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Sample records for stem workforce system

  1. The U.S. STEM Undergraduate Model: Applying System Dynamics to Help Meet President Obama's Goals for One Million STEM Graduates and the U.S. Navy's Civilian STEM Workforce Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Business-Higher Education Forum, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This report shows how insights gained from system dynamics modeling and the U.S. STEM Undergraduate Model® can help inform the Navy's strategy to grow a robust civilian workforce that is strongly invested with Navy-relevant STEM skills and ready to contribute to the next generation of Naval innovation. This work positions the Navy to serve a…

  2. Preparing the Future STEM Workforce for Diverse Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daily, Shaundra Bryant; Eugene, Wanda

    2013-01-01

    Following the belief that diversity breeds innovation in scientific endeavors, there is a national push for more diversity in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) workforce in order to maintain national economic competitiveness. Currently, STEM-related employment is only 28% non-White; however, greater efforts to recruit…

  3. Addressing the STEM Workforce Challenge: Missouri. BHEF Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Business-Higher Education Forum (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    While states and the federal government have put efforts in place to increase the size of the workforce trained in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) to meet innovation demands, there continues to be a nationwide shortage of students who are interested in and prepared for such careers. Missouri is no exception to this problem, one…

  4. Meeting the STEM Workforce Demand: Accelerating Math Learning among Students Interested in STEM. BHEF Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Business-Higher Education Forum (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    Efforts by federal and state governments to increase the STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) workforce in support of innovation and competitiveness are frustrated by a shortage of adequately prepared and interested students. Less than half of 12th graders meet the math proficiency benchmark that indicates college readiness.…

  5. Creating the Workforce of the Future: The STEM Interest and Proficiency Challenge. BHEF Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Business-Higher Education Forum (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    A strong economy requires a highly educated workforce, especially in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields. In the United States, STEM degree production has stagnated, despite employment projections forecasting a 17% growth in the field over the next decade. Two key criteria influence progression through the STEM education…

  6. Engineering an Associate Degree-Level STEM Workforce Education Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selwitz, Jason L.; Ahring, Birgitte; Garcia-Perez, Manuel; Morrison, Judith

    2018-01-01

    Community and technical colleges serve a vital function in STEM education by training workers for medium- and high-skilled technical careers and providing employers the labor necessary to operate and maintain thriving business ventures. A curriculum developed with the elements of a systems-based approach results in a program more relevant to the…

  7. Workforce Development : Matching Education Systems to Workforce Needs

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2014-01-01

    Equipping national workforces with job-relevant skills is a continuing challenge, and mismatches are a present concern. Many school graduates cannot find jobs commensurate with their education and training. Employers complain of difficulty in filling vacancies and bemoan the scarcity of soft skills for boosting productivity. More broadly, skills constraints make it difficult for companies ...

  8. Modeling workforce demand in North Dakota: a System Dynamics approach

    OpenAIRE

    Muminova, Adiba

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the dynamics behind the workforce demand and attempts to predict the potential effects of future changes in oil prices on workforce demand in North Dakota. The study attempts to join System Dynamics and Input-Output models in order to overcome shortcomings in both of the approaches and gain a more complete understanding of the issue of workforce demand. A system dynamics simulation of workforce demand within different economic sector...

  9. Training a Green Workforce With Stem Initiatives at the Alamo Colleges District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, R.; Strybos, J.

    2017-12-01

    The Alamo Colleges District (ACD) includes minority serving institutions successfully incorporating climate science and sustainability-related projects to engage students in STEM courses. This network of five community colleges is based around San Antonio, Texas, and has a student population of approximately 60,000 that reflects the diversity of the community. San Antonio residents are familiar with recent extreme weather conditions, such as extreme droughts and intensified annual rainfalls, and the colleges understand the importance of education about climate science, climate change and sustainable solutions. This presentation will discuss initiatives to engage students in STEMS program while providing them with tools to solve climate change problems at a local level. ACD's innovative tools to train a green workforce is focused on engaging students in courses provided toward accredited certificates and degrees. Example of these courses include Wind Power Generation, Wind Turbine Troubleshooting, Solar Photovoltaics Systems, Wastewater Minimization and Waste Water Treatment. Students have access to a 400-kW PV system installed at the Center for Excellence that is used as a training tool in solar panel installation and maintenance. Also, solar panels on the rooftop of the Scobee Education Center and adjacent bus stops are connected to an eGauge system and used as simulation training about energy and space science. At Eco Centro, students have worked on solar hydroponic projects, the refurbishment of a shipping container for food production in a controlled atmosphere, and the installation of a shipping container home that will be used as a teaching facility about sustainable design and construction. Finally, a recent project to convert an old trailer into a Mobile Weather Station will be used as a STEM classroom to prepare students to understand weather data and its local applicability.

  10. Tracking the workforce: the American Society of Clinical Oncology workforce information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, M Kelsey; Kosty, Michael P; Bajorin, Dean F; Bruinooge, Suanna S; Goldstein, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    In anticipation of oncologist workforce shortages projected as part of a 2007 study, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) worked with a contractor to create a workforce information system (WIS) to assemble the latest available data on oncologist supply and cancer incidence and prevalence. ASCO plans to publish findings annually, reporting on new data and tracking trends over time. THE WIS REPORT IS COMPOSED OF THREE SECTIONS: supply, new entrants, and cancer incidence and prevalence. Tabulations of the number of oncologists in the United States are derived mainly from the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile. Information on fellows and residents in the oncology workforce pipeline come from published sources such as Journal of the American Medical Association. Incidence and prevalence estimates are published by the American Cancer Society and National Cancer Institute. The WIS reports a total of 13,084 oncologists working in the United States in 2011. Oncologists are defined as those physicians who designate hematology, hematology/oncology, or medical oncology as their specialty. The WIS compares the characteristics of these oncologists with those of all physicians and tracks emerging trends in the physician training pipeline. Observing characteristics of the oncologist workforce over time allows ASCO to identify, prioritize, and evaluate its workforce initiatives. Accessible figures and reports generated by the WIS can be used by ASCO and others in the oncology community to advocate for needed health care system and policy changes to help offset future workforce shortages.

  11. Tracking the Workforce: The American Society of Clinical Oncology Workforce Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, M. Kelsey; Kosty, Michael P.; Bajorin, Dean F.; Bruinooge, Suanna S.; Goldstein, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In anticipation of oncologist workforce shortages projected as part of a 2007 study, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) worked with a contractor to create a workforce information system (WIS) to assemble the latest available data on oncologist supply and cancer incidence and prevalence. ASCO plans to publish findings annually, reporting on new data and tracking trends over time. Methods: The WIS report is composed of three sections: supply, new entrants, and cancer incidence and prevalence. Tabulations of the number of oncologists in the United States are derived mainly from the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile. Information on fellows and residents in the oncology workforce pipeline come from published sources such as Journal of the American Medical Association. Incidence and prevalence estimates are published by the American Cancer Society and National Cancer Institute. Results: The WIS reports a total of 13,084 oncologists working in the United States in 2011. Oncologists are defined as those physicians who designate hematology, hematology/oncology, or medical oncology as their specialty. The WIS compares the characteristics of these oncologists with those of all physicians and tracks emerging trends in the physician training pipeline. Conclusion: Observing characteristics of the oncologist workforce over time allows ASCO to identify, prioritize, and evaluate its workforce initiatives. Accessible figures and reports generated by the WIS can be used by ASCO and others in the oncology community to advocate for needed health care system and policy changes to help offset future workforce shortages. PMID:23633965

  12. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academies Press, 2016

    2016-01-01

    U.S. strength in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines has formed the basis of innovations, technologies, and industries that have spurred the nation's economic growth throughout the last 150 years. Universities are essential to the creation and transfer of new knowledge that drives innovation. This knowledge moves…

  13. An analysis of United States K-12 stem education versus STEM workforce at the dawn of the digital revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Franca

    The world is at the dawn of a third industrial revolution, the digital revolution, that brings great changes the world over. Today, computing devices, the Internet, and the World Wide Web are vital technology tools that affect every aspect of everyday life and success. While computing technologies offer enormous benefits, there are equally enormous safety and security risks that have been growing exponentially since they became widely available to the public in 1994. Cybercriminals are increasingly implementing sophisticated and serious hack attacks and breaches upon our nation's government, financial institutions, organizations, communities, and private citizens. There is a great need for computer scientists to carry America's innovation and economic growth forward and for cybersecurity professionals to keep our nation safe from criminal hacking. In this digital age, computer science and cybersecurity are essential foundational ingredients of technological innovation, economic growth, and cybersecurity that span all industries. Yet, America's K-12 education institutions are not teaching the computer science and cybersecurity skills required to produce a technologically-savvy 21st century workforce. Education is the key to preparing students to enter the workforce and, therefore, American K-12 STEM education must be reformed to accommodate the teachings required in the digital age. Keywords: Cybersecurity Education, Cybersecurity Education Initiatives, Computer Science Education, Computer Science Education Initiatives, 21 st Century K-12 STEM Education Reform, 21st Century Digital Literacies, High-Tech Innovative Problem-Solving Skills, 21st Century Digital Workforce, Standardized Testing, Foreign Language and Culture Studies, Utica College, Professor Chris Riddell.

  14. A Geoscience Workforce Model for Non-Geoscience and Non-Traditional STEM Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou-Mark, J.; Blake, R.; Norouzi, H.; Vladutescu, D. V.; Yuen-Lau, L.

    2016-12-01

    The Summit on the Future of Geoscience Undergraduate Education has recently identified key professional skills, competencies, and conceptual understanding necessary in the development of undergraduate geoscience students (American Geosciences Institute, 2015). Through a comprehensive study involving a diverse range of the geoscience academic and employer community, the following professional scientist skills were rated highly important: 1) critical thinking/problem solving skills; 2) effective communication; 3) ability to access and integrate information; 4) strong quantitative skills; and 5) ability to work in interdisciplinary/cross cultural teams. Based on the findings of the study above, the New York City College of Technology (City Tech) has created a one-year intensive training program that focusses on the development of technical and non-technical geoscience skills for non-geoscience, non-traditional STEM students. Although City Tech does not offer geoscience degrees, the primary goal of the program is to create an unconventional pathway for under-represented minority STEM students to enter, participate, and compete in the geoscience workforce. The selected cohort of STEM students engage in year-round activities that include a geoscience course, enrichment training workshops, networking sessions, leadership development, research experiences, and summer internships at federal, local, and private geoscience facilities. These carefully designed programmatic elements provide both the geoscience knowledge and the non-technical professional skills that are essential for the geoscience workforce. Moreover, by executing this alternate, robust geoscience workforce model that attracts and prepares underrepresented minorities for geoscience careers, this unique pathway opens another corridor that helps to ameliorate the dire plight of the geoscience workforce shortage. This project is supported by NSF IUSE GEOPATH Grant # 1540721.

  15. Workforce Development, Higher Education and Productive Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hordern, Jim

    2014-01-01

    Workforce development partnerships between higher education institutions and employers involve distinctive social and technical dynamics that differ from dominant higher education practices in the UK. The New Labour government encouraged such partnerships in England, including through the use of funding that aimed to stimulate reform to…

  16. Workforce planning and development in times of delivery system transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Patricia; Scully-Russ, Ellen

    2016-09-23

    As implementation of the US Affordable Care Act (ACA) advances, many domestic health systems are considering major changes in how the healthcare workforce is organized. The purpose of this study is to explore the dynamic processes and interactions by which workforce planning and development (WFPD) is evolving in this new environment. Informed by the theory of loosely coupled systems (LCS), we use a case study design to examine how workforce changes are being managed in Kaiser Permanente and Montefiore Health System. We conducted site visits with in-depth interviews with 8 to 10 stakeholders in each organization. Both systems demonstrate a concern for the impact of change on their workforce and have made commitments to avoid outsourcing and layoffs. Central workforce planning mechanisms have been replaced with strategies to integrate various stakeholders and units in alignment with strategic growth plans. Features of this new approach include early and continuous engagement of labor in innovation; the development of intermediary sense-making structures to garner resources, facilitate plans, and build consensus; and a whole system perspective, rather than a focus on single professions. We also identify seven principles underlying the WFPD processes in these two cases that can aid in development of a new and more adaptive workforce strategy in healthcare. Since passage of the ACA, healthcare systems are becoming larger and more complex. Insights from these case studies suggest that while organizational history and structure determined different areas of emphasis, our results indicate that large-scale system transformations in healthcare can be managed in ways that enhance the skills and capacities of the workforce. Our findings merit attention, not just by healthcare administrators and union leaders, but by policymakers and scholars interested in making WFPD policies at a state and national level more responsive.

  17. SE Capstone Project: Building Systems Engineering Education and Workforce Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    This project developed a system to improve fuel efficiency by means of regenerative braking . The team designed a simple system that allows "bolt-on...air traffic control, social networking, credit/debit cards, and anti-lock brakes are only a few functions enabled by complex systems of systems . We...Building Systems Engineering Education and Workforce Capacity SE Capstone Project APRIL 2012 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704

  18. Strategic workforce planning for a multihospital, integrated delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datz, David; Hallberg, Colleen; Harris, Kathy; Harrison, Lisa; Samples, Patience

    2012-01-01

    Banner Health has long recognized the need to anticipate, beyond the immediate operational realities or even the annual budgeting projection exercises, the necessary workforce needs of the future. Thus, in 2011, Banner implemented a workforce planning model that included structures, processes, and tools for predicting workforce needs, with particular focus on identified critical systemwide practice areas. The model represents the incorporation of labor management tools and processes with more strategic, broad-view, long-term assessment and planning mechanisms. The sequential tying of the workforce planning lifecycle with the organization's strategy and financial planning process supports alignment of goals, objectives, and resource allocation. Collaboration among strategy, finance, human resources, and operations has provided us with the ability to identify critical position groups based on 3-year strategic priorities. By engaging leaders from across the organization, focusing on activities at facility, regional, and system levels, and building in mechanisms for accountability, we are now engaged in continuous evaluations of our delivery models, the competencies and preparations necessary for the staff to effectively function within those delivery models, and developing and implementing action plans designed to ensure adequate numbers of the staff whose competencies will be suited to the work expected of them.

  19. Developing Secure Power Systems Professional Competence: Alignment and Gaps in Workforce Development Programs—Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neil, Lori Ross; Assante, Michael; Tobey, D. H.; Conway, T. J.; Vanderhorst, Jr, T. J.; Januszewski, III, J.; Leo, R.; Perman, K.

    2013-07-01

    This document is a summarization of the report, Developing Secure Power Systems Professional Competence: Alignment and Gaps in Workforce Development Programs, the final report for phase 2 of the SPSP (DOE workforce study) project.

  20. Policy challenges for the pediatric rheumatology workforce: Part II. Health care system delivery and workforce supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrickson, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The United States pediatric population with chronic health conditions is expanding. Currently, this demographic comprises 12-18% of the American child and youth population. Affected children often receive fragmented, uncoordinated care. Overall, the American health care delivery system produces modest outcomes for this population. Poor, uninsured and minority children may be at increased risk for inferior coordination of services. Further, the United States health care delivery system is primarily organized for the diagnosis and treatment of acute conditions. For pediatric patients with chronic health conditions, the typical acute problem-oriented visit actually serves as a barrier to care. The biomedical model of patient education prevails, characterized by unilateral transfer of medical information. However, the evidence basis for improvement in disease outcomes supports the use of the chronic care model, initially proposed by Dr. Edward Wagner. Six inter-related elements distinguish the success of the chronic care model, which include self-management support and care coordination by a prepared, proactive team. United States health care lacks a coherent policy direction for the management of high cost chronic conditions, including rheumatic diseases. A fundamental restructure of United States health care delivery must urgently occur which places the patient at the center of care. For the pediatric rheumatology workforce, reimbursement policies and the actions of health plans and insurers are consistent barriers to chronic disease improvement. United States reimbursement policy and overall fragmentation of health care services pose specific challenges for widespread implementation of the chronic care model. Team-based multidisciplinary care, care coordination and self-management are integral to improve outcomes. Pediatric rheumatology demand in the United States far exceeds available workforce supply. This article reviews the career choice decision-making process

  1. Policy challenges for the pediatric rheumatology workforce: Part II. Health care system delivery and workforce supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrickson Michael

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The United States pediatric population with chronic health conditions is expanding. Currently, this demographic comprises 12-18% of the American child and youth population. Affected children often receive fragmented, uncoordinated care. Overall, the American health care delivery system produces modest outcomes for this population. Poor, uninsured and minority children may be at increased risk for inferior coordination of services. Further, the United States health care delivery system is primarily organized for the diagnosis and treatment of acute conditions. For pediatric patients with chronic health conditions, the typical acute problem-oriented visit actually serves as a barrier to care. The biomedical model of patient education prevails, characterized by unilateral transfer of medical information. However, the evidence basis for improvement in disease outcomes supports the use of the chronic care model, initially proposed by Dr. Edward Wagner. Six inter-related elements distinguish the success of the chronic care model, which include self-management support and care coordination by a prepared, proactive team. United States health care lacks a coherent policy direction for the management of high cost chronic conditions, including rheumatic diseases. A fundamental restructure of United States health care delivery must urgently occur which places the patient at the center of care. For the pediatric rheumatology workforce, reimbursement policies and the actions of health plans and insurers are consistent barriers to chronic disease improvement. United States reimbursement policy and overall fragmentation of health care services pose specific challenges for widespread implementation of the chronic care model. Team-based multidisciplinary care, care coordination and self-management are integral to improve outcomes. Pediatric rheumatology demand in the United States far exceeds available workforce supply. This article reviews the career

  2. Systems Engineering Assessment & Workforce Development Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-05

    Government or its technical domains. Other fields, such as culinary and healthcare, have also identified these emerging and growing issues (Calhoun...et al. (2009). "The Art and Science of Systems Engineering." Systems Research Forum 3(2): 81-100. Shenhar, A. and B. Sauser, Eds. (2009). Systems

  3. First Steps Toward Improving DoD STEM Workforce Diversity: Response to the 2012 Department of Defense STEM Diversity Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    higher Education Forum higher Ed STEM Model College Developed model of best practices for higher education retention programs Launch fall 2012... learning materials to students all over the world. Examples include a system called Open Class provided by Pearson, which facilitates open online ...available from www.rand.org as a public service of the RAND Corporation. CHILDREN AND FAMILIES EDUCATION AND THE ARTS ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT HEALTH AND

  4. Unmanned Aerial Systems: Air Force and Army Should Improve Strategic Human Capital Planning for Pilot Workforces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    the best UAS pilot candidates, including by conducting additional research and testing a tool that measures multitasking ability, a competency...UNMANNED AERIAL SYSTEMS Air Force and Army Should Improve Strategic Human Capital Planning for Pilot Workforces...Should Improve Strategic Human Capital Planning for Pilot Workforces What GAO Found The Air Force and the Army have not fully applied four of the five

  5. Reshaping the Federal System for a Postmodern Workforce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryl D. Green

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The federal government faces a human capital crisis over the next several years due to driving environmental forces, which include the reduction in the replacement labor force cohorts and the image problem of public service. One of the great challenges facing the federal service is the need to address the negative perceptions of the quality of work life experienced in the federal service, especially for younger employees. Consequently, governmental organizations must cope with increasing aging of their labor forces and elevated retirement levels exacerbating succession planning and knowledge transfer practices. This paper examines the current environment of the federal system and explores how it must adapt to postmodern influences that are embraced by Millennial and Generation X employees. While today’s federal system is rigid in many of its key leadership, performance management, and support service delivery systems, the postmodern workforce thrives on flexibility, involvement, and excitement. This paper further examines what leadership concepts and competencies can assist in the positive transformation of the federal government.

  6. An Intelligent Decision Support System for Workforce Forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    growth. Brown (1999) developed a model to forecast dental workforce size and mix (by sex) for the first twenty years of the twenty first century in...forecasted competencies required to deliver needed dental services. Labor market signaling approaches based workforce forecasting model was presented...techniques viz. algebra, calculus or probability theory, (Law and Kelton, 1991). Simulation processes, same as conducting experiments on computers, deals

  7. Oligopolies with contingent workforce and unemployment insurance systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Akio; Merlone, Ugo; Szidarovszky, Ferenc

    2015-10-01

    In the recent literature the introduction of modified cost functions has added reality into the classical oligopoly analysis. Furthermore, the market evolution requires much more flexibility to firms, and in several countries contingent workforce plays an important role in the production choices by the firms. Therefore, an analysis of dynamic adjustment costs is in order to understand oligopoly dynamics. In this paper, dynamic single-product oligopolies without product differentiation are first examined with the additional consideration of production adjustment costs. Linear inverse demand and cost functions are considered and it is assumed that the firms adjust their outputs partially toward best response. The set of the steady states is characterized by a system of linear inequalities and there are usually infinitely many steady states. The asymptotic behavior of the output trajectories is examined by using computer simulation. The numerical results indicate that the resulting dynamics is richer than in the case of the classical Cournot model. This model and results are then compared to oligopolies with unemployment insurance systems when the additional cost is considered if firms do not use their maximum capacities.

  8. Policy challenges for the pediatric rheumatology workforce: Part II. Health care system delivery and workforce supply

    OpenAIRE

    Henrickson Michael

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The United States pediatric population with chronic health conditions is expanding. Currently, this demographic comprises 12-18% of the American child and youth population. Affected children often receive fragmented, uncoordinated care. Overall, the American health care delivery system produces modest outcomes for this population. Poor, uninsured and minority children may be at increased risk for inferior coordination of services. Further, the United States health care delivery syste...

  9. Systems Biology and Stem Cell Pluripotency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mashayekhi, Kaveh; Hall, Vanessa Jane; Freude, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in stem cell biology have accelerated research in the area of regenerative medicine. Over the past years, it has become possible to derive patient-specific stem cells which can be used to generate different cell populations for potential cell therapy. Systems biological...... modeling of stem cell pluripotency and differentiation have largely been based on prior knowledge of signaling pathways, gene regulatory networks, and epigenetic factors. However, there is a great need to extend the complexity of the modeling and to integrate different types of data, which would further...... improve systems biology and its uses in the field. In this chapter, we first give a general background on stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. Stem cell potency is introduced together with the hierarchy of stem cells ranging from pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem...

  10. Is health workforce planning recognising the dynamic interplay between health literacy at an individual, organisation and system level?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naccarella, Lucio; Wraight, Brenda; Gorman, Des

    2016-02-01

    The growing demands on the health system to adapt to constant change has led to investment in health workforce planning agencies and approaches. Health workforce planning approaches focusing on identifying, predicting and modelling workforce supply and demand are criticised as being simplistic and not contributing to system-level resiliency. Alternative evidence- and needs-based health workforce planning approaches are being suggested. However, to contribute to system-level resiliency, workforce planning approaches need to also adopt system-based approaches. The increased complexity and fragmentation of the healthcare system, especially for patients with complex and chronic conditions, has also led to a focus on health literacy not simply as an individual trait, but also as a dynamic product of the interaction between individual (patients, workforce)-, organisational- and system-level health literacy. Although it is absolutely essential that patients have a level of health literacy that enables them to navigate and make decisions, so too the health workforce, organisations and indeed the system also needs to be health literate. Herein we explore whether health workforce planning is recognising the dynamic interplay between health literacy at an individual, organisation and system level, and the potential for strengthening resiliency across all those levels.

  11. Combining Operations Management and Information Systems Curricula: Assessing Alumni Preparations for the Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, David; McFadden, Kathleen L.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore how well a curriculum that combines operations management and information systems uniquely prepares students for the workforce. To address our research questions, a Web-based survey was developed. We sent our survey to 203 alumni that graduated from the Department of Operations Management and Information…

  12. Introducing Physician Assistants into the Irish Healthcare System. An Integrated Clinical Workforce Reconfiguration Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Okereke, Emeka

    2011-01-01

    The Irish health system is facing a unique and unprecedented workforce challenge with acute shortage of Non-Consultant Hospital Doctors (NCHDs) threatening to undermine the overall health service delivery system. Ireland‟s requirement to comply with the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) aimed at regulating the working hours of NCHDs, lack of sufficient funding due to economic recession, changes in immigration rules, absence of structured training programmes for most junior doctors and de...

  13. Cancer stem cells of the digestive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Hugh S; Nishida, Naohiro; Koseki, Jun; Konno, Masamitsu; Kawamoto, Koichi; Tsunekuni, Kenta; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Ishii, Hideshi

    2014-12-01

    Stem cells of the digestive system are ideal in many ways for research, given they are abundant, highly proliferative and have a uniform structural arrangement. This in turn has enormously aided the research of cancer stem cells of the digestive system, which is now shaping our understanding of cancer stem cells. In this review, the recent advances in the understanding of cancer stem cells of the digestive system have been summarized, including aspects such as their identification, origin, cell-cycle dormancy, relationship with epithelial-mesenchymal transition, cellular metabolism and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Newly acquired knowledge concerning cancer stem cells have led to the development of novel cancer therapeutics with provisional yet encouraging results. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Extensible Adaptive System for STEM Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-16

    Copyright 2013 Raytheon BBN Technologies Corp. All Rights Reserved ONR STEM Grand Challenge Extensible Adaptive System for STEM Learning ...Contract # N00014-12-C-0535 Raytheon BBN Technologies Corp. (BBN) Reference # 14217 In partial fulfillment of contract deliverable item # A001...Quarterly Progress Report #2 April 7, 2013 –July 6, 2013 Submitted July 16, 2013 BBN Technical POC: John Makhoul Raytheon BBN Technologies

  15. Health Workforce Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sawai, Abdulaziz; Al-Shishtawy, Moeness M.

    2015-01-01

    In most countries, the lack of explicit health workforce planning has resulted in imbalances that threaten the capacity of healthcare systems to attain their objectives. This has directed attention towards the prospect of developing healthcare systems that are more responsive to the needs and expectations of the population by providing health planners with a systematic method to effectively manage human resources in this sector. This review analyses various approaches to health workforce planning and presents the Six-Step Methodology to Integrated Workforce Planning which highlights essential elements in workforce planning to ensure the quality of services. The purpose, scope and ownership of the approach is defined. Furthermore, developing an action plan for managing a health workforce is emphasised and a reviewing and monitoring process to guide corrective actions is suggested. PMID:25685381

  16. Exploring Earth Systems Through STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Loris; Salmon, Jennifer; Burns, Courtney

    2015-04-01

    During the 2010 school year, grade 8 science teachers at Dwight D. Eisenhower Middle School in Wyckoff, New Jersey, began using the draft of A Framework for K-12 Science Education to transition to the Next Generation Science Standards. In an evolutionary process of testing and revising, teachers work collaboratively to develop problem-based science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) units that integrate earth science, physical science, and life science topics. Students explore the interconnections of Earth's atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere through problem-based learning. Problem-based learning engages students in (1) direct observations in the field and classroom, (2) collection and analysis of data from remote sensors and hand-held sensors, and (3) analysis of physical, mathematical, and virtual models. Students use a variety of technologies and applications in their investigations, for example iPad apps, Google Classroom, and Vernier sensors. Data from NASA, NOAA, non-government organizations, and scientific research papers inspire student questions and spark investigations. Teachers create materials and websites to support student learning. Teachers curate reading, video, simulations, and other Internet resources for students. Because curriculum is standards-based as opposed to textbook-based, teacher participation in workshops and institutes frequently translates into new or improved study units. Recent programs include Toyota International Teacher Program to Costa Rica, Japan Society Going Global, Siemens STEM Academy, U.S. Naval Academy SET Sail, and NJSTA Maitland P. Simmons Memorial Award Summer Institute. Unit themes include weather and climate, introduction to general chemistry and biochemistry, and cells and heredity. Each if the three 12-week units has embedded engineering challenges inspired by current events, community needs, and/or the work of scientists. The unit segments begin with a problem, progress to

  17. Postings and transfers in the Ghanaian health system: a study of health workforce governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwamie, Aku; Asiamah, Miriam; Schaaf, Marta; Agyepong, Irene Akua

    2017-09-15

    Decision-making on postings and transfers - that is, the geographic deployment of the health workforce - is a key element of health workforce governance. When poorly managed, postings and transfers result in maldistribution, absenteeism, and low morale. At stake is managing the balance between organisational (i.e., health system) and individual (i.e., staff preference) needs. The negotiation of this potential convergence or divergence of interests provides a window on practices of postings and transfers, and on the micro-practices of governance in health systems more generally. This article explores the policies and processes, and the interplay between formal and informal rules and norms which underpin postings and transfers practice in two rural districts in the Greater Accra Region of Ghana. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight district managers and 87 frontline staff from the district health administration, district hospital, polyclinic, health centres and community outreach compounds across two districts. Interviews sought to understand how the postings and transfers process works in practice, factors in frontline staff and district manager decision-making, personal experiences in being posted, and study leave as a common strategy for obtaining transfers. Differential negotiation-spaces at regional and district level exist and inform postings and transfers in practice. This is in contrast to the formal cascaded rules set to govern decision-making authority for postings and transfers. Many frontline staff lack policy clarity of postings and transfers processes and thus 'test' the system through informal staff lobbying, compounding staff perception of the postings and transfers process as being unfair. District managers are also challenged with limited decision-space embedded in broader policy contexts of systemic hierarchy and resource dependence. This underscores the negotiation process as ongoing, rather than static. These findings point to

  18. Promoting Strategic STEM Education Outreach Programming Using a Systems-Based STEM-EO Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Annmarie R.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper a STEM Education Outreach (STEM-EO) Model for promoting strategic university outreach programming at Penn State University to the benefit of university, school district and community stakeholders is described. The model considers STEM-EO as a complex system involving overarching learning goals addressed within four outreach domains…

  19. An Analysis of Training Requirements and Competencies for the Naval Acquisition Systems Engineering Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    math (Lasley- Hunter, 2011, p. 30–31). The significance of this finding stems from the fact that education is one of three components of DAWIA...II CLE 003 Technical Reviews SYS 302 Technical Leadership in Systems Engineering CLL  008 Designing for Supportability in DoD Systems DAU SPRDE‐SE

  20. Health workforce governance and integration: the fit between planning and system.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batenburg, R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The EU Joint Action on Health Workforce Planning and Forecasting has taken up the challenge to let countries share and exchange practices in health workforce planning. It appears however, that not many countries actually apply (needs-based forecasting) models to support this. But does

  1. Health system's response for physician workforce shortages and the upcoming crisis in Ethiopia: a grounded theory research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assefa, Tsion; Haile Mariam, Damen; Mekonnen, Wubegzier; Derbew, Miliard

    2017-12-28

    A rapid transition from severe physician workforce shortage to massive production to ensure the physician workforce demand puts the Ethiopian health care system in a variety of challenges. Therefore, this study discovered how the health system response for physician workforce shortage using the so-called flooding strategy was viewed by different stakeholders. The study adopted the grounded theory research approach to explore the causes, contexts, and consequences (at the present, in the short and long term) of massive medical student admission to the medical schools on patient care, medical education workforce, and medical students. Forty-three purposively selected individuals were involved in a semi-structured interview from different settings: academics, government health care system, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). Data coding, classification, and categorization were assisted using ATLAs.ti qualitative data analysis scientific software. In relation to the health system response, eight main categories were emerged: (1) reasons for rapid medical education expansion; (2) preparation for medical education expansion; (3) the consequences of rapid medical education expansion; (4) massive production/flooding as human resources for health (HRH) development strategy; (5) cooperation on HRH development; (6) HRH strategies and planning; (7) capacity of system for HRH development; and (8) institutional continuity for HRH development. The demand for physician workforce and gaining political acceptance were cited as main reasons which motivated the government to scale up the medical education rapidly. However, the rapid expansion was beyond the capacity of medical schools' human resources, patient flow, and size of teaching hospitals. As a result, there were potential adverse consequences in clinical service delivery, and teaching learning process at the present: "the number should consider the available resources such as number of classrooms, patient flows

  2. Changing the system by changing the workforce: employing consumers to increase access, cultural diversity, and engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenz-Gross, Melodie; Irsfeld, Toni DuBrino; Twomey, Tammy; Perez, Ana; Thompson, Judith; Wally, Martha; Colleton, Barbara; Kroell, Christine; McKeown, Steven K; Metz, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Services to families have traditionally been delivered in a medical model. This presents challenges including workforce shortages, lack of cultural diversity, lack of training in strength-based work, and difficulty in successfully engaging and retaining families in the therapy process. The system of care (SOC) effort has worked to establish formal roles for caregivers in SOC to improve services. This paper provides an example of one community's efforts to change the SOC by expanding the roles available to caregivers in creating systems change. It describes the model developed by Communities of Care (CoC), a SOC in Central Massachusetts, and its evolution over a 10 year period. First person accounts by system partners, caregivers hired into professional roles as well as a family receiving services, demonstrate how hiring caregivers at all levels can change systems and change lives, not only for those being served but for the caregiver/professionals doing the work. It also demonstrates, however, that change at the system level is incremental, takes time, and can be fleeting unless an ongoing effort is made to support and sustain those changes.

  3. The Professional Development Plan of a Health Care Workforce as a Qualitative Indicator of the Health Care System's Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiti, Anna; Mylona, Vasiliki

    2015-01-01

    The quality of a health care system is heavily dependent on a capable and skillful health care workforce so as to guarantee the delivery of quality health care services to its user groups. Hence, only through continuous training and development can the health care workforce follow rapid scientific progress while equitably balancing investment…

  4. Addressing ageing of the workforce issues by enabling knowledge management systems with social networks analysis capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perisic, I.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: A method of addressing ageing of the workforce and knowledge transfer issues, especially in the area of potential loss of knowledge, is presented through the integration of social networks analysis capabilities within knowledge management systems. In the context of the ageing of the workforce, a key component is the identification of not only the individuals that are about to retire, but also the knowledge and the knowledge transfer capabilities that they will take with them they do so. This loss impacts decisions made about human resources 'supply side' programs such as education, but also programs for building 'communities of practices' within the IAEA community to foster development and research across regions and countries. Within this context, an integrated social network analysis component provides the ability to map out the network of knowledge on any specific topic. The stability of the network itself is a measure of the robustness of the knowledge within the selected IAEA community. Further, the network, by identifying 'brokers' and 'bridges', pinpoints key weaknesses that have to be addressed. In the case of ageing of the workforce, balancing, stabilizing and building redundancies within this social network is key to maintaining a safe nuclear policy. The core of the method relies on a system that has a holistic view of the body of knowledge accumulated within the IAEA community. For scalability issues, this system cannot replicate the plethora of potential sources of information, but rather has to harvest from each of them a set of metadata which in turn enables the knowledge management system. This metadata is defined and stored in a way to allow the rendering of a complete picture stored within the sub-systems. A key component used by the social network analysis component is, of course, the name of all individuals tied to any knowledge object within the database, but also their affiliation, country, seniority or 'age to retirement' (when

  5. Extravehicular Activity Systems Education and Public Outreach in Support of NASA's STEM Initiatives in Fiscal Year 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Heather; Jennings, Mallory A.; Lamberth, Erika Guillory

    2012-01-01

    NASA's goals to send humans beyond low Earth orbit will involve the need for a strong engineering workforce. Research indicates that student interest in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) areas is on the decline. According to the Department of Education, the United States President has mandated that 100,000 educators be trained in STEM over the next decade to reduce this trend. NASA has aligned its Education and Public Outreach (EPO) initiatives to include emphasis in promoting STEM. The Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Systems Project Office at the NASA Johnson Space Center actively supports this NASA initiative by providing subject matter experts and hands-on, interactive presentations to educate students, educators, and the general public about the design challenges encountered as NASA develops EVA hardware for exploration missions. This paper summarizes the EVA Systems EPO efforts and metrics from fiscal year 2011.

  6. Addressing ageing of the workforce issues by enabling knowledge management systems with social networks analysis capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perisic, I.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: A method of addressing ageing of the workforce and knowledge transfer issues, especially in the area of potential loss of knowledge, is presented through the integration of social networks analysis capabilities within knowledge management systems. In the context of the ageing of the workforce, a key component is the identification of not only the individuals that are about to retire, but also the knowledge and the knowledge transfer capabilities that they will take with them they do so. This loss impacts decisions made about human resources 'supply side' programs such as education, but also programs for building 'communities of practices' within the IAEA community to foster development and research across regions and countries. Within this context, an integrated social network analysis component provides the ability to map out the network of knowledge on any specific topic. The stability of the network itself is a measure of the robustness of the knowledge within the selected IAEA community. Further, the network, by identifying 'brokers' and 'bridges', pinpoints key weaknesses that have to be addressed. In the case of ageing of the workforce, balancing, stabilizing and building redundancies within this social network is key to maintaining a safe nuclear policy. The core of the method relies on a system that has a holistic view of the body of knowledge accumulated within the IAEA community. For scalability issues, this system cannot replicate the plethora of potential sources of information, but rather has to harvest from each of them a set of metadata which in turn enables the knowledge management system. This metadata is defined and stored in a way to allow the rendering of a complete picture stored within the subsystems. A key component used by the social network analysis component is, of course, the name of all individuals tied to any knowledge object within the database, but also their affiliation, country, seniority or 'age to retirement' (when

  7. Kenya's health workforce information system: a model of impact on strategic human resources policy, planning and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Keith P; Zuber, Alexandra; Willy, Rankesh M; Kiriinya, Rose N; Waudo, Agnes N; Oluoch, Tom; Kimani, Francis M; Riley, Patricia L

    2013-09-01

    Countries worldwide are challenged by health worker shortages, skill mix imbalances, and maldistribution. Human resources information systems (HRIS) are used to monitor and address these health workforce issues, but global understanding of such systems is minimal and baseline information regarding their scope and capability is practically non-existent. The Kenya Health Workforce Information System (KHWIS) has been identified as a promising example of a functioning HRIS. The objective of this paper is to document the impact of KHWIS data on human resources policy, planning and management. Sources for this study included semi-structured interviews with senior officials at Kenya's Ministry of Medical Services (MOMS), Ministry of Public Health and Sanitation (MOPHS), the Department of Nursing within MOMS, the Nursing Council of Kenya, Kenya Medical Practitioners and Dentists Board, Kenya's Clinical Officers Council, and Kenya Medical Laboratory Technicians and Technologists Board. Additionally, quantitative data were extracted from KHWIS databases to supplement the interviews. Health sector policy documents were retrieved from MOMS and MOPHS websites, and reviewed to assess whether they documented any changes to policy and practice as having been impacted by KHWIS data. Interviews with Kenyan government and regulatory officials cited health workforce data provided by KHWIS influenced policy, regulation, and management. Policy changes include extension of Kenya's age of mandatory civil service retirement from 55 to 60 years. Data retrieved from KHWIS document increased relicensing of professional nurses, midwives, medical practitioners and dentists, and interviewees reported this improved compliance raised professional regulatory body revenues. The review of Government records revealed few references to KHWIS; however, documentation specifically cited the KHWIS as having improved the availability of human resources for health information regarding workforce planning

  8. Workforce productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ruth

    2012-10-26

    Managers who are responsible for delivering the workforce productivity element of the Quality, Innovation, Productivity and Prevention (QIPP) programme can network and share best practice through a dedicated NHS Employers webpage.

  9. Room for manoeuvre in time of the workforce in dairy production systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Carneiro dos Santos Filho

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to characterize and to analyze the room for manoeuvre in time in dairy production systems (DPS. Two interviews were conducted in twenty DPS in the Northern region of Paraná, Brazil, with the following objectives: to know the management and practices involving the herd, the land area and the commercialization; and to qualify and evaluate the work organization. In order to build the variables, the repertory grid method was used, and for the typology, the graphic methodology of Bertin adapted to small samples was used. The results showed that the room for manoeuvre in time of the DPS, quantified in hours available per year, varied between the farmers and was related to routine work and seasonal work durations, as well as the autonomy of farmers to perform both works. The routine work was related to the number of cows, but was also explained by the herd management, by the transport equipment for the feed and by the workforce composition. Four types of work organization were identified between sampled DPS, based on room for manoeuvre in time and how they were built. Knowing the room for manoeuvre time and its variables, it is possible to guide the farmers to adjust their dairy production system in order to have more time available for other activities or to develop the dairy production system.

  10. Muscle Stem Cells: A Model System for Adult Stem Cell Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelison, Ddw; Perdiguero, Eusebio

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle stem cells, originally termed satellite cells for their position adjacent to differentiated muscle fibers, are absolutely required for the process of skeletal muscle repair and regeneration. In the last decade, satellite cells have become one of the most studied adult stem cell systems and have emerged as a standard model not only in the field of stem cell-driven tissue regeneration but also in stem cell dysfunction and aging. Here, we provide background in the field and discuss recent advances in our understanding of muscle stem cell function and dysfunction, particularly in the case of aging, and the potential involvement of muscle stem cells in genetic diseases such as the muscular dystrophies.

  11. Stem cell biology meets systems biology

    OpenAIRE

    Roeder, I.; Radtke, F.

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells and their descendents are the building blocks of life. How stem cell populations guarantee their maintenance and/or self-renewal, and how individual stem cells decide to transit from one cell stage to another to generate different cell types are long-standing and fascinating questions in the field. Here, we review the discussions that took place at a recent EMBO conference in Cambridge, UK, in which these questions were placed in the context of the latest advances in stem cell biol...

  12. From the NIH: A Systems Approach to Increasing the Diversity of the Biomedical Research Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valantine, Hannah A.; Lund, P. Kay; Gammie, Alison E.

    2016-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is committed to attracting, developing, and supporting the best scientists from all groups as an integral part of excellence in training. Biomedical research workforce diversity, capitalizing on the full spectrum of skills, talents, and viewpoints, is essential for solving complex human health challenges.…

  13. The Primary Dental Care Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neenan, M. Elaine; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A study describes the characteristics of the current primary dental care workforce (dentists, hygienists, assistants), its distribution, and its delivery system in private and public sectors. Graduate dental school enrollments, trends in patient visits, employment patterns, state dental activities, and workforce issues related to health care…

  14. Refueling the STEM and Special Education Teacher Pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhaber, Dan; Krieg, John; Theobald, Roddy; Brown, Nate

    2016-01-01

    Improving the quality of the teacher workforce is high on the nation's education policy agenda, but school systems continue to face difficulties in staffing STEM and special education classrooms with qualified teachers. This article documents the mismatch between the supply and demand of STEM and special education teachers in Washington State,…

  15. System for tracking transplanted limbal epithelial stem cells in the treatment of corneal stem cell deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boadi, J.; Sangwal, V.; MacNeil, S.; Matcher, S. J.

    2015-03-01

    The prevailing hypothesis for the existence and healing of the avascular corneal epithelium is that this layer of cells is continually produced by stem cells in the limbus and transported onto the cornea to mature into corneal epithelium. Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency (LSCD), in which the stem cell population is depleted, can lead to blindness. LSCD can be caused by chemical and thermal burns to the eye. A popular treatment, especially in emerging economies such as India, is the transplantation of limbal stem cells onto damaged limbus with hope of repopulating the region. Hence regenerating the corneal epithelium. In order to gain insights into the success rates of this treatment, new imaging technologies are needed in order to track the transplanted cells. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is well known for its high resolution in vivo images of the retina. A custom OCT system has been built to image the corneal surface, to investigate the fate of transplanted limbal stem cells. We evaluate two methods to label and track transplanted cells: melanin labelling and magneto-labelling. To evaluate melanin labelling, stem cells are loaded with melanin and then transplanted onto a rabbit cornea denuded of its epithelium. The melanin displays strongly enhanced backscatter relative to normal cells. To evaluate magneto-labelling the stem cells are loaded with magnetic nanoparticles (20-30nm in size) and then imaged with a custom-built, magneto-motive OCT system.

  16. Using Food Science Demonstrations to Engage Students of All Ages in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Shelly J.; Bohn, Dawn M.; Rasmussen, Aaron J.; Sutherland, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    The overarching goal of the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Education Initiative is to foster effective STEM teaching and learning throughout the educational system at the local, state, and national levels, thereby producing science literate citizens and a capable STEM workforce. To contribute to achieving this goal, we…

  17. Development of bioengineering system for stem cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H. S.; Shah, R.; Shah, C.

    2016-08-01

    From last decades, intensive research in the field of stem cells proliferation had been promoted due to the unique property of stem cells to self-renew themselves into multiples and has potential to replicate into an organ or tissues and so it's highly demanding though challenging. Bioreactor, a mechanical device, works as a womb for stem cell proliferation by providing nutritious environment for the proper growth of stem cells. Various factors affecting stem cells growth are the bioreactor mechanism, feeding of continuous nutrients, healthy environment, etc., but it always remains a challenge for controlling biological parameters. The present paper unveils the design of mechanical device commonly known as bioreactor in tissues engineering and biotech field, use for proliferation of stem cells and imparts the proper growing condition for stem cells. This high functional bioreactor provides automation mixing of cell culture and stem cells. This design operates in conjunction with mechanism of reciprocating motion. Compare to commercial bioreactors, this proposed design is more convenient, easy to operate and less maintenance is required as bioreactor culture bag is made of polyethylene which is single use purpose. Development of this bioengineering system will be beneficial for better growth and expansion of stem cell

  18. Maximizing the benefit of health workforce secondment in Botswana: an approach for strengthening health systems in resource-limited settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grignon JS

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Jessica S Grignon,1,2 Jenny H Ledikwe,1,2 Ditsapelo Makati,2 Robert Nyangah,2 Baraedi W Sento,2 Bazghina-werq Semo1,2 1Department of Global Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; 2International Training and Education Center for Health, Gaborone, Botswana Abstract: To address health systems challenges in limited-resource settings, global health initiatives, particularly the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, have seconded health workers to the public sector. Implementation considerations for secondment as a health workforce development strategy are not well documented. The purpose of this article is to present outcomes, best practices, and lessons learned from a President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief-funded secondment program in Botswana. Outcomes are documented across four World Health Organization health systems' building blocks. Best practices include documentation of joint stakeholder expectations, collaborative recruitment, and early identification of counterparts. Lessons learned include inadequate ownership, a two-tier employment system, and ill-defined position duration. These findings can inform program and policy development to maximize the benefit of health workforce secondment. Secondment requires substantial investment, and emphasis should be placed on high-level technical positions responsible for building systems, developing health workers, and strengthening government to translate policy into programs. Keywords: human resources, health policy, health worker, HIV/AIDS, PEPFAR

  19. STEM-based workbook: Enhancing students' STEM competencies on lever system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sejati, Binar Kasih; Firman, Harry; Kaniawati, Ida

    2017-05-01

    Twenty-first century is a century of technology, a rapid development of scientific studies and technology make them relied heavily on each other. This research investigated about the effect of STEM-based workbook in enhancing students' STEM competencies in terms of knowledge understanding, problem solving skill, innovative abilities, and responsibility. The workbook was tried on 24 students that applied engineering design processes together with mathematics and science knowledge to design and create an egg cracker. The result showed that the implementation of STEM-based workbook on lever system in human body is effective to improve students' STEM competencies, it can be proven by students' result on their knowledge understanding improvement which can be seen from normalized gain () score is 0.41 and categorized as medium improvement, students' problem solving skill is also improving where it obtained a medium improvement with normalized gain as much as 0.45. Innovative abilities also encountered an the improvement, the workbook analysis obtained a higher score which means students can be more innovative after finishing their workbook. Last, students' responsibility is keep improving day by day, students' effort gain the highest score it means that the students become more responsible after implementation of STEM-based workbook. All of the results are supported with the response of students towards STEM-based workbook implementation which showed positive response in all indicators.

  20. Inequality trends of health workforce in different stages of medical system reform (1985-2011) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kaiyuan; Zhang, Xinyi; Ding, Yi; Wang, Duolao; Lu, Zhou; Yu, Min

    2015-12-08

    The aim of this study was to identify whether policies in different stages of medical system reform had been effective in decreasing inequalities and increasing the density of health workers in rural areas in China between 1985 and 2011. With data from China Health Statistics Yearbooks from 2004 to 2012, we measured the Gini coefficient and the Theil L index across the urban and rural areas from 1985 to 2011 to investigate changes in inequalities in the distributions of health workers, doctors, and nurses by states, regions, and urban-rural stratum and account for the sources of inequalities. We found that the overall inequalities in the distribution of health workers decreased to the lowest in 2000, then increased gently until 2011. Nurses were the most unequally distributed between urban-rural districts among health workers. Most of the overall inequalities in the distribution of health workers across regions were due to inequalities within the rural-urban stratum. Different policies and interventions in different stages would result in important changes in inequality in the distribution of the health workforce. It was also influenced by other system reforms, like the urbanization, education, and employment reforms in China. The results are useful for the Chinese government to decide how to narrow the gap of the health workforce and meet its citizens' health needs to the maximum extent.

  1. Microfluidic systems for stem cell-based neural tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Mahdi; Bahrami, Sajad; Mirshekari, Hamed; Basri, Seyed Masoud Moosavi; Nik, Amirala Bakhshian; Aref, Amir R; Akbari, Mohsen; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-07-05

    Neural tissue engineering aims at developing novel approaches for the treatment of diseases of the nervous system, by providing a permissive environment for the growth and differentiation of neural cells. Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture systems provide a closer biomimetic environment, and promote better cell differentiation and improved cell function, than could be achieved by conventional two-dimensional (2D) culture systems. With the recent advances in the discovery and introduction of different types of stem cells for tissue engineering, microfluidic platforms have provided an improved microenvironment for the 3D-culture of stem cells. Microfluidic systems can provide more precise control over the spatiotemporal distribution of chemical and physical cues at the cellular level compared to traditional systems. Various microsystems have been designed and fabricated for the purpose of neural tissue engineering. Enhanced neural migration and differentiation, and monitoring of these processes, as well as understanding the behavior of stem cells and their microenvironment have been obtained through application of different microfluidic-based stem cell culture and tissue engineering techniques. As the technology advances it may be possible to construct a "brain-on-a-chip". In this review, we describe the basics of stem cells and tissue engineering as well as microfluidics-based tissue engineering approaches. We review recent testing of various microfluidic approaches for stem cell-based neural tissue engineering.

  2. The Single Graduate Medical Education (GME) Accreditation System Will Change the Future of the Family Medicine Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peabody, Michael R; O'Neill, Thomas R; Eden, Aimee R; Puffer, James C

    2017-01-01

    Due to the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)/American Osteopathic Association (AOA) single-accreditation model, the specialty of family medicine may see as many as 150 programs and 500 trainees in AOA-accredited programs seek ACGME accreditation. This analysis serves to better understand the composition of physicians completing family medicine residency training and their subsequent certification by the American Board of Family Medicine. We identified residents who completed an ACGME-accredited or dual-accredited family medicine residency program between 2006 and 2016 and cross-tabulated the data by graduation year and by educational background (US Medical Graduate-MD [USMG-MD], USMG-DO, or International Medical Graduate-MD [IMG-MD]) to examine the cohort composition trend over time. The number and proportion of osteopaths completing family medicine residency training continues to rise concurrent with a decline in the number and proportion of IMGs. Take Rates for USMG-MDs and USMG-IMGs seem stable; however, the Take Rate for the USMG-DOs has generally been rising since 2011. There is a clear change in the composition of graduating trainees entering the family medicine workforce. As the transition to a single accreditation system for graduate medical education progresses, further shifts in the composition of this workforce should be expected. © Copyright 2017 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  3. Workforce Assessment of Information Technology Sailors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    García Reyes, Federico

    2002-01-01

    .... The authors define this workforce as Sailors who facilitate or protect others' use of information and telecommunications systems, and help other personnel use hardware and software for strategic...

  4. D-Side: A Facility and Workforce Planning Group Multi-criteria Decision Support System for Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavana, Madjid

    2005-01-01

    "To understand and protect our home planet, to explore the universe and search for life, and to inspire the next generation of explorers" is NASA's mission. The Systems Management Office at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is searching for methods to effectively manage the Center's resources to meet NASA's mission. D-Side is a group multi-criteria decision support system (GMDSS) developed to support facility decisions at JSC. D-Side uses a series of sequential and structured processes to plot facilities in a three-dimensional (3-D) graph on the basis of each facility alignment with NASA's mission and goals, the extent to which other facilities are dependent on the facility, and the dollar value of capital investments that have been postponed at the facility relative to the facility replacement value. A similarity factor rank orders facilities based on their Euclidean distance from Ideal and Nadir points. These similarity factors are then used to allocate capital improvement resources across facilities. We also present a parallel model that can be used to support decisions concerning allocation of human resources investments across workforce units. Finally, we present results from a pilot study where 12 experienced facility managers from NASA used D-Side and the organization's current approach to rank order and allocate funds for capital improvement across 20 facilities. Users evaluated D-Side favorably in terms of ease of use, the quality of the decision-making process, decision quality, and overall value-added. Their evaluations of D-Side were significantly more favorable than their evaluations of the current approach. Keywords: NASA, Multi-Criteria Decision Making, Decision Support System, AHP, Euclidean Distance, 3-D Modeling, Facility Planning, Workforce Planning.

  5. Raising Job Quality and Skills for American Workers: Creating More-Effective Education and Workforce Development Systems in the States. Discussion Paper 2011-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Harry J.

    2011-01-01

    To improve the employment rates and earnings of Americans workers, we need to create more-coherent and more-effective education and workforce development systems, focusing primarily (though not exclusively) on disadvantaged youth and adults, and with education and training more clearly targeted towards firms and sectors that provide good-paying…

  6. Place Based STEM: Leveraging Local Resources to Engage K-12 Teachers in Teaching Integrated STEM and for Addressing the Local STEM Pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Louis Nadelson; Anne Louise Seifert; Meagan McKinney

    2014-06-01

    Business, industry, parks, nature settings, government infrastructure, and people, can be invaluable resources for connecting STEM curriculum within context which results in conditions ideal for promoting purposeful learning of authentic STEM content. Thus, community-based STEM resources offer ideal context for teaching STEM content. A benefit of focusing teacher attention on these contextual, content aligned resources is that they are in every community; making place-based STEM education a possibility, regardless of the location of STEM teaching and learning. Further, associating STEM teaching and learning with local resources addresses workforce development and the STEM pipeline by exposing students to STEM careers and applications in their local communities. The desire to align STEM teaching and learning with local STEM related resources guided the design of our week-long integrated STEM K-12 teacher professional development (PD) program, i-STEM. We have completed four years of our i-STEM PD program and have made place-based STEM a major emphasis of our curriculum. This report focuses on the data collected in the fourth year of our program. Our week-long i-STEM PD served over 425 educators last summer (2013), providing them with in depth theme-based integrated STEM short courses which were limited to an average of 15 participants and whole group plenary sessions focused around placed based integrated STEM, inquiry, engineering design, standards and practices of Common Core and 21st Century skills. This state wide PD was distributed in five Idaho community colleges and took place over two weeks. The STEM short courses included topics on engineering for sustainability, using engineering to spark interest in STEM, municipal water systems, health, agriculture, food safety, mining, forestry, energy, and others. Integral to these short courses were field trips designed to connect the K-12 educators to the resources in their local communities that could be leveraged

  7. Using systems thinking to identify workforce enablers for a whole systems approach to urgent and emergency care delivery: a multiple case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, Kim; Martin, Anne; Jackson, Carolyn; Wright, Toni

    2016-08-09

    Overcrowding in emergency departments is a global issue, which places pressure on the shrinking workforce and threatens the future of high quality, safe and effective care. Healthcare reforms aimed at tackling this crisis have focused primarily on structural changes, which alone do not deliver anticipated improvements in quality and performance. The purpose of this study was to identify workforce enablers for achieving whole systems urgent and emergency care delivery. A multiple case study design framed around systems thinking was conducted in South East England across one Trust consisting of five hospitals, one community healthcare trust and one ambulance trust. Data sources included 14 clinical settings where upstream or downstream pinch points are likely to occur including discharge planning and rapid response teams; ten regional stakeholder events (n = 102); a qualitative survey (n = 48); and a review of literature and analysis of policy documents including care pathways and protocols. The key workforce enablers for whole systems urgent and emergency care delivery identified were: clinical systems leadership, a single integrated career and competence framework and skilled facilitation of work based learning. In this study, participants agreed that whole systems urgent and emergency care allows for the design and implementation of care delivery models that meet complexity of population healthcare needs, reduce duplication and waste and improve healthcare outcomes and patients' experiences. For this to be achieved emphasis needs to be placed on holistic changes in structures, processes and patterns of the urgent and emergency care system. Often overlooked, patterns that drive the thinking and behavior in the workplace directly impact on staff recruitment and retention and the overall effectiveness of the organization. These also need to be attended to for transformational change to be achieved and sustained. Research to refine and validate a single

  8. Aerospace Workforce Development: The Nebraska Proposal; and Native View Connections: A Multi-Consortium Workforce Development Proposal. UNO Aviation Monograph Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Brent D.; Russell, Valerie; Vlasek, Karisa; Avery, Shelly; Calamaio, Larry; Carstenson, Larry; Farritor, Shane; deSilva, Shan; Dugan, James; Farr, Lynne

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Nebraska Space Grant Consortium (NSGC) continues to recognize the necessity of increasing the quantity and quality of highly skilled graduates and faculty involved with NASA. Through NASA Workforce Development funds awarded in 2002, NSGC spearheaded customer- focused workforce training and higher education, industry and community partnerships that are significantly impacting the state s workforce in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) competencies. NSGC proposes to build upon these accomplishments to meet the steadily increasing demand for STEM skills and to safeguard minority representation in these disciplines. A wide range of workforce development activities target NASA s need to establish stronger connections among higher education, industry, and community organizations. Participation in the National Student Satellite Program (NSSP), Community Internship Program, and Nebraska Science and Technology Recruitment Fair will extend the pipeline of employees benefiting NASA as well as Nebraska. The diversity component of this proposal catapults from the exceptional reputation NSGC has built by delivering geospatial science experiences to Nebraska s Native Americans. For 6 years, NSGC has fostered and sustained partnerships with the 2 tribal colleges and 4 reservation school districts in Nebraska to foster aeronautics education and outreach. This program, the Nebraska Native American Outreach Program (NNAOP), has grown to incorporate more than educational institutions and is now a partnership among tribal community leaders, academia, tribal schools, and industry. The content focus has broadened from aeronautics in the school systems to aerospace technology and earth science applications in tribal community decision-making and workforce training on the reservations. To date, participants include faculty and staff at 4 Nebraska tribal schools, 2 tribal colleges, approximately 1,000 Native American youth, and over 1,200 community members

  9. Workforce Planning in Complex Organizations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2004-01-01

    ...) civilian acquisition workforces. The greater need for workforce planning is expected to arise from an unusually heavy workforce turnover, itself due to a large number of expected retirements among older employees in a workforce...

  10. Stem cell therapy for the systemic right ventricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Ming-Sing; Ohye, Richard G

    2017-11-01

    In specific forms of congenital heart defects and pulmonary hypertension, the right ventricle (RV) is exposed to systemic levels of pressure overload. The RV is prone to failure in these patients because of its vulnerability to chronic pressure overload. As patients with a systemic RV reach adulthood, an emerging epidemic of RV failure has become evident. Medical therapies proven for LV failure are ineffective in treating RV failure. Areas covered: In this review, the pathophysiology of the failing RV under pressure overload is discussed, with specific emphasis on the pivotal roles of angiogenesis and oxidative stress. Studies investigating the ability of stem cell therapy to improve angiogenesis and mitigate oxidative stress in the setting of pressure overload are then reviewed. Finally, clinical trials utilizing stem cell therapy to prevent RV failure under pressure overload in congenital heart disease will be discussed. Expert commentary: Although considerable hurdles remain before their mainstream clinical implementation, stem cell therapy possesses revolutionary potential in the treatment of patients with failing systemic RVs who currently have very limited long-term treatment options. Rigorous clinical trials of stem cell therapy for RV failure that target well-defined mechanisms will ensure success adoption of this therapeutic strategy.

  11. Workforce Competitiveness Collection. "LINCS" Resource Collection News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Literacy Information and Communication System, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This edition of "'LINCS' Resource Collection News" features the Workforce Competitiveness Collection, covering the topics of workforce education, English language acquisition, and technology. Each month Collections News features one of the three "LINCS" (Literacy Information and Communication System) Resource Collections--Basic…

  12. Multiway modeling and analysis in stem cell systems biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandenberg Scott L

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systems biology refers to multidisciplinary approaches designed to uncover emergent properties of biological systems. Stem cells are an attractive target for this analysis, due to their broad therapeutic potential. A central theme of systems biology is the use of computational modeling to reconstruct complex systems from a wealth of reductionist, molecular data (e.g., gene/protein expression, signal transduction activity, metabolic activity, etc.. A number of deterministic, probabilistic, and statistical learning models are used to understand sophisticated cellular behaviors such as protein expression during cellular differentiation and the activity of signaling networks. However, many of these models are bimodal i.e., they only consider row-column relationships. In contrast, multiway modeling techniques (also known as tensor models can analyze multimodal data, which capture much more information about complex behaviors such as cell differentiation. In particular, tensors can be very powerful tools for modeling the dynamic activity of biological networks over time. Here, we review the application of systems biology to stem cells and illustrate application of tensor analysis to model collagen-induced osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells. Results We applied Tucker1, Tucker3, and Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC models to identify protein/gene expression patterns during extracellular matrix-induced osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells. In one case, we organized our data into a tensor of type protein/gene locus link × gene ontology category × osteogenic stimulant, and found that our cells expressed two distinct, stimulus-dependent sets of functionally related genes as they underwent osteogenic differentiation. In a second case, we organized DNA microarray data in a three-way tensor of gene IDs × osteogenic stimulus × replicates, and found that application of tensile strain to a

  13. A quantitative system for discriminating induced pluripotent stem cells, embryonic stem cells and somatic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anyou Wang

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs derived from somatic cells (SCs and embryonic stem cells (ESCs provide promising resources for regenerative medicine and medical research, leading to a daily identification of new cell lines. However, an efficient system to discriminate the different types of cell lines is lacking. Here, we develop a quantitative system to discriminate the three cell types, iPSCs, ESCs, and SCs. The system consists of DNA-methylation biomarkers and mathematical models, including an artificial neural network and support vector machines. All biomarkers were unbiasedly selected by calculating an eigengene score derived from analysis of genome-wide DNA methylations. With 30 biomarkers, or even with as few as 3 top biomarkers, this system can discriminate SCs from pluripotent cells (PCs, including ESCs and iPSCs with almost 100% accuracy. With approximately 100 biomarkers, the system can distinguish ESCs from iPSCs with an accuracy of 95%. This robust system performs precisely with raw data without normalization as well as with converted data in which the continuous methylation levels are accounted. Strikingly, this system can even accurately predict new samples generated from different microarray platforms and the next-generation sequencing. The subtypes of cells, such as female and male iPSCs and fetal and adult SCs, can also be discriminated with this method. Thus, this novel quantitative system works as an accurate framework for discriminating the three cell types, iPSCs, ESCs, and SCs. This strategy also supports the notion that DNA-methylation generally varies among the three cell types.

  14. [Biological characteristics of mesenchymal stem cell and hematopoietic stem cell in the co-culture system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Xu, Chao; Ye, Zhi-Yong; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Yuan, Jia-En; Ma, Tian-Bao; Lin, Han-Biao; Chen, Xiu-Qiong

    2016-10-25

    The aim of the present study was to obtain the qualified hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSC/HPC) and human umbilical cord-mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in vitro in the co-culture system. Cord blood mononuclear cells were separated from umbilical cord blood by Ficoll lymphocyte separation medium, and then CD34 + HSC was collected by MACS immunomagnetic beads. The selected CD34 + HSC/HPC and MSC were transferred into culture flask. IMDM culture medium with 15% AB-type cord plasma supplemented with interleukin-3 (IL-3), IL-6, thrombopoietin (TPO), stem cell factor (SCF) and FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt-3L) factors were used as the co-culture system for the amplification of HSC/HPC and MSC. The cellular growth status and proliferation on day 6 and 10 after co-culture were observed by using inverted microscope. The percentage of positive expression of CD34 in HSC/HPC, as well as the percentages of positive expressions of CD105, CD90, CD73, CD45, CD34 and HLA-DR in the 4 th generation MSC, was tested by flow cytometry. Semisolid colony culture was used to test the HSC/HPC colony forming ability. The osteogenic, chondrogenesis and adipogenic ability of the 4 th generation MSC were assessed. The karyotype analysis of MSC was conducted by colchicines. The results demonstrated that the HSC/HPC of co-culture group showed higher ability of amplification, CFU-GM and higher CD34 + percentage compared with the control group. The co-cultured MSC maintained the ability to differentiate into bone cells, fat cells and chondrocytes. And the karyotype stability of MSC remained normal. These results reveal that the appropriate co-culture system for MSC and HSC is developed, and via this co-culture system we could gain both two kinds of these cells. The MSCs under the co-culture system maintain the biological characteristics. The CFU-GM ability, cell counting and the flow cytometry results of HSC/HPC under the co-culture system are conform to the criterion, showing that

  15. Natuculture Systems: Addressing Students' STEM and Agriculture Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Alexander Augusto

    The purpose of this study was to assess the inclusion of a Natuculture systems learning experience into selected high school STEM courses to determine high school students' interests in majoring in STEM and for pursuing careers in agricultural sciences. Natuculture is defined as "any human-made system that mimics nature in human-disturbed landscapes". The research occurred at an urban area high school located in the Piedmont region of North Carolina. Fifty-three students in grades 9-12 participated during an academic semester learning experience which included planting, maintenance, & harvesting for an oasissofa. Data was collected using a questionnaire and reflective journals to gather students' attitudes towards agriculture and science and knowledge towards agriculture. Results showed that while the experiences did not improve students' interest in pursuing careers in agricultural sciences, overall, they did increase their knowledge of concepts related to agriculture. It was concluded that students benefit from experiential learning experiences. Based on the study, it is recommended that future research follow up with students to learn of their educational and career choices in agriculture and future learning experiences include curricula that integrates agricultural topics with STEM courses.

  16. Teacher Pension Systems, the Composition of the Teaching Workforce, and Teacher Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koedel, Cory; Podgursky, Michael; Shi, Shishan

    2013-01-01

    Teacher pension systems concentrate retirements within a narrow range of the career cycle by penalizing individuals who separate too soon or remain employed too long. The penalties result in the retention of some teachers who would otherwise choose to leave, and the premature exit of some teachers who would otherwise choose to stay. We examine the…

  17. Teacher Pension Systems, the Composition of the Teaching Workforce, and Teacher Quality. Working Paper 72

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koedel, Cory; Podgursky, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Teacher pension systems target retirements within a narrow range of the career cycle by penalizing individuals who separate too soon or remain employed too long. The penalties result in the retention of some teachers who would otherwise choose to leave, and the premature exit of some teachers who would otherwise choose to stay. We examine how the…

  18. 34 CFR 361.23 - Requirements related to the statewide workforce investment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... technology for individuals with disabilities; (ii) The use of information and financial management systems... resources and specification of the financial responsibility of each partner of the One-Stop service delivery... the Act, this part, other Federal requirements, and State law; and (vi) The specification of...

  19. Using the Lens of Social Capital to Understand Diversity in the Earth System Sciences Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Caitlin N.; Libarkin, Julie C.; McCallum, Carmen M.; Atchison, Christopher L.

    2015-01-01

    In this commentary, we argue that social capital theory, the idea that membership in a group creates opportunities to acquire valuable information and resources from other group members, is a useful framework in which to consider ways to increase diversity in the Earth System Sciences (ESS) and in the science, technology, engineering, and…

  20. Stem cell autotomy and niche interaction in different systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, David C; Dorn, August

    2015-07-26

    The best known cases of cell autotomy are the formation of erythrocytes and thrombocytes (platelets) from progenitor cells that reside in special niches. Recently, autotomy of stem cells and its enigmatic interaction with the niche has been reported from male germline stem cells (GSCs) in several insect species. First described in lepidopterans, the silkmoth, followed by the gipsy moth and consecutively in hemipterans, foremost the milkweed bug. In both, moths and the milkweed bug, GSCs form finger-like projections toward the niche, the apical cells (homologs of the hub cells in Drosophila). Whereas in the milkweed bug the projection terminals remain at the surface of the niche cells, in the gipsy moth they protrude deeply into the singular niche cell. In both cases, the projections undergo serial retrograde fragmentation with progressing signs of autophagy. In the gipsy moth, the autotomized vesicles are phagocytized and digested by the niche cell. In the milkweed bug the autotomized vesicles accumulate at the niche surface and disintegrate. Autotomy and sprouting of new projections appears to occur continuously. The significance of the GSC-niche interactions, however, remains enigmatic. Our concept on the signaling relationship between stem cell-niche in general and GSC and niche (hub cells and cyst stem cells) in particular has been greatly shaped by Drosophila melanogaster. In comparing the interactions of GSCs with their niche in Drosophila with those in species exhibiting GSC autotomy it is obvious that additional or alternative modes of stem cell-niche communication exist. Thus, essential signaling pathways, including niche-stem cell adhesion (E-cadherin) and the direction of asymmetrical GSC division - as they were found in Drosophila - can hardly be translated into the systems where GSC autotomy was reported. It is shown here that the serial autotomy of GSC projections shows remarkable similarities with Wallerian axonal destruction, developmental axon

  1. Stem cell autotomy and niche interaction in different systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, David C; Dorn, August

    2015-01-01

    The best known cases of cell autotomy are the formation of erythrocytes and thrombocytes (platelets) from progenitor cells that reside in special niches. Recently, autotomy of stem cells and its enigmatic interaction with the niche has been reported from male germline stem cells (GSCs) in several insect species. First described in lepidopterans, the silkmoth, followed by the gipsy moth and consecutively in hemipterans, foremost the milkweed bug. In both, moths and the milkweed bug, GSCs form finger-like projections toward the niche, the apical cells (homologs of the hub cells in Drosophila). Whereas in the milkweed bug the projection terminals remain at the surface of the niche cells, in the gipsy moth they protrude deeply into the singular niche cell. In both cases, the projections undergo serial retrograde fragmentation with progressing signs of autophagy. In the gipsy moth, the autotomized vesicles are phagocytized and digested by the niche cell. In the milkweed bug the autotomized vesicles accumulate at the niche surface and disintegrate. Autotomy and sprouting of new projections appears to occur continuously. The significance of the GSC-niche interactions, however, remains enigmatic. Our concept on the signaling relationship between stem cell-niche in general and GSC and niche (hub cells and cyst stem cells) in particular has been greatly shaped by Drosophila melanogaster. In comparing the interactions of GSCs with their niche in Drosophila with those in species exhibiting GSC autotomy it is obvious that additional or alternative modes of stem cell-niche communication exist. Thus, essential signaling pathways, including niche-stem cell adhesion (E-cadherin) and the direction of asymmetrical GSC division - as they were found in Drosophila - can hardly be translated into the systems where GSC autotomy was reported. It is shown here that the serial autotomy of GSC projections shows remarkable similarities with Wallerian axonal destruction, developmental axon

  2. Systemic Problems: A perspective on stem cell aging and rejuvenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conboy, Irina M; Conboy, Michael J; Rebo, Justin

    2015-10-01

    This review provides balanced analysis of the advances in systemic regulation of young and old tissue stem cells and suggests strategies for accelerating development of therapies to broadly combat age-related tissue degenerative pathologies. Many highlighted recent reports on systemic tissue rejuvenation combine parabiosis with a "silver bullet" putatively responsible for the positive effects. Attempts to unify these papers reflect the excitement about this experimental approach and add value in reproducing previous work. At the same time, defined molecular approaches, which are "beyond parabiosis" for the rejuvenation of multiple old organs represent progress toward attenuating or even reversing human tissue aging.

  3. Managing a national radiation oncologist workforce: A workforce planning model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuckless, Teri; Milosevic, Michael; Metz, Catherine de; Parliament, Matthew; Tompkins, Brent; Brundage, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The specialty of radiation oncology has experienced significant workforce planning challenges in many countries. Our purpose was to develop and validate a workforce-planning model that would forecast the balance between supply of, and demand for, radiation oncologists in Canada over a minimum 10-year time frame, to identify the model parameters that most influenced this balance, and to suggest how this model may be applicable to other countries. Methods: A forward calculation model was created and populated with data obtained from national sources. Validation was confirmed using a historical prospective approach. Results: Under baseline assumptions, the model predicts a short-term surplus of RO trainees followed by a projected deficit in 2020. Sensitivity analyses showed that access to radiotherapy (proportion of incident cases referred), individual RO workload, average age of retirement and resident training intake most influenced balance of supply and demand. Within plausible ranges of these parameters, substantial shortages or excess of graduates is possible, underscoring the need for ongoing monitoring. Conclusions: Workforce planning in radiation oncology is possible using a projection calculation model based on current system characteristics and modifiable parameters that influence projections. The workload projections should inform policy decision making regarding growth of the specialty and training program resident intake required to meet oncology health services needs. The methods used are applicable to workforce planning for radiation oncology in other countries and for other comparable medical specialties.

  4. The Hidden STEM Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothwell, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Workers in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) fields play a direct role in driving economic growth. Yet, because of how the STEM economy has been defined, policymakers have mainly focused on supporting workers with at least a bachelor's (BA) degree, overlooking a strong potential workforce of those with less than a BA. This report…

  5. Workplace Health & Wellbeing: Considering the Tourism Workforce

    OpenAIRE

    Hemingway, Ann; Hartwell, Heather; Ladkin, Adele

    2014-01-01

    Against a background of increasing tourism employment, this paper explores the health of the tourism workforce. The rationale for this exploration stems from the current international debate regarding work place health and wellbeing (EU 2012). Research shows that promoting health and wellbeing in the workplace is beneficial for employers and employees (Kuhn & Van der Auwera 2013, Black 2008, Department of Work and Pensions 2012). Dame Carol Black in her 2008/11 review of the evidence conclude...

  6. The Chameleon Workforce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marfelt, Mikkel Mouritz

    , cultural, professional, etc.). This PhD dissertation studies this phenomenon, ‘a diverse workforce’, in a large Scandinavian pharmaceutical company. The dissertation follows the Diverse and Global Workforce (DGW) project, a ‘headquarter centric’ and strategic corporate initiative to address the rapid......Due to advancements in technology and the expansion of companies onto a global level, organizations have become increasingly aware of the need to understand and manage diverse workforces; that is, the need to understand and manage differences among employees across borders (such as geographical...... global expansion of the company workforce....

  7. Global Collaborative STEM Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meabh Kelly, Susan; Smith, Walter

    2016-04-01

    Global Collaborative STEM Education, as the name suggests, simultaneously supports two sets of knowledge and skills. The first set is STEM -- science, technology, engineering and math. The other set of content knowledge and skills is that of global collaboration. Successful global partnerships require awareness of one's own culture, the biases embedded within that culture, as well as developing awareness of the collaborators' culture. Workforce skills fostered include open-mindedness, perseverance when faced with obstacles, and resourceful use of technological "bridges" to facilitate and sustain communication. In respect for the 2016 GIFT Workshop focus, Global Collaborative STEM Education projects dedicated to astronomy research will be presented. The projects represent different benchmarks within the Global Collaborative STEM Education continuum, culminating in an astronomy research experience that fully reflects how the global STEM workforce collaborates. To facilitate wider engagement in Global Collaborative STEM Education, project summaries, classroom resources and contact information for established international collaborative astronomy research projects will be disseminated.

  8. How the introduction of a human resources information system helped the Democratic Republic of Congo to mobilise domestic resources for an improved health workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likofata Esanga, Jean-Robert; Viadro, Claire; McManus, Leah; Wesson, Jennifer; Matoko, Nicaise; Ngumbu, Epiphane; Gilroy, Kate E; Trudeau, Daren

    2017-11-01

    The Democratic Republic of Congo has flagged health workforce management and compensation as issues requiring attention, including the problem of ghost workers (individuals on payroll who do not exist and/or show up at work). Recognising the need for reliable health workforce information, the government has worked to implement iHRIS, an open source human resources information system that facilitates health workforce management. In Kasaï Central and Kasaï Provinces, health workers brought relevant documentation to data collection points, where trained teams interviewed them and entered contact information, identification, photo, current job, and employment and education history into iHRIS on laptops. After uploading the data, the Ministry of Public Health used the database of over 11 500 verified health worker records to analyse health worker characteristics, density, compensation, and payroll. Both provinces had less than one physician per 10 000 population and a higher urban versus rural health worker density. Most iHRIS-registered health workers (57% in Kasaï Central and 73% in Kasaï) reported receiving no regular government pay of any kind (salaries or risk allowances). Payroll analysis showed that 27% of the health workers listed as salary recipients in the electronic payroll system were ghost workers, as were 42% of risk allowance recipients. As a result, the Ministries of Public Health, Public Service, and Finance reallocated funds away from ghost workers to cover salaries (n = 781) and risk allowances (n = 2613) for thousands of health workers who were previously under- or uncompensated due to lack of funds. The reallocation prioritised previously under- or uncompensated mid-level health workers, with 49% of those receiving salaries and 68% of those receiving risk allowances representing cadres such as nurses, laboratory technicians, and midwifery cadres. Assembling accurate health worker records can help governments understand health workforce

  9. An Intelligent Neural Stem Cell Delivery System for Neurodegenerative Diseases Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Shupei; Liu, Yi; Han, Fengtong; Guo, Mian; Hou, Xiaolu; Ye, Kangruo; Deng, Shuai; Shen, Yijun; Zhao, Yufang; Wei, Haiying; Song, Bing; Yao, Lifen; Tian, Weiming

    2018-05-02

    Transplanted stem cells constitute a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of neurological disorders. Emerging evidence indicates that a negative microenvironment, particularly one characterized by the acute inflammation/immune response caused by physical injuries or transplanted stem cells, severely impacts the survival of transplanted stem cells. In this study, to avoid the influence of the increased inflammation following physical injuries, an intelligent, double-layer, alginate hydrogel system is designed. This system fosters the matrix metalloproeinases (MMP) secreted by transplanted stem cell reactions with MMP peptide grafted on the inner layer and destroys the structure of the inner hydrogel layer during the inflammatory storm. Meanwhile, the optimum concentration of the arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) peptide is also immobilized to the inner hydrogels to obtain more stem cells before arriving to the outer hydrogel layer. It is found that blocking Cripto-1, which promotes embryonic stem cell differentiation to dopamine neurons, also accelerates this process in neural stem cells. More interesting is the fact that neural stem cell differentiation can be conducted in astrocyte-differentiation medium without other treatments. In addition, the system can be adjusted according to the different parameters of transplanted stem cells and can expand on the clinical application of stem cells in the treatment of this neurological disorder. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. UK Nuclear Workforce Demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, John

    2017-01-01

    UK Nuclear Sites: DECOMMISSIONING - 26 Magnox Reactors, 2 Fast Reactors; OPERATIONAL - 14 AGRs, 1 PWR; 9.6 GWe Total Capacity. Nuclear Workforce Demand • Total workforce demand is expected to grow from ~88,000 in 2017 to ~101,000 in 2021 • Average “inflow” is ~7,000 FTEs per annum • 22% of the workforce is female (28% in civil, 12% in defence) • 81% generic skills, 18% nuclear skills, 1% subject matter experts • 3300 trainees total in SLCs and Defence Enterprise (16% graduate trainees) • At peak demand on Civils Construction, over 4,000 workers will be required on each nuclear new build site • Manufacturing workforce is expected to rise from around 4,000 in 2014 to 8,500 at the peak of onsite activity in 2025

  11. Perspective: Leveraging the health care workforce: what do we need and what educational system will get us there?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garson, Arthur

    2011-11-01

    Shortages of 100,000 physicians and up to one million nurses are projected in the next 10 years. If these statistics are close to true, medical schools would need a 100% increase in graduates over the next 4 years, and nursing schools a 100% increase over the next 13 years. These calculations are instructive in that they demonstrate the absurdity of expecting schools to provide these sorts of increases in that time frame. Other solutions must be considered. For instance, do doctors and nurses need to do everything they are currently called on to do? Could not other members of the health care workforce, such as well-trained lay workers, be leveraged to do some of the more routine work, freeing medical professionals to perform their unique roles? How is such a workforce built, and how shall learners be educated to fill those needs? This article presents a hypothetical model that could be implemented based on carefully researched pilots to meet health care education needs. The model features three essential components: (1) a school for the public in which lay teachers develop curricula with members of the public, for example, about how to incentivize healthy behavior, (2) a college for health as part of a university with interdisciplinary teaching, where patients, faculty members, and students interact in each of the schools and learn together, and (3) the most effective and efficient nursing and medical school curricula, developed together based on evidence of what the student needs to know.

  12. Standards for Technological Literacy and STEM Education Delivery through Career and Technical Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asunda, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    At a minimum, employers rely on career and technical education (CTE) and workforce training systems to supply workers able to perform in their jobs. In CTE classes that seek to integrate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) concepts, it falls to the instructors to design and sequence the learning experiences that will promote…

  13. The Undergraduate Student Instrument Project (USIP) - building the STEM workforce by providing exciting, multi-disciplinary, student-led suborbital flight projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingwall, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD) recognizes that suborbital carriers play a vital role in training our country's future science and technology leaders. SMD created the Undergraduate Student Instrument Project (USIP) to offer students the opportunity to design, build, and fly instruments on NASA's unique suborbital research platforms. This paper explores the projects, the impact, and the lessons learned of USIP. USIP required undergraduate teams to design, build, and fly a scientific instrument in 18 months or less. Students were required to form collaborative multidisciplinary teams to design, develop and build their instrument. Teams quickly learned that success required skills often overlooked in an academic environment. Teams quickly learned to share technical information in a clear and concise manner that could be understood by other disciplines. The aggressive schedule required team members to hold each other accountable for progress while maintaining team unity. Unanticipated problems and technical issues led students to a deeper understanding of the need for schedule and cost reserves. Students exited the program with a far deeper understanding of project management and team dynamics. Through the process of designing and building an instrument that will enable new research transforms students from textbook learners to developers of new knowledge. The initial USIP project funded 10 undergraduate teams that flew a broad range of scientific instruments on scientific balloons, sounding rockets, commercial rockets and aircraft. Students were required to prepare for and conduct the major reviews that are an integral part of systems development. Each project conducted a Preliminary Design Review, Critical Design Review and Mission Readiness review for NASA officials and flight platform providers. By preparing and presenting their designs to technical experts, the students developed a deeper understanding of the technical and programmatic project pieces that

  14. Enhancing the American Society of Clinical Oncology workforce information system with geographic distribution of oncologists and comparison of data sources for the number of practicing oncologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, M Kelsey; Bruinooge, Suanna S; Goldstein, Michael A; Bajorin, Dean F; Kosty, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 2007 workforce report projected US oncologist shortages by 2020. Intervening years have witnessed shifting trends in both supply and demand, demonstrating the need to capture data in a dynamic manner. The ASCO Workforce Information System (WIS) provides an infrastructure to update annually emerging characteristics of US oncologists (medical oncologists, hematologist/oncologists, and hematologists). Several possible data sources exist to capture the number of oncologists in the United States. The WIS primarily uses the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile database because it provides detailed demographics. This analysis also compares total counts of oncologists from American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) certification reports, the National Provider Identifier (NPI) database, and Medicare Physician Compare data. The analysis also examines geographic distribution of oncologists by age and US population data. For each of the data sources, we pulled 2013 data. The Masterfile identified 13,409 oncologists. ABIM reported 13,757 oncologists. NPI listed 11,664 oncologists. Physician Compare identified 11,343 oncologists. Mapping of these data identifies distinct areas (primarily in central United States, Alaska, and Hawaii) that seem to lack ready access to oncologists. Efforts to survey oncologists about practice patterns will help determine if productivity and service delivery will change significantly. ASCO is committed to tracking oncologist supply and demand, as well as to providing timely analysis of strategies that will help address any shortages that may occur in specific regions or practice settings.

  15. Epigenetics, Nervous System Tumors, and Cancer Stem Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, Irfan A.; Mehler, Mark F.

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances have begun to elucidate how epigenetic regulatory mechanisms are responsible for establishing and maintaining cell identity during development and adult life and how the disruption of these processes is, not surprisingly, one of the hallmarks of cancer. In this review, we describe the major epigenetic mechanisms (i.e., DNA methylation, histone and chromatin modification, non-coding RNA deployment, RNA editing, and nuclear reorganization) and discuss the broad spectrum of epigenetic alterations that have been uncovered in pediatric and adult nervous system tumors. We also highlight emerging evidence that suggests epigenetic deregulation is a characteristic feature of so-called cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are thought to be present in a range of nervous system tumors and responsible for tumor maintenance, progression, treatment resistance, and recurrence. We believe that better understanding how epigenetic mechanisms operate in neural cells and identifying the etiologies and consequences of epigenetic deregulation in tumor cells and CSCs, in particular, are likely to promote the development of enhanced molecular diagnostics and more targeted and effective therapeutic agents for treating recalcitrant nervous system tumors

  16. Epigenetics, Nervous System Tumors, and Cancer Stem Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qureshi, Irfan A. [Rosyln and Leslie Goldstein Laboratory for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, NY 10461 (United States); Institute for Brain Disorders and Neural Regeneration, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, NY 10461 (United States); Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, NY 10461 (United States); Rose F. Kennedy Center for Research on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, NY 10461 (United States); Mehler, Mark F., E-mail: mark.mehler@einstein.yu.edu [Rosyln and Leslie Goldstein Laboratory for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, NY 10461 (United States); Institute for Brain Disorders and Neural Regeneration, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, NY 10461 (United States); Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, NY 10461 (United States); Department of Neuroscience, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, NY 10461 (United States); Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, NY 10461 (United States); Rose F. Kennedy Center for Research on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, NY 10461 (United States)

    2011-09-13

    Recent advances have begun to elucidate how epigenetic regulatory mechanisms are responsible for establishing and maintaining cell identity during development and adult life and how the disruption of these processes is, not surprisingly, one of the hallmarks of cancer. In this review, we describe the major epigenetic mechanisms (i.e., DNA methylation, histone and chromatin modification, non-coding RNA deployment, RNA editing, and nuclear reorganization) and discuss the broad spectrum of epigenetic alterations that have been uncovered in pediatric and adult nervous system tumors. We also highlight emerging evidence that suggests epigenetic deregulation is a characteristic feature of so-called cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are thought to be present in a range of nervous system tumors and responsible for tumor maintenance, progression, treatment resistance, and recurrence. We believe that better understanding how epigenetic mechanisms operate in neural cells and identifying the etiologies and consequences of epigenetic deregulation in tumor cells and CSCs, in particular, are likely to promote the development of enhanced molecular diagnostics and more targeted and effective therapeutic agents for treating recalcitrant nervous system tumors.

  17. Identifying niche-mediated regulatory factors of stem cell phenotypic state: a systems biology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravichandran, Srikanth; Del Sol, Antonio

    2017-02-01

    Understanding how the cellular niche controls the stem cell phenotype is often hampered due to the complexity of variegated niche composition, its dynamics, and nonlinear stem cell-niche interactions. Here, we propose a systems biology view that considers stem cell-niche interactions as a many-body problem amenable to simplification by the concept of mean field approximation. This enables approximation of the niche effect on stem cells as a constant field that induces sustained activation/inhibition of specific stem cell signaling pathways in all stem cells within heterogeneous populations exhibiting the same phenotype (niche determinants). This view offers a new basis for the development of single cell-based computational approaches for identifying niche determinants, which has potential applications in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. © 2017 The Authors. FEBS Letters published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  18. Stem Migration and Fretting Corrosion of the Antirotation Pin in the K2/Apex Hip System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Michael; Edmondson, Mark; Ebert, Jay; Nivbrant, Nils; Kop, Alan; Wood, David; De Steiger, Richard

    2016-03-01

    Many exchangeable neck hip systems have been withdrawn because of fretting corrosion at the neck/stem coupling. Our prospective randomized study evaluating stem stability (Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry) and clinical outcomes between the K2/Apex hip systems was ceased early because of a withdrawal of the stems which had an unfavorably high early revision rate reported in the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Registry (9.3% at 3 years). At 2 years, there are no clinical differences between the stems. Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis has identified a high proportion of potentially concerning subsidence and retroversion in both groups, more marked in the K2 stem, although mostly in asymptomatic patients. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry has shown similar bone density around the stems. Retrieval analysis of 3 study patients showed fretting corrosion of the antirotation pin and aseptic lymphocyte-dominated vasculitis-associated lesion, with no relationship to bearing type or size. Analysis of 7 further nonstudy K2/Apex stems confirmed similar corrosion. This study shows potentially concerning subsidence of both stems and is the first to describe corrosion at the neck-stem interface and a relationship to metal-related pathology. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Failure investigation of stem of valve disc in reactor recirculation system of TAPS Unit-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadasan, E.; Bahl, J.K.; Sivaramakrishnan, K.S.

    1986-01-01

    Failure analysis was carried out of failed 17-4 PH stainless steel stem of the valve disc in reactor recirculation system of Unit-1 of Tarapur Atomic Power Station. The examination revealed that the stem failed due to fatigue, accelerated by corrosion. Recommendations have been made to avoid such failures. (author)

  20. Systemic Injection of Neural Stem/progenitor Cells in Mice With Chronic EAE

    OpenAIRE

    Donegà, Matteo; Giusto, Elena; Cossetti, Chiara; Schaeffer, Julia; Pluchino, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Neural stem/precursor cells (NPCs) are a promising stem cell source for transplantation approaches aiming at brain repair or restoration in regenerative neurology. This directive has arisen from the extensive evidence that brain repair is achieved after focal or systemic NPC transplantation in several pre clinical models of neurological diseases.

  1. A miniature ultrasonic actuator-control system for plant stem diameter micro-variation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measurements of micro-variations in plant stem diameter are potentially useful to optimize irrigation decision support systems that are based on plant physiological responses. However, for this technology to be suitable for field applications, problems associated with stem softness and micro variati...

  2. Taper-based system for estimating stem volumes of upland oaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald E. Hilt

    1980-01-01

    A taper-based system for estimating stem volumes is developed for Central States upland oaks. Inside bark diameters up the stem are predicted as a function of dbhib, total height, and powers and relative height. A Fortran IV computer program, OAKVOL, is used to predict cubic and board-foot volumes to any desired merchantable top dib. Volumes of...

  3. Building the Social Work Workforce: Saving Lives and Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine Briar-Lawson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article depicts a journey over the decades to address some of the needs of children and families in the child welfare system. Recounting a few key milestones and challenges in the past 40 years, it is argued that workforce development is one key to improved outcomes for abused and neglected children and their families. Major events and several turning points are chronicled. Emerging workforce needs in aging are also cited as lessons learned from child welfare have implications for building a gero savvy social work workforce. Funding streams involving IV-E and Medicaid are discussed. It is argued that workforce development can be a life and death issue for some of these most vulnerable populations. Thus, the workforce development agenda must be at the forefront of the social work profession for the 21st century. Key funding streams are needed to foster investments in building and sustaining the social work workforce.

  4. Central nervous system infection following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanajiri, Ryo; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Yoshioka, Kosuke; Watanabe, Daisuke; Watakabe, Kyoko; Murata, Yutaka; Hagino, Takeshi; Seno, Yasushi; Najima, Yuho; Igarashi, Aiko; Doki, Noriko; Kakihana, Kazuhiko; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Ohashi, Kazuteru

    2017-03-01

    Here, we described the clinical characteristics and outcomes of central nervous system (CNS) infections occurring after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) in a single institution over the previous 6 years. Charts of 353 consecutive allogeneic transplant recipients were retrospectively reviewed for CNS infection. A total of 17 cases of CNS infection were identified at a median of 38 days (range, 10-1028 days) after allo-HSCT. Causative pathogens were human herpesvirus-6 (n=6), enterococcus (n=2), staphylococcus (n=2), streptococcus (n=2), varicella zoster virus (n=1), cytomegalovirus (n=1), John Cunningham virus (n=1), adenovirus (n=1), and Toxoplasma gondii (n=1). The cumulative incidence of CNS infection was 4.1% at 1 year and 5.5% at 5 years. Multivariate analysis revealed that high-risk disease status was a risk factor for developing CNS infection (p=.02), and that overall survival at 3 years after allo-HSCT was 33% in patients with CNS infection and 53% in those without CNS infection (p=.04). Copyright © 2016 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Health workforce development planning in the Sultanate of Oman: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Basu

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Oman's recent experience in health workforce development may be viewed against the backdrop of the situation just three or four decades ago, when it had just a few physicians and nurses (mostly expatriate. All workforce categories in Oman have grown substantially over the last two decades. Increased self-reliance was achieved despite substantial growth in workforce stocks. Stocks of physicians and nurses grew significantly during 1985–2007. This development was the outcome of well-considered national policies and plans. This case outlines how Oman is continuing to turn around its excessive dependence on expatriate workforce through strategic workforce development planning. Case description The Sultanate's early development initiatives focused on building a strong health care infrastructure by importing workforce. However, the policy-makers stressed national workforce development for a sustainable future. Beginning with the formulation of a strategic health workforce development plan in 1991, the stage was set for adopting workforce planning as an essential strategy for sustainable health development and workforce self-reliance. Oman continued to develop its educational infrastructure, and began to produce as much workforce as possible, in order to meet health care demands and achieve workforce self-reliance. Other policy initiatives with a beneficial impact on Oman's workforce development scenario were: regionalization of nursing institutes, active collaboration with universities and overseas specialty boards, qualitative improvement of the education system, development of a strong continuing professional development system, efforts to improve workforce management, planned change management and needs-based micro/macro-level studies. Strong political will and bold policy initiatives, dedicated workforce planning and educational endeavours have all contributed to help Oman to develop its health workforce stocks and gain

  6. Health workforce development planning in the Sultanate of Oman: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Basu

    2009-06-11

    Oman's recent experience in health workforce development may be viewed against the backdrop of the situation just three or four decades ago, when it had just a few physicians and nurses (mostly expatriate). All workforce categories in Oman have grown substantially over the last two decades. Increased self-reliance was achieved despite substantial growth in workforce stocks. Stocks of physicians and nurses grew significantly during 1985-2007. This development was the outcome of well-considered national policies and plans. This case outlines how Oman is continuing to turn around its excessive dependence on expatriate workforce through strategic workforce development planning. The Sultanate's early development initiatives focused on building a strong health care infrastructure by importing workforce. However, the policy-makers stressed national workforce development for a sustainable future. Beginning with the formulation of a strategic health workforce development plan in 1991, the stage was set for adopting workforce planning as an essential strategy for sustainable health development and workforce self-reliance. Oman continued to develop its educational infrastructure, and began to produce as much workforce as possible, in order to meet health care demands and achieve workforce self-reliance. Other policy initiatives with a beneficial impact on Oman's workforce development scenario were: regionalization of nursing institutes, active collaboration with universities and overseas specialty boards, qualitative improvement of the education system, development of a strong continuing professional development system, efforts to improve workforce management, planned change management and needs-based micro/macro-level studies. Strong political will and bold policy initiatives, dedicated workforce planning and educational endeavours have all contributed to help Oman to develop its health workforce stocks and gain self-reliance. Oman has successfully innovated workforce

  7. Partnering for Quality under the Workforce Investment Act: A Tool Kit for One-Stop System Building. Module 3: Collecting and Using Customer Feedback. Trainer Manual with Participant Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Deborah; Koller, Vinz; Kozumplik, Richalene; Lawrence, Mary Ann

    This document is part of a five-module training package to help employment and training service providers comply with the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) of 1998 and develop a one-stop training and employment services system. It contains the participant workbook, trainer manual, and activity worksheets for a module on collecting and using customer…

  8. Bioreactors to influence stem cell fate: augmentation of mesenchymal stem cell signaling pathways via dynamic culture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeatts, Andrew B; Choquette, Daniel T; Fisher, John P

    2013-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising cell source for bone and cartilage tissue engineering as they can be easily isolated from the body and differentiated into osteoblasts and chondrocytes. A cell based tissue engineering strategy using MSCs often involves the culture of these cells on three-dimensional scaffolds; however the size of these scaffolds and the cell population they can support can be restricted in traditional static culture. Thus dynamic culture in bioreactor systems provides a promising means to culture and differentiate MSCs in vitro. This review seeks to characterize key MSC differentiation signaling pathways and provides evidence as to how dynamic culture is augmenting these pathways. Following an overview of dynamic culture systems, discussion will be provided on how these systems can effectively modify and maintain important culture parameters including oxygen content and shear stress. Literature is reviewed for both a highlight of key signaling pathways and evidence for regulation of these signaling pathways via dynamic culture systems. The ability to understand how these culture systems are affecting MSC signaling pathways could lead to a shear or oxygen regime to direct stem cell differentiation. In this way the efficacy of in vitro culture and differentiation of MSCs on three-dimensional scaffolds could be greatly increased. Bioreactor systems have the ability to control many key differentiation stimuli including mechanical stress and oxygen content. The further integration of cell signaling investigations within dynamic culture systems will lead to a quicker realization of the promise of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biochemistry of Stem Cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Structure and function of stem cell pools in mammalian cell renewal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fliedner, T.M.; Nothdurft, W.

    1979-01-01

    Stem cells play a key-role in the maintenance of the equilibrium between cell loss and cell production in cell renewal systems as well as in the understanding of the radiation pathophysiology of mammalian organisms. The integrity of mammalian organisms with the need to maintain a constant ''millieu interior'' is depending on the normal functioning of cell renewal systems, especially those of epithelial surfaces and blood cell forming organs. All cell renewal systems of bodies have a very similar functional structure consisting of functional, proliferative - amplifying and stem cell compartments. They differ in transit and cell cycle times and in the number of amplification division - aside from the difference in their functional and biochemical make-up. The stem cell pools are providing the cells capable of differentiation without depleting their own kind. This can be achieved by symmetrical or assymmetrical stem cell division. In normal steady state, 50% of the stem cell division remain in the stem cell pool, while the other 50% leave it to differentiate, proliferate and mature, hemopoietic system is distributed throughout bodies. This is an important factor in the radiation biology of mammalian organisms since the loss of function in one area can be compensated for by more production in other areas, and locally depleted sites can be reseeded with the stem cells migrating in from blood. (Yamashita, S.)

  10. Introduction of a Quality Management System and Outcome After Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gratwohl, Alois; Brand, Ronald; Niederwieser, Dietger; Baldomero, Helen; Chabannon, Christian; Cornelissen, Jan; de Witte, Theo; Ljungman, Per; McDonald, Fiona; McGrath, Eoin; Passweg, Jakob; Peters, Christina; Rocha, Vanderson; Slaper-Cortenbach, Ineke; Sureda, Anna; Tichelli, Andre; Apperley, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Purpose A comprehensive quality management system called JACIE (Joint Accreditation Committee International Society for Cellular Therapy and the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation), was introduced to improve quality of care in hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). We

  11. U.S. Army Acquisition Workforce: Reflecting Modern Structural Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    provisions ensuring oversight over a massive infusion of contracts, state grants and other measures. Interviews with acquisition workforce specialists... telecommuting .”3 Incentives for retaining qualified acquisition workforce members are discussed. Surveys were analyzed primarily for contextual...and the players who now have a voice in this expanded system. One major change was the use of the Joint Requirements Oversight Council (JROC

  12. Operational workforce planning for check-in counters at airports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolletz, Raik

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses operation models for workforce planning for check-in systems at airports. We characterize different tasks of the hierarchical workforce planning problem with time-dependent demand. A binary linear programming formulation is developed for the fortnightly tour scheduling problem...

  13. Is surgical workforce diversity increasing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriole, Dorothy A; Jeffe, Donna B; Schechtman, Kenneth B

    2007-03-01

    We sought to determine the extent to which recent increases in levels of gender and racial diversity in the overall resident-physician workforce were evident among core-surgical specialty resident workforces. Chi-square tests for trend assessed the importance of changes from 1996 to 2004 in proportions of women and African Americans in the surgery-resident workforce. Surgery-resident trends were compared with overall resident workforce trends using two-tailed t-tests to compare regression slopes that quantified rates of change over time. Chi-square tests assessed differences between proportions of women and African Americans in the current overall board-certified workforce and their proportions in the surgery board-certified workforce. From 1996 to 2004, proportions of women increased in all seven surgical specialties studied. Compared with the overall trend toward increasing proportions of women in the resident workforce, the trend in one surgical specialty was larger (obstetrics/gynecology, p 0.05), and two were smaller (each p 0.05). Proportions of African Americans decreased in three specialties (each p workforce, except obstetrics/gynecology, remained lower than in the overall board-certified workforce (each p workforces have persisted since 1996 and will likely perpetuate ongoing surgery board-certified workforce disparities.

  14. Workforce and graduate school outcomes of NOAA's Educational Partnership Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, T.; Kaplan, M.

    2017-12-01

    Underrepresented groups, including Black, Hispanic, Native American, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Island professionals remain underrepresented in STEM fields generally, and in the ocean and atmospheric sciences specifically. NOAA has tried to address this disparity through a number of initiatives under the Educational Partnership Program with Minority Serving Institutions (EPP MSI) which currently has two components: four Cooperative Science Centers (CSCs) aligned with NOAA's mission areas; and an Undergraduate Scholarship Program (USP), both established in 2001. In order to determine the outcomes for the program participants and the impacts of these programs on degree completions and on the workforce, the EPP MSI undertook a multi-pronged effort to identify career and education achievements for 80% of the approximately 1750 EPP MSI alumni, 75% of whom are from underrepresented groups. This was accomplished through 1) searching online resources (e.g. professional web pages, LinkedIn, etc.), 2) personal communication with program-associated faculty, 3) National Student Clearinghouse, 4) a survey of former scholars conducted by Insight Policy Research, and 5) self-reporting though NOAA's Voluntary Alumni Update System. Results show that 60% of CSC alumni currently hold an advanced degree in a STEM field with another 8% currently working toward one. 66% of EPP Undergraduate Scholars go to graduate school. 72% of CSC and USP alumni are currently employed in or pursuing a graduate degree in a NOAA-related* field. More than 70 CSC graduates currently work for NOAA as contractors or federal employees while more than 240 work for other government agencies. More than 400 are employed in the private sector. Of more than 225 PhD graduates, 66 have completed or currently hold post-doctoral positions in NOAA mission fields; 71 have held faculty positions at major universities. However, one challenge is retaining diverse STEM talent within the Geosciences in light

  15. Workforce planning for DOE/EM: Assessing workforce demand and supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, R.E.; Ulibarri, C.A.

    1993-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has committed to bringing its facilities into regulatory compliance and restoring the environment of sites under its control by the year 2019. Responsibility for accomplishing this goal is vested with the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). Concerns regarding the availability of workers with the necessary technical skills and the prospect of retraining workers from other programs within DOE or other industries are addressed in this report in several ways. First, various workforce projections relevant to EM occupations are compared to determine common findings and resolve inconsistencies. Second, case studies, interviews, and published data are used to examine the potential availability of workers for these occupations via occupational mobility, training/retraining options, and salary adjustments. Third, demand and supply factors are integrated in a framework useful for structuring workforce analyses. The analyses demonstrate that workforce skills are not anticipated to change due to the change in mission; science, engineering, and technician occupations tend to be mobile within and across occupational categories; experience and on-the-job training are more crucial to issues of worker supply than education; and, the clarity of an organization`s mission, budget allocation process, work implementation and task assignment systems are critical determinants of both workforce need and supply. DOE is encouraged to create a more stable platform for workforce planning by resolving organizational and institutional hindrances to accomplishing work and capitalizing on workforce characteristics besides labor {open_quotes}supply{close_quotes} and demographics.

  16. Distributed security framework for modern workforce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balatsky, G.; Scherer, C. P., E-mail: gbalatsky@lanl.gov, E-mail: scherer@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Safe and sustainable nuclear power production depends on strict adherence to nuclear security as a necessary prerequisite for nuclear power. This paper considers the current challenges for nuclear security, and proposes a conceptual framework to address those challenges. We identify several emerging factors that affect nuclear security: 1. Relatively high turnover rates in the nuclear workforce compared to the earlier years of the nuclear industry, when nuclear workers were more likely to have secure employment, a lifelong career at one company, and retirement on a pension plan. 2. Vulnerabilities stemming from the ubiquitous presence of modern electronics and their patterns of use by the younger workforce. 3. Modern management practices, including outsourcing and short-term contracting (which relates to number 1 above). In such a dynamic and complex environment, nuclear security personnel alone cannot effectively guarantee adequate security. We propose that one solution to this emerging situation is a distributed security model in which the components of nuclear security become the responsibility of each and every worker at a nuclear facility. To implement this model, there needs to be a refurbishment of current workforce training and mentoring practices. The paper will present an example of distributed security framework model, and how it may look in practice. (author)

  17. Distributed security framework for modern workforce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balatsky, G.; Scherer, C. P.

    2014-01-01

    Safe and sustainable nuclear power production depends on strict adherence to nuclear security as a necessary prerequisite for nuclear power. This paper considers the current challenges for nuclear security, and proposes a conceptual framework to address those challenges. We identify several emerging factors that affect nuclear security: 1. Relatively high turnover rates in the nuclear workforce compared to the earlier years of the nuclear industry, when nuclear workers were more likely to have secure employment, a lifelong career at one company, and retirement on a pension plan. 2. Vulnerabilities stemming from the ubiquitous presence of modern electronics and their patterns of use by the younger workforce. 3. Modern management practices, including outsourcing and short-term contracting (which relates to number 1 above). In such a dynamic and complex environment, nuclear security personnel alone cannot effectively guarantee adequate security. We propose that one solution to this emerging situation is a distributed security model in which the components of nuclear security become the responsibility of each and every worker at a nuclear facility. To implement this model, there needs to be a refurbishment of current workforce training and mentoring practices. The paper will present an example of distributed security framework model, and how it may look in practice. (author)

  18. 76 FR 588 - Comment Request for Information Collection for Workforce Information Grants to States Application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-05

    ... regional use of workforce and economic information, increase data integration, expand the use of economic... increased employment and sustainable economic growth and recovery by supporting state and local workforce...; and economic research and information services to state and local policy makers, workforce system...

  19. Forum on Workforce Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Edward

    2010-01-01

    APPEL Mission: To support NASA's mission by promoting individual, team, and organizational excellence in program/project management and engineering through the application of learning strategies, methods, models, and tools. Goals: a) Provide a common frame of reference for NASA s technical workforce. b) Provide and enhance critical job skills. c) Support engineering, program and project teams. d) Promote organizational learning across the agency. e) Supplement formal educational programs.

  20. [CRISPR/Cas system for genome editing in pluripotent stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'eva, E A; Melino, D; Barlev, N A

    2015-01-01

    Genome editing systems based on site-specific nucleases became very popular for genome editing in modern bioengineering. Human pluripotent stem cells provide a unique platform for genes function study, disease modeling, and drugs testing. Consequently, technology for fast, accurate and well controlled genome manipulation is required. CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat/CRISPR-associated) system could be employed for these purposes. This system is based on site-specific programmable nuclease Cas9. Numerous advantages of the CRISPR/Cas system and its successful application to human stem cells provide wide opportunities for genome therapy and regeneration medicine. In this publication, we describe and compare the main genome editing systems based on site-specific programmable nucleases and discuss opportunities and perspectives of the CRISPR/Cas system for application to pluripotent stem cells.

  1. Dynamic simulation for effective workforce management in new product development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mutingi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Effective planning and management of workforce for new product development (NPD projects is a great challenge to many organisations, especially in the presence of engineering changes during the product development process. The management objective in effective workforce management is to recruit, develop and deploy the right people at the right place at the right time so as to fulfill organizational objectives. In this paper, we propose a dynamic simulation model to address the workforce management problem in a typical NPD project consisting of design, prototyping, and production phases. We assume that workforce demand is a function of project work remaining and the current available skill pool. System dynamics simulation concepts are used to capture the causality relationships and feedback loops in the workforce system from a systems thinking. The evaluation of system dynamics simulation reveals the dynamic behaviour in NPD workforce management systems and shows how adaptive dynamic recruitment and training decisions can effectively balance the workforce system during the NPD process.

  2. Retinal stem cells and regeneration of vision system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Henry K

    2014-01-01

    The vertebrate retina is a well-characterized model for studying neurogenesis. Retinal neurons and glia are generated in a conserved order from a pool of mutlipotent progenitor cells. During retinal development, retinal stem/progenitor cells (RPC) change their competency over time under the influence of intrinsic (such as transcriptional factors) and extrinsic factors (such as growth factors). In this review, we summarize the roles of these factors, together with the understanding of the signaling pathways that regulate eye development. The information about the interactions between intrinsic and extrinsic factors for retinal cell fate specification is useful to regenerate specific retinal neurons from RPCs. Recent studies have identified RPCs in the retina, which may have important implications in health and disease. Despite the recent advances in stem cell biology, our understanding of many aspects of RPCs in the eye remains limited. PRCs are present in the developing eye of all vertebrates and remain active in lower vertebrates throughout life. In mammals, however, PRCs are quiescent and exhibit very little activity and thus have low capacity for retinal regeneration. A number of different cellular sources of RPCs have been identified in the vertebrate retina. These include PRCs at the retinal margin, pigmented cells in the ciliary body, iris, and retinal pigment epithelium, and Müller cells within the retina. Because PRCs can be isolated and expanded from immature and mature eyes, it is possible now to study these cells in culture and after transplantation in the degenerated retinal tissue. We also examine current knowledge of intrinsic RPCs, and human embryonic stems and induced pluripotent stem cells as potential sources for cell transplant therapy to regenerate the diseased retina. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The intersection of cancer, cancer stem cells, and the immune system: therapeutic opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Daniel J; Sinyuk, Maksim; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Ahluwalia, Manmeet S; Lathia, Justin D

    2016-02-01

    During brain neoplasia, malignant cells subjugate the immune system to provide an environment that favors tumor growth. These mechanisms capitalize on tumor-promoting functions of various immune cell types and typically result in suppression of tumor immune rejection. Immunotherapy efforts are underway to disrupt these mechanisms and turn the immune system against developing tumors. While many of these therapies are already in early-stage clinical trials, understanding how these therapies impact various tumor cell populations, including self-renewing cancer stem cells, may help to predict their efficacy and clarify their mechanisms of action. Moreover, interrogating the biology of glioma cell, cancer stem cell, and immune cell interactions may provide additional therapeutic targets to leverage against disease progression. In this review, we begin by highlighting a series of investigations into immune cell-mediated tumor promotion that do not parse the tumor into stem and non-stem components. We then take a closer look at the immune-suppressive mechanisms derived specifically from cancer stem cell interactions with the immune system and end with an update on immunotherapy and cancer stem cell-directed clinical trials in glioblastoma. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Bioreactor systems for tissue engineering II. Strategies for the expansion and directed differentiation of stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasper, Cornelia [Hannover Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische Chemie; Griensven, Martijn van [Ludwig Boltzmann Institut fuer Klinische und Experimentelle Traumatologie, Wien (Austria); Poertner, Ralf (eds.) [Technische Univ. Hamburg-Harburg (Germany). Inst. Biotechnologie und Verfahrenstechnik

    2010-07-01

    Alternative Sources of Adult Stem Cells: Human Amniotic Membrane, by S. Wolbank, M. van Griensven, R. Grillari-Voglauer, and A. Peterbauer-Scherb; - Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Derived from Human Umbilical Cord Tissues: Primitive Cells with Potential for Clinical and Tissue Engineering Applications, by P. Moretti, T. Hatlapatka, D. Marten, A. Lavrentieva, I. Majore, R. Hass and C. Kasper; - Isolation, Characterization, Differentiation, and Application of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells, by J. W. Kuhbier, B. Weyand, C. Radtke, P. M. Vogt, C. Kasper and K. Reimers; - Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: Characteristics and Perspectives, by T. Cantz and U. Martin; - Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Technology in Regenerative Medicine and Biology, by D. Pei, J. Xu, Q. Zhuang, H.-F. Tse and M. A. Esteban; - Production Process for Stem Cell Based Therapeutic Implants: Expansion of the Production Cell Line and Cultivation of Encapsulated Cells, by C. Weber, S. Pohl, R. Poertner, P. Pino-Grace, D. Freimark, C. Wallrapp, P. Geigle and P. Czermak; - Cartilage Engineering from Mesenchymal Stem Cells, by C. Goepfert, A. Slobodianski, A.F. Schilling, P. Adamietz and R. Poertner; - Outgrowth Endothelial Cells: Sources, Characteristics and Potential Applications in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, by S. Fuchs, E. Dohle, M. Kolbe, C. J. Kirkpatrick; - Basic Science and Clinical Application of Stem Cells in Veterinary Medicine, by I. Ribitsch, J. Burk, U. Delling, C. Geissler, C. Gittel, H. Juelke, W. Brehm; - Bone Marrow Stem Cells in Clinical Application: Harnessing Paracrine Roles and Niche Mechanisms, by R. M. El Backly, R. Cancedda; - Clinical Application of Stem Cells in the Cardiovascular System, C. Stamm, K. Klose, Y.-H. Choi. (orig.)

  5. Effect of wine inhibitors on free pineapple stem bromelain activity in a model wine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esti, Marco; Benucci, Ilaria; Liburdi, Katia; Garzillo, Anna Maria Vittoria

    2011-04-13

    The influence of potential inhibitors, naturally present in wine, on the activity of stem bromelain was investigated in order to evaluate the applicability of this enzyme for protein stabilization in white wine. Bromelain proteolytic activity was tested against a synthetic substrate (Bz-Phe-Val-Arg-pNA) in a model wine system after adding ethanol, sulfur dioxide (SO(2)), skin, seed, and gallic and ellagic tannins at the average range of their concentration in wine. All the inhibitors of stem bromelain activity tested turned out to be reversible. Ethanol was a competitive inhibitor with a rather limited effect. Gallic and ellagic tannins have no inhibitory effect on stem bromelain activity, while both seed and skin tannins were uncompetitive inhibitors. The strongest inhibition effect was revealed for sulfur dioxide, which was a mixed-type inhibitor for the enzyme activity. This study provides useful information relative to a future biotechnological application of stem bromelain in winemaking.

  6. A study of the quality and effectiveness of the Airway Science Electronic Systems program to meet the workforce needs of the Federal Aviation Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedge, Clarence Alvin

    1999-11-01

    Scope and method of study. The purpose of the study was to determine the quality and effectiveness of the Airway Science Electronics Systems program to meet the workforce needs of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The study was to research traditional FAA hired electronics technicians and Airway Science degree graduate electronics technicians. More specially, the study sought (1) to compare the traditional electronics training course requirements to the Airway Science curriculum course requirements, (2) to examine the ratio of Airway Science Electronics Systems graduates to graduates of other Airway Science options and also related electronics training and (3) to determine strengths and weaknesses in the Airway Science Electronics System. Findings and conclusions. The data were obtained by questionnaires sent to (1) the 61 recognized Airway Science Institutions, (2) personal interviews with department chairmen who are members of the Oklahoma City Aviation Aerospace Alliance and (3) personal interviews were also conducted with Electronics Technicians and supervisors at the Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. It was found that the present area of airway science curriculum encompasses Airway Science Management, Airway Computer Science, Airway Electronics Systems, Aviation Maintenance Management and Aircraft Systems Management. Programs in airway science are designed specifically to help prepare individuals for meeting the requirements for a strong educational background for tomorrow's aviation leaders. The data indicated that the majority of airway science students pursue careers with the FAA but also find even greater opportunities in industry. The data also shows that in the surveyed schools with approved airway science programs, Airway Science Management was the most frequent offered program.

  7. Acquisition Workforce Annual Report 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration — This is the Federal Acquisition Institute's (FAI's) Annual demographic report on the Federal acquisition workforce, showing trends by occupational series, employment...

  8. Acquisition Workforce Annual Report 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration — This is the Federal Acquisition Institute's (FAI's) Annual demographic report on the Federal acquisition workforce, showing trends by occupational series, employment...

  9. Long-term maintenance of human induced pluripotent stem cells by automated cell culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konagaya, Shuhei; Ando, Takeshi; Yamauchi, Toshiaki; Suemori, Hirofumi; Iwata, Hiroo

    2015-11-17

    Pluripotent stem cells, such as embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, are regarded as new sources for cell replacement therapy. These cells can unlimitedly expand under undifferentiated conditions and be differentiated into multiple cell types. Automated culture systems enable the large-scale production of cells. In addition to reducing the time and effort of researchers, an automated culture system improves the reproducibility of cell cultures. In the present study, we newly designed a fully automated cell culture system for human iPS maintenance. Using an automated culture system, hiPS cells maintained their undifferentiated state for 60 days. Automatically prepared hiPS cells had a potency of differentiation into three germ layer cells including dopaminergic neurons and pancreatic cells.

  10. Workforce Development : Middle East and North Africa Regional Synthesis Report

    OpenAIRE

    Abu-Ghaida, Dina; Thacker, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The workforce development (WfD) systems of the seven MENA countries studied in this exercise—Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Morocco, the Palestinian Territories, Tunisia, and Yemen—were evaluated using the Systems Approach for Better Education Results (SABER) workforce development diagnostic tool and scored similarly in many aspects. Broadly, the seven MENA countries’ WfD systems remain very much in need of policy and institutional reform in order to better match skills demand with skills supply. Wi...

  11. Otolaryngology workforce analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Charles Anthony; McMenamin, Patrick; Mehta, Vikas; Pillsbury, Harold; Kennedy, David

    2016-12-01

    The number of trained otolaryngologists available is insufficient to supply current and projected US health care needs. The goal of this study was to assess available databases and present accurate data on the current otolaryngology workforce, examine methods for prediction of future health care needs, and explore potential issues with forecasting methods and policy implementation based on these predictions. Retrospective analysis of research databases, public use files, and claims data. The total number of otolaryngologists and current practices in the United States was tabulated using the databases of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, American Medical Association, American Board of Otolaryngology, American College of Surgeons, Association of American Medical Colleges, National Center for Health Statistics, and Department of Health and Human Services. Otolaryngologists were identified as surgeons and classified into surgical groups using a combination of AMA primary and secondary self-reported specialties and American Board of Medical Specialties certifications. Data gathered were cross-referenced to rule out duplications to assess total practicing otolaryngologists. Data analyzed included type of practice: 1) academic versus private and 2) general versus specialty; and demographics: 1) urban versus rural, 2) patient age, 3) reason for visit (referral, new, established, surgical follow-up), 4) reason for visit (diagnosis), and 5) payer type. Analysis from the above resources estimates the total number of otolaryngologists practicing in the United States in 2011 to be 12,609, with approximately 10,522 fully trained practicing physicians (9,232-10,654) and 2,087 in training (1,318 residents and 769 fellows/others). Based on 2011 data, workforce projections would place the fully trained and practicing otolaryngology workforce at 11,088 in 2015 and 12,084 in 2025 unless changes in training occur. The AAO-HNS Physicians Resource Committee

  12. Role of Australian primary healthcare organisations (PHCOs) in primary healthcare (PHC) workforce planning: lessons from abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naccarella, Lucio; Buchan, James; Newton, Bill; Brooks, Peter

    2011-08-01

    To review international experience in order to inform Australian PHC workforce policy on the role of primary healthcare organisations (PHCOs/Medicare Locals) in PHC workforce planning. A NZ and UK study tour was conducted by the lead author, involving 29 key informant interviews with regard to PHCOs roles and the effect on PHC workforce planning. Interviews were audio-taped with consent, transcribed and analysed thematically. Emerging themes included: workforce planning is a complex, dynamic, iterative process and key criteria exist for doing workforce planning well; PHCOs lacked a PHC workforce policy framework to do workforce planning; PHCOs lacked authority, power and appropriate funding to do workforce planning; there is a need to align workforce planning with service planning; and a PHC Workforce Planning and Development Benchmarking Database is essential for local planning and evaluating workforce reforms. With the Australian government promoting the role of PHCOs in health system reform, reflections from abroad highlight the key action within PHC and PHCOs required to optimise PHC workforce planning.

  13. Training Tomorrow's Nuclear Workforce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Training tomorrow's Nuclear Workforce Start with the children. That is the message Brian Molloy, a human resources expert in the IAEA's Nuclear Power Engineering Section, wants to convey to any country considering launching or expanding a nuclear power programme. Mathematics and science curricular and extra-curricular activities at secondary and even primary schools are of crucial importance to future recruiting efforts at nuclear power plants, he says:''You need to interest children in science and physics and engineering. The teaching needs to be robust enough to teach them, but it must also gain their interest.'' Recruiting high-calibre engineers needed for the operation of nuclear power plants is a growing challenge, even for existing nuclear power programmes, because of a wave of retirements combined with increasing global demand. But essential as engineers are, they are only a component of the staff at any nuclear power plant. In fact, most employees at nuclear power plants are not university graduates - they are skilled technicians, electricians, welders, fitters, riggers and people in similar trades. Molloy argues that this part of the workforce needs more focus. ''It's about getting a balance between focusing on the academic and the skilled vocational'', he says, adding that countries considering nuclear power programmes often initially place undue focus on nuclear engineers.

  14. Diseases of the circulatory system and the likelihood of their development in the workforce at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khomazyuk, N.N.; Goncharenko, L.I.; Kovalev, A.C.; Nastina, E.M.; Chebanyuk, C.V.

    1995-01-01

    Large doses of general or localized radiation can provoke changes in the circulatory system, can affect all layers of the heart and cause selective damage to vascular endothelium. A study of the condition of the circulatory system in the victims of the Chernobyl disaster was carried out by the authors in 1986. This paper presents the results of an investigation into the condition of the circulatory system of Chernobyl employees working for long periods with sources of ionizing radiation. (O.L.). 11 refs., 3 figs

  15. Advancing Earth System Science Literacy and Preparing the Future Geoscience Workforce Through Strategic Investments at the National Science Foundation (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsten, J. L.; Patino, L. C.; Rom, E. L.; Weiler, C. S.

    2010-12-01

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent federal agency created 60 years ago by the U.S. Congress "to promote the progress of science; to advance the national health, prosperity, and welfare; to secure the national defense…" NSF is the primary funding agency in the U.S. to support basic, frontier research across all fields in science, engineering, and education, except for medical sciences. With a FY 2011 budget request of more than $955 million, the NSF Directorate for Geosciences (GEO) is the principle source of federal funding for university-based fundamental research in the geosciences and preparation of the next generation of geoscientists. Since its inception, GEO has supported the education and training of a diverse and talented pool of future scientists, engineers, and technicians in the Earth, Ocean, Atmospheric and Geospatial Sciences sub-fields, through support of graduate research assistants, post-doctoral fellows, and undergraduate research experiences. In the late 1990’s and early 2000’s, GEO initiated several programs that expanded these investments to also support improvements in pre-college and undergraduate geoscience education through a variety of mechanisms (e.g., professional development support for K-12 teachers, development of innovative undergraduate curricula, and scientist-mentored research experiences for elementary and secondary students). In addition to GEO’s Geoscience Education (GeoEd), Opportunities for Enhancing Diversity in the Geosciences (OEDG), Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE), and Geoscience Teacher Training (GEO-Teach) programs, GEO participates in a number of cross-Foundation programs, including the Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU), Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (IGERT), Ethics Education in Science and Engineering (EESE), NSF Graduate STEM Fellows in K-12 Education (GK-12), and Partnerships for International Research and Education

  16. Early Childhood Workforce Index, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitebook, Marcy; McLean, Caitlin; Austin, Lea J. E.

    2016-01-01

    The State of the Early Childhood Workforce (SECW) Initiative is a groundbreaking multi-year project to shine a steady spotlight on the nation's early childhood workforce. The SECW Initiative is designed to challenge entrenched ideas and policies that maintain an inequitable and inadequate status quo for early educators and for the children and…

  17. Tools for Tomorrow's Science and Technology Workforce: MATE's 2006 ROV Competition Sets Students' Sights on Ocean Observing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zande, Jill; Meeson, Blanche; Cook, Susan; Matsumoto, George

    2006-01-01

    Teams participating in the 2006 ROV competition organized by the Marine Advanced Technology Education (MATE) Center and the Marine Technology Society's (MTS) ROV Committee experienced first-hand the scientific and technical challenges that many ocean scientists, technicians, and engineers face every day. The competition tasked more than 1,000 middle and high school, college, and university students from Newfoundland to Hong Kong with designing and building ROVs to support the next generation of ocean observing systems. Teaming up with the National Office for Integrated and Sustained Ocean Observations, Ocean. US, and the Ocean Research Interactive Observatory Networks (ORION) Program, the competition highlighted ocean observing systems and the careers, organizations, and technologies associated with ocean observatories. The student teams were challenged to develop vehicles that can deploy, install, and maintain networks of instruments as well as to explore the practical applications and the research questions made possible by observing systems.

  18. Neural Stem Cells: Implications for the Conventional Radiotherapy of Central Nervous System Malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barani, Igor J.; Benedict, Stanley H.; Lin, Peck-Sun

    2007-01-01

    Advances in basic neuroscience related to neural stem cells and their malignant counterparts are challenging traditional models of central nervous system tumorigenesis and intrinsic brain repair. Neurogenesis persists into adulthood predominantly in two neurogenic centers: subventricular zone and subgranular zone. Subventricular zone is situated adjacent to lateral ventricles and subgranular zone is confined to the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Neural stem cells not only self-renew and differentiate along multiple lineages in these regions, but also contribute to intrinsic brain plasticity and repair. Ionizing radiation can depopulate these exquisitely sensitive regions directly or impair in situ neurogenesis by indirect, dose-dependent and inflammation-mediated mechanisms, even at doses <2 Gy. This review discusses the fundamental neural stem cell concepts within the framework of cumulative clinical experience with the treatment of central nervous system malignancies using conventional radiotherapy

  19. Simulation of the dynamic behavior of the coffee fruit-stem system using finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Lúcio Santos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical harvesting can be considered an important factor to reduce the costs in coffee production and to improve the quality of the final product. Coffee harvesting machinery uses mechanical vibrations to accomplish the harvesting. Therefore, the determination of the natural frequencies of the fruit-stem systems is an essential dynamic parameter for the development of mechanized harvesting system by mechanical vibrations. The objective of this study was to develop a three-dimensional finite element model to determine the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the coffee fruit-stem systems, considering different fruit ripeness. Moreover, it was carried out a theoretical study, using the finite element three-dimensional model, based on the linear theory of elasticity, for determining the generated stress in a coffee fruit-stem system, during the harvesting process by mechanical vibration. The results showed that natural frequencies decrease as the ripeness condition of the fruit increases. Counter-phase mode shape can provide better detachment efficiency considering the stress generation on coffee fruit-stem system during the harvesting by mechanical vibrations and presented a difference greater than 40 Hz between the natural frequencies of the green and ripe fruit.

  20. The National Higher Education and Workforce Initiative: Strategy in Action: Building the Cybersecurity Workforce in Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Business-Higher Education Forum, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Business-Higher Education Forum (BHEF) has achieved particular success in operationalizing the National Higher Education and Workforce Initiative (HEWI) in Maryland around cybersecurity. Leveraging its membership of corporate CEOs, university presidents, and government agency leaders, BHEF partnered with the University System of Maryland to…

  1. HGFA Is an Injury-Regulated Systemic Factor that Induces the Transition of Stem Cells into GAlert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph T. Rodgers

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The activation of quiescent stem cells into the cell cycle is a key step in initiating the process of tissue repair. We recently reported that quiescent stem cells can transition into GAlert, a cellular state in which they have an increased functional ability to activate and participate in tissue repair. However, the precise molecular signals that induce GAlert in stem cells have remained elusive. Here, we show that the injury-induced regulation of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF proteolytic processing via the systemic protease, hepatocyte growth factor activator (HGFA, stimulates GAlert in skeletal muscle stem cells (MuSCs and fibro-adipogenic progenitors (FAPs. We demonstrate that administering active HGFA to animals is sufficient to induce GAlert in stem cells throughout the body and to significantly accelerate the processes of stem cell activation and tissue repair. Our data suggest that factors that induce GAlert will have broad therapeutic applications for regenerative medicine and wound healing. : Rodgers et al. show that HGFA is a systemic protease that is activated by tissue injury and relays a signal to stem cells in non-injured tissues that induces their transition into a primed, “GAlert” state in which they possess an enhanced potential to activate and repair tissue damage. Keywords: satellite cells, muscle stem cells, fibro-adipogenic progenitors, HGFA, HGF, mTORC1, cMet, stem cell quiescence, stem cell activation, GAlert

  2. STEM Engagement with NASA's Solar System Treks Portals for Lunar and Planetary Mapping and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, E. S.; Day, B. H.

    2018-01-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of the uses and capabilities of NASA's Solar System Treks family of online mapping and modeling portals. While also designed to support mission planning and scientific research, this presentation will focus on the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) engagement and public outreach capabilities of these web based suites of data visualization and analysis tools.

  3. Diabetes-Induced Dysfunction of Mitochondria and Stem Cells in Skeletal Muscle and the Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimaki, Shin; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common metabolic diseases spread all over the world, which results in hyperglycemia caused by the breakdown of insulin secretion or insulin action or both. Diabetes has been reported to disrupt the functions and dynamics of mitochondria, which play a fundamental role in regulating metabolic pathways and are crucial to maintain appropriate energy balance. Similar to mitochondria, the functions and the abilities of stem cells are attenuated under diabetic condition in several tissues. In recent years, several studies have suggested that the regulation of mitochondria functions and dynamics is critical for the precise differentiation of stem cells. Importantly, physical exercise is very useful for preventing the diabetic alteration by improving the functions of both mitochondria and stem cells. In the present review, we provide an overview of the diabetic alterations of mitochondria and stem cells and the preventive effects of physical exercise on diabetes, focused on skeletal muscle and the nervous system. We propose physical exercise as a countermeasure for the dysfunction of mitochondria and stem cells in several target tissues under diabetes complication and to improve the physiological function of patients with diabetes, resulting in their quality of life being maintained. PMID:29036909

  4. Bridging the knowledge gap: an innovative surveillance system to monitor the health of British Columbia's healthcare workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilligan, Tony; Alamgir, Hasanat

    2008-01-01

    Healthcare workers are exposed to a variety of work-related hazards including biological, chemical, physical, ergonomic, psychological hazards; and workplace violence. The Occupational Health and Safety Agency for Healthcare in British Columbia (OHSAH), in conjunction with British Columbia (BC) health regions, developed and implemented a comprehensive surveillance system that tracks occupational exposures and stressors as well as injuries and illnesses among a defined population of healthcare workers. Workplace Health Indicator Tracking and Evaluation (WHITE) is a secure operational database, used for data entry and transaction reporting. It has five modules: Incident Investigation, Case Management, Employee Health, Health and Safety, and Early Intervention/Return to Work. Since the WHITE database was first introduced into BC in 2004, it has tracked the health of 84,318 healthcare workers (120,244 jobs), representing 35,927 recorded incidents, resulting in 18,322 workers' compensation claims. Currently, four of BC's six healthcare regions are tracking and analyzing incidents and the health of healthcare workers using WHITE, providing OHSAH and healthcare stakeholders with comparative performance indicators on workplace health and safety. A number of scientific manuscripts have also been published in peer-reviewed journals. The WHITE database has been very useful for descriptive epidemiological studies, monitoring health risk factors, benchmarking, and evaluating interventions.

  5. A Flexible Reporter System for Direct Observation and Isolation of Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binwu Tang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many tumors are hierarchically organized with a minority cell population that has stem-like properties and enhanced ability to initiate tumorigenesis and drive therapeutic relapse. These cancer stem cells (CSCs are typically identified by complex combinations of cell-surface markers that differ among tumor types. Here, we developed a flexible lentiviral-based reporter system that allows direct visualization of CSCs based on functional properties. The reporter responds to the core stem cell transcription factors OCT4 and SOX2, with further selectivity and kinetic resolution coming from use of a proteasome-targeting degron. Cancer cells marked by this reporter have the expected properties of self-renewal, generation of heterogeneous offspring, high tumor- and metastasis-initiating activity, and resistance to chemotherapeutics. With this approach, the spatial distribution of CSCs can be assessed in settings that retain microenvironmental and structural cues, and CSC plasticity and response to therapeutics can be monitored in real time.

  6. Addressing the workforce pipeline challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard Bond; Kevin Kostelnik; Richard Holman

    2006-11-01

    A secure and affordable energy supply is essential for achieving U.S. national security, in continuing U.S. prosperity and in laying the foundations to enable future economic growth. To meet this goal the next generation energy workforce in the U.S., in particular those needed to support instrumentation, controls and advanced operations and maintenance, is a critical element. The workforce is aging and a new workforce pipeline, to support both current generation and new build has yet to be established. The paper reviews the challenges and some actions being taken to address this need.

  7. Undergraduate Research as a Process for STEM Teaching and Learning Systemic Change: Lessons Learned from the Council on Undergraduate Research NSF CCLI and TUES Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambos, E. L.; Havholm, K. G.; Malachowski, M.; Osborn, J.; Karukstis, K.

    2013-12-01

    concerted efforts to affect policy, workload, tenure and promotion and resource issues, which are often core factors in any STEM education change process. Several systems are now connecting individual campus-based undergraduate research efforts more effectively, and tying undergraduate research to regional workforce and economic development programs. Many campus teams are moving their department and colleges toward curricular innovations that emphasize scaffolding undergraduate research throughout the undergraduate curriculum. An NSF EAGER/WIDER supplement to the CUR CCLI III award was received in October 2012 and expanded the scope of the project to include deeper study of the changes processes underway at each of the six systems and to tease out the factors that can either promote or retard expansion of undergraduate research as a teaching and learning paradigm. Lessons learned from one of the six systems, the University of Wisconsin, will be highlighted.

  8. A single-cell and feeder-free culture system for monkey embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Takashi; Suzuki, Yutaka; Kato, Yosuke; Fujita, Risako; Araki, Toshihiro; Yamashita, Tomoko; Kato, Hidemasa; Torii, Ryuzo; Sato, Naoya

    2014-01-01

    Primate pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), including embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), hold great potential for research and application in regenerative medicine and drug discovery. To maximize primate PSC potential, a practical system is required for generating desired functional cells and reproducible differentiation techniques. Much progress regarding their culture systems has been reported to date; however, better methods would still be required for their practical use, particularly in industrial and clinical fields. Here we report a new single-cell and feeder-free culture system for primate PSCs, the key feature of which is an originally formulated serum-free medium containing FGF and activin. In this culture system, cynomolgus monkey ESCs can be passaged many times by single-cell dissociation with traditional trypsin treatment and can be propagated with a high proliferation rate as a monolayer without any feeder cells; further, typical PSC properties and genomic stability can be retained. In addition, it has been demonstrated that monkey ESCs maintained in the culture system can be used for various experiments such as in vitro differentiation and gene manipulation. Thus, compared with the conventional culture system, monkey ESCs grown in the aforementioned culture system can serve as a cell source with the following practical advantages: simple, stable, and easy cell maintenance; gene manipulation; cryopreservation; and desired differentiation. We propose that this culture system can serve as a reliable platform to prepare primate PSCs useful for future research and application.

  9. Diversity in the dermatology workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa, Jorge A; Pandya, Amit G

    2016-12-01

    The United States is becoming increasingly diverse, and minorities are projected to represent the majority of our population in the near future. Unfortunately, health disparities still exist for these groups, and inequalities have also become evident in the field of dermatology. There is currently a lack of diversity within the dermatology workforce. Potential solutions to these health care disparities include increasing cultural competence for all physicians and improving diversity in the dermatology workforce. ©2016 Frontline Medical Communications.

  10. Wind Energy Workforce Development & Jobs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegen, Suzanne

    2016-11-08

    The United States needs a skilled and qualified wind energy workforce to produce domestic clean power. To assist with wind energy workforce development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and National Renewable Energy Laboratory are engaged with several efforts.This presentation by Suzanne Tegen describes these efforts, including a wind industry survey, DOE's Wind Career Map, the DOE Wind Vision report, and an in-depth discussion of the Jobs & Economic Development Impacts Model.

  11. Plasticity and Neural Stem Cells in the Enteric Nervous System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaefer, Karl-Herbert; Van Ginneken, Chris; Copray, Sjef

    2009-01-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) is a highly organized part of the autonomic nervous system, which innervates the whole gastrointestinal tract by several interconnected neuronal networks. The ENS changes during development and keeps throughout its lifespan a significant capacity to adapt to

  12. Workforce mobility: Contributing towards smart city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nor, N. M.; Wahap, N. A.

    2014-02-01

    Smart cities gained importance as a means of making ICT enabled services and applications available to the citizens, companies and authorities that form part of a city's system. It aims at increasing citizen's quality of life, and improving the efficiency and quality of the services provided by governing entities and businesses. This perspective requires an integrated vision of a city and of its infrastructures in all components. One of the characteristics of a smart city is mobility. The concept of mobility, especially for the workforce, is studied through a research carried out on a daily work undertaken as a prototype in the administrative town of Putrajaya, Malaysia. Utilizing the location track from GNSS integrated with mobile devices platform, information on movement and mobility was analysed for quality and efficiency of services rendered. This paper will highlight the research and outcomes that were successfully carried out and will suggest that workforce mobility management can benefit the authorities towards implementing a smart city concept.

  13. A review of decellularized stem cell matrix: a novel cell expansion system for cartilage tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Pei

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell-based therapy is a promising biological approach for the treatment of cartilage defects. Due to the small size of autologous cartilage samples available for cell transplantation in patients, cells need to be expanded to yield a sufficient cell number for cartilage repair. However, chondrocytes and adult stem cells tend to become replicatively senescent once they are expanded on conventional plastic flasks. Many studies demonstrate that the loss of cell properties is concomitant with the decreased cell proliferation capacity. This is a significant challenge for cartilage tissue engineering and regeneration. Despite much progress having been made in cell expansion, there are still concerns over expanded cell size and quality for cell transplantation applications. Recently, in vivo investigations in stem cell niches have suggested the importance of developing an in vitro stem cell microenvironment for cell expansion and tissue-specific differentiation. Our and other investigators’ work indicates that a decellularized stem cell matrix (DSCM may provide such an expansion system to yield large-quantity and high-quality cells for cartilage tissue engineering and regeneration. This review briefly introduces key parameters in an in vivo stem cell niche and focuses on our recent work on DSCM for its rejuvenating or reprograming effect on various adult stem cells and chondrocytes. Since research in DSCM is still in its infancy, we are only able to discuss some potential mechanisms of DSCM on cell proliferation and chondrogenic potential. Further investigations of the underlying mechanism and in vivo regeneration capacity will allow this approach to be used in clinics.

  14. Engaging the Workforce - 12347

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaden, Michael D. [Transuranic Waste Processing Center, Lenoir City, TN 37771 (United States); Wastren Advantage Inc. (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Likert, Covey, and a number of others studying and researching highly effective organizations have found that performing functions such as problem-solving, decision-making, safety analysis, planning, and continuous improvement as close to the working floor level as possible results in greater buy-in, feelings of ownership by the workers, and more effective use of resources. Empowering the workforce does several things: 1) people put more effort and thought into work for which they feel ownership, 2) the information they use for planning, analysis, problem-solving,and decision-making is more accurate, 3) these functions are performed in a more timely manner, and 4) the results of these functions have more credibility with those who must implement them. This act of delegation and empowerment also allows management more time to perform functions they are uniquely trained and qualified to perform, such as strategic planning, staff development, succession planning, and organizational improvement. To achieve this state in an organization, however, requires a very open, transparent culture in which accurate, timely, relevant, candid, and inoffensive communication flourishes, a situation that does not currently exist in a majority of organizations. (authors)

  15. Role of the immune system in regeneration and its dynamic interplay with adult stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abnave, Prasad; Ghigo, Eric

    2018-04-09

    The immune system plays an indispensable role in the process of tissue regeneration following damage as well as during homeostasis. Inflammation and immune cell recruitment are signs of early onset injury. At the wound site, immune cells not only help to clear debris but also secrete numerous signalling molecules that induce appropriate cell proliferation and differentiation programmes essential for successful regeneration. However, the immune system does not always perform a complementary role in regeneration and several reports have suggested that increased inflammation can inhibit the regeneration process. Successful regeneration requires a balanced immune cell response, with the recruitment of accurately polarised immune cells in an appropriate quantity. The regulatory interactions of the immune system with regeneration are not unidirectional. Stem cells, as key players in regeneration, can also modulate the immune system in several ways to facilitate regeneration. In this review, we will focus on recent research demonstrating the key role of immune system in the regeneration process as well as the immunomodulatory effects of stem cells. Finally, we propose that research investigating the interplay between the immune system and stem cells within highly regenerating animals can benefit the identification of the key interactions and molecules required for successful regeneration. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A new workforce in the making? A case study of strategic human resource management in a whole-system change effort in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, Fraser; Greenhalgh, Trish; Humphrey, Charlotte; Hughes, Jane; Butler, Ceri; Pawson, Ray

    2011-01-01

    This paper seeks to describe the exploration of human resource issues in one large-scale program of innovation in healthcare. It is informed by established theories of management in the workplace and a multi-level model of diffusion of innovations. A realist approach was used based on interviews, ethnographic observation and documentary analysis. Five main approaches ("theories of change") were adopted to develop and support the workforce: recruiting staff with skills in service transformation; redesigning roles and creating new roles; enhancing workforce planning; linking staff development to service needs; creating opportunities for shared learning and knowledge exchange. Each had differing levels of success. The paper includes HR implications for the modernisation of a complex service organisation. This is the first time a realist evaluation of a complex health modernisation initiative has been undertaken.

  17. Relationship of Middle School Student STEM Interest to Career Intent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Rhonda; Knezek, Gerald

    2017-01-01

    Understanding middle school students' perceptions regarding STEM dispositions, and the role attitudes play in establishing STEM career aspirations, is imperative to preparing the STEM workforce of the future. Data were gathered from more than 800 middle school students participating in a hands-on, real world application curriculum to examine the…

  18. Barriers To Successful Implementation of STEM Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Ejiwale

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of STEM education in schools across the globe is to prepare the future workforce with strong scientific and mathematical backgrounds to enhance skills development across STEM disciplines. However, for STEM education to achieve its goals and objectives, addressing the barriers to STEM education should start by fixing the problems at the elementary, junior and senior high school levels; the grassroots and potential feeders to colleges and universities. Since many nations including the United States of America is in dire need of the workforce with adequate preparation in science and mathematics to help address the nation’s economy that is in shambles, the barriers to its successful implementation should be identified and addressed. In this paper, (a the definition of STEM education and (b some barriers to successful implementation of STEM education are discussed and elaborated.

  19. GammaScorpion: mobile gamma-ray tomography system for early detection of basal stem rot in oil palm plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Jaafar; Hassan, Hearie; Shari, Mohamad Rabaie; Mohd, Salzali; Mustapha, Mahadi; Mahmood, Airwan Affendi; Jamaludin, Shahrizan; Ngah, Mohd Rosdi; Hamid, Noor Hisham

    2013-03-01

    Detection of the oil palm stem rot disease Ganoderma is a major issue in estate management and production in Malaysia. Conventional diagnostic techniques are difficult and time consuming when using visual inspection, and destructive and expensive when based on the chemical analysis of root or stem tissue. As an alternative, a transportable gamma-ray computed tomography system for the early detection of basal stem rot (BSR) of oil palms due to Ganoderma was developed locally at the Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Kajang, Malaysia. This system produces high quality tomographic images that clearly differentiate between healthy and Ganoderma infected oil palm stems. It has been successfully tested and used to detect the extent of BSR damage in oil palm plantations in Malaysia without the need to cut down the trees. This method offers promise for in situ inspection of oil palm stem diseases compared to the more conventional methods.

  20. Genetic modification of hematopoietic stem cells with nonviral systems: past progress and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papapetrou, E P; Zoumbos, N C; Athanassiadou, A

    2005-10-01

    Serious unwanted complications provoked by retroviral gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have recently raised the need for the development and assessment of alternative gene transfer vectors. Within this context, nonviral gene transfer systems are attracting increasing interest. Their main advantages include low cost, ease of handling and large-scale production, large packaging capacity and, most importantly, biosafety. While nonviral gene transfer into HSCs has been restricted in the past by poor transfection efficiency and transient maintenance, in recent years, biotechnological developments are converting nonviral transfer into a realistic approach for genetic modification of cells of hematopoietic origin. Herein we provide an overview of past accomplishments in the field of nonviral gene transfer into hematopoietic progenitor/stem cells and we point at future challenges. We argue that episomally maintained self-replicating vectors combined with physical methods of delivery show the greatest promise among nonviral gene transfer strategies for the treatment of disorders of the hematopoietic system.

  1. Toward a Framework for Multicultural STEM-Focused Career Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byars-Winston, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Numerous federal and national commissions have called for policies, funds, and initiatives aimed at expanding the nation's science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) workforce and education investments to create a significantly larger, more diverse talent pool of individuals who pursue technical careers. Career development professionals are poised to contribute to the equity discourse about broadening STEM participation. However, few are aware of STEM-related career development matters, career opportunities and pathways, or strategies for promoting STEM pursuits. The author summarizes STEM education and workforce trends and articulates an equity imperative for broadening and diversifying STEM participation. The author then offers a multicultural STEM-focused career development framework to encourage career development professionals' knowledge and awareness of STEM education and careers and delineates considerations for practice aimed at increasing the attainment and achievement of diverse groups in STEM fields. PMID:25750480

  2. GLOBE and the Earth SySTEM Model in Teacher Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabot, M.; Moore, J.; Dorofy, P.

    2017-12-01

    This presentation will share the growing body of work linking ArcMap and GLOBE and the Earth SySTEM approach in the development of preservice teachers. Our work is linking the power of ArcMap with the vast database of GLOBE in a unique way that links the power of geospatial technologies in shaping the planning for and delivery of science instruction in the P-5 classroom.

  3. Purified umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cell treatment in a case of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Christopher D; Wongsaisri, Pornpatcharin; Htut, Thein; Grossman, Terry

    2017-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multiple organ system autoimmune disorder for which there is no known cure. We report a case of a young adult lady with SLE and Sjogren's with diagnostic and clinical resolution following purified umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) and globulin component protein macrophage activating factor (GcMAF) therapy in a combined multidisciplinary integrative medicine protocol. Our patient had complete reversal of all clinical and laboratory markers. We recommend a prospective randomized double blind study to assess the sustained efficacy of MSC and GcMAF in the treatment of autoimmune connective tissue diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus.

  4. Policy challenges for the pediatric rheumatology workforce: Part III. the international situation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrickson Michael

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Survival dominates current pediatric global health priorities. Diseases of poverty largely contribute to overall mortality in children under 5 years of age. Infectious diseases and injuries account for 75% of cause-specific mortality among children ages 5-14 years. Twenty percent of the world's population lives in extreme poverty (income below US $1.25/day. Within this population, essential services and basic needs are not met, including clean water, sanitation, adequate nutrition, shelter, access to health care, medicines and education. In this context, musculoskeletal disease comprises 0.1% of all-cause mortality in children ages 5-14 years. Worldwide morbidity from musculoskeletal disease remains generally unknown in the pediatric age group. This epidemiologic data is not routinely surveyed by international agencies, including the World Health Organization. The prevalence of pediatric rheumatic diseases based on data from developed nations is in the range of 2,500 - 3,000 cases per million children. Developing countries' needs for musculoskeletal morbidity are undergoing an epidemiologic shift to chronic conditions, as leading causes of pediatric mortality are slowly quelled. A global crisis of health care providers and human resources stems from insufficient workforce production, inability to retain workers in areas of greatest need, distribution disparity and poor management of both health care systems and health workforce. Internationally, the pediatric rheumatology workforce will also be in very short supply for the foreseeable future relative to projected demand. Physician extenders are an essential resource to meet this demand in underserved regions. They can be trained in common aspects of musculoskeletal medicine and rheumatic conditions. Innovative strategies have been introduced in the United Kingdom to address musculoskeletal medicine educational deficiencies. Telemedicine offers an important capacity to improve access to

  5. A prosurvival and proangiogenic stem cell delivery system to promote ischemic limb regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanyi; Fu, Minghuan; Li, Zhihong; Fan, Zhaobo; Li, Xiaofei; Liu, Ying; Anderson, Peter M; Xie, Xiaoyun; Liu, Zhenguo; Guan, Jianjun

    2016-02-01

    Stem cell therapy is one of the most promising strategies to restore blood perfusion and promote muscle regeneration in ischemic limbs. Yet its therapeutic efficacy remains low owing to the inferior cell survival under the low oxygen and nutrient environment of the injured limbs. To increase therapeutic efficacy, high rates of both short- and long-term cell survival are essential, which current approaches do not support. In this work, we hypothesized that a high rate of short-term cell survival can be achieved by introducing a prosurvival environment into the stem cell delivery system to enhance cell survival before vascularization is established; and that a high rate of long-term cell survival can be attained by building a proangiogenic environment in the system to quickly vascularize the limbs. The system was based on a biodegradable and thermosensitive poly(N-Isopropylacrylamide)-based hydrogel, a prosurvival and proangiogenic growth factor bFGF, and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). bFGF can be continuously released from the system for 4weeks. The released bFGF significantly improved MSC survival and paracrine effects under low nutrient and oxygen conditions (0% FBS and 1% O2) in vitro. The prosurvival effect of the bFGF on MSCs was resulted from activating cell Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) pathway. When transplanted into the ischemic limbs, the system dramatically improved MSC survival. Some of the engrafted cells were differentiated into skeletal muscle and endothelial cells, respectively. The system also promoted the proliferation of host cells. After only 2weeks of implantation, tissue blood perfusion was completely recovered; and after 4weeks, the muscle fiber diameter was restored similarly to that of the normal limbs. These pronounced results demonstrate that the developed stem cell delivery system has a potential for ischemic limb regeneration. Stem cell therapy is a promising strategy to restore blood perfusion and promote muscle

  6. People matter: tomorrow's workforce for tomorrow's world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easmon, Charles

    2014-01-01

    The focus of any health service, now and into the future, should be people delivering safe, quality care to people; care that covers not just diagnosis and treatment, but the whole experience that patients and their carers have of the service. Workforce development, the process by which the current and future workforce is planned and trained, must be related to current and future patterns of service delivery and take account of financial reality. It cannot exist in isolation. Despite employing 1.3 million people, upon whom up to 70% of its budget is spent, the NHS has been curiously relaxed about the workforce development of both its staff in training and of those trained staff who, with the impact of demographic change and the increasing speed of technological progress, will need to adapt to new ways of working and learn new skills. Given that the NHS has been repeatedly criticised by the Health Select Committee for its failure to link workforce planning and development with service and financial planning, and that inadequate staffing has been a feature of a number of recent organizational failures, how is this to be achieved? Some NHS organisations have been shown to be poor employers with a culture of bullying and fear and the use of suspensions and financial settlements bound to gagging clauses to remove whistleblowers. Gender and ethnic discrimination is an issue not yet fully resolved. Furthermore with the demographic changes around the increasing needs of an elderly population, the introduction of new technology and the increasing interdependency of health and social care, there is a need for a clear vision as to how the future NHS will be structured and developed. Fewer large specialist centres are likely, combined with local, community oriented integrated services with appropriate specialist support. Decisions need to be taken about this in time to give workforce development processes time to plan the best skill mix combinations and to develop clinicians

  7. Dermal-epidermal membrane systems by using human keratinocytes and mesenchymal stem cells isolated from dermis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salerno, Simona, E-mail: s.salerno@itm.cnr.it [Institute on Membrane Technology, National Research Council of Italy, ITM-CNR, c/o University of Calabria, via P. Bucci cubo 17/C, I-87036, Rende (CS) (Italy); Messina, Antonietta [Institute on Membrane Technology, National Research Council of Italy, ITM-CNR, c/o University of Calabria, via P. Bucci cubo 17/C, I-87036, Rende (CS) (Italy); Giordano, Francesca [Department of Pharmacy, Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Calabria, I-87036 Rende, (CS) (Italy); Bader, Augustinus [Biomedical-Biotechnological Center, BBZ, University of Leipzig, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Drioli, Enrico [Institute on Membrane Technology, National Research Council of Italy, ITM-CNR, c/o University of Calabria, via P. Bucci cubo 17/C, I-87036, Rende (CS) (Italy); WCU Energy Engineering Department, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); De Bartolo, Loredana, E-mail: l.debartolo@itm.cnr.it [Institute on Membrane Technology, National Research Council of Italy, ITM-CNR, c/o University of Calabria, via P. Bucci cubo 17/C, I-87036, Rende (CS) (Italy)

    2017-02-01

    Dermal-epidermal membrane systems were developed by co-culturing human keratinocytes with Skin derived Stem Cells (SSCs), which are Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) isolated from dermis, on biodegradable membranes of chitosan (CHT), polycaprolactone (PCL) and a polymeric blend of CHT and PCL. The membranes display physico-chemical, morphological, mechanical and biodegradation properties that could satisfy and fulfil specific requirements in skin tissue engineering. CHT membrane exhibits an optimal biodegradation rate for acute wounds; CHT-PCL for the chronic ones. On the other hand, PCL membrane in spite of its very slow biodegradation rate exhibits mechanical properties similar to in vivo dermis, a lower hydrophilic character, and a surface roughness, all properties that make it able to sustain cell adhesion and proliferation for in vitro skin models. Both CHT–PCL and PCL membranes guided epidermal and dermal differentiation of SSCs as pointed out by the expression of cytokeratins and the deposition of the ECM protein fibronectin, respectively. In the dermal-epidermal membrane systems, a more suitable microenvironment for the SSCs differentiation was promoted by the interactions and the mutual interplay with keratinocytes. Being skin tissue-biased stem cells committed to their specific final dermal and/or epidermal cell differentiation, SSCs are more suitable for skin tissue engineering than other adult MSCs with different origin. For this reason, they represent a useful autologous cell source for engineering skin substitutes for both in vivo and in vitro applications.

  8. Extravehicular Activity Systems Education and Public Outreach in Support of NASA's STEM Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Heather L.

    2011-01-01

    The exploration activities associated with NASA?s goals to return to the Moon, travel to Mars, or explore Near Earth Objects (NEOs) will involve the need for human-supported space and surface extravehicular activities (EVAs). The technology development and human element associated with these exploration missions provide fantastic content to promote science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). As NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden remarked on December 9, 2009, "We....need to provide the educational and experiential stepping-stones to inspire the next generation of scientists, engineers, and leaders in STEM fields." The EVA Systems Project actively supports this initiative by providing subject matter experts and hands-on, interactive presentations to educate students, educators, and the general public about the design challenges encountered as NASA develops EVA hardware for these missions. This paper summarizes these education and public efforts.

  9. Preparing tomorrow's transportation workforce : a Midwest summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Preparing Tomorrows Transportation Workforce: A Midwest Summit, held April 2728, 2010, in Ames, Iowa, was one of several : regional transportation workforce development summits held across the United States in 2009 and 2010 as part of a coordin...

  10. A Branch-and-Price algorithm for stable workforce assignments with hierarchical skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Firat, M.; Briskorn, D.; Laugier, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with assigning hierarchically skilled technicians to jobs by considering preferences. We investigate stability definitions in multi-skill workforce assignments stemming from the notion of blocking pairs as stated in the Marriage model of Gale–Shapley. We propose a Branch-and-Price

  11. Math and Science Education for the California Workforce: It Starts with K-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    EdSource, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Workforce projections worldwide show a growing need for people with strong backgrounds in math and science. As the eighth largest economy in the world, California benefits particularly from enterprises in the "STEM" fields (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics). How well California's current public school students are…

  12. Geoscience Workforce Development at UNAVCO: Leveraging the NSF GAGE Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, A. R.; Charlevoix, D. J.; Miller, M.

    2013-12-01

    Global economic development demands that the United States remain competitive in the STEM fields, and developing a forward-looking and well-trained geoscience workforce is imperative. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the geosciences will experience a growth of 19% by 2016. Fifty percent of the current geoscience workforce is within 10-15 years of retirement, and as a result, the U.S. is facing a gap between the supply of prepared geoscientists and the demand for well-trained labor. Barring aggressive intervention, the imbalance in the geoscience workforce will continue to grow, leaving the increased demand unmet. UNAVCO, Inc. is well situated to prepare undergraduate students for placement in geoscience technical positions and advanced graduate study. UNAVCO is a university-governed consortium facilitating research and education in the geosciences and in addition UNAVCO manages the NSF Geodesy Advancing Geosciences and EarthScope (GAGE) facility. The GAGE facility supports many facets of geoscience research including instrumentation and infrastructure, data analysis, cyberinfrastructure, and broader impacts. UNAVCO supports the Research Experiences in the Solid Earth Sciences for Students (RESESS), an NSF-funded multiyear geoscience research internship, community support, and professional development program. The primary goal of the RESESS program is to increase the number of historically underrepresented students entering graduate school in the geosciences. RESESS has met with high success in the first 9 years of the program, as more than 75% of RESESS alumni are currently in Master's and PhD programs across the U.S. Building upon the successes of RESESS, UNAVCO is launching a comprehensive workforce development program that will network underrepresented groups in the geosciences to research and opportunities throughout the geosciences. This presentation will focus on the successes of the RESESS program and plans to expand on this success with broader

  13. Cell fiber-based three-dimensional culture system for highly efficient expansion of human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Nagata, Shogo; Okitsu, Teru; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2017-06-06

    Human pluripotent stem cells are a potentially powerful cellular resource for application in regenerative medicine. Because such applications require large numbers of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cells, a scalable culture system of human pluripotent stem cell needs to be developed. Several suspension culture systems for human pluripotent stem cell expansion exist; however, it is difficult to control the thickness of cell aggregations in these systems, leading to increased cell death likely caused by limited diffusion of gases and nutrients into the aggregations. Here, we describe a scalable culture system using the cell fiber technology for the expansion of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. The cells were encapsulated and cultured within the core region of core-shell hydrogel microfibers, resulting in the formation of rod-shaped or fiber-shaped cell aggregations with sustained thickness and high viability. By encapsulating the cells with type I collagen, we demonstrated a long-term culture of the cells by serial passaging at a high expansion rate (14-fold in four days) while retaining its pluripotency. Therefore, our culture system could be used for large-scale expansion of human pluripotent stem cells for use in regenerative medicine.

  14. NOAA Workforce Management Office - About Us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agency's mission. The WFMO provides NOAA-wide leadership to workforce management functions including * WorkLife Center * WebTA * New Employee Info * Separation Info Workforce Management Office (WFMO) Serving accomplishment of the NOAA mission and the Nation's interests. The NOAA Workforce Management Office (WFMO

  15. Regulatory System for Stem/Progenitor Cell Niches in the Adult Rodent Pituitary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Saishu; Kato, Takako; Kato, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    The anterior lobe of the pituitary gland is a master endocrine tissue composed of five types of endocrine cells. Although the turnover rate of pituitary endocrine cells is as low as about 1.6% per day, recent studies have demonstrated that Sex-determining region Y-box 2 (SOX2)+-cells exist as pituitary stem/progenitor cells in the adult anterior lobe and contribute to cell regeneration. Notably, SOX2+-pituitary stem/progenitor cells form two types of niches in this tissue: the marginal cell layer (MCL-niche) and the dense cell clusters scattering in the parenchyma (parenchymal-niche). However, little is known about the mechanisms and factors for regulating the pituitary stem/progenitor cell niches, as well as the functional differences between the two types of niches. Elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms in the niches might enable us to understand the cell regeneration system that acts in accordance with physiological demands in the adult pituitary. In this review, so as to reveal the regulatory mechanisms of the two types of niche, we summarize the regulatory factors and their roles in the adult rodent pituitary niches by focusing on three components: soluble factors, cell surface proteins and extracellular matrixes. PMID:26761002

  16. Regulatory System for Stem/Progenitor Cell Niches in the Adult Rodent Pituitary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saishu Yoshida

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The anterior lobe of the pituitary gland is a master endocrine tissue composed of five types of endocrine cells. Although the turnover rate of pituitary endocrine cells is as low as about 1.6% per day, recent studies have demonstrated that Sex-determining region Y-box 2 (SOX2+-cells exist as pituitary stem/progenitor cells in the adult anterior lobe and contribute to cell regeneration. Notably, SOX2+-pituitary stem/progenitor cells form two types of niches in this tissue: the marginal cell layer (MCL-niche and the dense cell clusters scattering in the parenchyma (parenchymal-niche. However, little is known about the mechanisms and factors for regulating the pituitary stem/progenitor cell niches, as well as the functional differences between the two types of niches. Elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms in the niches might enable us to understand the cell regeneration system that acts in accordance with physiological demands in the adult pituitary. In this review, so as to reveal the regulatory mechanisms of the two types of niche, we summarize the regulatory factors and their roles in the adult rodent pituitary niches by focusing on three components: soluble factors, cell surface proteins and extracellular matrixes.

  17. Dental mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in alginate hydrogel co-delivery microencapsulation system for cartilage regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshaverinia, Alireza; Xu, Xingtian; Chen, Chider; Akiyama, Kentaro; Snead, Malcolm L; Shi, Songtao

    2013-01-01

    Dental-derived MSCs are promising candidates for cartilage regeneration, with high chondrogenic differentiation capacity. This property contributes to making dental MSCs an advantageous therapeutic option compared to current treatment modalities. The MSC delivery vehicle is the principal determinant for the success of MSC-mediated cartilage regeneration therapies. The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop a novel co-delivery system based on TGF-β1 loaded RGD-coupled alginate microspheres encapsulating Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells (PDLSCs) or Gingival Mesenchymal Stem Cells (GMSCs); and (2) investigate dental MSC viability and chondrogenic differentiation in alginate microspheres. The results revealed the sustained release of TGF-β1 from the alginate microspheres. After 4 weeks of chondrogenic differentiation in vitro, PDLSCs, GMSCs as well as human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSC) (as positive control) revealed chondrogenic gene expression markers (Col II and Sox-9) via qPCR, as well as matrix positively stained by toluidine blue and safranin-O. In animal studies, ectopic cartilage tissue regeneration was observed inside and around the transplanted microspheres, confirmed by histochemical and immunofluorescent staining. Interestingly, PDLSCs showed more chondrogenesis than GMSCs and hBMMSCs (Palginate microencapsulating dental MSCs make a promising candidate for cartilage regeneration. Our results highlight the vital role played by the microenvironment, as well as value of presenting inductive signals for viability and differentiation of MSCs. PMID:23891740

  18. Adsorptive removal of congo red and sunset yellow dyes from water systems by lady finger stem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, A.; Murtaza, S.; Ayub, R.; Rehman, R.; Zahid, A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: In this research work two anionic dyes, i.e. Congo Red and Sunset Yellow were removed successfully from aqueous media by Lady Finger stem in batch mode. Operational conditions optimization showed that agitation speed and particle size did not affect much in adsorption of these dyes; but contact time, pH, adsorbent dose and temperature of system effects the adsorption rate. Optimized conditions of adsorption for Congo Red dye were: 40 minute contact time, 8.0 pH, 0.5 g adsorbent dose, 40-60 microns mesh sized particles, 150 rpm agitation speed and 50 degree C temperature. Whereas for Sunset Yellow optimized conditions were: 30 minute contact time, 2.0 pH, 2.5 g adsorbent dose, 20-40 microns mesh sized particles, 50 rpm agitation speed and 30 degree C temperature. Suitability of equilibrium data was modulated with Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin models and found that both physisorption and chemisorption processes play important role in adsorption of these dyes by Lady Finger stem. The results demonstrated that Lady Finger stem can be efficiently employed on larger scale wastewater treatment. (author)

  19. Guiding the osteogenic fate of mouse and human mesenchymal stem cells through feedback system control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Yoshitomo; Ding, Xianting; Mussano, Federico; Wiberg, Akira; Ho, Chih-Ming; Nishimura, Ichiro

    2013-12-05

    Stem cell-based disease modeling presents unique opportunities for mechanistic elucidation and therapeutic targeting. The stable induction of fate-specific differentiation is an essential prerequisite for stem cell-based strategy. Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) initiates receptor-regulated Smad phosphorylation, leading to the osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC) in vitro; however, it requires supra-physiological concentrations, presenting a bottleneck problem for large-scale drug screening. Here, we report the use of a double-objective feedback system control (FSC) with a differential evolution (DE) algorithm to identify osteogenic cocktails of extrinsic factors. Cocktails containing significantly reduced doses of BMP-2 in combination with physiologically relevant doses of dexamethasone, ascorbic acid, beta-glycerophosphate, heparin, retinoic acid and vitamin D achieved accelerated in vitro mineralization of mouse and human MSC. These results provide insight into constructive approaches of FSC to determine the applicable functional and physiological environment for MSC in disease modeling, drug screening and tissue engineering.

  20. Response of stem cell system to whole body and partial body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gidali, J.

    1975-01-01

    The pluripotent stem cell system, though being distributed in the body, reacts homogeneously to irradiation. This homogeneity is controlled by short-range (local) and long-range (humoral) regulations acting primarily on pluripotent and committed stem cells. Migration of stem cells from unirradiated to irradiated areas may play a role in the regeneration processes even if local regeneration may also occur. Migration induction as well as proliferation induction in the shielded area do not seem to be specific radiation-induced reactions. Both may be influenced either by some physiological regulators released after irradiation in a higher quantity or by some non-specific triggering agents. Both repeated and continuous irradiation induce the establishment of a new steady state. In the steady state after repeated sublethal irradiations, the CFU count stays at a suboptimal level either as a consequence of an increased differentiation or of some undefined damage in milieu control. In the new steady state during continuous irradiation, the number of mature elements in blood is close to the normal while CFU population is reduced to less than 2 percent of its original level

  1. Establishing a sustainable nursing workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Judie

    2010-07-01

    Occupational sustainability in healthcare services involves meeting the demands of a changing NHS without compromising the health and wellbeing of nurses. This article examines occupational sustainability in the nursing profession, focusing on issues of nursing workload, employee health and recruitment issues, and workforce diversity.

  2. Today's Higher Education IT Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichsel, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    The professionals making up the current higher education IT workforce have been asked to adjust to a culture of increased IT consumerization, more sourcing options, broader interest in IT's transformative potential, and decreased resources. Disruptions that include the bring-your-own-everything era, cloud computing, new management practices,…

  3. Central New York's New Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for an Urban Future, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Conducted in late 2008 in partnership with the Greater Syracuse Chamber of Commerce and the Mohawk Valley Chamber of Commerce, this is the largest survey ever taken of Central New York businesses regarding the English language skills of the area workforce. The online survey was emailed to several hundred local businesses; 126 responses were…

  4. Valve stem packing seal test results for primary heat transport system conditions in Canadian nuclear generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, D.F.; Farrell, J.M.; Coutinho, R.F.

    1978-06-01

    Valve stem packing tests were done to obtain performance data on packing already in CANDU-PHW reactor service and on alternative packings. Most of the tests were replicated. Results are presented for ten packings tested under two stem cycle modes; leakage, packing consolidation and packing friction were the main responses. Packing tests were performed with water at close to CANDU-PHW reactor primary heat transport (PHT) system conditions (288 deg C and 10 MPa), but without ionizing radiation. The test rigs had rising, rotating stems. Stuffing box dimensions were typical of a standard Velan valve; packings were spring loaded to control applied packing stress

  5. The Impact of Out-Migration on the Nursing Workforce in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jessica M; Rogers, Martha F; Teplinskiy, Ilya; Oywer, Elizabeth; Wambua, David; Kamenju, Andrew; Arudo, John; Riley, Patricia L; Higgins, Melinda; Rakuom, Chris; Kiriinya, Rose; Waudo, Agnes

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine the impact of out-migration on Kenya's nursing workforce. Study Setting This study analyzed deidentified nursing data from the Kenya Health Workforce Informatics System, collected by the Nursing Council of Kenya and the Department of Nursing in the Ministry of Medical Services. Study Design We analyzed trends in Kenya's nursing workforce from 1999 to 2007, including supply, deployment, and intent to out-migrate, measured by requests for verification of credentials from destination countries. Principle Findings From 1999 to 2007, 6 percent of Kenya's nursing workforce of 41,367 nurses applied to out-migrate. Eighty-five percent of applicants were registered or B.Sc.N. prepared nurses, 49 percent applied within 10 years of their initial registration as a nurse, and 82 percent of first-time applications were for the United States or United Kingdom. For every 4.5 nurses that Kenya adds to its nursing workforce through training, 1 nurse from the workforce applies to out-migrate, potentially reducing by 22 percent Kenya's ability to increase its nursing workforce through training. Conclusions Nurse out-migration depletes Kenya's nursing workforce of its most highly educated nurses, reduces the percentage of younger nurses in an aging nursing stock, decreases Kenya's ability to increase its nursing workforce through training, and represents a substantial economic loss to the country. PMID:21413982

  6. Stem cell transplantation as a dynamical system: are clinical outcomes deterministic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toor, Amir A; Kobulnicky, Jared D; Salman, Salman; Roberts, Catherine H; Jameson-Lee, Max; Meier, Jeremy; Scalora, Allison; Sheth, Nihar; Koparde, Vishal; Serrano, Myrna; Buck, Gregory A; Clark, William B; McCarty, John M; Chung, Harold M; Manjili, Masoud H; Sabo, Roy T; Neale, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Outcomes in stem cell transplantation (SCT) are modeled using probability theory. However, the clinical course following SCT appears to demonstrate many characteristics of dynamical systems, especially when outcomes are considered in the context of immune reconstitution. Dynamical systems tend to evolve over time according to mathematically determined rules. Characteristically, the future states of the system are predicated on the states preceding them, and there is sensitivity to initial conditions. In SCT, the interaction between donor T cells and the recipient may be considered as such a system in which, graft source, conditioning, and early immunosuppression profoundly influence immune reconstitution over time. This eventually determines clinical outcomes, either the emergence of tolerance or the development of graft versus host disease. In this paper, parallels between SCT and dynamical systems are explored and a conceptual framework for developing mathematical models to understand disparate transplant outcomes is proposed.

  7. 48 CFR 1852.223-74 - Drug- and alcohol-free workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Drug- and alcohol-free... and Clauses 1852.223-74 Drug- and alcohol-free workforce. As prescribed in 1823.570-2, insert the following clause: Drug- and Alcohol-Free Workforce (MAR 1996) (a) Definitions. As used in this clause the...

  8. Ten Years of the Workforce Investment Act (WIA): Interpreting the Research on WIA and Related Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Paul T.; Berk, Jillian A.

    2011-01-01

    In 1998, President Clinton signed the federal Workforce Investment Act (WIA). Implemented in 2000, WIA replaced the Job Partnership Training Act (JTPA) as the primary federal job training program. Congress viewed WIA as a way to end "business as usual" in the workforce investment system. WIA aimed to transform the employment and training…

  9. 76 FR 43729 - Notice of Random Assignment Study To Evaluate Workforce Investment Act Adult and Dislocated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    ... prior employment and training service delivery systems. The recent recession, high unemployment rate and... Evaluate Workforce Investment Act Adult and Dislocated Worker Programs; Request for Comment AGENCY... estimates of the net impacts of intensive services and training provided under the Workforce Investment Act...

  10. A Human Capital Framework for a Stronger Teacher Workforce. Advancing Teaching--Improving Learning. White Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Jeannie; Martinez, Krissia; Nordstrum, Lee

    2013-01-01

    Building a stronger teacher workforce requires the thoughtful orchestration of multiple processes working together in a human capital system. This white paper presents a framework that can be used to take stock of current efforts to enhance the teacher workforce in school districts or educational organizations, as well as their underlying theories…

  11. Is the US Workforce Prepared to Thrive in the Past or in the Future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrus, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Past education focused on the three Rs (reading, 'riting and 'rithmetic), but these no longer give humans an edge over advanced computers and automation systems. This is why we need to understand where the future is heading and better prepare both our current workforce as well as the future workforce for tomorrow's job market. Of…

  12. Establishment of automated culture system for murine induced pluripotent stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koike Hiroyuki

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells can differentiate into any cell type, which makes them an attractive resource in fields such as regenerative medicine, drug screening, or in vitro toxicology. The most important prerequisite for these industrial applications is stable supply and uniform quality of iPS cells. Variation in quality largely results from differences in handling skills between operators in laboratories. To minimize these differences, establishment of an automated iPS cell culture system is necessary. Results We developed a standardized mouse iPS cell maintenance culture, using an automated cell culture system housed in a CO2 incubator commonly used in many laboratories. The iPS cells propagated in a chamber uniquely designed for automated culture and showed specific colony morphology, as for manual culture. A cell detachment device in the system passaged iPS cells automatically by dispersing colonies to single cells. In addition, iPS cells were passaged without any change in colony morphology or expression of undifferentiated stem cell markers during the 4 weeks of automated culture. Conclusions Our results show that use of this compact, automated cell culture system facilitates stable iPS cell culture without obvious effects on iPS cell pluripotency or colony-forming ability. The feasibility of iPS cell culture automation may greatly facilitate the use of this versatile cell source for a variety of biomedical applications.

  13. Investigating the remuneration of health workers in the DR Congo: implications for the health workforce and the health system in a fragile setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertone, Maria Paola; Lurton, Grégoire; Mutombo, Paulin Beya

    2016-11-01

    The financial remuneration of health workers (HWs) is a key concern to address human resources for health challenges. In low-income settings, the exploration of the sources of income available to HWs, their determinants and the livelihoods strategies that those remunerations entail are essential to gain a better understanding of the motivation of the workers and the effects on their performance and on service provision. This is even more relevant in a setting such as the DR Congo, characterized by the inability of the state to provide public services via a well-supported and financed public workforce. Based on a quantitative survey of 1771 HWs in four provinces of the DR Congo, this article looks at the level and the relative importance of each revenue. It finds that Congolese HWs earn their living from a variety of sources and enact different strategies for their financial survival. The main income is represented by the share of user fees for those employed in facilities, and per diems and top-ups from external agencies for those in Health Zone Management Teams (in both cases, with the exception of doctors), while governmental allowances are less relevant. The determinants at individual and facility level of the total income are also modelled, revealing that the distribution of most revenues systematically favours those working in already favourable conditions (urban facilities, administrative positions and positions of authority within facilities). This may impact negatively on the motivation and performance of HWs and on their distribution patters. Finally, our analysis highlights that, as health financing and health workforce reforms modify the livelihood opportunities of HWs, their design and implementation go beyond technical aspects and are unavoidably political. A better consideration of these issues is necessary to propose contextually grounded and politically savvy approaches to reform in the DR Congo. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University

  14. Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem cells are cells with the potential to develop into many different types of cells in the body. ... the body. There are two main types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Stem ...

  15. Workforce flexibility - in defence of professional healthcare work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Sarah; Duffield, Christine; Fry, Margaret; Roche, Michael

    2017-06-19

    Purpose The desirability of having a more flexible workforce is emphasised across many health systems yet this goal is as ambiguous as it is ubiquitous. In the absence of empirical studies in healthcare that have defined flexibility as an outcome, the purpose of this paper is to draw on classic management and sociological theory to reduce this ambiguity. Design/methodology/approach The paper uses the Weberian tool of "ideal types". Key workforce reforms are held against Atkinson's model of functional flexibility which aims to increase responsiveness and adaptability through multiskilling, autonomy and teams; and Taylorism which seeks stability and reduced costs through specialisation, fragmentation and management control. Findings Appeals to an amorphous goal of increasing workforce flexibility make an assumption that any reform will increase flexibility. However, this paper finds that the work of healthcare professionals already displays most of the essential features of functional flexibility but many widespread reforms are shifting healthcare work in a Taylorist direction. This contradiction is symptomatic of a failure to confront inevitable trade-offs in reform: between the benefits of specialisation and the costs of fragmentation; and between management control and professional autonomy. Originality/value The paper questions the conventional conception of "the problem" of workforce reform as primarily one of professional control over tasks. Holding reforms against the ideal types of Taylorism and functional flexibility is a simple, effective way the costs and benefits of workforce reform can be revealed.

  16. Cultural relativism: maintenance of genomic imprints in pluripotent stem cell culture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Maxim Vc; Bourc'his, Déborah

    2015-04-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) in culture have become a widely used model for studying events occurring during mammalian development; they also present an exciting avenue for therapeutics. However, compared to their in vivo counterparts, cultured PSC derivatives have unique properties, and it is well established that their epigenome is sensitive to medium composition. Here we review the specific effects on genomic imprints in various PSC types and culture systems. Imprinted gene regulation is developmentally important, and imprinting defects have been associated with several human diseases. Therefore, imprint abnormalities in PSCs may have considerable consequences for downstream applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. An All-Recombinant Protein-Based Culture System Specifically Identifies Hematopoietic Stem Cell Maintenance Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aki Ieyasu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs are considered one of the most promising therapeutic targets for the treatment of various blood disorders. However, due to difficulties in establishing stable maintenance and expansion of HSCs in vitro, their insufficient supply is a major constraint to transplantation studies. To solve these problems we have developed a fully defined, all-recombinant protein-based culture system. Through this system, we have identified hemopexin (HPX and interleukin-1α as responsible for HSC maintenance in vitro. Subsequent molecular analysis revealed that HPX reduces intracellular reactive oxygen species levels within cultured HSCs. Furthermore, bone marrow immunostaining and 3D immunohistochemistry revealed that HPX is expressed in non-myelinating Schwann cells, known HSC niche constituents. These results highlight the utility of this fully defined all-recombinant protein-based culture system for reproducible in vitro HSC culture and its potential to contribute to the identification of factors responsible for in vitro maintenance, expansion, and differentiation of stem cell populations.

  18. Pediatric Orthopaedic Workforce in 2014: Current Workforce and Projections for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Jeffrey R; Jones, Kerwyn C; Copley, Lawson A; Chambers, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    The changing nature of the United States (US) health care system has prompted debate concerning the physician supply. The basic questions are: do we have an adequate number of surgeons to meet current demands and are we training the correct number of surgeons to meet future demands? The purpose of this analysis was to characterize the current pediatric orthopaedic workforce in terms of supply and demand, both present and future. Databases were searched (POSNA, SF Match, KID, MGMA) to determine the current pediatric orthopaedic workforce and workforce distribution, as well as pediatric orthopaedic demand. The number of active Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA) members increased over the past 20 years, from 410 in 1993 to 653 in 2014 (155% increase); however, the density of POSNA members is not equally distributed, but correlates to population density. The number of estimated pediatric discharges, orthopaedic and nonorthopaedic, has remained relatively stable from 6,348,537 in 1997 to 5,850,184 in 2012. Between 2003 and 2013, the number of pediatric orthopaedic fellows graduating from Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and non-Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education programs increased from 39 to 50 (29%), with a peak of 67 fellows (71%) in 2009. Although predicting the exact need for pediatric orthopaedic surgeons (POS) is impossible because of the complex interplay among macroeconomic, governmental, insurance, and local factors, some trends were identified: the supply of POS has increased, which may offset the expected numbers of experienced surgeons who will be leaving the workforce in the next 10 to 15 years; macroeconomic factors influencing demand for physician services, driven by gross domestic product and population growth, are expected to be stable in the near future; expansion of the scope of practice for POS is expected to continue; and further similar assessments are warranted. Level II-economic and

  19. The global nephrology workforce: emerging threats and potential solutions!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Muhammad U; Elsayed, Mohamed E; Stack, Austin G

    2016-02-01

    Amidst the rising tide of chronic kidney disease (CKD) burden, the global nephrology workforce has failed to expand in order to meet the growing healthcare needs of this vulnerable patient population. In truth, this shortage of nephrologists is seen in many parts of the world, including North America, Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Asia and the African continent. Moreover, expert groups on workforce planning as well as national and international professional organizations predict further reductions in the nephrology workforce over the next decade, with potentially serious implications. Although the full impact of this has not been clearly articulated, what is clear is that the delivery of care to patients with CKD may be threatened in many parts of the world unless effective country-specific workforce strategies are put in place and implemented. Multiple factors are responsible for this apparent shortage in the nephrology workforce and the underpinning reasons may vary across health systems and countries. Potential contributors include the increasing burden of CKD, aging workforce, declining interest in nephrology among trainees, lack of exposure to nephrology among students and residents, rising cost of medical education and specialist training, increasing cultural and ethnic disparities between patients and care providers, increasing reliance on foreign medical graduates, inflexible work schedules, erosion of nephrology practice scope by other specialists, inadequate training, reduced focus on scholarship and research funds, increased demand to meet quality of care standards and the development of new care delivery models. It is apparent from this list that the solution is not simple and that a comprehensive evaluation is required. Consequently, there is an urgent need for all countries to develop a policy framework for the provision of kidney disease services within their health systems, a framework that is based on accurate projections of disease burden, a

  20. Tracking the Health of the Geoscience Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, L. M.; Keane, C. M.; Martinez, C. M.

    2008-12-01

    , lagging numbers of graduates from geoscience degree programs and the consolidation and closing of geoscience academic departments presents a strong challenge for the future of the geoscience profession. Measurement, analysis, and reporting of all aspects of the geoscience workforce system are central to successful decisions that support the improvement of geosciences in the U.S.

  1. Current reprogramming systems in regenerative medicine: from somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chenxia; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) paved the way for research fields including cell therapy, drug screening, disease modeling and the mechanism of embryonic development. Although iPSC technology has been improved by various delivery systems, direct transduction and small molecule regulation, low reprogramming efficiency and genomic modification steps still inhibit its clinical use. Improvements in current vectors and the exploration of novel vectors are required to balance efficiency and genomic modification for reprogramming. Herein, we set out a comprehensive analysis of current reprogramming systems for the generation of iPSCs from somatic cells. By clarifying advantages and disadvantages of the current reprogramming systems, we are striding toward an effective route to generate clinical grade iPSCs.

  2. Budget Pressures Churn Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2011-01-01

    When the budget-cutting ended this year in one rural North Texas school district, the people-moving began. Forced to chop its total staff to 55 employees from 64, the Perrin-Whitt Consolidated Independent school system went the route of many districts across the country: It made the majority of its reductions by encouraging early retirements and…

  3. NOAA Workforce Management Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assault and Harassment Prevention and Response Policy NOAA Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment Helpline Classification System How to Develop a Specialty Descriptor Request form for an addition to the ACS Workplace Program (PCO-LDP) Workplace Resources Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) Employee Assistance Program

  4. Managing a scarce resource: addressing critical health workforce challenges.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans. P.; Dussault, G.; Batenburg, R.; Frich, J.; Olivers, R.; Sermeus, W.

    2013-01-01

    With health care services significantly changing, the challenge is to initiate innovative, situational and integrated workforce forecasting and planning. Many health systems require a shift in mindset to move to the planning of skill mixes for health care professionals. This implies great challenges

  5. Informed policies for Europe’s health workforce of tomorrow.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batenburg, R.

    2010-01-01

    Although it is widely acknowledged that health workforce planning is critical for health care systems, it is probably one of the least strategically planned resources. One could argue that there are good reasons for this: demand and supply of the health labour market are in constant flux, and policy

  6. Characteristics of the Navy Laboratory Warfare Center Technical Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-29

    Mathematics and Information Science (M&IS) Actuarial Science 1510 Computer Science 1550 Gen. Math & Statistics 1501 Mathematics 1520 Operations...Admin. Network Systems & Data Communication Analysts Actuaries Mathematicians Operations Research Analyst Statisticians Social Science (SS...workforce was sub-divided into six broad occupational groups: Life Science , Physical Science , Engineering, Mathematics, Computer Science and Information

  7. Thailand's Health Workforce : A Review of Challenges and Experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Pagaiya, Nonglak; Noree, Thinakorn

    2009-01-01

    Thailand's health system is a dynamic entity that continues to change and grow. The country's health policies greatly affect the health workforce, the choices they make, their numbers and their availability. This paper explores the relationship between Thai health workers and the policies that affect them.

  8. STEM Learning Is Everywhere: Summary of a Convocation on Building Learning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Steve; Labov, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) permeate the modern world. The jobs people do, the foods they eat, the vehicles in which they travel, the information they receive, the medicines they take, and many other facets of modern life are constantly changing as STEM knowledge steadily accumulates. Yet STEM education in the United…

  9. Stem cell treatment for patients with autoimmune disease by systemic infusion of culture-expanded autologous adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ra Jeong Chan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prolonged life expectancy, life style and environmental changes have caused a changing disease pattern in developed countries towards an increase of degenerative and autoimmune diseases. Stem cells have become a promising tool for their treatment by promoting tissue repair and protection from immune-attack associated damage. Patient-derived autologous stem cells present a safe option for this treatment since these will not induce immune rejection and thus multiple treatments are possible without any risk for allogenic sensitization, which may arise from allogenic stem cell transplantations. Here we report the outcome of treatments with culture expanded human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAdMSCs of 10 patients with autoimmune associated tissue damage and exhausted therapeutic options, including autoimmune hearing loss, multiple sclerosis, polymyotitis, atopic dermatitis and rheumatoid arthritis. For treatment, we developed a standardized culture-expansion protocol for hAdMSCs from minimal amounts of fat tissue, providing sufficient number of cells for repetitive injections. High expansion efficiencies were routinely achieved from autoimmune patients and from elderly donors without measurable loss in safety profile, genetic stability, vitality and differentiation potency, migration and homing characteristics. Although the conclusions that can be drawn from the compassionate use treatments in terms of therapeutic efficacy are only preliminary, the data provide convincing evidence for safety and therapeutic properties of systemically administered AdMSC in human patients with no other treatment options. The authors believe that ex-vivo-expanded autologous AdMSCs provide a promising alternative for treating autoimmune diseases. Further clinical studies are needed that take into account the results obtained from case studies as those presented here.

  10. Use of the quality management system "JACIE" and outcome after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratwohl, Alois; Brand, Ronald; McGrath, Eoin; van Biezen, Anja; Sureda, Anna; Ljungman, Per; Baldomero, Helen; Chabannon, Christian; Apperley, Jane

    2014-05-01

    Competent authorities, healthcare payers and hospitals devote increasing resources to quality management systems but scientific analyses searching for an impact of these systems on clinical outcome remain scarce. Earlier data indicated a stepwise improvement in outcome after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with each phase of the accreditation process for the quality management system "JACIE". We therefore tested the hypothesis that working towards and achieving "JACIE" accreditation would accelerate improvement in outcome over calendar time. Overall mortality of the entire cohort of 107,904 patients who had a transplant (41,623 allogeneic, 39%; 66,281 autologous, 61%) between 1999 and 2006 decreased over the 14-year observation period by a factor of 0.63 per 10 years (hazard ratio: 0.63; 0.58-0.69). Considering "JACIE"-accredited centers as those with programs having achieved accreditation by November 2012, at the latest, this improvement was significantly faster in "JACIE"-accredited centers than in non-accredited centers (approximately 5.3% per year for 49,459 patients versus approximately 3.5% per year for 58,445 patients, respectively; hazard ratio: 0.83; 0.71-0.97). As a result, relapse-free survival (hazard ratio 0.85; 0.75-0.95) and overall survival (hazard ratio 0.86; 0.76-0.98) were significantly higher at 72 months for those patients transplanted in the 162 "JACIE"-accredited centers. No significant effects were observed after autologous transplants (hazard ratio 1.06; 0.99-1.13). Hence, working towards implementation of a quality management system triggers a dynamic process associated with a steeper reduction in mortality over the years and a significantly improved survival after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Our data support the use of a quality management system for complex medical procedures.

  11. Keeping stem cells under control: new insights into the mechanisms that limit niche-stem cell signaling within the reproductive system

    OpenAIRE

    Inaba, Mayu; Yamashita, Yukiko M.; Buszczak, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Adult stem cells reside in specialized microenvironments called niches that maintain stem cells in an undifferentiated and self-renewing state. Despite extensive studies on the signaling pathways that operate within stem cells and their niches, the mechanisms that restrict niche signal exclusively to stem cells remained elusive: such a mechanism is crucially important to ensure that stem cells undergo self-renewal while their progeny, often located just one cell diameter away from the niche, ...

  12. Workforce mobility: Contributing towards smart city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nor, N M; Wahap, N A

    2014-01-01

    Smart cities gained importance as a means of making ICT enabled services and applications available to the citizens, companies and authorities that form part of a city's system. It aims at increasing citizen's quality of life, and improving the efficiency and quality of the services provided by governing entities and businesses. This perspective requires an integrated vision of a city and of its infrastructures in all components. One of the characteristics of a smart city is mobility. The concept of mobility, especially for the workforce, is studied through a research carried out on a daily work undertaken as a prototype in the administrative town of Putrajaya, Malaysia. Utilizing the location track from GNSS integrated with mobile devices platform, information on movement and mobility was analysed for quality and efficiency of services rendered. This paper will highlight the research and outcomes that were successfully carried out and will suggest that workforce mobility management can benefit the authorities towards implementing a smart city concept

  13. Identifying STEM Concepts Associated with Junior Livestock Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, Kate; Rayfield, John; Moore, Lori L.

    2013-01-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education is intended to provide students with a cross-subject, contextual learning experience. To more fully prepare our nation's students to enter the globally competitive workforce, STEM integration allows students to make connections between the abstract concepts learned in core subject…

  14. Improving the resilience of the healthcare workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasper, Alan

    2016-11-24

    Emeritus Professor Alan Glasper, from the University of Southampton, discusses government strategies to ensure a future healthcare workforce that is sustainable and does not rely on overseas recruitment.

  15. Improving the resilience of the healthcare workforce

    OpenAIRE

    Glasper, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Emeritus Professor Alan Glasper, from the University of Southampton, discusses government strategies to ensure a future healthcare workforce that is sustainable and does not rely on overseas recruitment

  16. Development of a model system to analyze chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruedel, Anke; Hofmeister, Simone; Bosserhoff, Anja-Katrin

    2013-01-01

    High-density cell culture is widely used for the analysis of cartilage development of human mesenchymal stem cells (HMSCs) in vitro. Several cell culture systems, as micromass, pellet culture and alginate culture, are applied by groups in the field to induce chondrogenic differentiation of HMSCs. A draw back of all model systems is the high amount of cells necessary for the experiments. Further, handling of large experimental approaches is difficult due to culturing e.g. in 15 ml tubes. Therefore, we aimed to develop a new model system based on “hanging drop” cultures using 10 to 100 fold less cells. Here, we demonstrate that differentiation of chondrogenic cells was induced as previously shown in other model systems. Real time RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that Collagen type II and MIA/CD-RAP were upregulated during culturing whereas for induction of hypertrophic markers like Collagen type X and AP-2 epsilon treatment with TGF beta was needed. To further test the system, siRNA against Sox9 was used and effects on chondrogenic gene expression were evaluated. In summary, the hanging drop culture system was determined to be a promising tool for in vitro chondrogenic studies. PMID:24294400

  17. Employers’ View on Problems Related to Workforce Skills and Qualification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimplová Lenka

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this exploratory study is to reveal employers’ views on problems related to workforce human capital (skills and qualification. Where do employers themselves view the core of difficulties with ensuring adequately skilled workforce? Do they assign them to technological and organizational changes (a functional concept of job-specific human capital obsolescence, or do they see these problems as a result of other circumstances, such as macro-structural conditions or institutional settings? To answer these questions selected employers in mechanical engineering and information technology sectors in the Czech Republic were interviewed. The results show that the employers see the problems: 1 on the side of workforce – insufficient abilities and skills, exaggerated demands and low motivation; 2 as inadequate capacities and capabilities of the organization itself; 3 at macro-level as institutional shortcomings in the initial educational system and social benefits system. The problems related to workforce skills and qualification cannot be, thus, interpreted only in the functionalist view as job-specific human capital obsolescence, but the formulation of the problems is significantly affected by the institutional framework.

  18. North Dakota Energy Workforce Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, Drake [Bismarck State College, Bismarck, ND (United States)

    2014-12-29

    Bismarck State College, along with its partners (Williston State College, Minot State University and Dickinson State University), received funding to help address the labor and social impacts of rapid oilfield development in the Williston Basin of western North Dakota. Funding was used to develop and support both credit and non-credit workforce training as well as four major symposia designed to inform and educate the public; enhance communication and sense of partnership among citizens, local community leaders and industry; and identify and plan to ameliorate negative impacts of oil field development.

  19. Asymmetric cell division of stem cells in the lung and other systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed eBerika

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available New insights have been added to identification, behavior and cellular properties of embryonic and tissue-specific stem cells over the last few years. The modes of stem cell division, asymmetric versus symmetric, are tightly regulated during development and regeneration. The proper choice of a stem cell to divide asymmetrically or symmetrically has great consequences for development and disease because inappropriate asymmetric division disrupts organ morphogenesis, whereas uncontrolled symmetric division induces tumorigenesis. Therefore, understanding the behavior of lung stem cells could identify innovative solutions for restoring normal morphogenesis and/or regeneration of different organs. In this concise review, we describe recent studies in our laboratory about the mode of division of lung epithelial stem cells. We also compare asymmetric cell division in the lung stem cells with other tissues in different organisms.

  20. The effects of workforce-shaping tools on retirement: the case of the Department of Defense civil service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asch, Beth J; Haider, Steven J; Zissimopoulos, Julie M

    2009-11-01

    Apriority area for the public health workforce research agenda is the study of the public health labor market and how wages and benefits affect workforce outcomes, including recruiting, retention, and retirement. This study provides an example of such a study for the Department of Defense civil service workforce. We analyze the financial incentives to retire that are specifically embedded in the retirement system and how different workforce-shaping policies would affect these incentives. The study then uses a recently estimated model of the effects of financial incentives on retirement behavior among defense civilians to predict how these workforce-shaping tools would affect retirement behavior. We find that buyouts, retention incentives, and other workforce-shaping tools have a sizable effect on predicted retirement behavior and therefore, could be useful policies to help manage retirement outflows.

  1. Health care reform: preparing the psychology workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozensky, Ronald H

    2012-03-01

    This article is based on the opening presentation by the author to the Association of Psychologists in Academic Health Centers' 5th National Conference, "Preparing Psychologists for a Rapidly Changing Healthcare Environment" held in March, 2011. Reviewing the patient protection and affordable care act (ACA), that presentation was designed to set the stage for several days of symposia and discussions anticipating upcoming changes to the healthcare system. This article reviews the ACA; general trends that have impacted healthcare reform; the implications of the Act for psychology's workforce including the growing focus on interprofessional education, training, and practice, challenges to address in order to prepare for psychology's future; and recommendations for advocating for psychology's future as a healthcare profession.

  2. Increasing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Yield to Develop Mice with Human Immune Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Carlos Biancotti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs are unique in their capacity to give rise to all mature cells of the immune system. For years, HSC transplantation has been used for treatment of genetic and neoplastic diseases of the hematopoietic and immune systems. The sourcing of HSCs from human umbilical cord blood has salient advantages over isolation from mobilized peripheral blood. However, poor sample yield has prompted development of methodologies to expand HSCs ex vivo. Cytokines, trophic factors, and small molecules have been variously used to promote survival and proliferation of HSCs in culture, whilst strategies to lower the concentration of inhibitors in the culture media have recently been applied to promote HSC expansion. In this paper, we outline strategies to expand HSCs in vitro, and to improve engraftment and reconstitution of human immune systems in immunocompromised mice. To the extent that these “humanized” mice are representative of the endogenous human immune system, they will be invaluable tools for both basic science and translational medicine.

  3. An Integrated Model for Improving Undergraduate Geoscience Workforce Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, C. M.; Houlton, H. R.

    2017-12-01

    Within STEM fields, employers are reporting a widening gap in the workforce readiness of new graduates. As departments continue to be squeezed with new requirements, chasing the latest technologies and scientific developments and constrained budgets, formal undergraduate programs struggle to fully prepare students for the workforce. One major mechanisms to address gaps within formal education is in life-long learning. Most technical and professional fields have life-long learning requirements, but it is not common in the geosciences, as licensing requirements remain limited. By introducing the concept of career self-management and life-long learning into the formal education experience of students, we can build voluntary engagement and shift some of the preparation burden from existing degree programs. The Geoscience Online Learning Initiative (GOLI) seeks to extend professional life-long learning into the formal education realm. By utilizing proven, effective means to capture expert knowledge, the GOLI program constructs courses in the OpenEdX platform, where the content authors and society staff continuously refine the material into effective one- to two-hour long asynchronous modules. The topical focus of these courses are outside of the usual scope of the academic curriculum, but are aligned with applied technical or professional issues. These courses are provided as open education resources, but also qualify for CEUs as the ongoing professional microcredential in the profession. This way, interested faculty can utilize these resources as focused modules in their own course offerings or students can engage in the courses independently and upon passing the assessments and paying of a nominal fee, be awarded CEUs which count towards their professional qualifications. Establishing a continuum of learning over one's career is a critical cultural change needed for students to succeed and be resilient through the duration of a career. We will examine how this

  4. Hospital pharmacy workforce in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Thiago R; Penm, Jonathan; Baldoni, André O; Ayres, Lorena Rocha; Moles, Rebekah; Sanches, Cristina

    2018-01-04

    This study aims to describe the distribution of the hospital pharmacy workforce in Brazil. Data were acquired, during 2016, through the Brazilian National Database of Healthcare Facilities (CNES). The following variables were extracted: hospital name, registry number, telephone, e-mail, state, type of institution, subtype, management nature, ownership, presence of research/teaching activities, complexity level, number of hospital beds, presence of pharmacists, number of pharmacists, pharmacist specialization. All statistical analyses were performed by IBM SPSS v.19. The number of hospitals with a complete registry in the national database was 4790. The majority were general hospitals (77.9%), managed by municipalities (66.1%), under public administration (44.0%), had no research/teaching activities (90.5%), classified as medium complexity (71.6%), and had no pharmacist in their team (50.6%). Furthermore, almost 60.0% of hospitals did not comply with the minimum recommendations of having a pharmacist per 50 hospital beds. The Southeast region had the highest prevalence of pharmacists, with 64.4% of hospitals having a pharmaceutical professional. This may have occurred as this region had the highest population to hospital ratio. Non-profit hospitals were more likely to have pharmacists compared to those under public administration and private hospitals. This study mapped the hospital pharmacy workforce in Brazil, showing a higher prevalence of hospital pharmacists in the Southeast region, and in non-profit specialized hospitals.

  5. The globalization of the nursing workforce: Pulling the pieces together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Cheryl B; Sherwood, Gwen D

    2014-01-01

    The "globalization" of health care creates an increasingly interconnected workforce spanning international boundaries, systems, structures, and processes to provide care to and improve the health of peoples around the world. Because nurses comprise a large sector of the global health workforce, they are called upon to provide a significant portion of nursing and health care and thus play an integral role in the global health care economy. To meet global health care needs, nurses often move within and among countries, creating challenges and opportunities for the profession, health care organizations, communities, and nations. Researchers, policy makers, and industry and academic leaders must, in turn, grapple with the impacts of globalization on the nursing and health care workforce. Through this special issue, several key areas for discussion are raised. Although far from exhaustive, our intent is to expand and stimulate intra- and interprofessional conversations raising awareness of the issues, uncover unanticipated consequences, and offer solutions for shaping the nursing and health care workforce of the future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Fuzzy Expert System based on a Novel Hybrid Stem Cell (HSC) Algorithm for Classification of Micro Array Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, S Arul Antran; GaneshKumar, P

    2018-02-21

    In the growing scenario, microarray data is extensively used since it provides a more comprehensive understanding of genetic variants among diseases. As the gene expression samples have high dimensionality it becomes tedious to analyze the samples manually. Hence an automated system is needed to analyze these samples. The fuzzy expert system offers a clear classification when compared to the machine learning and statistical methodologies. In fuzzy classification, knowledge acquisition would be a major concern. Despite several existing approaches for knowledge acquisition much effort is necessary to enhance the learning process. This paper proposes an innovative Hybrid Stem Cell (HSC) algorithm that utilizes Ant Colony optimization and Stem Cell algorithm for designing fuzzy classification system to extract the informative rules to form the membership functions from the microarray dataset. The HSC algorithm uses a novel Adaptive Stem Cell Optimization (ASCO) to improve the points of membership function and Ant Colony Optimization to produce the near optimum rule set. In order to extract the most informative genes from the large microarray dataset a method called Mutual Information is used. The performance results of the proposed technique evaluated using the five microarray datasets are simulated. These results prove that the proposed Hybrid Stem Cell (HSC) algorithm produces a precise fuzzy system than the existing methodologies.

  7. Solar System Treks: Interactive Web Portals or STEM, Exploration and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, E.; Day, B. H.; Viotti, M.

    2017-12-01

    NASA's Solar System Treks project produces a suite of online visualization and analysis tools for lunar and planetary mapping and modeling. These portals offer great benefits for education and public outreach, providing access to data from a wide range of instruments aboard a variety of past and current missions. As a component of NASA's STEM Activation Infrastructure, they are available as resources for NASA STEM programs, and to the greater STEM community. As new missions are planned to a variety of planetary bodies, these tools facilitate public understanding of the missions and engage the public in the process of identifying and selecting where these missions will land. There are currently three web portals in the program: Moon Trek (https://moontrek.jpl.nasa.gov), Mars Trek (https://marstrek.jpl.nasa.gov), and Vesta Trek (https://vestatrek.jpl.nasa.gov). A new release of Mars Trek includes new tools and data products focusing on human landing site selection. Backed by evidence-based cognitive and computer science findings, an additional version is available for educational and public audiences in support of earning along novice-to-expert pathways, enabling authentic, real-world interaction with planetary data. Portals for additional planetary bodies are planned. As web-based toolsets, the portals do not require users to purchase or install any software beyond current web browsers. The portals provide analysis tools for measurement and study of planetary terrain. They allow data to be layered and adjusted to optimize visualization. Visualizations are easily stored and shared. The portals provide 3D visualization and give users the ability to mark terrain for generation of STL/OBJ files that can be directed to 3D printers. Such 3D prints are valuable tools in museums, public exhibits, and classrooms - especially for the visually impaired. The program supports additional clients, web services, and APIs facilitating dissemination of planetary data to external

  8. [Advances in application of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated 9 system in stem cells research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, S J; Huo, J H; Geng, Z J; Sun, X Y; Fu, X B

    2018-04-20

    Gene engineering has attracted worldwide attention because of its ability of precise location of disease mutations in genome. As a new gene editing technology, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated 9 (Cas9) system is simple, fast, and accurate to operate at a specific gene site. It overcomes the long-standing problem of conventional operation. At the same time, stem cells are a good foundation for establishing disease model in vitro. Therefore, it has great significance to combine stem cells with the rapidly developing gene manipulation techniques. In this review, we mainly focus on the mechanism of CRISPR/Cas9 technology and its application in stem cell genomic editing, so as to pave the way for promoting rapid application and development of CRISPR/Cas9 technology.

  9. A multifunctional 3D co-culture system for studies of mammary tissue morphogenesis and stem cell biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan J Campbell

    Full Text Available Studies on the stem cell niche and the efficacy of cancer therapeutics require complex multicellular structures and interactions between different cell types and extracellular matrix (ECM in three dimensional (3D space. We have engineered a 3D in vitro model of mammary gland that encompasses a defined, porous collagen/hyaluronic acid (HA scaffold forming a physiologically relevant foundation for epithelial and adipocyte co-culture. Polarized ductal and acinar structures form within this scaffold recapitulating normal tissue morphology in the absence of reconstituted basement membrane (rBM hydrogel. Furthermore, organoid developmental outcome can be controlled by the ratio of collagen to HA, with a higher HA concentration favouring acinar morphological development. Importantly, this culture system recapitulates the stem cell niche as primary mammary stem cells form complex organoids, emphasising the utility of this approach for developmental and tumorigenic studies using genetically altered animals or human biopsy material, and for screening cancer therapeutics for personalised medicine.

  10. Employee Engagement: Motivating and Retaining Tomorrow's Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuck, Michael Bradley; Wollard, Karen Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Tomorrow's workforce is seeking more than a paycheck; they want their work to meet their needs for affiliation, meaning, and self-development. Companies willing to meet these demands will capture the enormous profit potential of a workforce of fully engaged workers. This piece explores what engagement is, why it matters, and how human resource…

  11. Workforce strategies to improve children's oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Kristine

    2014-12-01

    (1) Tooth decay is the most common chronic disease for children. (2) As millions receive dental coverage under the Affordable Care Act, the demand for dental services is expected to strain the current workforce's ability to meet their needs. (3) States have adopted various workforce approaches to improve access to dental care for underserved populations.

  12. Experiential Training for Empowerment of the Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, John A.

    As downsizing of government and business organizations has become widespread, many managers are seeking to increase productivity by empowering the workforce. When effectively and appropriately implemented, empowered workforce structures can cut costs and improve quality and safety. Yet resistance to such changes arises from a patriarchal…

  13. Workshop: health workforce governance and integration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batenburg, R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Health workforce governance is increasingly recognized as a burning policy issue and focused on workforce shortages. Yet the most pressing problem is to solve maldistributions through governance and integration. Poor management of health 242 European Journal of Public Health, Vol. 24,

  14. Combination of systemic chemotherapy with local stem cell delivered S-TRAIL in resected brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redjal, Navid; Zhu, Yanni; Shah, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in standard therapies, the survival of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients has not improved. Limitations to successful translation of new therapies include poor delivery of systemic therapies and use of simplified preclinical models which fail to reflect the clinical complexity of GBMs. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis specifically in tumor cells and we have tested its efficacy by on-site delivery via engineered stem cells (SC) in mouse models of GBM that mimic the clinical scenario of tumor aggressiveness and resection. However, about half of tumor lines are resistant to TRAIL and overcoming TRAIL-resistance in GBM by combining therapeutic agents that are currently in clinical trials with SC-TRAIL and understanding the molecular dynamics of these combination therapies are critical to the broad use of TRAIL as a therapeutic agent in clinics. In this study, we screened clinically relevant chemotherapeutic agents for their ability to sensitize resistant GBM cell lines to TRAIL induced apoptosis. We show that low dose cisplatin increases surface receptor expression of death receptor 4/5 post G2 cycle arrest and sensitizes GBM cells to TRAIL induced apoptosis. In vivo, using an intracranial resection model of resistant primary human-derived GBM and real-time optical imaging, we show that a low dose of cisplatin in combination with synthetic extracellular matrix encapsulated SC-TRAIL significantly decreases tumor regrowth and increases survival in mice bearing GBM. This study has the potential to help expedite effective translation of local stem cell-based delivery of TRAIL into the clinical setting to target a broad spectrum of GBMs. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  15. Monitoring embryonic stem cell transplantation into rat corpus cavernosum using optical imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Jung Joon; Moon, Sung Min; Le, Uyenchi N.; Park, Kwang Sung; Lee, Hyun Suk; Song, Ho Cheon; Bom, Hee Seung; Han, Ha Jae

    2005-01-01

    The conventional method for the analysis of stem cell transplantation depends on postmortem histology. Here, we have sought to demonstrate the feasibility of a longitudinal monitoring of transplanted cell survival in living animals, by employing optical imaging techniques. Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) were obtained from American Type Culture Collection (ES-E14TG2a). Mouse ES cells were cultured in the DMEM (Gibco-BRL, Gaithersburg, MD) supplemented with 3.7 g/L sodium bicarbonate, 1 % penicillin and streptomycin, 1.7 mM L-glutamine, 0.1mM β-mercaptoethanol 5 ng/mL mouse leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), and 15% fetal bovine serum (FBS) with or without a feeder layer and cultured for five days in standard medium plus LIF. ESCs were then transfected (MOI=100) overnight with Ad-CMV-Fluc. Our experimental Sprague-Dawley rats (n=7) were given with different numbers of ESCs 6) expressing Fluc into corpus cavernosum. In cell cultures, firefly luciferase activity correlated linearly with cell numbers from 10 5 to 5x10 6 (r2=0.95). In living animal imaging, imaging signal activity correlated linearly with cell numbers injected from 10 5 to 5x10 6 at each time point (r2=0.62 ∼ 0.98), In all three groups of rats, imaging signal was detected in rat genital area from the 2nd day to the 47th day after cellular injection. Adenovirus mediated transient expression of firefly luciferase reporter gene in ESCs was feasible to monitor cell survival over a month after transplantation. The locations, magnitude, and survival duration of the ESCs were noninvasively monitored with a bioluminescence optical imaging system

  16. A Case of Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma Located at Brain Stem in a Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinho; Kim, Young Zoon

    2016-10-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is an extranodal Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that is confined to the brain, eyes, and/or leptomeninges without evidence of a systemic primary tumor. Although the tumor can affect all age groups, it is rare in childhood; thus, its incidence and prognosis in children have not been well defined and the best treatment strategy remains unclear. A nine-year old presented at our department with complaints of diplopia, dizziness, dysarthria, and right side hemiparesis. Magnetic resonance image suggested a diffuse brain stem glioma with infiltration into the right cerebellar peduncle. The patient was surgically treated by craniotomy and frameless stereotactic-guided biopsy, and unexpectedly, the histopathology of the mass was consistent with diffuse large B cell lymphoma, and immunohistochemical staining revealed positivity for CD20 and CD79a. Accordingly, we performed a staging work-up for systemic lymphoma, but no evidence of lymphoma elsewhere in the body was obtained. In addition, she had a negative serologic finding for human immunodeficient virus, which confirmed the histopathological diagnosis of PCNSL. She was treated by radiosurgery at 12 Gy and subsequent adjuvant combination chemotherapy based on high dose methotrexate. Unfortunately, 10 months after the tissue-based diagnosis, she succumbed due to an acute hydrocephalic crisis.

  17. Nanomedicine strategies for sustained, controlled, and targeted treatment of cancer stem cells of the digestive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fang-Yuan; Xu, Wei-Heng; Yin, Chuan; Zhang, Guo-Qing; Zhong, Yan-Qiang; Gao, Jie

    2016-10-15

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) constitute a small proportion of the cancer cells that have self-renewal capacity and tumor-initiating ability. They have been identified in a variety of tumors, including tumors of the digestive system. CSCs exhibit some unique characteristics, which are responsible for cancer metastasis and recurrence. Consequently, the development of effective therapeutic strategies against CSCs plays a key role in increasing the efficacy of cancer therapy. Several potential approaches to target CSCs of the digestive system have been explored, including targeting CSC surface markers and signaling pathways, inducing the differentiation of CSCs, altering the tumor microenvironment or niche, and inhibiting ATP-driven efflux transporters. However, conventional therapies may not successfully eradicate CSCs owing to various problems, including poor solubility, stability, rapid clearance, poor cellular uptake, and unacceptable cytotoxicity. Nanomedicine strategies, which include drug, gene, targeted, and combinational delivery, could solve these problems and significantly improve the therapeutic index. This review briefly summarizes the ongoing development of strategies and nanomedicine-based therapies against CSCs of the digestive system.

  18. A Safeguard System for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Rejuvenated T Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Ando

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs has created promising new avenues for therapies in regenerative medicine. However, the tumorigenic potential of undifferentiated iPSCs is a major safety concern for clinical translation. To address this issue, we demonstrated the efficacy of suicide gene therapy by introducing inducible caspase-9 (iC9 into iPSCs. Activation of iC9 with a specific chemical inducer of dimerization (CID initiates a caspase cascade that eliminates iPSCs and tumors originated from iPSCs. We introduced this iC9/CID safeguard system into a previously reported iPSC-derived, rejuvenated cytotoxic T lymphocyte (rejCTL therapy model and confirmed that we can generate rejCTLs from iPSCs expressing high levels of iC9 without disturbing antigen-specific killing activity. iC9-expressing rejCTLs exert antitumor effects in vivo. The system efficiently and safely induces apoptosis in these rejCTLs. These results unite to suggest that the iC9/CID safeguard system is a promising tool for future iPSC-mediated approaches to clinical therapy.

  19. Glial origin of mesenchymal stem cells in a tooth model system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaukua, Nina; Shahidi, Maryam Khatibi; Konstantinidou, Chrysoula; Dyachuk, Vyacheslav; Kaucka, Marketa; Furlan, Alessandro; An, Zhengwen; Wang, Longlong; Hultman, Isabell; Ahrlund-Richter, Lars; Blom, Hans; Brismar, Hjalmar; Lopes, Natalia Assaife; Pachnis, Vassilis; Suter, Ueli; Clevers, Hans; Thesleff, Irma; Sharpe, Paul; Ernfors, Patrik; Fried, Kaj; Adameyko, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells occupy niches in stromal tissues where they provide sources of cells for specialized mesenchymal derivatives during growth and repair. The origins of mesenchymal stem cells have been the subject of considerable discussion, and current consensus holds that perivascular cells

  20. The state of the psychology health service provider workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Daniel S; Kohout, Jessica L

    2011-12-01

    Numerous efforts to describe the health service provider or clinical workforce in psychology have been conducted during the past 30 years. The American Psychological Association (APA) has studied trends in the doctoral education pathway and the resultant effects on the broader psychology workforce. During this period, the creation and growth of the PsyD degree and the formalization of the predoctoral internship placement system (the APPIC Match) have been well noted, but efforts to gain a complete understanding of professional practice are lacking. Specifically, piecemeal research on the provider workforce has led to the study of specific subpopulations using varying approaches and definitions of those providing direct clinical service. Consequently, estimates of the supply and need for health service providers are distinctly divergent and generate protracted debate in organized psychology. The APA membership directory and the APA Doctorate Employment Surveys have traditionally been relied on for workforce analyses. Yet, these data have become characterized by limited generalizability in recent years because of declining survey response rates and the fact that APA member data may not be as representative of the entire psychology health service provider population as they were previously. The 2008 APA Survey of Psychology Health Service Providers targeted these limitations by including nonmember psychologists in the sampling frame. Results revealed emerging themes in the demographics, work settings, and delivery of health services of the psychology health service provider workforce. Future areas of research for APA and organized psychology to undertake in addressing need and demand are suggested. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Huperzine A protects neural stem cells against Aβ-induced apoptosis in a neural stem cells and microglia co-culture system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ning; Lin, Jizong; Wang, Kewan; Wei, Meidan; Chen, Qingzhuang; Wang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aims to explore whether Huperzine A (HupA) could protect neural stem cells against amyloid beta-peptide Aβ induced apoptosis in a neural stem cells (NSCs) and microglia co-culture system. Methods: Rat NSCs and microglial cells were isolated, cultured and identified with immunofluorescence Assays (IFA). Co-culture systems of NSCs and microglial cells were employed using Transwell Permeable Supports. The effects of Aβ1-42 on NSCs were studied in 4 groups using co-culture systems: NSCs, Aβ+NSCs, co-culture and Aβ+co-culture groups. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and flow cytometry were utilized to assess the differences of proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of NSCs between the groups. LQ test was performed to assess the amounts of IL-6, TNF-α and MIP-α secreted, and flow cytometry and Western blotting were used to assess apoptosis of NSCs and the expressions of Bcl-2 and Bax in each group. Results: IFA results showed that isolated rat NSCs were nestin-positive and microglial cells were CD11b/c-positive. Among all the groups, the Aβ+co-culture group has the lowest BrdU expression level, the lowest MAP2-positive, ChAT-positive cell counts and the highest NSC apoptosis rate. Smaller amounts of IL-6, TNF-α and MIP-α were being secreted by microglial cells in the HupA+Aβ+co-culture group compared with those in the Aβ+ co-culture group. Also the Bcl-2: Bax ratio was much higher in the HupA+Aβ+co-culture group than in the Aβ+co-culture group. Conclusions: HupA inhibits cell apoptosis through restraining microglia’s inflammatory response induced by Aβ1-42. PMID:26261518

  2. Regional health workforce planning through action research: lessons for commissioning health services from a case study in Far North Queensland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzera, Annette June; Murray, Richard; Stewart, Ruth; Mills, Jane; Beaton, Neil; Larkins, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Creating a stable and sustainable health workforce in regional, rural and remote Australia has long been a challenge to health workforce planners, policy makers and researchers alike. Traditional health workforce planning is often reactive and assumes continuation of current patterns of healthcare utilisation. This demonstration project in Far North Queensland exemplifies how participatory regional health workforce planning processes can accurately model current and projected local workforce requirements. The recent establishment of Primary Health Networks (PHNs) with the intent to commission health services tailored to individual healthcare needs underlines the relevance of such an approach. This study used action research methodology informed by World Health Organization (WHO) systems thinking. Four cyclical stages of health workforce planning were followed: needs assessment; health service model redesign; skills-set assessment and workforce redesign; and development of a workforce and training plan. This study demonstrated that needs-based loco-regional health workforce planning can be achieved successfully through participatory processes with stakeholders. Stronger health systems and workforce training solutions were delivered by facilitating linkages and planning processes based on community need involving healthcare professionals across all disciplines and sectors. By focusing upon extending competencies and skills sets, local health professionals form a stable and sustainable local workforce. Concrete examples of initiatives generated from this process include developing a chronic disease inter-professional teaching clinic in a rural town and renal dialysis being delivered locally to an Aboriginal community. The growing trend of policy makers decentralising health funding, planning and accountability and rising health system costs increase the future utility of this approach. This type of planning can also assist the new PHNs to commission health services

  3. An inducible CRISPR-ON system for controllable gene activation in human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jianying; Ma, Dacheng; Huang, Rujin; Ming, Jia; Ye, Min; Kee, Kehkooi; Xie, Zhen; Na, Jie

    2017-05-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are an important system to study early human development, model human diseases, and develop cell replacement therapies. However, genetic manipulation of hPSCs is challenging and a method to simultaneously activate multiple genomic sites in a controllable manner is sorely needed. Here, we constructed a CRISPR-ON system to efficiently upregulate endogenous genes in hPSCs. A doxycycline (Dox) inducible dCas9-VP64-p65-Rta (dCas9-VPR) transcription activator and a reverse Tet transactivator (rtTA) expression cassette were knocked into the two alleles of the AAVS1 locus to generate an iVPR hESC line. We showed that the dCas9-VPR level could be precisely and reversibly controlled by the addition and withdrawal of Dox. Upon transfection of multiplexed gRNA plasmid targeting the NANOG promoter and Dox induction, we were able to control NANOG gene expression from its endogenous locus. Interestingly, an elevated NANOG level promoted naïve pluripotent gene expression, enhanced cell survival and clonogenicity, and enabled hESCs to integrate with the inner cell mass (ICM) of mouse blastocysts in vitro. Thus, iVPR cells provide a convenient platform for gene function studies as well as high-throughput screens in hPSCs.

  4. Therapeutic interaction of systemically-administered mesenchymal stem cells with peri-implant mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke Kondo

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of systemically transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs on the peri-implant epithelial sealing around dental implants. MATERIALS AND METHODS: MSCs were isolated from bone marrow of donor rats and expanded in culture. After recipient rats received experimental titanium dental implants in the bone sockets after extraction of maxillary right first molars, donor rat MSCs were intravenously transplanted into the recipient rats. RESULTS: The injected MSCs were found in the oral mucosa surrounding the dental implants at 24 hours post-transplantation. MSC transplantation accelerated the formation of the peri-implant epithelium (PIE-mediated mucosa sealing around the implants at an early stage after implantation. Subsequently, enhanced deposition of laminin-332 was found along the PIE-implant interface at 4 weeks after the replacement. We also observed enhanced attachment and proliferation of oral mucous epithelial cells. CONCLUSION: Systemically transplanted MSCs might play a critical role in reinforcing the epithelial sealing around dental implants.

  5. GAPTrap: A Simple Expression System for Pluripotent Stem Cells and Their Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Kao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The ability to reliably express fluorescent reporters or other genes of interest is important for using human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs as a platform for investigating cell fates and gene function. We describe a simple expression system, designated GAPTrap (GT, in which reporter genes, including GFP, mCherry, mTagBFP2, luc2, Gluc, and lacZ are inserted into the GAPDH locus in hPSCs. Independent clones harboring variations of the GT vectors expressed remarkably consistent levels of the reporter gene. Differentiation experiments showed that reporter expression was reliably maintained in hematopoietic cells, cardiac mesoderm, definitive endoderm, and ventral midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Similarly, analysis of teratomas derived from GT-lacZ hPSCs showed that β-galactosidase expression was maintained in a spectrum of cell types representing derivatives of the three germ layers. Thus, the GAPTrap vectors represent a robust and straightforward tagging system that enables indelible labeling of PSCs and their differentiated derivatives.

  6. What is a stem cell?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, Jonathan M W

    2018-05-15

    The historical roots of the stem cell concept are traced with respect to its usage in embryology and in hematology. The modern consensus definition of stem cells, comprising both pluripotent stem cells in culture and tissue-specific stem cells in vivo, is explained and explored. Methods for identifying stem cells are discussed with respect to cell surface markers, telomerase, label retention and transplantability, and properties of the stem cell niche are explored. The CreER method for identifying stem cells in vivo is explained, as is evidence in favor of a stochastic rather than an obligate asymmetric form of cell division. In conclusion, it is found that stem cells do not possess any unique and specific molecular markers; and stem cell behavior depends on the environment of the cell as well as the stem cell's intrinsic qualities. Furthermore, the stochastic mode of division implies that stem cell behavior is a property of a cell population not of an individual cell. In this sense, stem cells do not exist in isolation but only as a part of multicellular system. This article is categorized under: Adult Stem Cells, Tissue Renewal, and Regeneration > Tissue Stem Cells and Niches Adult Stem Cells, Tissue Renewal, and Regeneration > Methods and Principles Adult Stem Cells, Tissue Renewal, and Regeneration > Environmental Control of Stem Cells. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Listening to the Voices of Children in Foster Care: Youths Speak out about Child Welfare Workforce Turnover and Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strolin-Goltzman, Jessica; Kollar, Sharon; Trinkle, Joanne

    2010-01-01

    Child welfare workforce turnover rates across private and public child welfare agencies are concerning. Although research about the causes of child welfare workforce turnover has been plentiful, empirical studies on the effects of turnover on child outcomes are sparse. Furthermore, the voices and experiences of youths within the system have been…

  8. 77 FR 31393 - Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA); Notice of Incentive Funding Availability Based on Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... Training Administration, Office of Policy Development and Research, Division of Strategic Planning and..., to support innovative workforce development and education activities that are authorized under title IB (Workforce Investment Systems) or title II (AEFLA) of WIA, or under the Carl D. Perkins Career and...

  9. 76 FR 26769 - Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA); Notice of Incentive Funding Availability Based on Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-09

    ... Training Administration, Office of Policy Development and Research, Division of Strategic Planning and..., to support innovative workforce development and education activities that are authorized under title IB (Workforce Investment Systems) or Title II (AEFLA) of WIA, or under the Carl D. Perkins Career and...

  10. 20 CFR 661.220 - What are the requirements for the submission of the State Workforce Investment Plan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEWIDE AND LOCAL GOVERNANCE OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT SYSTEM UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT State Governance Provisions § 661.220 What are the... incomplete, or which does not contain sufficient information to determine whether it is consistent with the...

  11. Developing Workforce Capacity in Public Health Informatics: Core Competencies and Curriculum Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas R. Wholey

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe a master’s level public health informatics (PHI curriculum to support workforce development. Public health decision-making requires intensive information management to organize responses to health threats and develop effective health education and promotion. PHI competencies prepare the public health workforce to design and implement these information systems. The objective for a Master’s and Certificate in PHI is to prepare public health informaticians with the competencies to work collaboratively with colleagues in public health and other health professions to design and develop information systems that support population health improvement. The PHI competencies are drawn from computer, information, and organizational sciences. A curriculum is proposed to deliver the competencies and result of a pilot PHI program is presented. Since the public health workforce needs to use information technology effectively to improve population health, it is essential for public health academic institutions to develop and implement PHI workforce training programs.

  12. Developing Workforce Capacity in Public Health Informatics: Core Competencies and Curriculum Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wholey, Douglas R.; LaVenture, Martin; Rajamani, Sripriya; Kreiger, Rob; Hedberg, Craig; Kenyon, Cynthia

    2018-01-01

    We describe a master’s level public health informatics (PHI) curriculum to support workforce development. Public health decision-making requires intensive information management to organize responses to health threats and develop effective health education and promotion. PHI competencies prepare the public health workforce to design and implement these information systems. The objective for a Master’s and Certificate in PHI is to prepare public health informaticians with the competencies to work collaboratively with colleagues in public health and other health professions to design and develop information systems that support population health improvement. The PHI competencies are drawn from computer, information, and organizational sciences. A curriculum is proposed to deliver the competencies and result of a pilot PHI program is presented. Since the public health workforce needs to use information technology effectively to improve population health, it is essential for public health academic institutions to develop and implement PHI workforce training programs. PMID:29770321

  13. Dental Workforce Availability and Dental Services Utilization in Appalachia: A Geospatial Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xue; Sambamoorthi, Usha; Wiener, R. Constance

    2016-01-01

    Objectives There is considerable variation in dental services utilization across Appalachian counties, and a plausible explanation is that individuals in some geographical areas do not utilize dental care due to dental workforce shortage. We conducted an ecological study on dental workforce availability and dental services utilization in Appalachia. Methods We derived county-level (n = 364) data on demographic, socio-economic characteristics and dental services utilization in Appalachia from the 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) using person-level data. We obtained county-level dental workforce availability and physician-to-population ratio estimates from Area Health Resource File, and linked them to the county-level BRFSS data. The dependent variable was the proportion using dental services within the last year in each county (ranging from 16.6% to 91.0%). We described the association between dental workforce availability and dental services utilization using ordinary least squares regression and spatial regression techniques. Spatial analyses consisted of bivariate Local Indicators of Spatial Association (LISA) and geographically weighted regression (GWR). Results Bivariate LISA showed that counties in the central and southern Appalachian regions had significant (p dental workforce availability, low percent dental services utilization). GWR revealed considerable local variations in the association between dental utilization and dental workforce availability. In the multivariate GWR models, 8.5% (t-statistics >1.96) and 13.45% (t-statistics >1.96) of counties showed positive and statistically significant relationships between the dental services utilization and workforce availability of dentists and dental hygienists, respectively. Conclusions Dental workforce availability was associated with dental services utilization in the Appalachian region; however, this association was not statistically significant in all counties. The findings suggest

  14. Generation of an ICF syndrome model by efficient genome editing of human induced pluripotent stem cells using the CRISPR system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horii, Takuro; Tamura, Daiki; Morita, Sumiyo; Kimura, Mika; Hatada, Izuho

    2013-09-30

    Genome manipulation of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells is essential to achieve their full potential as tools for regenerative medicine. To date, however, gene targeting in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) has proven to be extremely difficult. Recently, an efficient genome manipulation technology using the RNA-guided DNase Cas9, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system, has been developed. Here we report the efficient generation of an iPS cell model for immunodeficiency, centromeric region instability, facial anomalies syndrome (ICF) syndrome using the CRISPR system. We obtained iPS cells with mutations in both alleles of DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B) in 63% of transfected clones. Our data suggest that the CRISPR system is highly efficient and useful for genome engineering of human iPS cells.

  15. Generation of an ICF Syndrome Model by Efficient Genome Editing of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Using the CRISPR System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izuho Hatada

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Genome manipulation of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells is essential to achieve their full potential as tools for regenerative medicine. To date, however, gene targeting in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs has proven to be extremely difficult. Recently, an efficient genome manipulation technology using the RNA-guided DNase Cas9, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR system, has been developed. Here we report the efficient generation of an iPS cell model for immunodeficiency, centromeric region instability, facial anomalies syndrome (ICF syndrome using the CRISPR system. We obtained iPS cells with mutations in both alleles of DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B in 63% of transfected clones. Our data suggest that the CRISPR system is highly efficient and useful for genome engineering of human iPS cells.

  16. Neuromuscular junction formation between human stem cell-derived motoneurons and human skeletal muscle in a defined system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiufang; Gonzalez, Mercedes; Stancescu, Maria; Vandenburgh, Herman H; Hickman, James J

    2011-12-01

    Functional in vitro models composed of human cells will constitute an important platform in the next generation of system biology and drug discovery. This study reports a novel human-based in vitro Neuromuscular Junction (NMJ) system developed in a defined serum-free medium and on a patternable non-biological surface. The motoneurons and skeletal muscles were derived from fetal spinal stem cells and skeletal muscle stem cells. The motoneurons and skeletal myotubes were completely differentiated in the co-culture based on morphological analysis and electrophysiology. NMJ formation was demonstrated by phase contrast microscopy, immunocytochemistry and the observation of motoneuron-induced muscle contractions utilizing time-lapse recordings and their subsequent quenching by d-Tubocurarine. Generally, functional human based systems would eliminate the issue of species variability during the drug development process and its derivation from stem cells bypasses the restrictions inherent with utilization of primary human tissue. This defined human-based NMJ system is one of the first steps in creating functional in vitro systems and will play an important role in understanding NMJ development, in developing high information content drug screens and as test beds in preclinical studies for spinal or muscular diseases/injuries such as muscular dystrophy, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal cord repair. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The planarian flatworm: an in vivo model for stem cell biology and nervous system regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Gentile

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Planarian flatworms are an exception among bilaterians in that they possess a large pool of adult stem cells that enables them to promptly regenerate any part of their body, including the brain. Although known for two centuries for their remarkable regenerative capabilities, planarians have only recently emerged as an attractive model for studying regeneration and stem cell biology. This revival is due in part to the availability of a sequenced genome and the development of new technologies, such as RNA interference and next-generation sequencing, which facilitate studies of planarian regeneration at the molecular level. Here, we highlight why planarians are an exciting tool in the study of regeneration and its underlying stem cell biology in vivo, and discuss the potential promises and current limitations of this model organism for stem cell research and regenerative medicine.

  18. Cancer stem cells: a systems biology view of their role in prognosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertins, Susan D

    2014-04-01

    Evidence has accumulated that characterizes highly tumorigenic cancer cells residing in heterogeneous populations. The accepted term for such a subpopulation is cancer stem cells (CSCs). While many questions still remain about their precise role in the origin, progression, and drug resistance of tumors, it is clear they exist. In this review, a current understanding of the nature of CSC, their potential usefulness in prognosis, and the need to target them will be discussed. In particular, separate studies now suggest that the CSC is plastic in its phenotype, toggling between tumorigenic and nontumorigenic states depending on both intrinsic and extrinsic conditions. Because of this, a static view of gene and protein levels defined by correlations may not be sufficient to either predict disease progression or aid in the discovery and development of drugs to molecular targets leading to cures. Quantitative dynamic modeling, a bottom up systems biology approach whereby signal transduction pathways are described by differential equations, may offer a novel means to overcome the challenges of oncology today. In conclusion, the complexity of CSCs can be captured in mathematical models that may be useful for selecting molecular targets, defining drug action, and predicting sensitivity or resistance pathways for improved patient outcomes.

  19. A systemic evaluation of cardiac differentiation from mRNA reprogrammed human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Mehta

    Full Text Available Genetically unmodified cardiomyocytes mandated for cardiac regenerative therapy is conceivable by "foot-print free" reprogramming of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC. In this study, we report generation of foot-print free hiPSC through messenger RNA (mRNA based reprograming. Subsequently, we characterize cardiomyocytes derived from these hiPSC using molecular and electrophysiological methods to characterize their applicability for regenerative medicine. Our results demonstrate that mRNA-iPSCs differentiate ontogenetically into cardiomyocytes with increased expression of early commitment markers of mesoderm, cardiac mesoderm, followed by cardiac specific transcriptional and sarcomeric structural and ion channel genes. Furthermore, these cardiomyocytes stained positively for sarcomeric and ion channel proteins. Based on multi-electrode array (MEA recordings, these mRNA-hiPSC derived cardiomyocytes responded predictably to various pharmacologically active drugs that target adrenergic, sodium, calcium and potassium channels. The cardiomyocytes responded chronotropically to isoproterenol in a dose dependent manner, inotropic activity of nifidipine decreased spontaneous contractions. Moreover, Sotalol and E-4031 prolonged QT intervals, while TTX reduced sodium influx. Our results for the first time show a systemic evaluation based on molecular, structural and functional properties of cardiomyocytes differentiated from mRNA-iPSC. These results, coupled with feasibility of generating patient-specific iPSCs hold great promise for the development of large-scale generation of clinical grade cardiomyocytes for cardiac regenerative medicine.

  20. A Refined Culture System for Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Intestinal Epithelial Organoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Takahashi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Gut epithelial organoids are routinely used to investigate intestinal biology; however, current culture methods are not amenable to genetic manipulation, and it is difficult to generate sufficient numbers for high-throughput studies. Here, we present an improved culture system of human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC-derived intestinal organoids involving four methodological advances. (1 We adopted a lentiviral vector to readily establish and optimize conditioned medium for human intestinal organoid culture. (2 We obtained intestinal organoids from human iPSCs more efficiently by supplementing WNT3A and fibroblast growth factor 2 to induce differentiation into definitive endoderm. (3 Using 2D culture, followed by re-establishment of organoids, we achieved an efficient transduction of exogenous genes in organoids. (4 We investigated suspension organoid culture without scaffolds for easier harvesting and assays. These techniques enable us to develop, maintain, and expand intestinal organoids readily and quickly at low cost, facilitating high-throughput screening of pathogenic factors and candidate treatments for gastrointestinal diseases.

  1. Despite Improvements in MoI’s Personnel Systems, Additional Actions Are Needed to Completely Verify ANP Payroll Costs and Workforce Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-25

    contract to assist the Afghan government in collecting and managing the biometric data for all of the ANSF. 5. The Electronic Payroll System (EPS...Identification cards numbers will be utilized as the common data fields for the various payroll , biometric , and personnel databases and systems. In addition to...data in MoI’s payroll , personnel, identification card/registration, and biometric databases and systems. 3. Take the following steps as part of all

  2. Dental mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in an alginate hydrogel co-delivery microencapsulation system for cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshaverinia, Alireza; Xu, Xingtian; Chen, Chider; Akiyama, Kentaro; Snead, Malcolm L; Shi, Songtao

    2013-12-01

    Dental-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are promising candidates for cartilage regeneration, with a high capacity for chondrogenic differentiation. This property helps make dental MSCs an advantageous therapeutic option compared to current treatment modalities. The MSC delivery vehicle is the principal determinant for the success of MSC-mediated cartilage regeneration therapies. The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop a novel co-delivery system based on TGF-β1 loaded RGD-coupled alginate microspheres encapsulating periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) or gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs); and (2) investigate dental MSC viability and chondrogenic differentiation in alginate microspheres. The results revealed the sustained release of TGF-β1 from the alginate microspheres. After 4 weeks of chondrogenic differentiation in vitro, PDLSCs and GMSCs as well as human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) (as positive control) revealed chondrogenic gene expression markers (Col II and Sox-9) via qPCR, as well as matrix positively stained by Toluidine Blue and Safranin-O. In animal studies, ectopic cartilage tissue regeneration was observed inside and around the transplanted microspheres, confirmed by histochemical and immunofluorescent staining. Interestingly, PDLSCs showed more chondrogenesis than GMSCs and hBMMSCs (palginate microencapsulating dental MSCs make a promising candidate for cartilage regeneration. Our results highlight the vital role played by the microenvironment, as well as value of presenting inductive signals for viability and differentiation of MSCs. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Systems biology approach to developing S2RM-based "systemstherapeutics" and naturally induced pluripotent stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    The degree to, and the mechanisms through, whichstem cells are able to build, maintain, and heal the bodyhave only recently begun to be understood. Much of thestem cell's power resides in the release of a multitudeof molecules, called stem cell released molecules (SRM).A fundamentally new type of therapeutic, namely"systems therapeutic", can be realized by reverseengineering the mechanisms of the SRM processes.Recent data demonstrates that the composition of theSRM is different for each type of stem cell, as well asfor different states of each cell type. Although systemsbiology has been successfully used to analyze multiplepathways, the approach is often used to develop a smallmolecule interacting at only one pathway in the system.A new model is emerging in biology where systemsbiology is used to develop a new technology actingat multiple pathways called "systems therapeutics". Anatural set of healing pathways in the human that usesSRM is instructive and of practical use in developingsystems therapeutics. Endogenous SRM processes inthe human body use a combination of SRM from twoor more stem cell types, designated as S2RM, doing sounder various state dependent conditions for each celltype. Here we describe our approach in using statedependentSRM from two or more stem cell types,S2RM technology, to develop a new class of therapeuticscalled "systems therapeutics." Given the ubiquitous andpowerful nature of innate S2RM-based healing in thehuman body, this "systems therapeutic" approach usingS2RM technology will be important for the developmentof anti-cancer therapeutics, antimicrobials, woundcare products and procedures, and a number of othertherapeutics for many indications.

  4. Establishment of a Novel Lingual Organoid Culture System: Generation of Organoids Having Mature Keratinized Epithelium from Adult Epithelial Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisha, Hiroko; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Kanno, Shohei; Tokuyama, Yoko; Komai, Yoshihiro; Ohe, Shuichi; Yanai, Hirotsugu; Omachi, Taichi; Ueno, Hiroo

    2013-11-01

    Despite the strong need for the establishment of a lingual epithelial cell culture system, a simple and convenient culture method has not yet been established. Here, we report the establishment of a novel lingual epithelium organoid culture system using a three-dimensional matrix and growth factors. Histological analyses showed that the generated organoids had both a stratified squamous epithelial cell layer and a stratum corneum. Very recently, we showed via a multicolor lineage tracing method that Bmi1-positive stem cells exist at the base of the epithelial basal layer in the interpapillary pit. Using our new culture system, we found that organoids could be generated by single Bmi1-positive stem cells and that in the established organoids, multiple Bmi1-positive stem cells were generated at the outermost layer. Moreover, we observed that organoids harvested at an early point in culture could be engrafted and maturate in the tongue of recipient mice and that the organoids generated from carcinogen-treated mice had an abnormal morphology. Thus, this culture system presents valuable settings for studying not only the regulatory mechanisms of lingual epithelium but also lingual regeneration and carcinogenesis.

  5. Title V Workforce Development in the Era of Health Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Lewis; Mullenix, Amy; Apostolico, Alexsandra A; Fehrenbach, Lacy M; Cilenti, Dorothy

    2017-11-01

    Purpose The National Maternal and Child Health Workforce Development Center at UNC Chapel Hill (the Center), funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau, provides Title V state/jurisdiction leaders and staff and partners from other sectors with opportunities to develop skills in quality improvement, systems mapping and analysis, change management, and strategies to enhance access to care to leverage and implement health transformation opportunities to improve the health of women and children. Description Since 2013, the Center has utilized a variety of learning platforms to reach state and jurisdiction Title V leaders. In the intensive training program, new skills and knowledge are applied to a state-driven health transformation project and include distance-based learning opportunities, multi-day, in-person training and/or onsite consultation, as well as individualized coaching to develop workforce skills. Assessment The first intensive cohort of eight states reported enhanced skills in the core areas of quality improvement, systems mapping and analysis, change management, and strategies to enhance access to care which guided changes at state system and policy levels. In addition, teams reported new and/or enhanced partnerships with many sectors, thereby leveraging Title V resources to increase its impact. Conclusion The Center's provision of core workforce skills and application to state-defined goals has enabled states to undertake projects and challenges that not only have a positive impact on population health, but also encourage collaborative, productive partnerships that were once found to be challenging-creating a workforce capable of advancing the health and wellbeing of women and children.

  6. An Operational Process for Workforce Planning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Emmerichs, Robert

    2004-01-01

    .... This report describes a methodology, developed by RAND at the behest of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Civilian Personnel Policy, for conducting workforce planning-a methodology...

  7. Enhancing the diversity of the pediatrician workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Aaron L

    2007-04-01

    This policy statement describes the key issues related to diversity within the pediatrician and health care workforce to identify barriers to enhancing diversity and offer policy recommendations to overcome these barriers in the future. The statement addresses topics such as health disparities, affirmative action, recent policy developments and reports on workforce diversity, and research on patient and provider diversity. It also broadens the discussion of diversity beyond the traditional realms of race and ethnicity to include cultural attributes that may have an effect on the quality of health care. Although workforce diversity is related to the provision of culturally effective pediatric care, it is a discrete issue that merits separate discussion and policy formulation. At the heart of this policy-driven action are multiorganizational and multispecialty collaborations designed to address substantive educational, financial, organizational, and other barriers to improved workforce diversity.

  8. Region V Transportation Workforce Assessment and Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The transportation workforce is undergoing unprecedented change due to rapid retirement of baby boomers while at the same time information, communication, and automation technologies are rapidly changing the transportation of people and goods. The pu...

  9. A scalable system for production of functional pancreatic progenitors from human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C Schulz

    Full Text Available Development of a human embryonic stem cell (hESC-based therapy for type 1 diabetes will require the translation of proof-of-principle concepts into a scalable, controlled, and regulated cell manufacturing process. We have previously demonstrated that hESC can be directed to differentiate into pancreatic progenitors that mature into functional glucose-responsive, insulin-secreting cells in vivo. In this study we describe hESC expansion and banking methods and a suspension-based differentiation system, which together underpin an integrated scalable manufacturing process for producing pancreatic progenitors. This system has been optimized for the CyT49 cell line. Accordingly, qualified large-scale single-cell master and working cGMP cell banks of CyT49 have been generated to provide a virtually unlimited starting resource for manufacturing. Upon thaw from these banks, we expanded CyT49 for two weeks in an adherent culture format that achieves 50-100 fold expansion per week. Undifferentiated CyT49 were then aggregated into clusters in dynamic rotational suspension culture, followed by differentiation en masse for two weeks with a four-stage protocol. Numerous scaled differentiation runs generated reproducible and defined population compositions highly enriched for pancreatic cell lineages, as shown by examining mRNA expression at each stage of differentiation and flow cytometry of the final population. Islet-like tissue containing glucose-responsive, insulin-secreting cells was generated upon implantation into mice. By four- to five-months post-engraftment, mature neo-pancreatic tissue was sufficient to protect against streptozotocin (STZ-induced hyperglycemia. In summary, we have developed a tractable manufacturing process for the generation of functional pancreatic progenitors from hESC on a scale amenable to clinical entry.

  10. Genetic Modification in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells by Homologous Recombination and CRISPR/Cas9 System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Haipeng; Wu, Jianbo; Li, Shenglan; Rao, Mahendra S; Liu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Genetic modification is an indispensable tool to study gene function in normal development and disease. The recent breakthrough of creating human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by defined factors (Takahashi et al., Cell 131:861-872, 2007) provides a renewable source of patient autologous cells that not only retain identical genetic information but also give rise to many cell types of the body including neurons and glia. Meanwhile, the rapid advancement of genome modification tools such as gene targeting by homologous recombination (Capecchi, Nat Rev Genet 6:507-512, 2005) and genome editing tools such as CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats)/Cas (CRISPR-associated) system, TALENs (Transcription activator-like effector nucleases), and ZFNs (Zinc finger nucleases) (Wang et al., Cell 153:910-918, 2013; Mali et al., Science 339:823-826, 2013; Hwang et al., Nat Biotechnol 31:227-229, 2013; Friedland et al., Nat Methods 10(8):741-743, 2013; DiCarlo et al., Nucleic Acids Res 41:4336-4343, 2013; Cong et al., Science 339:819-823, 2013) has greatly accelerated the development of human genome manipulation at the molecular level. This chapter describes the protocols for making neural lineage reporter lines using homologous recombination and the CRISPR/Cas system-mediated genome editing, including construction of targeting vectors, guide RNAs, transfection into hPSCs, and selection and verification of successfully targeted clones. This method can be applied to various needs of hPSC genetic engineering at high efficiency and high reliability.

  11. Heme Oxygenase-1/Carbon Monoxide System and Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation and Maturation into Cardiomyocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suliman, Hagir B.; Zobi, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells into energetically efficient cardiomyocytes contributes to functional cardiac repair and is envisioned to ameliorate progressive degenerative cardiac diseases. Advanced cell maturation strategies are therefore needed to create abundant mature cardiomyocytes. In this study, we tested whether the redox-sensitive heme oxygenase-1/carbon monoxide (HO-1/CO) system, operating through mitochondrial biogenesis, acts as a mechanism for ES cell differentiation and cardiomyocyte maturation. Results: Manipulation of HO-1/CO to enhance mitochondrial biogenesis demonstrates a direct pathway to ES cell differentiation and maturation into beating cardiomyocytes that express adult structural markers. Targeted HO-1/CO interventions up- and downregulate specific cardiogenic transcription factors, transcription factor Gata4, homeobox protein Nkx-2.5, heart- and neural crest derivatives-expressed protein 1, and MEF2C. HO-1/CO overexpression increases cardiac gene expression for myosin regulatory light chain 2, atrial isoform, MLC2v, ANP, MHC-β, and sarcomere α-actinin and the major mitochondrial fusion regulators, mitofusin 2 and MICOS complex subunit Mic60. This promotes structural mitochondrial network expansion and maturation, thereby supporting energy provision for beating embryoid bodies. These effects are prevented by silencing HO-1 and by mitochondrial reactive oxygen species scavenging, while disruption of mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial DNA depletion by loss of mitochondrial transcription factor A compromise infrastructure. This leads to failure of cardiomyocyte differentiation and maturation and contractile dysfunction. Innovation: The capacity to augment cardiomyogenesis via a defined mitochondrial pathway has unique therapeutic potential for targeting ES cell maturation in cardiac disease. Conclusion: Our findings establish the HO-1/CO system and redox regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis as

  12. Treatment of Inherited Eye Defects by Systemic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Celine J; Kreymerman, Alexander; Ur, Sarah N; Frizzi, Katie E; Naphade, Swati; Lau, Athena; Tran, Tammy; Calcutt, Nigel A; Goldberg, Jeffrey L; Cherqui, Stephanie

    2015-11-01

    Cystinosis is caused by a deficiency in the lysosomal cystine transporter, cystinosin (CTNS gene), resulting in cystine crystal accumulation in tissues. In eyes, crystals accumulate in the cornea causing photophobia and eventually blindness. Hematopoietic stem progenitor cells (HSPCs) rescue the kidney in a mouse model of cystinosis. We investigated the potential for HSPC transplantation to treat corneal defects in cystinosis. We isolated HSPCs from transgenic DsRed mice and systemically transplanted irradiated Ctns-/- mice. A year posttransplantation, we investigated the fate and function of HSPCs by in vivo confocal and fluorescence microscopy (IVCM), quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR), mass spectrometry, histology, and by measuring the IOP. To determine the mechanism by which HSPCs may rescue disease cells, we transplanted Ctns-/- mice with Ctns-/- DsRed HSPCs virally transduced to express functional CTNS-eGFP fusion protein. We found that a single systemic transplantation of wild-type HSPCs prevented ocular pathology in the Ctns-/- mice. Engraftment-derived HSPCs were detected within the cornea, and also in the sclera, ciliary body, retina, choroid, and lens. Transplantation of HSPC led to substantial decreases in corneal cystine crystals, restoration of normal corneal thickness, and lowered IOP in mice with high levels of donor-derived cell engraftment. Finally, we found that HSPC-derived progeny differentiated into macrophages, which displayed tunneling nanotubes capable of transferring cystinosin-bearing lysosomes to diseased cells. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that HSPCs can rescue hereditary corneal defects, and supports a new potential therapeutic strategy for treating ocular pathologies.

  13. 77 FR 36549 - Nursing Workforce Diversity Invitational Summit-“Nursing in 3D: Workforce Diversity, Health...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ... Workforce Diversity Invitational Summit--``Nursing in 3D: Workforce Diversity, Health Disparities, and..., Division of Nursing, will host an invitational summit that focuses on Nursing Workforce Diversity (NWD..., thought leaders, and key workforce diversity stakeholders to identify the full range of academic and...

  14. Biological restoration of central nervous system architecture and function: part 3-stem cell- and cell-based applications and realities in the biological management of central nervous system disorders: traumatic, vascular, and epilepsy disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farin, Azadeh; Liu, Charles Y; Langmoen, Iver A; Apuzzo, Michael L J

    2009-11-01

    STEM CELL THERAPY has emerged as a promising novel therapeutic endeavor for traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, stroke, and epilepsy in experimental studies. A few preliminary clinical trials have further supported its safety and early efficacy after transplantation into humans. Although not yet clinically available for central nervous system disorders, stem cell technology is expected to evolve into one of the most powerful tools in the biological management of complex central nervous system disorders, many of which currently have limited treatment modalities. The identification of stem cells, discovery of neurogenesis, and application of stem cells to treat central nervous system disorders represent a dramatic evolution and expansion of the neurosurgeon's capabilities into the neurorestoration and neuroregeneration realms. In Part 3 of a 5-part series on stem cells, we discuss the theory, experimental evidence, and clinical data pertaining to the use of stem cells for the treatment of traumatic, vascular, and epileptic disorders.

  15. Anaerobic Co-Culture of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Anaerobic Pathogens - A New In Vitro Model System

    OpenAIRE

    Kriebel, Katja; Biedermann, Anne; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Lang, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are multipotent by nature and are originally isolated from bone marrow. In light of a future application of hMSCs in the oral cavity, a body compartment with varying oxygen partial pressures and an omnipresence of different bacterial species i.e. periodontitis pathogens, we performed this study to gain information about the behavior of hMSC in an anaerobic system and the response in interaction with oral bacterial pathogens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIP...

  16. Potential of stem cell based therapy and tissue engineering in the regeneration of the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Yihua; Tsang, Kent K S; Zhang Han

    2006-01-01

    The insufficiency of self-repair and regeneration of the central nervous system (CNS) leads to difficulty of rehabilitation of the injured brain. In the past few decades, the significant progress in cell therapy and tissue engineering has contributed to the functional recovery of the CNS to a great extent. The present review focuses on the potential role of stem cell based therapy and tissue engineering in the regeneration of the CNS. (topical review)

  17. Systemic Administration of Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cells Does Not Halt Osteoporotic Bone Loss in Ovariectomized Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Huang

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have innate ability to self-renew and immunosuppressive functions, and differentiate into various cell types. They have become a promising cell source for treating many diseases, particular for bone regeneration. Osteoporosis is a common metabolic bone disorder with elevated systemic inflammation which in turn triggers enhanced bone loss. We hypothesize that systemic infusion of MSCs may suppress the elevated inflammation in the osteoporotic subjects and slow down bone loss. The current project was to address the following two questions: (1 Will a single dose systemic administration of allogenic MSCs have any effect on osteoporotic bone loss? (2 Will multiple administration of allogenic MSCs from single or multiple donors have similar effect on osteoporotic bone loss? 18 ovariectomized (OVX rats were assigned into 3 groups: the PBS control group, MSCs group 1 (receiving 2x106 GFP-MSCs at Day 10, 46, 91 from the same donor following OVX and MSCs group 2 (receiving 2x106 GFP-MSCs from three different donors at Day 10, 46, 91. Examinations included Micro-CT, serum analysis, mechanical testing, immunofluorescence staining and bone histomorphometry analysis. Results showed that BV/TV at Day 90, 135, BMD of TV and trabecular number at Day 135 in the PBS group were significantly higher than those in the MSCs group 2, whereas trabecular spacing at Day 90, 135 was significantly smaller than that in MSCs group 2. Mechanical testing data didn't show significant difference among the three groups. In addition, the ELISA assay showed that level of Rantes in serum in MSCs group 2 was significantly higher than that of the PBS group, whereas IL-6 and IL-10 were significantly lower than those of the PBS group. Bone histomorphometry analysis showed that Oc.S/BS and Oc.N/BS in the PBS group were significant lower than those in MSCs group 2; Ob.S/BS and Ob.N/BS did not show significant difference among the three groups. The current study

  18. The aging nursing workforce: How to retain experienced nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jeremye D

    2006-01-01

    In the face of an anticipated nursing shortage, healthcare organizations must evaluate their culture, operations, and compensation system to ensure that these elements align with organizational efforts to retain nurses who are approaching retirement age. Management should focus on enhancing elements of job satisfaction and job embeddedness that will motivate nurses to remain both in the workforce and with their employer. Although much of this responsibility falls on the nurse manager, nurse managers are often not provided the necessary support by top management and are neither recognized nor held accountable for nurse turnover. Other retention initiatives can include altering working conditions to reduce both physical and mental stress and addressing issues of employee health and safety. As for compensation, organizations may be well-served by offering senior nursing staff flexible working hours, salary structures that reward experience, and benefit programs that hold value for an aging workforce.

  19. Cultural similarity, cultural competence, and nurse workforce diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnis, Sandra L; Brush, Barbara L; Moore, Jean

    2010-11-01

    Proponents of health workforce diversity argue that increasing the number of minority health care providers will enhance cultural similarity between patients and providers as well as the health system's capacity to provide culturally competent care. Measuring cultural similarity has been difficult, however, given that current benchmarks of workforce diversity categorize health workers by major racial/ethnic classifications rather than by cultural measures. This study examined the use of national racial/ethnic categories in both patient and registered nurse (RN) populations and found them to be a poor indicator of cultural similarity. Rather, we found that cultural similarity between RN and patient populations needs to be established at the level of local labor markets and broadened to include other cultural parameters such as country of origin, primary language, and self-identified ancestry. Only then can the relationship between cultural similarity and cultural competence be accurately determined and its outcomes measured.

  20. Estimating 3D Leaf and Stem Shape of Nursery Paprika Plants by a Novel Multi-Camera Photography System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available For plant breeding and growth monitoring, accurate measurements of plant structure parameters are very crucial. We have, therefore, developed a high efficiency Multi-Camera Photography (MCP system combining Multi-View Stereovision (MVS with the Structure from Motion (SfM algorithm. In this paper, we measured six variables of nursery paprika plants and investigated the accuracy of 3D models reconstructed from photos taken by four lens types at four different positions. The results demonstrated that error between the estimated and measured values was small, and the root-mean-square errors (RMSE for leaf width/length and stem height/diameter were 1.65 mm (R2 = 0.98 and 0.57 mm (R2 = 0.99, respectively. The accuracies of the 3D model reconstruction of leaf and stem by a 28-mm lens at the first and third camera positions were the highest, and the number of reconstructed fine-scale 3D model shape surfaces of leaf and stem is the most. The results confirmed the practicability of our new method for the reconstruction of fine-scale plant model and accurate estimation of the plant parameters. They also displayed that our system is a good system for capturing high-resolution 3D images of nursery plants with high efficiency.

  1. Estimating 3D Leaf and Stem Shape of Nursery Paprika Plants by a Novel Multi-Camera Photography System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Teng, Poching; Shimizu, Yo; Hosoi, Fumiki; Omasa, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    For plant breeding and growth monitoring, accurate measurements of plant structure parameters are very crucial. We have, therefore, developed a high efficiency Multi-Camera Photography (MCP) system combining Multi-View Stereovision (MVS) with the Structure from Motion (SfM) algorithm. In this paper, we measured six variables of nursery paprika plants and investigated the accuracy of 3D models reconstructed from photos taken by four lens types at four different positions. The results demonstrated that error between the estimated and measured values was small, and the root-mean-square errors (RMSE) for leaf width/length and stem height/diameter were 1.65 mm (R2 = 0.98) and 0.57 mm (R2 = 0.99), respectively. The accuracies of the 3D model reconstruction of leaf and stem by a 28-mm lens at the first and third camera positions were the highest, and the number of reconstructed fine-scale 3D model shape surfaces of leaf and stem is the most. The results confirmed the practicability of our new method for the reconstruction of fine-scale plant model and accurate estimation of the plant parameters. They also displayed that our system is a good system for capturing high-resolution 3D images of nursery plants with high efficiency. PMID:27314348

  2. Management issues regarding the contingent workforce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowen-Smed, S. [Bowen Workforce Solutions, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Fifty per cent of corporate leaders in Calgary today will be eligible for retirement over the next 5 years. In addition, 53 per cent of the entire Calgary workforce is 45 years or older. This paper suggests that only companies that seek aggressive programs to engage immigrants and contractors will weather the skills shortages anticipated in the future. It was noted that contractors care about aligning values to organizations, regardless of the project length, and that professional development is a key consideration when it comes to selecting their next project. Contingent workforce issues include: effectiveness; classification; risk; and cost. It was stated that effectiveness of the contingent workforce is an employer's responsibility. Factors that would strengthen the relationship between corporations and contractors include: proper orientation to manage expectations; training to improve productivity; tracking to enhance the quality of the workforce; and a management process to ensure adherence to protocol. It was concluded that the contingent workforce is an essential component to human capital management strategy, but that key issues must be managed to avoid unnecessary costs. In addition, effectiveness improves when processes are implemented. It was also suggested that technology is an essential component of the solution. Outsourcing is an effective approach to managing the contingent workforce. tabs., figs.

  3. Developing a translational ecology workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Mark W.; Hiers, J. Kevin; Davis, Frank W.; Garfin, Gregg; Jackson, Stephen T.; Terando, Adam J.; Woodhouse, Connie A.; Morelli, Toni; Williamson, Matthew A.; Brunson, Mark W.

    2017-01-01

    We define a translational ecologist as a professional ecologist with diverse disciplinary expertise and skill sets, as well as a suitable personal disposition, who engages across social, professional, and disciplinary boundaries to partner with decision makers to achieve practical environmental solutions. Becoming a translational ecologist requires specific attention to obtaining critical non‐scientific disciplinary breadth and skills that are not typically gained through graduate‐level education. Here, we outline a need for individuals with broad training in interdisciplinary skills, use our personal experiences as a basis for assessing the types of interdisciplinary skills that would benefit potential translational ecologists, and present steps that interested ecologists may take toward becoming translational. Skills relevant to translational ecologists may be garnered through personal experiences, informal training, short courses, fellowships, and graduate programs, among others. We argue that a translational ecology workforce is needed to bridge the gap between science and natural resource decisions. Furthermore, we argue that this task is a cooperative responsibility of individuals interested in pursuing these careers, educational institutions interested in training scientists for professional roles outside of academia, and employers seeking to hire skilled workers who can foster stakeholder‐engaged decision making.

  4. 1996 Australian radiology workforce report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donnell, C.; Stuckey, J.; Jones, D.N.

    1997-01-01

    A questionnaire was sent to all radiologists in Australia using a mailing list supplied by individual State Workforce subcommittee members. A reply rate of 72% was obtained. There are currently 1061 radiologists (1010.5 full-time equivalents) or 55.5 radiologists per million population, placing Australia in the mid-range compared with other OECD countries. This has increased slightly from 54.1 in 1994. There is a small but definite State variation. Utilizing current trainee numbers and traditional attrition rates, there is no projected change in these figures (55.3 in 2001), but the continued introduction of 'migrant' radiologists is postulated to cause an increase (56.6 with 25 migrants and 58.4 with 50 migrants in 2001). Analysis of work-practice indicates a performance rate of 14 100 procedures per year per practicing radiologist. There is again a State variation. It is estimated that the total number of medical imaging procedures per 1000 population per year (rendered by radiologists) is 815. These latter two figures place Australia in the mid-range compared with the United States and Great Britain. General radiography, mammography, ultrasound, and CT are the most common procedures (in that order), and are performed by the largest proportion of radiologists. (authors)

  5. Workforce scheduling: A new model incorporating human factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Othman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The majority of a company’s improvement comes when the right workers with the right skills, behaviors and capacities are deployed appropriately throughout a company. This paper considers a workforce scheduling model including human aspects such as skills, training, workers’ personalities, workers’ breaks and workers’ fatigue and recovery levels. This model helps to minimize the hiring, firing, training and overtime costs, minimize the number of fired workers with high performance, minimize the break time and minimize the average worker’s fatigue level.Design/methodology/approach: To achieve this objective, a multi objective mixed integer programming model is developed to determine the amount of hiring, firing, training and overtime for each worker type.Findings: The results indicate that the worker differences should be considered in workforce scheduling to generate realistic plans with minimum costs. This paper also investigates the effects of human fatigue and recovery on the performance of the production systems.Research limitations/implications: In this research, there are some assumptions that might affect the accuracy of the model such as the assumption of certainty of the demand in each period, and the linearity function of Fatigue accumulation and recovery curves. These assumptions can be relaxed in future work.Originality/value: In this research, a new model for integrating workers’ differences with workforce scheduling is proposed. To the authors' knowledge, it is the first time to study the effects of different important human factors such as human personality, skills and fatigue and recovery in the workforce scheduling process. This research shows that considering both technical and human factors together can reduce the costs in manufacturing systems and ensure the safety of the workers.

  6. Health information technology workforce needs of rural primary care practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillman, Susan M; Andrilla, C Holly A; Patterson, Davis G; Fenton, Susan H; Ostergard, Stefanie J

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed electronic health record (EHR) and health information technology (HIT) workforce resources needed by rural primary care practices, and their workforce-related barriers to implementing and using EHRs and HIT. Rural primary care practices (1,772) in 13 states (34.2% response) were surveyed in 2012 using mailed and Web-based questionnaires. EHRs or HIT were used by 70% of respondents. Among practices using or intending to use the technology, most did not plan to hire new employees to obtain EHR/HIT skills and even fewer planned to hire consultants or vendors to fill gaps. Many practices had staff with some basic/entry, intermediate and/or advanced-level skills, but nearly two-thirds (61.4%) needed more staff training. Affordable access to vendors/consultants who understand their needs and availability of community college and baccalaureate-level training were the workforce-related barriers cited by the highest percentages of respondents. Accessing the Web/Internet challenged nearly a quarter of practices in isolated rural areas, and nearly a fifth in small rural areas. Finding relevant vendors/consultants and qualified staff were greater barriers in small and isolated rural areas than in large rural areas. Rural primary care practices mainly will rely on existing staff for continued implementation and use of EHR/HIT systems. Infrastructure and workforce-related barriers remain and must be overcome before practices can fully manage patient populations and exchange patient information among care system partners. Efforts to monitor adoption of these skills and ongoing support for continuing education will likely benefit rural populations. © 2014 National Rural Health Association.

  7. Regulatory Systems in Bone Marrow for Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells Mobilization and Homing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Alvarez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of hematopoietic stem cell release, migration, and homing from the bone marrow (BM and of the mobilization pathway involves a complex interaction among adhesion molecules, cytokines, proteolytic enzymes, stromal cells, and hematopoietic cells. The identification of new mechanisms that regulate the trafficking of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs cells has important implications, not only for hematopoietic transplantation but also for cell therapies in regenerative medicine for patients with acute myocardial infarction, spinal cord injury, and stroke, among others. This paper reviews the regulation mechanisms underlying the homing and mobilization of BM hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, investigating the following issues: (a the role of different factors, such as stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1, among other ligands; (b the stem cell count in peripheral blood and BM and influential factors; (c the therapeutic utilization of this phenomenon in lesions in different tissues, examining the agents involved in HSPCs mobilization, such as the different forms of G-CSF, plerixafor, and natalizumab; and (d the effects of this mobilization on BM-derived stem/progenitor cells in clinical trials of patients with different diseases.

  8. FGF1 and IGF1-conditioned 3D culture system promoted the amplification and cancer stemness of lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pengpeng; Zhang, Rui; Yu, Wenwen; Ye, Yingnan; Cheng, Yanan; Han, Lei; Dong, Li; Chen, Yongzi; Wei, Xiyin; Yu, Jinpu

    2017-12-01

    Lung cancer stem cells (LCSCs) are considered as the cellular origins of metastasis and relapse of lung cancer. However, routine two-dimensional culture system (2D-culture) hardly mimics the growth and functions of LCSCs in vivo and therefore significantly decreases the stemness activity of LCSCs. In this study, we constructed a special BME-based three-dimensional culture system (3D-culture) to amplify LCSCs in human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 cells and found 3D-culture promoted the enrichment and amplification of LCSCs in A549 cells displaying higher proliferation potential and invasion activity, but lower apoptosis. The expression and secretion levels of FGF1 and IGF1 were dramatically elevated in 3D-culture compared to 2D-culture. After growing in FGF1 and IGF1-conditioned 3D-culture, the proportion of LCSCs with specific stemness phenotypes in A549 cells significantly increased compared to that in conventional 3D suspension culture system. Further results indicated that FGF1 and IGF1 promoted the amplification and cancer stemness of LCSCs dependent on MAPK signaling pathway. Our data firstly established a growth factors-conditioned 3D-culture for LCSCs and demonstrated the effects of FGF1 and IGF1 in promoting the enrichment and amplification of LCSCs which might provide a feasible cell model in vitro for both mechanism study and translational research on lung cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The need for endodontic treatment and systemic characteristics of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga-Diniz, Julia Mourão; Santa-Rosa, Caroline Christine; Martins, Renata de Castro; Silva, Maria Elisa Souza E; Vieira, Leda Quercia; Ribeiro Sobrinho, Antônio Paulino

    2017-07-03

    The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between the epidemiological and clinical profiles of patients before and after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and the need for endodontic treatment. The subjects included 188 individuals enrolled in the dental care program for transplanted patients of the School of Dentistry, Federal University of Minas Gerais (Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, FO-UFMG) from March 2011 through March 2016. The patients were subjected to an HSCT conditioning dental regimen based on a thorough clinical and radiographic evaluation. Intraoral periapical and bite-wing X-rays were obtained, and after evaluation, specific dental treatment was planned and performed. The following demographic and clinical data were collected from the patients' medical records: age, gender, transplantation stage, primary disease, transplant type, medication used, complete blood count at the time of visit, and need for endodontic treatment. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov and the chi-square tests were used. Leukemia (31.3%) and multiple myeloma (17.9%) were the most prevalent primary diseases. Most patients were subjected to allogeneic-related transplantation (83.6%). Most patients exhibited platelet counts and hemoglobin concentrations below the reference values in the pre-transplantation stage, while the neutrophil and platelet counts and the hemoglobin levels were within the reference ranges in the post-transplantation stage. The proportions of individuals requiring endodontic treatment were similar between the pre- and post-transplantation groups: 24.3% and 24.7%, respectively. The systemic conditions of the patients referred for dental treatment were compromised.

  10. Herpesvirus-associated central nervous system diseases after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meiqing; Huang, Fen; Jiang, Xinmiao; Fan, Zhiping; Zhou, Hongsheng; Liu, Can; Jiang, Qianli; Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Ke; Xuan, Li; Zhai, Xiao; Zhang, Fuhua; Yin, Changxin; Sun, Jing; Feng, Ru; Liu, Qifa

    2013-01-01

    Herpesvirus infections of the central nervous system (CNS) are associated with encephalitis/myelitis and lymphoproliferative diseases in immunocompromised individuals. As of now, data of herpesvirus-associated CNS diseases in transplant recipients is limited. Hence, in this prospective study, we investigated the incidence of herpesvirus-associated CNS diseases and explored the diagnosis of these diseases in 281 allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) recipients. Herpesvirus-DNA and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cells were sampled from 58 recipients with herpesvirus-associated diseases or with unexplainable CNS manifestations. Results showed that 23 patients were diagnosed as herpesvirus-associated CNS diseases, including 15 Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated diseases (4 encephalitis and 11 lymphoproliferative diseases), 5 herpes simplex virus type 1 encephalitis, 2 cytomegalovirus encephalitis/myelitis and 1 varicella zoster virus encephalitis. The median time of diseases onset was 65 (range 22-542) days post-transplantation. The 3-year cumulative incidence of herpesvirus-associated encephalitis/myelitis and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) was 6.3% ± 1.9% and 4.1% ± 1.2%, respectively. Of the evaluable cases, CSF cells mainly consisted of CD19(+)CD20(+) B cells (7/11) and had clonal rearrangement of immunoglobulin genes (3/11) in patients with CNS-PTLD. On the contrary, in patients with encephalitis/myelitis, CSF cells were comprised of different cell populations and none of the gene rearrangement was detected. Herpesvirus-associated CNS diseases are common in the early stages of allo-HSCT, wherein EBV is the most frequent causative virus. The immunophenotypic and clonal analysis of CSF cells might be helpful in the differential diagnosis between encephalitis and lymphoproliferative diseases.

  11. Increasing the sensitivity for stem cell monitoring in system-function based magnetic particle imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Them, Kolja; Szwargulski, P; Knopp, Tobias; Salamon, J; Kaul, M G; Ittrich, H; Sequeira, S; Lange, C

    2016-01-01

    The use of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) has provided new possibilities in biophysics and biomedical imaging technologies. The magnetization dynamics of SPIONs, which can be influenced by the environment, are of central interest. In this work, different biological SPION environments are used to investigate three different calibration methods for stem cell monitoring in magnetic particle imaging. It is shown that calibrating using SPIONs immobilized via agarose gel or intracellular uptake results in superior stem cell image quality compared to mobile SPIONs in saline. This superior image quality enables more sensitive localization and identification of a significantly smaller number of magnetically labeled stem cells. The results are important for cell tracking and monitoring of future SPION based therapies such as hyperthermia based cancer therapies, targeted drug delivery, or tissue regeneration approaches where it is crucial to image a sufficiently small number of SPIONs interacting with biological matter. (paper)

  12. Advances toward regenerative medicine in the central nervous system: challenges in making stem cell therapy a viable clinical strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    Over recent years, there has been a great deal of interest in the prospects of stem cell-based therapies for the treatment of nervous system disorders. The eagerness of scientists, clinicians, and spin-out companies to develop new therapies led to premature clinical trials in human patients, and now the initial excitement has largely turned to skepticism. Rather than embracing a defeatist attitude or pressing blindly ahead, I argue it is time to evaluate the challenges encountered by regenerative medicine in the central nervous system and the progress that is being made to solve these problems. In the twenty years since the adult brain was discovered to have an endogenous regenerative capacity, much basic research has been done to elucidate mechanisms controlling proliferation and cellular identity; how stem cells may be directed into neuronal lineages; genetic, pharmacological, and behavioral interventions that modulate neurogenic activity; and the exact nature of limitations to regeneration in the adult, aged, diseased and injured CNS. These findings should prove valuable in designing realistic clinical strategies to improve the prospects of stem cell-based therapies. In this review, I discuss how basic research continues to play a critical role in identifying both barriers and potential routes to regenerative therapy in the CNS.

  13. Characterization of Rat Hair Follicle Stem Cells Selected by Vario Magnetic Activated Cell Sorting System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Enyi; Lian, Xiaohua; Chen, Wei; Yang, Tian; Yang, Li

    2009-01-01

    Hair follicle stem cells (HfSCs) play crucial roles in hair follicle morphogenesis and hair cycling. These stem cells are self-renewable and have the multi-lineage potential to generate epidermis, sebaceous glands, and hair follicle. The separation and identification of hair follicle stem cells are important for further research in stem cell biology. In this study, we report on the successful enrichment of rat hair follicle stem cells through vario magnetic activated cell sorting (Vario MACS) and the biological characteristics of the stem cells. We chose the HfSCs positive surface markers CD34, α6-integrin and the negative marker CD71 to design four isolation strategies: positive selection with single marker of CD34, positive selection with single marker of α6-integrin, CD71 depletion followed by CD34 positive selection, and CD71 depletion followed by α6-integrin positive selection. The results of flow cytometry analysis showed that all four strategies had ideal effects. Specifically, we conducted a series of researches on HfSCs characterized by their high level of CD34, termed CD34 bri cells, and low to undetectable expression of CD34, termed CD34 dim cells. CD34 bri cells had greater proliferative potential and higher colony-forming ability than CD34 dim cells. Furthermore, CD34 bri cells had some typical characteristics as progenitor cells, such as large nucleus, obvious nucleolus, large nuclear:cytoplasmic ratio and few cytoplasmic organelles. Our findings clearly demonstrated that HfSCs with high purity and viability could be successfully enriched with Vario MACS

  14. Generation of human induced pluripotent stem cell lines from human dermal fibroblasts using a modified RNA system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Ok Uhm

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We generated human induced pluripotent stem cells (KSCBi002-B and KSCBi002-B-1 from the dermal fibroblasts of a donor using a modified RNA-based gene delivery method. According to GTG-banding analysis, the generated KSCBi002-B line has a cytogenetic abnormality (46,XY, t(1;4(q21;q25 that is distinct from that of the donor, whereas KSCBi002-B-1 has a normal karyotype (46,XY. These cell lines can be useful as a model for characterizing the hiPSCs generated by a non-viral and non-integrative system, or as a chromosomal balanced translocation model. These two cell lines are registered and available from the National Stem Cell Bank, Korea National Institute of Health.

  15. Mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus: is the cure for connective tissue diseases within connective tissue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion, Flavio A; Figueroa, Fernando E

    2011-05-11

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are now known to display not only adult stem cell multipotency but also robust anti-inflammatory and regenerative properties. After widespread in vitro and in vivo preclinical testing in several autoimmune disease models, allogenic MSCs have been successfully applied in patients with severe treatment-refractory systemic lupus erythematosus. The impressive results of these uncontrolled phase I and II trials - mostly in patients with non-responding renal disease - point to the need to perform controlled multicentric trials. In addition, they suggest that there is much to be learned from the basic and clinical science of MSCs in order to reap the full potential of these multifaceted progenitor cells in the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  16. Aiming to Meet Workforce Needs: An Evaluation of the Economic and Workforce Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jez, Su Jin; Adan, Sara

    2016-01-01

    California's dynamic economy depends on having a large and skilled workforce; consequently, the state must continually support and refine efforts to provide workers with employer-valued competencies. Given the wide range of regional and state needs across this vast state, ensuring that the workforce has the training to keep up with labor market…

  17. The Rural Obstetric Workforce in US Hospitals: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhimannil, Katy B.; Casey, Michelle M.; Hung, Peiyin; Han, Xinxin; Prasad, Shailendra; Moscovice, Ira S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to describe the types and combinations of clinicians who are delivering babies in rural hospitals, their employment status, the relationship between hospital birth volume and staffing models, and the staffing challenges faced by rural hospitals. Methods We conducted a telephone survey of 306 rural hospitals in 9 states: Colorado, Iowa, Kentucky, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Vermont, Washington, and Wisconsin, from November 2013-March 2014 to assess their obstetric workforce. Bivariate associations between hospitals’ annual birth volume and obstetric workforce characteristics were examined, as well as qualitative analysis of workforce changes and staffing challenges. Findings Hospitals with lower birth volume (< 240 births per year) are more likely to have family physicians and general surgeons attending deliveries, while those with a higher birth volume more frequently have obstetricians and midwives attending deliveries. Reported staffing challenges include scheduling, training, census fluctuation, recruitment and retention, and intra-hospital relationships. Conclusions Individual hospitals working in isolation may struggle to address staffing challenges. Federal and state policy makers, regional collaboratives, and health care delivery systems can facilitate solutions through programs such as telehealth, simulation training, and interprofessional education. PMID:25808202

  18. Workforce Optimization for Bank Operation Centers: A Machine Learning Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sefik Ilkin Serengil

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Online Banking Systems evolved and improved in recent years with the use of mobile and online technologies, performing money transfer transactions on these channels can be done without delay and human interaction, however commercial customers still tend to transfer money on bank branches due to several concerns. Bank Operation Centers serve to reduce the operational workload of branches. Centralized management also offers personalized service by appointed expert employees in these centers. Inherently, workload volume of money transfer transactions changes dramatically in hours. Therefore, work-force should be planned instantly or early to save labor force and increase operational efficiency. This paper introduces a hybrid multi stage approach for workforce planning in bank operation centers by the application of supervised and unsu-pervised learning algorithms. Expected workload would be predicted as supervised learning whereas employees are clus-tered into different skill groups as unsupervised learning to match transactions and proper employees. Finally, workforce optimization is analyzed for proposed approach on production data.

  19. Building allied health workforce capacity: a strategic approach to workforce innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerville, Lisa; Davis, Annette; Elliott, Andrea L; Terrill, Desiree; Austin, Nicole; Philip, Kathleen

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify areas where allied health assistants (AHAs) are not working to their full scope of practice in order to improve the effectiveness of the allied health workforce. Qualitative data collected via focus groups identified suitable AHA tasks and a quantitative survey with allied health professionals (AHPs) measured the magnitude of work the current AHP workforce spends undertaking these tasks. Quantification survey results indicate that Victoria's AHP workforce spends up to 17% of time undertaking tasks that could be delegated to an AHA who has relevant training and adequate supervision. Over half this time is spent on clinical tasks. The skills of AHAs are not being optimally utilised. Significant opportunity exists to reform the current allied health workforce. Such reform should result in increased capacity of the workforce to meet future demands.

  20. Wind Energy Workforce Development: Engineering, Science, & Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesieutre, George A.; Stewart, Susan W.; Bridgen, Marc

    2013-03-29

    Broadly, this project involved the development and delivery of a new curriculum in wind energy engineering at the Pennsylvania State University; this includes enhancement of the Renewable Energy program at the Pennsylvania College of Technology. The new curricula at Penn State includes addition of wind energy-focused material in more than five existing courses in aerospace engineering, mechanical engineering, engineering science and mechanics and energy engineering, as well as three new online graduate courses. The online graduate courses represent a stand-alone Graduate Certificate in Wind Energy, and provide the core of a Wind Energy Option in an online intercollege professional Masters degree in Renewable Energy and Sustainability Systems. The Pennsylvania College of Technology erected a 10 kilowatt Xzeres wind turbine that is dedicated to educating the renewable energy workforce. The entire construction process was incorporated into the Renewable Energy A.A.S. degree program, the Building Science and Sustainable Design B.S. program, and other construction-related coursework throughout the School of Construction and Design Technologies. Follow-on outcomes include additional non-credit opportunities as well as secondary school career readiness events, community outreach activities, and public awareness postings.

  1. [Dentists' workforce in Hungary and international migration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balázs, Péter

    2012-06-01

    In Hungary, cross-national migration in dental care was performed rather by patients from abroad instead of the domestic dentists' migration for working abroad. Actually, this tacitly realized and so-called dental tourism experienced two basic changes. The National Medical Tourism Ltd. arranged the First Conference for Development of Dental Tourism on 21 April 2011. Hungary's prime minister addressed the meeting and finally signed an agreement with the organizing Ltd. about governmental financial support for development of dental tourism. On the other hand, Germany and Austria deleted all restrictions against the free cross-national workforce migration since 1 May this year. For understanding and prognosis of dentists' future migration, it is inevitable to collect and analyse relevant data of the previous years. This study is presenting data obtained from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2010. According to the net outcome, the dentists' human resource system was balanced down to the end of 2010. However, this state is unsure even for the near future, thus preventing the deficit of dentists all necessary measures must be taken to keep up the present level of the domestic dentral service.

  2. Design and Validation of CRISPR/Cas9 Systems for Targeted Gene Modification in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ciaran M; Zhu, Haibao; Davis, Timothy H; Deshmukh, Harshahardhan; Bao, Gang

    2017-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is a powerful tool for precision genome editing. The ability to accurately modify genomic DNA in situ with single nucleotide precision opens up new possibilities for not only basic research but also biotechnology applications and clinical translation. In this chapter, we outline the procedures for design, screening, and validation of CRISPR/Cas9 systems for targeted modification of coding sequences in the human genome and how to perform genome editing in induced pluripotent stem cells with high efficiency and specificity.

  3. Recent trends in the U.S. Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (BSSR workforce.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyungjo Hur

    Full Text Available While behavioral and social sciences occupations comprise one of the largest portions of the "STEM" workforce, most studies of diversity in STEM overlook this population, focusing instead on fields such as biomedical or physical sciences. This study evaluates major demographic trends and productivity in the behavioral and social sciences research (BSSR workforce in the United States during the past decade. Our analysis shows that the demographic trends for different BSSR fields vary. In terms of gender balance, there is no single trend across all BSSR fields; rather, the problems are field-specific, and disciplines such as economics and political science continue to have more men than women. We also show that all BSSR fields suffer from a lack of racial and ethnic diversity. The BSSR workforce is, in fact, less representative of racial and ethnic minorities than are biomedical sciences or engineering. Moreover, in many BSSR subfields, minorities are less likely to receive funding. We point to various funding distribution patterns across different demographic groups of BSSR scientists, and discuss several policy implications.

  4. Gastrointestinal toxicity, systemic inflammation, and liver biochemistry in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordan, Karina; Pontoppidan, Peter; Uhlving, Hilde Hylland

    2017-01-01

    Liver toxicity is frequently seen in relation to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), but pathogenesis and the risk factors are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate associations between liver toxicity, gastrointestinal toxicity, and levels of immun...

  5. Gastrointestinal toxicity, systemic inflammation, and liver biochemistry in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver toxicity is frequently seen in relation to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), but pathogenesis and the risk factors are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate associations between liver toxicity, gastrointestinal toxicity, and levels of immune-r...

  6. Successful autologous Stem Cell transplantation in a woman with Severe Systemic Sclerosis, refractory to immunosuppressive therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, Elsa; Arbelaez, Ana M; Avila P, Luz M; Benjamin O, Juan Manuel

    2009-01-01

    The following case presents a 49 year-old patient with diffuse SSc and poor evolution given by rapidly progressive of severe skin and lung involvement, who had undergone autologous stem cell transplantation in December 2008. Sustained improvement of skin thickening and of major organ involvement was achieved at six months.

  7. Stem and Progenitor Cell-Based Therapy of the Central Nervous System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldman, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    A variety of neurological disorders are attractive targets for stem and progenitor cell-based therapy. Yet many conditions are not, whether by virtue of an inhospitable disease environment, poorly understood pathophysiology, or poor alignment of donor cell capabilities with patient needs. Moreove...

  8. Aneuploidy in stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Martinez, Jorge; Bakker, Bjorn; Schukken, Klaske M; Simon, Judith E; Foijer, Floris

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells hold enormous promise for regenerative medicine as well as for engineering of model systems to study diseases and develop new drugs. The discovery of protocols that allow for generating induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs) from somatic cells has brought this promise steps closer to

  9. IAEA Support for Building-Up a Highly Skilled Workforce Necessary for an Effective State System of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunegger-Guelich, A.; Cisar, V.; Crete, J.-M.; Stevens, R.

    2015-01-01

    The need for highly qualified and well trained experts in the area of nuclear safeguards and non-proliferation has been emphasized at several International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) General Conferences and Board of Governors' meetings. To meet this need, the IAEA has developed a training programme dedicated to assisting Member States in building-up knowledge, skills and attitudes required for the sustainable establishment and maintenance of an effective State system of accounting for and control of nuclear material. The IAEA training programme in the area of nuclear safeguards and non-proliferation is designed for experts in governmental organizations, regulatory bodies, utilities and relevant industries and is provided on a regular basis at the regional and international level and, upon request, at the national level. It is based on training needs assessed, inter alia, during relevant IAEA advisory services and is updated periodically by applying the Systematic Approach to Training (SAT). In the framework of this human resources assistance programme, the IAEA also facilitates fellowship programmes for young professionals, regularly hosts the IAEA safeguards traineeship programme and supports safeguards related outreach activities organized by donor countries, universities or other institutions. This paper provides an overview of the IAEA's efforts in the area of nuclear safeguards and non-proliferation training and education, including assistance to Member States' initiatives and nuclear education networks, focusing on the development and delivery of nuclear safeguards training and academic courses. Further, it discusses the important role of IAEA advisory missions and other mechanisms that significantly contribute to the continuous improvement of the IAEA Member States training in the area of nuclear safeguards and non-proliferation. Finally, it outlines the forthcoming eLearning module on Safeguards that will complement the existing training

  10. Types of Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stem Cell Glossary Search Toggle Nav Types of Stem Cells Stem cells are the foundation from which all ... Learn About Stem Cells > Types of Stem Cells Stem cells Stem cells are the foundation for every organ ...

  11. STEM based learning to facilitate middle school students’ conceptual change, creativity and collaboration in organization of living system topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustaman, N. Y.; Afianti, E.; Maryati, S.

    2018-05-01

    A study using one group pre-post-test experimental design on Life organization system topic was carried out to investigate student’s tendency in learning abstract concept, their creativity and collaboration in designing and producing cell models through STEM-based learning. A number of seventh grade students in Cianjur district were involved as research subjects (n=34). Data were collected using two tier test for tracing changes in student conception before and after the application of STEM-based learning, and rubrics in creativity design (adopted from Torrance) and product on cell models (individually, in group), and rubric for self-assessment and observed skills on collaboration adapted from Marzano’s for life-long learning. Later the data obtained were analyzed qualitatively by interpreting the tendency of data presented in matrix sorted by gender. Research findings showed that the percentage of student’s scientific concept mastery is moderate in general. Their creativity in making a cell model design varied in category (expressing, emergent, excellent, not yet evident). Student’s collaboration varied from excellent, fair, good, less once, to less category in designing cell model. It was found that STEM based learning can facilitate students conceptual change, creativity and collaboration.

  12. Neuromuscular junction formation between human stem-cell-derived motoneurons and rat skeletal muscle in a defined system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiufang; Das, Mainak; Rumsey, John; Gonzalez, Mercedes; Stancescu, Maria; Hickman, James

    2010-12-01

    To date, the coculture of motoneurons (MNs) and skeletal muscle in a defined in vitro system has only been described in one study and that was between rat MNs and rat skeletal muscle. No in vitro studies have demonstrated human MN to rat muscle synapse formation, although numerous studies have attempted to implant human stem cells into rat models to determine if they could be of therapeutic use in disease or spinal injury models, although with little evidence of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) formation. In this report, MNs differentiated from human spinal cord stem cells, together with rat skeletal myotubes, were used to build a coculture system to demonstrate that NMJ formation between human MNs and rat skeletal muscles is possible. The culture was characterized by morphology, immunocytochemistry, and electrophysiology, while NMJ formation was demonstrated by immunocytochemistry and videography. This defined system provides a highly controlled reproducible model for studying the formation, regulation, maintenance, and repair of NMJs. The in vitro coculture system developed here will be an important model system to study NMJ development, the physiological and functional mechanism of synaptic transmission, and NMJ- or synapse-related disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, as well as for drug screening and therapy design.

  13. Gender Matters: An Examination of Differential Effects of the College Experience on Degree Attainment in STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayles, Joy Gaston; Ampaw, Frim D.

    2011-01-01

    Although more women than men are enrolled in college within the United States, women remain underrepresented in critical areas of study such as science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). This is particularly concerning given that STEM fields of study are vital to the economic growth and workforce development within the United…

  14. Adaptation of the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Career Interest Survey (STEM-CIS) into Turkish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyunlu Unlu, Zeynep; Dokme, Ilbilge; Unlu, Veli

    2016-01-01

    Problem Statement: Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education has recently become a remarkable research topic, especially in developed countries as a result of the skilled workforce required in the fields of the STEM. Considering that professional tendencies are revealed at early ages, determining students' interest in STEM…

  15. Implementing Out-of-School Time STEM Resources: Best Practices from Public Television

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Christine Andrews

    2013-01-01

    Business leaders, educators, and government leaders agree that, in order for the United States to retain its standing as a world leader, public and private institutions need to work together to develop a well-qualified workforce in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). However, the number of graduates with STEM degrees has not…

  16. A global picture of pharmacy technician and other pharmacy support workforce cadres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Tamara; Brown, Andrew

    Understanding how pharmacy technicians and other pharmacy support workforce cadres assist pharmacists in the healthcare system will facilitate developing health systems with the ability to achieve universal health coverage as it is defined in different country contexts. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the present global variety in the technician and other pharmacy support workforce cadres considering; their scope, roles, supervision, education and legal framework. A structured online survey instrument was administered globally using the Survey Monkey platform, designed to address the following topic areas: roles, responsibilities, supervision, education and legislation. The survey was circulated to International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) member organisations and a variety of global list serves where pharmaceutical services are discussed. 193 entries from 67 countries and territories were included in the final analysis revealing a vast global variety with respect to the pharmacy support workforce. From no pharmacy technicians or other pharmacy support workforce cadres in Japan, through a variety of cadre interactions with pharmacists, to the autonomous practice of pharmacy support workforce cadres in Malawi. From strictly supervised practice with a focus on supply, through autonomous practice for a variety of responsibilities, to independent practice. From complete supervision for all tasks, through geographical varied supervision, to independent practice. From on the job training, through certificate level vocational courses, to 3-4 year diploma programs. From well-regulated and registered, through part regulation with weak implementation, to completely non-regulated contexts. This paper documents wide differences in supervision requirements, education systems and supportive legislation for pharmacy support workforce cadres globally. A more detailed understanding of specific country practice settings is required if the use of pharmacy

  17. Strategic management of the health workforce in developing countries: what have we learned?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fritzen Scott A

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The study of the health workforce has gained in prominence in recent years, as the dynamic interconnections between human resource issues and health system effectiveness have come into sharper focus. This paper reviews lessons relating to strategic management challenges emerging from the growing literature in this area. Workforce issues are strategic: they affect overall system performance as well as the feasibility and sustainability of health reforms. Viewing workforce issues strategically forces health authorities to confront the yawning gaps between policy and implementation in many developing countries. Lessons emerge in four areas. One concerns imbalances in workforce structure, whether from a functional specialization, geographical or facility lens. These imbalances pose a strategic challenge in that authorities must attempt to steer workforce distribution over time using a limited range of policy tools. A second group of lessons concerns the difficulties of central-level steering of the health workforce, often critically weak due to the lack of proper information systems and the complexities of public sector decentralization and service commercialization trends affecting the grassroots. A third cluster examines worker capacity and motivation, often shaped in developing countries as much by the informal norms and incentives as by formal attempts to support workers or to hold them accountable. Finally, a range of reforms centering on service contracting and improvements to human resource management are emerging. Since these have as a necessary (but not sufficient condition some flexibility in personnel practices, recent trends towards the sharing of such functions with local authorities are promising. The paper identifies a number of current lines of productive research, focusing on the relationship between health policy reforms and the local institutional environments in which the workforce, both public and private, is deployed.

  18. Strategic management of the health workforce in developing countries: what have we learned?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzen, Scott A

    2007-02-26

    The study of the health workforce has gained in prominence in recent years, as the dynamic interconnections between human resource issues and health system effectiveness have come into sharper focus. This paper reviews lessons relating to strategic management challenges emerging from the growing literature in this area. Workforce issues are strategic: they affect overall system performance as well as the feasibility and sustainability of health reforms. Viewing workforce issues strategically forces health authorities to confront the yawning gaps between policy and implementation in many developing countries. Lessons emerge in four areas. One concerns imbalances in workforce structure, whether from a functional specialization, geographical or facility lens. These imbalances pose a strategic challenge in that authorities must attempt to steer workforce distribution over time using a limited range of policy tools. A second group of lessons concerns the difficulties of central-level steering of the health workforce, often critically weak due to the lack of proper information systems and the complexities of public sector decentralization and service commercialization trends affecting the grassroots.A third cluster examines worker capacity and motivation, often shaped in developing countries as much by the informal norms and incentives as by formal attempts to support workers or to hold them accountable. Finally, a range of reforms centering on service contracting and improvements to human resource management are emerging. Since these have as a necessary (but not sufficient) condition some flexibility in personnel practices, recent trends towards the sharing of such functions with local authorities are promising. The paper identifies a number of current lines of productive research, focusing on the relationship between health policy reforms and the local institutional environments in which the workforce, both public and private, is deployed.

  19. A fully defined and scalable 3D culture system for human pluripotent stem cell expansion and differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yuguo; Schaffer, David V.

    2013-12-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, are promising for numerous biomedical applications, such as cell replacement therapies, tissue and whole-organ engineering, and high-throughput pharmacology and toxicology screening. Each of these applications requires large numbers of cells of high quality; however, the scalable expansion and differentiation of hPSCs, especially for clinical utilization, remains a challenge. We report a simple, defined, efficient, scalable, and good manufacturing practice-compatible 3D culture system for hPSC expansion and differentiation. It employs a thermoresponsive hydrogel that combines easy manipulation and completely defined conditions, free of any human- or animal-derived factors, and entailing only recombinant protein factors. Under an optimized protocol, the 3D system enables long-term, serial expansion of multiple hPSCs lines with a high expansion rate (∼20-fold per 5-d passage, for a 1072-fold expansion over 280 d), yield (∼2.0 × 107 cells per mL of hydrogel), and purity (∼95% Oct4+), even with single-cell inoculation, all of which offer considerable advantages relative to current approaches. Moreover, the system enabled 3D directed differentiation of hPSCs into multiple lineages, including dopaminergic neuron progenitors with a yield of ∼8 × 107 dopaminergic progenitors per mL of hydrogel and ∼80-fold expansion by the end of a 15-d derivation. This versatile system may be useful at numerous scales, from basic biological investigation to clinical development.

  20. A universal system for highly efficient cardiac differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells that eliminates interline variability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul W Burridge

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The production of cardiomyocytes from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC holds great promise for patient-specific cardiotoxicity drug testing, disease modeling, and cardiac regeneration. However, existing protocols for the differentiation of hiPSC to the cardiac lineage are inefficient and highly variable. We describe a highly efficient system for differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESC and hiPSC to the cardiac lineage. This system eliminated the variability in cardiac differentiation capacity of a variety of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC, including hiPSC generated from CD34(+ cord blood using non-viral, non-integrating methods.We systematically and rigorously optimized >45 experimental variables to develop a universal cardiac differentiation system that produced contracting human embryoid bodies (hEB with an improved efficiency of 94.7±2.4% in an accelerated nine days from four hESC and seven hiPSC lines tested, including hiPSC derived from neonatal CD34(+ cord blood and adult fibroblasts using non-integrating episomal plasmids. This cost-effective differentiation method employed forced aggregation hEB formation in a chemically defined medium, along with staged exposure to physiological (5% oxygen, and optimized concentrations of mesodermal morphogens BMP4 and FGF2, polyvinyl alcohol, serum, and insulin. The contracting hEB derived using these methods were composed of high percentages (64-89% of cardiac troponin I(+ cells that displayed ultrastructural properties of functional cardiomyocytes and uniform electrophysiological profiles responsive to cardioactive drugs.This efficient and cost-effective universal system for cardiac differentiation of hiPSC allows a potentially unlimited production of functional cardiomyocytes suitable for application to hPSC-based drug development, cardiac disease modeling, and the future generation of clinically-safe nonviral human cardiac cells for regenerative medicine.

  1. Systemic administration of mesenchymal stem cells combined with parathyroid hormone therapy synergistically regenerates multiple rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn Yakubovich, Doron; Sheyn, Dmitriy; Bez, Maxim; Schary, Yeshai; Yalon, Eran; Sirhan, Afeef; Amira, May; Yaya, Alin; De Mel, Sandra; Da, Xiaoyu; Ben-David, Shiran; Tawackoli, Wafa; Ley, Eric J; Gazit, Dan; Gazit, Zulma; Pelled, Gadi

    2017-03-09

    A devastating condition that leads to trauma-related morbidity, multiple rib fractures, remain a serious unmet clinical need. Systemic administration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been shown to regenerate various tissues. We hypothesized that parathyroid hormone (PTH) therapy would enhance MSC homing and differentiation, ultimately leading to bone formation that would bridge rib fractures. The combination of human MSCs (hMSCs) and a clinically relevant PTH dose was studied using immunosuppressed rats. Segmental defects were created in animals' fifth and sixth ribs. The rats were divided into four groups: a negative control group, in which animals received vehicle alone; the PTH-only group, in which animals received daily subcutaneous injections of 4 μg/kg teriparatide, a pharmaceutical derivative of PTH; the hMSC-only group, in which each animal received five injections of 2 × 10 6 hMSCs; and the hMSC + PTH group, in which animals received both treatments. Longitudinal in vivo monitoring of bone formation was performed biweekly using micro-computed tomography (μCT), followed by histological analysis. Fluorescently-dyed hMSCs were counted using confocal microscopy imaging of histological samples harvested 8 weeks after surgery. PTH significantly augmented the number of hMSCs that homed to the fracture site. Immunofluorescence of osteogenic markers, osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein, showed that PTH induced cell differentiation in both exogenously administered cells and resident cells. μCT scans revealed a significant increase in bone volume only in the hMSC + PTH group, beginning by the 4 th week after surgery. Eight weeks after surgery, 35% of ribs in the hMSC + PTH group had complete bone bridging, whereas there was complete bridging in only 6.25% of ribs (one rib) in the PTH-only group and in none of the ribs in the other groups. Based on the μCT scans, biomechanical analysis using the micro-finite element method demonstrated that

  2. Human adipose mesenchymal stem cells as potent anti-fibrosis therapy for systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria, Alexandre T J; Toupet, Karine; Maumus, Marie; Fonteneau, Guillaume; Le Quellec, Alain; Jorgensen, Christian; Guilpain, Philippe; Noël, Danièle

    2016-06-01

    Displaying immunosuppressive and trophic properties, mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) are being evaluated as promising therapeutic options in a variety of autoimmune and degenerative diseases. Although benefits may be expected in systemic sclerosis (SSc), a rare autoimmune disease with fibrosis-related mortality, MSC have yet to be evaluated in this specific condition. While autologous approaches could be inappropriate because of functional alterations in MSC from patients, the objective of the present study was to evaluate allogeneic and xenogeneic MSC in the HOCl-induced model of diffuse SSc. We also questioned the source of human MSC and compared bone marrow- (hBM-MSC) and adipose-derived MSC (hASC). HOCl-challenged BALB/c mice received intravenous injection of BM-MSC from syngeneic BALB/c or allogeneic C57BL/6 mice, and xenogeneic hBM-MSC or hASC (3 donors each). Skin thickness was measured during the experiment. At euthanasia, histology, immunostaining, collagen determination and RT-qPCR were performed in skin and lungs. Xenogeneic hBM-MSC were as effective as allogeneic or syngeneic BM-MSC in decreasing skin thickness, expression of Col1, Col3, α-Sma transcripts, and collagen content in skin and lungs. This anti-fibrotic effect was not associated with MSC migration to injured skin or with long-term MSC survival. Interestingly, compared with hBM-MSC, hASC were significantly more efficient in reducing skin fibrosis, which was related to a stronger reduction of TNFα, IL1β, and enhanced ratio of Mmp1/Timp1 in skin and lung tissues. Using primary cells isolated from 3 murine and 6 human individuals, this preclinical study demonstrated similar therapeutic effects using allogeneic or xenogeneic BM-MSC while ASC exerted potent anti-inflammatory and remodeling properties. This sets the proof-of-concept prompting to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of allogeneic ASC in SSc patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A human thymic epithelial cell culture system for the promotion of lymphopoiesis from hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudette-Zlatanova, Britte C; Knight, Katherine L; Zhang, Shubin; Stiff, Patrick J; Zúñiga-Pflücker, Juan Carlos; Le, Phong T

    2011-05-01

    A human thymic epithelial cell (TEC) line expressing human leukocyte antigen-ABC and human leukocyte antigen-DR was engineered to overexpress murine Delta-like 1 (TEC-Dl1) for the purpose of establishing a human culture system that supports T lymphopoiesis from hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). Cord blood or bone marrow HPCs were co-cultured with either the parental TEC line expressing low levels of the Notch ligands, Delta-like 1 and Delta-like 4, or with TEC-Dl1 to determine if these cell lines support human lymphopoiesis. In co-cultures with cord blood or bone marrow HPCs, TEC-Dl1 cells promote de novo generation of CD7(pos)CD1a(pos) T-lineage committed cells. Most CD7(pos)CD1a(hi) cells are CD4(pos)CD8(pos) double-positive (DP). We found that TEC-Dl1 cells are insufficient to generate mature CD3(hi) CD4(pos) or CD3(hi) CD8(pos) single-positive (SP) T cells from the CD4(pos)CD8(pos) DP T cells; however, we detected CD3(lo) cells within the DP and SP CD4 and CD8 populations. The CD3(lo) SP cells expressed lower levels of interleukin-2Rα and interleukin-7Rα compared to CD3(lo) DP cells. In contrast to the TEC-Dl1 line, the parental TEC-84 line expressing low levels of human Notch ligands permits HPC differentiation to the B-cell lineage. We report for the first time a human TEC line that supports lymphopoiesis from cord blood and bone marrow HPC. The TEC cell lines described herein provide a novel human thymic stroma model to study the contribution of human leukocyte antigen molecules and Notch ligands to T-cell commitment and maturation and could be utilized to promote lymphopoiesis for immune cell therapy. Copyright © 2011 ISEH - Society for Hematology and Stem Cells. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Changing Global Context of Virtual Workforce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Ejiwale

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The technological revolution occurring in today’s market place has made it possible for many companies to be innovative about the way and where work is done. To get the job done, due to digital revolution, companies have turned to virtual workforce to harness the benefits of connectivity and effective information sharing among stakeholders to get the job done. More important, the success of coordinating work among a virtual workforce for profitability in a rapidly changing global environment depends on “effective indirect communication” between the leadership and the virtual workforce. This article will address the importance of effective communication as a necessary tool for the success of e-leadership, productivity improvement in virtual work environment.

  5. Building the biomedical data science workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Michelle C; Bourne, Philip E

    2017-07-01

    This article describes efforts at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) from 2013 to 2016 to train a national workforce in biomedical data science. We provide an analysis of the Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) training program strengths and weaknesses with an eye toward future directions aimed at any funder and potential funding recipient worldwide. The focus is on extramurally funded programs that have a national or international impact rather than the training of NIH staff, which was addressed by the NIH's internal Data Science Workforce Development Center. From its inception, the major goal of BD2K was to narrow the gap between needed and existing biomedical data science skills. As biomedical research increasingly relies on computational, mathematical, and statistical thinking, supporting the training and education of the workforce of tomorrow requires new emphases on analytical skills. From 2013 to 2016, BD2K jump-started training in this area for all levels, from graduate students to senior researchers.

  6. Anaesthesia medical workforce in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, S Y

    2006-04-01

    This survey was conducted in all 28 New Zealand District Health Boards with a response rate of 100%. The Clinical Directors of Departments of Anaesthesia were asked to quantify their current anaesthesia service delivery and to assess their workforce level. Over half of the District Health Boards reported understaffing, fifty percent occurring in hospitals of provincial cities or towns with an inability to attract specialist anaesthesia staff. Financial constraint was the other main reason for understaffing. With the information from the survey, an attempt was made to predict future New Zealand anaesthesia workforce requirements. A model for Australasia established by Baker in 1997 was used. In comparing this survey to previous studies, there is evidence that the nature and expectations of the anaesthesia workforce are changing as well as the work environment. Currently, there is no indication that anaesthesia specialist training numbers should be reduced. Close, ongoing monitoring and planning are essential to ensure future demands for anaesthesia services can be met.

  7. The laboratory workforce shortage: a managerial perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortelyou-Ward, Kendall; Ramirez, Bernardo; Rotarius, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    Most clinical laboratories in the nation report severe difficulties in recruitment and retention of most types of personnel. Other important factors impacting this problem include work complexities, increased automation, and a graying workforce. As a further challenge, institutional needs for clinical laboratory personnel are expected to grow significantly in the next decade. This article examines the current situation of the clinical laboratory workforce. It analyzes the different types of personnel; the managerial, supervision, and line positions that are key for different types of laboratories; the job outlook and recent projections for different types of staff; and the current issues, trends, and challenges of the laboratory workforce. Laboratory managers need to take action with strategies suggested for overcoming these challenges. Most importantly, they need to become transformational leaders by developing effective staffing models, fostering healthy and productive work environments, and creating value with a strategic management culture and implementation of knowledge management.

  8. Mental Health Workforce Change through Social Work Education: A California Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Gwen; Morris, Meghan Brenna; Sirojudin, Sirojudin

    2013-01-01

    The 2004 California Mental Health Services Act requires large-scale system change in the public mental health system through a shift to recovery-oriented services for diverse populations. This article describes an innovative strategy for workforce recruitment and retention to create and sustain these systemic changes. The California Social Work…

  9. Geographic Analysis of the Radiation Oncology Workforce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aneja, Sanjay; Smith, Benjamin D.; Gross, Cary P.; Wilson, Lynn D.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Roberts, Kenneth; Yu, James B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate trends in the geographic distribution of the radiation oncology (RO) workforce. Methods and Materials: We used the 1995 and 2007 versions of the Area Resource File to map the ratio of RO to the population aged 65 years or older (ROR) within different health service areas (HSA) within the United States. We used regression analysis to find associations between population variables and 2007 ROR. We calculated Gini coefficients for ROR to assess the evenness of RO distribution and compared that with primary care physicians and total physicians. Results: There was a 24% increase in the RO workforce from 1995 to 2007. The overall growth in the RO workforce was less than that of primary care or the overall physician workforce. The mean ROR among HSAs increased by more than one radiation oncologist per 100,000 people aged 65 years or older, from 5.08 per 100,000 to 6.16 per 100,000. However, there remained consistent geographic variability concerning RO distribution, specifically affecting the non-metropolitan HSAs. Regression analysis found higher ROR in HSAs that possessed higher education (p = 0.001), higher income (p < 0.001), lower unemployment rates (p < 0.001), and higher minority population (p = 0.022). Gini coefficients showed RO distribution less even than for both primary care physicians and total physicians (0.326 compared with 0.196 and 0.292, respectively). Conclusions: Despite a modest growth in the RO workforce, there exists persistent geographic maldistribution of radiation oncologists allocated along socioeconomic and racial lines. To solve problems surrounding the RO workforce, issues concerning both gross numbers and geographic distribution must be addressed.

  10. Geographic Analysis of the Radiation Oncology Workforce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aneja, Sanjay [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, CT (United States); Smith, Benjamin D. [University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Gross, Cary P. [Cancer Outcomes, Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, CT (United States); Department of General Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Wilson, Lynn D. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Roberts, Kenneth [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Yu, James B., E-mail: james.b.yu@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate trends in the geographic distribution of the radiation oncology (RO) workforce. Methods and Materials: We used the 1995 and 2007 versions of the Area Resource File to map the ratio of RO to the population aged 65 years or older (ROR) within different health service areas (HSA) within the United States. We used regression analysis to find associations between population variables and 2007 ROR. We calculated Gini coefficients for ROR to assess the evenness of RO distribution and compared that with primary care physicians and total physicians. Results: There was a 24% increase in the RO workforce from 1995 to 2007. The overall growth in the RO workforce was less than that of primary care or the overall physician workforce. The mean ROR among HSAs increased by more than one radiation oncologist per 100,000 people aged 65 years or older, from 5.08 per 100,000 to 6.16 per 100,000. However, there remained consistent geographic variability concerning RO distribution, specifically affecting the non-metropolitan HSAs. Regression analysis found higher ROR in HSAs that possessed higher education (p = 0.001), higher income (p < 0.001), lower unemployment rates (p < 0.001), and higher minority population (p = 0.022). Gini coefficients showed RO distribution less even than for both primary care physicians and total physicians (0.326 compared with 0.196 and 0.292, respectively). Conclusions: Despite a modest growth in the RO workforce, there exists persistent geographic maldistribution of radiation oncologists allocated along socioeconomic and racial lines. To solve problems surrounding the RO workforce, issues concerning both gross numbers and geographic distribution must be addressed.

  11. WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT: States and Localities Increasingly Coordinate Services for TANF Clients, but Better Information Needed on Effective Approaches

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    In 1998, the Congress passed the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) to unify a fragmented employment and training system, requiring states to provide most federally funded employment-rated services through one- stop centers...

  12. Geoscience and the 21st Century Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manduca, C. A.; Bralower, T. J.; Blockstein, D.; Keane, C. M.; Kirk, K. B.; Schejbal, D.; Wilson, C. E.

    2013-12-01

    Geoscience knowledge and skills play new roles in the workforce as our society addresses the challenges of living safely and sustainably on Earth. As a result, we expect a wider range of future career opportunities for students with education in the geosciences and related fields. A workshop offered by the InTeGrate STEP Center on 'Geoscience and the 21st Century Workforce' brought together representatives from 24 programs with a substantial geoscience component, representatives from different employment sectors, and workforce scholars to explore the intersections between geoscience education and employment. As has been reported elsewhere, employment in energy, environmental and extractive sectors for geoscientists with core geology, quantitative and communication skills is expected to be robust over the next decade as demand for resources grow and a significant part of the current workforce retires. Relatively little is known about employment opportunities in emerging areas such as green energy or sustainability consulting. Employers at the workshop from all sectors are seeking the combination of strong technical, quantitative, communication, time management, and critical thinking skills. The specific technical skills are highly specific to the employer and employment needs. Thus there is not a single answer to the question 'What skills make a student employable?'. Employers at this workshop emphasized the value of data analysis, quantitative, and problem solving skills over broad awareness of policy issues. Employers value the ability to articulate an appropriate, effective, creative solution to problems. Employers are also very interested in enthusiasm and drive. Participants felt that the learning outcomes that their programs have in place were in line with the needs expressed by employers. Preparing students for the workforce requires attention to professional skills, as well as to the skills needed to identify career pathways and land a job. This critical

  13. Sultanate of Oman: building a dental workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Jennifer E; Manickam, Sivakumar; Wilson, Nairn H F

    2015-06-22

    A medium- and long-term perspective is required in human resource development to ensure that future needs and demands for oral healthcare are met by the most appropriate health professionals. This paper presents a case study of the Sultanate of Oman, one of the Gulf States with a current population of 3.8 million, which has initiated dental training through the creation of a dental college. The objectives of this paper are first to describe trends in the dental workforce in Oman from 1990 to date and compare the dental workforce with its medical counterparts in Oman and with other countries, and second, to consider future dental workforce in the Sultanate. Data were collected from published sources, including the Ministry of Health (MoH), Ministry of Manpower (MoM), and Ministry of National Economy (MoNE)-Sultanate of Oman; the World Health Organization (WHO); World Bank; and the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). Dentist-to-population ratios were compared nationally, regionally and globally for medicine and dentistry. Dental graduate outputs were mapped onto the local supply. Future trends were examined using population growth predictions, exploring the expected impact in relation to global, regional and European workforce densities. Population growth in Oman is increasing at a rate of over 2% per year. Oman has historically been dependent upon an expatriate dental workforce with only 24% of the dentist workforce Omani in 2010 (n = 160). Subsequent to Oman Dental College (ODC) starting to qualify dental (BDS) graduates in 2012, there is an increase in the annual growth of the dentist workforce. On the assumption that all future dental graduates from ODC have an opportunity to practise in Oman, ODC graduates will boost the annual Omani dentist growth rate starting at 28% per annum from 2012 onwards, building capacity towards global (n = 1711) and regional levels (Gulf State: n = 2167) in the medium term. The output of dental graduates from Oman Dental College is

  14. An approach to assess trends of pharmacist workforce production and density rate in Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milicevic, Milena Santric; Matejic, Bojana; Terzic-Supic, Zorica; Dedovic, Neveka; Novak, Sonja

    2010-01-01

    The policy dialog on human resource in health care is one of the central issues of the ongoing health care system reform in the Republic of Serbia. Pharmacists are the third largest health care professional group, after nurses and doctors. This study's objective was to analyze population coverage with pharmacists employed in the public sector of health care system of Serbia during 1961 - 2007, and to project their density by 2017. In this respect, additionally, time-series of annual number of enrolled and graduate pharmacy students were modelled. Time trends of routinely collected national statistical data, concerning the pharmacists, were analyzed by join point regression program, according to grid-search method. During the observed period of time, in Serbia, pharmacist workforce production and deployment trends were generally positive, but with different annual dynamic. Key findings were the slow rise of pharmacist workforce density rates per 100,000 population; the insufficient balance between pharmacists workforce supply side (annual number of enrolled and graduated students) and the public health care sector's ability to absorb annual number of pharmacy graduates. For ten years ahead, density rates of publicly active pharmacist workforce would probably increase for 46%, if no policy interventions were planned to adverse trends of pharmacist workforce production and deployment in public health care sector. The study results may be useful for variety of stakeholders to better understand how and why the supply and deployment of pharmacists were changing; and that the coordination among policy interventions is a crucial successes factor for a health workforce development plan implementation. The repercussions of any changes made to the pharmacy workforce, need to be considered carefully in advance.

  15. Umbilical cord blood banking in the worldwide hematopoietic stem cell transplantation system: perspectives for Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalynychenko, T O

    2017-09-01

    Significant progress in the promotion of procedural technologies associated with the transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells caused a rapid increase in activity. The exchange of hematopoietic stem cells for unrelated donor transplantations is now much easier due to the relevant international professional structures and organizations established to support cooperation and standard setting, as well as rules for the functioning of both national donor registries and cord blood banks. These processes are increasing every year and are contributing to the outpacing rates of development in this area. Products within their country should be regulated by the competent government authorities. This study analyzes the work of international and national levels of support for transplantation activity in the field of unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the standardization order of technologies, as well as data that justify the need to create a network of donated umbilical cord blood banks in Ukraine as a factor in the development of allogeneic transplantation. This will promote the accessibility of international standards for the treatment of serious diseases for Ukrainian citizens.

  16. A model linking clinical workforce skill mix planning to health and health care dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDonnell Geoff

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In an attempt to devise a simpler computable tool to assist workforce planners in determining what might be an appropriate mix of health service skills, our discussion led us to consider the implications of skill mixing and workforce composition beyond the 'stock and flow' approach of much workforce planning activity. Methods Taking a dynamic systems approach, we were able to address the interactions, delays and feedbacks that influence the balance between the major components of health and health care. Results We linked clinical workforce requirements to clinical workforce workload, taking into account the requisite facilities, technologies, other material resources and their funding to support clinical care microsystems; gave recognition to productivity and quality issues; took cognisance of policies, governance and power concerns in the establishment and operation of the health care system; and, going back to the individual, gave due attention to personal behaviour and biology within the socio-political family environment. Conclusion We have produced the broad endogenous systems model of health and health care which will enable human resource planners to operate within real world variables. We are now considering the development of simple, computable national versions of this model.

  17. A model linking clinical workforce skill mix planning to health and health care dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masnick, Keith; McDonnell, Geoff

    2010-04-30

    In an attempt to devise a simpler computable tool to assist workforce planners in determining what might be an appropriate mix of health service skills, our discussion led us to consider the implications of skill mixing and workforce composition beyond the 'stock and flow' approach of much workforce planning activity. Taking a dynamic systems approach, we were able to address the interactions, delays and feedbacks that influence the balance between the major components of health and health care. We linked clinical workforce requirements to clinical workforce workload, taking into account the requisite facilities, technologies, other material resources and their funding to support clinical care microsystems; gave recognition to productivity and quality issues; took cognisance of policies, governance and power concerns in the establishment and operation of the health care system; and, going back to the individual, gave due attention to personal behaviour and biology within the socio-political family environment. We have produced the broad endogenous systems model of health and health care which will enable human resource planners to operate within real world variables. We are now considering the development of simple, computable national versions of this model.

  18. An episomal vector-based CRISPR/Cas9 system for highly efficient gene knockout in human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yifang; Wang, Daqi; Lan, Feng; Wei, Gang; Ni, Ting; Chai, Renjie; Liu, Dong; Hu, Shijun; Li, Mingqing; Li, Dajin; Wang, Hongyan; Wang, Yongming

    2017-05-24

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) represent a unique opportunity for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying complex traits and diseases. CRISPR/Cas9 is a powerful tool to introduce genetic mutations into the hPSCs for loss-of-function studies. Here, we developed an episomal vector-based CRISPR/Cas9 system, which we called epiCRISPR, for highly efficient gene knockout in hPSCs. The epiCRISPR system enables generation of up to 100% Insertion/Deletion (indel) rates. In addition, the epiCRISPR system enables efficient double-gene knockout and genomic deletion. To minimize off-target cleavage, we combined the episomal vector technology with double-nicking strategy and recent developed high fidelity Cas9. Thus the epiCRISPR system offers a highly efficient platform for genetic analysis in hPSCs.

  19. The Art of Knowledge Management and Knowledge Transfer to the New Generation of Scientists, Engineers, and Technicians Entering the Workforce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagos, L.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: As a result of an aging workforce at US federal agencies and federal contractors’ workforce, it is projected that over 20% of the current workforce will be retiring over the next decade. Typically, the institutional knowledge and technical expertise is possessed by senior staff members approaching retirement. In many instances, this knowledge is lost once the employee retires; therefore, creating a huge gap in knowledge and knowledge transfer to new employees joining the workforce. Companies and federal agencies should develop methods to not only maintain the corporate knowledge and technical expertise, but also a transfer this valuable knowledge to the next generation of scientist, engineer and technicians entering the workforce. For example, Florida International University supports DOE-EM’s knowledge transfer through the DOE Fellows STEM programme and the development of international technology platform such as the Knowledge Management Information Tool for nuclear decommissioning (KM-IT). This paper will discuss the knowledge transfer issues faced by federal agencies and federal contractors and innovative tools to capture, store, maintain, and transfer the knowledge to the new generation of scientists, engineers and technicians entering the workplace. (author

  20. Stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jukes, Jojanneke; Both, Sanne; Post, Janine; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Karperien, Marcel; de Boer, Jan; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter defines stem cells and their properties. It identifies the major differences between embryonic and adult stem cells. Stem cells can be defined by two properties: the ability to make identical copies of themselves and the ability to form other cell types of the body. These properties are

  1. What's the matter with the information technology workforce?

    OpenAIRE

    Subramaniam, Manimegalai M.; Burnett, Kathleen

    2006-01-01

    Information technology and the information technology workforce are essential to Internet innovation, infrastructure, development, and maintenance. A comprehensive and dynamic definition of information technology will help develop and coordinate interventions to ensure that a viable, diverse, and talented workforce is available to support information technology innovation, development, implementation, maintenance and application. A viable, diverse, and talented workforce is essential if the U...

  2. Private sector approaches to workforce enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendling, Wayne R

    2010-06-01

    This paper addresses the private practice model of dental care delivery in the US. The great majority of dental care services are delivered through this model and thus changes in the model represent a means to substantially change the supply and availability of dental services. The two main forces that change how private practices function are broad economic factors, which alter the demand for dental care and innovations in practice structure and function which alter the supply and cost of services. Economics has long recognized that although there are private market solutions for many issues, not all problems can be addressed through this model. The private practice of dentistry is a private market solution that works for a substantial share of the market. However, the private market may not work to resolve all issues associated with access and utilization. Solutions for some problems call for creative private - public arrangements - another form of innovation; and market-based solutions may not be feasible for each and every problem. This paper discusses these economic factors and innovation as they relate to the private practice of dentistry, with special emphasis on those elements that have increased the capacity of the dental practice to offer services to those with limited means to access fee-based care. Innovations are frequently described as new care delivery models or new workforce models. However, innovation can occur on an ongoing and regular basis as dental practices examine new ways to combine capital and human resources and to leverage the education and skill of the dentists to a greater number of patients. Innovation occurs within a market context as the current and projected economic returns reward the innovation. Innovation can also occur through private-public arrangements. There are indications of available capacity within the existing delivery system to expand service delivery. The Michigan Medicaid Healthy Kids Dental program is discussed as

  3. Will the NP workforce grow in the future? New forecasts and implications for healthcare delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, David I

    2012-07-01

    The nurse practitioner (NP) workforce has been a focus of considerable policy interest recently, particularly as the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act may place additional demands on the healthcare professional workforce. The NP workforce has been growing rapidly in recent years, but fluctuation in enrollments in the past decades has resulted in a wide range of forecasts. To forecast the future NP workforce using a novel method that has been applied to the registered nurse and physician workforces and is robust to fluctuating enrollment trends. An age-cohort regression-based model was applied to the current and historical workforce, which was then forecasted to future years assuming stable age effects and a continuation of recent cohort trends. A total of 6798 NPs who were identified as having completed NP training in the National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses between 1992 and 2008. The future workforce is projected to grow to 244,000 in 2025, an increase of 94% from 128,000 in 2008. If NPs are defined more restrictively as those who self-identify their position title as "NP," supply is projected to grow from 86,000 to 198,000 (130%) over this period. The large projected increase in NP supply is higher and more grounded than other forecasts and has several implications: NPs will likely fulfill a substantial amount of future demand for care. Furthermore, as the ratio of NPs to Nurse Practitioners to physicians will surely grow, there could be implications for quality of care and for the configuration of future care delivery systems.

  4. Utilizing Local Partnerships to Enhance Workforce Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whikehart, John

    2009-01-01

    The Indiana Center for the Life Sciences, an award-winning partnership between education, government, and the private sector, houses state-of-the-art science labs, classrooms, and industry training space for community college students and local employers. This innovative partnership prepares both the current and future workforce for careers in the…

  5. Managing Workforce Diversity in South African Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, Rita

    2006-01-01

    An attempt is made to assess the effect of human resource diversity in South Africa and provide strategies for managing such diverse institutions. A pilot study using questionnaires was conducted to determine the circumstances surrounding workforce diversity in a number of educational institutions. Thereafter, qualitative interviews provided…

  6. Building a Cybersecurity Workforce with Remote Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nancy; Woodward, Belle

    2013-01-01

    Now more than ever, cybersecurity professionals are in demand and the trend is not expected to change anytime soon. Currently, only a small number of educational programs are funded and equipped to educate cybersecurity professionals and those few programs cannot train a workforce of thousands in a relatively short period of time. Moreover, not…

  7. Assessment of the pharmacist workforce in Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    Method: A national facility based census of the pharmacist workforce was conducted in Ethiopia. Pharmacists' job .... Female. N (%). Total No. of. Pharmacists,. N(%). Population Size. Density of .... 51(13.2). Marital Status. Single. 252 (64.1). Married. 136 (34.6). Divorced ..... Production, attrition and retention: In the memory of.

  8. Wind Energy Technology: Training a Sustainable Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krull, Kimberly W.; Graham, Bruce; Underbakke, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Through innovative teaching and technology, industry and educational institution partnerships, Cloud County Community College is preparing a qualified workforce for the emerging wind industry estimated to create 80,000 jobs by 2020. The curriculum blends on-campus, on-line and distance learning, land-lab, and field training opportunities for…

  9. Assessment of Pharmacists Workforce in Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    Method: A national facility based census of the pharmacist workforce was conducted in Ethiopia. ... pharmacists practice in community, hospitals and other medical .... Higher proportion of female pharmacists than males were working .... Recognition they get for good work. 8 ..... pharmacists' empowerment and organizational.

  10. FORUM Models for increasing the health workforce

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    stewardship of the anticipated growth of private education and services ... The Global Health Workforce Alliance3 recognises the importance of increasing ... Action 2010 - 2014 to advance economic growth and development, to be realised by ... of the private higher education sector must be better understood and supported.

  11. Information Literacy and the Workforce: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a review of reports on information literacy and the workforce. There is a substantial body of literature on information literacy in K-16 educational settings, but there is much less literature on implications for the workplace and job-related lifelong learning. The topical categories of the reports are: the importance of information…

  12. Strategies for Managing a Multigenerational Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iden, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    The multigenerational workforce presents a critical challenge for business managers, and each generation has different expectations. A human resource management study of organizations with more than 500 employees reported 58% of the managers experiencing conflict between younger and older workers. The purpose of this single case study was to…

  13. The Workforce Education and Development in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lung-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Workforce education and development (WED) can be broadly defined as those formal, informal and nonformal activities that prepare people for work. In Taiwan, it includes technological and vocational education (TVE), human resource development (HRD), public vocational training and adult education. In order to promote information exchanges and…

  14. Growing Our Workforce through Business and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauley, Douglas R.; Davidchik, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    In 2004, Central Community College (CCC) established the Mechatronics Education Center (MEC), a regional center of excellence, to help the state address the shortage of skilled technicians in the area of industrial automation. The MEC addresses the needs of the current and future workforce through the implementation of its three main components:…

  15. Georgia's Workforce Development Pipeline: One District's Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Melissa H.; Hufstetler, Tammy L.

    2011-01-01

    Launched in 2006, the Georgia Work Ready initiative seeks to improve the job training and marketability of Georgia's workforce and drive the state's economic growth. Georgia Work Ready is a partnership between the state and the Georgia Chamber of Commerce. Comprised of three components, Georgia's initiative focuses on job profiling, skills…

  16. Return to the workforce following infective endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butt, Jawad H.; Kragholm, Kristian; Dalager-Pedersen, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Background The ability to return to work after infective endocarditis (IE) holds important socioeconomic consequences for both patients and society, yet data on this issue are sparse. We examined return to the workforce and associated factors in IE patients of working age. Methods Using Danish...

  17. Transforming the Early Care and Education Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchiotti, Sara

    2018-01-01

    There is ample opportunity for state boards to improve outcomes for children by strengthening the early care and education workforce and thereby improving the quality of early care and education. Ensuring that ECE professionals have the knowledge, supports, and resources they need to support children's learning is one avenue to improving the…

  18. One Employer's Viewpoint: What Does Our Future Geoscience Workforce Need to Do and Why Will Workforce Diversity Be Key?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudin, M. G.; Summa, L. L.

    2007-12-01

    Global economic growth will continue to result in rising demand for energy, with estimates of 50 percent growth in the world's energy usage by 2030 being commonplace. This challenge to energy producers is compounded by the natural production declines associated with existing oil and gas fields, and so the demands on our future workforce will be extraordinary. There is little doubt that the oil and gas resources we will be utilizing in the future will come from different geographies, will be sourced from different geological systems, and will be the result of using different, more complex technological approaches. Relative growth in production outside of North America and Europe means that there will generally be a premium on students from outside these areas. It also means that an even greater appreciation of non-Western cultures is in order, for employers, faculties, and students. We are already seeing a significant shift in the geological systems that host our resources and this shift is likely permanent. Carbonate systems have become much more important, as have structurally complex terranes, but these changes pale in comparison to an increasing reliance on low permeability, resource-bearing rocks that were not even considered as potential reservoirs 10 years ago. There will doubtless be new tools and measurements which will help us succeed in this new environment, but the most valuable approaches will involve bold, integrated, systemic hypotheses at basinal and planetary scales. The recent publication of global controls on carbonate rock formation represents an early example of such an approach. To generate bold new hypotheses, it is crucial that the scientific community not engage in "groupthink." We think that organizations that promote diversity in ideas and approaches will benefit most, and a diverse workforce is the best guarantor of diverse ideas. Against this background, energy and mineral companies are facing enormous changes in their workforces as the

  19. Chondrogenesis of synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells in gene-transferred co-culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Rohan R; Zhou, Ruijie; Hao, Jinghua; Yeo, Suan Siong; Chooi, Wai Hon; Fan, Jiabing; Wang, Dong-An

    2010-09-01

    A co-culture strategy has been developed in this study wherein rabbit synovial mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs) are co-cultured with growth factor (GF) transfected articular chondrocytes. Toward this end, both SMSCs and early passage rabbit articular chondrocytes that had been adenovirally transduced with transforming growth factor-beta 3 (TGF-beta3) gene were separately encapsulated in alginate beads and co-cultured in the same pool of chondrogenic medium. The chondrocytes act as transfected companion cells (TCCs) providing GF supply to induce chondrogenic differentiation of SMSCs that play the role of therapeutic progenitor cells (TPCs). Against the same TCC based TGF-beta3 release profile, the co-culture was started at different time points (Day 0, Day 10 and Day 20) but made to last for identical periods of exposure (30 days) so that the exposure conditions could be optimized in terms of initiation and duration. Transfection of TCCs prevents the stem cell based TPCs from undergoing the invasive procedure. It also prevents unpredictable complications in the TPCs caused by long-term constitutive over-expression of a GF. The adenovirally transfected TCCs exhibit a transient GF expression which results in a timely termination of GF supply to the TPCs. The TCC-sourced transgenic TGF-beta3 successfully induced chondrogenesis in the TPCs. Real-time PCR results show enhanced expression of cartilage markers and immuno/histochemical staining for Glycosaminoglycans (GAG) and Collagen II also shows abundant extracellular matrix (ECM) production and chondrogenic morphogenesis in the co-cultured TPCs. These results confirm the efficacy of directing stem cell differentiation towards chondrogenesis and cartilage tissue formation by co-culturing them with GF transfected chondrocytes.

  20. Neural Stem Cell-Preserving External-Beam Radiotherapy of Central Nervous System Malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barani, Igor J.; Cuttino, Laurie W.; Benedict, Stanley H.; Todor, Dorin; Bump, Edward A.; Wu Yan; Chung, Theodore D.; Broaddus, William C.; Lin, Peck-Sun

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Recent discoveries have implicated neural stem cells (NSC) as the source of plasticity and repair in the mature mammalian brain. Treatment-induced NSC dysfunction may lead to observed toxicity. This study evaluates the feasibility of NSC-preserving external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A single computed tomography (CT) dataset depicting a right periventricular lesion was used in this study as this location reflects the most problematic geometric arrangement with respect to NSC preservation. Conventional and NSC preserving radiotherapy (RT) plans were generated for the same lesion using two clinical scenarios: cerebral metastatic disease and primary high-grade glioma. Disease-specific target volumes were used. Metastatic disease was conventionally treated with whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) to 3,750 cGy (15 fractions) followed by a single stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) boost of 1,800 cGy to gross disease only. High-grade glioma was treated with conventional opposed lateral and anterior superior oblique beams to 4,600 cGy (23 fractions) followed by a 1,400 cGy (7 fractions) boost. NSC preservation was achieved in both scenarios with inverse-planned intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Results: Cumulative dose reductions of 65% (metastatic disease) and 25% (high-grade glioma) to the total volume of the intracranial NSC compartments were achieved with NSC-preserving IMRT plans. The reduction of entry and exit dose to NSC niches located contralateral to the target contributed most to NSC preservation. Conclusions: Neural stem cells preservation with current external beam radiotherapy techniques is achievable in context of both metastatic brain disease and high-grade glioma, even when the target is located adjacent to a stem cell compartment. Further investigation with clinical trials is warranted to evaluate whether NSC preservation will result in reduced toxicity

  1. First steps towards the successful surface-based cultivation of human embryonic stem cells in hanging drop systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Julia C; Stumpf, Patrick S; Katsen-Globa, Alisa; Sachinidis, Agapios; Hescheler, Jürgen; Zimmermann, Heiko

    2012-11-01

    Miniaturization and parallelization of cell culture procedures are in focus of research in order to develop test platforms with low material consumption and increased standardization for toxicity and drug screenings. The cultivation in hanging drops (HDs) is a convenient and versatile tool for biological applications and represents an interesting model system for the screening applications due to its uniform shape, the advantageous gas supply, and the small volume. However, its application has so far been limited to non-adherent and aggregate forming cells. Here, we describe for the first time the proof-of-principle regarding the adherent cultivation of human embryonic stem cells in HD. For this microcarriers were added to the droplet as dynamic cultivation surfaces resulting in a maintained pluripotency and proliferation capacity for 10 days. This enables the HD technique to be extended to the cultivation of adherence-dependent stem cells. Also, the possible automation of this method by implementation of liquid handling systems opens new possibilities for miniaturized screenings, the improvement of cultivation and differentiation conditions, and toxicity and drug development.

  2. Generation of genetically modified mice using CRISPR/Cas9 and haploid embryonic stem cell systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Fang JIN

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available With the development of high-throughput sequencing technology in the post-genomic era, researchers have concentrated their efforts on elucidating the relationships between genes and their corresponding functions. Recently, important progress has been achieved in the generation of genetically modified mice based on CRISPR/Cas9 and haploid embryonic stem cell (haESC approaches, which provide new platforms for gene function analysis, human disease modeling, and gene therapy. Here, we review the CRISPR/Cas9 and haESC technology for the generation of genetically modified mice and discuss the key challenges in the application of these approaches.

  3. A global picture of pharmacy technician and other pharmacy support workforce cadres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koehler, Tamara; Brown, A.

    a b s t r a c t Introduction: Understanding how pharmacy technicians and other pharmacy support workforce cadres assist pharmacists in the healthcare system will facilitate developing health systems with the ability to achieve universal health coverage as it is defined in different country contexts.

  4. Adenovirus-mediated truncated Bid overexpression induced by the Cre/LoxP system promotes the cell apoptosis of CD133+ ovarian cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Qifang; Yang, Ru; Lu, Weixian; Zhu, Weipei; Zhou, Jundong; Zheng, Cui; Zhou, Dongmei; Yu, Ling; Wu, Jinchang

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells are a small subset of cancer cells that contribute to cancer progression, metastasis, chemoresistance and recurrence. CD133-positive (CD133+) ovarian cancer cells have been identified as ovarian cancer stem cells. Adenovirus-mediated gene therapy is an innovative therapeutic method for cancer treatment. In the present study, we aimed to develop a new gene therapy to specifically eliminate CD133+ ovarian cancer stem cells by targeting CD133. We used the Cre/LoxP system to augment the selective expression of the truncated Bid (tBid) gene as suicide gene therapy in CD133+ ovarian cancer stem cells. The adenovirus (Ad)-CD133-Cre expressing Cre recombinase under the control of the CD133 promoter and Ad-CMV-LoxP-Neo-LoxP-tBid expressing tBid under the control of the CMV promoter were successfully constructed using the Cre/LoxP switching system. The co-infection of Ad-CMV-LoxP-Neo-LoxP-tBid and Ad-CD133-Cre selectively induced tBid overexpression, which inhibited cell growth and triggered the cell apoptosis of CD133+ ovarian cancer stem cells. The Cre/LoxP system-mediated tBid overexpression activated the pro-apoptotic signaling pathway and augmented the cytotoxic effect of cisplatin in CD133+ ovarian cancer stem cells. Furthermore, in xenograft experiments, co-infection with the two recombinant adenoviruses markedly suppressed tumor growth in vivo and promoted cell apoptosis in tumor tissues. Taken together, the present study provides evidence that the adenovirus-mediated tBid overexpression induced by the Cre/LoxP system can effectively eliminate CD133+ ovarian cancer stem cells, representing a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of ovarian cancer.

  5. Imaging spectrum of central nervous system complications of hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Server, Andres [Oslo University Hospital-Rikshospitalet, Section of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Bargallo, Nuria [Universitat de Barcelona, Section of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona (Spain); Institut d' investigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBARS), Resonance Magnetic Image Core Facility, Barcelona (Spain); Floeisand, Yngvar [Oslo University Hospital-Rikshospitalet, Department of Hematology, Oslo (Norway); Sponheim, Jon [Oslo University Hospital-Rikshospitalet, Section of Gastroenterology, Department of Transplantation Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Graus, Francesc [Universitat de Barcelona, Department of Neurology, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona (Spain); Institut d' investigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBARS), Neuroimmunology Program, Barcelona (Spain); Hald, John K. [Oslo University Hospital-Rikshospitalet, Section of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo (Norway); University of Oslo, Faculty of Medicine, Oslo (Norway)

    2017-02-15

    Neurologic complications are common after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and solid organ transplantation (SOT) and affect 30-60% of transplant recipients. The aim of this article is to provide a practical imaging approach based on the timeline and etiology of CNS abnormalities, and neurologic complications related to transplantation of specific organs. The lesions will be classified based upon the interval from HSCT procedure: pre-engraftment period <30 days, early post-engraftment period 30-100 days, late post-engraftment period >100 days, and the interval from SOT procedure: postoperative phase 1-4 weeks, early posttransplant syndromes 1-6 months, late posttransplant syndromes >6 months. Further differentiation will be based on etiology: infections, drug toxicity, metabolic derangements, cerebrovascular complications, and posttransplantation malignancies. In addition, differentiation will be based on complications specific to the type of transplantation: allogeneic and autologous hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), heart, lung, kidney, pancreas, and liver. Thus, in this article we emphasize the strategic role of neuroradiology in the diagnosis and response to treatment by utilizing a methodical approach in the work up of patients with neurologic complications after transplantation. (orig.)

  6. Imaging spectrum of central nervous system complications of hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Server, Andres; Bargallo, Nuria; Floeisand, Yngvar; Sponheim, Jon; Graus, Francesc; Hald, John K.

    2017-01-01

    Neurologic complications are common after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and solid organ transplantation (SOT) and affect 30-60% of transplant recipients. The aim of this article is to provide a practical imaging approach based on the timeline and etiology of CNS abnormalities, and neurologic complications related to transplantation of specific organs. The lesions will be classified based upon the interval from HSCT procedure: pre-engraftment period <30 days, early post-engraftment period 30-100 days, late post-engraftment period >100 days, and the interval from SOT procedure: postoperative phase 1-4 weeks, early posttransplant syndromes 1-6 months, late posttransplant syndromes >6 months. Further differentiation will be based on etiology: infections, drug toxicity, metabolic derangements, cerebrovascular complications, and posttransplantation malignancies. In addition, differentiation will be based on complications specific to the type of transplantation: allogeneic and autologous hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), heart, lung, kidney, pancreas, and liver. Thus, in this article we emphasize the strategic role of neuroradiology in the diagnosis and response to treatment by utilizing a methodical approach in the work up of patients with neurologic complications after transplantation. (orig.)

  7. Is health workforce sustainability in Australia and New Zealand a realistic policy goal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchan, James M; Naccarella, Lucio; Brooks, Peter M

    2011-05-01

    This paper assesses what health workforce 'sustainability' might mean for Australia and New Zealand, given the policy direction set out in the World Health Organization draft code on international recruitment of health workers. The governments in both countries have in the past made policy statements about the desirability of health workforce 'self-sufficiency', but OECD data show that both have a high level of dependence on internationally recruited health professionals relative to most other OECD countries. The paper argues that if a target of 'self-sufficiency' or sustainability were to be based on meeting health workforce requirements from home based training, both Australia and New Zealand fall far short of this measure, and continue to be active recruiters. The paper stresses that there is no common agreed definition of what health workforce 'self-sufficiency', or 'sustainability' is in practice, and that without an agreed definition it will be difficult for policy-makers to move the debate on to reaching agreement and possibly setting measurable targets or timelines for achievement. The paper concludes that any policy decisions related to health workforce sustainability will also have to taken in the context of a wider community debate on what is required of a health system and how is it to be funded.

  8. Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Regulates Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cell Activation during the Granulopoietic Response to Systemic Bacterial Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xin; Wei, Shengcai; Simms, Kevin J; Cumpston, Devan N; Ewing, Thomas J; Zhang, Ping

    2018-01-01

    Activation and reprogramming of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells play a critical role in the granulopoietic response to bacterial infection. Our current study determined the significance of Sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling in the regulation of hematopoietic precursor cell activity during the host defense response to systemic bacterial infection. Bacteremia was induced in male Balb/c mice via intravenous injection (i.v.) of Escherichia coli (5 × 10 7 CFUs/mouse). Control mice received i.v. saline. SHH protein level in bone marrow cell (BMC) lysates was markedly increased at both 24 and 48 h of bacteremia. By contrast, the amount of soluble SHH ligand in marrow elutes was significantly reduced. These contrasting alterations suggested that SHH ligand release from BMCs was reduced and/or binding of soluble SHH ligand to BMCs was enhanced. At both 12 and 24 h of bacteremia, SHH mRNA expression by BMCs was significantly upregulated. This upregulation of SHH mRNA expression was followed by a marked increase in SHH protein expression in BMCs. Activation of the ERK1/2-SP1 pathway was involved in mediating the upregulation of SHH gene expression. The major cell type showing the enhancement of SHH expression in the bone marrow was lineage positive cells. Gli1 positioned downstream of the SHH receptor activation serves as a key component of the hedgehog (HH) pathway. Primitive hematopoietic precursor cells exhibited the highest level of baseline Gli1 expression, suggesting that they were active cells responding to SHH ligand stimulation. Along with the increased expression of SHH in the bone marrow, expression of Gli1 by marrow cells was significantly upregulated at both mRNA and protein levels following bacteremia. This enhancement of Gli1 expression was correlated with activation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell proliferation. Mice with Gli1 gene deletion showed attenuation in activation of marrow hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell proliferation and inhibition

  9. Systemic administration of a novel human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells population accelerates the resolution of acute liver injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burra Patrizia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatocytes and stem cells transplantation may be an alternative to liver transplantation in acute or chronic liver disease. We aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells from human umbilical cord (UCMSCs, a readily available source of mesenchymal stem cells, in the CCl4-induced acute liver injury model. Methods Mesenchymal stem cells profile was analyzed by flow cytometry. In order to evaluate the capability of our UCMSCs to differentiate in hepatocytes, cells were seeded on three different supports, untreated plastic support, MatrigelTM and human liver acellular matrix. Cells were analyzed by immunocitochemistry for alpha-fetoprotein and albumin expression, qPCR for hepatocyte markers gene expression, Periodic Acid-Schiff staining for glycogen storage, ELISA for albumin detection and colorimetric assay for urea secretion. To assess the effects of undifferentiated UCMSCs in hepatic regeneration after an acute liver injury, we transplanted them via tail vein in mice injected intraperitoneally with a single dose of CCl4. Livers were analyzed by histological evaluation for damage quantification, immunostaining for Kupffer and stellate cells/liver myofibroblasts activation and for UCMSCs homing. Pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines gene expression was evaluated by qPCR analysis and antioxidant enzyme activity was measured by catalase quantification. Data were analyzed by Mann–Whitney U-test, Kruskal-Wallis test and Cuzick’s test followed by Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. Results We have standardized the isolation procedure to obtain a cell population with hepatogenic properties prior to in vivo transplantation. When subjected to hepatogenic differentiation on untreated plastic support, UCMSCs differentiated in hepatocyte-like cells as demonstrated by their morphology, progressive up-regulation of mature hepatocyte markers, glycogen storage, albumin and urea secretion. However

  10. Mouse preantral follicle growth in 3D co-culture system using human menstrual blood mesenchymal stem cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, Zahra; Yazdekhasti, Hossein; Noori Mugahi, Seyed Mohammad Hossein; Abbasi, Mehdi; Kazemnejad, Somaieh; Shirazi, Abolfazl; Majidi, Masoumeh; Zarnani, Amir-Hassan

    2018-03-01

    Follicle culture provides a condition which can help investigators to evaluate various aspects of ovarian follicle growth and development and impact of different components and supplementations as well as presumably application of follicle culture approach in fertility preservation procedures. Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs), particularly those isolated from menstrual blood has the potential to be used as a tool for improvement of fertility. In the current study, a 3D co-culture system with mice preantral follicles and human Menstrual Blood Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MenSCs) using either collagen or alginate beads was designed to investigate whether this system allows better preantral follicles growth and development. Results showed that MenSCs increase the indices of follicular growth including survival rate, diameter, and antrum formation as well as the rate of in vitro maturation (IVM) in both collagen and alginates beads. Although statistically not significant, alginate was found to be superior in terms of supporting survival rate and antrum formation. Hormone assay demonstrated that the amount of secreted 17 β-estradiol and progesterone in both 3D systems increased dramatically after 12 days, with the highest levels in system employing MenSCs. Data also demonstrated that relative expression of studied genes increased for Bmp15 and Gdf9 and decreased for Mater when follicles were cultured in the presence of MenSCs. Collectively, results of the present study showed that MenSCs could improve indices of follicular growth and maturation in vitro. Further studies are needed before a clinical application of MenSCs-induced IVM is considered. Copyright © 2018 Society for Biology of Reproduction & the Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research of Polish Academy of Sciences in Olsztyn. All rights reserved.

  11. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell NEUROG2 Dual Knockin Reporter Lines Generated by the CRISPR/Cas9 System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shenglan; Xue, Haipeng; Wu, Jianbo; Rao, Mahendra S; Kim, Dong H; Deng, Wenbin; Liu, Ying

    2015-12-15

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) technologies are powerful tools for modeling development and disease, drug screening, and regenerative medicine. Faithful gene targeting in hiPSCs greatly facilitates these applications. We have developed a fast and precise clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR associated protein 9 (Cas9) technology-based method and obtained fluorescent protein and antibiotic resistance dual knockin reporters in hiPSC lines for neurogenin2 (NEUROG2), an important proneural transcription factor. Gene targeting efficiency was greatly improved in CRISPR/Cas9-mediated homology directed recombination (∼ 33% correctly targeted clones) compared to conventional targeting protocol (∼ 3%) at the same locus. No off-target events were detected. In addition, taking the advantage of the versatile applications of the CRISPR/Cas9 system, we designed transactivation components to transiently induce NEUROG2 expression, which helps identify transcription factor binding sites and trans-regulation regions of human NEUROG2. The strategy of using CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing coupled with fluorescence-activated cell sorting of neural progenitor cells in a knockin lineage hiPSC reporter platform might be broadly applicable in other stem cell derivatives and subpopulations.

  12. An Efficient Method for Generation of Knockout Human Embryonic Stem Cells Using CRISPR/Cas9 System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohaciakova, Dasa; Renzova, Tereza; Fedorova, Veronika; Barak, Martin; Kunova Bosakova, Michaela; Hampl, Ales; Cajanek, Lukas

    2017-11-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) represent a promising tool to study functions of genes during development, to model diseases, and to even develop therapies when combined with gene editing techniques such as CRISPR/CRISPR-associated protein-9 nuclease (Cas9) system. However, the process of disruption of gene expression by generation of null alleles is often inefficient and tedious. To circumvent these limitations, we developed a simple and efficient protocol to permanently downregulate expression of a gene of interest in hESCs using CRISPR/Cas9. We selected p53 for our proof of concept experiments. The methodology is based on series of hESC transfection, which leads to efficient downregulation of p53 expression even in polyclonal population (p53 Low cells), here proven by a loss of regulation of the expression of p53 target gene, microRNA miR-34a. We demonstrate that our approach achieves over 80% efficiency in generating hESC clonal sublines that do not express p53 protein. Importantly, we document by a set of functional experiments that such genetically modified hESCs do retain typical stem cells characteristics. In summary, we provide a simple and robust protocol to efficiently target expression of gene of interest in hESCs that can be useful for laboratories aiming to employ gene editing in their hESC applications/protocols.

  13. Lessons we learned from high-throughput and top-down systems biology analyses about glioma stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mock, Andreas; Chiblak, Sara; Herold-Mende, Christel

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that glioma stem cells (GSCs) account for tumor initiation, therapy resistance, and the subsequent regrowth of gliomas. Thus, continuous efforts have been undertaken to further characterize this subpopulation of less differentiated tumor cells. Although we are able to enrich GSCs, we still lack a comprehensive understanding of GSC phenotypes and behavior. The advent of high-throughput technologies raised hope that incorporation of these newly developed platforms would help to tackle such questions. Since then a couple of comparative genome-, transcriptome- and proteome-wide studies on GSCs have been conducted giving new insights in GSC biology. However, lessons had to be learned in designing high-throughput experiments and some of the resulting conclusions fell short of expectations because they were performed on only a few GSC lines or at one molecular level instead of an integrative poly-omics approach. Despite these shortcomings, our knowledge of GSC biology has markedly expanded due to a number of survival-associated biomarkers as well as glioma-relevant signaling pathways and therapeutic targets being identified. In this article we review recent findings obtained by comparative high-throughput analyses of GSCs. We further summarize fundamental concepts of systems biology as well as its applications for glioma stem cell research.

  14. Taking Workforce Initiatives to Scale: Workforce Initiatives Discussion Paper #2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Academy for Educational Development, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The System-wide Collaborative Action for Livelihoods and Environment, or SCALE process, has become one of the Academy for Educational Development's (AED's) and the United States Agency for International Development's (USAID's) most utilized and replicated models, with applications in education, health, natural resources management, tourism,…

  15. Another “M” for STEM? Moral Considerations for Advancing STEM Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Kahn

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Although workforce readiness is often cited as the primary rationale for STEM education, a broader view of scientific literacy, one that envisions students as members of an informed citizenry able to reason thoughtfully and ethically through increasingly complex STEM issues, seems warranted. To that end, this position paper advances the argument that STEM, particularly with the incorporation of engineering in the Next Generation Science Standards (U.S., must serve as a context for moral development by expanding student argumentation and discourse to include the moral and ethical consequences of STEM decision making. In addition, STEM is positioned as an ideal domain for inclusivity, capable of advancing a more just and equitable society through broader engagement and participation. To illustrate how these visions might be realized in the classroom, the author transforms a typical STEM lesson into a “moral” STEM lesson through the incorporation of two curricular frameworks, Socioscientific Issues (SSI and Universal Design for Learning (UDL. The purpose of this exercise is to demonstrate the manner in which STEM content and practices can be preserved and enhanced while widening curricular objectives to include the development of an informed, reflective, and inclusive STEM-literate citizenry.

  16. To effectively adapt and renew workforce competences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pezzani, P.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Most of French operating nuclear plants were constructed within a small time window. Few new plants have come on line within the last decade. As a result, most operating plants today have an ageing workforce that is going to retire in large numbers. In the next ten years, 40% of EDF nuclear workforce is going to retire, in average 600 people per year. At the same time, potential restructurings are opportunities to provide internal personnel for Nuclear Power Plants. The first generation of nuclear industry workers was hired during nuclear plant starting and testing. That was an opportunity to for training in the field without nuclear hazard. In addition, the NPP requirements increased dramatically through the last twenty years. This situation led to start a project to effectively adapt and renew workforce competences in the 19 EDF NPP in France. This Paper describes three steps to successfully ensure this transition to the new generation of nuclear industry workers. Acting in the field from their initial training, recruits are earlier ready to perform: 1. A Nuclear Job Academy in each French region based on Team Building and Sister Plants association, new training techniques and field training regarding behaviour and craft. All the new comers in Nuclear Power Station are led by an experienced technical mentor and trained by managers and experienced staff. 2. Flow loop maintenance simulator in each plant.On line training and test for periodic training.Step by Step qualification process. Internal workforce moving and rotation become a consistent, safe and successful opportunity to renew competences: EDF Group promotes the mobility of human resources by improving skills management (training programs, encouraging profession mobility, and reorientation towards priority jobs). To ensure that each nuclear new comer from internal workforce meets the nuclear requirements (as hired people), we build strong process witch guaranty internal people recruitment with

  17. Cutting-edge technology for public health workforce training in comparative effectiveness research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas-Miranda, Abraham A; Nash, Michelle C; Salemi, Jason L; Mbah, Alfred K; Salihu, Hamisu M

    2013-06-01

    A critical mass of public health practitioners with expertise in analytic techniques and best practices in comparative effectiveness research is needed to fuel informed decisions and improve the quality of health care. The purpose of this case study is to describe the development and formative evaluation of a technology-enhanced comparative effectiveness research learning curriculum and to assess its potential utility to improve core comparative effectiveness research competencies among the public health workforce. Selected public health experts formed a multidisciplinary research collaborative and participated in the development and evaluation of a blended 15-week comprehensive e-comparative effectiveness research training program, which incorporated an array of health informatics technologies. Results indicate that research-based organizations can use a systematic, flexible, and rapid means of instructing their workforce using technology-enhanced authoring tools, learning management systems, survey research software, online communities of practice, and mobile communication for effective and creative comparative effectiveness research training of the public health workforce.

  18. Globalisation, localisation and implications of a transforming nursing workforce in New Zealand: opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callister, Paul; Badkar, Juthika; Didham, Robert

    2011-09-01

    Severe staff and skill shortages within the health systems of developed countries have contributed to increased migration by health professionals. New Zealand stands out among countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development in terms of the high level of movements in and out of the country of skilled professionals, including nurses. In New Zealand, much attention has been given to increasing the number of Māori and Pacific nurses as one mechanism for improving Māori and Pacific health. Against a backdrop of the changing characteristics of the New Zealand nursing workforce, this study demonstrates that the globalisation of the nursing workforce is increasing at a faster rate than its localisation (as measured by the growth of the Māori and New Zealand-born Pacific workforces in New Zealand). This challenges the implementation of culturally appropriate nursing programmes based on the matching of nurse and client ethnicities. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. System-wide temporal characterization of the proteome and phosphoproteome of human embryonic stem cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rigbolt, Kristoffer T.G.; Prokhorova, Tatyana; Akimov, Vyacheslav

    2011-01-01

    by feeder cells. We profiled 6521 proteins and 23,522 phosphorylation sites, of which almost 50% displayed dynamic changes in phosphorylation status during 24 hours of differentiation. These data are a resource for studies of the events associated with the maintenance of hESC pluripotency and those...... of the matching sequence motif. In addition to identifying previously unknown phosphorylation sites on factors associated with differentiation, such as kinases and transcription factors, we observed dynamic phosphorylation of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). We found a specific interaction of DNMTs during early......To elucidate cellular events underlying the pluripotency of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), we performed parallel quantitative proteomic and phosphoproteomic analyses of hESCs during differentiation initiated by a diacylglycerol analog or transfer to media that had not been conditioned...

  20. The Low Chamber Pancreatic Cancer Cells Had Stem-Like Characteristics in Modified Transwell System: Is It a Novel Method to Identify and Enrich Cancer Stem-Like Cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongqing Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs or cancer-initiating cells (CICs play an important role in tumor initiation, progression, metastasis, chemoresistance, and recurrence. It is important to construct an effective method to identify and isolate CSCs for biotherapy of cancer. During the past years, many researchers had paid more attention to it; however, this method was still on seeking. Therefore, compared to the former methods that were used to isolate the cancer stem cell, in the present study, we tried to use modified transwell system to isolate and enrich CSCs from human pancreatic cancer cell lines (Panc-1. Our results clearly showed that the lower chamber cells in modified transwell system were easily forming spheres; furthermore, these spheres expressed high levels of stem cell markers (CD133/CD44/CD24/Oct-4/ESA and exhibited chemoresistance, underwent epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT, and possessed the properties of self-renewal in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Therefore, we speculated that modified transwell assay system, as a rapid and effective method, can be used to isolate and enrich CSCs.

  1. The unique stem cell system of the immortal larva of the human parasite Echinococcus multilocularis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background It is believed that in tapeworms a separate population of undifferentiated cells, the germinative cells, is the only source of cell proliferation throughout the life cycle (similar to the neoblasts of free living flatworms). In Echinococcus multilocularis, the metacestode larval stage has a unique development, growing continuously like a mass of vesicles that infiltrate the tissues of the intermediate host, generating multiple protoscoleces by asexual budding. This unique proliferation potential indicates the existence of stem cells that are totipotent and have the ability for extensive self-renewal. Results We show that only the germinative cells proliferate in the larval vesicles and in primary cell cultures that undergo complete vesicle regeneration, by using a combination of morphological criteria and by developing molecular markers of differentiated cell types. The germinative cells are homogeneous in morphology but heterogeneous at the molecular level, since only sub-populations express homologs of the post-transcriptional regulators nanos and argonaute. Important differences are observed between the expression patterns of selected neoblast marker genes of other flatworms and the E. multilocularis germinative cells, including widespread expression in E. multilocularis of some genes that are neoblast-specific in planarians. Hydroxyurea treatment results in the depletion of germinative cells in larval vesicles, and after recovery following hydroxyurea treatment, surviving proliferating cells grow as patches that suggest extensive self-renewal potential for individual germinative cells. Conclusions In E. multilocularis metacestodes, the germinative cells are the only proliferating cells, presumably driving the continuous growth of the larval vesicles. However, the existence of sub-populations of the germinative cells is strongly supported by our data. Although the germinative cells are very similar to the neoblasts of other flatworms in function and

  2. Degeneration and regeneration of the spermatogonial stem-cell system after exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1979-02-01

    Under continuous low level irradiation at 1.8 rad/day which will permit the survival of at least 10 generations in the mouse, cell renewal during spermatogenesis can achieve a near-steady state of cell population at approx. 80% of control levels for at least 12 cycles of spermatogonial cell renewal and 3 cycles of the seminiferous epithelium. Changes in the patterns of spermatogonial cell population kinetics indicate that there is some limited reserve of proliferative capacity, and the extent to which these changes may be due to decreasing the cell cycle time of a long-cycling type A/sub s/ stem-cell population in the type A cell compartment, or the bringing-in of a potentially proliferative type A/sub s/ population is now more clearly understood. These mechanisms are important in maintaining the steady-state of spermatogonial cell renewal under stress. The autoradiographic data indicate that under low level irradiation there are delays in the flow of the differentiated types A/sub 1-4/, intermediate, and type B spermatogonia in each proliferative subcompartment through the postsynthetic G 2 period into cell division, associated with a decrease in the duration of DNA synthesis, but with relatively normal cell cycle times. Under continuous exposure to low level irradiation, there is a differential radiosensitivity among the differentiated types A 1 to A 4 , In and B cells affecting proliferation - depopulation is minimal but evident in type B and In cells, much less among types A/sub 1-4/ cells and preleptotene spermatocytes, and least in the type A/sub s/ stem-cell compartment

  3. Motivational Pathways to STEM Career Choices: Using Expectancy-Value Perspective to Understand Individual and Gender Differences in STEM Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Te; Degol, Jessica

    2013-12-01

    The United States has made a significant effort and investment in STEM education, yet the size and the composition of the STEM workforce continues to fail to meet demand. It is thus important to understand the barriers and factors that influence individual educational and career choices. In this article, we conduct a literature review of the current knowledge surrounding individual and gender differences in STEM educational and career choices, using expectancy-value theory as a guiding framework. The overarching goal of this paper is to provide both a well-defined theoretical framework and complementary empirical evidence for linking specific sociocultural, contextual, biological, and psychological factors to individual and gender differences in STEM interests and choices. Knowledge gained through this review will eventually guide future research and interventions designed to enhance individual motivation and capacity to pursue STEM careers, particularly for females who are interested in STEM but may be constrained by misinformation or stereotypes.

  4. Human resource governance: what does governance mean for the health workforce in low- and middle-income countries?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaplan Avril D

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research on practical and effective governance of the health workforce is limited. This paper examines health system strengthening as it occurs in the intersection between the health workforce and governance by presenting a framework to examine health workforce issues related to eight governance principles: strategic vision, accountability, transparency, information, efficiency, equity/fairness, responsiveness and citizen voice and participation. Methods This study builds off of a literature review that informed the development of a framework that describes linkages and assigns indicators between governance and the health workforce. A qualitative analysis of Health System Assessment (HSA data, a rapid indicator-based methodology that determines the key strengths and weaknesses of a health system using a set of internationally recognized indicators, was completed to determine how 20 low- and middle-income countries are operationalizing health governance to improve health workforce performance. Results/discussion The 20 countries assessed showed mixed progress in implementing the eight governance principles. Strengths highlighted include increasing the transparency of financial flows from sources to providers by implementing and institutionalizing the National Health Accounts methodology; increasing responsiveness to population health needs by training new cadres of health workers to address shortages and deliver care to remote and rural populations; having structures in place to register and provide licensure to medical professionals upon entry into the public sector; and implementing pilot programs that apply financial and non-financial incentives as a means to increase efficiency. Common weaknesses emerging in the HSAs include difficulties with developing, implementing and evaluating health workforce policies that outline a strategic vision for the health workforce; implementing continuous licensure and regulation systems to

  5. Human resource governance: what does governance mean for the health workforce in low- and middle-income countries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Avril D; Dominis, Sarah; Palen, John Gh; Quain, Estelle E

    2013-02-15

    Research on practical and effective governance of the health workforce is limited. This paper examines health system strengthening as it occurs in the intersection between the health workforce and governance by presenting a framework to examine health workforce issues related to eight governance principles: strategic vision, accountability, transparency, information, efficiency, equity/fairness, responsiveness and citizen voice and participation. This study builds off of a literature review that informed the development of a framework that describes linkages and assigns indicators between governance and the health workforce. A qualitative analysis of Health System Assessment (HSA) data, a rapid indicator-based methodology that determines the key strengths and weaknesses of a health system using a set of internationally recognized indicators, was completed to determine how 20 low- and middle-income countries are operationalizing health governance to improve health workforce performance. The 20 countries assessed showed mixed progress in implementing the eight governance principles. Strengths highlighted include increasing the transparency of financial flows from sources to providers by implementing and institutionalizing the National Health Accounts methodology; increasing responsiveness to population health needs by training new cadres of health workers to address shortages and deliver care to remote and rural populations; having structures in place to register and provide licensure to medical professionals upon entry into the public sector; and implementing pilot programs that apply financial and non-financial incentives as a means to increase efficiency. Common weaknesses emerging in the HSAs include difficulties with developing, implementing and evaluating health workforce policies that outline a strategic vision for the health workforce; implementing continuous licensure and regulation systems to hold health workers accountable after they enter the workforce

  6. Transformational leadership can improve workforce competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Juliana

    2012-03-01

    Staffing problems can arise because of poor delegation skills or a failure by leaders to respond appropriately to economic factors and patient demographics. Training dilemmas, meanwhile, can arise because of managers' confusion about what constitutes 'training' and what constitutes 'education', and where responsibility of provision lies, with the consequence that they neglect these activities. This article uses Kouzes and Posner's (2009) transformational leadership model to show how managers can respond. Leaders who challenge budgets, consider new ways of working and engage effectively with the workforce can improve productivity and care, while those who invest in appropriate learning will have a highly trained workforce. The author explains how integration of leadership roles and management functions can lead to innovative problem solving.

  7. Safeguards Workforce Repatriation, Retention and Utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallucci, Nicholas [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Poe, Sarah [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory was tasked by NA-241 to assess the transition of former IAEA employees back to the United States, investigating the rate of retention and overall smoothness of the repatriation process among returning safeguards professionals. Upon conducting several phone interviews, study authors found that the repatriation process went smoothly for the vast majority and that workforce retention was high. However, several respondents expressed irritation over the minimal extent to which their safeguards expertise had been leveraged in their current positions. This sentiment was pervasive enough to prompt a follow-on study focusing on questions relating to the utilization rather than the retention of safeguards professionals. A second, web-based survey was conducted, soliciting responses from a larger sample pool. Results suggest that the safeguards workforce may be oversaturated, and that young professionals returning to the United States from Agency positions may soon encounter difficulties finding jobs in the field.

  8. Pediatric dermatology workforce shortage: perspectives from academia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craiglow, Brittany G; Resneck, Jack S; Lucky, Anne W; Sidbury, Robert; Yan, Albert C; Resnick, Steven D; Antaya, Richard J

    2008-12-01

    The pediatric dermatology workforce has not been systematically evaluated since recent changes in board certification requirements. To quantify and characterize the workforce of academic pediatric dermatologists and examine issues related to training, hiring, and retention. Dermatology chairpersons and residency directors in the United States and Canada completed a 30-question survey. Eighty of 132 programs (61%) responded to the survey. More than two thirds of programs (56/80) employed a pediatric dermatologist, and 34 programs were recruiting a pediatric dermatologist. The number of residents that pursue careers in pediatric dermatology is significantly associated with the number of pediatric dermatologists on faculty at their institution. Self-reported data, which may have been reflected by recall bias, and 61% response rate. At a majority of academic centers, the current pool of pediatric dermatology faculty is neither adequate to meet academic nor clinical demands. Methods to increase exposure to pediatric dermatology among medical students and residents must be sought.

  9. Multi generations in the workforce: Building collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasanthi Srinivasan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Organisations the world over in today's rapid growth context are faced with the challenge of understanding a multi-generational workforce and devising policies and processes to build collaboration between them. In its first part, this article synthesises the literature on generational studies, with emphasis on the definition of generations and the characteristics of the generational cohorts. It emphasises that such studies are embedded in the socio-economic-cultural-context and India-specific scholarship must take into account the demographic and economic variations across the country. It then discusses the challenges of multi-generations in the Indian workforce, their impact on leadership styles and managerial practices, and the task of building inter-generational collaboration with an eminent panel of practitioners and researchers.

  10. Women Workforce in the Korean Context

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Yeonu

    2017-01-01

    The social participation of women workforce in the labour market is now more prevalent than ever, however the promotion opportunities for women employees are limited compared to men in the Korean context. The article explores the impact of the Confucian tradition on women employees and as a result the traditional value causes difficulties for women employees to gain promotion than men in organisations. Also this article discusses why Korean women need to overcome the ‘glass ceiling’ more comp...

  11. CHALLANGES OF MANAGING WORKFORCE : Posti Group Oyj

    OpenAIRE

    Dhaunya , Rajendra

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this thesis project was to analyze the challenges of managing workforce and its minimizing techniques according to current changing trends in delivery department of Posti Group Oyj. The project was taken forward in co-ordination with supervisors where the qualitative method of research “Interview” was used to analyze the outcomes of questionnaire. The interview was conducted with three different supervisors. Communication and cultural challenge were mostly focused by them. Only rel...

  12. The cardiac sonography workforce in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Steve; Poppe, Katrina; Whalley, Gillian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: The aim of this paper is to investigate the cardiac sonography workforce characteristics and registration requirements in New Zealand (NZ), with a comparison to similar workforces internationally. Methods: The Survey of Clinical Echocardiography in New Zealand 2 (SCANZ2) audit was performed in December 2010. All of NZ's public‐funded District Health Board (DHB) centers providing echocardiography services responded to questions relating to staff, equipment, procedure types and patient statistics. The Medical Radiation Technologists Board (MRTB), Clinical Physiologists Registration Board (CPRB) and Australian Sonographers Association Registry (ASAR) websites were reviewed in March 2012 for registered sonographers with a cardiac scope of practice. The cardiac sonography workforces in Australia, the UK, the USA and Canada were investigated for comparison. Results: There are 84 cardiac sonographers (60.3 full‐time equivalent) working in DHBs: 71% from a cardiac technical background; 40% have post‐graduate qualifications; a further 17% are undertaking post‐graduate qualifications; and 59 cardiac sonographers have registration with professional bodies in NZ and/or Australia. Cardiac sonographers in NZ do not undergo compulsory registration, but other sonographers in NZ have compulsory registration with the MRTB. Sonographers are predominantly not licensed internationally. Discussion: Disparity exists between registration of cardiac and non‐cardiac sonographers in NZ. Many cardiac sonographers have voluntary registration but few are registered with the MRTB. Reasons for this include professional alignment, educational qualifications and representation. International trends show increased pressure from governments and professional bodies to regulate sonographers. Conclusion: This study provides a snapshot of the cardiac sonography workforce in NZ for the first time. PMID:28191178

  13. Building the biomedical data science workforce.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle C Dunn

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This article describes efforts at the National Institutes of Health (NIH from 2013 to 2016 to train a national workforce in biomedical data science. We provide an analysis of the Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K training program strengths and weaknesses with an eye toward future directions aimed at any funder and potential funding recipient worldwide. The focus is on extramurally funded programs that have a national or international impact rather than the training of NIH staff, which was addressed by the NIH's internal Data Science Workforce Development Center. From its inception, the major goal of BD2K was to narrow the gap between needed and existing biomedical data science skills. As biomedical research increasingly relies on computational, mathematical, and statistical thinking, supporting the training and education of the workforce of tomorrow requires new emphases on analytical skills. From 2013 to 2016, BD2K jump-started training in this area for all levels, from graduate students to senior researchers.

  14. Progressing recovery-oriented care in psychiatric inpatient units: Occupational therapy’s role in supporting a stronger peer workforce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Lloyd

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose - Initiated by the service user movement, recovery-oriented practices are one of the keystones of modern mental health care. Over the past two decades, substantial gains have been made with introducing recovery-oriented practice in many areas of mental health practice, but there remain areas where progress is delayed, notably, the psychiatric inpatient environment. The peer support workforce can play a pivotal role in progressing recovery-oriented practices. The purpose of this paper is to provide a pragmatic consideration of how occupational therapists can influence mental health systems to work proactively with a peer workforce. Design/methodology/approach - The authors reviewed current literature and considered practical approaches to building a peer workforce in collaboration with occupational therapists. Findings - It is suggested that the peer support workforce should be consciously enhanced in the inpatient setting to support culture change as a matter of priority. Occupational therapists working on inpatient units should play a key role in promoting and supporting the growth in the peer support workforce. Doing so will enrich the Occupational Therapy profession as well as improving service user outcomes. Originality/value - This paper seeks to provide a pragmatic consideration of how occupational therapists can influence mental health systems to work proactively with a peer workforce.

  15. 48 CFR 1823.570 - Drug- and alcohol-free workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Drug- and alcohol-free..., OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY, AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE Drug-Free Workplace 1823.570 Drug- and alcohol-free workforce. This section sets sets forth NASA requirements for mandatory drug and alcohol testing of certain...

  16. European variation in health workforce planning: do we need best practices or situational solutions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batenburg, R.

    2013-01-01

    Context:The feasibility study report published by Matrix Insight in 2012, is probably the first empirical and systematic comparison of health workforce planning systems in all European countries. As such, the report provides important data and information to explore what differences and similarities

  17. Preparing the Host Country Workforce for Expatriate Managers: The Neglected Other Side of the Coin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Charles M.; Ring, Peter Smith

    1994-01-01

    Using an instructional systems development approach, ways to prepare the host country workforce for the assignment of an expatriate manager are discussed. The model is based on a number of perspectives: exchange theory, participatory management, corporate social responsibility, communication theory, and strategic human resource planning. (SK)

  18. 77 FR 59224 - Comment Request for Information Collection for the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-26

    ... Collection for the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Management Information and Reporting System; Extension With... changes that are being requested in the extension with revisions to the WIA Management Information and.... III. Current Actions Type of Review: Extension with revisions. Title: WIA Management Information and...

  19. The Workforce Task Force report: clinical implications for neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, William D; Vatz, Kenneth A; Griggs, Robert C; Pedley, Timothy

    2013-07-30

    The American Academy of Neurology Workforce Task Force (WFTF) report predicts a future shortfall of neurologists in the United States. The WFTF data also suggest that for most states, the current demand for neurologist services already exceeds the supply, and by 2025 the demand for neurologists will be even higher. This future demand is fueled by the aging of the US population, the higher health care utilization rates of neurologic services, and by a greater number of patients gaining access to the health care system due to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Uncertainties in health care delivery and patient access exist due to looming concerns about further Medicare reimbursement cuts. This uncertainty is set against a backdrop of Congressional volatility on a variety of issues, including the repeal of the sustainable growth rate for physician reimbursement. The impact of these US health care changes on the neurology workforce, future increasing demands, reimbursement, and alternative health care delivery models including accountable care organizations, nonphysician providers such as nurse practitioners and physician assistants, and teleneurology for both stroke and general neurology are discussed. The data lead to the conclusion that neurologists will need to play an even larger role in caring for the aging US population by 2025. We propose solutions to increase the availability of neurologic services in the future and provide other ways of meeting the anticipated increased demand for neurologic care.

  20. Public health workforce employment in US public and private sectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Virginia C

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the number and distribution of 26 administrative, professional, and technical public health occupations across the array of US governmental and nongovernmental industries. This study used data from the Occupational Employment Statistics program of the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. For each occupation of interest, the investigator determined the number of persons employed in 2006 in five industries and industry groups: government, nonprofit agencies, education, healthcare, and all other industries. Industry-specific employment profiles varied from one occupation to another. However, about three-fourths of all those engaged in these occupations worked in the private healthcare industry. Relatively few worked in nonprofit or educational settings, and less than 10 percent were employed in government agencies. The industry-specific distribution of public health personnel, particularly the proportion employed in the public sector, merits close monitoring. This study also highlights the need for a better understanding of the work performed by public health occupations in nongovernmental work settings. Finally, the Occupational Employment Statistics program has the potential to serve as an ongoing, national data collection system for public health workforce information. If this potential was realized, future workforce enumerations would not require primary data collection but rather could be accomplished using secondary data.

  1. Biochemistry of epidermal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Richard L; Adhikary, Gautam; Balasubramanian, Sivaprakasam; Rorke, Ellen A; Vemuri, Mohan C; Boucher, Shayne E; Bickenbach, Jackie R; Kerr, Candace

    2013-02-01

    The epidermis is an important protective barrier that is essential for maintenance of life. Maintaining this barrier requires continuous cell proliferation and differentiation. Moreover, these processes must be balanced to produce a normal epidermis. The stem cells of the epidermis reside in specific locations in the basal epidermis, hair follicle and sebaceous glands and these cells are responsible for replenishment of this tissue. A great deal of effort has gone into identifying protein epitopes that mark stem cells, in identifying stem cell niche locations, and in understanding how stem cell populations are related. We discuss these studies as they apply to understanding normal epidermal homeostasis and skin cancer. An assortment of stem cell markers have been identified that permit assignment of stem cells to specific regions of the epidermis, and progress has been made in understanding the role of these cells in normal epidermal homeostasis and in conditions of tissue stress. A key finding is the multiple stem cell populations exist in epidermis that give rise to different structures, and that multiple stem cell types may contribute to repair in damaged epidermis. Understanding epidermal stem cell biology is likely to lead to important therapies for treating skin diseases and cancer, and will also contribute to our understanding of stem cells in other systems. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biochemistry of Stem Cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Biochemistry of epidermal stem cells☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Richard L.; Adhikary, Gautam; Balasubramanian, Sivaprakasam; Rorke, Ellen A.; Vemuri, Mohan C.; Boucher, Shayne E.; Bickenbach, Jackie R.; Kerr, Candace

    2014-01-01

    Background The epidermis is an important protective barrier that is essential for maintenance of life. Maintaining this barrier requires continuous cell proliferation and differentiation. Moreover, these processes must be balanced to produce a normal epidermis. The stem cells of the epidermis reside in specific locations in the basal epidermis, hair follicle and sebaceous glands and these cells are responsible for replenishment of this tissue. Scope of review A great deal of effort has gone into identifying protein epitopes that mark stem cells, in identifying stem cell niche locations, and in understanding how stem cell populations are related. We discuss these studies as they apply to understanding normal epidermal homeostasis and skin cancer. Major conclusions An assortment of stem cell markers have been identified that permit assignment of stem cells to specific regions of the epidermis, and progress has been made in understanding the role of these cells in normal epidermal homeostasis and in conditions of tissue stress. A key finding is the multiple stem cell populations exist in epidermis that give rise to different structures, and that multiple stem cell types may contribute to repair in damaged epidermis. General significance Understanding epidermal stem cell biology is likely to lead to important therapies for treating skin diseases and cancer, and will also contribute to our understanding of stem cells in other systems. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biochemistry of Stem Cells. PMID:22820019

  3. STEM Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yu; Fang, Michael; Shauman, Kimberlee

    2015-08-01

    Improving science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education, especially for traditionally disadvantaged groups, is widely recognized as pivotal to the U.S.'s long-term economic growth and security. In this article, we review and discuss current research on STEM education in the U.S., drawing on recent research in sociology and related fields. The reviewed literature shows that different social factors affect the two major components of STEM education attainment: (1) attainment of education in general, and (2) attainment of STEM education relative to non-STEM education conditional on educational attainment. Cognitive and social psychological characteristics matter for both major components, as do structural influences at the neighborhood, school, and broader cultural levels. However, while commonly used measures of socioeconomic status (SES) predict the attainment of general education, social psychological factors are more important influences on participation and achievement in STEM versus non-STEM education. Domestically, disparities by family SES, race, and gender persist in STEM education. Internationally, American students lag behind those in some countries with less economic resources. Explanations for group disparities within the U.S. and the mediocre international ranking of US student performance require more research, a task that is best accomplished through interdisciplinary approaches.

  4. Rural mental health workforce difficulties: a management perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T; Sutton, K; Maybery, D

    2010-01-01

    The recruitment, retention and training of mental health workers is of major concern in rural Australia, and the Gippsland region of Victoria is no exception. Previous studies have identified a number of common factors in these workforce difficulties, including rurality, difficulties of access to professional development and training, and professional and personal isolation. However, those previous studies have often focused on medicine and been based on the perspectives of practitioners, and have almost ignored the perspectives of managers of rural mental health services. The study reported in this article sought to contribute to the development of a more sustainable and effective regional mental health workforce by complementing earlier insights with those of leading administrators, managers and senior clinicians in the field. The study took a qualitative approach. It conducted semi-structured in-person interviews with 24 managers of health/mental-health services and senior administrators and clinicians working in organisations of varying sizes in the public and private sectors. Thematic content analysis of the transcribed interviews identified core difficulties these managers experienced in the recruitment, retention and training of employees. The study found that some of the issues commonly resulting in difficulties in recruiting, retaining and developing a trained workforce in rural areas, such as rurality (implying personal and professional isolation, distances to deliver service and small organisations) and a general shortage of trained personnel, are significant in Gippsland. Through its focus on the perspectives of leaders in the management of rural mental health services, however, the study found other key issues that contribute to workforce difficulties. Many, including the unattractive nature of mental health work, the fragmented administration of the mental health system, short-term and tied funding, and shortcomings in training are external to

  5. Generation of human induced pluripotent stem cell lines from human dermal fibroblasts using a non-integration system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Ok Uhm

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We generated human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs from dermal fibroblasts using a Sendai virus (SeV-based gene delivery method. The generated hiPSC line, KSCBi002-A, has a normal karyotype (46,XY. The pluripotency and differentiation capacity were characterized by comparison with those of a human embryonic stem cell line. This cell line is registered and available from the National Stem Cell Bank, Korea National Institute of Health.

  6. First Annual LGBT Health Workforce Conference: Empowering Our Health Workforce to Better Serve LGBT Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Nelson F; Sánchez, John Paul; Lunn, Mitchell R; Yehia, Baligh R; Callahan, Edward J

    2014-03-01

    The Institute of Medicine has identified significant health disparities and barriers to health care experienced by lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) populations. By lowering financial barriers to care, recent legislation and judicial decisions have created a remarkable opportunity for reducing disparities by making health care available to those who previously lacked access. However, the current health-care workforce lacks sufficient training on LGBT-specific health-care issues and delivery of culturally competent care to sexual orientation and gender identity minorities. The LGBT Healthcare Workforce Conference was developed to provide a yearly forum to address these deficiencies through the sharing of best practices in LGBT health-care delivery, creating LGBT-inclusive institutional environments, supporting LGBT personal and professional development, and peer-to-peer mentoring, with an emphasis on students and early career professionals in the health-care fields. This report summarizes the findings of the first annual LGBT Health Workforce Conference.

  7. Bioengineered Systems and Designer Matrices That Recapitulate the Intestinal Stem Cell Niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuli Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between intestinal stem cells (ISCs and the surrounding niche environment is complex and dynamic. Key factors localized at the base of the crypt are necessary to promote ISC self-renewal and proliferation, to ultimately provide a constant stream of differentiated cells to maintain the epithelial barrier. These factors diminish as epithelial cells divide, migrate away from the crypt base, differentiate into the postmitotic lineages, and end their life span in approximately 7 days when they are sloughed into the intestinal lumen. To facilitate the rapid and complex physiology of ISC-driven epithelial renewal, in vivo gradients of growth factors, extracellular matrix, bacterial products, gases, and stiffness are formed along the crypt-villus axis. New bioengineered tools and platforms are available to recapitulate various gradients and support the stereotypical cellular responses associated with these gradients. Many of these technologies have been paired with primary small intestinal and colonic epithelial cells to re-create select aspects of normal physiology or disease states. These biomimetic platforms are becoming increasingly sophisticated with the rapid discovery of new niche factors and gradients. These advancements are contributing to the development of high-fidelity tissue constructs for basic science applications, drug screening, and personalized medicine applications. Here, we discuss the direct and indirect evidence for many of the important gradients found in vivo and their successful application to date in bioengineered in vitro models, including organ-on-chip and microfluidic culture devices.

  8. A 3D Sphere Culture System Containing Functional Polymers for Large-Scale Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomi G. Otsuji

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs in cell-based therapy and drug discovery requires large-scale cell production. However, scaling up conventional adherent cultures presents challenges of maintaining a uniform high quality at low cost. In this regard, suspension cultures are a viable alternative, because they are scalable and do not require adhesion surfaces. 3D culture systems such as bioreactors can be exploited for large-scale production. However, the limitations of current suspension culture methods include spontaneous fusion between cell aggregates and suboptimal passaging methods by dissociation and reaggregation. 3D culture systems that dynamically stir carrier beads or cell aggregates should be refined to reduce shearing forces that damage hPSCs. Here, we report a simple 3D sphere culture system that incorporates mechanical passaging and functional polymers. This setup resolves major problems associated with suspension culture methods and dynamic stirring systems and may be optimal for applications involving large-scale hPSC production.

  9. Closed-channel culture system for efficient and reproducible differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into islet cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Kunio; Konagaya, Shuhei; Turner, Alexander; Noda, Yuichiro; Kitamura, Shigeru; Kotera, Hidetoshi; Iwata, Hiroo

    2017-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are thought to be a promising cell-source solution for regenerative medicine due to their indefinite proliferative potential and ability to differentiate to functional somatic cells. However, issues remain with regard to achieving reproducible differentiation of cells with the required functionality for realizing human transplantation therapies and with regard to reducing the potential for bacterial or fungal contamination. To meet these needs, we have developed a closed-channel culture device and corresponding control system. Uniformly-sized spheroidal hPSCs aggregates were formed inside wells within a closed-channel and maintained continuously throughout the culture process. Functional islet-like endocrine cell aggregates were reproducibly induced following a 30-day differentiation protocol. Our system shows an easily scalable, novel method for inducing PSC differentiation with both purity and functionality. - Highlights: • A simple, closed-channel-based, semi-automatic culture system is proposed. • Uniform cell aggregate formation and culture is realized in microwell structure. • Functional islet cells are successfully induced following 30-plus-day protocol. • System requires no daily medium replacement and reduces contamination risk.

  10. Coupling between Metacognition and Emotions during STEM Learning with Advanced Learning Technologies: A Critical Analysis, Implications for Future Research, and Design of Learning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Roger; Mudrick, Nicholas; Taub, Michelle; Wortha, Franz

    2017-01-01

    Metacognition and emotions play a critical role in learners' ability to monitor and regulate their learning about 21st-century skills related to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) content while using advanced learning technologies (ALTs; e.g., intelligent tutoring systems, serious games, hypermedia, augmented reality). In…

  11. Career planning for the non-clinical workforce - an opportunity to develop a sustainable workforce in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavabie, Jacqueline A; Simms, Jacqueline M

    2017-03-01

    Many health and social care systems worldwide have been developing a variety of navigator and signposting roles to help patients negotiate care through increasingly complex systems and multiple provider agencies. This UK project aims to explore, through a combination of job description review and workshops of stakeholders, the common competencies and features of non-clinical roles. The information is collated to develop common job descriptions at four key levels. These form the basis for a career pathway supported by portfolio-based educational programmes, embracing Apprenticeship Training Programmes. The programmes have the potential to support recruitment and retention of an increasingly skilled workforce to move between traditional health and social care provider boundaries. This offers the opportunity to release clinicians from significant administrative workload and support patients in an integrated care system.

  12. Learn About Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Handbook Stem Cell Glossary Search Toggle Nav Stem Cell Basics Stem cells are the foundation from which ... original cell’s DNA, cytoplasm and cell membrane. About stem cells Stem cells are the foundation of development in ...

  13. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells reduce systemic inflammation and attenuate LPS-induced acute lung injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jianjun

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs possess potent immunomodulatory properties and simultaneously lack the ability to illicit immune responses. Hence, MSCs have emerged as a promising candidate for cellular therapeutics for inflammatory diseases. Within the context of this study, we investigated whether human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs could ameliorate lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced acute lung injury (ALI in a rat model. Methods ALI was induced via injection of LPS. Rats were divided into three groups: (1 saline group(control, (2 LPS group, and (3 MSC + LPS group. The rats were sacrificed at 6, 24, and 48 hours after injection. Serum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF, and lungs were collected for cytokine concentration measurements, assessment of lung injury, and histology. Results UC-MSCs increased survival rate and suppressed LPS-induced increase of serum concentrations of pro-inflammatory mediators TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 without decreasing the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. The MSC + LPS group exhibited significant improvements in lung inflammation, injury, edema, lung wet/dry ratio, protein concentration, and neutrophil counts in the BALF, as well as improved myeloperoxidase (MPO activity in the lung tissue. Furthermore, UC-MSCs decreased malondialdehyde (MDA production and increased Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1 protein production and activity in the lung tissue. Conclusion UC-MSCs noticeably increased the survival rate of rats suffering from LPS-induced lung injury and significantly reduced systemic and pulmonary inflammation. Promoting anti-inflammatory homeostasis and reducing oxidative stress might be the therapeutic basis of UC-MSCs.

  14. Advanced Good Cell Culture Practice for human primary, stem cell-derived and organoid models as well as microphysiological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamies, David; Bal-Price, Anna; Chesné, Christophe; Coecke, Sandra; Dinnyes, Andras; Eskes, Chantra; Grillari, Regina; Gstraunthaler, Gerhard; Hartung, Thomas; Jennings, Paul; Leist, Marcel; Martin, Ulrich; Passier, Robert; Schwamborn, Jens C; Stacey, Glyn N; Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun; Daneshian, Mardas

    2018-04-13

    A major reason for the current reproducibility crisis in the life sciences is the poor implementation of quality control measures and reporting standards. Improvement is needed, especially regarding increasingly complex in vitro methods. Good Cell Culture Practice (GCCP) was an effort from 1996 to 2005 to develop such minimum quality standards also applicable in academia. This paper summarizes recent key developments in in vitro cell culture and addresses the issues resulting for GCCP, e.g. the development of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and gene-edited cells. It further deals with human stem-cell-derived models and bioengineering of organo-typic cell cultures, including organoids, organ-on-chip and human-on-chip approaches. Commercial vendors and cell banks have made human primary cells more widely available over the last decade, increasing their use, but also requiring specific guidance as to GCCP. The characterization of cell culture systems including high-content imaging and high-throughput measurement technologies increasingly combined with more complex cell and tissue cultures represent a further challenge for GCCP. The increasing use of gene editing techniques to generate and modify in vitro culture models also requires discussion of its impact on GCCP. International (often varying) legislations and market forces originating from the commercialization of cell and tissue products and technologies are further impacting on the need for the use of GCCP. This report summarizes the recommendations of the second of two workshops, held in Germany in December 2015, aiming map the challenge and organize the process or developing a revised GCCP 2.0.

  15. Cancer Stem Cells in Moderately Differentiated Buccal Mucosal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Express Components of the Renin-Angiotensin System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Therese Featherston

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim We have recently identified and characterized cancer stem cell (CSC subpopulations within moderately differentiated buccal mucosal squamous cell carcinoma (MDBMSCC. We hypothesized that these CSCs express components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS.Methods 3,3-Diaminobenzidine (DAB immunohistochemical (IHC staining was performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded MDBMSCC samples to investigate the expression of the components of the RAS: pro(renin receptor (PRR, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE, angiotensin II receptor 1 (ATIIR1 and angiotensin II receptor 2 (ATIIR2. NanoString mRNA gene expression analysis and Western Blotting (WB were performed on snap-frozen MDBMSCC samples to confirm gene expression and translation of these transcripts, respectively. Double immunofluorescent (IF IHC staining of these components of the RAS with the embryonic stem cell markers OCT4 or SALL4 was performed to demonstrate their localization in relation to the CSC subpopulations within MDBMSCC.Results DAB IHC staining demonstrated expression of PRR, ACE, ATIIR1 and ATIIR2 in MDBMSCC. IF IHC staining showed that PRR was expressed by the CSC subpopulations within the tumor nests, the peri-tumoral stroma and the endothelium of the microvessels within the peri-tumoral stroma. ATIIR1 and ATIIR2 were localized to the CSC subpopulations within the tumor nests and the peri-tumoral stroma, while ACE was localized to the endothelium of the microvessels within the peri-tumoral stroma. WB and NanoString analyses confirmed protein expression and transcription activation of PRR, ACE and ATIIR1 but not of ATIIR2, respectively.

  16. Embryonic Stem Cell-Like Population in Dupuytren’s Disease Expresses Components of the Renin-Angiotensin System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas On

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background:. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS mediates cardiac and renal fibrosis. Dupuytren’s disease (DD is a proliferative fibromatosis affecting the hands. This study investigated the expression of the RAS in DD. Methods:. 3,3-Diaminobenzidine (DAB and immunofluorescent immunohistochemical (IHC staining for (prorenin receptor (PRR, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE, angiotensin II receptor 1 (ATIIR1, and angiotensin II receptor 2 (ATIIR2 was performed on 4-μm thick formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections of DD cords and nodules from 6 patients. Western blotting (WB and NanoString mRNA analysis were performed to confirm RAS protein expression and transcriptional activation, respectively. Results:. IHC staining demonstrated the expression of PRR, ACE, ATIIR1, and ATIIR2 on the ERG+ and CD34+ endothelium of the micro vessels surrounding the DD cords and nodules. PRR was also expressed on the pericyte layer of these microvessels. WB confirmed protein expression of PRR, ACE, and ATIIR2 but not ATIIR1. NanoString analysis confirmed transcriptional activation of PRR, ACE, ATIIR1, but ATIIR2 was below detectable levels. Conclusions:. We demonstrated expression of PRR, ATIIR1, ATIIR2, and ACE on the embryonic stem cell–like cell population on the microvessels surrounding DD nodules and cords by IHC staining, although the expression of ATIIR1 was not confirmed by WB and that of ATIIR2 was below detectable levels on NanoString analysis. These findings suggest the embryonic stem cell–like cell population as a potential therapeutic target for DD, by using RAS modulators.

  17. Clicker Score Trajectories and Concept Inventory Scores as Predictors for Early Warning Systems for Large STEM Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Un Jung; Sbeglia, Gena C.; Ha, Minsu; Finch, Stephen J.; Nehm, Ross H.

    2015-12-01

    Increasing the retention of STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) majors has recently emerged as a national priority in undergraduate education. Since poor performance in large introductory science and math courses is one significant factor in STEM dropout, early detection of struggling students is needed. Technology-supported "early warning systems" (EWSs) are being developed to meet these needs. Our study explores the utility of two commonly collected data sources—pre-course concept inventory scores and longitudinal clicker scores—for use in EWS, specifically, in determining the time points at which robust predictions of student success can first be established. The pre-course diagnostic assessments, administered to 287 students, included two concept inventories and one attitude assessment. Clicker question scores were also obtained for each of the 37 class sessions. Additionally, student characteristics (sex, ethnicity, and English facility) were gathered in a survey. Our analyses revealed that all variables were predictive of final grades. The correlation of the first 3 weeks of clicker scores with final grades was 0.53, suggesting that this set of variables could be used in an EWS starting at the third week. We also used group-based trajectory models to assess whether trajectory patterns were homogeneous in the class. The trajectory analysis identified three distinct clicker performance patterns that were also significant predictors of final grade. Trajectory analyses of clicker scores, student characteristics, and pre-course diagnostic assessment appear to be valuable data sources for EWS, although further studies in a diversity of instructional contexts are warranted.

  18. Intratracheal Administration of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Modulates Tachykinin System, Suppresses Airway Remodeling and Reduces Airway Hyperresponsiveness in an Animal Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Urbanek

    Full Text Available The need for new options for chronic lung diseases promotes the research on stem cells for lung repair. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can modulate lung inflammation, but the data on cellular processes involved in early airway remodeling and the potential involvement of neuropeptides are scarce.To elucidate the mechanisms by which local administration of MSCs interferes with pathophysiological features of airway hyperresponsiveness in an animal model.GFP-tagged mouse MSCs were intratracheally delivered in the ovalbumin mouse model with subsequent functional tests, the analysis of cytokine levels, neuropeptide expression and histological evaluation of MSCs fate and airway pathology. Additionally, MSCs were exposed to pro-inflammatory factors in vitro.Functional improvement was observed after MSC administration. Although MSCs did not adopt lung cell phenotypes, cell therapy positively affected airway remodeling reducing the hyperplastic phase of the gain in bronchial smooth muscle mass, decreasing the proliferation of epithelium in which mucus metaplasia was also lowered. Decrease of interleukin-4, interleukin-5, interleukin-13 and increase of interleukin-10 in bronchoalveolar lavage was also observed. Exposed to pro-inflammatory cytokines, MSCs upregulated indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. Moreover, asthma-related in vivo upregulation of pro-inflammatory neurokinin 1 and neurokinin 2 receptors was counteracted by MSCs that also determined a partial restoration of VIP, a neuropeptide with anti-inflammatory properties.Intratracheally administered MSCs positively modulate airway remodeling, reduce inflammation and improve function, demonstrating their ability to promote tissue homeostasis in the course of experimental allergic asthma. Because of a limited tissue retention, the functional impact of MSCs may be attributed to their immunomodulatory response combined with the interference of neuropeptide system activation and tissue

  19. An enhanced reliability-oriented workforce planning model for process industry using combined fuzzy goal programming and differential evolution approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ighravwe, D. E.; Oke, S. A.; Adebiyi, K. A.

    2018-03-01

    This paper draws on the "human reliability" concept as a structure for gaining insight into the maintenance workforce assessment in a process industry. Human reliability hinges on developing the reliability of humans to a threshold that guides the maintenance workforce to execute accurate decisions within the limits of resources and time allocations. This concept offers a worthwhile point of deviation to encompass three elegant adjustments to literature model in terms of maintenance time, workforce performance and return-on-workforce investments. These fully explain the results of our influence. The presented structure breaks new grounds in maintenance workforce theory and practice from a number of perspectives. First, we have successfully implemented fuzzy goal programming (FGP) and differential evolution (DE) techniques for the solution of optimisation problem in maintenance of a process plant for the first time. The results obtained in this work showed better quality of solution from the DE algorithm compared with those of genetic algorithm and particle swarm optimisation algorithm, thus expressing superiority of the proposed procedure over them. Second, the analytical discourse, which was framed on stochastic theory, focusing on specific application to a process plant in Nigeria is a novelty. The work provides more insights into maintenance workforce planning during overhaul rework and overtime maintenance activities in manufacturing systems and demonstrated capacity in generating substantially helpful information for practice.

  20. Dynamic simulation for effective workforce management in new product development

    OpenAIRE

    M. Mutingi

    2012-01-01

    Effective planning and management of workforce for new product development (NPD) projects is a great challenge to many organisations, especially in the presence of engineering changes during the product development process. The management objective in effective workforce management is to recruit, develop and deploy the right people at the right place at the right time so as to fulfill organizational objectives. In this paper, we propose a dynamic simulation model to address the workforce mana...

  1. Assessing What Factors Are Driving the Army Civilian Acquisition Multigenerational Workforce Age/Experience Mix

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-06

    45 viii ix Abstract Generation members are born , start school, enter the workforce, have children, and retire at about the...and Army acquisition workforce has evolved into a multigenerational workforce of young (Millennials, born 1980–2000), middle age (Generation X, 1965...younger workforce. Editors of TDn2K, a restaurant workforce data and analytics provider firm ( Restaurant Hospitality, 2014), quoting Sarah Atkinson

  2. Can action research strengthen district health management and improve health workforce performance? A research protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mshelia, C; Huss, R; Mirzoev, T; Elsey, H; Baine, S O; Aikins, M; Kamuzora, P; Bosch-Capblanch, X; Raven, J; Wyss, K; Green, A; Martineau, T

    2013-08-30

    The single biggest barrier for countries in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) to scale up the necessary health services for addressing the three health-related Millennium Development Goals and achieving Universal Health Coverage is the lack of an adequate and well-performing health workforce. This deficit needs to be addressed both by training more new health personnel and by improving the performance of the existing and future health workforce. However, efforts have mostly been focused on training new staff and less on improving the performance of the existing health workforce. The purpose of this paper is to disseminate the protocol for the PERFORM project and reflect on the key challenges encountered during the development of this methodology and how they are being overcome. The overall aim of the PERFORM project is to identify ways of strengthening district management in order to address health workforce inadequacies by improving health workforce performance in SSA. The study will take place in three districts each in Ghana, Tanzania and Uganda using an action research approach. With the support of the country research teams, the district health management teams (DHMTs) will lead on planning, implementation, observation, reflection and redefinition of the activities in the study. Taking into account the national and local human resource (HR) and health systems (HS) policies and practices already in place, 'bundles' of HR/HS strategies that are feasible within the context and affordable within the districts' budget will be developed by the DHMTs to strengthen priority areas of health workforce performance. A comparative analysis of the findings from the three districts in each country will add new knowledge on the effects of these HR/HS bundles on DHMT management and workforce performance and the impact of an action research approach on improving the effectiveness of the DHMTs in implementing these interventions. Different challenges were faced during the development of

  3. Return to the workforce following coronary artery bypass grafting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butt, Jawad H; Rørth, Rasmus; Kragholm, Kristian

    2018-01-01

    Background Returning to the workforce after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) holds important socioeconomic consequences not only for patients, but the society as well. Yet data on this issue are limited. We examined return to the workforce and associated factors in patients of working age.......0%) patients had returned to the workforce, 614 (10.2%) were on paid sick leave, 267 (4.4%) received disability pension, 250 (4.1%) were on early retirement, 57 (0.9%) had died, and 16 (0.3%) had emigrated. Factors associated with return to the workforce were identified using multivariable logistic regression...

  4. FY17 Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training (EWDJT) Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    This notice announces the availability of funds and solicits proposals from eligible entities, including nonprofit organizations, to deliver Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training programs.

  5. A Simultaneous Density-Integral System for Estimating Stem Profile and Biomass: Slash Pine and Willow Oak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard R. Parresol; Charles E. Thomas

    1996-01-01

    In the wood utilization industry, both stem profile and biomass are important quantities. The two have traditionally been estimated separately. The introduction of a density-integral method allows for coincident estimation of stem profile and biomass, based on the calculus of mass theory, and provides an alternative to weight-ratio methodology. In the initial...

  6. Comparison of two different Radiostereometric analysis (RSA) systems with markerless elementary geometrical shape modeling for the measurement of stem migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Röhrl, Stephan M; Bøe, B; Nordsletten, Lars

    2014-09-01

    Radiostereometric analysis (RSA) is the gold standard of measurement for in vivo 3D implants migration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo precision of 2 RSA marker-based systems compared with that of marker-free, elementary geometrical shape modeling RSA. Stem migration was measured in 50 patients recruited from an on-going Randomized Controlled Trial. We performed marker-based analysis with the Um RSA and RSAcore systems and compared these results with those of the elementary geometrical shape RSA. The precision for subsidence was 0.118 mm for Um RSA, 0.141 mm for RSAcore, and 0.136 mm for elementary geometrical shape RSA. The precision for retroversion was 1.3° for elementary geometrical shape RSA, approximately 2-fold greater than that for the other methods. The intraclass correlation coefficient between the marker-based systems and elementary geometrical shape RSA was approximately 0.5 for retroversion. All 3 methods yielded ICCs for subsidence and varus-valgus rotation above 0.9. We found an excellent correlation between marker-based RSA and elementary geometrical shape RSA for subsidence and varus-valgus rotation, independent of the system used. The precisions for out-of-plane migration were inferior for elementary geometrical shape RSA. Therefore, as a mechanism of failure, retroversion may be more difficult to detect early. This is to our knowledge the first study to compare different RSA systems with or without markers on the implant. Marker-based RSA has high precision in all planes, independent of the system used. Elementary geometrical shape RSA is inferior in out-of-plane migration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The workforce for health in a globalized context--global shortages and international migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluttis, Christoph; Bishaw, Tewabech; Frank, Martina W

    2014-01-01

    The 'crisis in human resources' in the health sector has been described as one of the most pressing global health issues of our time. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that the world faces a global shortage of almost 4.3 million doctors, midwives, nurses, and other healthcare professionals. A global undersupply of these threatens the quality and sustainability of health systems worldwide. This undersupply is concurrent with globalization and the resulting liberalization of markets, which allow health workers to offer their services in countries other than those of their origin. The opportunities of health workers to seek employment abroad has led to a complex migration pattern, characterized by a flow of health professionals from low- to high-income countries. This global migration pattern has sparked a broad international debate about the consequences for health systems worldwide, including questions about sustainability, justice, and global social accountabilities. This article provides a review of this phenomenon and gives an overview of the current scope of health workforce migration patterns. It further focuses on the scientific discourse regarding health workforce migration and its effects on both high- and low-income countries in an interdependent world. The article also reviews the internal and external factors that fuel health worker migration and illustrates how health workforce migration is a classic global health issue of our time. Accordingly, it elaborates on the international community's approach to solving the workforce crisis, focusing in particular on the WHO Code of Practice, established in 2010.

  8. Future changes driving dietetics workforce supply and demand: future scan 2012-2022.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhea, Marsha; Bettles, Craig

    2012-03-01

    The dietetics profession faces many workforce challenges and opportunities to ensure that registered dietitians (RDs) and dietetic technicians, registered (DTRs) are at the forefront of health and nutrition. The profession must prepare for new public priorities, changes in population, and the restructuring of how people learn and work, as well as new advances in science and technology. In September 2010, the Dietetics Workforce Demand Task Force, in consultation with a panel of thought leaders, identified 10 change drivers that affect dietetics workforce supply and demand. This future scan report provides an overview of eight of these drivers. Two change drivers-health care reform and population risk factors/nutrition initiatives-are addressed in separate technical articles. A change matrix has been included at the end of this executive summary. The matrix contains a summary of each change driver and its expected impact and is designed to present the drivers in the context of a larger, dynamic system of change in the dietetics profession. The impact of any of these change drivers individually and collectively in a dynamic system is uncertain. The outcome of any change driver is also uncertain. The dietetics profession faces many choices within each change driver to meet the workforce challenges and seize the opportunities for leadership and growth. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The workforce for health in a globalized context – global shortages and international migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluttis, Christoph; Bishaw, Tewabech; Frank, Martina W.

    2014-01-01

    The ‘crisis in human resources’ in the health sector has been described as one of the most pressing global health issues of our time. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that the world faces a global shortage of almost 4.3 million doctors, midwives, nurses, and other healthcare professionals. A global undersupply of these threatens the quality and sustainability of health systems worldwide. This undersupply is concurrent with globalization and the resulting liberalization of markets, which allow health workers to offer their services in countries other than those of their origin. The opportunities of health workers to seek employment abroad has led to a complex migration pattern, characterized by a flow of health professionals from low- to high-income countries. This global migration pattern has sparked a broad international debate about the consequences for health systems worldwide, including questions about sustainability, justice, and global social accountabilities. This article provides a review of this phenomenon and gives an overview of the current scope of health workforce migration patterns. It further focuses on the scientific discourse regarding health workforce migration and its effects on both high- and low-income countries in an interdependent world. The article also reviews the internal and external factors that fuel health worker migration and illustrates how health workforce migration is a classic global health issue of our time. Accordingly, it elaborates on the international community's approach to solving the workforce crisis, focusing in particular on the WHO Code of Practice, established in 2010. PMID:24560265

  10. Stem cell therapy for inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijvestein, Marjolijn

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and mesenchymal stromal (MSC) cell therapy are currently under investigation as novel therapies for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Hematopoietic stem cells are thought to repopulate the immune system and reset the immunological response to luminal

  11. Molecular mechanisms of adult stem cell aging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rudolph, K. Lenhard

    2010-01-01

    "There is growing evidence that adult stem cells age. This process can result in alterations in the number and function of stem cells, leading to distinct phenotypic outcomes in different organ systems...

  12. Does Postsecondary Persistence in STEM Vary by Gender?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara King

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The underrepresentation of women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM is often explained by women’s greater likelihood to leave STEM at each key juncture from elementary school into the workforce. It is important to examine this more closely and look for points in the pipeline where gender equity exists. This study uses nationally representative data from a recent cohort of college students to investigate thoroughly gender differences in STEM persistence. Results indicate that no significant gender differences in persistence exist. This finding holds among those in computer science, engineering, mathematics, and physical science, and for those in life science. Additionally, the results are unchanged if the sample is limited to degree earners and are robust to the inclusion of individual and institutional variables. Although it is clear that women are less likely to choose certain STEM majors, those who do are no less likely to earn a STEM degree.

  13. Stem cells in psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ruixia; Li, Junqin; Niu, Xuping; Liu, Ruifeng; Chang, Wenjuan; Zhao, Xincheng; Wang, Qiang; Li, Xinhua; Yin, Guohua; Zhang, Kaiming

    2017-06-01

    Psoriasis is a complex chronic relapsing inflammatory disease. Although the exact mechanism remains unknown, it is commonly accepted that the development of psoriasis is a result of multi-system interactions among the epidermis, dermis, blood vessels, immune system, neuroendocrine system, metabolic system, and hematopoietic system. Many cell types have been confirmed to participate in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Here, we review the stem cell abnormalities related to psoriasis that have been investigated recently. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation vs intravenous pulse cyclophosphamide in diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Laar, Jacob M; Farge, Dominique; Sont, Jacob K; Naraghi, Kamran; Marjanovic, Zora; Larghero, Jérôme; Schuerwegh, Annemie J; Marijt, Erik W A; Vonk, Madelon C; Schattenberg, Anton V; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A; Daikeler, Thomas; Kötter, Ina; Schmalzing, Marc; Martin, Thierry; Lioure, Bruno; Weiner, Stefan M; Kreuter, Alexander; Deligny, Christophe; Durand, Jean-Marc; Emery, Paul; Machold, Klaus P; Sarrot-Reynauld, Francoise; Warnatz, Klaus; Adoue, Daniel F P; Constans, Joël; Tony, Hans-Peter; Del Papa, Nicoletta; Fassas, Athanasios; Himsel, Andrea; Launay, David; Lo Monaco, Andrea; Philippe, Pierre; Quéré, Isabelle; Rich, Éric; Westhovens, Rene; Griffiths, Bridget; Saccardi, Riccardo; van den Hoogen, Frank H; Fibbe, Willem E; Socié, Gérard; Gratwohl, Alois; Tyndall, Alan

    2014-06-25

    High-dose immunosuppressive therapy and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have shown efficacy in systemic sclerosis in phase 1 and small phase 2 trials. To compare efficacy and safety of HSCT vs 12 successive monthly intravenous pulses of cyclophosphamide. The Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation International Scleroderma (ASTIS) trial, a phase 3, multicenter, randomized (1:1), open-label, parallel-group, clinical trial conducted in 10 countries at 29 centers with access to a European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation-registered transplant facility. From March 2001 to October 2009, 156 patients with early diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis were recruited and followed up until October 31, 2013. HSCT vs intravenous pulse cyclophosphamide. The primary end point was event-free survival, defined as time from randomization until the occurrence of death or persistent major organ failure. A total of 156 patients were randomly assigned to receive HSCT (n = 79) or cyclophosphamide (n = 77). During a median follow-up of 5.8 years, 53 events occurred: 22 in the HSCT group (19 deaths and 3 irreversible organ failures) and 31 in the control group (23 deaths and 8 irreversible organ failures). During the first year, there were more events in the HSCT group (13 events [16.5%], including 8 treatment-related deaths) than in the control group (8 events [10.4%], with no treatment-related deaths). At 2 years, 14 events (17.7%) had occurred cumulatively in the HSCT group vs 14 events (18.2%) in the control group; at 4 years, 15 events (19%) had occurred cumulatively in the HSCT group vs 20 events (26%) in the control group. Time-varying hazard ratios (modeled with treatment × time interaction) for event-free survival were 0.35 (95% CI, 0.16-0.74) at 2 years and 0.34 (95% CI, 0.16-0.74) at 4 years. Among patients with early diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis, HSCT was associated with increased treatment-related mortality in the first year

  15. PRIMARY STAGE OF PAKIS-STEM-BLOCK SYSTEM AS THERMAL PROTECTIVE TO FLAT BARE CONCRETE ROOFTOP IN TROPICAL CLIMATE OF SURABAYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Santoso Mintorogo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In the era of global warming and increasing urban heat island condition, flat concrete deck on shop-houses may be less sustainable to handle the excessive solar heat radiation impacts on the roof surfaces. Innovative alternative roofing system is needed to manage heat radiation that will lead to sustainable factors likes energy savings, less energy body used on the roofing materials, and provide comprehensive environmental friendly roof system. This paper discusses about particular environmental friendly materials such as “Pakis-Stem Blocks” system is a good thermal resistant to absorb the solar sun heat and provide natural cooling through convective-wind without adding substantial loads to the roof structures. “Pakis-stem blocks” are easier, cheaper and more valuable than other sub-structure roofing materials as thermal resistant layer on flat bare concrete deck besides green roofing systems.

  16. The National Workforce Assistance Collaborative: A New Institution with Plans To Improve Workforce Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Terri

    The National Workforce Assistance Collaborative (NWAC) was established by the National Alliance of Business to provide assistance to community colleges and other organizations that offer programs to increase business productivity. The NWAC is charged with building the capacity of service providers that work with small and mid-sized companies in…

  17. Workforce restructuring, Oak Ridge site, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The workforce strategy to be used needs to have been finalized before procurement activities begin. The outcome will need to include policy on 'make or buy' decisions in achieving safe, economic and timely project completion, scope for utilizing existing staff, need for renegotiation of existing agreements designed for the operating phase, level of encouragement to contractors to recruit locally, etc. If these issues are not addressed in a timely manner, future debate and conflict are likely, with the potential to harm both the project and the parties involved

  18. Survey on workforce retention and attrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-03-01

    The Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE) is conducting a survey to gather information on why technical professionals change jobs or quit working. The survey, prompted by concern about the retention of skilled workers, aims to provide information to employers that can assist them in addressing practices that can lead to significant workforce attrition. To participate in the survey, which is open to everyone (including those who are not SPE members), go to http://research.spe.org/se.ashx?s=705E3F1335720258 through 15 May 2013. For more information, contact speresearch@spe.org.

  19. AN INTEGER PROGRAMMING MODEL FOR HIERARCHICAL WORKFORCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BANU SUNGUR

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The model presented in this paper is based on the model developed by Billionnet for the hierarchical workforce problem. In Billionnet’s Model, while determining the workers’ weekly costs, weekly working hours of workers are not taken into consideration. In our model, the weekly costs per worker are reduced in proportion to the working hours per week. Our model is illustrated on the Billionnet’s Example. The models in question are compared and evaluated on the basis of the results obtained from the example problem. A reduction is achieved in the total cost by the proposed model.

  20. The American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology workforce assessment: Part 1-Current state of the workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hord, Jeffrey; Shah, Mona; Badawy, Sherif M; Matthews, Dana; Hilden, Joanne; Wayne, Alan S; Salsberg, Edward; Leavey, Patrick S

    2018-02-01

    The American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology (ASPHO) recognized recent changes in medical practice and the potential impact on pediatric hematology-oncology (PHO) workforce. ASPHO surveyed society members and PHO Division Directors between 2010 and 2016 and studied PHO workforce data collected by the American Board of Pediatrics and the American Medical Association to characterize the current state of the PHO workforce. The analysis of this information has led to a comprehensive description of PHO physicians, professional activities, and workplace. It is important to continue to collect data to identify changes in composition and needs of the PHO workforce. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. STEM Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    & Development (LDRD) National Security Education Center (NSEC) Office of Science Programs Richard P Databases National Security Education Center (NSEC) Center for Nonlinear Studies Engineering Institute Scholarships STEM Education Programs Teachers (K-12) Students (K-12) Higher Education Regional Education

  2. Culture of Mouse Neural Stem Cell Precursors

    OpenAIRE

    Currle, D. Spencer; Hu, Jia Sheng; Kolski-Andreaco, Aaron; Monuki, Edwin S.

    2007-01-01

    Primary neural stem cell cultures are useful for studying the mechanisms underlying central nervous system development. Stem cell research will increase our understanding of the nervous system and may allow us to develop treatments for currently incurable brain diseases and injuries. In addition, stem cells should be used for stem cell research aimed at the detailed study of mechanisms of neural differentiation and transdifferentiation and the genetic and environmental signals that direct the...

  3. The effect of simulated microgravity on human mesenchymal stem cells cultured in an osteogenic differentiation system: a bioinformatics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheyn, Dima; Pelled, Gadi; Netanely, Dvir; Domany, Eytan; Gazit, Dan

    2010-11-01

    One proposed strategy for bone regeneration involves ex vivo tissue engineering, accomplished using bone-forming cells, biodegradable scaffolds, and dynamic culture systems, with the goal of three-dimensional tissue formation. Rotating wall vessel bioreactors generate simulated microgravity conditions ex vivo, which lead to cell aggregation. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have been extensively investigated and shown to possess the potential to differentiate into several cell lineages. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the effect of simulated microgravity on all genes expressed in hMSCs, with the underlying hypothesis that many important pathways are affected during culture within a rotating wall vessel system. Gene expression was analyzed using a whole genome microarray and clustering with the aid of the National Institutes of Health's Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery database and gene ontology analysis. Our analysis showed 882 genes that were downregulated and 505 genes that were upregulated after exposure to simulated microgravity. Gene ontology clustering revealed a wide variety of affected genes with respect to cell compartment, biological process, and signaling pathway clusters. The data sets showed significant decreases in osteogenic and chondrogenic gene expression and an increase in adipogenic gene expression, indicating that ex vivo adipose tissue engineering may benefit from simulated microgravity. This finding was supported by an adipogenic differentiation assay. These data are essential for further understanding of ex vivo tissue engineering using hMSCs.

  4. Dynamic cultivation of human mesenchymal stem cells in a rotating bed bioreactor system based on the Z RP platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederichs, Solvig; Röker, Stefanie; Marten, Dana; Peterbauer, Anja; Scheper, Thomas; van Griensven, Martijn; Kasper, Cornelia

    2009-01-01

    Because the regeneration of large bone defects is limited by quantitative restrictions and risks of infections, the development of bioartificial bone substitutes is of great importance. To obtain a three-dimensional functional tissue-like graft, static cultivation is inexpedient due to limitations in cell density, nutrition and oxygen support. Dynamic cultivation in a bioreactor system can overcome these restrictions and furthermore provide the possibility to control the environment with regard to pH, oxygen content, and temperature. In this study, a three-dimensional bone construct was engineered by the use of dynamic bioreactor technology. Human adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells were cultivated on a macroporous zirconium dioxide based ceramic disc called Sponceram. Furthermore, hydroxyapatite coated Sponceram was used. The cells were cultivated under dynamic conditions and compared with statically cultivated cells. The differentiation into osteoblasts was initiated by osteogenic supplements. Cellular proliferation during static and dynamic cultivation was compared measuring glucose and lactate concentration. The differentiation process was analysed determining AP-expression and using different specific staining methods. Our results demonstrate much higher proliferation rates during dynamic conditions in the bioreactor system compared to static cultivation measured by glucose consumption and lactate production. Cell densities on the scaffolds indicated higher proliferation on native Sponceram compared to hydroxyapatite coated Sponceram. With this study, we present an excellent method to enhance cellular proliferation and bone lineage specific growth of tissue like structures comprising fibrous (collagen) and globular (mineral) extracellular components. (c) 2009 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2009.

  5. Application of stem cell/growth factor system, as a multimodal therapy approach in regenerative medicine to improve cell therapy yields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourrajab, Fatemeh; Babaei Zarch, Mojtaba; Baghi Yazdi, Mohammad; Rahimi Zarchi, Abolfazl; Vakili Zarch, Abbas

    2014-04-15

    Stem cells hold a great promise for regenerative medicine, especially for replacing cells in infarcted organ that hardly have any intrinsic renewal capacity, including heart and brain. Signaling pathways that regulate pluripotency or lineage-specific gene and protein expression have been the major focus of stem cell research. Between them, there are some well known signaling pathways such as GF/GFR systems, SDF-1α/CXC4 ligand receptor interaction and PI3K/Akt signaling, and cytokines may regulate cell fate decisions, and can be utilized to positively influence cell therapy outcomes or accentuate synergistic compliance. For example, contributing factors in the progression of heart failure are both the loss of cardiomyocytes after myocardial infarction, and the absence of an adequate endogenous repair signaling. Combining cell engraftment with therapeutic signaling factor delivery is more exciting in terms of host progenitor/donor stem cell survival and proliferation. Thus stem cell-based therapy, besides triggering signaling pathways through GF/GFR systems can become a realistic option in regenerative processes for replacing lost cells and reconstituting the damaged organ, as before. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The DOE fellows program-a workforce development initiative for the US department of energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagos, Leonel E. [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler St, EC2100, Miami, Florida (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) oversees one of the largest and most technically challenging cleanup programs in the world. The mission of DOE-EM is to complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy from five decades of nuclear weapons development and government-sponsored nuclear energy research. Since 1995, Florida International University's Applied Research Center (FIU-ARC) has supported the DOE-EM mission and provided unique research capabilities to address some of these highly technical and difficult challenges. This partnership has allowed FIU-ARC to create a unique infrastructure that is critical for the training and mentoring of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) students and has exposed many STEM students to 'hands-on' DOE-EM applied research, supervised by the scientists and engineers at ARC. As a result of this successful partnership between DOE and FIU, DOE requested FIU-ARC to create the DOE-FIU Science and Technology Workforce Development Initiative in 2007. This innovative program was established to create a 'pipeline' of minority STEM students trained and mentored to enter DOE's environmental cleanup workforce. The program was designed to help address DOE's future workforce needs by partnering with academic, government and private companies (DOE contractors) to mentor future minority scientists and engineers in the research, development, and deployment of new technologies and processes addressing DOE's environmental cleanup challenges. Since its inception in 2007, the program has trained and mentored 78 FIU STEM minority students. Although, the program has been in existence for only six years, a total of 75 internships have been conducted at DOE National Laboratories, DOE sites, DOE Headquarters and field offices, and DOE contractors. Over 100 DOE Fellows have participated in the Waste Management (WM) Symposia since 2008 with a total of 84 student

  7. The DOE fellows program-a workforce development initiative for the US department of energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagos, Leonel E.

    2013-01-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) oversees one of the largest and most technically challenging cleanup programs in the world. The mission of DOE-EM is to complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy from five decades of nuclear weapons development and government-sponsored nuclear energy research. Since 1995, Florida International University's Applied Research Center (FIU-ARC) has supported the DOE-EM mission and provided unique research capabilities to address some of these highly technical and difficult challenges. This partnership has allowed FIU-ARC to create a unique infrastructure that is critical for the training and mentoring of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) students and has exposed many STEM students to 'hands-on' DOE-EM applied research, supervised by the scientists and engineers at ARC. As a result of this successful partnership between DOE and FIU, DOE requested FIU-ARC to create the DOE-FIU Science and Technology Workforce Development Initiative in 2007. This innovative program was established to create a 'pipeline' of minority STEM students trained and mentored to enter DOE's environmental cleanup workforce. The program was designed to help address DOE's future workforce needs by partnering with academic, government and private companies (DOE contractors) to mentor future minority scientists and engineers in the research, development, and deployment of new technologies and processes addressing DOE's environmental cleanup challenges. Since its inception in 2007, the program has trained and mentored 78 FIU STEM minority students. Although, the program has been in existence for only six years, a total of 75 internships have been conducted at DOE National Laboratories, DOE sites, DOE Headquarters and field offices, and DOE contractors. Over 100 DOE Fellows have participated in the Waste Management (WM) Symposia since 2008 with a total of 84 student

  8. Cloning of gene-encoded stem bromelain on system coming from Pichia pastoris as therapeutic protein candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Y.; Hidayati, W.

    2018-01-01

    The process of identifying bacterial recombination using PCR, and restriction, and then sequencing process was done after identifying the bacteria. This research aimed to get a yeast cell of Pichia pastoris which has an encoder gene of stem bromelain enzyme. The production of recombinant stem bromelain enzymes using yeast cells of P. pastoris can produce pure bromelain rod enzymes and have the same conformation with the enzyme’s conformation in pineapple plants. This recombinant stem bromelain enzyme can be used as a therapeutic protein in inflammatory, cancer and degenerative diseases. This study was an early stage of a step series to obtain bromelain rod protein derived from pineapple made with genetic engineering techniques. This research was started by isolating the RNA of pineapple stem which was continued with constructing cDNA using reserve transcriptase-PCR technique (RT-PCR), doing the amplification of bromelain enzyme encoder gene with PCR technique using a specific premiere couple which was designed. The process was continued by cloning into bacterium cells of Escherichia coli. A vector which brought the encoder gene of stem bromelain enzyme was inserted into the yeast cell of P. pastoris and was continued by identifying the yeast cell of P. pastoris which brought the encoder gene of stem bromelain enzyme. The research has not found enzyme gene of stem bromelain in yeast cell of P. pastoris yet. The next step is repeating the process by buying new reagent; RNase inhibitor, and buying liquid nitrogen.

  9. The proteolytic system of pineapple stems revisited: Purification and characterization of multiple catalytically active forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matagne, André; Bolle, Laetitia; El Mahyaoui, Rachida; Baeyens-Volant, Danielle; Azarkan, Mohamed

    2017-06-01

    Crude pineapple proteases extract (aka stem bromelain; EC 3.4.22.4) is an important proteolytic mixture that contains enzymes belonging to the cysteine proteases of the papain family. Numerous studies have been reported aiming at the fractionation and characterization of the many molecular species present in the extract, but more efforts are still required to obtain sufficient quantities of the various purified protease forms for detailed physicochemical, enzymatic and structural characterization. In this work, we describe an efficient strategy towards the purification of at least eight enzymatic forms. Thus, following rapid fractionation on a SP-Sepharose FF column, two sub-populations with proteolytic activity were obtained: the unbound (termed acidic) and bound (termed basic) bromelain fractions. Following reversible modification with monomethoxypolyethylene glycol (mPEG), both fractions were further separated on Q-Sepharose FF and SP-Sepharose FF, respectively. This procedure yielded highly purified molecular species, all titrating ca. 1 mol of thiol group per mole of enzyme, with distinct biochemical properties. N-terminal sequencing allowed identifying at least eight forms with proteolytic activity. The basic fraction contained previously identified species, i.e. basic bromelain forms 1 and 2, ananain forms 1 and 2, and comosain (MEROPS identifier: C01.027). Furthermore, a new proteolytic species, showing similarities with basic bomelain forms 1 and 2, was discovered and termed bromelain form 3. The two remaining species were found in the acidic bromelain fraction and were arbitrarily named acidic bromelain forms 1 and 2. Both, acidic bromelain forms 1, 2 and basic bromelain forms 1, 2 and 3 are glycosylated, while ananain forms 1 and 2, and comosain are not. The eight protease forms display different amidase activities against the various substrates tested, namely small synthetic chromogenic compounds (DL-BAPNA and Boc-Ala-Ala-Gly-pNA), fluorogenic compounds

  10. Learning from our global competitors: A comparative analysis of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education pipelines in the United States, Mainland China and Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Christina M.

    Maintaining a competitive edge within the 21st century is dependent on the cultivation of human capital, producing qualified and innovative employees capable of competing within the new global marketplace. Technological advancements in communications technology as well as large scale, infrastructure development has led to a leveled playing field where students in the U.S. will ultimately be competing for jobs with not only local, but also international, peers. Thus, the ability to understand and learn from our global competitors, starting with the examination of innovative education systems and best practice strategies, is tantamount to the economic development, and ultimate survival, of the U.S. as a whole. The purpose of this study was to investigate the current state of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education and workforce pipelines in the U.S., China, and Taiwan. Two broad research questions examined STEM workforce production in terms of a) structural differences in primary and secondary school systems, including analysis of minimum high school graduation requirements and assessments as well as b) organizational differences in tertiary education and trends in STEM undergraduate and graduate degrees awarded in each region of interest. While each of the systems studied had their relative strengths and weaknesses, each of the Asian economies studied had valuable insights that can be categorized broadly in terms of STEM capacity, STEM interest and a greater understanding of global prospects that led to heightened STEM awareness. In China and Taiwan, STEM capacity was built via both traditional and vocational school systems. Focused and structured curriculum during the primary and early secondary school years built solid mathematics and science skills that translated into higher performance on international assessments and competitions. Differentiated secondary school options, including vocational high school and technical colleges and

  11. Dynamical System Modeling of Immune Reconstitution after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation Identifies Patients at Risk for Adverse Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toor, Amir A; Sabo, Roy T; Roberts, Catherine H; Moore, Bonny L; Salman, Salman R; Scalora, Allison F; Aziz, May T; Shubar Ali, Ali S; Hall, Charles E; Meier, Jeremy; Thorn, Radhika M; Wang, Elaine; Song, Shiyu; Miller, Kristin; Rizzo, Kathryn; Clark, William B; McCarty, John M; Chung, Harold M; Manjili, Masoud H; Neale, Michael C

    2015-07-01

    Systems that evolve over time and follow mathematical laws as they evolve are called dynamical systems. Lymphocyte recovery and clinical outcomes in 41 allograft recipients conditioned using antithymocyte globulin (ATG) and 4.5-Gy total body irradiation were studied to determine if immune reconstitution could be described as a dynamical system. Survival, relapse, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were not significantly different in 2 cohorts of patients receiving different doses of ATG. However, donor-derived CD3(+) cell reconstitution was superior in the lower ATG dose cohort, and there were fewer instances of donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI). Lymphoid recovery was plotted in each individual over time and demonstrated 1 of 3 sigmoid growth patterns: Pattern A (n = 15) had rapid growth with high lymphocyte counts, pattern B (n = 14) had slower growth with intermediate recovery, and pattern C (n = 10) had poor lymphocyte reconstitution. There was a significant association between lymphocyte recovery patterns and both the rate of change of donor-derived CD3(+) at day 30 after stem cell transplantation (SCT) and clinical outcomes. GVHD was observed more frequently with pattern A, relapse and DLI more so with pattern C, with a consequent survival advantage in patients with patterns A and B. We conclude that evaluating immune reconstitution after SCT as a dynamical system may differentiate patients at risk of adverse outcomes and allow early intervention to modulate that risk. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Validation of shortened 2-day sterility testing of mesenchymal stem cell-based therapeutic preparation on an automated culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysák, Daniel; Holubová, Monika; Bergerová, Tamara; Vávrová, Monika; Cangemi, Giuseppina Cristina; Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Kruzliak, Peter; Jindra, Pavel

    2016-03-01

    Cell therapy products represent a new trend of treatment in the field of immunotherapy and regenerative medicine. Their biological nature and multistep preparation procedure require the application of complex release criteria and quality control. Microbial contamination of cell therapy products is a potential source of morbidity in recipients. The automated blood culture systems are widely used for the detection of microorganisms in cell therapy products. However the standard 2-week cultivation period is too long for some cell-based treatments and alternative methods have to be devised. We tried to verify whether a shortened cultivation of the supernatant from the mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) culture obtained 2 days before the cell harvest could sufficiently detect microbial growth and allow the release of MSC for clinical application. We compared the standard Ph. Eur. cultivation method and the automated blood culture system BACTEC (Becton Dickinson). The time to detection (TTD) and the detection limit were analyzed for three bacterial and two fungal strains. The Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were recognized within 24 h with both methods (detection limit ~10 CFU). The time required for the detection of Bacillus subtilis was shorter with the automated method (TTD 10.3 vs. 60 h for 10-100 CFU). The BACTEC system reached significantly shorter times to the detection of Candida albicans and Aspergillus brasiliensis growth compared to the classical method (15.5 vs. 48 and 31.5 vs. 48 h, respectively; 10-100 CFU). The positivity was demonstrated within 48 h in all bottles, regardless of the size of the inoculum. This study validated the automated cultivation system as a method able to detect all tested microorganisms within a 48-h period with a detection limit of ~10 CFU. Only in case of B. subtilis, the lowest inoculum (~10 CFU) was not recognized. The 2-day cultivation technique is then capable of confirming the microbiological safety of MSC and

  13. The child neurology clinical workforce in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, James F.; Mintz, Mark; Joshi, Sucheta M.; Gilbert, Donald L.; Radabaugh, Carrie; Ruch-Ross, Holly

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: More than a decade has passed since the last major workforce survey of child neurologists in the United States; thus, a reassessment of the child neurology workforce is needed, along with an inaugural assessment of a new related field, neurodevelopmental disabilities. Methods: The American Academy of Pediatrics and the Child Neurology Society conducted an electronic survey in 2015 of child neurologists and neurodevelopmental disabilities specialists. Results: The majority of respondents participate in maintenance of certification, practice in academic medical centers, and offer subspecialty care. EEG reading and epilepsy care are common subspecialty practice areas, although many child neurologists have not had formal training in this field. In keeping with broader trends, medical school debts are substantially higher than in the past and will often take many years to pay off. Although a broad majority would choose these fields again, there are widespread dissatisfactions with compensation and benefits given the length of training and the complexity of care provided, and frustrations with mounting regulatory and administrative stresses that interfere with clinical practice. Conclusions: Although not unique to child neurology and neurodevelopmental disabilities, such issues may present barriers for the recruitment of trainees into these fields. Creative approaches to enhance the recruitment of the next generation of child neurologists and neurodevelopmental disabilities specialists will benefit society, especially in light of all the exciting new treatments under development for an array of chronic childhood neurologic disorders. PMID:27566740

  14. An Aging Workforce: Employment Opportunities and Obstacles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Full Professor, Institute of Economic Sciences

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The last decade has witnessed significant changes in the structure of unemployment in the global labour market. This is corroborated by the fact that the global workforce is rapidly aging and the share of people aged 50 and over in the structure of the labour market is increasing. In line with this trend, unemployment issues should be considered as a global problem that cannot be fully resolved at the level of any individual country separately.The main objective of this paper is to throw some light on the aging workforce and the elderly population’s opportunity to realise their right to work and be treated equally with younger age groups. Hence, the paper simultaneously focuses on the age and gender discrimination of elderly population in terms of their employment prospects. The aim of our research is not only to point out certain stereotypes concerning the elderly labour force, but also to stress that unless preconditions for overcoming these stereotypes are created and employment opportunities are given to this segment of the labour force, full employment as an ultimate goal of global economic policy cannot be achieved. It is in accordance with these considerations that we offer a model to achieve this goal.

  15. Does State Legislation Improve Nursing Workforce Diversity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travers, Jasmine; Smaldone, Arlene; Cohn, Elizabeth Gross

    2015-08-01

    A health-care workforce representative of our nation's diversity is a health and research priority. Although racial and ethnic minorities represent 37% of Americans, they comprise only 16% of the nursing workforce. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of state legislation on minority recruitment to nursing. Using data from the National Conference of State Legislatures, American Association of Colleges of Nursing, and U.S. census, we compared minority enrollment in baccalaureate nursing programs of states (Texas, Virginia, Michigan, California, Florida, Connecticut, and Arkansas) before and 3 years after enacting legislation with geographically adjacent states without legislation. Data were analyzed using descriptive and chi-square statistics. Following legislation, Arkansas (13.8%-24.5%), California (3.3%-5.4%), and Michigan (8.0%-10.0%) significantly increased enrollment of Blacks, and Florida (11.8%-15.4%) and Texas (11.2%-13.9%) significantly increased enrollment of Hispanic baccalaureate nursing students. States that tied legislation to funding, encouragement, and reimbursement had larger enrollment gains and greater minority representation. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Strategies for Managing a Multigenerational Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iden, Ronald

    The multigenerational workforce presents a critical challenge for business managers, and each generation has different expectations. A human resource management study of organizations with more than 500 employees reported 58% of the managers experiencing conflict between younger and older workers. The purpose of this single case study was to explore the multigenerational strategies used by 3 managers from a Franklin County, Ohio manufacturing facility with a population size of 6 participants. The conceptual framework for this study was built upon generational theory and cohort group theory. The data were collected through face-to-face semistructured interviews, company documents, and a reflexive journal. Member checking was completed to strengthen the credibility and trustworthiness of the interpretation of participants' responses. A modified van Kaam method enabled separation of themes following the coding of data. Four themes emerged from the data: (a) required multigenerational managerial skills, (b) generational cohort differences, (c) most effective multigenerational management strategies, and (d) least effective multigenerational management strategies. Findings from this study may contribute to social change through better understanding, acceptance, and appreciation of the primary generations in the workforce, and, in turn, improve community relationships.

  17. Road for understanding cancer stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Erzik, Can

    2007-01-01

    There is increasing evidence suggesting that stem cells are susceptive to carcinogenesis and, consequently, can be the origin of many cancers. Recently, the neoplastic potential of stem cells has been supported by many groups showing the existence of subpopulations with stem cell characteristics...... in tumor biopsies such as brain and breast. Evidence supporting the cancer stem cell hypothesis has gained impact due to progress in stem cell biology and development of new models to validate the self-renewal potential of stem cells. Recent evidence on the possible identification of cancer stem cells may...... offer an opportunity to use these cells as future therapeutic targets. Therefore, model systems in this field have become very important and useful. This review will focus on the state of knowledge on cancer stem cell research, including cell line models for cancer stem cells. The latter will, as models...

  18. Blueprint for Action: Visioning Summit on the Future of the Workforce in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sectish, Theodore C; Hay, William W; Mahan, John D; Mendoza, Fernando S; Spector, Nancy D; Stanton, Bonita; Szilagyi, Peter G; Turner, Teri L; Walker, Leslie R; Slaw, Kenneth

    2015-07-01

    The Federation of Pediatric Organizations engaged members of the pediatric community in an 18-month process to envision the future of the workforce in pediatrics, culminating in a Visioning Summit on the Future of the Workforce in Pediatrics. This article documents the planning process and methods used. Four working groups were based on the 4 domains that are likely to affect the future workforce: Child Health Research and Training, Diversity and Inclusion, Gender and Generations, and Pediatric Training Along the Continuum. These groups identified the issues and trends and prioritized their recommendations. Before the summit, 5 key megatrends cutting across all domains were identified:1. Aligning Education to the Emerging Health Needs of Children and Families 2. Promoting Future Support for Research Training and for Child Health Research 3. Striving Toward Mastery Within the Profession 4. Aligning and Optimizing Pediatric Practice in a Changing Health Care Delivery System 5. Taking Advantage of the Changing Demographics and Expertise of the Pediatric Workforce At the Visioning Summit, we assembled members of each of the working groups, the Federation of Pediatric Organizations Board of Directors, and several invited guests to discuss the 5 megatrends and develop the vision, solutions, and actions for each megatrend. Based on this discussion, we offer 10 recommendations for the field of pediatrics and its leading organizations to consider taking action. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  19. How to Break the Cycle of Low Workforce Diversity: A Model for Change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine R O'Brien

    Full Text Available Social justice concerns but also perceived business advantage are behind a widespread drive to increase workplace diversity. However, dominance in terms of ethnicity, gender or other aspects of diversity has been resistant to change in many sectors. The different factors which contribute to low diversity are often hotly contested and difficult to untangle. We propose that many of the barriers to change arise from self-reinforcing feedbacks between low group diversity and inclusivity. Using a dynamic model, we demonstrate how bias in employee appointment and departure can trap organizations in a state with much lower diversity than the applicant pool: a workforce diversity "poverty trap". Our results also illustrate that if turnover rate is low, employee diversity takes a very long time to change, even in the absence of any bias. The predicted rate of change in workforce composition depends on the rate at which employees enter and leave the organization, and on three measures of inclusion: applicant diversity, appointment bias and departure bias. Quantifying these three inclusion measures is the basis of a new, practical framework to identify barriers and opportunities to increasing workforce diversity. Because we used a systems approach to investigate underlying feedback mechanisms rather than context-specific causes of low workforce diversity, our results are applicable across a wide range of settings.

  20. How to Break the Cycle of Low Workforce Diversity: A Model for Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Katherine R; Scheffer, Marten; van Nes, Egbert H; van der Lee, Romy

    2015-01-01

    Social justice concerns but also perceived business advantage are behind a widespread drive to increase workplace diversity. However, dominance in terms of ethnicity, gender or other aspects of diversity has been resistant to change in many sectors. The different factors which contribute to low diversity are often hotly contested and difficult to untangle. We propose that many of the barriers to change arise from self-reinforcing feedbacks between low group diversity and inclusivity. Using a dynamic model, we demonstrate how bias in employee appointment and departure can trap organizations in a state with much lower diversity than the applicant pool: a workforce diversity "poverty trap". Our results also illustrate that if turnover rate is low, employee diversity takes a very long time to change, even in the absence of any bias. The predicted rate of change in workforce composition depends on the rate at which employees enter and leave the organization, and on three measures of inclusion: applicant diversity, appointment bias and departure bias. Quantifying these three inclusion measures is the basis of a new, practical framework to identify barriers and opportunities to increasing workforce diversity. Because we used a systems approach to investigate underlying feedback mechanisms rather than context-specific causes of low workforce diversity, our results are applicable across a wide range of settings.

  1. Casualisation of the nursing workforce in Australia: driving forces and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creegan, Reta; Duffield, Christine; Forrester, Kim

    2003-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the extent of casualisation of the nursing workforce in Australia, focusing on the impact for those managing the system. The implications for nurse managers in particular are considerable in an industry where service demand is difficult to control and where individual nurses are thought to be increasingly choosing to work casually. While little is known of the reasons behind nurses exercising their preference for casual work arrangements, some reasons postulated include visa status (overseas trained nurses on holiday/working visas); permanent employees taking on additional shifts to increase their income levels; and those who elect to work under casual contracts for lifestyle reasons. Unknown is the demography of the casual nursing workforce, how these groups are distributed within the workforce, and how many contracts of employment they have across the health service--either through privately managed nursing agencies or hospital managed casual pools. A more detailed knowledge of the forces driving the decisions of this group is essential if health care organisations are to equip themselves to manage this changing workforce and maintain a standard of patient care that is acceptable to the community.

  2. European Socio-cultural Change and Generational Diversity in the Post-Soviet Workforce.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madara APSALONE

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In times of increased retirement age and senior employees staying in workforce longer, successfully managing generational differences in the workforce forms an increasingly important challenge for modern day management. In many ways, generations may vary in attitudes and approaches, reflecting deeper differences in their core values. This might be particularly true for the Post-Soviet countries, where earlier generations were educated and started their careers within a completely different socio-economic system. In this study we explore differences in approaches towards values and attitudes amongst four generations of retail sector employees – starting from those, who were still to great extent exposed to pre-Soviet values, continuing with employees, who started their careers during the Soviet times, and ending with those, who were educated and entered the workforce after the collapse of the Soviet Union. 208 Latvian service employees were surveyed to assess their personal values and likelihood of dishonest and unethical behavior from four generations currently active in the workforce - Post-War generation, Early Gen X, Transition generation and Millennials. We confirmed that despite dual morality and ambiguous ethics in the Soviet Union, older generations reported higher likelihood of honest behavior than younger generations. And Post-War and Early Generation X also rated honesty and responsibility higher as their personal values. We also found significant differences between Early Generation X and the Transition generation in a post-Soviet context.

  3. Preparation of high bioactivity multilayered bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cell sheets for myocardial infarction using a 3D-dynamic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingwei; Zhang, Jianhua; Qin, Zixi; Fan, Zepei; Lu, Cheng; Chen, Baoxin; Zhao, Jupeng; Li, Xiaojuan; Xiao, Fei; Lin, Xi; Wu, Zheng

    2018-05-01

    Cell sheet techniques offer a promising future for myocardial infarction (MI) therapy; however, insufficient nutrition supply remains the major limitation in maintaining stem cell bioactivity in vitro. In order to enhance cell sheet mechanical strength and bioactivity, a decellularized porcine pericardium (DPP) scaffold was prepared by the phospholipase A2 method, and aspartic acid was used as a spacer arm to improve the vascular endothelial growth factor crosslink efficiency on the DPP scaffold. Based on this scaffold, multilayered bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell sheets were rapidly constructed, using RAD16-I peptide hydrogel as a temporary 3D scaffold, and cell sheets were cultured in either the 3D-dynamic system (DCcs) or the traditional static condition (SCcs). The multilayered structure, stem cell bioactivity, and ultrastructure of DCcs and SCcs were assessed. The DCcs exhibited lower apoptosis, lower differentiation, and an improved paracrine effect after a 48 h culture in vitro compared to the SCcs. Four groups were set to evaluate the cell sheet effect in rat MI model: sham group, MI control group, DCcs group, and SCcs group. The DCcs group improved cardiac function and decreased the infarcted area compared to the MI control group, while no significant improvements were observed in the SCcs group. Improved cell survival, angiogenesis, and Sca-1 + cell and c-kit + cell amounts were observed in the DCcs group. In conclusion, the DCcs maintained higher stem cell bioactivity by using the 3D-dynamic system to provide sufficient nutrition, and transplanting DCcs significantly improved the cardiac function and angiogenesis. This study provides an efficient method to prepare vascular endothelial growth factor covalent decellularized pericardium scaffold with aspartic acid, and a multilayered bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) sheet is constructed on it using a 3D-dynamic system. The dynamic nutrition supply showed a significant benefit on BMSC bioactivity

  4. Hepatic esterase activity is increased in hepatocyte-like cells derived from human embryonic stem cells using a 3D culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young-Jun; Kim, Hyemin; Kim, Ji-Woo; Yoon, Seokjoo; Park, Han-Jin

    2018-05-01

    The aim of the study is to generate a spherical three-dimensional (3D) aggregate of hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) differentiated from human embryonic stem cells and to investigate the effect of the 3D environment on hepatic maturation and drug metabolism. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that gene expression of mature hepatocyte markers, drug-metabolizing enzymes, and hepatic transporters was significantly higher in HLCs cultured in the 3D system than in those cultured in a two-dimensional system (p formation, were increased in HLCs cultured in the 3D system. In particular, 3D spheroidal culture increased expression of CES1 and BCHE, which encode hepatic esterases (p 3D spheroidal culture enhances the maturation and drug metabolism of stem cell-derived HLCs, and this may help to optimize hepatic differentiation protocols for hepatotoxicity testing.

  5. Disruptive innovation in community pharmacy - Impact of automation on the pharmacist workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinks, Jean; Jackson, John; Kirkpatrick, Carl M; Wheeler, Amanda J

    Pharmacy workforce planning has been relatively static for many decades. However, like all industries, health care is exposed to potentially disruptive technological changes. Automated dispensing systems have been available to pharmacy for over a decade and have been applied to a range of repetitive technical processes which are at risk of error, including record keeping, item selection, labeling and dose packing. To date, most applications of this technology have been at the local level, such as hospital pharmacies or single-site community pharmacies. However, widespread implementation of a more centralized automated dispensing model, such as the 'hub and spoke' model currently being debated in the United Kingdom, could cause a 'technology shock,' delivering industry-wide efficiencies, improving medication accessibility and lowering costs to consumers and funding agencies. Some of pharmacists' historical roles may be made redundant, and new roles may be created, decoupling pharmacists to a certain extent from the dispensing and supply process. It may also create an additional opportunity for pharmacists to be acknowledged and renumerated for professional services that extend beyond the dispensary. Such a change would have significant implications for the organization and funding of community pharmacy services as well as pharmacy workforce planning. This paper discusses the prospect of centralized automated dispensing systems and how this may impact on the pharmacy workforce. It concludes that more work needs to be done in the realm of pharmacy workforce planning to ensure that the introduction of any new technology delivers optimal outcomes to consumers, insurers and the pharmacy workforce. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Exploration of an allied health workforce redesign model: quantifying the work of allied health assistants in a community workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerville, Lisa; Davis, Annette; Milne, Sarah; Terrill, Desiree; Philip, Kathleen

    2017-07-25

    The Victorian Assistant Workforce Model (VAWM) enables a systematic approach for the identification and quantification of work that can be delegated from allied health professionals (AHPs) to allied health assistants (AHAs). The aim of the present study was to explore the effect of implementation of VAWM in the community and ambulatory health care setting. Data captured using mixed methods from allied health professionals working across the participating health services enabled the measurement of opportunity for workforce redesign in the community and ambulatory allied health workforce. A total of 1112 AHPs and 135 AHAs from the 27 participating organisations took part in the present study. AHPs identified that 24% of their time was spent undertaking tasks that could safely be delegated to an appropriately qualified and supervised AHA. This equates to 6837h that could be redirected to advanced and expanded AHP practice roles or expanded patient-centred service models. The VAWM demonstrates potential for more efficient implementation of assistant workforce roles across allied health. Data outputs from implementation of the VAWM are vital in informing strategic planning and sustainability of workforce change. A more efficient and effective workforce promotes service delivery by the right person, in the right place, at the right time. What is known about this topic? There are currently workforce shortages that are predicted to grow across the allied health workforce. Ensuring that skill mix is optimal is one way to address these shortages. Matching the right task to right worker will also enable improved job satisfaction for both allied health assistants and allied health professionals. Workforce redesign efforts are more effective when there is strong data to support the redesign. What does this paper add? This paper builds on a previous paper by Somerville et al. with a case study applying the workforce redesign model to a community and ambulatory health care

  7. Information and Communication Technology Workforce Employability in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhaimi, Mohammed Adam; Hasan, Muhammad; Hussin, Husnayati; Shah, Asadullah

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes of the study are to understand ICT workforce employability in Malaysia, to identify the causes that influence the growth of skill gaps in the ICT workforce, and to determine ways to reduce these gaps. Design/methodology/approach: The methodology of the study comprised project reports and a literature review. Findings: The…

  8. Definitions and Design Options: Workforce Initiatives Discussion Paper #1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Academy for Educational Development, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Workforce initiatives are about giving people the skills to do their jobs well, about strengthening the institutional infrastructure that provides job services, about positioning labor markets to lead growth and increased investment, and about creating sustainable employment and improved working conditions. Workforce initiatives aim to fill a…

  9. New Game, New Rules: Strategic Positioning for Workforce Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warford, Larry J.; Flynn, William J.

    2000-01-01

    Asserts that institutional planning for workforce development programs should be based on serving four major workforce segments: emerging workers, transitional workers, entrepreneurs, and incumbent workers. Suggests that a typical college be divided into four components to deal with these different workers and their differing educational and…

  10. Labor and skills gap analysis of the biomedical research workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Julie L.; Johnston, Elizabeth; Berndt, Sam; Segal, Katie; Lei, Ming; Wiest, Jonathan S.

    2016-01-01

    The United States has experienced an unsustainable increase of the biomedical research workforce over the past 3 decades. This expansion has led to a myriad of consequences, including an imbalance in the number of researchers and available tenure-track faculty positions, extended postdoctoral training periods, increasing age of investigators at first U.S. National Institutes of Health R01 grant, and exodus of talented individuals seeking careers beyond traditional academe. Without accurate data on the biomedical research labor market, challenges will remain in resolving these problems and in advising trainees of viable career options and the skills necessary to be productive in their careers. We analyzed workforce trends, integrating both traditional labor market information and real-time job data. We generated a profile of the current biomedical research workforce, performed labor gap analyses of occupations in the workforce at regional and national levels, and assessed skill transferability between core and complementary occupations. We conclude that although supply into the workforce and the number of job postings for occupations within that workforce have grown over the past decade, supply continues to outstrip demand. Moreover, we identify practical skill sets from real-time job postings to optimally equip trainees for an array of careers to effectively meet future workforce demand.—Mason, J. L., Johnston, E., Berndt, S., Segal, K., Lei, M., Wiest, J. S. Labor and skills gap analysis of the biomedical research workforce. PMID:27075242

  11. Investigation of Malaysian Higher Education Quality Culture and Workforce Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Hairuddin Mohd; Musah, Mohammed Borhandden

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between the quality culture and workforce performance in the Malaysian higher education sector. The study also aims to test and validate the psychometric properties of the quality culture and workforce performance instruments used in the study. Design/methodology/approach: A total…

  12. The public health workforce: An assessment in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jambroes, M.

    2015-01-01

    The public health workforce is a key resource of population health. How many people work in public health in the Netherlands, what are their characteristics and who does what? Remarkably, such information about the size and composition of the public health workforce in the Netherlands is lacking. A

  13. The State of the Psychology Health Service Provider Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Daniel S.; Kohout, Jessica L.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous efforts to describe the health service provider or clinical workforce in psychology have been conducted during the past 30 years. The American Psychological Association (APA) has studied trends in the doctoral education pathway and the resultant effects on the broader psychology workforce. During this period, the creation and growth of…

  14. Labor and skills gap analysis of the biomedical research workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Julie L; Johnston, Elizabeth; Berndt, Sam; Segal, Katie; Lei, Ming; Wiest, Jonathan S

    2016-08-01

    The United States has experienced an unsustainable increase of the biomedical research workforce over the past 3 decades. This expansion has led to a myriad of consequences, including an imbalance in the number of researchers and available tenure-track faculty positions, extended postdoctoral training periods, increasing age of investigators at first U.S. National Institutes of Health R01 grant, and exodus of talented individuals seeking careers beyond traditional academe. Without accurate data on the biomedical research labor market, challenges will remain in resolving these problems and in advising trainees of viable career options and the skills necessary to be productive in their careers. We analyzed workforce trends, integrating both traditional labor market information and real-time job data. We generated a profile of the current biomedical research workforce, performed labor gap analyses of occupations in the workforce at regional and national levels, and assessed skill transferability between core and complementary occupations. We conclude that although supply into the workforce and the number of job postings for occupations within that workforce have grown over the past decade, supply continues to outstrip demand. Moreover, we identify practical skill sets from real-time job postings to optimally equip trainees for an array of careers to effectively meet future workforce demand.-Mason, J. L., Johnston, E., Berndt, S., Segal, K., Lei, M., Wiest, J. S. Labor and skills gap analysis of the biomedical research workforce. © FASEB.

  15. The American Community College: Nexus for Workforce Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Robert H., Ed.

    Emphasizing the central role of community colleges in workforce development, this two-part monograph reviews the status of workforce development initiatives at the national, state, and local levels and provides descriptions of 10 exemplary programs at community colleges across North America. The first part focuses on the status of and operating…

  16. Nuclear education and training: assuring a competent workforce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urso, M.E.; Murphy, B.P.; Giot, M.

    2011-01-01

    . The outcomes will be presented. In parallel to these reviews, which address more specifically the training of nuclear professionals, the study investigates needs related to the larger part of the nuclear workforce, by mapping skills and competencies of different types of workers, encompassing functional and behavioural skills, training requirements and standards. By considering examples of job profile characterisation across countries collectively agreed as good practice, commonalities are drawn to enable the development of internationally benchmarked training standards, hence facilitating the establishment of a competent workforce, its mobility and progression and providing guidance to 'new-comers'. By capturing common education, training and knowledge across the globe, it is possible to develop an international taxonomy: a system for classifying job roles and competencies of the diverse work forces serving NPPs. This has the potential to be a powerful tool for workforce planning. (authors)

  17. Redesigning Human Body Systems: Effective Pedagogical Strategy for Promoting Active Learning and STEM Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abour H. Cherif

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The human body is a remarkable biological machine maintained by interdependent body systems and organized biochemical reactions. Evolution has worked on humans for hundreds of thousands of years, yet the current pace of technological and social change have radically affected our life style and have exposed possible human frailties. This raises the question of whether or not nature’s work could be improved upon. We provide two-sided perspectives as a rationale for the need for the redesign of the human body. Then, we describe pedagogical strategy through which students study morphological and anatomical structures and the physiological functions of the human body systems and their respective organs and parts. The students select their own favorite system or organ to redesign in order to optimize the efficiency of the anatomical structural, physiological function, and/or the aesthetic and functional morphology; a redesign that might lead to, for example, lowering risk of diabetes, heart attack, and/or stroke. Through group work and interaction (student groups compete for a prestigious “in-house” patent award, students actively engage in the learning process in order to understand the role of design in the efficiency and functionality and vulnerability to disease of the human body system.

  18. Hand movements with a phase structure and gestures that depict action stem from a left hemispheric system of conceptualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmich, I; Lausberg, H

    2014-10-01

    represent action stem from a left hemispheric system of conceptualization.

  19. Anaerobic co-culture of mesenchymal stem cells and anaerobic pathogens - a new in vitro model system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Kriebel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs are multipotent by nature and are originally isolated from bone marrow. In light of a future application of hMSCs in the oral cavity, a body compartment with varying oxygen partial pressures and an omnipresence of different bacterial species i.e. periodontitis pathogens, we performed this study to gain information about the behavior of hMSC in an anaerobic system and the response in interaction with oral bacterial pathogens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We established a model system with oral pathogenic bacterial species and eukaryotic cells cultured in anaerobic conditions. The facultative anaerobe bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans were studied. Their effects on hMSCs and primary as well as permanent gingival epithelial cells (Ca9-22, HGPEC were comparatively analyzed. We show that hMSCs cope with anoxic conditions, since 40% vital cells remain after 72 h of anaerobic culture. The Ca9-22 and HGPEC cells are significantly more sensitive to lack of oxygen. All bacterial species reveal a comparatively low adherence to and internalization into hMSCs (0.2% and 0.01% of the initial inoculum, respectively. In comparison, the Ca9-22 and HGPEC cells present better targets for bacterial adherence and internalization. The production of the pro-inflammatory chemokine IL-8 is higher in both gingival epithelial cell lines compared to hMSCs and Fusobacterium nucleatum induce a time-dependent cytokine secretion in both cell lines. Porphyromonas gingivalis is less effective in stimulating secretion of IL-8 in the co-cultivation experiments. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HMSCs are suitable for use in anoxic regions of the oral cavity. The interaction with local pathogenic bacteria does not result in massive pro-inflammatory cytokine responses. The test system established in this study allowed further investigation of parameters prior to set up of

  20. Time to address gender discrimination and inequality in the health workforce

    OpenAIRE

    Newman, Constance

    2014-01-01

    Gender is a key factor operating in the health workforce. Recent research evidence points to systemic gender discrimination and inequalities in health pre-service and in-service education and employment systems. Human resources for health (HRH) leaders’ and researchers’ lack of concerted attention to these inequalities is striking, given the recognition of other forms of discrimination in international labour rights and employment law discourse. If not acted upon, gender discrimination and in...

  1. Setting priorities for EU healthcare workforce IT skills competence improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sisi; Bamidis, Panagiotis D; Konstantinidis, Stathis Th; Traver, Vicente; Car, Josip; Zary, Nabil

    2017-04-01

    A major challenge for healthcare quality improvement is the lack of IT skills and knowledge of healthcare workforce, as well as their ambivalent attitudes toward IT. This article identifies and prioritizes actions needed to improve the IT skills of healthcare workforce across the EU. A total of 46 experts, representing different fields of expertise in healthcare and geolocations, systematically listed and scored actions that would improve IT skills among healthcare workforce. The Child Health and Nutrition Research Initiative methodology was used for research priority-setting. The participants evaluated the actions using the following criteria: feasibility, effectiveness, deliverability, and maximum impact on IT skills improvement. The leading priority actions were related to appropriate training, integrating eHealth in curricula, involving healthcare workforce in the eHealth solution development, improving awareness of eHealth, and learning arrangement. As the different professionals' needs are prioritized, healthcare workforce should be actively and continuously included in the development of eHealth solutions.

  2. Neural stem/progenitor cells as a promising candidate for regenerative therapy of the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie eBonnamain

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Neural transplantation is a promising therapeutic strategy for neurodegenerative diseases and other affections of the central nervous system (CNS like Parkinson and Huntington diseases, multiple sclerosis or stroke. If cell replacement therapy already went through clinical trials for some of these diseases using fetal human neuroblasts, several important limitations led to the search for alternative cell sources that would be more suitable for intracerebral transplantation. Taking into account logistical and ethical issues linked to the use of tissue derived from human fetuses, and the immunologically special status of the CNS allowing the occurrence of deleterious immune reactions, Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells (NSPCs appear as an interesting cell source candidate. In addition to their ability for replacing cell populations lost during the pathological events, NSPCs also display surprising therapeutic effects of neuroprotection and immunomodulation. A better knowledge of the mechanisms involved in these specific characteristics will hopefully lead in the future to a successful use of NSPCs in regenerative medicine for CNS affections.

  3. Changes in Antioxidant Defense System Using Different Lipid Emulsions in Parenteral Nutrition in Children after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Auxiliadora Baena-Gómez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traditionally, lipids used in parenteral nutrition (PN are based on ω-6 fatty acid-rich vegetable oils, such as soybean oil, with potential adverse effects involving oxidative stress. Methods: We evaluated the antioxidant defense system in children, after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT, who were randomized to use a lipid emulsion with fish oil or soybean oil. Blood samples at baseline, at 10 days, and at the end of the PN were taken to analyze plasma retinol, α-tocopherol, β-carotene, coenzyme Q9 and coenzyme Q10 levels, and catalase (CAT, glutathione reductase (GR, glutathione peroxidase (GPOX, and superoxide dismutase (SOD levels in lysed erythrocytes. Results: An increase in plasma α-tocopherol levels in the group of patients receiving the fish oil-containing emulsion (FO compared with the group receiving the soybean emulsion was observed at day 10 of PN. Concurrently, plasma α-tocopherol increased in the FO group and β-carotene decreased in both groups at day 10 compared with baseline levels, being more significant in the group receiving the FO emulsion. Conclusion: FO-containing emulsions in PN could improve the antioxidant profile by increasing levels of α-tocopherol in children after HSCT who are at higher risk of suffering oxidative stress and metabolic disorders.

  4. Establishment of feeder-free culture system for human induced pluripotent stem cell on DAS nanocrystalline graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunah; Nam, Donggyu; Choi, Jae-Kyung; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J.; Kwon, Soon-Yong; Zaehres, Holm; Lee, Taehee; Park, Chan Young; Kang, Hyun-Wook; Schöler, Hans R.; Kim, Jeong Beom

    2016-02-01

    The maintenance of undifferentiated human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC) under xeno-free condition requires the use of human feeder cells or extracellular matrix (ECM) coating. However, human-derived sources may cause human pathogen contamination by viral or non-viral agents to the patients. Here we demonstrate feeder-free and xeno-free culture system for hPSC expansion using diffusion assisted synthesis-grown nanocrystalline graphene (DAS-NG), a synthetic non-biological nanomaterial which completely rule out the concern of human pathogen contamination. DAS-NG exhibited advanced biocompatibilities including surface nanoroughness, oxygen containing functional groups and hydrophilicity. hPSC cultured on DAS-NG could maintain pluripotency in vitro and in vivo, and especially cell adhesion-related gene expression profile was comparable to those of cultured on feeders, while hPSC cultured without DAS-NG differentiated spontaneously with high expression of somatic cell-enriched adhesion genes. This feeder-free and xeno-free culture method using DAS-NG will facilitate the generation of clinical-grade hPSC.

  5. Efficient Large-Scale 2D Culture System for Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and Differentiated Cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shugo Tohyama

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac regenerative therapies utilizing human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs are hampered by ineffective large-scale culture. hiPSCs were cultured in multilayer culture plates (CPs with active gas ventilation (AGV, resulting in stable proliferation and pluripotency. Seeding of 1 × 106 hiPSCs per layer yielded 7.2 × 108 hiPSCs in 4-layer CPs and 1.7 × 109 hiPSCs in 10-layer CPs with pluripotency. hiPSCs were sequentially differentiated into cardiomyocytes (CMs in a two-dimensional (2D differentiation protocol. The efficiency of cardiac differentiation using 10-layer CPs with AGV was 66%–87%. Approximately 6.2–7.0 × 108 cells (4-layer and 1.5–2.8 × 109 cells (10-layer were obtained with AGV. After metabolic purification with glucose- and glutamine-depleted and lactate-supplemented media, a massive amount of purified CMs was prepared. Here, we present a scalable 2D culture system using multilayer CPs with AGV for hiPSC-derived CMs, which will facilitate clinical applications for severe heart failure in the near future.

  6. Defective pulmonary innate immune responses post-stem cell transplantation; review and results from one model system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Racquel eDomingo-Gonzalez

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Infectious pulmonary complications limit the success of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT as a therapy for malignant and nonmalignant disorders. Susceptibility to pathogens in both autologous and allogeneic HSCT recipients persists despite successful immune reconstitution. As studying the causal effects of these immune defects in the human population can be limiting, a bone marrow transplant (BMT mouse model can be used to understand the defect in mounting a productive innate immune response post-transplantation. When syngeneic BMT is performed, this system allows the study of BMT-induced alterations in innate immune cell function that are independent of the confounding effects of immunosuppressive therapy and graft-versus-host disease. Studies from several laboratories, including our own show that pulmonary susceptibility to bacterial infections post-BMT are largely due to alterations in the lung alveolar macrophages. Changes in these cells post-BMT include cytokine and eicosanoid dysregulations, scavenger receptor alterations, changes in micro RNA profiles, and alterations in intracellular signaling molecules that limit bacterial phagocytosis and killing. The changes that occur highlight mechanisms that promote susceptibility to infections commonly afflicting HSCT recipients and provide insight into therapeutic targets that may improve patient outcomes post-HSCT.

  7. Gene Expression Profile Reveals Abnormalities of Multiple Signaling Pathways in Mesenchymal Stem Cell Derived from Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Tang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to compare bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and normal controls by means of cDNA microarray, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting. Our results showed there were a total of 1, 905 genes which were differentially expressed by BMMSCs derived from SLE patients, of which, 652 genes were upregulated and 1, 253 were downregulated. Gene ontology (GO analysis showed that the majority of these genes were related to cell cycle and protein binding. Pathway analysis exhibited that differentially regulated signal pathways involved actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesion, tight junction, and TGF-β pathway. The high protein level of BMP-5 and low expression of Id-1 indicated that there might be dysregulation in BMP/TGF-β signaling pathway. The expression of Id-1 in SLE BMMSCs was reversely correlated with serum TNF-α levels. The protein level of cyclin E decreased in the cell cycling regulation pathway. Moreover, the MAPK signaling pathway was activated in BMMSCs from SLE patients via phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and SAPK/JNK. The actin distribution pattern of BMMSCs from SLE patients was also found disordered. Our results suggested that there were distinguished differences of BMMSCs between SLE patients and normal controls.

  8. Hydrogel elasticity and microarchitecture regulate dental-derived mesenchymal stem cell-host immune system cross-talk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Sahar; Chen, Chider; Hasani-Sadrabadi, Mohammad Mahdi; Yu, Bo; Zadeh, Homayoun H; Wu, Benjamin M; Moshaverinia, Alireza

    2017-09-15

    The host immune system (T-lymphocytes and their pro-inflammatory cytokines) has been shown to compromise bone regeneration ability of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We have recently shown that hydrogel, used as an encapsulating biomaterial affects the cross-talk among host immune cells and MSCs. However, the role of hydrogel elasticity and porosity in regulation of cross-talk between dental-derived MSCs and immune cells is unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that the modulus of elasticity and porosity of the scaffold influence T-lymphocyte-dental MSC interplay by regulating the penetration of inflammatory T cells and their cytokines. Moreover, we demonstrated that alginate hydrogels with different elasticity and microporous structure can regulate the viability and determine the fate of the encapsulated MSCs through modulation of NF-kB pathway. Our in vivo data show that alginate hydrogels with smaller pores and higher elasticity could prevent pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced MSC apoptosis by down-regulating the Caspase-3- and 8- associated proapoptotic cascades, leading to higher amounts of ectopic bone regeneration. Additionally, dental-derived MSCs encapsulated in hydrogel with higher elasticity exhibited lower expression levels of NF-kB p65 and Cox-2 in vivo. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the mechanical characteristics and microarchitecture of the microenvironment encapsulating MSCs, in addition to presence of T-lymphocytes and their pro-inflammatory cytokines, affect the fate of encapsulated dental-derived MSCs. In this study, we demonstrate that alginate hydrogel regulates the viability and the fate of the encapsulated dental-derived MSCs through modulation of NF-kB pathway. Alginate hydrogels with smaller pores and higher elasticity prevent pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced MSC apoptosis by down-regulating the Caspase-3- and 8- associated proapoptotic cascade, leading to higher amounts of ectopic bone regeneration. MSCs encapsulated in

  9. The Influence of Affirming Kindness and Community on Broadening Participation in STEM Career Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Mica; Eroy-Reveles, Alegra; Matsui, John

    2018-01-01

    The United States’ inability to achieve equitable workforce development in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) career pathways is well-recognized and has been attributed to the poor retention of a diverse stream of students in academia. Social science theory and research provide evidence that social contextual variables—specifically kindness cues affirming social inclusion—influence chronic underrepresentation of some groups within STEM career pathways. Review of the literature suggests that the current STEM academic context does not consistently provide cues that affirm social inclusion to all members of the academic population, and that policies that address this disparity are essential to broadening STEM workforce development in the United States. PMID:29657577

  10. Public health workforce research in review: a 25-year retrospective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Tracy M; Boulton, Matthew L

    2012-05-01

    The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation commissioned a systematic review of public health workforce literature in fall 2010. This paper reviews public health workforce articles published from 1985 to 2010 that support development of a public health workforce research agenda, and address four public health workforce research themes: (1) diversity; (2) recruitment, retention, separation, and retirement; (3) education, training, and credentialing; and (4) pay, promotion, performance, and job satisfaction. PubMed, ERIC, and Web of Science databases were used to search for articles; Google search engine was used to identify gray literature. The study used the following inclusion criteria: (1) articles written in English published in the U.S.; (2) the main theme(s) of the article relate to at least one of the four public health workforce research themes; and (3) the document focuses on the domestic public health workforce. The literature suggests that the U.S. public health workforce is facing several urgent priorities that should be addressed, including: (1) developing an ethnically/racially diverse membership to meet the needs of an increasingly diverse nation; (2) recruiting and retaining highly trained, well-prepared employees, and succession planning to replace retirees; (3) building public health workforce infrastructure while also confronting a major shortage in the public health workforce, through increased education, training, and credentialing; and (4) ensuring competitive salaries, opportunities for career advancement, standards for workplace performance, and fostering organizational cultures which generate high levels of job satisfaction for effective delivery of services. Additional research is needed in all four thematic areas reviewed to develop well-informed, evidence-based strategies for effectively addressing critical issues facing the public health workforce. Copyright © 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  11. The joint action on health workforce planning and forecasting: results of a European programme to improve health workforce policies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroezen, M.; Hoegaerden, M. van; Batenburg, R.

    2017-01-01

    Health workforce (HWF) planning and forecasting is faced with a number of challenges, most notably a lack of consistent terminology, a lack of data, limited model-, demand-based- and future-based planning, and limited inter-country collaboration. The Joint Action on Health Workforce Planning and

  12. Workforce Planning for New Nuclear Power Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    An appropriate infrastructure is essential for the efficient, safe, reliable and sustainable use of nuclear power. The IAEA continues to be encouraged by its Member States to provide assistance to those considering the introduction of nuclear power. Its response has been to increase technical assistance, organize more missions and hold workshops, as well as to issue new and updated publications in the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series. Milestones in the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power, an IAEA Nuclear Energy Series publication (NG-G-3.1), provides detailed guidance on a holistic approach to national nuclear infrastructure development involving three phases. Nineteen issues are identified in this guide, ranging from development of a government's national position on nuclear power to planning for procurement related to the first nuclear power plant. One of these 19 issues upon which each of the other 18 depend is suitable human resources development. As a growing number of Member States begin to consider the nuclear power option, they ask for guidance from the IAEA on how to develop the human resources necessary to launch a nuclear power programme. The nuclear power field, comprising industry, government authorities, regulators, R and D organizations and educational institutions, relies on a specialized, highly trained and motivated workforce for its sustainability and continued success, quite possibly more than any other industrial field. This report has been prepared to provide information on the use of integrated workforce planning as a tool to effectively develop these resources for the spectrum of organizations that have a stake in such nuclear power programmes. These include, during the initial stages, a nuclear energy programme implementing organization (NEPIO), as well as the future operating organization, nuclear regulatory body, government authorities and technical support organizations if a decision is made to initiate a nuclear power

  13. Regional health workforce monitoring as governance innovation: a German model to coordinate sectoral demand, skill mix and mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, E; Lauxen, O; Larsen, C

    2016-11-28

    As health workforce policy is gaining momentum, data sources and monitoring systems have significantly improved in the European Union and internationally. Yet data remain poorly connected to policy-making and implementation and often do not adequately support integrated approaches. This brings the importance of governance and the need for innovation into play. The present case study introduces a regional health workforce monitor in the German Federal State of Rhineland-Palatinate and seeks to explore the capacity of monitoring to innovate health workforce governance. The monitor applies an approach from the European Network on Regional Labour Market Monitoring to the health workforce. The novel aspect of this model is an integrated, procedural approach that promotes a 'learning system' of governance based on three interconnected pillars: mixed methods and bottom-up data collection, strong stakeholder involvement with complex communication tools and shared decision- and policy-making. Selected empirical examples illustrate the approach and the tools focusing on two aspects: the connection between sectoral, occupational and mobility data to analyse skill/qualification mixes and the supply-demand matches and the connection between monitoring and stakeholder-driven policy. Regional health workforce monitoring can promote effective governance in high-income countries like Germany with overall high density of health workers but maldistribution of staff and skills. The regional stakeholder networks are cost-effective and easily accessible and might therefore be appealing also to low- and middle-income countries.

  14. [Genetic regulation of plant shoot stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al'bert, E V; Ezhova, T A

    2013-02-01

    This article describes the main features of plant stem cells and summarizes the results of studies of the genetic control of stem cell maintenance in the apical meristem of the shoot. It is demonstrated that the WUS-CLV gene system plays a key role in the maintenance of shoot apical stem cells and the formation of adventitious buds and somatic embryos. Unconventional concepts of plant stem cells are considered.

  15. Stem Cell Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tips Info Center Research Topics Federal Policy Glossary Stem Cell Information General Information Clinical Trials Funding Information Current ... Basics » Stem Cell Basics I. Back to top Stem Cell Basics I. Introduction: What are stem cells, and ...

  16. MANAGING HUMAN TALENT. WORKFORCE DIVERSITY VS. INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES. CHALLENGES OF THE WORKFORCE MOTIVATION AND RETENTION

    OpenAIRE

    Monica Boldea; Ionuţ Drăgoi

    2011-01-01

    Each day presents a new set of challenges and risks to companies operating in this age ofboth a global economy and of multiculturalism, i.e. a fast-changing marketplace. Globalcompetition and escalating economic pressures make the business environment bothdynamic and difficult, especially given the workforce diversity which has to be managed soas to achieve the highest levels of task performance and job satisfaction; managers must beprepared to respect alternative cultures and value diversity...

  17. Time to address gender discrimination and inequality in the health workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Constance

    2014-05-06

    Gender is a key factor operating in the health workforce. Recent research evidence points to systemic gender discrimination and inequalities in health pre-service and in-service education and employment systems. Human resources for health (HRH) leaders' and researchers' lack of concerted attention to these inequalities is striking, given the recognition of other forms of discrimination in international labour rights and employment law discourse. If not acted upon, gender discrimination and inequalities result in systems inefficiencies that impede the development of the robust workforces needed to respond to today's critical health care needs.This commentary makes the case that there is a clear need for sex- and age-disaggregated and qualitative data to more precisely illuminate gender-related trends and dynamics in the health workforce. Because of their importance for measurement, the paper also presents definitions and examples of sex or gender discrimination and offers specific case examples.At a broader level, the commentary argues that gender equality should be an HRH research, leadership, and governance priority, where the aim is to strengthen health pre-service and continuing professional education and employment systems to achieve better health systems outcomes, including better health coverage. Good HRH leadership, governance, and management involve recognizing the diversity of health workforces, acknowledging gender constraints and opportunities, eliminating gender discrimination and equalizing opportunity, making health systems responsive to life course events, and protecting health workers' labour rights at all levels. A number of global, national and institution-level actions are proposed to move the gender equality and HRH agendas forward.

  18. Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommerlund, Julie

    2004-01-01

    In his influential essay on markets, An essay on framing and overflowing (1998), Michel Callon writes that `the growing complexity of industrialized societies [is] due in large part to the movements of the technosciences, which are causing connections and interdependencies to proliferate'. This p...... and tantalizing than stem cells, in research, in medicine, or as products.......'. This paper is about tech-noscience, and about the proliferation of connections and interdependencies created by it.More specifically, the paper is about stem cells. Biotechnology in general has the power to capture the imagination. Within the field of biotechnology nothing seems more provocative...

  19. Towards a high quality high school workforce: A longitudinal, demographic analysis of U.S. public school physics teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory T. Rushton

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Efforts to improve the number and quality of the high school physics teaching workforce have taken several forms, including those sponsored by professional organizations. Using a series of large-scale teacher demographic data sets from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES, this study sought to investigate trends in teacher quality at the national level in the two and a half decades between 1987 and 2012. Specifically, we investigated (i details about the degree backgrounds, main teaching assignments, and experience levels of those assigned to teach physics; (ii whether the proportion of those with certifications in physics as a fraction of the entire physics teaching workforce had changed; and (iii if workforce diversity (with respect to race and gender had changed over time. Our data indicate that trends in these domains have generally been positive, but still fall short of having a highly qualified physics teacher in each classroom. Additionally, the population of physics teachers has more novices and fewer veterans than it did 10 years ago, although veteran physics teachers are not as rare as those in other branches of high school STEM fields. We also analyzed trends in physics teacher race and gender diversity and found them to lag behind other STEM and non-STEM teacher communities. High school physics is still mostly taught by white males with backgrounds from outside of physics. Implications for future policy decisions at the local and national levels are discussed, including attending to the specific needs of degree-holding and non-degree-holding physics teachers separately and localizing teacher recruitment and preparation efforts in regional centers.

  20. Towards a high quality high school workforce: A longitudinal, demographic analysis of U.S. public school physics teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Gregory T.; Rosengrant, David; Dewar, Andrew; Shah, Lisa; Ray, Herman E.; Sheppard, Keith; Watanabe, Lynn

    2017-12-01

    Efforts to improve the number and quality of the high school physics teaching workforce have taken several forms, including those sponsored by professional organizations. Using a series of large-scale teacher demographic data sets from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), this study sought to investigate trends in teacher quality at the national level in the two and a half decades between 1987 and 2012. Specifically, we investigated (i) details about the degree backgrounds, main teaching assignments, and experience levels of those assigned to teach physics; (ii) whether the proportion of those with certifications in physics as a fraction of the entire physics teaching workforce had changed; and (iii) if workforce diversity (with respect to race and gender) had changed over time. Our data indicate that trends in these domains have generally been positive, but still fall short of having a highly qualified physics teacher in each classroom. Additionally, the population of physics teachers has more novices and fewer veterans than it did 10 years ago, although veteran physics teachers are not as rare as those in other branches of high school STEM fields. We also analyzed trends in physics teacher race and gender diversity and found them to lag behind other STEM and non-STEM teacher communities. High school physics is still mostly taught by white males with backgrounds from outside of physics. Implications for future policy decisions at the local and national levels are discussed, including attending to the specific needs of degree-holding and non-degree-holding physics teachers separately and localizing teacher recruitment and preparation efforts in regional centers.