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Sample records for stenting trial protocol

  1. Drug-eluting or bare-metal stents for large coronary vessel stenting? The BASKET-PROVE (PROspective Validation Examination) trial: Study protocol and design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfisterer, M.; Bertel, O.; Bonetti, P.O.

    2008-01-01

    or refute this hypothesis, we set up an 11-center 4-country prospective trial of 2260 consecutive patients treated with >= 3.0-mm stents only, randomized to receive Cypher (Johnson & Johnson, Miami Lakes, FL), Vision (Abbott Vascular, Abbott Laboratories, IL), or Xience stents (Abbott Vascular). Only...

  2. Study design and rationale of the 'Balloon-Expandable Cobalt Chromium SCUBA Stent versus Self-Expandable COMPLETE-SE Nitinol Stent for the Atherosclerotic ILIAC Arterial Disease (SENS-ILIAC Trial) Trial': study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woong Gil; Rha, Seung Woon; Choi, Cheol Ung; Kim, Eung Ju; Oh, Dong Joo; Cho, Yoon Hyung; Park, Sang Ho; Lee, Seung Jin; Hur, Ae Yong; Ko, Young Guk; Park, Sang Min; Kim, Ki Chang; Kim, Joo Han; Kim, Min Woong; Kim, Sang Min; Bae, Jang Ho; Bong, Jung Min; Kang, Won Yu; Seo, Jae Bin; Jung, Woo Yong; Cho, Jang Hyun; Kim, Do Hoi; Ahn, Ji Hoon; Kim, Soo Hyun; Jang, Ji Yong

    2016-06-25

    The self-expandable COMPLETE™ stent (Medtronic) has greater elasticity, allowing it to regain its shape after the compression force reduces, and has higher trackability, thus is easier to maneuver through tortuous vessels, whereas the balloon-expandable SCUBA™ stent (Medtronic) has higher radial stiffness and can afford more accurate placement without geographic miss, which is important in aortoiliac bifurcation lesions. To date, there have been no randomized control trials comparing efficacy and safety between the self-expanding stent and balloon-expandable stent in advanced atherosclerotic iliac artery disease. The purpose of our study is to examine primary patency (efficacy) and incidence of stent fracture and geographic miss (safety) between two different major representative stents, the self-expanding nitinol stent (COMPLETE-SE™) and the balloon-expanding cobalt-chromium stent (SCUBA™), in stenotic or occlusive iliac arterial lesions. This trial is designed as a prospective, randomized, multicenter trial to demonstrate a noninferiority of SCUBA™ stent to COMPLETE-SE™ stent following balloon angioplasty in iliac arterial lesions, and a total of 280 patients will be enrolled. The primary end point of this study is the rate of primary patency in the treated segment at 12 months after intervention as determined by catheter angiography, computed tomography angiography, or duplex ultrasound. The SENS-ILIAC trial will give powerful insight into whether the stent choice according to deployment mechanics would impact stent patency, geographic miss, or stent fracture in patients undergoing stent implantation in iliac artery lesions. National Institutes of Health Clinical Trials Registry (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01834495 ), registration date: May 8, 2012.

  3. Palliative radiotherapy in addition to self-expanding metal stent for improving dysphagia and survival in advanced oesophageal cancer (ROCS: Radiotherapy after Oesophageal Cancer Stenting): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Douglas; Blazeby, Jane; Nelson, Annmarie; Hurt, Chris; Nixon, Lisette; Fitzgibbon, Jim; Crosby, Tom; Staffurth, John; Evans, Mim; Kelly, Noreen Hopewell; Cohen, David; Griffiths, Gareth; Byrne, Anthony

    2014-10-22

    The single most distressing symptom for patients with advanced esophageal cancer is dysphagia. Amongst the more effective treatments for relief of dysphagia is insertion of a self-expanding metal stent (SEMS). It is possible that the addition of a palliative dose of external beam radiotherapy may prolong the relief of dysphagia and provide additional survival benefit. The ROCS trial will assess the effect of adding palliative radiotherapy after esophageal stent insertion. The study is a randomized multicenter phase III trial, with an internal pilot phase, comparing stent alone versus stent plus palliative radiotherapy in patients with incurable esophageal cancer. Eligible participants are those with advanced esophageal cancer who are in need of stent insertion for primary management of dysphagia. Radiotherapy will be administered as 20 Gray (Gy) in five fractions over one week or 30 Gy in 10 fractions over two weeks, within four weeks of stent insertion. The internal pilot will assess rates and methods of recruitment; pre-agreed criteria will determine progression to the main trial. In total, 496 patients will be randomized in a 1:1 ratio with follow up until death. The primary outcome is time to progression of patient-reported dysphagia. Secondary outcomes include survival, toxicity, health resource utilization, and quality of life. An embedded qualitative study will explore the feasibility of patient recruitment by examining patients' motivations for involvement and their experiences of consent and recruitment, including reasons for not consenting. It will also explore patients' experiences of each trial arm. The ROCS study will be a challenging trial studying palliation in patients with a poor prognosis. The internal pilot design will optimize methods for recruitment and data collection to ensure that the main trial is completed on time. As a pragmatic trial, study strengths include collection of all follow-up data in the usual place of care, and a focus on

  4. The 'Harmonizing Optimal Strategy for Treatment of coronary artery stenosis - sAfety & effectiveneSS of drug-elUting stents & antiplatelet REgimen' (HOST-ASSURE trial: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Kyung

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Second-generation drug-eluting stents (DES have raised the bar of clinical performance. These stents are mostly made from cobalt chromium alloy. A newer generation DES has been developed from platinum chromium alloy, but clinical data regarding the efficacy and safety of the platinum chromium-based everolimus-eluting stent (PtCr-EES is limited, with no comparison data against the cobalt chromium-based zotarolimus-eluting stent (CoCr-ZES. In addition, an antiplatelet regimen is an integral component of medical therapy after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI. A 1-week duration of doubling the dose of clopidogrel (double-dose antiplatelet therapy (DDAT was shown to improve outcome at 1 month compared with conventional dose in acute coronary syndrome (ACS patients undergoing PCI. However in Asia, including Korea, the addition of cilostazol (triplet antiplatelet therapy (TAT is used more commonly than doubling the dose of clopidogrel in high-risk patients. Methods In the 'Harmonizing Optimal Strategy for Treatment of coronary artery stenosis - sAfety & effectiveneSS of drug-elUting stents & antiplatelet REgimen' (HOST-ASSURE trial, approximately 3,750 patients are being prospectively and randomly assigned in a 2 × 2 factorial design according to the type of stent (PtCr-EES vs CoCr-ZES and antiplatelet regimen (TAT vs DDAT. The first primary endpoint is target lesion failure at 1 year for the stent comparison, and the second primary endpoint is net clinical outcome at 1 month for comparison of antiplatelet therapy regimen. Discussion The HOST-ASSURE trial is the largest study yet performed to directly compare the efficacy and safety of the PtCr-EES versus CoCr-ZES in an 'all-comers' population. In addition, this study will also compare the clinical outcome of TAT versus DDAT for 1-month post PCI. Trial registration ClincalTrials.gov number NCT01267734.

  5. Dutch iliac stent trial : Long-term results in patients randomized for primary or selective stent placement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, W.M.; van der Graaf, Y.; Seegers, J.; Spithoven, J.H.; Buskens, E.; van Baal, J.G.; Buth, J.; Moll, F.L.; Overtoom, T.T.C.; van Sambeek, M.R.H.M.; Mali, W.P.T.M.

    Purpose: To determine long-term results of the prospective Dutch Iliac Stent Trial. Materials and Methods: The study protocol was approved by local institutional review boards. All patients gave written informed consent. Two hundred seventy-nine patients (201 men, 78 women; mean age, 58 years) with

  6. The study protocol for a non-randomized controlled clinical trial using a genotype-guided strategy in a dataset of patients who undergone percutaneous coronary intervention with stent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Lucía Dávila-Fajardo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This article contains data related to the research article entitled “Results of genotype–guided antiplatelet therapy in patients undergone percutaneous coronary intervention with stent” (J. Sánchez-Ramos, C.L. Dávila-Fajardo, P. Toledo Frías, X. Díaz Villamarín, L.J. Martínez-González, S. Martínez Huertas, F. Burillo Gómez, J. Caballero Borrego, A. Bautista Pavés, M.C. Marín Guzmán, J.A. Ramirez Hernández, C. Correa Vilches, J. Cabeza Barrera, 2016 (1. This data article reports, for the first time, about the non-randomized clinical trial protocol that check if CYP2C19/ABCB1 genotype–guided strategy in which the choice of antiplatelet therapy is based on the genetic test, reduces the rates of cardiovascular events and bleeding compared to a non-tailored strategy in patients undergone percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI with stent. The data included in this article are: design and setting of the study, study population, inclusion and exclusion criteria, definition of the intervention, objectives, variables (baseline characteristics and during the follow-up, study procedures, collection and treatment of the biological sample, genotyping, withdrawal criteria, sample size, statistic analysis, ethical aspects, information sheet and consent form. The authors confirm that this study has been registered in Eudra CT (Eudra CT: 2016-001294-33.

  7. Endeavour zotarolimus-eluting stent reduces stent thrombosis and improves clinical outcomes compared with cypher sirolimus-eluting stent : 4-year results of the PROTECT randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijns, William; Steg, Ph. Gabriel; Mauri, Laura; Kurowski, Volkhard; Parikh, Keyur; Gao, Runlin; Bode, Christoph; Greenwood, John P.; Lipsic, Erik; Alamgir, Farqad; Rademaker-Havinga, Tessa; Boersma, Eric; Radke, Peter; van Leeuwen, Frank; Camenzind, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    Aims To compare the long-term clinical safety between two drug-eluting stents with different healing characteristics in the Patient Related Outcomes with Endeavour (E-ZES) vs. Cypher (C-SES) Stenting Trial (PROTECT). At 3 years, there was no difference in the primary outcome of definite or probable

  8. Carotid artery stenting compared with endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis (International Carotid Stenting Study): an interim analysis of a randomised controlled trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ederle, Jörg

    2010-03-20

    Stents are an alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis, but previous trials have not established equivalent safety and efficacy. We compared the safety of carotid artery stenting with that of carotid endarterectomy.

  9. Carotid artery stenting compared with endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis (International Carotid Stenting Study): an interim analysis of a randomised controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ederle, J.; Dobson, J.; Featherstone, R.L.; Bonati, L.H.; Worp, H.B. van der; Borst, G.J. de; Lo, T.H.; Gaines, P.; Dorman, P.J.; Macdonald, S.; Lyrer, P.A.; Hendriks, J.M.; McCollum, C.; Nederkoorn, P.J.; Brown, M.M.; Blankensteijn, J.D.; Leeuw, F.E. de; Schultze Kool, L.J.; Vliet, J.A. van der; et al.,

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stents are an alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis, but previous trials have not established equivalent safety and efficacy. We compared the safety of carotid artery stenting with that of carotid endarterectomy. METHODS: The International

  10. Carotid artery stenting compared with endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis (International Carotid Stenting Study): an interim analysis of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ederle, Jörg; Dobson, Joanna; Featherstone, Roland L.; Bonati, Leo H.; van der Worp, H. Bart; de Borst, Gert J.; Lo, T. Hauw; Gaines, Peter; Dorman, Paul J.; Macdonald, Sumaira; Lyrer, Philippe A.; Hendriks, Johanna M.; McCollum, Charles; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; Brown, Martin M.; Algra, A.; Bamford, J.; Beard, J.; Bland, M.; Bradbury, A. W.; Brown, M. M.; Clifton, A.; Gaines, P.; Collins, R.; Molyneux, A.; Naylor, R.; Warlow, C.; Ferro, J. M.; Thomas, D.; Bonati, L. H.; Coward, L.; Dobson, J.; Ederle, J.; Featherstone, R. F.; Tindall, H.; McCabe, D. J. H.; Wallis, A.; Brooks, M.; Chambers, B.; Chan, A.; Chu, P.; Clark, D.; Dewey, H.; Donnan, G.; Fell, G.; Hoare, M.; Molan, M.; Roberts, A.; Roberts, N.; Beiles, B.; Bladin, C.; Clifford, C.; Grigg, M.; New, G.; Bell, R.; Bower, S.; Chong, W.; Holt, M.; Saunder, A.; Than, P. G.; Gett, S.; Leggett, D.; McGahan, T.; Quinn, J.; Ray, M.; Wong, A.; Woodruff, P.; Foreman, R.; Schultz, D.; Scroop, R.; Stanley, B.; Allard, B.; Atkinson, N.; Cambell, W.; Davies, S.; Field, P.; Milne, P.; Mitchell, P.; Tress, B.; Yan, B.; Beasley, A.; Dunbabin, D.; Stary, D.; Walker, S.; Cras, P.; d'Archambeau, O.; Hendriks, J. M. H.; van Schil, P.; St Blasius, A. Z.; Bosiers, M.; Deloose, K.; van Buggenhout, E.; de Letter, J.; Devos, V.; Ghekiere, J.; Vanhooren, G.; Astarci, P.; Hammer, F.; Lacroix, V.; Peeters, A.; Verbist, J.; Blair, J.-F.; Caron, J. L.; Daneault, N.; Giroux, M.-F.; Guilbert, F.; Lanthier, S.; Lebrun, L.-H.; Oliva, V.; Raymond, J.; Roy, D.; Soulez, G.; Weill, A.; Hill, M.; Hu, W.; Hudion, M.; Morrish, W.; Sutherland, G.; Wong, J.; Albäck, A.; Harno, H.; Ijäs, P.; Kaste, M.; Lepäntalo, M.; Mustanoja, S.; Paananen, T.; Porras, M.; Putaala, J.; Railo, M.; Sairanen, T.; Soinne, L.; Vehmas, A.; Vikatmaa, P.; Goertler, M.; Halloul, Z.; Skalej, M.; Brennan, P.; Kelly, C.; Leahy, A.; Moroney, J.; Thornton, J.; Koelemay, M. J. W.; Reekers, J. A. A.; Roos, Y. B. W. E. M.; Hendriks, J. M.; Koudstaal, P. J.; Pattynama, P. M. T.; van der Lugt, A.; van Dijk, L. C.; van Sambeek, M. R. H. M.; van Urk, H.; Verhagen, H. J. M.; Bruijninckx, C. M. A.; de Bruijn, S. F.; Keunen, R.; Knippenberg, B.; Mosch, A.; Treurniet, F.; van Dijk, L.; van Overhagen, H.; Wever, J.; de Beer, F. C.; van den Berg, J. S. P.; van Hasselt, B. A. A. M.; Zeilstra, D. J.; Boiten, J.; van Otterloo, J. C. A. de Mol; de Vries, A. C.; Lycklama a Nijeholt, G. J.; van der Kallen, B. F. W.; Blankensteijn, J. D.; de Leeuw, F. E.; Kool, L. J. Schultze; van der Vliet, J. A.; de Borst, G. J.; de Kort, G. A. P.; Kapelle, L. J.; Lo, T. H.; Mali, W. P. Th M.; Moll, F.; van der Worp, H. B.; Verhagen, H.; Barber, P. A.; Bourchier, R.; Hill, A.; Holden, A.; Stewart, J.; Bakke, S. J.; Krohg-Sørensen, K.; Skjelland, M.; Tennøe, B.; Bialek, P.; Biejat, Z.; Czepiel, W.; Czlonkowska, A.; Dowzenko, A.; Jedrzejewska, J.; Kobayashi, A.; Lelek, M.; Polanski, J.; Kirbis, J.; Milosevic, Z.; Zvan, B.; Blasco, J.; Chamorro, A.; Macho, J.; Obach, V.; Riambau, V.; San Roman, L.; Branera, J.; Canovas, D.; Estela, Jordi; Gaibar, A. Gimenez; Perendreu, J.; Björses, K.; Gottsater, A.; Ivancev, K.; Maetzsch, T.; Sonesson, B.; Berg, B.; Delle, M.; Formgren, J.; Gillgren, P.; Kall, T.-B.; Konrad, P.; Nyman, N.; Takolander, R.; Andersson, T.; Malmstedt, J.; Soderman, M.; Wahlgren, C.; Wahlgren, N.; Binaghi, S.; Hirt, L.; Michel, P.; Ruchat, P.; Engelter, S. T.; Fluri, F.; Guerke, L.; Jacob, A. L.; Kirsch, E.; Lyrer, P. A.; Radue, E.-W.; Stierli, P.; Wasner, M.; Wetzel, S.; Bonvin, C.; Kalangos, A.; Lovblad, K.; Murith, M.; Ruefenacht, D.; Sztajzel, R.; Higgins, N.; Kirkpatrick, P. J.; Martin, P.; Varty, K.; Adam, D.; Bell, J.; Crowe, P.; Gannon, M.; Henderson, M. J.; Sandler, D.; Shinton, R. A.; Scriven, J. M.; Wilmink, T.; D'Souza, S.; Egun, A.; Guta, R.; Punekar, S.; Seriki, D. M.; Thomson, G.; Brennan, J. A.; Enevoldson, T. P.; Gilling-Smith, G.; Gould, D. A.; Harris, P. L.; McWilliams, R. G.; Nasser, H.-C.; White, R.; Prakash, K. G.; Serracino-Inglott, F.; Subramanian, G.; Symth, J. V.; Walker, M. G.; Clarke, M.; Davis, M.; Dixit, S. A.; Dorman, P.; Dyker, A.; Ford, G.; Golkar, A.; Jackson, R.; Jayakrishnan, V.; Lambert, D.; Lees, T.; Louw, S.; Macdonald, S.; Mendelow, A. D.; Rodgers, H.; Rose, J.; Stansby, G.; Wyatt, M.; Baker, T.; Baldwin, N.; Jones, L.; Mitchell, D.; Munro, E.; Thornton, M.; Baker, D.; Davis, N.; Hamilton, G.; McCabe, D.; Platts, A.; Tibballs, J.; Cleveland, T.; Dodd, D.; Lonsdale, R.; Nair, R.; Nassef, A.; Nawaz, S.; Venables, G.; Belli, A.; Cloud, G.; Halliday, A.; Markus, H.; McFarland, R.; Morgan, R.; Pereira, A.; Thompson, A.; Chataway, J.; Cheshire, N.; Gibbs, R.; Hammady, M.; Jenkins, M.; Malik, I.; Wolfe, J.; Adiseshiah, M.; Bishop, C.; Brew, S.; Brookes, J.; Jäger, R.; Kitchen, N.; Ashleigh, R.; Butterfield, S.; Gamble, G. E.; McCollum, C.; Nasim, A.; O'Neill, P.; Edwards, R. D.; Lees, K. R.; MacKay, A. J.; Moss, J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stents are an alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis, but previous trials have not established equivalent safety and efficacy. We compared the safety of carotid artery stenting with that of carotid endarterectomy. METHODS: The International

  11. Carotid artery stenting compared with endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis (International Carotid Stenting Study) : an interim analysis of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ederle, Joerg; Dobson, Joanna; Featherstone, Roland L.; Bonati, Leo H.; van der Worp, H. Bart; de Borst, Gert J.; Lo, T. Hauw; Gaines, Peter; Dorman, Paul J.; Macdonald, Sumaira; Lyrer, Philippe A.; Hendriks, Johanna M.; McCollum, Charles; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; Brown, Martin M.; Algra, A.; Bamford, J.; Beard, J.; Bland, M.; Bradbury, A. W.; Brown, M. M.; Clifton, A.; Gaines, P.; Hacke, W.; Halliday, A.; Malik, I.; Mas, J. L.; McGuire, A. J.; Sidhu, P.; Venables, G.; Bradbury, A.; Brown, M. M.; Clifton, A.; Gaines, P.; Collins, R.; Molynewc, A.; Naylor, R.; Warlow, C.; Ferro, J. M.; Thomas, D.; Bonati, L. H.; Coward, L.; Dobson, J.; Ederle, J.; Featherstone, R. F.; Tindall, H.; McCabe, D. J. H.; Wallis, A.; Hendriks, J. M. H.; Hendriks, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Stents are an alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis, but previous trials have not established equivalent safety and efficacy. We compared the safety of carotid artery stenting with that of carotid endarterectomy. Methods The International Carotid

  12. Comparison of paclitaxel- and sirolimus-eluting stents in everyday clinical practice: the SORT OUT II randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galløe, Anders M; Thuesen, Leif; Kelbaek, Henning

    2008-01-01

    Approval of drug-eluting coronary stents was based on results of relatively small trials of selected patients; however, in routine practice, stents are used in a broader spectrum of patients.......Approval of drug-eluting coronary stents was based on results of relatively small trials of selected patients; however, in routine practice, stents are used in a broader spectrum of patients....

  13. Stent

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Stent URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002303.htm Stent To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A stent is a tiny tube placed into a hollow structure in your ...

  14. Restenosis after carotid artery stenting and endarterectomy: a secondary analysis of CREST, a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Brajesh K; Beach, Kirk W; Roubin, Gary S; Lutsep, Helmi L; Moore, Wesley S; Malas, Mahmoud B; Chiu, David; Gonzales, Nicole R; Burke, J Lee; Rinaldi, Michael; Elmore, James R; Weaver, Fred A; Narins, Craig R; Foster, Malcolm; Hodgson, Kim J; Shepard, Alexander D; Meschia, James F; Bergelin, Robert O; Voeks, Jenifer H; Howard, George; Brott, Thomas G

    2012-09-01

    In the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy versus Stenting Trial (CREST), the composite primary endpoint of stroke, myocardial infarction, or death during the periprocedural period or ipsilateral stroke thereafter did not differ between carotid artery stenting and carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic or asymptomatic carotid stenosis. A secondary aim of this randomised trial was to compare the composite endpoint of restenosis or occlusion. Patients with stenosis of the carotid artery who were asymptomatic or had had a transient ischaemic attack, amaurosis fugax, or a minor stroke were eligible for CREST and were enrolled at 117 clinical centres in the USA and Canada between Dec 21, 2000, and July 18, 2008. In this secondary analysis, the main endpoint was a composite of restenosis or occlusion at 2 years. Restenosis and occlusion were assessed by duplex ultrasonography at 1, 6, 12, 24, and 48 months and were defined as a reduction in diameter of the target artery of at least 70%, diagnosed by a peak systolic velocity of at least 3·0 m/s. Studies were done in CREST-certified laboratories and interpreted at the Ultrasound Core Laboratory (University of Washington). The frequency of restenosis was calculated by Kaplan-Meier survival estimates and was compared during a 2-year follow-up period. We used proportional hazards models to assess the association between baseline characteristics and risk of restenosis. Analyses were per protocol. CREST is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00004732. 2191 patients received their assigned treatment within 30 days of randomisation and had eligible ultrasonography (1086 who had carotid artery stenting, 1105 who had carotid endarterectomy). In 2 years, 58 patients who underwent carotid artery stenting (Kaplan-Meier rate 6·0%) and 62 who had carotid endarterectomy (6·3%) had restenosis or occlusion (hazard ratio [HR] 0·90, 95% CI 0·63-1·29; p=0·58). Female sex (1·79, 1·25-2·56), diabetes (2·31, 1·61-3·31

  15. Stent Thrombosis With Drug-Eluting Stents and Bioresorbable Scaffolds: Evidence From a Network Meta-Analysis of 147 Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Si-Hyuck; Chae, In-Ho; Park, Jin-Joo; Lee, Hak Seung; Kang, Do-Yoon; Hwang, Seung-Sik; Youn, Tae-Jin; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2016-06-27

    This study sought to perform a systematic review and network meta-analysis to compare the relative safety and efficacy of contemporary DES and BVS. To improve outcomes of patients undergoing percutaneous coronary revascularization, there have been advances in the design of drug-eluting stents (DES), including the development of drug-eluting bioresorbable vascular scaffolds (BVS). Prospective, randomized, controlled trials comparing bare-metal stents (BMS), paclitaxel-eluting stents (PES), sirolimus-eluting stents (SES), Endeavor zotarolimus-eluting stents (E-ZES), cobalt-chromium (CoCr) everolimus-eluting stents (EES), platinum-chromium (PtCr)-EES, biodegradable polymer (BP)-EES, Resolute zotarolimus-eluting stents (R-ZES), BP biolimus-eluting stents (BP-BES), hybrid sirolimus-eluting stents (H [Orsiro]-SES), polymer-free sirolimus- and probucol-eluting stents, or BVS were searched in online databases. The primary endpoint was definite or probable stent thrombosis at 1 year. A total of 147 trials including 126,526 patients were analyzed in this study. All contemporary DES were superior to BMS and PES in terms of definite or probable stent thrombosis at 1 year. CoCr-EES, PtCr-EES, and H-SES were associated with significantly lower risk than BVS. CoCr-EES and H-SES were superior to SES and BP-BES. The risk of myocardial infarction was significantly lower with H-SES than with BVS. There were no significant differences regarding all-cause or cardiac mortality. Contemporary devices including BVS showed comparably low risks of repeat revascularization. Contemporary DES, including biocompatible DP-DES, BP-DES, and polymer-free DES, showed a low risk of definite or probable stent thrombosis at 1 year. BVS had an increased risk of device thrombosis compared with CoCr-EES, PtCr-EES, and H-SES. Data from extended follow-up are warranted to confirm the long-term safety of contemporary coronary devices. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by

  16. Low-profile stent system for treatment of atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis : The GREAT trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapoval, Marc; Zahringer, Markus; Pattynama, Peter; Rabbia, Claudio; Vignali, Claudio; Maleux, Geert; Boyer, Louis; Szczerbo-Trojanowska, Malgorzata; Jaschke, Werner; Hafsahl, Geir; Downes, Mark; Beregi, Jean Paul; Veeger, Nic; Talen, Aly

    PURPOSE: The Palmaz Genesis Peripheral Stainless Steel Balloon Expandable Stent in Renal Artery Treatment (GREAT) Trial was designed to assess the safety and performance of a low-profile stent for the treatment of obstructive renal artery disease by looking at 6-month renal artery patency uniformly

  17. Metallic Limus-Eluting Stents Abluminally Coated with Biodegradable Polymers: Angiographic and Clinical Comparison of a Novel Ultra-Thin Sirolimus Stent Versus Biolimus Stent in the DESTINY Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Pedro A; Abizaid, Alexandre A C; Meireles, George C; Sarmento-Leite, Rogério; Prudente, Mauricio; Cantarelli, Marcelo; Dourado, Adriano D; Mariani, Jose; Perin, Marco A; Costantini, Costantino; Costa, Ricardo A; Costa, José Ribamar; Chamie, Daniel; Campos, Carlos A; Ribeiro, Expedito

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the outcomes of patients treated with a new drug-eluting stent formulation with low doses of sirolimus, built in an ultra-thin-strut platform coated with biodegradable abluminal coating. This study is a randomized trial that tested the main hypothesis that the angiographic late lumen loss of the novel sirolimus-eluting stent is noninferior compared with commercially available biolimus-eluting stent. A final study population comprising 170 patients with one or two de novo lesions was randomized in the ratio 2:1 for sirolimus-eluting stent or biolimus-eluting stent, respectively. The primary endpoint was 9-month angiographic in-stent late lumen loss. Adverse clinical events were prospectively collected for 1 year. After 9 months, the novel sirolimus-eluting stent was shown noninferior compared with the biolimus stent for the primary endpoint (angiographic in-stent late lumen loss: 0.20 ± 0.29 mm vs. 0.15 ± 0.20 mm, respectively; P value for noninferiority <0.001). The 1-year incidence of death, myocardial infarction, repeat revascularization, and stent thrombosis remained low and not significantly different between the groups. The present randomized trial demonstrates that the tested novel sirolimus-eluting stent was angiographically noninferior in comparison with a last-generation biolimus-eluting stent. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Very late stent thrombosis with second generation drug eluting stents compared to bare metal stents: Network meta-analysis of randomized primary percutaneous coronary intervention trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Femi; Stewart, Susan; Southard, Jeffrey A

    2016-07-01

    The relative safety of drug-eluting stents (DES) and bare-metal stents (BMS) in primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) in ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) continues to be debated. The long-term clinical outcomes between second generation DES and BMS for primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) using network meta-analysis were compared. Randomized controlled trials comparing stent types (first generation DES, second generation DES, or BMS) were considered for inclusion. A search strategy used Medline, Embase, Cochrane databases, and proceedings of international meetings. Information about study design, inclusion criteria, and sample characteristics were extracted. Network meta-analysis was used to pool direct (comparison of second generation DES to BMS) and indirect evidence (first generation DES with BMS and second generation DES) from the randomized trials. Twelve trials comparing all stents types including 9,673 patients randomly assigned to treatment groups were analyzed. Second generation DES was associated with significantly lower incidence of definite or probable ST (OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.39-0.89), MI (OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.39-0.89), and TVR at 3 years (OR 0.50: 95% CI 0.31-0.81) compared with BMS. In addition, there was a significantly lower incidence of MACE with second generation DES versus BMS (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.34-0.74) at 3 years. These were driven by a higher rate of TVR, MI and stent thrombosis in the BMS group at 3 years. There was a non-significant reduction in the overall and cardiac mortality [OR 0.83, 95% CI (0.60-1.14), OR 0.88, 95% CI (0.6-1.28)] with the use of second generation DES versus BMS at 3 years. Network meta-analysis of randomized trials of primary PCI demonstrated lower incidence of MACE, MI, TVR, and stent thrombosis with second generation DES compared with BMS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Impact of polymer formulations on neointimal proliferation after zotarolimus-eluting stent with different polymers: insights from the RESOLUTE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waseda, Katsuhisa; Ako, Junya; Yamasaki, Masao; Koizumi, Tomomi; Sakurai, Ryota; Hongo, Yoichiro; Koo, Bon-Kwon; Ormiston, John; Worthley, Stephen G; Whitbourn, Robert J; Walters, Darren L; Meredith, Ian T; Fitzgerald, Peter J; Honda, Yasuhiro

    2011-06-01

    Polymer formulation may affect the efficacy of drug-eluting stents. Resolute, Endeavor, and ZoMaxx are zotarolimus-eluting stents with different stent platforms and different polymer coatings and have been tested in clinical trials. The aim of this analysis was to compare the efficacy of zotarolimus-eluting stents with different polymers. Data were obtained from the first-in man trial or first randomized trials of each stent, The Clinical RESpOnse EvaLUation of the MedTronic Endeavor CR ABT-578 Eluting Coronary Stent System in De Novo Native Coronary Artery Lesions (RESOLUTE), Randomized Controlled Trial to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of the Medtronic AVE ABT-578 Eluting Driver Coronary Stent in De Novo Native Coronary Artery Lesions (ENDEAVOR II), and ZoMaxx I trials. Follow-up intravascular ultrasound analyses (8 to 9 months of follow-up) were possible in 353 patients (Resolute: 88, Endeavor: 98, ZoMaxx: 82, Driver: 85). Volume index (volume/stent length) was obtained for vessel, stent, lumen, peristent plaque, and neointima. Cross-sectional narrowing was defined as neointimal area divided by stent area (%). Neointima-free frame ratio was calculated as the number of frames without intravascular ultrasound-detectable neointima divided by the total number of frames within the stent. At baseline, vessel, lumen, and peristent plaque volume index were not significantly different among the 4 stent groups. At follow-up, percent neointimal obstruction was significantly lower in Resolute compared with Endeavor, ZoMaxx, and Driver (Resolute: 3.7±4.0, Endeavor: 17.5±10.1, ZoMaxx: 14.6±8.1, Driver: 29.4±17.2%; Ppolymer used in Resolute independently correlated with neointimal suppression among 3 zotarolimus-eluting stents. The different polymer formulations significantly affect the relative amount of neointima for zotarolimus-eluting stents. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00248079.

  20. The INNOVATION Trial: four-year safety and effectiveness of the INCRAFT® AAA Stent-Graft System for endovascular repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratesi, Giovanni; Pratesi, Carlo; Chiesa, Roberto; Coppi, Gioacchino; Scheinert, Dierk; Brunkwall, Jan S; van der Meulen, Stefaan; Torsello, Giovanni

    2017-10-01

    This paper reports the 4-year safety and effectiveness of the INCRAFT® AAA Stent-Graft System (Cordis Corp., Milpitas, CA, USA), an ultra-low-profile device for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms. The INNOVATION Trial is the prospective, first-in-human, multicenter trial to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the INCRAFT® System. Patients underwent annual clinical and computed tomography angiography examination as part of the study protocol. The INCRAFT® AAA Stent-Graft System is a customizable tri-modular design, with an ultra-low profile (14-Fr) delivery system. Patient were treated under approved protocol, the prescribed clinical and imaging follow-up at annually through 5 years. Results analyzed and adjudicated by a clinical events committee, independent core laboratory, and a data safety and monitoring board. This manuscript reports results through 4 years of follow-up. A total of 60 patients were enrolled in the trial, all of whom were successfully treated. Follow-up rates at 1 and 4 years were 93% (56/60) and 85% (51/60), respectively. All-cause mortality at 4 years was 17.6% and no death was AAA-, device-, or procedure-related. The secondary reintervention rate at 1 year was 4.6%, primarily the result of stent thrombosis. In total, 10 patients required 13 post-procedure interventions within 4-years of follow-up (2 to repair a type I endoleak, 4 to repair a type II endoleak, 1 for stent thrombosis, 1 for renal stenosis, 1 for aneurysm enlargement, 2 for limb migration and 2 for prosthesis stenosis or occlusion). There were 4 cases (10%) of aneurysm enlargement reported at the 4 year follow-up. At 4 years, 38 out of 39 patients were free from type I and III endoleaks. There were no proximal type I or type III endoleaks at 4-year follow-up. Core laboratory evaluation of the postoperative imaging studies indicated absence of endograft migration while a single fracture was demonstrated without any clinical sequelae. The INCRAFT® AAA Stent

  1. Bioresorbable Polymer-Coated Orsiro Versus Durable Polymer-Coated Resolute Onyx Stents (BIONYX) : Rationale and design of the randomized TWENTE IV multicenter trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Liefke C.; Kok, Marlies M.; Zocca, Paolo; Jessurun, Gillian A.J.; Schotborgh, Carl E.; Roguin, Ariel; Benit, Edouard; Aminian, Adel; Danse, Peter W.; Löwik, Marije M.; Linssen, Gerard C.M.; van der Palen, Job; Doggen, Carine J.M.; von Birgelen, Clemens

    2018-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to compare in a noninferiority trial the efficacy and safety of 2 contemporary drug-eluting stents (DESs): a novel, durable polymer-coated stent versus an established bioabsorbable polymer-coated stent. Methods and results: The BIONYX trial (ClinicalTrials.gov-no.NCT02508714) is an

  2. SPIRIT 2013 Statement: defining standard protocol items for clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, An-Wen; Tetzlaff, Jennifer M; Altman, Douglas G; Laupacis, Andreas; Gøtzsche, Peter C; Krle A-Jerić, Karmela; Hrobjartsson, Asbjørn; Mann, Howard; Dickersin, Kay; Berlin, Jesse A; Dore, Caroline J; Parulekar, Wendy R; Summerskill, William S M; Groves, Trish; Schulz, Kenneth F; Sox, Harold C; Rockhold, Frank W; Rennie, Drummond; Moher, David

    2015-12-01

    The protocol of a clinical trial serves as the foundation for study planning, conduct, reporting, and appraisal. However, trial protocols and existing protocol guidelines vary greatly in content and quality. This article describes the systematic development and scope of SPIRIT (Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Interventional Trials) 2013, a guideline for the minimum content of a clinical trial protocol. The 33-item SPIRIT checklist applies to protocols for all clinical trials and focuses on content rather than format. The checklist recommends a full description of what is planned; it does not prescribe how to design or conduct a trial. By providing guidance for key content, the SPIRIT recommendations aim to facilitate the drafting of high-quality protocols. Adherence to SPIRIT would also enhance the transparency and completeness of trial protocols for the benefit of investigators, trial participants, patients, sponsors, funders, research ethics committees or institutional review boards, peer reviewers, journals, trial registries, policymakers, regulators, and other key stakeholders.

  3. Differentiated analysis of an everolimus-eluting stent and a paclitaxel-eluting stent among higher risk subgroups for restenosis: results from the SPIRIT II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattab, Ahmed A; Richardt, Gert; Verin, Vitali; Kelbaek, Henning; Macaya, Carlos; Berland, Jacques; Miquel-Hebert, Karine; Dorange, Cécile; Serruys, Patrick W

    2008-03-01

    Restenosis is higher among certain subpopulations when subjected to percutaneous coronary interventions even when using drug-eluting stents. The randomised SPIRIT II trial demonstrated the superiority of the XIENCE V Everolimus Eluting Coronary Stent System over the TAXUS Paclitaxel-Eluting Stent System in terms of in-stent late loss at six months among 300 patients treated for de novo native coronary artery lesions. In this post-hoc analysis of SPIRIT II we focused on six-month angiographic outcomes of diabetic patients (n=69), left anterior descending arteries (n=149), long lesions >20 mm (n=43), small vessels B2 and C lesions (n=233). In-stent late loss was consistently less among all subgroups when treated by everolimus-eluting stents compared to paclitaxel-eluting stents: diabetics 0.15+/-0.26 mm versus 0.39+/-0.34 mm, p=0.006; LAD 0.12+/-0.23 mm versus 0.44+/-0.37 mm, pB2/C lesions 0.12+/-0.31 mm versus 0.36+/-0.36 mm, pSPIRIT II trial population.

  4. Design of the exhale airway stents for emphysema (EASE) trial : an endoscopic procedure for reducing hyperinflation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shah, Pallav L.; Slebos, Dirk-Jan; Cardoso, Paulo F. G.; Cetti, Edward J.; Sybrecht, Gerhard W.; Cooper, Joel D.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Airway Bypass is a catheter-based, bronchoscopic procedure in which new passageways are created that bypass the collapsed airways, enabling trapped air to exit the lungs. The Exhale Airway Stents for Emphysema (EASE) Trial was designed to investigate whether Exhale (R) Drug-Eluting

  5. Trial of self-expandable metallic stents in the palliation of tracheo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trial of self-expandable metallic stents in the palliation of tracheo-oesophageal fistula in carcinoma of the oesophagus. ... Over half of the patients in the TOF group had concomitant pneumonia at presentation with decreased survival (p = 0.010) and a hazard ratio of 10.86. Two patients died, on days 4 and 7 respectively.

  6. Sustained Benefit at 2 Years for Covered Stents Versus Bare-Metal Stents in Long SFA Lesions: The VIASTAR Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lammer, Johannes, E-mail: jlammer@gmx.at, E-mail: johannes.lammer@meduniwien.ac.at [Medical University Vienna, The Department of Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy (Austria); Zeller, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.zeller@universitaets-herzzentrum.de [Universitaets-Herzzentrum Freiburg-Bad Krozingen, Department of Angiology (Germany); Hausegger, Klaus A., E-mail: klaus.hausegger@lkh-klu.at [Klinikum Klagenfurt, The Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Austria); Schaefer, Philipp J., E-mail: jp.schaefer@rad.uni-kiel.de [University Clinics Schleswig-Holstein, The Department of Radiology (Germany); Gschwendtner, Manfred, E-mail: manfred.gschwendtner@elisabethinen.or.at [Elisabethinen Hospital, The Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Austria); Mueller-Huelsbeck, Stefan, E-mail: muehue@diako.de [Diakonissen Hospital, The Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Rand, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.rand@wienkav.at [Hietzing Hospital, The Department of Radiology (Austria); Funovics, Martin, E-mail: martin.funovics@meduniwien.ac.at; Wolf, Florian, E-mail: florian.wolf@meduniwien.ac.at [Medical University Vienna, The Department of Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy (Austria); Rastan, Aljoscha, E-mail: aljoscha.rastan@universitaets-herzzentrum.de [Universitaets-Herzzentrum Freiburg-Bad Krozingen, Department of Angiology (Germany); Gschwandtner, Michael, E-mail: michael.gschwandtner@meduniwien.ac.at [Medical University Vienna, The Department of Angiology (Austria); Puchner, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.puchner@meduniwien.ac.at [Medical University Vienna, The Department of Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy (Austria); and others

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThe hypothesis that covered stents are superior to bare-metal stents (BMS) in long femoropopliteal artery disease was tested. The one-year results of the VIASTAR trial revealed a patency benefit of covered stents in the treatment-per-protocol (TPP) analysis only.MethodsA prospective, randomized, single-blind, multicenter study evaluated 141 patients with symptomatic peripheral arterial disease (PAD) after treatment with heparin-bonded covered stents (VIABAHN{sup ®} Endoprosthesis) or BMS. Clinical outcomes and patency rates were assessed at 1, 6, 12, and 24 months. Mean lesion length was 19.0 ± 6.3 cm in the VIABAHN{sup ®} versus 17.3 ± 6.6 cm in the BMS group.ResultsThe 24-month primary patency rates in the VIABAHN{sup ®} and BMS group were: intention-to-treat 63.1 (95 % CI 0.52–0.76) versus 41.2 % (95 % CI 0.29–0.57; log rank p = 0.04) and TPP 69.4 (95 % CI 0.58–0.83) versus 40.0 % (95 % CI 0.28–0.56; log rank p = 0.004). Freedom from target-lesion-revascularization (TLR) was 79.4 (95 % CI 0.70–0.90) versus 73.0 % (95 % CI 0.63–0.85) for VIABAHN{sup ®} versus BMS (log rank p = 0.37). For the TPP group in lesions ≥20 cm, the 24-month patency rates were 65.2 (95 % CI 0.50–0.85) versus 26.7 % (95 % CI 0.12–0.59; log rank p = 0.004) for VIABAHN{sup ®} versus BMS, and freedom from TLR was 80.0 (95 % CI 0.68–0.94) versus 61.9 % (95 % CI 0.44–0.87; log rank p = 0.13). The ankle brachial index was 0.89 ± 0.18 versus 0.91 ± 0.17 (p = 0.76) at 24-month in the VIABAHN{sup ®} versus the BMS group, respectively.ConclusionAt 24-month, this trial in PAD patients with long femoropopliteal lesions demonstrated a significantly improved primary patency rate for heparin-bonded covered stents compared to BMS, however, without a significant impact on clinical outcomes and TLR rate (Reg. Nr. ISRCTN48164244)

  7. The Bolton Treovance abdominal stent-graft: European clinical trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesa, R; Riambau, V; Coppi, G; Zipfel, B; Llagostera, S; Marone, E M; Kahlberg, A

    2012-10-01

    Endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) has emerged as a promising, less invasive alternative to conventional open surgery for the treatment of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). In the last 20 years, the application rate of EVAR and its clinical results have significantly improved thanks to the evolution of stent-grafts and endovascular delivery systems. However, further development is still needed to reduce the incidence of complications and secondary re-interventions. The Treovance abdominal aortic stent-graft (Bolton Medical, Barcelona, Spain) is a new-generation endovascular device, developed to increase flexibility, lower profile, improve deployment and sealing mechanisms. In particular, it is provided with some innovative features as a double layer of proximal barbs (suprarenal and infrarenal) for supplemental fixation, dull barbs between modules to avoid potential leg disconnections, detachable outer sheath provided with a new-design hemostatic valve, and a double improved mechanism (slow motion and "pin and pull") for precise stent-graft deployment. A European prospective, non-randomized, multi-institutional, "first-in-human" trial (the ADVANCE trial) was conducted from March to December 2011 to assess the safety and performance of the Treovance stent-graft system before commercialization. Thirty patients with anatomically suitable non-ruptured AAAs were enrolled at five clinical sites in Italy, Spain, and Germany. EVAR was completed successfully in all patients. The stent-graft was delivered and deployed safely even in heavily angulated or calcified anatomies. No 30-day device-related complications nor deaths were observed. Preliminary experience with the Treovance abdominal stent-graft within the ADVANCE trial was satisfactory with regard to technical success and perioperative clinical results. Follow-up data are needed to assess mid- and long-term clinical outcomes, along with durability of this new-generation endovascular device.

  8. A sirolimus-eluting bioabsorbable polymer-coated stent (MiStent) versus an everolimus-eluting durable polymer stent (Xience) after percutaneous coronary intervention (DESSOLVE III): a randomised, single-blind, multicentre, non-inferiority, phase 3 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Winter, Robbert J; Katagiri, Yuki; Asano, Taku; Milewski, Krzysztof P; Lurz, Philipp; Buszman, Pawel; Jessurun, Gillian A J; Koch, Karel T; Troquay, Roland P T; Hamer, Bas J B; Ophuis, Ton Oude; Wöhrle, Jochen; Wyderka, Rafał; Cayla, Guillaume; Hofma, Sjoerd H; Levesque, Sébastien; Żurakowski, Aleksander; Fischer, Dieter; Kośmider, Maciej; Goube, Pascal; Arkenbout, E Karin; Noutsias, Michel; Ferrari, Markus W; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Wijns, William; Serruys, Patrick W

    2018-02-03

    MiStent is a drug-eluting stent with a fully absorbable polymer coating containing and embedding a microcrystalline form of sirolimus into the vessel wall. It was developed to overcome the limitation of current durable polymer drug-eluting stents eluting amorphous sirolimus. The clinical effect of MiStent sirolimus-eluting stent compared with a durable polymer drug-eluting stents has not been investigated in a large randomised trial in an all-comer population. We did a randomised, single-blind, multicentre, phase 3 study (DESSOLVE III) at 20 hospitals in Germany, France, Netherlands, and Poland. Eligible participants were any patients aged at least 18 years who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention in a lesion and had a reference vessel diameter of 2·50-3·75 mm. We randomly assigned patients (1:1) to implantation of either a sirolimus-eluting bioresorbable polymer stent (MiStent) or an everolimus-eluting durable polymer stent (Xience). Randomisation was done by local investigators via web-based software with random blocks according to centre. The primary endpoint was a non-inferiority comparison of a device-oriented composite endpoint (DOCE)-cardiac death, target-vessel myocardial infarction, or clinically indicated target lesion revascularisation-between the groups at 12 months after the procedure assessed by intention-to-treat. A margin of 4·0% was defined for non-inferiority of the MiStent group compared with the Xience group. All participants were included in the safety analyses. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02385279. Between March 20, and Dec 3, 2015, we randomly assigned 1398 patients with 2030 lesions; 703 patients with 1037 lesions were assigned to MiStent, of whom 697 received the index procedure, and 695 patients with 993 lesions were asssigned to Xience, of whom 690 received the index procedure. At 12 months, the primary endpoint had occurred in 40 patients (5·8%) in the sirolimus-eluting stent group and in 45

  9. A comparison of direct aspiration versus stent retriever as a first approach ('COMPASS'): protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Aquilla S; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Mocco, J

    2018-02-20

    Acute ischemic stroke is a potentially devastating condition and leading cause of morbidity and mortality, affecting an estimated 800 000 people per year in the USA. The natural history of untreated or unrevascularized large vessel occlusions in acute stroke patients results in mortality rates approaching 30%, with only 25% achieving good neurologic outcomes at 90 days. Recently, data have demonstrated that early endovascular recanalization of large vessel occlusions results in better outcomes than medical therapy alone. However, the majority of patients in these studies were treated with a stent retriever based approach. The purpose of COMPASS is to evaluate whether patients treated with a direct aspiration first pass (ADAPT) approach have non-inferior functional outcomes to those treated with a stent retriever as the firstline (SRFL) approach. All patients who meet the inclusion and exclusion criteria and consent to participate will be enrolled at participating centers. Treatment will be randomly assigned by a central web based system in a 1:1 manner to treatment with either ADAPT or SRFL thrombectomy. Statistical methodology is prespecified with details available in the statistical analysis plan. The trial recently completed enrollment, and data collection/verification is ongoing. The final results will be made available on completion of enrollment and follow-up. This paper details the design of the COMPASS trial, a randomized, blinded adjudicator, concurrent, controlled trial of patients treated with either ADAPT or SRFL approaches in order to evaluate whether ADAPT results in non-inferior functional outcome. NCT02466893, Results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Single-dose brachytherapy versus metal stent placement for the palliation of dysphagia from oesophageal cancer: multicentre randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homs, Marjolein Y. V.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Eijkenboom, Wilhelmina M. H.; Tilanus, Hugo W.; Stalpers, Lukas J. A.; Bartelsman, Joep F. W. M.; van Lanschot, Jan J. B.; Wijrdeman, Harm K.; Mulder, Chris J. J.; Reinders, Janny G.; Boot, Henk; Aleman, Berthe M. P.; Kuipers, Ernst J.; Siersema, Peter D.

    2004-01-01

    Background Both single-dose brachytherapy and self-expanding metal stent placement are commonly used for palliation of oesophageal obstruction due to inoperable cancer, but their relative merits are unknown. We under-took a randomised trial to compare the outcomes of brachytherapy and stent

  11. A randomized trial comparing primary angioplasty versus stent placement for symptomatic intracranial stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Adnan I; Chaudhry, Saqib A; Siddiq, Farhan; Majidi, Shahram; Rodriguez, Gustavo J; Suri, M Fareed K

    2013-01-01

    Background: Both primary angioplasty alone and angioplasty with a self-expanding stent have been compared in non-randomized concurrent clinical studies that suggest equivalent results. However, there is no randomized trial that has compared the two procedures in patients with symptomatic high grade intracranial stenosis. Objective: The primary aim of the randomized trial was to compare the clinical and angiographic efficacy of primary angioplasty and angioplasty followed by stent placement in preventing restenosis, stroke, requirement for second treatment, and death in patients with symptomatic intracranial stenosis. Methods: The study prospectively evaluated efficacy and safety of the two existing neurointerventional techniques for treatment of moderate intracranial stenosis (stenosis ≥ 50%) with documented failure of medical treatment or severe stenosis (≥70%) with or without failure of medical treatment. Results: A total of 18 patients were recruited in the study (mean age [±SD] was 64.7 ± 15.1 years); out of these, 12 were men. Of these 18, 10 were treated with primary angioplasty and 8 were treated with angioplasty followed by self-expanding stent. The technical success rates of intracranial angioplasty and stent placements defined as ability to achieve <30% residual stenosis when assessed by immediate post-procedure angiography was 5 of 10 and 5 of 8 patients, respectively. The total fluoroscopic time (mean [±SD]) was lower in patients undergoing primary angioplasty 37 [±11] min versus those undergoing angioplasty followed by self-expanding stent 42 [±15] min, P = 0.4321. The stroke and death rate within 1 month was very low in both patient groups (1 of 10 versus 0 of 8 patients). One patient randomized to stent placement continued to have recurrent ischemic symptoms requiring another angioplasty in the vertebral artery on post-procedure Day 2. Conclusions: The trial suggests that a randomized trial comparing primary angioplasty to angioplasty

  12. [Cost-effectiveness trial of self-expandable metal stents and plastic biliary stents in malignant biliary obstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daróczi, Tímea; Bor, Renáta; Fábián, Anna; Szabó, Ella; Farkas, Klaudia; Bálint, Anita; Czakó, László; Rutka, Mariann; Szűcs, Mónika; Milassin, Ágnes; Molnár, Tamás; Szepes, Zoltán

    2016-02-14

    Self-expandable metal and plastic stents can be applied in the palliative endoscopic treatment of patients with unresectable malignant biliary obstruction. The use of metal stentsis recommended if the patient's life expectancy is more than four months. To compare the therapeutic efficacy and cost-effectiveness of metal and plastic stents in the treatment of malignant biliary obstruction. The authors retrospectively enrolled patients who received metal (37 patients) or plastic stent (37 patients). The complication rate, stent patency and cumulative cost of treatment were assessed in the two groups. The complication rate of metal stents was lower (37.84% vs. 56.76%), but the stent patency was higher compared with plastic stents (19.11 vs. 8.29 weeks; p = 0.0041). In the plastic stent group the frequency of hospitalization of patients in context with stent complications (1.18 vs. 2.32; p = 0.05) and the necessity of reintervention for stent dysfunction (17 vs. 27; p = 0.033) were substantially higher. In this group multiple stent implantation raised the stent patency from 7.68 to 10.75 weeks. There was no difference in the total cost of treatment of malignant biliary obstruction between the two groups (p = 0.848). Considering the cost of treatment and the burden of patients the authors recommend self-expandable metal sten timplantation if the life expectancy of patients is more than two months. In short survival cases multiple plastic stent implantation is recommended.

  13. A novel stent inflation protocol improves long-term outcomes compared with rapid inflation/deflation deployment method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallurupalli, Srikanth; Kasula, Srikanth; Kumar Agarwal, Shiv; Pothineni, Naga Venkata K; Abualsuod, Amjad; Hakeem, Abdul; Ahmed, Zubair; Uretsky, Barry F

    2017-08-01

    High-pressure inflation for coronary stent deployment is universally performed. However, the duration of inflation is variable and does not take into account differences in lesion compliance. We developed a standardized "pressure optimization protocol" (POP) using inflation pressure stability rather than an arbitrary inflation time or angiographic balloon appearance for stent deployment. Whether this approach improves long-term outcomes is unknown. 792 patients who underwent PCI using either rapid inflation/deflation (n = 376) or POP (n = 416) between January 2009 and March 2014 were included. Exclusion criteria included PCI for acute myocardial infarction, in-stent restenosis, chronic total occlusion, left main, and saphenous vein graft lesions. Primary endpoint was target vessel failure [TVF = combined end point of target vessel revascularization (TVR), myocardial infarction, and cardiac death]. Outcomes were analyzed in the entire cohort and in a propensity analysis. Stent implantation using POP with a median follow-up of 1317 days was associated with lower TVF compared with rapid inflation/deflation (10.1 vs. 17.8%, P inflation/deflation (10 vs. 18%, P < 0.0001). Stent deployment using POP led to reduced TVF compared to rapid I/D. These results recommend this method to improve long-term outcomes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A randomized controlled trial comparing alpha blocker (tamsulosin) and anticholinergic (solifenacin) in treatment of ureteral stent-related symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nahas, Ahmed R; Tharwat, Mohamed; Elsaadany, Mohamed; Mosbah, Ahmed; Gaballah, Mohamed A

    2016-07-01

    To compare the effectiveness of tamsulosin and solifenacin in relieving ureteral stents related symptoms. A randomized controlled trial was conducted between January 2013 and July 2014. Inclusion criteria were patients aged 20-50 years who underwent temporary unilateral ureteral stent for drainage of calcular upper tract obstruction or after ureteroscopic lithotripsy. Patients with history of lower urinary tract symptoms before stent placement, stents that were fixed after open or laparoscopic procedures, and those who developed complications related to the primary procedure were not included. Eligible patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups using computer-generated random tables. Patients in group 1 received placebo, patients in group 2 received tamsulosin 0.4 mg once daily, and those in group 3 received solifenacin 5 mg once daily. Ureteral Stent Symptom Questionnaire (USSQ) was answered by all patients 1-2 weeks after stent placement. The primary outcome was the comparison of total score of USSQ between all groups. The study included 131 patients. All baseline characteristics (age, sex, side, indication, length, and duration of stent) were comparable for all groups. Total USSQ score was 61 in solifenacin group, 76 in tamsulosin group, and 83 in control group (P tamsulosin group (P tamsulosin alone or solifenacin alone in patients with ureteral stents can improve the quality of life by decreasing ureteral stent-related symptoms. Solifenacin was better than tamsulosin. CLINICALTRIAL. NCT01880619.

  15. Optical coherence tomography compared with intravascular ultrasound and with angiography to guide coronary stent implantation (ILUMIEN III: OPTIMIZE PCI): a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ziad A; Maehara, Akiko; Généreux, Philippe; Shlofmitz, Richard A; Fabbiocchi, Franco; Nazif, Tamim M; Guagliumi, Giulio; Meraj, Perwaiz M; Alfonso, Fernando; Samady, Habib; Akasaka, Takashi; Carlson, Eric B; Leesar, Massoud A; Matsumura, Mitsuaki; Ozan, Melek Ozgu; Mintz, Gary S; Ben-Yehuda, Ori; Stone, Gregg W

    2016-11-26

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is most commonly guided by angiography alone. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) guidance has been shown to reduce major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) after PCI, principally by resulting in a larger postprocedure lumen than with angiographic guidance. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides higher resolution imaging than does IVUS, although findings from some studies suggest that it might lead to smaller luminal diameters after stent implantation. We sought to establish whether or not a novel OCT-based stent sizing strategy would result in a minimum stent area similar to or better than that achieved with IVUS guidance and better than that achieved with angiography guidance alone. In this randomised controlled trial, we recruited patients aged 18 years or older undergoing PCI from 29 hospitals in eight countries. Eligible patients had one or more target lesions located in a native coronary artery with a visually estimated reference vessel diameter of 2·25-3·50 mm and a length of less than 40 mm. We excluded patients with left main or ostial right coronary artery stenoses, bypass graft stenoses, chronic total occlusions, planned two-stent bifurcations, and in-stent restenosis. Participants were randomly assigned (1:1:1; with use of an interactive web-based system in block sizes of three, stratified by site) to OCT guidance, IVUS guidance, or angiography-guided stent implantation. We did OCT-guided PCI using a specific protocol to establish stent length, diameter, and expansion according to reference segment external elastic lamina measurements. All patients underwent final OCT imaging (operators in the IVUS and angiography groups were masked to the OCT images). The primary efficacy endpoint was post-PCI minimum stent area, measured by OCT at a masked independent core laboratory at completion of enrolment, in all randomly allocated participants who had primary outcome data. The primary safety endpoint was procedural

  16. Optimal Scanning Protocols for Dual-Energy CT Angiography in Peripheral Arterial Stents: An in Vitro Phantom Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman Almutairi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the optimal dual-energy computed tomography (DECT scanning protocol for peripheral arterial stents while achieving a low radiation dose, while still maintaining diagnostic image quality, as determined by an in vitro phantom study. Methods: Dual-energy scans in monochromatic spectral imaging mode were performed on a peripheral arterial phantom with use of three gemstone spectral imaging (GSI protocols, three pitch values, and four kiloelectron volts (keV ranges. A total of 15 stents of different sizes, materials, and designs were deployed in the phantom. Image noise, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR, different levels of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR, and the four levels of monochromatic energy for DECT imaging of peripheral arterial stents were measured and compared to determine the optimal protocols. Results: A total of 36 scans with 180 datasets were reconstructed from a combination of different protocols. There was a significant reduction of image noise with a higher SNR from monochromatic energy images between 65 and 70 keV in all investigated preset GSI protocols (p < 0.05. In addition, significant effects were found from the main effect analysis for these factors: GSI, pitch, and keV (p = 0.001. In contrast, there was significant interaction on the unstented area between GSI and ASIR (p = 0.015 and a very high significant difference between keV and ASIR (p < 0.001. A radiation dose reduction of 50% was achieved. Conclusions: The optimal scanning protocol and energy level in the phantom study were GSI-48, pitch value 0.984, and 65 keV, which resulted in lower image noise and a lower radiation dose, but with acceptable diagnostic images.

  17. Drug-eluting stents for acute coronary syndrome: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lishan Wang

    Full Text Available Drug-eluting stents (DES are increasingly used for treatment of acute coronary syndrome (ACS. However, clinical efficacy and safety of various types of DES is not well established in these subjects. We therefore evaluated clinical utility of second-generation and first-generation DES in patients with ACS by conducting a meta-analysis.A search of Medline, Embase, the Cochrane databases, and Web of Science was made. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs which compared second-generation DES (everolimus-eluting stents [EES] or zotarolimus-eluting stents [ZES] versus first-generation DES (sirolimus-eluting stents [SES] or paclitaxe-eluting stents [PES] in patients with ACS and provided data on clinical efficacy or safety endpoints were included. Pooled estimates were calculated using random-effects model.A total of 2,757 participants with ACS in 6 RCTs were included. Compared with first-generation one, second-generation DES trended to be associated with the decreased incidence of definite or probable stent thrombosis in ACS patients (risk ratio [RR]  = 0.60, 95% confidence intervals [CI] 0.33 to 1.07, p = 0.09. However, the rate of target lesion revascularization (TLR significantly increased in second-generation DES (RR = 2.08, 95%CI 1.25 to 3.47, p = 0.005. There were no significant differences in the incidence of major adverse cardiac events (MACEs, all-cause death, cardiac death, and recurrent myocardial infarction between the two arms (all p>0.10. The second-generation EES showed a tendency towards lower risk of MACEs (p = 0.06 and a beneficial effect on reducing stent thrombosis episodes (p = 0.009, while the second-generation ZES presented an increased occurrence of MACEs (p = 0.02 and TLR (p = 0.003.Second-generation DES, especially EES, appeared to present a lower risk of stent thrombosis, whereas second-generation ZES might increase the need for repeat revascularization in ACS patients. During coronary

  18. Biodegradable stent or balloon dilatation for benign oesophageal stricture: Pilot randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Anjan; Close, Helen; Viswanath, Yirupaiahgari K; Rees, Colin J; Hancock, Helen C; Dwarakanath, A Deepak; Maier, Rebecca H; Wilson, Douglas; Mason, James M

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To undertake a randomised pilot study comparing biodegradable stents and endoscopic dilatation in patients with strictures. METHODS: This British multi-site study recruited seventeen symptomatic adult patients with refractory strictures. Patients were randomised using a multicentre, blinded assessor design, comparing a biodegradable stent (BS) with endoscopic dilatation (ED). The primary endpoint was the average dysphagia score during the first 6 mo. Secondary endpoints included repeat endoscopic procedures, quality of life, and adverse events. Secondary analysis included follow-up to 12 mo. Sensitivity analyses explored alternative estimation methods for dysphagia and multiple imputation of missing values. Nonparametric tests were used. RESULTS: Although both groups improved, the average dysphagia scores for patients receiving stents were higher after 6 mo: BS-ED 1.17 (95%CI: 0.63-1.78) P = 0.029. The finding was robust under different estimation methods. Use of additional endoscopic procedures and quality of life (QALY) estimates were similar for BS and ED patients at 6 and 12 mo. Concomitant use of gastrointestinal prescribed medication was greater in the stent group (BS 5.1, ED 2.0 prescriptions; P dysphagia, co-medication and adverse events. Rigorously conducted and adequately powered trials are needed before widespread adoption of this technology. PMID:25561787

  19. Percutaneous coronary intervention with second-generation paclitaxel-eluting stents versus everolimus-eluting stents in United States contemporary practice (REWARDS TLX Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waksman, Ron; Ghali, Magdi; Goodroe, Randy; Ryan, Thomas; Turco, Mark; Ring, Michael; McGarry, Thomas; Dobies, David; Shammas, Nicolas; Steinberg, Daniel H; Swymelar, Stacy; Kaneshige, Kimberly; Torguson, Rebecca

    2012-10-15

    Registry Experience at the Washington Hospital Center, DES - Taxus Liberte Versus Xience V (REWARDS TLX) is a physician-initiated, retrospective, real-world, multicenter, observational study for all patients >18 years of age subjected to percutaneous coronary intervention with everolimus-eluting stents (EESs) or paclitaxel-eluting stents (PESs). Outcomes of patients receiving a TAXUS Liberté or XIENCE V drug-eluting stent were compared. Baseline clinical, procedural, and follow-up data at 12 months were collected from 10 clinical centers by an electronic data capture system. The study's primary end point was major adverse cardiac events: a composite of all-cause death, Q-wave myocardial infarction, target vessel revascularization, and stent thrombosis. The trial is registered with http://www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01134159). Data were entered for 1,195 patients (PES, n = 595; EES, n = 600). Baseline clinical characteristics were similar except for higher dyslipidemia, systemic hypertension, and family history of coronary artery disease in the EES group. In-hospital outcome was similar between groups, with an overall in-hospital stent thrombosis rate of 0.2%. The primary end point at 12 months was similar (EES 7.8% vs 10.8%, p = 0.082). Overall stent thrombosis rate was lower in the EES group (0.3% vs 1.2%, respectively, p = 0.107); however, target lesion revascularization was similar (PES, hazard ratio 1.46, 95% confidence interval 0.98 to 2.19, p = 0.064). There was no difference in overall mortality between groups. In conclusion, second-generation EESs and PESs demonstrated similar efficacy and safety profiles for broadened patient and lesion subsets compared to a selected population from the pivotal trials. However, for composite efficacy and safety end points, EESs outperformed second-generation PESs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. TIDES-ACS Trial: comparison of titanium-nitride-oxide coated bio-active-stent to the drug (everolimus)-eluting stent in acute coronary syndrome. Study design and objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colkesen, E B; Eefting, F D; Rensing, B J; Suttorp, M J; Ten Berg, J M; Karjalainen, P P; Van Der Heyden, J A

    2015-02-01

    Drug-eluting stents (DES), delivering antiproliferative drugs from a durable polymer, have shown to reduce in-stent restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) compared to bare-metal stents (BMS). However, they have been associated with a hypersensitivity reaction, delayed healing, and incomplete endothelialization, which may contribute to an increased risk of late stent thrombosis. Consequently, a prolonged duration of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) is needed, with an increased risk of bleeding complication. A number of stent technologies are being developed in an attempt to modify late thrombotic events and DAPT duration. The Optimax™ stent is such a novel, next generation bioactive stent (BAS), in which a thicker layer of titanium-nitride-oxide coating is inserted over the stent struts. The rationale of this is to obtain more efficient and rapid vascular healing at the site of the stent implantation. The aim of TIDES-ACS Trial is to compare clinical outcome in patients presenting with ACS, treated with PCI using Optimax-BAS versus Synergy™-EES. Second objective is to explore whether the Optimax™-BAS use is superior compared with Synergy™-EES use with respect of hard end points (cardiac death, myocardial infarction [MI] and major bleeding). A prospective, randomized, multicenter trial (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02049229), will be conducted in interventional centres in Finland (six centres), France (five centres) and Holland (two centres), including a total of 1800 patients.

  1. The SABRE Trial (Sirolimus Angioplasty Balloon for Coronary In-Stent Restenosis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verheye, Stefan; Vrolix, Mathias; Kumsars, Indulis

    2017-01-01

    centers, 50 ISR patients were treated with the Virtue balloon. Angiographic measurements at 6 months are reported, along with 12-month clinical follow-up. RESULTS Procedural success in the intention-to-treat population was 100 The primary safety endpoint was target lesion failure (TLF) (cardiac death...... and 14.3% MACE and for the per-protocol population were 2.8% TLF and 2.8% MACE. CONCLUSIONS This first-in-human study showed excellent procedural success for the Virtue sirolimus-eluting angioplasty balloon, 6-month LLL rates in line with current stent-free ISR treatment options, and clinical outcomes...

  2. Drug-eluting stents versus bare-metal stents for acute coronary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feinberg, Joshua; Nielsen, Emil Eik; Greenhalgh, Janette

    2017-01-01

    -EXPANDED, and BIOSIS from their inception to January 2017. We also searched two clinical trials registers, the European Medicines Agency and the US Food and Drug Administration databases, and pharmaceutical company websites. In addition, we searched the reference lists of review articles and relevant trials. SELECTION...... CRITERIA: Randomised clinical trials assessing the effects of drug-eluting stents versus bare-metal stents for acute coronary syndrome. We included trials irrespective of publication type, status, date, or language. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We followed our published protocol and the methodological...

  3. Colonic stenting as bridge to surgery versus emergency surgery for management of acute left-sided malignant colonic obstruction: a multicenter randomized trial (Stent-in 2 study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholten Pieter

    2007-07-01

    analysis of variance. Mortality will be compared using Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank statistics. Discussion The Stent-in 2 study is a randomized controlled multicenter trial that will provide evidence whether or not colonic stenting as bridge to surgery is to be performed in patients with acute left-sided colonic obstruction. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN46462267.

  4. Effect of white-matter lesions on the risk of periprocedural stroke after carotid artery stenting versus endarterectomy in the International Carotid Stenting Study (ICSS): a prespecified analysis of data from a randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ederle, J.; Davagnanam, I.; Worp, H.B. van der; Venables, G.S.; Lyrer, P.A.; Featherstone, R.L.; Brown, M.M.; Jager, H.R.; Leeuw, F.E. de; Schultze Kool, L.J.; Vliet, J.A. van der; et al.,

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Findings from randomised trials have shown a higher early risk of stroke after carotid artery stenting than after carotid endarterectomy. We assessed whether white-matter lesions affect the perioperative risk of stroke in patients treated with carotid artery stenting versus carotid

  5. Improved safety and reduction in stent thrombosis associated with biodegradable polymer-based biolimus-eluting stents versus durable polymer-based sirolimus-eluting stents in patients with coronary artery disease: final 5-year report of the LEADERS (Limus Eluted From A Durable Versus ERodable Stent Coating) randomized, noninferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serruys, Patrick W; Farooq, Vasim; Kalesan, Bindu; de Vries, Ton; Buszman, Pawel; Linke, Axel; Ischinger, Thomas; Klauss, Volker; Eberli, Franz; Wijns, William; Morice, Marie Claude; Di Mario, Carlo; Corti, Roberto; Antoni, Diethmar; Sohn, Hae Y; Eerdmans, Pedro; Rademaker-Havinga, Tessa; van Es, Gerrit-Anne; Meier, Bernhard; Jüni, Peter; Windecker, Stephan

    2013-08-01

    This study sought to report the final 5 years follow-up of the landmark LEADERS (Limus Eluted From A Durable Versus ERodable Stent Coating) trial. The LEADERS trial is the first randomized study to evaluate biodegradable polymer-based drug-eluting stents (DES) against durable polymer DES. The LEADERS trial was a 10-center, assessor-blind, noninferiority, "all-comers" trial (N = 1,707). All patients were centrally randomized to treatment with either biodegradable polymer biolimus-eluting stents (BES) (n = 857) or durable polymer sirolimus-eluting stents (SES) (n = 850). The primary endpoint was a composite of cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI), or clinically indicated target vessel revascularization within 9 months. Secondary endpoints included extending the primary endpoint to 5 years and stent thrombosis (ST) (Academic Research Consortium definition). Analysis was by intention to treat. At 5 years, the BES was noninferior to SES for the primary endpoint (186 [22.3%] vs. 216 [26.1%], rate ratio [RR]: 0.83 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.68 to 1.02], p for noninferiority 1 year) and associated composite clinical outcomes. (Limus Eluted From A Durable Versus ERodable Stent Coating [LEADERS] trial; NCT00389220). Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A randomized, controlled, multicenter trial to evaluate the safety and efficacy of Zotarolimus- vs. Paclitaxel-eluting stents in de novo occlusive lesions in coronary arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chevalier, Bernard; Dimario, Carlo; Neumann, Franz-Josef

    2013-01-01

    The ZOMAXX I trial tested the noninferiority of a zotarolimus-eluting coronary stent (ZoMaxx(™) ) when compared with a paclitaxel-eluting coronary stent (Taxus(™) Express(2™) ) in a randomized trial of percutaneous intervention for de novo coronary artery stenosis. Angiographic analysis at the pr...

  7. Intimal hyperplasia and vascular remodeling after everolimus-eluting and sirolimus-eluting stent implantation in diabetic patients the randomized diabetes and drug-eluting stent (DiabeDES) IV intravascular ultrasound trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonsen, Lisbeth; Maeng, Michael; Thayssen, Per

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of the everolimus-eluting Xience™/Promus™ stent (EES) and the sirolimus-eluting Cypher™ stent (SES) on intimal hyperplasia (IH) in diabetic patients. BACKGROUND: Patients with diabetes mellitus have increased risk of in-stent restenosis after coronary stent...... implantation due to intimal hyperplasia (IH). METHODS: In a sub study of the Randomized Comparison of Everolimus-Eluting and Sirolimus-Eluting Stents in Patients Treated with Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (SORT OUT IV trial), serial intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) 10-month follow-up data were available...... in 88 patients, including 48 EES and 40 SES treated patients. IVUS endpoints included IH volume, in-stent % volume obstruction and changes in external elastic membrane (EEM) volume. RESULTS: Compared with the SES group, IH volume was increased in the EES group [median (interquartile range): 2.8 mm(3) (0...

  8. Comparison of everolimus- and paclitaxel-eluting stents in patients with acute and stable coronary syndromes: pooled results from the SPIRIT (A Clinical Evaluation of the XIENCE V Everolimus Eluting Coronary Stent System) and COMPARE (A Trial of Everolimus-Eluting Stents and Paclitaxel-Eluting Stents for Coronary Revascularization in Daily Practice) Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planer, David; Smits, Pieter C; Kereiakes, Dean J; Kedhi, Elvin; Fahy, Martin; Xu, Ke; Serruys, Patrick W; Stone, Gregg W

    2011-10-01

    This study sought to compare the clinical outcomes of everolimus-eluting stents (EES) versus paclitaxel-eluting stents (PES) in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Although randomized trials have shown superiority of EES to PES, the safety and efficacy of EES in ACS is unknown. We performed a patient-level pooled analysis from the prospective, randomized SPIRIT (Clinical Evaluation of the XIENCE V Everolimus Eluting Coronary Stent System) II, III, IV, and COMPARE (A Trial of Everolimus-Eluting Stents and Paclitaxel-Eluting Stents for Coronary Revascularization in Daily Practice) trials in which 2,381 patients with ACS and 4,404 patients with stable CAD were randomized to EES or to PES. Kaplan-Meier estimates of death, myocardial infarction (MI), ischemia-driven target lesion revascularization, and stent thrombosis were assessed at 2 years and stratified by clinical presentation (ACS vs. stable CAD). At 2 years, patients with ACS compared with stable CAD had higher rates of death (3.2% vs. 2.4%, hazard ratio [HR]: 1.37 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02 to 1.85], p = 0.04) and MI (4.9% vs. 3.4%, HR: 1.45 [95% CI: 1.14 to 1.85], p = 0.02). In patients with ACS, EES versus PES reduced the rate of death or MI (6.6% vs. 9.3%, HR: 0.70 [95% CI: 0.52 to 0.94], p = 0.02), stent thrombosis (0.7% vs. 2.9%, HR: 0.25 [95% CI: 0.12 to 0.52], p = 0.0002), and ischemia-driven target lesion revascularization (4.7% vs. 6.2%, HR: 0.69 [95% CI: 0.48 to 0.99], p = 0.04). In patients with stable CAD, EES reduced the rate of death or MI (4.5% vs. 7.1%, HR: 0.62 [95% CI: 0.48 to 0.80], p = 0.0002), stent thrombosis (0.7% vs. 1.8%, HR: 0.34 [95% CI: 0.19 to 0.62], p = 0.0002), and ischemia-driven target lesion revascularization (3.9% vs. 6.9%, HR: 0.55 [95% CI: 0.42 to 0.73], p SPIRIT II]; NCT00180310; SPIRIT III: A Clinical Evaluation of the Investigational Device XIENCE V Everolimus Eluting Coronary Stent System [EECSS] in the

  9. Redactions in protocols for drug trials: what industry sponsors concealed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardsen, Mikkel; Ogden, Michelle; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2018-04-01

    Objective To describe the redactions in contemporary protocols for industry-sponsored randomised drug trials with patient relevant outcomes and to evaluate whether there was a legitimate rationale for the redactions. Design Cohort study. Under the Freedom of Information Act, we requested access to trial protocols approved by a research ethics committee in Denmark from October 2012 to March 2013. We received 17 consecutive protocols, which had been redacted before we got them, and nine protocols without redactions. In five additional cases, the companies refused to let the committees give us access, and in three other cases, documents were missing. Participants Not applicable. Setting Not applicable. Main outcome measure Amount and nature of redactions in 22 predefined key protocol variables. Results The redactions were most widespread in those sections of the protocol where there is empirical evidence of substantial problems with the trustworthiness of published drug trials: data analysis, handling of missing data, detection and analysis of adverse events, definition of the outcomes, interim analyses and premature termination of the study, sponsor's access to incoming data while the study is running, ownership to the data and investigators' publication rights. The parts of the text that were redacted differed widely, both between companies and within the same company. Conclusions We could not identify any legitimate rationale for the redactions. The current mistrust in industry-sponsored drug trials can only change if the industry offers unconditional access to its trial protocols and other relevant documents and data.

  10. Stent parameters predict major adverse clinical events and the response to platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa blockade: findings of the ESPRIT trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tcheng, James E; Lim, Ing Haan; Srinivasan, Shankar; Jozic, Joseph; Gibson, C Michael; O'Shea, J Conor; Puma, Joseph A; Simon, Daniel I

    2009-02-01

    Only limited data describe relationships between stent parameters (length and diameter), adverse events after percutaneous coronary intervention, and effects of platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa blockade by stent parameters. In this post hoc analysis of the 1983 patients receiving a stent in the Enhanced Suppression of the Platelet Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa Receptor with Integrilin Therapy randomized percutaneous coronary intervention trial of eptifibatide versus placebo, rates of the major adverse cardiac event (MACE) end point (death, myocardial infarction, urgent target-vessel revascularization, or thrombotic bailout) at 48 hours and 1 year were correlated with stent parameters and then analyzed by randomization to eptifibatide versus placebo. In the placebo group, MACE increased with number of stents implanted, total stent length (by quartiles of or=30 mm), and total stented vessel area (by quartiles of area or=292 mm(2)). By stent parameters, MACE at 48 hours was reduced in the eptifibatide group at stent lengths of 18 to or=30 mm (OR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.25 to 0.75; P=0.003), stent diameters of >2.5 to <3.5 mm (OR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.39 to 0.82; P=0.002), and with 2 stents implanted (OR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.22 to 0.69; P=0.001). In the placebo group, near-linear relationships were observed between both increasing stent length and increasing stented vessel area and MACE at 48 hours and 1 year (all, P<0.001); these gradients were flattened in the eptifibatide group (P=0.005 for stent length). Stent parameters predict MACE after percutaneous coronary intervention. Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa blockade mitigates much of the hazard of increasing procedural complexity.

  11. Bioabsorbable polymer-coated sirolimus-eluting stent implantation preserves coronary vasomotion: A DESSOLVE II trial sub-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusinaru, Dan; Vrolix, Mathias; Verheye, Stefan; Chowdhary, Saqib; Schoors, Danny; Di Mario, Carlo; Desmet, Walter; Donohoe, Dennis J; Ormiston, John A; Knape, Charlene; Bezerra, Hiram; Lansky, Alexandra; Wijns, William

    2015-12-01

    We studied coronary vasomotion in patients treated with the Mistent(®) absorbable polymer sirolimus-eluting stent (APSES) and in patients implanted with the Endeavor(®) zotarolimus-eluting stent (ZES). First generation (1st-gen) drug-eluting stents (DES) induce persistent vasomotor dysfunction in the treated coronary artery. It is unknown whether and to what extent the implantation of an absorbable polymer DES impairs coronary vasomotion. This sub-study of the DESSOLVE II trial included 19 APSES Mistent(®) and 10 ZES Endeavor(®) patients. Incremental atrial pacing and quantitative coronary angiography were used to assess vasomotion proximal and distal to the stent and in a reference segment at 9 months after implantation. Percent changes in vessel diameter with pacing versus baseline were calculated and compared. Vasomotor response of the APSES group was also compared with changes observed in a historical group of 17 patients implanted with a 1st-gen sirolimus-eluting stent (SES). Normal vasomotion (vasodilatation) was preserved and of comparable magnitude in the APSES and in the ZES group both proximally (P = 0.34) and distally (P = 0.38) to the stent. This finding was not observed in the 1st-gen SES group showing marked pacing-induced vasoconstriction at both stent edges (P absorbable polymer sirolimus-eluting stent is associated with preserved coronary vasomotion, comparable to that observed after implantation of the Endeavor(®) ZES, and distinct from 1st-gen SES which induce coronary vasomotor dysfunction. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa integrin blockade with eptifibatide in coronary stent intervention: the ESPRIT trial: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, J C; Hafley, G E; Greenberg, S; Hasselblad, V; Lorenz, T J; Kitt, M M; Strony, J; Tcheng, J E

    2001-05-16

    The Enhanced Suppression of the Platelet IIb/IIIa Receptor with Integrilin Therapy (ESPRIT) trial showed the efficacy of adjunctive, double-bolus eptifibatide therapy in reducing ischemic complications of nonurgent coronary stent implantation at 48 hours and at 30 days. To determine whether the beneficial effects of eptifibatide persist at 6 months after treatment. Follow-up study of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover-permitted trial conducted from June 1999 through February 2000. Ninety-two tertiary care centers in the United States and Canada. A total of 2064 patients scheduled to undergo nonurgent percutaneous coronary intervention with stent implantation. Patients were randomly assigned to receive placebo or eptifibatide (two 180-microg/kg boluses 10 minutes apart and continuous infusion of 2.0 microg/kg per minute), started immediately before stent implantation and continued for 18 to 24 hours. Complete follow-up data were available for 988 (95.0%) of 1040 patients given eptifibatide and 977 (95.4%) of 1024 patients given placebo. Composite rates of death or myocardial infarction (MI); death, MI, or target vessel revascularization; and their individual components 6 months after enrollment, compared between the 2 groups. By 6 months, the composite end point of death or MI had occurred in 7.5% of eptifibatide-treated patients and in 11.5% of placebo-treated patients (hazard ratio [HR], 0.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.47-0.84; P =.002). The composite of death, MI, or target vessel revascularization was 14.2% in eptifibatide-treated patients vs 18.3% in placebo-treated patients (HR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.60-0.93; P =.008). Most of this benefit accrued early (<48 hours after initiation of therapy) and was maintained through 6 months. Six-month mortality in the eptifibatide group was 0.8% vs 1.4% in the placebo group (HR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.24-1.34; P =.19) and target vessel revascularization occurred in 8.6% of the eptifibatide group vs 9.4% of

  13. The Impact of Post-Procedural Asymmetry, Expansion, and Eccentricity of Bioresorbable Everolimus-Eluting Scaffold and Metallic Everolimus-Eluting Stent on Clinical Outcomes in the ABSORB II Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwannasom, Pannipa; Sotomi, Yohei; Ishibashi, Yuki; Cavalcante, Rafael; Albuquerque, Felipe N; Macaya, Carlos; Ormiston, John A; Hill, Jonathan; Lang, Irene M; Egred, Mohaned; Fajadet, Jean; Lesiak, Maciej; Tijssen, Jan G; Wykrzykowska, Joanna J; de Winter, Robbert J; Chevalier, Bernard; Serruys, Patrick W; Onuma, Yoshinobu

    2016-06-27

    The study sought to investigate the relationship between post-procedural asymmetry, expansion, and eccentricity indices of metallic everolimus-eluting stent (EES) and bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) and their respective impact on clinical events at 1-year follow-up. Mechanical properties of a fully BVS are inherently different from those of permanent metallic stent. The ABSORB II (A bioresorbable everolimus-eluting scaffold versus a metallic everolimus-eluting stent for ischaemic heart disease caused by de-novo native coronary artery lesions) trial compared the BVS and metallic EES in the treatment of a de novo coronary artery stenosis. Protocol-mandated intravascular ultrasound imaging was performed pre- and post-procedure in 470 patients (162 metallic EES and 308 BVS). Asymmetry index (AI) was calculated per lesion as: (1 - minimum scaffold/stent diameter/maximum scaffold/stent diameter). Expansion index and optimal scaffold/stent expansion followed the definition of the MUSIC (Multicenter Ultrasound Stenting in Coronaries) study. Eccentricity index (EI) was calculated as the ratio of minimum and maximum scaffold/stent diameter per cross section. The incidence of device-oriented composite endpoint (DoCE) was collected. Post-procedure, the metallic EES group was more symmetric and concentric than the BVS group. Only 8.0% of the BVS arm and 20.0% of the metallic EES arm achieved optimal scaffold/stent expansion (p 0.30 is an independent predictor of DoCE (hazard ratio: 3.43; 95% confidence interval: 1.08 to 10.92; p = 0.037). BVS implantation is more frequently associated with post-procedural asymmetric and eccentric morphology compared to metallic EES. Post-procedural devices asymmetry were independently associated with DoCE following percutaneous coronary intervention. However, this approach should be viewed as hypothesis generating due to low event rates. (ABSORB II Randomized Controlled Trial [ABSORB II]; NCT01425281). Copyright © 2016 American

  14. Meta-Analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials Comparing Biodegradable Polymer Drug-Eluting Stent to Second-Generation Durable Polymer Drug-Eluting Stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hayek, Georges; Bangalore, Sripal; Casso Dominguez, Abel; Devireddy, Chandan; Jaber, Wissam; Kumar, Gautam; Mavromatis, Kreton; Tamis-Holland, Jacqueline; Samady, Habib

    2017-03-13

    The authors sought to perform a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) comparing the safety and efficacy of biodegradable polymer drug-eluting stents (BP-DES) to second-generation durable polymer drug-eluting stents (DP-DES). Prior meta-analyses have established the superiority of BP-DES over bare-metal stents and first-generation DP-DES; however, their advantage compared with second-generation DP-DES remains controversial. The authors searched PubMed and Scopus databases for RCTs comparing BP-DES to the second-generation DP-DES. Outcomes included target vessel revascularization (TVR) as efficacy outcome and cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI), and definite or probable stent thrombosis (ST) as safety outcomes. In addition, we performed landmark analysis for endpoints beyond 1 year of follow-up and a subgroup analysis based on the stent characteristics. The authors included 16 RCTs comprising 19,886 patients in the meta-analysis. At the longest available follow-up (mean duration 26 months), we observed no significant differences in TVR (p = 0.62), cardiac death (p = 0.46), MI (p = 0.98), or ST (risk ratio: 0.83, 95% confidence interval: 0.64 to 1.09; p = 0.19). Our landmark analysis showed that BP-DES were not associated with a reduction in the risk of very late ST (risk ratio: 0.87, 95% confidence interval: 0.49 to 1.53; p = 0.62). Similar outcomes were seen regardless of the eluting drug (biolimus vs. sirolimus), the stent platform (stainless steel vs. alloy), the kinetics of polymer degradation or drug release (6 months), the strut thickness of the BP-DES (thin 100 μm), or the DAPT duration (≥6 months vs. ≥12 months). BP-DES have similar safety and efficacy profiles to second-generation DP-DES. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Comparison between the STENTYS self-apposing bare metal and paclitaxel-eluting coronary stents for the treatment of saphenous vein grafts (ADEPT trial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.J. IJsselmuiden (Alexander); C. Simsek (Cihan); Van Driel, A.G. (A. G.); Bouchez, D. (D.); G. Amoroso (Giovanni); P. Vermeersch (Paul); Karjalainen, P.P. (P. P.)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractAims To describe the safety and performance of STENTYS self-expandable bare metal stents (BMS) versus paclitaxel-eluting stents (PES) in saphenous vein grafts (SVGs). Methods and Results A randomised controlled trial was performed in four hospitals in three European countries between

  16. Subgroup analyses in randomised controlled trials: cohort study on trial protocols and journal publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasenda, Benjamin; Schandelmaier, Stefan; Sun, Xin; von Elm, Erik; You, John; Blümle, Anette; Tomonaga, Yuki; Saccilotto, Ramon; Amstutz, Alain; Bengough, Theresa; Meerpohl, Joerg J; Stegert, Mihaela; Olu, Kelechi K; Tikkinen, Kari A O; Neumann, Ignacio; Carrasco-Labra, Alonso; Faulhaber, Markus; Mulla, Sohail M; Mertz, Dominik; Akl, Elie A; Bassler, Dirk; Busse, Jason W; Ferreira-González, Ignacio; Lamontagne, Francois; Nordmann, Alain; Gloy, Viktoria; Raatz, Heike; Moja, Lorenzo; Rosenthal, Rachel; Ebrahim, Shanil; Vandvik, Per O; Johnston, Bradley C; Walter, Martin A; Burnand, Bernard; Schwenkglenks, Matthias; Hemkens, Lars G; Bucher, Heiner C; Guyatt, Gordon H; Briel, Matthias

    2014-07-16

    To investigate the planning of subgroup analyses in protocols of randomised controlled trials and the agreement with corresponding full journal publications. Cohort of protocols of randomised controlled trial and subsequent full journal publications. Six research ethics committees in Switzerland, Germany, and Canada. 894 protocols of randomised controlled trial involving patients approved by participating research ethics committees between 2000 and 2003 and 515 subsequent full journal publications. Of 894 protocols of randomised controlled trials, 252 (28.2%) included one or more planned subgroup analyses. Of those, 17 (6.7%) provided a clear hypothesis for at least one subgroup analysis, 10 (4.0%) anticipated the direction of a subgroup effect, and 87 (34.5%) planned a statistical test for interaction. Industry sponsored trials more often planned subgroup analyses compared with investigator sponsored trials (195/551 (35.4%) v 57/343 (16.6%), P<0.001). Of 515 identified journal publications, 246 (47.8%) reported at least one subgroup analysis. In 81 (32.9%) of the 246 publications reporting subgroup analyses, authors stated that subgroup analyses were prespecified, but this was not supported by 28 (34.6%) corresponding protocols. In 86 publications, authors claimed a subgroup effect, but only 36 (41.9%) corresponding protocols reported a planned subgroup analysis. Subgroup analyses are insufficiently described in the protocols of randomised controlled trials submitted to research ethics committees, and investigators rarely specify the anticipated direction of subgroup effects. More than one third of statements in publications of randomised controlled trials about subgroup prespecification had no documentation in the corresponding protocols. Definitive judgments regarding credibility of claimed subgroup effects are not possible without access to protocols and analysis plans of randomised controlled trials. © The DISCO study group 2014.

  17. A Comparison of Stent Implant versus Medical Treatment for Severe Symptomatic Intracranial Stenosis: A Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezao Mohammadian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atherosclerotic stenosis of the major intracranial arteries is the most common cause of ischemic stroke. There are limited treatments for severe intracranial stenosis, and stent placement versus medical treatment remains controversial. The aim of this study was to compare functional outcomes of these two modalities in patients with severe symptomatic intracranial stenosis. Methods: At a single center, between 2008 and 2011, patients with angiographically demonstrated severe (70–90% symptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis were divided into two groups: group A, which received only medical treatment, and group B, which underwent endovascular stent implant treatment. The severity and location of the stenosis was determined by digital subtraction angiography and the Warfarin-Aspirin Symptomatic Intracranial Disease (WASID trial criteria in all patients. The exclusion criteria were: specific causes other than atherosclerosis, such as artery dissection, fibromuscular dysplasia, vasculitis, radiation and intracranial hemorrhage, focal neurological deficit that did not correlate to internal carotid artery or middle cerebral artery stenosis. All procedures were done under light anesthesia. Technical success was defined as the reduction of stenosis to Results: Overall, 63 patients (29 in group A and 34 in group B were evaluated and followed for a mean period of 15.22 months (range 6–25. The technical success rate was 97% in a total of 34 stents in 34 patients. There was no difference between the early (within 30 days adverse event rates of the two groups. The median follow-up duration for the stent implant patients was 15 months (range 6–25, and for the medically treated cohort it was 14 months (range 8–25. The re-stenosis rate was 5.8% and the total number of late (>30 days adverse events, including stroke, myocardial infarction and death, was 1 (2.9% and 6 (20.7% in the stent implant and medical groups, respectively (p = 0.042. The

  18. Relationship between heparin anticoagulation and clinical outcomes in coronary stent intervention: observations from the ESPRIT trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolleson, Thaddeus R; O'Shea, J Conor; Bittl, John A; Hillegass, William B; Williams, Kathryn A; Levine, Glenn; Harrington, Robert A; Tcheng, James E

    2003-02-05

    We evaluated the relationship between the degree of heparin anticoagulation and clinical efficacy and bleeding in patients undergoing contemporary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stent implantation. Despite universal acceptance of heparin anticoagulation as a standard of care in PCI, considerable controversy still exists regarding the appropriate dosing of heparin. The study population (n = 2,064) comprised all patients enrolled in the Enhanced Suppression of the Platelet IIb/IIIa Receptor with Integrilin Therapy (ESPRIT) trial. The index activated clotting time (ACT) was defined as the ACT measured after the last heparin dose and before first device activation and was correlated with outcome and bleeding events. No association was observed between decreasing ACT levels and the rate of ischemic events in the treatment or placebo arms. The incidence of the primary composite end point (death, myocardial infarction, urgent target vessel revascularization, and thrombotic bailout glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor therapy at 48 h) was actually lowest in the lowest ACT tertile for both the placebo (10.0%) and treatment groups (6.1%). When analyzed by tertile, major bleeding rates did not increase in the lowest ACT tertile in patients given placebo (0.6%) versus those receiving eptifibatide (0.7%). Major bleeding rates increased as the ACT increased in the eptifibatide-treated patients. Ischemic end points in patients undergoing contemporary PCI with stent placement do not increase by decreasing ACT levels, at least to a level of 200 s. Bleeding events do increase with increasing ACT levels and are enhanced with eptifibatide treatment. An ACT of 200 to 250 s is reasonable in terms of efficacy and safety with the use of contemporary technology and pharmacotherapy.

  19. Long-Term Results of Everolimus-Eluting Stents Versus Drug-Eluting Balloons in Patients With Bare-Metal In-Stent Restenosis: 3-Year Follow-Up of the RIBS V Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, Fernando; Pérez-Vizcayno, María José; García Del Blanco, Bruno; Otaegui, Imanol; Masotti, Mónica; Zueco, Javier; Veláquez, Maite; Sanchís, Juan; García-Touchard, Arturo; Lázaro-García, Rosa; Moreu, José; Bethencourt, Armando; Cuesta, Javier; Rivero, Fernando; Cárdenas, Alberto; Gonzalo, Nieves; Jiménez-Quevedo, Pilar; Fernández, Cristina

    2016-06-27

    The aim of this study was to compare the long-term efficacy of everolimus-eluting stents (EES) and drug-eluting balloons (DEB) in patients with bare-metal stent in-stent restenosis (ISR). The relative long-term clinical efficacy of current therapeutic modalities in patients with ISR remains unknown. The 3-year clinical follow-up (pre-specified endpoint) of patients included in the RIBS V (Restenosis Intra-Stent of Bare-Metal Stents: Drug-Eluting Balloon vs Everolimus-Eluting Stent Implantation) randomized clinical trial was analyzed. All patients were followed yearly using a pre-defined structured questionnaire. A total of 189 patients with bare-metal stent ISR were allocated to either EES (n = 94) or DEB (n = 95). Clinical follow-up at 1, 2, and 3 years was obtained in all patients (100%). Compared with patients treated with DEB, those treated with EES obtained better angiographic results, including larger minimal luminal diameter at follow-up (primary study endpoint; 2.36 ± 0.6 mm vs. 2.01 ± 0.6 mm; p 1 year) target vessel (3 [3.2%] vs. 3 [3.2%]; p = 0.95) and target lesion (1 [1%] vs. 2 [2.1%]; p = 0.54) revascularization was low and similar in the 2 arms. Rates of definite or probable stent thrombosis (1% vs. 0%) were also similar in the 2 arms. The 3-year clinical follow-up of the RIBS V clinical trial confirms the sustained safety and efficacy of EES and DEB in patients treated for bare-metal stent ISR. In this setting, EES reduce the need for target lesion revascularization at very long-term follow-up. (RIBS V [Restenosis Intra-Stent of Bare Metal Stents: Paclitaxel-Eluting Balloon vs Everolimus-Eluting Stent] [RIBS V]; NCT01239953). Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Interventions to increase enrollment in a large multicenter phase 3 trial of carotid stenting vs. endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longbottom, Mary E; Roberts, Jamie N; Tom, Meelee; Hughes, Susan E; Howard, Virginia J; Sheffet, Alice J; Meschia, James F; Brott, Thomas G

    2012-08-01

    Randomized clinical trials often encounter slow enrollment. Failing to meet sample size requirements has scientific, financial, and ethical implications. We report interventions used to accelerate recruitment in a large multicenter clinical trial that was not meeting prespecified enrollment commitments. The Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs. Stenting Trial began randomization in December 2000. To accelerate enrollment, multiple recruitment tactics were initiated, which included expanding the number of sites, hiring a recruitment director (May 2003), broadening eligibility criteria (April 2005), branding with a study logo, Web site, and recruitment materials, increasing site visits by study leadership, sending e-mails to the site teams after every enrollment, distributing electronic newsletters, and implementing investigator and coordinator conferences. From December 2000 through May 2003, 14 sites became active (54 patients randomized), from June 2003 through April 2005, 44 sites were added (404 patients randomized), and from May 2005 through July 2008, 54 sites were added (2044 patients randomized). During these time intervals, the number of patients enrolled per site per year was 1·5, 3·6, and 5·6. For the single years 2004 to 2008, the mean monthly randomization rates per year were 19·7, 38·1, 56·4, 53·0, and 54·7 (annualized), respectively. Enrollment was highest after recruitment tactics were implemented: 677 patients in 2006, 636 in 2007, and 657 in 2008 (annualized). The prespecified sample size of 2502 patients, 47% asymptomatic, was accomplished on July 2008. Aggressive recruitment tactics and investment in a full-time recruitment director who can lead implementation may be effective in accelerating recruitment in multicenter trials. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2012 World Stroke Organization.

  1. Blockchain protocols in clinical trials: Transparency and traceability of consent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benchoufi, Mehdi; Porcher, Raphael; Ravaud, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    Clinical trial consent for protocols and their revisions should be transparent for patients and traceable for stakeholders. Our goal is to implement a process allowing for collection of patients’ informed consent, which is bound to protocol revisions, storing and tracking the consent in a secure, unfalsifiable and publicly verifiable way, and enabling the sharing of this information in real time. For that, we build a consent workflow using a trending technology called Blockchain. This is a distributed technology that brings a built-in layer of transparency and traceability. From a more general and prospective point of view, we believe Blockchain technology brings a paradigmatical shift to the entire clinical research field. We designed a Proof-of-Concept protocol consisting of time-stamping each step of the patient’s consent collection using Blockchain, thus archiving and historicising the consent through cryptographic validation in a securely unfalsifiable and transparent way. For each protocol revision, consent was sought again.  We obtained a single document, in an open format, that accounted for the whole consent collection process: a time-stamped consent status regarding each version of the protocol. This document cannot be corrupted and can be checked on any dedicated public website. It should be considered a robust proof of data. However, in a live clinical trial, the authentication system should be strengthened to remove the need for third parties, here trial stakeholders, and give participative control to the peer users. In the future, the complex data flow of a clinical trial could be tracked by using Blockchain, which core functionality, named Smart Contract, could help prevent clinical trial events not occurring in the correct chronological order, for example including patients before they consented or analysing case report form data before freezing the database. Globally, Blockchain could help with reliability, security, transparency and could be

  2. Blockchain protocols in clinical trials: Transparency and traceability of consent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benchoufi, Mehdi; Porcher, Raphael; Ravaud, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Clinical trial consent for protocols and their revisions should be transparent for patients and traceable for stakeholders. Our goal is to implement a process allowing for collection of patients' informed consent, which is bound to protocol revisions, storing and tracking the consent in a secure, unfalsifiable and publicly verifiable way, and enabling the sharing of this information in real time. For that, we build a consent workflow using a trending technology called Blockchain. This is a distributed technology that brings a built-in layer of transparency and traceability. From a more general and prospective point of view, we believe Blockchain technology brings a paradigmatical shift to the entire clinical research field. We designed a Proof-of-Concept protocol consisting of time-stamping each step of the patient's consent collection using Blockchain, thus archiving and historicising the consent through cryptographic validation in a securely unfalsifiable and transparent way. For each protocol revision, consent was sought again.  We obtained a single document, in an open format, that accounted for the whole consent collection process: a time-stamped consent status regarding each version of the protocol. This document cannot be corrupted and can be checked on any dedicated public website. It should be considered a robust proof of data. However, in a live clinical trial, the authentication system should be strengthened to remove the need for third parties, here trial stakeholders, and give participative control to the peer users. In the future, the complex data flow of a clinical trial could be tracked by using Blockchain, which core functionality, named Smart Contract, could help prevent clinical trial events not occurring in the correct chronological order, for example including patients before they consented or analysing case report form data before freezing the database. Globally, Blockchain could help with reliability, security, transparency and could be a

  3. 3-Year Clinical Follow-Up of the RIBS IV Clinical Trial: A Prospective Randomized Study of Drug-Eluting Balloons Versus Everolimus-Eluting Stents in Patients With In-Stent Restenosis in Coronary Arteries Previously Treated With Drug-Eluting Stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, Fernando; Pérez-Vizcayno, María José; Cuesta, Javier; García Del Blanco, Bruno; García-Touchard, Arturo; López-Mínguez, José Ramón; Masotti, Mónica; Zueco, Javier; Cequier, Angel; Velázquez, Maite; Moreno, Raúl; Mainar, Vicente; Domínguez, Antonio; Moris, Cesar; Molina, Eduardo; Rivero, Fernando; Jiménez-Quevedo, Pilar; Gonzalo, Nieves; Fernández-Pérez, Cristina

    2018-05-28

    This study sought to compare the long-term safety and efficacy of drug-eluting balloons (DEB) and everolimus-eluting stents (EES) in patients with in-stent restenosis (ISR) of drug-eluting stents (DES). Treatment of patients with DES-ISR remains a challenge. The RIBS IV (Restenosis Intra-Stent of Drug-Eluting Stents: Drug-Eluting Balloons vs Everolimus-Eluting Stents) trial is a prospective multicenter randomized clinical trial comparing DEB and EES in patients with DES-ISR. The pre-specified comparison of the 3-year clinical outcomes obtained with these interventions is the main objective of the present study. A total of 309 patients with DES-ISR were randomized to DEB (n = 154) or EES (n = 155). At angiographic follow-up, the in-segment minimal lumen diameter was larger in the EES arm (2.03 ± 0.7 mm vs. 1.80 ± 0.6 mm; p 1 year) target lesion revascularization (2.6% vs. 4%) and target vessel revascularization (4% vs. 6.6%) was similar in the 2 arms. Rates of cardiac death (3.9% vs. 3.2%), myocardial infarction (2.6% vs. 4.5%), and stent thrombosis (1.3% vs. 2.6%) at 3 years were also similar in both arms. The 3-year clinical follow-up of this randomized clinical trial demonstrates that in patients with DES-ISR, EES reduce the need for repeat interventions compared with DEB. (Restenosis Intra-Stent of Drug-Eluting Stents: Drug-Eluting Balloons vs Everolimus-Eluting Stents [RIBS IV]; NCT01239940). Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Costs and cost-effectiveness of carotid stenting versus endarterectomy for patients at standard surgical risk: results from the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy Versus Stenting Trial (CREST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilain, Katherine R; Magnuson, Elizabeth A; Li, Haiyan; Clark, Wayne M; Begg, Richard J; Sam, Albert D; Sternbergh, W Charles; Weaver, Fred A; Gray, William A; Voeks, Jenifer H; Brott, Thomas G; Cohen, David J

    2012-09-01

    The Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy versus Stenting Trial (CREST) demonstrated similar rates of the primary composite end point between carotid artery stenting (CAS) and carotid endarterectomy (CEA), although the risk of stroke was higher with CAS, and the risk of myocardial infarction was higher with CEA. Given the large number of patients who are candidates for these procedures, an understanding of their relative cost and cost-effectiveness may have important implications for health care policy and treatment guidelines. We performed a formal economic evaluation alongside the CREST trial. Costs were estimated from all trial participants over the first year of follow-up using a combination of resource use data and hospital billing data. Patient-level health use scores were obtained using data from the SF-36. We then used a Markov disease-simulation model calibrated to the CREST results to project 10-year costs and quality-adjusted life expectancy for the 2 treatment groups. Although initial procedural costs were $1025/patient higher with CAS, postprocedure costs and physician costs were lower such that total costs for the index hospitalization were similar for the CAS and CEA groups ($15 055 versus $14 816; mean difference, $239/patient; 95% CI for difference, -$297 to $775). Neither follow-up costs after discharge nor total 1-year costs differed significantly. For the CREST population, model-based projections over a 10-year time horizon demonstrated that CAS would result in a mean incremental cost of $524/patient and a reduction in quality-adjusted life expectancy of 0.008 years compared with CEA. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis demonstrated that CEA was economically attractive at an incremental cost-effectiveness threshold of $50 000/quality-adjusted life-year gained in 54% of samples, whereas CAS was economically attractive in 46%. Despite slightly lower in-trial costs and lower rates of stroke with CEA compared with CAS, projected 10-year outcomes

  5. FFR-guided multivessel stenting reduces urgent revascularization compared with infarct-related artery only stenting in ST-elevation myocardial infarction: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ankur; Bajaj, Navkaranbir S; Arora, Pankaj; Arora, Garima; Qamar, Arman; Bhatt, Deepak L

    2018-02-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have shown fractional flow reserve-guided (FFR) multivessel stenting to be superior to infarct-related artery (IRA) only stenting in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and multivessel disease. This effect was mainly driven by a reduction in overall repeat revascularization. However, the ability to assess the effect of this strategy on urgent revascularization or reinfarction was underpowered in individual trials. We searched Pubmed, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL, and Web of Science for RCTs of FFR-guided multivessel stenting versus IRA-only stenting in STEMI with multivessel disease. The outcomes of interest were death, reinfarction, urgent, and non-urgent repeat revascularization. Risk ratios (RR) were pooled using the DerSimonian and Laird random-effects model. After review of 786 citations, 2 RCTs were included. The pooled results demonstrated a significant reduction in the composite of death, reinfarction, or revascularization in the FFR-guided multivessel stenting group versus IRA-only stenting group (RR [95%, Confidence Interval]: 0.49 [0.33-0.72], p<0.001). This risk reduction was driven mainly by a reduction in repeat revascularization, both urgent (0.41 [0.24-0.71], p=0.002) and non-urgent revascularization (0.31 [0.19-0.50], p<0.001). Pooled RR for reinfarction was lower in the FFR-guided strategy, but was not statistically significant (0.71[0.39-1.31], p=0.28). This systematic review and meta-analysis suggests that a strategy of FFR-guided multivessel stenting in STEMI patients reduces not only overall repeat revascularization but also urgent revascularization. The effect on reinfarction needs to be evaluated in larger trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Paclitaxel-eluting stents versus everolimus-eluting coronary stents in a diabetic population: two-year follow-up of the TUXEDO-India trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Upendra; Bhagwat, Ajit; Pinto, Brian; Goel, Praveen K; Jagtap, Prashant; Sathe, Shireesh; Wander, Gurpreet S; Arambam, Priyadarshini; Bangalore, Sripal

    2017-11-20

    The aim of this study was to report whether the superiority of the everolimus-eluting stent (EES) vs. the paclitaxel-eluting stent (PES) at one-year follow-up in the Taxus Element versus Xience Prime in a Diabetic Population (TUXEDO)-India trial was sustained at longer-term follow-up. One thousand eight hundred and thirty (1,830) patients with diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease were randomised to EES vs. PES. Follow-up data up to two years were available in 1,701 (92.9%) patients. The primary endpoint was target vessel failure (TVF), defined as the composite of cardiac death, target vessel myocardial infarction (TV-MI), or ischaemia-driven target vessel revascularisation (TVR). Treatment with EES had a lower two-year rate of TVF (4.3% vs. 6.6%, p=0.03). Of the secondary endpoints, EES significantly reduced any MI (1.6% vs. 3.5%, p=0.01), TV-MI (0.7% vs. 3.1%, p=0.0001), ST (0.4% vs. 2.2%, p=0.001), cardiac death or target vessel MI (2.9% vs. 4.8%, p=0.04) and TLR (1.9% vs. 3.7%, p=0.02), compared with PES. Between one year and two years, no significant differences in the clinical outcomes were observed (pinteraction >0.05). In this adequately powered trial, the benefits of EES vs. PES in a diabetic population seen at one year were maintained at two years.

  7. Determining clinical benefits of drug-eluting coronary stents according to the population risk profile: a meta-regression from 31 randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Raul; Martin-Reyes, Roberto; Jimenez-Valero, Santiago; Sanchez-Recalde, Angel; Galeote, Guillermo; Calvo, Luis; Plaza, Ignacio; Lopez-Sendon, Jose-Luis

    2011-04-01

    The use of drug-eluting stents (DES) in unfavourable patients has been associated with higher rates of clinical complications and stent thrombosis, and because of that concerns about the use of DES in high-risk settings have been raised. This study sought to demonstrate that the clinical benefit of DES increases as the risk profile of the patients increases. A meta-regression analysis from 31 randomized trials that compared DES and bare-metal stents, including overall 12,035 patients, was performed. The relationship between the clinical benefit of using DES (number of patients to treat [NNT] to prevent one episode of target lesion revascularization [TLR]), and the risk profile of the population (rate of TLR in patients allocated to bare-metal stents) in each trial was evaluated. The clinical benefit of DES increased as the risk profile of each study population increased: NNT for TLR=31.1-1.2 (TLR for bare-metal stents); prisk profile of each study population, since the effect of DES in mortality, myocardial infarction, and stent thrombosis, was not adversely affected by the risk profile of each study population (95% confidence interval for β value 0.09 to 0.11, -0.12 to 0.19, and -0.03 to-0.15 for mortality, myocardial infarction, and stent thrombosis, respectively). The clinical benefit of DES increases as the risk profile of the patients increases, without affecting safety. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Efficacy and safety of zotarolimus-eluting and sirolimus-eluting coronary stents in routine clinical care (SORT OUT III): a randomised controlled superiority trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Klaus; Maeng, Michael; Kaltoft, Anne

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In low-risk patients, the zotarolimus-eluting stent has been shown to reduce rates of restenosis without increasing the risk of stent thrombosis. We compared the efficacy and safety of the zotarolimus-eluting stent versus the sirolimus-eluting stent in patients with coronary artery...... disease who were receiving routine clinical care with no direct follow-up. METHODS: We did a single-blind, all-comer superiority trial in adult patients with chronic stable coronary artery disease or acute coronary syndromes, and at least one target lesion. Patients were treated at one of five...... Danish administrative and health-care registries. The primary endpoint was a composite of major adverse cardiac events within 9 months: cardiac death, myocardial infarction, and target vessel revascularisation. Intention-to-treat analyses were done at 9-month and 18-month follow-up. This trial...

  9. Treatment strategies for coronary in-stent restenosis: systematic review and hierarchical Bayesian network meta-analysis of 24 randomised trials and 4880 patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacoppo, Daniele; Gargiulo, Giuseppe; Aruta, Patrizia; Capranzano, Piera; Tamburino, Corrado

    2015-01-01

    Study question What is the most safe and effective interventional treatment for coronary in-stent restenosis? Methods In a hierarchical Bayesian network meta-analysis, PubMed, Embase, Scopus, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, ScienceDirect, and major scientific websites were screened up to 10 August 2015. Randomised controlled trials of patients with any type of coronary in-stent restenosis (either of bare metal stents or drug eluting stents; and either first or recurrent instances) were included. Trials including multiple treatments at the same time in the same group or comparing variants of the same intervention were excluded. Primary endpoints were target lesion revascularisation and late lumen loss, both at six to 12 months. The main analysis was complemented by network subanalyses, standard pairwise comparisons, and subgroup and sensitivity analyses. Study answer and limitations Twenty four trials (4880 patients), including seven interventional treatments, were identified. Compared with plain balloons, bare metal stents, brachytherapy, rotational atherectomy, and cutting balloons, drug coated balloons and drug eluting stents were associated with a reduced risk of target lesion revascularisation and major adverse cardiac events, and with reduced late lumen loss. Treatment ranking indicated that drug eluting stents had the highest probability (61.4%) of being the most effective for target lesion vascularisation; drug coated balloons were similarly indicated as the most effective treatment for late lumen loss (probability 70.3%). The comparative efficacy of drug coated balloons and drug eluting stents was similar for target lesion revascularisation (summary odds ratio 1.10, 95% credible interval 0.59 to 2.01) and late lumen loss reduction (mean difference in minimum lumen diameter 0.04 mm, 95% credible interval −0.20 to 0.10). Risks of death, myocardial infarction, and stent thrombosis were comparable across all treatments, but these analyses were limited by a

  10. Bronchoscopic lung-volume reduction with Exhale airway stents for emphysema (EASE trial) : randomised, sham-controlled, multicentre trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shah, P. L.; Slebos, D-J; Cardoso, P. F. G.; Cetti, E.; Voelker, K.; Levine, B.; Russell, M. E.; Goldin, J.; Brown, M.; Cooper, J. D.; Sybrecht, G. W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Airway bypass is a bronchoscopic lung-volume reduction procedure for emphysema whereby transbronchial passages into the lung are created to release trapped air, supported with paclitaxel-coated stents to ease the mechanics of breathing. The aim of the EASE (Exhale airway stents for

  11. Early Ventricular Tachycardia or Fibrillation in Patients With ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction Undergoing Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention and Impact on Mortality and Stent Thrombosis (from the Harmonizing Outcomes with Revascularization and Stents in Acute Myocardial Infarction Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmidou, Ioanna; Embacher, Monica; McAndrew, Thomas; Dizon, José M; Mehran, Roxana; Ben-Yehuda, Ori; Mintz, Gary S; Stone, Gregg W

    2017-11-15

    The prevalence and impact of early ventricular arrhythmias (ventricular tachycardia [VT]/ventricular fibrillation [VF]) occurring before mechanical revascularization for acute ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) treated with percutaneous coronary intervention are poorly understood. We sought to investigate the association between early VT/VF and long-term clinical outcomes using data from the Harmonizing Outcomes with Revascularization and Stents in Acute Myocardial Infarction trial. Among 3,602 patients with STEMI, 108 patients (3.0%) had early VT/VF. Baseline clinical characteristics were similar in patients with versus without early VT/VF. Patients with early VT/VF had shorter symptom-to-balloon times and lower left ventricular ejection fraction and underwent more frequent thrombectomy compared with patients without early VT/VF. Adjusted 3-year rates of all-cause death (15.7% vs 6.5%; adjusted hazard ratio 2.62, 95% confidence interval 1.48 to 4.61, p stent thrombosis (13.7% vs 5.7%; adjusted hazard ratio 2.74, 95% confidence interval 1.52 to 4.93, p Stents in Acute Myocardial Infarction trial, VT/VF occurring before coronary angiography and revascularization in patients with STEMI was strongly associated with increased 3-year rates of death and stent thrombosis. Further investigation into the mechanisms underlying the increased risk of early stent thrombosis in patients with early VT/VF is required. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Does Combination Therapy with Tamsulosin and Tolterodine Improve Ureteral Stent Discomfort Compared with Tamsulosin Alone? A Double-Blind, Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivalingam, Sri; Streeper, Necole M; Sehgal, Priyanka D; Sninsky, Brian C; Best, Sara L; Nakada, Stephen Y

    2016-02-01

    Ureteral stent discomfort is a significant postoperative problem for many patients. Despite the use of narcotics and α-blockers patients often experience bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms and pain, which impair daily activities. We compared combination therapy with an α-blocker and an anticholinergic to monotherapy with an α-blocker. A double-blind, randomized, controlled trial was performed from December 2012 to April 2014. A total of 80 patients were randomized, including 44 to the combination group (tamsulosin 0.4 mg and tolterodine early release 4 mg) and 36 to the monotherapy group (tamsulosin 0.4 mg and placebo). Patients with preexisting ureteral stent placement or current anticholinergic therapy were excluded from study. Patients completed USSQ (Urinary Stent Symptom Questionnaire) before stent placement on the day of surgery, the day after stent placement, the morning of stent removal and the day after stent removal. The questionnaire included questions regarding urinary symptoms, general health, body pain, and work and sexual history. A total of 80 patients (40 males and 40 females) were studied. Mean age was 51.5 vs 51.3 years (p = 0.95) and mean body mass index was 33.6 vs 31.9 kg/m(2) (p = 0.44) in monotherapy group 1 vs combination therapy group 2. Between the 2 groups there was no significant difference in urinary symptoms, body pain and activities of daily living from baseline to just before stent removal (p = 0.95, 0.40 and 0.95, respectively). Although there was no difference between the groups, both showed improvement in urinary symptoms from the time of initial stent insertion to just prior to stent removal (difference -0.50 for combination therapy and -0.40 for monotherapy). The mean stent indwelling time of 9.6 and 8.7 days in the combination and monotherapy groups, respectively, did not differ (p = 0.67). On ANOVA it had no significant impact on results (p = 0.64). Combination therapy with tamsulosin and tolterodine does not

  13. Modified nasolacrimal duct stenting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Min; Jin Mei; Chen Huanjun; Li Yi

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Traditional nasolacrimal duct stenting possesses some shortcoming including difficulty of pulling ball head guide wire from the nasal cavity with turbinate hypertrophy and nasal septal deviation. The new method of nose-oral tube track establishment can overcome the forementioned and increase the successful rate. Methods: 5 F catheter and arterial sheath were modified to be nasolacrimal duct stent delivery device respectively. Antegrade dacryocystography was taken firstly to display the obstructed site and followed by the modified protocol of inserting the guide wire through nasolacrimal duct and nasal cavity, and establishing the stent delivery track for retrograde stent placement. Results: 5 epiphora patients with failure implantation by traditional method were all succeeded through the modified stenting (100%). During 6-mouth follow-up, no serious complications and reocclusion occurred. Conclusion: The establishment of eye-nose-mouth-nose of external nasal guide wire track can improve the successful rate of nasolacrimal duct stenting. (authors)

  14. First-in-man randomised comparison of the BuMA Supreme biodegradable polymer sirolimus-eluting stent versus a durable polymer zotarolimus-eluting coronary stent: the PIONEER trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Birgelen, Clemens; Asano, Taku; Amoroso, Giovanni; Aminian, Adel; Brugaletta, Salvatore; Vrolix, Mathias; Hernandez-Antolín, Rosana; van de Harst, Pim; Iñiguez, Andres; Janssens, Luc; Smits, Pieter C; Wykrzykowska, Joanna J; Ribeiro, Vasco Gama; Pereira, Hélder; da Silva, Pedro Canas; Piek, Jan J; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Serruys, Patrick W; Sabaté, Manel

    2018-04-20

    A second iteration of a sirolimus-eluting stent (SES) that has a biodegradable PLGA polymer coating with an electrografting base layer on a thin-strut (80 µm) cobalt-chromium platform (BuMA Supreme; SINOMED, Tianjin, China) has been developed. This first-in-man trial aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of the novel device. This randomised, multicentre, single-blinded, non-inferiority trial compared the BuMA Supreme SES versus a contemporary durable polymer zotarolimus-eluting stent (ZES) in terms of angiographic in-stent late lumen loss (LLL) at nine-month follow-up as the primary endpoint. A total of 170 patients were randomly allocated to treatment with either SES (n=83) or ZES (n=87). At nine-month angiographic follow-up, in-stent LLL was 0.29±0.33 mm in the SES group and 0.14±0.37 mm in the ZES group (pnon-inferiority=0.45). The in-stent percent diameter stenosis and the binary restenosis rate of the two treatment arms were similar (19.2±12.0% vs. 16.1±12.6%, p=0.09, and 3.3% vs. 4.4%, p=1.00, respectively). At 12-month clinical follow-up, there was no difference between treatment arms with regard to the device-oriented composite clinical endpoint (4.9% vs. 5.7%; p=0.72). The PIONEER trial did not meet its primary endpoint in terms of in-stent LLL at nine-month follow-up. However, this result did not translate into any increase in restenosis rate or impairment in 12-month clinical outcomes.

  15. A sirolimus-eluting bioabsorbable polymer-coated stent (MiStent) versus an everolimus-eluting durable polymer stent (Xience) after percutaneous coronary intervention (DESSOLVE III): a randomised, single-blind, multicentre, non-inferiority, phase 3 trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Winter, Robbert J.; Katagiri, Yuki; Asano, Taku; Milewski, Krzysztof P.; Lurz, Philipp; Buszman, Pawel; Jessurun, Gillian A. J.; Koch, Karel T.; Troquay, Roland P. T.; Hamer, Bas J. B.; Ophuis, Ton Oude; Wöhrle, Jochen; Wyderka, Rafał; Cayla, Guillaume; Hofma, Sjoerd H.; Levesque, Sébastien; Żurakowski, Aleksander; Fischer, Dieter; Kośmider, Maciej; Goube, Pascal; Arkenbout, E. Karin; Noutsias, Michel; Ferrari, Markus W.; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Wijns, William; Serruys, Patrick W.

    2018-01-01

    Background MiStent is a drug-eluting stent with a fully absorbable polymer coating containing and embedding a microcrystalline form of sirolimus into the vessel wall. It was developed to overcome the limitation of current durable polymer drug-eluting stents eluting amorphous sirolimus. The clinical

  16. Systematic Review of Infrapopliteal Drug-Eluting Stents: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsanos, Konstantinos, E-mail: katsanos@med.upatras.gr [NHS Foundation Trust, King' s Health Partners, Department of Interventional Radiology, Guy' s and St. Thomas' Hospitals (United Kingdom); Spiliopoulos, Stavros [Patras University Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology, School of Medicine (Greece); Diamantopoulos, Athanasios [NHS Foundation Trust, King' s Health Partners, Department of Interventional Radiology, Guy' s and St. Thomas' Hospitals (United Kingdom); Karnabatidis, Dimitris [Patras University Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology, School of Medicine (Greece); Sabharwal, Tarun [NHS Foundation Trust, King' s Health Partners, Department of Interventional Radiology, Guy' s and St. Thomas' Hospitals (United Kingdom); Siablis, Dimitris [Patras University Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology, School of Medicine (Greece)

    2013-06-15

    IntroductionDrug-eluting stents (DES) have been proposed for the treatment of infrapopliteal arterial disease. We performed a systematic review to provide a qualitative analysis and quantitative data synthesis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing infrapopliteal DES.Materials and MethodsPubMed (Medline), EMBASE (Excerpta Medical Database), AMED (Allied and Complementary medicine Database), Scopus, CENTRAL (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials), online content, and abstract meetings were searched in September 2012 for eligible RCTs according to the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses selection process. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool. Primary endpoint was primary patency defined as absence of {>=}50 % vessel restenosis at 1 year. Secondary outcome measures included patient survival, limb amputations, change of Rutherford-Becker class, target lesion revascularization (TLR) events, complete wound healing, and event-free survival at 1 year. Risk ratio (RRs) were calculated using the Mantel-Haenszel fixed effects model, and number-needed-to-treat values are reported.ResultsThree RCTs involving 501 patients with focal infrapopliteal lesions were analyzed (YUKON-BTX, DESTINY, and ACHILLES trials). All three RCTs included relatively short and focal infrapopliteal lesions. At 1 year, there was clear superiority of infrapopliteal DES compared with control treatments in terms of significantly higher primary patency (80.0 vs. 58.5 %; pooled RR = 1.37, 95 % confidence interval [CI] = 1.18-1.58, p < 0.0001; number-needed-to-treat (NNT) value = 4.8), improvement of Rutherford-Becker class (79.0 vs. 69.6 %; pooled RR = 1.13, 95 % CI = 1.002-1.275, p = 0.045; NNT = 11.1), decreased TLR events (9.9 vs. 22.0 %; pooled RR = 0.45, 95 % CI = 0.28-0.73, p = 0.001; NNT = 8.3), improved wound healing (76.8 vs. 59.7 %; pooled RR = 1.29, 95 % CI = 1.02-1.62, p = 0.04; NNT = 5.9), and better overall

  17. Systematic Review of Infrapopliteal Drug-Eluting Stents: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsanos, Konstantinos; Spiliopoulos, Stavros; Diamantopoulos, Athanasios; Karnabatidis, Dimitris; Sabharwal, Tarun; Siablis, Dimitris

    2013-01-01

    IntroductionDrug-eluting stents (DES) have been proposed for the treatment of infrapopliteal arterial disease. We performed a systematic review to provide a qualitative analysis and quantitative data synthesis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing infrapopliteal DES.Materials and MethodsPubMed (Medline), EMBASE (Excerpta Medical Database), AMED (Allied and Complementary medicine Database), Scopus, CENTRAL (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials), online content, and abstract meetings were searched in September 2012 for eligible RCTs according to the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses selection process. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration’s tool. Primary endpoint was primary patency defined as absence of ≥50 % vessel restenosis at 1 year. Secondary outcome measures included patient survival, limb amputations, change of Rutherford–Becker class, target lesion revascularization (TLR) events, complete wound healing, and event-free survival at 1 year. Risk ratio (RRs) were calculated using the Mantel–Haenszel fixed effects model, and number-needed-to-treat values are reported.ResultsThree RCTs involving 501 patients with focal infrapopliteal lesions were analyzed (YUKON-BTX, DESTINY, and ACHILLES trials). All three RCTs included relatively short and focal infrapopliteal lesions. At 1 year, there was clear superiority of infrapopliteal DES compared with control treatments in terms of significantly higher primary patency (80.0 vs. 58.5 %; pooled RR = 1.37, 95 % confidence interval [CI] = 1.18–1.58, p < 0.0001; number-needed-to-treat (NNT) value = 4.8), improvement of Rutherford–Becker class (79.0 vs. 69.6 %; pooled RR = 1.13, 95 % CI = 1.002–1.275, p = 0.045; NNT = 11.1), decreased TLR events (9.9 vs. 22.0 %; pooled RR = 0.45, 95 % CI = 0.28–0.73, p = 0.001; NNT = 8.3), improved wound healing (76.8 vs. 59.7 %; pooled RR = 1.29, 95 % CI = 1.02–1.62, p = 0.04; NNT = 5.9), and better

  18. Ureteral Stenting after Uncomplicated Ureteroscopy for Distal Ureteral Stones: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. El Harrech

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. We compared outcome and complications after uncomplicated ureteroscopic treatment of distal ureteral calculi with or without the use of ureteral stents. Materials and Methods. 117 patients, prospectively divided into three groups to receive a double j stent (group 1, 42 patients, ureteral stent (group 2, 37 patients, or no stent (group 3, 38 patients, underwent ureteroscopic treatment of distal ureteral calculi. Stone characteristics, operative time, postoperative pain, lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS, analgesia need, rehospitalization, stone-free rate, and late postoperative complications were all studied. Results. There were no significant differences in preoperative data. There was no significant difference between the three groups regarding hematuria, fever, flank pain, urinary tract infection, and rehospitalisation. At 48 hours and 1 week, frequency/urgency and dysuria were significantly less in the nonstented group. When comparing group 1 and group 3, patients with double j stents had statistically significantly more bladder pain (P=0.003, frequency/urgency (P=0.002, dysuria (P=0.001, and need of analgesics (P=0.001. All patients who underwent imaging postoperatively were without evidence of obstruction or ureteral stricture. Conclusions. Uncomplicated ureteroscopy for distal ureteral calculi without intraoperative ureteral dilation can safely be performed without placement of a ureteral stent.

  19. Spectral Imaging for Intracranial Stents and Stent Lumen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Chi-Lun; Tseng, Ying-Chi; Chen, David Yen-Ting; Chen, Chi-Jen; Hsu, Hui-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Application of computed tomography for monitoring intracranial stents is limited because of stent-related artifacts. Our purpose was to evaluate the effect of gemstone spectral imaging on the intracranial stent and stent lumen. In vitro, we scanned Enterprise stent phantom and a stent-cheese complex using the gemstone spectral imaging protocol. Follow-up gemstone spectral images of 15 consecutive patients with placement of Enterprise from January 2013 to September 2014 were also retrospectively reviewed. We used 70-keV, 140-keV, iodine (water), iodine (calcium), and iodine (hydroxyapatite) images to evaluate their effect on the intracranial stent and stent lumen. Two regions of interest were individually placed in stent lumen and adjacent brain tissue. Contrast-to-noise ratio was measured to determine image quality. The maximal diameter of stent markers was also measured to evaluate stent-related artifact. Two radiologists independently graded the visibility of the lumen at the maker location by using a 4-point scale. The mean of grading score, contrast/noise ratio and maximal diameter of stent markers were compared among all modes. All results were analyzed by SPSS version 20. In vitro, iodine (water) images decreased metallic artifact of stent makers to the greatest degree. The most areas of cheese were observed on iodine (water) images. In vivo, iodine (water) images had the smallest average diameter of stent markers (0.33 ± 0.17mm; P stent lumen (160.03 ±37.79; P stent-related artifacts of Enterprise and enhance contrast of in-stent lumen. Spectral imaging may be considered a noninvasive modality for following-up patients with in-stent stenosis.

  20. Peri-interventional antibiotic prophylaxis only vs continuous low-dose antibiotic treatment in patients with JJ stents: a prospective randomised trial analysing the effect on urinary tract infections and stent-related symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moltzahn, Felix; Haeni, Katharina; Birkhäuser, Frédéric D; Roth, Beat; Thalmann, George N; Zehnder, Pascal

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the antibiotic treatment regime in patients with indwelling JJ stents, the benefits and disadvantages of a peri-interventional antibiotic prophylaxis were compared with those of a continuous low-dose antibiotic treatment in a prospective randomised trial. In all, 95 patients were randomised to either receive peri-interventional antibiotic prophylaxis during stent insertion only (group A, 44 patients) or to additionally receive a continuous low-dose antibiotic treatment until stent removal (group B, 51). Evaluations for urinary tract infections (UTI), stent-related symptoms (SRSs) and drug side-effects were performed before stent insertion and consecutively after 1, 2 and 4 weeks and/or at stent withdrawal. All patients received a peri-interventional antibiotic prophylaxis with 1.2 g amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (625 mg) once daily was administered for continuous low-dose treatment (group B). Primary endpoints were the overall rates of UTIs and SRSs. Secondary endpoints were the rates and severity of drug side-effects. Neither the overall UTI rates (group A: 9% vs group B: 10%), nor the rates of febrile UTIs (group A: 7% vs group B: 6%) were different between the groups. Similarly, SRS rates did not differ (group A: 98% vs group B: 96%). Antibiotic side-effect symptoms were to be increased in patients treated with low-dose antibiotics. A continuous antibiotic low-dose treatment during the entire JJ stent-indwelling time does not reduce the quantity or severity of UTIs and has no effect on SRSs either compared with a peri-interventional antibiotic prophylaxis only. © 2012 BJU International.

  1. Carotid artery stenting in high surgical risk patients using the FiberNet embolic protection system: the EPIC trial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myla, Subbarao; Bacharach, J Michael; Ansel, Gary M; Dippel, Eric J; McCormick, Daniel J; Popma, Jeffrey J

    2010-05-01

    The multicenter EPIC (FiberNet Embolic Protection System in Carotid Artery Stenting Trial) single-arm trial evaluated the 30-day outcomes of a new design concept for embolic protection during carotid artery stenting (CAS). Embolic protection filters available for use during CAS include fixed and over-the-wire systems that rely on embolic material capture within a "basket" structure. The FiberNet Embolic Protection System (EPS), which features a very low crossing profile, consists of a three-dimensional fiber-based filter distally mounted on a 0.014 inch guidewire with integrated aspiration during filter retrieval. The trial enrolled 237 patients from 26 centers. Demographics, clinical and lesion characteristics, as well as adverse events through a 30-day follow-up were recorded. The mean age of the patients was 74 years, 64% were male and 20% had symptomatic carotid artery disease. The combined major adverse event (MAE) rate at 30 days for all death, stroke, and myocardial infarction was 3.0%. There were three major strokes (two ischemic and one hemorrhagic) and two minor strokes (both ischemic) for a 2.1% 30-day stroke rate. The procedural technical success rate was 97.5% and macroscopic evidence of debris was reported in 90.9% of the procedures. The FiberNet EPS, used with commercially available stents, produced low stroke rates following CAS in high surgical risk patients presenting with carotid artery disease. The unique filter design including aspiration during retrieval may have contributed to the low 30-day stroke rate reported during CAS in patients considered at high risk for complications following carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Copyright 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Comparison of Outcomes in Patients With Versus Without Diabetes Mellitus After Revascularization With Everolimus- and Sirolimus-Eluting Stents (from the SORT OUT IV Trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Thayssen, Per; Junker, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased risk of major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) after percutaneous coronary intervention. The purpose of this substudy of the SORT OUT IV trial was to compare clinical outcomes in patients with and without diabetes mellitus treated with everolimus-eluting stents...... (EESs) or sirolimus-eluting stents (SESs). In total 2,774 patients (390 with diabetes, 14.1%) were randomized to stent implantation with EESs (n = 1,390, diabetes in 14.0%) or SESs (n = 1,384, diabetes in 14.2%). Randomization was stratified by presence/absence of diabetes. The primary end point...... was MACEs, a composite of cardiac death, myocardial infarction, definite stent thrombosis, or target vessel revascularization within 18 months. MACEs were higher in diabetic than in nondiabetic patients (13.1% vs 6.4%, hazard ratio [HR] 2.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.51 to 2.86). In diabetic patients...

  3. The short- and long-term outcomes of percutaneous intervention with drug-eluting stent vs bare-metal stent in saphenous vein graft disease: An updated meta-analysis of all randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheiri, Babikir; Osman, Mohammed; Abdalla, Ahmed; Ahmed, Sahar; Bachuwa, Ghassan; Hassan, Mustafa

    2018-05-11

    The use of drug-eluting stents (DES) vs bare-metal stents (BMS) in saphenous vein graft (SVG) lesions remains controversial. We conducted a meta-analysis of all randomized clinical trials comparing the outcomes of DES with BMS in SVG percutaneous coronary interventions. A search of PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, and Clinicaltrials.gov was performed for all randomized clinical trials. We evaluated the short- and long-term clinical outcomes of the following: all-cause mortality, major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), definite/probable stent thrombosis, target lesion revascularization (TLR), and target-vessel revascularization (TVR). From a total of 1582 patients in 6 randomized clinical trials, 797 had DES and 785 had BMS. Patients with DES had lower short-term MACE, TLR, and TVR in comparison with BMS (odds ratio [OR]: 0.56, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.35-0.91, P = 0.02; OR: 0.43, 95% CI: 0.19-0.99, P = 0.05; and OR: 0.45, 95% CI: 0.22-0.95, P = 0.04, respectively). However, there were no different outcomes for all-cause mortality (P = 0.63) or stent thrombosis (P = 0.21). With long-term follow-up, there were no significant reductions of MACE (P = 0.20), TLR (P = 0.57), TVR (P = 0.07), all-cause mortality (P = 0.29), and stent thrombosis (P = 0.76). The use of DES in SVG lesions was associated with lower short-term MACE, TLR, and TVR in comparison with BMS. However, there were no significant differences with long-term follow-up. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Comparison of in vivo acute stent recoil between the bioabsorbable everolimus-eluting coronary stent and the everolimus-eluting cobalt chromium coronary stent: insights from the ABSORB and SPIRIT trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanimoto, Shuzou; Serruys, Patrick W; Thuesen, Leif

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study sought to evaluate and compare in vivo acute stent recoil of a novel bioabsorbable stent and a metallic stent. BACKGROUND: The bioabsorbable everolimus-eluting coronary stent (BVS) is composed of a poly-L-lactic acid backbone, coated with a bioabsorbable polymer containing...... the antiproliferative drug, everolimus, and expected to be totally metabolized and absorbed in the human body. Because the BVS is made from polymer, it may have more acute recoil than metallic stents in vivo. METHODS: A total of 54 patients, who underwent elective stent implantation for single de novo native coronary...... artery lesions, were enrolled: 27 patients treated with the BVS and 27 patients treated with the everolimus-eluting cobalt chromium stent (EES). Acute absolute recoil, assessed by quantitative coronary angiography, was defined as the difference between mean diameter of the last inflated balloon...

  5. Biodegradable Polymer Biolimus-Eluting Stents Versus Durable Polymer Everolimus-Eluting Stents in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease: Final 5-Year Report From the COMPARE II Trial (Abluminal Biodegradable Polymer Biolimus-Eluting Stent Versus Durable Polymer Everolimus-Eluting Stent).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachojannis, Georgios J; Smits, Pieter C; Hofma, Sjoerd H; Togni, Mario; Vázquez, Nicolás; Valdés, Mariano; Voudris, Vassilis; Slagboom, Ton; Goy, Jean-Jaques; den Heijer, Peter; van der Ent, Martin

    2017-06-26

    This analysis investigates the 5-year outcomes of the biodegradable polymer biolimus-eluting stent (BP-BES) and durable polymer everolimus-eluting stent (DP-EES) in an all-comers population undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. Recent 1- and 3-year results from randomized trials have indicated similar safety and efficacy outcomes of BP-BES and DP-EES. Whether benefits of the biodegradable polymer device arise over longer follow-up is unknown. Moreover, in-depth, prospective, long-term follow-up data on metallic drug-eluting stents with durable or biodegradable polymers are scarce. The COMPARE II trial (Abluminal Biodegradable Polymer Biolimus-Eluting Stent Versus Durable Polymer Everolimus-Eluting Stent) was a prospective, randomized, multicenter, all-comers trial in which 2,707 patients were randomly allocated (2:1) to BP-BES or DP-EES. The pre-specified endpoint at 5 years was major adverse cardiac events, a composite of cardiac death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or target vessel revascularization. Five-year follow-up was available in 2,657 patients (98%). At 5 years, major adverse cardiac events occurred in 310 patients (17.3%) in the BP-BES group and 142 patients (15.6%) in the DP-EES group (p = 0.26). The rate of the combined safety endpoint all-cause death or myocardial infarction was 15.0% in the BP-BES group versus 14.8% in the DP-EES group (p = 0.90), whereas the efficacy measure target vessel revascularization was 10.6% versus 9.0% (p = 0.18), respectively. Interestingly, definite stent thrombosis rates did not differ between groups (1.5% for BP-BES vs. 0.9% for DP-EES; p = 0.17). The 5-year analysis comparing biodegradable polymer-coated BES and the durable polymer-coated EES confirms the initial early- and mid-term results regarding similar safety and efficacy outcomes in this all-comers percutaneous coronary intervention population. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  6. Design of the Revascularization With Open Bypass vs Angioplasty and Stenting of the Lower Extremity Trial (ROBUST): a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malas, Mahmoud B; Qazi, Umair; Glebova, Natalia; Arhuidese, Isibor; Reifsnyder, Thomas; Black, James; Perler, Bruce A; Freischlag, Julie A

    2014-12-01

    To our knowledge, there is no level 1 evidence comparing open bypass with angioplasty and stenting in TransAtlantic Inter-Society Consensus (TASC II) B and C superficial femoral artery lesions. The Revascularization With Open Bypass vs Angioplasty and Stenting of the Lower Extremity Trial (ROBUST) is the first prospective randomized clinical trial comparing both treatments. To report the design of the ROBUST trial. The primary aim of the trial is to compare (1) the patency rate (primary, primary assisted, and secondary patency at 6 and 12 months), (2) improvement of quality of life, (3) clinical improvement (at least 1 Rutherford category), and (4) wound healing and limb salvage in patients presenting with critical limb ischemia; secondary aims include (1) cost-effectiveness by factoring procedure and hospital admission costs including rehabilitation, readmission, and reintervention costs, (2) amputation-free survival, (3) reintervention rate, and (4) 30-day operative mortality, morbidity, and wound and access complications. ROBUST is a prospective randomized clinical trial with the aim to enroll 320 patients with intermittent claudication that does not respond to medical management and patients with critical limb ischemia. The maximum level of medical therapy will be administered using antiplatelet agents and statins, as well as measures to control hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Patients with TASC II B or C lesions are prospectively randomized to receive either femoropopliteal bypass or percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting; patients with TASC II A and D lesions are not randomized and receive percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting or femoropopliteal bypass, respectively. All patients will be evaluated at 1, 6, and 12 months postoperatively with physical examination, ankle brachial index, duplex, and a quality-of-life questionnaire. The trial is actively enrolling participants. At the time of writing, 29 patients have been enrolled

  7. The Dresden in-stent restenosis radiation trial (DIRRT) with liquid-filled 188Re balloon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kropp, J.; Runge, R.R.; Reynen, K.; Koeckeritz, U.; Schmeisser, A.; Strasser, R.H.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In some studies intracoronary radiation therapy (IRT) to minimize the restenosis rate after PTCA proved to be effective. We evaluated the performance, safety and effectiveness of IRT with 188 Re-perrhenate filled into a standard PTCA balloon. This kind of IRT allows a self-centering homogenous dose distribution to the vessel wall. 107 patients (pts) with a mean age of 63 years (81 m, 26 fin) with in-stent restenosis (type B in 39 %, type C in 61 %) and proven ischemia were included. After routine re-PTCA with or without additional stent implantation a second standard balloon was placed into the PTCA area and filled with β - -emitting liquid 188 Re at 3 atm. Irradiation time was 525 ± 167 sec to achieve a dose of 30 Gy at 0.5 mm depth of the vessel wall. In only one procedure there was a disconnection of the 188 Re containing system and the catheter but no contamination of the cath table or lab was measured. In 16 coronaries 21 stents were additionally implanted. In the follow-up 4 stent thromboses (1 day, 37 days, 2 x 6 months) with subsequent myocardial infarction were noticed, all in pts with additionally implanted stents. 57 pts had control angiography after 4 to 6 months after therapy and 41 after one year. Restenosis (stenosis > 50 % of luminal diameter) was shown in 9 out of 12 pts (75 %) with additionally implanted stents but only in 4 out of 24 pts (17 %) with PTCA alone. Reocclusion was noticed in 3 (25 %) pts with additional stent but only in 1 pt (4 %) without. No re-restenosis occurred in 20 patients which were without finding after 6 months. Intracoronary radiation therapy (IRT) with β - -emitting liquid-filled 188 Re balloon is a safe and effective therapy method which might be used routinely. Long-term results seem satisfactory in a patient group with in-stent restenosis and high risk of re-restenosis. But the positive effect of irradiation is abolished if an additional stent after PTCA is needed. (author)

  8. Long-term outcomes after stenting versus endarterectomy for treatment of symptomatic carotid stenosis: the International Carotid Stenting Study (ICSS) randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonati, L.H.; Dobson, J.; Featherstone, R.L.; Ederle, J.; Worp, H.B. van der; Borst, G.J. de; Mali, W.P.; Beard, J.D.; Cleveland, T.; Engelter, S.T.; Lyrer, P.A.; Ford, G.A.; Dorman, P.J.; Brown, M.M.; Leeuw, F.E. de; et al.,

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stenting is an alternative to endarterectomy for treatment of carotid artery stenosis, but long-term efficacy is uncertain. We report long-term data from the randomised International Carotid Stenting Study comparison of these treatments. METHODS: Patients with symptomatic carotid

  9. Long-term outcomes after stenting versus endarterectomy for treatment of symptomatic carotid stenosis: the International Carotid Stenting Study (ICSS) randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonati, Leo H.; Dobson, Joanna; Featherstone, Roland L.; Ederle, Jörg; van der Worp, H. Bart; de Borst, Gert J.; Mali, Willem P. Th M.; Beard, Jonathan D.; Cleveland, Trevor; Engelter, Stefan T.; Lyrer, Philippe A.; Ford, Gary A.; Dorman, Paul J.; Brown, Martin M.; Bamford, J.; Beard, J.; Bland, M.; Bradbury, A. W.; Brown, M. M.; Hacke, W.; Halliday, A.; Malik, I.; Mas, J. L.; McGuire, A. J.; Sidhu, P.; Venables, G.; Clifton, A.; Gaines, P.; Collins, R.; Molyneux, A.; Naylor, R.; Warlow, C.; Ferro, J. M.; Thomas, D.; Coward, L.; Dobson, J.; Doig, D.; Ederle, J.; Featherstone, R. F.; Kennedy, F.; Tindall, H.; Turner, E.; McCabe, D. J. H.; Wallis, A.; Brooks, M.; Chambers, B.; Koelemay, M. J. W.; Nederkoorn, P. J.; Reekers, J. A. A.; Roos, Y. B. W. E. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Stenting is an alternative to endarterectomy for treatment of carotid artery stenosis, but long-term efficacy is uncertain. We report long-term data from the randomised International Carotid Stenting Study comparison of these treatments. Methods Patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis

  10. Randomized Comparison of Ridaforolimus- and Zotarolimus-Eluting Coronary Stents in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease: Primary Results From the BIONICS Trial (BioNIR Ridaforolimus-Eluting Coronary Stent System in Coronary Stenosis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandzari, David E; Smits, Pieter C; Love, Michael P; Ben-Yehuda, Ori; Banai, Shmuel; Robinson, Simon D; Jonas, Michael; Kornowski, Ran; Bagur, Rodrigo; Iniguez, Andres; Danenberg, Haim; Feldman, Robert; Jauhar, Rajiv; Chandna, Harish; Parikh, Manish; Perlman, Gidon Y; Balcells, Mercedes; Markham, Peter; Ozan, Melek Ozgu; Genereux, Philippe; Edelman, Elazer R; Leon, Martin B; Stone, Gregg W

    2017-10-03

    The safety and efficacy of a novel cobalt alloy-based coronary stent with a durable elastomeric polymer eluting the antiproliferative agent ridaforolimus for treatment of patients with coronary artery disease is undetermined. A prospective, international 1:1 randomized trial was conducted to evaluate in a noninferiority design the relative safety and efficacy of ridaforolimus-eluting stents (RESs) and slow-release zotarolimus-eluting stents among 1919 patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention at 76 centers. Inclusion criteria allowed enrollment of patients with recent myocardial infarction, total occlusions, bifurcations lesions, and other complex conditions. Baseline clinical and angiographic characteristics were similar between the groups. Overall, mean age was 63.4 years, 32.5% had diabetes mellitus, and 39.7% presented with acute coronary syndromes. At 12 months, the primary end point of target lesion failure (composite of cardiac death, target vessel-related myocardial infarction, and target lesion revascularization) was 5.4% for both devices (upper bound of 1-sided 95% confidence interval 1.8%, P noninferiority =0.001). Definite/probable stent thrombosis rates were low in both groups (0.4% RES versus 0.6% zotarolimus-eluting stent, P =0.75); 13-month angiographic in-stent late lumen loss was 0.22±0.41 mm and 0.23±0.39 mm ( P noninferiority =0.004) for the RES and zotarolimus-eluting stent groups, respectively, and intravascular ultrasound percent neointimal hyperplasia was 8.10±5.81 and 8.85±7.77, respectively ( P noninferiority =0.01). In the present trial, which allowed broad inclusion criteria, the novel RESs met the prespecified criteria for noninferiority compared with zotarolimus-eluting stents for the primary end point of target lesion failure at 12 months and had similar measures of late lumen loss. These findings support the safety and efficacy of RESs in patients who are representative of clinical practice. URL: http

  11. Covered Metallic Stents With an Anti-Migration Design vs. Uncovered Stents for the Palliation of Malignant Gastric Outlet Obstruction: A Multicenter, Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyuk; Min, Byung-Hoon; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Shin, Cheol Min; Kim, Younjoo; Chung, Hyunsoo; Lee, Sang Hyub

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Previous studies reported comparable stent patency between covered self-expandable metallic stents (SEMS) and uncovered SEMS (UCS) for palliation of malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the newly developed WAVE-covered SEMS (WCS), which has an anti-migration design, compared with UCS in gastric cancer patients with symptomatic GOO. METHODS: A total of 102 inoperable gastric cancer patients with symptomatic GOO were prospectively enrolled from five referral centers and randomized to undergo UCS or WCS placement. Stent patency and recurrence of obstructive symptoms were assessed at 8 weeks and 16 weeks after stent placement. RESULTS: At the 8-week follow-up, both stent patency rates (72.5% vs. 62.7%) and re-intervention rates (19.6% vs. 19.6%) were comparable between the WCS and the UCS groups. Both stent stenosis (2.4% vs. 8.1%) and migration rates (9.5% vs. 5.4%) were comparable between WCS and UCS groups. At the 16-week follow-up, however, the WCS group had a significantly higher stent patency rate than the UCS group (68.6% vs. 41.2%). Re-intervention rates in the WCS and UCS groups were 23.5% and 39.2%, respectively. Compared with the UCS group, the WCS group had a significantly lower stent restenosis rate (7.1% vs. 37.8%) and a comparable migration rate (9.5% vs. 5.4%). Overall stent patency was significantly longer in the WCS group than in the UCS group. No stent-associated significant adverse events occurred in either the WCS or UCS groups. In the multivariate analysis, WCS placement and chemotherapy were identified as independent predictors of 16-week stent patency. CONCLUSIONS: WCS group showed comparable migration rate and significantly more durable long-term stent patency compared with UCS group for the palliation of GOO in patients with inoperable gastric cancer. PMID:26372507

  12. A prospective randomized trial of Teflon versus polyethylene stents for distal malignant biliary obstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Berkel, A. M.; Boland, C.; Redekop, W. K.; Bergman, J. J.; Groen, A. K.; Tytgat, G. N.; Huibregtse, K.

    1998-01-01

    Clogging of biliary stents continues to be a major clinical problem. Different polymer materials may have different effects on clogging. In vitro studies have shown a direct relation between the frictional coefficient of a polymer and the amount of encrusted material. Teflon appeared to be the best

  13. Radioactive metallic stent for the treatment of esophageal cancer in animal model and clinical trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, K. B. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea); Lee, J. D. [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate tissue response of self-expandable metallic stent covered Ho-166 in normal canine esophagus. Ho-166 was incorporated within polyurethan and covered over the outer surface of self-expandable metallic stents(diameter ; 18mm, length ; 40mm). Metallic stents with radioactivity of 4.0-7.8mCi (Group A), 1.0-1.8mCi (Group B) and 0.5-0.7mCi (Group C) were placed in normal mid-esophagus in twelve dogs (Group A), five (Group B) and another five dogs (Group C) respectively. Estimated radiation dose was 200-392Gy in Group A, 50-90Gy in Group B, and 25-35 Gy in Group C. The dogs were sacrified at two or three months later. In group A, mid-esophagus stricture, mucosal ulceration were found. Sereve fibrosis and degeneration of muscular propria, outer one half were found in three and complete fibrosis of esophageal wall in seven and fibrosis of esophageal wall and periesophageal soft tissue in two. In group B, glandular atrophy and submucosal fibrosis were found but muscular layer was intact. In group C, no histological change was demonstrated in three but submucosal inflammation and glandular atrophy with intact mucosa in two. Self-expandable metallic stent covered with Ho-166 may be used safely in esophagus without complication. 21 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  14. Comparing Stent Thrombosis associated with Zotarolimus Eluting Stents versus Everolimus Eluting Stents at 1 year follow up: a systematic review and meta-analysis of 6 randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundhun, Pravesh Kumar; Yanamala, Chandra Mouli; Huang, Wei-Qiang

    2017-03-16

    Two thousand fifteen has been a winning year for Drug Eluting Stents (DES). Increase in the number of patients with cardiovascular diseases treated by Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) has resulted to a high demand for second generation DES. This current analysis aimed to compare the different types of Stent Thrombosis (ST) associated with Zotarolimus Eluting Stents (ZES) versus Everolimus Eluting Stents (EES) at 1 year follow up. Electronic databases were searched for studies comparing ZES with EES. Different types of ST reported at 1 year follow up were considered as the primary endpoints in this analysis. Odds Ratios (OR) with 95% Confidence Intervals (CIs) were used as the statistical parameters and the pooled analyses were carried out by the RevMan 5 · 3 software. A total number of 10,512 patients were included in this analysis. No significant difference in any definite ST, acute definite ST, subacute definite ST, and late definite ST were observed between ZES and EES, at 1 year follow up with OR: 1.70, 95% CI: 0.92 - 3.16; P = 0.09, OR: 3.44, 95% CI: 0.82 - 14.43; P = 0.09, OR: 1.13, 95% CI: 0.43 - 2.95; P = 0.80 and OR: 2.39, 95% CI: 0.83 - 6.85; P = 0.11 respectively. Moreover, any definite or probable ST and definite/probable/possible ST were also not significantly different with OR: 1.39, 95% CI: 0.89 - 2.17; P = 0.15 and OR: 1.19, 95% CI: 0.84 - 1.70; P = 0.33 respectively. In addition, any probable ST, acute probable ST, late probable ST and possible ST were also not significantly different at 1 year follow up with OR: 1.11, 95% CI: 0.60 - 2.05; P = 0.75, OR: 0.53, 95% CI: 0.12 - 2.40; P = 0.41, OR: 1.67, 95% CI: 0.35 - 7.86; P = 0.52 and OR: 1.08, 95% CI: 0.64 - 1.82; P = 0.78 respectively. At 1 year follow up, ZES were not associated with significantly lower or higher definite and probable ST compared to EES. In addition, no significant difference was observed in acute, subacute and late

  15. Re-examining minimal luminal diameter relocation and quantitative coronary angiography - Intravascular ultrasound correlations in stented saphenous vein grafts: Methodological insights from the randomised RRISC trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. Semeraro (Oscar); P. Agostoni (Pierfrancesco); S. Verheye (Stefan); G.J.J. van Langenhove (Glenn); P.A. van den Heuvel (Paul); C. Convens (Carl); F. van den Branden (Frank); N. Bruining (Nico); P. Vermeersch (Paul)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAims: Angiographic parameters (such as late luminal loss) are common endpoints in drug-eluting stent trials, but their correlation with the neointimal process and their reliability in predicting restenosis are debated. Methods and results: Using quantitative coronary angiography (QCA)

  16. Association between age and risk of stroke or death from carotid endarterectomy and carotid stenting : A meta-analysis of pooled patient data from four randomised trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Howard, George; Roubin, Gary S.; Jansen, Olav; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Halliday, Alison; Fraedrich, Gustav; Eckstein, Hans Henning; Calvet, David; Bulbulia, Richard; Bonati, Leo H.; Becquemin, Jean Pierre; Algra, Ale; Brown, Martin M.; Ringleb, Peter A.; Brott, Thomas G.; Mas, Jean Louis

    2016-01-01

    Background: Age was reported to be an effect-modifier in four randomised controlled trials comparing carotid artery stenting (CAS) and carotid endarterectomy (CEA), with better CEA outcomes than CAS outcomes noted in the more elderly patients. We aimed to describe the association of age with

  17. A critical assessment of the effects of tamsulosin and solifenacin as monotherapies and as a combination therapy for the treatment of ureteral stent-related symptoms: a 2 × 2 factorial randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinsung; Yoo, Changhee; Han, Deok Hyun; Shin, Dong Wook

    2015-11-01

    To assess the efficacy of tamsulosin, solifenacin, and combination therapy of both agents for the treatment of ureteral stent-related symptoms (SRSs). An open-label, randomized controlled trial was conducted with 112 patients who underwent unilateral ureteral stent insertion following ureteroscopic stone surgery. Patients were randomized with a 2 × 2 factorial design to one of four groups, i.e., A (control), B (tamsulosin 0.2 mg once daily), C (solifenacin 5 mg once daily), and D (both active treatments). Patients were evaluated at week 2 by the ureteral stent symptom questionnaire (USSQ). The primary efficacy outcome was the urinary symptom score of the USSQ, and the secondary efficacy outcomes were the scores in the other five USSQ domains, the Euro-QOL score, and oral analgesic requirements during the 2 weeks. Efficacy outcomes were primarily analyzed for the per-protocol set population. The four groups were generally well balanced in terms of baseline characteristics. Eighty-one patients (72.3 %) completed the study protocol. Comparison of the six USSQ domain scores at week 2 showed no differences between the four groups. Similarly, comparison of the domain scores stratified by tamsulosin or solifenacin medication showed no differences for either medication. The other secondary outcomes were also similar in the group comparisons. Neither tamsulosin nor solifenacin medications provide beneficial effects for relieving various SRSs. In addition, the combination therapy did not have beneficial effects. Further studies are warranted to determine the benefit of medical therapy for the treatment of SRSs and to determine the optimal management strategy for SRSs.

  18. PROPOSAL OF GUIDELINE FOR CLINICAL TRIAL PROTOCOLS WITH HERBAL DRUGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Migdacelys Arboláez Estrada.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARYCuba has extensive experience about herbal drugs, however only a few products get to the clinical phase of drug development. Our objective was to design new guidelines for clinical trials with herbal drugs.A detailed bibliographic search about regulatory aspects about clinical trials in Cuba and the world was done for development of the guideline. The guideline's proposed format includes: 1 Index, including the classification of the content. 2 Summary, 3 Fifteen chapters, related to the clinical trials. The guideline also propose the inclusion of annexes.A new guideline containing 15 chapters allows for writing more clear and detailed clinical trial protocols. The guideline contains the information required to guide the research staff who is interested in the validation of herbal drugs pharmacological activations from the perspective of clinical trials. RESUMEN Cuba tiene experiencia extensa sobre plantas medicinales, aunque solo algunos productos llegan a una fase clínica del desarrollo. Nuestro objetivo fué diseñar una nueva guía para ensayos clínicos con plantas medicinales.Hemos realizado una detallada búsqueda bibliográfica sobre aspectos reguladores de ensayos clínicos en Cuba y el resto del mundo para el desarrollo de la guía. El formato propuesto de la guia incluye: 1 Índice, incluyendo la clasificación de los contenidos. 2 Resumen, 3 Quince capítulos, relacionados con los ensayos clínicos. La guía también propone la inclusión de anexos.La nueva guía que contiene 15 capítulos que orientan la redacción de protocolos de ensayos clínicos más claros y más detallados. La guía contiene la información requerida para orientar al personal investigador interesado en la validación de la actividad farmacológica de las plantas medicinales desde la perspectiva de los ensayos clínicos.

  19. Stent fracture, valve dysfunction, and right ventricular outflow tract reintervention after transcatheter pulmonary valve implantation: patient-related and procedural risk factors in the US Melody Valve Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElhinney, Doff B; Cheatham, John P; Jones, Thomas K; Lock, James E; Vincent, Julie A; Zahn, Evan M; Hellenbrand, William E

    2011-12-01

    Among patients undergoing transcatheter pulmonary valve (TPV) replacement with the Melody valve, risk factors for Melody stent fracture (MSF) and right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) reintervention have not been well defined. From January 2007 to January 2010, 150 patients (median age, 19 years) underwent TPV implantation in the Melody valve Investigational Device Exemption trial. Existing conduit stents from a prior catheterization were present in 37 patients (25%, fractured in 12); 1 or more new prestents were placed at the TPV implant catheterization in 51 patients. During follow-up (median, 30 months), MSF was diagnosed in 39 patients. Freedom from a diagnosis of MSF was 77±4% at 14 months (after the 1-year evaluation window) and 60±9% at 39 months (3-year window). On multivariable analysis, implant within an existing stent, new prestent, or bioprosthetic valve (combined variable) was associated with longer freedom from MSF (Pbioprosthetic valve was associated with lower risk of MSF and reintervention.

  20. Bounding the per-protocol effect in randomized trials: An application to colorectal cancer screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.A. Swanson (Sonja); Holme (Øyvind); M. Løberg (Magnus); M. Kalager (Mette); M. Bretthauer (Michael); G. Hoff (G.); E. Aas (Eline); M.A. Hernán (M.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The per-protocol effect is the effect that would have been observed in a randomized trial had everybody followed the protocol. Though obtaining a valid point estimate for the per-protocol effect requires assumptions that are unverifiable and often implausible, lower and upper

  1. An everolimus-eluting stent versus a paclitaxel-eluting stent in small vessel coronary artery disease: a pooled analysis from the SPIRIT II and SPIRIT III trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartorelli, Antonio L; Serruys, Patrick W; Miquel-Hébert, Karine; Yu, Shui; Pierson, Wes; Stone, Gregg W

    2010-07-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of the XIENCE V everolimus-eluting stent compared to the TAXUS paclitaxel-eluting stent in small vessels. The XIENCE V everolimus-eluting stent (EES) has been shown to improve angiographic and clinical outcomes after percutaneous myocardial revascularization, but its performance in small coronary arteries has not been investigated. In this pooled analysis, we studied a cohort of 541 patients with small coronary vessels (reference diameter SPIRIT II and SPIRIT III studies. TAXUS Express (73% of lesions) and TAXUS Liberté (27% of lesions) paclitaxel-eluting stents (PES) were used as controls in SPIRIT II. In SPIRIT III, Taxus Express(2) PES was the control. Mean angiographic in-stent and in-segment late loss was significantly less in the EES group compared with the PES group, (0.15 +/- 0.37 mm vs. 0.30 +/- 0.44 mm; P = 0.011 for in-stent; 0.10 +/- 0.38 mm vs. 0.21 +/- 0.34 mm; P = 0.034 for in-segment). EES also resulted in a significant reduction in composite major adverse cardiac events at 1 year (19/366 [5.2%] vs. 17/159 [10.7%]; P = 0.037), due to fewer non-Q-wave myocardial infarctions and target lesion revascularizations. At 1 year, the rate of non-Q-wave myocardial infarction was significantly lower in the EES group compared with that of the PES group (6/366 [1.6%] vs. 8/159 [5.0%]; P = 0.037). In patients with small vessel coronary arteries, the XIENCE V EES was superior to the TAXUS PES. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. A randomized trial of microdose leuprolide acetate protocol versus luteal phase ganirelix protocol in predicted poor responders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLuigi, Andrea J; Engmann, Lawrence; Schmidt, David W; Benadiva, Claudio A; Nulsen, John C

    2011-06-30

    We performed a randomized trial to compare IVF outcomes in 54 poor responder patients undergoing a microdose leuprolide acetate (LA) protocol or a GnRH antagonist protocol incorporating a luteal phase E(2) patch and GnRH antagonist in the preceding menstrual cycle. Cancellation rates, number of oocytes retrieved, clinical pregnancy rates (PR), and ongoing PRs were similar between the two groups. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Stent-protected angioplasty versus carotid endarterectomy in patients with carotid artery stenosis: meta-analysis of randomized trial data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesmann, Martin; Schoepf, Veronika; Brueckmann, Hartmut; Jansen, Olav

    2008-01-01

    Stent-protected angioplasty of carotid artery stenosis may be an alternative to surgical endarterectomy. Results published so far are indecisive, with evidence both in favour of and against this procedure. After the recent publication of two large European multicentre trials (SPACE and EVA-3S) almost 3,000 patients have been included in randomized studies. For this report, we therefore conducted a systematic review of randomized studies that compared endovascular treatment with surgery for carotid stenosis. We evaluated seven trials including 2,973 patients. In our meta-analysis endovascular treatment seemed to carry a slightly higher risk for stroke or death within 30 days after the procedure as compared with surgery (8.2% vs. 6.2%; p = 0.04; OR 1.35), whereas the rates of disabling stroke or death within 30 days did not differ significantly (p = 0.47; n.s.). On the other hand, surgery carried a significantly higher risk for cranial nerve palsy (4.7% vs. 0.2%; p < 0.0001; OR 0.17) and myocardial infarction (2.3% vs. 0.9%; p = 0.03; OR 0.37). Long-term effects of both methods still need to be evaluated. Two other large multicentre trials (ICSS and CREST) are ongoing. Results of these studies will increase the database to about 7,000 randomized patients. Future meta-analyses should then allow definitive treatment recommendations. (orig.)

  4. Double Kissing Crush Versus Provisional Stenting for Left Main Distal Bifurcation Lesions: DKCRUSH-V Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Liang; Zhang, Jue-Jie; Han, Yaling; Kan, Jing; Chen, Lianglong; Qiu, Chunguang; Jiang, Tiemin; Tao, Ling; Zeng, Hesong; Li, Li; Xia, Yong; Gao, Chuanyu; Santoso, Teguh; Paiboon, Chootopol; Wang, Yan; Kwan, Tak W; Ye, Fei; Tian, Nailiang; Liu, Zhizhong; Lin, Song; Lu, Chengzhi; Wen, Shangyu; Hong, Lang; Zhang, Qi; Sheiban, Imad; Xu, Yawei; Wang, Lefeng; Rab, Tanveer S; Li, Zhanquan; Cheng, Guanchang; Cui, Lianqun; Leon, Martin B; Stone, Gregg W

    2017-11-28

    Provisional stenting (PS) is the most common technique used to treat distal left main (LM) bifurcation lesions in patients with unprotected LM coronary artery disease undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. The double kissing (DK) crush planned 2-stent technique has been shown to improve clinical outcomes in non-LM bifurcations compared with PS, and in LM bifurcations compared with culotte stenting, but has never been compared with PS in LM bifurcation lesions. The authors sought to determine whether a planned DK crush 2-stent technique is superior to PS for patients with true distal LM bifurcation lesions. The authors randomized 482 patients from 26 centers in 5 countries with true distal LM bifurcation lesions (Medina 1,1,1 or 0,1,1) to PS (n = 242) or DK crush stenting (n = 240). The primary endpoint was the 1-year composite rate of target lesion failure (TLF): cardiac death, target vessel myocardial infarction, or clinically driven target lesion revascularization. Routine 13-month angiographic follow-up was scheduled after ascertainment of the primary endpoint. TLF within 1 year occurred in 26 patients (10.7%) assigned to PS, and in 12 patients (5.0%) assigned to DK crush (hazard ratio: 0.42; 95% confidence interval: 0.21 to 0.85; p = 0.02). Compared with PS, DK crush also resulted in lower rates of target vessel myocardial infarction I (2.9% vs. 0.4%; p = 0.03) and definite or probable stent thrombosis (3.3% vs. 0.4%; p = 0.02). Clinically driven target lesion revascularization (7.9% vs. 3.8%; p = 0.06) and angiographic restenosis within the LM complex (14.6% vs. 7.1%; p = 0.10) also tended to be less frequent with DK crush compared with PS. There was no significant difference in cardiac death between the groups. In the present multicenter randomized trial, percutaneous coronary intervention of true distal LM bifurcation lesions using a planned DK crush 2-stent strategy resulted in a lower rate of TLF at 1 year than a PS

  5. Prevention of abdominal wound infection (PROUD trial, DRKS00000390: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heger Ulrike

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wound infection affects a considerable portion of patients after abdominal operations, increasing health care costs and postoperative morbidity and affecting quality of life. Antibacterial coating has been suggested as an effective measure to decrease postoperative wound infections after laparotomies. The INLINE metaanalysis has recently shown the superiority of a slowly absorbable continuous suture for abdominal closure; with PDS plus® such a suture has now been made available with triclosan antibacterial coating. Methods/Design The PROUD trial is designed as a randomised, controlled, observer, surgeon and patient blinded multicenter superiority trial with two parallel groups and a primary endpoint of wound infection during 30 days after surgery. The intervention group will receive triclosan coated polydioxanone sutures, whereas the control group will receive the standard polydioxanone sutures; abdominal closure will otherwise be standardized in both groups. Statistical analysis is based on intention-to-treat population via binary logistic regression analysis, the total sample size of n = 750 is sufficient to ensure alpha = 5% and power = 80%, an interim analysis will be carried out after data of 375 patients are available. Discussion The PROUD trial will yield robust data to determine the effectiveness of antibacterial coating in one of the standard sutures for abdominal closure and potentially lead to amendment of current guidelines. The exploration of clinically objective parameters as well as quality of life holds immediate relevance for clinical management and the pragmatic trial design ensures high external validity. Trial Registration The trial protocol has been registered with the German Clinical Trials Register (DRKS00000390.

  6. SPIRIT 2013 explanation and elaboration: guidance for protocols of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, An-Wen; Tetzlaff, Jennifer M; Gøtzsche, Peter C; Altman, Douglas G; Mann, Howard; Berlin, Jesse A; Dickersin, Kay; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Schulz, Kenneth F; Parulekar, Wendy R; Krleza-Jeric, Karmela; Laupacis, Andreas; Moher, David

    2013-01-08

    High quality protocols facilitate proper conduct, reporting, and external review of clinical trials. However, the completeness of trial protocols is often inadequate. To help improve the content and quality of protocols, an international group of stakeholders developed the SPIRIT 2013 Statement (Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Interventional Trials). The SPIRIT Statement provides guidance in the form of a checklist of recommended items to include in a clinical trial protocol. This SPIRIT 2013 Explanation and Elaboration paper provides important information to promote full understanding of the checklist recommendations. For each checklist item, we provide a rationale and detailed description; a model example from an actual protocol; and relevant references supporting its importance. We strongly recommend that this explanatory paper be used in conjunction with the SPIRIT Statement. A website of resources is also available (www.spirit-statement.org). The SPIRIT 2013 Explanation and Elaboration paper, together with the Statement, should help with the drafting of trial protocols. Complete documentation of key trial elements can facilitate transparency and protocol review for the benefit of all stakeholders.

  7. Testing the activitystat hypothesis: a randomised controlled trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomersall, Sjaan; Maher, Carol; Norton, Kevin; Dollman, Jim; Tomkinson, Grant; Esterman, Adrian; English, Coralie; Lewis, Nicole; Olds, Tim

    2012-10-08

    The activitystat hypothesis proposes that when physical activity or energy expenditure is increased or decreased in one domain, there will be a compensatory change in another domain to maintain an overall, stable level of physical activity or energy expenditure. To date, there has been no experimental study primarily designed to test the activitystat hypothesis in adults. The aim of this trial is to determine the effect of two different imposed exercise loads on total daily energy expenditure and physical activity levels. This study will be a randomised, multi-arm, parallel controlled trial. Insufficiently active adults (as determined by the Active Australia survey) aged 18-60 years old will be recruited for this study (n=146). Participants must also satisfy the Sports Medicine Australia Pre-Exercise Screening System and must weigh less than 150 kg. Participants will be randomly assigned to one of three groups using a computer-generated allocation sequence. Participants in the Moderate exercise group will receive an additional 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity per week for six weeks, and those in the Extensive exercise group will receive an additional 300 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity per week for six weeks. Exercise targets will be accumulated through both group and individual exercise sessions monitored by heart rate telemetry. Control participants will not be given any instructions regarding lifestyle. The primary outcome measures are activity energy expenditure (doubly labeled water) and physical activity (accelerometry). Secondary measures will include resting metabolic rate via indirect calorimetry, use of time, maximal oxygen consumption and several anthropometric and physiological measures. Outcome measures will be conducted at baseline (zero weeks), mid- and end-intervention (three and six weeks) with three (12 weeks) and six month (24 week) follow-up. All assessors will be blinded to group allocation. This protocol

  8. Partner randomized controlled trial: study protocol and coaching intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garbutt Jane M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many children with asthma live with frequent symptoms and activity limitations, and visits for urgent care are common. Many pediatricians do not regularly meet with families to monitor asthma control, identify concerns or problems with management, or provide self-management education. Effective interventions to improve asthma care such as small group training and care redesign have been difficult to disseminate into office practice. Methods and design This paper describes the protocol for a randomized controlled trial (RCT to evaluate a 12-month telephone-coaching program designed to support primary care management of children with persistent asthma and subsequently to improve asthma control and disease-related quality of life and reduce urgent care events for asthma care. Randomization occurred at the practice level with eligible families within a practice having access to the coaching program or to usual care. The coaching intervention was based on the transtheoretical model of behavior change. Targeted behaviors included 1 effective use of controller medications, 2 effective use of rescue medications and 3 monitoring to ensure optimal control. Trained lay coaches provided parents with education and support for asthma care, tailoring the information provided and frequency of contact to the parent's readiness to change their child's day-to-day asthma management. Coaching calls varied in frequency from weekly to monthly. For each participating family, follow-up measurements were obtained at 12- and 24-months after enrollment in the study during a telephone interview. The primary outcomes were the mean change in 1 the child's asthma control score, 2 the parent's quality of life score, and 3 the number of urgent care events assessed at 12 and 24 months. Secondary outcomes reflected adherence to guideline recommendations by the primary care pediatricians and included the proportion of children prescribed controller medications

  9. Renal PTA stenting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsetis, D.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Renal artery stenosis (RAS) is a common condition that may lead to hypertension, progressive renal dysfunction and cardiovascular morbidity. Catheter-based therapy for symptomatic, haemodynamically significant, RAS has become the preferred method of revascularization. Balloon angioplasty has been the traditional treatment of choice for fibromuscular dysplasia, however stents are increasingly used for the treatment of atheromatous lesions; in many cases-such as in ostial lesions-, direct stenting is strongly indicated. Despite the increased use of endovascular therapy for renal artery stenosis, there is still controversy regarding the optimal management and the net benefit of this treatment. Several randomized trials of balloon angioplasty or stenting for renal artery stenosis compared with medical therapy alone have been conducted, however these could not show definite advantage of endovascular therapy. Problems encountered with those trials include enrollment of small number of patients, frequent crossover from medical to interventional therapy compromising the intention-to-treat results, or selection of patients that are not expected to show clear benefit. The Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Artery Lesions (ASTRAL) is the most important of these trials; however, it,s study design was faulty and therefore did not provide conclusive evidence to answer the question of whether angioplasty and stenting or medical therapy is the best treatment for haemodynamically significant RAS. All expectations are now focused on the Cardiovascular Outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL) trial which was designed to answer the same question, and its methodologies took into consideration the weaknesses of the ASTRAL trial. Regarding stent device itself, it seems that the optimal design is probably a stainless steel, laser cut, open-cells stent mounted on a rapid exchange delivery balloon catheter compatible with 0.014-in and 0.018-in guidewire. As a future

  10. Five-year outcome after implantation of zotarolimus- and everolimus-eluting stents in randomized trial participants and nonenrolled eligible patients : A secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Von Birgelen, Clemens; Van Der Heijden, Liefke C.; Basalus, Mounir Welson Zakhary; Kok, Marlies M.; Sen, Hanim; Louwerenburg, Hans W.; van Houwelingen, Gert K.; Stoel, Martin G.; de Man, Frits H.A.F.; Linssen, Gerard C.M.; Tandjung, Kenneth; Doggen, Carine J.M.; Van Der Palen, Job; Löwik, Marije M.

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Long-term follow-up after a clinical trial of 2 often-used, newer-generation drug-eluting stents (DESs) in a broad patient population is of interest. Comprehensive long-term outcome of eligible nonenrolled patients has never been reported. OBJECTIVE: To assess 5-year safety and efficacy

  11. Patient-reported outcome (PRO assessment in clinical trials: a systematic review of guidance for trial protocol writers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Calvert

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests there are inconsistencies in patient-reported outcome (PRO assessment and reporting in clinical trials, which may limit the use of these data to inform patient care. For trials with a PRO endpoint, routine inclusion of key PRO information in the protocol may help improve trial conduct and the reporting and appraisal of PRO results; however, it is currently unclear exactly what PRO-specific information should be included. The aim of this review was to summarize the current PRO-specific guidance for clinical trial protocol developers.We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINHAL and Cochrane Library databases (inception to February 2013 for PRO-specific guidance regarding trial protocol development. Further guidance documents were identified via Google, Google scholar, requests to members of the UK Clinical Research Collaboration registered clinical trials units and international experts. Two independent investigators undertook title/abstract screening, full text review and data extraction, with a third involved in the event of disagreement. 21,175 citations were screened and 54 met the inclusion criteria. Guidance documents were difficult to access: electronic database searches identified just 8 documents, with the remaining 46 sourced elsewhere (5 from citation tracking, 27 from hand searching, 7 from the grey literature review and 7 from experts. 162 unique PRO-specific protocol recommendations were extracted from included documents. A further 10 PRO recommendations were identified relating to supporting trial documentation. Only 5/162 (3% recommendations appeared in ≥50% of guidance documents reviewed, indicating a lack of consistency.PRO-specific protocol guidelines were difficult to access, lacked consistency and may be challenging to implement in practice. There is a need to develop easily accessible consensus-driven PRO protocol guidance. Guidance should be aimed at ensuring key PRO information is routinely included in

  12. Development of a manualized protocol of massage therapy for clinical trials in osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ather

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical trial design of manual therapies may be especially challenging as techniques are often individualized and practitioner-dependent. This paper describes our methods in creating a standardized Swedish massage protocol tailored to subjects with osteoarthritis of the knee while respectful of the individualized nature of massage therapy, as well as implementation of this protocol in two randomized clinical trials. Methods The manualization process involved a collaborative process between methodologic and clinical experts, with the explicit goals of creating a reproducible semi-structured protocol for massage therapy, while allowing some latitude for therapists’ clinical judgment and maintaining consistency with a prior pilot study. Results The manualized protocol addressed identical specified body regions with distinct 30- and 60-min protocols, using standard Swedish strokes. Each protocol specifies the time allocated to each body region. The manualized 30- and 60-min protocols were implemented in a dual-site 24-week randomized dose-finding trial in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee, and is currently being implemented in a three-site 52-week efficacy trial of manualized Swedish massage therapy. In the dose-finding study, therapists adhered to the protocols and significant treatment effects were demonstrated. Conclusions The massage protocol was manualized, using standard techniques, and made flexible for individual practitioner and subject needs. The protocol has been applied in two randomized clinical trials. This manualized Swedish massage protocol has real-world utility and can be readily utilized both in the research and clinical settings. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00970008 (18 August 2009

  13. Randomized controlled study of excimer laser atherectomy for treatment of femoropopliteal in-stent restenosis: initial results from the EXCITE ISR trial (EXCImer Laser Randomized Controlled Study for Treatment of FemoropopliTEal In-Stent Restenosis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dippel, Eric J; Makam, Prakash; Kovach, Richard; George, Jon C; Patlola, Raghotham; Metzger, D Christopher; Mena-Hurtado, Carlos; Beasley, Robert; Soukas, Peter; Colon-Hernandez, Pedro J; Stark, Matthew A; Walker, Craig

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of excimer laser atherectomy (ELA) with adjunctive percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) versus PTA alone for treating patients with chronic peripheral artery disease with femoropopliteal bare nitinol in-stent restenosis (ISR). Femoropopliteal stenting has shown superiority to PTA for lifestyle-limiting claudication and critical limb ischemia, although treating post-stenting artery reobstruction, or ISR, remains challenging. The multicenter, prospective, randomized, controlled EXCITE ISR (EXCImer Laser Randomized Controlled Study for Treatment of FemoropopliTEal In-Stent Restenosis) trial was conducted across 40 U.S. centers. Patients with Rutherford Class 1 to 4 and lesions of target lesion length ≥4 cm, vessel diameter 5 to 7 mm were enrolled and randomly divided into ELA + PTA and PTA groups by a 2:1 ratio. The primary efficacy endpoint was target lesion revascularization (TLR) at 6-month follow up. The primary safety endpoint was major adverse event (death, amputation, or TLR) at 30 days post-procedure. Study enrollment was stopped at 250 patients due to early efficacy demonstrated at a prospectively-specified interim analysis. A total of 169 ELA + PTA subjects (62.7% male; mean age 68.5 ± 9.8 years) and 81 PTA patients (61.7% male; mean age 67.8 ± 10.3 years) were enrolled. Mean lesion length was 19.6 ± 12.0 cm versus 19.3 ± 11.9 cm, and 30.5% versus 36.8% of patients exhibited total occlusion. ELA + PTA subjects demonstrated superior procedural success (93.5% vs. 82.7%; p = 0.01) with significantly fewer procedural complications. ELA + PTA and PTA subject 6-month freedom from TLR was 73.5% versus 51.8% (p < 0.005), and 30-day major adverse event rates were 5.8% versus 20.5% (p < 0.001), respectively. ELA + PTA was associated with a 52% reduction in TLR (hazard ratio: 0.48; 95% confidence interval: 0.31 to 0.74). The EXCITE ISR trial is the first large, prospective, randomized study

  14. Polymer-Free Drug-Coated Coronary Stents Are Cost-Effective in Patients at High Bleeding Risk: Economic Evaluation of the LEADERS FREE Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipovic-Pierucci, Antoine; Durand-Zaleski, Isabelle; Butel, Thibault; Greene, Samantha; Hovasse, Thomas; Iñiguez, Andres; Nazzaro, Marco Stefano; Oldroyd, Keith G; Talwar, Suneel; Richardt, Gert; Windhovel, Ute; Urban, Philip; Morice, Marie-Claude

    2018-02-20

    In patients at high risk of bleeding who undergo PCI the biolimus A9 polymer-free drug coated stent (DCS) has superior efficacy and safety compared to a bare metal stent (BMS). We estimated the cost effectiveness of DCS vs. BMS. The Leaders FREE-based economic evaluation estimated service use and quality of life data collected prospectively. The entire trial population was analysed using cost-weights from England, France, Germany, Italy, Scotland and Spain. Country-specific QALYs were derived from EQ-5D scores. We estimated cost per event averted and per QALY gained. DCS use resulted in -0.095 cardiac deaths, target vessel MI, stent thrombosis and revascularization per patient (0.152 vs. 0.237;pcosts for the index admission were similar between groups. One-year costs using cost-weights from each of the 6 countries, including the additional €300 per DCS stent, ranged from €4,664-8,593 for DCS and €4,845-9,742 for BMS and were lower in the DCS group (England:€-428, France:€-137, Germany:€-33, Italy:€-522, Scotland:€-298, Spain:€-854). The probability that DCS dominated BMS was >50% in all countries. At a threshold of €10,000 per event averted DCS had a 98% probability of being cost-effective in all 6 countries.

  15. Reporting on blinding in trial protocols and corresponding publications was often inadequate but rarely contradictory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Pildal, Julie; Chan, An-Wen

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the reporting on blinding in protocols and articles describing randomized controlled trials. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: We studied 73 protocols of trials approved by the scientific/ethical committees for Copenhagen and Frederiksberg, 1994 and 1995, and their corresponding...... publications. RESULTS: Three out of 73 trials (4%) reported blinding in the protocol that contradicted that in the publication (e.g., "open" vs. "double blind"). The proportion of "double-blind" trials with a clear description of the blinding of participants increased from 11 out of 58 (19%) when based...... on publications alone to 39 (67%) when adding the information in the protocol. The similar proportions for the blinding of health care providers were 2 (3%) and 22 (38%); and for the blinding of data collectors, they were 8 (14%) and 14 (24%). In 52 of 58 publications (90%), it was unclear whether all patients...

  16. The EPIC nitinol stent system in the treatment of iliac artery lesions: one-year results from the ORION clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clair, Daniel G; Adams, Julie; Reen, Bernard; Feldman, Robert; Starr, Jean; Diaz-Cartelle, Juan; Dawkins, Keith D

    2014-04-01

    To report the 1-year results of a pivotal study for a new-generation nitinol stent for the treatment of iliac atherosclerotic lesions. The ORION trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00896337) was a single-arm, non-randomized, prospective, multicenter clinical trial that enrolled 125 patients (81 men; mean age 61.1±9.3 years) implanted with the EPIC self-expanding nitinol stent system in 166 de novo or restenotic iliac artery lesions ≤13 cm long. The primary endpoint was the 9-month major adverse event rate [i.e., device- or procedure-related death within 30 days, myocardial infarction during the index hospitalization, target vessel revascularization (TVR), or index limb amputation]. Follow-up occurred at hospital discharge and at 1, 9, and 12 months. An independent core laboratory evaluated ultrasound results at 1, 9, and 12 months. The primary endpoint met the prespecified performance goal, with only 3.4% (4/117) of patients experiencing a major adverse event by 9 months (p<0.0001). By 12 months, 6 (5.4%) of 111 patients had TVR; none had an index limb amputation. The ankle-brachial index, Walking Impairment Questionnaire, and Rutherford classifications all showed sustained improvements through 12 months. Primary patency was 94.4% with comparable results for lesions classified as complex (TASC II C/D 95.5%) or non-complex (TASC II A/B 95.0%). The EPIC stent system demonstrated safety and effectiveness through 12 months, including improvements for complex lesions. The EPIC stent is a viable alternative to surgery for patients with either complex or non-complex lesions.

  17. Carotid Stenting in Patients With High Risk Versus Standard Risk for Open Carotid Endarterectomy (REAL-1 Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Haro, Joaquin; Michel, Ignacio; Bleda, Silvia; Cañibano, Cristina; Acin, Francisco

    2017-07-15

    Carotid stenting (CAS) has been mainly offered to those patients considered at "high risk" for open carotid endarterectomy based on available data from large randomized clinical trials. However, several recent studies have called medical "high risk" into question for CAS indication. The REAL-1 trial evaluated the safety and perioperative and long-term effectiveness in patients with significant carotid artery stenosis with "high-risk" criteria treated with CAS and proximal protection device (MOMA) compared with those with standard surgical-risk features. This nonrandomized double-arm registry included 125 patients (40% symptomatic), 71 (56%) with "standard-risk" and 54 (44%) with "high-risk" criteria. The primary end point was the cumulative incidence of any major adverse event, a composite of stroke, myocardial infarction, and death within 30 days after the intervention or ipsilateral stroke after 30 days and up to 4 years. There was no significant difference in primary end point rate at 30 days between patients at "standard risk" and those with "high risk" (1.4% vs 1.9% respectively; hazard ratio for "standard risk" 1.1; 95% CI 0.8 to 1.2, p = 0.77) nor estimated 4-year rate of ipsilateral stroke (1.3% vs 1.8%; hazard ratio for "standard risk" 1.05, 95% CI 0.86 to 1.14, p = 0.9). In conclusion, 4-year postprocedure results demonstrated that CAS with proximal device (MOMA) is safe and effective for patients with and without "high-risk" for carotid endarterectomy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluating Protocol Lifecycle Time Intervals in HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Jeffrey T.; Dixon, Dennis; Varghese, Suresh; Cope, Marie T.; Marci, Joe; Kagan, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Identifying efficacious interventions for the prevention and treatment of human diseases depends on the efficient development and implementation of controlled clinical trials. Essential to reducing the time and burden of completing the clinical trial lifecycle is determining which aspects take the longest, delay other stages, and may lead to better resource utilization without diminishing scientific quality, safety, or the protection of human subjects. Purpose In this study we modeled time-to-event data to explore relationships between clinical trial protocol development and implementation times, as well as identify potential correlates of prolonged development and implementation. Methods We obtained time interval and participant accrual data from 111 interventional clinical trials initiated between 2006 and 2011 by NIH’s HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Networks. We determined the time (in days) required to complete defined phases of clinical trial protocol development and implementation. Kaplan-Meier estimates were used to assess the rates at which protocols reached specified terminal events, stratified by study purpose (therapeutic, prevention) and phase group (pilot/phase I, phase II, and phase III/ IV). We also examined several potential correlates to prolonged development and implementation intervals. Results Even though phase grouping did not determine development or implementation times of either therapeutic or prevention studies, overall we observed wide variation in protocol development times. Moreover, we detected a trend toward phase III/IV therapeutic protocols exhibiting longer developmental (median 2 ½ years) and implementation times (>3years). We also found that protocols exceeding the median number of days for completing the development interval had significantly longer implementation. Limitations The use of a relatively small set of protocols may have limited our ability to detect differences across phase groupings. Some timing effects

  19. Expandable stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, J C; Carrasco, H

    1996-05-01

    Expandable metallic stents are effective in selected patients with malignant or benign airway stenoses. When used for malignant lesions, the primary purpose of the stent is to improve the quality of life; stents are usually chosen for palliation of symptoms in recognition of the low likelihood of success for other therapy. For patients with benign stenoses, the stents provide a permanent source of structural support to alleviate the narrowed segment. The advantages of the expandable metallic stents are as follows: (1) they can be inserted through an endotracheal tube or under local anesthesia with relative simplicity under fluoroscopic guidance; (2) they do not impair the drainage of sputum because ciliary movement is not interrupted; (3) over a period of a few weeks, the meshwork is gradually covered with mucosa as the stent becomes incorporated into the airway wall; (4) ventilation usually is not impaired if the metallic mesh stent covers another nonstenosed bronchus, because the interstices of the stent are nonobstructive; and (5) they are dynamic and continue to expand over time, particularly if concurrent treatment achieves an effect on the lesion that caused stenosis. Disadvantages of the expandable stent include (1) they often are only temporarily effective for tracheobronchial stenosis due to intraluminal tumor or granulation tissue, both of which can grow between the wires; (2) they are considered permanent stents because removal is difficult; and (3) they can be poorly positioned during placement or can become displaced by progressive migration after placement, and they cannot be repositioned. A relative contraindication to insertion is an inflammatory process or infection that can predispose to granulation formation, particularly at the points of maximal contact pressure of the stent to the airway mucosa. In the presence of inflammation, it may be better to use a silicone prosthesis until the inflammatory process subsides and fibrosis occurs. Granulation

  20. Randomized Trial of the SMART Stent versus Balloon Angioplasty in Long Superficial Femoral Artery Lesions: The SUPER Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalmers, Nicholas; Walker, Paul T.; Belli, Anna-Maria; Thorpe, Anthony P.; Sidhu, Paul S.; Robinson, Graham; Ransbeeck, Mariella van; Fearn, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether primary stenting reduces the rate of restenosis compared with balloon angioplasty alone in the endovascular treatment of long superficial femoral artery lesions; and to assess the effect of treatment on quality of life. A total of 150 patients with superior femoral artery occlusion or severe stenosis of 5–22 cm length from 17 UK centers were randomized to either primary stenting with the SMART stent or balloon angioplasty (i.e., percutaneous transluminal angioplasty, PTA). Bailout stent placement was permitted in case of inadequate result from PTA. The primary end point was restenosis measured by duplex ultrasound at 1 year. Quality-of-life assessments were performed by the EuroQol (EQ)-5D questionnaire. Mean lesion length was 123.0 mm in the stent group and 116.8 mm in the PTA group. A total of 140 (93.3 %) of 150 had total occlusions. At 12 months’ follow-up, restenosis measured by Duplex ultrasound was not significantly different between the stent and PTA groups by intention-to-treat or as-treated analyses: 47.2 versus 43.5 % (p = 0.84) and 40.8 versus 46.7 % (p = 0.68), respectively. There were fewer target lesion revascularizations in patients randomized to stenting, but this did not reach statistical significance (12.5 vs. 20.8 %, p = 0.26). There was no difference in the rate of amputation. Patients in both groups reported improved quality of life. Primary stenting of long lesions in predominantly occluded superficial femoral arteries does not reduce the rate of binary restenosis compared with balloon angioplasty and bailout stenting. Both treatment strategies conferred a meaningful and sustained improvement to the quality of life of patients with severe superficial femoral artery disease.

  1. Stent thrombosis: insights on outcomes, predictors and impact of dual antiplatelet therapy interruption from the SPIRIT II, SPIRIT III, SPIRIT IV and COMPARE trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedhi, Elvin; Stone, Gregg W; Kereiakes, Dean J; Serruys, Patrick W; Parise, Helen; Fahy, Martin; Simonton, Charles A; Sudhir, Krishnankutty; Sood, Poornima; Smits, Pieter C

    2012-09-01

    Recent studies have suggested that EES may reduce ST compared to PES, but no individual trial has been adequately powered for this endpoint. The incidence of stent thrombosis, as well as the impact of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) discontinuation during the first two years following everolimus-eluting stent (EES) and paclitaxel-eluting stent (PES) deployment were therefore analysed from a pooled, patient-level database derived from four randomised clinical trials. Data from the SPIRIT II, SPIRIT III, SPIRIT IV and COMPARE trials (n=6,789 patients) were analysed. Two-year ST rates were determined using time-to-event methods and compared with the log-rank test. ST rates were also determined after DAPT discontinuation. EES compared to PES significantly reduced the two-year rates of ST (0.7% versus 2.3%, p=0.0001), including the interval rates of ST up to 30 days (0.2% versus 1.0%, p<0.0001), between 31 days and one year (0.2% versus 0.6%, p=0.02), and after one year (0.3% versus 0.8%, p=0.001). EES also reduced the two-year composite rate of cardiac death or MI (4.0% versus 6.6%, p=0.0001). Increased rates of ST after DAPT discontinuation beyond six months were observed in the PES cohort, but not in the EES cohort. In this large pooled analysis from four randomised trials, treatment with EES compared to PES significantly reduced the rates of ST through two years of follow-up, with a concomitant reduction in cardiac death or MI. DAPT discontinuation beyond six months may be safe with EES.

  2. Heparin-bonded covered stents versus bare-metal stents for complex femoropopliteal artery lesions: the randomized VIASTAR trial (Viabahn endoprosthesis with PROPATEN bioactive surface [VIA] versus bare nitinol stent in the treatment of long lesions in superficial femoral artery occlusive disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammer, Johannes; Zeller, Thomas; Hausegger, Klaus A; Schaefer, Philipp J; Gschwendtner, Manfred; Mueller-Huelsbeck, Stefan; Rand, Thomas; Funovics, Martin; Wolf, Florian; Rastan, Aljoscha; Gschwandtner, Michael; Puchner, Stefan; Ristl, Robin; Schoder, Maria

    2013-10-08

    The hypothesis that endovascular treatment with covered stents has equal risks but higher efficacy than bare-metal stents (BMS) in long femoropopliteal artery disease was tested. Although endovascular treatment of short superficial femoral artery lesions revealed excellent results, efficacy in long lesions remains unsatisfactory. In a prospective, randomized, single-blind, multicenter study, 141 patients with symptomatic peripheral arterial disease were assigned to treatment with heparin-bonded, covered stents (Viabahn 72 patients) or BMS (69 patients). Clinical outcomes and patency rates were assessed at 1, 6, and 12 months. Mean ± SD lesion length was 19.0 ± 6.3 cm in the Viabahn group and 17.3 ± 6.6 cm in the BMS group. Major complications within 30 days were observed in 1.4%. The 12-month primary patency rates in the Viabahn and BMS groups were: intention-to-treat (ITT) 70.9% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.58 to 0.80) and 55.1% (95% CI: 0.41 to 0.67) (log-rank test p = 0.11); treatment per-protocol (TPP) 78.1% (95% CI: 0.65 to 0.86) and 53.5% (95% CI: 0.39 to 0.65) (hazard ratio: 2.23 [95% CI: 1.14 to 4.34) (log-rank test p = 0.009). In lesions ≥20 cm, (TransAtlantic Inter-Society Consensus class D), the 12-month patency rate was significantly longer in VIA patients in the ITT analysis (VIA 71.3% vs. BMS 36.8%; p = 0.01) and the TPP analysis (VIA 73.3% vs. BMS 33.3%; p = 0.004). Freedom from target lesion revascularization was 84.6% for Viabahn (95% CI: 0.72 to 0.91) versus 77.0% for BMS (95% CI: 0.63 to 0.85; p = 0.37). The ankle-brachial index in the Viabahn group significantly increased to 0.94 ± 0.23 compared with the BMS group (0.85 ± 0.23; p stents compared with BMS in lesions ≥20 cm and for all lesions in the TPP analysis. In the ITT analysis for all lesions, which was flawed by major protocol deviations in 8.5% of the patients, the difference was not significant. (GORE VIABAHN® endoprosthesis with bioactive propaten surface versus bare

  3. Comparison of newer-generation drug-eluting with bare-metal stents in patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: a pooled analysis of the EXAMINATION (clinical Evaluation of the Xience-V stent in Acute Myocardial INfArcTION) and COMFORTABLE-AMI (Comparison of Biolimus Eluted From an Erodible Stent Coating With Bare Metal Stents in Acute ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction) trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabaté, Manel; Räber, Lorenz; Heg, Dik; Brugaletta, Salvatore; Kelbaek, Henning; Cequier, Angel; Ostojic, Miodrag; Iñiguez, Andrés; Tüller, David; Serra, Antonio; Baumbach, Andreas; von Birgelen, Clemens; Hernandez-Antolin, Rosana; Roffi, Marco; Mainar, Vicente; Valgimigli, Marco; Serruys, Patrick W; Jüni, Peter; Windecker, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to study the efficacy and safety of newer-generation drug-eluting stents (DES) compared with bare-metal stents (BMS) in an appropriately powered population of patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Among patients with STEMI, early generation DES improved efficacy but not safety compared with BMS. Newer-generation DES, everolimus-eluting stents, and biolimus A9-eluting stents, have been shown to improve clinical outcomes compared with early generation DES. Individual patient data for 2,665 STEMI patients enrolled in 2 large-scale randomized clinical trials comparing newer-generation DES with BMS were pooled: 1,326 patients received a newer-generation DES (everolimus-eluting stent or biolimus A9-eluting stent), whereas the remaining 1,329 patients received a BMS. Random-effects models were used to assess differences between the 2 groups for the device-oriented composite endpoint of cardiac death, target-vessel reinfarction, and target-lesion revascularization and the patient-oriented composite endpoint of all-cause death, any infarction, and any revascularization at 1 year. Newer-generation DES substantially reduce the risk of the device-oriented composite endpoint compared with BMS at 1 year (relative risk [RR]: 0.58; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.43 to 0.79; p = 0.0004). Similarly, the risk of the patient-oriented composite endpoint was lower with newer-generation DES than BMS (RR: 0.78; 95% CI: 0.63 to 0.96; p = 0.02). Differences in favor of newer-generation DES were driven by both a lower risk of repeat revascularization of the target lesion (RR: 0.33; 95% CI: 0.20 to 0.52; p stent thrombosis (RR: 0.35; 95% CI: 0.16 to 0.75; p = 0.006) compared with BMS. Among patients with STEMI, newer-generation DES improve safety and efficacy compared with BMS throughout 1 year. It remains to be determined whether the differences in favor of newer-generation DES are sustained during long-term follow-up. Copyright © 2014 American

  4. Late lumen loss and intima hyperplasia after sirolimus-eluting and zotarolimus-eluting stent implantation in diabetic patients: the diabetes and drug-eluting stent (DiabeDES III) angiography and intravascular ultrasound trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Mæng, Michael; Thayssen, Per

    2011-01-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus have increased risk of in-stent restenosis after coronary stent implantation due to neointimal hyperplasia (NIH). The aim of this study was to use quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) and volumetric intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) to evaluate the effects...... of the sirolimus-eluting Cypher® stent (SES) and the zotarolimus-eluting Endeavor® stent (ZES) on angiographic late lumen loss and intima hyperplasia in diabetic patients....

  5. Rotational atherectomy before paclitaxel-eluting stent implantation in complex calcified coronary lesions: Two-year clinical outcome of the randomized ROTAXUS trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waha, Suzanne; Allali, Abdelhakim; Büttner, Heinz-Joachim; Toelg, Ralph; Geist, Volker; Neumann, Franz-Josef; Khattab, Ahmed A; Richardt, Gert; Abdel-Wahab, Mohamed

    2016-03-01

    In the randomized ROTAXUS trial, routine lesion preparation of complex calcified coronary lesions using rotational atherectomy (RA) prior to paclitaxel-eluting stent implantation did not reduce the primary endpoint of angiographic late lumen loss at 9 months compared to stenting without RA. So far, no long-term data of prospective head-to-head comparisons between both treatment strategies have been reported. ROTAXUS randomly assigned patients with complex calcified coronary lesions to RA followed by stenting (n = 120) or stenting without RA (n = 120). The primary endpoint of the current analysis was the occurrence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) at 2-year follow-up defined as the composite of death, myocardial infarction, and target vessel revascularization (TVR). At 2 years, MACE occurred in 32 patients in the RA group and 37 patients in the standard therapy group (29.4% vs. 34.3%, P = 0.47). The rates of death (8.3% vs. 7.4%, P = 1.00), myocardial infarction (8.3% vs. 6.5%, P = 0.80), target lesion revascularization (TLR, 13.8% vs. 16.7%, P = 0.58), and TVR (19.3% vs. 22.2%, P = 0.62) were similar in both groups. Despite high rates of initial angiographic success, nearly one third of patients enrolled in ROTAXUS experienced MACE within 2-year follow-up, with no differences between patients treated with or without RA. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Complication rate in unprotected carotid artery stenting with closed-cell stents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tietke, Marc W.K.; Kerby, Tina; Alfke, Karsten; Riedel, Christian; Rohr, Axel; Jensen, Ulf; Jansen, Olaf; Zimmermann, Phillip; Stingele, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The discussion on the use of protection devices (PDs) in carotid artery stenting (CAS) is gaining an increasing role in lowering the periprocedural complication rates. While many reviews and reports with retrospective data analysis do promote the use of PDs the most recent multi-centre trials are showing advantages for unprotected CAS combined with closed-cell stent designs. We retrospectively analysed 358 unprotected CAS procedures performed from January 2003 to June 2009 in our clinic. Male/female ratio was 2.68/1. The average age was 69.3 years. Seventy-three percent (261/358) showed initial neurological symptoms. All patients were treated on a standardised interventional protocol. A closed and small-sized cell designed stent was implanted in most cases (85.2%). One hundred seventy-one (47.8%) were controlled by Doppler ultrasonography usually at first in a 3-month and later in 6-month intervals. The peri-interventional and 30-day mortality/stroke rate was 4.19% (15/358). These events included three deaths, five hyperperfusion syndromes (comprising one death by a secondary fatal intracranial haemorrhage), one subarachnoid haemorrhage and seven ischaemic strokes. Only 20% (3/15) of all complications occurred directly peri-interventional. The overall peri-interventional complication rate was 0.8% (3/358). Most complications occurred in initial symptomatic patients (5.36%). The in-stent restenosis rate for more than 70% was 7% (12/171) detected at an average of 9.8 month. Our clinical outcome demonstrates that unprotected CAS with small cell designed stents results in a very low procedural complication rate, which makes the use of a protection device dispensable. (orig.)

  7. From Protocols to Publications: A Study in Selective Reporting of Outcomes in Randomized Trials in Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghav, Kanwal Pratap Singh; Mahajan, Sminil; Yao, James C.; Hobbs, Brian P.; Berry, Donald A.; Pentz, Rebecca D.; Tam, Alda; Hong, Waun K.; Ellis, Lee M.; Abbruzzese, James; Overman, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The decision by journals to append protocols to published reports of randomized trials was a landmark event in clinical trial reporting. However, limited information is available on how this initiative effected transparency and selective reporting of clinical trial data. Methods We analyzed 74 oncology-based randomized trials published in Journal of Clinical Oncology, the New England Journal of Medicine, and The Lancet in 2012. To ascertain integrity of reporting, we compared published reports with their respective appended protocols with regard to primary end points, nonprimary end points, unplanned end points, and unplanned analyses. Results A total of 86 primary end points were reported in 74 randomized trials; nine trials had greater than one primary end point. Nine trials (12.2%) had some discrepancy between their planned and published primary end points. A total of 579 nonprimary end points (median, seven per trial) were planned, of which 373 (64.4%; median, five per trial) were reported. A significant positive correlation was found between the number of planned and nonreported nonprimary end points (Spearman r = 0.66; P < .001). Twenty-eight studies (37.8%) reported a total of 65 unplanned end points; 52 (80.0%) of which were not identified as unplanned. Thirty-one (41.9%) and 19 (25.7%) of 74 trials reported a total of 52 unplanned analyses involving primary end points and 33 unplanned analyses involving nonprimary end points, respectively. Studies reported positive unplanned end points and unplanned analyses more frequently than negative outcomes in abstracts (unplanned end points odds ratio, 6.8; P = .002; unplanned analyses odd ratio, 8.4; P = .007). Conclusion Despite public and reviewer access to protocols, selective outcome reporting persists and is a major concern in the reporting of randomized clinical trials. To foster credible evidence-based medicine, additional initiatives are needed to minimize selective reporting. PMID:26304898

  8. From Protocols to Publications: A Study in Selective Reporting of Outcomes in Randomized Trials in Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghav, Kanwal Pratap Singh; Mahajan, Sminil; Yao, James C; Hobbs, Brian P; Berry, Donald A; Pentz, Rebecca D; Tam, Alda; Hong, Waun K; Ellis, Lee M; Abbruzzese, James; Overman, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    The decision by journals to append protocols to published reports of randomized trials was a landmark event in clinical trial reporting. However, limited information is available on how this initiative effected transparency and selective reporting of clinical trial data. We analyzed 74 oncology-based randomized trials published in Journal of Clinical Oncology, the New England Journal of Medicine, and The Lancet in 2012. To ascertain integrity of reporting, we compared published reports with their respective appended protocols with regard to primary end points, nonprimary end points, unplanned end points, and unplanned analyses. A total of 86 primary end points were reported in 74 randomized trials; nine trials had greater than one primary end point. Nine trials (12.2%) had some discrepancy between their planned and published primary end points. A total of 579 nonprimary end points (median, seven per trial) were planned, of which 373 (64.4%; median, five per trial) were reported. A significant positive correlation was found between the number of planned and nonreported nonprimary end points (Spearman r = 0.66; P medicine, additional initiatives are needed to minimize selective reporting. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  9. Airway stents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Colleen

    2018-01-01

    Stents and tubes to maintain the patency of the airways are commonly used for malignant obstruction and are occasionally employed in benign disease. Malignant airway obstruction usually results from direct involvement of bronchogenic carcinoma, or by extension of carcinomas occurring in the esophagus or the thyroid. External compression from lymph nodes or metastatic disease from other organs can also cause central airway obstruction. Most malignant airway lesions are surgically inoperable due to advanced disease stage and require multimodality palliation, including stent placement. As with any other medical device, stents have significantly evolved over the last 50 years and deserve an in-depth understanding of their true capabilities and complications. Not every silicone stent is created equal and the same holds for metallic stents. Herein, we present an overview of the topic as well as some of the more practical and controversial issues surrounding airway stents. We also try to dispel the myths surrounding stent removal and their supposed use only in central airways. At the end, we come to the long-held conclusion that stents should not be used as first line treatment of choice, but after ruling out the possibility of curative surgical resection or repair. PMID:29707506

  10. Long-term efficacy and safety of biodegradable-polymer biolimus-eluting stents: main results of the Basel Stent Kosten-Effektivitäts Trial-PROspective Validation Examination II (BASKET-PROVE II), a randomized, controlled noninferiority 2-year outcome trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Christoph; Galatius, Soeren; Jeger, Raban; Gilgen, Nicole; Skov Jensen, Jan; Naber, Christoph; Alber, Hannes; Wanitschek, Maria; Eberli, Franz; Kurz, David J; Pedrazzini, Giovanni; Moccetti, Tiziano; Rickli, Hans; Weilenmann, Daniel; Vuillomenet, André; Steiner, Martin; Von Felten, Stefanie; Vogt, Deborah R; Wadt Hansen, Kim; Rickenbacher, Peter; Conen, David; Müller, Christian; Buser, Peter; Hoffmann, Andreas; Pfisterer, Matthias

    2015-01-06

    Biodegradable-polymer drug-eluting stents (BP-DES) were developed to be as effective as second-generation durable-polymer drug-eluting stents (DP-DES) and as safe >1 year as bare-metal stents (BMS). Thus, very late stent thrombosis (VLST) attributable to durable polymers should no longer appear. To address these early and late aspects, 2291 patients presenting with acute or stable coronary disease needing stents ≥3.0 mm in diameter between April 2010 and May 2012 were randomly assigned to biolimus-A9-eluting BP-DES, second-generation everolimus-eluting DP-DES, or thin-strut silicon-carbide-coated BMS in 8 European centers. All patients were treated with aspirin and risk-adjusted doses of prasugrel. The primary end point was combined cardiac death, myocardial infarction, and clinically indicated target-vessel revascularization within 2 years. The combined secondary safety end point was a composite of VLST, myocardial infarction, and cardiac death. The cumulative incidence of the primary end point was 7.6% with BP-DES, 6.8% with DP-DES, and 12.7% with BMS. By intention-to-treat BP-DES were noninferior (predefined margin, 3.80%) compared with DP-DES (absolute risk difference, 0.78%; -1.93% to 3.50%; P for noninferiority 0.042; per protocol P=0.09) and superior to BMS (absolute risk difference, -5.16; -8.32 to -2.01; P=0.0011). The 3 stent groups did not differ in the combined safety end point, with no decrease in events >1 year, particularly VLST with BP-DES. In large vessel stenting, BP-DES appeared barely noninferior compared with DP-DES and more effective than thin-strut BMS, but without evidence for better safety nor lower VLST rates >1 year. Findings challenge the concept that durable polymers are key in VLST formation. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01166685. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Staying well after depression: trial design and protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duggan Danielle S

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression is often a chronic relapsing condition, with relapse rates of 50-80% in those who have been depressed before. This is particularly problematic for those who become suicidal when depressed since habitual recurrence of suicidal thoughts increases likelihood of further acute suicidal episodes. Therefore the question how to prevent relapse is of particular urgency in this group. Methods/Design This trial compares Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT, a novel form of treatment combining mindfulness meditation and cognitive therapy for depression, with both Cognitive Psycho-Education (CPE, an equally plausible cognitive treatment but without meditation, and treatment as usual (TAU. It will test whether MBCT reduces the risk of relapse in recurrently depressed patients and the incidence of suicidal symptoms in those with a history of suicidality who do relapse. It recruits participants, screens them by telephone for main inclusion and exclusion criteria and, if they are eligible, invites them to a pre-treatment session to assess eligibility in more detail. This trial allocates eligible participants at random between MBCT and TAU, CPE and TAU, and TAU alone in a ratio of 2:2:1, stratified by presence of suicidal ideation or behaviour and current anti-depressant use. We aim to recruit sufficient participants to allow for retention of 300 following attrition. We deliver both active treatments in groups meeting for two hours every week for eight weeks. We shall estimate effects on rates of relapse and suicidal symptoms over 12 months following treatment and assess clinical status immediately after treatment, and three, six, nine and twelve months thereafter. Discussion This will be the first trial of MBCT to investigate whether MCBT is effective in preventing relapse to depression when compared with a control psychological treatment of equal plausibility; and to explore the use of MBCT for the most severe recurrent

  12. Results of a randomized clinical trial of external beam radiation to prevent restenosis after superficial femoral artery stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therasse, Eric; Donath, David; Elkouri, Stéphane; Lespérance, Jacques; Giroux, Marie-France; Oliva, Vincent L; Guertin, Marie-Claude; Bouchard, Louis; Perreault, Pierre; Gilbert, Patrick; Soulez, Gilles

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of external beam radiation (EBR) in preventing restenosis after superficial femoral artery (SFA) stenting in comparison with a control group treated with SFA stenting only. In this Institutional Review Board-approved study, patients who provided written informed consent were randomly assigned to 0 Gy or 14 Gy of EBR to the stent site 24 hours after SFA stenting. The primary end point was the angiographic binary restenosis rate 2 years after stenting. Categorical and continuous end points were respectively analyzed using logistic regression models and Wilcoxon tests. End points expressed as time to event were analyzed using a log-rank test. The study included 155 patients, 46 women and 109 men (mean age, 66 years; range, 45-85 years). In the 0 and 14 Gy groups, binary restenosis was present, respectively, in 44% (34/77) and 68% (52/76; P = .003) 2 years after stenting. Stent thrombosis occurred in 13% (10/78) of the 0 Gy group and in 33% (25/77) of the 14 Gy group (P = .003). Target lesion revascularization at 2 years was 26% (25/78) in the 0 Gy group and 30% (23/77) in the 14 Gy group (P = .56). There were no significant differences in total walking distances change from baseline to 2 years (46 ± 100 and 26 ± 79 m, respectively, in the 0 Gy and 14 Gy group; P = .25). There were no procedure-related deaths and no major amputations. A single 14 Gy dose of EBR to the SFA stenting site did not prevent in-stent restenosis. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Efficacy and safety of zotarolimus-eluting and sirolimus-eluting coronary stents in routine clinical care (SORT OUT III): a randomised controlled superiority trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Klaus; Maeng, Michael; Kaltoft, Anne

    2010-01-01

    In low-risk patients, the zotarolimus-eluting stent has been shown to reduce rates of restenosis without increasing the risk of stent thrombosis. We compared the efficacy and safety of the zotarolimus-eluting stent versus the sirolimus-eluting stent in patients with coronary artery disease who we...

  14. The Bipolar Interactive Psychoeducation (BIPED study: trial design and protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Ian

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bipolar disorders affect between 3–5% of the population and are associated with considerable lifelong impairment. Since much of the morbidity associated with bipolar disorder is caused by recurrent depressive symptoms, which are often only poorly responsive to antidepressants, there is a need to develop alternative, non-pharmacological interventions. Psychoeducational interventions have emerged as promising long-term therapeutic options for bipolar disorder. Methods/design The study is an exploratory, individually randomised controlled trial. The intervention known as 'Beating Bipolar' is a psychoeducational programme which is delivered via a novel web-based system. We will recruit 100 patients with a diagnosis of DSM-IV bipolar disorder (including type I and type II currently in clinical remission. The primary outcome is quality of life. This will be compared for those patients who have participated in the psychoeducational programme with those who received treatment as usual. Quality of life will be assessed immediately following the intervention as well as 10 months after randomisation. Secondary outcomes include current depressive and manic symptoms, number of episodes of depression and mania/hypomania experienced during the follow-up period, global functioning, functional impairment and insight. An assessment of costs and a process evaluation will also be conducted which will explore the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention as well as potential barriers to effectiveness. Discussion Bipolar disorder is common, under-recognised and often poorly managed. It is a chronic, life-long, relapsing condition which has an enormous impact on the individual and the economy. This trial will be the first to explore the effectiveness of a novel web-based psychoeducational intervention for patients with bipolar disorder which has potential to be easily rolled out to patients. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials

  15. Safety and effectiveness of the INVATEC MO.MA proximal cerebral protection device during carotid artery stenting: results from the ARMOUR pivotal trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansel, Gary M; Hopkins, L Nelson; Jaff, Michael R; Rubino, Paolo; Bacharach, J Michael; Scheinert, Dierk; Myla, Subbarao; Das, Tony; Cremonesi, Alberto

    2010-07-01

    The multicenter ARMOUR (ProximAl PRotection with the MO.MA Device DUring CaRotid Stenting) trial evaluated the 30-day safety and effectiveness of the MO.MA Proximal Cerebral Protection Device (Invatec, Roncadelle, Italy) utilized to treat high surgical risk patients undergoing carotid artery stenting (CAS). Distal embolic protection devices (EPD) have been traditionally utilized during CAS. The MO.MA device acts as a balloon occlusion "endovascular clamping" system to achieve cerebral protection prior to crossing the carotid stenosis. This prospective registry enrolled 262 subjects, 37 roll-in and 225 pivotal subjects evaluated with intention to treat (ITT) from September 2007 to February 2009. Subjects underwent CAS using the MO.MA device. The primary endpoint, myocardial infarction, stroke, or death through 30 days (30-day major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events [MACCE]) was compared to a performance goal of 13% derived from trials utilizing distal EPD. For the ITT population, the mean age was 74.7 years with 66.7% of the cohort being male. Symptomatic patients comprised 15.1% and 28.9% were octogenarians. Device success was 98.2% and procedural success was 93.2%. The 30-day MACCE rate was 2.7% [95% CI (1.0-5.8%)] with a 30-day major stroke rate of 0.9%. No symptomatic patient suffered a stroke during this trial. The ARMOUR trial demonstrated that the MO.MA(R) Proximal Cerebral Protection Device is safe and effective for high surgical risk patients undergoing CAS. The absence of stroke in symptomatic patients is the lowest rate reported in any independently adjudicated prospective multicenter registry trial to date. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Protocol adherence for continuously titrated interventions in randomized trials: an overview of the current methodology and case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Lauzier

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The standard definition for protocol adherence is the proportion of all scheduled doses that are delivered. In clinical research, this definition has several limitations when evaluating protocol adherence in trials that study interventions requiring continuous titration. Discussion Building upon a specific case study, we analyzed a recent trial of a continuously titrated intervention to assess the impact of different definitions of protocol deviations on the interpretation of protocol adherence. The OVATION pilot trial was an open-label randomized controlled trial of higher (75–80 mmHg versus lower (60–65 mmHg mean arterial pressure (MAP targets for vasopressor therapy in shock. In this trial, potential protocol deviations were defined as MAP values outside the targeted range for >4 consecutive hours during vasopressor therapy without synchronous and consistent adjustments of vasopressor doses. An adjudication committee reviewed each potential deviation to determine if it was clinically-justified or not. There are four reasons for this contextual measurement and reporting of protocol adherence. First, between-arm separation is a robust measure of adherence to complex protocols. Second, adherence assessed by protocol deviations varies in function of the definition of deviations and the frequency of measurements. Third, distinguishing clinically-justified vs. not clinically-justified protocol deviations acknowledges clinically sensible bedside decision-making and offers a clear terminology before the trial begins. Finally, multiple metrics exist to report protocol deviations, which provides different information but complementary information on protocol adherence. Conclusions In trials of interventions requiring continuous titration, metrics used for defining protocol deviations have a considerable impact on the interpretation of protocol adherence. Definitions for protocol deviations should be prespecified and correlated

  17. Protocol adherence for continuously titrated interventions in randomized trials: an overview of the current methodology and case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauzier, F; Adhikari, N K; Seely, A; Koo, K K Y; Belley-Côté, E P; Burns, K E A; Cook, D J; D'Aragon, F; Rochwerg, B; Kho, M E; Oczkowksi, S J W; Duan, E H; Meade, M O; Day, A G; Lamontagne, F

    2017-07-17

    The standard definition for protocol adherence is the proportion of all scheduled doses that are delivered. In clinical research, this definition has several limitations when evaluating protocol adherence in trials that study interventions requiring continuous titration. Building upon a specific case study, we analyzed a recent trial of a continuously titrated intervention to assess the impact of different definitions of protocol deviations on the interpretation of protocol adherence. The OVATION pilot trial was an open-label randomized controlled trial of higher (75-80 mmHg) versus lower (60-65 mmHg) mean arterial pressure (MAP) targets for vasopressor therapy in shock. In this trial, potential protocol deviations were defined as MAP values outside the targeted range for >4 consecutive hours during vasopressor therapy without synchronous and consistent adjustments of vasopressor doses. An adjudication committee reviewed each potential deviation to determine if it was clinically-justified or not. There are four reasons for this contextual measurement and reporting of protocol adherence. First, between-arm separation is a robust measure of adherence to complex protocols. Second, adherence assessed by protocol deviations varies in function of the definition of deviations and the frequency of measurements. Third, distinguishing clinically-justified vs. not clinically-justified protocol deviations acknowledges clinically sensible bedside decision-making and offers a clear terminology before the trial begins. Finally, multiple metrics exist to report protocol deviations, which provides different information but complementary information on protocol adherence. In trials of interventions requiring continuous titration, metrics used for defining protocol deviations have a considerable impact on the interpretation of protocol adherence. Definitions for protocol deviations should be prespecified and correlated with between-arm separation, if it can be measured.

  18. TCT-584 Nine Month Imaging and Twelve Month Clinical Results from the DESSOLVE II Randomized Trial of the MiStent® SES with Absorbable Polymer

    OpenAIRE

    Wijns, William; Vrolix, Mathias; Verheye, Stefan; Schoors, Danny; Slagboom, Ton; Gosselink, Marcel; Benit, Edouard; Desmet, Walter; Chowdhary, Saquib; Lansky, Alexandra; Bezerra, Hiram; Fitzgerald, Peter; Kandzari, David; Ormiston, John

    2012-01-01

    Background : The MiStent SES (Micell Technologies, Durham, NC) is an investigational drug-eluting stent (DES) developed to adress unfavorable late-term outcomes such as stent thrombosis. These events are hypothesized to be associated in part with durable polymers of current DES. The MiStent SES uses a unique combination of components, a crystalline formulation of sirolimus and a fully absorbable polymer on a thinstrut, cobalt chromium stent platform. The polymer coating is eliminated from the...

  19. Neuropsychological outcome after percutaneous coronary intervention or coronary artery bypass grafting: results from the Stent or Surgery (SoS) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Währborg, Peter; Booth, Jean E; Clayton, Tim; Nugara, Fiona; Pepper, John; Weintraub, William S; Sigwart, Ulrich; Stables, Rod H

    2004-11-30

    Coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) has been associated with a range of neurological and neuropsychological complications from stroke to cognitive problems such as memory and problem solving disturbance. However, little is known about the impact of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) on neuropsychological outcome. In the Stent or Surgery Trial (SoS), 988 patients were randomized in equal proportions between PCI supported by stent implantation and CABG. As a substudy of this trial, we undertook an evaluation of neurological and neuropsychological outcomes after intervention. A clinical examination and neuropsychological assessment consisting of 5 tests (Digit Span Forwards and Backwards, Visual Reproduction, Bourdon, and Block Design) were performed at baseline and 6 and 12 months after the procedure. A total of 145 patients were included in the substudy analysis: 77 in the PCI group and 68 in the CABG group. One patient in the PCI arm had a stroke. There was no significant difference between treatment groups at 6 and 12 months for any of the 5 tests. The mean change from baseline was also similar in both groups. We were not able to demonstrate an important and significant difference in neuropsychological outcome in patients treated with different revascularization strategies. This important finding needs to be examined in further research.

  20. Acupuncture for dry eye: a randomised controlled trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Ae-Ran

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dry eye is usually managed by conventional medical interventions such as artificial tears, anti-inflammatory drugs and surgical treatment. However, since dry eye is one of the most frequent ophthalmologic disorders, safer and more effective methods for its treatment are necessary, especially for vulnerable patients. Acupuncture has been widely used to treat patients with dry eye. Our aim is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for this condition. Methods/Design A randomised, patient-assessor blinded, sham (non-acupuncture point, shallow acupuncture controlled study was established. Participants allocated to verum acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups will be treated three times weekly for three weeks for a total of nine sessions per participant. Seventeen points (GV23; bilateral BL2, GB4, TE23, Ex1 (Taiyang, ST1 and GB20; and left SP3, LU9, LU10 and HT8 for men, right for women have been selected for the verum acupuncture; for the sham acupuncture, points have been selected that do not coincide with a classical acupuncture point and that are located close to the verum points, except in the case of the rim of the eye. Ocular surface disease index, tear film breakup time, the Schirmer I test, medication quantification scale and general assessment of improvement will be used as outcome variables for evaluating the effectiveness of acupuncture. Safety will also be assessed at every visit. Primary and secondary outcomes will be assessed four weeks after screening. All statistical analyses will be performed using analysis of covariance. Discussion The results of this trial will be used as a basis for clarifying the efficacy of acupuncture for dry eye. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00969280.

  1. Staying well after depression: trial design and protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J Mark G; Russell, Ian T; Crane, Catherine; Russell, Daphne; Whitaker, Chris J; Duggan, Danielle S; Barnhofer, Thorsten; Fennell, Melanie J V; Crane, Rebecca; Silverton, Sarah

    2010-03-19

    Depression is often a chronic relapsing condition, with relapse rates of 50-80% in those who have been depressed before. This is particularly problematic for those who become suicidal when depressed since habitual recurrence of suicidal thoughts increases likelihood of further acute suicidal episodes. Therefore the question how to prevent relapse is of particular urgency in this group. This trial compares Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT), a novel form of treatment combining mindfulness meditation and cognitive therapy for depression, with both Cognitive Psycho-Education (CPE), an equally plausible cognitive treatment but without meditation, and treatment as usual (TAU). It will test whether MBCT reduces the risk of relapse in recurrently depressed patients and the incidence of suicidal symptoms in those with a history of suicidality who do relapse. It recruits participants, screens them by telephone for main inclusion and exclusion criteria and, if they are eligible, invites them to a pre-treatment session to assess eligibility in more detail. This trial allocates eligible participants at random between MBCT and TAU, CPE and TAU, and TAU alone in a ratio of 2:2:1, stratified by presence of suicidal ideation or behaviour and current anti-depressant use. We aim to recruit sufficient participants to allow for retention of 300 following attrition. We deliver both active treatments in groups meeting for two hours every week for eight weeks. We shall estimate effects on rates of relapse and suicidal symptoms over 12 months following treatment and assess clinical status immediately after treatment, and three, six, nine and twelve months thereafter. This will be the first trial of MBCT to investigate whether MCBT is effective in preventing relapse to depression when compared with a control psychological treatment of equal plausibility; and to explore the use of MBCT for the most severe recurrent depression--that in people who become suicidal when depressed.

  2. Surgical Trial in Lobar Intracerebral Haemorrhage (STICH II Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowan Elise N

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within the spectrum of spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage there are some patients with large or space occupying haemorrhage who require surgery for neurological deterioration and others with small haematomas who should be managed conservatively. There is equipoise about the management of patients between these two extremes. In particular there is some evidence that patients with lobar haematomas and no intraventricular haemorrhage might benefit from haematoma evacuation. The STICH II study will establish whether a policy of earlier surgical evacuation of the haematoma in selected patients will improve outcome compared to a policy of initial conservative treatment. Methods/Design an international multicentre randomised parallel group trial. Only patients for whom the treating neurosurgeon is in equipoise about the benefits of early craniotomy compared to initial conservative treatment are eligible. All patients must have a CT scan confirming spontaneous lobar intracerebral haemorrhage (≤1 cm from the cortex surface of the brain and 10-100 ml in volume. Any clotting or coagulation problems must be corrected and randomisation must take place within 48 hours of ictus. With 600 patients, the study will be able to demonstrate a 12% benefit from surgery (2p Stratified randomisation is undertaken using a central 24 hour randomisation service accessed by telephone or web. Patients randomised to early surgery should have the operation within 12 hours. Information about the status (Glasgow Coma Score and focal signs of all patients through the first five days of their trial progress is also collected in addition to another CT scan at about five days (+/- 2 days. Outcome is measured at six months via a postal questionnaire to the patient. Primary outcome is death or severe disability defined using a prognosis based 8 point Glasgow Outcome Scale. Secondary outcomes include: Mortality, Rankin, Barthel, EuroQol, and Survival. Trial

  3. Single dental implant retained mandibular complete dentures – influence of the loading protocol: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Over the years, there has been a strong consensus in dentistry that at least two implants are required to retain a complete mandibular denture. It has been shown in several clinical trials that one single median implant can retain a mandibular overdenture sufficiently well for up to 5 years without implant failures, when delayed loading was used. However, other trials have reported conflicting results with in part considerable failure rates when immediate loading was applied. Therefore it is the purpose of the current randomized clinical trial to test the hypothesis that immediate loading of a single mandibular midline implant with an overdenture will result in a comparable clinical outcome as using the standard protocol of delayed loading. Methods/design This prospective nine-center randomized controlled clinical trial is still ongoing. The final patient will complete the trial in 2016. In total, 180 edentulous patients between 60 and 89 years with sufficient complete dentures will receive one median implant in the edentulous mandible, which will retain the existing complete denture using a ball attachment. Loading of the median implant is either immediately after implant placement (experimental group) or delayed by 3 months of submerged healing at second-stage surgery (control group). Follow-up of patients will be performed for 24 months after implant loading. The primary outcome measure is non-inferiority of implant success rate of the experimental group compared to the control group. The secondary outcome measures encompass clinical, technical and subjective variables. The study was funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German research foundation, KE 477/8-1). Discussion This multi-center clinical trial will give information on the ability of a single median implant to retain a complete mandibular denture when immediately loaded. If viable, this treatment option will strongly improve everyday dental practice. Trial registration The trial

  4. Short and long-term safety and efficacy of polymer-free vs. durable polymer drug-eluting stents. A comprehensive meta-analysis of randomized trials including 6178 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Navarese, E.P.; Kowalewski, M.; Cortese, B.; Kandzari, D.; Dias, S.; Wojakowski, W.; Buffon, A.; Lansky, A.; Angelini, P.; Torguson, R.; Kubica, J.; Kelm, M.; Boer, M.J. de; Waksman, R.; Suryapranata, H.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The efficacy and safety of polymer-free drug-eluting stents (DESs) in clinical practice is currently subject of debate; randomized trials (RCTs) conducted so far provided conflicting results or were underpowered to definitively address this question; we aimed to investigate the efficacy

  5. Evaluation of XIENCE V everolimus-eluting and Taxus Express2 paclitaxel-eluting coronary stents in patients with jailed side branches from the SPIRIT IV trial at 2 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, John K; Lansky, Alexandra J; Meller, Stephanie M; Hou, Liming; Sood, Poornima; Applegate, Robert J; Wang, John C; Skelding, Kimberly A; Shah, Aakar; Kereiakes, Dean J; Sudhir, Krishnankutty; Cristea, Ecaterina; Yaqub, Manejeh; Stone, Gregg W

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether patients from the Clinical Evaluation of the XIENCE V Everolimus Eluting Coronary Stent System in the Treatment of Patients With de Novo Native Coronary Artery Lesions (SPIRIT) IV trial who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention, who had target lesions with jailed side branches, had improved clinical outcomes when treated with the XIENCE V versus Taxus Express(2) drug-eluting stent. In the SPIRIT III randomized trial, patients with target lesions with jailed side branches after XIENCE V compared with Taxus Express(2) implantation had lower 2-year rates of major adverse cardiac events. The SPIRIT IV trial represents a larger more diverse patient population compared with SPIRIT III. In the large-scale, prospective, multicenter, randomized SPIRIT IV trial, 3,687 patients who underwent coronary stenting with up to 3 de novo native coronary artery lesions were randomized 2:1 to receive XIENCE V versus Taxus Express(2) stents. Two-year clinical outcomes of patients with or without jailed side branches after stenting were compared. A jailed side branch was defined as any side branch >1.0 mm in diameter within the target segment being stented, excluding bifurcations deemed to require treatment. Of the 3,687 patients in SPIRIT IV, a total of 1,426 had side branches that were jailed during angioplasty of the target lesion. Patients with jailed side branches after XIENCE V compared with Taxus Express(2) implantation had significantly lower 2-year rates of target lesion failure (6.5% vs 11.9%, p = 0.001), major adverse cardiac events (6.6% vs 12.2%, p = 0.0008), ischemia-driven target vessel revascularization (4.1% vs 7.9%, p = 0.004), and stent thrombosis (0.6% vs 2.8%, p = 0.001). In conclusion, patients with jailed side branches after stenting with XIENCE V compared to Taxus Express(2) devices had superior clinical outcomes at 2 years in the large-scale randomized SPIRIT IV trial. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All

  6. A randomized comparison of a durable polymer Everolimus-eluting stent with a bare metal coronary stent: The SPIRIT first trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serruys, Patrick W.; Ong, Andrew T. L.; Piek, Jan J.; Neumann, Franz-Josef; van der Giessen, Willem J.; Wiemer, Marcus; Zeiher, Andreas; Grube, Eberhard; Haase, Jürgen; Thuesen, Leif; Hamm, Christian; Otto-Terlouw, Patricia C.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Everolimus is a sirolimus analogue with similar efficacy in animal models, and has been previously successfully tested in humans using an erodable polymer.Methods: This first-in-man single blind multi-centre randomized controlled trial assessed the safety and efficacy of everolimus

  7. A randomised comparison of an everolimus-eluting coronary stent with a paclitaxel-eluting coronary stent:the SPIRIT II trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serruys, Patrick W.; Ruygrok, Peter; Neuzner, Jörg; Piek, Jan J.; Seth, Ashok; Schofer, Joachim J.; Richardt, Gert; Wiemer, Marcus; Carrié, Didier; Thuesen, Leif; Boone, Els; Miquel-Herbert, Karine; Daemen, Joost

    2006-01-01

    Background: Everolimus has been successfully tested in humans using both an erodable and a durable polymer in small previous studies.Methods: This single blind multi-centre non-inferiority randomised (3:1) controlled trial evaluated the safety and performance of the XIENCE V Everolimus Eluting

  8. FIT for FUNCTION: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Julie; Tang, Ada; Guyatt, Gordon; Thabane, Lehana; Xie, Feng; Sahlas, Demetrios; Hart, Robert; Fleck, Rebecca; Hladysh, Genevieve; Macrae, Louise

    2018-01-15

    The current state of evidence suggests that community-based exercise programs are beneficial in improving impairment, function, and health status, and are greatly needed for persons with stroke. However, limitations of these studies include risk of bias, feasibility, and cost issues. This single-blinded, randomized controlled trial (RCT) of 216 participants with stroke will compare the effectiveness of a 12-week YMCA community-based wellness program (FIT for FUNCTION) specifically designed for community-dwelling persons with stroke to persons who receive a standard YMCA membership. The primary outcome will be community reintegration using the Reintegration to Normal Living Index at 12 and 24 weeks. Secondary outcomes include measurement of physical activity level using the Rapid Assessment of Physical Activity and accelerometry; balance using the Berg Balance Scale; lower extremity function using the Short Physical Performance Battery; exercise capacity using the 6-min walk test; grip strength and isometric knee extension strength using hand held dynamometry; and health-related quality of life using the European Quality of Life 5-Dimension Questionnaire. We are also assessing cardiovascular health and lipids; glucose and inflammatory markers will be collected following 12-h fast for total cholesterol, insulin, glucose, and glycated hemoglobin. Self-efficacy for physical activity will be assessed with a single question and self-efficacy for managing chronic disease will be assessed using the Stanford 6-item Scale. The Patient Activation Measure will be used to assess the patient's level of knowledge, skill, and confidence for self-management. Healthcare utilization and costs will be evaluated. Group, time, and group × time interaction effects will be estimated using generalized linear models for continuous variables, including relevant baseline variables as covariates in the analysis that differ appreciably between groups at baseline. Cost data will be treated

  9. Probiotics: Prevention of Severe Pneumonia and Endotracheal Colonization Trial-PROSPECT: protocol for a feasibility randomized pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Jennie; Meade, Maureen; Marshall, John; Heyland, Daren K; Surette, Michael G; Bowdish, Dawn Me; Lauzier, Francois; Thebane, Lehana; Cook, Deborah J

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics are defined as live microorganisms that may confer health benefits when ingested. Meta-analysis of probiotic trials suggests a 25 % lower ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and 18 % lower infection rates overall when administered to patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). However, prior trials are small, largely single center, and at high risk of bias. Before a large rigorous trial is launched, testing whether probiotics confer benefit, harm, or have no impact, a pilot trial is needed. The aim of the PROSPECT Pilot Trial is to determine the feasibility of performing a larger trial in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients investigating Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. A priori, we determined that the feasibility of the larger trial would be based on timely recruitment, high protocol adherence, minimal contamination, and an acceptable VAP rate. Patients ≥18 years old in the ICU who are anticipated to receive mechanical ventilation for ≥72 hours will be included. Patients are excluded if they are at increased risk of probiotic-associated infection, have strict enteral medication contraindications, are pregnant, previously enrolled in a related trial, or are receiving palliative care. Following informed consent, patients are randomized in variable unspecified block sizes in a fixed 1:1 ratio, stratified by ICU, and medical, surgical, or trauma admitting diagnosis. Patients receive 1 × 10 10 colony forming units of L. rhamnosus GG (Culturelle, Locin Industries Ltd) or an identical placebo suspended in tap water administered twice daily via nasogastric tube in the ICU. Clinical and research staff, patients, and families are blinded. The primary outcomes for this pilot trial are the following: (1) recruitment success, (2) ≥90 % protocol adherence, (3) ≤5 % contamination, and (4) ~10 % VAP rate. Additional clinical outcomes are VAP, other infections, diarrhea (total, antibiotic associated, and Clostridium difficile), ICU and

  10. Predictors of stent dysfunction after self-expandable metal stent placement for malignant gastric outlet obstruction: tumor ingrowth in uncovered stents and migration of covered stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Yasuki; Naitoh, Itaru; Hayashi, Kazuki; Ban, Tesshin; Natsume, Makoto; Okumura, Fumihiro; Nakazawa, Takahiro; Takada, Hiroki; Hirano, Atsuyuki; Jinno, Naruomi; Togawa, Shozo; Ando, Tomoaki; Kataoka, Hiromi; Joh, Takashi

    2017-10-01

    Endoscopic metallic stenting is widely accepted as a palliation therapy for malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). However, the predictors of stent dysfunction have not been clarified. We aimed to evaluate the predictors, especially tumor ingrowth in uncovered self-expandable metallic stents (U-SEMS) and migration of covered self-expandable metallic stents (C-SEMS), which are the main causes related to the stent characteristics. In this multicenter retrospective study, we compared patients with U-SEMS and C-SEMS in terms of clinical outcomes, and predictors of stent dysfunction. In total, 252 patients (126 with U-SEMS and 126 with C-SEMS) were enrolled. There were no significant differences in technical success, clinical success, GOO score, or time to stent dysfunction. Tumor ingrowth was significantly more frequent in U-SEMS (U-SEMS, 11.90% vs. C-SEMS, 0.79%; p = 0.002), and stent migration was significantly more frequent for C-SEMS (C-SEMS, 8.73% vs. U-SEMS, 0.79%; p = 0.005). Karnofsky performance status (p = 0.04), no presence of ascites (p = 0.02), and insufficient (stent expansion (p = 0.003) were significantly associated with tumor ingrowth in U-SEMS. Meanwhile, a shorter stent length (p = 0.05) and chemotherapy (p = 0.03) were predictors of C-SEMS migration. Both U-SEMS and C-SEMS are effective with comparable patencies. Tumor ingrowth and stent migration are the main causes of stent dysfunction for U-SEMS and C-SEMS, respectively. With regard to stent dysfunction, U-SEMS might be a good option for patients receiving chemotherapy, while C-SEMS with longer stents for patients in good condition. (Clinical trial registration number: UMIN000024059).

  11. [Absorbable coronary stents. New promising technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbel, Raimund; Böse, Dirk; Haude, Michael; Kordish, Igor; Churzidze, Sofia; Malyar, Nasser; Konorza, Thomas; Sack, Stefan

    2007-06-01

    revascularization rate of 23.8% which was below the 30% cut point of the study protocol. No myocardial Q wave infarction or death were reported. The primary endpoint was reached. During the follow-up period, vasomotion was tested in some of the patients. The proof of principle was confirmed: restoration of vasomotion during acetylcholine testing. The development of the absorbable magnesium stent, which was pushed forward by B. Heublein, Hanover, Germany, has been successful and opens new possibilities for treatment of coronary arteries. Permanent foreign-body implantation is avoided allowing further revascularization procedures in the future, bypass grafting, and restoration of vasomotion. Even prophylactic stenting in nonsignificant stenosis, like vulnerable lesions, may become a regular procedure. Noninvasive coronary imaging by CT and MRI is now possible. Stenting of children and in peripheral arteries may become a standard procedure. Currently, the degradation process of the magnesium stent has to be prolonged, and the neointima proliferation rate has to be reduced so that the DREAM (Drug-Eluting Absorbable Magnesium Stent) concept of Ron Waksman, Washington, DC, USA, can be realized.

  12. Sensitivity Analysis of Per-Protocol Time-to-Event Treatment Efficacy in Randomized Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Peter B.; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Hudgens, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Assessing per-protocol treatment effcacy on a time-to-event endpoint is a common objective of randomized clinical trials. The typical analysis uses the same method employed for the intention-to-treat analysis (e.g., standard survival analysis) applied to the subgroup meeting protocol adherence criteria. However, due to potential post-randomization selection bias, this analysis may mislead about treatment efficacy. Moreover, while there is extensive literature on methods for assessing causal treatment effects in compliers, these methods do not apply to a common class of trials where a) the primary objective compares survival curves, b) it is inconceivable to assign participants to be adherent and event-free before adherence is measured, and c) the exclusion restriction assumption fails to hold. HIV vaccine efficacy trials including the recent RV144 trial exemplify this class, because many primary endpoints (e.g., HIV infections) occur before adherence is measured, and nonadherent subjects who receive some of the planned immunizations may be partially protected. Therefore, we develop methods for assessing per-protocol treatment efficacy for this problem class, considering three causal estimands of interest. Because these estimands are not identifiable from the observable data, we develop nonparametric bounds and semiparametric sensitivity analysis methods that yield estimated ignorance and uncertainty intervals. The methods are applied to RV144. PMID:24187408

  13. Discrepancies in sample size calculations and data analyses reported in randomised trials: comparison of publications with protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, A.W.; Hrobjartsson, A.; Jorgensen, K.J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate how often sample size calculations and methods of statistical analysis are pre-specified or changed in randomised trials. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. Data source Protocols and journal publications of published randomised parallel group trials initially approved...... in 1994-5 by the scientific-ethics committees for Copenhagen and Frederiksberg, Denmark (n=70). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Proportion of protocols and publications that did not provide key information about sample size calculations and statistical methods; proportion of trials with discrepancies between...... of handling missing data was described in 16 protocols and 49 publications. 39/49 protocols and 42/43 publications reported the statistical test used to analyse primary outcome measures. Unacknowledged discrepancies between protocols and publications were found for sample size calculations (18/34 trials...

  14. Development of a dynamic quality assurance testing protocol for multisite clinical trial DCE-CT accreditation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driscoll, B. [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Keller, H. [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, 150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E2 (Canada); Jaffray, D.; Coolens, C. [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, 150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E2 (Canada); Techna Institute, University Health Network, 124-100 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L5 (Canada)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Credentialing can have an impact on whether or not a clinical trial produces useful quality data that is comparable between various institutions and scanners. With the recent increase of dynamic contrast enhanced-computed tomography (DCE-CT) usage as a companion biomarker in clinical trials, effective quality assurance, and control methods are required to ensure there is minimal deviation in the results between different scanners and protocols at various institutions. This paper attempts to address this problem by utilizing a dynamic flow imaging phantom to develop and evaluate a DCE-CT quality assurance (QA) protocol.Methods: A previously designed flow phantom, capable of producing predictable and reproducible time concentration curves from contrast injection was fully validated and then utilized to design a DCE-CT QA protocol. The QA protocol involved a set of quantitative metrics including injected and total mass error, as well as goodness of fit comparison to the known truth concentration curves. An additional region of interest (ROI) sensitivity analysis was also developed to provide additional details on intrascanner variability and determine appropriate ROI sizes for quantitative analysis. Both the QA protocol and ROI sensitivity analysis were utilized to test variations in DCE-CT results using different imaging parameters (tube voltage and current) as well as alternate reconstruction methods and imaging techniques. The developed QA protocol and ROI sensitivity analysis was then applied at three institutions that were part of clinical trial involving DCE-CT and results were compared.Results: The inherent specificity of robustness of the phantom was determined through calculation of the total intraday variability and determined to be less than 2.2 ± 1.1% (total calculated output contrast mass error) with a goodness of fit (R{sup 2}) of greater than 0.99 ± 0.0035 (n= 10). The DCE-CT QA protocol was capable of detecting significant deviations from

  15. Effectiveness of Positioning Stents in Radiation-Induced Xerostomia in Patients with Tongue Carcinoma: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, Priyanka; Chand, Pooran; Singh, Balendra Pratap; Rao, Jitendra; Siddarth, Ramashanker; Srivastava, Kirti

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform an objective and subjective evaluation of the efficacy of positioning stents in radiation-induced xerostomia in patients with tongue carcinoma. A total of 30 patients with tongue carcinoma and undergoing conventional radiotherapy were randomly assigned to control (n = 15) and study (n = 15) groups, without and with a positioning stent, respectively. Assessment of salivary output reduction was done before and after radiotherapy, at 3- and 6-month intervals, by measurement of unstimulated and stimulated salivary flow rates (objective evaluation). Xerostomia (subjective evaluation) was noted using six items from the Quality of Life Head and Neck Module (QLQ-H&N35) as proposed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer. The significance level was set at .05. Mean unstimulated and stimulated salivary flow rates at 3- and 6-month intervals revealed significantly (P xerostomia and its symptoms.

  16. Carotid Stenting with Distal Protection in High-Surgical-Risk Patients: One-Year Results of the ASTI Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosiers, Marc, E-mail: marc.bosiers@telenet.be [A.Z. Sint-Blasius, Department of Vascular Surgery (Belgium); Scheinert, Dierk, E-mail: dierk.scheinert@gmx.de [Park Hospital, Center for Vascular Medicine-Angiology and Vascular Surgery (Germany); Mathias, Klaus, E-mail: k.mathias@asklepios.com [Klinikum Dortmund GmbH (Germany); Langhoff, Ralf, E-mail: ralf.langhoff@sankt-gertrauden.de [Sankt Gertrauden-Krankenhaus (Germany); Mudra, Harald, E-mail: haraldmudra@aol.com [Klinikum Neuperlach (Germany); Diaz-Cartelle, Juan, E-mail: juan.diazcartelle@bostonscientific.com [One Boston Scientific Place, Boston Scientific Corporation (United States)

    2015-04-15

    PurposeThis prospective, multicenter, nonrandomized study evaluated the periprocedural and 1-year outcomes in high-surgical-risk patients with carotid artery stenosis treated with the Adapt Carotid Stent plus FilterWire EZ distal protection catheter (Boston Scientific Corporation, Natick, MA).Materials and MethodsThe study enrolled 100 patients (32 symptomatic, 63 asymptomatic, 5 unknown) at high risk for carotid endarterectomy due to prespecified anatomical criteria and/or medical comorbidities. Thirty-day and 1-year follow-up included clinical evaluation, carotid duplex ultrasound, and independent neurologic and NIH stroke scale assessments. One-year endpoints included the composite rate of major adverse events (MAE), defined as death, stroke, and myocardial infarction (MI) and the rates of late ipsilateral stroke (31–365 days), target lesion revascularization, and in-stent restenosis.ResultsOf the 100 enrolled patients, technical success was achieved in 90.9 % (90/99). The 30-day MAE rate (5.1 %) consisted of major stroke (2.0 %) and minor stroke (3.1 %); no deaths or MIs occurred. The 1-year MAE rate (12.2 %) consisted of death, MI, and stroke rates of 4.4, 3.3, and 8.9 %, respectively. Late ipsilateral stroke (31–365 days) rate was 1.1 %. Symptomatic patients had higher rates of death (11.1 vs. 1.7 %) and MI (7.4 vs. 1.7 %), but lower rates of major (7.4 vs. 10.0 %) and minor stroke (0.0 vs. 6.7 %), compared with asymptomatic patients.ConclusionResults through 1 year postprocedure demonstrated that carotid artery stenting with Adapt Carotid Stent and FilterWire EZ is safe and effective in high-risk-surgical patients.

  17. Carotid Stenting with Distal Protection in High-Surgical-Risk Patients: One-Year Results of the ASTI Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosiers, Marc; Scheinert, Dierk; Mathias, Klaus; Langhoff, Ralf; Mudra, Harald; Diaz-Cartelle, Juan

    2015-01-01

    PurposeThis prospective, multicenter, nonrandomized study evaluated the periprocedural and 1-year outcomes in high-surgical-risk patients with carotid artery stenosis treated with the Adapt Carotid Stent plus FilterWire EZ distal protection catheter (Boston Scientific Corporation, Natick, MA).Materials and MethodsThe study enrolled 100 patients (32 symptomatic, 63 asymptomatic, 5 unknown) at high risk for carotid endarterectomy due to prespecified anatomical criteria and/or medical comorbidities. Thirty-day and 1-year follow-up included clinical evaluation, carotid duplex ultrasound, and independent neurologic and NIH stroke scale assessments. One-year endpoints included the composite rate of major adverse events (MAE), defined as death, stroke, and myocardial infarction (MI) and the rates of late ipsilateral stroke (31–365 days), target lesion revascularization, and in-stent restenosis.ResultsOf the 100 enrolled patients, technical success was achieved in 90.9 % (90/99). The 30-day MAE rate (5.1 %) consisted of major stroke (2.0 %) and minor stroke (3.1 %); no deaths or MIs occurred. The 1-year MAE rate (12.2 %) consisted of death, MI, and stroke rates of 4.4, 3.3, and 8.9 %, respectively. Late ipsilateral stroke (31–365 days) rate was 1.1 %. Symptomatic patients had higher rates of death (11.1 vs. 1.7 %) and MI (7.4 vs. 1.7 %), but lower rates of major (7.4 vs. 10.0 %) and minor stroke (0.0 vs. 6.7 %), compared with asymptomatic patients.ConclusionResults through 1 year postprocedure demonstrated that carotid artery stenting with Adapt Carotid Stent and FilterWire EZ is safe and effective in high-risk-surgical patients

  18. Tissue coverage of a hydrophilic polymer-coated zotarolimus-eluting stent vs. a fluoropolymer-coated everolimus-eluting stent at 13-month follow-up: an optical coherence tomography substudy from the RESOLUTE All Comers trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutiérrez-Chico, Juan Luis; van Geuns, Robert Jan; Regar, Evelyn

    2011-01-01

    To compare the tissue coverage of a hydrophilic polymer-coated zotarolimus-eluting stent (ZES) vs. a fluoropolymer-coated everolimus-eluting stent (EES) at 13 months, using optical coherence tomography (OCT) in an 'all-comers' population of patients, in order to clarify the mechanism of eventual...

  19. Assessment of Adverse Events in Protocols, Clinical Study Reports, and Published Papers of Trials of Orlistat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroll, Jeppe Bennekou; Penninga, Elisabeth I; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about how adverse events are summarised and reported in trials, as detailed information is usually considered confidential. We have acquired clinical study reports (CSRs) from the European Medicines Agency through the Freedom of Information Act. The CSRs describe......Med and adverse event data were extracted from this source as well. All three sources were compared. Individual adverse events from one trial were summed and compared to the totals in the summary report. None of the protocols or CSRs contained instructions for investigators on how to question participants about...

  20. Standardized terminology for clinical trial protocols based on top-level ontological categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, B; Herre, H; Lippoldt, K; Loeffler, M

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a new method for the ontologically based standardization of concepts with regard to the quality assurance of clinical trial protocols. We developed a data dictionary for medical and trial-specific terms in which concepts and relations are defined context-dependently. The data dictionary is provided to different medical research networks by means of the software tool Onto-Builder via the internet. The data dictionary is based on domain-specific ontologies and the top-level ontology of GOL. The concepts and relations described in the data dictionary are represented in natural language, semi-formally or formally according to their use.

  1. Agreements between Industry and Academia on Publication Rights: A Retrospective Study of Protocols and Publications of Randomized Clinical Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Kasenda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about publication agreements between industry and academic investigators in trial protocols and the consistency of these agreements with corresponding statements in publications. We aimed to investigate (i the existence and types of publication agreements in trial protocols, (ii the completeness and consistency of the reporting of these agreements in subsequent publications, and (iii the frequency of co-authorship by industry employees.We used a retrospective cohort of randomized clinical trials (RCTs based on archived protocols approved by six research ethics committees between 13 January 2000 and 25 November 2003. Only RCTs with industry involvement were eligible. We investigated the documentation of publication agreements in RCT protocols and statements in corresponding journal publications. Of 647 eligible RCT protocols, 456 (70.5% mentioned an agreement regarding publication of results. Of these 456, 393 (86.2% documented an industry partner's right to disapprove or at least review proposed manuscripts; 39 (8.6% agreements were without constraints of publication. The remaining 24 (5.3% protocols referred to separate agreement documents not accessible to us. Of those 432 protocols with an accessible publication agreement, 268 (62.0% trials were published. Most agreements documented in the protocol were not reported in the subsequent publication (197/268 [73.5%]. Of 71 agreements reported in publications, 52 (73.2% were concordant with those documented in the protocol. In 14 of 37 (37.8% publications in which statements suggested unrestricted publication rights, at least one co-author was an industry employee. In 25 protocol-publication pairs, author statements in publications suggested no constraints, but 18 corresponding protocols documented restricting agreements.Publication agreements constraining academic authors' independence are common. Journal articles seldom report on publication agreements, and, if they do

  2. Agreements between Industry and Academia on Publication Rights: A Retrospective Study of Protocols and Publications of Randomized Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasenda, Benjamin; von Elm, Erik; You, John J.; Tomonaga, Yuki; Saccilotto, Ramon; Amstutz, Alain; Bengough, Theresa; Meerpohl, Joerg J.; Stegert, Mihaela; Olu, Kelechi K.; Tikkinen, Kari A. O.; Neumann, Ignacio; Carrasco-Labra, Alonso; Faulhaber, Markus; Mulla, Sohail M.; Mertz, Dominik; Akl, Elie A.; Bassler, Dirk; Busse, Jason W.; Nordmann, Alain; Gloy, Viktoria; Ebrahim, Shanil; Schandelmaier, Stefan; Sun, Xin; Vandvik, Per O.; Johnston, Bradley C.; Walter, Martin A.; Burnand, Bernard; Hemkens, Lars G.; Bucher, Heiner C.; Guyatt, Gordon H.; Briel, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about publication agreements between industry and academic investigators in trial protocols and the consistency of these agreements with corresponding statements in publications. We aimed to investigate (i) the existence and types of publication agreements in trial protocols, (ii) the completeness and consistency of the reporting of these agreements in subsequent publications, and (iii) the frequency of co-authorship by industry employees. Methods and Findings We used a retrospective cohort of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) based on archived protocols approved by six research ethics committees between 13 January 2000 and 25 November 2003. Only RCTs with industry involvement were eligible. We investigated the documentation of publication agreements in RCT protocols and statements in corresponding journal publications. Of 647 eligible RCT protocols, 456 (70.5%) mentioned an agreement regarding publication of results. Of these 456, 393 (86.2%) documented an industry partner’s right to disapprove or at least review proposed manuscripts; 39 (8.6%) agreements were without constraints of publication. The remaining 24 (5.3%) protocols referred to separate agreement documents not accessible to us. Of those 432 protocols with an accessible publication agreement, 268 (62.0%) trials were published. Most agreements documented in the protocol were not reported in the subsequent publication (197/268 [73.5%]). Of 71 agreements reported in publications, 52 (73.2%) were concordant with those documented in the protocol. In 14 of 37 (37.8%) publications in which statements suggested unrestricted publication rights, at least one co-author was an industry employee. In 25 protocol-publication pairs, author statements in publications suggested no constraints, but 18 corresponding protocols documented restricting agreements. Conclusions Publication agreements constraining academic authors’ independence are common. Journal articles seldom report on

  3. Effects of cobalt-chromium everolimus eluting stents or bare metal stent on fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events: patient level meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valgimigli, Marco; Sabaté, Manel; Kaiser, Christoph; Brugaletta, Salvatore; de la Torre Hernandez, Jose Maria; Galatius, Soeren; Cequier, Angel; Eberli, Franz; de Belder, Adam; Serruys, Patrick W; Ferrante, Giuseppe

    2014-11-04

    To examine the safety and effectiveness of cobalt-chromium everolimus eluting stents compared with bare metal stents. Individual patient data meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. Cox proportional regression models stratified by trial, containing random effects, were used to assess the impact of stent type on outcomes. Hazard ratios with 95% confidence interval for outcomes were reported. Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Randomised controlled trials that compared cobalt-chromium everolimus eluting stents with bare metal stents were selected. The principal investigators whose trials met the inclusion criteria provided data for individual patients. The primary outcome was cardiac mortality. Secondary endpoints were myocardial infarction, definite stent thrombosis, definite or probable stent thrombosis, target vessel revascularisation, and all cause death. The search yielded five randomised controlled trials, comprising 4896 participants. Compared with patients receiving bare metal stents, participants receiving cobalt-chromium everolimus eluting stents had a significant reduction of cardiac mortality (hazard ratio 0.67, 95% confidence interval 0.49 to 0.91; P=0.01), myocardial infarction (0.71, 0.55 to 0.92; P=0.01), definite stent thrombosis (0.41, 0.22 to 0.76; P=0.005), definite or probable stent thrombosis (0.48, 0.31 to 0.73; Pstents the use of cobalt-chromium everolimus eluting stents improves global cardiovascular outcomes including cardiac survival, myocardial infarction, and overall stent thrombosis. © Valgimigli et al 2014.

  4. Initiating change locally in bullying and aggression through the school environment (INCLUSIVE) trial: update to cluster randomised controlled trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonell, Chris; Mathiot, Anne; Allen, Elizabeth; Bevilacqua, Leonardo; Christie, Deborah; Elbourne, Diana; Fletcher, Adam; Grieve, Richard; Legood, Rosa; Scott, Stephen; Warren, Emily; Wiggins, Meg; Viner, Russell M

    2017-05-25

    Systematic reviews suggest that multi-component interventions are effective in reducing bullying victimisation and perpetration. We are undertaking a phase III randomised trial of the INCLUSIVE multi-component intervention. This trial aims to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the INCLUSIVE intervention in reducing aggression and bullying victimisation in English secondary schools. This paper updates the original trial protocol published in 2014 (Trials 15:381, 2014) and presents the changes in the process evaluation protocol and the secondary outcome data collection. The methods are summarised as follows. cluster randomised trial. 40 state secondary schools. Outcomes assessed among the cohort of students at the end of year 7 (n = 6667) at baseline. INCLUSIVE is a multi-component school intervention including a social and emotional learning curriculum, changes to school environment (an action group comprising staff and students reviews local data on needs to review rules and policies and determine other local actions) and staff training in restorative practice. The intervention will be delivered by schools supported in the first two years by educational facilitators independent of the research team, with a third intervention year involving no external facilitation but all other elements. Comparator: normal practice. Primary: Two primary outcomes at student level assessed at baseline and at 36 months: 1. Aggressive behaviours in school: Edinburgh Study of Youth Transitions and Crime school misbehaviour subscale (ESYTC) 2. Bullying and victimisation: Gatehouse Bullying Scale (GBS) Secondary outcomes assessed at baseline, 24 and 36 months will include measures relating to the economic evaluation, psychosocial outcomes in students and staff and school-level truancy and exclusion rates. 20 schools per arm will provide 90% power to identify an effect size of 0.25 SD with a 5% significance level. Randomisation: eligible consenting schools were

  5. Protocol for the Osteoporosis Choice trial. A pilot randomized trial of a decision aid in primary care practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulledge-Scheitel Sidna M

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bisphosphonates can reduce fracture risk in patients with osteoporosis, but many at-risk patients do not start or adhere to these medications. The aims of this study are to: (1 preliminarily evaluate the effect of an individualized 10-year osteoporotic fracture risk calculator and decision aid (OSTEOPOROSIS CHOICE for postmenopausal women at risk for osteoporotic fractures; and (2 assess the feasibility and validity (i.e., absence of contamination of patient-level randomization (vs. cluster randomization in pilot trials of decision aid efficacy. Methods/Design This is a protocol for a parallel, 2-arm, randomized trial to compare an intervention group receiving OSTEOPOROSIS CHOICE to a control group receiving usual primary care. Postmenopausal women with bone mineral density T-scores of STEOPOROSIS CHOICE on five outcomes: (a patient knowledge regarding osteoporosis risk factors and treatment; (b quality of the decision-making process for both the patient and clinician; (c patient and clinician acceptability and satisfaction with the decision aid; (d rate of bisphosphonate use and adherence, and (e trial processes (e.g., ability to recruit participants, collect patient outcomes. To capture these outcomes, we will use patient and clinician surveys following each visit and video recordings of the clinical encounters. These video recordings will also allow us to determine the extent to which clinicians previously exposed to the decision aid were able to recreate elements of the decision aid with control patients (i.e., contamination. Pharmacy prescription profiles and follow-up phone interviews will assess medication start and adherence at 6 months. Discussion This pilot trial will provide evidence of feasibility, validity of patient randomization, and preliminary efficacy of a novel approach -- decision aids -- to improving medication adherence for postmenopausal women at risk of osteoporotic fractures. The results will inform

  6. The Effect of Cilostazol on the Angiographic Outcome of Drug-Eluting Coronary Stents Angiographic Analysis of the CILON-T (Influence of CILostazol-Based Triple Antiplatelet Therapy ON Ischemi Complication after Drug-Eluting StenT Implantation) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Jung-Won; Lee, Seung-Pyo; Park, KyungWoo; Kang, Hyun-Jae; Koo, Bon-Kwon; Cho, Young-Seok; Youn, Tae-Jin; Chae, In-Ho; Choi, Dong-Ju; Rha, Seung-Woon; Bae, Jang-Ho; Kwon, Taek-Geun; Bae, Jang-Whan; Cho, Myeong-Chan; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2017-12-12

    It is not clear if anti-restonotic effect of cilostazol is consistent for different types of drug-eluting stents (DES).The purpose of this study was to compare the anti-proliferative effect of cilostazol between DAT and TAT with consideration of confounding influences of DES type.Nine hundred and fifteen patients were randomized to either dual antiplatelet therapy (DAT; aspirin and clopidogrel) or triple antiplatelet therapy (TAT; aspirin, clopidogrel, and cilostazol) in the previous CILON-T trial. After excluding 70 patients who received both or neither stents, we analyzed 845 patients who received exclusively PES or ZES, and compared in-stent late loss at 6 months between both antiplatelet regimens (DAT versus TAT).Baseline angiographic and clinical characteristics were similar between the DAT (656 lesions in 425 patients) and the TAT group (600 lesions in 420 patients). The 6-month follow-up angiography was completed in 745 patients (88.2%). Quantitative coronary angiography showed that TAT significantly reduced in-stent late loss (DAT 0.62 ± 0.62 mm versus TAT 0.54 ± 0.49 mm, P = 0.015). Stent type, diabetes or lesion length did not interact with difference of late loss. However, reduction of late loss by cilostazol did not lead to a significant reduction in the rate of target lesion revascularization (TLR) (DAT 7.8% versus TAT 6.9%, P = 0.69) due to a nonlinear relationship found between late loss and TLR.The TAT group showed less in-stent late loss as compared to the DAT group. This was consistently observed regardless of DES type, lesion length, or diabetic status. However, reduction of late loss by cilostazol did not lead to a significant reduction in TLR.

  7. Dedicated bifurcation stents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajith Ananthakrishna Pillai

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Bifurcation percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI is still a difficult call for the interventionist despite advancements in the instrumentation, technical skill and the imaging modalities. With major cardiac events relate to the side-branch (SB compromise, the concept and practice of dedicated bifurcation stents seems exciting. Several designs of such dedicated stents are currently undergoing trials. This novel concept and pristine technology offers new hope notwithstanding the fact that we need to go a long way in widespread acceptance and practice of these gadgets. Some of these designs even though looks enterprising, the mere complex delivering technique and the demanding knowledge of the exact coronary anatomy makes their routine use challenging.

  8. Correction: PAIS: paracetamol (acetaminophen in stroke; protocol for a randomized, double blind clinical trial. [ISCRTN74418480

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kappelle L Jaap

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Paracetamol (Acetaminophen In Stroke (PAIS study is a phase III multicenter, double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial of high-dose acetaminophen in patients with acute stroke. The trial compares treatment with a daily dose of 6 g acetaminophen, started within 12 hours after the onset of symptoms, with matched placebo. The purpose of this study is to assess whether treatment with acetaminophen for 3 days will result in improved functional outcome through a modest reduction in body temperature and prevention of fever. The previously planned statistical analysis based on a dichotomization of the scores on the modified Rankin Scale (mRS may not make the most efficient use of the available baseline information. Therefore, the planned primary analysis of the PAIS study has been changed from fixed dichotomization of the mRS to a sliding dichotomy analysis. Methods Instead of taking a single definition of good outcome for all patients, the definition is tailored to each individual patient's baseline prognosis on entry into the trial. Conclusion The protocol change was initiated because of both advances in statistical approaches and to increase the efficiency of the trial by improving statistical power. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials [ISCRTN74418480

  9. A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials and prospective studies comparing covered and bare self-expandable metal stents for the treatment of malignant obstruction in the digestive tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhiping; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Fang; Ye, Xiaofei; Qi, Xingshun; Fan, Daiming

    2013-01-01

    Self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) are widely used for the palliative treatment of malignant gastrointestinal obstruction. Our aim was to evaluate the evidence comparing covered and bare SEMS in the digestive tract using meta-analytical techniques. A literature search was performed using PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Embase databases for comparative studies assessing the two types of stents. The primary outcomes of interest were stent patency and patient survival; second outcomes included technical success, clinical success, tumor ingrowth, tumor overgrowth, and stent migration. A random-effects model was conducted. Pooled analysis was done separately based on the different segments of the digestive tract. Eleven studies (8 randomized controlled trials and 3 prospective cohort studies) including a total of 1376 patients were identified. Covered SEMS were equivalent to bare SEMS in terms of technical success, clinical success, stent patency (gastroduodenal obstruction: HR =0.87, 95% CI 0.53-1.42; colorectal obstruction: HR =0.89, 95% CI 0.18-4.45; biliary obstruction: HR =0.73, 95% CI 0.41-1.32) and survival rates (esophageal obstruction: HR =1.80, 95% CI 0.73-4.44; gastroduodenal obstruction: HR =0.83, 95% CI 0.55-1.26; biliary obstruction: HR =0.99, 95% CI 0.77-1.28), although bare stents were more prone to tumor ingrowth (esophageal obstruction: RR =0.10, 95% CI 0.01-0.77; gastroduodenal obstruction: RR =0.12, 95% CI 0.03-0.55; colorectal obstruction: RR =0.21, 95% CI 0.06-0.70; biliary obstruction: RR =0.21, 95% CI 0.06-0.69), whereas covered stents had the higher risk of stent migration (gastroduodenal obstruction: RR =5.01, 95% CI 1.53-16.43; colorectal obstruction: RR =11.70, 95% CI 2.84-48.27; biliary obstruction: RR =8.11, 95% CI 1.47-44.76) and tumor overgrowth (biliary obstruction: RR =2.03, 95% CI 1.08-3.78). Both covered and bare SEMS are comparable in efficacy for the palliative treatment of malignant obstruction in the digestive tract. Each type of

  10. Prospective, unmasked evaluation of the iStent® inject system for open-angle glaucoma: synergy trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskanyan, Lilit; García-Feijoó, Julián; Belda, Jose I; Fea, Antonio; Jünemann, Anselm; Baudouin, Christophe

    2014-02-01

    Micro-invasive glaucoma surgical implantation of trabecular micro-bypass stents, previously shown to be safe and effective for open-angle glaucoma (OAG) subjects during cataract surgery, was considered for evaluation as a sole procedure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and intraocular pressure (IOP)-lowering efficacy after ab interno implantation of two Glaukos Trabecular Micro-Bypass iStent inject second generation devices in subjects with OAG. This study was performed at sites in France, Germany, Italy, Republic of Armenia, and Spain. In this pan-European, multi-center prospective, post-market, unmasked study, 99 patients with OAG on at least two topical ocular hypotensive medications who required additional IOP lowering to control glaucoma disease underwent implantation of two GTS400 stents in a stand-alone procedure. Patients were qualified if they presented with preoperative mean IOP between 22 and 38 mmHg after medication washout. Postoperatively, subjects were assessed at Day 1, Months 1, 3, 6, 7, 9, and 12. IOP, medication use and safety were assessed at each visit. Sixty-six percent of subjects achieved IOP ≤18 mmHg at 12 months without medication, and 81% of subjects achieved Month 12 IOP ≤ 18 mmHg with either a single medication or no medication. Mean baseline washout IOP values decreased by 10.2 mmHg or 39.7% from 26.3 (SD 3.5) mmHg to 15.7 (SD 3.7) mmHg at Month 12. Mean IOP at 12 months was 14.7 (SD 3.1) mmHg in subjects not using ocular hypotensive medications. Reduction from preoperative medication burden was achieved in 86.9% of patients, including 15.2% with reduction of one medication and 71.7% with reduction of two or more medications. Postoperative complications occurred at a low rate and resolved without persistent effects. In this series, implantation of two trabecular micro-bypass second generation stents in subjects with OAG resulted in IOP and medication reduction and favorable safety outcomes.

  11. Temporary urethral covered stent - third year of experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stojanovis, V.; Maksimovis, H.; Markovis, B.; Markovis, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: In October 2003, a new generation of urethral stents ALLIUM, produced in Israel, were used at the Department of Interventional Radiology, CCS, in 18 patients with chronic stricture of bulbar urethra. The indications for insertion were determined according to well-known and recognized therapeutical protocols. The stent is made of nitinol wire with polyurethane cover. It is inserted under local anesthesia by a special self-expandable system that may be fixed or flexible. The stents we used were 3-6 cm long and 28 Fr wide. Radioscopic-assisted insertion was performed over formerly placed metal guide. Prior to insertion, balloon-catheter dilatation of stricture matching the stent width was carried out. Pre-insertion urethrotomy was performed in one case. The insertion technique is simple, presupposing the knowledge of older generations of techniques of urethral dilatation and insertion of self-expandable stents. The follow-up of results was done according to a priori established protocol including the following: UCG, uroflowmetry and interview with patients. Due to stent migration, the 'stent over stent' technique was applied in one case, while reposition by balloon-catheter outward traction was performed in two cases of caudal migration. No irritative discomforts were reported in the first 4 months after stent dwelling. Uroflowmetric controls verified at least four times better results than before the insertion. Given it is the question of covered stent, there is no possibility of proliferative secondary lumen obstruction. On account of soft structure and conic shape of posterior part of stent, no lesions of the external urethral sphincter were manifested. The stent is simply withdrawn after 6 months by outward traction using the forceps at the time when the stent construction turns into soft and straight wire. The first clinical experiences are very favorable and ALLIUM stent may be expected to be the stent of choice for chronic bulbar strictures

  12. A Randomized Trial Comparing Two Tongue-Pressure Resistance Training Protocols for Post-Stroke Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Catriona M; Bayley, Mark T; Peladeau-Pigeon, Melanie; Nagy, Ahmed; Namasivayam, Ashwini M; Stokely, Shauna L; Wolkin, Talia

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the outcomes of two tongue resistance training protocols. One protocol ("tongue-pressure profile training") emphasized the pressure-timing patterns that are typically seen in healthy swallows by focusing on gradual pressure release and saliva swallowing tasks. The second protocol ("tongue-pressure strength and accuracy training") emphasized strength and accuracy in tongue-palate pressure generation and did not include swallowing tasks. A prospective, randomized, parallel allocation trial was conducted. Of 26 participants who were screened for eligibility, 14 received up to 24 sessions of treatment. Outcome measures of posterior tongue strength, oral bolus control, penetration-aspiration and vallecular residue were made based on videofluoroscopy analysis by blinded raters. Complete data were available for 11 participants. Significant improvements were seen in tongue strength and post-swallow vallecular residue with thin liquids, regardless of treatment condition. Stage transition duration (a measure of the duration of the bolus presence in the pharynx prior to swallow initiation, which had been chosen to capture impairments in oral bolus control) showed no significant differences. Similarly, significant improvements were not seen in median scores on the penetration-aspiration scale. This trial suggests that tongue strength can be improved with resistance training for individuals with tongue weakness following stroke. We conclude that improved penetration-aspiration does not necessarily accompany improvements in tongue strength; however, tongue-pressure resistance training does appear to be effective for reducing thin liquid vallecular residue.

  13. Drug-eluting stents and bare metal stents in patients with NSTE-ACS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sune Haahr; Pfisterer, Matthias; Kaiser, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    the randomised BASKET-PROVE trial (sirolimus-eluting stent vs. everolimus-eluting stent vs. bare metal stent in large-vessel stenting). The primary endpoint was the combined two-year rate of cardiovascular death or non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI). Secondary endpoints were each component of the primary...... implantation in large vessels was associated with a reduction in both TVR and the combined endpoint consisting of cardiovascular death/MI. Thus, DES use improves both efficacy and safety. These findings support the use of DES in NSTE-ACS patients....

  14. The effects of a tailored intensive care unit delirium prevention protocol: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Kyoung-Ja; Lee, Sun-Mi

    2015-09-01

    A decreased incidence of delirium following the application of non-pharmacologic intervention protocols to several patient populations has been previously reported. However, few studies have been conducted to examine the effects of their application to intensive care unit (ICU) patients. To examine the effects of applying a tailored delirium preventive protocol, developed by the authors, to ICU patients by analyzing its effects on delirium incidence, in-hospital mortality, ICU readmission, and length of ICU stay in a Korean hospital. A single-blind randomized controlled trial. A 1049-bed general hospital with a 105-bed ICU. Sixty and 63 ICU patients were randomly assigned to the intervention and control groups, respectively. The researchers applied the delirium prevention protocol to the intervention group every day for the first 7 days of ICU hospitalization. Delirium incidence, mortality, and re-admission to the ICU during the same hospitalization period were analyzed by logistic regression analysis; the 7- and 30-day in-hospital mortality by Kaplan-Meier survival and Cox proportional hazard regression analysis; and length of ICU stay was assessed by linear regression analysis. Application of the protocol had no significant effect on delirium incidence, in-hospital mortality, re-admission to the ICU, or length of ICU stay. Whereas the risk of 30-day in-hospital mortality was not significantly lower in the intervention than in the control group (OR: 0.33; 95% CI: 0.10-1.09), we found a significantly decreased 7-day in-hospital mortality in the intervention group after protocol application (HR: 0.09; 95% CI: 0.01-0.72). Application of a tailored delirium prevention protocol to acute stage patients during the first 7 days of ICU hospitalization appeared to reduce the 7-day in-hospital risk of mortality only for this patient population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A prospective 3-year follow-up trial of implantation of two trabecular microbypass stents in open-angle glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donnenfeld ED

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Eric D Donnenfeld,1 Kerry D Solomon,2 Lilit Voskanyan,3 David F Chang,4 Thomas W Samuelson,5 Iqbal Ike K Ahmed,6 L Jay Katz7 1Ophthalmic Consultants of Long Island, Rockville Centre, NY, 2Carolina Eyecare Physicians, Mt Pleasant, SC, USA; 3S.V. Malayan Ophthalmology Centre, Yerevan, Armenia; 4Altos Eye Physicians, Los Altos, CA, 5Minnesota Eye Consultants, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 6University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 7Wills Eye Hospital, Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, PA, USA Purpose: To evaluate 3-year safety and intraocular pressure (IOP following two trabecular microbypass stents in phakic and pseudophakic subjects with open-angle glaucoma (OAG not controlled on preoperative medication. Patients and methods: In this prospective pilot study, phakic or pseudophakic subjects with OAG and IOP between 18 mmHg and 30 mmHg on one preoperative topical ocular hypotensive medication underwent medication washout. Thirty-nine qualified subjects with preoperative unmedicated IOP ≥22 mmHg and ≤38 mmHg received two stents. Postoperative examinations were scheduled at Day 1, Week 1, Months 1, 3, 6, and 12, and semiannually through Month 60. Ocular hypotensive medication was considered if postoperative IOP exceeded 21 mmHg. IOP, medication use, and safety were assessed at each visit. Subject follow-up through Month 36 was completed. Results: Thirty-six eyes (92.3%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 79.1%, 98.4% achieved the primary efficacy end point of Month 12 reduction in IOP ≥20% from baseline (unmedicated IOP without ocular hypotensive medication. Four subjects required medication during the Month 36 follow-up period. Mean IOP at 36 months for subjects not taking medication was 15.2 mmHg. At 36 months, subjects sustained mean IOP decrease of 9.1±2.7 mmHg (95% CI 8.0 mmHg, 10.14 mmHg, or 37% IOP reduction, from unmedicated baseline IOP. Compared to preoperative medicated IOP, subjects had mean reduction at Month 36 of 5.5±2

  16. Serial Versus Direct Dilation of Small Diameter Stents Results in a More Predictable and Complete Intentional Transcatheter Stent Fracture: A PICES Bench Testing Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crystal, Matthew A; Morgan, Gareth J; Danon, Saar; Gray, Robert G; Gruenstein, Daniel H; Gordon, Brent M; Goldstein, Bryan H

    2018-01-01

    Balloon-expandable stents, implanted in infants and children with congenital heart disease (CHD), often require redilation to match somatic growth. Small diameter stents may eventually require longitudinal surgical transection to prevent iatrogenic vascular stenosis. Intentional transcatheter stent fracture (TSF) is an emerging alternative approach to stent transection, but little is known about the optimal stent substrate and best protocol to improve the likelihood of successful TSF. Bench testing was performed with a stent dilation protocol. After recording baseline characteristics, stents were serially or directly dilated using ultra-high-pressure balloons (UHPB) until fracture occurred or further stent dilation was not possible. Stent characteristics recorded were as follows: cell design, metallurgy, mechanism, and uniformity of fracture. Stents tested included bare-metal coronary stents, premounted small diameter stents, and ePTFE-covered small diameter premounted stents. Ninety-four stents representing 9 distinct models were maximally dilated, with 80 (85%) demonstrating evidence of fracture. Comprehensive fracture details were recorded in 64 stents: linear and complete in 34/64 stents (53.1%), linear and incomplete in 9/64 stents (14.1%), transverse/complex and complete in 6/64 stents (9.4%), and transverse/complex and incomplete in 15/64 stents (23.4%). Stent fracture was not accomplished in some stent models secondary to significant shortening, i.e., "napkin-ring" formation. Serial dilation resulted in evidence of fracture in 62/67 (92.5%) stents compared with 18/27 (66.7%) stents in the direct dilation group (p = 0.003). Intentional TSF is feasible in an ex vivo model. Serial dilation more reliably expanded the stent and allowed for ultimate stent fracture, whereas direct large diameter dilation of stents was more likely to generate a "napkin-ring" configuration, which may be more resistant to fracture. In vivo animal and human testing is necessary to

  17. The Apathy in Dementia Methylphenidate Trial 2 (ADMET 2): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Roberta W; Drye, Lea; Mintzer, Jacobo; Lanctôt, Krista; Rosenberg, Paul; Herrmann, Nathan; Padala, Prasad; Brawman-Mintzer, Olga; Burke, William; Craft, Suzanne; Lerner, Alan J; Levey, Allan; Porsteinsson, Anton; van Dyck, Christopher H

    2018-01-18

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized not only by cognitive and functional decline, but also often by the presence of neuropsychiatric symptoms. Apathy, which can be defined as a lack of motivation, is one of the most prevalent neuropsychiatric symptoms in AD and typically leads to a worse quality of life and greater burden for caregivers. Treatment options for apathy in AD are limited, but studies have examined the use of the amphetamine, methylphenidate. The Apathy in Dementia Methylphenidate Trial (ADMET) found that treatment of apathy in AD with methylphenidate was associated with significant improvement in apathy in two of three outcome measures, some evidence of improvement in global cognition, and minimal adverse events. However, the trial only enrolled 60 participants who were followed for only 6 weeks. A larger, longer-lasting trial is required to confirm these promising findings. The Apathy in Dementia Methylphenidate Trial 2 (ADMET 2) is a phase III, placebo-controlled, masked, 6-month, multi-center, randomized clinical trial targeted to enroll 200 participants with AD and apathy. Participants are randomly assigned 1:1 to 20 mg methylphenidate per day prepared as four over-encapsulated tablets or to matching placebo. The primary outcomes include (1) the mean difference in the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Apathy subscale scores measured as change from baseline to 6 months, and (2) the odds of having a given rating or better on the modified AD Cooperative Study Clinical Global Impression of Change ratings at month 6 compared with the baseline rating. Other outcomes include change in cognition, safety, and cost-effectiveness measured at monthly follow-up visits up to 6 months. Given the prevalence of apathy in AD and its impact on both patients and caregivers, an intervention to alleviate apathy would be of great benefit to society. ADMET 2 follows on the promising results from the original ADMET to evaluate the efficacy of methylphenidate as a

  18. Clinical characteristics predict benefits from eptifibatide therapy during coronary stenting: insights from the Enhanced Suppression of the Platelet IIb/IIIa Receptor With Integrilin Therapy (ESPRIT) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puma, Joseph A; Banko, Lesan T; Pieper, Karen S; Sacchi, Terrence J; O'Shea, J Conor; Dery, Jean Pierre; Tcheng, James E

    2006-02-21

    In order to determine a differential benefit from treatment, we compared the long-term outcome of high-risk versus low-risk patients and evaluated survival free from death or myocardial infarction at one year. Newer anticoagulant strategies during percutaneous coronary intervention have necessitated a reanalysis of the role of intravenous GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors. The Enhanced Suppression of the Platelet IIb/IIIa Receptor with Integrilin Therapy trial randomized 2,064 patients undergoing nonurgent coronary stent implantation to eptifibatide or placebo. High-risk characteristics were defined as age >75 years, diabetes, elevated cardiac markers, ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction within 7 days, or unstable angina within 48 h of randomization. Age <5 years, absence of diabetes, and any other reason for admission were considered low risk characterstics. There were 1,018 patients in the high-risk group (50.8% eptifibatide, 49.2% placebo) and 1,045 patients in the low-risk group (50.0% eptifibatide, 50.0% placebo). Baseline demographics were similar in both groups except for more hypertension (63% vs. 55%, respectively), peripheral vascular disease (8.2% vs. 5.2%, respectively), prior stroke (5.5% vs. 3.2%, respectively), and female gender (33% vs. 22%, respectively) in the high-risk than the low-risk group. At one year, the composite end point of death or myocardial infarction occurred in 15.89% of placebo patients and 7.99% of eptifibatide patients in the high-risk group and 9.02% of the placebo and 8.11% of eptifibatide patients in the low-risk group. Although eptifibatide treatment improved outcomes for all patients, preprocedural clinical characteristics can define a subgroup of patients who may derive greatest benefit from its use during coronary stent placement.

  19. Complementary effects of thienopyridine pretreatment and platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa integrin blockade with eptifibatide in coronary stent intervention; results from the ESPRIT trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dery, Jean-Pierre; Campbell, Mark E; Mathias, Jasmine; Pieper, Karen S; Harrington, Robert A; Madan, Mina; Gibson, C Michael; Tolleson, Thaddeus R; O'Shea, J Conor; Tcheng, James E

    2007-07-01

    This analysis sought to investigate the complementary effect of thienopyridine pretreatment and platelet glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa integrin blockade in coronary stent intervention. Definitive evidence supporting combined antiplatelet therapy consisting of thienopyridine pretreatment and GP IIb/IIIa receptor blockade in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stent implantation is limited. We retrospectively analyzed clinical outcomes by thienopyridine use in the 2,040 patients randomized to eptifibatide or placebo who underwent PCI in the ESPRIT trial. A total of 901 patients received a loading dose of thienopyridine before PCI (group 1), 123 received thienopyridine pretreatment without a loading dose (group 2), and 1,016 were not treated with thienopyridine before PCI (group 3). The composite incidence of death or myocardial infarction at 30 days was significantly lower in group 1 than in groups 2 and 3 combined (OR, 0.71 [95%CI, 0.52-0.99]; P = 0.0417). A similar trend was seen for the composite of death, myocardial infarction, or urgent target vessel revascularization (unadjusted OR, 0.77 [0.57-1.05]; P = 0.1025). After adjusting for baseline characteristics, these differences were no longer significant. No interactions were identified with eptifibatide assignment for any of the group comparisons. Pretreatment with a loading dose of thienopyridine lowers the rate of ischemic complications regardless of treatment with a GP IIb/IIIa inhibitor. Conversely, the efficacy of eptifibatide is maintained whether or not a loading dose of a thienopyridine is administered. Optimal outcomes are achieved in patients receiving thienopyridine pretreatment along with platelet GP IIb/IIIa inhibitor therapy. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Sustained Aeration of Infant Lungs (SAIL) trial: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foglia, Elizabeth E; Owen, Louise S; Thio, Marta; Ratcliffe, Sarah J; Lista, Gianluca; Te Pas, Arjan; Hummler, Helmut; Nadkarni, Vinay; Ades, Anne; Posencheg, Michael; Keszler, Martin; Davis, Peter; Kirpalani, Haresh

    2015-03-15

    Extremely preterm infants require assistance recruiting the lung to establish a functional residual capacity after birth. Sustained inflation (SI) combined with positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) may be a superior method of aerating the lung compared with intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV) with PEEP in extremely preterm infants. The Sustained Aeration of Infant Lungs (SAIL) trial was designed to study this question. This multisite prospective randomized controlled unblinded trial will recruit 600 infants of 23 to 26 weeks gestational age who require respiratory support at birth. Infants in both arms will be treated with PEEP 5 to 7 cm H2O throughout the resuscitation. The study intervention consists of performing an initial SI (20 cm H20 for 15 seconds) followed by a second SI (25 cm H2O for 15 seconds), and then PEEP with or without IPPV, as needed. The control group will be treated with initial IPPV with PEEP. The primary outcome is the combined endpoint of bronchopulmonary dysplasia or death at 36 weeks post-menstrual age. www.clinicaltrials.gov , Trial identifier NCT02139800 , Registered 13 May 2014.

  1. Symptomatic stent cast.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keohane, John

    2012-02-03

    Biliary stent occlusion is a major complication of endoscopic stent insertion and results in repeat procedures. Various theories as to the etiology have been proposed, the most frequently studied is the attachment of gram negative bacteria within the stent. Several studies have shown prolongation of stent patency with antibiotic prophylaxis. We report the case of stent occlusion from a cast of a previously inserted straight biliary stent; a "stent cast" in an 86-year-old woman with obstructive jaundice. This was retrieved with the lithotrypter and she made an uneventful recovery. This is the first reported case of a biliary stent cast.

  2. Alzheimer’s disease multiple intervention trial (ADMIT: study protocol for a randomized controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callahan Christopher M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the current lack of disease-modifying therapies, it is important to explore new models of longitudinal care for older adults with dementia that focus on improving quality of life and delaying functional decline. In a previous clinical trial, we demonstrated that collaborative care for Alzheimer’s disease reduces patients’ neuropsychiatric symptoms as well as caregiver stress. However, these improvements in quality of life were not associated with delays in subjects’ functional decline. Trial design Parallel randomized controlled clinical trial with 1:1 allocation. Participants A total of 180 community-dwelling patients aged ≥45 years who are diagnosed with possible or probable Alzheimer’s disease; subjects must also have a caregiver willing to participate in the study and be willing to accept home visits. Subjects and their caregivers are enrolled from the primary care and geriatric medicine practices of an urban public health system serving Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. Interventions All patients receive best practices primary care including collaborative care by a dementia care manager over two years; this best practices primary care program represents the local adaptation and implementation of our prior collaborative care intervention in the urban public health system. Intervention patients also receive in-home occupational therapy delivered in twenty-four sessions over two years in addition to best practices primary care. The focus of the occupational therapy intervention is delaying functional decline and helping both subjects and caregivers adapt to functional impairments. The in-home sessions are tailored to the specific needs and goals of each patient-caregiver dyad; these needs are expected to change over the course of the study. Objective To determine whether best practices primary care plus home-based occupational therapy delays functional decline among patients with Alzheimer’s disease compared

  3. Bioabsorbable coronary stents--are these the next big thing in coronary angioplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balla, Sudarshan; Aggarwal, Kul; Nistala, Ravi

    2010-06-01

    The role of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in the treatment of coronary artery disease has grown at an astronomical pace. Drug eluting stents (DES) offer advantages over bare metal stents (BMS) such as reduction in early in-stent restenosis rates. However, they have disadvantages like from increased late stent thrombosis when compared with BMS. Furthermore, recent data suggest endothelial dysfunction in the DES stented segments of the arteries. Currently, bioabsorbable stents are under development to avert the complications of DES such as stent thrombosis via degradation of the stent over time. The hypothetical advantage of leaving behind a natural vessel and restoring vasoreactivity may be the almost normal physiology which can be achieved after an intervention with a stent. The ABSORB and the PROGRESS AMS are two of the recent clinical trials that have looked at the outcomes of using bioabsorbable stents. So far, data from these and other studies has yielded mixed results in terms of angiographic and clinical outcomes. Newer stents such as REVA and WHISPER are presently being tested in preclinical and clinical trials. The landscape for bioabsorbable stents is constantly evolving through continued improvisation on existing technology and emergence of new technology. Large scale randomized trials are still needed with adequate long term follow-up for safety and benefits to have mainstream application in coronary artery disease, bioabsorbable stents are a promising innovation in the field of PCI. We review some of the patents and the data that is emerging on bioabsorbable stents in addition to currently ongoing clinical trials.

  4. A randomised clinical trial of a comprehensive exercise program for chronic whiplash: trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latimer Jane

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whiplash is the most common injury following a motor vehicle accident. Approximately 60% of people suffer persistent pain and disability six months post injury. Two forms of exercise; specific motor relearning exercises and graded activity, have been found to be effective treatments for this condition. Although the effect sizes for these exercise programs, individually, are modest, pilot data suggest much larger effects on pain and disability are achieved when these two treatments are combined. The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of this comprehensive exercise approach for chronic whiplash. Methods/Design A multicentre randomised controlled trial will be conducted. One hundred and seventy-six participants with chronic grade I to II whiplash will be recruited in Sydney and Brisbane, Australia. All participants will receive an educational booklet on whiplash and in addition, those randomised to the comprehensive exercise group (specific motor relearning and graded activity exercises will receive 20 progressive and individually-tailored, 1 hour exercise sessions over a 12 week period (specific motor relearning exercises: 8 sessions over 4 weeks; graded activity: 12 sessions over 8 weeks. The primary outcome to be assessed is pain intensity. Other outcomes of interest include disability, health-related quality of life and health service utilisation. Outcomes will be measured at baseline, 14 weeks, 6 months and 12 months by an assessor who is blinded to the group allocation of the subjects. Recruitment is due to commence in late 2009. Discussion The successful completion of this trial will provide evidence on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a simple treatment for the management of chronic whiplash. Trial registration ACTRN12609000825257

  5. The Depression in Visual Impairment Trial (DEPVIT: trial design and protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margrain Tom H

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of depression in people with a visual disability is high but screening for depression and referral for treatment is not yet an integral part of visual rehabilitation service provision. One reason for this may be that there is no good evidence about the effectiveness of treatments in this patient group. This study is the first to evaluate the effect of depression treatments on people with a visual impairment and co morbid depression. Methods /design The study is an exploratory, multicentre, individually randomised waiting list controlled trial. Participants will be randomised to receive Problem Solving Therapy (PST, a ‘referral to the GP’ requesting treatment according to the NICE’s ‘stepped care’ recommendations or the waiting list arm of the trial. The primary outcome measure is change (from randomisation in depressive symptoms as measured by the Beck’s Depression Inventory (BDI-II at 6 months. Secondary outcomes include change in depressive symptoms at 3 months, change in visual function as measured with the near vision subscale of the VFQ-48 and 7 item NEI-VFQ at 3 and 6 months, change in generic health related quality of life (EQ5D, the costs associated with PST, estimates of incremental cost effectiveness, and recruitment rate estimation. Discussion Depression is prevalent in people with disabling visual impairment. This exploratory study will establish depression screening and referral for treatment in visual rehabilitation clinics in the UK. It will be the first to explore the efficacy of PST and the effectiveness of NICE’s ‘stepped care’ approach to the treatment of depression in people with a visual impairment. Trial registration ISRCTN46824140

  6. The Chronic Kidney Disease Water Intake Trial: Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William F. Clark

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: In observational studies, drinking more water associates with a slower rate of kidney function decline; whether the same is true in a randomized controlled trial is unknown. Objective: To examine the 1-year effect of a higher vs usual water intake on estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR in patients with chronic kidney disease. Design: Parallel-group randomized controlled trial. Setting: Nine centers in Ontario, Canada. Enrollment and randomization occurred between May 2013 and May 2016; follow-up for the primary outcome will continue until June 2017. Participants: Adults (n = 631 with stage 3 chronic kidney disease (eGFR 30-60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 and microalbuminuria. Intervention: The high water intake group was coached to increase their oral water intake by 1.0 to 1.5 L/day (depending on sex and weight, over and above usual consumed beverages, for a period of 1 year. The control group was coached to maintain their usual water intake during this time. Measures: Participants provided 24-hour urine samples at baseline and at 6 and 12 months after randomization; urine samples were analyzed for volume, creatinine, osmolality, and the albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Blood samples were obtained at baseline and at 3- to 6-month intervals after randomization, and analyzed for creatinine, copeptin, osmolality, and electrolytes. Other measures collected included health-related quality of life, blood pressure, body mass index, and diet. Primary outcome: The between-group change in eGFR from baseline (prerandomization to 12 months after randomization. Secondary outcomes: Change in plasma copeptin concentration, 24-hour urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio, measured creatinine clearance, estimated 5-year risk of kidney failure (using the 4-variable Kidney Failure Risk Equation, and health-related quality of life. Planned analysis: The primary analysis will follow an intention-to-treat approach. The between-group change in eGFR will be compared using

  7. South African Research Ethics Committee Review of Standards of Prevention in HIV Vaccine Trial Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essack, Zaynab; Wassenaar, Douglas R

    2018-04-01

    HIV prevention trials provide a prevention package to participants to help prevent HIV acquisition. As new prevention methods are proven effective, this raises ethical and scientific design complexities regarding the prevention package or standard of prevention. Given its high HIV incidence and prevalence, South Africa has become a hub for HIV prevention research. For this reason, it is critical to study the implementation of relevant ethical-legal frameworks for such research in South Africa. This qualitative study used in-depth interviews to explore the practices and perspectives of eight members of South African research ethics committees (RECs) who have reviewed protocols for HIV vaccine trials. Their practices and perspectives are compared with ethics guideline requirements for standards of prevention.

  8. Nitrates and bone turnover (NABT) - trial to select the best nitrate preparation: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucur, Roxana C; Reid, Lauren S; Hamilton, Celeste J; Cummings, Steven R; Jamal, Sophie A

    2013-09-08

    comparisons with the best' approach for data analyses, as this strategy allows practical considerations of ease of use and tolerability to guide selection of the preparation for future studies. Data from this protocol will be used to develop a randomized, controlled trial of nitrates to prevent osteoporotic fractures. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01387672. Controlled-Trials.com: ISRCTN08860742.

  9. Increasing walking in patients with intermittent claudication: Protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Carroll Ronan E

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People with intermittent claudication are at increased risk of death from heart attack and stroke compared to matched controls. Surgery for intermittent claudication is for symptom management and does not reduce the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Increasing physical activity can reduce claudication symptoms and may improve cardiovascular health. This paper presents the pilot study protocol for a randomised controlled trial to test whether a brief psychological intervention leads to increased physical activity, improvement in quality of life, and a reduction in the demand for surgery, for patients with intermittent claudication. Methods/Design We aim to recruit 60 patients newly diagnosed with intermittent claudication, who will be randomised into two groups. The control group will receive usual care, and the treatment group will receive usual care and a brief 2-session psychological intervention to modify illness and walking beliefs and develop a walking action plan. The primary outcome will be walking, measured by pedometer. Secondary outcomes will include quality of life and uptake of surgery for symptom management. Participants will be followed up after (a 4 months, (b 1 year and (c 2 years. Discussion This study will assess the acceptability and efficacy of a brief psychological intervention to increase walking in patients with intermittent claudication, both in terms of the initiation, and maintenance of behaviour change. This is a pilot study, and the results will inform the design of a larger multi-centre trial. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN28051878

  10. Peer-led healthy lifestyle program in supportive housing: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J; Stefancic, Ana; O'Hara, Kathleen; El-Bassel, Nabila; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Luchsinger, José A; Gates, Lauren; Younge, Richard; Wall, Melanie; Weinstein, Lara; Palinkas, Lawrence A

    2015-09-02

    The risk for obesity is twice as high in people with serious mental illness (SMI) compared to the general population. Racial and ethnic minority status contribute additional health risks. The aim of this study is to describe the protocol of a Hybrid Trial Type 1 design that will test the effectiveness and examine the implementation of a peer-led healthy lifestyle intervention in supportive housing agencies serving diverse clients with serious mental illness who are overweight or obese. The Hybrid Trial Type 1 design will combine a randomized effectiveness trial with a mixed-methods implementation study. The effectiveness trial will test the health impacts of a peer-led healthy lifestyle intervention versus usual care in supportive housing agencies. The healthy lifestyle intervention is derived from the Group Lifestyle Balanced Program, lasts 12 months, and will be delivered by trained peer specialists. Repeated assessments will be conducted at baseline and at 6, 12, and 18 months post randomization. A mixed-methods (e.g., structured interviews, focus groups, surveys) implementation study will be conducted to examine multi-level implementation factors and processes that can inform the use of the healthy lifestyle intervention in routine practice, using data from agency directors, program managers, staff, and peer specialists before, during, and after the implementation of the effectiveness trial. This paper describes the use of a hybrid research design that blends effectiveness trial methodologies and implementation science rarely used when studying the physical health of people with SMI and can serve as a model for integrating implementation science and health disparities research. Rigorously testing effectiveness and exploring the implementation process are both necessary steps to establish the evidence for large-scale delivery of peer-led healthy lifestyle intervention to improve the physical health of racial/ethnic minorities with SMI. www

  11. Multidisciplinary approach to carotid stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, C S; Chambers, B R; Clark, D J; Molan, M; Brooks, M; Roberts, N; Fell, G; Roberts, A K; New, G; Donnan, G A

    2011-11-01

    Stroke neurologists, vascular surgeons, interventional neuroradiologists and interventional cardiologists have embraced carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) because of potential advantages over carotid endarterectomy (CEA). At Austin Health, a multidisciplinary neuro-interventional group was formed to standardise indications and facilitate training. The aims of this study were to describe our organisational model and to determine whether 30-day complications and early outcomes were similar to those of major trials. A clinical protocol was developed to ensure optimal management. CAS was performed on patients with high medical risk for CEA, with technically difficult anatomy for CEA, or who were randomised to CAS in a trial. From October 2003 to May 2008, 47 patients (34 male, mean age 71.5) underwent CAS of 50 carotid arteries. Forty-three cases had ipsilateral carotid territory symptoms within the previous 12 months. The main indications for CAS were high risk for CEA (n= 17) and randomised to CAS (n= 21). Interventionists were proctored in 27 cases. The procedural success rate was 94% with two cases abandoned because of anatomical problems and one because of on-table angina. Hypotension requiring vasopressor therapy occurred in 12 cases (24%). The duration of follow up was one to 44 months (mean 6.8 months). The 30-day rate of peri-procedural stroke or death was 6% and the one-year rate of peri-procedural stroke or death or subsequent ipsilateral stroke was 10.6%. Restenosis occurred in 13% (all asymptomatic). A multidisciplinary approach is a useful strategy for initiating and sustaining a CAS programme. © 2011 The Authors. Internal Medicine Journal © 2011 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  12. Brief intervention to reduce risky drinking in pregnancy: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Graeme B

    2012-09-01

    delivery, and retention in the study population, to inform power calculations for a definitive trial. The health-economics component will establish how cost-effectiveness will be assessed, and examine which data on health service resource use should be collected in a main trial. Participants’ views on instruments and procedures will be sought to confirm their acceptability. Discussion The study will produce a full trial protocol with robust sample-size calculations to extend evidence on effectiveness of screening and brief intervention. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN43218782

  13. The "Healthy Habits, Healthy Girls" randomized controlled trial for girls: study design, protocol, and baseline results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leme, Ana Carolina Barco; Philippi, Sonia Tucunduva

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the study design, protocol, and baseline results of the "Healthy Habits, Healthy Girls" program. The intervention is being evaluated through a randomized controlled trial in 10 public schools in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. Data on the following variables were collected and assessed at baseline and will be reevaluated at 7 and 12 months: body mass index, waist circumference, dietary intake, nutrition, physical activity, social cognitive mediators, physical activity level, sedentary behaviors, self-rated physical status, and overall self-esteem. According to the baseline results, 32.4% and 23.4% of girls were overweight in the intervention and control groups, respectively, and in both groups a higher percentage failed to meet daily recommendations for moderate and vigorous physical activity and maximum screen time (TV, computer, mobile devices). There were no significant differences between the groups for most of the variables, except age (p = 0.000) and waist circumference (p = 0.014). The study showed a gap in the Brazilian literature on protocols for randomized controlled trials to prevent obesity among youth. The current study may thus be an important initial contribution to the field.

  14. A quality analysis of clinical anaesthesia study protocols from the Chinese clinical trials registry according to the SPIRIT statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Chen, Shouming; Yang, Di; Li, Jiajin; Wu, Taixiang; Zuo, Yunxia

    2018-05-15

    To learn about the overall quality of clinical anaesthesia study protocols from the Chinese Clinical Trials Registry and to discuss the way to improve study protocol quality. We defined completeness of each sub-item in SPIRIT as N/A (not applicable) or with a score of 0, 1, or 2. For each protocol, we calculated the proportion of adequately reported items (score = 2 and N/A) and unreported items (score = 0). Protocol quality was determined according to the proportion of reported items, with values >50% indicating high quality. Protocol quality was determined according to the proportion of reported items. For each sub-item in SPIRIT, we calculated the adequately reported rate (percentage of all protocols with score 2 and NA on one sub-item) as well as the unreported rate (percentage of all protocols with score 0 on one sub-item). Total 126 study protocols were available for assessment. Among these, 88.1% were assessed as being of low quality. By comparison, the percentage of low-quality protocols was 88.9% after the publication of the SPIRIT statement. Among the 51 SPIRIT sub-items, 18 sub-items had an unreported rate above 90% while 16 had a higher adequately reported rate than an unreported rate. The overall quality of clinical anaesthesia study protocols registered in the ChiCTR was poor. A mandatory protocol upload and self-check based on the SPIRIT statement during the trial registration process may improve protocol quality in the future.

  15. Telerehabilitation Versus Traditional Care Following Total Hip Replacement: A Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Mark; Bourke, Michael; Crossley, Kay; Russell, Trevor

    2017-03-02

    Total hip replacement (THR) is the gold standard treatment for severe hip osteoarthritis. Effectiveness of physical rehabilitation for THR patients following discharge from hospital is supported by evidence; however, barriers such as geographical location and transport can limit access to appropriate health care. One solution to this issue is using an alternative model of care using telerehabilitation technology to deliver rehabilitation programs directly into patients' homes. A telerehabilitation model may also have potential health care cost savings for health care providers. This study aims to determine if a telerehabilitation model of care delivered remotely is as effective as face-to-face rehabilitation in the THR population and cost effective for health care providers and patients. A total of 70 people undergoing THR will be recruited to participate in a randomized, single-blind, controlled noninferiority clinical trial. The trial will compare a technology-based THR rehabilitation program to in-person care. On discharge from hospital, participants randomized to the in-person group will receive usual care, defined as a paper home exercise program (HEP) targeting strengthening exercises for quadriceps, hip abductors, extensors, and flexors; they will be advised to perform their HEP 3 times per day. At 2, 4, and 6 weeks postoperatively, they will receive a 30-minute in-person physiotherapy session with a focus on gait retraining and reviewing and progressing their HEP. The telerehabilitation protocol will involve a program similar in content to the in-person rehabilitation program, except delivery will be directly into the homes of the participants via telerehabilitation technology on an iPad. Outcomes will be evaluated preoperatively, day of discharge from in-patient physiotherapy, 6 weeks and 6 months postoperatively. The primary outcome will be the quality of life subscale of the hip disability and osteoarthritis outcome score, measured at 6 weeks. Both

  16. Comparison of the sirolimus-eluting versus paclitaxel-eluting coronary stent in patients with diabetes mellitus: the diabetes and drug-eluting stent (DiabeDES) randomized angiography trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maeng, Michael; Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Galloe, Anders Michael

    2008-01-01

    group (0.23 +/- 0.54 vs 0.44 +/- 0.52 mm, p = 0.025). Angiographic in-segment restenosis at 8-month follow-up, a secondary end point, was present in 16 patients (Cypher, n = 6; Taxus, n = 10; p = 0.24). Target lesion revascularization was performed in 5 patients (6.5%) and 9 patients (11.......8%) in the Cypher and Taxus groups, respectively (p = 0.25). Definite stent thrombosis was observed in 2 patients (in the Taxus group), no patients had probable stent thrombosis, and 1 patient in each group had possible stent thrombosis. Major adverse cardiac events (cardiac death, myocardial infarction, definite...

  17. The Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial (DiRECT): protocol for a cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Wilma S; Ford, Ian; Sattar, Naveed; Hollingsworth, Kieren G; Adamson, Ashley; Sniehotta, Falko F; McCombie, Louise; Brosnahan, Naomi; Ross, Hazel; Mathers, John C; Peters, Carl; Thom, George; Barnes, Alison; Kean, Sharon; McIlvenna, Yvonne; Rodrigues, Angela; Rehackova, Lucia; Zhyzhneuskaya, Sviatlana; Taylor, Roy; Lean, Mike E J

    2016-02-16

    Despite improving evidence-based practice following clinical guidelines to optimise drug therapy, Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) still exerts a devastating toll from vascular complications and premature death. Biochemical remission of T2DM has been demonstrated with weight loss around 15kg following bariatric surgery and in several small studies of non-surgical energy-restriction treatments. The non-surgical Counterweight-Plus programme, running in Primary Care where obesity and T2DM are routinely managed, produces >15 kg weight loss in 33% of all enrolled patients. The Diabetes UK-funded Counterpoint study suggested that this should be sufficient to reverse T2DM by removing ectopic fat in liver and pancreas, restoring first-phase insulin secretion. The Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial (DiRECT) was designed to determine whether a structured, intensive, weight management programme, delivered in a routine Primary Care setting, is a viable treatment for achieving durable normoglycaemia. Other aims are to understand the mechanistic basis of remission and to identify psychological predictors of response. Cluster-randomised design with GP practice as the unit of randomisation: 280 participants from around 30 practices in Scotland and England will be allocated either to continue usual guideline-based care or to add the Counterweight-Plus weight management programme, which includes primary care nurse or dietitian delivery of 12-20weeks low calorie diet replacement, food reintroduction, and long-term weight loss maintenance. Main inclusion criteria: men and women aged 20-65 years, all ethnicities, T2DM 0-6years duration, BMI 27-45 kg/m(2). Tyneside participants will undergo Magnetic Resonance (MR) studies of pancreatic and hepatic fat, and metabolic studies to determine mechanisms underlying T2DM remission. Co-primary endpoints: weight reduction ≥ 15 kg and HbA1c <48 mmol/mol at one year. Further follow-up at 2 years. This study will establish whether a structured weight

  18. Telemedical support for prehospital Emergency Medical Service (TEMS trial): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevanovic, Ana; Beckers, Stefan Kurt; Czaplik, Michael; Bergrath, Sebastian; Coburn, Mark; Brokmann, Jörg Christian; Hilgers, Ralf-Dieter; Rossaint, Rolf

    2017-01-26

    Increasing numbers of emergency calls, shortages of Emergency Medical Service (EMS), physicians, prolonged emergency response times and regionally different quality of treatment by EMS physicians require improvement of this system. Telemedical solutions have been shown to be beneficial in different emergency projects, focused on specific disease patterns. Our previous pilot studies have shown that the implementation of a holistic prehospital EMS teleconsultation system, between paramedics and experienced tele-EMS physicians, is safe and feasible in different emergency situations. We aim to extend the clinical indications for this teleconsultation system. We hypothesize that the use of a tele-EMS physician is noninferior regarding the occurrence of system-induced patient adverse events and superior regarding secondary outcome parameters, such as the quality of guideline-conforming treatment and documentation, when compared to conventional EMS-physician treatment. Three thousand and ten patients will be included in this single-center, open-label, randomized controlled, noninferiority trial with two parallel arms. According to the inclusion criteria, all emergency cases involving adult patients who require EMS-physician treatment, excluding life-threatening cases, will be randomly assigned by the EMS dispatching center into two groups. One thousand five hundred and five patients in the control group will be treated by a conventional EMS physician on scene, and 1505 patients in the intervention group will be treated by paramedics who are concurrently instructed by the tele-EMS physicians at the teleconsultation center. The primary outcome measure will include the rate of treatment-specific adverse events in relation to the kind of EMS physician used. The secondary outcome measures will record the specific treatment-associated quality indicators. The evidence underlines the better quality of service using telemedicine networks between medical personnel and medical

  19. Long-Term Follow-up of the PADI Trial : Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty Versus Drug-Eluting Stents for Infrapopliteal Lesions in Critical Limb Ischemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spreen, Marlon I; Martens, Jasper M; Knippenberg, Bob; van Dijk, Lukas C; De Vries, Jean-Paul P. M.; Vos, Jan Albert; de Borst, Gert Jan; Vonken, Evert-Jan P A; Bijlstra, Okker D; Wever, Jan J; Statius van Eps, Randolph G; Mali, Willem P Th M; van Overhagen, Hendrik

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical outcomes reported after treatment of infrapopliteal lesions with drug-eluting stents (DESs) have been more favorable compared with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with a bailout bare metal stent (PTA-BMS) through midterm follow-up in patients with critical limb ischemia.

  20. Frequency of Cardiac Death and Stent Thrombosis in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (from the BASKET-PROVE I and II Trials)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jatene, Tannas; Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Nochioka, Kotaro

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with long-term all-cause death after percutaneous coronary intervention with bare-metal stents. Regarding other outcomes, previous studies have shown conflicting results and the impact of drug-eluting stent (DES) in this population is not...

  1. The prognostic utility of the SYNTAX score on 1-year outcomes after revascularization with zotarolimus- and everolimus-eluting stents: a substudy of the RESOLUTE All Comers Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garg, Scot; Serruys, Patrick W; Silber, Sigmund

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed the ability of the SYNTAX score (SXscore) to stratify risk in patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) using zotarolimus-eluting or everolimus-eluting stents.......This study assessed the ability of the SYNTAX score (SXscore) to stratify risk in patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) using zotarolimus-eluting or everolimus-eluting stents....

  2. Comparison between publicly accessible publications, registries, and protocols of phase III trials indicated persistence of selective outcome reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sheng; Liang, Fei; Li, Wenfeng

    2017-11-01

    The decision to make protocols of phase III randomized controlled trials (RCTs) publicly accessible by leading journals was a landmark event in clinical trial reporting. Here, we compared primary outcomes defined in protocols with those in publications describing the trials and in trial registration. We identified phase III RCTs published between January 1, 2012, and June 30, 2015, in The New England Journal of Medicine, The Lancet, The Journal of the American Medical Association, and The BMJ with available protocols. Consistency in primary outcomes between protocols and registries (articles) was evaluated. We identified 299 phase III RCTs with available protocols in this analysis. Out of them, 25 trials (8.4%) had some discrepancy for primary outcomes between publications and protocols. Types of discrepancies included protocol-defined primary outcome reported as nonprimary outcome in publication (11 trials, 3.7%), protocol-defined primary outcome omitted in publication (10 trials, 3.3%), new primary outcome introduced in publication (8 trials, 2.7%), protocol-defined nonprimary outcome reported as primary outcome in publication (4 trials, 1.3%), and different timing of assessment of primary outcome (4 trials, 1.3%). Out of trials with discrepancies in primary outcome, 15 trials (60.0%) had discrepancies that favored statistically significant results. Registration could be seen as a valid surrogate of protocol in 237 of 299 trials (79.3%) with regard to primary outcome. Despite unrestricted public access to protocols, selective outcome reporting persists in a small fraction of phase III RCTs. Only studies from four leading journals were included, which may cause selection bias and limit the generalizability of this finding. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Interreality for the management and training of psychological stress: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Psychological stress occurs when an individual perceives that environmental demands tax or exceed his or her adaptive capacity. Its association with severe health and emotional diseases, points out the necessity to find new efficient strategies to treat it. Moreover, psychological stress is a very personal problem and requires training focused on the specific needs of individuals. To overcome the above limitations, the INTERSTRESS project suggests the adoption of a new paradigm for e-health - Interreality - that integrates contextualized assessment and treatment within a hybrid environment, bridging the physical and the virtual worlds. According to this premise, the aim of this study is to investigate the advantages of using advanced technologies, in combination with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), based on a protocol for reducing psychological stress. Methods/Design The study is designed as a randomized controlled trial. It includes three groups of approximately 50 subjects each who suffer from psychological stress: (1) the experimental group, (2) the control group, (3) the waiting list group. Participants included in the experimental group will receive a treatment based on cognitive behavioral techniques combined with virtual reality, biofeedback and mobile phone, while the control group will receive traditional stress management CBT-based training, without the use of new technologies. The wait-list group will be reassessed and compared with the two other groups five weeks after the initial evaluation. After the reassessment, the wait-list patients will randomly receive one of the two other treatments. Psychometric and physiological outcomes will serve as quantitative dependent variables, while subjective reports of participants will be used as the qualitative dependent variable. Discussion What we would like to show with the present trial is that bridging virtual experiences, used to learn coping skills and emotional regulation, with real

  4. Mecasin treatment in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungha; Kim, Jae Kyoun; Son, Mi Ju; Kim, Dongwoung; Song, Bongkeun; Son, Ilhong; Kang, Hyung Won; Lee, Jongdeok; Kim, Sungchul

    2018-04-13

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that causes paralysis of limb, swallowing, and breathing muscles. Riluzole, the Food and Drug Administration-approved drug for ALS, provides minimal benefit, prolonging patient life by only 2-3 months. Previous studies have found a neuro-protective and anti-neuroinflammatory effect of Mecasin, with retrospective studies providing suggestive evidence for a beneficial effect of Mecasin. The aim of this study was to develop a protocol to determine the proper dosage of Mecasin. This is a phase II-A, multi-center, randomized study with three arms. Thirty-six patients with ALS will be randomly assigned to one of three groups, each receiving the standard treatment with 100 mg of riluzole in addition to one of 1.6 g of Mecasin, 2.4 g of Mecasin, or a placebo. The Primary outcome is the Korean version of the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale-Revised result after 12 weeks of treatment. Secondary outcomes include results of the Short Form Health Survey-8, Medical Research Council Scale, Visual Analogue Scale for Pain, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, Fatigue Severity Scale, Patient Global Impression of Change, pulmonary function test, forced expiratory volume in 1 s and its ratio to forced vital capacity, creatine kinase, and body weight. The frequencies of total adverse events and serious adverse events will be described and documented. The trial protocol has been approved by the Institutional Review Board of the Wonkwang University Gwangju and Sanbon Hospital (2016-5-4 and 2016-34-01, respectively). An Investigational New Drug status (30731) was granted by the Korea Food and Drug Administration. This trial will aim to identify the optimal dosage of Mecasin. Additionally, it will test the efficacy and safety of Mecasin in conjunction with standard treatment, riluzole, for alleviating the functional decline in patients with ALS. Korean National Clinical Trial Registry CRIS; KCT

  5. Long-term outcome in patients treated with sirolimus-eluting stents in complex coronary artery lesions: 3-year results of the SCANDSTENT (Stenting Coronary Arteries in Non-Stress/Benestent Disease) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelbaek, H.; Klovgaard, L.; Helqvist, S.

    2008-01-01

    data of the long-term outcome of patients with complex coronary artery lesions. METHODS: We randomly assigned 322 patients with total coronary occlusions or lesions located in bifurcations, ostial, or angulated segments of the coronary arteries to have SES or BMS implanted. RESULTS: At 3 years, major...... performed between 1 and 3 years after the index treatment (p = NS). According to revised definitions, stent thrombosis occurred in 5 patients (3.1%) in the SES group and in 7 patients (4.4%) in the BMS group (p = NS); very late stent thrombosis was observed in 4 versus 1 patient. CONCLUSIONS: A continued...

  6. Use acupuncture to treat functional constipation: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ying

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whether acupuncture is effective for patients with functional constipation is still unclear. Therefore, we report the protocol of a randomized controlled trial of using acupuncture to treat functional constipation. Design A randomized, controlled, four-arm design, large-scale trial is currently undergoing in China. Seven hundred participants are randomly assigned to three acupuncture treatment groups and Mosapride Citrate control group in a 1:1:1:1 ratio. Participants in acupuncture groups receive 16 sessions of acupuncture treatment, and are followed up for a period of 9 weeks after randomization. The acupuncture groups are: (1 Back-Shu and Front-Mu acupoints of Large Intestine meridians (Shu-Mu points group; (2 He-Sea and Lower He-Sea acupoints of Large Intestine meridians (He points group; (3 Combining used Back-Shu, Front-Mu, He-Sea, and Lower He-Sea acupoints of Large Intestine meridians (Shu-Mu-He points group. The control group is Mosapride Citrate group. The primary outcome is frequency of defecation per week at the fourth week after randomization. The secondary outcomes include Bristol stool scale, the extent of difficulty during defecating, MOS 36-item Short Form health survey (SF-36, Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS, and Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS. The first two of second outcomes are measured 1 week before randomization and 2, 4, and 8 weeks after randomization. Other second outcomes are measured 1 week before randomization and 2 and 4 weeks after randomization, but SF-36 is measured at randomization and 4 weeks after randomization. Discussion The result of this trial (which will be available in 2012 will confirm whether acupuncture is effective to treat functional constipation and whether traditional acupuncture theories play an important role in it. Trials registration Clinical Trials.gov NCT01411501

  7. A protocol for a pragmatic randomized controlled trial evaluating outcomes of emergency nurse practitioner service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Natasha; Gardner, Glenn; O'Reilly, Gerard

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate emergency nurse practitioner service effectiveness on outcomes related to quality of care and service responsiveness. Increasing service pressures in the emergency setting have resulted in the adoption of service innovation models; the most common and rapidly expanding of these is the emergency nurse practitioner. The delivery of high quality patient care in the emergency department is one of the most important service indicators to be measured in health services today. The rapid uptake of emergency nurse practitioner service in Australia has outpaced the capacity to evaluate this model in outcomes related to safety and quality of patient care. Pragmatic randomized controlled trial at one site with 260 participants. This protocol describes a definitive prospective randomized controlled trial, which will examine the impact of emergency nurse practitioner service on key patient care and service indicators. The study control will be standard emergency department care. The intervention will be emergency nurse practitioner service. The primary outcome measure is pain score reduction and time to analgesia. Secondary outcome measures are waiting time, number of patients who did not wait, length of stay in the emergency department and representations within 48 hours. Scant research enquiry evaluating emergency nurse practitioner service on patient effectiveness and service responsiveness exists currently. This study is a unique trial that will test the effectiveness of the emergency nurse practitioner service on patients who present to the emergency department with pain. The research will provide an opportunity to further evaluate emergency nurse practitioner models of care and build research capacity into the workforce. Trial registration details: Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry dated 18th August 2013, ACTRN12613000933752. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Occupational therapy discharge planning for older adults: A protocol for a randomised trial and economic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wales Kylie

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Decreased functional ability is common in older adults after hospitalisation. Lower levels of functional ability increase the risk of hospital readmission and nursing care facility admission. Discharge planning across the hospital and community interface is suggested to increase functional ability and decrease hospital length of stay and hospital readmission. However evidence is limited and the benefits of occupational therapists providing this service has not been investigated. This randomised trial will investigate the clinical effectiveness of a discharge planning program in reducing functional difficulties of older adults post-discharge. This trial will also examine the cost of the intervention and cost effectiveness when compared to in-hospital discharge planning. Methods/design 400 participants admitted to participating hospitals will be recruited. Participants will be 70 years of age and over, have no significant cognitive impairment and be independently mobile at discharge. This study protocol was approved by the ethics committee of Ryde Rehabilitation Human Research Ethics Committee, Western Sydney Local Health District (Westmead Campus Human Research Ethics Committee, Alfred Health Human Research ethics committee for the randomised trial and NSW Population and Health Service Human Research Ethics Committee for data linkage. Participants will provide informed written consent. Participants will be randomly allocated to the intervention or control group. The intervention group will receive discharge planning therapies primarily within their home environment while the control group will receive an in-hospital consultation, both provided by trained occupational therapists. Primary outcome measures will be the Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living Scale (NEADL and the Late Life Disability Index (LLDI which will measure functional independence, and participation and limitation in daily life activities

  9. Impact of the New American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Definition of Stroke on the Results of the Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kasab, Sami; Lynn, Michael J; Turan, Tanya N; Derdeyn, Colin P; Fiorella, David; Lane, Bethany F; Janis, L Scott; Chimowitz, Marc I

    2017-01-01

    An American Heart Association/American Stroke Association (AHA/ASA) writing committee has recently recommended that tissue evidence of cerebral infarction associated with temporary symptoms (CITS) lasting Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis (SAMMPRIS) trial. We compared outcomes in the medical (n = 227) and stenting (n = 224) groups in SAMMPRIS using the following primary end point (new components in bold): any stroke, CITS, or death within 30 days after enrollment or within 30 days after a revascularization procedure for the qualifying lesion during follow-up; or ischemic stroke or CITS in the territory of the qualifying artery beyond 30 days. We also compared the use of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) in both treatment groups. By considering CITS as equivalent to stroke, the number of primary end points increased from 34 to 43 in the medical group and from 52 to 66 in the stenting group of SAMMPRIS. The Kaplan-Meier curves for the primary end points in the 2 groups were significantly different (P = .009). The percentage of patients with reported TIAs who underwent brain MRI was 69% in the medical group and 61% in the stenting group (P = .40). Using the AHA/ASA definition of stroke resulted in a substantially higher primary end point rate in both treatment groups and an even higher benefit from medical therapy over stenting than originally shown in SAMMPRIS. The higher rate of CITS in the stenting group was not due to ascertainment bias. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Palliative brachytherapy with or without primary stent placement in patients with oesophageal cancer, a randomised phase III trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amdal, Cecilie Delphin; Jacobsen, Anne-Birgitte; Sandstad, Berit; Warloe, Trond; Bjordal, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether a combination of self-expanding metal stent (SEMS) and brachytherapy provided more rapid and prolonged effect on dysphagia without increased pain compared to brachytherapy alone in patients with incurable oesophageal cancer. Methods: 41 Patients were randomised to SEMS followed by brachytherapy, 8 Gy × 3 (n = 21) or brachytherapy alone, 8 Gy × 3 (n = 20). Change in dysphagia and pain three and seven weeks after randomisation (FU1 and FU2) was assessed by patient-reported outcome. Dysphagia, other symptoms and health-related quality of life were assessed every four weeks thereafter. The study was closed before the estimated patient-number was reached due to slow recruitment. Results: Patients receiving SEMS followed by brachytherapy had significantly improved dysphagia at FU1 compared to patients receiving brachytherapy alone (n = 35). Difference in pain was not observed. At FU2, patients in both arms (n = 21) had less dysphagia. Four patients in the combined treatment arm experienced manageable complications, no complications occurred after brachytherapy alone. Conclusion: For the relief of dysphagia, SEMS followed by brachytherapy is preferable and safe for patients in need of immediate alleviation, while brachytherapy with or without preceding SEMS provides relief within a few weeks after treatment

  11. A Randomized trial of an Asthma Internet Self-management Intervention (RAISIN): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Deborah; Wyke, Sally; Thomson, Neil C; McConnachie, Alex; Agur, Karolina; Saunderson, Kathryn; Chaudhuri, Rekha; Mair, Frances S

    2014-05-24

    The financial costs associated with asthma care continue to increase while care remains suboptimal. Promoting optimal self-management, including the use of asthma action plans, along with regular health professional review has been shown to be an effective strategy and is recommended in asthma guidelines internationally. Despite evidence of benefit, guided self-management remains underused, however the potential for online resources to promote self-management behaviors is gaining increasing recognition. The aim of this paper is to describe the protocol for a pilot evaluation of a website 'Living well with asthma' which has been developed with the aim of promoting self-management behaviors shown to improve outcomes. The study is a parallel randomized controlled trial, where adults with asthma are randomly assigned to either access to the website for 12 weeks, or usual asthma care for 12 weeks (followed by access to the website if desired). Individuals are included if they are over 16-years-old, have a diagnosis of asthma with an Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) score of greater than, or equal to 1, and have access to the internet. Primary outcomes for this evaluation include recruitment and retention rates, changes at 12 weeks from baseline for both ACQ and Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ) scores, and quantitative data describing website usage (number of times logged on, length of time logged on, number of times individual pages looked at, and for how long). Secondary outcomes include clinical outcomes (medication use, health services use, lung function) and patient reported outcomes (including adherence, patient activation measures, and health status). Piloting of complex interventions is considered best practice and will maximise the potential of any future large-scale randomized controlled trial to successfully recruit and be able to report on necessary outcomes. Here we will provide results across a range of outcomes which will provide estimates of

  12. Pregnancy outcome of “delayed start” GnRH antagonist protocol versus GnRH antagonist protocol in poor responders: A clinical trial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Aflatoonian

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Management of poor-responding patients is still major challenge in assisted reproductive techniques (ART. Delayed-start GnRH antagonist protocol is recommended to these patients, but little is known in this regards. Objective: The goal of this study was assessment of delayed-start GnRH antagonist protocol in poor responders, and in vitro fertilization (IVF outcomes. Materials and Methods: This randomized clinical trial included sixty infertile women with Bologna criteria for ovarian poor responders who were candidate for IVF. In case group (n=30, delayed-start GnRH antagonist protocol administered estrogen priming followed by early follicular-phase GnRH antagonist treatment for 7 days before ovarian stimulation with gonadotropin. Control group (n=30 treated with estrogen priming antagonist protocol. Finally, endometrial thickness, the rates of oocytes maturation, , embryo formation, and pregnancy were compared between two groups. Results: Rates of implantation, chemical, clinical, and ongoing pregnancy in delayed-start cycles were higher although was not statistically significant. Endometrial thickness was significantly higher in case group. There were no statistically significant differences in the rates of oocyte maturation, embryo formation, and IVF outcomes between two groups. Conclusion: There is no significant difference between delayed-start GnRH antagonist protocol versus GnRH antagonist protocol.

  13. Supporting Policy In health with Research: an Intervention Trial (SPIRIT)—protocol for a stepped wedge trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Governments in different countries have committed to better use of evidence from research in policy. Although many programmes are directed at assisting agencies to better use research, there have been few tests of the effectiveness of such programmes. This paper describes the protocol for SPIRIT (Supporting Policy In health with Research: an Intervention Trial), a trial designed to test the effectiveness of a multifaceted programme to build organisational capacity for the use of research evidence in policy and programme development. The primary aim is to determine whether SPIRIT results in an increase in the extent to which research and research expertise is sought, appraised, generated and used in the development of specific policy products produced by health policy agencies. Methods and analysis A stepped wedge cluster randomised trial involving six health policy agencies located in Sydney, Australia. Policy agencies are the unit of randomisation and intervention. Agencies were randomly allocated to one of three start dates (steps) to receive the 1-year intervention programme, underpinned by an action framework. The SPIRIT intervention is tailored to suit the interests and needs of each agency and includes audit, feedback and goal setting; a leadership programme; staff training; the opportunity to test systems to assist in the use of research in policies; and exchange with researchers. Outcome measures will be collected at each agency every 6 months for 30 months (starting at the beginning of step 1). Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval was granted by the University of Western Sydney Human Research and Ethics Committee HREC Approval H8855. The findings of this study will be disseminated broadly through peer-reviewed publications and presentations at conferences and used to inform future strategies. PMID:24989620

  14. Stent Thrombosis is the Primary Cause of ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction following Coronary Stent Implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Søren Lund; Galløe, Anders M; Thuesen, Leif

    2014-01-01

    Background: The widespread use of coronary stents has exposed a growing population to the risk of stent thrombosis, but the importance in terms of risk of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarctions (STEMIs) remains unclear. Methods: We studied five years follow-up data for 2,098 all-comer patients...... treated with coronary stents in the randomized SORT OUT II trial (mean age 63.6 yrs. 74.8% men). Patients who following stent implantation were readmitted with STEMI were included and each patient was categorized ranging from definite-to ruled-out stent thrombosis according to the Academic Research...... Consortium definitions. Multivariate logistic regression was performed on selected covariates to assess odds ratios (ORs) for definite stent thrombosis. Results: 85 patients (4.1%), mean age 62.7 years, 77.1% men, were admitted with a total of 96 STEMIs, of whom 60 (62.5%) had definite stent thrombosis...

  15. Which dressing do donor site wounds need?: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubbink Dirk T

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Donor site wounds after split-skin grafting are rather 'standard' wounds. At present, lots of dressings and topical agents for donor site wounds are commercially available. This causes large variation in the local care of these wounds, while the optimum 'standard' dressing for local wound care is unclear. This protocol describes a trial in which we investigate the effectiveness of various treatment options for these donor site wounds. Methods A 14-center, six-armed randomized clinical trial is being carried out in the Netherlands. An a-priori power analysis and an anticipated dropout rate of 15% indicates that 50 patients per group are necessary, totaling 300 patients, to be able to detect a 25% quicker mean time to complete wound healing. Randomization has been computerized to ensure allocation concealment. Adult patients who need a split-skin grafting operation for any reason, leaving a donor site wound of at least 10 cm2 are included and receive one of the following dressings: hydrocolloid, alginate, film, hydrofiber, silicone dressing, or paraffin gauze. No combinations of products from other intervention groups in this trial are allowed. Optimum application and changes of these dressings are pursued according to the protocol as supplied by the dressing manufacturers. Primary outcomes are days to complete wound healing and pain (using a Visual Analogue Scale. Secondary outcomes are adverse effects, scarring, patient satisfaction, and costs. Outcome assessors unaware of the treatment allocation will assess whether or not an outcome has occurred. Results will be analyzed according to the intention to treat principle. The first patient was randomized October 1, 2009. Discussion This study will provide comprehensive data on the effectiveness of different treatment options for donor site wounds. The dressing(s that will prevail in effectiveness, satisfaction and costs will be promoted among clinicians dealing with such

  16. Acupuncture Antiarrhythmic Effects on Drug Refractory Persistent Atrial Fibrillation: Study Protocol for a Randomized, Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimin Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common form of arrhythmia. Several trials have suggested that acupuncture may prevent AF. However, the efficacy of acupuncture for AF prevention has not been well investigated. Therefore, we designed a prospective, two-parallel-armed, participant and assessor blinded, randomized, sham-controlled clinical trial to investigate acupuncture in persistent AF (ACU-AF. Methods. A total of 80 participants will be randomly assigned to active acupuncture or sham acupuncture groups in a 1 : 1 ratio. Both groups will take the same antiarrhythmic medication during the study period. Patients will receive 10 sessions of acupuncture treatment once a week for 10 weeks. The primary endpoint is AF recurrence rate. Secondary endpoints are left atrium (LA and left atrial appendage (LAA changes in function and volume, and inflammatory biomarker changes. Ethics. This study protocol was approved by the institutional review boards (IRBs of Kyung Hee University Hospital (number 1335-04. This trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov NCT02110537.

  17. Safety of intrathecal transplantation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells for treating hereditary cerebellar ataxia: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-hua An

    2016-01-01

    Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01489267; registered on 30 October 2011. The study protocol has been approved by the ethics committee of the General Hospital of Chinese Armed Police Forces, China (approval No. 201117.

  18. Trends in the number and the quality of trial protocols involving children submitted to a French Institutional Review Board

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Gautier

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a great need for high quality clinical research for children. The European Pediatric Regulation aimed to improve the quality of clinical trials in order to increase the availability of treatments for children. The main purpose of this study was to assess the evolution of both the number and the quality of pediatric trial protocols that were submitted to a French Institutional Review Board (IRB00009118 before and after the initiation of the EU Pediatric Regulation. Methods All protocols submitted to the IRB00009118 between 2003 and 2014 and conducting research on subjects under eighteen years of age were eligible. The quality of randomized clinical trials was assessed according to the guidelines developed by the Enhancing the QUAlity and Transparency Of health Research (EQUATOR Network and ranked using the Jadad score. Results Out of 622 protocols submitted to the Institutional Review Board (IRB, 21% (133/622 included children. Among these 133 pediatric protocols, the number of submitted pediatric protocols doubled between the two studied periods. From 2003 to 2008, 47 protocols including 21 institutionally sponsored were submitted to the IRB and from 2009 until 2014, 86 protocols including 48 institutionally sponsored were submitted. No significant trend was observed on the quality of RCTs. The overall median score of RCTs on the Jadad scale was high (3.5, 70.0% of protocols had a Jadad score ≥ 3, and 30.0% had a score < 3. Conclusion Following the EU Pediatric Regulation, the number of pediatric protocols submitted to the IRB00009118 tends to increase, but no change was noticed regarding their quality.

  19. [Drug-eluting stent thrombosis and its pharmacological prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pershukov, I V; Batyraliev, T A

    2007-01-01

    The problem of drug eluting stents (DES) safety has been actively discussed throughout 2006 because of increase of frequency of development of late stent thromboses which were noted during almost 2 years after stenting. In December 2006 US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory panel acknowledged increase of development of late stent thrombosis. At the same time FDA accepted new definition of stent-thrombosis suggested by the Academic Research Consortium. According to this definition thrombosis can be definite, probable and possible. Any unexplained death before end of follow-up in a trial should be considered thrombosis related. Recalculation of thrombosis rate using this definition caused pronounced increase of this parameter in previously conducted trials. Thrombosis rate rose from 0,6 to 3,3% for bare metal stents, from 0,8 to 3,6% for sirolimus eluting stents and from 1,3 to 3,5% for paclitaxel eluting stents. Professional cardiological and angiographical societies (ACC, AHA, SCAI) responding to FDA advisory panel published their proofs and vision of the problem of stent thrombosis. In February 2007 ACC, AHA, SCAI, American College of Surgeons and Association of Dentists published scientific bulletin in which described preventive measures aimed at lowering of risk of thrombosis development. This document contains strict recommendation to continue double antithrombotic therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel for 12 months after implantation of DES or abandonment of the use of this type of stents when long term double antithrombotic therapy is not possible.

  20. Family planning to promote physical activity: a randomized controlled trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Alison; Rhodes, Ryan E; Blanchard, Chris M; Naylor, Patti-Jean; Warburton, Darren E R

    2015-10-05

    Physical activity is associated with the reduction of several chronic conditions in adults. Additionally, physical activity is extremely important for children for their development and cognitive functioning and also to create a physically active lifestyle that continues into adulthood. Despite the known benefits of physical activity, only one in five adults are achieving the public health recommendations of 150 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity per week and only 13 % of boys and 6 % of girls between the ages of 5 and 17 years are meeting the guidelines of 60 minutes per day. This study aims to evaluate whether a planning condition improves adherence to regular physical activity compared to an education-only control condition among families. Families are eligible if there is at least one child between the ages of 6 and 12 years who is not meeting the Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines. A six-month longitudinal randomized controlled trial will be used to compare the two conditions. Materials will be delivered at baseline with 'booster' sessions at six weeks and three months. Participants will be assessed at baseline and at six months with a fitness test, as well as questionnaires and accelerometery at baseline, six weeks, three months and six months. A total of 137 families have been recruited thus far from Greater Victoria. This study is ongoing and recruitment will continue until December 2015 with the target goal of reaching 160 families. This protocol describes the implementation of a randomized controlled trial that utilizes planning strategies to try and increase physical activity among families. Research findings could be useful in public health in providing effective strategies to families to help decrease sedentary lifestyles. Additionally, findings may help to inform future interventions aimed at increasing physical activity among families. This trial was registered on June 5, 2012 with the Clinical Trials Registry maintained by the

  1. The Interface of Clinical Decision-Making With Study Protocols for Knowledge Translation From a Walking Recovery Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershberg, Julie A; Rose, Dorian K; Tilson, Julie K; Brutsch, Bettina; Correa, Anita; Gallichio, Joann; McLeod, Molly; Moore, Craig; Wu, Sam; Duncan, Pamela W; Behrman, Andrea L

    2017-01-01

    Despite efforts to translate knowledge into clinical practice, barriers often arise in adapting the strict protocols of a randomized, controlled trial (RCT) to the individual patient. The Locomotor Experience Applied Post-Stroke (LEAPS) RCT demonstrated equal effectiveness of 2 intervention protocols for walking recovery poststroke; both protocols were more effective than usual care physical therapy. The purpose of this article was to provide knowledge-translation tools to facilitate implementation of the LEAPS RCT protocols into clinical practice. Participants from 2 of the trial's intervention arms: (1) early Locomotor Training Program (LTP) and (2) Home Exercise Program (HEP) were chosen for case presentation. The two cases illustrate how the protocols are used in synergy with individual patient presentations and clinical expertise. Decision algorithms and guidelines for progression represent the interface between implementation of an RCT standardized intervention protocol and clinical decision-making. In each case, the participant presents with a distinct clinical challenge that the therapist addresses by integrating the participant's unique presentation with the therapist's expertise while maintaining fidelity to the LEAPS protocol. Both participants progressed through an increasingly challenging intervention despite their own unique presentation. Decision algorithms and exercise progression for the LTP and HEP protocols facilitate translation of the RCT protocol to the real world of clinical practice. The two case examples to facilitate translation of the LEAPS RCT into clinical practice by enhancing understanding of the protocols, their progression, and their application to individual participants.Video Abstract available for more insights from the authors (see Supplemental Digital Content 1, available at: http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A147).

  2. Acupuncture, Counseling, and Usual care for Depression (ACUDep: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacPherson Hugh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evidence on the effect of acupuncture or counseling for depression is not conclusive yet is sufficient to warrant further research. Our aim is to conduct a full-scale RCT to determine the clinical and cost effectiveness of acupuncture and counseling compared to usual care alone. We will explore the experiences and perspectives of patients and practitioners. Methods/Design Randomized controlled trial with three parallel arms: acupuncture plus usual care, counseling plus usual care, and usual care alone, in conjunction with a nested qualitative study using in-depth interviews with purposive samples of trial participants. Participants: Patients aged over 18 years diagnosed with depression or mood disorder by their GP and with a score of 20 or above on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II. Randomization: Computer randomization by York Trials Unit to acupuncture, counseling, and usual care alone in proportions of 2:2:1, respectively, with secure allocation concealment. Interventions: Patients allocated to acupuncture and counseling groups receive the offer of up to 12 weekly sessions. Both interventions allow flexibility to address patient variation, yet are constrained within defined protocols. Acupuncture is based on traditional Chinese medicine and counseling is non-directive within the humanistic tradition. Outcome: The PHQ-9 is the primary outcome measure, collected at baseline, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Also measured is BDI-II, SF-36 Bodily pain subscale, and EQ-5D. Texted mood scores are collected weekly over the first 15 weeks. Health-related resource use is collected over 12 months. Analysis: The sample size target was for 640 participants, calculated for an effect size of 0.32 on the PHQ-9 when comparing acupuncture with counseling given 90% power, 5% significance, and 20% loss to follow-up. Analysis of covariance will be used on an intention-to-treat basis. Thematic analysis will be used for qualitative data. We will

  3. Guidelines for Inclusion of Patient-Reported Outcomes in Clinical Trial Protocols: The SPIRIT-PRO Extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Melanie; Kyte, Derek; Mercieca-Bebber, Rebecca; Slade, Anita; Chan, An-Wen; King, Madeleine T; Hunn, Amanda; Bottomley, Andrew; Regnault, Antoine; Chan, An-Wen; Ells, Carolyn; O'Connor, Daniel; Revicki, Dennis; Patrick, Donald; Altman, Doug; Basch, Ethan; Velikova, Galina; Price, Gary; Draper, Heather; Blazeby, Jane; Scott, Jane; Coast, Joanna; Norquist, Josephine; Brown, Julia; Haywood, Kirstie; Johnson, Laura Lee; Campbell, Lisa; Frank, Lori; von Hildebrand, Maria; Brundage, Michael; Palmer, Michael; Kluetz, Paul; Stephens, Richard; Golub, Robert M; Mitchell, Sandra; Groves, Trish

    2018-02-06

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) data from clinical trials can provide valuable evidence to inform shared decision making, labeling claims, clinical guidelines, and health policy; however, the PRO content of clinical trial protocols is often suboptimal. The SPIRIT (Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Interventional Trials) statement was published in 2013 and aims to improve the completeness of trial protocols by providing evidence-based recommendations for the minimum set of items to be addressed, but it does not provide PRO-specific guidance. To develop international, consensus-based, PRO-specific protocol guidance (the SPIRIT-PRO Extension). The SPIRIT-PRO Extension was developed following the Enhancing Quality and Transparency of Health Research (EQUATOR) Network's methodological framework for guideline development. This included (1) a systematic review of existing PRO-specific protocol guidance to generate a list of potential PRO-specific protocol items (published in 2014); (2) refinements to the list and removal of duplicate items by the International Society for Quality of Life Research (ISOQOL) Protocol Checklist Taskforce; (3) an international stakeholder survey of clinical trial research personnel, PRO methodologists, health economists, psychometricians, patient advocates, funders, industry representatives, journal editors, policy makers, ethicists, and researchers responsible for evidence synthesis (distributed by 38 international partner organizations in October 2016); (4) an international Delphi exercise (n = 137 invited; October 2016 to February 2017); and (5) consensus meeting (n = 30 invited; May 2017). Prior to voting, consensus meeting participants were informed of the results of the Delphi exercise and given data from structured reviews evaluating the PRO protocol content of 3 defined samples of trial protocols. The systematic review identified 162 PRO-specific protocol recommendations from 54 sources. The ISOQOL Taskforce (n

  4. Study protocol for the evaluation of an Infant Simulator based program delivered in schools: a pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Brinkman, Sally A; Johnson, Sarah E; Lawrence, David; Codde, James P; Hart, Michael B; Straton, Judith AY; Silburn, Sven

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background This paper presents the study protocol for a pragmatic randomised controlled trial to evaluate the impact of a school based program developed to prevent teenage pregnancy. The program includes students taking care of an Infant Simulator; despite growing popularity and an increasing global presence of such programs, there is no published evidence of their long-term impact. The aim of this trial is to evaluate the Virtual Infant Parenting (VIP) program by investigating pre-c...

  5. Lovastatin for adult patients with dengue: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Dengue is the most important vector-borne viral infection of man, with approximately 2 billion people living in areas at risk. Infection results in a range of manifestations from asymptomatic infection through to life-threatening shock and haemorrhage. One of the hallmarks of severe dengue is vascular endothelial disruption. There is currently no specific therapy and clinical management is limited to supportive care. Statins are a class of drug initially developed for lipid lowering. There has been considerable recent interest in their effects beyond lipid lowering. These include anti-inflammatory effects at the endothelium. In addition, it is possible that lovastatin may have an anti-viral effect against dengue. Observational data suggest that the use of statins may improve outcomes for such conditions as sepsis and pneumonia. This paper describes the protocol for a randomised controlled trial investigating a short course of lovastatin therapy in adult patients with dengue. Methods/design A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial will investigate the effects of lovastatin therapy in the treatment of dengue. The trial will be conducted in two phases with an escalation of dose between phases if an interim safety review is satisfactory. This is an exploratory study focusing on safety and there are no data on which to base a sample size calculation. A target sample size of 300 patients in the second phase, enrolled over two dengue seasons, was chosen based on clinical judgement and feasibility considerations. In a previous randomised trial in dengue, about 10% and 30% of patients experienced at least one serious adverse event or adverse event, respectively. With 300 patients, we will have 80% power to detect an increase of 12% (from 10% to 22%) or 16% (from 30% to 46%) in the frequency of adverse events. Furthermore, this sample size ensures some power to explore the efficacy of statins. Discussion The development of a dengue therapeutic that can

  6. HEART: heart exercise and remote technologies: A randomized controlled trial study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kira Geoffrey

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the leading cause of death worldwide. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR is aimed at improving health behaviors to slow or reverse the progression of CVD disease. Exercise is a central element of CR. Technologies such as mobile phones and the Internet (mHealth offer potential to overcome many of the psychological, physical, and geographical barriers that have been associated with lack of participation in exercise-based CR. We aim to trial the effectiveness of a mobile phone delivered exercise-based CR program to increase exercise capacity and functional outcomes compared with usual CR care in adults with CVD. This paper outlines the rationale and methods of the trial. Methods A single-blinded parallel two-arm randomized controlled trial is being conducted. A total of 170 people will be randomized at 1:1 ratio either to receive a mHealth CR program or usual care. Participants are identified by CR nurses from two metropolitan hospitals in Auckland, New Zealand through outpatient clinics and existing databases. Consenting participants are contacted to attend a baseline assessment. The intervention consists of a theory-based, personalized, automated package of text and video message components via participants' mobile phones and the Internet to increase exercise behavior, delivered over six months. The control group will continue with usual CR. Data collection occurs at baseline and 24 weeks (post-intervention. The primary outcome is change in maximal oxygen uptake from baseline to 24 weeks. Secondary outcomes include post-intervention measures on self-reported physical activity (IPAQ, cardiovascular risk factors (systolic blood pressure, weight, and waist to hip ratio, health related quality of life (SF-36, and cost-effectiveness. Discussion This manuscript presents the protocol for a randomized controlled trial of a mHealth exercise-based CR program. Results of this trial will provide much needed

  7. Increasing girls’ physical activity during an organised youth sport basketball program: a randomised controlled trial protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Participation in organised youth sports (OYS) has been recommended as an opportunity to increase young peoples’ moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) levels. Participants, however, spend a considerable proportion of time during OYS inactive. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to investigate whether coaches who attended coach education sessions (where education on increasing MVPA and decreasing inactivity during training was delivered) can increase players’ MVPA during training sessions over a 5-day basketball program compared to coaches who did not receive coach education sessions. Methods/design A convenience sample of 80 female players and 8 coaches were recruited into the UWS School Holiday Basketball Program in Greater Western Sydney, Australia. A two-arm, parallel-group randomised controlled trial was employed to investigate whether coaches who attended 2 coach education sessions (compared with a no-treatment control) can increase their players’ MVPA during training sessions over a 5-day basketball program. Objectively measured physical activity, directly observed lesson context and leader behaviour, player motivation, players’ perceived autonomy support, and coaching information (regarding training session planning, estimations on player physical activity and lesson context during training, perceived ability to modify training sessions, perceived importance of physical activity during training, intention to increase physical activity/reduce inactivity, and likelihood of increasing physical activity/reducing inactivity) were assessed at baseline (day 1) and at follow-up (day 5). Linear mixed models will be used to analyse between arm differences in changes from baseline to follow-up on all outcomes. Discussion The current trial protocol describes, to our knowledge, the first trial conducted in an OYS context to investigate the efficacy of an intervention, relative to a control, in increasing MVPA. This study’s findings will

  8. Evaluating the optimal timing of surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujagic, Edin; Zwimpfer, Tibor; Marti, Walter R; Zwahlen, Marcel; Hoffmann, Henry; Kindler, Christoph; Fux, Christoph; Misteli, Heidi; Iselin, Lukas; Lugli, Andrea Kopp; Nebiker, Christian A; von Holzen, Urs; Vinzens, Fabrizio; von Strauss, Marco; Reck, Stefan; Kraljević, Marko; Widmer, Andreas F; Oertli, Daniel; Rosenthal, Rachel; Weber, Walter P

    2014-05-24

    Surgical site infections are the most common hospital-acquired infections among surgical patients. The administration of surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis reduces the risk of surgical site infections . The optimal timing of this procedure is still a matter of debate. While most studies suggest that it should be given as close to the incision time as possible, others conclude that this may be too late for optimal prevention of surgical site infections. A large observational study suggests that surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis should be administered 74 to 30 minutes before surgery. The aim of this article is to report the design and protocol of a randomized controlled trial investigating the optimal timing of surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis. In this bi-center randomized controlled trial conducted at two tertiary referral centers in Switzerland, we plan to include 5,000 patients undergoing general, oncologic, vascular and orthopedic trauma procedures. Patients are randomized in a 1:1 ratio into two groups: one receiving surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis in the anesthesia room (75 to 30 minutes before incision) and the other receiving surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis in the operating room (less than 30 minutes before incision). We expect a significantly lower rate of surgical site infections with surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis administered more than 30 minutes before the scheduled incision. The primary outcome is the occurrence of surgical site infections during a 30-day follow-up period (one year with an implant in place). When assuming a 5% surgical site infection risk with administration of surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis in the operating room, the planned sample size has an 80% power to detect a relative risk reduction for surgical site infections of 33% when administering surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis in the anesthesia room (with a two-sided type I error of 5%). We expect the study to be completed within three years. The results of this

  9. [Development of clinical trial education program for pharmaceutical science students through small group discussion and role-playing using protocol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imakyure, Osamu; Shuto, Hideki; Nishikawa, Fumi; Hagiwara, Yoshifuka; Inoue, Sachiko; Koyanagi, Taeko; Hirakawa, Masaaki; Kataoka, Yasufumi

    2010-08-01

    The acquirement of basic knowledge of clinical trials and professional attitude in their practices is a general instructional objective in the Model Core Curriculum for Pharmaceutical Education. Unfortunately, the previous program of clinical trial education was not effective in the acquirement of a professional attitude in their practices. Then, we developed the new clinical trial education program using protocol through small group discussion (SGD) and roll-playing. Our program consists of 7 steps of practical training. In step 1, the students find some problems after presentation of the protocol including case and prescription. In step 2, they analyse the extracted problems and share the information obtained in SGD. In steps 3 and 5, five clinical case scenarios are presented to the students and they discuss which case is suitable for entry to the clinical trial or which case corresponds to the discontinuance criteria in the present designed protocol. In steps 4 and 6, the roll-playing is performed by teachers and students as doctors and clinical research coordinators (CRC) respectively. Further, we conducted a trial practice based on this program for the students. In the student's self-evaluation into five grades, the average score of the skill acquisition level in each step was 3.8-4.7 grade. Our clinical trial education program could be effective in educating the candidates for CRC or clinical pharmacists.

  10. A blinded randomised placebo-controlled trial investigating the efficacy of morphine analgesia for procedural pain in infants: Trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Rebeccah; Hartley, Caroline; Moultrie, Fiona; Adams, Eleri; Juszczak, Ed; Rogers, Richard; Norman, Jane E; Patel, Chetan; Stanbury, Kayleigh; Hoskin, Amy; Green, Gabrielle

    2016-11-15

    Infant pain has both immediate and long-term negative consequences, yet in clinical practice it is often undertreated. To date, few pain-relieving drugs have been tested in infants. Morphine is a potent analgesic that provides effective pain relief in adults, but there is inconclusive evidence for its effectiveness in infants. The purpose of this study is to establish whether oral morphine provides effective analgesia for procedural pain in infants. A blinded, placebo-controlled, parallel-group randomized, phase II, clinical trial will be undertaken to determine whether morphine sulphate administered orally prior to clinically-required retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) screening and heel lancing provides effective analgesia. 
156 infants between 34 and 42 weeks' gestational age who require a clinical heel lance and ROP screening on the same test occasion will be included in the trial. Infants will be randomised to receive either a single dose of morphine sulphate (100 μg/kg) or placebo. Each infant will be monitored for 48 hours and safety data will be collected during the 24 hours following drug administration. The primary outcome will be the Premature Infant Pain Profile-revised (PIPP-R) score 30 seconds after ROP screening. The co-primary outcome will be the magnitude of nociceptive-specific brain activity evoked by a clinically-required heel lance. Infant clinical stability will be assessed by comparing the number of episodes of bradycardia, tachycardia, desaturation and apnoea, and changes in respiratory support requirements in the 24-hour periods before and after the clinical intervention. In addition, drug safety will be assessed by considering the occurrence of apnoeic and hypotensive episodes requiring intervention in the 24-hour period following drug administration. This study has been published as an Accepted Protocol Summary by The Lancet .

  11. Transcranial direct current stimulation for depression in Alzheimer's disease: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Zui; Yokoi, Yuma

    2017-06-19

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease frequently elicit neuropsychiatric symptoms as well as cognitive deficits. Above all, depression is one of the most common neuropsychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer's disease but antidepressant drugs have not shown significant beneficial effects on it. Moreover, electroconvulsive therapy has not ensured its safety for potential severe adverse events although it does show beneficial clinical effect. Transcranial direct current stimulation can be the safe alternative of neuromodulation, which applies weak direct electrical current to the brain. Although transcranial direct current stimulation has plausible evidence for its effect on depression in young adult patients, no study has explored it in older subjects with depression in Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, we present a study protocol designed to evaluate the safety and clinical effect of transcranial direct current stimulation on depression in Alzheimer's disease in subjects aged over 65 years. This is a two-arm, parallel-design, randomized controlled trial, in which patients and assessors will be blinded. Subjects will be randomized to either an active or a sham transcranial direct current stimulation group. Participants in both groups will be evaluated at baseline, immediately, and 2 weeks after the intervention. This study investigates the safety and effect of transcranial direct current stimulation that may bring a significant impact on both depression and cognition in patients with Alzheimer's disease, and may be useful to enhance their quality of life. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02351388 . Registered on 27 January 2015. Last updated on 30 May 2016.

  12. Dry needling in a manual physiotherapy and therapeutic exercise protocol for patients with chronic mechanical shoulder pain of unspecific origin: a protocol for a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejera-Falcón, Emma; Toledo-Martel, Nuria Del Carmen; Sosa-Medina, Francisco Manuel; Santana-González, Fátima; Quintana-de la Fe, Miriam Del Pino; Gallego-Izquierdo, Tomás; Pecos-Martín, Daniel

    2017-09-18

    Shoulder pain of musculoskeletal origin is the main cause of upper limb pain of non-traumatic origin. Despite being one of the most common reasons for consultation, there is no established protocol for treatment due to the complexity of its etiology. However, it has been shown that the presence of myofascial trigger points on the shoulder muscles is a common condition associated with patients suffering from shoulder pain. This protocol has been created which describes the design of a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of the inclusion of dry needling (DN) within a protocol of manual physiotherapy and therapeutic exercise in the treatment of chronic shoulder pain of unspecific origin. Thirty-six participants aged 18-65 years will be recruited having mechanical chronic shoulder pain on unspecific origin and meeting the inclusion criteria. These will be randomized to one of two interventions, (i) DN, manual physiotherapy and therapeutic exercise or (ii) sham DN, manual physiotherapy and therapeutic exercise. The protocol will cover 6 weeks of treatment, with a 6-month follow-up. Our main outcome measure will be the Visual Analogue Scale for pain. This is the first study to combine the use of DN, manual physiotherapy and an exercise program with a 6-month follow-up, thus becoming a new contribution to the treatment of chronic shoulder pain, while new lines of research may be established to help determine the effects of DN on chronic shoulder pain and the frequency and proper dosage. International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number Register: ISRCTN30604244 ( http://www.controlled-trials.com ) 29 June 2016.

  13. Randomized trial of Legflow® paclitaxel eluting balloon and stenting versus standard percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting for the treatment of intermediate and long lesions of the superficial femoral artery (RAPID trial): Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Karimi; S.W. de Boer (Sanne W.); D.A.F. Van Den Heuvel; B. Fioole (Bram); D. Vroegindeweij (Dammis); J.M.M. Heyligers (Jan); P.N.M. Lohle (Paul N.M.); O.E. Elgersma (Otto E.); R.P.T. Nolthenius (Rudolf ); J.A. Vos (Jan Albert); J.-P.P.M. de Vries (Jean-Paul)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Restenosis after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) of the superficial femoral artery (SFA) may occur in 45% of patients at 2 years follow-up. Paclitaxel-coated balloons have been found to reduce neointimal hyperplasia, and thus reduce restenosis. Recently, the

  14. Randomized trial of Legflow((R)) paclitaxel eluting balloon and stenting versus standard percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting for the treatment of intermediate and long lesions of the superficial femoral artery (RAPID trial): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karimi, A.; Boer, S.W. de; Heuvel, D.A. Van Den; Fioole, B.; Vroegindeweij, D.; Heyligers, J.M.M; Lohle, P.N.; Elgersma, O.; Nolthenius, R.P.T.; Vos, J.A.; Vries, J.P. de

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Restenosis after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) of the superficial femoral artery (SFA) may occur in 45% of patients at 2 years follow-up. Paclitaxel-coated balloons have been found to reduce neointimal hyperplasia, and thus reduce restenosis. Recently, the Legflow((R))

  15. Hepatitis C - Assessment to Treatment Trial (HepCATT) in primary care: study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Kirsty; Macleod, John; Metcalfe, Chris; Simon, Joanne; Horwood, Jeremy; Hollingworth, William; Marlowe, Sharon; Gordon, Fiona H; Muir, Peter; Coleman, Barbara; Vickerman, Peter; Harrison, Graham I; Waldron, Cherry-Ann; Irving, William; Hickman, Matthew

    2016-07-29

    Public Health England (PHE) estimates that there are upwards of 160,000 individuals in England and Wales with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, but until now only around 100,000 laboratory diagnoses have been reported to PHE and of these 28,000 have been treated. Targeted case-finding in primary care is estimated to be cost-effective; however, there has been no robust randomised controlled trial evidence available of specific interventions. Therefore, this study aims to develop and conduct a complex intervention within primary care and to evaluate this approach using a cluster randomised controlled trial. A total of 46 general practices in South West England will be randomised in a 1:1 ratio to receive either a complex intervention comprising: educational training on HCV for the practice; poster and leaflet display in the practice waiting rooms to raise awareness and encourage opportunistic testing; a HCV risk prediction algorithm based on information on possible risk markers in the electronic patient record run using Audit + software (BMJ Informatica). The audit will then be used to recall and offer patients a HCV test. Control practices will follow usual care. The effectiveness of the intervention will be measured by comparing number and rates of HCV testing, the number and proportion of patients testing positive, onward referral, rates of specialist assessment and treatment in control and intervention practices. Intervention costs and health service utilisation will be recorded to estimate the NHS cost per new HCV diagnosis and new HCV patient initiating treatment. Longer-term cost-effectiveness of the intervention in improving quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) will be extrapolated using a pre-existing dynamic health economic model. Patients' and health care workers' experiences and acceptability of the intervention will be explored through semi-structured qualitative interviews. This trial has the potential to make an important impact on patient

  16. Impact of using a local protocol in preoperative testing: blind randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Mônica Loureiro; Iglesias, Antônio Carlos

    2017-01-01

    to evaluate the impact of the use of a local protocol of preoperative test requests in reducing the number of exams requested and in the occurrence of changes in surgical anesthetic management and perioperative complications. we conducted a randomized, blinded clinical trial at the Gaffrée and Guinle University Hospital with 405 patients candidates for elective surgery randomly divided into two groups, according to the practice of requesting preoperative exams: a group with non-selectively requested exams and a protocol group with exams requested according to the study protocol. Studied exams: complete blood count, coagulogram, glycemia, electrolytes, urea and creatinine, ECG and chest X-ray. Primary outcomes: changes in surgical anesthetic management caused by abnormal exams, reduction of the number of exams requested after the use of the protocol and perioperative complications. there was a significant difference (pgrupos segundo a prática de solicitação de exames pré-operatórios: grupo Rotina com exames solicitados de maneira não seletiva e grupo Protocolo com exames solicitados de acordo com o protocolo em estudo. Exames em estudo: hemograma, coagulograma, glicemia, eletrólitos, ureia e creatinina, ECG e radiografia de tórax. Desfechos primários: alterações na conduta anestésico-cirúrgica motivadas por exames anormais, redução do número de exames solicitados após o uso do protocolo e complicações perioperatórias. foi observada diferença significativa (pgrupos (14,9% x 29,1%) e redução de 57,3% no número de exames pedidos entre os dois grupos (pgrupos. Na análise multivariada hemograma e coagulograma foram os únicos exames capazes de modificar a conduta anestésico-cirúrgica. o protocolo proposto foi efetivo em eliminar um quantitativo significativo de exames complementares sem indicação clínica, sem que houvesse aumento na morbidade e mortalidades perioperatórias.

  17. Association between age and risk of stroke or death from carotid endarterectomy and carotid stenting: a meta-analysis of pooled patient data from four randomised trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, George; Roubin, Gary S; Jansen, Olav; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Halliday, Alison; Fraedrich, Gustav; Eckstein, Hans-Henning; Calvet, David; Bulbulia, Richard; Bonati, Leo H; Becquemin, Jean-Pierre; Algra, Ale; Brown, Martin M; Ringleb, Peter A; Brott, Thomas G; Mas, Jean-Louis

    2016-03-26

    Age was reported to be an effect-modifier in four randomised controlled trials comparing carotid artery stenting (CAS) and carotid endarterectomy (CEA), with better CEA outcomes than CAS outcomes noted in the more elderly patients. We aimed to describe the association of age with treatment differences in symptomatic patients and provide age-specific estimates of the risk of stroke and death within narrow (5 year) age groups. In this meta-analysis, we analysed individual patient-level data from four randomised controlled trials within the Carotid Stenosis Trialists' Collaboration (CSTC) involving patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis. We included only trials that randomly assigned patients to CAS or CEA and only patients with symptomatic stenosis. We assessed rates of stroke or death in 5-year age groups in the periprocedural period (between randomisation and 120 days) and ipsilateral stroke during long-term follow-up for patients assigned to CAS or CEA. We also assessed differences between CAS and CEA. All analyses were done on an intention-to-treat basis. Collectively, 4754 patients were randomly assigned to either CEA or CAS treatment in the four studies. 433 events occurred over a median follow-up of 2·7 years. For patients assigned to CAS, the periprocedural hazard ratio (HR) for stroke and death in patients aged 65-69 years compared with patients younger than 60 years was 2·16 (95% CI 1·13-4·13), with HRs of roughly 4·0 for patients aged 70 years or older. We noted no evidence of an increased periprocedural risk by age group in the CEA group (p=0·34). These changes underpinned a CAS-versus CEA periprocedural HR of 1·61 (95% CI 0·90-2·88) for patients aged 65-69 years and an HR of 2·09 (1·32-3·32) for patients aged 70-74 years. Age was not associated with the postprocedural stroke risk either within treatment group (p≥0·09 for CAS and 0·83 for CEA), or between treatment groups (p=0·84). In these RCTs, CEA was clearly superior to CAS in

  18. A Prospective, Multicenter Study of a Novel Mesh-Covered Carotid Stent: The CGuard CARENET Trial (Carotid Embolic Protection Using MicroNet).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofer, Joachim; Musiałek, Piotr; Bijuklic, Klaudija; Kolvenbach, Ralf; Trystula, Mariusz; Siudak, Zbigniew; Sievert, Horst

    2015-08-17

    This study sought to evaluate the feasibility of the CGuard Carotid Embolic Protective Stent system-a novel thin strut nitinol stent combined with a polyethylene terephthalate mesh covering designed to prevent embolic events from the target lesion in the treatment of carotid artery lesions in consecutive patients suitable for carotid artery stenting. The risk of cerebral embolization persists throughout the carotid artery stenting procedure and remains during the stent healing period. A total of 30 consecutive patients (age 71.6 ± 7.6 years, 63% male) meeting the conventional carotid artery stenting inclusion criteria were enrolled in 4 centers in Germany and Poland. The primary combined endpoint was the procedure success of the CGuard system and the number and volume of new lesions on the ipsilateral side assessed by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging at 48 h post-procedure and at 30 days. The secondary endpoint was 30-day major adverse cardiac or cerebrovascular events (death, stroke, or myocardial infarction). Protection devices were used in all procedures. Procedure success was 100%, with 0% procedural complications. The 30-day major adverse cardiac or cerebrovascular events rate was 0%. New ipsilateral ischemic lesions at 48 h occurred in 37.0% of patients and the average lesion volume was 0.039 ± 0.08 cm(3). The 30-day diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed complete resolution of all but 1 periprocedural lesion and only 1 new minor (0.116 cm(3)) lesion in relation to the 48-h scan. The use of the CGuard system in patients undergoing carotid artery stenting is feasible. In addition, the benefit of using CGuard may extend throughout the stent healing period. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of a physical activity intervention for new parents: protocol paper for a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Quinlan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying critical life transitions in people’s physical activity behaviors may illuminate the most opportune intervention apertures for chronic disease prevention. A substantive evidence base now indicates that parenthood is one of these critical transition points for physical activity decline. This study will examine whether a brief theory-based intervention can prevent a decline in physical activity among new parents over 6 months following intervention. This study protocol represents the first dyad-based physical activity initiative in the parenthood literature involving both mothers and fathers; prior research has focused on only mothers or only fathers (albeit limited, and has shown only short-term changes in physical activity. This study will be investigating whether a theory-based physical activity intervention can maintain or improve moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity measured via accelerometry of new parents over a 6 month period following intervention compared to a control group. Methods This study is a 6-month longitudinal randomized controlled trial. Parents are measured at baseline (2 months postpartum with two assessment points at 6 weeks (3.5 months postpartum and 3 months (5 months postpartum and a final follow-up assessment at 6 months (8 months postpartum. The content of the theory-based intervention was derived from the results of our prior longitudinal trial of new parents using an adapted theory of planned behavior framework to predict changes in physical activity. Results A total of 152 couples have been recruited to date. Sixteen couples dropped out after baseline and a total of 88 couples have completed their 6-month measures. Discussion If the intervention proves successful, couple-based physical activity promotion efforts among parents could be a promising avenue to pursue to help mitigate the declines of physical activity levels during parenthood. These findings could inform

  20. Prednisolone and acupuncture in Bell's palsy: study protocol for a randomized, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Kangjun

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are a variety of treatment options for Bell's palsy. Evidence from randomized controlled trials indicates corticosteroids can be used as a proven therapy for Bell's palsy. Acupuncture is one of the most commonly used methods to treat Bell's palsy in China. Recent studies suggest that staging treatment is more suitable for Bell's palsy, according to different path-stages of this disease. The aim of this study is to compare the effects of prednisolone and staging acupuncture in the recovery of the affected facial nerve, and to verify whether prednisolone in combination with staging acupuncture is more effective than prednisolone alone for Bell's palsy in a large number of patients. Methods/Design In this article, we report the design and protocol of a large sample multi-center randomized controlled trial to treat Bell's palsy with prednisolone and/or acupuncture. In total, 1200 patients aged 18 to 75 years within 72 h of onset of acute, unilateral, peripheral facial palsy will be assessed. There are six treatment groups, with four treated according to different path-stages and two not. These patients are randomly assigned to be in one of the following six treatment groups, i.e. 1 placebo prednisolone group, 2 prednisolone group, 3 placebo prednisolone plus acute stage acupuncture group, 4 prednisolone plus acute stage acupuncture group, 5 placebo prednisolone plus resting stage acupuncture group, 6 prednisolone plus resting stage acupuncture group. The primary outcome is the time to complete recovery of facial function, assessed by Sunnybrook system and House-Brackmann scale. The secondary outcomes include the incidence of ipsilateral pain in the early stage of palsy (and the duration of this pain, the proportion of patients with severe pain, the occurrence of synkinesis, facial spasm or contracture, and the severity of residual facial symptoms during the study period. Discussion The result of this trial will assess the

  1. A Fully Automated Diabetes Prevention Program, Alive-PD: Program Design and Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Gladys; Azar, Kristen Mj; Block, Torin J; Romanelli, Robert J; Carpenter, Heather; Hopkins, Donald; Palaniappan, Latha; Block, Clifford H

    2015-01-21

    In the United States, 86 million adults have pre-diabetes. Evidence-based interventions that are both cost effective and widely scalable are needed to prevent diabetes. Our goal was to develop a fully automated diabetes prevention program and determine its effectiveness in a randomized controlled trial. Subjects with verified pre-diabetes were recruited to participate in a trial of the effectiveness of Alive-PD, a newly developed, 1-year, fully automated behavior change program delivered by email and Web. The program involves weekly tailored goal-setting, team-based and individual challenges, gamification, and other opportunities for interaction. An accompanying mobile phone app supports goal-setting and activity planning. For the trial, participants were randomized by computer algorithm to start the program immediately or after a 6-month delay. The primary outcome measures are change in HbA1c and fasting glucose from baseline to 6 months. The secondary outcome measures are change in HbA1c, glucose, lipids, body mass index (BMI), weight, waist circumference, and blood pressure at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Randomization and delivery of the intervention are independent of clinic staff, who are blinded to treatment assignment. Outcomes will be evaluated for the intention-to-treat and per-protocol populations. A total of 340 subjects with pre-diabetes were randomized to the intervention (n=164) or delayed-entry control group (n=176). Baseline characteristics were as follows: mean age 55 (SD 8.9); mean BMI 31.1 (SD 4.3); male 68.5%; mean fasting glucose 109.9 (SD 8.4) mg/dL; and mean HbA1c 5.6 (SD 0.3)%. Data collection and analysis are in progress. We hypothesize that participants in the intervention group will achieve statistically significant reductions in fasting glucose and HbA1c as compared to the control group at 6 months post baseline. The randomized trial will provide rigorous evidence regarding the efficacy of this Web- and Internet-based program in reducing or

  2. Streamlining tasks and roles to expand treatment and care for HIV: randomised controlled trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Vuuren Cloete

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major barrier to accessing free government-provided antiretroviral treatment (ART in South Africa is the shortage of suitably skilled health professionals. Current South African guidelines recommend that only doctors should prescribe ART, even though most primary care is provided by nurses. We have developed an effective method of educational outreach to primary care nurses in South Africa. Evidence is needed as to whether primary care nurses, with suitable training and managerial support, can initiate and continue to prescribe and monitor ART in the majority of ART-eligible adults. Methods/design This is a protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomised trial to evaluate the effectiveness of a complex intervention based on and supporting nurse-led antiretroviral treatment (ART for South African patients with HIV/AIDS, compared to current practice in which doctors are responsible for initiating ART and continuing prescribing. We will randomly allocate 31 primary care clinics in the Free State province to nurse-led or doctor-led ART. Two groups of patients aged 16 years and over will be included: a 7400 registering with the programme with CD4 counts of ≤ 350 cells/mL (mainly to evaluate treatment initiation and b 4900 already receiving ART (to evaluate ongoing treatment and monitoring. The primary outcomes will be time to death (in the first group and viral suppression (in the second group. Patients' survival, viral load and health status indicators will be measured at least 6-monthly for at least one year and up to 2 years, using an existing province-wide clinical database linked to the national death register. Trial registration Controlled Clinical Trials ISRCTN46836853

  3. Electroacupuncture for tapering off long-term benzodiazepine use: study protocol of randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Wing-Fai; Chung, Ka-Fai; Zhang, Zhang-Jin; Chan, Wai-Chi; Zhang, Shi-Ping; Ng, Roger Man-Kin; Chan, Connie Lai-Wah; Ho, Lai-Ming; Yu, Yee-Man; Lao, Li-Xing

    2017-03-31

    Conventional approaches for benzodiazepine tapering have their limitations. Anecdotal studies have shown that acupuncture is a potential treatment for facilitating successful benzodiazepine tapering. As of today, there was no randomized controlled trial examining its efficacy and safety. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of using electroacupuncture as an adjunct treatment to gradual tapering of benzodiazepine doses in complete benzodiazepine cessation in long-term benzodiazepine users. The study protocol of a randomized, assessor- and subject-blinded, controlled trial is presented. One hundred and forty-four patients with histories of using benzodiazepines in ≥50% of days for more than 3 months will be randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive either electroacupuncture or placebo electroacupuncture combined with gradual benzodiazepine tapering schedule. Both experimental and placebo treatments will be delivered twice per week for 4 weeks. Major assessments will be conducted at baseline, week 6 and week 16 post-randomization. Primary outcome is the cessation rate of benzodiazepine use. Secondary outcomes include the percentage change in the doses of benzodiazepine usage and the severity of withdrawal symptoms experienced based on the Benzodiazepine Withdrawal Symptom Questionnaire, insomnia as measured by the Insomnia Severity Index, and anxiety and depressive symptoms as evaluated by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Adverse events will also be measured at each study visit. Results of this study will provide high quality evidence of the efficacy and safety of electroacupuncture as an adjunct treatment for benzodiazepine tapering in long-term users. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02475538 .

  4. Coronary bifurcation lesions treated with simple or complex stenting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behan, Miles W; Holm, Niels R; de Belder, Adam J

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Randomized trials of coronary bifurcation stenting have shown better outcomes from a simple (provisional) strategy rather than a complex (planned two-stent) strategy in terms of short-term efficacy and safety. Here, we report the 5-year all-cause mortality based on pooled patient-level data...

  5. Long-term prognostic value of risk scores after drug-eluting stent implantation for unprotected left main coronary artery: A pooled analysis of the ISAR-LEFT-MAIN and ISAR-LEFT-MAIN 2 randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xhepa, Erion; Tada, Tomohisa; Kufner, Sebastian; Ndrepepa, Gjin; Byrne, Robert A; Kreutzer, Johanna; Ibrahim, Tareq; Tiroch, Klaus; Valgimigli, Marco; Tölg, Ralf; Cassese, Salvatore; Fusaro, Massimiliano; Schunkert, Heribert; Laugwitz, Karl L; Mehilli, Julinda; Kastrati, Adnan

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the long-term prognostic value of risk scores in the setting of drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation for uLMCA. Data on the prognostic value of novel risk scores developed to select the most appropriate revascularization strategy in patients undergoing DES implantation for uLMCA disease are relatively limited. The study represents a patient-level pooled analysis of the ISAR-LEFT-MAIN (607 patients randomized to paclitaxel-eluting or sirolimus-eluting stents) and the ISAR-LEFT-MAIN-2 (650 patients randomized to everolimus-eluting or zotarolimus-eluting stents) randomized trials. The Syntax Score (SxScore) as well the Syntax Score II (SS-II), the EuroSCORE and the Global Risk Classification (GRC) were calculated. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality. At a mean follow-up of 3 years there were 160 deaths (12.7%). The death-incidence was significantly higher in the upper tertiles than in the intermediate or lower ones for all risk scores (log-rank test P risk scores were able to stratify the mortality risk at long-term follow-up. EuroSCORE was the only risk score that significantly improved the discriminatory power of a multivariable model to predict long-term mortality. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Examining the impact of genetic testing for type 2 diabetes on health behaviors: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voils Corrine I

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We describe the study design, procedures, and development of the risk counseling protocol used in a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the impact of genetic testing for diabetes mellitus (DM on psychological, health behavior, and clinical outcomes. Methods/Design Eligible patients are aged 21 to 65 years with body mass index (BMI ≥27 kg/m2 and no prior diagnosis of DM. At baseline, conventional DM risk factors are assessed, and blood is drawn for possible genetic testing. Participants are randomized to receive conventional risk counseling for DM with eye disease counseling or with genetic test results. The counseling protocol was pilot tested to identify an acceptable graphical format for conveying risk estimates and match the length of the eye disease to genetic counseling. Risk estimates are presented with a vertical bar graph denoting risk level with colors and descriptors. After receiving either genetic counseling regarding risk for DM or control counseling on eye disease, brief lifestyle counseling for prevention of DM is provided to all participants. Discussion A standardized risk counseling protocol is being used in a randomized trial of 600 participants. Results of this trial will inform policy about whether risk counseling should include genetic counseling. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01060540

  7. Relationship between Risk Factor Control and Compliance with a Lifestyle Modification Program in the Stenting Aggressive Medical Management for Prevention of Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Tanya N; Al Kasab, Sami; Nizam, Azhar; Lynn, Michael J; Harrell, Jamie; Derdeyn, Colin P; Fiorella, David; Janis, L Scott; Lane, Bethany F; Montgomery, Jean; Chimowitz, Marc I

    2018-03-01

    Lifestyle modification programs have improved the achievement of risk factor targets in a variety of clinical settings, including patients who have previously suffered a stroke or transient ischemic attack and those with multiple risk factors. Stenting Aggressive Medical Management for Prevention of Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis (SAMMPRIS) was the first vascular disease prevention trial to provide a commercially available lifestyle modification program to enhance risk factor control. We sought to determine the relationship between compliance with this program and risk factor control in SAMMPRIS. SAMMPRIS aggressive medical management included a telephonic lifestyle modification program provided free of charge to all subjects (n = 451) during their participation in the study. Subjects with fewer than 3 expected lifestyle-coaching calls were excluded from these analyses. Compliant subjects (n = 201) had  greater than or equal to 78.5% of calls (median % of completed/expected calls). Noncompliant subjects (n = 200) had less than 78.5% of calls or refused to participate. Mean risk factor values or % in-target for each risk factor was compared between compliant versus noncompliant subjects, using t tests and chi-square tests. Risk factor changes from baseline to follow-up were compared between the groups to account for baseline differences. Compliant subjects had better risk factor control throughout follow-up for low-density lipoprotein, systolic blood pressure (SBP), hemoglobin A1c (HgA1c), non-high-density lipoprotein, nonsmoking, and exercise than noncompliant subjects, but there was no difference for body mass index. After adjusting for baseline differences between the groups, compliant subjects had a greater change from baseline than noncompliant subjects for SBP did at 24 months and HgA1c at 6 months. SAMMPRIS subjects who were compliant with the lifestyle modification program had better risk factor control during the study for almost

  8. Alcohol handrubbing and chlorhexidine handwashing protocols for routine hospital practice: A randomized clinical trial of protocol efficacy and time effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chow, Angela; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Chan, Siew-Pang; Poh, Bee-Fong; Krishnan, Prabha; Ng, Woei-Kian; Choudhury, Saugata; Chan, Joey; Ang, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    Background: The World Health Organization (WHO) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend the use of alcohol handrubs to prevent health care-associated infections. However, the efficacy and time effectiveness of different alcohol handrubbing protocols have yet to be

  9. Long term outcomes of new generation drug eluting stents versus coronary artery bypass grafting for multivessel and/or left main coronary artery disease. A Bayesian network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mina, George S; Watti, Hussam; Soliman, Demiana; Shewale, Anand; Atkins, Jessica; Reddy, Pratap; Dominic, Paari

    2018-01-05

    Most data guiding revascularization of multivessel disease (MVD) and/or left main disease (LMD) favor coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) over percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). However, those data are based on trials comparing CABG to bare metal stents (BMS) or old generation drug eluting stents (OG-DES). Hence, it is essential to outcomes of CABG to those of new generation drug eluting stents (NG-DES). We searched PUBMED and Cochrane database for trials evaluating revascularization of MVD and/or LMD with CABG and/or PCI. A Bayesian network meta-analysis was performed to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% credible intervals (CrI). Primary outcome was major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) at 3-5 years. Secondary outcomes were mortality, cerebrovascular accidents (CVA), myocardial infarction (MI) and repeat revascularization. We included 10 trials with a total of 9287 patients. CABG was associated with lower MACE when compared to BMS or OG-DES. However, MACE was not significantly different between CABG and NG-DES (OR 0.79, CrI 0.45-1.40). Moreover, there were no significant differences between CABG and NG-DES in mortality (OR 0.78, CrI 0.45-1.37), CVA (OR 0.93 CrI 0.35-2.2) or MI (OR 0.6, CrI 0.17-2.0). On the other hand, CABG was associated with lower repeat revascularization (OR 0.55, CrI 0.36-0.84). Our study suggests that NG-DES is an acceptable alternative to CABG in patients with MVD and/or LMD. However, repeat revascularization remains to be lower with CABG than with PCI. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Carotid Angioplasty and Stenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotid angioplasty and stenting Overview Carotid angioplasty (kuh-ROT-id AN-jee-o-plas-tee) and stenting ... to better see and examine the blood vessels. Food and medications You'll receive instructions on what ...

  11. Determining the Optimal Protocol for Measuring an Albuminuria Class Transition in Clinical Trials in Diabetic Kidney Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kröpelin, Tobias F; de Zeeuw, Dick; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Albuminuria class transition (normo- to micro- to macroalbuminuria) is used as an intermediate end point to assess renoprotective drug efficacy. However, definitions of such class transition vary between trials. To determine the most optimal protocol, we evaluated the approaches used in four...... effect increased (decreased precision) with stricter end point definitions, resulting in a loss of statistical significance. In conclusion, the optimal albuminuria transition end point for use in drug intervention trials can be determined with a single urine collection for albuminuria assessment per...... clinical trials testing the effect of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system intervention on albuminuria class transition in patients with diabetes: the BENEDICT, the DIRECT, the ALTITUDE, and the IRMA-2 Trial. The definition of albuminuria class transition used in each trial differed from the definitions...

  12. Economic Outcomes of Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffolds Versus Everolimus-Eluting Stents in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: 1-Year Results From the ABSORB III Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Suzanne J; Lei, Yang; Chinnakondepalli, Khaja; Vilain, Katherine; Magnuson, Elizabeth A; Kereiakes, Dean J; Ellis, Stephen G; Stone, Gregg W; Cohen, David J

    2017-04-24

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the economic impact of the Absorb bioresorbable vascular scaffold compared with the Xience everolimus-eluting stent in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. The ABSORB III trial (Everolimus-Eluting Bioresorbable Scaffolds for Coronary Artery Disease) demonstrated that the Absorb scaffold was noninferior to the Xience stent with respect to target lesion failure at 1 year. Whether health care costs differ between the Absorb scaffold and the Xience stent is unknown. We performed a prospective health economic study alongside the ABSORB III trial, in which patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention for stable or unstable angina were randomized to receive the Absorb scaffold (n = 1,322) or Xience stent (n = 686). Resource use data were collected through 1 year of follow-up. Costs were assessed using resource-based accounting (for procedures), MedPAR data (for other index hospitalization costs), and Medicare reimbursements (for follow-up costs and physician fees). Initial procedural costs were higher with the Absorb scaffold than the Xience stent ($6,316 ± 1,892 vs. $6,103 ± 1,895; p = 0.02), driven mainly by greater balloon catheter use and the higher cost of the scaffold in the Absorb group. Nonetheless, index hospitalization costs ($15,035 ± 2,992 for Absorb vs. $14,903 ± 3,449 for Xience; p = 0.37) and total 1-year costs ($17,848 ± 6,110 for Absorb vs. $17,498 ± 7,411 for Xience; p = 0.29) were similar between the 2 groups. Although initial procedural costs were higher with the Absorb scaffold, there were no differences in total 1-year health care costs between the 2 cohorts. Longer term follow-up is needed to determine whether meaningful cost savings emerge after scaffold resorption. (A Clinical Evaluation of Absorb™ BVS, the Everolimus-Eluting Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffold in the Treatment of Subjects With de Novo Native Coronary Artery Lesions; NCT01751906). Copyright © 2017

  13. Assessment Of Coronary Arterial Stents By Multislice-CT Angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maintz, D.; Fallenberg, E. M.; Heindel, W.; Fischbach, R.; Grude, M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To assess patency and lumen visibility of coronary artery stents by multislice-CT angiography (MSCTA) in comparison with conventional coronary angiography as the standard of reference. Material and Methods: 47 stents of 13 different types were evaluated in 29 patients. MSCTA was performed on a 4-slice scanner with a standard coronary protocol (detector collimation 4 x 1 mm; table feed 1.5 mm/rotation, 400 mAs, 120 kV). Image evaluation was performed by two readers who were blinded to the reports from the catheter angiography. MIP reconstructions were evaluated for image quality on a 4-point scale (1 = poor, 4 = excellent) and stent patency (contrast distal to the stent as an indirect patency sign). Axial images and multiplanar reformations through the stents were used for assessment of stent lumen visibility (measurement of the visible stent lumen diameter) and detection of relevant in-stent stenosis (50%). Results: Image quality was fair to good on average (score 2.64 ± 1.0) and depended on the heart rate (heart rate 45-60: average score 3.2, heart rate 61-70: average score 2.8, heart rate >71: average score 1.4). Thirty-seven stents were correctly classified as patent, 1 was correctly classified as occluded and 9 stents were not assessable due to insufficient image quality because of triggering artifacts. Parts of the stent lumen could be visualized in 30 cases. On average, 20-40% of the stent lumen diameter was visible. Twenty-five stents were correctly classified as having no stenosis, 1 was falsely classified as stenosed, 1 was correctly classified as occluded. In 20 stents lumen visibility was not sufficient for stenosis evaluation. Conclusion: Although the stent lumen may be partly visualized in most stents, a reliable evaluation of in-stent stenoses does not seem practical by 4-slice MSCT. Nevertheless, for stent patency evaluation, MS-CTA might provide valuable clinical information. With submillimeter MSCT (e.g. 16-slice scanners) and more

  14. Physical activity as a treatment for depression: the TREAD randomised trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawlor Debbie A

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression is one of the most common reasons for consulting a General Practitioner (GP within the UK. Whilst antidepressants have been shown to be clinically effective, many patients and healthcare professionals would like to access other forms of treatment as an alternative or adjunct to drug therapy for depression. A recent systematic review presented some evidence that physical activity could offer one such option, although further investigation is needed to test its effectiveness within the context of the National Health Service. The aim of this paper is to describe the protocol for a randomised, controlled trial (RCT designed to evaluate an intervention developed to increase physical activity as a treatment for depression within primary care. Methods/design The TREAD study is a pragmatic, multi-centre, two-arm RCT which targets patients presenting with a new episode of depression. Patients were approached if they were aged 18-69, had recently consulted their GP for depression and, where appropriate, had been taking antidepressants for less than one month. Only those patients with a confirmed diagnosis of a depressive episode as assessed by the Clinical Interview Schedule-Revised (CIS-R, a Beck Depression Inventory (BDI score of at least 14 and informed written consent were included in the study. Eligible patients were individually randomised to one of two treatment groups; usual GP care or usual GP care plus facilitated physical activity. The primary outcome of the trial is clinical symptoms of depression assessed using the BDI four months after randomisation. A number of secondary outcomes are also measured at the 4-, 8- and 12-month follow-up points including quality of life, attitude to and involvement in physical activity and antidepressant use/adherence. Outcomes will be analysed on an intention-to-treat (ITT basis and will use linear and logistic regression models to compare treatments. Discussion The results of

  15. Functional rehabilitation of upper limb apraxia in poststroke patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Mármol, Jose Manuel; García-Ríos, M Carmen; Barrero-Hernandez, Francisco J; Molina-Torres, Guadalupe; Brown, Ted; Aguilar-Ferrándiz, María Encarnación

    2015-11-05

    expected to clarify the effectiveness of a combined functional rehabilitation approach compared to a conservative intervention for improving upper limb movement and function in poststroke patients. Clinical Trial Gov number NCT02199093 . The protocol registration was received 23 July 2014. Participant enrollment began on 1 May 2014. The trial is expected to be completed in March 2016.

  16. The FiCTION dental trial protocol – filling children’s teeth: indicated or not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    ; incidence of caries in primary and permanent teeth, patient quality of life, cost-effectiveness, acceptability of treatment strategies to patients and parents and their experiences, and dentists’ preferences. Discussion FiCTION will provide evidence for the most clinically-effective and cost-effective approach to managing caries in children’s primary teeth in Primary Care. This will support general dental practitioners in treatment decision making for child patients to minimize pain and infection in primary teeth. The trial is currently recruiting patients. Trial registration Protocol ID: NCTU: ISRCTN77044005 PMID:23725316

  17. Evaluation of a physical activity intervention for new parents: protocol paper for a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Alison; Rhodes, Ryan E; Beauchamp, Mark R; Symons Downs, Danielle; Warburton, Darren E R; Blanchard, Chris M

    2017-11-09

    Identifying critical life transitions in people's physical activity behaviors may illuminate the most opportune intervention apertures for chronic disease prevention. A substantive evidence base now indicates that parenthood is one of these critical transition points for physical activity decline. This study will examine whether a brief theory-based intervention can prevent a decline in physical activity among new parents over 6 months following intervention. This study protocol represents the first dyad-based physical activity initiative in the parenthood literature involving both mothers and fathers; prior research has focused on only mothers or only fathers (albeit limited), and has shown only short-term changes in physical activity. This study will be investigating whether a theory-based physical activity intervention can maintain or improve moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity measured via accelerometry of new parents over a 6 month period following intervention compared to a control group. This study is a 6-month longitudinal randomized controlled trial. Parents are measured at baseline (2 months postpartum) with two assessment points at 6 weeks (3.5 months postpartum) and 3 months (5 months postpartum) and a final follow-up assessment at 6 months (8 months postpartum). The content of the theory-based intervention was derived from the results of our prior longitudinal trial of new parents using an adapted theory of planned behavior framework to predict changes in physical activity. A total of 152 couples have been recruited to date. Sixteen couples dropped out after baseline and a total of 88 couples have completed their 6-month measures. If the intervention proves successful, couple-based physical activity promotion efforts among parents could be a promising avenue to pursue to help mitigate the declines of physical activity levels during parenthood. These findings could inform public health materials and practitioners. This trial has been

  18. Low-profile stent placement with the monorail technique for treatment of renal artery stenosis: midterm results of a prospective trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Hülsbeck, Stefan; Frahm, Christian; Behm, Charlotte; Schäfer, Phillip Jobst; Bolte, Hendrik; Heller, Martin; Jahnke, Thomas

    2005-07-01

    To determine feasibility, safety, and midterm patency of a monorail balloon stent device for the treatment of renal artery stenosis (RAS). During a period of 30 months, 47 patients (with severe hypertension, n=45; renal insufficiency, n=20) with 50 cases of RAS and indications for stent implantation (calcified ostial lesion, n=41; insufficient percutaneous transluminal angioplasty, n=6; dissection, n=3) were enrolled into the prospective evaluation. After predilation, 59 stents (Rx-Herculink 4 mm, n=2; 5 mm, n=19; 6 mm, n=35; 7 mm, n=3) were implanted under manometer control with use of the long-sheath technique (5 F; 6 F for 7-mm stents) via a femoral (n=44) or transbrachial approach (n=6). Parameters of hypertension and renal insufficiency were determined before and after the procedure and for a maximum of 18 months. Restenosis rate was determined with color duplex ultrasonography. Renal artery stent placement (mean diameter, 5.7 mm; mean length, 16 mm) was technically successful in all cases (100%). Mean blood pressure and serum creatinine level decreased from 177/93 mm Hg to 145/78 mm Hg and from 1.8 mg/dL to 1.5 mg/dL, respectively. Within 48 hours after the implantation, acute occlusions occurred in two patients, supposedly triggered by cholesterol embolization. Primary and primary assisted patency rates were 87% and 92% at 6 months and 75% and 84% at 18 months. Renal artery stent placement with the rapid-exchange monorail system is a safe procedure with promising patency rates. In combination with the long-sheath technique, adequate control of stent deployment is guaranteed during the entire intervention. The low profile of the device facilitates the use of small sheaths (5 F) to minimize access-site complications.

  19. Partially covered versus uncovered self-expandable nitinol stents with anti-migration properties for the palliation of malignant distal biliary obstruction: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min Jae; Kim, Jin Hong; Yoo, Byung Moo; Hwang, Jae Chul; Yoo, Jun Hwan; Lee, Ki Seong; Kang, Joon Koo; Kim, Soon Sun; Lim, Sun Gyo; Shin, Sung Jae; Cheong, Jae Youn; Lee, Kee Myung; Lee, Kwang Jae; Cho, Sung Won

    2015-01-01

    Covered self-expandable metal stents (SEMSs) are increasingly used as alternatives to uncovered SEMSs for the palliation of inoperable malignant distal biliary obstruction to counteract tumor ingrowth. We aimed to compare the outcomes of partially covered and uncovered SEMSs with identical mesh structures and anti-migration properties, such as low axial force and flared ends. One hundred and three patients who were diagnosed with inoperable malignant distal biliary obstruction between January 2006 and August 2013 were randomly assigned to either the partially covered (n = 51) or uncovered (n = 52) SEMS group. There were no significant differences in the cumulative stent patency, overall patient survival, stent dysfunction-free survival and overall adverse events, including pancreatitis and cholecystitis, between the two groups. Compared to the uncovered group, stent migration (5.9% vs. 0%, p = 0.118) and tumor overgrowth (7.8% vs. 1.9%, p = 0.205) were non-significantly more frequent in the partially covered group, whereas tumor ingrowth showed a significantly higher incidence in the uncovered group (5.9% vs. 19.2%, p = 0.041). Stent migration in the partially covered group occurred only in patients with short stenosis of the utmost distal bile duct (two in ampullary cancer, one in bile duct cancer), and did not occur in any patients with pancreatic cancer. For the palliation of malignant distal biliary obstruction, endoscopic placement of partially covered SEMSs with anti-migration designs and identical mesh structures to uncovered SEMSs failed to prolong cumulative stent patency or reduce stent migration.

  20. Peer mentorship to promote effective pain management in adolescents: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayes Loran P

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This protocol is for a study of a new program to improve outcomes in children suffering from chronic pain disorders, such as fibromyalgia, recurrent headache, or recurrent abdominal pain. Although teaching active pain self-management skills through cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT or a complementary program such as hypnotherapy or yoga has been shown to improve pain and functioning, children with low expectations of skill-building programs may lack motivation to comply with therapists' recommendations. This study will develop and test a new manualized peer-mentorship program which will provide modeling and reinforcement by peers to other adolescents with chronic pain (the mentored participants. The mentorship program will encourage mentored participants to engage in therapies that promote the learning of pain self-management skills and to support the mentored participants' practice of these skills. The study will examine the feasibility of this intervention for both mentors and mentored participants, and will assess the preliminary effectiveness of this program on mentored participants' pain and functional disability. Methods This protocol will recruit adolescents ages 12-17 with chronic pain and randomly assign them to either peer mentorship or a treatment-as-usual control group. Mentored participants will be matched with peer mentors of similar age (ages 14-18 who have actively participated in various treatment modalities through the UCLA Pediatric Pain Program and have learned to function successfully with a chronic pain disorder. The mentors will present information to mentored participants in a supervised and monitored telephone interaction for 2 months to encourage participation in skill-building programs. The control group will receive usual care but without the mentorship intervention. Mentored and control subjects' pain and functioning will be assessed at 2 months (end of intervention for mentored participants and

  1. Quality-of-Life After Everolimus-Eluting Stents or Bypass Surgery for Left-Main Disease: Results From the EXCEL Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Suzanne J; Chinnakondepalli, Khaja; Magnuson, Elizabeth A; Kandzari, David E; Puskas, John D; Ben-Yehuda, Ori; van Es, Gerrit-Anne; Taggart, David P; Morice, Marie-Claude; Lembo, Nicholas J; Brown, W Morris; Banning, Adrian; Simonton, Charles A; Kappetein, A Pieter; Sabik, Joseph F; Serruys, Patrick W; Stone, Gregg W; Cohen, David J

    2017-12-26

    The EXCEL (Evaluation of Xience Versus Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery for Effectiveness of Left Main Revascularization) trial compared outcomes in patients with unprotected left main coronary artery disease (LMCAD) treated with coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) using everolimus-eluting stents. Whereas rates of death, stroke, and myocardial infarction were similar at 36 months, event timing and repeat revascularization rates differed by treatment group. To understand the effects of revascularization strategy from the patient's perspective, a prospective quality of life (QoL) substudy was performed alongside the EXCEL trial. Between September 2010 and March 2014, 1,905 patients with LMCAD were randomized to undergo CABG or PCI, of whom 1,788 participated in the QoL substudy. QoL was assessed at baseline and 1, 12, and 36 months using the Seattle Angina Questionnaire, the 12-Item Short Form Health Survey, the Rose Dyspnea Scale, the Patient Health Questionnaire-8, and the EQ-5D. Differences between PCI and CABG were assessed using longitudinal random-effect growth curve models. Over 36 months, both PCI and CABG were associated with significant improvements in QoL compared with baseline. At 1 month, PCI was associated with better QoL than CABG. By 12 months though, these differences were largely attenuated, and by 36 months, there were no significant QoL differences between PCI and CABG. Among selected patients with LMCAD, both PCI and CABG result in similar QoL improvement through 36 months, although a greater early benefit is seen with PCI. Taken together with the 3-year clinical results of EXCEL, these findings suggest that PCI and CABG provide similar intermediate-term outcomes for patients with LMCAD. (Evaluation of Xience Versus Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery for Effectiveness of Left Main Revascularization [EXCEL]; NCT01205776). Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier

  2. Effects of cobalt-chromium everolimus eluting stents or bare metal stent on fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valgimigli, Marco; Sabaté, Manel; Kaiser, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    eluting stents with bare metal stents were selected. The principal investigators whose trials met the inclusion criteria provided data for individual patients. PRIMARY OUTCOMES: The primary outcome was cardiac mortality. Secondary endpoints were myocardial infarction, definite stent thrombosis, definite...... a significant reduction of cardiac mortality (hazard ratio 0.67, 95% confidence interval 0.49 to 0.91; P=0.01), myocardial infarction (0.71, 0.55 to 0.92; P=0.01), definite stent thrombosis (0.41, 0.22 to 0.76; P=0.005), definite or probable stent thrombosis (0.48, 0.31 to 0.73; P... coronary syndrome v stable coronary artery disease), diabetes mellitus, female sex, use of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors, and up to one year v longer duration treatment with dual antiplatelets. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis offers evidence that compared with bare metal stents the use of cobalt...

  3. Stent thrombosis with drug-eluting and bare-metal stents: evidence from a comprehensive network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmerini, Tullio; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe; Della Riva, Diego; Stettler, Christoph; Sangiorgi, Diego; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Kimura, Takeshi; Briguori, Carlo; Sabatè, Manel; Kim, Hyo-Soo; De Waha, Antoinette; Kedhi, Elvin; Smits, Pieter C; Kaiser, Christoph; Sardella, Gennaro; Marullo, Antonino; Kirtane, Ajay J; Leon, Martin B; Stone, Gregg W

    2012-04-14

    The relative safety of drug-eluting stents and bare-metal stents, especially with respect to stent thrombosis, continues to be debated. In view of the overall low frequency of stent thrombosis, large sample sizes are needed to accurately estimate treatment differences between stents. We compared the risk of thrombosis between bare-metal and drug-eluting stents. For this network meta-analysis, randomised controlled trials comparing different drug-eluting stents or drug-eluting with bare-metal stents currently approved in the USA were identified through Medline, Embase, Cochrane databases, and proceedings of international meetings. Information about study design, inclusion and exclusion criteria, sample characteristics, and clinical outcomes was extracted. 49 trials including 50,844 patients randomly assigned to treatment groups were analysed. 1-year definite stent thrombosis was significantly lower with cobalt-chromium everolimus eluting stents (CoCr-EES) than with bare-metal stents (odds ratio [OR] 0·23, 95% CI 0·13-0·41). The significant difference in stent thrombosis between CoCr-EES and bare-metal stents was evident as early as 30 days (OR 0·21, 95% CI 0·11-0·42) and was also significant between 31 days and 1 year (OR 0·27, 95% CI 0·08-0·74). CoCr-EES were also associated with significantly lower rates of 1-year definite stent thrombosis compared with paclitaxel-eluting stents (OR 0·28, 95% CI 0·16-0·48), permanent polymer-based sirolimus-eluting stents (OR 0·41, 95% CI 0·24-0·70), phosphorylcholine-based zotarolimus-eluting stents (OR 0·21, 95% CI 0·10-0·44), and Resolute zotarolimus-eluting stents (OR 0·14, 95% CI 0·03-0·47). At 2-year follow-up, CoCr-EES were still associated with significantly lower rates of definite stent thrombosis than were bare-metal (OR 0·35, 95% CI 0·17-0·69) and paclitaxel-eluting stents (OR 0·34, 95% CI 0·19-0·62). No other drug-eluting stent had lower definite thrombosis rates compared with bare

  4. Effectiveness of a transdiagnostic internet-based protocol for the treatment of emotional disorders versus treatment as usual in specialized care: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Robles, Alberto; García-Palacios, Azucena; Baños, Rosa; Riera, Antonio; Llorca, Ginés; Traver, Francisco; Haro, Gonzalo; Palop, Vicente; Lera, Guillem; Romeu, José Enrique; Botella, Cristina

    2015-10-31

    Emotional disorders (depression and anxiety disorders) are highly prevalent mental health problems. Although evidence showing the effectiveness of disorder-specific treatments exists, high comorbidity rates among emotional disorders limit the utility of these protocols. This has led some researchers to focus their interest on transdiagnostic interventions, a treatment perspective that might be more widely effective across these disorders. Also, the current way of delivering treatments makes it difficult provide assistance to all of the population in need. The use of the Internet in the delivery of evidence-based treatments may help to disseminate treatments among the population. In this study, we aim to test the effectiveness of EmotionRegulation, a new transdiagnostic Internet-based protocol for unipolar mood disorders, five anxiety disorders (panic disorder, agoraphobia, social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder and anxiety disorder not otherwise specified), and obsessive-compulsive disorder in comparison to treatment as usual as provided in Spanish public specialized mental health care. We will also study its potential impact on basic temperament dimensions (neuroticism/behavioral inhibition and extraversion/behavioral activation). Expectations and opinions of patients about this protocol will also be studied. The study is a randomized controlled trial. 200 participants recruited in specialized care will be allocated to one of two treatment conditions: a) EmotionRegulation or b) treatment as usual. Primary outcome measures will be the BAI and the BDI-II. Secondary outcomes will include a specific measure of the principal disorder, and measures of neuroticism/behavioral inhibition and extraversion/behavioral activation. Patients will be assessed at baseline, post-treatment, and 3- and 12-month follow-ups. Intention to treat and per protocol analyses will be performed. Although the effectiveness of face-to-face transdiagnostic protocols has been

  5. Music therapy in Huntington's disease: a protocol for a multi-center randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bruggen-Rufi, Monique; Vink, Annemieke; Achterberg, Wilco; Roos, Raymund

    2016-07-26

    Huntington's disease is a progressive, neurodegenerative disease with autosomal dominant inheritance, characterized by motor disturbances, cognitive decline and behavioral and psychological symptoms. Since there is no cure, all treatment is aimed at improving quality of life. Music therapy is a non-pharmacological intervention, aiming to improve the quality of life, but its use and efficacy in patients with Huntington's disease has hardly been studied. In this article, a protocol is described to study the effects of music therapy in comparison with a control intervention to improve quality of life through stimulating expressive and communicative skills. By targeting these skills we assume that the social-cognitive functioning will improve, leading to a reduction in behavioral problems, resulting in an overall improvement of the quality of life in patients with Huntington's disease. The study is designed as a multi-center single-blind randomised controlled intervention trial. Sixty patients will be randomised using centre-stratified block-permuted randomisation. Patients will be recruited from four long-term care facilities specialized in Huntington's disease-care in The Netherlands. The outcome measure to assess changes in expressive and communication skills is the Behaviour Observation Scale Huntington and changes in behavior will be assessed by the Problem Behaviour Assesment-short version and by the BOSH. Measurements take place at baseline, then 8, 16 (end of intervention) and 12 weeks after the last intervention (follow-up). This randomized controlled study will provide greater insight into the effectiveness of music therapy on activities of daily living, social-cognitive functioning and behavior problems by improving expressive and communication skills, thus leading to a better quality of life for patients with Huntington's disease. Netherlands Trial Register: NTR4904 , registration date Nov. 15, 2014.

  6. Balance circuit classes to improve balance among rehabilitation inpatients: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treacy, Daniel; Schurr, Karl; Sherrington, Catherine

    2013-07-20

    -based physiotherapy at the study site as well as across other rehabilitation inpatient settings. The protocol for this study is registered with the Australian New Zealand, Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN=12611000412932.

  7. Shared decision making for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunneman, Marleen; Branda, Megan E; Noseworthy, Peter A; Linzer, Mark; Burnett, Bruce; Dick, Sara; Spencer-Bonilla, Gabriela; Fernandez, Cara A; Gorr, Haeshik; Wambua, Mike; Keune, Shelly; Zeballos-Palacios, Claudia; Hargraves, Ian; Shah, Nilay D; Montori, Victor M

    2017-09-29

    Nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common ongoing health problem that places patients at risk of stroke. Whether and how a patient addresses this risk depends on each patient's goals, context, and values. Consequently, leading cardiovascular societies recommend using shared decision making (SDM) to individualize antithrombotic treatment in patients with AF. The aim of this study is to assess the extent to which the ANTICOAGULATION CHOICE conversation tool promotes high-quality SDM and influences anticoagulation uptake and adherence in patients with AF at risk of strokes. This study protocol describes a multicenter, encounter-level, randomized trial to assess the effect of using the ANTICOAGULATION CHOICE conversation tool in the clinical encounter, compared to usual care. The participating centers include an academic hospital system, a suburban community group practice, and an urban safety net hospital, all in Minnesota, USA. Patients with ongoing nonvalvular AF at risk of strokes (CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc score ≥ 1 in men, or ≥ 2 in women) will be eligible for participation. We aim to include 999 patients and their clinicians. The primary outcome is the quality of SDM as perceived by participants, and as assessed by a post-encounter survey that ascertains (a) knowledge transfer, (b) concordance of the decision made, (c) quality of communication, and (d) satisfaction with the decision-making process. Recordings of encounters will be reviewed to assess the extent of patient involvement and how participants use the tool (fidelity). Anticoagulant use, choice of agent, and adherence will be drawn from patients' medical and pharmacy records. Strokes and bleeding events will be drawn from patient records. This study will provide a valid and precise measure of the effect of the ANTICOAGULATION CHOICE conversation tool on SDM quality and processes, and on the treatment choices and adherence to therapy among AF patients at risk of stroke. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT

  8. A trial of a job-specific workers' health surveillance program for construction workers: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sluiter Judith K

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dutch construction workers are offered periodic health examinations. This care can be improved by tailoring this workers health surveillance (WHS to the demands of the job and adjust the preventive actions to the specific health risks of a worker in a particular job. To improve the quality of the WHS for construction workers and stimulate relevant job-specific preventive actions by the occupational physician, we have developed a job-specific WHS. The job-specific WHS consists of modules assessing both physical and psychological requirements. The selected measurement instruments chosen, are based on their appropriateness to measure the workers' capacity and health requirements. They include a questionnaire and biometrical tests, and physical performance tests that measure physical functional capabilities. Furthermore, our job-specific WHS provides occupational physicians with a protocol to increase the worker-behavioural effectiveness of their counselling and to stimulate job-specific preventive actions. The objective of this paper is to describe and clarify our study to evaluate the behavioural effects of this job-specific WHS on workers and occupational physicians. Methods/Design The ongoing study of bricklayers and supervisors is a nonrandomised trial to compare the outcome of an intervention (job-specific WHS group (n = 206 with that of a control (WHS group (n = 206. The study includes a three-month follow-up. The primary outcome measure is the proportion of participants who have undertaken one or more of the preventive actions advised by their occupational physician in the three months after attending the WHS. A process evaluation will be carried out to determine context, reach, dose delivered, dose received, fidelity, and satisfaction. The present study is in accordance with the TREND Statement. Discussion This study will allow an evaluation of the behaviour of both the workers and occupational physician regarding the

  9. Increasing organ donation via anticipated regret (INORDAR: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Carroll Ronan E

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Throughout the world there is an insufficient supply of donor organs to meet the demand for organ transplantations. This paper presents a protocol for a randomised controlled trial, testing whether a simple, theory-based anticipated regret manipulation leads to a significant increase in posthumous organ donor registrations. Methods We will use a between-groups, prospective randomised controlled design. A random sample of 14,520 members of the adult Scottish general public will be contacted via post. These participants will be randomly allocated into 1 of the 4 conditions. The no questionnaire control (NQC group will simply receive a letter and donor registration form. The questionnaire control (QC arm will receive a questionnaire measuring their emotions and non-cognitive affective attitudes towards organ donation. The theory of planned behavior (TPB group will complete the emotions and affective attitudes questionnaire plus additional items assessing their cognitive attitudes towards organ donation, perceived control over registration and how they think significant others view this action. Finally, the anticipated regret (AR group will complete the same indices as the TPB group, plus two additional anticipated regret items. These items will assess the extent to which the participant anticipates regret for not registering as an organ donor in the near future. The outcome variable will be NHS Blood and Transplant verified registrations as an organ donor within 6 months of receiving our postal intervention. Discussion This study will assess whether simply asking people to reflect on the extent to which they may anticipate regret for not registering as an organ donor increases organ donor registration 6 months later. If successful, this simple and easy to administer theory-based intervention has the potential to save lives and money for the NHS by reducing the number of people receiving treatments such as dialysis. This

  10. Targeted full energy and protein delivery in critically ill patients: a study protocol for a pilot randomised control trial (FEED Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Fetterplace

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current guidelines for the provision of protein for critically ill patients are based on incomplete evidence, due to limited data from randomised controlled trials. The present pilot randomised controlled trial is part of a program of work to expand knowledge about the clinical effects of protein delivery to critically ill patients. The primary aim of this pilot study is to determine whether an enteral feeding protocol using a volume target, with additional protein supplementation, delivers a greater amount of protein and energy to mechanically ventilated critically ill patients than a standard nutrition protocol. The secondary aims are to evaluate the potential effects of this feeding strategy on muscle mass and other patient-centred outcomes. Methods This prospective, single-centred, pilot, randomised control trial will include 60 participants who are mechanically ventilated and can be enterally fed. Following informed consent, the participants receiving enteral nutrition in the intensive care unit (ICU will be allocated using a randomisation algorithm in a 1:1 ratio to the intervention (high-protein daily volume-based feeding protocol, providing 25 kcal/kg and 1.5 g/kg protein or standard care (hourly rate-based feeding protocol providing 25 kcal/kg and 1 g/kg protein. The co-primary outcomes are the average daily protein and energy delivered to the end of day 15 following randomisation. The secondary outcomes include change in quadriceps muscle layer thickness (QMLT from baseline (prior to randomisation to ICU discharge and other nutritional and patient-centred outcomes. Discussion This trial aims to examine whether a volume-based feeding protocol with supplemental protein increases protein and energy delivery. The potential effect of such increases on muscle mass loss will be explored. These outcomes will assist in formulating larger randomised control trials to assess mortality and morbidity. Trial registration

  11. Engaging Moms on Teen Indoor Tanning Through Social Media: Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagoto, Sherry L; Baker, Katie; Griffith, Julia; Oleski, Jessica L; Palumbo, Ashley; Walkosz, Barbara J; Hillhouse, Joel; Henry, Kimberly L; Buller, David B

    2016-11-29

    . This trial will deliver social media content grounded in theory and will test it in a randomized design with state-of-the-art measures. This will contribute much needed insights on how to employ social media for health behavior change and disease prevention both for indoor tanning and other health risk behaviors and inform future social media efforts by public health and health care organizations. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02835807; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02835807 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6mDMICcCE). ©Sherry L Pagoto, Katie Baker, Julia Griffith, Jessica L Oleski, Ashley Palumbo, Barbara J Walkosz, Joel Hillhouse, Kimberly L Henry, David B Buller. Originally published in JMIR Research Protocols (http://www.researchprotocols.org), 29.11.2016.

  12. Physical activity as a treatment for depression: the TREAD randomised trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Helen; Winder, Rachel; Chalder, Melanie; Wright, Christine; Sherlock, Sofie; Haase, Anne; Wiles, Nicola J; Montgomery, Alan A; Taylor, Adrian H; Fox, Ken R; Lawlor, Debbie A; Peters, Tim J; Sharp, Deborah J; Campbell, John; Lewis, Glyn

    2010-11-12

    Depression is one of the most common reasons for consulting a General Practitioner (GP) within the UK. Whilst antidepressants have been shown to be clinically effective, many patients and healthcare professionals would like to access other forms of treatment as an alternative or adjunct to drug therapy for depression. A recent systematic review presented some evidence that physical activity could offer one such option, although further investigation is needed to test its effectiveness within the context of the National Health Service.The aim of this paper is to describe the protocol for a randomised, controlled trial (RCT) designed to evaluate an intervention developed to increase physical activity as a treatment for depression within primary care. The TREAD study is a pragmatic, multi-centre, two-arm RCT which targets patients presenting with a new episode of depression. Patients were approached if they were aged 18-69, had recently consulted their GP for depression and, where appropriate, had been taking antidepressants for less than one month. Only those patients with a confirmed diagnosis of a depressive episode as assessed by the Clinical Interview Schedule-Revised (CIS-R), a Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) score of at least 14 and informed written consent were included in the study. Eligible patients were individually randomised to one of two treatment groups; usual GP care or usual GP care plus facilitated physical activity. The primary outcome of the trial is clinical symptoms of depression assessed using the BDI four months after randomisation. A number of secondary outcomes are also measured at the 4-, 8- and 12-month follow-up points including quality of life, attitude to and involvement in physical activity and antidepressant use/adherence. Outcomes will be analysed on an intention-to-treat (ITT) basis and will use linear and logistic regression models to compare treatments. The results of the trial will provide information about the effectiveness of

  13. Person-centered care planning and service engagement: a study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanhope, Victoria; Tondora, Janis; Davidson, Larry; Choy-Brown, Mimi; Marcus, Steven C

    2015-04-22

    interpretation of outcomes. The aim of this study is to generate valuable guidance for state systems engaged in scale-up and transformation efforts. Targeted staff selection for training to support sustainability will serve to provide further insight into important intervention implementation strategies. Person-centered care planning has the potential to enhance the impact of all evidence-based and recovery-oriented practices and bring practice into line with the emerging national guidelines in health care reform. This trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (Identifier: NCT02299492) on 21 November 2014 as New York University Protocol Record PCCP-13-9762, Person-Centered Care Planning and Service Engagement.

  14. Promoting psychosocial well-being following stroke: study protocol for a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkevold, Marit; Kildal Bragstad, Line; Bronken, Berit A; Kvigne, Kari; Martinsen, Randi; Gabrielsen Hjelle, Ellen; Kitzmüller, Gabriele; Mangset, Margrete; Angel, Sanne; Aadal, Lena; Eriksen, Siren; Wyller, Torgeir B; Sveen, Unni

    2018-04-03

    Stroke is a major public health threat globally. Psychosocial well-being may be affected following stroke. Depressive symptoms, anxiety, general psychological distress and social isolation are prevalent. Approximately one third report depressive symptoms and 20% report anxiety during the first months or years after the stroke. Psychosocial difficulties may impact significantly on long-term functioning and quality of life, reduce the effects of rehabilitation services and lead to higher mortality rates. The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of a previously developed and feasibility tested dialogue-based psychosocial intervention aimed at promoting psychosocial well-being and coping following stroke among stroke survivors with and without aphasia. The study will be conducted as a multicenter, randomized, single blind controlled trial with one intervention and one control arm. It will include a total of 330 stroke survivors randomly allocated into either an intervention group (dialogue-based intervention to promote psychosocial well-being) or a control group (usual care). Participants in the intervention group will receive eight individual sessions of supported dialogues in their homes during the first six months following an acute stroke. The primary outcome measure will be psychosocial well-being measured by the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ). Secondary outcome measures will be quality of life (SAQoL), sense of coherence (SOC), and depression (Yale). Process evaluation will be conducted in a longitudinal mixed methods study by individual qualitative interviews with 15-20 participants in the intervention and control groups, focus group interviews with the intervention personnel and data collectors, and a comprehensive analysis of implementation fidelity. The intervention described in this study protocol is based on thorough development and feasibility work, guided by the UK medical research council framework for developing and testing complex

  15. The FiCTION dental trial protocol - filling children's teeth: indicated or not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes, Nicola P T; Clarkson, Jan E; Speed, Chris; Douglas, Gail V A; Maguire, Anne

    2013-06-01

    permanent teeth, patient quality of life, cost-effectiveness, acceptability of treatment strategies to patients and parents and their experiences, and dentists’ preferences. FiCTION will provide evidence for the most clinically-effective and cost-effective approach to managing caries in children's primary teeth in Primary Care. This will support general dental practitioners in treatment decision making for child patients to minimize pain and infection in primary teeth. The trial is currently recruiting patients. Protocol ID: NCTU: ISRCTN77044005.

  16. Psychosocial therapy for Parkinson's-related dementia: study protocol for the INVEST randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Sheree A; McDonald, Kathryn R; Vatter, Sabina; Orgeta, Vasiliki; Poliakoff, Ellen; Smith, Sarah; Silverdale, Monty A; Fu, Bo; Leroi, Iracema

    2017-06-19

    Parkinson's disease (PD) with mild cognitive impairment (MCI-PD) or dementia (PDD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are characterised by motor and 'non-motor' symptoms which impact on quality of life. Treatment options are generally limited to pharmacological approaches. We developed a psychosocial intervention to improve cognition, quality of life and companion burden for people with MCI-PD, PDD or DLB. Here, we describe the protocol for a single-blind randomised controlled trial to assess feasibility, acceptability and tolerability of the intervention and to evaluate treatment implementation. The interaction among the intervention and selected outcome measures and the efficacy of this intervention in improving cognition for people with MCI-PD, PDD or DLB will also be explored. Dyads will be randomised into two treatment arms to receive either 'treatment as usual' (TAU) or cognitive stimulation therapy specifically adapted for Parkinson's-related dementias (CST-PD), involving 30 min sessions delivered at home by the study companion three times per week over 10 weeks. A mixed-methods approach will be used to collect data on the operational aspects of the trial and treatment implementation. This will involve diary keeping, telephone follow-ups, dyad checklists and researcher ratings. Analysis will include descriptive statistics summarising recruitment, acceptability and tolerance of the intervention, and treatment implementation. To pilot an outcome measure of efficacy, we will undertake an inferential analysis to test our hypothesis that compared with TAU, CST-PD improves cognition. Qualitative approaches using thematic analysis will also be applied. Our findings will inform a larger definitive trial. Ethical opinion was granted (REC reference: 15/YH/0531). Findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals and at conferences. We will prepare reports for dissemination by organisations involved with PD and dementia. ISRCTN (ISRCTN11455062). © Article author

  17. Bailout use of platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa inhibition during coronary stent implantation: observations from the ESPRIT trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantor, Warren J; Madan, Mina; O'Shea, J Conor; Chisholm, Robert J; Lui, Henry K; Cohen, David J; Feldman, Robert L; Green, Robert; Hellkamp, Anne S; Kitt, Michael M; Tcheng, James E

    2005-07-01

    Glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa inhibitors are often used as a rescue or bailout therapy to manage complications arising during percutaneous coronary intervention, rather than as prophylactic treatment. We sought to identify the characteristics and outcomes of patients requiring bailout treatment. The ESPRIT trial randomized 2,064 patients to receive eptifibatide or placebo starting immediately before percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Bailout therapy was used in 77 patients: 43 (4.2%) randomized to placebo and 34 (3.3%) to eptifibatide (p = 0.3). Bailout therapy for thrombosis was used more often in the placebo group (2.1% versus 1.0%; p = 0.03). Multivariable predictors of bailout included a greater than or equal to 90% stenosis, or visible thrombus on the baseline angiogram, and no aspirin pre-treatment before PCI. However, overall the model predicted bailout poorly (c-index = 0.64). The need for bailout cannot be reliably predicted using baseline characteristics. Patients experiencing complications have poor clinical outcomes despite bailout use of GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors.

  18. Neointimal Hyperplasia after Silverhawk Atherectomy versus Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty (PTA) in Femoropopliteal Stent Reobstructions: A Controlled, Randomized Pilot Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodmann, Marianne; Rief, Peter; Froehlich, Harald; Dorr, Andreas; Gary, Thomas; Eller, Philipp; Hafner, Franz; Deutschmann, Hannes; Seinost, Gerald; Pilger, Ernst

    2013-01-01

    Due to intimal hyperplasia instent reobstruction in the femoropopliteal arterial segment is still an unsolved problem. Different techniques have been discussed in case of reintervention to guarantee longlasting patency rate. We conducted a randomized, controlled, pilot trial comparing Silverhawk atherectomy with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) in patients with a first instent reobstruction in the femoropopliteal arterial segment, to evaluate intima media thickness (IMT) within the treated segment, as a parameter of recurrence of intimal hyperplasia. In a total 19 patients were included: 9 patients in the atherectomy device and 10 patients in the PTA arm. IMT within the treated segment was statistically significantly elevated in all patients treated with the Silverhawk device versus the patients treated with PTA. The obvious differentiation in elevation of IMT in nonfavor for patients treated with the Silverhawk device started at month 2 (max IMT SH 0.178 mm vs. IMT PTA 0.1 mm, p = 0.001) with a spike at month 5 (max IMT SH 0.206 mm vs. IMT PTA 0.145 mm, p = 0.003) and a decline once again at month 6 (max IMT SH 0.177 mm vs. IMT PTA 0.121 mm, p = 0.02). The values for mean IMT performed the same way. Although Silverhawk atherectomy provides good results at first sight, in the midterm follow-up of treatment of first instent restenosis it did not perform better than PTA as it showed elevated reoccurrence of intimal media hyperplasia.

  19. Neointimal Hyperplasia after Silverhawk Atherectomy versus Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty (PTA) in Femoropopliteal Stent Reobstructions: A Controlled, Randomized Pilot Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodmann, Marianne, E-mail: marianne.brodmann@medunigraz.at; Rief, Peter; Froehlich, Harald; Dorr, Andreas; Gary, Thomas; Eller, Philipp; Hafner, Franz [Medical University of Graz, Division of Angiology (Austria); Deutschmann, Hannes [Medical University Graz, Division of Interventional Radiology (Austria); Seinost, Gerald; Pilger, Ernst [Medical University of Graz, Division of Angiology (Austria)

    2013-02-15

    Due to intimal hyperplasia instent reobstruction in the femoropopliteal arterial segment is still an unsolved problem. Different techniques have been discussed in case of reintervention to guarantee longlasting patency rate. We conducted a randomized, controlled, pilot trial comparing Silverhawk atherectomy with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) in patients with a first instent reobstruction in the femoropopliteal arterial segment, to evaluate intima media thickness (IMT) within the treated segment, as a parameter of recurrence of intimal hyperplasia. In a total 19 patients were included: 9 patients in the atherectomy device and 10 patients in the PTA arm. IMT within the treated segment was statistically significantly elevated in all patients treated with the Silverhawk device versus the patients treated with PTA. The obvious differentiation in elevation of IMT in nonfavor for patients treated with the Silverhawk device started at month 2 (max IMT SH 0.178 mm vs. IMT PTA 0.1 mm, p = 0.001) with a spike at month 5 (max IMT SH 0.206 mm vs. IMT PTA 0.145 mm, p = 0.003) and a decline once again at month 6 (max IMT SH 0.177 mm vs. IMT PTA 0.121 mm, p = 0.02). The values for mean IMT performed the same way. Although Silverhawk atherectomy provides good results at first sight, in the midterm follow-up of treatment of first instent restenosis it did not perform better than PTA as it showed elevated reoccurrence of intimal media hyperplasia.

  20. Acute Stent Thrombosis After Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Peter; Wiberg, Sebastian; Van't Hof, Arnoud

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study sought to determine clinical, procedural, and treatment factors associated with acute stent thrombosis (AST) in the EUROMAX (European Ambulance Acute Coronary Syndrome Angiography) trial. BACKGROUND: Bivalirudin started during transport for primary percutaneous coronary...

  1. Covered duodenal self-expandable metal stents prolong biliary stent patency in double stenting: The largest series of bilioduodenal obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Yasuki; Naitoh, Itaru; Hayashi, Kazuki; Kondo, Hiromu; Yoshida, Michihiro; Shimizu, Shuya; Hirano, Atsuyuki; Okumura, Fumihiro; Ando, Tomoaki; Jinno, Naruomi; Takada, Hiroki; Togawa, Shozo; Joh, Takashi

    2018-03-01

    Endoscopic biliary and duodenal stenting (DS; double stenting) is widely accepted as a palliation therapy for malignant bilioduodenal obstruction. The aim of the current study was to investigate the patency and adverse events of duodenal and biliary stents in patients with DS. Patients who underwent DS from April 2004 to March 2017 were analyzed retrospectively with regard to clinical outcomes and predictive factors of recurrent biliary and duodenal obstruction (recurrent biliary obstruction [RBO] and recurrent duodenal obstruction [RDO]). A total of 109 consecutive patients was enrolled. Technical success of DS was achieved in 108 patients (99.1%). Symptoms due to biliary and duodenal obstruction were improved in 89 patients (81.7%). RBO occurred in 25 patients (22.9%) and RDO in 13 (11.9%). The median times to RBO and RDO from DS were 87 and 76 days, respectively. Placement of a duodenal uncovered self-expandable metal stent (U-SEMS) was significantly associated with RBO in the multivariable analysis (P = 0.007). Time to RBO was significantly longer in the duodenal covered self-expandable metal stent group than in the U-SEMS group (P = 0.003). No predictive factors of RDO were detected, and duodenal stent type was not associated with the time to RDO (P = 0.724). Double stenting was safe and effective for malignant bilioduodenal obstruction. Duodenal U-SEMS is a risk factor for RBO. The covered self-expandable metal stent is the preferred type of duodenal SEMS in patients with DS (Clinical trial registration number: UMIN000027606). © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Assessment of Adverse Events in Protocols, Clinical Study Reports, and Published Papers of Trials of Orlistat: A Document Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeppe Bennekou Schroll

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about how adverse events are summarised and reported in trials, as detailed information is usually considered confidential. We have acquired clinical study reports (CSRs from the European Medicines Agency through the Freedom of Information Act. The CSRs describe the results of studies conducted as part of the application for marketing authorisation for the slimming pill orlistat. The purpose of this study was to study how adverse events were summarised and reported in study protocols, CSRs, and published papers of orlistat trials.We received the CSRs from seven randomised placebo controlled orlistat trials (4,225 participants submitted by Roche. The CSRs consisted of 8,716 pages and included protocols. Two researchers independently extracted data on adverse events from protocols and CSRs. Corresponding published papers were identified on PubMed and adverse event data were extracted from this source as well. All three sources were compared. Individual adverse events from one trial were summed and compared to the totals in the summary report. None of the protocols or CSRs contained instructions for investigators on how to question participants about adverse events. In CSRs, gastrointestinal adverse events were only coded if the participant reported that they were "bothersome," a condition that was not specified in the protocol for two of the trials. Serious adverse events were assessed for relationship to the drug by the sponsor, and all adverse events were coded by the sponsor using a glossary that could be updated by the sponsor. The criteria for withdrawal due to adverse events were in one case related to efficacy (high fasting glucose led to withdrawal, which meant that one trial had more withdrawals due to adverse events in the placebo group. Finally, only between 3% and 33% of the total number of investigator-reported adverse events from the trials were reported in the publications because of post hoc filters, though six of

  3. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Trial Protocol Each clinical trial has a master plan called a protocol (PRO-to-kol). This plan explains how the trial will work. The trial ... clinical trial; and detailed information about the treatment plan. Eligibility Criteria A clinical trial's protocol describes what ...

  4. UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network’s STOP GAP trial (a multicentre trial of prednisolone versus ciclosporin for pyoderma gangrenosum: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Fiona F

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG is a rare inflammatory skin disorder characterised by painful and rapidly progressing skin ulceration. PG can be extremely difficult to treat and patients often require systemic immunosuppression. Recurrent lesions of PG are common, but the relative rarity of this condition means that there is a lack of published evidence regarding its treatment. A systematic review published in 2005 found no randomised controlled trials (RCTs relating to the treatment of PG. Since this time, one small RCT has been published comparing infliximab to placebo, but none of the commonly used systemic treatments for PG have been formally assessed. The UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network’s STOP GAP Trial has been designed to address this lack of trial evidence. Methods The objective is to assess whether oral ciclosporin is more effective than oral prednisolone for the treatment of PG. The trial design is a two-arm, observer-blind, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial comparing ciclosporin (4 mg/kg/day to prednisolone (0.75 mg/kg/day. A total of 140 participants are to be recruited over a period of 4 years, from up to 50 hospitals in the UK and Eire. Primary outcome of velocity of healing at 6 weeks is assessed blinded to treatment allocation (using digital images of the ulcers. Secondary outcomes include: (i time to healing; (ii global assessment of improvement; (iii PG inflammation assessment scale score; (iv self-reported pain; (v health-related quality of life; (vi time to recurrence; (vii treatment failures; (viii adverse reactions to study medications; and (ix cost effectiveness/utility. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of PG (excluding granulomatous PG; measurable ulceration (that is, not pustular PG; and patients aged over 18 years old who are able to give informed consent are included in the trial. Randomisation is by computer generated code using permuted blocks of randomly varying size

  5. Neointimal hyperplasia after silverhawk atherectomy versus percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) in femoropopliteal stent reobstructions: a controlled, randomized pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodmann, Marianne; Rief, Peter; Froehlich, Harald; Dorr, Andreas; Gary, Thomas; Eller, Philipp; Hafner, Franz; Deutschmann, Hannes; Seinost, Gerald; Pilger, Ernst

    2013-02-01

    Due to intimal hyperplasia instent reobstruction in the femoropopliteal arterial segment is still an unsolved problem. Different techniques have been discussed in case of reintervention to guarantee longlasting patency rate. We conducted a randomized, controlled, pilot trial comparing Silverhawk atherectomy with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) in patients with a first instent reobstruction in the femoropopliteal arterial segment, to evaluate intima media thickness (IMT) within the treated segment, as a parameter of recurrence of intimal hyperplasia. In a total 19 patients were included: 9 patients in the atherectomy device and 10 patients in the PTA arm. IMT within the treated segment was statistically significantly elevated in all patients treated with the Silverhawk device versus the patients treated with PTA. The obvious differentiation in elevation of IMT in nonfavor for patients treated with the Silverhawk device started at month 2 (max IMT SH 0.178 mm vs. IMT PTA 0.1 mm, p = 0.001) with a spike at month 5 (max IMT SH 0.206 mm vs. IMT PTA 0.145 mm, p = 0.003) and a decline once again at month 6 (max IMT SH 0.177 mm vs. IMT PTA 0.121 mm, p = 0.02). The values for mean IMT performed the same way. Although Silverhawk atherectomy provides good results at first sight, in the midterm follow-up of treatment of first instent restenosis it did not perform better than PTA as it showed elevated reoccurrence of intimal media hyperplasia.

  6. Biodegradable stents for the treatment of refractory or recurrent benign esophageal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaz-Iglesia, Iñaki; García-Pérez, Sonia; Nachtnebel, Anna; Martín-Águeda, Belén; Sánchez-Piedra, Carlos; Karadayi, Bilgehan; Demirbaş, Ali Rıza

    2016-06-01

    Esophageal stents are used for the treatment of refractory and recurrent dyphagias. In 2007, esophageal biodegradable stents (EBS) were authorised as an alternative to existing metal and plastic stents in Europe. The advantages claimed for EBS are fewer complications concerning tissue ingrowth, stent migration and stent removal. We performed a systematic review to evaluate the efficacy and safety of EBS compared to fully-covered self-expanding metal stents, self-expanding plastic stents, and esophageal dilation for the treatment of refractory or recurrent benign esophageal stenosis. Three comparative studies (one randomized controlled trial and two cohort studies) were assessed. The studies used different inclusion criteria, had a very small (sample) size and the quality of the evidence was very low. Expert commentary: The current evidence is insufficient to determine the relative efficacy or safety of esophageal biodegradable stents. The results of this systematic review should be updated once new evidence is available.

  7. UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network's STOP GAP trial (a multicentre trial of prednisolone versus ciclosporin for pyoderma gangrenosum): protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Fiona F; Thomas, Kim S; Mitchell, Eleanor J; Williams, Hywel C; Norrie, John; Mason, James M; Ormerod, Anthony D

    2012-04-28

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a rare inflammatory skin disorder characterised by painful and rapidly progressing skin ulceration. PG can be extremely difficult to treat and patients often require systemic immunosuppression. Recurrent lesions of PG are common, but the relative rarity of this condition means that there is a lack of published evidence regarding its treatment. A systematic review published in 2005 found no randomised controlled trials (RCTs) relating to the treatment of PG. Since this time, one small RCT has been published comparing infliximab to placebo, but none of the commonly used systemic treatments for PG have been formally assessed. The UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network's STOP GAP Trial has been designed to address this lack of trial evidence. The objective is to assess whether oral ciclosporin is more effective than oral prednisolone for the treatment of PG. The trial design is a two-arm, observer-blind, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial comparing ciclosporin (4 mg/kg/day) to prednisolone (0.75 mg/kg/day). A total of 140 participants are to be recruited over a period of 4 years, from up to 50 hospitals in the UK and Eire. Primary outcome of velocity of healing at 6 weeks is assessed blinded to treatment allocation (using digital images of the ulcers). Secondary outcomes include: (i) time to healing; (ii) global assessment of improvement; (iii) PG inflammation assessment scale score; (iv) self-reported pain; (v) health-related quality of life; (vi) time to recurrence; (vii) treatment failures; (viii) adverse reactions to study medications; and (ix) cost effectiveness/utility. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of PG (excluding granulomatous PG); measurable ulceration (that is, not pustular PG); and patients aged over 18 years old who are able to give informed consent are included in the trial. Randomisation is by computer generated code using permuted blocks of randomly varying size, stratified by lesion size, and

  8. Post-Exercise Protein Trial: Interactions between Diet and Exercise (PEPTIDE): study protocol for randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghannam, Abdullah F; Tsintzas, Kostas; Thompson, Dylan; Bilzon, James; Betts, James A

    2014-11-24

    Performing regular exercise is known to manifest a number of health benefits that mainly relate to cardiovascular and muscular adaptations to allow for greater oxygen extraction and utilization. There is increasing evidence that nutrient intake can affect the adaptive response to a single exercise bout, and that protein feeding is important to facilitate this process. Thus, the exercise-nutrient interaction may potentially lead to a greater response to training. The role of post-exercise protein ingestion in enhancing the effects of running-based endurance exercise training relative to energy-matched carbohydrate intervention remains to be established. Additionally, the influence of immediate versus overnight protein ingestion in mediating these training effects is currently unknown. The current protocol aims to establish whether post-exercise nutrient intake and timing would influence the magnitude of improvements during a prescribed endurance training program. The project involves two phases with each involving two treatment arms applied in a randomized investigator-participant double-blind parallel group design. For each treatment, participants will be required to undergo six weeks of running-based endurance training. Immediately post-exercise, participants will be prescribed solutions providing 0.4 grams per kilogram of body mass (g · kg(-1)) of whey protein hydrolysate plus 0.4 g · kg(-1) sucrose, relative to an isocaloric sucrose control (0.8 g · kg(-1); Phase I). In Phase II, identical protein supplements will be provided (0.4 + 0.4 g · kg(-1) · h(-1) of whey protein hydrolysate and sucrose, respectively), with the timing of ingestion manipulated to compare immediate versus overnight recovery feedings. Anthropometric, expired gas, venous blood and muscle biopsy samples will be obtained at baseline and following the six-week training period. By investigating the role of nutrition in enhancing the effects of endurance exercise training, we will provide

  9. Wing-shaped plastic stents vs. self-expandable metal stents for palliative drainage of malignant distal biliary obstruction: a randomized multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Arthur; Riecken, Bettina; Rische, Susanne; Klinger, Christoph; Jakobs, Ralf; Bechtler, Matthias; Kähler, Georg; Dormann, Arno; Caca, Karel

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies have shown superior patency rates for self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) compared with plastic stents in patients with malignant biliary obstruction. The aim of this study was to compare stent patency, patient survival, and complication rates between a newly designed, wing-shaped, plastic stent and SEMSs in patients with unresectable, malignant, distal, biliary obstruction. A randomized, multicenter trial was conducted at four tertiary care centers in Germany. A total of 37 patients underwent randomization between March 2010 and January 2013. Patients underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiography with insertion of either a wing-shaped, plastic stent without lumen or an SEMS.  Stent failure occurred in 10/16 patients (62.5 %) in the winged-stent group vs. 4/18 patients (22.2 %) in the SEMS group (P = 0.034). The median time to stent failure was 51 days (range 2 - 92 days) for the winged stent and 80 days (range 28 - 266 days) for the SEMS (P = 0.002). Early stent failure (stent failure was significantly higher in the winged-stent group compared with the SEMS group. A high incidence of early stent failure within 8 weeks was observed in the winged-stent group. Thus, the winged, plastic stent without central lumen may not be appropriate for mid or long term drainage of malignant biliary obstruction. Study registration ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01063634). © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Intensive group training protocol versus guideline physiotherapy for patients with chronic low back pain: a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    van der Roer, Nicole; van Tulder, Maurits; Barendse, Johanna; Knol, Dirk; van Mechelen, Willem; de Vet, Henrica

    2008-01-01

    Intensive group training using principles of graded activity has been proven to be effective in occupational care for workers with chronic low back pain. Objective of the study was to compare the effects of an intensive group training protocol aimed at returning to normal daily activities and guideline physiotherapy for primary care patients with non-specific chronic low back pain. The study was designed as pragmatic randomised controlled trial with a setup of 105 primary care physiotherapist...

  11. Behavioral counseling to prevent childhood obesity – study protocol of a pragmatic trial in maternity and child health care

    OpenAIRE

    Mustila, Taina; Keskinen, Päivi; Luoto, Riitta

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Prevention is considered effective in combating the obesity epidemic. Prenatal environment may increase offspring's risk for obesity. A child starts to adopt food preferences and other behavioral habits affecting weight gain during preschool years. We report the study protocol of a pragmatic lifestyle intervention aiming at primary prevention of childhood obesity. Methods/Design A non-randomized controlled pragmatic trial in maternity and child health care clinics. The con...

  12. Supportive Mental Health Self-Monitoring among Smartphone Users with Psychological Distress: Protocol for a Fully Mobile Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Till Beiwinkel; Stefan Hey; Olaf Bock; Wulf Rössler; Wulf Rössler; Wulf Rössler

    2017-01-01

    Mobile health (mHealth) could be widely used in the population to improve access to psychological treatment. In this paper, we describe the development of a mHealth intervention on the basis of supportive self-monitoring and describe the protocol for a randomized controlled trial to evaluate its effectiveness among smartphone users with psychological distress. Based on power analysis, a representative quota sample of N = 186 smartphone users will be recruited, with an over-sampling of persons...

  13. Efficacy of Mobile Serious Games in Increasing HIV Risk Perception in Swaziland: A Randomized Control Trial (SGprev Trial) Research Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukhele, Bhekumusa Wellington; Musumari, Patou; El-Saaidi, Christina; Techasrivichien, Teeranee; Suguimoto, S Pilar; Ono Kihara, Masako; Kihara, Masahiro

    2016-11-22

    -list control group at 4-weeks post-intervention. We will use standardized regression coefficients to calculate the effect of the intervention on our primary outcome with P values. We will conduct both intention to treat and as treated analysis. This study is funded by Hayao Nakayama Foundation for Science & Technology and Culture; Grant number H26-A2-41. The research and development approval has been obtained from Kyoto University Graduate School and Faculty of Medicine Ethics Committee, Japan, and Swaziland's Ministry of Health Ethics and Scientific committee. Results are expected in February 2017. This study will provide evidence on the efficiency of a mobile phone interactive game in increasing HIV risk perception in Swaziland. Our findings may also be generalizable to similar settings in SSA. University Hospital Medical Information Network Clinical Trial Registry ID number (UMIN-CTR):UMIN000021781; URL:https://upload.umin.ac.jp/cgi-open-bin/ctr_e/ctr_view.cgi?recptno=R000025103 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6hOphB11a). ©Bhekumusa Wellington Lukhele, Patou Musumari, Christina El-Saaidi, Teeranee Techasrivichien, S. Pilar Suguimoto, Masako Ono Kihara, Masahiro Kihara. Originally published in JMIR Research Protocols (http://www.researchprotocols.org), 22.11.2016.

  14. Intravascular imaging comparison of two metallic limus-eluting stents abluminally coated with biodegradable polymers: IVUS and OCT results of the DESTINY trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, J Ribamar; Chamié, Daniel; Abizaid, Alexandre A C; Ribeiro, Expedito; Meireles, George C; Prudente, Maurício; Campos, Carlos A; Castro, Juliana P; Costa, Ricardo; Lemos, Pedro A

    2017-02-01

    We sought to compare, by means of IVUS and OCT imaging, the performance of a novel sirolimus-eluting drug-eluting stent (DES) with biodegradable polymer (Inspiron™) to the Biomatrix™ DES. From the DESTINY trial, a total of 70 randomized patients (2:1) were enrolled in the IVUS substudy (Inspiron™, n = 46; Biomatrix™: n = 20) while 25 patients were evaluated with OCT (Inspiron™, n = 19; Biomatrix™: n = 06) at 9-month follow-up. The main endpoints were % of neointimal tissue obstruction (IVUS) and neointimal stut coverage (OCT) at 9 months. Patients treated with both DES had very little NIH formation at 9 months either by IVUS (% of NIH obstruction of 4.9 ± 4.1 % with Inspiron™ vs. 2.7 ± 2.9 % with Biomatrix™, p = 0.03) or by OCT (neointimal thickness of 144.2 ± 72.5 µm Inspiron™ vs. 115.0 ± 53.9 µm with Biomatrix™, p = 0.45). Regarding OCT strut-level assessment, again both devices showed excellent 9-month performance, with high rates of strut coverage (99.49 ± 1.01 % with Inspiron™ vs. 97.62 ± 2.21 % with Biomatrix™, p < 0.001) and very rare malapposition (0.29 ± 1.06 % with Inspiron™ vs. 0.53 ± 0.82 % with Biomatrix™, p = 0.44). Patients with any uncovered struts were more frequently identified in the Biomatrix™ group (9.78 ± 7.13 vs. 2.29 ± 3.91 %, p < 0.001). In the present study, midterm IVUS and OCT evaluations showed that both new generation DES with biodegradable polymer were effective in terms of suppressing excessive neointimal response, with very high rates of apposed and covered struts, suggesting a consistent and benign healing pattern.

  15. Circumferential Stent Fracture: Novel Detection and Treatment with the Use of StentBoost

    OpenAIRE

    Ramegowda, Raghu T.; Chikkaswamy, Srinivas B.; Bharatha, Ashalatha; Radhakrishna, Jayashree; Krishnanaik, Geetha B.; Nanjappa, Manjunath C.; Panneerselvam, Arunkumar

    2012-01-01

    Circumferential stent fracture is extremely uncommon, and in rare cases, it can cause stent thrombosis. Recognizing stent fracture can be difficult on conventional fluoroscopy because of poor stent radiopacity. We found that StentBoost image acquisition yields improved visibility of stent struts, enabling the identification of stent fracture and the precise positioning of new stents over previously stented segments.

  16. Effect of Covered Metallic Stents Compared With Plastic Stents on Benign Biliary Stricture Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coté, Gregory A.; Slivka, Adam; Tarnasky, Paul; Mullady, Daniel K.; Elmunzer, B. Joseph; Elta, Grace; Fogel, Evan; Lehman, Glen; McHenry, Lee; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Menon, Shyam; Siddiqui, Uzma D.; Watkins, James; Lynch, Sheryl; Denski, Cheryl; Xu, Huiping; Sherman, Stuart

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Endoscopic placement of multiple plastic stents in parallel is the first-line treatment for most benign biliary strictures; it is possible that fully covered, self-expandable metallic stents (cSEMS) may require fewer endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedures (ERCPs) to achieve resolution. OBJECTIVE To assess whether use of cSEMS is noninferior to plastic stents with respect to stricture resolution. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Multicenter (8 endoscopic referral centers), open-label, parallel, randomized clinical trial involving patients with treatment-naive, benign biliary strictures (N = 112) due to orthotopic liver transplant (n = 73), chronic pancreatitis (n = 35), or postoperative injury (n = 4), who were enrolled between April 2011 and September 2014 (with follow-up ending October 2015). Patients with a bile duct diameter less than 6 mm and those with an intact gallbladder in whom the cystic duct would be overlapped by a cSEMS were excluded. INTERVENTIONS Patients (N = 112) were randomized to receive multiple plastic stents or a single cSEMS, stratified by stricture etiology and with endoscopic reassessment for resolution every 3 months (plastic stents) or every 6 months (cSEMS). Patients were followed up for 12 months after stricture resolution to assess for recurrence. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Primary outcome was stricture resolution after no more than 12 months of endoscopic therapy. The sample size was estimated based on the noninferiority of cSEMS to plastic stents, with a noninferiority margin of −15%. RESULTS There were 55 patients in the plastic stent group (mean [SD] age, 57 [11] years; 17 women [31%]) and 57 patients in the cSEMS group (mean [SD] age, 55 [10] years; 19 women [33%]). Compared with plastic stents (41/48, 85.4%), the cSEMS resolution rate was 50 of 54 patients (92.6%), with a rate difference of 7.2% (1-sided 95% CI, −3.0% to ∞; P stents was rejected. The mean number of ERCPs to achieve resolution

  17. Plastic or metal stents for benign extrahepatic biliary strictures: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vleggaar Frank P

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Benign biliary strictures may be a consequence of surgical procedures, chronic pancreatitis or iatrogenic injuries to the ampulla. Stents are increasingly being used for this indication, however it is not completely clear which stent type should be preferred. Methods A systematic review on stent placement for benign extrahepatic biliary strictures was performed after searching PubMed and EMBASE databases. Data were pooled and evaluated for technical success, clinical success and complications. Results In total, 47 studies (1116 patients on outcome of stent placement were identified. No randomized controlled trials (RCTs, one non-randomized comparative studies and 46 case series were found. Technical success was 98,9% for uncovered self-expandable metal stents (uSEMS, 94,8% for single plastic stents and 94,0% for multiple plastic stents. Overall clinical success rate was highest for placement of multiple plastic stents (94,3% followed by uSEMS (79,5% and single plastic stents (59.6%. Complications occurred more frequently with uSEMS (39.5% compared with single plastic stents (36.0% and multiple plastic stents (20,3%. Conclusion Based on clinical success and risk of complications, placement of multiple plastic stents is currently the best choice. The evolving role of cSEMS placement as a more patient friendly and cost effective treatment for benign biliary strictures needs further elucidation. There is a need for RCTs comparing different stent types for this indication.

  18. Improving pain treatment with a smartphone app: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suso-Ribera, Carlos; Mesas, Ángela; Medel, Javier; Server, Anna; Márquez, Esther; Castilla, Diana; Zaragozá, Irene; García-Palacios, Azucena

    2018-02-27

    Chronic pain has become a major health problem across the world, especially in older adults. Unfortunately, the effectiveness of medical interventions is modest. Some have argued that assessment strategies should be improved if the impact of medical interventions is to be improved. Ecological momentary assessment using smartphones is now considered the gold standard in monitoring in health settings, including chronic pain. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no randomized controlled trial to show that telemonitoring using a smartphone app can indeed improve the effectiveness of medical treatments in adults with chronic pain. The goal of this study will be to explore the effects of using a smartphone app for telemonitoring adults with chronic pain. The study will be a randomized controlled trial with three groups: treatment as usual (TAU), TAU+app, and TAU+app+alarms. All groups will receive the adequate treatment for their pain, which will be prescribed the first day of study according to clinical guidelines. Assessment in the TAU group will be the usual at the Pain Clinic, that is, a paper-and-pencil evaluation at the onset of treatment (beginning of study) and at follow up (end of study, 30 days later). The other two groups (TAU+app and TAU+app+alarms) will be assessed daily using Pain Monitor, a smartphone app developed by our multidisciplinary team. Telemonitoring will only be made in the TAU+app+alarms group. For this group, physicians at the Pain Clinic may decide to adjust pain treatment in response to alarms. Telemonitoring is not the usual practice at the Pain Clinic and will not occur in the other two groups (TAU and TAU+app), so no changes in treatment are expected in these groups after the first appointment. The total sample size will be 150, with 50 patients in each group. The assessment protocol will be the same in all groups and will include pain intensity and side effects of the medication (primary outcomes), together with several pain

  19. A review on biodegradable materials for cardiovascular stent application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Li-Da; Li, Zhen; Pan, Yu; Sabir, MuhammadIqbal; Zheng, Yu-Feng; Li, Li

    2016-09-01

    A stent is a medical device designed to serve as a temporary or permanent internal scaffold to maintain or increase the lumen of a body conduit. The researchers and engineers diverted to investigate biodegradable materials due to the limitation of metallic materials in stent application such as stent restenosis which requires prolonged anti platelet therapy, often result in smaller lumen after implantation and obstruct re-stenting treatments. Biomedical implants with temporary function for the vascular intervention are extensively studied in recent years. The rationale for biodegradable stent is to provide the support for the vessel in predicted period of time and then degrading into biocompatible constituent. The degradation of stent makes the re-stenting possible after several months and also ameliorates the vessel wall quality. The present article focuses on the biodegradable materials for the cardiovascular stent. The objective of this review is to describe the possible biodegradable materials for stent and their properties such as design criteria, degradation behavior, drawbacks and advantages with their recent clinical and preclinical trials.

  20. Long-Term Safety of Drug-Eluting and Bare-Metal Stents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmerini, Tullio; Benedetto, Umberto; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous meta-analyses have investigated the relative safety and efficacy profiles of different types of drug-eluting stents (DES) and bare-metal stents (BMS); however, most prior trials in these meta-analyses reported follow-up to only 1 year, and as such, the relative long-term safety....... RESULTS: Fifty-one trials that included a total of 52,158 randomized patients with follow-up duration ≥3 years were analyzed. At a median follow-up of 3.8 years, cobalt-chromium everolimus-eluting stents (EES) were associated with lower rates of mortality, definite stent thrombosis (ST), and myocardial...... infarction than BMS, paclitaxel-eluting stents (PES), and sirolimus-eluting stents (SES) and less ST than BES. Phosphorylcholine-based zotarolimus-eluting stents had lower rates of definite ST than SES and lower rates of myocardial infarction than BMS and PES. The late rates of target...

  1. Study protocol for the evaluation of an Infant Simulator based program delivered in schools: a pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hart Michael B

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper presents the study protocol for a pragmatic randomised controlled trial to evaluate the impact of a school based program developed to prevent teenage pregnancy. The program includes students taking care of an Infant Simulator; despite growing popularity and an increasing global presence of such programs, there is no published evidence of their long-term impact. The aim of this trial is to evaluate the Virtual Infant Parenting (VIP program by investigating pre-conceptual health and risk behaviours, teen pregnancy and the resultant birth outcomes, early child health and maternal health. Methods and Design Fifty-seven schools (86% of 66 eligible secondary schools in Perth, Australia were recruited to the clustered (by school randomised trial, with even randomisation to the intervention and control arms. Between 2003 and 2006, the VIP program was administered to 1,267 participants in the intervention schools, while 1,567 participants in the non-intervention schools received standard curriculum. Participants were all female and aged between 13-15 years upon recruitment. Pre and post-intervention questionnaires measured short-term impact and participants are now being followed through their teenage years via data linkage to hospital medical records, abortion clinics and education records. Participants who have a live birth are interviewed by face-to-face interview. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and proportional hazards regression will test for differences in pregnancy, birth and abortion rates during the teenage years between the study arms. Discussion This protocol paper provides a detailed overview of the trial design as well as initial results in the form of participant flow. The authors describe the intervention and its delivery within the natural school setting and discuss the practical issues in the conduct of the trial, including recruitment. The trial is pragmatic and will directly inform those who provide

  2. Rationale and design of the East-West late lumen loss study: Comparison of late lumen loss between Eastern and Western drug-eluting stent study cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Robert W; Radhakrishnan, Vaishnavi; Lam, Peter S; Allocco, Dominic J; Brar, Sandeep; Fahy, Martin; Fisher, Rebecca; Ikeno, Fumiaki; Généreux, Philippe; Kimura, Takeshi; Liu, Minglei; Lye, Weng Kit; Mintz, Gary S; Nagai, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Yuka; White, Roseann; Allen, John C; Krucoff, Mitchell W

    2016-12-01

    The contemporary evaluation of novel drug-eluting stents (DES) includes mechanistic observations that characterize postdeployment stent behavior. Quantification of late lumen loss due to neointimal hyperplasia 8-13 months after stent implantation, via quantitative coronary angiography (QCA), constitutes such an observation and is required by most regulatory authorities. Late lumen loss, as determined by QCA, has been validated as a surrogate for clinical endpoints such as target vessel revascularization. The mechanistic response to DES has not been directly compared across predominantly Asian or Western populations, whereas understanding their comparability across geographic populations could enhance global DES evaluation. The East-West late lumen loss study is designed to demonstrate whether the residual differences in late lumen loss, as assessed by QCA, is different between Eastern and Western DES recipients from studies with protocol angiography at 8-13 months of follow-up. Data from independent core laboratories that have characterized angiographic late lumen loss in DES clinical trials with protocol follow-up angiography will be compiled and dichotomized into Eastern and Western populations. A prospectively developed propensity score model incorporating clinical and anatomic variables affecting late lumen loss will be used to adjust comparisons of QCA measurements. Documentation of whether there are clinically meaningful differences in mechanistic response to DES implantation across genetically unique geographies could facilitate both the quality and efficiency of global device evaluation requiring invasive follow-up for novel stent designs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluating Data Abstraction Assistant, a novel software application for data abstraction during systematic reviews: protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian J. Saldanha

    2016-11-01

    abstraction approaches. Trial registration The trial is registered at National Information Center on Health Services Research and Health Care Technology (NICHSR under Registration # HSRP20152269: https://wwwcf.nlm.nih.gov/hsr_project/view_hsrproj_record.cfm?NLMUNIQUE_ID=20152269&SEARCH_FOR=Tianjing%20Li . All items from the World Health Organization Trial Registration Data Set are covered at various locations in this protocol. Protocol version and date: This is version 2.0 of the protocol, dated September 6, 2016. As needed, we will communicate any protocol amendments to the Institutional Review Boards (IRBs of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (JHBSPH and Brown University. We also will make appropriate as-needed modifications to the NICHSR website in a timely fashion.

  4. Evaluation of the safety and efficacy of an edoxaban-based antithrombotic regimen in patients with atrial fibrillation following successful percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stent placement: Rationale and design of the ENTRUST-AF PCI trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranckx, Pascal; Lewalter, Thorsten; Valgimigli, Marco; Tijssen, Jan G; Reimitz, Paul-Egbert; Eckardt, Lars; Lanz, Hans-Joachim; Zierhut, Wolfgang; Smolnik, Rüdiger; Goette, Andreas

    2018-02-01

    The optimal antithrombotic treatment after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stenting in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) is unknown. In the ENGAGE AF-TIMI 48 trial, edoxaban was noninferior to a vitamin K antagonist (VKA) with respect to the prevention of stroke or systemic embolism and was associated with significantly lower rates of bleeding and cardiovascular death in patients with nonvalvular AF. The effects of edoxaban in combination with single- or dual-antiplatelet therapy in the setting of PCI are unexplored. The ENTRUST-AF PCI trial is a multinational, multicenter, randomized, open-label phase 3b trial with blinded end point evaluation involving 1,500 patients on oral anticoagulation for AF. Patients are randomized between 4 hours and 5 days after successful PCI to either an edoxaban-based strategy (experimental arm; 60 mg [or 30 mg according to dose reduction criteria] once daily plus a P2Y 12 antagonist [default clopidogrel, 75 mg once daily] for 12 months) or a VKA-based strategy (control arm; VKA plus a P2Y 12 antagonist [as above] plus acetylsalicylic acid [100 mg once daily] for 30 days to 12 months). The primary safety end point is the incidence of International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis-defined major or clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding. The main efficacy end point is the composite of cardiovascular death, stroke, systemic embolic events, spontaneous myocardial infarction, and definite stent thrombosis. The ENTRUST-AF PCI trial tests the hypothesis that an edoxaban-based antithrombotic strategy reduces the risk of bleeding complications after PCI compared with VKA plus conventional dual-antiplatelet therapy in patients with AF in need of oral anticoagulation. The relative risk of ischemic events between groups will be compared. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Electroacupuncture to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gajin; Leem, Jungtae; Lee, Hojung; Lee, Junhee

    2016-05-17

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease lowers the quality of life and increases medical costs. Electroacupuncture has been used to ease symptoms and improve gastrointestinal motility in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. The main purposes of this study are to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this procedure. This is a protocol for a randomized, patient-blinded, assessor-blinded, sham-controlled trial. Sixty participants with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease, who have previously undergone standard treatment, will be recruited from August 2015 at Kyung Hee University Korean Medicine Hospital. The participants will be allocated to either the electroacupuncture (n = 30) or the sham electroacupuncture group (n = 30); the allocation will be concealed from both the participants and the assessors. The EA group will undergo penetrating acupuncture at 18 fixed points and two optional points chosen using the pattern identification for gastroesophageal reflux disease. Electrical stimulation will be applied at some of the acupoints. The sham electroacupuncture group will undergo nonpenetrating acupuncture without electrical stimulation at 18 nonspecific points, each of which will be only 2 cm away from the true acupoints used in the electroacupuncture group. In both groups, the procedure will be performed using the Park device. The treatment will last for 6 weeks (with two sessions each week), and the outcome will be evaluated at baseline, 3 weeks, and 6 weeks. The primary outcome will be the proportion of responders with adequate symptom relief, whereas the secondary outcomes will comprise the results of the Nepean dyspepsia index; the Korean gastrointestinal symptom rating scale; the EQ-5D™; levels of gastrin, motilin, and inflammatory cytokines; the perceived stress scale; the qi-stagnation questionnaire; the patient global impression of change; and the spleen qi deficiency questionnaire. The results of this trial will provide information

  6. EXERCISE in pediatric autologous stem cell transplant patients: a randomized controlled trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chamorro-Viña Carolina

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an intensive therapy used to improve survivorship and cure various oncologic diseases. However, this therapy is associated with high mortality rates and numerous negative side-effects. The recovery of the immune system is a special concern and plays a key role in the success of this treatment. In healthy populations it is known that exercise plays an important role in immune system regulation, but little is known about the role of exercise in the hematological and immunological recovery of children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant. The primary objective of this randomized-controlled trial (RCT is to study the effect of an exercise program (in- and outpatient on immune cell recovery in patients undergoing an autologous stem cell transplantation. The secondary objective is to determine if an exercise intervention diminishes the usual deterioration in quality of life, physical fitness, and the acquisition of a sedentary lifestyle. Methods This RCT has received approval from The Conjoint Health Research Ethics Board (CHREB of the University of Calgary (Ethics ID # E-24476. Twenty-four participants treated for a malignancy with autologous stem cell transplant (5 to 18 years in the Alberta Children’s Hospital will be randomly assigned to an exercise or control group. The exercise group will participate in a two-phase exercise intervention (in- and outpatient from hospitalization until 10 weeks after discharge. The exercise program includes strength, flexibility and aerobic exercise. During the inpatient phase this program will be performed 5 times/week and will be supervised. The outpatient phase will combine a supervised session with two home-based exercise sessions with the use of the Wii device. The control group will follow the standard protocol without any specific exercise program. A range of outcomes, including quantitative and functional recovery of immune system

  7. Optimising conservative management of chronic low back pain: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simson, Katherine J; Miller, Clint T; Ford, Jon; Hahne, Andrew; Main, Luana; Rantalainen, Timo; Teo, Wei-Peng; Teychenne, Megan; Connell, David; Trudel, Guy; Zheng, Guoyan; Thickbroom, Gary; Belavy, Daniel L

    2017-04-20

    Lower back pain is a global health issue affecting approximately 80% of people at some stage in their life. The current literature suggests that any exercise is beneficial for reducing back pain. However, as pain is a subjective evaluation and physical deficits are evident in low back pain, using it as the sole outcome measure to evaluate superiority of an exercise protocol for low back pain treatment is insufficient. The overarching goal of the current clinical trial is to implement two common, conservative intervention approaches and examine their impact on deficits in chronic low back pain. Forty participants, 25-45 years old with chronic (>3 months), non-specific low back pain will be recruited. Participants will be randomised to receive either motor control and manual therapy (n = 20) or general strength and conditioning (n = 20) exercise treatments for 6 months. The motor control/manual therapy group will receive twelve 30-min sessions, ten in the first 3 months (one or two per week) and two in the last 3 months. The general exercise group will attend two 1-hour sessions weekly for 3 months, and one or two a week for the following 3 months. Primary outcome measures are average lumbar spine intervertebral disc T2 relaxation time and changes in thickness of the transversus abdominis muscle on a leg lift using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Secondary outcomes include muscle size and fat content, vertebral body fat content, intervertebral disc morphology and water diffusion measured by MRI, body composition using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, physical function through functional tests, changes in corticospinal excitability and cortical motor representation of the spinal muscles using transcranial magnetic stimulation and self-reported measure of pain symptoms, health and disability. Outcome measures will be conducted at baseline, at the 3-month follow-up and at 6 months at the end of intervention. Pain, depressive symptomology and emotions will be

  8. Invention of a nasolacrimal stent retrieval hook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Hyung; Kim, Yeong Kyun; Park, Sang Soo; Song, Ho Young

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical usefulness of a nasolacrimal stent retrieval hook The retrieval hook consisted of two parts, a hook and pusher. The head of the hook part was made of 0.7mm stainless steel wire and was question mark-shaped, while the body of this part was constructed by soldering together four stainless steel pipes ranging in thickness from 1.25 to 3.5mm, serially. The pusher part was made of two plastic tubes and was designed in such a way that the hook grasped the stent tightly. The device was used to remove 46 stents in 40 patients, and tested for 1) average number of trials;2) success rate;and 3) average time of the procedure. The average number of trials, success rate, and average time taken to remove the stent was 4.7, 91%, and 1.8 minutes, respectively. In the removal of nasolacrimal stents, the retrieval hook was easy to use, useful and effective

  9. Stenting in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke: literature review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar A Samaniego

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Recanalization of acute large artery occlusions is a strong predictor of good outcome. The development of thrombectomy devices resulted in a significant improvement in recanalization rates compared to thrombolytics alone. However, clinical trials and registries with these thrombectomy devices in acute ischemic stroke (AIS have shown recanalization rates in the range of 40-81%. The last decade has seen the development of nickel titanium self-expandable stents (SES. These stents, in contrast to balloon-mounted stents, allow better navigability and deployment in tortuous vessels and therefore are optimal for the cerebral circulation. SES were initially used for stent-assisted coil embolization of intracranial aneurysms and for treatment of intracranial stenosis. However, a few authors have recently reported feasibility of deployment of SES in AIS. The use of these devices yielded higher recanalization rates compared to traditional thrombectomy devices. Encouraged by these results, retrievable SES systems have been recently used in AIS. These devices offer the advantage of resheathing and retrieving of the stent even after full deployment. Some of these stents can also be detached in case permanent stent placement is needed. Retrievable SES are being used in Europe and currently tested in clinical trials in the United States. We review the recent literature in the use of stents for the treatment of AIS secondary to large vessel occlusion.

  10. A trial of a job-specific workers' health surveillance program for construction workers: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschman, Julitta S; van der Molen, Henk F; van Duivenbooden, Cor; Sluiter, Judith K; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2011-09-29

    Dutch construction workers are offered periodic health examinations. This care can be improved by tailoring this workers health surveillance (WHS) to the demands of the job and adjust the preventive actions to the specific health risks of a worker in a particular job. To improve the quality of the WHS for construction workers and stimulate relevant job-specific preventive actions by the occupational physician, we have developed a job-specific WHS. The job-specific WHS consists of modules assessing both physical and psychological requirements. The selected measurement instruments chosen, are based on their appropriateness to measure the workers' capacity and health requirements. They include a questionnaire and biometrical tests, and physical performance tests that measure physical functional capabilities. Furthermore, our job-specific WHS provides occupational physicians with a protocol to increase the worker-behavioural effectiveness of their counselling and to stimulate job-specific preventive actions. The objective of this paper is to describe and clarify our study to evaluate the behavioural effects of this job-specific WHS on workers and occupational physicians. The ongoing study of bricklayers and supervisors is a nonrandomised trial to compare the outcome of an intervention (job-specific WHS) group (n = 206) with that of a control (WHS) group (n = 206). The study includes a three-month follow-up. The primary outcome measure is the proportion of participants who have undertaken one or more of the preventive actions advised by their occupational physician in the three months after attending the WHS. A process evaluation will be carried out to determine context, reach, dose delivered, dose received, fidelity, and satisfaction. The present study is in accordance with the TREND Statement. This study will allow an evaluation of the behaviour of both the workers and occupational physician regarding the preventive actions undertaken by them within the scope of a job

  11. First-in-human evaluation of a bioabsorbable polymer-coated sirolimus-eluting stent: imaging and clinical results of the DESSOLVE I Trial (DES with sirolimus and a bioabsorbable polymer for the treatment of patients with de novo lesion in the native coronary arteries).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormiston, John; Webster, Mark; Stewart, James; Vrolix, Mathias; Whitbourn, Robert; Donohoe, Dennis; Knape, Charlene; Lansky, Alexandra; Attizzani, Guilherme F; Fitzgerald, Peter; Kandzari, David E; Wijns, William

    2013-10-01

    This first-in-human multicenter study sought to examine prospectively the safety and efficacy of a new, cobalt chromium thin-strut, coronary absorbable polymer-coated, sirolimus-eluting stent. Bioabsorbable polymers on drug-eluting stents may lower the long-term risks of inflammation, delayed healing, and adverse events. We enrolled patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease with stable or unstable angina pectoris and >50% diameter stenosis, amenable to coverage with a ≤23-mm long stent in a vessel 2.5 to 3.5 mm in diameter. All patients received dual antiplatelet therapy after implantation. Patients, in groups of 10, underwent repeat angiography, intravascular ultrasound, and optical coherence tomography at 4, 6, or 8 months, and all patients were seen or contacted at 18 months of follow-up. The median (range) in-stent late lumen loss (LLL) was 0.03 mm (-0.22 to 0.21 mm), 0.10 mm (-0.03 to 1.2 mm), and 0.08 mm (-0.01 to 0.28 mm), at 4, 6, and 8 months, respectively. At 18 months, the median in-stent LLL was 0.08 mm (-0.30 to 0.46 mm). On optical coherence tomography, the proportion of uncovered stent struts decreased from a median of 7.3% (range 0.4% to 46.3%) at 4 months to 0% (range: 0% to 3.4%) at 18 months. The percentage of neointimal volume obstruction by intravascular ultrasound increased from a median of 5.3% to 9.1% between 4 and 6 months and remained nearly unchanged thereafter through 18 months of follow-up. The only recorded major adverse cardiac event was a myocardial infarction. At 18 months of follow-up, this absorbable polymer-coated, cobalt chromium sirolimus-eluting stent was associated with a low and stable in-stent LLL, complete strut coverage, and no stent thrombosis. (First-In-Human Trial of the MiStent Drug-Eluting Stent [DES] in Coronary Artery Disease [DESSOLVE-I]; NCT01247428). Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Treatment of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome with a combination of lopinavir-ritonavir and interferon-β1b (MIRACLE trial): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabi, Yaseen M; Alothman, Adel; Balkhy, Hanan H; Al-Dawood, Abdulaziz; AlJohani, Sameera; Al Harbi, Shmeylan; Kojan, Suleiman; Al Jeraisy, Majed; Deeb, Ahmad M; Assiri, Abdullah M; Al-Hameed, Fahad; AlSaedi, Asim; Mandourah, Yasser; Almekhlafi, Ghaleb A; Sherbeeni, Nisreen Murad; Elzein, Fatehi Elnour; Memon, Javed; Taha, Yusri; Almotairi, Abdullah; Maghrabi, Khalid A; Qushmaq, Ismael; Al Bshabshe, Ali; Kharaba, Ayman; Shalhoub, Sarah; Jose, Jesna; Fowler, Robert A; Hayden, Frederick G; Hussein, Mohamed A

    2018-01-30

    It had been more than 5 years since the first case of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus infection (MERS-CoV) was recorded, but no specific treatment has been investigated in randomized clinical trials. Results from in vitro and animal studies suggest that a combination of lopinavir/ritonavir and interferon-β1b (IFN-β1b) may be effective against MERS-CoV. The aim of this study is to investigate the efficacy of treatment with a combination of lopinavir/ritonavir and recombinant IFN-β1b provided with standard supportive care, compared to treatment with placebo provided with standard supportive care in patients with laboratory-confirmed MERS requiring hospital admission. The protocol is prepared in accordance with the SPIRIT (Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Interventional Trials) guidelines. Hospitalized adult patients with laboratory-confirmed MERS will be enrolled in this recursive, two-stage, group sequential, multicenter, placebo-controlled, double-blind randomized controlled trial. The trial is initially designed to include 2 two-stage components. The first two-stage component is designed to adjust sample size and determine futility stopping, but not efficacy stopping. The second two-stage component is designed to determine efficacy stopping and possibly readjustment of sample size. The primary outcome is 90-day mortality. This will be the first randomized controlled trial of a potential treatment for MERS. The study is sponsored by King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Enrollment for this study began in November 2016, and has enrolled thirteen patients as of Jan 24-2018. ClinicalTrials.gov, ID: NCT02845843 . Registered on 27 July 2016.

  13. A bioresorbable everolimus-eluting scaffold versus a metallic everolimus-eluting stent for ischaemic heart disease caused by de-novo native coronary artery lesions (ABSORB II): an interim 1-year analysis of clinical and procedural secondary outcomes from a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serruys, Patrick W.; Chevalier, Bernard; Dudek, Dariusz; Cequier, Angel; Carrié, Didier; Iniguez, Andres; Dominici, Marcello; van der Schaaf, René J.; Haude, Michael; Wasungu, Luc; Veldhof, Susan; Peng, Lei; Staehr, Peter; Grundeken, Maik J.; Ishibashi, Yuki; Garcia-Garcia, Hector M.; Onuma, Yoshinobu

    2015-01-01

    Despite rapid dissemination of an everolimus-eluting bioresorbable scaffold for treatment for coronary artery disease, no data from comparisons with its metallic stent counterpart are available. In a randomised controlled trial we aimed to compare an everolimus-eluting bioresorbable scaffold with an

  14. Covered metal stent or multiple plastic stents for refractory pancreatic ductal strictures in chronic pancreatitis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yonghua; Liu, Mingdong; Chen, Min; Li, Yunhong; Lu, Ying; Zou, Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    Refractory chronic pancreatitis has been proposed as a challenge for endoscopists following routine single plastic stenting. However, data on the efficacy and safety of further endoscopic stenting are still controversial. The current systematic review aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of placement of fully covered self-expandable metal stent (FCSEMS) and multiple plastic stents. Databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, CBM, CNKI, VIP, and WANFANG Database were used to search relevant trials. Published studies were assessed by using well-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. The process was independently performed by two investigators. A total of 5 studies provided data of 80 patients. Forest plots and publication bias were not carried out because few studies were relevant and screened studies were all case series. The technical success rate was 100% both in placement of FCSEMS and multiple plastic stents. The functional success rate after placement of FCSEMS was 100%, followed by multiple plastic stents (94.7%). Complications occurred 26.2% after FCSEMS placement, which was not described in detail in multiple plastic stents. The stent migration rate was 8.2% for FCSEMS and 10.5% for multiple plastic stents. Reintervention rate was 9.8% for FCSEMS and 15.8% for multiple plastic stents. Pain improvement rate was 85.2% for FCSEMS and 84.2% for multiple plastic stents. FCSEMS appeared to be no significant difference with multiple plastic stents in treatment of refractory chronic pancreatitis. We need to develop more investigations. Copyright © 2014 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Zotarolimus-eluting durable-polymer-coated stent versus a biolimus-eluting biodegradable-polymer-coated stent in unselected patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (SORT OUT VI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raungaard, Bent; Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Tilsted, Hans-Henrik

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: New-generation drug-eluting coronary stents have reduced the risk of coronary events, especially in patients with complex disease or lesions. To what extent different stent platforms, polymers, and antiproliferative drugs affect outcomes, however, is unclear. We investigated the safety...... and efficacy of a third-generation stent by comparing a highly biocompatible durable-polymer-coated zotarolimus-eluting stent with a biodegradable-polymer-coated biolimus-eluting stent. METHODS: This open-label, randomised, multicentre, non-inferiority trial was done at three sites across western Denmark. All......-polymer zotarolimus-eluting stent or the biodegradable-polymer biolimus-eluting stent. The primary endpoint was a composite of safety (cardiac death and myocardial infarction not clearly attributable to a non-target lesion) and efficacy (target-lesion revascularisation) at 12 months, analysed by intention to treat...

  16. Time course, predictors and clinical implications of stent thrombosis following primary angioplasty. Insights from the DESERT cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Luca, Giuseppe; Dirksen, Maurits T; Spaulding, Christian

    2013-01-01

    on the timing of stent thrombosis (ST) with both DES and bare metal stents (BMS) and its prognostic significance in patients undergoing pPCI. The Drug-Eluting Stent in Primary Angioplasty (DESERT) cooperation is based on a pooled database including individual data of randomised trials that evaluate the long...

  17. Auxetic coronary stent endoprosthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin, Faisal; Ali, Murtaza Najabat; Ansari, Umar

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular heart disease is one of the leading health issues in the present era and requires considerable health care resources to prevent it. The present study was focused on the development of a new coronary stent based on novel auxetic geometry which enables the stent to exhibit...... a negative Poisson's ratio. Commercially available coronary stents have isotropic properties, whereas the vascular system of the body shows anisotropic characteristics. This results in a mismatch between anisotropic-isotropic properties of the stent and arterial wall, and this in turn is not favorable...... for mechanical adhesion of the commercially available coronary stents with the arterial wall. It is believed that an auxetic coronary stent with inherent anisotropic mechanical properties and negative Poisson's ratio will have good mechanical adhesion with the arterial wall. METHODS: The auxetic design...

  18. Optical Coherence Tomography Substudy of A Prospective Multicenter Randomized Post-Market Trial to Assess the Safety and Effectiveness of the Firehawk™ Rapamycin Target Eluting Cobalt Chromium Coronary Stent System for the Treatment of Atherosclerotic Lesions: TARGET All Comers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumbach, Andreas; Lansky, Alexandra J; Onuma, Yoshi; Asano, Taku; Johnson, Thomas; Anderson, Richard; Kiemeneij, Ferdinand; Zheng, Ming; Van Royen, Niels; Slagboom, Ton; Vlachojannis, Georg; Xu, Bo; Serruys, Patrick; Wijns, William

    2018-06-12

    Durable polymer drug-eluting stents (DP DES) may contribute to persistent inflammation, delayed endothelial healing and subsequent late DES thrombosis. The aim of this Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) sub-study was to compare healing and neointimal coverage of a novel bioabsorbable polymer sirolimus-eluting stent (FIREHAWK®) (BP DES) versus the DP DES (XIENCE) at 90 days in an all comers patient population. The TARGET All Comers study is a prospective multicenter randomised post-market trial of 1656 patients randomised 1:1 to FIREHAWK or XIENCE at 21 centers in 10 European countries. The TARGET OCT sub-study enrolled 36 consecutive patients with 52 lesions at 6 centers proficient in OCT. Follow-up OCT was performed at 3 months or prior to revascularisation when occurring before the 3-month window. The substudy was designed for non-inferiority of the primary endpoint of neointimal thickness. At follow-up, the mean neointimal thickness by OCT (52 lesions, Firehawk, n=24; Xience, n=28), was not significantly different between groups (Firehawk 75.5μm vs Xience V 82.3 μm) meeting the primary endpoint of non-inferiority (Pnoninferiority<0.001). The percentage of stent strut coverage was high in both groups (strut level: 99.9% ± 0.3 vs 100% ± 0.1, p=0.26), and the proportion of malapposed struts (1.0±1.6% vs. 1.2±2.0%, p=0.51) was low in both groups. Based on OCT, the FIREHAWK BP DES has a similar healing response 3 months after implantation compared to the DP DES, with near complete strut coverage, moderate neointima formation and minimal strut malapposition.

  19. Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial: tongue strengthening exercises in head and neck cancer patients, does exercise load matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nuffelen, Gwen; Van den Steen, Leen; Vanderveken, Olivier; Specenier, Pol; Van Laer, Carl; Van Rompaey, Diane; Guns, Cindy; Mariën, Steven; Peeters, Marc; Van de Heyning, Paul; Vanderwegen, Jan; De Bodt, Marc

    2015-09-04

    Reduced tongue strength is an important factor contributing to early and late dysphagia in head and neck cancer patients previously treated with chemoradiotherapy. The evidence is growing that tongue strengthening exercises can improve tongue strength and swallowing function in both healthy and dysphagic subjects. However, little is known about the impact of specific features of an exercise protocol for tongue strength on the actual outcome (strength or swallowing function). Previous research originating in the fields of sports medicine and physical rehabilitation shows that the degree of exercise load is an influential factor for increasing muscle strength in the limb skeletal muscles. Since the tongue is considered a muscular hydrostat, it remains to be proven whether the same concepts will apply. This ongoing randomized controlled trial in chemoradiotherapy-treated patients with head and neck cancer investigates the effect of three tongue strengthening exercise protocols, with different degrees of exercise load, on tongue strength and swallowing. At enrollment, 51 patients whose dysphagia is primarily related to reduced tongue strength are randomly assigned to a training schedule of 60, 80, or 100% of their maximal tongue strength. Patients are treated three times a week for 8 weeks, executing 120 repetitions of the assigned exercise once per training day. Exercise load is progressively adjusted every 2 weeks. Patients are evaluated before, during and after treatment by means of tongue strength measurements, fiber-optic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing and quality-of-life questionnaires. This randomized controlled trial is the first to systematically investigate the effect of different exercise loads in tongue strengthening exercise protocols. The results will allow the development of more efficacious protocols. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN14447678.

  20. A Feasibility Randomised Controlled Trial of the New Orleans Intervention for Infant Mental Health: A Study Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Pritchett

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Child maltreatment is associated with life-long social, physical, and mental health problems. Intervening early to provide maltreated children with safe, nurturing care can improve outcomes. The need for prompt decisions about permanent placement (i.e., regarding adoption or return home is internationally recognised. However, a recent Glasgow audit showed that many maltreated children “revolve” between birth families and foster carers. This paper describes the protocol of the first exploratory randomised controlled trial of a mental health intervention aimed at improving placement permanency decisions for maltreated children. This trial compares an infant's mental health intervention with the new enhanced service as usual for maltreated children entering care in Glasgow. As both are new services, the trial is being conducted from a position of equipoise. The outcome assessment covers various fields of a child’s neurodevelopment to identify problems in any ESSENCE domain. The feasibility, reliability, and developmental appropriateness of all outcome measures are examined. Additionally, the potential for linkage with routinely collected data on health and social care and, in the future, education is explored. The results will inform a definitive randomised controlled trial that could potentially lead to long lasting benefits for the Scottish population and which may be applicable to other areas of the world. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NC01485510.

  1. Effectiveness of Chinese massage therapy (Tui Na) for chronic low back pain: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingxiao; Feng, Yue; Pei, Hong; Deng, Shufang; Wang, Minyu; Xiao, Xianjun; Zheng, Hui; Lai, Zhenhong; Chen, Jiao; Li, Xiang; He, Xiaoguo; Liang, Fanrong

    2014-10-29

    Low back pain is a common, disabling musculoskeletal disorder in both developing and developed countries. Although often recommended, the potential efficacy of massage therapy in general, and Chinese massage (tuina) in particular, for relief of chronic low back pain (CLBP) has not been fully established due to inadequate sample sizes, low methodological quality, and subclinical dosing regimens of trials to date. Thus, the purpose of this randomized controlled trial (RCT) is to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of tuina massage therapy versus conventional analgesics for CLBP. The present study is a single center, two-arm, open-label RCT. A total of 150 eligible CLBP patients will be randomly assigned to either a tuina treatment group or a conventional drug control group in a 1:1 ratio. Patients in the tuina group receive a 20 minutes, 4-step treatment protocol which includes both structural and relaxation massage, administered in 20 sessions over a period of 4 weeks. Patients in the conventional drug control group are instructed to take a specific daily dose of ibuprofen. The primary outcome measure is the change from baseline back pain and function, measured by Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, at two months. Secondary outcome measures include the visual analogue scale, Japanese orthopedic association score (JOAS), and McGill pain questionnaire. The design and methodological rigor of this trial will allow for collection of valuable data to evaluate the efficacy of a specific tuina protocol for treating CLBP. This trial will therefore contribute to providing a solid foundation for clinical treatment of CLBP, as well as future research in massage therapy. This trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov of the National Institute of Health on 22 October 2013 (http://NCT01973010).

  2. Study protocol for the evaluation of an Infant Simulator based program delivered in schools: a pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Sally A; Johnson, Sarah E; Lawrence, David; Codde, James P; Hart, Michael B; Straton, Judith A Y; Silburn, Sven

    2010-10-21

    This paper presents the study protocol for a pragmatic randomised controlled trial to evaluate the impact of a school based program developed to prevent teenage pregnancy. The program includes students taking care of an Infant Simulator; despite growing popularity and an increasing global presence of such programs, there is no published evidence of their long-term impact. The aim of this trial is to evaluate the Virtual Infant Parenting (VIP) program by investigating pre-conceptual health and risk behaviours, teen pregnancy and the resultant birth outcomes, early child health and maternal health. Fifty-seven schools (86% of 66 eligible secondary schools) in Perth, Australia were recruited to the clustered (by school) randomised trial, with even randomisation to the intervention and control arms. Between 2003 and 2006, the VIP program was administered to 1,267 participants in the intervention schools, while 1,567 participants in the non-intervention schools received standard curriculum. Participants were all female and aged between 13-15 years upon recruitment. Pre and post-intervention questionnaires measured short-term impact and participants are now being followed through their teenage years via data linkage to hospital medical records, abortion clinics and education records. Participants who have a live birth are interviewed by face-to-face interview. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and proportional hazards regression will test for differences in pregnancy, birth and abortion rates during the teenage years between the study arms. This protocol paper provides a detailed overview of the trial design as well as initial results in the form of participant flow. The authors describe the intervention and its delivery within the natural school setting and discuss the practical issues in the conduct of the trial, including recruitment. The trial is pragmatic and will directly inform those who provide Infant Simulator based programs in school settings. ISRCTN24952438.

  3. Randomized multicenter study of multiple plastic stents vs. covered self-expandable metallic stent in the treatment of biliary stricture in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapamäki, Carola; Kylänpää, Leena; Udd, Marianne; Lindström, Outi; Grönroos, Juha; Saarela, Arto; Mustonen, Harri; Halttunen, Jorma

    2015-07-01

    The use of covered self-expandable metallic stents (cSEMS) in benign biliary indications is evolving. The aim of the study was to assess the safety and feasibility of cSEMS compared with multiple plastic stents in the treatment of benign biliary stricture (BBS) caused by chronic pancreatitis. This was a prospective, multicenter, randomized study of 60 patients with BBS caused by chronic pancreatitis. All patients received an initial plastic stent before randomization. At randomization, the stent was replaced either with a single cSEMS or three plastic stents. After 3 months, the position of the cSEMS was checked or another three plastic stents were added. At 6 months after randomization, all stents were removed. Clinical follow-up including abdominal ultrasound and laboratory tests were performed at 6 months and 2 years after stent removal. Two patients dropped out of the cSEMS group before stent removal. In April 2014, the median follow-up was 40 months (range 1 - 66 months). The 2-year, stricture-free success rate was 90 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] 72 % - 97 %) in the plastic stent group and 92 % (95 %CI 70 % - 98 %) in the cSEMS group (P = 0.405). There was one late recurrence in the plastic stent group 50 months after stent removal. Stent migration occurred three times (10 %) in the plastic stent group and twice in the cSEMS group (7 %; P = 1.000). A 6-month treatment with either six 10-Fr plastic stents or with one 10-mm cSEMS produced good long-term relief of biliary stricture caused by chronic pancreatitis.Study registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01085747). © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. The PD COMM trial: a protocol for the process evaluation of a randomised trial assessing the effectiveness of two types of SLT for people with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterson-Algar, Patricia; Burton, Christopher R; Brady, Marian C; Nicoll, Avril; Clarke, Carl E; Rick, Caroline; Hughes, Max; Au, Pui; Smith, Christina H; Sackley, Catherine M

    2017-08-29

    The PD COMM trial is a phase III multi-centre randomised controlled trial whose aim is to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of two approaches to speech and language therapy (SLT) compared with no SLT intervention (control) for people with Parkinson's disease who have self-reported or carer-reported problems with their speech or voice. Our protocol describes the process evaluation embedded within the outcome evaluation whose aim is to evaluate what happened at the time of the PD COMM intervention implementation and to provide findings that will assist in the interpretation of the PD COMM trial results. Furthermore, the aim of the PD COMM process evaluation is to investigate intervention complexity within a theoretical model of how the trialled interventions might work best and why. Drawing from the Normalization Process Theory and frameworks for implementation fidelity, a mixed method design will be used to address process evaluation research questions. Therapists' and participants' perceptions and experiences will be investigated via in-depth interviews. Critical incident reports, baseline survey data from therapists, treatment record forms and home practice diaries also will be collected at relevant time points throughout the running of the PD COMM trial. Process evaluation data will be analysed independently of the outcome evaluation before the two sets of data are then combined. To date, there are a limited number of published process evaluation protocols, and few are linked to trials investigating rehabilitation therapies. Providing a strong theoretical framework underpinning design choices and being tailored to meet the complex characteristics of the trialled interventions, our process evaluation has the potential to provide valuable insight into which components of the interventions being delivered in PD COMM worked best (and what did not), how they worked well and why. ISRCTN Registry, ISRCTN12421382 . Registered on 18 April 2016.

  5. Investigation of the Study Characteristics Affecting Clinical Trial Quality Using the Protocol Deviations Leading to Exclusion of Subjects From the Per Protocol Set Data in Studies for New Drug Application: A Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohara, Norihito; Kaneko, Masayuki; Narukawa, Mamoru

    2018-01-01

    The concept of the risk-based approach has been introduced as an effort to secure the quality of clinical trials. In the risk-based approach, identification and evaluation of risk in advance are considered important. For recently completed clinical trials, we investigated the relationship between study characteristics and protocol deviations leading to the exclusion of subjects from Per Protocol Set (PPS) efficacy analysis. New drugs approved in Japan in the fiscal year 2014-2015 were targeted in the research. The reasons for excluding subjects from the PPS efficacy analysis were described in 102 trials out of 492 in the summary of new drug application documents, which was publicly disclosed after the drug's regulatory approval. The author extracted these reasons along with the numbers of the cases and the study characteristics of each clinical trial. Then, the direct comparison, univariate regression analysis, and multivariate regression analysis was carried out based on the exclusion rate. The study characteristics for which exclusion of subjects from the PPS efficacy analysis were frequently observed was multiregional clinical trials in study region; inhalant and external use in administration route; Anti-infective for systemic use; Respiratory system, Dermatologicals, and Nervous system in therapeutic drug under the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification. In the multivariate regression analysis, the clinical trial variables of inhalant, Respiratory system, or Dermatologicals were selected as study characteristics leading to a higher exclusion rate. The characteristics of the clinical trial that is likely to cause protocol deviations that will affect efficacy analysis were suggested. These studies should be considered for specific attention and priority observation in the trial protocol or its monitoring plan and execution, such as a clear description of inclusion/exclusion criteria in the protocol, development of training materials to site staff, and

  6. Electroacupuncture versus sham electroacupuncture for urinary retention in poststroke patients: study protocol for a multicenter, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seungwon; Lee, Jiwon; Yoo, Junghee; Lim, Sung Min; Lee, Euiju

    2016-04-12

    This study protocol evaluates the effectiveness of adjuvant electroacupuncture (EA) for urinary retention in poststroke patients undergoing conventional treatments, in comparison with that of a sham control. A multicenter, blinded, randomized controlled trial will be conducted in three hospitals in the Republic of Korea. We are recruiting 54 stroke survivors (aged >19 years), who were diagnosed with urinary retention based on the results of two consecutive post-void residual (PVR) tests, and dividing them randomly into two arms: the EA and Park-sham control groups. They will receive ten sessions of EA or sham treatment for 2 weeks. The participants will be blinded with non-penetrating needles and fake sounds of EA stimulators. The daily PVR ratio will be primarily measured at baseline and at the end of the study to statistically test the effectiveness of EA for poststroke urinary retention. Then, the Korean version of the Qualiveen Questionnaire, the Korean version of the International Prostate Symptom Score, and the blinding index will be assessed. After each EA session or sham EA, adverse events will be reported to evaluate the safety of EA. Results will be analyzed by using the independent t-test or Mann-Whitney U test, based on both intention-to-treat and per-protocol principles. The findings will provide clinical evidence for the effectiveness of EA treatment to improve urinary retention in stroke survivors. This study protocol was registered in ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02472288) on 10 June 2015.

  7. Heparin-bonded, expanded polytetrafluoroethylene-lined stent graft in the treatment of femoropopliteal artery disease: 1-year results of the VIPER (Viabahn Endoprosthesis with Heparin Bioactive Surface in the Treatment of Superficial Femoral Artery Obstructive Disease) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxon, Richard R; Chervu, Arun; Jones, Paul A; Bajwa, Tanvir K; Gable, Dennis R; Soukas, Peter A; Begg, Richard J; Adams, John G; Ansel, Gary M; Schneider, Darren B; Eichler, Charles M; Rush, Michael J

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the performance of a heparin-bonded, expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE)-lined nitinol endoprosthesis in the treatment of long-segment occlusive disease of the femoropopliteal artery (FPA) and to identify factors associated with loss of patency. In a single-arm, prospective, 11-center study (VIPER [Gore Viabahn Endoprosthesis with Heparin Bioactive Surface in the Treatment of Superficial Femoral Artery Obstructive Disease] trial), 119 limbs (113 patients; 69 men; mean age, 67 y), including 88 with Rutherford category 3-5 disease and 72 with Inter-Society Consensus for the Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease (TASC II) C or D lesions of the FPA, underwent stent graft implantation. The mean lesion length was 19 cm; 56% of lesions were occlusions. Follow-up evaluations included color duplex ultrasonography in all patients, with patency defined as a peak systolic velocity ratio20% was 70% (P = .047). Primary patency was not significantly affected by device diameter (5 vs 6 vs 7 mm) or lesion length (≤20 cm vs>20 cm). The 30-day major adverse event rate was 0.8%. The heparin-bonded, ePTFE/nitinol stent graft provided clinical improvement and a primary patency rate of 73% at 1 year in the treatment of long-segment FPA disease. Careful sizing of the device relative to vessel landing zones is essential for achieving optimal outcomes. Copyright © 2013 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Ultrasound guided injection of dexamethasone versus placebo for treatment of plantar fasciitis: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilheany Mark F

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plantar fasciitis is the most commonly reported cause of chronic pain beneath the heel. Management of this condition commonly involves the use of corticosteroid injection in cases where less invasive treatments have failed. However, despite widespread use, only two randomised trials have tested the effect of this treatment in comparison to placebo. These trials currently offer the best available evidence by which to guide clinical practice, though both were limited by methodological issues such as insufficient statistical power. Therefore, the aim of this randomised trial is to compare the effect of ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection versus placebo for treatment of plantar fasciitis. Methods The trial will be conducted at the La Trobe University Podiatry Clinic and will recruit 80 community-dwelling participants. Diagnostic ultrasound will be used to diagnose plantar fasciitis and participants will be required to meet a range of selection criteria. Participants will be randomly allocated to one of two treatment arms: (i ultrasound-guided injection of the plantar fascia with 1 mL of 4 mg/mL dexamethasone sodium phosphate (experimental group, or (ii ultrasound-guided injection of the plantar fascia with 1 mL normal saline (control group. Blinding will be applied to participants and the investigator performing procedures, measuring outcomes and analysing data. Primary outcomes will be pain measured by the Foot Health Status Questionnaire and plantar fascia thickness measured by ultrasound at 4, 8 and 12 weeks. All data analyses will be conducted on an intention-to-treat basis. Conclusion This will be a randomised trial investigating the effect of dexamethasone injection on pre-specified treatment outcomes in people with plantar fasciitis. Within the parameters of this protocol, the trial findings will be used to make evidence-based recommendations regarding the use of corticosteroid injection for treatment of this

  9. The evaluation of complex clinical trial protocols: resources available to research ethics committees and the use of clinical trial registries--a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homedes, Núria; Ugalde, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    To assess the potential role of clinical trial (CT) registries and other resources available to research ethics committees (RECs) in the evaluation of complex CT protocols in low-income and middle-income countries. Using a case study approach, the authors examined the decision-making process of a REC in Argentina and its efforts to use available resources to decide on a complex protocol. We also analysed the information in the USA and other CT registries and consulted 24 CT experts in seven countries. Information requested by the Argentinean REC from other national RECs and ethics' experts was not useful to verify the adequacy of the REC's decision whether or not to approve the CT. The responses from the national regulatory agency and the sponsor were not helpful either. The identification of international resources that could assist was beyond the REC's capability. The information in the USA and other CT registries is limited, and at times misleading; and its accuracy is not verified by register keepers. RECs have limited access to experts and institutions that could assist them in their deliberations. Sponsors do not always answer RECs' request for information to properly conduct the ethical and methodological assessment of CT protocols. The usefulness of the CT registries is curtailed by the lack of appropriate codes and by data errors. Information about reasons for rejection, withdrawal or suspension of the trial should be included in the registries. Establishing formal channels of communication among national and foreign RECs and with independent international reference centres could strengthen the ethical review of CT protocols. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Randomized Controlled Trial to Compare the Safety and Efficacy of Tamsulosin, Solifenacin, and Combination of Both in Treatment of Double-J Stent-Related Lower Urinary Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essam Shalaby

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We evaluated the effectiveness and safety of tamsulosin, solifenacin, and combination of both in reducing double-J stent-related lower urinary symptoms. Materials and Methods. A total of 338 patients with double-J ureteral stenting were randomly divided, postoperatively, into 4 groups. In group I (, no treatment was given (control group, group II ( received tamsulosin 0.4 mg daily, group III ( received solifenacin 10 mg daily, and group IV ( received a combination of both medications. Before insertion and 2 weeks after, all patients completed the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS, quality of life component of the IPSS (IPSS/Qol, Overactive Bladder Questionnaire (OAB-q, and Visual Analogue Pain Scale (VAPS questionnaire. Results. The demographics and preoperative questionnaires scores of all groups were comparable. There were statistically significant differences in all scores in favour of groups II, III, and IV as compared to control group ( value < 0.005. Group IV showed statistically significant differences in total IPSS, QoL score, and OAB-q score as compared to groups II and III ( value < 0.001. Conclusions. Combined therapy of tamsulosin and solifenacin significantly alleviated lower urinary symptoms associated with double-J stents as compared to either medication alone.

  11. A Randomized Controlled Trial to Compare the Safety and Efficacy of Tadalafil and Tamsulosin in Relieving Double J Stent Related Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satinder Pal Aggarwal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of Tadalafil and Tamsulosin in treating Double J stent related symptoms. Methods. In a prospective study, 161 patients with DJ related symptoms were randomized into 3 groups: Group A patients (54, Group B patients (53, and Group C patients (54. They were given Tadalafil, Tamsulosin, and placebo, respectively, at 1st week till removal of DJ stent at 3rd week. All patients completed Ureteral Stent Symptom Questionnaire (USSQ at 1st week and at 3rd week. The statistical significant difference among groups was determined by the t-test, Kruskal-Wallis test and multivariate analysis were used to assess association of the variables within the three groups, and the level of significance was set at P<0.05. Results. Tadalafil and Tamsulosin were comparable in relieving urinary symptoms, general health, and work performance (OR = 0.65, 1.8, and 0.92. But Tadalafil was more effective in relieving body pain, sexual problems, and additional problems than Tamsulosin (OR = 5.95, 19.25, and 2.69 and was statistically significant as P<0.05. Conclusion. Tadalafil was as effective as Tamsulosin in relieving urinary symptom but more effective in relieving sexual symptoms and body pain.

  12. Effectiveness of a healthy lifestyle intervention for low back pain and osteoarthritis of the knee: protocol and statistical analysis plan for two randomised controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate M. O’Brien

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background These trials are the first randomised controlled trials of telephone-based weight management and healthy lifestyle interventions for low back pain and knee osteoarthritis. This article describes the protocol and statistical analysis plan. Method These trials are parallel randomised controlled trials that investigate and compare the effect of a telephone-based weight management and healthy lifestyle intervention for improving pain intensity in overweight or obese patients with low back pain or knee osteoarthritis. The analysis plan was finalised prior to initiation of analyses. All data collected as part of the trial were reviewed, without stratification by group, and classified by baseline characteristics, process of care and trial outcomes. Trial outcomes were classified as primary and secondary outcomes. Appropriate descriptive statistics and statistical testing of between-group differences, where relevant, have been planned and described. Conclusions A protocol for standard analyses was developed for the results of two randomised controlled trials. This protocol describes the data, and the pre-determined statistical tests of relevant outcome measures. The plan demonstrates transparent and verifiable use of the data collected. This a priori protocol will be followed to ensure rigorous standards of data analysis are strictly adhered to.

  13. Effectiveness of a healthy lifestyle intervention for low back pain and osteoarthritis of the knee: protocol and statistical analysis plan for two randomised controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Brien, Kate M.; Williams, Amanda; Wiggers, John; Wolfenden, Luke; Yoong, Serene; Campbell, Elizabeth; Kamper, Steven J.; McAuley, James; Attia, John; Oldmeadow, Chris; Williams, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background These trials are the first randomised controlled trials of telephone-based weight management and healthy lifestyle interventions for low back pain and knee osteoarthritis. This article describes the protocol and statistical analysis plan. Method These trials are parallel randomised controlled trials that investigate and compare the effect of a telephone-based weight management and healthy lifestyle intervention for improving pain intensity in overweight or obese patients with low back pain or knee osteoarthritis. The analysis plan was finalised prior to initiation of analyses. All data collected as part of the trial were reviewed, without stratification by group, and classified by baseline characteristics, process of care and trial outcomes. Trial outcomes were classified as primary and secondary outcomes. Appropriate descriptive statistics and statistical testing of between-group differences, where relevant, have been planned and described. Conclusions A protocol for standard analyses was developed for the results of two randomised controlled trials. This protocol describes the data, and the pre-determined statistical tests of relevant outcome measures. The plan demonstrates transparent and verifiable use of the data collected. This a priori protocol will be followed to ensure rigorous standards of data analysis are strictly adhered to. PMID:27683839

  14. Evaluating a community-based early childhood education and development program in Indonesia: study protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial with supplementary matched control group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pradhan, M.; Brinkman, S.A.; Beatty, A.; Maika, A.; Satriawan, E.; de Ree, J.; Hasan, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background This paper presents the study protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) with a supplementary matched control group. The aim of the trial is to evaluate a community-based early education and development program launched by the Government of Indonesia. The program

  15. Evaluating a community-based early childhood education and development program in Indonesia: study protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial with supplementary matched control group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pradhan, M.P.; Brinkman, S.A.; Beatty, A.; Maika, A.; Satriawan, E.; de Ree, J.; Hasan, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: This paper presents the study protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) with a supplementary matched control group. The aim of the trial is to evaluate a community-based early education and development program launched by the Government of Indonesia. The program

  16. Implementation and results of an integrated data quality assurance protocol in a randomized controlled trial in Uttar Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gass, Jonathon D; Misra, Anamika; Yadav, Mahendra Nath Singh; Sana, Fatima; Singh, Chetna; Mankar, Anup; Neal, Brandon J; Fisher-Bowman, Jennifer; Maisonneuve, Jenny; Delaney, Megan Marx; Kumar, Krishan; Singh, Vinay Pratap; Sharma, Narender; Gawande, Atul; Semrau, Katherine; Hirschhorn, Lisa R

    2017-09-07

    There are few published standards or methodological guidelines for integrating Data Quality Assurance (DQA) protocols into large-scale health systems research trials, especially in resource-limited settings. The BetterBirth Trial is a matched-pair, cluster-randomized controlled trial (RCT) of the BetterBirth Program, which seeks to improve quality of facility-based deliveries and reduce 7-day maternal and neonatal mortality and maternal morbidity in Uttar Pradesh, India. In the trial, over 6300 deliveries were observed and over 153,000 mother-baby pairs across 120 study sites were followed to assess health outcomes. We designed and implemented a robust and integrated DQA system to sustain high-quality data throughout the trial. We designed the Data Quality Monitoring and Improvement System (DQMIS) to reinforce six dimensions of data quality: accuracy, reliability, timeliness, completeness, precision, and integrity. The DQMIS was comprised of five functional components: 1) a monitoring and evaluation team to support the system; 2) a DQA protocol, including data collection audits and targets, rapid data feedback, and supportive supervision; 3) training; 4) standard operating procedures for data collection; and 5) an electronic data collection and reporting system. Routine audits by supervisors included double data entry, simultaneous delivery observations, and review of recorded calls to patients. Data feedback reports identified errors automatically, facilitating supportive supervision through a continuous quality improvement model. The five functional components of the DQMIS successfully reinforced data reliability, timeliness, completeness, precision, and integrity. The DQMIS also resulted in 98.33% accuracy across all data collection activities in the trial. All data collection activities demonstrated improvement in accuracy throughout implementation. Data collectors demonstrated a statistically significant (p = 0.0004) increase in accuracy throughout

  17. Coronary Stents in Diabetic Patients: State of the Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codner, Pablo; Gurm, Hitinder Singh; Motivala, Apurva

    2017-04-01

    This review article aims to summarize the findings of the most relevant research that compared the use of paclitaxel vs. "limus" based drug eluting stent (DES) in diabetic patients and to define the current state of knowledge with new stent technologies in this patient population. Since drug eluting stents (DES) were introduced, it has been of great interest to establish whether paclitaxel or sirolimus eluting stents have the same safety and efficacy features for patients with coronary artery disease. The answer to this question is particularly relevant for diabetic patients. Several randomized trials, registry-based studies, and meta-analyses have assessed the performance of these different DES in diabetic patients. The most recently published data favors limus over paclitaxel DES in diabetic patients, but most of these studies compared first vs. second generation DES with the inherent caveats of comparing different platforms, alloys, and drug delivery vehicles. In this literature review, we found that there is robust evidence favoring the use of DES over bare metal stents in diabetic patients with coronary artery disease. We also found that the current state of knowledge is that the everolimus eluting stents have better safety and efficacy than paclitaxel eluting stents in diabetic patients and hence should be the preferred choice. New revascularization strategies including bio-absorbable scaffolds, polymer free stents, and bio-degradable polymers are being studied in diabetic patients with encouraging results.

  18. Agreement of duplex ultrasonography vs. computed tomography angiography for evaluation of native and in-stent SFA re-stenosis—Findings from a randomized controlled trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langenberger, Herbert; Schillinger, Martin; Plank, Christina; Sabeti, Schila; Dick, Petra; Cejna, Manfred; Lammer, Johannes; Minar, Erich; Loewe, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Background: Multidetector CT angiography (CTA) is a non-invasive imaging technique for evaluation of peripheral vascular disease. CTA might be particularly useful for assessment of intermediate- and long-term morphological outcome after endovascular treatment. Validation of CTA vs. the current imaging standard, colour Doppler ultrasonography (CDUS), for quantification of native and in-stent re-stenosis in the superficial femoral artery (SFA) is required. Methods: Seventy randomized patients who underwent stent implantation (n = 47) or balloon angioplasty (n = 23) underwent 6-month follow-up with CDUS and CTA. CTA was compared with CDUS in both sub-groups of patients in terms of binary re-stenosis (>50% lumen narrowing) and re-occlusion. Agreement between CTA and CDUS was assessed using Kappa (κ) statistics with 95% confidence intervals, and correlation coefficients. Results: Binary re-stenosis was detected in 16/70 (22.9%) patients by CTA and 17/70 (24.3%) patients by CDUS (κ = 0.88, 95% CI: 0.80–0.96). Re-stenosis rates after balloon angioplasty were 39.1% (9/23) on CTA and CDUS (κ = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.66–0.98), and after stent implantation 14.9% (7/47) on CTA and 17.0% (8/47) on CDUS (κ = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.84–1.00). Re-occlusions were detected in 3/70 (4.3%) patients by both CTA and CDUS (κ = 0.65; 95% CI 0.54–0.76). Significant correlations (r = 0.85, p < 0.001) were noted between degree of re-stenosis on CTA and peak velocity ratio on CDUS. The correlation coefficient was higher in patients after balloon angioplasty (r = 0.94, p < 0.001) than in patients after stent implantation (r = 0.71, p < 0.001). Conclusion: CTA and CDUS show excellent agreement for evaluation of native and in-stent re-stenosis after endovascular treatment of SFA obstructions. CTA is an appropriate non-invasive imaging modality for follow-up after endovascular therapy

  19. Text messaging reminders for influenza vaccine in primary care: protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial (TXT4FLUJAB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrett, Emily; van Staa, Tjeerd; Free, Caroline; Smeeth, Liam

    2014-05-02

    The UK government recommends that at least 75% of people aged under 64 with certain conditions receive an annual influenza vaccination. Primary care practices often fall short of this target and strategies to increase vaccine uptake are required. Text messaging reminders are already used in 30% of practices to remind patients about vaccination, but there has been no trial addressing their effectiveness in increasing influenza vaccine uptake in the UK. The aims of the study are (1) to develop the methodology for conducting cluster randomised trials of text messaging interventions utilising routine electronic health records and (2) to assess the effectiveness of using a text messaging influenza vaccine reminder in achieving an increase in influenza vaccine uptake in patients aged 18-64 with chronic conditions, compared with standard care. This cluster randomised trial will recruit general practices across three settings in English primary care (Clinical Practice Research Datalink, ResearchOne and London iPLATO text messaging software users) and randomise them to either standard care or a text messaging campaign to eligible patients. Flu vaccine uptake will be ascertained using routinely collected, anonymised electronic patient records. This protocol outlines the proposed study design and analysis methods. This study will determine the effectiveness of text messaging vaccine reminders in primary care in increasing influenza vaccine uptake, and will strengthen the methodology for using electronic health records in cluster randomised trials of text messaging interventions. This trial was approved by the Surrey Borders Ethics Committee (13/LO/0872). The trial results will be disseminated at national conferences and published in a peer-reviewed medical journal. The results will also be distributed to the Primary Care Research Network and to all participating general practices. This study is registered at controlled-trials.com ISRCTN48840025, July 2013.

  20. Tachikawa project for prevention of posttraumatic stress disorder with polyunsaturated fatty acid (TPOP): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Yutaka; Nishi, Daisuke; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Hamazaki, Kei; Matsumura, Kenta; Noguchi, Hiroko; Hashimoto, Kenji; Hamazaki, Tomohito

    2013-01-05

    Preclinical and clinical studies suggest that supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids after trauma might reduce subsequent posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). To date, we have shown in an open trial that PTSD symptoms in critically injured patients can be reduced by taking omega-3 fatty acids, hypothesized to stimulate hippocampal neurogenesis. The primary aim of the present randomized controlled trial is to examine the efficacy of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in the secondary prevention of PTSD following accidental injury, as compared with placebo. This paper describes the rationale and protocol of this trial. The Tachikawa Project for Prevention of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder with Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid (TPOP) is a double-blinded, parallel group, randomized controlled trial to assess whether omega-3 fatty acid supplementation can prevent PTSD symptoms among accident-injured patients consecutively admitted to an intensive care unit. We plan to recruit accident-injured patients and follow them prospectively for 12 weeks. Enrolled patients will be randomized to either the omega-3 fatty acid supplement group (1,470 mg docosahexaenoic acid and 147 mg eicosapentaenoic acid daily) or placebo group. Primary outcome is score on the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS). We will need to randomize 140 injured patients to have 90% power to detect a 10-point difference in mean CAPS scores with omega-3 fatty acid supplementation compared with placebo. Secondary measures are diagnosis of PTSD and major depressive disorder, depressive symptoms, physiologic response in the experiment using script-driven imagery and acoustic stimulation, serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor, health-related quality of life, resilience, and aggression. Analyses will be by intent to treat. The trial was initiated on December 13 2008, with 104 subjects randomized by November 30 2012. This study promises to be the first trial to provide a novel prevention strategy for PTSD among

  1. Remotely-Supervised Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS for Clinical Trials: Guidelines for Technology and Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh E Charvet

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is cumulative. Treatment protocols typically require multiple consecutive sessions spanning weeks or months. However, traveling to clinic for a tDCS session can present an obstacle to subjects and their caregivers. With modified devices and headgear, tDCS treatment can be administered remotely under clinical supervision, potentially enhancing recruitment, throughput, and convenience. Here we propose standards and protocols for clinical trials utilizing remotely-supervised tDCS with the goal of providing safe, reproducible and well-tolerated stimulation therapy outside of the clinic. The recommendations include: 1 training of staff in tDCS treatment and supervision, 2 assessment of the user’s capability to participate in tDCS remotely, 3 ongoing training procedures and materials including assessments of the user and/or caregiver, 4 simple and fail-safe electrode preparation techniques and tDCS headgear, 5 strict dose control for each session, 6 ongoing monitoring to quantify compliance (device preparation, electrode saturation/placement, stimulation protocol, with corresponding corrective steps as required, 7 monitoring for treatment-emergent adverse effects, 8 guidelines for discontinuation of a session and/or study participation including emergency failsafe procedures tailored to the treatment population’s level of need. These guidelines are intended to provide a minimal level of methodological rigor for clinical trials seeking to apply tDCS outside a specialized treatment center. We outline indication-specific applications (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Depression, Multiple Sclerosis, Palliative Care following these recommendations that support a standardized framework for evaluating the tolerability and reproducibility of remote-supervised tDCS that, once established, will allow for translation of tDCS clinical trials to a greater size and range of patient populations.

  2. A clinical trial protocol to treat massive Africanized honeybee (Apis mellifera) attack with a new apilic antivenom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Alexandre Naime; Boyer, Leslie; Chippaux, Jean-Philippe; Medolago, Natalia Bronzatto; Caramori, Carlos Antonio; Paixão, Ariane Gomes; Poli, João Paulo Vasconcelos; Mendes, Mônica Bannwart; Dos Santos, Lucilene Delazari; Ferreira, Rui Seabra; Barraviera, Benedito

    2017-01-01

    Envenomation caused by multiple stings from Africanized honeybees Apis mellifera constitutes a public health problem in the Americas. In 2015, the Brazilian Ministry of Health reported 13,597 accidents (incidence of seven cases per 100,000 inhabitants) with 39 deaths (lethality of 0.25%). The toxins present in the venom, which include melittin and phospholipase A 2 , cause lesions in diverse organs and systems that may be fatal. As there has been no specific treatment to date, management has been symptomatic and supportive only. In order to evaluate the safety and neutralizing capacity of a new apilic antivenom, as well as to confirm its lowest effective dose, a clinical protocol was developed to be applied in a multicenter, non-randomized and open phase I/II clinical trial. Twenty participants with more than five stings, aged more than 18 years, of both sexes, who have not previously received the heterologous serum against bee stings, will be included for 24 months. The proposed dose was based on the antivenom neutralizing capacity and the number of stings. Treatment will be administered only in a hospital environment and the participants will be evaluated for a period up to 30 days after discharge for clinical and laboratory follow-up. This protocol, approved by the Brazilian regulatory agencies for ethics (National Commission for Ethics on Research - CONEP) and sanitation (National Health Surveillance Agency - ANVISA), is a guideline constituted by specific, adjuvant, symptomatic and complementary treatments, in addition to basic orientations for conducting a clinical trial involving heterologous sera. This is the first clinical trial protocol designed specifically to evaluate the preliminary efficacy and safety of a new antivenom against stings from the Africanized honeybee Apis mellifera . The results will support future studies to confirm a new treatment for massive bee attack that has a large impact on public health in the Americas.

  3. Multicentre trial of a perioperative protocol to reduce mortality in patients with peptic ulcer perforation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, M H; Adamsen, S; Thomsen, R W

    2011-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality rates in patients with perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) remain substantial. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of a multimodal and multidisciplinary perioperative care protocol on mortality in patients with PPU.......Morbidity and mortality rates in patients with perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) remain substantial. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of a multimodal and multidisciplinary perioperative care protocol on mortality in patients with PPU....

  4. Resource use and costs of type 2 diabetes patients receiving managed or protocolized primary care: a controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, Amber A W A; de Bruijne, Martine C; Feenstra, Talitha L; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Baan, Caroline A; Bosmans, Judith E; Bot, Sandra D M; Donker, Gé A; Nijpels, Giel

    2014-06-25

    care was significantly associated with better process in terms of diabetes care, fewer secondary care consultations and lower health care costs. The same trends were seen for protocolized care, however they were not statistically significant. Current Controlled trials: ISRCTN66124817.

  5. Assessment of Vascular Stent Heating with Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnerin, Nicole; Mirando, David; Potter-Baker, Kelsey A; Cardenas, Jesus; Cunningham, David A; Sankarasubramanian, Vishwanath; Beall, Erik; Plow, Ela B

    2017-05-01

    A high proportion of patients with stroke do not qualify for repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) clinical studies due to the presence of metallic stents. The ultimate concern is that any metal could become heated due to eddy currents. However, to date, no clinical safety data are available regarding the risk of metallic stents heating with rTMS. We tested the safety of common rTMS protocols (1 Hz and 10 Hz) with stents used commonly in stroke, nitinol and elgiloy. In our method, stents were tested in gelled saline at 2 different locations: at the center and at the lobe of the coil. In addition, at each location, stent heating was evaluated in 3 different orientations: parallel to the long axis of coil, parallel to the short axis of the coil, and perpendicular to the plane of the coil. We found that stents did not heat to more than 1°C with either 1 Hz rTMS or 10 Hz rTMS in any configuration or orientation. Heating in general was greater at the lobe when the stent was oriented perpendicularly. Our study represents a new method for ex vivo quantification of stent heating. We have found that heating of stents was well below the Food and Drug Administration standards of 2°C. Thus, our study paves the way for in vivo testing of rTMS (≤10 Hz) in the presence of implanted magnetic resonance imaging-compatible stents in animal studies. When planning human safety studies though, geometry, orientation, and location relative to the coil would be important to consider as well. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Long-term forecasting and comparison of mortality in the Evaluation of the Xience Everolimus Eluting Stent vs. Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery for Effectiveness of Left Main Revascularization (EXCEL) trial: prospective validation of the SYNTAX Score II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Carlos M; van Klaveren, David; Farooq, Vasim; Simonton, Charles A; Kappetein, Arie-Pieter; Sabik, Joseph F; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Stone, Gregg W; Serruys, Patrick W

    2015-05-21

    To prospectively validate the SYNTAX Score II and forecast the outcomes of the randomized Evaluation of the Xience Everolimus-Eluting Stent Versus Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery for Effectiveness of Left Main Revascularization (EXCEL) Trial. Evaluation of the Xience Everolimus Eluting Stent vs. Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery for Effectiveness of Left Main Revascularization is a prospective, randomized multicenter trial designed to establish the efficacy and safety of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with the everolimus-eluting stent compared with coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery in subjects with unprotected left-main coronary artery (ULMCA) disease and low-intermediate anatomical SYNTAX scores (EXCEL, the SYNTAX Score II was prospectively applied to predict 4-year mortality in the CABG and PCI arms. The 95% prediction intervals (PIs) for mortality were computed using simulation with bootstrap resampling (10 000 times). For the entire study cohort, the 4-year predicted mortalities were 8.5 and 10.5% in the PCI and CABG arms, respectively [odds ratios (OR) 0.79; 95% PI 0.43-1.50). In subjects with low (≤22) anatomical SYNTAX scores, the predicted OR was 0.69 (95% PI 0.34-1.45); in intermediate anatomical SYNTAX scores (23-32), the predicted OR was 0.93 (95% PI 0.53-1.62). Based on 4-year mortality predictions in EXCEL, clinical characteristics shifted long-term mortality predictions either in favour of PCI (older age, male gender and COPD) or CABG (younger age, lower creatinine clearance, female gender, reduced left ventricular ejection fraction). The SYNTAX Score II indicates at least an equipoise for long-term mortality between CABG and PCI in subjects with ULMCA disease up to an intermediate anatomical complexity. Both anatomical and clinical characteristics had a clear impact on long-term mortality predictions and decision making between CABG and PCI. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The

  7. Protocol for the combined immunosuppression & radiotherapy in thyroid eye disease (CIRTED trial: A multi-centre, double-masked, factorial randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kingston Laura

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical management of thyroid eye disease remains controversial due to a paucity of high quality evidence on long-term treatment outcomes. Glucocorticoids are known to be effective initially but have significant side-effects with long-term use and recrudescence can occur on cessation. Current evidence is conflicting on the efficacy of radiotherapy and non-steroid systemic immunosuppression, and the majority of previous studies have been retrospective, uncontrolled, small or poorly designed. The Combined Immunosuppression and Radiotherapy in Thyroid Eye Disease (CIRTED trial was designed to investigate the efficacy of radiotherapy and azathioprine in combination with a standard course of oral prednisolone in patients with active thyroid eye disease. Methods/design Patients with active thyroid eye disease will be randomised to receive (i azathioprine or oral placebo and (ii radiotherapy or sham-radiotherapy in this multi-centre, factorial randomised control trial. The primary outcome is improvement in disease severity (assessed using a composite binary measure at 12 months and secondary end-points include quality of life scores and health economic measures. Discussion The CIRTED trial is the first study to evaluate the role of radiotherapy and azathioprine as part of a long-term, combination immunosuppressive treatment regime for Thyroid Eye Disease. It will provide evidence for the role of radiotherapy and prolonged immunosuppression in the management of this condition, as well as pilot data on their use in combination. We have paid particular attention in the trial design to establishing (a robust placebo controls and masking protocols which are effective and safe for both radiotherapy and the systemic administration of an antiproliferative drug; (b constructing effective inclusion and exclusion criteria to select for active disease; and (c selecting pragmatic outcome measures. Trial registration Current controlled trials

  8. Understanding influences on teachers' uptake and use of behaviour management strategies within the STARS trial: process evaluation protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansford, Lorraine; Sharkey, Siobhan; Edwards, Vanessa; Ukoumunne, Obioha; Byford, Sarah; Norwich, Brahm; Logan, Stuart; Ford, Tamsin

    2015-02-10

    The 'Supporting Teachers And childRen in Schools' (STARS) study is a cluster randomised controlled trial evaluating the Incredible Years Teacher Classroom Management (TCM) programme as a public health intervention. TCM is a 6 day training course delivered to groups of 8-12 teachers. The STARS trial will investigate whether TCM can improve children's behaviour, attainment and wellbeing, reduce teachers' stress and improve their self-efficacy. This protocol describes the methodology of the process evaluation embedded within the main trial, which aims to examine the uptake and implementation of TCM strategies within the classroom plus the wider school environment and improve the understanding of outcomes. The STARS trial will work with eighty teachers of children aged 4-9 years from eighty schools. Teachers will be randomised to attend the TCM course (intervention arm) or to "teach as normal" (control arm) and attend the course a year later. The process evaluation will use quantitative and qualitative approaches to assess fidelity to model, as well as explore headteachers' and teachers' experiences of TCM and investigate school factors that influence the translation of skills learnt to practice. Four of the eight groups of teachers (n = 40) will be invited to participate in focus groups within one month of completing the TCM course, and again a year later, while 45 of the 80 headteachers will be invited to take part in telephone interviews. Standardised checklists will be completed by group leaders and each training session will be videotaped to assess fidelity to model. Teachers will also complete standardised session evaluations. This study will provide important information about whether the Teacher Classroom Management course influences child and teacher mental health and well-being in both the short and long term. The process evaluation will provide valuable insights into factors that may facilitate or impede any impact. The trial has been registered with ISCTRN

  9. Cluster randomized trial in the general practice research database: 2. Secondary prevention after first stroke (eCRT study: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dregan Alex

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this research is to develop and evaluate methods for conducting pragmatic cluster randomized trials in a primary care electronic database. The proposal describes one application, in a less frequent chronic condition of public health importance, secondary prevention of stroke. A related protocol in antibiotic prescribing was reported previously. Methods/Design The study aims to implement a cluster randomized trial (CRT using the electronic patient records of the General Practice Research Database (GPRD as a sampling frame and data source. The specific objective of the trial is to evaluate the effectiveness of a computer-delivered intervention at enhancing the delivery of stroke secondary prevention in primary care. GPRD family practices will be allocated to the intervention or usual care. The intervention promotes the use of electronic prompts to support adherence with the recommendations of the UK Intercollegiate Stroke Working Party and NICE guidelines for the secondary prevention of stroke in primary care. Primary outcome measure will be the difference in systolic blood pressure between intervention and control trial arms at 12-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes will be differences in serum cholesterol, prescribing of antihypertensive drugs, statins, and antiplatelet therapy. The intervention will continue for 12 months. Information on the utilization of the decision-support tools will also be analyzed. Discussion The CRT will investigate the effectiveness of using a computer-delivered intervention to reduce the risk of stroke recurrence following a first stroke event. The study will provide methodological guidance on the implementation of CRTs in electronic databases in primary care. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN35701810

  10. The transvaginal hybrid NOTES versus conventionally assisted laparoscopic sigmoid resection for diverticular disease (TRANSVERSAL) trial: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senft, Jonas D; Warschkow, Rene; Diener, Markus K; Tarantino, Ignazio; Steinemann, Daniel C; Lamm, Sebastian; Simon, Thomas; Zerz, Andreas; Müller-Stich, Beat P; Linke, Georg R

    2014-11-20

    current surgical standard for sigmoid resection. The trial protocol was registered in the German Clinical Trials Register ( DRKS00005995) on March 27, 2014.

  11. Intensive group training protocol versus guideline physiotherapy for patients with chronic low back pain: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Roer, Nicole; van Tulder, Maurits; Barendse, Johanna; Knol, Dirk; van Mechelen, Willem; de Vet, Henrica

    2008-09-01

    Intensive group training using principles of graded activity has been proven to be effective in occupational care for workers with chronic low back pain. Objective of the study was to compare the effects of an intensive group training protocol aimed at returning to normal daily activities and guideline physiotherapy for primary care patients with non-specific chronic low back pain. The study was designed as pragmatic randomised controlled trial with a setup of 105 primary care physiotherapists in 49 practices and 114 patients with non-specific low back pain of more than 12 weeks duration participated in the study. In the intensive group training protocol exercise therapy, back school and operant-conditioning behavioural principles are combined. Patients were treated during 10 individual sessions along 20 group sessions. Usual care consisted of physiotherapy according to the Dutch guidelines for Low Back Pain. Main outcome measures were functional disability (Roland Morris disability questionnaire), pain intensity, perceived recovery and sick leave because of low back pain assessed at baseline and after 6, 13, 26 and 52 weeks. Both an intention-to-treat analysis and a per-protocol analysis were performed. Multilevel analysis did not show significant differences between both treatment groups on any outcome measures during the complete follow-up period, with one exception. After 26 weeks the protocol group showed more reduction in pain intensity than the guideline group, but this difference was absent after 52 weeks. We finally conclude that an intensive group training protocol was not more effective than usual physiotherapy for chronic low back pain.

  12. Use of protocol and evaluation of postoperative residual curarization incidence in the absence of intraoperative acceleromyography - Randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Nadir Caparica Santos

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Evaluate the incidence of postoperative residual curarization (PORC in the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU after the use of protocol and absence of intraoperative acceleromyography (AMG. Methods Randomized clinical trial with 122 patients allocated into two groups (protocol and control. Protocol group received initial and additional doses of rocuronium (0.6 mg·kg-1 and 10 mg, respectively; the use of rocuronium was avoided in the final 45 min; blockade reversal with neostigmine (50 µg·kg-1; time ≥15 min between reversion and extubation. Control: initial and additional doses of rocuronium, blockade reversal, neostigmine dose, and extubation time, all at the discretion of the anesthesiologist. AMG was used in the PACU and PORC considered at T4/T1 ratio <1.0. Results The incidence of PORC was lower in protocol group than in control group (25% vs. 45.2%, p = 0.02. In control group, total dose of rocuronium was higher in patients with PORC than without PORC (0.43 vs. 0.35 mg·kg-1·h-1, p = 0.03 and the time interval between the last administration of rocuronium and neostigmine was lower (75.0 vs. 101.0 min, p < 0.01. In protocol group, there was no difference regarding the analyzed parameters (with PORC vs. without PORC. Considering the entire study population and the presence or absence of PORC, total dose of rocuronium was higher in patients with PORC (0.42 vs. 0.31 mg·kg-1·h-1, p = 0.01, while the time interval between the last administration of rocuronium and neostigmine was lower (72.5 vs. 99.0 min, p ≤ 0.01. Conclusion The proposed systematization reduced PORC incidence in PACU in the absence of intraoperative AMG.

  13. Measuring the impact and costs of a universal group based parenting programme: protocol and implementation of a trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winstanley Sarah

    2010-06-01

    new UK research governance procedures. Discussion Whilst there are strong theoretical arguments to support universal provision of parenting programmes, few universal programmes have been subjected to randomised controlled trials. In this paper we describe a RCT protocol with quantitative and qualitative outcome measures and an economic evaluation designed to provide clear evidence with regard to effectiveness and costs. We describe challenges implementing the protocol and how we are addressing these. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN13919732

  14. Effectiveness of trigger point dry needling for plantar heel pain: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landorf Karl B

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plantar heel pain (plantar fasciitis is a common and disabling condition, which has a detrimental impact on health-related quality of life. Despite the high prevalence of plantar heel pain, the optimal treatment for this disorder remains unclear. Consequently, an alternative therapy such as dry needling is increasingly being used as an adjunctive treatment by health practitioners. Only two trials have investigated the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain, however both trials were of a low methodological quality. This manuscript describes the design of a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain. Methods Eighty community-dwelling men and woman aged over 18 years with plantar heel pain (who satisfy the inclusion and exclusion criteria will be recruited. Eligible participants with plantar heel pain will be randomised to receive either one of two interventions, (i real dry needling or (ii sham dry needling. The protocol (including needling details and treatment regimen was formulated by general consensus (using the Delphi research method using 30 experts worldwide that commonly use dry needling for plantar heel pain. Primary outcome measures will be the pain subscale of the Foot Health Status Questionnaire and "first step" pain as measured on a visual analogue scale. The secondary outcome measures will be health related quality of life (assessed using the Short Form-36 questionnaire - Version Two and depression, anxiety and stress (assessed using the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale - short version. Primary outcome measures will be performed at baseline, 2, 4, 6 and 12 weeks and secondary outcome measures will be performed at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks. Data will be analysed using the intention to treat principle. Conclusion This study is the first randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain. The trial will

  15. StentBoost Visualization for the Evaluation of Coronary Stent Expansion During Percutaneous Coronary Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Cura, Fernando; Albertal, Mariano; Candiello, Alfonsina; Nau, Gerardo; Bonvini, Victor; Tricherri, Hernan; Padilla, Lucio T.; Belardi, Jorge A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Inadequate stent implantation is associated with stent thrombosis and restenosis. StentBoost can enhance stent visualization and evaluate stent expansion. Currently, there are limited comparison studies between StentBoost and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). We aimed to test the correlation and agreement between IVUS and StentBoost measurements. Methods From December 2010 to December 2011, 38 patients (54 stents) were analyzed using IVUS and StentBoost. Minimal stent diameter and...

  16. Promoting physical activity in sedentary elderly Malays with type 2 diabetes: a protocol for randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazlina, Shariff-Ghazali; Browning, Colette Joy; Yasin, Shajahan

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Like many countries Malaysia is facing an increase in the number of people with type 2 diabetes mellitus diabetes (T2DM) and modifiable lifestyle factors such as sedentary behaviour are important drivers of this increase. The level of physical activity is low among elderly Malay people. In Malaysia, strategies to promote physical activity in elderly Malay people with T2DM are not well documented in the research literature. This paper discusses an intervention to increase physical activity in elderly Malay people with T2DM. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effectiveness of personalised feedback alone and in combination with peer support in promoting and maintaining physical activity in comparison with usual care. Methods and analysis A three-arm randomised controlled trial will be conducted among sedentary Malay adults aged 60 years and above with T2DM attending an urban primary healthcare clinic in Malaysia. The participants will be randomised into three groups for a 12-week intervention with a follow-up at 24 and 36 weeks to assess adherence. The primary outcome of this study is pedometer-determined physical activity. Glycaemic and blood pressure control, body composition, cardiorespiratory fitness, balance, lipid profile, health-related quality of life, psychological well-being, social support and self-efficacy for exercise are the secondary measures. Linear mixed models will be used to determine the effect of the intervention over time and between groups. Ethical and dissemination The Monash University Human Research Ethics Committee and the Malaysian Ministry of Health's Medical Research Ethics Committee approved this protocol. The findings of this study will be presented at international conferences and published in peer-reviewed journals. Trial registration This study protocol has been registered with the Malaysian National Medical Research Registry and with the Current Controlled Trial Ltd (http://www.controlled-trials

  17. Study protocol: a randomized controlled trial investigating the effects of a psychosexual training program for adolescents with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Kirsten; Greaves-Lord, Kirstin; Tick, Nouchka T; Verhulst, Frank C; Maras, Athanasios; van der Vegt, Esther J M

    2015-08-28

    Previous research shows that adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) run several risks in their psychosexual development and that these adolescents can have limited access to reliable information on puberty and sexuality, emphasizing the need for specific guidance of adolescents with ASD in their psychosexual development. Few studies have investigated the effects of psychosexual training programs for adolescents with ASD and to date no randomized controlled trials are available to study the effects of psychosexual interventions for this target group. The randomized controlled trial (RCT) described in this study protocol aims to investigate the effects of the Tackling Teenage Training (TTT) program on the psychosexual development of adolescents with ASD. This parallel clinical trial, conducted in the South-West of the Netherlands, has a simple equal randomization design with an intervention and a waiting-list control condition. Two hundred adolescents and their parents participate in this study. We assess the participants in both conditions using self-report as well as parent-report questionnaires at three time points during 1 year: at baseline (T1), post-treatment (T2), and for follow-up (T3). To our knowledge, the current study is the first that uses a randomized controlled design to study the effects of a psychosexual training program for adolescents with ASD. It has a number of methodological strengths, namely a large sample size, a wide range of functionally relevant outcome measures, the use of multiple informants, and a standardized research and intervention protocol. Also some limitations of the described study are identified, for instance not making a comparison between two treatment conditions, and no use of blinded observational measures to investigate the ecological validity of the research results. Dutch Trial Register NTR2860. Registered on 20 April 2011.

  18. Nodule management protocol of the NELSON randomised lung cancer screening trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Dong Ming; Gietema, Hester; de Koning, Harry; Vernhout, Rene; Nackaerts, Kristiaan; Prokop, Mathias; Weenink, Carla; Lammers, Jan-Willem; Groen, Harry; Oudkerk, Matthijs; van Klaveren, Rob

    In December 2003, the Dutch-Belgian NELSON trial, a Dutch acronym for "Nederlands-Leuvens Longkanker Screenings ONderzoek", has been launched. Primary objective of the NELSON trial is to investigate whether screening for lung cancer by 16-detector multi-slice CT with 16 mm x 0.75 mm collimation and

  19. The relaxation exercise and social support trial-resst: study protocol for a randomized community based trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakkash Rima

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies suggests a possible link between vaginal discharge and common mental distress, as well as highlight the implications of the subjective burden of disease and its link with mental health. Methods/Design This is a community-based intervention trial that aims to evaluate the impact of a psycho-social intervention on medically unexplained vaginal discharge (MUVD in a group of married, low-income Lebanese women, aged 18-49, and suffering from low to moderate levels of anxiety and/or depression. The intervention consisted of 12 sessions of structured social support, problem solving techniques, group discussions and trainer-supervised relaxation exercises (twice per week over six weeks. Women were recruited from Hey el Selloum, a southern disadvantaged suburb of Beirut, Lebanon, during an open recruitment campaign. The primary outcome was self-reported MUVD, upon ruling out reproductive tract infections (RTIs, through lab analysis. Anxiety and/or depression symptoms were the secondary outcomes for this trial. These were assessed using an Arabic validated version of the Hopkins Symptoms Checklist-25 (HSCL-25. Assessments were done at baseline and six months using face-to face interviews, pelvic examinations and laboratory tests. Women were randomized into either intervention or control group. Intent to treat analysis will be used. Discussion The results will indicate whether the proposed psychosocial intervention was effective in reducing MUVD (possibly mediated by common mental distress. Trial Registration The trial is registered at the Wellcome Trust Registry, ISRCTN assigned: ISRCTN: ISRCTN98441241

  20. Predictors of early stent occlusion among plastic biliary stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khashab, Mouen A; Kim, Katherine; Hutfless, Susan; Lennon, Anne Marie; Kalloo, Anthony N; Singh, Vikesh K

    2012-09-01

    A major disadvantage of plastic biliary stents is their short patency rates. The aim of this study was to identify predictors of early stent occlusion among patients receiving conventional plastic biliary stents. Early stent occlusion was defined as worsening cholestatic liver test results of a severity sufficiently significant to warrant ERCP with stent exchange prior to the planned stent exchange, or as symptoms of cholangitis. The association of cumulative stent diameter, demographics, stricture location, procedure indication, Charlson comorbidity index, history of prior early stent occlusion, presence of gallbladder, and performance of sphincteromy with the occurrence of early stent occlusion was studied using logistic regression and multivariate analysis. Our patient cohort comprised 343 patients (mean age 59.3 years) who underwent 561 ERCP procedures with the placement of one or more plastic biliary stents (mean number of stents per procedure 1.2, mean total diameter of stents per procedure 12 Fr). Early stent occlusion occurred in 73 (13 %) procedures. Female gender was protective against early stent occlusion (adjusted OR 0.54, 95 % CI 0.32-0.90, p = 0.02), while hilar stricture location was independently associated with a significantly increased risk of early stent occlusion (adjusted OR 3.41, 95 % CI 1.68-6.90, p = 0.0007). Early occlusion of conventional biliary stents occurred in 13 % of cases. While female gender decreased the risk of early stent occlusion, hilar stricture location was a significant predictor of early stent occlusion. Our results suggest that physicians should consider early elective stent exchange in patients with hilar strictures.

  1. Stopping randomized trials early for benefit: a protocol of the Study Of Trial Policy Of Interim Truncation-2 (STOPIT-2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briel, Matthias; Lane, Melanie; Montori, Victor M; Bassler, Dirk; Glasziou, Paul; Malaga, German; Akl, Elie A; Ferreira-Gonzalez, Ignacio; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Urrutia, Gerard; Kunz, Regina; Culebro, Carolina Ruiz; da Silva, Suzana Alves; Flynn, David N; Elamin, Mohamed B; Strahm, Brigitte; Murad, M Hassan; Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Adhikari, Neill KJ; Mills, Edward J; Gwadry-Sridhar, Femida; Kirpalani, Haresh; Soares, Heloisa P; Elnour, Nisrin O Abu; You, John J; Karanicolas, Paul J; Bucher, Heiner C; Lampropulos, Julianna F; Nordmann, Alain J; Burns, Karen EA; Mulla, Sohail M; Raatz, Heike; Sood, Amit; Kaur, Jagdeep; Bankhead, Clare R; Mullan, Rebecca J; Nerenberg, Kara A; Vandvik, Per Olav; Coto-Yglesias, Fernando; Schünemann, Holger; Tuche, Fabio; Chrispim, Pedro Paulo M; Cook, Deborah J; Lutz, Kristina; Ribic, Christine M; Vale, Noah; Erwin, Patricia J; Perera, Rafael; Zhou, Qi; Heels-Ansdell, Diane; Ramsay, Tim; Walter, Stephen D; Guyatt, Gordon H

    2009-01-01

    Background Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) stopped early for benefit often receive great attention and affect clinical practice, but pose interpretational challenges for clinicians, researchers, and policy makers. Because the decision to stop the trial may arise from catching the treatment effect at a random high, truncated RCTs (tRCTs) may overestimate the true treatment effect. The Study Of Trial Policy Of Interim Truncation (STOPIT-1), which systematically reviewed the epidemiology and reporting quality of tRCTs, found that such trials are becoming more common, but that reporting of stopping rules and decisions were often deficient. Most importantly, treatment effects were often implausibly large and inversely related to the number of the events accrued. The aim of STOPIT-2 is to determine the magnitude and determinants of possible bias introduced by stopping RCTs early for benefit. Methods/Design We will use sensitive strategies to search for systematic reviews addressing the same clinical question as each of the tRCTs identified in STOPIT-1 and in a subsequent literature search. We will check all RCTs included in each systematic review to determine their similarity to the index tRCT in terms of participants, interventions, and outcome definition, and conduct new meta-analyses addressing the outcome that led to early termination of the tRCT. For each pair of tRCT and systematic review of corresponding non-tRCTs we will estimate the ratio of relative risks, and hence estimate the degree of bias. We will use hierarchical multivariable regression to determine the factors associated with the magnitude of this ratio. Factors explored will include the presence and quality of a stopping rule, the methodological quality of the trials, and the number of total events that had occurred at the time of truncation. Finally, we will evaluate whether Bayesian methods using conservative informative priors to "regress to the mean" overoptimistic tRCTs can correct observed

  2. Stopping randomized trials early for benefit: a protocol of the Study Of Trial Policy Of Interim Truncation-2 (STOPIT-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mullan Rebecca J

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Randomized clinical trials (RCTs stopped early for benefit often receive great attention and affect clinical practice, but pose interpretational challenges for clinicians, researchers, and policy makers. Because the decision to stop the trial may arise from catching the treatment effect at a random high, truncated RCTs (tRCTs may overestimate the true treatment effect. The Study Of Trial Policy Of Interim Truncation (STOPIT-1, which systematically reviewed the epidemiology and reporting quality of tRCTs, found that such trials are becoming more common, but that reporting of stopping rules and decisions were often deficient. Most importantly, treatment effects were often implausibly large and inversely related to the number of the events accrued. The aim of STOPIT-2 is to determine the magnitude and determinants of possible bias introduced by stopping RCTs early for benefit. Methods/Design We will use sensitive strategies to search for systematic reviews addressing the same clinical question as each of the tRCTs identified in STOPIT-1 and in a subsequent literature search. We will check all RCTs included in each systematic review to determine their similarity to the index tRCT in terms of participants, interventions, and outcome definition, and conduct new meta-analyses addressing the outcome that led to early termination of the tRCT. For each pair of tRCT and systematic review of corresponding non-tRCTs we will estimate the ratio of relative risks, and hence estimate the degree of bias. We will use hierarchical multivariable regression to determine the factors associated with the magnitude of this ratio. Factors explored will include the presence and quality of a stopping rule, the methodological quality of the trials, and the number of total events that had occurred at the time of truncation. Finally, we will evaluate whether Bayesian methods using conservative informative priors to "regress to the mean" overoptimistic t

  3. The OPERA trial: protocol for a randomised trial of an exercise intervention for older people in residential and nursing accommodation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Stephanie

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression is common in residents of Residential and Nursing homes (RNHs. It is usually undetected and often undertreated. Depression is associated with poor outcomes including increased morbidity and mortality. Exercise has potential to improve depression, and has been shown in existing trials to improve outcomes among younger and older people. Existing evidence comes from trials that are short, underpowered and not from RNH settings. The aim of the OPERA trial is to establish whether exercise is effective in reducing the prevalence of depression among older RNH residents. Method OPERA is a cluster randomised controlled trial. RNHs are randomised to one of two groups with interventions lasting 12 months Intervention group: a depression awareness and physical activity training session for care home staff, plus a whole home physical activation programme including twice weekly physiotherapist-led exercise groups. The intervention lasts for one year from randomisation, or Control group: a depression awareness training session for care home staff. Participants are people aged 65 or over who are free of severe cognitive impairment and willing to participate in the study. Our primary outcome is the prevalence of depressive symptoms, a GDS-15 score of five or more, in all participants at the end of the one year intervention period. Our secondary depression outcomes include remission of depressive symptoms and change in GDS-15 scores in those with depressive symptoms prior to randomisation. Other secondary outcomes include, fear of falling, mobility, fractures, pain, cognition, costs and health related quality of life. We aimed to randomise 77 RNHs. Discussion Home recruitment was completed in May 2010; 78 homes have been randomised. Follow up will finish in May 2011 and results will be available late 2011. Trial Registration [ISRCTN: ISRCTN43769277

  4. Pressure and pain In Systemic sclerosis/Scleroderma - an evaluation of a simple intervention (PISCES: randomised controlled trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcacer-Pitarch Begonya

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foot problems associated with Systemic Sclerosis (SSc/Scleroderma have been reported to be both common and disabling. There are only limited data describing specifically, the mechanical changes occurring in the foot in SSc. A pilot project conducted in preparation for this trial confirmed the previous reports of foot related impairment and reduced foot function in people with SSc and demonstrated a link to mechanical etiologies. To-date there have been no formal studies of interventions directed at the foot problems experienced by people with Systemic Sclerosis. The primary aim of this trial is to evaluate whether foot pain and foot-related health status in people with Systemic Sclerosis can be improved through the provision of a simple pressure-relieving insole. Methods The proposed trial is a pragmatic, multicenter, randomised controlled clinical trial following a completed pilot study. In four participating centres, 140 consenting patients with SSc and plantar foot pain will be randomised to receive either a commercially available pressure relieving and thermally insulating insole, or a sham insole with no cushioning or thermal properties. The primary end point is a reduction in pain measured using the Foot Function Index Pain subscale, 12 weeks after the start of intervention. Participants will complete the primary outcome measure (Foot Function Index pain sub-scale prior to randomisation and at 12 weeks post randomisation. Secondary outcomes include participant reported pain and disability as derived from the Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Questionnaire and plantar pressures with and without the insoles in situ. Discussion This trial protocol proposes a rigorous and potentially significant evaluation of a simple and readily provided therapeutic approach which, if effective, could be of a great benefit for this group of patients. Trial registration number ISRCTN: ISRCTN02824122

  5. Study protocol for a controlled trial of Strengths Model Case Management in mental health services in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoi, Wing-See Emily; Tse, Samson; Fukui, Sadaaki; Jones, Steven

    2015-10-06

    Although strengths-based models are popular within recovery-oriented approaches, there is still a lack of conclusive research to guide how they should be implemented. A recent meta-analysis confirmed the lack of clarity in how this perspective is operationalised and that fidelity monitoring during the implementation process is lacking. Hence, there is a clear need to evaluate the feasibility of delivering and evaluating a clearly operationalised strengths-based intervention that incorporates fidelity checks to inform more definitive research. This protocol therefore describes a controlled trial of Strengths Model Case Management (SMCM), a complex intervention, for people with severe mental illnesses in Hong Kong. This trial follows the guidelines of the Medical Research Council as a phase 2 trial. Hence, it is a pilot study that tests the feasibility and effectiveness of the model. This is a 9-month controlled trial that uses the Kansas Model. Participants and a matched control group are recruited on a voluntary basis, after screening for eligibility. Effectiveness of the SMCM will be measured through outcome measures taken at baseline, the mid-point and at the end of the trial. Outcomes for service users include personal recovery, hope, subjective well-being, psychiatric symptoms, perceived level of recovery features within the organisation, therapeutic alliance and achievement of recovery goals. Outcomes for care workers will include job burnout, organisational features of recovery and perceived supervisory support. With a 2×3 analysis of variance design and a moderate intervention effect (Cohen's d=0.50), a total of 86 participants will be needed for a statistical power of 0.80. Ethical approval has been obtained from the Human Research Ethics Committee for Non-Clinical Faculties at The University of Hong Kong (HRECNCF: EA140913). Australian New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry (ACTRN)12613001120763. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission

  6. Influence of covered stent versus bare stent on long-term efficacy of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Lu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the long-term postoperative efficacy of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS using polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE-covered stent or bare stent, and to provide a basis of evidence-based medicine for the selection of stent in TIPS. Methods CBM, Wanfang Data, CNKI, VIP, MEDLINE, and PubMed were searched for controlled trials on TIPS in the treatment of cirrhotic portal hypertension published form 1989 to 2015; the studies which met the inclusion criteria were selected, and quality assessment was performed for these articles. RevMan 5.3 software was used to analyze the incidence rates of stent dysfunction and hepatic encephalopathy and 1-year survival rate after TIPS, and funnel plots were used to analyze publication bias. Results A total of 11 studies were included, consisting of 698 patients in PTFE-covered stent group and 1283 patients in bare stent group. The results of the meta-analysis showed that the PTFE-covered stent group showed a significantly lower incidence rate of stent dysfunction than the bare stent group (14.8% vs 47.0%, OR=0.18, 95% CI: 0.13-0.24, P<0.001. There was no significant difference in the incidence rate of hepatic encephalopathy between the two groups (23.5% vs 25.7%, OR=0.88, 95% CI: 0.66-1.17, P=0.37. The PTFE-covered stent group had a significantly higher 1-year survival rate than the bare stent group (76.9% vs 62.7%, OR=2.10, 95% CI: 1.54-2.85, P<0.001. The funnel plots which were plotted based on the incidence rates of stent dysfunction and hepatic encephalopathy and 1-year survival rate lacked symmetry, which suggested that a certain degree of publication bias might exist. Conclusion Compared with the bare stent, the PTFE-covered stent can improve stent dysfunction and 1-year survival rate after TIPS, while there is no significant change in the incidence rate of hepatic encephalopathy. Therefore, the PTFE-covered stent has certain advantages over the bare stent in TIPS. In

  7. Study protocol for a pragmatic randomised controlled trial evaluating efficacy of a smoking cessation e-‘Tabac Info Service’: ee-TIS trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambon, L; Bergman, P; Le Faou, Al; Vincent, I; Le Maitre, B; Pasquereau, A; Arwidson, P; Thomas, D; Alla, F

    2017-01-01

    Introduction A French national smoking cessation service, Tabac Info Service, has been developed to provide an adapted quitline and a web and mobile application involving personalised contacts (eg, questionnaires, advice, activities, messages) to support smoking cessation. This paper presents the study protocol of the evaluation of the application (e-intervention Tabac Info Service (e-TIS)). The primary objective is to assess the efficacy of e-TIS. The secondary objectives are to (1) describe efficacy variations with regard to users' characteristics, (2) analyse mechanisms and contextual conditions of e-TIS efficacy. Methods and analyses The study design is a two-arm pragmatic randomised controlled trial including a process evaluation with at least 3000 participants randomised to the intervention or to the control arm (current practices). Inclusion criteria are: aged 18 years or over, current smoker, having completed the online consent forms, possessing a mobile phone with android or apple systems and using mobile applications, wanting to stop smoking sooner or later. The primary outcome is the point prevalence abstinence of 7 days at 6 months later. Data will be analysed in intention to treat (primary) and per protocol analyses. A logistic regression will be carried out to estimate an OR (95% CI) for efficacy. A multivariate multilevel analysis will explore the influence on results of patients' characteristics (sex, age, education and socioprofessional levels, dependency, motivation, quit experiences) and contextual factors, conditions of use, behaviour change techniques. Ethics and dissemination The study protocol was reviewed by the ethical and deontological institutional review board of the French Institute for Public Health Surveillance on 18 April 2016. The findings of this study will allow us to characterise the efficacy of e-TIS and conditions of its efficacy. These findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed articles. Trial registration

  8. Canadian Optically-guided approach for Oral Lesions Surgical (COOLS) trial: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poh, Catherine F; Durham, J Scott; Brasher, Penelope M; Anderson, Donald W; Berean, Kenneth W; MacAulay, Calum E; Lee, J Jack; Rosin, Miriam P

    2011-01-01

    Oral cancer is a major health problem worldwide. The 5-year survival rate ranges from 30-60%, and has remained unchanged in the past few decades. This is mainly due to late diagnosis and high recurrence of the disease. Of the patients who receive treatment, up to one third suffer from a recurrence or a second primary tumor. It is apparent that one major cause of disease recurrence is clinically unrecognized field changes which extend beyond the visible tumor boundary. We have previously developed an approach using fluorescence visualization (FV) technology to improve the recognition of the field at risk surrounding a visible oral cancer that needs to be removed and preliminary results have shown a significant reduction in recurrence rates. This paper describes the study design of a randomized, multi-centre, double blind, controlled surgical trial, the COOLS trial. Nine institutions across Canada will recruit a total of 400 patients with oral severe dysplasia or carcinoma in situ (N = 160) and invasive squamous cell carcinoma (N = 240). Patients will be stratified by participating institution and histology grade and randomized equally into FV-guided surgery (experimental arm) or white light-guided surgery (control arm). The primary endpoint is a composite of recurrence at or 1 cm within the previous surgery site with 1) the same or higher grade histology compared to the initial diagnosis (i.e., the diagnosis used for randomization); or 2) further treatment due to the presence of severe dysplasia or higher degree of change at follow-up. This is the first randomized, multi-centre trial to validate the effectiveness of the FV-guided surgery. In this paper we described the strategies, novelty, and challenges of this unique trial involving a surgical approach guided by the FV technology. The success of the trial requires training, coordination, and quality assurance across multiple sites within Canada. The COOLS trial, an example of translational research, may result in

  9. Optical Coherence Tomography Guided Percutaneous Coronary Intervention With Nobori Stent Implantation in Patients With Non-ST-Segment-Elevation Myocardial Infarction (OCTACS) Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonsen, Lisbeth; Thayssen, Per; Maehara, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    (s). A final OCT was performed in case of reintervention. Six-month OCT follow-up was available in 85 patients. Twenty-three (46%) OCT-guided patients had additional postdilation or stenting. The percentage of acutely malapposed struts was substantially lower in the OCT-guided group (3.4% [interquartile range......, 0.3-7.6] versus 7.8% [interquartile range, 2.3-19.4]; Pinterquartile range, 1.2-9.8] versus 9.0% [interquartile range, 5.5-14.5], P

  10. Role of Esophageal Metal Stents Placement and Combination Therapy in Inoperable Esophageal Carcinoma: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Andrew; Lipka, Seth; Kumar, Ambuj; Sethi, Sajiv; Bromberg, David; Li, Nanxing; Shen, Huafeng; Stefaniwsky, Lilia; Brady, Patrick

    2018-04-01

    More than 50% of patients with esophageal cancer already have inoperable disease at the time of diagnosis. Controversy surrounds the outcomes of patients with advanced esophageal cancer who receive palliative care by either stent alone or stent plus an additional modality. We set out to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies assessing the use of metal stents as treatment options for symptomatic improvement, survival, and adverse events. We searched Embase, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) from inception until January 14, 2016, as well as other databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing esophageal stent versus either esophageal stent plus brachytherapy, radiotherapy, or chemotherapy. For quality assurance purposes throughout the systematic review, multiple independent extractions were performed, and the process was executed as per the standards of the Cochrane collaboration. Primary outcomes were mean change in dysphagia score, overall survival, and quality of life. Secondary outcomes were adverse events including fever, severe pain, aspiration, fistula, stent migration, perforation, and restenosis. Eight RCTs enrolling 732 patients were included with three distinct comparisons: stents combination therapy vs stents alone (5 studies, n = 417), stents alone versus brachytherapy alone (2 studies, n = 274), and stents + brachytherapy vs brachytherapy alone (1 study, n = 41). Stents combination therapy was defined as stents plus radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or both. Mean change in dysphagia scores favored stents combination therapy versus stents alone, and the effect was seen in patients surviving longer than 3 months. Stents combination therapy was also associated with a more favorable overall survival. The risks of stent migration, aspiration pneumonia, and restenosis were lower in the stents combination group compared to stents alone, while the risks of severe pain, hemorrhage, and

  11. Ibuprofen versus mecillinam for uncomplicated cystitis - a randomized controlled trial study protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vik, Ingvild; Bollestad, Marianne; Grude, Nils

    2014-01-01

    , controlled, double blind trial following the principles of Good Clinical Practice. Women between the ages of 18 to 60 presenting with symptoms of uncomplicated cystitis are screened for eligibility. 500 women from four sites in Norway, Sweden and Denmark are allocated to treatment with 600 mg ibuprofen three.......DiscussionIf treatment of uncomplicated cystitis with ibuprofen is as effective as mecillinam for symptom relief, we can potentially reduce the use of antibiotics on a global scale.Trial registrationEudraCTnr: 2012-002776-14. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01849926....

  12. Cost-effectiveness of drug-eluting stents versus bare-metal stents in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Baschet, Louise; Bourguignon, Sandrine; Marque, S?bastien; Durand-Zaleski, Isabelle; Teiger, Emmanuel; Wilquin, Fanny; Levesque, Karine

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the cost-effectiveness of drug-eluting stents (DES) compared with bare-metal stents (BMS) in patients requiring a percutaneous coronary intervention in France, using a recent meta-analysis including second-generation DES. Methods A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed in the French National Health Insurance setting. Effectiveness settings were taken from a meta-analysis of 117?762 patient-years with 76 randomised trials. The main effectiveness criterion was major c...

  13. Protocol for a scoping review of post-trial extensions of randomised controlled trials using individually linked administrative and registry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Tiffany; Perrier, Laure; Tricco, Andrea C; Straus, Sharon E; Jüni, Peter; Zwarenstein, Merrick; Lix, Lisa M; Smith, Mark; Rosella, Laura C; Henry, David A

    2017-02-17

    Well-conducted randomised controlled trials (RCTs) provide the least biased estimates of intervention effects. However, RCTs are costly and time-consuming to perform and long-term follow-up of participants may be hampered by lost contacts and financial constraints. Advances in computing and population-based registries have created new possibilities for increasing the value of RCTs by post-trial extension using linkage to routinely collected administrative/registry data in order to determine long-term interventional effects. There have been recent important examples, including 20+ years follow-up studies of trials of pravastatin and mammography. Despite the potential value of post-trial extension, there has been no systematic study of this literature. This scoping review aims to characterise published post-trial extension studies, assess their value, and identify any potential challenges associated with this approach. This review will use the recommended methods for scoping reviews. We will search MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. A draft search strategy is included in this protocol. Review of titles and abstracts, full texts of potentially eligible studies and data/information extraction will be conducted independently by pairs of investigators. Eligible studies will be RCTs that investigated healthcare interventions that were extended by individual linkage to administrative/registry/electronic medical records data after the completion of the planned follow-up period. Information concerning the original trial, characteristics of the extension study, any clinical, policy or ethical implications and methodological or practical challenges will be collected using standardised forms. As this study uses secondary data, and does not include person-level data, ethics approval is not required. We aim to disseminate these findings through journals and conferences targeting triallists and researchers involved in health data linkage. We

  14. Pancreatitis of biliary origin, optimal timing of cholecystectomy (PONCHO trial: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouwense Stefan A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After an initial attack of biliary pancreatitis, cholecystectomy minimizes the risk of recurrent biliary pancreatitis and other gallstone-related complications. Guidelines advocate performing cholecystectomy within 2 to 4 weeks after discharge for mild biliary pancreatitis. During this waiting period, the patient is at risk of recurrent biliary events. In current clinical practice, surgeons usually postpone cholecystectomy for 6 weeks due to a perceived risk of a more difficult dissection in the early days following pancreatitis and for logistical reasons. We hypothesize that early laparoscopic cholecystectomy minimizes the risk of recurrent biliary pancreatitis or other complications of gallstone disease in patients with mild biliary pancreatitis without increasing the difficulty of dissection and the surgical complication rate compared with interval laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods/Design PONCHO is a randomized controlled, parallel-group, assessor-blinded, superiority multicenter trial. Patients are randomly allocated to undergo early laparoscopic cholecystectomy, within 72 hours after randomization, or interval laparoscopic cholecystectomy, 25 to 30 days after randomization. During a 30-month period, 266 patients will be enrolled from 18 hospitals of the Dutch Pancreatitis Study Group. The primary endpoint is a composite endpoint of mortality and acute re-admissions for biliary events (that is, recurrent biliary pancreatitis, acute cholecystitis, symptomatic/obstructive choledocholithiasis requiring endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography including cholangitis (with/without endoscopic sphincterotomy, and uncomplicated biliary colics occurring within 6 months following randomization. Secondary endpoints include the individual endpoints of the composite endpoint, surgical and other complications, technical difficulty of cholecystectomy and costs. Discussion The PONCHO trial is designed to show that early

  15. Perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis in the treatment of acute cholecystitis (PEANUTS II trial): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loozen, Charlotte S; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; van Geloven, Antoinette A W; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A P; de Reuver, Philip R; Besselink, Mark H G; Vlaminckx, Bart; Kelder, Johannes C; Knibbe, Catherijne A J; Boerma, Djamila

    2017-08-23

    The additional value of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis in preventing infectious complications after emergency cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis is a much-debated subject in the surgical community. Evidence-based guidelines are lacking, and consequently the use of antibiotic prophylaxis varies greatly among surgeons and hospitals. Recently, high-level evidence became available demonstrating that postoperative antibiotic prophylaxis in patients with acute cholecystitis does not reduce the risk of infectious complications. Preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis in relation to the risk of infectious complications, however, has never been studied. The PEANUTS II trial is a randomized, controlled, multicenter, open-label noninferiority trial whose aim is to determine the utility of preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis in patients undergoing emergency cholecystectomy for acute calculous cholecystitis. Patients with mild or moderate acute cholecystitis, as defined according the Tokyo Guidelines, will be randomly assigned to a single preoperative dose of antibiotic prophylaxis (2000 mg of first-generation cephalosporin delivered intravenously) or no antibiotic prophylaxis before emergency cholecystectomy. The primary endpoint is a composite endpoint consisting of all postoperative infectious complications occurring during the first 30 days after surgery. Secondary endpoints include all the individual components of the primary endpoint, all other complications, duration of hospital stay, and total costs. The hypothesis is that the absence of antibiotic prophylaxis is noninferior to the presence of antibiotic prophylaxis. A noninferiority margin of 10% is assumed. With a 1-sided risk of 2.5% and a power of 80%, a total of 454 subjects will have to be included. Analysis will be performed according to the intention-to-treat principle. The PEANUTS II trial will provide evidence-based advice concerning the utility of antibiotic prophylaxis in patients undergoing

  16. Percutaneous Ureteral stent insertion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Yup; Sung, Dong Wook; Choi, Woo Suk; Lee, Dong Ho; Ko, Young Tae; Lee, Sun Wha; Lim, Jae Hoon [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-10-15

    Percutaneous ureteral stent insertion is a treatment of permanent or temporary urinary diversion to maintain continuity and function of the obstructed and injured ureter. We performed 31 cases of percutaneous double pig tall ureteral stent insertion in 21 patients, included 13 patients with malignant ureteral obstruction and eight patients with injured ureter as well as benign inflammatory stricture. Satisfactory resulted was obtained in all patients but one, who need percutaneous nephrostomy on week later for urinary diversion. No significant complication was encountered. The authors concluded that percutaneous ureteral stent insertion, an interventional procedure alternative to urologic retrograde method, is an effective method for urinary diversion.

  17. The Healthy Steps Study: A randomized controlled trial of a pedometer-based Green Prescription for older adults. Trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schluter Philip J

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Graded health benefits of physical activity have been demonstrated for the reduction of coronary heart disease, some cancers, and type-2 diabetes, and for injury reduction and improvements in mental health. Older adults are particularly at risk of physical inactivity, and would greatly benefit from successful targeted physical activity interventions. Methods/Design The Healthy Steps study is a 12-month randomized controlled trial comparing the efficacy of a pedometer-based Green Prescription with the conventional time-based Green Prescription in increasing and maintaining physical activity levels in low-active adults over 65 years of age. The Green Prescription interventions involve a primary care physical activity prescription with 3 follow-up telephone counselling sessions delivered by trained physical activity counsellors over 3 months. Those in the pedometer group received a pedometer and counselling based around increasing steps that can be monitored on the pedometer, while those in the standard Green Prescription group received counselling using time-based goals. Baseline, 3 month (end of intervention, and 12 month measures were assessed in face-to-face home visits with outcomes measures being physical activity (Auckland Heart Study Physical Activity Questionnaire, quality of life (SF-36 and EQ-5D, depressive symptoms (Geriatric Depression Scale, blood pressure, weight status, functional status (gait speed, chair stands, and tandem balance test and falls and adverse events (self-report. Utilisation of health services was assessed for the economic evaluation carried out alongside this trial. As well, a process evaluation of the interventions and an examination of barriers and motives for physical activity in the sample were conducted. The perceptions of primary care physicians in relation to delivering physical activity counselling were also assessed. Discussion The findings from the Healthy Steps trial are due in late

  18. Prospective Evaluation of Two iStent® Trabecular Stents, One iStent Supra® Suprachoroidal Stent, and Postoperative Prostaglandin in Refractory Glaucoma: 4-year Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Jonathan S; Masood, Imran; Hornbeak, Dana M; Belda, Jose I; Auffarth, Gerd; Jünemann, Anselm; Giamporcaro, Jane Ellen; Martinez-de-la-Casa, Jose M; Ahmed, Iqbal Ike K; Voskanyan, Lilit; Katz, L Jay

    2018-03-01

    This study evaluates long-term outcomes of two trabecular micro-bypass stents, one suprachoroidal stent, and postoperative prostaglandin in eyes with refractory open angle glaucoma (OAG). Prospective ongoing 5-year study of 80 eligible subjects (70 with 4-year follow-up) with OAG and IOP ≥ 18 mmHg after prior trabeculectomy and while taking 1-3 glaucoma medications. Subjects received two iStent ® trabecular micro-bypass stents, one iStent Supra ® suprachoroidal stent, and postoperative travoprost. Postoperative IOP was measured with medication and annually following medication washouts. Performance was measured by the proportion of eyes with ≥ 20% IOP reduction on one medication (the protocol-specified prostaglandin) versus preoperative medicated IOP (primary outcome); and the proportion of eyes with postoperative IOP ≤ 15 and ≤ 18 mmHg on one medication (secondary outcome). Additional clinical and safety data included medications, visual field, pachymetry, gonioscopy, adverse events, visual acuity, and slit-lamp and fundus examinations. Preoperatively, mean medicated IOP was 22.0 ± 3.1 mmHg on 1.2 ± 0.4 medications, and mean unmedicated IOP was 26.4 ± 2.4 mmHg. Postoperatively, among eyes without later cataract surgery, mean medicated IOP at all visits through 48 months was ≤ 13.7 mmHg (≥ 37% reduction), and annual unmedicated IOP was ≤ 18.4 mmHg (reductions of ≥ 30% vs. preoperative unmedicated IOP and ≥ 16% vs. preoperative medicated IOP). At all postoperative visits among eyes without additional surgery or medication, ≥ 91% of eyes had ≥ 20% IOP reduction on one medication versus preoperative medicated IOP. At month 48, 97 and 98% of eyes achieved IOP ≤ 15 and ≤ 18 mmHg, respectively, on one medication. Six eyes required additional medication, no eyes required additional glaucoma surgery, and safety measurements were favorable throughout follow-up. IOP control was achieved safely with two

  19. Danish method study on cervical screening in women offered HPV vaccination as girls (Trial23): a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamsborg, Lise Holst; Andersen, Berit; Larsen, Lise Grupe; Christensen, Jette; Johansen, Tonje; Hariri, Jalil; Christiansen, Sanne; Rygaard, Carsten; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2018-05-26

    The first birth cohorts of women offered human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination as girls are now entering cervical screening. However, there is no international consensus on how to screen HPV vaccinated women. These women are better protected against cervical cancer and could therefore be offered less intensive screening. Primary HPV testing is more sensitive than cytology, allowing for a longer screening interval. The aim of Trial23 is to investigate if primary HPV testing with cytology triage of HPV positive samples is a reasonable screening scheme for women offered HPV vaccination as girls. Trial23 is a method study embedded in the existing cervical screening programme in four out of five Danish regions. Without affecting the screening programme, women born in 1994 are randomised to present screening with liquid-based cytology every third year (present programme arm) or present screening plus an HPV test (HPV arm). The study started 1 February 2017 and will run over three screening rounds corresponding to 7-8 years. The primary endpoint is cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 or above. The trial is undertaken as a non-inferiority study including intention-to-treat and per-protocol analyses. The potential effect of primary HPV screening with a 6-year interval will be calculated from the observed data. The study protocol has been submitted to the ethical committee and deemed a method study. All women are screened according to routine guidelines. The study will contribute new evidence on the future screening of HPV vaccinated birth cohorts of women. All results will be published in open-access journal. NCT03049553; Pre-results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. A randomized controlled trial of community health workers using patient stories to support hypertension management: Study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargraves, J Lee; Bonollo, Debra; Person, Sharina D; Ferguson, Warren J

    2018-04-12

    Uncontrolled hypertension is a significant public health problem in the U.S. with about one half of people able to keep blood pressure (BP) under control. Uncontrolled hypertension leads to increased risk of stroke, heart attack, and death. Furthermore, the social and economic costs of poor hypertension control are staggering. People living with hypertension can benefit from additional educational outreach and support. This randomized trial conducted at two Community Health Centers (CHCs) in Massachusetts assessed the effect of community health workers (CHWs) assisting patients with hypertension. In addition to the support provided by CHWs, the study uses video narratives from patients who have worked to control their BP through diet, exercise, and better medication adherence. Participants enrolled in the study were randomly assigned to immediate intervention (I) by CHWs or a delayed intervention (DI) (4 to 6 months later). Each participant was asked to meet with the CHW 5 times (twice in person and three times telephonically). Study outcomes include systolic and diastolic BP, diet, exercise, and body mass index. CHWs working directly with patients, using multiple approaches to support patient self-management, can be effective agents to support change in chronic illness management. Moreover, having culturally appropriate tools, such as narratives available through videos, can be an important, cost effective aid to CHWs. Recruitment and intervention delivery within a busy CHC environment required adaptation of the study design and protocols for staff supervision, data collection and intervention delivery and lessons learned are presented. Clinical Trials.gov registration submitted 8/17/16: Protocol ID# 5P60MD006912-02 and Clinical trials.gov ID# NCT02874547 Community Health Workers Using Patient Stories to Support Hypertension Management. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Meta Salud Diabetes study protocol: a cluster-randomised trial to reduce cardiovascular risk among a diabetic population of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornejo Vucovich, Elsa; Ingram, Maia; Valenica, Celina; Castro Vasquez, Maria del Carmen; Gonzalez-Fagoaga, Eduardo; Geurnsey de Zapien, Jill

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Northern Mexico has among the highest rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes in the world. This research addresses core gaps in implementation science to develop, test and scale-up CVD risk-reduction interventions in diabetics through a national primary care health system. Methods and analysis The Meta Salud Diabetes (MSD) research project is a parallel two-arm cluster-randomised clinical behavioural trial based in 22 (n=22) health centres in Sonora, Mexico. MSD aims to evaluate the effectiveness of the MSD intervention for the secondary prevention of CVD risk factors among a diabetic population (n=320) compared with the study control of usual care. The MSD intervention consists of 2-hour class sessions delivered over a 13-week period providing educational information to encourage sustainable behavioural change to prevent disease complications including the adoption of physical activity. MSD is delivered within the context of Mexico’s national primary care health centre system by health professionals, including nurses, physicians and community health workers via existing social support groups for individuals diagnosed with chronic disease. Mixed models are used to estimate the effect of MSD by comparing cardiovascular risk, as measured by the Framingham Risk Score, between the trial arms. Secondary outcomes include hypertension, behavioural risk factors and psychosocial factors. Ethics and dissemination This work is supported by the National Institutes of Health, National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (1R01HL125996-01) and approved by the University of Arizona Research Institutional Review Board (Protocol 1508040144) and the Research Bioethics Committee at the University of Sonora. The first Internal Review Board approval date was 31 August 2015 with five subsequent approved amendments. This article refers to protocol V.0.2, dated 30 January 2017. Results will be disseminated via peer-reviewed publication and presentation at

  2. Promoting physical activity in sedentary elderly Malays with type 2 diabetes: a protocol for randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazlina, Shariff-Ghazali; Browning, Colette Joy; Yasin, Shajahan

    2012-01-01

    Like many countries Malaysia is facing an increase in the number of people with type 2 diabetes mellitus diabetes (T2DM) and modifiable lifestyle factors such as sedentary behaviour are important drivers of this increase. The level of physical activity is low among elderly Malay people. In Malaysia, strategies to promote physical activity in elderly Malay people with T2DM are not well documented in the research literature. This paper discusses an intervention to increase physical activity in elderly Malay people with T2DM. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effectiveness of personalised feedback alone and in combination with peer support in promoting and maintaining physical activity in comparison with usual care. A three-arm randomised controlled trial will be conducted among sedentary Malay adults aged 60 years and above with T2DM attending an urban primary healthcare clinic in Malaysia. The participants will be randomised into three groups for a 12-week intervention with a follow-up at 24 and 36 weeks to assess adherence. The primary outcome of this study is pedometer-determined physical activity. Glycaemic and blood pressure control, body composition, cardiorespiratory fitness, balance, lipid profile, health-related quality of life, psychological well-being, social support and self-efficacy for exercise are the secondary measures. Linear mixed models will be used to determine the effect of the intervention over time and between groups. ETHICAL AND DISSEMINATION: The Monash University Human Research Ethics Committee and the Malaysian Ministry of Health's Medical Research Ethics Committee approved this protocol. The findings of this study will be presented at international conferences and published in peer-reviewed journals. This study protocol has been registered with the Malaysian National Medical Research Registry and with the Current Controlled Trial Ltd (http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN71447000/).

  3. Tongue pressure profile training for dysphagia post stroke (TPPT): study protocol for an exploratory randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Catriona M; Bayley, Mark A; Péladeau-Pigeon, Melanie; Stokely, Shauna L

    2013-05-07

    It is estimated that approximately 50% of stroke survivors will experience swallowing difficulty, or dysphagia. The associated sequelae of dysphagia include dehydration, malnutrition, and aspiration pneumonia, all of which have can have serious medical consequences. To improve swallowing safety and efficiency, alternative nutritional intake methods (for example, a feeding tube) or a modified diet texture (such as pureed foods or thickened liquids) may be recommended but these modifications may negatively affect quality of life. An alternative approach to treating dysphagia has emerged over the past few years, targeting stronger lingual muscles through maximal isometric pressure tasks. Although these studies have shown promising results, thin-liquid bolus control continues to be challenging for patients with dysphagia. Previous work investigating lingual pressures when healthy participants swallow has suggested that greater task specificity in lingual exercises may yield improved results with thin liquids. This is a small, exploratory randomized clinical trial being conducted with post-stroke patients 4 to 20 weeks after onset of dysphagia secondary to impaired lingual control. At enrollment, participants are randomly assigned to one of two treatment protocols, either tongue pressure profile training (TPPT) or the control treatment, tongue pressure strength-and-accuracy training (TPSAT). Each treatment protocol consists of 24 sessions of treatment over 8 to 12 weeks with monitoring of tongue pressure as well as a baseline and outcome videofluoroscopic swallowing study. Tongue pressure measures, videofluoroscopic measures, and functional outcome measures will be obtained following training of 60 participants (30 in each condition), to determine whether TPPT yields better outcomes. This study will continue to explore options beyond tube feeding and modified diets for people with neurogenic dysphagia following stroke. Should the novel protocol, TPPT, prove to be more

  4. Facilitating return to work through early specialist health-based interventions (FRESH): protocol for a feasibility randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, Kathryn A; Phillips, Julie; Jones, Trevor; Gibson, Ali; Sutton, Chris; Watkins, Caroline; Sach, Tracey; Duley, Lelia; Walker, Marion; Drummond, Avril; Hoffman, Karen; O'Connor, Rory; Forshaw, Denise; Shakespeare, David

    2015-01-01

    Over one million people sustain traumatic brain injury each year in the UK and more than 10 % of these are moderate or severe injuries, resulting in cognitive and psychological problems that affect the ability to work. Returning to work is a primary rehabilitation goal but fewer than half of traumatic brain injury survivors achieve this. Work is a recognised health service outcome, yet UK service provision varies widely and there is little robust evidence to inform rehabilitation practice. A single-centre cohort comparison suggested better work outcomes may be achieved through early occupational therapy targeted at job retention. This study aims to determine whether this intervention can be delivered in three new trauma centres and to conduct a feasibility, randomised controlled trial to determine whether its effects and cost effectiveness can be measured to inform a definitive trial. Mixed methods study, including feasibility randomised controlled trial, embedded qualitative studies and feasibility economic evaluation will recruit 102 people with traumatic brain injury and their nominated carers from three English UK National Health Service (NHS) trauma centres. Participants will be randomised to receive either usual NHS rehabilitation or usual rehabilitation plus early specialist traumatic brain injury vocational rehabilitation delivered by an occupational therapist. The primary objective is to assess the feasibility of conducting a definitive trial; secondary objectives include measurement of protocol integrity (inclusion/exclusion criteria, intervention adherence, reasons for non-adherence) recruitment rate, the proportion of eligible patients recruited, reasons for non-recruitment, spectrum of TBI severity, proportion of and reasons for loss to follow-up, completeness of data collection, gains in face-to-face V s postal data collection and the most appropriate methods of measuring primary outcomes (return to work, retention) to determine the sample size for a

  5. Thromboelastometry versus standard coagulation tests versus restrictive protocol to guide blood transfusion prior to central venous catheterization in cirrhosis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Leonardo Lima; Pessoa, Camila Menezes Souza; Neto, Ary Serpa; do Prado, Rogerio Ruscitto; Silva, Eliezer; de Almeida, Marcio Dias; Correa, Thiago Domingos

    2017-02-27

    Liver failure patients have traditionally been empirically transfused prior to invasive procedures. Blood transfusion is associated with immunologic and nonimmunologic reactions, increased risk of adverse outcomes and high costs. Scientific evidence supporting empirical transfusion is lacking, and the best approach for blood transfusion prior to invasive procedures in cirrhotic patients has not been established so far. The aim of this study is to compare three transfusion strategies (routine coagulation test-guided - ordinary or restrictive, or thromboelastometry-guided) prior to central venous catheterization in critically ill patients with cirrhosis. Design and setting: a double-blinded, parallel-group, single-center, randomized controlled clinical trial in a tertiary private hospital in São Paulo, Brazil. adults (aged 18 years or older) admitted to the intensive care unit with cirrhosis and an indication for central venous line insertion. Patients will be randomly assigned to three groups for blood transfusion strategy prior to central venous catheterization: standard coagulation tests-based, thromboelastometry-based, or restrictive. The primary efficacy endpoint will be the proportion of patients transfused with any blood product prior to central venous catheterization. The primary safety endpoint will be the incidence of major bleeding. Secondary endpoints will be the proportion of transfusion of fresh frozen plasma, platelets and cryoprecipitate; infused volume of blood products; hemoglobin and hematocrit before and after the procedure; intensive care unit and hospital length of stay; 28-day and hospital mortality; incidence of minor bleeding; transfusion-related adverse reactions; and cost analysis. This study will evaluate three strategies to guide blood transfusion prior to central venous line placement in severely ill patients with cirrhosis. We hypothesized that thromboelastometry-based and/or restrictive protocols are safe and would significantly

  6. Immediate vs. delayed insertion of intrauterine contraception after second trimester abortion: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soon Judith A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We describe the rationale and protocol for a randomized controlled trial (RCT to assess whether intrauterine contraception placed immediately after a second trimester abortion will result in fewer pregnancies than current recommended practice of intended placement at 4 weeks post-abortion. Decision analysis suggests the novel strategy could substantially reduce subsequent unintended pregnancies and abortions. This paper highlights considerations of design, implementation and evaluation of a trial expected to provide rigorous evidence for appropriate insertion timing and health economics of intrauterine contraception after second trimester abortion. Methods/Design Consenting women choosing to use intrauterine contraception after abortion for a pregnancy of 12 to 24 weeks will be randomized to insertion timing groups either immediately (experimental intervention or four weeks (recommended care post abortion. Primary outcome measure is pregnancy rate at one year. Secondary outcomes include: cumulative pregnancy rates over five year follow-up period, comprehensive health economic analyses comparing immediate and delayed insertion groups, and device retention rates, complication rates (infection, expulsion and, contraceptive method satisfaction. Web-based Contraception Satisfaction Questionnaires, clinical records and British Columbia linked health databases will be used to assess primary and secondary outcomes. Enrolment at all clinics in the province performing second trimester abortions began in May 2010 and is expected to complete in late 2011. Data on one year outcomes will be available for analysis in 2014. Discussion The RCT design combined with access to clinical records at all provincial abortion clinics, and to information in provincial single-payer linked administrative health databases, birth registry and hospital records, offers a unique opportunity to evaluate such an approach by determining pregnancy rate at one

  7. EARLYDRAIN- outcome after early lumbar CSF-drainage in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardutzky, Jürgen; Witsch, Jens; Jüttler, Eric; Schwab, Stefan; Vajkoczy, Peter; Wolf, Stefan

    2011-09-14

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) may be complicated by delayed cerebral ischemia, which is a major cause of unfavorable clinical outcome and death in SAH-patients. Delayed cerebral ischemia is presumably related to the development of vasospasm triggered by the presence of blood in the basal cisterns. To date, oral application of the calcium antagonist nimodipine is the only prophylactic treatment for vasospasm recognized under international guidelines.In retrospective trials lumbar drainage of cerebrospinal fluid has been shown to be a safe and feasible measure to remove the blood from the basal cisterns and decrease the incidence of delayed cerebral ischemia and vasospasm in the respective study populations. However, the efficacy of lumbar drainage has not been evaluated prospectively in a randomized controlled trial yet. This is a protocol for a 2-arm randomized controlled trial to compare an intervention group receiving early continuous lumbar CSF-drainage and standard neurointensive care to a control group receiving standard neurointensive care only. Adults suffering from a first aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage whose aneurysm has been secured by means of coiling or clipping are eligible for trial participation. The effect of early CSF drainage (starting measured in the following ways: the primary endpoint will be disability after 6 months, assessed by a blinded investigator during a personal visit or standardized telephone interview using the modified Rankin Scale. Secondary endpoints include mortality after 6 months, angiographic vasospasm, transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) mean flow velocity in both middle cerebral arteries and rate of shunt insertion at 6 months after hospital discharge. Here, we present the study design of a multicenter prospective randomized controlled trial to investigate whether early application of a lumbar drainage improves clinical outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  8. Prevention of nosocomial infections in critically ill patients with lactoferrin (PREVAIL study): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscedere, John; Maslove, David; Boyd, John Gordon; O'Callaghan, Nicole; Lamontagne, Francois; Reynolds, Steven; Albert, Martin; Hall, Rick; McGolrick, Danielle; Jiang, Xuran; Day, Andrew G

    2016-09-29

    Nosocomial infections remain an important source of morbidity, mortality, and increased health care costs in hospitalized patients. This is particularly problematic in intensive care units (ICUs) because of increased patient vulnerability due to the underlying severity of illness and increased susceptibility from utilization of invasive therapeutic and monitoring devices. Lactoferrin (LF) and the products of its breakdown have multiple biological effects, which make its utilization of interest for the prevention of nosocomial infections in the critically ill. This is a phase II randomized, multicenter, double-blinded trial to determine the effect of LF on antibiotic-free days in mechanically ventilated, critically ill, adult patients in the ICU. Eligible, consenting patients will be randomized to receive either LF or placebo. The treating clinician will remain blinded to allocation during the study; blinding will be maintained by using opaque syringes and containers. The primary outcome will be antibiotic-free days, defined as the number of days alive and free of antibiotics 28 days after randomization. Secondary outcomes will include: antibiotic utilization, adjudicated diagnosis of nosocomial infection (longer than 72 h of admission to ICU), hospital and ICU length of stay, change in organ function after randomization, hospital and 90-day mortality, incidence of tracheal colonization, changes in gastrointestinal permeability, and immune function. Outcomes to inform the conduct of a larger definitive trial will also be evaluated, including feasibility as determined by recruitment rates and protocol adherence. The results from this study are expected to provide insight into a potential novel therapeutic use for LF in critically ill adult patients. Further, analysis of study outcomes will inform a future, large-scale phase III randomized controlled trial powered on clinically important outcomes related to the use of LF. The trial was registered at www.ClinicalTrials

  9. Improving Recovery and Outcomes Every Day after the ICU (IMPROVE): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sophia; Hammes, Jessica; Khan, Sikandar; Gao, Sujuan; Harrawood, Amanda; Martinez, Stephanie; Moser, Lyndsi; Perkins, Anthony; Unverzagt, Frederick W; Clark, Daniel O; Boustani, Malaz; Khan, Babar

    2018-03-27

    Delirium affects nearly 70% of older adults hospitalized in the intensive care unit (ICU), and many of those will be left with persistent cognitive impairment or dementia. There are no effective and scalable recovery models to remediate ICU-acquired cognitive impairment and its attendant elevated risk for dementia or Alzheimer disease (AD). The Improving Recovery and Outcomes Every Day after the ICU (IMPROVE) trial is an ongoing clinical trial which evaluates the efficacy of a combined physical exercise and cognitive training on cognitive function among ICU survivors 50 years and older who experienced delirium during an ICU stay. This article describes the study protocol for IMPROVE. IMPROVE is a four-arm, randomized controlled trial. Subjects will be randomized to one of four arms: cognitive training and physical exercise; cognitive control and physical exercise; cognitive training and physical exercise control; and cognitive control and physical exercise control. Facilitators administer the physical exercise and exercise control interventions in individual and small group formats by using Internet-enabled videoconference. Cognitive training and control interventions are also facilitator led using Posit Science, Inc. online modules delivered in individual and small group format directly into the participants' homes. Subjects complete cognitive assessment, mood questionnaires, physical performance batteries, and quality of life scales at baseline, 3, and 6 months. Blood samples will also be taken at baseline and 3 months to measure pro-inflammatory cytokines and acute-phase reactants; neurotrophic factors; and markers of glial dysfunction and astrocyte activation. This study is the first clinical trial to examine the efficacy of combined physical and cognitive exercise on cognitive function in older ICU survivors with delirium. The results will provide information about potential synergistic effects of a combined intervention on a range of outcomes and mechanisms

  10. Wrist-ankle acupuncture (WAA) for primary dysmenorrhea (PD) of young females: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingfan; Tian, Sinan; Tian, Jing; Shu, Shi

    2017-08-22

    Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common health complaints all over the world, specifically among young females. Acupuncture has been employed to relieve the pain-based symptoms and to avoid the side effects of conventional medication, and wrist-ankle acupuncture (WAA) has confirmed analgesic efficacy for various types of pain. The aim of this study is to evaluate the immediate analgesia effect of WAA on PD of young females. This study will carry out a randomized parallel controlled single-blind trial to observe the immediate analgesia effect of WAA in PD of young females. Sixty participants who meet inclusion criteria will be recruited from September 2016 to September 2017 in Changhai hospital of China. They are randomly assigned to WAA therapy or sham acupuncture groups (30 patients for each group), and then receive real or sham acupuncture treatment, respectively. In this trial, the primary outcome measure is simple form of McGill pain questionnaire (SF-MPQ), while expectation and treatment credibility scale (ETCS), safety assessment, the COX menstrual symptom scale (CMSS), questionnaire about the feeling of being punctured are included in the secondary outcomes. This trial will be the first study protocol designed to evaluate the immediate analgesia effect of WAA in PD of young females. The strengths in methodology, including rigorous randomized, sham-controlled, participants-blinded and assessors-blinded, will guarantee the quality of this study. WAA doesn't require any needling sensation, so non-penetrating sham acupuncture can serve as an effective placebo intervention in this trial. Chinese Clinical Trial Registry (identifier: ChiCTR-IOR-16008546 ; registration date: 27 May 2016).

  11. Fluoxetine for Autistic Behaviors (FAB trial): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial in children and adolescents with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouti, Anissa; Reddihough, Dinah; Marraffa, Catherine; Hazell, Philip; Wray, John; Lee, Katherine; Kohn, Michael

    2014-06-16

    Serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly prescribed off-label for children with autism. To date, clinical trials examining the use of SSRIs in autism have been limited by small sample sizes and inconclusive results. The efficacy and safety of SSRIs for moderating autistic behaviors is yet to be adequately examined to provide evidence to support current clinical practice. The aim of the Fluoxetine for Autistic Behaviors (FAB) study is to determine the efficacy and safety of low dose fluoxetine compared with placebo, for reducing the frequency and severity of repetitive stereotypic behaviors in children and adolescents with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The relationship between the effectiveness of fluoxetine treatment and serotonin transporter genotype will also be explored. The FAB study is a multicenter, double-blinded, randomized controlled trial, funded by the Australian Government's National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) grant. Participants will be aged between 7.5 and 17 years with a confirmed diagnosis of ASD. Eligible participants will be randomized to either placebo or fluoxetine for a 16-week period. Medication will be titrated over the first four weeks. Reponses to medication will be monitored fortnightly using the Clinical Global Impressions Scale (CGI). The primary outcome measure is the Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale-Modified for Pervasive Developmental Disorders (CYBOCS-PDD), administered at baseline and 16 weeks. Secondary outcome measures include the Aberrant Behaviour Scale (ABC), the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale Parent Report (SCAS-P), and the Repetitive Behaviors Scale (RBS-R), measured at baseline and 16 weeks. Participants will be invited to undergo genetic testing for SLC6A4 allele variants using a cheek swab. Continuous outcomes, including the primary outcome will be compared between the active and placebo groups using unadjusted linear regression. Binary outcomes will be compared using

  12. Systemic therapy for vulval Erosive Lichen Planus (the 'hELP' trial): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Rosalind C; Murphy, Ruth; Bratton, Daniel J; Sydes, Matthew R; Wilkes, Sally; Nankervis, Helen; Dowey, Shelley; Thomas, Kim S

    2016-01-04

    Erosive lichen planus affecting the vulva (ELPV) is a relatively rare, chronic condition causing painful raw areas in the vulvovaginal region. Symptoms are pain and burning, which impact upon daily living. There is paucity of evidence regarding therapy. A 2012 Cochrane systematic review found no randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in this field. Topically administered corticosteroids are the accepted first-line therapy: however, there is uncertainty as to which second-line treatments to use. Several systemic agents have been clinically noted to show promise for ELPV refractory to topically administered corticosteroids but there is no RCT evidence to support these. The 'hELP' study is a RCT with an internal pilot phase designed to provide high-quality evidence. The objective is to test whether systemic therapy in addition to standard topical therapy is a beneficial second-line treatment for ELPV. Adjunctive systemic therapies used are hydroxychloroquine, methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. Topical therapy plus a short course of prednisolone given orally is considered the comparator intervention. The trial is a four-armed, open-label, pragmatic RCT which uses a blinded independent clinical assessor. To provide 80 % power for each comparison, 96 participants are required in total. The pilot phase aims to recruit 40 participants. The primary clinical outcome is the proportion of patients achieving treatment success at 6 months. 'Success' is defined by a composite measure of Patient Global Assessment score of 0 or 1 on a 4-point scale plus improvement from baseline on clinical photographs scored by a clinician blinded to treatment allocation. Secondary clinical outcomes include 6-month assessment of: (1) Reduction in pain/soreness; (2) Global assessment of disease; (3) Response at other affected mucosal sites; (4) Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores; (5) Sexual function; (6) Health-related quality of life using 'Short Form 36' and 'Skindex

  13. Protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial of an intervention to increase the use of traffic light food labelling in UK shoppers (the FLICC trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarborough, Peter; Hodgkins, Charo; Raats, Monique M; Harrington, Richard A; Cowburn, Gill; Dean, Moira; Doherty, Aiden; Foster, Charlie; Juszczak, Edmund; Matthews, Anne; Mizdrak, Anja; Mhurchu, Cliona Ni; Shepherd, Richard; Tiomotijevic, Lada; Winstone, Naomi; Rayner, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Traffic light labelling of foods-a system that incorporates a colour-coded assessment of the level of total fat, saturated fat, sugar and salt on the front of packaged foods-has been recommended by the UK Government and is currently in use or being phased in by many UK manufacturers and retailers. This paper describes a protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial of an intervention designed to increase the use of traffic light labelling during real-life food purchase decisions. The objectives of this two-arm randomised controlled pilot trial are to assess recruitment, retention and data completion rates, to generate potential effect size estimates to inform sample size calculations for the main trial and to assess the feasibility of conducting such a trial. Participants will be recruited by email from a loyalty card database of a UK supermarket chain. Eligible participants will be over 18 and regular shoppers who frequently purchase ready meals or pizzas. The intervention is informed by a review of previous interventions encouraging the use of nutrition labelling and the broader behaviour change literature. It is designed to impact on mechanisms affecting belief and behavioural intention formation as well as those associated with planning and goal setting and the adoption and maintenance of the behaviour of interest, namely traffic light label use during purchases of ready meals and pizzas. Data will be collected using electronic sales data via supermarket loyalty cards and web-based questionnaires and will be used to estimate the effect of the intervention on the nutrition profile of purchased ready meals and pizzas and the behavioural mechanisms associated with label use. Data collection will take place over 48 weeks. A process evaluation including semi-structured interviews and web analytics will be conducted to assess feasibility of a full trial. The design of the pilot trial allows for efficient recruitment and data collection. The intervention could be

  14. mHealth Technology and Nurse Health Coaching to Improve Health in Diabetes: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Sheridan; Dharmar, Madan; Fazio, Sarina; Tang-Feldman, Yajarayma; Young, Heather M

    2018-02-15

    Chronic diseases, including diabetes mellitus, are the leading cause of mortality and disability in the United States. Current solutions focus primarily on diagnosis and pharmacological treatment, yet there is increasing evidence that patient-centered models of care are more successful in improving and addressing chronic disease outcomes. The objective of this clinical trial is to evaluate the impact of a mobile health (mHealth) enabled nurse health coaching intervention on self-efficacy among adults with type-2 diabetes mellitus. A randomized controlled trial was conducted at an academic health system in Northern California. A total of 300 participants with type-2 diabetes were scheduled to be enrolled through three primary care clinics. Participants were randomized to either usual care or intervention. All participants received training on use of the health system patient portal. Participants in the intervention arm received six scheduled health-coaching telephone calls with a registered nurse and were provided with an activity tracker and mobile application that integrated data into the electronic health record (EHR) to track their daily activity and health behavior decisions. All participants completed a baseline survey and follow-up surveys at 3 and 9 months. Primary and secondary outcomes include diabetes self-efficacy, hemoglobin A 1c (HbA 1c ), and quality of life measures. Data collection for this trial, funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, will be completed by December 2017. Results from the trial will be available mid-2018. This protocol details a patient-centered intervention using nurse health coaching, mHealth technologies, and integration of patient-generated data into the EHR. The aim of the intervention is to enhance self-efficacy and health outcomes by providing participants with a mechanism to track daily activity by offering coaching support to set reasonable and attainable health goals, and by creating a complete feedback

  15. Protocol for a randomised controlled trial of treatment of asymptomatic candidiasis for the prevention of preterm birth [ACTRN12610000607077

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rickard Kristen R

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prevention of preterm birth remains one of the most important challenges in maternity care. We propose a randomised trial with: a simple Candida testing protocol that can be easily incorporated into usual antenatal care; a simple, well accepted, treatment intervention; and assessment of outcomes from validated, routinely-collected, computerised databases. Methods/Design Using a prospective, randomised, open-label, blinded-endpoint (PROBE study design, we aim to evaluate whether treating women with asymptomatic vaginal candidiasis early in pregnancy is effective in preventing spontaneous preterm birth. Pregnant women presenting for antenatal care The study protocol draws on the usual antenatal care schedule, has been pilot-tested and the intervention involves only a minor modification of current practice. Women who agree to participate will self-collect a vaginal swab and those who are culture positive for Candida will be randomised (central, telephone to open-label treatment or usual care (screening result is not revealed, no treatment, routine antenatal care. Outcomes will be obtained from population databases. A sample size of 3,208 women with Candida colonisation (1,604 per arm is required to detect a 40% reduction in the spontaneous preterm birth rate among women with asymptomatic candidiasis from 5.0% in the control group to 3.0% in women treated with clotrimazole (significance 0.05, power 0.8. Analyses will be by intention to treat. Discussion For our hypothesis, a placebo-controlled trial had major disadvantages: a placebo arm would not represent current clinical practice; knowledge of vaginal colonisation with Candida may change participants' behaviour; and a placebo with an alcohol preservative may have an independent affect on vaginal flora. These disadvantages can be overcome by the PROBE study design. This trial will provide definitive evidence on whether screening for and treating asymptomatic candidiasis in

  16. Effectiveness of the universal prevention program 'Healthy School and Drugs': Study protocol of a randomized clustered trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malmberg Monique

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Substance use is highly prevalent among Dutch adolescents. The Healthy School and Drugs program is a nationally implemented school-based prevention program aimed at reducing early and excessive substance use among adolescents. Although the program's effectiveness was tested in a quasi-experimental design before, many program changes were made afterwards. The present study, therefore, aims to test the effects of this widely used, renewed universal prevention program. Methods/Design A randomized clustered trial will be conducted among 3,784 adolescents of 23 secondary schools in The Netherlands. The trial has three conditions; two intervention conditions (i.e., e-learning and integral and a control condition. The e-learning condition consists of three digital learning modules (i.e., about alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana that are sequentially offered over the course of three school years (i.e., grade 1, grade 2, and grade 3. The integral condition consists of parental participation in a parental meeting on substance use, regulation of substance use, and monitoring and counseling of students' substance use at school, over and above the three digital modules. The control condition is characterized as business as usual. Participating schools were randomly assigned to either an intervention or control condition. Participants filled out a digital questionnaire at baseline and will fill out the same questionnaire three more times at follow-up measurements (8, 20, and 32 months after baseline. Outcome variables included in the questionnaire are the percentage of binge drinking (more than five drinks per occasion, the average weekly number of drinks, and the percentage of adolescents who ever drunk a glass of alcohol and the percentage of adolescents who ever smoked a cigarette or a joint respectively for tobacco and marijuana. Discussion This study protocol describes the design of a randomized clustered trial that evaluates the

  17. Intravascular ultrasound assessed incomplete stent apposition and stent fracture in stent thrombosis after bare metal versus drug-eluting stent treatment the Nordic Intravascular Ultrasound Study (NIVUS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosonen, Petteri; Vikman, Saila; Jensen, Lisette Okkels

    2012-01-01

    This prospective multicenter registry used intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) in patients with definite stent thrombosis (ST) to compare rates of incomplete stent apposition (ISA), stent fracture and stent expansion in patients treated with drug-eluting (DES) versus bare metal (BMS) stents. ST...... is a rare, but potential life threatening event after coronary stent implantation. The etiology seems to be multifactorial....

  18. Blockchain protocols in clinical trials: Transparency and traceability of consent [version 3; referees: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations, 1 not approved

    OpenAIRE

    Mehdi Benchoufi; Raphael Porcher; Philippe Ravaud

    2017-01-01

    Clinical trial consent for protocols and their revisions should be transparent for patients and traceable for stakeholders. Our goal is to implement a process allowing the collection of patients’ informed consent, which is bound to protocol revisions, storing and tracking the consent in a secure, unfalsifiable and publicly verifiable way, and enabling the sharing of this information in real time. For that, we will built a consent workflow using a rising technology called Blockchain. This is a...

  19. Dual antiplatelet therapy versus oral anticoagulation plus dual antiplatelet therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation and low-to-moderate thromboembolic risk undergoing coronary stenting: design of the MUSICA-2 randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambola, Antonia; Montoro, J Bruno; Del Blanco, Bruno García; Llavero, Nadia; Barrabés, José A; Alfonso, Fernando; Bueno, Héctor; Cequier, Angel; Serra, Antonio; Zueco, Javier; Sabaté, Manel; Rodríguez-Leor, Oriol; García-Dorado, David

    2013-10-01

    Oral anticoagulation (OAC) is the recommended therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) because it reduces the risk of stroke and other thromboembolic events. Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) is required after percutaneous coronary intervention and stenting (PCI-S). In patients with AF requiring PCI-S, the association of DAPT and OAC carries an increased risk of bleeding, whereas OAC therapy or DAPT alone may not protect against the risk of developing new ischemic or thromboembolic events. The MUSICA-2 study will test the hypothesis that DAPT compared with triple therapy (TT) in patients with nonvalvular AF at low-to-moderate risk of stroke (CHADS2 score ≤2) after PCI-S reduces the risk of bleeding and is not inferior to TT for preventing thromboembolic complications. The MUSICA-2 is a multicenter, open-label randomized trial that will compare TT with DAPT in patients with AF and CHADS2 score ≤2 undergoing PCI-S. The primary end point is the incidence of stroke or any systemic embolism or major adverse cardiac events: death, myocardial infarction, stent thrombosis, or target vessel revascularization at 1 year of PCI-S. The secondary end point is the combination of any cardiovascular event with major or minor bleeding at 1 year of PCI-S. The calculated sample size is 304 patients. The MUSICA-2 will attempt to determine the most effective and safe treatment in patients with nonvalvular AF and CHADS2 score ≤2 after PCI-S. Restricting TT for AF patients at high risk for stroke may reduce the incidence of bleeding without increasing the risk of thromboembolic complications. © 2013.

  20. Comparison of one-year outcomes following coronary artery stenting in diabetic versus nondiabetic patients (from the Enhanced Suppression of the Platelet IIb/IIIa Receptor With Integrilin Therapy [ESPRIT] Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labinaz, Marino; Madan, Mina; O'Shea, J O'Conor; Kilaru, Rakhi; Chin, Wai; Pieper, Karen; McGuire, Darren K; Saucedo, Jorge F; Talley, J David; Lui, Henry; Kitt, Michael M; Califf, Robert M; Tcheng, James T

    2002-09-15

    For patients undergoing nonurgent coronary stent implantation, blockade of the glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor with eptifibatide reduces the incidence of ischemic complications. We evaluated the interaction of eptifibatide with diabetes in patients who underwent this procedure by analyzing the 1-year outcomes of those enrolled in the Enhanced Suppression of the Platelet IIb/IIIa Receptor with Integrilin Therapy (ESPRIT) trial (466 diabetic and 1,595 nondiabetic patients). At 1 year, the composite end point of death, myocardial infarction (MI), or target vessel revascuarlization (TVR) was higher in diabetic patients (24.5% vs 18.4%; p = 0.008). At 1 year, eptifibatide had a similar effect on the composite end point of death, MI, or TVR in diabetic (hazards ratio [HR] 0.71, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.49 to 1.04) and nondiabetic patients (HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.63 to 0.99). A similar treatment effect was also seen on death or MI in both groups. The 1-year mortality rate for diabetic patients assigned to placebo was 3.5% versus 1.3% for patients receiving eptifibatide (HR 0.37, 95% CI 0.10 to 1.41); the latter rate was similar to the mortality rate of 1.4% for nondiabetic patients in the eptifibatide group. However, eptifibatide did not have a significant effect on TVR in diabetic patients (HR 0.90, 95% CI 0.57 to 1.41). Our data suggest that treatment with eptifibatide is associated with a similar relative reduction in adverse ischemic complications in diabetic and nondiabetic patients undergoing coronary stent implantation. There is no evidence of a statistical interaction in the treatment effect of eptifibatide between patients with and without diabetes.

  1. A randomized controlled trial of culturally adapted motivational interviewing for Hispanic heavy drinkers: Theory of Adaptation and Study Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christina S.; Colby, Suzanne M.; Magill, Molly; Almeida, Joanna; Tavares, Tonya; Rohsenow, Damaris J.

    2016-01-01

    Background The NIH Strategic Plan prioritizes health disparities research for socially disadvantaged Hispanics, to reduce the disproportionate burden of alcohol-related negative consequences compared to other racial/ethnic groups. Cultural adaptation of evidence-based treatments, such as motivational interviewing (MI), can improve access and response to alcohol treatment. However, the lack of rigorous clinical trials designed to test the efficacy and theoretical underpinnings of cultural adaptation has made proof of concept difficult. Objective The CAMI2 (Culturally Adapted Motivational Interviewing) study design and its theoretical model, is described to illustrate how MI adapted to social and cultural factors (CAMI) can be discriminated against non-adapted MI. Methods and Design CAMI2, a large, 12 month randomized prospective trial, examines the efficacy of CAMI and MI among heavy drinking Hispanics recruited from the community (n=257). Outcomes are reductions in heavy drinking days (Time Line Follow-Back) and negative consequences of drinking among Hispanics (Drinkers Inventory of Consequences). A second aim examines perceived acculturation stress as a moderator of treatment outcomes in the CAMI condition. Summary The CAMI2 study design protocol is presented and the theory of adaptation is presented. Findings from the trial described may yield important recommendations on the science of cultural adaptation and improve MI dissemination to Hispanics with alcohol risk. PMID:27565832

  2. PAAPPAS community trial protocol: a randomized study of obesity prevention for adolescents combining school with household intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele R. Sgambato

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of childhood obesity is increasing at a high rate in Brazil, making prevention a health priority. Schools are the central focus of interventions aiming the prevention and treatment of childhood obesity, however, randomized trials and cohort studies have not yet provided clear evidence of strategies to reduce prevalence of obesity. The aim of this study is to present a protocol to evaluate the efficacy of combining school and household level interventions to reduce excessive weight gain among students. Methods The intervention target fifth and sixth graders from 18 public schools (9 interventions and 9 controls in the municipality of Duque de Caxias, metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. A sample size of 2500 students will be evaluated at school for their weight status and those from the intervention group who are overweight or obese will be followed monthly at home by community health agents. Demographic, socioeconomic, anthropometric, eating behavior and food consumption data will be collected at school using a standardized questionnaire programmed in personal digital assistant. At school, all students from the intervention group will be encouraged to change eating habits and food consumption and to increase physical activity and reducing sedentary behavior. Discussion This study will provide evidence whether integration of school with primary health care can prevent excessive weight gain among adolescents. Positive results will inform a sustainable strategy to be disseminated in the health care system in Brazil. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02711488 . Date of registration: March 11, 2016.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging for cerebral lesions during minimal invasive mitral valve surgery: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbero, Cristina; Ricci, Davide; Cura Stura, Erik; Pellegrini, Augusto; Marchetto, Giovanni; ElQarra, Suad; Boffini, Massimo; Passera, Roberto; Valentini, Maria Consuelo; Rinaldi, Mauro

    2017-02-21

    Recent data have highlighted a higher rate of neurological injuries in minimal invasive mitral valve surgery (MIMVS) compared with the standard sternotomy approach; therefore, the role of specific clamping techniques and perfusion strategies on the occurrence of this complication is a matter of discussion in the medical literature. The purpose of this trial is to prospectively evaluate major, minor and silent neurological events in patients undergoing right mini-thoracotomy mitral valve surgery using retrograde perfusion and an endoaortic clamp or a transthoracic clamp. A prospective, blinded, randomized controlled study on the rate of neurological embolizations during MIMVS started at the University of Turin in June 2014. Major, minor and silent neurological events are being investigated through standard neurological evaluation and magnetic resonance imaging assessment. The magnetic resonance imaging protocol includes conventional sequences for the morphological and quantitative assessment and nonconventional sequences for the white matter microstructural evaluation. Imaging studies are performed before surgery as baseline assessment and on the third postoperative day and, in patients who develop postoperative ischemic lesions, after 6 months. Despite recent concerns raised about the endoaortic setting with retrograde perfusion, we expect to show equivalence in terms of neurological events of this technique compared with the transthoracic clamp in a selected cohort of patients. With the first results expected in December 2016 the findings would be of help in confirming the efficacy and safety of MIMVS. ClinicalTrials.gov, Identifier: NCT02818166 . Registered on 8 February 2016 - trial retrospectively registered.

  4. Efficacy and Safety of Electroacupuncture on Treating Depression Related Sleep Disorders: Study Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Yin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Depression is frequently accompanied by sleep disturbances including insomnia. Insomnia may persist even after mood symptoms have been adequately treated. Acupuncture is considered to be beneficial to adjust the state of body and mind and restore the normal sleep-awake cycle. This trial is aimed at evaluating the efficacy and safety of electroacupuncture on treating i