WorldWideScience

Sample records for stellar physics asteroseismology

  1. Stellar ages from asteroseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebreton, Yveline; Montalbán, Josefina

    2009-06-01

    Asteroseismology has been recognized for a long time as a very powerful mean to probe stellar interiors. The oscillations frequencies are closely related to stellar internal structure properties via the density and the sound speed profiles. Since these properties are in turn tightly linked with the mass and evolutionary state, we can expect to determine the age and mass of a star from the comparison of its oscillation spectrum with the predictions of stellar models. Such a comparison will of course suffer both from the problems we face when modeling a particular star (for instance the uncertainties on its global parameters and chemical composition) and from our general misunderstanding of the physical processes at work in stellar interiors (for instance the various transport processes that may lead to core mixing and affect the ages predicted by models). However for stars where observations have provided very precise and numerous oscillation frequencies together with accurate global parameters and additional information (as the radius or the mass of the star if it is member of a binary system, the radius if it observable in interferometry or the mean density if the star is an exoplanet host), we can also expect to better constrain the physical description of the stellar structure and transport processes and to finally get a more reliable age estimation. After a brief survey of stellar pulsations, we present some general seismic diagnostics that can be used to infer the age of a pulsating star as well as their limitations. We then illustrate the ability of asteroseismology to scrutinize stellar interiors on the basis of a few examples. In the years to come, extended very precise asteroseismic observations are expected, either in photometry or in spectroscopy, from present and future ground-based (HARPS, CORALIE, ELODIE, UVES, UCLES, SIAMOIS, SONG) or spatial devices (MOST, CoRoT, WIRE, Kepler, PLATO). This will considerably enlarge the sample of stars eligible to

  2. Fundamental stellar properties from asteroseismology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva Aguirre, V.; Casagrande, L.; Miglio, A.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate characterization of stellar populations is of prime importance to correctly understand the formation and evolution process of our Galaxy. The field of asteroseismology has been particularly successful in such an endeavor providing fundamental parameters for large samples of stars...... in different evolutionary phases. We present our results on determinations of masses, radii, and distances of stars in the CoRoT and Kepler fields, showing that we can map and date different regions of the galactic disk and distinguish gradients in the distribution of stellar properties at different heights...

  3. Asteroseismology of Stellar Populations in the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Eggenberger, Patrick; Girardi, Léo; Montalbán, Josefina

    2015-01-01

    The detection of radial and non-radial solar-like oscillations in thousands of G-K giants with CoRoT and Kepler is paving the road for detailed studies of stellar populations in the Galaxy. The available average seismic constraints allow largely model-independent determination of stellar radii and masses, and can be used to determine the position and age of thousands of stars in different regions of the Milky Way, and of giants belonging to open clusters. Such a close connection between stellar evolution, Galactic evolution, and asteroseismology opens a new very promising gate in our understanding of stars and galaxies.  This book represents a natural progression from the collection of review papers presented in the book 'Red Giants as Probes of the Structure and Evolution of the Milky Way', which appeared in the  Astrophysics and Space Science Proceedings series in 2012. This sequel volume contains review papers on spectroscopy, seismology of red giants, open questions in Galactic astrophysics, and discu...

  4. Asteroseismology of Exoplanet-Host Stars in the TESS Era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campante, Tiago L.; Schofield, Mathew; Chaplin, William J.

    2015-01-01

    New insights on stellar evolution and stellar interiors physics are being made possible by asteroseismology, the study of stars by the observation of their natural, resonant oscillations. Throughout the duration of the Kepler mission, asteroseismology has also played an important role in the char......New insights on stellar evolution and stellar interiors physics are being made possible by asteroseismology, the study of stars by the observation of their natural, resonant oscillations. Throughout the duration of the Kepler mission, asteroseismology has also played an important role...... in the characterization of host stars and their planetary systems. Examples include the precise estimation of the fundamental properties of stellar hosts, the obliquity determination of planetary systems, or the orbital eccentricity determination via asterodensity profiling. The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite...... (TESS) will perform a wide-field survey for planets that transit bright host stars. Its excellent photometric precision and long intervals of uninterrupted observations will enable asteroseismology of solar-type stars and their evolved counterparts. Based on existing all-sky simulations of the stellar...

  5. Dynamical Asteroseismology: towards improving the theories of stellar structure and (tidal evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tkachenko Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential of the dynamical asteroseismology, the research area that builds upon the synergies between the asteroseismology and binary stars research fields, is discussed in this manuscript. We touch upon the following topics: i the mass discrepancy observed in intermediate-to high-mass main-sequence and evolved binaries as well as in the low mass systems that are still in the pre-main sequence phase of their evolution; ii the rotationally induced mixing in high-mass stars, in particular how the most recent theoretical predictions and spectroscopic findings compare to the results of asteroseismic investigations; iii internal gravity waves and their potential role in the evolution of binary star systems and surface nitrogen enrichment in high-mass stars; iv the tidal evolution theory, in particular how its predictions of spin-orbit synchronisation and orbital circularisation compare to the present-day high-quality observations; v the tidally-induced pulsations and their role in the angular momentum transport within binary star systems; vi the scaling relations between fundamental and seismic properties of stars across the entire HR-diagram.

  6. Dynamical Asteroseismology: towards improving the theories of stellar structure and (tidal) evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachenko, Andrew

    2017-10-01

    The potential of the dynamical asteroseismology, the research area that builds upon the synergies between the asteroseismology and binary stars research fields, is discussed in this manuscript. We touch upon the following topics: i) the mass discrepancy observed in intermediate-to high-mass main-sequence and evolved binaries as well as in the low mass systems that are still in the pre-main sequence phase of their evolution; ii) the rotationally induced mixing in high-mass stars, in particular how the most recent theoretical predictions and spectroscopic findings compare to the results of asteroseismic investigations; iii) internal gravity waves and their potential role in the evolution of binary star systems and surface nitrogen enrichment in high-mass stars; iv) the tidal evolution theory, in particular how its predictions of spin-orbit synchronisation and orbital circularisation compare to the present-day high-quality observations; v) the tidally-induced pulsations and their role in the angular momentum transport within binary star systems; vi) the scaling relations between fundamental and seismic properties of stars across the entire HR-diagram.

  7. Automatic Determination of Stellar Parameters Via Asteroseismology of Stochastically Oscillating Stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quirion, Pierre-Olivier; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Arentoft, Torben

    2010-01-01

    Space-based projects are providing a wealth of high-quality asteroseismic data, including frequencies for a large number of stars showing solar-like oscillations. These data open the prospect for precise determinations of key stellar parameters, of particular value to the study of extra...... of stellar radius and mass for a sample of well-observed stars. We conclude that the SEEK package fixes stellar parameters with accuracy and precision....

  8. Stellar Physics 2: Stellar Evolution and Stability

    CERN Document Server

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, Gennady S

    2011-01-01

    "Stellar Physics" is a an outstanding book in the growing body of literature on star formation and evolution. Not only does the author, a leading expert in the field, very thoroughly present the current state of knowledge on stellar physics, but he handles with equal care the many problems that this field of research still faces. A bibliography with well over 1000 entries makes this book an unparalleled reference source. "Stellar Evolution and Stability" is the second of two volumes and can be read, as can the first volume "Fundamental Concepts and Stellar Equilibrium," as a largely independent work. It traces in great detail the evolution of protostars towards the main sequence and beyond this to the last stage of stellar evolution, with the corresponding vast range from white dwarfs to supernovae explosions, gamma-ray bursts and black hole formation. The book concludes with special chapters on the dynamical, thermal and pulsing stability of stars. This second edition is carefully updated in the areas of pre...

  9. Asteroseismology in PLATO. A necessary tool for characterizing planetary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, J. C.; Garrido, R.; Mas-Hesse, J. M.; Rodríguez, J.

    2015-05-01

    Today, the field of stellar physics is witnessing a significant boost thanks to the progress of asteroseismology from space with satellites like CoRoT and Kepler, which will be exploited to its full power with the PLATO mission now under development. Both the study of stellar interiors and the analysis of exo-planetary systems have mutual benefits since not only they share similar techniques for obtaining the data (analysis of light curves) but also the high precision with which today asteroseismology can provide the global parameters of stars is crucial to accurately and precisely characterize the planetary systems. In this contribution I briefly describe this symbiosis.

  10. Asteroseismology of Pulsating Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The success of helioseismology is due to its capability of measuring -mode oscillations in the Sun. This allows us to extract information on the internal structure and rotation of the Sun from the surface to the core. Similarly, asteroseismology is the study of the internal structure of the stars as derived from stellar oscillations.

  11. Asteroseismology of red giants from the first four months of Kepler data: Fundamental stellar parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallinger, Thomas; Mosser, Benoit; Hekker, Saskia

    2010-01-01

    Context. Clear power excess in a frequency range typical for solar-type oscillations in red giants has been detected in more than 1000 stars, which have been observed during the first 138 days of the science operation of the NASA Kepler satellite. This sample includes stars in a wide mass...... and radius range with spectral types G and K, extending in luminosity from the bottom of the giant branch up to high-luminous red giants, including the red bump and clump. The high-precision asteroseismic observations with Kepler provide a perfect source for testing stellar structure and evolutionary models...

  12. Asteroseismology with NASA's Kepler Mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, Daniel; Chaplin, W. J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of stellar oscillations - also called asteroseismology - is among the most powerful observational tools to study the structure and evolution of stars. The high precision photometry collected by the Kepler space telescope has revolutionized asteroseismology over the past few years...... by boosting the number of stars with detected oscillations by nearly two orders of magnitude over ground-based efforts, and delivering data with unprecedented signal-to-noise. In this talk I will highlight some of the recent breakthrough discoveries by the Kepler Mission, focusing in particular...

  13. Prospects for asteroseismology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Houdek, Günter

    2010-01-01

    The observational basis for asteroseismology is being dramatically strengthened, through more than two years of data from the CoRoT satellite, the flood of data coming from the Kepler mission and, in the slightly longer term, from dedicated ground-based facilities. Our ability to utilize these data...... depends on further development of techniques for basic data analysis, as well as on an improved understanding of the relation between the observed frequencies and the underlying properties of the stars. Also, stellar modelling must be further developed, to match the increasing diagnostic potential...

  14. Magneto-asteroseismology of massive magnetic pulsators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buysschaert, B.; Neiner, C.; Aerts, C.

    2017-11-01

    Simultaneously and coherently studying the large-scale magnetic field and the stellar pulsations of a massive star provides strong complementary diagnostics suitable for detailed stellar modelling. This hybrid method is called magneto-asteroseismology and permits the determination of the internal structure and conditions within magnetic massive pulsators, for example the effect of magnetism on non-standard mixing processes. Here, we overview this technique, its requirements, and list the currently known suitable stars to apply the method.

  15. Asteroseismology: Theory and phenomenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Timothy M.

    1994-01-01

    Seismic studies of the Sun have succeeded in mapping the variation of sound speed with depth in the Sun, and variation of angular velocity with both depth and latitude. Many stars besides the Sun may also be amenable to asteroseismic analysis. Stars of roughly solar type should of course behave in ways similar to the sun, and stars of this sort form a large fraction of the potential targets for asteroseismology. But several other types of stars (delta scuti stars, roAP stars, and the pulsating white dwarfs) also have the desired pulsation characteristics. Pulsations in some of these stars are, for various reasons, much easier to observe than in the Sun-like stars. Virtually all unambiguous observations of multi-mode pulsators relate to these other categories of stars. Since oscillation mode frequencies are arguably the most precise measurement relating to a star that we can make, a few tens of such frequencies may still be of great importance to our understanding of the stellar structure and evolution.

  16. Public Outreach in Asteroseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolláth, Z.

    2006-04-01

    Although public talks of astronomy and cosmology are usually attractive for the general audience, it is very hard to present specialized topics like stellar pulsation to the public at large. Fortunately parallels between the different disciplines, even between science and art, can help to popularize the interior physics of stars. For example, acoustic waves of pulsating stars have a very close relation to the sounds in musical instruments. This connection makes it possible to use sounds, even music for the demonstration of stellar processes. Stellar voices can be combined with computer animation too. Beyond these complex examples, simple systems, like soap-bubbles can be used to exhibit stellar-like oscillations.

  17. Generating physically realizable stellar structures via embedding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurya, S.K. [University of Nizwa, Department of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, College of Arts and Science, Nizwa (Oman); Govender, M. [Durban University of Technology, Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Durban (South Africa)

    2017-05-15

    In this work we present an exact solution of the Einstein-Maxwell field equations describing compact charged objects within the framework of classical general relativity. Our model is constructed by embedding a four-dimensional spherically symmetric static metric into a five-dimensional flat metric. The source term for the matter field is composed of a perfect fluid distribution with charge. We show that our model obeys all the physical requirements and stability conditions necessary for a realistic stellar model. Our theoretical model approximates observations of neutron stars and pulsars to a very good degree of accuracy. (orig.)

  18. Asteroseismology: Data Analysis Methods and Interpretation for Space and Ground-based Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campante, T. L.

    2012-06-01

    This dissertation has been submitted to the Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the PhD degree in Astronomy. The scientific results presented herein follow from the research activity performed under the supervision of Dr. Mário João Monteiro at the Centro de Astrofísica da Universidade do Porto and Dr. Hans Kjeldsen at the Institut for Fysik og Astronomi, Aarhus Universitet. The dissertation is composed of three chapters and a list of appendices. Chapter 1 serves as an unpretentious and rather general introduction to the field of asteroseismology of solar-like stars. It starts with a historical account of the field of asteroseismology followed by a general review of the basic physics and properties of stellar pulsations. Emphasis is then naturally placed on the stochastic excitation of stellar oscillations and on the potential of asteroseismic inference. The chapter closes with a discussion about observational techniques and the observational status of the field. Chapter 2 is devoted to the subject of data analysis in asteroseismology. This is an extensive subject, therefore, a compilation is presented of the relevant data analysis methods and techniques employed contemporarily in asteroseismology of solar-like stars. Special attention has been drawn to the subject of statistical inference both from the competing Bayesian and frequentist perspectives. The chapter ends with a description of the implementation of a pipeline for mode parameter analysis of Kepler data. In the course of these two first chapters, reference is made to a series of articles led by the author (or otherwise having greatly benefited from his contribution) that can be found in Appendices A to E. Chapter 3 then goes on to present a series of additional published results.

  19. Convection and stellar oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarslev, Magnus Johan

    2017-01-01

    of stars. For stars like the sun, energy transport in the outer layers occurs mainly through turbulent convection. Here, pressure mode oscillations are essentially propagating sound waves, whose properties can be altered by interaction with the turbulent motion of the gas. This has always been a problem...... for asteroseismology, because of the challenges inherent in modelling turbulent convection in 1D stellar models. As a result of oversimplifying the physics near the surface, theoretical calculations systematically overestimate the oscillation frequencies. This has become known as the asteroseismic surface effect. Due...... to lacking better options, this frequency difference is typically corrected for with ad-hoc formulae. The topic of this thesis is the improvement of 1D stellar convection models and the effects this has on asteroseismic properties. The source of improvements is 3D simulations of radiation...

  20. What asteroseismology can do for exoplanets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Eylen Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe three useful applications of asteroseismology in the context of exoplanet science: (1 the detailed characterisation of exoplanet host stars; (2 the measurement of stellar inclinations; and (3 the determination of orbital eccentricity from transit duration making use of asteroseismic stellar densities. We do so using the example system Kepler-410 [1]. This is one of the brightest (V = 9.4 Kepler exoplanet host stars, containing a small (2.8 R⊕ transiting planet in a long orbit (17.8 days, and one or more additional non-transiting planets as indicated by transit timing variations. The validation of Kepler-410 (KOI-42 was complicated due to the presence of a companion star, and the planetary nature of the system was confirmed after analyzing a Spitzer transit observation as well as ground-based follow-up observations.

  1. The Space Stellar Photometry Mission COROT: Asteroseismology ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Author Affiliations. Annie Baglin1 Gerard Vauclair2 Corot team. DESPA, UMR CNRS 8632 Observatoire de Paris, 92195 Meudon, France; LAT, UMR CNRS 5572, Observatoire de Midi-Pyrenees, 31 400 Toulouse, France ...

  2. The Space Stellar Photometry Mission COROT: Asteroseismology ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    A frequency resolution of 0.5 µ Hz is sufficient for this purpose, corresponding to observing runs of 10 to 20 days. Stars down to the 9th magnitude are appropriate targets; 5 to 10 targets will be observable at the same time. Let us note that COROT is up to now the only seismology project which has this multiplex capability.

  3. Constraining stellar physics from red-giant stars in binaries - stellar rotation, mixing processes and stellar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, P. G.; Kallinger, T.; Pavlovski, K.; Palacios, A.; Tkachenko, A.; García, R. A.; Mathis, S.; Corsaro, E.; Johnston, C.; Mosser, B.; Ceillier, T.; do Nascimento, J.-D.; Raskin, G.

    2017-10-01

    The unparalleled photometric data obtained by NASA's Kepler Space Telescope has led to an improved understanding of stellar structure and evolution - in particular for solar-like oscillators in this context. Binary stars are fascinating objects. Because they were formed together, binary systems provide a set of two stars with very well constrained parameters. Those can be used to study properties and physical processes, such as the stellar rotation, dynamics and rotational mixing of elements and allows us to learn from the differences we find between the two components. In this work, we discussed a detailed study of the binary system KIC 9163796, discovered through Kepler photometry. The ground-based follow-up spectroscopy showed that this system is a double-lined spectroscopic binary, with a mass ratio close to unity. However, the fundamental parameters of the components of this system as well as their lithium abundances differ substantially. Kepler photometry of this system allows to perform a detailed seismic analysis as well as to derive the orbital period and the surface rotation rate of the primary component of the system. Indications of the seismic signature of the secondary are found. The differing parameters are best explained with both components located in the early and the late phase of the first dredge up at the bottom of the red-giant branch. Observed lithium abundances in both components are in good agreement with prediction of stellar models including rotational mixing. By combining observations and theory, a comprehensive picture of the system can be drawn.

  4. Investigation of physical parameters in stellar flares observed by GINGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Robert A.

    1994-01-01

    This program involves analysis and interpretation of results from GINGA Large Area Counter (LAC) observations from a group of large stellar x-ray flares. All LAC data are re-extracted using the standard Hayashida method of LAC background subtraction and analyzed using various models available with the XSPEC spectral fitting program. Temperature-emission measure histories are available for a total of 5 flares observed by GINGA. These will be used to compare physical parameters of these flares with solar and stellar flare models.

  5. K2 red giant asteroseismology using Bayesian Asteroseismology data Modeling (BAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinn, Joel; Stello, Dennis; Pinsonneault, Marc H.

    2017-01-01

    The re-purposed Kepler mission, K2, boasts an impressive panoramic view of tens of thousands of red giants along the ecliptic, zooming in on clusters of various ages and metalliticies and probing Galactic sight lines inaccessible to the original Kepler field of view. However, its compromised pointing has introduced spurious features in stellar light curves and has reduced its photometric quality compared to that of the original Kepler mission. Enhanced data processing techniques above and beyond those used for Kepler are therefore required in order to translate observed K2 stellar light curves in to reliable fundamental parameters like surface gravity, radius, and mass with asteroseismology. I will present results from one such effort -- the Bayesian Asteroseismology data Modeling (BAM) pipeline. I will discuss the state of science with red giants in K2, with particular emphasis on a sample of red giants analyzed with the BAM. Implications for Galactic population studies using K2 red giants will be presented, with an eye toward completeness and contamination.

  6. Constraining stellar physics from red-giant stars in binaries – stellar rotation, mixing processes and stellar activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beck P. G.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The unparalleled photometric data obtained by NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope has led to an improved understanding of stellar structure and evolution - in particular for solar-like oscillators in this context. Binary stars are fascinating objects. Because they were formed together, binary systems provide a set of two stars with very well constrained parameters. Those can be used to study properties and physical processes, such as the stellar rotation, dynamics and rotational mixing of elements and allows us to learn from the differences we find between the two components. In this work, we discussed a detailed study of the binary system KIC 9163796, discovered through Kepler photometry. The ground-based follow-up spectroscopy showed that this system is a double-lined spectroscopic binary, with a mass ratio close to unity. However, the fundamental parameters of the components of this system as well as their lithium abundances differ substantially. Kepler photometry of this system allows to perform a detailed seismic analysis as well as to derive the orbital period and the surface rotation rate of the primary component of the system. Indications of the seismic signature of the secondary are found. The differing parameters are best explained with both components located in the early and the late phase of the first dredge up at the bottom of the red-giant branch. Observed lithium abundances in both components are in good agreement with prediction of stellar models including rotational mixing. By combining observations and theory, a comprehensive picture of the system can be drawn.

  7. ENEAS: the European Network of Excellence in AsteroSeismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, C.; Baglin, A.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Goupil, M. J.; Houdek, G.; Kjeldsen, H.; Kollath, Z.; Kurtz, D.; Lebreton, Y.; Maceroni, C.; Noels, A.; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, A.; Škoda, P.; Solano, E.; Thompson, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    Asteroseismology is one of the major important science topics in astrophysics in the coming decade. Several recent breakthroughs have indeed been made in Europe in this field. The observational data will improve significantly in the near future, as upgraded ground-based instruments are being built and two European asteroseismic space missions are planned for launch between 2005 and 2008. They will provide us for the first time with ultra-high-accuracy, high-temporal resoluton data from space for stars other than the Sun. A successful asteroseismic study involves many different steps, from state-of-the-art raw data treatment to theoretical physical modelling of the oscillation frequencies. Our network is set up to meet the needs of combining and exchanging the different expertises of the participating institutes, of training PhD students and of both training and exchanging post-doctoral researchers. This will guarantee the most fruitful and efficient exploitation of the very substantial investments that are being made in Europe in future observations of stellar oscillations, strengthening Europe's leading position in this research field. Also, it will be a test-bed for the development of efficient procedures for collaboration across the internet, involving a vast range of procedures and skills, as well as extensive common use of a broad variety of data. Furthermore, procedures will be incorporated for the joint training of students, which is an essential part of our project.

  8. Helioseismology, Asteroseismology, and MHD Connections

    CERN Document Server

    Gizon, Laurent; Leibacher, John

    2009-01-01

    This volume presents a timely snapshot of the state of helio- and asteroseismology in the era when the SOHO/MDI instrument is about to be replaced by SDO/HMI and the CoRoT space mission is yielding its first long-duration light curves of thousands of stars. The articles and topics in this book are inspired by two seminal conferences, HELAS II and SOHO19/GONG 2007, but contributions from other experts have been commissioned as well. For example, three key papers were invited to describe the current status of asteroseismology, global helioseismology, and local helioseismology. These papers provide a framework for the other contributions and together they form a complete description of our understanding of pressure waves in the Sun and other stars. This volume is aimed at solar physicists and astronomers specializing in helio- and asteroseismology.

  9. Theory of Asteroseismology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The increasing number of pulsating modes in a star leads to the increase of the amount of information derived from the pulsation. Probing the invisible interior of stars is a dream come true. In this review, I summarize the fundamental properties of stellar pulsations and the excitation mechanisms, emphasizing several cases ...

  10. Recent advances in modeling stellar interiors (u)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzik, Joyce Ann [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Advances in stellar interior modeling are being driven by new data from large-scale surveys and high-precision photometric and spectroscopic observations. Here we focus on single stars in normal evolutionary phases; we will not discuss the many advances in modeling star formation, interacting binaries, supernovae, or neutron stars. We review briefly: (1) updates to input physics of stellar models; (2) progress in two and three-dimensional evolution and hydrodynamic models; (3) insights from oscillation data used to infer stellar interior structure and validate model predictions (asteroseismology). We close by highlighting a few outstanding problems, e.g., the driving mechanisms for hybrid {gamma} Dor/{delta} Sct star pulsations, the cause of giant eruptions seen in luminous blue variables such as {eta} Car and P Cyg, and the solar abundance problem.

  11. Asteroseismology with Kepler and SONG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Kepler mission was designed to characterise extra-solar planetary systems but the observing technique, photometric detection of transits, makes the mission ideally suited also for asteroseismology. Since the launch of the mission in March 2009 Kepler has provided a treasure trove of aste...

  12. Asteroseismology: Past, Present and Future

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy; Volume 26; Issue 2-3 ... Asteroseismology is now a booming field of research with stunning new discoveries; I highlight a personal selection of these in this review, many of which are discussed in more detail elsewhere in these proceedings.

  13. Exploring Non-Standard Stellar Physics with Lithium Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Garrett

    2016-07-01

    For over a century, astronomers have been building physical models to study the internal constitution of stars. These efforts have culminated in the so-called "standard stellar model" (SSM), the computational bedrock upon which the modern theory of stellar evolution stands. SSMs have been extremely successful at describing many observational properties of stars, including the intricate morphology of the color-magnitude diagrams of star clusters, the observed mass-radius relationship on the hydrogen-burning main sequence, and the detailed interior structure of the Sun. Nonetheless, there remain several outstanding features of the galactic stellar pattern that SSMs fail to predict, and it is these discrepancies which point to interesting physical processes occurring in stars that have heretofore been neglected. One significant tool for uncovering deficiencies in the SSM is the abundance of the light element lithium. Li is rapidly destroyed deep inside stellar atmospheres, duly depleting the observed abundance at the surface, and in principle revealing detailed information about the temperatures, mixing processes, and physical conditions of the interiors of stars. SSMs make strong predictions for the destruction of Li in solar-type stars, namely that a mass-dependent depletion pattern is imprinted on the pre-main sequence, and persists in an unaltered state for the entirety of the main sequence. However, these predictions are strongly contradicted by numerous observations, which implying unequal rates of Li burning at fixed mass and composition during the pre-main sequence, and variable, long-timescale Li destruction during the main sequence. Unraveling the underlying processes driving this non-standard Li depletion will inform our understanding of the physical phenomena which are ignored in our standard picture, but are influential to the structure and evolution of stars. In this dissertation, I report on my progress reconciling SSMs with the open cluster Li pattern

  14. Starlight An Introduction to Stellar Physics for Amateurs

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Keith

    2009-01-01

    When you look up at the sky at night and see the stars, do you understand what you’re looking at? What is starlight made up of, and how does it travel to us? How are stars born, and how do they die? How do we figure out how far away are the stars and how massive they are? Can we know which stars will go supernova and which will end up as white dwarfs or black holes? How long will our Sun continue to shine down on us, and how do we know its age? There are so many questions, and in this engaging and informative book by Keith Robinson, which serves as a companion to his very popular earlier book called Spectroscopy – the Key to the Stars, you will learn the basics of stellar physics and the answers to many of these questions, as well as how to figure out some of those answers for yourself. We have come so far in our understanding of stellar light and heat. By reading this book, you, too, can understand many of the secrets of the fiery Sun that rules our Solar System and the gemlike points of light in the nig...

  15. Book Review: A Concise History of Solar and Stellar Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kenneth J. H.

    2005-01-01

    There is no doubt that the awareness of the often long history and its principal players of a scientific specialty is disappearing among present-day researchers. The reason is the inexorable rise of specialization, in which scientists are expected to keep pace with publications in their own field, not to mention the inevitable round of writing grant proposals and teaching and other mundane responsibilities. The authors of this small book had the intention of rectifying this for solar and stellar physics, disciplines which are still broad enough to embrace fields as diverse as nuclear fusion, magnetohydrodynamics, and the dynamic theory of gas spheres. They take the reader on a journey from ancient Greek and middle Eastern astronomy to the late 1990s, one which has an emphasis very much on a theoretical point of view. For the authors, it is the ideas that are central, not the observations.

  16. Book Review: A Concise History of Solar and Stellar Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kenneth J. H.

    2005-01-01

    There is no doubt that the awareness of the often long history and its principal players of a scientific specialty is disappearing among present-day researchers. The reason is the inexorable rise of specialization, in which scientists are expected to keep pace with publications in their own field, not to mention the inevitable round of writing grant proposals and teaching and other mundane responsibilities. The authors of this small book had the intention of rectifying this for solar and stellar physics, disciplines which are still broad enough to embrace fields as diverse as nuclear fusion, magnetohydrodynamics, and the dynamic theory of gas spheres. They take the read on a journey from ancient Greek and middle Eastern astronomy to the late 1990s, one which has an emphasis very much on a theoretical point of view. For the authors, it is the ideas that are central, not the observations.

  17. Transport, Convective Equilibrium, and Reactor Physics in Stellarator Type Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Darwin Dao-Man

    In Part 1 of this thesis, the neoclassical transport in stellarator reactors is studied in detail. It is found that the electron energy confinement time is in general comparable to that of the ions regardless of the size of the machine. Although the neoclassical losses are large, numerical examples show that ignition can be achieved in a reasonably sized machine. The kinetic calculation for the ion transport with the effect of collisionless detrapping/entrapping has not been carried out. This would be a good subject for later investigation. The energy transfer from thermonuclear (alpha) -particles to the background plasma is calculated in Part 2. It is found that (alpha)-particles can transfer most of their energy into the background plasma before collisionally scatter into the trapping region and are lost. In Part 3, the convective equilibrium hypothesis is proposed for high (beta) reactors which have regions where the plasma (beta) exceeds the critical (beta). Although the convective transport cannot be calculated precisely, it is shown that the density and temperature profiles in the convective region can still be estimated. A simple mixing-length theory shows that the convective transport is highly efficient. A detailed study of the nonlinear behavior of convective cells is currently being investigated. A novel power cycle for direct conversion of (alpha) -particle energy into electricity is proposed for an ignited plasma in a stellarator reactor in Part 4. In analyzing the physics of the cycle, there appears to be no major physical or engineering obstacle that would make the cycle impractical. This power cycle may provide an alternative scheme for extracting energy from D-T fueled reactors and may become an important scheme for energy conversion for advanced neutron-lean fueled reactors. By operating two or more reactors in tandem, the cycle can be made self -sustaining. The dynamics of a coupled reactor reactor system will be the subject of a later study and

  18. Theory of Asteroseismology Hiromoto Shibahashi

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The operator L is Hermitian in the case of vanishing pressure at the stellar surface. (the zero-boundary condition): ... Hence the eigenvalues, σ2, are real; the eigenfunctions form a normalized orthogonal set: ∫ M. 0 ξ∗ ... stars are characterized by the eigenfunctions that are proportional to the spherical harmonics, Ym l (θ,φ)(l ...

  19. FUNDAMENTAL PROPERTIES OF KEPLER PLANET-CANDIDATE HOST STARS USING ASTEROSEISMOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Daniel; Lissauer, Jack J.; Rowe, Jason F. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Chaplin, William J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jorgen; Kjeldsen, Hans; Handberg, Rasmus; Karoff, Christoffer; Lund, Mikkel N.; Lundkvist, Mia [Stellar Astrophysics Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Gilliland, Ronald L. [Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Buchhave, Lars A. [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Fischer, Debra A.; Basu, Sarbani [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Hekker, Saskia [Astronomical Institute ' ' Anton Pannekoek' ' , University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); Howard, Andrew W. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Isaacson, Howard; Marcy, Geoffrey W. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Latham, David W., E-mail: daniel.huber@nasa.gov [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); and others

    2013-04-20

    We have used asteroseismology to determine fundamental properties for 66 Kepler planet-candidate host stars, with typical uncertainties of 3% and 7% in radius and mass, respectively. The results include new asteroseismic solutions for four host stars with confirmed planets (Kepler-4, Kepler-14, Kepler-23 and Kepler-25) and increase the total number of Kepler host stars with asteroseismic solutions to 77. A comparison with stellar properties in the planet-candidate catalog by Batalha et al. shows that radii for subgiants and giants obtained from spectroscopic follow-up are systematically too low by up to a factor of 1.5, while the properties for unevolved stars are in good agreement. We furthermore apply asteroseismology to confirm that a large majority of cool main-sequence hosts are indeed dwarfs and not misclassified giants. Using the revised stellar properties, we recalculate the radii for 107 planet candidates in our sample, and comment on candidates for which the radii change from a previously giant-planet/brown-dwarf/stellar regime to a sub-Jupiter size or vice versa. A comparison of stellar densities from asteroseismology with densities derived from transit models in Batalha et al. assuming circular orbits shows significant disagreement for more than half of the sample due to systematics in the modeled impact parameters or due to planet candidates that may be in eccentric orbits. Finally, we investigate tentative correlations between host-star masses and planet-candidate radii, orbital periods, and multiplicity, but caution that these results may be influenced by the small sample size and detection biases.

  20. A bright outlook for helio- and asteroseismology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    As documented in the following, very substantial results have already been obtained from helio- and asteroseismology, based on huge observational projects, such as the GONG project, the helioseismic instruments on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) ...

  1. Mode lifetimes of stellar oscillations. Implications for asteroseismology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaplin, W.J.; Houdek, G.; Karoff, Christoffer

    2009-01-01

    is the effective temperature). When this relation is combined with the well-known scaling relation of Kjeldsen & Bedding for mode amplitudes observed in narrow-band intensity observations, we obtain the unexpected result that the height (the maximum power spectral density) of mode peaks in the frequency power...... as their hotter counterparts. When observations are instead made in Doppler velocity, our results imply that mode height does increase with increasing effective temperature....

  2. Solar, Stellar and Galactic Connections between Particle Physics and Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Carraminana, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    This book collects extended and specialized reviews on topics linking astrophysics and particle physics at a level intermediate between a graduate student and a young researcher. The book includes also three reviews on observational techniques used in forefront astrophysics and short articles on research performed in Latin America. The reviews, updated and written by specialized researchers, describe the state of the art in the related research topics. This book is a valuable complement not only for research but also for lecturers in specialized course of high energy astrophysics, cosmic ray astrophysics and particle physics.

  3. Strömgren survey for asteroseismology and galactic archaeology: Let the saga begin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casagrande, L.; Dotter, A.; Milone, A. P.; Marino, A. F.; Asplund, M.; Schlesinger, K. J. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mount Stromlo Observatory, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Aguirre, V. Silva; Lund, M. N.; Grundahl, F.; Nissen, P. E. [Stellar Astrophysics Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Stello, D. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Huber, D. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Serenelli, A. M. [Institute of Space Sciences (IEEC-CSIC), Campus UAB, Fac. Ciéncies, Torre C5 parell 2, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Cassisi, S.; Pietrinferni, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, via Maggini, I-64100 Teramo (Italy); Hodgkin, S. [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Feltzing, S. [Lund Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, P.O. Box 43, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); Flynn, C. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Schönrich, R. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210-1173 (United States); Wang, W., E-mail: luca.casagrande@anu.edu.au [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2014-06-01

    Asteroseismology has the capability of precisely determining stellar properties that would otherwise be inaccessible, such as radii, masses, and thus ages of stars. When coupling this information with classical determinations of stellar parameters, such as metallicities, effective temperatures, and angular diameters, powerful new diagnostics for Galactic studies can be obtained. The ongoing Strömgren survey for Asteroseismology and Galactic Archaeology has the goal of transforming the Kepler field into a new benchmark for Galactic studies, similar to the solar neighborhood. Here we present the first results from a stripe centered at a Galactic longitude of 74° and covering latitude from about 8° to 20°, which includes almost 1000 K giants with seismic information and the benchmark open cluster NGC 6819. We describe the coupling of classical and seismic parameters, the accuracy as well as the caveats of the derived effective temperatures, metallicities, distances, surface gravities, masses, and radii. Confidence in the achieved precision is corroborated by the detection of the first and secondary clumps in a population of field stars with a ratio of 2 to 1 and by the negligible scatter in the seismic distances among NGC 6819 member stars. An assessment of the reliability of stellar parameters in the Kepler Input Catalog is also performed, and the impact of our results for population studies in the Milky Way is discussed, along with the importance of an all-sky Strömgren survey.

  4. Asteroseismological study of massive ZZ Ceti stars with fully evolutionary models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, A. D.; Kepler, S. O. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, Porto Alegre 91501-970, RS (Brazil); Córsico, A. H.; Althaus, L. G. [Facultad de Ciencias Astronómicas y Geofísicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque s/n, (1900) La Plata (Argentina); Fraga, L., E-mail: alejandra.romero@ufrgs.br [Southern Observatory for Astrophysical Research, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile)

    2013-12-10

    We present the first asteroseismological study for 42 massive ZZ Ceti stars based on a large set of fully evolutionary carbon-oxygen core DA white dwarf models characterized by a detailed and consistent chemical inner profile for the core and the envelope. Our sample comprises all of the ZZ Ceti stars with spectroscopic stellar masses between 0.72 and 1.05 M {sub ☉} known to date. The asteroseismological analysis of a set of 42 stars enables study of the ensemble properties of the massive, pulsating white dwarf stars with carbon-oxygen cores, in particular the thickness of the hydrogen envelope and the stellar mass. A significant fraction of stars in our sample have stellar mass that is high enough to crystallize at the effective temperatures of the ZZ Ceti instability strip, which enables us to study the effects of crystallization on the pulsation properties of these stars. Our results show that the phase diagram presented in Horowitz et al. seems to be a good representation of the crystallization process inside white dwarf stars, in agreement with the results from white dwarf luminosity function in globular clusters.

  5. Spin–Orbit Alignment of Exoplanet Systems: Ensemble Analysis Using Asteroseismology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campante, T. L.; Lund, M. N.; Kuszlewicz, James S.

    2016-01-01

    The angle ψ between a planet’s orbital axis and the spin axis of its parent star is an important diagnostic of planet formation, migration, and tidal evolution. We seek empirical constraints on ψ by measuring the stellar inclination i s via asteroseismology for an ensemble of 25 solar-type hosts...... observed with NASA’s Kepler satellite. Our results for i s are consistent with alignment at the 2 σ level for all stars in the sample, meaning that the system surrounding the red-giant star Kepler-56 remains as the only unambiguous misaligned multiple-planet system detected to date. The availability...

  6. Automated Classification of Variable Stars in the Asteroseismology Program of the Kepler Space Mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomme, J.; Debosscher, J.; De Ridder, J.

    2010-01-01

    We present the first results of the application of supervised classification methods to the Kepler Q1 long-cadence light curves of a subsample of 2288 stars measured in the asteroseismology program of the mission. The methods, originally developed in the framework of the CoRoT and Gaia space...... missions, are capable of identifying the most common types of stellar variability in a reliable way. Many new variables have been discovered, among which a large fraction are eclipsing/ellipsoidal binaries unknown prior to launch. A comparison is made between our classification from the Kepler data...

  7. Probing the Structure of Kepler ZZ Ceti Stars with Full Evolutionary Models-based Asteroseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Alejandra D.; Córsico, A. H.; Castanheira, B. G.; De Gerónimo, F. C.; Kepler, S. O.; Koester, D.; Kawka, A.; Althaus, L. G.; Hermes, J. J.; Bonato, C.; Gianninas, A.

    2017-12-01

    We present an asteroseismological analysis of four ZZ Ceti stars observed with the Kepler spacecraft: GD 1212, SDSS J113655.17+040952.6, KIC 11911480, and KIC 4552982, based on a grid of full evolutionary models of DA white dwarf (WD) stars. We employ a grid of carbon–oxygen core models, characterized by a detailed and consistent chemical inner profile for the core and the envelope. In addition to the observed periods, we take into account other information from the observational data, such as amplitudes, rotational splittings, and period spacing, as well as photometry and spectroscopy. For each star, we present an asteroseismological model that closely reproduces their observed properties. The asteroseismological stellar mass and effective temperature of the target stars are (0.632+/- 0.027 {M}ȯ , 10737 ± 73 K) for GD 1212, (0.745+/- 0.007 {M}ȯ , 11110 ± 69 K) for KIC 4552982, (0.5480+/- 0.01 {M}ȯ , 12,721 ± 228 K) for KIC11911480, and (0.570+/- 0.01 {M}ȯ , 12,060 ± 300 K) for SDSS J113655.17+040952.6. In general, the asteroseismological values are in good agreement with the spectroscopy. For KIC 11911480 and SDSS J113655.17+040952.6 we derive a similar seismological mass, but the hydrogen envelope is an order of magnitude thinner for SDSS J113655.17+040952.6, which is part of a binary system and went through a common envelope phase.

  8. Asteroseismology of Red Giants and Galactic Archaeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekker, Saskia

    From the oscillations in red-giant stars measured in time-series data it is possible to derive more accurate stellar parameters (e.g., mass, radius and age) as can be done using only single-epoch spectroscopy or photometry. These stellar parameters combined with chemical composition and the position, distance and velocity of the stars play an important role in studying the formation and evolution of the Milky Way. In this chapter we discuss some key physical phenomena that are at play in (red-giant) stars as well as some important phases in red-giant evolution. Subsequently, oscillation characteristics that are of importance for the determination of stellar parameters (as indicated above) of red-giant stars are introduced followed by a description of the main components of the Milky Way. Finally, the role red giants can play in creating a detailed observational picture of the Milky Way and deciphering the formation and evolution of the Milky Way is discussed.

  9. Kepler Asteroseismology of Red-giant Stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.

    2012-01-01

    The Kepler mission, launched in March 2009, has revolutionized asteroseismology, providing detailed observations of thousands of stars. This has allowed in-depth analyses of stars ranging from compact hot subdwarfs to red giants, and including the detection of solar-like oscillations in hundreds...... of stars on or near the main sequence. Here I mainly consider solar-like oscillations in red giants, where Kepler observations are yielding results of a perhaps unexpected richness. In addition to giving a brief overview of the observational and numerical results for these stars, I present a simple...

  10. Aluminum and Oxygen Isotopic Ratios in Meteorite Grains: a Puzzle Solved By Nuclear and Stellar Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmerini, Sara

    2017-07-01

    Low mass stars contribute to the chemical evolution of the Galaxy as well as more massive supernova progenitors. Indeed the limited amount of processed matter released into the interstellar medium by small objects is compensated by the large number of them. At the late stages of their evolution, stars with mass smaller than 3M⊙ undergo the Asymptotic Giant Branch phase, which has been found to be a unique site for synthesis of some nuclei heavier than Fe through slow neutron capture reactions. AGB nucleosynthesis is also characterized by H-burning coupled with mixing phenomena, which has been proved to account for anomalies in light element isotopic abundances from Li to Al observed in stellar spectra and meteorites. We present here the case of a large number of meteorite grains, whose isotopic composition offers a puzzles that only Nuclear and Stellar Physics coupled together might solve.

  11. High Speed White Dwarf Asteroseismology with the Herty Hall Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Aaron; Kim, A.

    2012-01-01

    Asteroseismology is the process of using observed oscillations of stars to infer their interior structure. In high speed asteroseismology, we complete that by quickly computing hundreds of thousands of models to match the observed period spectra. Each model on a single processor takes five to ten seconds to run. Therefore, we use a cluster of sixteen Dell Workstations with dual-core processors. The computers use the Ubuntu operating system and Apache Hadoop software to manage workloads.

  12. The noise wars in helio- and asteroseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, R. A.

    2012-12-01

    During this conference, latest results on helioseismology (both local and global) as well as in asteroseismology have been reviewed, the hottest questions discussed and the future prospects of our field fully debated. A conference so rich in the variety of topics addressed is impossible to be deeply reviewed in a paper. Therefore, I present here my particular view of the field as it is today, concentrating on the solar-like stars and global helioseismology. The link I found to do so is the constant battle in which we are all engaged against the sources of noise that difficult our studies. The noise in the data, the noise in the inversions, the precision and accuracy of our inferred models, \\ldots .

  13. Navy Precision Optical Interferometer Measurements of 10 Stellar Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    ships used to derive stellar properties from asteroseismology observations by comparing the radii estimated using the astero- seismology relations to...dispersion of 1 s points provided an estimate of the internal uncertainties. The target list was derived from the sample of stars with stellar...Kornilov et al. (1991), Eggen (1968), Johnson et al. (1966), Cutri et al. (2003), and Gezari et al. (1993) as well as spectrophotometry from Glushneva

  14. Population synthesis to constrain Galactic and stellar physics. I. Determining age and mass of thin-disc red-giant stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagarde, N.; Robin, A. C.; Reylé, C.; Nasello, G.

    2017-05-01

    Context. The cornerstone mission of the European Space Agency, Gaia, together with forthcoming complementary surveys (CoRoT, Kepler, K2, APOGEE, and Gaia-ESO), will revolutionize our understanding of the formation and history of our Galaxy, providing accurate stellar masses, radii, ages, distances, as well as chemical properties for a very large sample of stars across different Galactic stellar populations. Aims: Using an improved population synthesis approach and new stellar evolution models we attempt to evaluate the possibility of deriving ages and masses of clump stars from their chemical properties. Methods: A new version of the Besançon Galaxy models (BGM) is used in which new stellar evolutionary tracks are computed from the stellar evolution code STAREVOL. These provide global, chemical, and seismic properties of stars from the pre-main sequence to the early-AGB. For the first time, the BGM can explore the effects of an extra-mixing occurring in red-giant stars. In particular we focus on the effects of thermohaline instability on chemical properties as well as on the determination of stellar ages and masses using the surface [C/N] abundance ratio. Results: The impact of extra-mixing on 3He, 12C/13C, nitrogen, and [C/N] abundances along the giant branch is quantified. We underline the crucial contribution of asteroseismology to discriminate between evolutionary states of field giants belonging to the Galactic disc. The inclusion of thermohaline instability has a significant impact on 12C/13C, 3He as well as on the [C/N] values. We clearly show the efficiency of thermohaline mixing at different metallicities and its influence on the determined stellar mass and age from the observed [C/N] ratio. We then propose simple relations to determine ages and masses from chemical abundances according to these models. Conclusions: We emphasize the usefulness of population synthesis tools to test stellar models and transport processes inside stars. We show that transport

  15. CHARACTERIZING TWO SOLAR-TYPE KEPLER SUBGIANTS WITH ASTEROSEISMOLOGY: KIC 10920273 AND KIC 11395018

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dogan, G.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Mathur, S. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Deheuvels, S.; Pinsonneault, M. [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kohn Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Di Mauro, M. P. [INAF-IAPS, Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Eggenberger, P. [Geneva Observatory, University of Geneva, Maillettes 51, 1290 Sauverny (Switzerland); Creevey, O. L. [Universite de Nice, Laboratoire Cassiopee, CNRS UMR 6202, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Monteiro, M. J. P. F. G.; Sousa, S. G.; Brandao, I. M.; Campante, T. L. [Centro de Astrofisica and DFA-Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto (Portugal); Frasca, A. [INAF, Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, via S. Sofia 78, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Karoff, C.; Handberg, R.; Thygesen, A. O.; Bruntt, H. [Stellar Astrophysics Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Biazzo, K. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Salita Moiariello 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); Niemczura, E. [Instytut Astronomiczny, Uniwersytet Wroclawski, ul. Kopernika 11, 51-622 Wroclaw (Poland); Bedding, T. R., E-mail: gulnur@ucar.edu [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); and others

    2013-01-20

    Determining fundamental properties of stars through stellar modeling has improved substantially due to recent advances in asteroseismology. Thanks to the unprecedented data quality obtained by space missions, particularly CoRoT and Kepler, invaluable information is extracted from the high-precision stellar oscillation frequencies, which provide very strong constraints on possible stellar models for a given set of classical observations. In this work, we have characterized two relatively faint stars, KIC 10920273 and KIC 11395018, using oscillation data from Kepler photometry and atmospheric constraints from ground-based spectroscopy. Both stars have very similar atmospheric properties; however, using the individual frequencies extracted from the Kepler data, we have determined quite distinct global properties, with increased precision compared to that of earlier results. We found that both stars have left the main sequence and characterized them as follows: KIC 10920273 is a one-solar-mass star (M = 1.00 {+-} 0.04 M {sub Sun }), but much older than our Sun (t = 7.12 {+-} 0.47 Gyr), while KIC 11395018 is significantly more massive than the Sun (M = 1.27 {+-} 0.04 M {sub Sun }) with an age close to that of the Sun (t = 4.57 {+-} 0.23 Gyr). We confirm that the high lithium abundance reported for these stars should not be considered to represent young ages, as we precisely determined them to be evolved subgiants. We discuss the use of surface lithium abundance, rotation, and activity relations as potential age diagnostics.

  16. Stellar formation

    CERN Document Server

    Reddish, V C

    1978-01-01

    Stellar Formation brings together knowledge about the formation of stars. In seeking to determine the conditions necessary for star formation, this book examines questions such as how, where, and why stars form, and at what rate and with what properties. This text also considers whether the formation of a star is an accident or an integral part of the physical properties of matter. This book consists of 13 chapters divided into two sections and begins with an overview of theories that explain star formation as well as the state of knowledge of star formation in comparison to stellar structure

  17. Studying stellar rotation and convection theoretical background and seismic diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Belkacem, Kévin; Neiner, Coralie; Lignières, Francois; Green, John

    2013-01-01

    This volume synthesizes the results of work carried out by several international teams of the SIROCO (Seismology for Rotation and Convection) collaboration. It provides the theoretical background required to interpret the huge quantity of high-quality observational data recently provided by space experiments such as CoRoT and Kepler. Asteroseismology allows astrophysicists to test, to model and to understand stellar structure and evolution as never before. The chapters in this book address the two groups of topics summarized as "Stellar Rotation and Associated Seismology" as well as "Stellar Convection and Associated Seismology". The book offers the reader solid theoretical background knowledge and adapted seismic diagnostic techniques.

  18. Pulsating low-mass white dwarfs in the frame of new evolutionary sequences. V. Asteroseismology of ELMV white dwarf stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcaferro, Leila M.; Córsico, Alejandro H.; Althaus, Leandro G.

    2017-11-01

    Context. Many pulsating low-mass white dwarf stars have been detected in the past years in the field of our Galaxy. Some of them exhibit multiperiodic brightness variation, therefore it is possible to probe their interiors through asteroseismology. Aims: We present a detailed asteroseismological study of all the known low-mass variable white dwarf stars based on a complete set of fully evolutionary models that are representative of low-mass He-core white dwarf stars. Methods: We employed adiabatic radial and nonradial pulsation periods for low-mass white dwarf models with stellar masses ranging from 0.1554 to 0.4352 M⊙ that were derived by simulating the nonconservative evolution of a binary system consisting of an initially 1 M⊙ zero-age main-sequence (ZAMS) star and a 1.4 M⊙ neutron star companion. We estimated the mean period spacing for the stars under study (where this was possible), and then we constrained the stellar mass by comparing the observed period spacing with the average of the computed period spacings for our grid of models. We also employed the individual observed periods of every known pulsating low-mass white dwarf star to search for a representative seismological model. Results: We found that even though the stars under analysis exhibit few periods and the period fits show multiplicity of solutions, it is possible to find seismological models whose mass and effective temperature are in agreement with the values given by spectroscopy for most of the cases. Unfortunately, we were not able to constrain the stellar masses by employing the observed period spacing because, in general, only few periods are exhibited by these stars. In the two cases where we were able to extract the period spacing from the set of observed periods, this method led to stellar mass values that were substantially higher than expected for this type of stars. Conclusions: The results presented in this work show the need for further photometric searches, on the one hand

  19. The Stellar Observations Network Group - first results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoci, Victoria; Grundahl, Frank; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Joergen

    SONG - the Stellar Observations Network Group is a Danish-led project set to design and build a global network of 1-m telescopes to carry out detailed studies of solar-like stars using asteroseismology and to discover and characterise exo-planets and their star system. Here we present more than 100...... nights of high-precision radial velocity measurements from 2014 of the subgiant mu Herculis. Preliminary analyses of the largest ground-based data set ever obtained for such as star clearly show the detection of stochastically excited pressure modes. The high quality of our data allows unique extraction...

  20. The connection between period spectra and constraints in white dwarf asteroseismology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bischoff-Kim Agnès

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available White dwarfs are the end product of evolution for around 98% of the stars in our Galaxy. Buried in their interiors are the records of physical processes that take place during earlier stages in the life of the star. In recent years, a well-established theory of non-radial oscillations, improved white dwarf models, year of expertise built up in the field of white dwarf asteroseismic fitting, and computing power have culminated in the asteroseismology finally delivering what it promised: a detailed map of the interior structure of white dwarfs. As always in science, new results raise new questions. We perform a number of numerical experiments to better understand the connection between a given set of periods varying in the number of periods and in the set of radial overtones and the quality of the constraints on interior structure one obtains from fitting these periods.

  1. Spin–Orbit Alignment of Exoplanet Systems: Ensemble Analysis Using Asteroseismology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campante, T. L.; Lund, M. N.; Kuszlewicz, James S.

    2016-01-01

    The angle ψ between a planet’s orbital axis and the spin axis of its parent star is an important diagnostic of planet formation, migration, and tidal evolution. We seek empirical constraints on ψ by measuring the stellar inclination i s via asteroseismology for an ensemble of 25 solar-type hosts...... observed with NASA’s Kepler satellite. Our results for i s are consistent with alignment at the 2 σ level for all stars in the sample, meaning that the system surrounding the red-giant star Kepler-56 remains as the only unambiguous misaligned multiple-planet system detected to date. The availability...... of a measurement of the projected spin–orbit angle λ for two of the systems allows us to estimate ψ . We find that the orbit of the hot Jupiter HAT-P-7b is likely to be retrograde ( ##IMG## [http://ej.iop.org/images/0004-637X/819/1/85/apj522683ieqn1.gif] $psi =116rc. 4_-14.7^+30.2$ ), whereas that of Kepler-25c...

  2. New Insights of High-precision Asteroseismology: Acoustic Radius and χ2-matching Method for Solar-like Oscillator KIC 6225718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Li, Yan

    2017-10-01

    Asteroseismology is a powerful tool for probing stellar interiors and determining stellar fundamental parameters. In the present work, we adopt the χ2-minimization method but only use the observed high-precision seismic observations (i.e., oscillation frequencies) to constrain theoretical models for analyzing solar-like oscillator KIC 6225718. Finally, we find the acoustic radius τ0 is the only global parameter that can be accurately measured by the χ2-matching method between observed frequencies and theoretical model calculations for a pure p-mode oscillation star. We obtain seconds for KIC 6225718. It leads that the mass and radius of the CMMs are degenerate with each other. In addition, we find that the distribution range of acoustic radius is slightly enlarged by some extreme cases, which posses both a larger mass and a higher (or lower) metal abundance, at the lower acoustic radius end.

  3. Determining the core stratification in white dwarfs with asteroseismology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charpinet S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the forward modeling approach and a new parameterization for the core chemical stratification in ZZ Ceti stars, we test several situations typical of the usually limited constraints available, such as small numbers of observed independent modes, to carry out asteroseismology of these stars. We find that, even with a limited number of modes, the core chemical stratification (in particular, the location of the steep chemical transitions expected in the oxygen profile can be determined quite precisely due to the significant sensitivity of some confined modes to partial reflexion (trapping effects. These effects are similar to the well known trapping induced by the shallower chemical transitions at the edge of the core and at the bottom of the H-rich envelope. We also find that success to unravel the core structure depends on the information content of the available seismic data. In some cases, it may not be possible to isolate a unique, well-defined seismic solution and the problem remains degenerate. Our results establish that constraining the core chemical stratification in white dwarf stars based solely on asteroseismology is possible, an opportunity that we have started to exploit.

  4. Targeted Optimization of Quasi-Symmetric Stellarators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegna, Chris C. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Engineering Physics; Anderson, D. T. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Talmadge, J. N. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-10-06

    The proposed research focuses on targeted areas of plasma physics dedicated to improving the stellarator concept. Research was pursued in the technical areas of edge/divertor physics in 3D configurations, magnetic island physics in stellarators, the role of 3D shaping on microinstabilities and turbulent transport and energetic ion confinement in stellarators.

  5. Asteroseismology of the ZZ Ceti and DAZ GD133

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, J.-N.; Vauclair, G.; Su, J.

    2017-09-01

    GD 133 is a DAZ white dwarf with an atmosphere polluted by heavy elements accreted from a debris disk, which is formed by the disruption of rocky planetesimals with orbits bringing them at the white dwarf tidal radius. To reach such orbits implies the potential presence of a perturbing planet. GD133 is a ZZ Ceti pulsator close to the blue edge of the instability strip. The presence of a planet could be revealed by the periodical variation of the observed pulsation periods induced by the orbital motion of the white dwarf. We started a multi-site photometric follow-up aimed at detecting the signature of this potential planet. As a partial result of this work in progress, we give the parameters of a preliminary best-fit model derived from asteroseismology.

  6. Principles of astrophysics using gravity and stellar physics to explore the cosmos

    CERN Document Server

    Keeton, Charles

    2014-01-01

    This book gives a survey of astrophysics at the advanced undergraduate level.  It originates from a two-semester course sequence at Rutgers University that is meant to appeal not only to astrophysics students but also more broadly to physics and engineering students.  The organization is driven more by physics than by astronomy; in other words, topics are first developed in physics and then applied to astronomical systems that can be investigated, rather than the other way around. The first half of the book focuses on gravity.  Gravity is the dominant force in many astronomical systems, so a tremendous amount can be learned by studying gravity, motion and mass.  The theme in this part of the book, as well as throughout astrophysics, is using motion to investigate mass.  The goal of Chapters 2-11 is to develop a progressively richer understanding of gravity as it applies to objects ranging from planets and moons to galaxies and the universe as a whole. The second half uses other aspects of physics to addr...

  7. Asteroseismology of solar-type stars with Kepler: II. Stellar modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metcalfe , T.S.; Karoff, Christoffer

    2010-01-01

    Observations from the Kepler satellite were recently published for three bright G-type stars, which were monitored during the first 33.5 days of science operations. One of these stars, KIC 11026764, exhibits a characteristic pattern of oscillation frequencies suggesting that the star has evolved ...

  8. Stellar Activity Cycles and Contribution of the Deep Layers Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, S.

    It is believed that magnetic activity on the Sun and solar-type stars are tightly related to the dynamo process driven by the interaction between rotation, convection, and magnetic field. However, the detailed mechanisms of this process are still incompletely understood. Many questions remain unanswered, e.g.: why some stars are more active than others?; why some stars have a flat activity?; why is there a Maunder minimum?; are all the cycles regular? A large number of proxies are typically used to study the magnetic activity of stars as we cannot resolve stellar discs. Recently, it was shown that asteroseismology can also be used to study stellar activity, making it an even more powerful tool. If short cycles are not so uncommon, we expect to detect many of them with missions such as CoRoT, Kepler, and possibly the PLATO mission. We will review some of the latest results obtained with spectroscopic measurements. We will show how asteroseismology can help us to better understand the complex process of dynamo and illustrate how the CoRoT and Kepler missions are revolutionizing our knowledge on stellar activity. A new window is being opened over our understanding of the magnetic variability of stars.

  9. Theoretical oscillation frequencies for solar-type dwarfs from stellar models with 〈3D〉-atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Andreas Christ Sølvsten; Weiss, Achim; Mosumgaard, Jakob Rørsted; Silva Aguirre, Victor; Sahlholdt, Christian Lundsgaard

    2017-12-01

    We present a new method for replacing the outermost layers of stellar models with interpolated atmospheres based on results from 3D simulations, in order to correct for structural inadequacies of these layers. This replacement is known as patching. Tests, based on 3D atmospheres from three different codes and interior models with different input physics, are performed. Using solar models, we investigate how different patching criteria affect the eigenfrequencies. These criteria include the depth, at which the replacement is performed, the quantity, on which the replacement is based, and the mismatch in Teff and log g between the un-patched model and patched 3D atmosphere. We find the eigenfrequencies to be unaltered by the patching depth deep within the adiabatic region, while changing the patching quantity or the employed atmosphere grid leads to frequency shifts that may exceed 1 μHz. Likewise, the eigenfrequencies are sensitive to mismatches in Teff or log g. A thorough investigation of the accuracy of a new scheme, for interpolating mean 3D stratifications within the atmosphere grids, is furthermore performed. Throughout large parts of the atmosphere grids, our interpolation scheme yields sufficiently accurate results for the purpose of asteroseismology. We apply our procedure in asteroseismic analyses of four Kepler stars and draw the same conclusions as in the solar case: Correcting for structural deficiencies lowers the eigenfrequencies, this correction is slightly sensitive to the patching criteria, and the remaining frequency discrepancy between models and observations is less frequency dependent. Our work shows the applicability and relevance of patching in asteroseismology.

  10. Looks like a duck, moves like a duck, but does it quack like a duck? Asteroseismology of red-giant stars in clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miglio, Andrea; Brogaard, Karsten Frank; Handberg, Rasmus

    to Helium ionisation, properties of near-core mixing in the He-core-burning phase).Finally, we will discuss the prospects for seismic analyses of other clusters, in particular the globular cluster M4 which could reveal new insights into mass-loss dispersion and its effect on the horizontal-branch morphology.......Undoubtedly one the highlights of the Kepler asteroseismology programme has been the detection of solar-like oscillations in giants belonging to the open clusters NGC 6791, NGC 6819, and NGC 6811. The availability of such constraints has made it possible to infer precise stellar properties (e.......g. radius, mass, evolutionary state, age) on a star-by-star basis.These constraints give us a “new pair of eyes” to look at clusters, and they open several exciting opportunities. Based on a detailed analysis of the complete set of 4-years-long Kepler data, we present clear evidence for stars that have...

  11. Towards asteroseismology of core-collapse supernovae with gravitational-wave observations - I. Cowling approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Forné, Alejandro; Cerdá-Durán, Pablo; Passamonti, Andrea; Font, José A.

    2018-03-01

    Gravitational waves from core-collapse supernovae are produced by the excitation of different oscillation modes in the protoneutron star (PNS) and its surroundings, including the shock. In this work we study the relationship between the post-bounce oscillation spectrum of the PNS-shock system and the characteristic frequencies observed in gravitational-wave signals from core-collapse simulations. This is a fundamental first step in order to develop a procedure to infer astrophysical parameters of the PNS formed in core-collapse supernovae. Our method combines information from the oscillation spectrum of the PNS, obtained through linear perturbation analysis in general relativity of a background physical system, with information from the gravitational-wave spectrum of the corresponding non-linear, core-collapse simulation. Using results from the simulation of the collapse of a 35 M⊙ pre-supernova progenitor we show that both types of spectra are indeed related and we are able to identify the modes of oscillation of the PNS, namely g-modes, p-modes, hybrid modes, and standing accretion shock instability (SASI) modes, obtaining a remarkably close correspondence with the time-frequency distribution of the gravitational-wave modes. The analysis presented in this paper provides a proof of concept that asteroseismology is indeed possible in the core-collapse scenario, and it may serve as a basis for future work on PNS parameter inference based on gravitational-wave observations.

  12. The Stellar Imager (SI) - A Mission to Resolve Stellar Surfaces, Interiors, and Magnetic Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Joergen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University (Denmark); Carpenter, Kenneth G [Code 667 NASA-GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Schrijver, Carolus J [LMATC 3251 Hanover St., Bldg. 252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Karovska, Margarita, E-mail: jcd@phys.au.d, E-mail: Kenneth.G.Carpenter@nasa.gov, E-mail: schryver@lmsal.com, E-mail: karovska@head.cfa.harvard.edu [60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is a space-based, UV/Optical Interferometer (UVOI) designed to enable 0.1 milli-arcsecond (mas) spectral imaging of stellar surfaces and of the Universe in general. It will also probe via asteroseismology flows and structures in stellar interiors. SI will enable the development and testing of a predictive dynamo model for the Sun, by observing patterns of surface activity and imaging of the structure and differential rotation of stellar interiors in a population study of Sun-like stars to determine the dependence of dynamo action on mass, internal structure and flows, and time. SI's science focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe and will revolutionize our understanding of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant planets, and of many magneto-hydrodynamically controlled processes in the Universe. SI is a 'Landmark/Discovery Mission' in the 2005 Heliophysics Roadmap, an implementation of the UVOI in the 2006 Astrophysics Strategic Plan, and a NASA Vision Mission ('NASA Space Science Vision Missions' (2008), ed. M. Allen). We present here the science goals of the SI Mission, a mission architecture that could meet those goals, and the technology development needed to enable this mission. Additional information on SI can be found at: http://hires.gsfc.nasa.gov/si/.

  13. Relativistic stellar models

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 77; Issue 3. Relativistic stellar models ... Upon specifying particular forms for one of the gravitational potentials and the electric field intensity, the condition for pressure isotropy is transformed into a hypergeometric equation with two free parameters. For particular ...

  14. Introduction to stellar structure

    CERN Document Server

    Maciel, Walter J

    2016-01-01

    In the first part of this book, the author presents the basic properties of the stellar interior and describes them thoroughly, along with deriving the main stellar structure equations of temperature, density, pressure and luminosity, among others. The process and application of solving these equations is explained, as well as linking these results with actual observations.  The second part of the text describes what happens to a star over time, and how to determine this by solving the same equations at different points during a star’s lifetime. The fate of various stars is quite different depending on their masses, and this is described in the final parts of the book. This text can be used for an upper level undergraduate course or an introductory graduate course on stellar physics.

  15. Stellar Structure and Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Kippenhahn, Rudolf; Weiss, Achim

    2013-01-01

    This long-awaited second edition of the classical textbook on Stellar Structure and Evolution by Kippenhahn and Weigert is a thoroughly revised version of the original text. Taking into account modern observational constraints as well as additional physical effects such as mass loss and diffusion, Achim Weiss and Rudolf Kippenhahn have succeeded in bringing the book up to the state-of-the-art with respect to both the presentation of stellar physics and the presentation and interpretation of current sophisticated stellar models. The well-received and proven pedagogical approach of the first edition has been retained. The book provides a comprehensive treatment of the physics of the stellar interior and the underlying fundamental processes and parameters. The models developed to explain the stability, dynamics and evolution of the stars are presented and great care is taken to detail the various stages in a star’s life. Just as the first edition, which remained a standard work for more than 20 years after its...

  16. Stellar remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Kawaler, S D; Srinivasan, G

    1997-01-01

    This volume examines the internal structure, origin and evolution of white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes, all objects at the final stage of stellar evolution. It covers topics such as: pulsation of white dwarfs; millisecond pulsars; and the dynamics around black holes.

  17. BEYOND THE MAIN SEQUENCE: TESTING THE ACCURACY OF STELLAR MASSES PREDICTED BY THE PARSEC EVOLUTIONARY TRACKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghezzi, Luan; Johnson, John Asher, E-mail: lghezzi@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-10-20

    Characterizing the physical properties of exoplanets and understanding their formation and orbital evolution requires precise and accurate knowledge of their host stars. Accurately measuring stellar masses is particularly important because they likely influence planet occurrence and the architectures of planetary systems. Single main-sequence stars typically have masses estimated from evolutionary tracks, which generally provide accurate results due to their extensive empirical calibration. However, the validity of this method for subgiants and giants has been called into question by recent studies, with suggestions that the masses of these evolved stars could have been overestimated. We investigate these concerns using a sample of 59 benchmark evolved stars with model-independent masses (from binary systems or asteroseismology) obtained from the literature. We find very good agreement between these benchmark masses and the ones estimated using evolutionary tracks. The average fractional difference in the mass interval ∼0.7–4.5 M{sub ⊙} is consistent with zero (−1.30 ± 2.42%), with no significant trends in the residuals relative to the input parameters. A good agreement between model-dependent and -independent radii (−4.81 ± 1.32%) and surface gravities (0.71 ± 0.51%) is also found. The consistency between independently determined ages for members of binary systems adds further support for the accuracy of the method employed to derive the stellar masses. Taken together, our results indicate that determination of masses of evolved stars using grids of evolutionary tracks is not significantly affected by systematic errors, and is thus valid for estimating the masses of isolated stars beyond the main sequence.

  18. The Stellar Imager (SI) Mission Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Kenneth S.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Oegerle, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is envisioned as a space-based, UV-optical interferometer composed of 10 or more one-meter class elements distributed with a maximum baseline of 0.5 approximately km. It will image stars and binaries with one hundred to one thousand resolution elements on their surface and enable long-term studies of stellar magnetic activity patterns and their evolution with time, for comparison with those on the sun. It will also sound their interiors through asteroseismology to image internal structure, differential rotation, and large-scale circulations. SI will enable us to understand the various effects of magnetic fields of stars, the dynamos that generate these fields, and the internal structure and dynamics of the stars in which these dynamos operate. The ultimate goal of the mission is to achieve the best possible forecasting of solar activity as a driver of climate and space weather on times scales ranging from months to decades, and an understanding of the impact of stellar magnetic activity on astrobiology and life in the Universe. The road to that goal will revolutionize our understanding of stars and stellar systems, the building blocks of the Universe. Fitting naturally within the NASA and ESA long-term time lines, SI complements defined missions, and with them will show us entire other solar systems, from the central star to their orbiting planets. In this paper we will describe the scientific goals of the mission, the performance requirements needed to address those goals, and the design concepts now under study.

  19. Asteroseismology of Pulsating Stars Santosh Joshi∗ & Yogesh C ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    posed that the waves observed on the surface of the Sun are standing-wave in nature. The periods of .... for a sound wave to travel from the stellar center to the surface which is equivalent to the free-fall time-scale of the star. ..... In the former case, oscillations result from the amplification of small disturbances by means of a ...

  20. Progress Toward Attractive Stellarators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilson, G H; Brown, T G; Gates, D A; Lu, K P; Zarnstorff, M C; Boozer, A H; Harris, J H; Meneghini, O; Mynick, H E; Pomphrey, N; Reiman, A H

    2011-01-05

    The quasi-axisymmetric stellarator (QAS) concept offers a promising path to a more compact stellarator reactor, closer in linear dimensions to tokamak reactors than previous stellarator designs. Concept improvements are needed, however, to make it more maintainable and more compatible with high plant availability. Using the ARIES-CS design as a starting point, compact stellarator designs with improved maintenance characteristics have been developed. While the ARIES-CS features a through-the-port maintenance scheme, we have investigated configuration changes to enable a sector-maintenance approach, as envisioned for example in ARIES AT. Three approaches are reported. The first is to make tradeoffs within the QAS design space, giving greater emphasis to maintainability criteria. The second approach is to improve the optimization tools to more accurately and efficiently target the physics properties of importance. The third is to employ a hybrid coil topology, so that the plasma shaping functions of the main coils are shared more optimally, either with passive conductors made of high-temperature superconductor or with local compensation coils, allowing the main coils to become simpler. Optimization tools are being improved to test these approaches.

  1. Verification of the Kepler Input Catalog from Asteroseismology of Solar-type Stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verner, G.A.; Chaplin, W.J.; Basu, S.

    2011-01-01

    We calculate precise stellar radii and surface gravities from the asteroseismic analysis of over 500 solar-type pulsating stars observed by the Kepler space telescope. These physical stellar properties are compared with those given in the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC), determined from ground......-based multi-color photometry. For the stars in our sample, we find general agreement but we detect an average overestimation bias of 0.23 dex in the KIC determination of log (g) for stars with log (g)KIC > 4.0 dex, and a resultant underestimation bias of up to 50% in the KIC radii estimates for stars with R...... KIC stars characterized in the KIC with R ~ 1 R sun than is suggested by the physical properties in the KIC. Furthermore, if the radius estimates are taken...

  2. Stellar evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Meadows, A J

    2013-01-01

    Stellar Evolution, Second Edition covers the significant advances in the understanding of birth, life, and death of stars.This book is divided into nine chapters and begins with a description of the characteristics of stars according to their brightness, distance, size, mass, age, and chemical composition. The next chapters deal with the families, structure, and birth of stars. These topics are followed by discussions of the chemical composition and the evolution of main-sequence stars. A chapter focuses on the unique features of the sun as a star, including its evolution, magnetic fields, act

  3. Book Review: "Inside Stars. A Theory of the Internal Constitution of Stars, and the Sources of Stellar Energy According to General Relativity" (Letters to Progress in Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millette P. A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This book provides a general relativistic theory of the internal constitution of liquid stars. It is a solid contribution to our understanding of stellar structure from a general relativistic perspective. It raises new ideas on the constitution of stars and planetary systems, and proposes a new approach to stellar structure an d stellar energy generation which is bound to help us better understand stellar astrophysics.

  4. Testing the forward modeling approach in asteroseismology. II. Structure and internal dynamics of the hot B subdwarf component in the close eclipsing binary system PG 1336-018

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpinet, S.; Van Grootel, V.; Reese, D.; Fontaine, G.; Green, E. M.; Brassard, P.; Chayer, P.

    2008-10-01

    Aims: We present a stringent test on the forward modeling technique in asteroseismology by confronting the predictions of a detailed seismic analysis of the pulsating subdwarf component in the unique close eclipsing binary system PG 1336-018 with those derived independently from modeling the binary light curve of the system. We also take advantage of the observed rotationally-split rich period spectrum to investigate the internal dynamics of the pulsating component in this system expected to be tidally locked. Methods: We carry out numerical exercises based on the double optimization technique that we developed within the framework of the forward modeling approach in asteroseismology. We use a recently updated version that now incorporates the effects of stellar rotation on the pulsation properties. We thus search in parameter space for the optimal model that objectively leads to the best simultaneous match of the 25 periods (including rotationally-split components) observed in PG 1336-018. For the first time, we also attempt to precisely reconstruct the internal rotation profile of the pulsator from its oscillations. Results: Our principal result is that our seismic model, which closely reproduces the observed periods, is remarkably consistent with one of the best-fitting possible solutions uncovered independently from the binary light curve analysis, in effect pointing to the correct one. The latter indicates a mass of Mast = 0.466±0.006 M⊙ and a radius of Rast = 0.15±0.01 R⊙ for the sdB star. In comparison, our seismic analysis, combined to high-quality time-averaged spectroscopy, leads to the following estimates of the basic structural parameters of the sdB component: Mast = 0.459±0.005 M⊙, Rast = 0.151±0.001 R⊙, log g = 5.739±0.002, Teff = 32 740 ± 400 K, and log(Menv/Mast) = -4.54±0.07. We also find strong evidence that the sdB star has reached spin-orbit synchronism and rotates as a solid body down to at least r ~ 0.55 Rast. We further

  5. On stellar X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, R.; Golub, L.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    Stellar X-ray astronomy represents an entirely new astronomical discipline which has emerged during the past five years. It lies at the crossroads of solar physics, stellar physics, and general astrophysics. The present review is concerned with the main physical problems which arise in connection with a study of the stellar X-ray data. A central issue is the extent to which the extrapolation from solar physics is justified and the definition (if possible) of the limits to such extrapolation. The observational properties of X-ray emission from stars are considered along with the solar analogy and the modeling of X-ray emission from late-type stars, the modeling of X-ray emission from early-type stars, the physics of stellar X-ray emission, stellar X-ray emission in the more general astrophysical context, and future prospects.

  6. STELLARATOR INJECTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, R.F.

    1962-09-01

    A method and means are described for injecting energetic neutral atoms or molecular ions into dense magnetically collimated plasma columns of stellarators and the like in such a manner that the atoms or ions are able to significantly penetrate the column before being ionized by collision with the plasma constituent particles. Penetration of the plasma column by the neutral atoms or molecular ions is facilitated by superposition of two closely spaced magnetic mirrors on the plasma confinement field. The mirrors are moved apart to magnetically sweep plasma from a region between the mirrors and establish a relatively low plasma density therein. By virture of the low density, neutral atoms or molecular ions injected into the region significantly penetrate the plasma column before being ionized. Thereafter, the mirrors are diminished to permit the injected material to admix with the plasma in the remainder of the column. (AEC)

  7. Formation history of open clusters constrained by detailed asteroseismology of red giant stars observed by Kepler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsaro, Enrico; Lee, Yueh-Ning; García, Rafael A.; Hennebelle, Patrick; Mathur, Savita; Beck, Paul G.; Mathis, Stephane; Stello, Dennis; Bouvier, Jérôme

    2017-10-01

    Stars originate by the gravitational collapse of a turbulent molecular cloud of a diffuse medium, and are often observed to form clusters. Stellar clusters therefore play an important role in our understanding of star formation and of the dynamical processes at play. However, investigating the cluster formation is diffcult because the density of the molecular cloud undergoes a change of many orders of magnitude. Hierarchical-step approaches to decompose the problem into different stages are therefore required, as well as reliable assumptions on the initial conditions in the clouds. We report for the first time the use of the full potential of NASA Kepler asteroseismic observations coupled with 3D numerical simulations, to put strong constraints on the early formation stages of open clusters. Thanks to a Bayesian peak bagging analysis of about 50 red giant members of NGC 6791 and NGC 6819, the two most populated open clusters observed in the nominal Kepler mission, we derive a complete set of detailed oscillation mode properties for each star, with thousands of oscillation modes characterized. We therefore show how these asteroseismic properties lead us to a discovery about the rotation history of stellar clusters. Finally, our observational findings will be compared with hydrodynamical simulations for stellar cluster formation to constrain the physical processes of turbulence, rotation, and magnetic fields that are in action during the collapse of the progenitor cloud into a proto-cluster.

  8. Stark broadening data for stellar plasma research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrijević, M. S.

    Results of an effort to provide to astrophysicists and physicists an as much as possible complete set of Stark broadening parameters needed for stellar opacity calculations, stellar atmosphere modelling, abundance determinations and diagnostics of different plasmas in astrophysics, physics and plasma technology, are presented. Stark broadening has been considered within the semiclassical perturbation, and the modified semiempirical approaches.

  9. The physical parameters of the retired a star HD 185351

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, John Asher [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Huber, Daniel; Barclay, Thomas [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Boyajian, Tabetha; Brewer, John M. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); White, Timothy R. [Institut für Astrophysik, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Von Braun, Kaspar [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Maestro, Vicente; Stello, Dennis [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2014-10-10

    We report here an analysis of the physical stellar parameters of the giant star HD 185351 using Kepler short-cadence photometry, optical and near infrared interferometry from CHARA, and high-resolution spectroscopy. Asteroseismic oscillations detected in the Kepler short-cadence photometry combined with an effective temperature calculated from the interferometric angular diameter and bolometric flux yield a mean density ρ{sub *} = 0.0130 ± 0.0003 ρ{sub ☉} and surface gravity log g = 3.280 ± 0.011. Combining the gravity and density we find R {sub *} = 5.35 ± 0.20 R {sub ☉} and M {sub *} = 1.99 ± 0.23 M {sub ☉}. The trigonometric parallax and CHARA angular diameter give a radius R {sub *} = 4.97 ± 0.07 R {sub ☉}. This smaller radius, when combined with the mean stellar density, corresponds to a stellar mass 1.60 ± 0.08 M {sub ☉}, which is smaller than the asteroseismic mass by 1.6σ. We find that a larger mass is supported by the observation of mixed modes in our high-precision photometry, the spacing of which is consistent only for M {sub *} ≳ 1.8 M {sub ☉}. Our various and independent mass measurements can be compared to the mass measured from interpolating the spectroscopic parameters onto stellar evolution models, which yields a model-based mass M {sub *,} {sub model} = 1.87 ± 0.07 M {sub ☉}. This mass agrees well with the asteroseismic value, but is 2.6σ higher than the mass from the combination of asteroseismology and interferometry. The discrepancy motivates future studies with a larger sample of giant stars. However, all of our mass measurements are consistent with HD 185351 having a mass in excess of 1.5 M {sub ☉}.

  10. Stellar dynamics and black holes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chandrasekhar's most important contribution to stellar dynamics was the concept of dynamical friction. I briefly review that work, then discuss some implications of Chandrasekhar's theory of gravitational encounters for motion in galactic nuclei. Author Affiliations. David Merritt1. Department of Physics, Rochester Institute ...

  11. Stellar Metamorphosis:

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    [TOP LEFT AND RIGHT] The Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 has captured images of the birth of two planetary nebulae as they emerge from wrappings of gas and dust, like butterflies breaking out of their cocoons. These images highlight a fleeting phase in the stellar burnout process, occurring just before dying stars are transformed into planetary nebulae. The left-hand image is the Cotton Candy nebula, IRAS 17150-3224; the right-hand image, the Silkworm nebula, IRAS 17441-2411. Called proto-planetary nebulae, these dying stars have been caught in a transition phase between a red giant and a planetary nebula. This phase is only about 1,000 years long, very short in comparison to the 1 billion-year lifetime of a star. These images provide the earliest snapshots of the transition process. Studying images of proto-planetary nebulae is important to understanding the process of star death. A star begins to die when it has exhausted its thermonuclear fuel - hydrogen and helium. The star then becomes bright and cool (red giant phase) and swells to several tens of times its normal size. It begins puffing thin shells of gas off into space. These shells become the star's cocoon. In the Hubble images, the shells are the concentric rings seen around each nebula. But the images also reveal the nebulae breaking out from those shells. The butterfly-like wings of gas and dust are a common shape of planetary nebulae. Such butterfly shapes are created by the 'interacting winds' process, in which a more recent 'fast wind' - material propelled by radiation from the hot central star - punches a hole in the cocoon, allowing the nebula to emerge. (This 'interacting wind' theory was first proposed by Dr. Sun Kwok to explain the origin of planetary nebulae, and has been subsequently proven successful in explaining their shapes.) The nebulae are being illuminated by light from the invisible central star, which is then reflected toward us. We are viewing the nebulae

  12. Autoguider locked on a fiber input for precision stellar radial velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchy, F.; Connes, P.

    1999-04-01

    Measurement of stellar radial velocities (RV) is one acknowledged approach for planetary-search and asteroseismology programs. We study the incomplete scrambling action of a fiber feeding a spectrograph, which leaves RV errors at a level of few m/s. Observations realised with the ELODIE fiber-fed crossed-dispersion spectrograph at the 193-cm telescope of Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP) are presented. A fiber-locked autoguider (called FLAG) has been specifically built to reduce the stellar-beam geometrical fluctuations within the spectrograph. With FLAG, the fiber-input plays the role of guiding detector. Automatic focusing is also accomplished by the system. The design and performance characteristics of the instrument tested at the 152-cm telescope of OHP are reviewed here. Based on observations collected at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence, CNRS, France.

  13. Formation of stellar clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilgys, Romas; Bonnell, Ian A.

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the triggering of star formation and the formation of stellar clusters in molecular clouds which form as the interstellar medium passes through spiral shocks. The spiral shock compresses gas into an ∼100 pc long main star formation ridge, where clusters form every 5-10 pc along the merger ridge. We use a gravitational potential-based cluster finding algorithm, which extracts individual clusters, calculates their physical properties and traces cluster evolution over multiple time-steps. Final cluster masses at the end of simulation range between 1000 and 30 000 M⊙ with their characteristic half-mass radii between 0.1 and 2 pc. These clusters form by gathering material from 10-20 pc size scales. Clusters also show a mass-specific angular momentum relation, where more massive clusters have larger specific angular momentum due to the larger size scales, and hence angular momentum from which they gather their mass. The evolution shows that more massive clusters experience hierarchical merging process, which increases stellar age spreads up to 2-3 Myr. Less massive clusters appear to grow by gathering nearby recently formed sinks, while more massive clusters with their large global gravitational potentials are increasing their mass growth from gas accretion.

  14. Probing mass-radius relation of protoneutron stars from gravitational-wave asteroseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotani, Hajime; Kuroda, Takami; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kotake, Kei

    2017-09-01

    The gravitational-wave (GW) asteroseismology is a powerful technique for extracting interior information of compact objects. In this work, we focus on spacetime modes, the so-called w modes, of GWs emitted from a proto-neutron star (PNS) in the postbounce phase of core-collapse supernovae. Using results from recent three-dimensional supernova models, we study how to infer the properties of the PNS based on a quasi-normal mode analysis in the context of the GW asteroseismology. We find that the w1-mode frequency multiplied by the PNS radius is expressed as a linear function with respect to the ratio of the PNS mass to the PNS radius. This relation is insensitive to the nuclear equation of state (EOS) employed in this work. Combining with another universal relation of the f -mode oscillations, we point out that the time dependent mass-radius relation of the PNS can be obtained by observing both the f - and w1-mode GWs simultaneously. Our results suggest that the simultaneous detection of the two modes could provide a new probe into finite-temperature nuclear EOS that predominantly determines the PNS evolution.

  15. Physical properties and evolutionary status of the W-subtype contact binary V502 Oph with a stellar companion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhou; Shengbang, Qian; Binghe, Huang; Hao, Li; Jia, Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Multi-color (B, V, Rc, Ic) CCD photometric light curves of the contact binary V502 Oph are analyzed using the Wilson-Devinney program. The solutions reveal that V502 Oph is a W-subtype contact (f = 35.3%) binary system. The temperature difference between its two components is 240 K and the more massive star has a lower surface temperature. A cool spot is added in our model to account for the light curves' asymmetry (O'Connell effect) and a third light is detected for the first time in the light curves' modeling. Combining the orbital inclination (i = 76.4°) with the published mass function of V502 Oph, the absolute physical parameters of the two components are determined, which are M1 = 0.46(±0.02) M⊙, M2 = 1.37(±0.02) M⊙, R1 = 0.94(±0.01) R⊙, R2 = 1.51(±0.01) R⊙, L1 = 1.13(±0.02) L⊙, and L2 = 2.49(±0.03) L⊙. The formation and the evolutionary status of V502 Oph are discussed. All photoelectric and CCD times of light minimum about V502 Oph are gathered and its orbital period variations are analyzed. The results show that the orbital period of V502 Oph is decreasing continuously at a rate of dP/dt = -1.69 × 10-7 d yr-1,which corresponds to a conservative mass transfer rate of dM2/dt = -3.01 × 10- 8 M⊙ yr-1. The light-travel time effect is due to the presence of a close-in tertiary component with a period of P3 = 18.7 yr and an amplitute of 0.00402 d. V502 Oph is an ideal target to test the formation and evolution theories of binary and multiple systems in which the light curves, the O - C curve and spectroscopic observations are comprehensively researched.

  16. Stellar Structure and Evolution: An Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, C. Simon

    The synthesis of new elements takes place inside stars. How do stars evolve and distribute this creation to the universe at large? This article starts with the observables that the theory of stellar evolution aims to reproduce, and gives a quick overview of what that theory predicts (Sects. 2-3). It presents the equations governing stellar structure and evolution (Sects. 4-6) and the physics of stellar interiors (Sects. 7-9). Approximate and numerical methods for their solution are outlined (Sects. 10-11) and the general results of stellar structure and evolution are discussed (Sects. 12-13). The structure and evolution of horizontal-branch stars, hydrogen-deficient stars and other stellar remnants are also considered (Sects. 14-15).

  17. Stellar Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binney, James

    Gröninger was dissatisfied with his approximate treatment of (141) since it gave poor estimates of the fundamental lines in the waterstuff spectrum. We have even less reason to be satisfied with the Lin-Shu-Kalnajs analysis of (140) which, unaided, is unable to give an adequate account of even the high-frequency normal modes; Personne's programme turns out to involve loosely-wound waves for which the LsK-dispersion relation is not really valid. Obviously more powerful techniques need to be developed for the solution of (140). Meanwhile, is the TWA theory of spiral structure worth bothering with? Quantitatively the TWA theory is not a success. Yet it has played an important role in the study of galaxies by introducing a widely employed conceptual framework. Only after effective machinery for the evaluation of normal modes of disks is available will we know for certain whether this role has been beneficial. In any event one must not underestimate the con- and de-structuve influence on progress in science of the conceptual frameworks that simple models introduce. Two examples will illustrate this point: (i) High-energy physicists think always in terms of particles and interactions and yet these are really just elements (propagators and vertices) introduced during the iterative solution of a set of coupled non-linear integro-differential equations. (ii) Isaac Newton spent vastly more time, thought and experimental effort on chemistry than on either physics or mathematics. Yet his incomparable mind, which both before and after his period as a chemist revolutionized mathematics and first demonstrated the possibility of exact science, achieved nothing of lasting value in Chemistry, whose foundations were to be laid by men of much smaller stature in the mid 18thc. Why did he fail so miserably? Because his conceptual framework was pre-Newtonian; brought up in the mystical, pre-Enlightenment mid 17thc. he thought in terms of the ancient alchemical concepts of corruption and

  18. Stellar Parameters in an Instant with Machine Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellinger Earl P.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of dedicated photometric space missions, the ability to rapidly process huge catalogues of stars has become paramount. Bellinger and Angelou et al. [1] recently introduced a new method based on machine learning for inferring the stellar parameters of main-sequence stars exhibiting solar-like oscillations. The method makes precise predictions that are consistent with other methods, but with the advantages of being able to explore many more parameters while costing practically no time. Here we apply the method to 52 so-called “LEGACY“ main-sequence stars observed by the Kepler space mission. For each star, we present estimates and uncertainties of mass, age, radius, luminosity, core hydrogen abundance, surface helium abundance, surface gravity, initial helium abundance, and initial metallicity as well as estimates of their evolutionary model parameters of mixing length, overshooting coeffcient, and diffusion multiplication factor. We obtain median uncertainties in stellar age, mass, and radius of 14.8%, 3.6%, and 1.7%, respectively. The source code for all analyses and for all figures appearing in this manuscript can be found electronically at https://github.com/earlbellinger/asteroseismology

  19. Hydrodynamics and stellar winds an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Maciel, Walter J

    2014-01-01

    Stellar winds are a common phenomenon in the life of stars, from the dwarfs like the Sun to the red giants and hot supergiants, constituting one of the basic aspects of modern astrophysics. Stellar winds are a hydrodynamic phenomenon in which circumstellar gases expand towards the interstellar medium. This book presents an elementary introduction to the fundamentals of hydrodynamics with an application to the study of stellar winds. The principles of hydrodynamics have many other applications, so that the book can be used as an introduction to hydrodynamics for students of physics, astrophysics and other related areas.

  20. Synthetic clusters of massive stars to test stellar evolution models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgy, Cyril; Ekström, Sylvia

    2017-03-01

    During the last few years, the Geneva stellar evolution group has released new grids of stellar models, including the effect of rotation and with updated physical inputs (Ekström et al. 2012; Georgy et al. 2013a, b). To ease the comparison between the outputs of the stellar evolution computations and the observations, a dedicated tool was developed: the Syclist toolbox (Georgy et al. 2014). It allows to compute interpolated stellar models, isochrones, synthetic clusters, and to simulate the time-evolution of stellar populations.

  1. Physics, Formation and Evolution of Rotating Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Maeder, André

    2009-01-01

    Rotation is ubiquitous at each step of stellar evolution, from star formation to the final stages, and it affects the course of evolution, the timescales and nucleosynthesis. Stellar rotation is also an essential prerequisite for the occurrence of Gamma-Ray Bursts. In this book the author thoroughly examines the basic mechanical and thermal effects of rotation, their influence on mass loss by stellar winds, the effects of differential rotation and its associated instabilities, the relation with magnetic fields and the evolution of the internal and surface rotation. Further, he discusses the numerous observational signatures of rotational effects obtained from spectroscopy and interferometric observations, as well as from chemical abundance determinations, helioseismology and asteroseismology, etc. On an introductory level, this book presents in a didactical way the basic concepts of stellar structure and evolution in "track 1" chapters. The other more specialized chapters form an advanced course on the gradua...

  2. The potential of 3D radiation-hydrodynamics models for white dwarf asteroseismology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tremblay P.-E.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available White dwarfs with hydrogen-rich atmospheres (DA are the most abundant of all degenerate objects. In recent years work has been dedicated to increase the accuracy of their model atmospheres. Most notably, convective motions are now treated with 3D radiation-hydrodynamics instead of the standard mixing-length theory. We present and describe selected 3D model atmospheres close and within the instability strip of the pulsating ZZ Ceti white dwarfs. Our 3D simulations depend only weakly on numerical parameters and compared to 1D models, they provide more realistic determinations of the depth of the convective zone. The 3D structures can then be adopted as input for asteroseismology.

  3. Modelling of stellar convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupka, Friedrich; Muthsam, Herbert J.

    2017-07-01

    The review considers the modelling process for stellar convection rather than specific astrophysical results. For achieving reasonable depth and length we deal with hydrodynamics only, omitting MHD. A historically oriented introduction offers first glimpses on the physics of stellar convection. Examination of its basic properties shows that two very different kinds of modelling keep being needed: low dimensional models (mixing length, Reynolds stress, etc.) and "full" 3D simulations. A list of affordable and not affordable tasks for the latter is given. Various low dimensional modelling approaches are put in a hierarchy and basic principles which they should respect are formulated. In 3D simulations of low Mach number convection the inclusion of then unimportant sound waves with their rapid time variation is numerically impossible. We describe a number of approaches where the Navier-Stokes equations are modified for their elimination (anelastic approximation, etc.). We then turn to working with the full Navier-Stokes equations and deal with numerical principles for faithful and efficient numerics. Spatial differentiation as well as time marching aspects are considered. A list of codes allows assessing the state of the art. An important recent development is the treatment of even the low Mach number problem without prior modification of the basic equation (obviating side effects) by specifically designed numerical methods. Finally, we review a number of important trends such as how to further develop low-dimensional models, how to use 3D models for that purpose, what effect recent hardware developments may have on 3D modelling, and others.

  4. Ensemble Asteroseismology of Solar-Type Stars with the NASA Kepler Mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaplin, William J.; Kjeldsen, Hans; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen

    2011-01-01

    In addition to its search for extrasolar planets, the NASA Kepler mission provides exquisite data on stellar oscillations. We report the detections of oscillations in 500 solar-type stars in the Kepler field of view, an ensemble that is large enough to allow statistical studies of intrinsic stellar...... properties (such as mass, radius, and age) and to test theories of stellar evolution. We find that the distribution of observed masses of these stars shows intriguing differences to predictions from models of synthetic stellar populations in the Galaxy....

  5. The Stellar-Solar Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, T. R.

    2004-05-01

    Many solar-stellar astronomers believe that the solar-stellar connection primarily is a one-way street: the exquisitely detailed studies of the solar surface, interior, and heliosphere strongly mold our views of the distant, unresolved stars. Perhaps many solar physicists have gone so far as to adopt the myopic view that stellar astronomy, by and large, is merely sponging up the fabulous insights from ever deeper examinations of our local star, but the ``dark side'' is not really capable of returning the favor. What could we possibly learn from the stars, that we don't already know from much better observations of the Sun? In my Introduction to this Topical Session, I will discuss two broad issues: (1) the present divergence between solar and stellar physics (driven by the different goals and tools of the two disciplines); and (2) the diversity of stars in the H-R diagram, to help inform our understanding of solar processes. Today, there are observations of stars that greatly exceed the quality of analogous solar measurements: e.g., HST/STIS UV echelle spectra of Alpha Cen A; Chandra transmission grating spectra of solar-type stars; and only recently have we obtained a definitive understanding of the Sun's soft X-ray luminosity in the key ROSAT/PSPC band. The lack of equivalent solar observations hinders practical applications of the solar-stellar connection. On the more informative side, the evolutionary paths of other stars can be quite different from the Sun's, with potentially dramatic influences on phenomena such as magnetic activity. Equally important, examples of Sun-like stars can be found at all stages of evolution, from proplyds to red giants, in the volume of nearby space out to 500 pc. In short, the solar-stellar connection need not be a one-way street, but rather a powerful tool to explore solar processes within the broader context of stars and stellar evolution. This work was supported by NASA grant NAG5-13058.

  6. Quasi-axially symmetric stellarators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garabedian, Paul R.

    1998-01-01

    Confinement of a plasma for controlled thermonuclear fusion is studied numerically. Toroidal equilibria are considered, with an emphasis on the Modular Helias-like Heliac 2 (MHH2), which is a stellarator of low aspect ratio with just two field periods surrounded by 16 modular coils. The geometry is fully three-dimensional, but there is an axial symmetry of the magnetic structure that is calculated to give confinement competitive with that in circular tokamaks. Additional vertical and toroidal field coils, together with a current drive, provide the flexibility and the control of rotational transform necessary for a successful experiment. An MHH3 device with three field periods and comparable quasi-axial symmetry is presented, too, and because of reversed shear, its physical properties may be better. Variational analysis of equilibrium and stability is shown to give a more reliable prediction of performance for these stellarators than linearized or local theories that suffer from a failure of differentiability and convergence. PMID:9707544

  7. Clues from stellar catastrophes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rimoldi, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This thesis uses catastrophic stellar events (supernovae and stellar collisions) to investigate different aspects of their environment. The first part of the thesis examines what happens to supernova remnants near supermassive black holes like the one in the Milky Way Galaxy. To do so, a technique

  8. Physical Properties of Spectroscopically Confirmed Galaxies at z ≥ 6. III. Stellar Populations from SED Modeling with Secure Lyα Emission and Redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Linhua; Finlator, Kristian; Cohen, Seth H.; Egami, Eiichi; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Fan, Xiaohui; Davé, Romeel; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Mechtley, Matthew; Ouchi, Masami; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Clément, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of stellar populations in a sample of spectroscopically confirmed Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) and Lyα emitters (LAEs) at 5.7populations based on the multi-band data and secure redshifts. By estimating nebular emission from the observed Lyα flux, we break the strong model degeneracy between young galaxies with prominent nebular emission and older galaxies with strong Balmer breaks. The results show that our galaxies cover a wide range of ages from several to a few hundred million years (Myr), and stellar masses from ˜108 to ˜10{}11 {M}⊙ . These galaxies can be roughly divided into two subsamples: an “old” subsample consisting of galaxies older than 100 Myr, with stellar masses higher than {10}9 {M}⊙ , and a “young” subsample consisting of galaxies younger than ˜30 Myr, with masses ranging between ˜108 and ˜ 3× {10}9 {M}⊙ . Both subsamples display a correlation between stellar mass and star formation rate (SFR), but with very different normalizations. The average specific SFR (sSFR) of the “old” subsample is 3-4 Gyr-1, consistent with previous studies of “normal” star-forming galaxies at z≥slant 6. The average sSFR of the “young” subsample is an order of magnitude higher, likely due to starburst activity. Our results also indicate little dust extinction in the majority of the galaxies, as already suggested by their steep rest-frame UV slopes. Finally, LAEs and LBGs with strong Lyα emission are indistinguishable in terms of age, stellar mass, and SFR. Based in part on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the data archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. Based in part on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA. Based in part on

  9. Stellar Chromospheric Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall Jeffrey C.

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The Sun, stars similar to it, and many rather dissimilar to it, have chromospheres, regions classically viewed as lying above the brilliant photosphere and characterized by a positive temperature gradient and a marked departure from radiative equilibrium. Stellar chromospheres exhibit a wide range of phenomena collectively called activity, stemming largely from the time evolution of their magnetic fields and the mass flux and transfer of radiation through the complex magnetic topology and the increasingly optically thin plasma of the outer stellar atmosphere. In this review, I will (1 outline the development of our understanding of chromospheric structure from 1960 to the present, (2 discuss the major observational programs and theoretical lines of inquiry, (3 review the origin and nature of both solar and stellar chromospheric activity and its relationship to, and effect on, stellar parameters including total energy output, and (4 summarize the outstanding problems today.

  10. Advanced Stellar Compass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Buch; Jørgensen, John Leif; Thuesen, Gøsta

    1997-01-01

    This document describes all interface properties for the Advanced Stellar Compass, developed for the German Research Satellite "CHAMP". Basic operations, modes, software protocol, calibration methods and closed loop test strategies are described.......This document describes all interface properties for the Advanced Stellar Compass, developed for the German Research Satellite "CHAMP". Basic operations, modes, software protocol, calibration methods and closed loop test strategies are described....

  11. The more the merrier: grid based modelling of Kepler dwarfs with 5-dimensional stellar grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serenelli Aldo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present preliminary results of our grid based modelling (GBM of the dwarf/subgiant sample of stars observed with Kepler including global asteroseismic parameters. GBM analysis in this work is based on a large grid of stellar models that is characterized by five independent parameters: model mass and age, initial metallicity (Zini, initial helium (Yini, and mixing length parameter (αMLT. Using this grid relaxes assumptions used in all previous GBM work where the initial composition is determined by a single parameter and that αMLT is fixed to a solar-calibrated value. The new grid allows us to study, for example, the impact of different galactic chemical enrichment models on the determination of stellar parameters such as mass radius and age. Also, it allows to include new results from stellar atmosphere models on αMLT in the GBM analysis in a simple manner. Alternatively, it can be tested if global asteroseismology is a useful tool to constraint our ignorance on quantities such as Yini and αMLT. Initial findings show that mass determination is robust with respect to freedom in the latter quantities, with a 4.4% maximum deviation for extreme assumptions regarding prior information on Yini – Zini relations and aMLT. On the other hand, tests carried out so far seem to indicate that global seismology does not have much power to constrain Yini – Zni relations of αMLT values without resourcing to additional information.

  12. The more the merrier: grid based modelling of Kepler dwarfs with 5-dimensional stellar grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serenelli, Aldo; Chaplin, William J.; Huber, Daniel

    2017-10-01

    We present preliminary results of our grid based modelling (GBM) of the dwarf/subgiant sample of stars observed with Kepler including global asteroseismic parameters. GBM analysis in this work is based on a large grid of stellar models that is characterized by five independent parameters: model mass and age, initial metallicity (Zini), initial helium (Yini), and mixing length parameter (αMLT). Using this grid relaxes assumptions used in all previous GBM work where the initial composition is determined by a single parameter and that αMLT is fixed to a solar-calibrated value. The new grid allows us to study, for example, the impact of different galactic chemical enrichment models on the determination of stellar parameters such as mass radius and age. Also, it allows to include new results from stellar atmosphere models on αMLT in the GBM analysis in a simple manner. Alternatively, it can be tested if global asteroseismology is a useful tool to constraint our ignorance on quantities such as Yini and αMLT. Initial findings show that mass determination is robust with respect to freedom in the latter quantities, with a 4.4% maximum deviation for extreme assumptions regarding prior information on Yini - Zini relations and aMLT. On the other hand, tests carried out so far seem to indicate that global seismology does not have much power to constrain Yini - Zni relations of αMLT values without resourcing to additional information.

  13. Probabilistic stellar rotation periods with Gaussian processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Ruth; Aigrain, Suzanne; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Stellar rotation has many applications in the field of exoplanets. High-precision photometry from space-based missions like Kepler and K2 allows us to measure stellar rotation periods directly from light curves. Stellar variability produced by rotation is usually not sinusoidal or perfectly periodic, therefore sine-fitting periodograms are not well suited to rotation period measurement. Autocorrelation functions are often used to extract periodic information from light curves, however uncertainties on rotation periods measured by autocorrelation are difficult to define. A ‘by eye’ check, or a set of heuristic criteria are used to validate measurements and rotation periods are only reported for stars that pass this vetting process. A probabilistic rotation period measurement method, with a suitable generative model bypasses the need for a validation stage and can produce realistic uncertainties. The physics driving the production of variability in stellar light curves is still poorly understood and difficult to model. We therefore use an effective model for stellar variability: a Gaussian process with a quasi-periodic covariance function. By injecting fake signals into Kepler light curves we show that the GP model is well suited to quasi-periodic, non-sinusoidal signals, is capable of modelling noise and physical signals simultaneously and provides probabilistic rotation period measurements with realistic uncertainties.

  14. PREFACE: A Stellar Journey A Stellar Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asplund, M.

    2008-10-01

    The conference A Stellar Journey was held in Uppsala, Sweden, 23 27June 2008, in honour of Professor Bengt Gustafsson's 65th birthday. The choice of Uppsala as the location for this event was obvious given Bengt's long-standing association with the city stemming back to his school days. With the exception of a two-year postdoc stint in Copenhagen, five years as professor at Stockholm University and two years as director of the Sigtuna foundation, Bengt has forged his illustrious professional career at Uppsala University. The symposium venue was Museum Gustavianum, once the main building of the oldest university in Scandinavia. The title of the symposium is a paraphrasing of Bengt's popular astronomy book Kosmisk Resa (in English: Cosmic Journey) written in the early eighties. I think this aptly symbolizes his career that has been an astronomical voyage from near to far, from the distant past to the present. The original book title was modified slightly to reflect that most of his work to date has dealt with stars in one way or another. In addition it also gives credit to Bengt's important role as a guiding light for a very large number of students, colleagues and collaborators, indeed for several generations of astronomers. For me personally, the book Kosmisk Resa bears particular significance as it has shaped my life rather profoundly. Although I had already decided to become an astronomer, when I first read the book as a 14-year-old I made up my mind then and there that I would study under Bengt Gustafsson and work on stars. Indeed I have remained true to this somewhat audacious resolution. I suspect that a great number of us have similar stories how Bengt has had a major influence on our lives, whether on the professional or personal level. Perhaps Bengt's most outstanding characteristic is his enthralling enthusiasm. This is equally true whether he is pondering some scientific conundrum, supervising students or performing in front of an audience, be it an

  15. Stellar compass for the Clementine Mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    A CCD sensor with 42 x 28 degrees FOV and 576 x 384 pixels was built by the Advanced Technology Program (ATP) in the Physics Department at LLNL. That sensor, called the StarTracker camera, is used on the Clementine Lunar Mapping mission between January and May, 1994. Together with the Stellar Compass software, the StarTracker camera provided a way of identifying its orientation to within about 150 microradians in camera body pitch and yaw. This presentation will be an overview of basically how the Stellar Compass software works, along with showing some of its performance results.

  16. VERIFYING ASTEROSEISMICALLY DETERMINED PARAMETERS OF KEPLER STARS USING HIPPARCOS PARALLAXES: SELF-CONSISTENT STELLAR PROPERTIES AND DISTANCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Aguirre, V.; Chaplin, W. J.; Bedding, T. R.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Kjeldsen, H. [Stellar Astrophysics Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Casagrande, L. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mount Stromlo Observatory, The Australian National University, ACT 2611 (Australia); Basu, S. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Campante, T. L.; Monteiro, M. J. P. F. G. [Centro de Astrofisica and Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Huber, D. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Miglio, A.; Elsworth, Y.; Hekker, S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Serenelli, A. M.; Garcia, R. A.; Mathur, S. [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Ballot, J. [CNRS, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie, 14 avenue Edouard Belin, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Creevey, O. L. [Laboratoire Lagrange, UMR 7293, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote dAzur, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Gilliland, R. L. [Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States); Metcalfe, T. S. [Space Science Institute, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); and others

    2012-09-20

    Accurately determining the properties of stars is of prime importance for characterizing stellar populations in our Galaxy. The field of asteroseismology has been thought to be particularly successful in such an endeavor for stars in different evolutionary stages. However, to fully exploit its potential, robust methods for estimating stellar parameters are required and independent verification of the results is mandatory. With this purpose, we present a new technique to obtain stellar properties by coupling asteroseismic analysis with the InfraRed Flux Method. By using two global seismic observables and multi-band photometry, the technique allows us to obtain masses, radii, effective temperatures, bolometric fluxes, and hence distances for field stars in a self-consistent manner. We apply our method to 22 solar-like oscillators in the Kepler short-cadence sample, that have accurate Hipparcos parallaxes. Our distance determinations agree to better than 5%, while measurements of spectroscopic effective temperatures and interferometric radii also validate our results. We briefly discuss the potential of our technique for stellar population analysis and models of Galactic Chemical Evolution.

  17. Solar and stellar coronae and winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, Moira

    2017-10-01

    Solar-like stars influence their environments through their coronal emis- sion and winds. These processes are linked through the physics of the stellar magnetic field, whose strength and geometry has now been explored for a large number of stars through spectropolarimetric observations. We have now detected trends with mass and rotation rate in the distribution of magnetic energies in different geometries and on also different length scales. This has implications both for the dynamo processes that generate the fields and also for the dynamics and evolution of the coronae and winds. Modelling of the surface driving processes on stars of various masses and rotation rates has revealed tantalising clues about the dynamics of stellar coronae and their ejecta. These new observations have also prompted a resurgence in the modelling of stellar winds, which is now uncovering the range of different interplanetary conditions that exoplanets might experience as they evolve.

  18. Stellarator Coil Design and Plasma Sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long-Poe Ku and Allen H. Boozer

    2010-11-03

    The rich information contained in the plasma response to external magnetic perturbations can be used to help design stellarator coils more effectively. We demonstrate the feasibility by first devel- oping a simple, direct method to study perturbations in stellarators that do not break stellarator symmetry and periodicity. The method applies a small perturbation to the plasma boundary and evaluates the resulting perturbed free-boundary equilibrium to build up a sensitivity matrix for the important physics attributes of the underlying configuration. Using this sensitivity information, design methods for better stellarator coils are then developed. The procedure and a proof-of-principle application are given that (1) determine the spatial distributions of external normal magnetic field at the location of the unperturbed plasma boundary to which the plasma properties are most sen- sitive, (2) determine the distributions of external normal magnetic field that can be produced most efficiently by distant coils, (3) choose the ratios of the magnitudes of the the efficiently produced magnetic distributions so the sensitive plasma properties can be controlled. Using these methods, sets of modular coils are found for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) that are either smoother or can be located much farther from the plasma boundary than those of the present design.

  19. Recent advances in non-LTE stellar atmosphere models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Andreas A. C.

    2017-11-01

    In the last decades, stellar atmosphere models have become a key tool in understanding massive stars. Applied for spectroscopic analysis, these models provide quantitative information on stellar wind properties as well as fundamental stellar parameters. The intricate non-LTE conditions in stellar winds dictate the development of adequate sophisticated model atmosphere codes. The increase in both, the computational power and our understanding of physical processes in stellar atmospheres, led to an increasing complexity in the models. As a result, codes emerged that can tackle a wide range of stellar and wind parameters. After a brief address of the fundamentals of stellar atmosphere modeling, the current stage of clumped and line-blanketed model atmospheres will be discussed. Finally, the path for the next generation of stellar atmosphere models will be outlined. Apart from discussing multi-dimensional approaches, I will emphasize on the coupling of hydrodynamics with a sophisticated treatment of the radiative transfer. This next generation of models will be able to predict wind parameters from first principles, which could open new doors for our understanding of the various facets of massive star physics, evolution, and death.

  20. Commission 35: Stellar Constitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Antona, Francesca; Charbonnel, Corinne; Dziembowski, Wojciech; Fontaine, Gilles; Larson, Richard B.; Lattanzio, John; Liebert, Jim W.; Müller, Ewald; Weiss, Achim; Yungelson, Lev R.

    The Commission home page is maintained by Claus Leitherer and contains general information on the Commission structure and activities, including links to stellar structure resources that were made available by the owners. The resources contain evolutionary tracks and isochrones from various groups, nuclear reaction, EOS, and opacity data as well as links to main astronomical journals. As a routine activity, the Organizing Committee has commented on and ranked proposals for several IAU sponsored meetings. Our Commission acted as one of the coordinating bodies of a Symposium held at the IAU XXVI General Assembly in Prague, August 2006, (IAU Symposium No. 239 Convection in Astrophysics, and participated in the organization of the following Joint Discussions: JD05 Calibrating the Top of the Stellar Mass-Luminosity Relation, JD06 Neutron Stars and Black Holes in Star Clusters, JD08 Solar and Stellar Activity Cycles, JD11 Pre-Solar Grains as Astrophysical Tools; JD14 Modelling Dense Stellar Systems; and JD17 Highlights of Recent Progress in the Seismology of the Sun and Sun-like Stars.

  1. A Stellar Demonstrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, Rosa M.

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of the stellar demonstrator is to help explain the movement of stars. In particular, students have difficulties understanding why, if they are living in the Northern Hemisphere, they may observe starts in the Southern Hemisphere, or why circumpolar stars are not the same in different parts of Europe. Using the demonstrator, these…

  2. Advanced Stellar Compass FMECA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif; Betto, Maurizio; Kilsgaard, Søren

    1998-01-01

    This documents describes the Advanced Stellar Compass (ASC) failure modes, effects and criticality analyses (FMECA).The objectives of the FMECA are:1)To identify the possible failure;2)To identify the effects of the possible failures including the identification of potential hazards to determine...

  3. THE ADVANCED STELLAR COMPASS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif; Liebe, Carl Christian

    1997-01-01

    this demand the Advanced Stellar Compass (ASC), a fully autonomous miniature star tracker, was developed. This ASC is capable of both solving the "lost in space" problem and determine the attitude with arcseconds precision. The development, principles of operation and instrument autonomy of the ASC...

  4. Benchmarking the Multidimensional Stellar Implicit Code MUSIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffrey, T.; Pratt, J.; Viallet, M.; Baraffe, I.; Popov, M. V.; Walder, R.; Folini, D.; Geroux, C.; Constantino, T.

    2017-04-01

    We present the results of a numerical benchmark study for the MUltidimensional Stellar Implicit Code (MUSIC) based on widely applicable two- and three-dimensional compressible hydrodynamics problems relevant to stellar interiors. MUSIC is an implicit large eddy simulation code that uses implicit time integration, implemented as a Jacobian-free Newton Krylov method. A physics based preconditioning technique which can be adjusted to target varying physics is used to improve the performance of the solver. The problems used for this benchmark study include the Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, and the decay of the Taylor-Green vortex. Additionally we show a test of hydrostatic equilibrium, in a stellar environment which is dominated by radiative effects. In this setting the flexibility of the preconditioning technique is demonstrated. This work aims to bridge the gap between the hydrodynamic test problems typically used during development of numerical methods and the complex flows of stellar interiors. A series of multidimensional tests were performed and analysed. Each of these test cases was analysed with a simple, scalar diagnostic, with the aim of enabling direct code comparisons. As the tests performed do not have analytic solutions, we verify MUSIC by comparing it to established codes including ATHENA and the PENCIL code. MUSIC is able to both reproduce behaviour from established and widely-used codes as well as results expected from theoretical predictions. This benchmarking study concludes a series of papers describing the development of the MUSIC code and provides confidence in future applications.

  5. Solar and stellar photospheric abundances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Allende Prieto

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The determination of photospheric abundances in late-type stars from spectroscopic observations is a well-established field, built on solid theoretical foundations. Improving those foundations to refine the accuracy of the inferred abundances has proven challenging, but progress has been made. In parallel, developments on instrumentation, chiefly regarding multi-object spectroscopy, have been spectacular, and a number of projects are collecting large numbers of observations for stars across the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, promising important advances in our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. After providing a brief description of the basic physics and input data involved in the analysis of stellar spectra, a review is made of the analysis steps, and the available tools to cope with large observational efforts. The paper closes with a quick overview of relevant ongoing and planned spectroscopic surveys, and highlights of recent research on photospheric abundances.

  6. The Stellar Imager (SI) Mission Concept: Imaging the Surfaces and Interiors of Other Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Oegerle, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is envisioned as a space-based, uv-optical interferometer composed of 10 or more one-meter class elements distributed with a maximum. baseline of 0.5-km and providing a resolution of 60 micro-arcseconds at 1550 A. It will image stars and binaries with one hundred to one thousand resolution elements on their surface and enable long-term studies of stellar magnetic activity patterns and their evolution with time, for comparison with those on the sun. It will also sound their interiors through asteroseismology to image internal structure, differential rotation, and large-scale circulations. SI will enable us to understand the various effects of magnetic fields of stars, the dynamos that generate these fields, and the internal structure and dynamic the stars in which these dynamos operate. The ultimate goal of the mission is to achieve the best-possible forecasting of solar activity as a driver of climate and space weather on times scales ranging from months up to decades, and an understanding of the impact of stellar magnetic activity on life in the universe. The road to that goal will revolutionize our understanding of stars and stellar systems, the building blocks of the universe. Fitting naturally within the NASA and ESA long-term time lines, SI complements defined missions, and with them will show us entire other solar systems, from the central star to their orbiting planets. in this paper we describe the scientific goals of the mission, the performance requirements needed to address those goals, and the design concepts now under study.

  7. Stellar Astrophysics with Arcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickhouse, Nancy S.; Huenemoerder, David P.; Wolk, Scott; Schulz, Norbert; Foster, Adam; Brenneman, Laura; Poppenhaeger, Katja; Arcus Team

    2018-01-01

    The Arcus mission is now in Phase A of the NASA Medium-Class Explorer competition. We present here the Arcus science case for stellar astrophysics. With spectral resolving power of at least 2500 and effective area greater than 400 cm^2, Arcus will measure new diagnostic lines, e.g. for H- and He-like ions of oxygen and other elements. Weak dielectronic recombination lines will provide sensitive measurements of temperature to test stellar coronal heating models. Arcus will also resolve the coronal and accretion line components in young accreting stars, allowing detailed studies of accretion shocks and their post-shock behavior. Arcus can resolve line shapes and variability in hot star winds to study inhomogeneities and dynamics of wind structure. Such profiles will provide an independent measure of mass loss rates, for which theoretical and observational discrepancies can reach an order of magnitude. Arcus will also study exoplanet atmospheres through X-ray absorption, determing their extent and composition.

  8. Local Stellarator Equilibrium Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Stuart R.; Hegna, Chris C.; Lewandowski, Jerome W.

    2000-10-01

    Extensive calculations of ballooning and drift waves spectrums in asymmetric toroidal configurations (e.g. stellarators) to appreciate the role of magnetic geometry and profile variations are usually are usually prohibitive as the evaluation of the magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium is in itself a non-trivial problem. Although simple analytical MHD model equilibria do exist for tokamak configurations, their stellarator counterparts are usually crude or very approximate. In order to make more extensive stability calculations (of both ideal ballooning and drift-type modes), a technique for generating three-dimensional magneto-static equilibria, localized to a magnetic surface, has been developed. The technique allows one to easily manipulate various 3-D shaping and profile effects on a magnetic surface avoiding the need to recompute an entire three dimensional solution of the equilibrium. The model equilibrium has been implemented into existing ideal MHD ballooning and drift wave numerical codes. Marginal ballooning stability diagrams and drift wave calculations will be reported.

  9. Stellar Parameters in an Instant with Machine Learning. Application to Kepler LEGACY Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellinger, Earl P.; Angelou, George C.; Hekker, Saskia; Basu, Sarbani; Ball, Warrick H.; Guggenberger, Elisabet

    2017-10-01

    With the advent of dedicated photometric space missions, the ability to rapidly process huge catalogues of stars has become paramount. Bellinger and Angelou et al. [1] recently introduced a new method based on machine learning for inferring the stellar parameters of main-sequence stars exhibiting solar-like oscillations. The method makes precise predictions that are consistent with other methods, but with the advantages of being able to explore many more parameters while costing practically no time. Here we apply the method to 52 so-called "LEGACY" main-sequence stars observed by the Kepler space mission. For each star, we present estimates and uncertainties of mass, age, radius, luminosity, core hydrogen abundance, surface helium abundance, surface gravity, initial helium abundance, and initial metallicity as well as estimates of their evolutionary model parameters of mixing length, overshooting coeffcient, and diffusion multiplication factor. We obtain median uncertainties in stellar age, mass, and radius of 14.8%, 3.6%, and 1.7%, respectively. The source code for all analyses and for all figures appearing in this manuscript can be found electronically at https://github.com/earlbellinger/asteroseismology

  10. Stellar Parameters in an Instant with Machine Learning: Application to Kepler LEGACY Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellinger, Earl P.; Angelou, George C.; Hekker, Saskia; Basu, Sarbani; Ball, Warrick H.; Guggenberger, Elisabeth

    2017-05-01

    With the advent of dedicated photometric space missions, the ability to rapidly process huge catalogues of stars has become paramount. Bellinger and Angelou et al. (2016) recently introduced a new method based on machine learning for inferring the stellar parameters of main-sequence stars exhibiting solar-like oscillations. The method makes precise predictions that are consistent with other methods, but with the advantages of being able to explore many more parameters while costing practically no time. Here we apply the method to 52 so-called "LEGACY" main-sequence stars observed by the Kepler space mission. For each star, we present estimates and uncertainties of mass, age, radius, luminosity, core hydrogen abundance, surface helium abundance, surface gravity, initial helium abundance, and initial metallicity as well as estimates of their evolutionary model parameters of mixing length, overshooting coefficient, and diffusion multiplication factor. We obtain median uncertainties in stellar age, mass, and radius of 14.8%, 3.6%, and 1.7%, respectively. The source code for all analyses and for all figures appearing in this manuscript can be found electronically at: https://github.com/earlbellinger/asteroseismology

  11. Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Bill; Bildsten, Lars; Dotter, Aaron; Herwig, Falk; Lesaffre, Pierre; Timmes, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Stellar physics and evolution calculations enable a broad range of research in astrophysics. Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) is a suite of open source, robust, efficient, thread-safe libraries for a wide range of applications in computational stellar astrophysics. A one-dimensional stellar evolution module, MESAstar, combines many of the numerical and physics modules for simulations of a wide range of stellar evolution scenarios ranging from very low mass to massive stars, including advanced evolutionary phases. MESAstar solves the fully coupled structure and composition equations simultaneously. It uses adaptive mesh refinement and sophisticated timestep controls, and supports shared memory parallelism based on OpenMP. State-of-the-art modules provide equation of state, opacity, nuclear reaction rates, element diffusion data, and atmosphere boundary conditions. Each module is constructed as a separate Fortran 95 library with its own explicitly defined public interface to facilitate independent development. Several detailed examples indicate the extensive verification and testing that is continuously performed and demonstrate the wide range of capabilities that MESA possesses. These examples include evolutionary tracks of very low mass stars, brown dwarfs, and gas giant planets to very old ages; the complete evolutionary track of a 1 M sun star from the pre-main sequence (PMS) to a cooling white dwarf; the solar sound speed profile; the evolution of intermediate-mass stars through the He-core burning phase and thermal pulses on the He-shell burning asymptotic giant branch phase; the interior structure of slowly pulsating B Stars and Beta Cepheids; the complete evolutionary tracks of massive stars from the PMS to the onset of core collapse; mass transfer from stars undergoing Roche lobe overflow; and the evolution of helium accretion onto a neutron star. MESA can be downloaded from the project Web site (http://mesa.sourceforge.net/).

  12. Young stellar objects close to Sgr A*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali, B.; Pelupessy, F. I.; Eckart, A.; Portegies Zwart, S.; Sabha, N.; Borkar, A.; Moultaka, J.; Mužić, K.; Moser, L.

    2014-05-01

    We aim at modeling small groups of young stars such as IRS 13N, 0.1 pc away from Sgr A*, which is suggested to contain a few embedded massive young stellar objects. We perform hydrodynamical simulations to follow the evolution of molecular clumps orbiting around a 4 × 106 M⊙ black hole, to constrain the formation and the physical conditions of such groups.

  13. Pulsating stars harbouring planets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moya A.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Why bother with asteroseismology while studying exoplanets? There are several answers to this question. Asteroseismology and exoplanetary sciences have much in common and the synergy between the two opens up new aspects in both fields. These fields and stellar activity, when taken together, allow maximum extraction of information from exoplanet space missions. Asteroseismology of the host star has already proved its value in a number of exoplanet systems by its unprecedented precision in determining stellar parameters. In addition, asteroseismology allows the possibility of discovering new exoplanets through time delay studies. The study of the interaction between exoplanets and their host stars opens new windows on various physical processes. In this review I will summarize past and current research in exoplanet asteroseismology and explore some guidelines for the future.

  14. Observations and asteroseismological analysis of the rapid subdwarf B pulsator EC 09582-1137

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, S. K.; Van Grootel, V.; Fontaine, G.; Charpinet, S.; Brassard, P.

    2009-11-01

    We made photometric and spectroscopic observations of the rapidly pulsating subdwarf B star EC 09582-1137 with the aim of determining the target's fundamental structural parameters from asteroseismology. This analysis forms part of a long-term programme geared towards distinguishing between different proposed formation scenarios for hot B subdwarfs on the basis of their internal characteristics. So far, secure asteroseismic solutions have been computed for 9 of these pulsators, and first comparisons with results from evolutionary calculations look promising. The new data comprise 30 h of fast time-series photometry obtained with SUSI2 at the NTT on La Silla, Chile, as well as 1 h of low-resolution spectroscopy gathered with EMMI, also mounted on the NTT. From the photometry we detected 5 independent harmonic oscillations in the 135-170 s period range with amplitudes up to 0.5% of the mean brightness of the star. In addition, we extracted two periodicities interpreted as components of a rotationally split multiplet that indicate a rotation period of the order of 2-5 days. We also recovered the first harmonic of the dominant pulsation, albeit at an amplitude below the imposed 4σ detection threshold. The spectroscopic observations led to the following estimates of the atmospheric parameters of EC 09582-1137: T_eff = 34 806±233 K, log{g} = 5.80±0.04, and log N(He)/N(H) = -1.68±0.06. Using the observed oscillations as input, we searched in model parameter space for unique solutions that present a good fit to the data. Under the assumption that the two dominant observed periodicities correspond to radial or dipole modes, we were able to isolate a well-constrained optimal model that agrees with the atmospheric parameters derived from spectroscopy. The observed oscillations are identified with low-order acoustic modes with degree indices ℓ = 0, 1, 2, and 4 and match the computed periods with a dispersion of 0.57%. Non-adiabatic calculations reveal all theoretical

  15. Asteroseismology of the beta Cephei star nu Eridani: massive exploration of standard and non-standard stellar models to fit the oscillation data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ausseloos, M.; Scuflaire, R.; Thoul, A.; Aerts, C.C.

    2004-01-01

    We present the results of a detailed seismic modelling of the beta Cephei star nu Eridani with the Liege evolution and pulsation codes. We selected four clearly detected, well-identified and independent pulsation modes from the frequency spectrum obtained from a recent five-month multisite,

  16. The DEMO Quasisymmetric Stellarator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey B. McFadden

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The NSTAB nonlinear stability code solves differential equations in conservation form, and the TRAN Monte Carlo test particle code tracks guiding center orbits in a fixed background, to provide simulations of equilibrium, stability, and transport in tokamaks and stellarators. These codes are well correlated with experimental observations and have been validated by convergence studies. Bifurcated 3D solutions of the 2D tokamak problem have been calculated that model persistent disruptions, neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs and edge localized modes (ELMs occurring in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER, which does not pass the NSTAB simulation test for nonlinear stability. So we have designed a quasiaxially symmetric (QAS stellarator with similar proportions as a candidate for the demonstration (DEMO fusion reactor that does pass the test [1]. The configuration has two field periods and an exceptionally accurate 2D symmetry that furnishes excellent thermal confinement and good control of the prompt loss of alpha particles. Robust coils are found from a filtered form of the Biot-Savart law based on a distribution of current over a control surface for the coils and the current in the plasma defined by the equilibrium calculation. Computational science has addressed the issues of equilibrium, stability, and transport, so it remains to develop an effective plan to construct the coils and build a diverter.

  17. Inferring probabilistic stellar rotation periods using Gaussian processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Ruth; Morton, Timothy; Aigrain, Suzanne; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Rajpaul, Vinesh

    2018-02-01

    Variability in the light curves of spotted, rotating stars is often non-sinusoidal and quasi-periodic - spots move on the stellar surface and have finite lifetimes, causing stellar flux variations to slowly shift in phase. A strictly periodic sinusoid therefore cannot accurately model a rotationally modulated stellar light curve. Physical models of stellar surfaces have many drawbacks preventing effective inference, such as highly degenerate or high-dimensional parameter spaces. In this work, we test an appropriate effective model: a Gaussian Process with a quasi-periodic covariance kernel function. This highly flexible model allows sampling of the posterior probability density function of the periodic parameter, marginalizing over the other kernel hyperparameters using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach. To test the effectiveness of this method, we infer rotation periods from 333 simulated stellar light curves, demonstrating that the Gaussian process method produces periods that are more accurate than both a sine-fitting periodogram and an autocorrelation function method. We also demonstrate that it works well on real data, by inferring rotation periods for 275 Kepler stars with previously measured periods. We provide a table of rotation periods for these and many more, altogether 1102 Kepler objects of interest, and their posterior probability density function samples. Because this method delivers posterior probability density functions, it will enable hierarchical studies involving stellar rotation, particularly those involving population modelling, such as inferring stellar ages, obliquities in exoplanet systems, or characterizing star-planet interactions. The code used to implement this method is available online.

  18. Precision Stellar Characterization of FGKM Stars using an Empirical Spectral Library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, Samuel W.; Petigura, Erik A. [California Institute of Technology (United States); Von Braun, Kaspar, E-mail: syee@caltech.edu [Lowell Observatory, 1400 W. Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States)

    2017-02-10

    Classification of stars, by comparing their optical spectra to a few dozen spectral standards, has been a workhorse of observational astronomy for more than a century. Here, we extend this technique by compiling a library of optical spectra of 404 touchstone stars observed with Keck/HIRES by the California Planet Search. The spectra have high resolution ( R ≈ 60,000), high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N ≈ 150/pixel), and are registered onto a common wavelength scale. The library stars have properties derived from interferometry, asteroseismology, LTE spectral synthesis, and spectrophotometry. To address a lack of well-characterized late-K dwarfs in the literature, we measure stellar radii and temperatures for 23 nearby K dwarfs, using modeling of the spectral energy distribution and Gaia parallaxes. This library represents a uniform data set spanning the spectral types ∼M5–F1 ( T {sub eff} ≈ 3000–7000 K, R {sub ⋆} ≈ 0.1–16 R {sub ⊙}). We also present “Empirical SpecMatch” (SpecMatch-Emp), a tool for parameterizing unknown spectra by comparing them against our spectral library. For FGKM stars, SpecMatch-Emp achieves accuracies of 100 K in effective temperature ( T {sub eff}), 15% in stellar radius ( R {sub ⋆}), and 0.09 dex in metallicity ([Fe/H]). Because the code relies on empirical spectra it performs particularly well for stars ∼K4 and later, which are challenging to model with existing spectral synthesizers, reaching accuracies of 70 K in T {sub eff}, 10% in R {sub ⋆}, and 0.12 dex in [Fe/H]. We also validate the performance of SpecMatch-Emp, finding it to be robust at lower spectral resolution and S/N, enabling the characterization of faint late-type stars. Both the library and stellar characterization code are publicly available.

  19. Precision Stellar Characterization of FGKM Stars using an Empirical Spectral Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Samuel W.; Petigura, Erik A.; von Braun, Kaspar

    2017-02-01

    Classification of stars, by comparing their optical spectra to a few dozen spectral standards, has been a workhorse of observational astronomy for more than a century. Here, we extend this technique by compiling a library of optical spectra of 404 touchstone stars observed with Keck/HIRES by the California Planet Search. The spectra have high resolution (R ≈ 60,000), high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N ≈ 150/pixel), and are registered onto a common wavelength scale. The library stars have properties derived from interferometry, asteroseismology, LTE spectral synthesis, and spectrophotometry. To address a lack of well-characterized late-K dwarfs in the literature, we measure stellar radii and temperatures for 23 nearby K dwarfs, using modeling of the spectral energy distribution and Gaia parallaxes. This library represents a uniform data set spanning the spectral types ˜M5-F1 (T eff ≈ 3000-7000 K, R ⋆ ≈ 0.1-16 R ⊙). We also present “Empirical SpecMatch” (SpecMatch-Emp), a tool for parameterizing unknown spectra by comparing them against our spectral library. For FGKM stars, SpecMatch-Emp achieves accuracies of 100 K in effective temperature (T eff), 15% in stellar radius (R ⋆), and 0.09 dex in metallicity ([Fe/H]). Because the code relies on empirical spectra it performs particularly well for stars ˜K4 and later, which are challenging to model with existing spectral synthesizers, reaching accuracies of 70 K in T eff, 10% in R ⋆, and 0.12 dex in [Fe/H]. We also validate the performance of SpecMatch-Emp, finding it to be robust at lower spectral resolution and S/N, enabling the characterization of faint late-type stars. Both the library and stellar characterization code are publicly available.

  20. MODULES FOR EXPERIMENTS IN STELLAR ASTROPHYSICS (MESA): PLANETS, OSCILLATIONS, ROTATION, AND MASSIVE STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paxton, Bill; Cantiello, Matteo; Bildsten, Lars [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Arras, Phil [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Brown, Edward F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, and Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48864 (United States); Dotter, Aaron [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Mankovich, Christopher [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Montgomery, M. H. [Department of Astronomy and McDonald Observatory, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Stello, Dennis [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Timmes, F. X. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Townsend, Richard, E-mail: matteo@kitp.ucsb.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    We substantially update the capabilities of the open source software package Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA), and its one-dimensional stellar evolution module, MESA star. Improvements in MESA star's ability to model the evolution of giant planets now extends its applicability down to masses as low as one-tenth that of Jupiter. The dramatic improvement in asteroseismology enabled by the space-based Kepler and CoRoT missions motivates our full coupling of the ADIPLS adiabatic pulsation code with MESA star. This also motivates a numerical recasting of the Ledoux criterion that is more easily implemented when many nuclei are present at non-negligible abundances. This impacts the way in which MESA star calculates semi-convective and thermohaline mixing. We exhibit the evolution of 3-8 M{sub Sun} stars through the end of core He burning, the onset of He thermal pulses, and arrival on the white dwarf cooling sequence. We implement diffusion of angular momentum and chemical abundances that enable calculations of rotating-star models, which we compare thoroughly with earlier work. We introduce a new treatment of radiation-dominated envelopes that allows the uninterrupted evolution of massive stars to core collapse. This enables the generation of new sets of supernovae, long gamma-ray burst, and pair-instability progenitor models. We substantially modify the way in which MESA star solves the fully coupled stellar structure and composition equations, and we show how this has improved the scaling of MESA's calculational speed on multi-core processors. Updates to the modules for equation of state, opacity, nuclear reaction rates, and atmospheric boundary conditions are also provided. We describe the MESA Software Development Kit that packages all the required components needed to form a unified, maintained, and well-validated build environment for MESA. We also highlight a few tools developed by the community for rapid visualization of MESA star

  1. A catalog of stellar spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelman, S. J.; Pyper, D. M.; Shore, S. N.; White, R. E.; Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A machine-readable catalog of stellar spectrophotometric measurements made with rotating grating scanner is introduced. Consideration is given to the processes by which the stellar data were collected and calibrated with the fluxes of Vega (Hayes and Latham, 1975). A sample page from the spectrophotometric catalog is presented.

  2. Tidal effects on stellar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppenhaeger, K.

    2017-10-01

    The architecture of many exoplanetary systems is different from the solar system, with exoplanets being in close orbits around their host stars and having orbital periods of only a few days. We can expect interactions between the star and the exoplanet for such systems that are similar to the tidal interactions observed in close stellar binary systems. For the exoplanet, tidal interaction can lead to circularization of its orbit and the synchronization of its rotational and orbital period. For the host star, it has long been speculated if significant angular momentum transfer can take place between the planetary orbit and the stellar rotation. In the case of the Earth-Moon system, such tidal interaction has led to an increasing distance between Earth and Moon. For stars with Hot Jupiters, where the orbital period of the exoplanet is typically shorter than the stellar rotation period, one expects a decreasing semimajor axis for the planet and enhanced stellar rotation, leading to increased stellar activity. Also excess turbulence in the stellar convective zone due to rising and subsiding tidal bulges may change the magnetic activity we observe for the host star. I will review recent observational results on stellar activity and tidal interaction in the presence of close-in exoplanets, and discuss the effects of enhanced stellar activity on the exoplanets in such systems.

  3. Three-dimensional stellarator codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garabedian, P R

    2002-08-06

    Three-dimensional computer codes have been used to develop quasisymmetric stellarators with modular coils that are promising candidates for a magnetic fusion reactor. The mathematics of plasma confinement raises serious questions about the numerical calculations. Convergence studies have been performed to assess the best configurations. Comparisons with recent data from large stellarator experiments serve to validate the theory.

  4. Three-dimensional stellarator codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garabedian, P. R.

    2002-01-01

    Three-dimensional computer codes have been used to develop quasisymmetric stellarators with modular coils that are promising candidates for a magnetic fusion reactor. The mathematics of plasma confinement raises serious questions about the numerical calculations. Convergence studies have been performed to assess the best configurations. Comparisons with recent data from large stellarator experiments serve to validate the theory. PMID:12140367

  5. Optimizing stellarators for turbulent transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mynick, H E; Pomphrey, N; Xanthopoulos, P

    2010-08-27

    Up to now, the term "transport-optimized" stellarators has meant optimized to minimize neoclassical transport, while the task of also mitigating turbulent transport, usually the dominant transport channel in such designs, has not been addressed, due to the complexity of plasma turbulence in stellarators. Here, we demonstrate that stellarators can also be designed to mitigate their turbulent transport, by making use of two powerful numerical tools not available until recently, namely, gyrokinetic codes valid for 3D nonlinear simulations and stellarator optimization codes. Two initial proof-of-principle configurations are obtained, reducing the level of ion temperature gradient turbulent transport from the National Compact Stellarator Experiment baseline design by a factor of 2-2.5.

  6. Nucleosynthesis in stellar explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woosley, S.E.; Axelrod, T.S.; Weaver, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    The final evolution and explosion of stars from 10 M/sub solar/ to 10/sup 6/ M/sub solar/ are reviewed with emphasis on factors affecting the expected nucleosynthesis. We order our paper in a sequence of decreasing mass. If, as many suspect, the stellar birth function was peaked towards larger masses at earlier times (see e.g., Silk 1977; but also see Palla, Salpeter, and Stahler 1983), this sequence of masses might also be regarded as a temporal sequence. At each stage of Galactic chemical evolution stars form from the ashes of preceding generations which typically had greater mass. A wide variety of Type I supernova models, most based upon accreting white dwarf stars, are also explored using the expected light curves, spectra, and nucleosynthesis as diagnostics. No clearly favored Type I model emerges that is capable of simultaneously satisfying all three constraints.

  7. Probing the equation of state of nuclear matter via neutron star asteroseismology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotani, Hajime; Nakazato, Ken'ichiro; Iida, Kei; Oyamatsu, Kazuhiro

    2012-05-18

    We general-relativistically calculate the frequency of fundamental torsional oscillations of neutron star crusts, where we focus on the crystalline properties obtained from macroscopic nuclear models in a way that is dependent on the equation of state of nuclear matter. We find that the calculated frequency is sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy, but almost independent of the incompressibility of symmetric nuclear matter. By identifying the lowest-frequency quasiperiodic oscillation in giant flares observed from soft gamma-ray repeaters as the fundamental torsional mode and allowing for the dependence of the calculated frequency on stellar models, we provide a lower limit of the density derivative of the symmetry energy as L≃50  MeV.

  8. Impact Of Stellar And Non-stellar Feedback On Intermediate-sized Galaxies In Amr Cosmological Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimm, Taysun; Devriendt, J.; Slyz, A.; Dobois, Y.

    2012-01-01

    We study the role of stellar and active galactic nuclei feedback on intermediate-sized galaxies using Adaptive Mesh Refinement hydrodynamic simulations. It is well known that Milky Way-like galaxies show a deficit of baryons compared to the universal baryonic fraction. This is called the "missing baryon problem". Supernova feedback is often invoked as a solution to this discrepancy, but recent studies have suggested that different modelling strategies of the feedback can potentially impact results. Moreover, although feedback from active galactic nuclei can suppress star formation in massive clusters, its impact on smaller galaxies is still unclear. In an attempt to better understand the effect of different feedback mechanisms, we have performed high-resolution (10pc) zoom cosmological simulations with various physical ingredients. Based on these simulations, we will discuss the influence of stellar (energetic stellar explosions) and non-stellar (active galactic nuclei) energy sources on galaxy growth.

  9. SUB-STELLAR COMPANIONS AND STELLAR MULTIPLICITY IN THE TAURUS STAR-FORMING REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daemgen, Sebastian [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5H 3H4 (Canada); Bonavita, Mariangela [The University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Jayawardhana, Ray [Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto, Ontario L3T 3R1 (Canada); Lafrenière, David [Department of Physics, University of Montréal, Montréal, QC (Canada); Janson, Markus, E-mail: daemgen@astro.utoronto.ca [Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-02-01

    We present results from a large, high-spatial-resolution near-infrared imaging search for stellar and sub-stellar companions in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region. The sample covers 64 stars with masses between those of the most massive Taurus members at ∼3 M {sub ☉} and low-mass stars at ∼0.2 M {sub ☉}. We detected 74 companion candidates, 34 of these reported for the first time. Twenty-five companions are likely physically bound, partly confirmed by follow-up observations. Four candidate companions are likely unrelated field stars. Assuming physical association with their host star, estimated companion masses are as low as ∼2 M {sub Jup}. The inferred multiplicity frequency within our sensitivity limits between ∼10-1500 AU is 26.3{sub −4.9}{sup +6.6}%. Applying a completeness correction, 62% ± 14% of all Taurus stars between 0.7 and 1.4 M {sub ☉} appear to be multiple. Higher order multiples were found in 1.8{sub −1.5}{sup +4.2}% of the cases, in agreement with previous observations of the field. We estimate a sub-stellar companion frequency of ∼3.5%-8.8% within our sensitivity limits from the discovery of two likely bound and three other tentative very low-mass companions. This frequency appears to be in agreement with what is expected from the tail of the stellar companion mass ratio distribution, suggesting that stellar and brown dwarf companions share the same dominant formation mechanism. Further, we find evidence for possible evolution of binary parameters between two identified sub-populations in Taurus with ages of ∼2 Myr and ∼20 Myr, respectively.

  10. Study of Stellar Clusters Containing Massive Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costado, Teresa; Alfaro, E. J.; Delgado, A. J.; Djupvik, A. A.; Maíz Apellániz, J.

    2013-06-01

    programme of stellar clusters containing massive stars, whose main objective is to answer the two scientific questions. In order to perform this study we need to measure the main physical variables of the cluster, determine cluster membership and mass and age of cluster members. The obtaining of this is best carried out through determination of the Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) of stars in the field, from multiband UBVRIHα + JHKs photometry. In this conference, we want to present some results for clusters currently under study.

  11. Lithium abundance and rotation of seismic solar analogues. Solar and stellar connection from Kepler and Hermes observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, P. G.; do Nascimento, J.-D., Jr.; Duarte, T.; Salabert, D.; Tkachenko, A.; Mathis, S.; Mathur, S.; García, R. A.; Castro, M.; Pallé, P. L.; Egeland, R.; Montes, D.; Creevey, O.; Andersen, M. F.; Kamath, D.; van Winckel, H.

    2017-06-01

    spectroscopic survey of solar-analogue stars with a mass of 1.00 ± 0.15 M⊙ that are characterised through asteroseismology and surface rotation rates based on Kepler observations. The correlation between A(Li) and Prot supports the gyrochronological concept for stars younger than the Sun and becomes clearer when the confirmed binaries are excluded. The consensus between measured A(Li) for solar analogues with model grids, calibrated on the Sun's chemical properties, suggests that these targets share the same internal physics. In this light, the solar Li and rotation rate appear to be normal for a star like the Sun. Based on observations made with the NASA Kepler space telescope and the Hermes spectrograph mounted on the 1.2 m Mercator Telescope at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.

  12. A method to deconvolve stellar rotational velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curé, Michel; Rial, Diego F.; Christen, Alejandra; Cassetti, Julia

    2014-05-01

    Aims: Rotational speed is an important physical parameter of stars, and knowing the distribution of stellar rotational velocities is essential for understanding stellar evolution. However, rotational speed cannot be measured directly and is instead the convolution between the rotational speed and the sine of the inclination angle v sin i. Methods: We developed a method to deconvolve this inverse problem and obtain the cumulative distribution function for stellar rotational velocities extending the work of Chandrasekhar & Münch (1950, ApJ, 111, 142) Results: This method is applied: a) to theoretical synthetic data recovering the original velocity distribution with a very small error; and b) to a sample of about 12.000 field main-sequence stars, corroborating that the velocity distribution function is non-Maxwellian, but is better described by distributions based on the concept of maximum entropy, such as Tsallis or Kaniadakis distribution functions. Conclusions: This is a very robust and novel method that deconvolves the rotational velocity cumulative distribution function from a sample of v sin i data in a single step without needing any convergence criteria.

  13. Warm gas towards young stellar objects in Corona Australis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Johan; Jørgensen, Jes Kristian; D. Green, Joel

    2014-01-01

    The effects of external irradiation on the chemistry and physics in the protostellar envelope around low-mass young stellar objects are poorly understood. The Corona Australis star-forming region contains the R CrA dark cloud, comprising several low-mass protostellar cores irradiated by an interm......The effects of external irradiation on the chemistry and physics in the protostellar envelope around low-mass young stellar objects are poorly understood. The Corona Australis star-forming region contains the R CrA dark cloud, comprising several low-mass protostellar cores irradiated...

  14. A Golden Decade for Stellar Populations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Roberto G.

    2010-04-01

    People working on stellar populations can look forward to an exciting decade ahead. Investigations of stellar populations lie at the heart of the science cases being used to justify the development of upcoming telescopes and emerging instrumentation technologies. Examples abound, but I will focus on three case studies: (1) Wide field astronomy with upcoming ground-based and space-based survey facilities; (2) Adaptive optics, which has the potential to revolutionize our understanding of stellar populations in both nearby and distant galaxies; (3) The James Webb Space Telescope, which may well extend the reach of stellar population work to encompass the full range of the star-forming history of the Universe. However, most of these developments will require extensive advance preparation in order to be used effectively. The time to start that preparation is now (if not yesterday). Three areas which need urgent development are highlighted in these proceedings: (1) We need a wide-field high-resolution spectroscopic capability to augment wide-area imaging surveys; (2) We need a set of AO-friendly extragalactic deep fields in order to exploit upcoming AO-fed instrumentation; and (3) Existing tools for population synthesis modeling need to be extended in order to incorporate the effects of dust. Because the physics of dust creation and destruction is so complicated and uncertain, the latter capability sounds almost impossibly hard to develop, but in this talk I will argue that some simple approaches already exist that allow dust to be injected rather naturally into population synthesis models. I will show a concrete example where incorporation of dust into spectral synthesis models allows one to detect and characterize rate of formation of circumstellar disks at high redshifts.

  15. Stellar Presentations (Abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, D.

    2015-12-01

    (Abstract only) The AAVSO is in the process of expanding its education, outreach and speakers bureau program. powerpoint presentations prepared for specific target audiences such as AAVSO members, educators, students, the general public, and Science Olympiad teams, coaches, event supervisors, and state directors will be available online for members to use. The presentations range from specific and general content relating to stellar evolution and variable stars to specific activities for a workshop environment. A presentation—even with a general topic—that works for high school students will not work for educators, Science Olympiad teams, or the general public. Each audience is unique and requires a different approach. The current environment necessitates presentations that are captivating for a younger generation that is embedded in a highly visual and sound-bite world of social media, twitter and U-Tube, and mobile devices. For educators, presentations and workshops for themselves and their students must support the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), the Common Core Content Standards, and the Science Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) initiative. Current best practices for developing relevant and engaging powerpoint presentations to deliver information to a variety of targeted audiences will be presented along with several examples.

  16. Optimizing Stellarators for Turbulent Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.E. Mynick, N.Pomphrey, and P. Xanthopoulos

    2010-05-27

    Up to now, the term "transport-optimized" stellarators has meant optimized to minimize neoclassical transport, while the task of also mitigating turbulent transport, usually the dominant transport channel in such designs, has not been addressed, due to the complexity of plasma turbulence in stellarators. Here, we demonstrate that stellarators can also be designed to mitigate their turbulent transport, by making use of two powerful numerical tools not available until recently, namely gyrokinetic codes valid for 3D nonlinear simulations, and stellarator optimization codes. A first proof-of-principle configuration is obtained, reducing the level of ion temperature gradient turbulent transport from the NCSX baseline design by a factor of about 2.5.

  17. Stellar magnetic activity and exoplanets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidotto A.A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that magnetic activity could be enhanced due to interactions between close-in massive planets and their host stars. In this article, I present a brief overview of the connection between stellar magnetic activity and exoplanets. Stellar activity can be probed in chromospheric lines, coronal emission, surface spot coverage, etc. Since these are manifestations of stellar magnetism, these measurements are often used as proxies for the magnetic field of stars. Here, instead of focusing on the magnetic proxies, I overview some recent results of magnetic field measurements using spectropolarimetric observations. Firstly, I discuss the general trends found between large-scale magnetism, stellar rotation, and coronal emission and show that magnetism seems to be correlated to the internal structure of the star. Secondly, I overview some works that show evidence that exoplanets could (or not act as to enhance the activity of their host stars.

  18. Stellar magnetic activity and exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidotto, A. A.

    2017-10-01

    It has been proposed that magnetic activity could be enhanced due to interactions between close-in massive planets and their host stars. In this article, I present a brief overview of the connection between stellar magnetic activity and exoplanets. Stellar activity can be probed in chromospheric lines, coronal emission, surface spot coverage, etc. Since these are manifestations of stellar magnetism, these measurements are often used as proxies for the magnetic field of stars. Here, instead of focusing on the magnetic proxies, I overview some recent results of magnetic field measurements using spectropolarimetric observations. Firstly, I discuss the general trends found between large-scale magnetism, stellar rotation, and coronal emission and show that magnetism seems to be correlated to the internal structure of the star. Secondly, I overview some works that show evidence that exoplanets could (or not) act as to enhance the activity of their host stars.

  19. Stellar atmospheres behind transiting exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dravins, D.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Dahlén, E.; Gustavsson, M.; Pazira, H.

    2017-09-01

    Stellar surfaces are covered with brighter and darker structures, just like on the Sun. While solar surface details can be easily studied with telescopes, stellar surfaces cannot thus be resolved. However, one can use planets that happen to pass in front of distant stars as "shades" that successively block out small portions of the stellar surface behind. By measuring how the light from the star changes during such a transit, one can deduce stellar surface properties. Knowing those is required not only to study the star as such, but also to deduce the chemical composition of the planet that is passing in front of it, where some of the detected starlight has been filtered through the planet's atmosphere.

  20. Design, construction and validation of the UST-1 modular stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queral, V., E-mail: vicentemanuel.queral@ciemat.es

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • A small and simple low cost two period modular stellarator is reviewed. • It is defined as a monolithic circular surface torus with carved grooves. • The grooves are accurately mechanised by a new toroidal milling machine. • A very simple e-beam field mapping system has been built and utilized. - Abstract: Stellarator advancement is hindered, among others, by the requirement of geometric complexity at high accuracy and the still scarce universities and research centres following the stellarator line. In this framework, the objectives of the small UST-1 stellarator development were to: (i) explore and test the performance of one possible accurate construction method for stellarators (ii) encourage universities and small fusion research centres to build simple and economical stellarators (iii) educative purpose. Therefore, UST-1 was properly designed to be easily built by a milling machine working on toroidal coordinates, being the winding surface circular poloidally and toroidally. The coil frame is a sole monolithic toroidal thick surface equipped with grooves mechanised by the toroidal milling machine. Only one double pancake is wound in each groove so as to compress the conductor on the laterals of the groove in order to speed up and simplify the winding process. The physics design, the conceptual engineering design and the construction process of UST-1 is presented. The toroidal milling machine is described. The e-beam field line mapping experiments carried out to validate the resulting magnetic configuration are reported. The developed construction method has been proved for the small UST-1 stellarator. Small stellarators are valuable for quick tests of diagnostics, educative purposes, assessment of new confinement concepts, turbulence studies and other applications.

  1. MHD stability of the MHH2 stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garabedian, P.R. [New York Univ., NY (United States). Courant Inst. of Mathematical Sciences

    1998-12-31

    The NSTAB code provides a computer implementation of the variational principle of magnetohydrodynamics. Excellent resolution is obtained by combining a spectral representation in the toroidal and poloidal angles with a low order, but exceptionally accurate, finite difference scheme in the radial direction. Conservation form of the magnetostatics equations is used to capture islands and current sheets effectively on crude grids. This method enables one to discuss global stability by analyzing bifurcated solutions of the equilibrium problem. The author applies it to investigate the physics of the MHH2 stellarator, whose magnetic structure has a remarkable property of quasi-axial symmetry.

  2. Parameter and cost optimizations for a modular stellarator reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchon, W. N. G.; Johnson, P. C.; Watson, C. J. H.

    1983-02-01

    The physical scaling and cost scaling of a modular stellarator reactor are described. It is shown that configurations based on l=2 are best able to support adequate beta, and physical relationships are derived which enable the geometry and parameters of an l=2 modular stellarator to be defined. A cost scaling for the components of the nuclear island is developed using Starfire (tokamak reactor study) engineering as a basis. It is shown that for minimum cost the stellarator should be of small aspect ratio. For a 4000 MWth plant, as Starfire, the optimum configuration is a 15 coil, 3 field period, l=2 device with a major radius of 16 m and a plasma minor radius of 2 m; and with a conservative wall loading of 2 MW/m2 and an average beta of 3.9%; the estimated cost per kilowatt (electrical) is marginally (7%) greater than Starfire.

  3. Processing and Managing the Kepler Mission's Treasure Trove of Stellar and Exoplanet Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jon M.

    2016-01-01

    The Kepler telescope launched into orbit in March 2009, initiating NASAs first mission to discover Earth-size planets orbiting Sun-like stars. Kepler simultaneously collected data for 160,000 target stars at a time over its four-year mission, identifying over 4700 planet candidates, 2300 confirmed or validated planets, and over 2100 eclipsing binaries. While Kepler was designed to discover exoplanets, the long term, ultra- high photometric precision measurements it achieved made it a premier observational facility for stellar astrophysics, especially in the field of asteroseismology, and for variable stars, such as RR Lyraes. The Kepler Science Operations Center (SOC) was developed at NASA Ames Research Center to process the data acquired by Kepler from pixel-level calibrations all the way to identifying transiting planet signatures and subjecting them to a suite of diagnostic tests to establish or break confidence in their planetary nature. Detecting small, rocky planets transiting Sun-like stars presents a variety of daunting challenges, from achieving an unprecedented photometric precision of 20 parts per million (ppm) on 6.5-hour timescales, supporting the science operations, management, processing, and repeated reprocessing of the accumulating data stream. This paper describes how the design of the SOC meets these varied challenges, discusses the architecture of the SOC and how the SOC pipeline is operated and is run on the NAS Pleiades supercomputer, and summarizes the most important pipeline features addressing the multiple computational, image and signal processing challenges posed by Kepler.

  4. Galactic evolution. I - Single-zone models. [encompassing stellar evolution and gas-star dynamic theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuan, T. X.; Hart, M. H.; Ostriker, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    The two basic approaches of physical theory required to calculate the evolution of a galactic system are considered, taking into account stellar evolution theory and the dynamics of a gas-star system. Attention is given to intrinsic (stellar) physics, extrinsic (dynamical) physics, and computations concerning the fractionation of an initial mass of gas into stars. The characteristics of a 'standard' model and its variants are discussed along with the results obtained with the aid of these models.

  5. The Hot and Energetic Universe: End points of stellar evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Motch, Christian; Wilms, Jörn; Barret, Didier; Becker, Werner; Bogdanov, Slavko; Boirin, Laurence; Corbel, Stéphane; Cackett, Ed; Campana, Sergio; de Martino, Domitilla; Haberl, Frank; in't Zand, Jean; Méndez, Mariano; Mignani, Roberto; Miller, Jon; Orio, Marina; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Rea, Nanda; Rodriguez, Jérôme; Rozanska, Agata; Schwope, Axel; Steiner, Andrew; Webb, Natalie; Zampieri, Luca; Zane, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    White dwarfs, neutron stars and stellar mass black holes are key laboratories to study matter in most extreme conditions of gravity and magnetic field. The unprecedented effective area of Athena+ will allow us to advance our understanding of emission mechanisms and accretion physics over a wide

  6. Interrupted Stellar Encounters in Star Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Aaron M.; Leigh, Nathan W. C.

    2015-07-01

    Strong encounters between single stars and binaries play a pivotal role in the evolution of star clusters. Such encounters can also dramatically modify the orbital parameters of binaries, exchange partners in and out of binaries, and are a primary contributor to the rate of physical stellar collisions in star clusters. Often, these encounters are studied under the approximation that they happen quickly enough and within a small enough volume to be considered isolated from the rest of the cluster. In this paper, we study the validity of this assumption through the analysis of a large grid of single-binary and binary-binary scattering experiments. For each encounter we evaluate the encounter duration, and compare this with the expected time until another single or binary star will join the encounter. We find that for lower-mass clusters, similar to typical open clusters in our Galaxy, the percent of encounters that will be “interrupted” by an interloping star or binary may be 20%-40% (or higher) in the core, though for typical globular clusters we expect ≲1% of encounters to be interrupted. Thus, the assumption that strong encounters occur in relative isolation breaks down for certain clusters. Instead, many strong encounters develop into more complex “mini-clusters,” which must be accounted for in studying, for example, the internal dynamics of star clusters, and the physical stellar collision rate.

  7. INTERRUPTED STELLAR ENCOUNTERS IN STAR CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geller, Aaron M. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Leigh, Nathan W. C., E-mail: a-geller@northwestern.edu, E-mail: nleigh@amnh.org [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West and 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States)

    2015-07-20

    Strong encounters between single stars and binaries play a pivotal role in the evolution of star clusters. Such encounters can also dramatically modify the orbital parameters of binaries, exchange partners in and out of binaries, and are a primary contributor to the rate of physical stellar collisions in star clusters. Often, these encounters are studied under the approximation that they happen quickly enough and within a small enough volume to be considered isolated from the rest of the cluster. In this paper, we study the validity of this assumption through the analysis of a large grid of single–binary and binary–binary scattering experiments. For each encounter we evaluate the encounter duration, and compare this with the expected time until another single or binary star will join the encounter. We find that for lower-mass clusters, similar to typical open clusters in our Galaxy, the percent of encounters that will be “interrupted” by an interloping star or binary may be 20%–40% (or higher) in the core, though for typical globular clusters we expect ≲1% of encounters to be interrupted. Thus, the assumption that strong encounters occur in relative isolation breaks down for certain clusters. Instead, many strong encounters develop into more complex “mini-clusters,” which must be accounted for in studying, for example, the internal dynamics of star clusters, and the physical stellar collision rate.

  8. A multi-institutional Stellarator Configuration Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, David

    2017-10-01

    A multi-institutional study aimed at mapping the space of quasi-axisymmetric stellarators has begun. The goal is to gain improved understanding of the dependence of important physics and engineering parameters (e.g. bootstrap current, stability, coil complexity, etc.) on plasma shape (average elongation, aspect ratio, number of periods). In addition, the stellarator optimization code STELLOPT will be upgraded with new capabilities such as improved coil design algorithms such as COILOPT + + and REGCOIL, divertor optimization options, equilibria with islands using the SPEC code, and improved bootstrap current calculations with the SFINCS code. An effort is underway to develop metrics for divertor optimization. STELLOPT has also had numerous improvements to numerical algorithms and parallelization capabilities. Simultaneously, we also are pursuing the optimization of turbulent transport according to the method of proxy functions. Progress made to date includes an elongation scan on quasi-axisymmetric equilibria and an initial comparison between the SFINCS code and the BOOTSJ calculation of bootstrap current currently available in STELLOPT. Further progress on shape scans and subsequent physics analysis will be reported. The status of the STELLOPT upgrades will be described. The eventual goal of this exercise is to identify attractive configurations for future US experimental facilities.. This work is supported by US DoE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  9. A comprehensive study of young B stars in NGC 2264 . I. Space photometry and asteroseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwintz, K.; Moravveji, E.; Pápics, P. I.; Tkachenko, A.; Przybilla, N.; Nieva, M.-F.; Kuschnig, R.; Antoci, V.; Lorenz, D.; Themeßl, N.; Fossati, L.; Barnes, T. G.

    2017-05-01

    Context. Space photometric time series of the most massive members of the young open cluster NGC 2264 allow us to study their different sources of variability down to the millimagnitude level and permit a search for slowly pulsating B (SPB)-type pulsation among objects that are only a few million years old. Aims: Our goal is to conduct a homogeneous study of young B-type stars in the cluster NGC 2264 using photometric time series from space in combination with high-resolution spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry obtained from the ground. The latter will be presented in a separate follow-up article. Methods: We performed frequency analyses for eleven B stars in the field of the young cluster NGC 2264 using photometric time series from the MOST, CoRoT, and Spitzer space telescopes and the routines Period04 and SigSpec. We employ the MESA stellar evolution code in combination with the oscillation code GYRE to identify the pulsation modes for two SPB stars that exhibit short period spacing series. Results: From our analysis we identify four objects that show SPB pulsations, five stars that show rotational modulation of their light curves caused by spots, one star that is identified to be a binary, and one object in the field of the cluster that is found to be a non-member Be star. In two SPB stars we detect a number of regularly spaced pulsation modes that are compatible with being members of a g-mode period series. Conclusions: Despite NGC 2264's young age, our analysis illustrates that its B-type members have already arrived on the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS). Our asteroseismic analysis yields masses between 4 and 6 M⊙ and ages between 1 and 6 million years, which agree well to the overall cluster age. Based on data from the MOST satellite, a Canadian Space Agency mission, jointly operated by Microsatellite Systems Canada Inc. (MSCI), formerly part of Dynacon, Inc., the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies and the University of British Columbia

  10. Excitation of Stellar Pulsations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houdek, G.

    2012-01-01

    In this review I present an overview of our current understanding of the physical mechanisms that are responsible for the excitation of pulsations in stars with surface convection zones. These are typically cooler stars such as the δ Scuti stars, and stars supporting solar-like oscillations....

  11. Planets, stars and stellar systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bond, Howard; McLean, Ian; Barstow, Martin; Gilmore, Gerard; Keel, William; French, Linda

    2013-01-01

    This is volume 3 of Planets, Stars and Stellar Systems, a six-volume compendium of modern astronomical research covering subjects of key interest to the main fields of contemporary astronomy. This volume on “Solar and Stellar Planetary Systems” edited by Linda French and Paul Kalas presents accessible review chapters From Disks to Planets, Dynamical Evolution of Planetary Systems, The Terrestrial Planets, Gas and Ice Giant Interiors, Atmospheres of Jovian Planets, Planetary Magnetospheres, Planetary Rings, An Overview of the Asteroids and Meteorites, Dusty Planetary Systems and Exoplanet Detection Methods. All chapters of the handbook were written by practicing professionals. They include sufficient background material and references to the current literature to allow readers to learn enough about a specialty within astronomy, astrophysics and cosmology to get started on their own practical research projects. In the spirit of the series Stars and Stellar Systems published by Chicago University Press in...

  12. TEM turbulence optimisation in stellarators

    CERN Document Server

    Proll, J H E; Xanthopoulos, P; Lazerson, S A; Faber, B J

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of neoclassically optimised stellarators, optimising stellarators for turbulent transport is an important next step. The reduction of ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence has been achieved via shaping of the magnetic field, and the reduction of trapped-electron mode (TEM) turbulence is adressed in the present paper. Recent analytical and numerical findings suggest TEMs are stabilised when a large fraction of trapped particles experiences favourable bounce-averaged curvature. This is the case for example in Wendelstein 7-X [C.D. Beidler $\\textit{et al}$ Fusion Technology $\\bf{17}$, 148 (1990)] and other Helias-type stellarators. Using this knowledge, a proxy function was designed to estimate the TEM dynamics, allowing optimal configurations for TEM stability to be determined with the STELLOPT [D.A. Spong $\\textit{et al}$ Nucl. Fusion $\\bf{41}$, 711 (2001)] code without extensive turbulence simulations. A first proof-of-principle optimised equilibrium stemming from the TEM-dominated stella...

  13. Modeling Neutral Hydrogen in the HSX Stellarator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephey, L.; Bader, A.; Anderson, D. T.; Talmadge, J. N.; Hegna, C.; Anderson, F. S. B.

    2012-10-01

    Efforts to improve the understanding of neutral hydrogen in the HSX stellarator are ongoing. The DEGAS code [1], a fully 3D Monte-Carlo neutral particle code, is used to simulate neutral particle density and synthetic H-alpha emission in HSX. DEGAS simulations are compared to EMC3-EIRENE [2] simulations in an effort to understand the similarities and differences in how each code predicts neutral physics in the unique HSX geometry and relatively low operating density. Additionally, experimentally motivated DEGAS simulations are presented of a supersonic gas injection system that will be installed on HSX. Finally, simulations of many different wall recycling scenarios are presented in an effort to develop a plasma wall interaction model that more closely matches experimental H-alpha measurements.[4pt] [1] D. B. Heifetz et al, J. Comp. Phys. Vol. 46 (1982) p. 309.[0pt] [2] Y. Feng et al, Contribution Plasma Physics, 44 1-3 (2004) p. 57-69.

  14. Asteroseismology of the Open Clusters NGC 6791, NGC 6811, and NGC 6819 from 19 Months of Kepler Photometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corsaro, Enrico; Stello, Dennis; Huber, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    show clear correlation with fundamental stellar parameters such as mass and radius. When the stellar populations from the clusters are compared, we see evidence for a difference in mass of the red giant branch stars and possibly a difference in structure of the red clump stars, from our measurements...... giant branch and red clump stars through the measurement of the period spacing of mixed dipole modes in 53 stars among all the three clusters to verify the stellar classification from the color-magnitude diagram. These seismic results also allow us to identify a number of special cases, including......We studied solar-like oscillations in 115 red giants in the three open clusters, NGC 6791, NGC 6811, and NGC 6819, based on photometric data covering more than 19 months with NASA's Kepler space telescope. We present the asteroseismic diagrams of the asymptotic parameters δν02, δν01, and ϵ, which...

  15. New method to design stellarator coils without the winding surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Caoxiang; Hudson, Stuart R.; Song, Yuntao; Wan, Yuanxi

    2018-01-01

    Finding an easy-to-build coils set has been a critical issue for stellarator design for decades. Conventional approaches assume a toroidal ‘winding’ surface, but a poorly chosen winding surface can unnecessarily constrain the coil optimization algorithm, This article presents a new method to design coils for stellarators. Each discrete coil is represented as an arbitrary, closed, one-dimensional curve embedded in three-dimensional space. A target function to be minimized that includes both physical requirements and engineering constraints is constructed. The derivatives of the target function with respect to the parameters describing the coil geometries and currents are calculated analytically. A numerical code, named flexible optimized coils using space curves (FOCUS), has been developed. Applications to a simple stellarator configuration, W7-X and LHD vacuum fields are presented.

  16. Identification of Stellar Sequences in Various Stellar Systems ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The spatial morphological study of stellar clusters has been carried out through their identified probable members. The field stars decontamination is performed by the statistical cleaning approach (depends on the magnitude and colour of stars within the field and cluster regions). The colour magnitude ratio diagram ...

  17. A Framework for Finding and Interpreting Stellar CMEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osten, Rachel A.; Wolk, Scott J.

    2017-10-01

    The astrophysical study of mass loss, both steady-state and transient, on the cool half of the HR diagram has implications both for the star itself and the conditions created around the star that can be hospitable or inimical to supporting life. Stellar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) have not been conclusively detected, despite the ubiquity with which their radiative counterparts in an eruptive event (flares) have been. I will review some of the different observational methods which have been used and possibly could be used in the future in the stellar case, emphasizing some of the difficulties inherent in such attempts. I will provide a framework for interpreting potential transient stellar mass loss in light of the properties of flares known to occur on magnetically active stars. This uses a physically motivated way to connect the properties of flares and coronal mass ejections and provides a testable hypothesis for observing or constraining transient stellar mass loss. Finally I will describe recent results using observations at low radio frequencies to detect stellar coronal mass ejections, and give updates on prospects using future facilities to make headway in this important area.

  18. New Asteroseismic Scaling Relations Based on the Hayashi Track Relation Applied to Red Giant Branch Stars in NGC 6791 and NGC 6819

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, T.; Li, Y.; Hekker, S.

    2014-01-01

    Stellar mass M, radius R, and gravity g are important basic parameters in stellar physics. Accurate values for these parameters can be obtained from the gravitational interaction between stars in multiple systems or from asteroseismology. Stars in a cluster are thought to be formed coevally from the

  19. Integrated Circuit Stellar Magnitude Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, James A.

    1978-01-01

    Describes an electronic circuit which can be used to demonstrate the stellar magnitude scale. Six rectangular light-emitting diodes with independently adjustable duty cycles represent stars of magnitudes 1 through 6. Experimentally verifies the logarithmic response of the eye. (Author/GA)

  20. Maximum stellar iron core mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. An analytical method of estimating the mass of a stellar iron core, just prior to core collapse, is .... approximately as an ideal gas, the mean kinetic energies of the free electrons and atomic nuclei will be equal. .... whose density varies from a maximum at the core's center to a minimum at its 'surface'. The dimensional ...

  1. Maximum stellar iron core mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An analytical method of estimating the mass of a stellar iron core, just prior to core collapse, is described in this paper. The method employed depends, in part, upon an estimate of the true relativistic mass increase experienced by electrons within a highly compressed iron core, just prior to core collapse, and is significantly ...

  2. Stellar model fits and inversions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.

    2012-01-01

    The recent asteroseismic data from the CoRoT and Kepler missions have provided an entirely new basis for investigating stellar properties. This has led to a rapid development in techniques for analysing such data, although it is probably fair to say that we are still far from having the tools req...

  3. NH3 (10-00) in the pre-stellar core L1544

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caselli, P.; Bizzocchi, L.; Keto, E.

    2017-01-01

    Pre-stellar cores represent the initial conditions in the process of star and planet formation, therefore it is important to study their physical and chemical structure. Because of their volatility, nitrogen-bearing molecules are key to study the dense and cold gas present in pre-stellar cores....... The NH3 rotational transition detected with Herschel-HIFI provides a unique combination of sensitivity and spectral resolution to further investigate physical and chemical processes in pre-stellar cores. Here we present the velocity-resolved Herschel-HIFI observations of the ortho-NH3(10-00) line at 572...... GHz and study the abundance profile of ammonia across the pre-stellar core L1544 to test current theories of its physical and chemical structure. Recently calculated collisional coefficients have been included in our non-LTE radiative transfer code to reproduce Herschel observations. A gas...

  4. Classifying TDSS Stellar Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Rachael Christina; Green, Paul J.; TDSS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS), a subprogram of SDSS-IV eBOSS, obtains classification/discovery spectra of point-source photometric variables selected from PanSTARRS and SDSS multi-color light curves regardless of object color or lightcurve shape. Tens of thousands of TDSS spectra are already available and have been spectroscopically classified both via pipeline and by visual inspection. About half of these spectra are quasars, half are stars. Our goal is to classify the stars with their correct variability types. We do this by acquiring public multi-epoch light curves for brighter stars (rclassifications and parameters in the Catalina Surveys Periodic Variable Star Catalog. Variable star classifications include RR Lyr, close eclipsing binaries, CVs, pulsating white dwarfs, and other exotic systems. The key difference between our catalog and others is that along with the light curves, we will be using TDSS spectra to help in the classification of variable type, as spectra are rich with information allowing estimation of physical parameters like temperature, metallicity, gravity, etc. This work was supported by the SDSS Research Experience for Undergraduates program, which is funded by a grant from Sloan Foundation to the Astrophysical Research Consortium.

  5. Small to mid-sized stellarator experiments: topology, confinement and turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J. H.

    2004-12-01

    The very large stellarator experiments LHD (operating) and W7X (under construction) move stellarator-confined plasmas into the near-reactor regime. Continuing experiments on smaller devices operating at heating powers from kilowatts to a few megawatts are exploring the effects of magnetic configuration stability and turbulence on plasma confinement to improve stellarator performance and our understanding of general toroidal confinement physics. Key issues being explored are the relation of rational magnetic surfaces and magnetic configuration characteristics such as helical ripple to plasma transport, confinement scaling and turbulence. The robust macroscopic stability of currentless stellarator plasma is a major contributing factor to these studies. Many of the phenomena most clearly evident in stellarators are increasingly implicated in tokamak experiments as well.

  6. Mild evolution of the stellar metallicity gradients of disc galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissera, Patricia B.; Machado, Rubens E. G.; Vilchez, José M.; Pedrosa, Susana E.; Sanchez-Blazquez, Patricia; Varela, Silvio

    2017-08-01

    Context. The metallicity gradients of the stellar populations in disc galaxies and their evolution store relevant information on the disc formation history and on those processes which could mix stars a posteriori, such as migration, bars and/or galaxy-galaxy interactions. Aims: We aim to investigate the evolution of the metallicity gradients of the whole stellar populations in disc components of simulated galaxies in a cosmological context. Methods: We analyse simulated disc galaxies selected from a cosmological hydrodynamical simulation that includes chemical evolution and a physically motivated supernova feedback capable of driving mass-loaded galactic winds. Results: We detect a mild evolution with redshift in the metallicity slopes of - 0.02 ± 0.01 dex kpc-1 from z 1. If the metallicity profiles are normalised by the effective radius of the stellar disc, the slopes show no clear evolution for zmigration albeit weaker than in previous works. Conclusions: Our stellar discs show a mild evolution of the stellar metallicity slopes up to z 1, which is well-matched by the evolution calculated archeologically from the abundance distributions of mono-age stellar populations at z 0. The dispersion in the relations allows for stronger individual evolutions. Overall, supernova feedback could explain the trends but an impact of migration can not be totally discarded. Galaxy-galaxy interactions or small satellite accretions can also contribute to modify the metallicity profiles in the outer parts. Disentangling the effects of these processes for individual galaxies is still a challenge in a cosmological context.

  7. Dark matter constraints from stellar evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, A.; Domínguez, I.; Straniero, O.

    2016-01-01

    The study of dark matter constraints from its effect on star evolution has been discussed in recent years. We propose a star evolution simulation approach to determine those costraints from properties related to star evolutionary stages and propose globular cluster observables in order to check those constraints. My work in progress (my PhD project research) employs FRANEC code to simulate complete star evolution from pre-main sequence to AGB phase, and regards several DM candidates like axions or WIMPs, motivated by different unsolved physical problems. Detailed energy production or energy loss due to DM particles are included, taking into account the expected interaction between dark matter particles and stellar plasma within different models.

  8. On the stellar rotation-activity connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, R.

    1983-01-01

    The relationship between rotation rates and surface activity in late-type dwarf stars is explored in a survey of recent theoretical and observational studies. Current theoretical models of stellar-magnetic-field production and coronal activity are examined, including linear kinematic dynamo theory, nonlinear dynamos using approximations, and full numerical simulations of the MHD equations; and some typical results are presented graphically. The limitations of the modeling procedures and the constraints imposed by the physics are indicated. The statistical techniques used in establishing correlations between various observational parameters are analyzed critically, and the methods developed for quasar luminosity functions by Avni et al. (1980) are used to evaluate the effects of upper detection bounds, incomplete samples, and missing data for the case of rotation and X-ray flux data.

  9. Characterizing stellar and exoplanetary environments

    CERN Document Server

    Khodachenko, Maxim

    2015-01-01

    In this book an international group of specialists discusses studies of exoplanets subjected to extreme stellar radiation and plasma conditions. It is shown that such studies will help us to understand how terrestrial planets and their atmospheres, including the early Venus, Earth and Mars, evolved during the host star’s active early phase. The book presents an analysis of findings from Hubble Space Telescope observations of transiting exoplanets, as well as applications of advanced numerical models for characterizing the upper atmosphere structure and stellar environments of exoplanets. The authors also address detections of atoms and molecules in the atmosphere of “hot Jupiters” by NASA’s Spitzer telescope. The observational and theoretical investigations and discoveries presented are both timely and important in the context of the next generation of space telescopes. 
 The book is divided into four main parts, grouping chapters on exoplanet host star radiation and plasma environments, exoplanet u...

  10. Geometry Dependence of Stellarator Turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.E. Mynick, P. Xanthopoulos and A.H. Boozer

    2009-08-10

    Using the nonlinear gyrokinetic code package GENE/GIST, we study the turbulent transport in a broad family of stellarator designs, to understand the geometry-dependence of the microturbulence. By using a set of flux tubes on a given flux surface, we construct a picture of the 2D structure of the microturbulence over that surface, and relate this to relevant geometric quantities, such as the curvature, local shear, and effective potential in the Schrodinger-like equation governing linear drift modes.

  11. Stellar populations of shell galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsten, S. G.; Hau, G. K. T.; Zenteno, A.

    2017-12-01

    We present a study of the inner (out to ∼1 Reff) stellar populations of nine shell galaxies. We derive stellar population parameters from long-slit spectra by both analysing the Lick indices of the galaxies and by fitting single stellar population model spectra to the full galaxy spectra. The results from the two methods agree reasonably well. A few of the shell galaxies appear to have lower central Mg2 index values than the general population of galaxies of the same central velocity dispersion, which is possibly due to a past interaction event. Our sample shows a relation between central metallicity and velocity dispersion that is consistent with previous samples of non-shell galaxies. Analysing the metallicity gradients in our sample, we find an average gradient of -0.16 ± 0.10 dex decade-1 in radius. We compare this with formation models to constrain the merging history of shell galaxies. We argue that our galaxies likely have undergone major mergers but it is unclear whether the shells formed from these events or from separate minor mergers. Additionally, we find evidence for young stellar populations ranging in age from 500 Myr to 4-5 Gyr in four of the galaxies, allowing us to speculate on the age of the shells. For NGC 5670, we use a simple dynamical model to find the time required to produce the observed distribution of shells to be roughly consistent with the age of the young subpopulation, suggesting that the shells and subpopulation possibly formed from the same event.

  12. Weird Stellar Pair Puzzles Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    Astronomers have discovered a speedy spinning pulsar in an elongated orbit around an apparent Sun-like star, a combination never seen before, and one that has them puzzled about how the strange system developed. Orbital Comparison Comparing Orbits of Pulsar and Its Companion to our Solar System. CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for full caption information and available graphics. "Our ideas about how the fastest-spinning pulsars are produced do not predict either the kind of orbit or the type of companion star this one has," said David Champion of the Australia Telescope National Facility. "We have to come up with some new scenarios to explain this weird pair," he added. Astronomers first detected the pulsar, called J1903+0327, as part of a long-term survey using the National Science Foundation's Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico. They made the discovery in 2006 doing data analysis at McGill University, where Champion worked at the time. They followed up the discovery with detailed studies using the Arecibo telescope, the NSF's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia, the Westerbork radio telescope in the Netherlands, and the Gemini North optical telescope in Hawaii. The pulsar, a city-sized superdense stellar corpse left over after a massive star exploded as a supernova, is spinning on its axis 465 times every second. Nearly 21,000 light-years from Earth, it is in a highly-elongated orbit that takes it around its companion star once every 95 days. An infrared image made with the Gemini North telescope in Hawaii shows a Sun-like star at the pulsar's position. If this is an orbital companion to the pulsar, it is unlike any companions of other rapidly rotating pulsars. The pulsar, a neutron star, also is unusually massive for its type. "This combination of properties is unprecedented. Not only does it require us to figure out how this system was produced, but the large mass may help us understand how matter behaves at extremely

  13. Stellar Echo Imaging of Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Chris; Lerch, Kieran; Lucente, Mark; Meza-Galvan, Jesus; Mitchell, Dan; Ruedin, Josh; Williams, Spencer; Zollars, Byron

    2016-01-01

    All stars exhibit intensity fluctuations over several timescales, from nanoseconds to years. These intensity fluctuations echo off bodies and structures in the star system. We posit that it is possible to take advantage of these echoes to detect, and possibly image, Earth-scale exoplanets. Unlike direct imaging techniques, temporal measurements do not require fringe tracking, maintaining an optically-perfect baseline, or utilizing ultra-contrast coronagraphs. Unlike transit or radial velocity techniques, stellar echo detection is not constrained to any specific orbital inclination. Current results suggest that existing and emerging technology can already enable stellar echo techniques at flare stars, such as Proxima Centauri, including detection, spectroscopic interrogation, and possibly even continent-level imaging of exoplanets in a variety of orbits. Detection of Earth-like planets around Sun-like stars appears to be extremely challenging, but cannot be fully quantified without additional data on micro- and millisecond-scale intensity fluctuations of the Sun. We consider survey missions in the mold of Kepler and place preliminary constraints on the feasibility of producing 3D tomographic maps of other structures in star systems, such as accretion disks. In this report we discuss the theory, limitations, models, and future opportunities for stellar echo imaging.

  14. Using Gaussian Processes to Construct Flexible Models of Stellar Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czekala, Ian

    2018-01-01

    The use of spectra is fundamental to astrophysical fields ranging from exoplanets to stars to galaxies. In spite of this ubiquity, or perhaps because of it, there are a plethora of use cases that do not yet have physics-based forward models that can fit high signal-to-noise data to within the observational noise. These inadequacies result in subtle but systematic residuals not captured by any model, which complicates and biases parameter inference. Fortunately, the now-prevalent collection and archiving of large spectral datasets also provides an opening for empirical, data-driven approaches. We introduce one example of a time-series dataset of high-resolution stellar spectra, as is commonly delivered by planet-search radial velocity instruments like TRES, HIRES, and HARPS. Measurements of radial velocity variations of stars and their companions are essential for stellar and exoplanetary study; these measurements provide access to the fundamental physical properties that dictate all phases of stellar evolution and facilitate the quantitative study of planetary systems. In observations of a (spatially unresolved) spectroscopic binary star, one only ever records the composite sum of the spectra from the primary and secondary stars, complicating photospheric analysis of each individual star. Our technique “disentangles” the composite spectra by treating each underlying stellar spectrum as a Gaussian process, whose posterior predictive distribution is inferred simultaneously with the orbital parameters. To demonstrate the potential of this technique, we deploy it on red-optical time-series spectra of the mid-M-dwarf eclipsing binary LP661-13, which was recently discovered by the MEarth project. We successfully reconstruct the primary and secondary stellar spectra and report orbital parameters with improved precision compared to traditional radial velocity analysis techniques.

  15. A general comparison between tokamak and stellarator plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhong Xu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper generally compares the essential features between tokamaks and stellarators, based on previous review work individually made by authors on several specific topics, such as theories, bulk plasma transport and edge divertor physics, along with some recent results. It aims at summarizing the main results and conclusions with regard to the advantages and disadvantages in these two types of magnetic fusion devices. The comparison includes basic magnetic configurations, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD instabilities, operational limits and disruptions, neoclassical and turbulent transport, confinement scaling and isotopic effects, plasma rotation, and edge and divertor physics. Finally, a concept of quasi-symmetric stellarators is briefly referred along with a comparison of future application for fusion reactors.

  16. Results of Compact Stellarator Eengineering Trade Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Brown, L. Bromberg, and M. Cole

    2009-09-25

    A number of technical requirements and performance criteria can drive stellarator costs, e.g., tight tolerances, accurate coil positioning, low aspect ratio (compactness), choice of assembly strategy, metrology, and complexity of the stellarator coil geometry. With the completion of a seven-year design and construction effort of the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) it is useful to interject the NCSX experience along with the collective experiences of the NCSX stellarator community to improving the stellarator configuration. Can improvements in maintenance be achieved by altering the stellarator magnet configuration with changes in the coil shape or with the combination of trim coils? Can a mechanical configuration be identified that incorporates a partial set of shaped fixed stellarator coils along with some removable coil set to enhance the overall machine maintenance? Are there other approaches that will simplify the concepts, improve access for maintenance, reduce overall cost and improve the reliability of a stellarator based power plant? Using ARIES-CS and NCSX as reference cases, alternative approaches have been studied and developed to show how these modifications would favorably impact the stellarator power plant and experimental projects. The current status of the alternate stellarator configurations being developed will be described and a comparison made to the recently designed and partially built NCSX device and the ARIES-CS reactor design study.

  17. Results of Compact Stellarator Engineering Trade Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tom Brown, L. Bromberg, M. Cole

    2009-05-27

    number of technical requirements and performance criteria can drive stellarator costs, e.g., tight tolerances, accurate coil positioning, low aspect ratio (compactness), choice of assembly strategy, metrology, and complexity of the stellarator coil geometry. With the completion of a seven-year design and construction effort of the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) it is useful to interject the NCSX experience along with the collective experiences of the NCSX stellarator community to improving the stellarator configuration. Can improvements in maintenance be achieved by altering the stellarator magnet configuration with changes in the coil shape or with the combination of trim coils? Can a mechanical configuration be identified that incorporates a partial set of shaped fixed stellarator coils along with some removable coil set to enhance the overall machine maintenance? Are there other approaches that will simplify the concepts, improve access for maintenance, reduce overall cost and improve the reliability of a stellarator based power plant? Using ARIES-CS and NCSX as reference cases, alternative approaches have been studied and developed to show how these modifications would favorably impact the stellarator power plant and experimental projects. The current status of the alternate stellarator configurations being developed will be described and a comparison made to the recently designed and partially built NCSX device and the ARIES-CS reactor design study.

  18. Stellar and wind parameters of massive stars from spectral analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Ignacio; Curé, Michel

    2017-11-01

    The only way to deduce information from stars is to decode the radiation it emits in an appropriate way. Spectroscopy can solve this and derive many properties of stars. In this work we seek to derive simultaneously the stellar and wind characteristics of a wide range of massive stars. Our stellar properties encompass the effective temperature, the surface gravity, the stellar radius, the micro-turbulence velocity, the rotational velocity and the Si abundance. For wind properties we consider the mass-loss rate, the terminal velocity and the line-force parameters α, k and δ (from the line-driven wind theory). To model the data we use the radiative transport code Fastwind considering the newest hydrodynamical solutions derived with Hydwind code, which needs stellar and line-force parameters to obtain a wind solution. A grid of spectral models of massive stars is created and together with the observed spectra their physical properties are determined through spectral line fittings. These fittings provide an estimation about the line-force parameters, whose theoretical calculations are extremely complex. Furthermore, we expect to confirm that the hydrodynamical solutions obtained with a value of δ slightly larger than ~ 0.25, called δ-slow solutions, describe quite reliable the radiation line-driven winds of A and late B supergiant stars and at the same time explain disagreements between observational data and theoretical models for the Wind-Momentum Luminosity Relationship (WLR).

  19. Stellar and wind parameters of massive stars from spectral analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, I.; Curé, M.

    2017-07-01

    The only way to deduce information from stars is to decode the radiation it emits in an appropriate way. Spectroscopy can solve this and derive many properties of stars. In this work we seek to derive simultaneously the stellar and wind characteristics of A and B supergiant stars. Our stellar properties encompass the effective temperature, the surface gravity, the stellar radius, the micro-turbulence velocity, the rotational velocity and, finally, the chemical composition. For wind properties we consider the mass-loss rate, the terminal velocity and the line-force parameters (α, k and δ) obtained from the standard line-driven wind theory. To model the data we use the radiative transport code Fastwind considering the newest hydrodynamical solutions derived with Hydwind code, which needs stellar and line-force parameters to obtain a wind solution. A grid of spectral models of massive stars is created and together with the observed spectra their physical properties are determined through spectral line fittings. These fittings provide an estimation about the line-force parameters, whose theoretical calculations are extremely complex. Furthermore, we expect to confirm that the hydrodynamical solutions obtained with a value of δ slightly larger than ˜ 0.25, called δ-slow solutions, describe quite reliable the radiation line-driven winds of A and late B supergiant stars and at the same time explain disagreements between observational data and theoretical models for the Wind-Momentum Luminosity Relationship (WLR).

  20. Modelling Quasi-Periodic Pulsations in Solar and Stellar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, J. A.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Dominique, M.; Jelínek, P.; Takasao, S.

    2018-02-01

    Solar flare emission is detected in all EM bands and variations in flux density of solar energetic particles. Often the EM radiation generated in solar and stellar flares shows a pronounced oscillatory pattern, with characteristic periods ranging from a fraction of a second to several minutes. These oscillations are referred to as quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs), to emphasise that they often contain apparent amplitude and period modulation. We review the current understanding of quasi-periodic pulsations in solar and stellar flares. In particular, we focus on the possible physical mechanisms, with an emphasis on the underlying physics that generates the resultant range of periodicities. These physical mechanisms include MHD oscillations, self-oscillatory mechanisms, oscillatory reconnection/reconnection reversal, wave-driven reconnection, two loop coalescence, MHD flow over-stability, the equivalent LCR-contour mechanism, and thermal-dynamical cycles. We also provide a histogram of all QPP events published in the literature at this time. The occurrence of QPPs puts additional constraints on the interpretation and understanding of the fundamental processes operating in flares, e.g. magnetic energy liberation and particle acceleration. Therefore, a full understanding of QPPs is essential in order to work towards an integrated model of solar and stellar flares.

  1. Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA): Binaries, Pulsations, and Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Bill; Marchant, Pablo; Schwab, Josiah; Bauer, Evan B.; Bildsten, Lars; Cantiello, Matteo; Dessart, Luc; Farmer, R.; Hu, H.; Langer, N.; Townsend, R. H. D.; Townsley, Dean M.; Timmes, F. X.

    2015-09-01

    We substantially update the capabilities of the open-source software instrument Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA). MESA can now simultaneously evolve an interacting pair of differentially rotating stars undergoing transfer and loss of mass and angular momentum, greatly enhancing the prior ability to model binary evolution. New MESA capabilities in fully coupled calculation of nuclear networks with hundreds of isotopes now allow MESA to accurately simulate the advanced burning stages needed to construct supernova progenitor models. Implicit hydrodynamics with shocks can now be treated with MESA, enabling modeling of the entire massive star lifecycle, from pre-main-sequence evolution to the onset of core collapse and nucleosynthesis from the resulting explosion. Coupling of the GYRE non-adiabatic pulsation instrument with MESA allows for new explorations of the instability strips for massive stars while also accelerating the astrophysical use of asteroseismology data. We improve the treatment of mass accretion, giving more accurate and robust near-surface profiles. A new MESA capability to calculate weak reaction rates “on-the-fly” from input nuclear data allows better simulation of accretion induced collapse of massive white dwarfs and the fate of some massive stars. We discuss the ongoing challenge of chemical diffusion in the strongly coupled plasma regime, and exhibit improvements in MESA that now allow for the simulation of radiative levitation of heavy elements in hot stars. We close by noting that the MESA software infrastructure provides bit-for-bit consistency for all results across all the supported platforms, a profound enabling capability for accelerating MESA's development.

  2. Stellarator fusion neutronics research in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimin, S.; Cross, R.C. [Sydney Univ., NSW (Australia). School of Physics; Dewar, R.L.; Gardner, H.J. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    The new status of the H-INF Heliac Stellaralor as a National Facility and the signed international Implementing Agreement on `Collaboration in the Development of the Stellarator Concept` represents a significant encouragement for further fusion research in Australia. In this report the future of fusion research in Australia is discussed with special attention being paid to the importance of Stellarator power plant studies and in particular stellarator fusion neutronics. The main differences between tokamak and stellarator neutronics analyses are identified, namely the neutron wall loading, geometrical modelling and total heating in in-vessel reactor components including toroidal field (TF) coils. Due to the more complicated nature of stellarator neutronics analyses, simplified approaches to fusion neutronics already developed for tokamaks are expected to be even more important and widely used for designing a Conceptual Stellarator Power Plant. 15 refs.

  3. Stellar Feedback from Galactic Bulges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shikui; Wang, D. Q.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that feedback from galactic bulges can play an essential role in the halo gas dynamics and the evolution of their host galaxies by conducting a series of 1-D and 3-D simulations. In our 1-D models we approximately divide the the bulge stellar feedback into two phases: 1) a starbusrt-induced blastwave from the formation of bulge built up through frequent major mergers at high redshift and 2) a gradual feedback in forms of stellar wind and Type Ia SNe from low mass stars. Our simulations show that the combination of the two-phase feedback can heat the surrounding gas beyond the virial radius and stop further gas accretion, which naturally produces a baryon deficit around MW-like galaxies and explains the lack of large-scale X-ray halos, consistent with observations. The hot gas dynamics depends sensitively on the environment and bulge formation history. This dependency may account for the large dispersion in the X-ray luminosities of the galaxies with similar L_B. In the 3-D simulations, we examine the spatial, thermal, and chemical substructures and their effects on X-ray measurements. The sporadic SN explosion creates wealth of filamentary and shell-like structures in the hot gas and produces a broad lognormal-like emission-measure distribution, which enhances the X-ray emission at a low and high temperatures. The luminosity at 0.3-2.0 keV band is nearly tripled due to the gas structures. We find that the SN Ia ejecta are not well-mixed with the ambient medium within the bulge scale, and the X-ray emission is primarily from shocked stellar wind materials which in general has low metallicity.

  4. Controlling turbulence in present and future stellarators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthopoulos, P; Mynick, H E; Helander, P; Turkin, Y; Plunk, G G; Jenko, F; Görler, T; Told, D; Bird, T; Proll, J H E

    2014-10-10

    Turbulence is widely expected to limit the confinement and, thus, the overall performance of modern neoclassically optimized stellarators. We employ novel petaflop-scale gyrokinetic simulations to predict the distribution of turbulence fluctuations and the related transport scaling on entire stellarator magnetic surfaces and reveal striking differences to tokamaks. Using a stochastic global-search optimization method, we derive the first turbulence-optimized stellarator configuration stemming from an existing quasiomnigenous design.

  5. Recent advances in stellarator optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, D. A.; Boozer, A. H.; Brown, T.; Breslau, J.; Curreli, D.; Landreman, M.; Lazerson, S. A.; Lore, J.; Mynick, H.; Neilson, G. H.; Pomphrey, N.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Zolfaghari, A.

    2017-12-01

    Computational optimization has revolutionized the field of stellarator design. To date, optimizations have focused primarily on optimization of neoclassical confinement and ideal MHD stability, although limited optimization of other parameters has also been performed. The purpose of this paper is to outline a select set of new concepts for stellarator optimization that, when taken as a group, present a significant step forward in the stellarator concept. One of the criticisms that has been leveled at existing methods of design is the complexity of the resultant field coils. Recently, a new coil optimization code—COILOPT++, which uses a spline instead of a Fourier representation of the coils,—was written and included in the STELLOPT suite of codes. The advantage of this method is that it allows the addition of real space constraints on the locations of the coils. The code has been tested by generating coil designs for optimized quasi-axisymmetric stellarator plasma configurations of different aspect ratios. As an initial exercise, a constraint that the windings be vertical was placed on large major radius half of the non-planar coils. Further constraints were also imposed that guaranteed that sector blanket modules could be removed from between the coils, enabling a sector maintenance scheme. Results of this exercise will be presented. New ideas on methods for the optimization of turbulent transport have garnered much attention since these methods have led to design concepts that are calculated to have reduced turbulent heat loss. We have explored possibilities for generating an experimental database to test whether the reduction in transport that is predicted is consistent with experimental observations. To this end, a series of equilibria that can be made in the now latent QUASAR experiment have been identified that will test the predicted transport scalings. Fast particle confinement studies aimed at developing a generalized optimization algorithm are also

  6. Abundance measurements in stellar environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, F.

    2014-05-01

    Most of what we know about stars, and systems of stars, is derived from the analysis of their electromagnetic radiation. This lesson is an attempt to describe to Physicists, without any Astrophysical background, the framework to understand the present status of abundance determination in stellar environments and its limit. These notes are dedicated to the recently passed, November 21, 2013, Prof. Dimitri Mihalas who spent his life confuting the 19th century positivist philosopher Auguste Comte who stated that we shall not at all be able to determine the chemical composition of stars.

  7. Abundance measurements in stellar environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, F. [Università di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Sezione Astrofisica, Via S. Sofia 78, 95123 Catania (Italy)

    2014-05-09

    Most of what we know about stars, and systems of stars, is derived from the analysis of their electromagnetic radiation. This lesson is an attempt to describe to Physicists, without any Astrophysical background, the framework to understand the present status of abundance determination in stellar environments and its limit. These notes are dedicated to the recently passed, November 21, 2013, Prof. Dimitri Mihalas who spent his life confuting the 19th century positivist philosopher Auguste Comte who stated that we shall not at all be able to determine the chemical composition of stars.

  8. Stellar Streams in the Dark Energy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipp, Nora; Drlica-Wagner, Alex; Balbinot, Eduardo; DES Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    We present a search for Galactic stellar streams in the Dark Energy Survey (DES), using three years of optical data taken across 5000 sq. degrees of the southern sky. The wide-field, uniform DES photometry provides unprecedented sensitivity to the stellar density field in the southern hemisphere, allowing for the detection of faint stellar populations. We follow the “Field of Streams” procedure developed in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (Belokurov et al., 2006) to identify stellar density features such as dwarf galaxies, globular clusters, and the stellar streams resulting from the tidal disruption of these objects. Improved analysis techniques applied to the DES data enable the discovery of new stellar streams, and provide added insight into the origin and stellar populations of previously identified objects. An increased sample size together with detailed characterization of individual stellar streams and their progenitors can inform our understanding of the formation of the Milky Way stellar halo, as well as the large and small scale distribution of dark matter in the Milky Way.

  9. Helical axis stellarator with noninterlocking planar coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiman, Allan; Boozer, Allen H.

    1987-01-01

    A helical axis stellarator using only noninterlocking planar, non-circular coils, generates magnetic fields having a magnetic well and large rotational transform with resultant large equilibrium beta.

  10. Predictions of stellar occultations by TNOs/Centaurs using Gaia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmars, Josselin; Camargo, Julio; Berard, Diane; Sicardy, Bruno; Leiva, Rodrigo; Vieira-Martins, Roberto; Braga-Ribas, Felipe; Assafin, Marcelo; Rossi, Gustavo; Chariklo occultations Team, Rio Group, Lucky Star Occultation Team, Granada Occultation Team

    2017-10-01

    Stellar occultations are the unique technique from the ground to access physical parameters of the distant solar system objects, such as the measure of the size and the shape at kilometric level, the detection of tenuous atmospheres (few nanobars), and the investigation of close vicinity (satellites, rings, jets).Predictions of stellar occultations require accurate positions of the star and the object.The Gaia DR1 catalog now allows to get stellar position to the milliarcsecond (mas) level. The main uncertainty in the prediction remains in the position of the object (tens to hundreds of mas).Now, we take advantage of the NIMA method for the orbit determination that uses the most recent observations reduced by the Gaia DR1 catalog and the astrometric positions derived from previous positive occultations.Up to now, we have detected nearly 50 positive occultations for about 20 objects that provide astrometric positions of the object at the time of the occultation. The uncertainty of these positions only depends on the uncertainty on the position of the occulted stars, which is a few mas with the Gaia DR1 catalog. The main limitation is now on the proper motion of the star which is only given for bright stars in the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution. This limitation will be solved with the publicationof the Gaia DR2 expected on April 2018 giving proper motions and parallaxes for the Gaia stars. Until this date, we use hybrid stellar catalogs (UCAC5, HSOY) that provide proper motions derived from Gaia DR1 and another stellar catalog.Recently, the Gaia team presented a release of three preliminary Gaia DR2 stellar positions involved in the occultations by Chariklo (22 June and 23 July 2017) and by Triton (5 October 2017).Taking the case of Chariklo as an illustration, we will present a comparison between the proper motions of DR2 and the other catalogs and we will show how the Gaia DR2 will lead to a mas level precision in the orbit and in the prediction of stellar

  11. Flexible helical-axis stellarator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jeffrey H.; Hender, Timothy C.; Carreras, Benjamin A.; Cantrell, Jack L.; Morris, Robert N.

    1988-01-01

    An 1=1 helical winding which spirals about a conventional planar, circular central conductor of a helical-axis stellarator adds a significant degree of flexibility by making it possible to control the rotational transform profile and shear of the magnetic fields confining the plasma in a helical-axis stellarator. The toroidal central conductor links a plurality of toroidal field coils which are separately disposed to follow a helical path around the central conductor in phase with the helical path of the 1=1 winding. This coil configuration produces bean-shaped magnetic flux surfaces which rotate around the central circular conductor in the same manner as the toroidal field generating coils. The additional 1=1 winding provides flexible control of the magnetic field generated by the central conductor to prevent the formation of low-order resonances in the rotational transform profile which can produce break-up of the equilibrium magnetic surfaces. Further, this additional winding can deepen the magnetic well which together with the flexible control provides increased stability.

  12. Compact stellarators with modular coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garabedian, P. R.

    2000-01-01

    Compact stellarator designs with modular coils and only two or three field periods are now available; these designs have both good stability and quasiaxial symmetry providing adequate transport for a magnetic fusion reactor. If the bootstrap current assumes theoretically predicted values a three field period configuration is optimal, but if that net current turns out to be lower, a device with two periods and just 12 modular coils might be better. There are also attractive designs with quasihelical symmetry and four or five periods whose properties depend less on the bootstrap current. Good performance requires that there be a satisfactory magnetic well in the vacuum field, which is a property lacking in a stellarator-tokamak hybrid that has been proposed for a proof of principle experiment. In this paper, we present an analysis of stability for these configurations that is based on a mountain pass theorem asserting that, if two solutions of the problem of magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium can be found, then there has to be an unstable solution. We compare results of our theory of equilibrium, stability, and transport with recently announced measurements from the large LHD experiment in Japan. PMID:10899993

  13. Anisotropic extension of Finch and Skea stellar model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ranjan; Das, Shyam; Thirukkanesh, S.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, the spacetime geometry of Finch and Skea [Class. Quantum Gravity 6:467, 1989] has been utilized to obtain closed-form solutions for a spherically symmetric anisotropic matter distribution. By examining its physical admissibility, we have shown that the class of solutions can be used as viable models for observed pulsars. In particular, a specific class of solutions can be used as an `anisotropic switch' to examine the impact of anisotropy on the gross physical properties of a stellar configuration. Accordingly, the mass-radius relationship has been analyzed.

  14. Stellarator expansion methods for MHD equilibrium and stability calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, V.E.; Charlton, L.A.; Hicks, H.R.; Holmes, J.A.; Carreras, B.A.; Hender, T.C.; Garcia, L.

    1986-03-01

    Two methods for performing stellarator expansion, or average method, MHD calculations are described. The first method includes the calculation of vacuum, equilibrium, and stability, using the Greene and Johnson stellarator expansion in which the equilibrium is reduced to a 2-D problem by averaging over the geometric toroidal angle in real space coordinates. In the second method, the average is performed in a system of vacuum magnetic coordinates. Both methods are implemented to utilize realistic vacuum field information, making them applicable to configuration studies and machine design, as well as to basic research. Illustrative examples are presented to detail the sensitivities of the calculations to physical parameters and to show numerical convergence and the comparison of these methods with each other and with other methods.

  15. Starspots properties and stellar activity from planetary transits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valio, Adriana

    2017-10-01

    Magnetic activity of stars manifests itself in the form of dark spots on the stellar surface. This in turn will cause variations of a few percent in the star light curve as it rotates. When an orbiting planet eclipses its host a star, it may cross in front of one of these spots. In this case, a ``bump'' will be detected in the transit lightcurve. By fitting these spot signatures with a model, it is possible to determine the spots physical properties such as size, temperature, location, magnetic field, and lifetime. Moreover, the monitoring of the spots longitude provides estimates of the stellar rotation and differential rotation. For long time series of transits during multiple years, magnetic cycles can also be determined. This model has been applied successfully to CoRoT-2, CoRoT-4, CoRot-5, CoRoT-6, CoRoT-8, CoRoT-18, Kepler-17, and Kepler-63.

  16. Asymmetric Drift and the Stellar Velocity Ellipsoid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westfall, Kyle B.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Verheijen, Marc A. W.; Andersen, David R.; Swaters, Rob A.

    2007-01-01

    We present the decomposition of the stellar velocity ellipsoid using stellar velocity dispersions within a 40° wedge about the major-axis (smaj), the epicycle approximation, and the asymmetric drift equation. Thus, we employ no fitted forms for smaj and escape interpolation errors resulting from

  17. The Kinematics of Galactic Stellar Disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merrifield, M. R.; Kuijken, K.

    1998-01-01

    Abstract: The disks of galaxies are primarily stellar systems, and fundamentally dynamical entities. Thus, to fully understand galactic disks, we must study their stellar kinematics as well as their morphologies. Observational techniques have now advanced to a point where quite detailed

  18. Stellar Spectral Classification with Locality Preserving Projections ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    With the help of computer tools and algorithms, automatic stellar spectral classification has become an area of current interest. The process of stellar spectral classification mainly includes two steps: dimension reduction and classification. As a popular dimensionality reduction technique, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) ...

  19. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Sphicas

    There have been three physics meetings since the last CMS week: “physics days” on March 27-29, the Physics/ Trigger week on April 23-27 and the most recent physics days on May 22-24. The main purpose of the March physics days was to finalize the list of “2007 analyses”, i.e. the few topics that the physics groups will concentrate on for the rest of this calendar year. The idea is to carry out a full physics exercise, with CMSSW, for select physics channels which test key features of the physics objects, or represent potential “day 1” physics topics that need to be addressed in advance. The list of these analyses was indeed completed and presented in the plenary meetings. As always, a significant amount of time was also spent in reviewing the status of the physics objects (reconstruction) as well as their usage in the High-Level Trigger (HLT). The major event of the past three months was the first “Physics/Trigger week” in Apri...

  20. Astrospheres and Solar-like Stellar Winds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wood Brian E.

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Stellar analogs for the solar wind have proven to be frustratingly difficult to detect directly. However, these stellar winds can be studied indirectly by observing the interaction regions carved out by the collisions between these winds and the interstellar medium (ISM. These interaction regions are called "astrospheres", analogous to the "heliosphere" surrounding the Sun. The heliosphere and astrospheres contain a population of hydrogen heated by charge exchange processes that can produce enough H I Ly alpha absorption to be detectable in UV spectra of nearby stars from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST. The amount of astrospheric absorption is a diagnostic for the strength of the stellar wind, so these observations have provided the first measurements of solar-like stellar winds. Results from these stellar wind studies and their implications for our understanding of the solar wind are reviewed here. Of particular interest are results concerning the past history of the solar wind and its impact on planetary atmospheres.

  1. Impact of stellar activity on the determination of stellar parameters with interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligi, R.; Mourard, D.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Perraut, K.; Chiavassa, A.

    2014-12-01

    With the new space missions dedicated to exoplanet detection and characterization, like PLATO, CHEOPS, TESS, the determination of stellar parameters with high accuracy becomes more and more essential. However, direct or indirect estimations of stellar parameters are affected by stellar activity (magnetic spots, bright plages, granulation) that introduces bias that lower those parameters accuracy. Improving the sensitivity and resolution of future interferometers will allow enlarging the number of common targets of space and ground instruments, and accessing the accuracy needed to distinguish between planetary signals and stellar activity signals. After presenting how visible interferometry contributes to the direct and accurate determination of stellar parameters and thus planetary ones, the impact of stellar activity on interferometric observables and stellar parameters will be presented. Finally, solutions to distinguish between exoplanet and spot signals will be discussed.

  2. The Environmental Dependence of the Galaxy Stellar Mass Function in the ECO Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richstein, Hannah; Berlind, Andreas A.; Calderon, Victor; Eckert, Kathleen D.; Kannappan, Sheila; Moffett, Amanda J.; Stark, David

    2017-01-01

    We study the environmental dependence of the galaxy stellar mass function in the ECO survey and compare it with models that associate galaxies with dark matter halos. Specifically, we quantify the environment of each galaxy in the ECO survey using an Nth nearest neighbor distance metric, and we measure how the galaxy stellar mass distribution varies from low density to high density environments. As expected, we find that massive galaxies preferentially populate high density regions, while low mass galaxies preferentially populate lower density environments. We investigate whether this trend can be explained simply by the stellar-to-halo mass relation combined with the environmental dependence of the halo mass function. In other words, we test the hypothesis that the stellar mass of a galaxy depends solely on the mass of its dark matter halo and does not exhibit a residual dependence on the halo’s larger environment. To test this hypothesis, we first construct mock ECO catalogs by populating dark matter halos in an N-body simulation with galaxies using a model that preserves the overall clustering strength of the galaxy population. We then assign stellar masses to the mock galaxies using physically motivated models that connect stellar mass to halo mass and are constrained to match the global ECO stellar mass function. Finally, we impose the radial and angular selection functions of the ECO survey and repeat our environmental analysis on the mock catalogs. We find that the environmental dependence of stellar mass in the mock catalogs is in agreement with that observed in the ECO survey. Our results are thus consistent with the simple hypothesis that galaxy stellar mass only depends on halo mass. The RESOLVE/ECO surveys were supported by NSF award AST-0955368.

  3. What Do Numerical Simulations Tell Us About Solar/Stellar Dynamos?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouve, L.

    2016-09-01

    In this talk, we will review some aspects of the stellar magnetism and in particular what numerical simulations tell us about the physical processes underlying the observations. In cool stars, a convective dynamo is thought to be responsible for the presence and evolution of magnetic fields. The question of the impact of the internal stellar structure on the magnetic field topology will be addressed. We will focus in particular on the role of differential rotation and of a tachocline. Another important aspect of stellar dynamos is the possible presence of magnetic cycles and how its period depends on the stellar parameters. Numerical simulations addressing this issue will be presented. Finally, one step of the dynamo process is the emergence of magnetic flux from the interior where it is created and organised to the exterior where it emerges as starspots. We will also show results of global 3D MHD numerical simulations of such a process.

  4. Parametrizing the stellar haloes of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Richard; Kauffman, Guinevere; Wang, Jing; Vegetti, Simona

    2014-09-01

    We study the stellar haloes of galaxies out to 70-100 kpc as a function of stellar mass and galaxy type by stacking aligned r- and g-band images from a sample of 45 508 galaxies from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 9 in the redshift range 0.06 ≤ z ≤ 0.1 and in the mass range 1010.0 M⊙ < M* < 1011.4 M⊙. We derive surface brightness profiles to a depth of almost μr ˜ 32 mag arcsec-2. We find that the ellipticity of the stellar halo is a function of galaxy stellar mass and that the haloes of high-concentration galaxies are more elliptical than those of low-concentration galaxies. Where the g - r colour of the stellar halo can be measured, we find that the stellar light is always bluer than in the main galaxy. The colour of the stellar halo is redder for more massive galaxies. We further demonstrate that the full two-dimensional surface intensity distribution of our galaxy stacks can only be fit through multicomponent Sérsic models. Using the fraction of light in the outer component of the models as a proxy for the fraction of accreted stellar light, we show that this fraction is a function of stellar mass and galaxy type. The fraction of accreted stellar light rises from 30 to 70 per cent and from 2 to 25 per cent for high- and low-concentration galaxies, respectively, over the mass range 1010.0-1011.4 M⊙.

  5. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    2010-01-01

    A remarkable amount of progress has been made in Physics since the last CMS Week in June given the exponential growth in the delivered LHC luminosity. The first major milestone was the delivery of a variety of results to the ICHEP international conference held in Paris this July. For this conference, CMS prepared 15 Physics Analysis Summaries on physics objects and 22 Summaries on new and interesting physics measurements that exploited the luminosity recorded by the CMS detector. The challenge was incorporating the largest batch of luminosity that was delivered only days before the conference (300 nb-1 total). The physics covered from this initial running period spanned hadron production measurements, jet production and properties, electroweak vector boson production, and even glimpses of the top quark. Since then, the accumulated integrated luminosity has increased by a factor of more than 100, and all groups have been working tremendously hard on analysing this dataset. The September Physics Week was held ...

  6. Stellar Atmospheric Parameterization Based on Deep Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ru-yang; Li, Xiang-ru

    2017-07-01

    Deep learning is a typical learning method widely studied in the fields of machine learning, pattern recognition, and artificial intelligence. This work investigates the problem of stellar atmospheric parameterization by constructing a deep neural network with five layers, and the node number in each layer of the network is respectively 3821-500-100-50-1. The proposed scheme is verified on both the real spectra measured by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the theoretic spectra computed with the Kurucz's New Opacity Distribution Function (NEWODF) model, to make an automatic estimation for three physical parameters: the effective temperature (Teff), surface gravitational acceleration (lg g), and metallic abundance (Fe/H). The results show that the stacked autoencoder deep neural network has a better accuracy for the estimation. On the SDSS spectra, the mean absolute errors (MAEs) are 79.95 for Teff/K, 0.0058 for (lg Teff/K), 0.1706 for lg (g/(cm·s-2)), and 0.1294 dex for the [Fe/H], respectively; On the theoretic spectra, the MAEs are 15.34 for Teff/K, 0.0011 for lg (Teff/K), 0.0214 for lg(g/(cm · s-2)), and 0.0121 dex for [Fe/H], respectively.

  7. Cool WISPs for stellar cooling excesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannotti, Maurizio; Irastorza, Igor; Redondo, Javier; Ringwald, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Several stellar systems (white dwarfs, red giants, horizontal branch stars and possibly the neutron star in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A) show a mild preference for a non-standard cooling mechanism when compared with theoretical models. This exotic cooling could be provided by Weakly Interacting Slim Particles (WISPs), produced in the hot cores and abandoning the star unimpeded, contributing directly to the energy loss. Taken individually, these excesses do not show a strong statistical weight. However, if one mechanism could consistently explain several of them, the hint could be significant. We analyze the hints in terms of neutrino anomalous magnetic moments, minicharged particles, hidden photons and axion-like particles (ALPs). Among them, the ALP or a massless HP represent the best solution. Interestingly, the hinted ALP parameter space is accessible to the next generation proposed ALP searches, such as ALPS II and IAXO and the massless HP requires a multi TeV energy scale of new physics that might be accessible at the LHC.

  8. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Sphicas

    The CPT project came to an end in December 2006 and its original scope is now shared among three new areas, namely Computing, Offline and Physics. In the physics area the basic change with respect to the previous system (where the PRS groups were charged with detector and physics object reconstruction and physics analysis) was the split of the detector PRS groups (the old ECAL-egamma, HCAL-jetMET, Tracker-btau and Muons) into two groups each: a Detector Performance Group (DPG) and a Physics Object Group. The DPGs are now led by the Commissioning and Run Coordinator deputy (Darin Acosta) and will appear in the correspond¬ing column in CMS bulletins. On the physics side, the physics object groups are charged with the reconstruction of physics objects, the tuning of the simulation (in collaboration with the DPGs) to reproduce the data, the provision of code for the High-Level Trigger, the optimization of the algorithms involved for the different physics analyses (in collaboration with the analysis gr...

  9. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Incandela

    There have been numerous developments in the physics area since the September CMS week. The biggest single event was the Physics/Trigger week in the end of Octo¬ber, whereas in terms of ongoing activities the “2007 analyses” went into high gear. This was in parallel with participation in CSA07 by the physics groups. On the or¬ganizational side, the new conveners of the physics groups have been selected, and a new database for man¬aging physics analyses has been deployed. Physics/Trigger week The second Physics-Trigger week of 2007 took place during the week of October 22-26. The first half of the week was dedicated to working group meetings. The ple¬nary Joint Physics-Trigger meeting took place on Wednesday afternoon and focused on the activities of the new Trigger Studies Group (TSG) and trigger monitoring. Both the Physics and Trigger organizations are now focused on readiness for early data-taking. Thus, early trigger tables and preparations for calibr...

  10. Stellar coronae from Einstein - Observations and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, R.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1980-01-01

    Einstein Observatory observations of stellar X-ray emission are presented and their implications for the formation of stellar coronae and the problem of stellar angular momentum loss are discussed. Solar coronal X-ray observations and observations of stellar coronae made prior to Einstein are reviewed, and it is noted that they already suggest that the standard theory of acoustic coronal heating is inadequate. The principal results of the Einstein/CfA stellar survey are summarized, with attention given to variations of the level of X-ray flux detected along the main sequence, the decline of X-ray flux with increasing age of giants and supergiants, and indications of a large range of X-ray emission levels within a given type, which are clearly incompatible with models for acoustic flux generation. A new theory to explain stellar coronae and hence X-ray emission from them is then proposed in which stellar magnetic fields play the key role in determining the level of coronal emission, and the modulation of the surface magnetic flux level and the level of stressing of surface magnetic fields essentially determine the variation of mean coronal activity in the H-R diagram.

  11. Expanding CME-flare relations to other stellar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschou, Sofia P.; Drake, Jeremy J.; Cohen, Ofer

    2017-05-01

    Stellar activity is one of the main parameters in exoplanet habitability studies. While the effects of UV to X-ray emission from extreme flares on exoplanets are beginning to be investigated, the impact of coronal mass ejections is currently highly speculative because CMEs and their properties cannot yet be directly observed on other stars. An extreme superflare was observed in X-rays on the Algol binary system on August 30 1997, emitting a total of energy 1.4x 10^{37} erg and making it a great candidate for studying the upper energy limits of stellar superflares in solar-type (GK) stars. A simultaneous increase and subsequent decline in absorption during the flare was also observed and interpretted as being caused by a CME. Here we investigate the dynamic properties of a CME that could explain such time-dependent absorption and appeal to trends revealed from solar flare and CME statistics as a guide. Using the ice-cream cone model that is extensively used in solar physics to describe the three-dimensional CME structure, in combination with the temporal profile of the hydrogen column density evolution, we are able to characterize the CME and estimate its kinetic energy and mass. We examine the mass, kinetic and flare X-ray fluence in the context of solar relations to examine the extent to which such relations can be extrapolated to much more extreme stellar events.

  12. Stellarator Turbulence: Subdominant Eigenmodes and Quasilinear Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueschel, M J; Faber, B J; Citrin, J; Hegna, C C; Terry, P W; Hatch, D R

    2016-02-26

    Owing to complex geometry, gyrokinetic simulations in stellarator geometry produce large numbers of subdominant unstable and stable, near-orthogonal eigenmodes. Here, results based on the full eigenmode spectrum in stellarator geometry are presented for the first time. In the nonlinear state of a low-magnetic-shear ion-temperature-gradient-driven case, a multitude of these modes are active and imprint the system. Turbulent frequency spectra are broadband as a consequence, in addition to a nonlinear, narrow signature at electron frequencies. It is shown that successful quasilinear, mixing-length transport modeling is possible in stellarators, where it is essential to account for all subdominant unstable modes.

  13. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Submitted by

    Physics Week: plenary meeting on physics groups plans for startup (14–15 May 2008) The Physics Objects (POG) and Physics Analysis (PAG) Groups presented their latest developments at the plenary meeting during the Physics Week. In the presentations particular attention was given to startup plans and readiness for data-taking. Many results based on the recent cosmic run were shown. A special Workshop on SUSY, described in a separate section, took place the day before the plenary. At the meeting, we had also two special DPG presentations on “Tracker and Muon alignment with CRAFT” (Ernesto Migliore) and “Calorimeter studies with CRAFT” (Chiara Rovelli). We had also a report from Offline (Andrea Rizzi) and Computing (Markus Klute) on the San Diego Workshop, described elsewhere in this bulletin. Tracking group (Boris Mangano). The level of sophistication of the tracking software increased significantly over the last few months: V0 (K0 and Λ) reconstr...

  14. Massive Black Hole Implicated in Stellar Destruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    New results from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Magellan telescopes suggest that a dense stellar remnant has been ripped apart by a black hole a thousand times as massive as the Sun. If confirmed, this discovery would be a cosmic double play: it would be strong evidence for an intermediate mass black hole, which has been a hotly debated topic, and would mark the first time such a black hole has been caught tearing a star apart. This scenario is based on Chandra observations, which revealed an unusually luminous source of X-rays in a dense cluster of old stars, and optical observations that showed a peculiar mix of elements associated with the X-ray emission. Taken together, a case can be made that the X-ray emission is produced by debris from a disrupted white dwarf star that is heated as it falls towards a massive black hole. The optical emission comes from debris further out that is illuminated by these X-rays. The intensity of the X-ray emission places the source in the "ultraluminous X-ray source" or ULX category, meaning that it is more luminous than any known stellar X-ray source, but less luminous than the bright X-ray sources (active galactic nuclei) associated with supermassive black holes in the nuclei of galaxies. The nature of ULXs is a mystery, but one suggestion is that some ULXs are black holes with masses between about a hundred and several thousand times that of the Sun, a range intermediate between stellar-mass black holes and supermassive black holes located in the nuclei of galaxies. This ULX is in a globular cluster, a very old and crowded conglomeration of stars. Astronomers have suspected that globular clusters could contain intermediate-mass black holes, but conclusive evidence for this has been elusive. "Astronomers have made cases for stars being torn apart by supermassive black holes in the centers of galaxies before, but this is the first good evidence for such an event in a globular cluster," said Jimmy Irwin of the University

  15. Extension of the XGC code for global gyrokinetic simulations in stellarator geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Michael; Moritaka, Toseo; White, Roscoe; Hager, Robert; Ku, Seung-Hoe; Chang, Choong-Seock

    2017-10-01

    In this work, the total-f, gyrokinetic particle-in-cell code XGC is extended to treat stellarator geometries. Improvements to meshing tools and the code itself have enabled the first physics studies, including single particle tracing and flux surface mapping in the magnetic geometry of the heliotron LHD and quasi-isodynamic stellarator Wendelstein 7-X. These have provided the first successful test cases for our approach. XGC is uniquely placed to model the complex edge physics of stellarators. A roadmap to such a global confinement modeling capability will be presented. Single particle studies will include the physics of energetic particles' global stochastic motions and their effect on confinement. Good confinement of energetic particles is vital for a successful stellarator reactor design. These results can be compared in the core region with those of other codes, such as ORBIT3d. In subsequent work, neoclassical transport and turbulence can then be considered and compared to results from codes such as EUTERPE and GENE. After sufficient verification in the core region, XGC will move into the stellarator edge region including the material wall and neutral particle recycling.

  16. Populations of Be stars: stellar evolution of extreme stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martayan, Christophe; Rivinius, Thomas; Baade, Dietrich; Hubert, Anne-Marie; Zorec, Jean

    2011-07-01

    Among the emission-line stars, the classical Be stars known for their extreme properties are remarkable. The Be stars are B-type main sequence stars that have displayed at least once in their life emission lines in their spectrum. Beyond this phenomenological approach some progresses were made on the understanding of this class of stars. With high-technology techniques (interferometry, adaptive optics, multi-objects spectroscopy, spectropolarimetry, high-resolution photometry, etc) from different instruments and space mission such as the VLTI, CHARA, FLAMES, ESPADONS-NARVAL, COROT, MOST, SPITZER, etc, some discoveries were performed allowing to constrain the modeling of the Be stars stellar evolution but also their circumstellar decretion disks. In particular, the confrontation between theory and observations about the effects of the stellar formation and evolution on the main sequence, the metallicity, the magnetic fields, the stellar pulsations, the rotational velocity, and the binarity (including the X-rays binaries) on the Be phenomenon appearance is discussed. The disks observations and the efforts made on their modeling is mentioned. As the life of a star does not finish at the end of the main sequence, we also mention their stellar evolution post main sequence including the gamma-ray bursts. Finally, the different new results and remaining questions about the main physical properties of the Be stars are summarized and possible ways of investigations proposed. The recent and future facilities (XSHOOTER, ALMA, E-ELT, TMT, GMT, JWST, GAIA, etc) and their instruments that may help to improve the knowledge of Be stars are also briefly introduced.

  17. Stargate: An Open Stellar Catalog for NASA Exoplanet Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Angelle

    NASA is invested in a number of space- and ground-based efforts to find extrasolar planets around nearby stars with the ultimate goal of discovering an Earth 2.0 viable for searching for bio-signatures in its atmosphere. With both sky-time and funding resources extremely precious it is crucial that the exoplanet community has the most efficient and functional tools for choosing which stars to observe and then deriving the physical properties of newly discovered planets via the properties of their host stars. Historically, astronomers have utilized a piecemeal set of archives such as SIMBAD, the Washington Double Star Catalog, various exoplanet encyclopedias and electronic tables from the literature to cobble together stellar and planetary parameters in the absence of corresponding images and spectra. The mothballed NStED archive was in the process of collecting such data on nearby stars but its course may have changed if it comes back to NASA mission specific targets and NOT a volume limited sample of nearby stars. This means there is void. A void in the available set of tools many exoplanet astronomers would appreciate to create comprehensive lists of the stellar parameters of stars in our local neighborhood. Also, we need better resources for downloading adaptive optics images and published spectra to help confirm new discoveries and find ideal target stars. With so much data being produced by the stellar and exoplanet community we have decided to propose for the creation of an open access archive in the spirit of the open exoplanet catalog and the Kepler Community Follow-up Program. While we will highly regulate and constantly validate the data being placed into our archive the open nature of its design is intended to allow the database to be updated quickly and have a level of versatility which is necessary in today's fast moving, big data exoplanet community. Here, we propose to develop the Stargate Open stellar catalog for NASA exoplanet exploration.

  18. Stellar matter with pseudoscalar condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrianov, A.A. [Saint-Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Universitat de Barcelona, Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos (ICCUB), Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Andrianov, V.A.; Kolevatov, S.S. [Saint-Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Espriu, D. [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos (ICCUB), Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2016-03-15

    In this work we consider how the appearance of gradients of pseudoscalar condensates in dense systems may possibly influence the transport properties of photons in such a medium as well as other thermodynamic characteristics. We adopt the hypothesis that in regions where the pseudoscalar density gradient is large the properties of photons and fermions are governed by the usual lagrangian extended with a Chern-Simons interaction for photons and a constant axial field for fermions. We find that these new pieces in the lagrangian produce non-trivial reflection coefficients both for photons and fermions when entering or leaving a region where the pseudoscalar has a non-zero gradient. A varying pseudoscalar density may also lead to instability of some fermion and boson modes and modify some properties of the Fermi sea. We speculate that some of these modifications could influence the cooling rate of stellar matter (for instance in compact stars) and have other observable consequences. While quantitative results may depend on the precise astrophysical details most of the consequences are quite universal and consideration should be given to this possibility. (orig.)

  19. Stellar X-Ray Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swank, J.

    2011-01-01

    Most of the stellar end-state black holes, pulsars, and white dwarfs that are X-ray sources should have polarized X-ray fluxes. The degree will depend on the relative contributions of the unresolved structures. Fluxes from accretion disks and accretion disk corona may be polarized by scattering. Beams and jets may have contributions of polarized emission in strong magnetic fields. The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS) will study the effects on polarization of strong gravity of black holes and strong magnetism of neutron stars. Some part of the flux from compact stars accreting from companion stars has been reflected from the companion, its wind, or accretion streams. Polarization of this component is a potential tool for studying the structure of the gas in these binary systems. Polarization due to scattering can also be present in X-ray emission from white dwarf binaries and binary normal stars such as RS CVn stars and colliding wind sources like Eta Car. Normal late type stars may have polarized flux from coronal flares. But X-ray polarization sensitivity is not at the level needed for single early type stars.

  20. Stellar recipes for axion hunters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannotti, Maurizio; Irastorza, Igor G.; Redondo, Javier; Ringwald, Andreas; Saikawa, Ken'ichi

    2017-10-01

    There are a number of observational hints from astrophysics which point to the existence of stellar energy losses beyond the ones accounted for by neutrino emission. These excessive energy losses may be explained by the existence of a new sub-keV mass pseudoscalar Nambu-Goldstone boson with tiny couplings to photons, electrons, and nucleons. An attractive possibility is to identify this particle with the axion—the hypothetical pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson predicted by the Peccei-Quinn solution to the strong CP problem. We explore this possibility in terms of a DFSZ-type axion and of a KSVZ-type axion/majoron, respectively. Both models allow a good global fit to the data, prefering an axion mass around 10 meV. We show that future axion experiments—the fifth force experiment ARIADNE and the helioscope IAXO—can attack the preferred mass range from the lower and higher end, respectively. An axion in this mass range can also be the main constituent of dark matter.

  1. PREFACE: Stellar Atmospheres in the Gaia Era - Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobel, Alex; De Greve, Jean-Pierre; Van Rensbergen, Walter

    2011-12-01

    Volume 328 (2011) of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series provides a record of the invited and contributed talks, and of the posters presented at the GREAT-ESF workshop entitled `Stellar Atmospheres in the Gaia Era: Quantitative Spectroscopy and Comparative Spectrum Modelling' (http://great-esf.oma.be and mirrored at http://spectri.freeshell.org/great-esf). The conference was held on 23-24 June 2011 at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium. 47 scientists from 11 countries around the world attended the workshop. The ESA-Gaia satellite (launch mid 2013) will observe a billion stellar objects in the Galaxy and provide spectrophotometric and high-resolution spectra of an unprecedented number of stars observed with a space-based instrument. The confrontation of these data with theoretical models will significantly advance our understanding of the physics of stellar atmospheres. New stellar populations such as previously unknown emission line stars will be discovered, and fundamental questions such as the basic scenarios of stellar evolution will be addressed with Gaia data. The 33 presentations and 4 main discussion sessions at the workshop addressed important topics in spectrum synthesis methods and detailed line profile calculations urgently needed for accurate modelling of stellar spectra. It brought together leading scientists and students of the stellar physics communities investigating hot and cool star spectra. The scientific programme of the workshop consisted of 23 oral (6 invited) and 10 poster presentations about cool stars (first day; Comparative Spectrum Modelling and Quantitative Spectroscopy of Cool Stars), and hot stars (second day; Quantitative Spectroscopy of Hot Stars). The hot and cool stars communities use different spectrum modelling codes for determining basic parameters such as the effective temperature, surface gravity, iron abundance, and the chemical composition of stellar atmospheres. The chaired sessions of the first day highlighted

  2. Insights on the Stellar Mass-Metallicity Relation from the CALIFA Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Delgado, R. M.; Cid Fernandes, R.; García-Benito, R.; Pérez, E.; de Amorim, A. L.; Cortijo-Ferrero, C.; Lacerda, E. A. D.; López Fernández, R.; Sánchez, S. F.; Vale Asari, N.; Alves, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Galbany, L.; Gallazzi, A.; Husemann, B.; Bekeraite, S.; Jungwiert, B.; López-Sánchez, A. R.; de Lorenzo-Cáceres, A.; Marino, R. A.; Mast, D.; Mollá, M.; del Olmo, A.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; van de Ven, G.; Vílchez, J. M.; Walcher, C. J.; Wisotzki, L.; Ziegler, B.; Collaboration920, CALIFA

    2014-08-01

    We use spatially and temporally resolved maps of stellar population properties of 300 galaxies from the CALIFA integral field survey to investigate how the stellar metallicity (Z sstarf) relates to the total stellar mass (M sstarf) and the local mass surface density (μsstarf) in both spheroidal- and disk-dominated galaxies. The galaxies are shown to follow a clear stellar mass-metallicity relation (MZR) over the whole 109-1012 M ⊙ range. This relation is steeper than the one derived from nebular abundances, which is similar to the flatter stellar MZR derived when we consider only young stars. We also find a strong relation between the local values of μsstarf and Z sstarf (the μZR), betraying the influence of local factors in determining Z sstarf. This shows that both local (μsstarf-driven) and global (M sstarf-driven) processes are important in determining metallicity in galaxies. We find that the overall balance between local and global effects varies with the location within a galaxy. In disks, μsstarf regulates Z sstarf, producing a strong μZR whose amplitude is modulated by M sstarf. In spheroids it is M sstarf that dominates the physics of star formation and chemical enrichment, with μsstarf playing a minor, secondary role. These findings agree with our previous analysis of the star formation histories of CALIFA galaxies, which showed that mean stellar ages are mainly governed by surface density in galaxy disks and by total mass in spheroids.

  3. Collisionless microinstabilities in stellarators II - numerical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Proll, Josefine Henriette Elise; Helander, Per

    2013-01-01

    Microinstabilities exhibit a rich variety of behavior in stellarators due to the many degrees of freedom in the magnetic geometry. It has recently been found that certain stellarators (quasi-isodynamic ones with maximum-$J$ geometry) are partly resilient to trapped-particle instabilities, because fast-bouncing particles tend to extract energy from these modes near marginal stability. In reality, stellarators are never perfectly quasi-isodynamic, and the question thus arises whether they still benefit from enhanced stability. Here the stability properties of Wendelstein 7-X and a more quasi-isodynamic configuration, QIPC, are investigated numerically and compared with the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) and the DIII-D tokamak. In gyrokinetic simulations, performed with the gyrokinetic code GENE in the electrostatic and collisionless approximation, ion-temperature-gradient modes, trapped-electron modes and mixed-type instabilities are studied. Wendelstein 7-X and QIPC exhibit significantly reduce...

  4. Starspots: A Key to the Stellar Dynamo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berdyugina Svetlana V.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic activity similar to that of the Sun is observed on a variety of cool stars with external convection envelopes. Stellar rotation coupled with convective motions generate strong magnetic fields in the stellar interior and produce a multitude of magnetic phenomena including starspots in the photosphere, chromospheric plages, coronal loops, UV, X-ray, and radio emission and flares. Here I review the phenomenon of starspots on different types of cool stars, observational tools and diagnostic techniques for studying starspots as well as starspot properties including their temperatures, areas, magnetic field strengths, lifetimes, active latitudes and longitudes, etc. Evolution of starspots on various time scales allows us to investigate stellar differential rotation, activity cycles, and global magnetic fields. Together these constitute the basis for our understanding of stellar and solar dynamos and provide valuable constraints for theoretical models.

  5. Mass outflows from young stellar objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, S. E.; Strom, K. M.

    1985-01-01

    The process of mass loss from young stellar objects is examined in a review of recent observational investigations and theoretical models. Consideration is given to the interaction of the stellar wind with surrounding molecular clouds, the high degree of collimation seen in some embedded objects, alignment of outflows from stars embedded in the same cloud complex, initially isotropic and intrinsically anisotropic models of mass outflow, and the kinds of observations needed to determine the actual mechanisms involved.

  6. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Futyan

    A lot has transpired on the “Physics” front since the last CMS Bulletin. The summer was filled with preparations of new Monte Carlo samples based on CMSSW_3, the finalization of all the 10 TeV physics analyses [in total 50 analyses were approved] and the preparations for the Physics Week in Bologna. A couple weeks later, the “October Exercise” commenced and ran through an intense two-week period. The Physics Days in October were packed with a number of topics that are relevant to data taking, in a number of “mini-workshops”: the luminosity measurement, the determination of the beam spot and the measurement of the missing transverse energy (MET) were the three main topics.  Physics Week in Bologna The second physics week in 2009 took place in Bologna, Italy, on the week of Sep 7-11. The aim of the week was to review and establish how ready we are to do physics with the early collisions at the LHC. The agenda of the week was thus pac...

  7. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Futyan

    A lot has transpired on the “Physics” front since the last CMS Bulletin. The summer was filled with preparations of new Monte Carlo samples based on CMSSW_3, the finalization of all the 10 TeV physics analyses [in total 50 analyses were approved] and the preparations for the Physics Week in Bologna. A couple weeks later, the “October Exercise” commenced and ran through an intense two-week period. The Physics Days in October were packed with a number of topics that are relevant to data taking, in a number of “mini-workshops”: the luminosity measurement, the determination of the beam spot and the measurement of the missing transverse energy (MET) were the three main topics.   Physics Week in Bologna The second physics week in 2009 took place in Bologna, Italy, on the week of Sep 7-11. The aim of the week was to review and establish (we hoped) the readiness of CMS to do physics with the early collisions at the LHC. The agenda of the...

  8. Minimizing stellarator turbulent transport by geometric optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mynick, H. E.

    2010-11-01

    Up to now, a transport optimized stellarator has meant one optimized to minimize neoclassical transport,ootnotetextH.E. Mynick, Phys. Plasmas 13, 058102 (2006). while the task of also mitigating turbulent transport, usually the dominant transport channel in such designs, has not been addressed, due to the complexity of plasma turbulence in stellarators. However, with the advent of gyrokinetic codes valid for 3D geometries such as GENE,ootnotetextF. Jenko, W. Dorland, M. Kotschenreuther, B.N. Rogers, Phys. Plasmas 7, 1904 (2000). and stellarator optimization codes such as STELLOPT,ootnotetextA. Reiman, G. Fu, S. Hirshman, L. Ku, et al, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 41 B273 (1999). designing stellarators to also reduce turbulent transport has become a realistic possibility. We have been using GENE to characterize the dependence of turbulent transport on stellarator geometry,ootnotetextH.E Mynick, P.A. Xanthopoulos, A.H. Boozer, Phys.Plasmas 16 110702 (2009). and to identify key geometric quantities which control the transport level. From the information obtained from these GENE studies, we are developing proxy functions which approximate the level of turbulent transport one may expect in a machine of a given geometry, and have extended STELLOPT to use these in its cost function, obtaining stellarator configurations with turbulent transport levels substantially lower than those in the original designs.

  9. Ubiquitous time variability of integrated stellar populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Charlie; van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Choi, Jieun

    2015-11-01

    Long-period variable stars arise in the final stages of the asymptotic giant branch phase of stellar evolution. They have periods of up to about 1,000 days and amplitudes that can exceed a factor of three in the I-band flux. These stars pulsate predominantly in their fundamental mode, which is a function of mass and radius, and so the pulsation periods are sensitive to the age of the underlying stellar population. The overall number of long-period variables in a population is directly related to their lifetimes, which is difficult to predict from first principles because of uncertainties associated with stellar mass-loss and convective mixing. The time variability of these stars has not previously been taken into account when modelling the spectral energy distributions of galaxies. Here we construct time-dependent stellar population models that include the effects of long-period variable stars, and report the ubiquitous detection of this expected ‘pixel shimmer’ in the massive metal-rich galaxy M87. The pixel light curves display a variety of behaviours. The observed variation of 0.1 to 1 per cent is very well matched to the predictions of our models. The data provide a strong constraint on the properties of variable stars in an old and metal-rich stellar population, and we infer that the lifetime of long-period variables in M87 is shorter by approximately 30 per cent compared to predictions from the latest stellar evolution models.

  10. A new stellar library in the region of the CO index at 2.3 mu m - New index definition and empirical fitting functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marmol-Queralto, E.; Cardiel, N.; Cenarro, A. J.; Vazdekis, A.; Gorgas, J.; Pedraz, S.; Peletier, R. F.; Sanchez-Blazquez, P.

    2008-01-01

    Context. The analysis of unresolved stellar populations demands evolutionary synthesis models with realistic physical ingredients and extended wavelength coverage. Aims. We quantitatively describe the first CO bandhead at 2.3 mu m to allow stellar population models to provide improved predictions in

  11. NH3 (10-00) in the pre-stellar core L1544

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caselli, P.; Bizzocchi, L.; Keto, E.

    2017-01-01

    Pre-stellar cores represent the initial conditions in the process of star and planet formation, therefore it is important to study their physical and chemical structure. Because of their volatility, nitrogen-bearing molecules are key to study the dense and cold gas present in pre-stellar cores. T...

  12. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Joe Incandela

    There have been two plenary physics meetings since the December CMS week. The year started with two workshops, one on the measurements of the Standard Model necessary for “discovery physics” as well as one on the Physics Analysis Toolkit (PAT). Meanwhile the tail of the “2007 analyses” is going through the last steps of approval. It is expected that by the end of January all analyses will have converted to using the data from CSA07 – which include the effects of miscalibration and misalignment. January Physics Days The first Physics Days of 2008 took place on January 22-24. The first two days were devoted to comprehensive re¬ports from the Detector Performance Groups (DPG) and Physics Objects Groups (POG) on their planning and readiness for early data-taking followed by approvals of several recent studies. Highlights of POG presentations are included below while the activities of the DPGs are covered elsewhere in this bulletin. January 24th was devo...

  13. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Incandela

    The all-plenary format of the CMS week in Cyprus gave the opportunity to the conveners of the physics groups to present the plans of each physics analysis group for tackling early physics analyses. The presentations were complete, so all are encouraged to browse through them on the Web. There is a wealth of information on what is going on, by whom and on what basis and priority. The CMS week was followed by two CMS “physics events”, the ICHEP08 days and the physics days in July. These were two weeks dedicated to either the approval of all the results that would be presented at ICHEP08, or to the review of all the other Monte-Carlo based analyses that were carried out in the context of our preparations for analysis with the early LHC data (the so-called “2008 analyses”). All this was planned in the context of the beginning of a ramp down of these Monte Carlo efforts, in anticipation of data.  The ICHEP days are described below (agenda and talks at: http://indic...

  14. Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cullen, Katherine

    2005-01-01

    Defined as the scientific study of matter and energy, physics explains how all matter behaves. Separated into modern and classical physics, the study attracts both experimental and theoretical physicists. From the discovery of the process of nuclear fission to an explanation of the nature of light, from the theory of special relativity to advancements made in particle physics, this volume profiles 10 pioneers who overcame tremendous odds to make significant breakthroughs in this heavily studied branch of science. Each chapter contains relevant information on the scientist''s childhood, research, discoveries, and lasting contributions to the field and concludes with a chronology and a list of print and Internet references specific to that individual.

  15. Solar-stellar Coffee: A Model For Informal Interdisciplinary Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Travis S.

    2007-12-01

    Initiated at NCAR more than two years ago, solar-stellar coffee is a weekly informal discussion of recent papers that are relevant to solar and stellar physics. The purpose is to generate awareness of new papers, to discuss their connections to past and current work, and to encourage a broader and more interdisciplinary view of solar physics. The discussion is local, but traffic to the website (http://coffee.solar-stellar.org/) is global -- suggesting that solar and stellar astronomers around the world find value in this intelligent pre-filter for astro-ph and other sources (papers are selected by local participants). In addition to enhancing the preprint posting and reading habits of solar physicists (with the associated boost in citation rates), the weekly discussion also provides an interdisciplinary professional development opportunity for graduate students, postdocs, and early career scientists. The web page is driven by a simple set of scripts (available on request), so this interaction model can easily be replicated at other institutions for topics of local interest. The concept of solar-stellar coffee began with support from an NSF Astronomy & Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowship under award AST-0401441. The National Center for Atmospheric Research is a federally funded research and development center sponsored by the National Science Foundation.

  16. The first operation of the superconducting optimized stellarator fusion device Wendelstein 7-X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinger, Thomas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Greifswald (Germany); Ernst-Moritz-Arndt Universitaet, Greifswald (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The confinement of a high-temperature plasma by a suitable magnetic field is the most promising path to master nuclear fusion of Deuterium and Tritium on the scale of a reasonable power station. The two leading confinement concepts are the tokamak and the stellarator. Different from a tokamak, the stellarator does not require a strong current in the plasma but generates the magnetic field by external coils only. This has significant advantages, e.g. better stability properties and inherent steady-state capability. But stellarators need optimization, since ad hoc chosen magnetic field geometries lead to insufficient confinement properties, unfavourable plasma equilibria, and loss of fast particles. Wendelstein 7-X is a large (plasma volume 30 m{sup 3}) stellarator device with shaped superconducting coils that were determined via pure physics optimization criteria. After 19 years of construction, Wendelstein 7-X has now started operation. This talk introduces into the stellarator concept as a candidate for a future fusion power plant, summarizes the optimization principles, and presents the first experimental results with Helium and Hydrogen high temperature plasmas. An outlook on the physics program and the main goals of the project is given, too.

  17. THE K2 M67 STUDY: AN EVOLVED BLUE STRAGGLER IN M67 FROM K2 MISSION ASTEROSEISMOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiner, Emily; Mathieu, Robert D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Stello, Dennis [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Vanderburg, Andrew [Harvard–Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Sandquist, Eric, E-mail: leiner@astro.wisc.edu [Department of Astronomy, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182 (United States)

    2016-11-20

    Yellow straggler stars (YSSs) fall above the subgiant branch in optical color–magnitude diagrams (CMDs), between the blue stragglers and the red giants. YSSs may represent a population of evolved blue stragglers, but none have the direct and precise mass and radius measurements needed to determine their evolutionary states and formation histories. Here we report the first asteroseismic mass and radius measurements of such a star, the yellow straggler S1237 in the open cluster M67. We apply asteroseismic scaling relations to a frequency analysis of the Kepler K2 light curve and find a mass of 2.9 ± 0.2 M {sub ⊙} and a radius of 9.2 ± 0.2 R{sub ⊙}. This is more than twice the mass of the main-sequence turnoff in M67, suggesting that S1237 is indeed an evolved blue straggler. S1237 is the primary in a spectroscopic binary. We update the binary orbital solution and use spectral energy distribution fitting to constrain the CMD location of the secondary star. We find that the secondary is likely an upper main-sequence star near the turnoff, but a slightly hotter blue straggler companion is also possible. We then compare the asteroseismic mass of the primary to its mass from CMD fitting, finding that the photometry implies a mass and radius more than 2 σ below the asteroseismic measurement. Finally, we consider formation mechanisms for this star and suggest that S1237 may have formed from dynamical encounters resulting in stellar collisions or a binary merger.

  18. Debris disks in open stellar clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlova, Nadiya Igorivna

    Indirect searches for planets (such as radial velocity studies) show that their formation may be quite common. The planets are however too small and faint to be seen against the glare of their host stars; therefore, their direct detection is limited to the nearest systems. Alternatively one can study planets by studying their "by-product"---dust. We see raw material available for planets around young stars, and debris dust around old stars betraying planet-induced activity. Dust has a larger surface area per unit mass compared with a large body; it can be spread over a larger solid angle, intercepting more starlight and emitting much more light via reprocessing. By studying dusty disks we can infer the presence of planets at larger distances. Here we present results of a survey conducted with the Spitzer Space Telescope of debris disks in three open clusters. With ages of 30--100 Myrs, these clusters are old enough that the primordial dust should have accreted into planetesimals, fallen onto the star, or been blown away due to a number of physical processes. The dust we observe must come from collisions or sublimation of larger bodies. The purpose of this study is to investigate the dust evolution in the terrestrial planet zone, analogous to the Zodiacal cloud in our Solar system. We are most sensitive to this zone because the peak of a 125 K black body radiation falls into the primary pass-band of our survey---24mm. We investigate the fraction and amount of the infra-red excesses around intermediate- to solar-mass stars in open stellar clusters with well defined ages. The results are analyzed in the context of disk studies at other wavelengths and ages, providing an understanding of the time-scale for disk dissipation and ultimately planet building and frequency.

  19. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Guenther Dissertori

    The time period between the last CMS week and this June was one of intense activity with numerous get-together targeted at addressing specific issues on the road to data-taking. The two series of workshops, namely the “En route to discoveries” series and the “Vertical Integration” meetings continued.   The first meeting of the “En route to discoveries” sequence (end 2007) had covered the measurements of the Standard Model signals as necessary prerequisite to any claim of signals beyond the Standard Model. The second meeting took place during the Feb CMS week and concentrated on the commissioning of the Physics Objects, whereas the third occurred during the April Physics Week – and this time the theme was the strategy for key new physics signatures. Both of these workshops are summarized below. The vertical integration meetings also continued, with two DPG-physics get-togethers on jets and missing ET and on electrons and photons. ...

  20. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Hill

    2012-01-01

    The months that have passed since the last CMS Bulletin have been a very busy and exciting time for CMS physics. We have gone from observing the very first 8TeV collisions produced by the LHC to collecting a dataset of the collisions that already exceeds that recorded in all of 2011. All in just a few months! Meanwhile, the analysis of the 2011 dataset and publication of the subsequent results has continued. These results come from all the PAGs in CMS, including searches for the Higgs boson and other new phenomena, that have set the most stringent limits on an ever increasing number of models of physics beyond the Standard Model including dark matter, Supersymmetry, and TeV-scale gravity scenarios, top-quark physics where CMS has overtaken the Tevatron in the precision of some measurements, and bottom-quark physics where CMS made its first discovery of a new particle, the Ξ*0b baryon (candidate event pictured below). Image 2:  A Ξ*0b candidate event At the same time POGs and PAGs...

  1. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    2011-01-01

    Since the last CMS Week, all physics groups have been extremely active on analyses based on the full 2010 dataset, with most aiming for a preliminary measurement in time for the winter conferences. Nearly 50 analyses were approved in a “marathon” of approval meetings during the first two weeks of March, and the total number of approved analyses reached 90. The diversity of topics is very broad, including precision QCD, Top, and electroweak measurements, the first observation of single Top production at the LHC, the first limits on Higgs production at the LHC including the di-tau final state, and comprehensive searches for new physics in a wide range of topologies (so far all with null results unfortunately). Most of the results are based on the full 2010 pp data sample, which corresponds to 36 pb-1 at √s = 7 TeV. This report can only give a few of the highlights of a very rich physics program, which is listed below by physics group...

  2. Free-boundary equilibria from stellarator vacuum fields given by their boundary geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, M. I.; Drevlak, M.; Kasilov, S. V.; Kernbichler, W.; Nemov, V. V.; Nührenberg, J.; Zille, R.

    2017-06-01

    A stellarator vacuum magnetic field determined by its last closed magnetic surface can be reconstructed by finding a remote surface-current density. Small changes of the surface-current density can then easily be made. These intermediate steps before finding a modular coil system enable free-boundary finite-β equilibria to be calculated so that their physical properties can be assessed.

  3. Stellar Firework in a Whirlwind

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    VLT Image of Supernova in Beautiful Spiral Galaxy NGC 1288 Stars do not like to be alone. Indeed, most stars are members of a binary system, in which two stars circle around each other in an apparently never-ending cosmic ballet. But sometimes, things can go wrong. When the dancing stars are too close to each other, one of them can start devouring its partner. If the vampire star is a white dwarf - a burned-out star that was once like our Sun - this greed can lead to a cosmic catastrophe: the white dwarf explodes as a Type Ia supernova. In July 2006, ESO's Very Large Telescope took images of such a stellar firework in the galaxy NGC 1288. The supernova - designated SN 2006dr - was at its peak brightness, shining as bright as the entire galaxy itself, bearing witness to the amount of energy released. ESO PR Photo 39/07 ESO PR Photo 39/07 SN 2006dr in NGC 1288 NGC 1288 is a rather spectacular spiral galaxy, seen almost face-on and showing multiple spiral arms pirouetting around the centre. Bearing a strong resemblance to the beautiful spiral galaxy NGC 1232, it is located 200 million light-years away from our home Galaxy, the Milky Way. Two main arms emerge from the central regions and then progressively split into other arms when moving further away. A small bar of stars and gas runs across the centre of the galaxy. The first images of NGC 1288, obtained during the commissioning period of the FORS instrument on ESO's VLT in 1998, were of such high quality that they have allowed astronomers [1] to carry out a quantitative analysis of the morphology of the galaxy. They found that NGC 1288 is most probably surrounded by a large dark matter halo. The appearance and number of spiral arms are indeed directly related to the amount of dark matter in the galaxy's halo. The supernova was first spotted by amateur astronomer Berto Monard. On the night of 17 July 2006, Monard used his 30-cm telescope in the suburbs of Pretoria in South Africa and discovered the supernova as an

  4. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Hill

    2012-01-01

      2012 has started off as a very busy year for the CMS Physics Groups. Planning for the upcoming higher luminosity/higher energy (8 TeV) operation of the LHC and relatively early Rencontres de Moriond are the high-priority activities for the group at the moment. To be ready for the coming 8-TeV data, CMS has made a concerted effort to perform and publish analyses on the 5 fb−1 dataset recorded in 2011. This has resulted in the submission of 16 papers already, including nine on the search for the Higgs boson. In addition, a number of preliminary results on the 2011 dataset have been released to the public. The Exotica and SUSY groups approved several searches for new physics in January, such as searches for W′ and exotic highly ionising particles. These were highlighted at a CERN seminar given on 24th  January. Many more analyses, from all the PAGs, including the newly formed SMP (Standard Model Physics) and FSQ (Forward and Small-x QCD), were approved in February. The ...

  5. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Hill

    2012-01-01

      The period since the last CMS Bulletin has been historic for CMS Physics. The pinnacle of our physics programme was an observation of a new particle – a strong candidate for a Higgs boson – which has captured worldwide interest and made a profound impact on the very field of particle physics. At the time of the discovery announcement on 4 July, 2012, prominent signals were observed in the high-resolution H→γγ and H→ZZ(4l) modes. Corroborating excess was observed in the H→W+W– mode as well. The fermionic channel analyses (H→bb, H→ττ), however, yielded less than the Standard Model (SM) expectation. Collectively, the five channels established the signal with a significance of five standard deviations. With the exception of the diphoton channel, these analyses have all been updated in the last months and several new channels have been added. With improved analyses and more than twice the i...

  6. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Darin Acosta

    2010-01-01

    The collisions last year at 900 GeV and 2.36 TeV provided the long anticipated collider data to the CMS physics groups. Quite a lot has been accomplished in a very short time. Although the delivered luminosity was small, CMS was able to publish its first physics paper (with several more in preparation), and commence the commissioning of physics objects for future analyses. Many new performance results have been approved in advance of this CMS Week. One remarkable outcome has been the amazing agreement between out-of-the-box data with simulation at these low energies so early in the commissioning of the experiment. All of this is testament to the hard work and preparation conducted beforehand by many people in CMS. These analyses could not have happened without the dedicated work of the full collaboration on building and commissioning the detector, computing, and software systems combined with the tireless work of many to collect, calibrate and understand the data and our detector. To facilitate the efficien...

  7. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    the PAG conveners

    2011-01-01

    The delivered LHC integrated luminosity of more than 1 inverse femtobarn by summer and more than 5 by the end of 2011 has been a gold mine for the physics groups. With 2011 data, we have submitted or published 14 papers, 7 others are in collaboration-wide review, and 75 Physics Analysis Summaries have been approved already. They add to the 73 papers already published based on the 2010 and 2009 datasets. Highlights from each physics analysis group are described below. Heavy ions Many important results have been obtained from the first lead-ion collision run in 2010. The published measurements include the first ever indications of Υ excited state suppression (PRL synopsis), long-range correlation in PbPb, and track multiplicity over a wide η range. Preliminary results include the first ever measurement of isolated photons (showing no modification), J/ψ suppression including the separation of the non-prompt component, further study of jet fragmentation, nuclear modification factor...

  8. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Demortier

    Physics-wise, the CMS week in December was dominated by discussions of the analyses that will be carried out in the “next six months”, i.e. while waiting for the first LHC collisions.  As presented in December, analysis approvals based on Monte Carlo simulation were re-opened, with the caveat that for this work to be helpful to the goals of CMS, it should be carried out using the new software (CMSSW_2_X) and associated samples.  By the end of the week, the goal for the physics groups was set to be the porting of our physics commissioning methods and plans, as well as the early analyses (based an integrated luminosity in the range 10-100pb-1) into this new software. Since December, the large data samples from CMSSW_2_1 were completed. A big effort by the production group gave a significant number of events over the end-of-year break – but also gave out the first samples with the fast simulation. Meanwhile, as mentioned in December, the arrival of 2_2 meant that ...

  9. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    2010-01-01

    The Physics Groups are actively engaged on analyses of the first data from the LHC at 7 TeV, targeting many results for the ICHEP conference taking place in Paris this summer. The first large batch of physics approvals is scheduled for this CMS Week, to be followed by four more weeks of approvals and analysis updates leading to the start of the conference in July. Several high priority analysis areas were organized into task forces to ensure sufficient coverage from the relevant detector, object, and analysis groups in the preparation of these analyses. Already some results on charged particle correlations and multiplicities in 7 TeV minimum bias collisions have been approved. Only one small detail remains before ICHEP: further integrated luminosity delivered by the LHC! Beyond the Standard Model measurements that can be done with these data, the focus changes to the search for new physics at the TeV scale and for the Higgs boson in the period after ICHEP. Particle Flow The PFT group is focusing on the ...

  10. The supernova: A stellar spectacle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straka, W. C.

    1976-01-01

    The life of a star, the supernova, related objects and their importance in astronomy and science in general are discussed. Written primarily for science teachers of secondary school chemistry, physics, and earth sciences, the booklet contains a glossary, reference sources, suggested topics for discussion, and projects for individual or group assignment.

  11. Electron Capture Cross Sections for Stellar Nucleosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. G. Giannaka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the first stage of this work, we perform detailed calculations for the cross sections of the electron capture on nuclei under laboratory conditions. Towards this aim we exploit the advantages of a refined version of the proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation (pn-QRPA and carry out state-by-state evaluations of the rates of exclusive processes that lead to any of the accessible transitions within the chosen model space. In the second stage of our present study, we translate the abovementioned e--capture cross sections to the stellar environment ones by inserting the temperature dependence through a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution describing the stellar electron gas. As a concrete nuclear target we use the 66Zn isotope, which belongs to the iron group nuclei and plays prominent role in stellar nucleosynthesis at core collapse supernovae environment.

  12. Magnetospheric outflows in young stellar objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanni, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Different classes of outflows are associated with the magnetospheric activity of accreting T Tauri protostars. Stellar winds are accelerated along the open field lines anchored in the stellar surface; disk winds (extended or X-type) can be launched along the open magnetic surfaces threading the accretion disk; another type of ejection can arise from the region of interaction of the closed magnetosphere with the accretion disk (magnetospheric ejections, conical winds), where the magnetic surfaces undergo quasiperiodic episodes of inflation and reconnection. In this chapter I will present the main dynamical properties of these different types of outflow. Two main issues will be addressed. First, I will try to understand if these ejection phenomena can account for the origin of the jets often observed in young forming stellar systems. Second, I will evaluate the impact of these outflows on the angular momentum evolution of the central protostar.

  13. Magnetospheric outflows in young stellar objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zanni Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Different classes of outflows are associated with the magnetospheric activity of accreting T Tauri protostars. Stellar winds are accelerated along the open field lines anchored in the stellar surface; disk winds (extended or X-type can be launched along the open magnetic surfaces threading the accretion disk; another type of ejection can arise from the region of interaction of the closed magnetosphere with the accretion disk (magnetospheric ejections, conical winds, where the magnetic surfaces undergo quasiperiodic episodes of inflation and reconnection. In this chapter I will present the main dynamical properties of these different types of outflow. Two main issues will be addressed. First, I will try to understand if these ejection phenomena can account for the origin of the jets often observed in young forming stellar systems. Second, I will evaluate the impact of these outflows on the angular momentum evolution of the central protostar.

  14. Stellar spectral classification of previously unclassified stars GSC 4461-698 and GSC 4466-870

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, Darren Moser

    Stellar spectral classification is one of the first efforts undertaken to begin defining the physical characteristics of stars. However, many stars lack even this basic information, which is the foundation for later research to constrain stellar effective temperatures, masses, radial velocities, the number of stars in the system, and age. This research obtained visible-λ stellar spectra via the testing and commissioning of a Santa Barbara Instruments Group (SBIG) Self-Guiding Spectrograph (SGS) at the UND Observatory. Utilizing a 16-inch-aperture telescope on Internet Observatory #3, the SGS obtained spectra of GSC 4461-698 and GSC 4466-870 in the low-resolution mode using an 18-µm wide slit with dispersion of 4.3 Å/pixel, resolution of 8 Å, and a spectral range from 3800-7500 Å. Observational protocols include automatic bias/dark frame subtraction for each stellar spectrum obtained. This was followed by spectral averaging to obtain a combined spectrum for each star observed. Image calibration and spectral averaging was performed using the software programs, Maxim DL, Image J, Microsoft Excel, and Winmk. A wavelength calibration process was used to obtain spectra of an Hg/Ne source that allowed the conversion of spectrograph channels into wavelengths. Stellar emission and absorption lines, such as those for hydrogen (H) and helium (He), were identified, extracted, and rectified. Each average spectrum was compared to the MK stellar spectral standards to determine an initial spectral classification for each star. The hope is that successful completion of this project will allow long-term stellar spectral observations to begin at the UND Observatory.

  15. A teaching module about stellar structure and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colantonio, Arturo; Galano, Silvia; Leccia, Silvio; Puddu, Emanuella; Testa, Italo

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a teaching module about stellar structure, functioning and evolution. Drawing from literature in astronomy education, we designed the activities around three key ideas: spectral analysis, mechanical and thermal equilibrium, energy and nuclear reactions. The module is divided into four phases, in which the key ideas for describing stars' functioning and physical mechanisms are gradually introduced. The activities (20 hours) build on previously learned laws in mechanics, thermodynamics, and electromagnetism and help students combine them meaningfully in order to get a complete picture of processes that happens in stars. The module was piloted with two intact classes of secondary school students (N = 59 students, 17-18 years old), using a ten-question multiple-choice questionnaire as research instrument. Results support the effectiveness of the proposed activities. Implications for the teaching of advanced physics topics using stars as fruitful context are briefly discussed.

  16. Students Excited by Stellar Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    In the constellation of Ophiuchus, above the disk of our Milky Way Galaxy, there lurks a stellar corpse spinning 30 times per second -- an exotic star known as a radio pulsar. This object was unknown until it was discovered last week by three high school students. These students are part of the Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC) project, run by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, WV, and West Virginia University (WVU). The pulsar, which may be a rare kind of neutron star called a recycled pulsar, was discovered independently by Virginia students Alexander Snider and Casey Thompson, on January 20, and a day later by Kentucky student Hannah Mabry. "Every day, I told myself, 'I have to find a pulsar. I better find a pulsar before this class ends,'" said Mabry. When she actually made the discovery, she could barely contain her excitement. "I started screaming and jumping up and down." Thompson was similarly expressive. "After three years of searching, I hadn't found a single thing," he said, "but when I did, I threw my hands up in the air and said, 'Yes!'." Snider said, "It actually feels really neat to be the first person to ever see something like that. It's an uplifting feeling." As part of the PSC, the students analyze real data from NRAO's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to find pulsars. The students' teachers -- Debra Edwards of Sherando High School, Leah Lorton of James River High School, and Jennifer Carter of Rowan County Senior High School -- all introduced the PSC in their classes, and interested students formed teams to continue the work. Even before the discovery, Mabry simply enjoyed the search. "It just feels like you're actually doing something," she said. "It's a good feeling." Once the pulsar candidate was reported to NRAO, Project Director Rachel Rosen took a look and agreed with the young scientists. A followup observing session was scheduled on the GBT. Snider and Mabry traveled to West Virginia to assist in the

  17. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Christopher Hill

    2013-01-01

    Since the last CMS Bulletin, the CMS Physics Analysis Groups have completed more than 70 new analyses, many of which are based on the complete Run 1 dataset. In parallel the Snowmass whitepaper on projected discovery potential of CMS for HL-LHC has been completed, while the ECFA HL-LHC future physics studies has been summarised in a report and nine published benchmark analyses. Run 1 summary studies on b-tag and jet identification, quark-gluon discrimination and boosted topologies have been documented in BTV-13-001 and JME-13-002/005/006, respectively. The new tracking alignment and performance papers are being prepared for submission as well. The Higgs analysis group produced several new results including the search for ttH with H decaying to ZZ, WW, ττ+bb (HIG-13-019/020) where an excess of ~2.5σ is observed in the like-sign di-muon channel, and new searches for high-mass Higgs bosons (HIG-13-022). Search for invisible Higgs decays have also been performed both using the associ...

  18. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Hill

    2013-01-01

    In the period since the last CMS Bulletin, the LHC – and CMS – have entered LS1. During this time, CMS Physics Analysis Groups have performed more than 40 new analyses, many of which are based on the complete 8 TeV dataset delivered by the LHC in 2012 (and in some cases on the full Run 1 dataset). These results were shown at, and well received by, several high-profile conferences in the spring of 2013, including the inaugural meeting of the Large Hadron Collider    Physics Conference (LHCP) in Barcelona, and the 26th International Symposium on Lepton Photon Interactions at High Energies (LP) in San Francisco. In parallel, there have been significant developments in preparations for Run 2 of the LHC and on “future physics” studies for both Phase 1 and Phase 2 upgrades of the CMS detector. The Higgs analysis group produced five new results for LHCP including a new H-to-bb search in VBF production (HIG-13-011), ttH with H to γ&ga...

  19. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. D'Hondt

    The Electroweak and Top Quark Workshop (16-17th of July) A Workshop on Electroweak and Top Quark Physics, dedicated on early measurements, took place on 16th-17th July. We had more than 40 presentations at the Workshop, which was an important milestone for 2007 physics analyses in the EWK and TOP areas. The Standard Model has been tested empirically by many previous experiments. Observables which are nowadays known with high precision will play a major role for data-based CMS calibrations. A typical example is the use of the Z to monitor electron and muon reconstruction in di-lepton inclusive samples. Another example is the use of the W mass as a constraint for di-jets in the kinematic fitting of top-quark events, providing information on the jet energy scale. The predictions of the Standard Model, for what concerns proton collisions at the LHC, are accurate to a level that the production of W/Z and top-quark events can be used as a powerful tool to commission our experiment. On the other hand the measure...

  20. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Hill

    2013-01-01

    The period since the last CMS bulletin has seen the end of proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy 8 TeV, a successful proton-lead collision run at 5 TeV/nucleon, as well as a “reference” proton run at 2.76 TeV. With these final LHC Run 1 datasets in hand, CMS Physics Analysis Groups have been busy analysing these data in preparation for the winter conferences. Moreover, despite the fact that the pp run only concluded in mid-December (and there was consequently less time to complete data analyses), CMS again made a strong showing at the Rencontres de Moriond in La Thuile (EW and QCD) where nearly 40 new results were presented. The highlight of these preliminary results was the eagerly anticipated updated studies of the properties of the Higgs boson discovered in July of last year. Meanwhile, preparations for Run 2 and physics performance studies for Phase 1 and Phase 2 upgrade scenarios are ongoing. The Higgs analysis group produced updated analyses on the full Run 1 dataset (~25 f...

  1. Stellar Astrophysics for the Local Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, A.; Herrero, A.; Sánchez, F.

    2011-06-01

    1. Fundamentals of stellar evolution theory: understanding the HRD C. Chiosi; 2. Observations of the most luminous stars in local group galaxies P. Massey; 3. Quantitative spectroscopy of the brightest blue supergiant stars in galaxies R. P. Kudritzki; 4. Calibration of the extragalactic distance scale B. F. Madore and W. L. Freedman; 5. Dwarf galaxies G. S. Da Costa; 6. Resolved stellar populations of the luminous galaxies in the local group M. Mateo; 7. Chemical evolution of the ISM in nearby galaxies E. D. Skillman; 8. Populations of massive stars and the interstellar medium C. Leitherer.

  2. Colliding Stellar Wind Models with Orbital Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkin, Francis P.; O'Connor, Brendan

    2018-01-01

    We present thin-shell models for the collision between two ballistic stellar winds, including orbital motion.The stellar orbits are assumed circular, so that steady-state solutions exist in the rotating frame, where we include centrifugal and Coriolis forces. Exact solutions for the pre-shock winds are incorporated. Here we discuss 2-D model results for equal wind momentum-loss rates, although we allow for the winds to have distinct speeds and mass loss rates. For these unequal wind conditions, we obtain a clear violation of skew-symmetry, despite equal momentum loss rates, due to the Coriolis force.

  3. Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA): Convective Boundaries, Element Diffusion, and Massive Star Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Bill; Schwab, Josiah; Bauer, Evan B.; Bildsten, Lars; Blinnikov, Sergei; Duffell, Paul; Farmer, R.; Goldberg, Jared A.; Marchant, Pablo; Sorokina, Elena; Thoul, Anne; Townsend, Richard H. D.; Timmes, F. X.

    2018-02-01

    We update the capabilities of the software instrument Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) and enhance its ease of use and availability. Our new approach to locating convective boundaries is consistent with the physics of convection, and yields reliable values of the convective-core mass during both hydrogen- and helium-burning phases. Stars with MType II supernova properties. These capabilities are exhibited with exploratory models of pair-instability supernovae, pulsational pair-instability supernovae, and the formation of stellar-mass black holes. The applicability of MESA is now widened by the capability to import multidimensional hydrodynamic models into MESA. We close by introducing software modules for handling floating point exceptions and stellar model optimization, as well as four new software tools - MESA-Web, MESA-Docker, pyMESA, and mesastar.org - to enhance MESA's education and research impact.

  4. Stellar feedback strongly alters the amplification and morphology of galactic magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Kung-Yi; Hayward, Christopher C.; Hopkins, Philip F.; Quataert, Eliot; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Kereš, Dušan

    2018-01-01

    Using high-resolution magnetohydrodynamic simulations of idealized, non-cosmological galaxies, we investigate how cooling, star formation and stellar feedback affect galactic magnetic fields. We find that the amplification histories, saturation values and morphologies of the magnetic fields vary considerably depending on the baryonic physics employed, primarily because of differences in the gas density distribution. In particular, adiabatic runs and runs with a subgrid (effective equation of state) stellar feedback model yield lower saturation values and morphologies that exhibit greater large-scale order compared with runs that adopt explicit stellar feedback and runs with cooling and star formation but no feedback. The discrepancies mostly lie in gas denser than the galactic average, which requires cooling and explicit fragmentation to capture. Independent of the baryonic physics included, the magnetic field strength scales with gas density as B ∝ n2/3, suggesting isotropic flux freezing or equipartition between the magnetic and gravitational energies during the field amplification. We conclude that accurate treatments of cooling, star formation and stellar feedback are crucial for obtaining the correct magnetic field strength and morphology in dense gas, which, in turn, is essential for properly modelling other physical processes that depend on the magnetic field, such as cosmic ray feedback.

  5. Magnetism, dynamo action and the solar-stellar connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Allan Sacha; Browning, Matthew K.

    2017-09-01

    The Sun and other stars are magnetic: magnetism pervades their interiors and affects their evolution in a variety of ways. In the Sun, both the fields themselves and their influence on other phenomena can be uncovered in exquisite detail, but these observations sample only a moment in a single star's life. By turning to observations of other stars, and to theory and simulation, we may infer other aspects of the magnetism—e.g., its dependence on stellar age, mass, or rotation rate—that would be invisible from close study of the Sun alone. Here, we review observations and theory of magnetism in the Sun and other stars, with a partial focus on the "Solar-stellar connection": i.e., ways in which studies of other stars have influenced our understanding of the Sun and vice versa. We briefly review techniques by which magnetic fields can be measured (or their presence otherwise inferred) in stars, and then highlight some key observational findings uncovered by such measurements, focusing (in many cases) on those that offer particularly direct constraints on theories of how the fields are built and maintained. We turn then to a discussion of how the fields arise in different objects: first, we summarize some essential elements of convection and dynamo theory, including a very brief discussion of mean-field theory and related concepts. Next we turn to simulations of convection and magnetism in stellar interiors, highlighting both some peculiarities of field generation in different types of stars and some unifying physical processes that likely influence dynamo action in general. We conclude with a brief summary of what we have learned, and a sampling of issues that remain uncertain or unsolved.

  6. Magnetism, dynamo action and the solar-stellar connection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Sacha Brun

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Sun and other stars are magnetic: magnetism pervades their interiors and affects their evolution in a variety of ways. In the Sun, both the fields themselves and their influence on other phenomena can be uncovered in exquisite detail, but these observations sample only a moment in a single star’s life. By turning to observations of other stars, and to theory and simulation, we may infer other aspects of the magnetism—e.g., its dependence on stellar age, mass, or rotation rate—that would be invisible from close study of the Sun alone. Here, we review observations and theory of magnetism in the Sun and other stars, with a partial focus on the “Solar-stellar connection”: i.e., ways in which studies of other stars have influenced our understanding of the Sun and vice versa. We briefly review techniques by which magnetic fields can be measured (or their presence otherwise inferred in stars, and then highlight some key observational findings uncovered by such measurements, focusing (in many cases on those that offer particularly direct constraints on theories of how the fields are built and maintained. We turn then to a discussion of how the fields arise in different objects: first, we summarize some essential elements of convection and dynamo theory, including a very brief discussion of mean-field theory and related concepts. Next we turn to simulations of convection and magnetism in stellar interiors, highlighting both some peculiarities of field generation in different types of stars and some unifying physical processes that likely influence dynamo action in general. We conclude with a brief summary of what we have learned, and a sampling of issues that remain uncertain or unsolved.

  7. The origin of discrete multiple stellar populations in globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekki, K.; Jeřábková, T.; Kroupa, P.

    2017-10-01

    Recent observations have revealed that at least several old globular clusters (GCs) in the Galaxy have discrete distributions of stars along the Mg-Al anticorrelation. In order to discuss this recent observation, we construct a new one-zone GC formation model in which the maximum stellar mass (mmax) in the initial mass function of stars in a forming GC depends on the star formation rate, as deduced from independent observations. We investigate the star formation histories of forming GCs. The principal results are as follows. About 30 Myr after the formation of the first generation (1G) of stars within a particular GC, new stars can be formed from ejecta from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars of 1G. However, the formation of this second generation (2G) of stars can last only for [10-20] Myr because the most massive SNe of 2G expel all of the remaining gas. The third generation (3G) of stars are then formed from AGB ejecta ≈30 Myr after the truncation of 2G star formation. This cycle of star formation followed by its truncation by SNe can continue until all AGB ejecta is removed from the GC by some physical process. Thus, it is inevitable that GCs have discrete multiple stellar populations in the [Mg/Fe]-[Al/Fe] diagram. Our model predicts that low-mass GCs are unlikely to have discrete multiple stellar populations, and young massive clusters may not have massive OB stars owing to low mmax (<[20-30] M⊙) during the secondary star formation.

  8. Proxima Centauri reloaded: Unravelling the stellar noise in radial velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damasso, M.; Del Sordo, F.

    2017-03-01

    Context. The detection and characterisation of Earth-like planets with Doppler signals of the order of 1 m s-1 currently represent one of the greatest challenge for extrasolar-planet hunters. As results for such findings are often controversial, it is desirable to provide independent confirmations of the discoveries. Testing different models for the suppression of non-Keplerian stellar signals usually plaguing radial velocity data is essential to ensuring findings are robust and reproducible. Aims: Using an alternative treatment of the stellar noise to that discussed in the discovery paper, we re-analyse the radial velocity dataset that led to the detection of a candidate terrestrial planet orbiting the star Proxima Centauri. We aim to confirm the existence of this outstanding planet, and test the existence of a second planetary signal. Methods: Our technique jointly modelled Keplerian signals and residual correlated signals in radial velocities using Gaussian processes. We analysed only radial velocity measurements without including other ancillary data in the fitting procedure. In a second step, we have compared our outputs with results coming from photometry, to provide a consistent physical interpretation. Our analysis was performed in a Bayesian framework to quantify the robustness of our findings. Results: We show that the correlated noise can be successfully modelled as a Gaussian process regression, and contains a periodic term modulated on the stellar rotation period and characterised by an evolutionary timescale of the order of one year. Both findings appear to be robust when compared with results obtained from archival photometry, thus providing a reliable description of the noise properties. We confirm the existence of a coherent signal described by a Keplerian orbit equation that can be attributed to the planet Proxima b, and provide an independent estimate of the planetary parameters. Our Bayesian analysis dismisses the existence of a second planetary

  9. Ambitious Survey Spots Stellar Nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    -dimensional geometry of the Magellanic system. Chris Evans from the VMC team adds: "The VISTA images will allow us to extend our studies beyond the inner regions of the Tarantula into the multitude of smaller stellar nurseries nearby, which also harbour a rich population of young and massive stars. Armed with the new, exquisite infrared images, we will be able to probe the cocoons in which massive stars are still forming today, while also looking at their interaction with older stars in the wider region." The wide-field image shows a host of different objects. The bright area above the centre is the Tarantula Nebula itself, with the RMC 136 cluster of massive stars in its core. To the left is the NGC 2100 star cluster. To the right is the tiny remnant of the supernova SN1987A (eso1032). Below the centre are a series of star-forming regions including NGC 2080 - nicknamed the "Ghost Head Nebula" - and the NGC 2083 star cluster. The VISTA Magellanic Cloud Survey is one of six huge near-infrared surveys of the southern sky that will take up most of the first five years of operations of VISTA. Notes [1] VISTA ― the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy ― is the newest telescope at ESO's Paranal Observatory in northern Chile. VISTA is a survey telescope working at near-infrared wavelengths and is the world's largest survey telescope. Its large mirror, wide field of view and very sensitive detectors will reveal a completely new view of the southern sky. The telescope is housed on the peak adjacent to the one hosting ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) and shares the same exceptional observing conditions. VISTA has a main mirror that is 4.1 m across. In photographic terms it can be thought of as a 67-megapixel digital camera with a 13 000 mm f/3.25 mirror lens. More information ESO, the European Southern Observatory, is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world's most productive astronomical observatory. It is supported by 14 countries

  10. The “Building Blocks” of Stellar Halos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle A. Oman

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The stellar halos of galaxies encode their accretion histories. In particular, the median metallicity of a halo is determined primarily by the mass of the most massive accreted object. We use hydrodynamical cosmological simulations from the apostle project to study the connection between the stellar mass, the metallicity distribution, and the stellar age distribution of a halo and the identity of its most massive progenitor. We find that the stellar populations in an accreted halo typically resemble the old stellar populations in a present-day dwarf galaxy with a stellar mass ∼0.2–0.5 dex greater than that of the stellar halo. This suggests that had they not been accreted, the primary progenitors of stellar halos would have evolved to resemble typical nearby dwarf irregulars.

  11. SCOPE - Stellar Classification Online Public Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harenberg, Steven

    2010-01-01

    The Astronomical Photographic Data Archive (APDA) has been established to be the primary North American archive for the collections of astronomical photographic plates. Located at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI) in Rosman, NC, the archive contains hundreds of thousands stellar spectra, many of which have never before been classified. To help classify the vast number of stars, the public is invited to participate in a distributed computing online environment called Stellar Classification Online - Public Exploration (SCOPE). Through a website, the participants will have a tutorial on stellar spectra and practice classifying. After practice, the participants classify spectra on photographic plates uploaded online from APDA. These classifications will be recorded in a database where the results from many users will be statistically analyzed. Stars with known spectral types will be included to test the reliability of classifications. The process of building the database of stars from APDA, which the citizen scientist will be able to classify, includes: scanning the photographic plates, orienting the plate to correct for the change in right ascension/declination using Aladin, stellar HD catalog identification using Simbad, marking the boundaries for each spectrum, and setting up the image for use on the website. We will describe the details of this process.

  12. Advanced Stellar Compass - Alenia Mars Express

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilsgaard, Søren; Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif

    1998-01-01

    This document, submitted in reply to an Alenia R.f.P., is a proposal to implement the Advanced Stellar Compass (ASC) in the Mars Express mission.The Mars Express is an ESA dedicated mission to Mars scientific investigation.The ASC is a very advanced instrument designed by the Space Instrumentation...

  13. Summary of the Advanced Stellar Compass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif

    1997-01-01

    The current version of the Advanced Stellar Compass (ASC) is an improved implementation of the instrument developed for the Danish Geomagnetic Research Satellite Ørsted. The Ørsted version was successfully tested in space on the NASA sounding rocket "Thunderstorm III", that was launched September 2...

  14. Robust Modeling of Stellar Triples in PHOEBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Kyle E.; Prsa, Andrej; Horvat, Martin; Stassun, Keivan G.

    2017-01-01

    The number of known mutually-eclipsing stellar triple and multiple systems has increased greatly during the Kepler era. These systems provide significant opportunities to both determine fundamental stellar parameters of benchmark systems to unprecedented precision as well as to study the dynamical interaction and formation mechanisms of stellar and planetary systems. Modeling these systems to their full potential, however, has not been feasible until recently. Most existing available codes are restricted to the two-body binary case and those that do provide N-body support for more components make sacrifices in precision by assuming no stellar surface distortion. We have completely redesigned and rewritten the PHOEBE binary modeling code to incorporate support for triple and higher-order systems while also robustly modeling data with Kepler precision. Here we present our approach, demonstrate several test cases based on real data, and discuss the current status of PHOEBE's support for modeling these types of systems. PHOEBE is funded in part by NSF grant #1517474.

  15. The Ancient stellar population of Leo A.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saha, Abhijit; Fiorentino, Giuliana; Tolstoy, Eline; Cole, Andrew

    The primary goal of our proposal is the characterisation of the oldest stellar populations in Leo A using the properties of ancient RR Lyrae variable stars as tracers. Well known and long established correlations exist between the periods and luminosities of RR Lyrae variable stars and their ages

  16. The resolved stellar population of Leo A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolstoy, E

    1996-01-01

    New observations of the resolved stellar population of the extremely metal-poor Magellanic dwarf irregular galaxy Leo A in Thuan-Gunn r, g, i, and narrowband Ha filters are presented. Using the recent Cepheid variable star distance determination to Leo A by Hoessel et al., we are able to create an

  17. The evolution of runaway stellar collision products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glebbeek, E.; Gaburov, E.; de Mink, S.E.; Pols, O.R.; Portegies Zwart, S.F.

    2009-01-01

    In the cores of young dense star clusters, repeated stellar collisions involving the same object can occur. It has been suggested that this leads to the formation of an intermediate-mass black hole. To verify this scenario we compute the detailed evolution of the merger remnant of three sequences,

  18. Exploring the Morphology of RAVE Stellar Spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matijevic, G.; Zwitter, T.; Bienayme, O.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Boeche, C.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G.; Grebel, E. K.; Helmi, A.; Munari, U.; Navarro, J.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G.; Siebert, A.; Siviero, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Watson, F. G.; Williams, M.; Wyse, R. F. G.

    The RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) is a medium-resolution (R similar to 7500) spectroscopic survey of the Milky Way that has already obtained over half a million stellar spectra. They present a randomly selected magnitude-limited sample, so it is important to use a reliable and automated

  19. Galactic stellar haloes in the CDM model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cooper, A. P.; Cole, S.; Frenk, C. S.; White, S. D. M.; Helly, J.; Benson, A. J.; De Lucia, G.; Helmi, A.; Jenkins, A.; Navarro, J. F.; Springel, V.; Wang, J.

    2010-01-01

    We present six simulations of galactic stellar haloes formed by the tidal disruption of accreted dwarf galaxies in a fully cosmological setting. Our model is based on the Aquarius project, a suite of high-resolution N-body simulations of individual dark matter haloes. We tag subsets of particles in

  20. THE STELLAR KINEMATICS OF GALACTIC DISKS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOTTEMA, R

    Stellar velocity dispersion measurements of a sample of 12 galactic disks are summarized. The observed radial functionality is parameterized such that one dispersion value is assigned to each galaxy. Comparison of the galaxy dispersion with absolute magnitude and maximum rotation reveals that the

  1. Stellar Relics from the Early Galaxy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Galactic halo; chemical evolution; metal poor stars; chemical abundances; inner halo; outer halo; globular clusters; ultra-faint dwarf galaxies. Abstract. We reviewed the recent progress in the field of stellar/galactic archeology, which is a study of the relics from the early galaxy. The oldest and most pristine ...

  2. Stellar chemical signatures and hierarchical galaxy formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venn, KA; Irwin, M; Shetrone, MD; Tout, CA; Hill, [No Value; Tolstoy, E

    To compare the chemistries of stars in the Milky Way dwarf spheroidal (dSph) satellite galaxies with stars in the Galaxy, we have compiled a large sample of Galactic stellar abundances from the literature. When kinematic information is available, we have assigned the stars to standard Galactic

  3. Evolution and seismic tools for stellar astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Monteiro, Mario JPFG

    2008-01-01

    A collection of articles published by the journal "Astrophysics and Space Science, Volume 316, Number 1-4", August 2008. This work covers 10 evolution codes and 9 oscillation codes. It is suitable for researchers and research students working on the modeling of stars and on the implementation of seismic test of stellar models.

  4. Measuring Stellar Rotation Periods with Kepler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M. B.; Gizon, L.; Schunker, H.

    2013-01-01

    We measure rotation periods for 12151 stars in the Kepler field, based on photometric variability caused by stellar activity. Our analysis returns stable rotation periods over at least six out of eight quarters of Kepler data. This large sample of stars enables us to study rotation periods...

  5. The Advanced Stellar Compass, Development and Operations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif; Liebe, Carl Christian

    1996-01-01

    this demand the Advanced Stellar Compass (ASC), a fully autonomous miniature star tracker, was developed. This ASC is capable of both solving the "lost in space" problem and determine the attitude with arcseconds precision. The development, principles of operation and instrument autonomy of the ASC...

  6. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    V.Ciulli

    2011-01-01

    The main programme of the Physics Week held between 16th and 20th May was a series of topology-oriented workshops on di-leptons, di-photons, inclusive W, and all-hadronic final states. The goal of these workshops was to reach a common understanding for the set of objects (ID, cleaning...), the handling of pile-up, calibration, efficiency and purity determination, as well as to revisit critical common issues such as the trigger. Di-lepton workshop Most analysis groups use a di-lepton trigger or a combination of single and di-lepton triggers in 2011. Some groups need to collect leptons with as low PT as possible with strong isolation and identification requirements as for Higgs into WW at low mass, others with intermediate PT values as in Drell-Yan studies, or high PT as in the Exotica group. Electron and muon reconstruction, identification and isolation, was extensively described in the workshop. For electrons, VBTF selection cuts for low PT and HEEP cuts for high PT were discussed, as well as more complex d...

  7. The impact of pollution on stellar evolution models

    OpenAIRE

    Dotter, Aaron; Chaboyer, Brian

    2003-01-01

    An approach is introduced for incorporating the concept of stellar pollution into stellar evolution models. The approach involves enhancing the metal content of the surface layers of stellar models. In addition, the surface layers of stars in the mass range of 0.5-2.0 Solar masses are mixed to an artificial depth motivated by observations of lithium abundance. The behavior of polluted stellar evolution models is explored assuming the pollution occurs after the star has left the fully convecti...

  8. Effect of different cosmologies on the galaxy stellar mass function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Amanda R.; Gruppioni, C.; Ribeiro, M. B.; Pozzetti, L.; February, S.; Ilbert, O.; Pozzi, F.

    2017-11-01

    The goal of this paper is to understand how the underlying cosmological models may affect the analysis of the stellar masses in galaxies. We computed the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF) assuming the observationally constrained Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) `giant-void' models and compared them with the results from the standard cosmological model. Based on a sample of 220 000 KS-band selected galaxies from the UltraVISTA data, we computed the GSMF up to z ≈ 4 assuming different cosmologies, since, from a cosmological perspective, the two quantities that affect the stellar mass estimation are the luminosity distance and time. The results show that the stellar mass decreased on average by ˜1.1-27.1 per cent depending on the redshift value. For the GSMF, we fitted a double-Schechter function to the data and verified that a change is only seen in two parameters, M^{*} and φ ^{*}1, but always with less than a 3σ significance. We also carried out an additional analysis for the blue and red populations in order to verify a possible change on the galaxy evolution scenario. The results showed that the GSMF derived with the red population sample is more affected by the change of cosmology than the blue one. We also found out that the LTB models overestimated the number density of galaxies with M 10^{11} M_{⊙}, as compared to the standard model over the whole studied redshift range. This feature is noted in the complete, red plus blue, sample. Once we compared the general behaviour of the GSMF derived from the alternative cosmological models with the one based on the standard cosmology we found out that the variation was not large enough to change the shape of the function. Hence, the GSMF was found to be robust under this change of cosmology. This means that all physical interpretations of the GSMF based in the standard cosmological model are valid on the LTB cosmology.

  9. A new stellarator coil design tool using space curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Caoxiang; Hudson, Stuart; Breslau, Joshua; Lazerson, Samuel; Song, Yuntao; Wan, Yuanxi

    2016-10-01

    Finding easy-to-build coils has always been critical for stellarator design. Conventional approaches assume a toroidal ``winding'' surface. Either a surface current potential is constructed using a Green's function; or a discrete set of filamentary coils lying on the winding surface is non-linearly optimized. The winding surface concept ensures that the coils are separated from the plasma surface; however, requiring the coils lie on a given winding surface may overly constrain the coil optimization process. In this work, we investigate whether a winding surface is required. Our starting point is to represent each discrete coil as an arbitrary closed curve embedded in 3D space. From the Fundamental Theorem for Curves, such curves are uniquely described by the curvature and torsion functions. Our representation does not need a winding surface and can allow coils to evolve arbitrarily. We have constructed different penalty functions, F, that incorporate both the `physics' and `engineering' constraints. The first and second derivatives of F with respect to the parameters describing the coils are constructed analytically and are exploited to enable fast optimization algorithms for finding minima. Illustrations of coils for W7X and other stellarators will be presented. China Scholarship Council.

  10. Precision Stellar and Planetary Astrophysics with TESS and Gaia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Daniel J.; KELT Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    There is an ever-present need for precise and accurate stellar parameters, particularly for low-mass stars. For example, some fraction of measured M dwarf radii are inflated and have effective temperatures that are suppressed relative to predictions from models, but the physical cause of these effects is still uncertain. This is exacerbated by the fact that only a handful of M dwarfs -- all from double-lined eclipsing binaries (EBs) -- have both masses and radii measured to 3% or better. In the Gaia era, we can now measure model-independent masses and radii for single-lined EBs, thus expanding the sample of stars with precisely measured parameters by at least an order of magnitude, in principle. I will illustrate how one can combine Gaia parallaxes and broad-band stellar fluxes with the eclipse and radial velocity data to provide model-independent masses and radii. I will present our expected achievable constraints on the masses and radii of single-lined EBs. I will discuss both our current effort to turn several dozens of single-lined EBs discovered by the KELT and HATNet surveys into a catalog of exquisitely characterized stars and exoplanets as well as the prospects for achieving similar science for a much larger number of systems with TESS.

  11. Predictions of Stellar Occultations by Irregular Satellites up to 2020

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Gomes, Altair; Assafin, Marcelo; Beauvalet, Laurene; Desmars, Josselin; Vieira-Martins, Roberto; Camargo, Julio I.; Morgado, Bruno Eduardo; Braga Ribas, Felipe

    2017-06-01

    Due to their orbital configurations, it is believed the irregular satellites of the Giant Planets were captured by their host planets during the Solar System evolution. It is important to know their physical parameters such as size, shape, albedo and composition in an attempt to access their origin. The best ground-based technique to do so is by stellar occultations.With the release of the GAIA catalog and the publication of a large database of positions of irregular satellites (Gomes-Júnior et al., 2015), the position of the stars and the ephemeris of the satellites are improved to better predict stellar occultation.The present work predicts such events for the 8 largest irregular satellites of Jupiter and the largest irregular satellite of Saturn, Phoebe, up to 2020. Another motivation is the passage of Jupiter in front of the Galatic Plane in 2019-2020 increasing a lot the number of stars to be occulted. The same happens with Saturn in 2018.

  12. Asteroseismology of old open clusters with Kepler: direct estimate of the integrated red giant branch mass-loss in NGC 6791 and 6819

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miglio, A.; Brogaard, K.; Stello, D.; Chaplin, W.J.; D'Antona, F.; Montalbán, J.; Basu, S.; Bressan, A.; Grundahl, F.; Pinsonneault, M.; Serenelli, A.M.; Elsworth, Y.; Hekker, S.; Kallinger, T.; Mosser, B.; Ventura, P.; Bonanno, A.; Noels, A.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Szabo, R.; Li, J.; McCauliff, S.; Middour, C.K.; Kjeldsen, H.

    2012-01-01

    Mass-loss of red giant branch (RGB) stars is still poorly determined, despite its crucial role in the chemical enrichment of galaxies. Thanks to the recent detection of solar-like oscillations in G-K giants in open clusters with Kepler, we can now directly determine stellar masses for a

  13. IMF shape constraints from stellar populations and dynamics from CALIFA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyubenova, M.; Martín-Navarro, I.; van de Ven, G.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Galbany, L.; Gallazzi, A.; García-Benito, R.; González Delgado, R.; Husemann, B.; La Barbera, F.; Marino, R. A.; Mast, D.; Mendez-Abreu, J.; Peletier, R. F. P.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Sánchez, S. F.; Trager, S. C.; van den Bosch, R. C. E.; Vazdekis, A.; Walcher, C. J.; Zhu, L.; Zibetti, S.; Ziegler, B.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Collaboration, CALIFA

    2016-01-01

    In this Paper, we describe how we use stellar dynamics information to constrain the shape of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) in a sample of 27 early-type galaxies from the CALIFA survey. We obtain dynamical and stellar mass-to-light ratios, Υdyn and Υ*, over a homogenous aperture of 0.5 Re.

  14. Stellar population synthesis models between 2.5 and 5 mu m based on the empirical IRTF stellar library

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeck, B.; Vazdekis, A.; Peletier, R. F.; Knapen, J. H.; Falcon-Barroso, J.

    2015-01-01

    We present the first single-burst stellar population models in the infrared wavelength range between 2.5 and 5 mu m which are exclusively based on empirical stellar spectra. Our models take as input 180 spectra from the stellar IRTF (Infrared Telescope Facility) library. Our final single-burst

  15. BONNSAI: correlated stellar observables in Bayesian methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, F. R. N.; Castro, N.; Fossati, L.; Langer, N.; de Koter, A.

    2017-02-01

    In an era of large spectroscopic surveys of stars and big data, sophisticated statistical methods become more and more important in order to infer fundamental stellar parameters such as mass and age. Bayesian techniques are powerful methods because they can match all available observables simultaneously to stellar models while taking prior knowledge properly into account. However, in most cases it is assumed that observables are uncorrelated which is generally not the case. Here, we include correlations in the Bayesian code Bonnsai by incorporating the covariance matrix in the likelihood function. We derive a parametrisation of the covariance matrix that, in addition to classical uncertainties, only requires the specification of a correlation parameter that describes how observables co-vary. Our correlation parameter depends purely on the method with which observables have been determined and can be analytically derived in some cases. This approach therefore has the advantage that correlations can be accounted for even if information for them are not available in specific cases but are known in general. Because the new likelihood model is a better approximation of the data, the reliability and robustness of the inferred parameters are improved. We find that neglecting correlations biases the most likely values of inferred stellar parameters and affects the precision with which these parameters can be determined. The importance of these biases depends on the strength of the correlations and the uncertainties. For example, we apply our technique to massive OB stars, but emphasise that it is valid for any type of stars. For effective temperatures and surface gravities determined from atmosphere modelling, we find that masses can be underestimated on average by 0.5σ and mass uncertainties overestimated by a factor of about 2 when neglecting correlations. At the same time, the age precisions are underestimated over a wide range of stellar parameters. We conclude that

  16. The Search for Stellar Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villadsen, Jacqueline Rose

    2017-05-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) may dramatically impact habitability and atmospheric composition of planets around magnetically active stars, including young solar analogs and many M dwarfs. Theoretical predictions of such effects are limited by the lack of observations of stellar CMEs. This thesis addresses this gap through a search for the spectral and spatial radio signatures of CMEs on active M dwarfs. Solar CMEs produce radio bursts with a distinctive spectral signature, narrow-band plasma emission that drifts to lower frequency as a CME expands outward. To search for analogous events on nearby stars, I worked on system design, software, and commissioning for the Starburst project, a wideband single-baseline radio interferometry backend dedicated to stellar observations. In addition, I led a survey of nearby active M dwarfs with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), detecting coherent radio bursts in 13 out of 23 epochs, over a total of 58 hours. This survey's ultra-wide bandwidth (0.23-6.0 GHz) dynamic spectroscopy, unprecedented for stellar observations, revealed diverse behavior in the time-frequency plane. Flare star UV Ceti produced complex, luminous events reminiscent of brown dwarf aurorae; AD Leo sustained long-duration, intense, narrow-band "storms"; and YZ CMi emitted a burst with substructure with rapid frequency drift, resembling solar Type III bursts, which are attributed to electrons moving at speeds of order 10% of the speed of light. To search for the spatial signature of CMEs, I led 8.5-GHz observations with the Very Long Baseline Array simultaneous to 24 hours of the VLA survey. This program detected non-thermal continuum emission from the stars in all epochs, as well as continuum flares on AD Leo and coherent bursts on UV Ceti, enabling measurement of the spatial offset between flaring and quiescent emission. These observations demonstrate the diversity of stellar transients that can be expected in time-domain radio surveys, especially

  17. INSIGHTS ON THE STELLAR MASS-METALLICITY RELATION FROM THE CALIFA SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González Delgado, R. M.; García-Benito, R.; Pérez, E.; Cortijo-Ferrero, C.; López Fernández, R.; Sánchez, S. F. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Cid Fernandes, R.; De Amorim, A. L.; Lacerda, E. A. D.; Vale Asari, N. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, P.O. Box 476, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Alves, J. [University of Vienna, Türkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Bland-Hawthorn, J. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Galbany, L. [Millennium Institute of Astrophysics and Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Gallazzi, A. [INAF—Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo Enrico Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Husemann, B. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching b. München (Germany); Bekeraite, S. [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Jungwiert, B. [Astronomical Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Bocni II 1401, 14131 Prague (Czech Republic); López-Sánchez, A. R. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); De Lorenzo-Cáceres, A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Marino, R. A. [CEI Campus Moncloa, UCM-UPM, Departamento de Astrofísica y CC. de la Atmósfera, Facultad de CC. Físicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Collaboration: CALIFA collaboration920; and others

    2014-08-10

    We use spatially and temporally resolved maps of stellar population properties of 300 galaxies from the CALIFA integral field survey to investigate how the stellar metallicity (Z {sub *}) relates to the total stellar mass (M {sub *}) and the local mass surface density (μ{sub *}) in both spheroidal- and disk-dominated galaxies. The galaxies are shown to follow a clear stellar mass-metallicity relation (MZR) over the whole 10{sup 9}-10{sup 12} M {sub ☉} range. This relation is steeper than the one derived from nebular abundances, which is similar to the flatter stellar MZR derived when we consider only young stars. We also find a strong relation between the local values of μ{sub *} and Z {sub *} (the μZR), betraying the influence of local factors in determining Z {sub *}. This shows that both local (μ{sub *}-driven) and global (M {sub *}-driven) processes are important in determining metallicity in galaxies. We find that the overall balance between local and global effects varies with the location within a galaxy. In disks, μ{sub *} regulates Z {sub *}, producing a strong μZR whose amplitude is modulated by M {sub *}. In spheroids it is M {sub *} that dominates the physics of star formation and chemical enrichment, with μ{sub *} playing a minor, secondary role. These findings agree with our previous analysis of the star formation histories of CALIFA galaxies, which showed that mean stellar ages are mainly governed by surface density in galaxy disks and by total mass in spheroids.

  18. Modular Coils and Plasma Configurations for Quasi-axisymmetric Stellarators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L.P. Ku and A.H. Boozer

    2010-09-10

    Characteristics of modular coils for quasi-axisymmetric stellarators that are related to the plasma aspect ratio, number of field periods and rotational transform have been examined systematically. It is observed that, for a given plasma aspect ratio, the coil complexity tends to increase with the increased number of field periods. For a given number of field periods, the toroidal excursion of coil winding is reduced as the plasma aspect ratio is increased. It is also clear that the larger the coil-plasma separation is, the more complex the coils become. It is further demonstrated that it is possible to use other types of coils to complement modular coils to improve both the physics and the modular coil characteristics.

  19. Global magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in the L-2M stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhailov, M. I., E-mail: mikhaylov-mi@nrcki.ru [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Shchepetov, S. V., E-mail: shch@fpl.gpi.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Nührenberg, C.; Nührenberg, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Analysis of global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities in the L-2M stellarator (Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences) is presented. The properties of free-boundary equilibria states are outlined, the stability conditions for small-scale modes are briefly discussed, and the number of trapped particles is estimated. All the magnetic configurations under study are stable against ballooning modes. It is shown that global ideal internal MHD modes can be found reliably only in Mercier unstable plasmas. In plasma that is stable with respect to the Mercier criterion, global unstable modes that are localized in the vicinity of the free plasma boundary and are not associated with any rational magnetic surface inside the plasma (the so-called peeling modes) can be found. The radial structure of all perturbations under study is almost entirely determined by the poloidal coupling of harmonics. The results of calculations are compared with the available experimental data.

  20. Prediction of stellar masses with Finch and Skea geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kileba Matondo, D.; Mafa Takisa, P.; Maharaj, S. D.; Ray, S.

    2017-10-01

    The Finch and Skea spacetime produces stars which are physically reasonable. In this investigation we use a particular solution of the generalised Finch and Skea model of Maharaj et al. (Int. J. Mod. Phys. D 26:1750014, 2016) to study the mass and radius. We generate masses and radii for three cases: charged anisotropic, charged isotropic and uncharged isotropic distributions for observed compact objects. Physical features of the model show the non-negligible influence of charge and anisotropy on the mass and radius within the stellar objects. The model parameters values are fixed based on physical requirements and stability conditions of compact stars. We show that the model is consistent with the observed masses of selected pulsars PSR J1614-2230, PSR J1903+0327, 4U 1820-30, Cen X-3, EXO 1785-248 and LMC X-4. The investigation reveals that the Finch and Skea geometry is physically relevant for the study of observed compact stars.

  1. Stellar Streams Discovered in the Dark Energy Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shipp, N.; et al.

    2018-01-09

    We perform a search for stellar streams around the Milky Way using the first three years of multi-band optical imaging data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We use DES data covering $\\sim 5000$ sq. deg. to a depth of $g > 23.5$ with a relative photometric calibration uncertainty of $< 1 \\%$. This data set yields unprecedented sensitivity to the stellar density field in the southern celestial hemisphere, enabling the detection of faint stellar streams to a heliocentric distance of $\\sim 50$ kpc. We search for stellar streams using a matched-filter in color-magnitude space derived from a synthetic isochrone of an old, metal-poor stellar population. Our detection technique recovers four previously known thin stellar streams: Phoenix, ATLAS, Tucana III, and a possible extension of Molonglo. In addition, we report the discovery of eleven new stellar streams. In general, the new streams detected by DES are fainter, more distant, and lower surface brightness than streams detected by similar techniques in previous photometric surveys. As a by-product of our stellar stream search, we find evidence for extra-tidal stellar structure associated with four globular clusters: NGC 288, NGC 1261, NGC 1851, and NGC 1904. The ever-growing sample of stellar streams will provide insight into the formation of the Galactic stellar halo, the Milky Way gravitational potential, as well as the large- and small-scale distribution of dark matter around the Milky Way.

  2. Onion-peeling inversion of stellarator images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, K. C.; Diaz-Pacheco, R. R.; Kornbluth, Y.; Volpe, F. A.; Wei, Y.

    2016-11-01

    An onion-peeling technique is developed for inferring the emissivity profile of a stellarator plasma from a two-dimensional image acquired through a CCD or CMOS camera. Each pixel in the image is treated as an integral of emission along a particular line-of-sight. Additionally, the flux surfaces in the plasma are partitioned into discrete layers, each of which is assumed to have uniform emissivity. If the topology of the flux surfaces is known, this construction permits the development of a system of linear equations that can be solved for the emissivity of each layer. We present initial results of this method applied to wide-angle visible images of the Columbia Neutral Torus (CNT) stellarator plasma.

  3. Mass outflows associated with young stellar objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Stephen E.; Strom, Karen M.

    1987-01-01

    Properties of optical and molecular outflows associated with young stellar objects are discussed with emphasis placed on new results concerning outflow energetics, collimating structures, and the relationship between the outflow properties and the magnetic field geometry characterizing the host molecular clouds. Particular consideration is given to the IRAS observations of YSO mass outflows, which reveal extended far-IR emission associated with high-velocity molecular gas and in which a number of disk-like structures associated with YSO outflow sources were resolved. The disk axes appeared to lie along the direction of molecular outflows or stellar jets. The mass outflows showed a remarkable tendency to align along the direction of the magnetic fields which thread their host molecular clouds, suggesting that the cloud magnetic field must play an important role in determining the flattening (and perhaps the rotation) of protostellar structures.

  4. Simulating Stellar Cluster Formation and Early Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Joshua; McMillan, Stephen L. W.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Ibañez-Mejia, Juan; Portegies Zwart, Simon; Pellegrino, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    We present our current development of a model of stellar cluster formation and evolution in the presence of stellar feedback. We have integrated the MHD code Flash into the Astrophysical Multi-Use Software Environment (AMUSE) and coupled the gas dynamics to an N-body code using a Fujii gravity bridge. Further we have integrated feedback from radiation using the FERVENT module for Flash, supernovae by thermal and kinetic energy injection, and winds by kinetic energy injection. Finally we have developed a method of implementing star formation using the Jeans criterion of the gas. We present initial results from our cluster formation model in a cloud using self-consistent boundary conditions drawn from a model of supernova-driven interstellar turbulence.

  5. Resolving Multiple Stellar Populations in G1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Michael

    2017-08-01

    The most luminous and massive compact stellar system in the Local Group is G1, a satellite of M31. It has been speculated that G1 is the remnant nucleus of a tidally stripped dwarf elliptical galaxy. As such, G1 is key to understanding both the evolution of dwarf galaxies and the hierarchical assembly of bright spirals. Recently, new U-B-V-I broad band imaging techniques have revealed multiple stellar populations in Milky Way globular clusters. We propose to obtain new deep WFC3/UVIS F336W and F814W images, to be combined with archival WFC3 data, to probe the star formation and enrichment history of G1. This study will yield new and definitive insights into the origin and evolution of G1, the relationship of globular clusters to dwarf galaxies, and the formation of luminous spirals like M31 and the Milky Way.

  6. Energetic Particle Estimates for Stellar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngblood, Allison; Chamberlin, Phil; Woods, Tom

    2018-01-01

    In the heliosphere, energetic particles are accelerated away from the Sun during solar flares and/or coronal mass ejections where they frequently impact the Earth and other solar system bodies. Solar (or stellar) energetic particles (SEPs) not only affect technological assets, but also influence mass loss and chemistry in planetary atmospheres (e.g., depletion of ozone). SEPs are increasingly recognized as an important factor in assessing exoplanet habitability, but we do not yet have constraints on SEP emission from any stars other than the Sun. Until indirect measurements are available, we must assume solar-like particle production and apply correlations between solar flares and SEPs detected near Earth to stellar flares. We present improved scaling relations between solar far-UV flare flux and >10 MeV proton flux near Earth. We apply these solar scaling relations to far-UV flares from exoplanet host stars and discuss the implications for modeling chemistry and mass loss in exoplanet atmospheres.

  7. Stellar evolution as seen by mixed modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosser Benoît

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of mixed modes in subgiants and red giants allows us to monitor stellar evolution from the main sequence to the asymptotic giant branch and draw seismic evolutionary tracks. Quantified asteroseismic definitions that characterize the change in the evolutionary stages have been defined. This seismic information can now be used for stellar modelling, especially for studying the energy transport in the helium burning core or for specifying the inner properties of stars all along their evolution. Modelling will also allow us to study stars identified in the helium subflash stage, high-mass stars either arriving or quitting the secondary clump, or stars that could be in the blue-loop stage.

  8. Onion-peeling inversion of stellarator images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, K C; Diaz-Pacheco, R R; Kornbluth, Y; Volpe, F A; Wei, Y

    2016-11-01

    An onion-peeling technique is developed for inferring the emissivity profile of a stellarator plasma from a two-dimensional image acquired through a CCD or CMOS camera. Each pixel in the image is treated as an integral of emission along a particular line-of-sight. Additionally, the flux surfaces in the plasma are partitioned into discrete layers, each of which is assumed to have uniform emissivity. If the topology of the flux surfaces is known, this construction permits the development of a system of linear equations that can be solved for the emissivity of each layer. We present initial results of this method applied to wide-angle visible images of the Columbia Neutral Torus (CNT) stellarator plasma.

  9. SMASH: Survey of the MAgellanic Stellar History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidever, David L.; Olsen, Knut; Walker, Alistair R.; Vivas, A. Katherina; Blum, Robert D.; Kaleida, Catherine; Choi, Yumi; Conn, Blair C.; Gruendl, Robert A.; Bell, Eric F.; Besla, Gurtina; Muñoz, Ricardo R.; Gallart, Carme; Martin, Nicolas F.; Olszewski, Edward W.; Saha, Abhijit; Monachesi, Antonela; Monelli, Matteo; de Boer, Thomas J. L.; Johnson, L. Clifton; Zaritsky, Dennis; Stringfellow, Guy S.; van der Marel, Roeland P.; Cioni, Maria-Rosa L.; Jin, Shoko; Majewski, Steven R.; Martinez-Delgado, David; Monteagudo, Lara; Noël, Noelia E. D.; Bernard, Edouard J.; Kunder, Andrea; Chu, You-Hua; Bell, Cameron P. M.; Santana, Felipe; Frechem, Joshua; Medina, Gustavo E.; Parkash, Vaishali; Serón Navarrete, J. C.; Hayes, Christian

    2017-11-01

    The Large and Small Magellanic Clouds are unique local laboratories for studying the formation and evolution of small galaxies in exquisite detail. The Survey of the MAgellanic Stellar History (SMASH) is an NOAO community Dark Energy Camera (DECam) survey of the Clouds mapping 480 deg2 (distributed over ˜2400 square degrees at ˜20% filling factor) to ˜24th mag in ugriz. The primary goals of SMASH are to identify low surface brightness stellar populations associated with the stellar halos and tidal debris of the Clouds, and to derive spatially resolved star formation histories. Here, we present a summary of the survey, its data reduction, and a description of the first public Data Release (DR1). The SMASH DECam data have been reduced with a combination of the NOAO Community Pipeline, the PHOTRED automated point-spread-function photometry pipeline, and custom calibration software. The astrometric precision is ˜15 mas and the accuracy is ˜2 mas with respect to the Gaia reference frame. The photometric precision is ˜0.5%-0.7% in griz and ˜1% in u with a calibration accuracy of ˜1.3% in all bands. The median 5σ point source depths in ugriz are 23.9, 24.8, 24.5, 24.2, and 23.5 mag. The SMASH data have already been used to discover the Hydra II Milky Way satellite, the SMASH 1 old globular cluster likely associated with the LMC, and extended stellar populations around the LMC out to R ˜ 18.4 kpc. SMASH DR1 contains measurements of ˜100 million objects distributed in 61 fields. A prototype version of the NOAO Data Lab provides data access and exploration tools.

  10. Stellarator optimization under several criteria using metaheuristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castejón, F.; Gómez-Iglesias, A.; Vega-Rodríguez, M. A.; Jiménez, J. A.; Velasco, J. L.; Romero, J. A.

    2013-01-01

    A new algorithm based on metaheuristics has been developed to perform stellarator optimization. This algorithm, which is inspired by the behaviour of bees and is called distributed asynchronous bees, has been used for the optimization under three criteria: minimization of B × grad(B) drift, Mercier and ballooning stability. This algorithm is tested by partially optimizing TJ-II and, afterwards, a three-period optimized configuration is found by performing a full optimization that starts from a three-period heliac.

  11. Clustering in the stellar abundance space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesso, R.; Rocha-Pinto, H. J.

    2018-03-01

    We have studied the chemical enrichment history of the interstellar medium through an analysis of the n-dimensional stellar abundance space. This work is a non-parametric analysis of the stellar chemical abundance space. The main goal is to study the stars from their organization within this abundance space. Within this space, we seek to find clusters (in a statistical sense), that is, stars likely to share similar chemo-evolutionary history, using two methods: the hierarchical clustering and the principal component analysis. We analysed some selected abundance surveys available in the literature. For each sample, we labelled the group of stars according to its average abundance curve. In all samples, we identify the existence of a main enrichment pattern of the stars, which we call chemical enrichment flow. This flow is set by the structured and well-defined mean rate at which the abundances of the interstellar medium increase, resulting from the mixture of the material ejected from the stars and stellar mass-loss and interstellar medium gas. One of the main results of our analysis is the identification of subgroups of stars with peculiar chemistry. These stars are situated in regions outside of the enrichment flow in the abundance space. These peculiar stars show a mismatch in the enrichment rate of a few elements, such as Mg, Si, Sc and V, when compared to the mean enrichment rate of the other elements of the same stars. We believe that the existence of these groups of stars with peculiar chemistry may be related to the accretion of planetary material on to stellar surfaces or may be due to production of the same chemical element by different nucleosynthetic sites.

  12. SMASH: Survey of the MAgellanic Stellar History

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nidever, David L.; Olsen, Knut; Blum, Robert D.; Saha, Abhijit [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Walker, Alistair R.; Vivas, A. Katherina [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Kaleida, Catherine [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Choi, Yumi; Besla, Gurtina; Olszewski, Edward W. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson AZ, 85721 (United States); Conn, Blair C. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Gruendl, Robert A. [National Center for Supercomputing Applications, 1205 West Clark Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Bell, Eric F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 1085 S. University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1107 (United States); Muñoz, Ricardo R. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Camino del Observatorio 1515, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile); Gallart, Carme; Monelli, Matteo [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Martin, Nicolas F. [Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, UMR 7550, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Monachesi, Antonela [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); De Boer, Thomas J. L. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Johnson, L. Clifton, E-mail: dnidever@noao.edu [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, UC San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA, 92093-0424 (United States); and others

    2017-11-01

    The Large and Small Magellanic Clouds are unique local laboratories for studying the formation and evolution of small galaxies in exquisite detail. The Survey of the MAgellanic Stellar History (SMASH) is an NOAO community Dark Energy Camera (DECam) survey of the Clouds mapping 480 deg{sup 2} (distributed over ∼2400 square degrees at ∼20% filling factor) to ∼24th mag in ugriz . The primary goals of SMASH are to identify low surface brightness stellar populations associated with the stellar halos and tidal debris of the Clouds, and to derive spatially resolved star formation histories. Here, we present a summary of the survey, its data reduction, and a description of the first public Data Release (DR1). The SMASH DECam data have been reduced with a combination of the NOAO Community Pipeline, the PHOTRED automated point-spread-function photometry pipeline, and custom calibration software. The astrometric precision is ∼15 mas and the accuracy is ∼2 mas with respect to the Gaia reference frame. The photometric precision is ∼0.5%–0.7% in griz and ∼1% in u with a calibration accuracy of ∼1.3% in all bands. The median 5 σ point source depths in ugriz are 23.9, 24.8, 24.5, 24.2, and 23.5 mag. The SMASH data have already been used to discover the Hydra II Milky Way satellite, the SMASH 1 old globular cluster likely associated with the LMC, and extended stellar populations around the LMC out to R  ∼ 18.4 kpc. SMASH DR1 contains measurements of ∼100 million objects distributed in 61 fields. A prototype version of the NOAO Data Lab provides data access and exploration tools.

  13. Solar and stellar flare observations using WATCH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, Niels; Rao, A. R.

    1988-01-01

    The Danish experiment WATCH (Wide Angle Telescope for Cosmic Hard X-rays) is to be flown on board the Soviet satellite GRANAT in middle of 1989. The performance characteristics of the WATCH instrument is described. It is estimated that WATCH can detect about 100 solar hard X-ray bursts per day....... WATCH can also detect about 40 energetic stellar soft X-ray flares, similar to the fast transient X-ray emissions detected by the Ariel V satellite....

  14. Numerical studies of new stellarator concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, F.; Betancourt, O.; Garabedian, P.

    1980-01-01

    A three-dimensional computer code has been developed to study the magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium and stability of a diffuse or sharp boundary plasma in toroidal geometry. It is shown how equilibria with net toroidal current identically zero can be determined and how growth rates of instabilities can be calculated. Applications are made to an l = 2, 3 stellarator configuration that offers the possibility of achieving a critical value as high as 10% for the plasma parameter

  15. Stellar Cosmic Rays in a Habitable Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struminsky, A.; Sadovski, A.

    2017-06-01

    According to recent observations, relative number of flare stars does not change very much from cool dwarfs to hot A stars. Flare energies are strongly correlated with stellar luminosity and radius. Whence it follows that the typical magnetic field associated with a flare is several tens of gauss and the typical flare loop length-scales are parts of the stellar radius. Flares on O-B stars were not observed, but they are possible, since strong magnetic fields are detected on O-B stars. Therefore, stars of O-M spectral classes are potential sources of cosmic rays. Energy estimates of a magnetic field strength in a tube in photospheres of O-M stars are performed. Basing on their values possible flare energies and numbers of accelerated protons are estimated. The values obtained for the Sun correspond to observations by order of magnitude that justify estimates for other stars. Values of magnetic field strength in a tube differ less than five times for O and M flares (700 and 3500 G), but corresponding flare energies and numbers of accelerated protons for O stars are greater by five orders. Contrary fluencies of stellar protons appear to be five orders less.

  16. STELLAR: fast and exact local alignments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weese David

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large-scale comparison of genomic sequences requires reliable tools for the search of local alignments. Practical local aligners are in general fast, but heuristic, and hence sometimes miss significant matches. Results We present here the local pairwise aligner STELLAR that has full sensitivity for ε-alignments, i.e. guarantees to report all local alignments of a given minimal length and maximal error rate. The aligner is composed of two steps, filtering and verification. We apply the SWIFT algorithm for lossless filtering, and have developed a new verification strategy that we prove to be exact. Our results on simulated and real genomic data confirm and quantify the conjecture that heuristic tools like BLAST or BLAT miss a large percentage of significant local alignments. Conclusions STELLAR is very practical and fast on very long sequences which makes it a suitable new tool for finding local alignments between genomic sequences under the edit distance model. Binaries are freely available for Linux, Windows, and Mac OS X at http://www.seqan.de/projects/stellar. The source code is freely distributed with the SeqAn C++ library version 1.3 and later at http://www.seqan.de.

  17. Intrinsic Turbulence Stabilization in a Stellarator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Xanthopoulos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The magnetic surfaces of modern stellarators are characterized by complex, carefully optimized shaping and exhibit locally compressed regions of strong turbulence drive. Massively parallel computer simulations of plasma turbulence reveal, however, that stellarators also possess two intrinsic mechanisms to mitigate the effect of this drive. In the regime where the length scale of the turbulence is very small compared to the equilibrium scale set by the variation of the magnetic field, the strongest fluctuations form narrow bandlike structures on the magnetic surfaces. Thanks to this localization, the average transport through the surface is significantly smaller than that predicted at locations of peak turbulence. This feature results in a numerically observed upshift of the onset of turbulence on the surface towards higher ion temperature gradients as compared with the prediction from the most unstable regions. In a second regime lacking scale separation, the localization is lost and the fluctuations spread out on the magnetic surface. Nonetheless, stabilization persists through the suppression of the large eddies (relative to the equilibrium scale, leading to a reduced stiffness for the heat flux dependence on the ion temperature gradient. These fundamental differences with tokamak turbulence are exemplified for the QUASAR stellarator [G. H. Neilson et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 42, 489 (2014].

  18. Non-resonant divertors for stellarators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boozer, Allen; Punjabi, Alkesh

    2017-10-01

    The outermost confining magnetic surface in optimized stellarators has sharp edges, which resemble tokamak X-points. The plasma cross section has an even number of edges at the beginning but an odd number half way through the period. Magnetic field lines cannot cross sharp edges, but stellarator edges have a finite length and do not determine the rotational transform on the outermost confining surface. Just outside the last confining surface, surfaces formed by magnetic field lines have splits containing two adjacent magnetic flux tubes: one with entering and the other with an equal existing flux to the walls. The splits become wider with distance outside the outermost confining surface. These flux tubes form natural non-resonant stellarator divertors, which we are studying using maps. This work is supported by the US DOE Grants DE-FG02-95ER54333 to Columbia University and DE-FG02-01ER54624 and DE-FG02-04ER54793 to Hampton University and used resources of the NERSC, supported by the Office of Science, US DOE, under Contract No. DE-AC02-.

  19. Calculations of neoclassical impurity transport in stellarators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollén, Albert; Smith, Håkan M.; Langenberg, Andreas; Turkin, Yuriy; Beidler, Craig D.; Helander, Per; Landreman, Matt; Newton, Sarah L.; García-Regaña, José M.; Nunami, Masanori

    2017-10-01

    The new stellarator Wendelstein 7-X has finished the first operational campaign and is restarting operation in the summer 2017. To demonstrate that the stellarator concept is a viable candidate for a fusion reactor and to allow for long pulse lengths of 30 min, i.e. ``quasi-stationary'' operation, it will be important to avoid central impurity accumulation typically governed by the radial neoclassical transport. The SFINCS code has been developed to calculate neoclassical quantities such as the radial collisional transport and the ambipolar radial electric field in 3D magnetic configurations. SFINCS is a cutting-edge numerical tool which combines several important features: the ability to model an arbitrary number of kinetic plasma species, the full linearized Fokker-Planck collision operator for all species, and the ability to calculate and account for the variation of the electrostatic potential on flux surfaces. In the present work we use SFINCS to study neoclassical impurity transport in stellarators. We explore how flux-surface potential variations affect the radial particle transport, and how the radial electric field is modified by non-trace impurities and flux-surface potential variations.

  20. Stellar Mass Function of Active and Quiescent Galaxies via the Continuity Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapi, A.; Mancuso, C.; Bressan, A.; Danese, L.

    2017-09-01

    The continuity equation is developed for the stellar mass content of galaxies and exploited to derive the stellar mass function of active and quiescent galaxies over the redshift range z˜ 0{--}8. The continuity equation requires two specific inputs gauged from observations: (i) the star formation rate functions determined on the basis of the latest UV+far-IR/submillimeter/radio measurements and (ii) average star formation histories for individual galaxies, with different prescriptions for disks and spheroids. The continuity equation also includes a source term taking into account (dry) mergers, based on recent numerical simulations and consistent with observations. The stellar mass function derived from the continuity equation is coupled with the halo mass function and with the SFR functions to derive the star formation efficiency and the main sequence of star-forming galaxies via the abundance-matching technique. A remarkable agreement of the resulting stellar mass functions for active and quiescent galaxies of the galaxy main sequence, and of the star formation efficiency with current observations is found; the comparison with data also allows the characteristic timescales for star formation and quiescence of massive galaxies, the star formation history of their progenitors, and the amount of stellar mass added by in situ star formation versus that contributed by external merger events to be robustly constrained. The continuity equation is shown to yield quantitative outcomes that detailed physical models must comply with, that can provide a basis for improving the (subgrid) physical recipes implemented in theoretical approaches and numerical simulations, and that can offer a benchmark for forecasts on future observations with multiband coverage, as will become routinely achievable in the era of JWST.

  1. Auguste Comte's blunder: an account of the first century of stellar spectroscopy and how it took one hundred years to prove that Comte was wrong!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearnshaw, John

    2010-07-01

    In 1835 the French philosopher Auguste Comte predicted that we would never know anything about the chemical composition of stars. This paper gives a broad overview of the development of stellar spectroscopy, especially from about 1860. Developments in stellar spectroscopy segregated quite clearly into three main fields of endeavour: spectral classification, radial velocities and spectral analysis. This paper concentrates mainly on spectral analysis, or how stellar spectroscopy one hundred years after Comte showed that quantitative information on the composition of stars was possible. The journey was quite arduous, as it required numerous developments in theoretical physics and in laboratory spectroscopy, which in turn allowed stellar spectral analysis successfully to be undertaken by the mid-twentieth century. The key developments in physics that first had to be understood were in quantum and atomic theory, ionization theory, the concept of the Planck function, local thermodynamic equilibrium, the first stellar model atmospheres, line formation theory, turbulence, collisional broadening of spectral lines and the theory of radiative transfer and of the curve of growth. The close links between stellar spectroscopy and theoretical physics will be emphasized. In addition laboratory physics, to measure line wavelengths and oscillator strengths, was also an essential precursor to quantitative data on the chemical composition of stars. Comte may have been an influential philosopher of science in his time. Perhaps his one small transgression was not to have read the works of Joseph Fraunhofer, which in the early nineteenth century already contained the first small clues that Comte's assertion might be wrong.

  2. Relations among stellar X-ray emission observed from Einstein, stellar rotation and bolometric luminosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallavicini, R.; Golub, L.; Rosner, R.; Vaiana, G. S.; Ayres, T.; Linsky, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    The correlation between observed stellar X-ray luminosities, bolometric luminosities, and projected rotational velocities for stars of various spectral types and luminosity classes are determined. Early type stars (O3 to A5) have X-ray luminosities independent of rotational velocities, and correlating with bolometric luminosities. Late type stars of spectral type G to M have luminosities well correlated to equatorial rotational velocities, and are independent of luminosity class. The dependence of late type stars is found to be equivalent to a relation between the X-ray surface flux and the stellar angular velocity. F stars are intermediate with X-ray luminosities higher than would be predicted on the basis of the early type star relation, although lower than expected from the late type velocity dependence. The location of RS CVn stars as a class is also discussed, and it is found that the heating of late type stellar coronas does not result from direct conversion of ratational energy.

  3. Estimating precise metallicity and stellar mass evolution of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, Gregory

    2018-01-01

    The evolution of galaxies can be conveniently broken down into the evolution of their contents. The changing dust, gas, and stellar content in addition to the changing dark matter potential and periodic feedback from a super-massive blackhole are some of the key ingredients. We focus on the stellar content that can be observed, as the stars reflect information about the galaxy when they were formed. We approximate the stellar content and star formation histories of unresolved galaxies using stellar population modeling. Though simplistic, this approach allows us to reconstruct the star formation histories of galaxies that can be used to test models of galaxy formation and evolution. These models, however, suffer from degeneracies at large lookback times (t > 1 Gyr) as red, low luminosity stars begin to dominate a galaxy’s spectrum. Additionally, degeneracies between stellar populations at different ages and metallicities often make stellar population modeling less precise. The machine learning technique diffusion k-means has been shown to increase the precision in stellar population modeling using a mono-metallicity basis set. However, as galaxies evolve, we expect the metallicity of stellar populations to vary. We use diffusion k-means to generate a multi-metallicity basis set to estimate the stellar mass and chemical evolution of unresolved galaxies. Two basis sets are formed from the Bruzual & Charlot 2003 and MILES stellar population models. We then compare the accuracy and precision of these models in recovering complete (stellar mass and metallicity) histories of mock data. Similarities in the groupings of stellar population spectra in the diffusion maps for each metallicity hint at fundamental age transitions common to both basis sets that can be used to identify stellar populations in a given age range.

  4. Using the Genetic Algorithm to Find Coils for Compact Stellarators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, , Jr.; Valanju, P. M.; Hirshman, S. P.; Brooks, A.; Pomphrey, N.

    1999-11-01

    Stellarators are now optimized by finding the shape of the plasma surface that produces a desired mix of physics properties. The challenge is to find a practical coil set that creates that optimized surface with sufficient accuracy to retain the desired physics properties and still meet engineering and experimental constraints. Given the wide range of possible coil geometries, this is a daunting task requiring iterations between a practical coil geometry and the physics properties produced by it. A novel technique, the Genetic Algorithm (GA) (D.E. Goldberg, Genetic Algorithms in Search, Optimization, and Machine Leaning), (Addison Wesley, New York) 1989., has recently been applied to this problem. The GA is a computational search procedure for finding the global minimum of a target function using natural selection. This technique has been applied to the design of coils for the NCSX. Typically > 30 coil contours are needed to reproduce the necessary accuracy. Using GA, the result can be improved by choosing a small subset (e.g. 10) contours, each carrying different currents from among a much larger number (e.g. 50).

  5. Integrated concept development of next-step helical-axis advanced stellarators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warmer, Felix

    2016-04-13

    With the increasing energy demand of mankind and the transformation of our society towards sustainability, nuclear fusion by magnetic confinement is a promising option for the sustainable electricity supply in the future. In view of these prospects this thesis focuses on the concept development of next-step helical-axis advanced stellarator (HELIAS) burning-plasma devices. The HELIAS-line is the continued development of the prototype optimised stellarator Wendelstein 7-X which started operation in 2015. For the integrated concept development of such devices, the approach taken in this work encompasses detailed physics and engineering considerations while also including economic aspects. Starting with physics considerations, the properties of plasma transport and confinement of 3D stellarator configurations are discussed due to their critical importance for the device design. It becomes clear that current empirical confinement time scalings are not sufficient to predict the confinement in future stellarator devices. Therefore, detailed 1D transport simulations are carried out to reduce the uncertainties regarding confinement. Beyond the well-validated neoclassical approach, first attempts are made to include results from state-of-the-art turbulence simulations into the 1D transport simulations to further enhance the predictive capabilities. Next, for the systematic development of consistent design points, stellarator-specific models are developed and implemented in the well-established European systems code PROCESS. This allows a consistent description of an entire HELIAS fusion power plant including physics, engineering, and economic considerations. With the confidence obtained from a verification study, systems studies are for the first time applied for a HELIAS power-plant which shows that the available design window is constrained by the beta-limit. Furthermore, an economic comparison of an exemplary design point to an ''equivalent'' tokamak

  6. Stellarator Research Opportunities: A report of the National Stellarator Coordinating Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, David A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Anderson, David [University of Wisconsin-Madison

    2017-06-01

    This document is the product of a stellarator community workshop, organized by the National Stellarator Coordinating Committee and referred to as Stellcon, that was held in Cambridge, Massachusetts in February 2016, hosted by MIT. The workshop was widely advertised, and was attended by 40 scientists from 12 different institutions including national labs, universities and private industry, as well as a representative from the Department of Energy. The final section of this document describes areas of community wide consensus that were developed as a result of the discussions held at that workshop. Areas where further study would be helpful to generate a consensus path forward for the US stellarator program are also discussed. The program outlined in this document is directly responsive to many of the strategic priorities of FES as articulated in “Fusion Energy Sciences: A Ten-Year Perspective (2015-2025)” [2]. The natural disruption immunity of the stellarator directly addresses “Elimination of transient events that can be deleterious to toroidal fusion plasma confinement devices” an area of critical importance for the U.S. fusion energy sciences enterprise over the next decade. Another critical area of research “Strengthening our partnerships with international research facilities,” is being significantly advanced on the W7-X stellarator in Germany and serves as a test-bed for development of successful international collaboration on ITER. This report also outlines how materials science as it relates to plasma and fusion sciences, another critical research area, can be carried out effectively in a stellarator. Additionally, significant advances along two of the Research Directions outlined in the report; “Burning Plasma Science: Foundations - Next-generation research capabilities”, and “Burning Plasma Science: Long pulse - Sustainment of Long-Pulse Plasma Equilibria” are proposed.

  7. Massive stars reveal variations of the stellar initial mass function in the Milky Way stellar clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dib, Sami; Schmeja, Stefan; Hony, Sacha

    2017-01-01

    We investigate whether the stellar initial mass function (IMF) is universal, or whether it varies significantly among young stellar clusters in the Milky Way. We propose a method to uncover the range of variation of the parameters that describe the shape of the IMF for the population of young Galactic clusters.These parameters are the slopes in the low and high stellar mass regimes, γ and Γ, respectively, and the characteristic mass, Mch. The method relies exclusively on the high-mass content of the clusters, but is able to yield information on the distributions of parameters that describe the IMF over the entire stellar mass range. This is achieved by comparing the fractions of single and lonely massive O stars in a recent catalogue of the Milky Way clusters with a library of simulated clusters built with various distribution functions of the IMF parameters. The synthetic clusters are corrected for the effects of the binary population, stellar evolution, sample incompleteness, and ejected O stars. Our findings indicate that broad distributions of the IMF parameters are required in order to reproduce the fractions of single and lonely O stars in Galactic clusters. They also do not lend support to the existence of a cluster mass-maximum stellar mass relation. We propose a probabilistic formulation of the IMF whereby the parameters of the IMF are described by Gaussian distribution functions centred around γ = 0.91, Γ = 1.37, and Mch = 0.41 M⊙, and with dispersions of σγ = 0.25, σΓ = 0.60, and σ _{M_{ch}}=0.27 M⊙ around these values.

  8. Habitability in different Milky Way stellar environments: a stellar interaction dynamical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Torres, Juan J; Pichardo, Bárbara; Lake, George; Segura, Antígona

    2013-05-01

    Every Galactic environment is characterized by a stellar density and a velocity dispersion. With this information from literature, we simulated flyby encounters for several Galactic regions, numerically calculating stellar trajectories as well as orbits for particles in disks; our aim was to understand the effect of typical stellar flybys on planetary (debris) disks in the Milky Way Galaxy. For the solar neighborhood, we examined nearby stars with known distance, proper motions, and radial velocities. We found occurrence of a disturbing impact to the solar planetary disk within the next 8 Myr to be highly unlikely; perturbations to the Oort cloud seem unlikely as well. Current knowledge of the full phase space of stars in the solar neighborhood, however, is rather poor; thus we cannot rule out the existence of a star that is more likely to approach than those for which we have complete kinematic information. We studied the effect of stellar encounters on planetary orbits within the habitable zones of stars in more crowded stellar environments, such as stellar clusters. We found that in open clusters habitable zones are not readily disrupted; this is true if they evaporate in less than 10(8) yr. For older clusters the results may not be the same. We specifically studied the case of Messier 67, one of the oldest open clusters known, and show the effect of this environment on debris disks. We also considered the conditions in globular clusters, the Galactic nucleus, and the Galactic bulge-bar. We calculated the probability of whether Oort clouds exist in these Galactic environments.

  9. What shapes stellar metallicity gradients of massive galaxies at large radii?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschmann, Michaela

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the differential impact of physical mechanisms, mergers and internal energetic phenomena, on the evolution of stellar metallicity gradients in massive, present-day galaxies employing sets of high-resolution, cosmological zoom simulations. We demonstrate that negative metallicity gradients at large radii (>2Reff) originate from the accretion of metal-poor stellar systems. At larger radii, galaxies become typically more dominated by stars accreted from satellite galaxies in major and minor mergers. However, only strong galactic, stellar-driven winds can sufficiently reduce the metallicity content of the accreted stars to realistically steepen the outer metallicity gradients in agreement with observations. In contrast, the gradients of the models without winds are inconsistent with observations. Moreover, we discuss the impact of additional AGN feedback. This analysis greatly highlights the importance of both energetic processes and merger events for stellar population properties of massive galaxies at large radii. Our results are expected to significantly contribute to the interpretation of current and up-coming IFU surveys (e.g. MaNGA, CALIFA).

  10. Strong Stellar-driven Outflows Shape the Evolution of Galaxies at Cosmic Dawn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontanot, Fabio; De Lucia, Gabriella [INAF—Astronomical Observatory of Trieste, via G.B. Tiepolo 11, I-34143 Trieste (Italy); Hirschmann, Michaela [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC-CNRS, UMR7095, Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2017-06-20

    We study galaxy mass assembly and cosmic star formation rate (SFR) at high redshift (z ≳ 4), by comparing data from multiwavelength surveys with predictions from the GAlaxy Evolution and Assembly (gaea) model. gaea implements a stellar feedback scheme partially based on cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, which features strong stellar-driven outflows and mass-dependent timescales for the re-accretion of ejected gas. In previous work, we have shown that this scheme is able to correctly reproduce the evolution of the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF) up to z ∼ 3. We contrast model predictions with both rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) and optical luminosity functions (LFs), which are mostly sensitive to the SFR and stellar mass, respectively. We show that gaea is able to reproduce the shape and redshift evolution of both sets of LFs. We study the impact of dust on the predicted LFs, and we find that the required level of dust attenuation is in qualitative agreement with recent estimates based on the UV continuum slope. The consistency between data and model predictions holds for the redshift evolution of the physical quantities well beyond the redshift range considered for the calibration of the original model. In particular, we show that gaea is able to recover the evolution of the GSMF up to z ∼ 7 and the cosmic SFR density up to z ∼ 10.

  11. Evidence for two distinct stellar initial mass functions: probing for clues to the dichotomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaritsky, Dennis [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A. [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Pessev, Peter M. [Gemini South Observatory, c/o AURA Inc., Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Chandar, Rupali, E-mail: dzaritsky@as.arizona.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Toledo, 2801 West Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    We present new measurements of the velocity dispersions of 11 Local Group globular clusters using spatially integrated spectra, to expand our sample of clusters with precise integrated-light velocity dispersions to 29, over 4 different host galaxies. This sample allows us to further our investigation of the stellar mass function among clusters, with a particular emphasis on a search for the driver of the apparent bimodal nature of the inferred stellar initial mass function (IMF). We confirm our previous result that clusters fall into two classes. If, as we argue, this behavior reflects a variation in the stellar IMF, the cause of that variation is not clear. The variations do not correlate with formation epoch as quantified by age, metallicity quantified by [Fe/H], host galaxy, or internal structure as quantified by velocity dispersion, physical size, relaxation time, or luminosity. The stellar mass-to-light ratios, Y{sub *}, of the high and low Y{sub *} cluster populations are well-matched to those found in recent studies of early and late type galaxies, respectively.

  12. 'Let the stars shine in peace!' Niels Bohr and stellar energy, 1929-1934.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragh, Helge

    2017-04-01

    Faced with various anomalies related to nuclear physics in particular, in 1929 Niels Bohr suggested that energy might not be conserved in the atomic nucleus and the processes involving it. By this radical proposal he hoped not only to get rid of the anomalies but also saw a possibility to explain a puzzle in astrophysics, namely the energy generated by stars. Bohr repeated his suggestion of stellar energy arising ex nihilo on several occasions but without ever going into detail. In fact, it is not very clear what he meant or how seriously he took the stellar energy hypothesis. This paper relates Bohr's comments to the period's attempts to find a mechanism for stellar energy and also to the role played by astrophysics at the Copenhagen institute. Moreover, it looks at how Bohr's hypothesis was received not only by physicists but also by astronomers. In this regard the disciplinary status of astrophysics and its contemporary relation to the new quantum mechanics is of relevance. It turns out that, with very few exceptions, the hypothesis was met with silence by astronomers and astrophysicists concerned with the problem of stellar energy production. And yet, for a brief period of time it did have an impact on how physicists thought about the interior of the stars.

  13. Stellar parameters for stars of the CoRoT exoplanet field

    OpenAIRE

    Cortés, C.; Maciel, S. C.; Vieira, S; Lopes, C. E. Ferreira; Leão, I. C.; OLIVEIRA, G. P. de.; Correia, C; Martins, B. L. Canto; Catelan, M.; De Medeiros, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    Aims:To support the computation and evolutionary interpretation of periods associated with the rotational modulation, oscillations, and variability of stars located in the CoRoT fields, we are conducting a spectroscopic survey for stars located in the fields already observed by the satellite. These observations allow us to compute physical and chemical parameters for our stellar sample. Method: Using spectroscopic observations obtained with UVES/VLT and Hydra/Blanco, and based on standard ana...

  14. Fractal multi-scale nature of solar/stellar magnetic field

    OpenAIRE

    Abramenko, Valentina I.

    2013-01-01

    An abstract mathematical concept of fractal organization of certain complex objects received significant attention in astrophysics during last decades. The concept evolved into a broad field including multi-fractality and intermittency, percolation theory, self-organized criticality, theory of catastrophes, etc. Such a strong mathematical and physical approach provide new possibilities for exploring various aspects of astrophysics. In particular, in the solar and stellar magnetism, multi-frac...

  15. The Effects of Stellar Dynamics on the Evolution of Young, Dense Stellar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkus, H.; van Bever, J.; Vanbeveren, D.

    In this paper, we report on first results of a project in Brussels in which we study the effects of stellar dynamics on the evolution of young dense stellar systems using 3 decades of expertise in massive-star evolution and our population (number and spectral) synthesis code. We highlight an unconventionally formed object scenario (UFO-scenario) for Wolf Rayet binaries and study the effects of a luminous blue variable-type instability wind mass-loss formalism on the formation of intermediate-mass black holes.

  16. Major results from the stellarator Wendelstein 7-AS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsch, M; Baldzuhn, J; Beidler, C; Brakel, R; Burhenn, R; Dinklage, A; Ehmler, H; Endler, M; Erckmann, V; Feng, Y; Geiger, J; Giannone, L; Grieger, G; Grigull, P; Hartfuss, H-J; Hartmann, D; Jaenicke, R; Koenig, R; Laqua, H P; Maassberg, H [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Teilinstitut Greifswald, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany)] (and others)

    2008-05-15

    Wendelstein 7-AS was the first modular stellarator device to test some basic elements of stellarator optimization: a reduced Shafranov shift and improved stability properties resulted in {beta}-values up to 3.4% (at 0.9 T). This operational limit was determined by power balance and impurity radiation without noticeable degradation of stability or a violent collapse. The partial reduction of neoclassical transport could be verified in agreement with calculations indicating the feasibility of the concept of drift optimization. A full neoclassical optimization, in particular a minimization of the bootstrap current was beyond the scope of this project. A variety of non-ohmic heating and current drive scenarios by ICRH, NBI and in particular, ECRH were tested and compared successfully with their theoretical predictions. Besides, new heating schemes of overdense plasmas were developed such as RF mode conversion heating-Ordinary mode, Extraordinary mode, Bernstein-wave (OXB) heating-or 2nd harmonic O-mode (O2) heating. The energy confinement was about a factor of 2 above ISS95 without degradation near operational boundaries. A number of improved confinement regimes such as core electron-root confinement with central T{sub e} {<=} 7 keV and regimes with strongly sheared radial electric field at the plasma edge resulting in T{sub i} {<=} 1.7 keV were obtained. As the first non-tokamak device, W7-AS achieved the H-mode and moreover developed a high density H-mode regime (HDH) with strongly reduced impurity confinement that allowed quasi-steady-state operation ({tau} {approx} 65 {center_dot} {tau}{sub E}) at densities n{sub e} {approx_equal} 4x10{sup 20}m{sup -3} (at 2.5 T). The first island divertor was tested successfully and operated with stable partial detachment in agreement with numerical simulations. With these results W7-AS laid the physics background for operation of an optimized low-shear steady-state stellarator. (review article)

  17. Why stellar astronomers should be interested in the sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelz, J.

    By all accounts, the Sun is a garden-variety star with an average age, a standard size, a regular temperature, a normal mass, an ordinary structure, and a typical chemical composition. Only one feature makes it special - the Sun is our star. It is located in the center of our solar system, and therefore, is responsible for all l fe on Earth.i Astronomically speaking, the Sun is the only star in the sky that we can study up- close and personal. The unaided human eye does a better job of resolving the Sun than the finest telescope does for any other star. Stellar astronomers issue a press release whenever they can lay a few pixels of some state-of the-art instrument across a nearby supergiant. The resolution of the Sun, however, is something we can see routinely in the magnificent images that are downloaded every day from the TRACE spacecraft. In a very real sense, the Sun is the Rosetta Stone of the Stars. It was observations of the Sun deflecting starlight that ushered in a new way of thinking about gravity. Zeeman observations of the Sun showed that stellar atmospheres were controlled by magnetic fields. Models of the solar chromosphere required the development of more complex non-LTE analysis. The discovery of solar helium founded the science of stellar spectroscopy. Measurements of the solar mass, radius, and temperature allowed scientists to probe the interiors of stars for the first time. The ancient age of the Sun implied that stars shine as a result of thermonuclear fusion. Observations of solar flares stimulated developments in rapid magnetic reconnection theory. The study of solar coronal holes lead to a deeper understanding of the role that mass loss plays in the evolution of stars. Detailed analysis of the solar activity cycle inspired the development of MHD dynamo theory. The detection and understanding of the solar corona u covered one of the longest unsolvedn mysteries in all of astrophysics - the coronal-heating problem. And the list goes on. The Sun

  18. Accretion-induced variability links young stellar objects, white dwarfs, and black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaringi, Simone; Maccarone, Thomas J; Körding, Elmar; Knigge, Christian; Vaughan, Simon; Marsh, Thomas R; Aranzana, Ester; Dhillon, Vikram S; Barros, Susana C C

    2015-10-01

    The central engines of disc-accreting stellar-mass black holes appear to be scaled down versions of the supermassive black holes that power active galactic nuclei. However, if the physics of accretion is universal, it should also be possible to extend this scaling to other types of accreting systems, irrespective of accretor mass, size, or type. We examine new observations, obtained with Kepler/K2 and ULTRACAM, regarding accreting white dwarfs and young stellar objects. Every object in the sample displays the same linear correlation between the brightness of the source and its amplitude of variability (rms-flux relation) and obeys the same quantitative scaling relation as stellar-mass black holes and active galactic nuclei. We also show that the most important parameter in this scaling relation is the physical size of the accreting object. This establishes the universality of accretion physics from proto-stars still in the star-forming process to the supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies.

  19. Simulation, Analysis, and Design of the Princeton Adaptable Stellarator for Education and Outreach (PASEO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jared; Dominguez, Arturo; N/A Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    The PPPL Science Education Department, in collaboration with IPP, is currently developing a versatile small scale Stellarator for education and outreach purposes. The Princeton Adaptable Stellarator for Education and Outreach (PASEO) will provide visual demonstrations of Stellarator physics and serve as a lab platform for undergraduate and graduate students. Based off the Columbia Non-Neutral Torus (CNT) (1), and mini-CNTs (2), PASEO will create pure electron plasmas to study magnetic surfaces. PASEO uses similar geometries to these, but has an adjustable coil configuration to increase its versatility and conform to a highly visible vacuum chamber geometry. To simulate the magnetic surfaces in these new configurations, a MATALB code utilizing the Biot Savart law and a Fourth Order Runge-Kutta method was developed, leading to new optimal current ratios. The design for PASEO and its predicted plasma confinement are presented. (1) T.S. Pedersen et al., Fusion Science and Technology Vol. 46 July 2004 (2) C. Dugan, et al., American Physical Society; 48th Annual Meeting of the Division of Plasma Physics, October 30-November 3, 2006

  20. Recent Progress in Modeling Stellar Populations Near and Far

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzual, Gustavo

    2010-05-01

    I will present a summary of recent advances in the fields of stellar evolution, stellar model atmospheres, and stellar spectral libraries, which allow us to build more realistic stellar population synthesis models than those available up to now. Empirical and theoretical stellar libraries of increasing degree of completeness and accuracy covering from the EUV to the NIR and their usage in current models will be examined. In particular, the treatment of stars in the TP-AGB phase of stellar evolution will be discussed in detail. Understanding these stars is fundamental for the determination of the mass of distant galaxies using population synthesis models. Applications of these models to problems of current interest will be discussed. Problems that need to be understood and data sets that still need to be collected in order to solve issues present in these models will be indicated.

  1. On the inference of stellar ages and convective-core properties in main-sequence solar-like pulsators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandão, I. M.; Cunha, M. S.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.

    2013-01-01

    physics. We considered the dependence of the diagnostic tools on stellar age and on the size of the relative discontinuity in the squared sound speed at the edge of the convectively unstable region. We find that the absolute value of the frequency derivatives of the diagnostic tools increases as the star...

  2. The Yale-Potsdam Stellar Isochrones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spada, F.; Demarque, P.; Kim, Y.-C.; Boyajian, T. S.; Brewer, J. M.

    2017-04-01

    We introduce the Yale-Potsdam Stellar Isochrones (YaPSI), a new grid of stellar evolution tracks and isochrones of solar-scaled composition. In an effort to improve the Yonsei-Yale database, special emphasis is placed on the construction of accurate low-mass models ({M}* < 0.6 {M}⊙ ), and in particular on their mass-luminosity and mass-radius relations, both crucial for characterizing exoplanet-host stars, and, in turn, their planetary systems. The YaPSI models cover the mass range 0.15-5.0 {M}⊙ densely enough to permit detailed interpolation in mass, and the metallicity and helium abundance ranges [Fe/H] = -1.5 to +0.3 and Y 0 = 0.25-0.37 are specified independently of each other (I.e., no fixed {{Δ }}Y/{{Δ }}Z relation is assumed). The evolutionary tracks are calculated from the pre-main sequence up to the tip of the red giant branch. The isochrones, with ages between 1 Myr and 20 Gyr, provide UBVRI colors in the Johnson-Cousins system, and JHK colors in the homogenized Bessell & Brett system, derived from two different semi-empirical {T}{eff}-color calibrations from the literature. We also provide utility codes, such as an isochrone interpolator, in age, metallicity, and helium content, and an interface of the tracks with an open-source Monte Carlo Markov-Chain tool for the analysis of individual stars. Finally, we present comparisons of the YaPSI models with the best empirical mass-luminosity and mass-radius relations available to date, as well as isochrone fitting of well-studied stellar clusters.

  3. Parameterizing Stellar Spectra Using Deep Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang-Ru; Pan, Ru-Yang; Duan, Fu-Qing

    2017-03-01

    Large-scale sky surveys are observing massive amounts of stellar spectra. The large number of stellar spectra makes it necessary to automatically parameterize spectral data, which in turn helps in statistically exploring properties related to the atmospheric parameters. This work focuses on designing an automatic scheme to estimate effective temperature ({T}{eff}), surface gravity ({log}g) and metallicity [Fe/H] from stellar spectra. A scheme based on three deep neural networks (DNNs) is proposed. This scheme consists of the following three procedures: first, the configuration of a DNN is initialized using a series of autoencoder neural networks; second, the DNN is fine-tuned using a gradient descent scheme; third, three atmospheric parameters {T}{eff}, {log}g and [Fe/H] are estimated using the computed DNNs. The constructed DNN is a neural network with six layers (one input layer, one output layer and four hidden layers), for which the number of nodes in the six layers are 3821, 1000, 500, 100, 30 and 1, respectively. This proposed scheme was tested on both real spectra and theoretical spectra from Kurucz’s new opacity distribution function models. Test errors are measured with mean absolute errors (MAEs). The errors on real spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) are 0.1477, 0.0048 and 0.1129 dex for {log}g, {log}{T}{eff} and [Fe/H] (64.85 K for {T}{eff}), respectively. Regarding theoretical spectra from Kurucz’s new opacity distribution function models, the MAE of the test errors are 0.0182, 0.0011 and 0.0112 dex for {log}g, {log}{T}{eff} and [Fe/H] (14.90 K for {T}{eff}), respectively.

  4. EarthFinder: A Precise Radial Velocity Survey Probe Mission of our Nearest Stellar Neighbors for Earth-Mass Habitable Zone Analogs Using High-Resolution UV-Vis-NIR Echelle Spectroscopy on a Space Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plavchan, Peter; EarthFinder Team

    2018-01-01

    We are investigating the science case for a 1.0-1.4 meter space telescope to survey the closest, brightest FGKM main sequence stars to search for Habitable Zone (HZ) Earth analogs using the precise radial velocity (PRV) technique at a precision of 1-10 cm/s. Our baseline instrument concept uses two diffraction-limited spectrographs operating in the 0.4-1.0 microns and 1.0-2.4 microns spectral regions each with a spectral resolution of R=150,000~200,000, with the possibility of a third UV arm. Because the instrument utilizes a diffraction-limited input beam, the spectrograph would be extremely compact, less than 50 cm on a side, and illumination can be stabilized with the coupling of starlight into single mode fibers. With two octaves of wavelength coverage and a cadence unimpeded by any diurnal, seasonal, and atmospheric effects, EarthFinder will offer a unique platform for recovering stellar activity signals from starspots, plages, granulation, etc. to detect exoplanets at velocity semi-amplitudes currently not obtainable from the ground. Variable telluric absorption and emission lines may potentially preclude achieving PRV measurements at or below 10 cm/s in the visible and Earth-trailing (e.g. Spitzer, Kepler) or Lagrange orbit, the space-based cadence of observations of a star can be year-round at the ecliptic poles, with two ~100-day "seasons" every 6 months in the ecliptic plane. This will provide a distinct advantage compared to an annual ~3-6 month observing season from the ground for mitigating stellar activity and detecting the orbital periods of HZ Earth-mass analogs (e.g. ~6-months to ~2 years). Finally, we are compiling a list of ancillary science cases for the observatory, ranging from asteroseismology to the direct measurement of the expansion of the Universe.

  5. Advanced Stellar Compass, SAC-C, Interface Control Document

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Buch; Betto, Maurizio; Riis, Troels

    Interface Control Document for the Advanced Stellar Compass for the SAC-C satellite. The SAC-C is Argentine, Danish and NASA satellite. On the SAC-C satellite there are a simplified version of the Ørsted instrumentation platform. The Advanced Stellar Compass is a improved version of the Ørsted Star...... Imager. This document descibes the interface between the Advanced Stellar Compass and OBDH, the size of the DPU and the Camera etc....

  6. Imaging of Stellar Surfaces with the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-18

    Imaging of Stellar Surfaces with the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer Anders M. Jorgensena, H. R. Schmittb, G. T. van Bellec, D. J. Hutterd, J...phase observations on long baselines at shorter wavelengths in order to further increase the resolution. In this paper we describe the NPOI Stellar ...Imaging stellar surfaces requires aperture diameters of sometimes hundreds of meters. In general, the diffraction limited angular resolution of an aper

  7. IPS guidestar selection for stellar mode (ASTRO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Larry; Wooten, Lewis

    1988-01-01

    This report describes how guide stars are selected for the Optical Sensor Package (OSP) for the Instrument Pointing System (IPS) when it is operating in the stellar mode on the ASTRO missions. It also describes how the objective loads are written and how the various roll angles are related; i.e., the celestial roll or position angle, the objective load roll angles, and the IPS gimbal angles. There is a brief description of how the IPS operates and its various modes of operation; i.e., IDOP, IDIN, and OSPCAL.

  8. Advanced Stellar Compass - ROCSAT 2 - Proposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Troels; Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif

    1998-01-01

    System Integration is supposed to take place at NSPO facilities.The ASC is a highly advanced and autonomous Stellar Reference Unit designed, developed and produced by the Space Instrumentation Group of the Department of Automation of the Technical University of Denmark.The document is structured...... and in section 7 the mechanical and electrical interfaces are given. In section 8 and 9 we address issues like manufacturing, transportation and storage and to conclude in section 10 the requirements imposed by the ASC on the system are given....

  9. Deep learning classification in asteroseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hon, Marc; Stello, Dennis; Yu, Jie

    2017-08-01

    In the power spectra of oscillating red giants, there are visually distinct features defining stars ascending the red giant branch from those that have commenced helium core burning. We train a 1D convolutional neural network by supervised learning to automatically learn these visual features from images of folded oscillation spectra. By training and testing on Kepler red giants, we achieve an accuracy of up to 99 per cent in separating helium-burning red giants from those ascending the red giant branch. The convolutional neural network additionally shows capability in accurately predicting the evolutionary states of 5379 previously unclassified Kepler red giants, by which we now have greatly increased the number of classified stars.

  10. Deep learning classification in asteroseismology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hon, Marc; Stello, Dennis; Yu, Jie

    2017-01-01

    In the power spectra of oscillating red giants, there are visually distinct features defining stars ascending the red giant branch from those that have commenced helium core burning. We train a 1D convolutional neural network by supervised learning to automatically learn these visual features from...

  11. An updated MILES stellar library and stellar population models (Research Note)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falcon-Barroso, J.; Sanchez-Blazquez, P.; Vazdekis, A.; Ricciardelli, E.; Cardiel, N.; Cenarro, A. J.; Gorgas, J.; Peletier, R. F.

    Aims: We present a number of improvements to the MILES library and stellar population models. We correct some small errors in the radial velocities of the stars, measure the spectral resolution of the library and models more accurately, and give a better absolute flux calibration of the models.

  12. Identification of Stellar Sequences in Various Stellar Systems: ESO65-SC03, Teutsch 106, Turner 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Gireesh C.

    2017-12-01

    The spatial morphological study of stellar clusters has been carried out through their identified probable members. The field stars decontamination is performed by the statistical cleaning approach (depends on the magnitude and colour of stars within the field and cluster regions). The colour magnitude ratio diagram (CMRD) approach is used to separate the stellar sequences of cluster systems. The age, distance and reddening of each cluster is estimated through the visual inspection of best fitted isochrone in colour magnitude diagrams (CMDs). The mean proper motion values of stellar clusters are obtained through the extracted data from PPMXL and UCAC4 catalogs. Moreover, these values vary according to the extracted data-set from these catalogues. This variation has occurred due to different estimation efficiency of proper motions. The two colour ratio (TCR) and two colour magnitude ratio (TCMR) values of each cluster is determined by utilizing the WISE and PPMXL catalogues, these values are found abnormal for Teutsch 106. In addition, the TCMR values are similar to TCR values at longer wavelength, whereas both values are far away from each other at shorter wavelength. The fraction of young stellar objects (YSOs) is also computed for each cluster.

  13. Stellar halos: a rosetta stone for galaxy formation and cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis Read, Justin

    2015-08-01

    Stellar halos make up about a percent of the total stellar mass in galaxies. Yet their old age and long phase mixing times make them living fossil records of galactic history. In this talk, I review the latest simulations of structure formation in our standard Lambda Cold Dark Matter cosmology. I discuss the latest predictions for stellar halos and the relationship between the stellar halo light and the underlying dark matter. Finally, I discuss how these simulations compare to observations of the Milky Way and Andromeda and, ultimately, what this means for our cosmological model and the formation history of the Galaxy.

  14. The Origin of Stellar Species: constraining stellar evolution scenarios with Local Group galaxy surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarbadhicary, Sumit; Badenes, Carles; Chomiuk, Laura; Maldonado, Jessica; Caprioli, Damiano; Heger, Mairead; Huizenga, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Our understanding of the progenitors of many stellar species, such as supernovae, massive and low-mass He-burning stars, is limited because of many poorly constrained aspects of stellar evolution theory. For my dissertation, I have focused on using Local Group galaxy surveys to constrain stellar evolution scenarios by measuring delay-time distributions (DTD). The DTD is the hypothetical occurrence rate of a stellar object per elapsed time after a brief burst of star formation. It is the measured distribution of timescales on which stars evolve, and therefore serves as a powerful observational constraint on theoretical progenitor models. The DTD can be measured from a survey of stellar objects and a set of star-formation histories of the host galaxy, and is particularly effective in the Local Group, where high-quality star-formation histories are available from resolved stellar populations. I am currently calculating a SN DTD with supernova remnants (SNRs) in order to provide the strongest constraints on the progenitors of thermonuclear and core-collapse supernovae. However, most SNRs do not have reliable age measurements and their evolution depends on the ambient environment. For this reason, I wrote a radio light curve model of an SNR population to extract the visibility times and rates of supernovae - crucial ingredients for the DTD - from an SNR survey. The model uses observational constraints on the local environments from multi-wavelength surveys, accounts for missing SNRs and employs the latest models of shock-driven particle acceleration. The final calculation of the SN DTD in the Local Group is awaiting completion of a systematic SNR catalog from deep radio-continuum images, now in preparation by a group led by Dr. Laura Chomiuk. I have also calculated DTDs for the LMC population of RR Lyrae and Cepheid variables, which serve as important distance calibrators and stellar population tracers. We find that Cepheids can have delay-times between 10 Myrs - 1 Gyr

  15. Stellar structure and compact objects before 1940: Towards relativistic astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonolis, Luisa

    2017-06-01

    Since the mid-1920s, different strands of research used stars as "physics laboratories" for investigating the nature of matter under extreme densities and pressures, impossible to realize on Earth. To trace this process this paper is following the evolution of the concept of a dense core in stars, which was important both for an understanding of stellar evolution and as a testing ground for the fast-evolving field of nuclear physics. In spite of the divide between physicists and astrophysicists, some key actors working in the cross-fertilized soil of overlapping but different scientific cultures formulated models and tentative theories that gradually evolved into more realistic and structured astrophysical objects. These investigations culminated in the first contact with general relativity in 1939, when J. Robert Oppenheimer and his students George Volkoff and Hartland Snyder systematically applied the theory to the dense core of a collapsing neutron star. This pioneering application of Einstein's theory to an astrophysical compact object can be regarded as a milestone in the path eventually leading to the emergence of relativistic astrophysics in the early 1960s.

  16. Stellarator News, Issue 38, March 1995

    CERN Document Server

    Rome, J A

    1995-01-01

    Stellarator News, an international journal of the stellarator community, is Published by Fusion Energy Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, James A. Rome, Editor In the March 1995 issue . . . **** Exerpts from the U.S. Congress Office of Technology Assment report on TPX and Alternate Concepts. **** Edge transport and turbulence studies on U-3M The turbulent-driven particle flow is shown to be comparable with the equilibrium flow at the boundary of the configuration under Alfven-heating conditions in the U-3M torsatron. **** Topological aspects of island divertor studies on W7-AS The structure of the edge plasma in W7-AS, observed with probes, television camera, and H-alpha light agrees at low beta with vacuum field calculations: the low-valued resonances at iotabar=5/m are resolved for m = 8 to 11; external perturbations are not significant at the edge, even for iotabar = 5/10. **** 140-GHz second harmonic O-mode electron cyclotron heating at W7-AS First experimental results are presented of 140-GHz secon...

  17. Color superconductivity in compact stellar hybrid configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranea-Sandoval, Ignacio F.; Orsaria, Milva G.; Han, Sophia; Weber, Fridolin; Spinella, William M.

    2017-12-01

    The discovery of pulsars PSR J1614-2230 and PSR J0348+0432 with masses of around 2 M⊙ imposes strong constraints on the equations of state of cold, ultradense matter. If a phase transition from hadronic matter to quark matter were to occur in the inner cores of such massive neutron stars, the energetically favorable state of quark matter would be a color superconductor. In this study, we analyze the stability and maximum mass of such neutron stars. The hadronic phase is described by nonlinear relativistic mean-field models, and the local Nambu-Jona Lasinio model is used to describe quark matter in the 2SC+s quark phase. The phase transition is treated as a Maxwell transition, assuming a sharp hadron-quark interface, and the "constant-sound-speed" (CSS) parametrization is employed to discuss the existence of stellar twin configurations. We find that massive neutron stars such as J1614-2230 and J0348+0432 can only exist on the connected stellar branch but not on the disconnected twin-star branch. The latter can only support stars with masses that are strictly below 2 M⊙ .

  18. Il desiderio stellare del Principe di Salina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalba Galvagno

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available If desire originates from the stars –de sideribus- and, if we agree with this etymology, the Subject’s desire coincides with the Other’s desire, Tomasi di Lampedusa’s Il Gattopardo shows one of the most fascinating and enigmatic literary figures of stellar desire, as it can be read, furthermore, in the explicit of the seventh part of the novel: «Giunta faccia a faccia con lui sollevò il velo e così, pudica ma pronto ad esser posseduta, gli apparve più bella di come mai l’avesse intravista negli spazi stellari».            Why does this female figure descending from the stellar spaces in order to yield to Don Fabrizio who has reached the final stage of his journey, embody the object of a possessive desire which, paradoxically, corresponds to death? Indeed, death marks the entire novel since its memorable incipit: «”Nunc et in hora mortis nostrae. Amen”». What kind of desire is it precisely about? What is our unexpectedly Hamlet-like hero troubled by? The cues which the novel shows for the interpretation of this desire are few but meaningful. However we could appeal to Ricordi d’Infanzia which lead to the writer’s laboratory at the time of the Gattopardo, and, perhaps, let us know the “cause” of the prince of Salina’s desire.

  19. Including collisions in gyrokinetic tokamak and stellarator simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauffmann, Karla

    2012-04-10

    ITGs and TEMs in a tokamak configuration. The results show that collisions reduce the growth rate of slab ITGs in cylinder geometry, whereas they do not affect ITGs in a tokamak, which are mainly curvature-driven. However it is important to note that the pitch-angle scattering operator does not conserve momentum, which is most critical in the parallel direction. Therefore, the damping found in a cylinder could be the consequence of this missing feature and not a physical result [Dimits and Cohen 1994]. Nonetheless, the results are useful to determine whether the instability is mainly being driven by a slab or toroidal ITG mode. EUTERPE also has the feature of including kinetic electrons, which made simulations of TEMs with collisions possible. The combination of collisions and kinetic electrons made the numerical calculations extremely time-consuming, since the time step had to be small enough to resolve the fast electron motion. In contrast to the ITG results, it was observed that collisions are extremely important for TEMs in a tokamak, and in some special cases, depending on whether they were mainly driven by density or temperature gradients, collisions could even suppress the mode (in agreement with [Angioni et al. 2005, Connor et al. 2006]). In the case of stellarators it was found that ITGs are highly dependent on the device configuration. For LHD it was shown that collisions slightly reduce the growth rate of the instability, but for Wendelstein 7-X they do not affect it and the growth rate showed a similar trend with collisionality to that of the tokamak case. Collisions also tend to make the ballooning structure of the modes less pronounced.

  20. Diverse stellar haloes in nearby Milky Way mass disc galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmsen, Benjamin; Monachesi, Antonela; Bell, Eric F.; de Jong, Roelof S.; Bailin, Jeremy; Radburn-Smith, David J.; Holwerda, Benne W.

    2017-04-01

    We have examined the resolved stellar populations at large galactocentric distances along the minor axis (from 10 kpc up to between 40 and 75 kpc), with limited major axis coverage, of six nearby highly inclined Milky Way (MW) mass disc galaxies using Hubble Space Telescope data from the Galaxy haloes, Outer discs, Substructure, Thick discs, and Star clusters (GHOSTS) survey. We select red giant branch stars to derive stellar halo density profiles. The projected minor axis density profiles can be approximated by power laws with projected slopes of -2 to -3.7 and a diversity of stellar halo masses of 1-6 × 109 M⊙, or 2-14 per cent of the total galaxy stellar masses. The typical intrinsic scatter around a smooth power-law fit is 0.05-0.1 dex owing to substructure. By comparing the minor and major axis profiles, we infer projected axis ratios c/a at ˜25 kpc between 0.4and0.75. The GHOSTS stellar haloes are diverse, lying between the extremes charted out by the (rather atypical) haloes of the MW and M31. We find a strong correlation between the stellar halo metallicities and the stellar halo masses. We compare our results with cosmological models, finding good agreement between our observations and accretion-only models where the stellar haloes are formed by the disruption of dwarf satellites. In particular, the strong observed correlation between stellar halo metallicity and mass is naturally reproduced. Low-resolution hydrodynamical models have unrealistically high stellar halo masses. Current high-resolution hydrodynamical models appear to predict stellar halo masses somewhat higher than observed but with reasonable metallicities, metallicity gradients, and density profiles.

  1. Asteroseismology of old open clusters with Kepler: direct estimate of the integrated red giant branch mass-loss in NGC 6791 and 6819

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miglio, A.; Brogaard, Karsten Frank; Stello, D.

    2012-01-01

    Mass-loss of red giant branch (RGB) stars is still poorly determined, despite its crucial role in the chemical enrichment of galaxies. Thanks to the recent detection of solar-like oscillations in G–K giants in open clusters with Kepler, we can now directly determine stellar masses...... for a statistically significant sample of stars in the old open clusters NGC 6791 and 6819. The aim of this work is to constrain the integrated RGB mass-loss by comparing the average mass of stars in the red clump (RC) with that of stars in the low-luminosity portion of the RGB [i.e. stars with L≲L(RC)]. Stellar...... masses were determined by combining the available seismic parameters νmax and Δν with additional photometric constraints and with independent distance estimates. We measured the masses of 40 stars on the RGB and 19 in the RC of the old metal-rich cluster NGC 6791. We find that the difference between...

  2. Theory of stellar atmospheres an introduction to astrophysical non-equilibrium quantitative spectroscopic analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hubeny, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    This book provides an in-depth and self-contained treatment of the latest advances achieved in quantitative spectroscopic analyses of the observable outer layers of stars and similar objects. Written by two leading researchers in the field, it presents a comprehensive account of both the physical foundations and numerical methods of such analyses. The book is ideal for astronomers who want to acquire deeper insight into the physical foundations of the theory of stellar atmospheres, or who want to learn about modern computational techniques for treating radiative transfer in non-equilibrium situations. It can also serve as a rigorous yet accessible introduction to the discipline for graduate students.

  3. Radio Telescopes Reveal Youngest Stellar Corpse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    Astronomers using a global combination of radio telescopes to study a stellar explosion some 30 million light-years from Earth have likely discovered either the youngest black hole or the youngest neutron star known in the Universe. Their discovery also marks the first time that a black hole or neutron star has been found associated with a supernova that has been seen to explode since the invention of the telescope nearly 400 years ago. M51 An artist's impression of Supernova 1986J. The newly discovered nebula around the black hole or neutron star in the center is shown in blue, and is in the center of the expanding, fragmented shell of material thrown off in the supernova explosion, which is shown in red. CREDIT: Norbert Bartel and Michael F. Bietenholz, York University; Artist: G. Arguner (Click on image for larger version) Image Files Artist's Conception (above image, 836K) Galaxy and Supernova (47K) A VLA image (left) of the galaxy NGC 891, showing the bright supernova explosion below the galaxy's center. At right, a closer view of the supernova, made with a global array of radio telescopes. CREDIT: Miguel A. Perez-Torres, Antxon Alberdi and Lucas Lara, Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia - CSIC, Spain, Jon Marcaide and Jose C. Guirado, Universidad de Valencia, Spain Franco Mantovani, IRA-CNR, Italy, Eduardo Ros, MPIfR, Germany, and Kurt W. Weiler, Naval Research Laboratory, USA Multi-Frequency Closeup View (201K) Blue and white area shows the nebula surrounding the black hole or neutron star lurking in the center of the supernova. This nebula is apparent at a higher radio frequency (15 GHz). The red and also the contours show the distorted, expanding shell of material thrown off in the supernova explosion. This shell is seen at a lower radio frequency (5 GHz). CREDIT: Michael F. Bietenholz and Norbert Bartel, York University, Michael Rupen, NRAO, NRAO/AUI/NSF A supernova is the explosion of a massive star after it exhausts its supply of nuclear fuel and

  4. DWARFS GOBBLING DWARFS: A STELLAR TIDAL STREAM AROUND NGC 4449 AND HIERARCHICAL GALAXY FORMATION ON SMALL SCALES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Delgado, David; Rix, Hans-Walter; Maccio, Andrea V. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomy, Heidelberg (Germany); Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Arnold, Jacob A.; Brodie, Jean P. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Jay Gabany, R. [Black Bird Observatory, Mayhill, New Mexico (United States); Annibali, Francesca [Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, INAF, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Fliri, Juergen [LERMA, CNRS UMR 8112, Observatoire de Paris, 61 Avenue de l' Observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France); Zibetti, Stefano [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute-University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Van der Marel, Roeland P.; Aloisi, Alessandra [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Chonis, Taylor S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Texas (United States); Carballo-Bello, Julio A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Tenerife (Spain); Gallego-Laborda, J. [Fosca Nit Observatory, Montsec Astronomical Park, Ager (Spain); Merrifield, Michael R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2012-04-01

    A candidate diffuse stellar substructure was previously reported in the halo of the nearby dwarf starburst galaxy NGC 4449 by Karachentsev et al. We map and analyze this feature using a unique combination of deep integrated-light images from the BlackBird 0.5 m telescope, and high-resolution wide-field images from the 8 m Subaru Telescope, which resolve the nebulosity into a stream of red giant branch stars, and confirm its physical association with NGC 4449. The properties of the stream imply a massive dwarf spheroidal progenitor, which after complete disruption will deposit an amount of stellar mass that is comparable to the existing stellar halo of the main galaxy. The stellar mass ratio between the two galaxies is {approx}1:50, while the indirectly measured dynamical mass ratio, when including dark matter, may be {approx}1:10-1:5. This system may thus represent a 'stealth' merger, where an infalling satellite galaxy is nearly undetectable by conventional means, yet has a substantial dynamical influence on its host galaxy. This singular discovery also suggests that satellite accretion can play a significant role in building up the stellar halos of low-mass galaxies, and possibly in triggering their starbursts.

  5. Period variations in pulsating X-ray sources. II. Torque variations and stellar response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, F.K.; Pines, D.; Shaham, J.

    1978-10-15

    A statistical description of variations in the torque acting on a rotating neutron star is developed in terms of stationary random processes and is used to calculate the torque power spectrum, stellar response power spectrum, and the total mean square variation in the crustal angular velocity of the star. The response of a star with a finite frequency internal mode is calculated with the aid of phenomenological equations which correspond to a generalized two-component model of the star. The form of the stellar response functions is examined in a number of limiting cases of physical interest, and the dependence of the response power on both the period of observation and the time over which fluctuating torques have been acting is discussed.

  6. Do stellar clusters form fewer binaries? Using moderate separation binaries to distinguish between nature and nurture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Megan

    2017-08-01

    Fewer wide-separation binaries are found in dense stellar clusters than in looser stellar associations. It is therefore unclear whether feedback in clusters prevents the formation of multiple systems or dynamical interactions destroy them. Measuring the prevalence of close, bound binary systems provide a key test to distinguish between these possibilities. Systems with separations of 10-50 AU will survive interactions in the cluster environment, and therefore are more representative of the natal population of multiple systems. By fitting a double-star PSF, we will identify visual binaries in the Orion Nebula with separations as small as 0.03. At the distance of Orion, this corresponds to a physical separation of 12 AU, effectively closing the observational gap in the binary separation distribution left between known visual and spectroscopic binaries (>65 AU or thesis.

  7. Final integration, commissioning and start of the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, H.-S.; Brakel, R.; Braeuer, T.; Bykov, V.; van Eeten, P.; Feist, J.-H.; Füllenbach, F.; Gasparotto, M.; Grote, H.; Klinger, T.; Laqua, H.; Nagel, M.; Naujoks, D.; Otte, M.; Risse, K.; Rummel, T.; Schacht, J.; Spring, A.; Pedersen, T. Sunn; Vilbrandt, R.; Wegener, L.; Werner, A.; Wolf, R. C.; Baldzuhn, J.; Biedermann, C.; Braune, H.; Burhenn, R.; Hirsch, M.; Höfel, U.; Knauer, J.; Kornejew, P.; Marsen, S.; Stange, T.; Trimino Mora, H.; W7-X Team

    2017-11-01

    The main objective of the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) stellarator is to demonstrate the integrated reactor potential of the optimized stellarator line. An important element of this mission is the achievement of high heating-power and high confinement in steady-state operation. Such an integrated plasma operation has not yet been demonstrated and represents the major scientific goal of W7-X. The way towards this goal is staged. In the first phase, called OP 1.1, December 2015-March 2016, a limiter configuration was used. In this paper, the preparation of the first operation phase as well as lessons learned during the first commissioning and the operation phase are discussed, while the physics results from OP 1.1 are reported elsewhere (Wolf et al 2017 Nucl. Fusion 57 102020).

  8. Proton Testing of Advanced Stellar Compass Digital Processing Unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Gøsta; Denver, Troelz; Jørgensen, Finn E

    1999-01-01

    The Advanced Stellar Compass Digital Processing Unit was radiation tested with 300 MeV protons at Proton Irradiation Facility (PIF), Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland.......The Advanced Stellar Compass Digital Processing Unit was radiation tested with 300 MeV protons at Proton Irradiation Facility (PIF), Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland....

  9. Operations of a non-stellar object tracker in space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Troels; Jørgensen, John Leif; Betto, Maurizio

    1999-01-01

    The ability to detect and track non-stellar objects by utilizing a star tracker may seem rather straight forward, as any bright object, not recognized as a star by the system is a non stellar object. However, several pitfalls and errors exist, if a reliable and robust detection is required. To te...

  10. Substructure in the Stellar Halos of the Aquarius Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmi, Amina; Cooper, A. P.; White, S. D. M.; Cole, S.; Frenk, C. S.; Navarro, J. F.

    2011-01-01

    We characterize the substructure in the simulated stellar halos of Cooper et al. which were formed by the disruption of satellite galaxies within the cosmological N-body simulations of galactic halos of the Aquarius project. These stellar halos exhibit a wealth of tidal features: broad overdensities

  11. A Stellar Reference Unit Design Study for SIRTF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif; Liebe, Carl Christian

    1996-01-01

    A design study for a stellar reference unit, or star tracker, for SIRTF was conducted in FY96 in conjunction with the Tracking Sensors Group of the Avionic Equipment Section of JPL. The resulting design was derived from the Oersted, autonomous, Advanced Stellar Compass, star tracker. The projecte...

  12. Variation of galactic cold gas reservoirs with stellar mass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maddox, Natasha; Hess, Kelley M.; Obreschkow, Danail; Blyth, S.-L.; Jarvis, Matt J.

    The stellar and neutral hydrogen (H I) mass functions at z ˜ 0 are fundamental benchmarks for current models of galaxy evolution. A natural extension of these benchmarks is the two-dimensional distribution of galaxies in the plane spanned by stellar and H I mass, which provides a more stringent test

  13. Spectroscopic evidence of distinct stellar populations in the counter-rotating stellar disks of NGC 3593 and NGC 4550

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccato, L.; Morelli, L.; Pizzella, A.; Corsini, E. M.; Buson, L. M.; Dalla Bontà, E.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: We present the results of integral-field spectroscopic observations of the two disk galaxies NGC 3593 and NGC 4550 obtained with the Visible Multi Object Spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope. Both galaxies are known to host two counter-rotating stellar disks, with the ionized gas corotating with one of them. We measured in each galaxy the surface brightness, kinematics, mass surface density, and the stellar populations of the two stellar components, as well as the distribution, kinematics, and metallicity of the ionized-gas component to constrain the formation scenario of these peculiar galaxies. Methods: We applied a novel spectroscopic decomposition technique to both galaxies, to disentangle at each position in the field of view the relative contribution of the two counter-rotating stellar and one ionized-gas components to the observed spectrum. We measured the kinematics and the line strengths of the Lick indices of the two counter-rotating stellar components. We modeled the data of each stellar component with single stellar population models that account for the α/Fe overabundance. Results: In both galaxies we successfully separated the main from the secondary stellar component that is less massive and rotates in the same direction as the ionized-gas component. The two stellar components have exponential surface-brightness profiles. In NGC 3593 they have different scale lengths, with the secondary one dominating the innermost 500 pc. In NGC 4550 they have the same scale lengths, but slightly different scale heights. In both galaxies, the two counter-rotating stellar components have different stellar populations. The secondary stellar disk is younger, more metal poor, and more α-enhanced than the main galaxy stellar disk. Such a difference is stronger in NGC 3593 than in NGC 4550. Conclusions: Our findings rule out an internal origin of the secondary stellar component and favor a scenario where it formed from gas accreted on retrograde orbits from

  14. Improving 1D Stellar Models with 3D Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rørsted Mosumgaard, Jakob; Silva Aguirre, Víctor; Weiss, Achim; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Trampedach, Regner

    2017-10-01

    Stellar evolution codes play a major role in present-day astrophysics, yet they share common issues. In this work we seek to remedy some of those by the use of results from realistic and highly detailed 3D hydrodynamical simulations of stellar atmospheres. We have implemented a new temperature stratification extracted directly from the 3D simulations into the Garching Stellar Evolution Code to replace the simplified atmosphere normally used. Secondly, we have implemented the use of a variable mixing-length parameter, which changes as a function of the stellar surface gravity and temperature - also derived from the 3D simulations. Furthermore, to make our models consistent, we have calculated new opacity tables to match the atmospheric simulations. Here, we present the modified code and initial results on stellar evolution using it.

  15. Thermonuclear inverse magnetic pumping power cycle for stellarator reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Darwin D.; Kulsrud, Russell M.

    1991-01-01

    The plasma column in a stellarator is compressed and expanded alternatively in minor radius. First a plasma in thermal balance is compressed adiabatically. The volume of the compressed plasma is maintained until the plasma reaches a new thermal equilibrium. The plasma is then expanded to its original volume. As a result of the way a stellarator works, the plasma pressure during compression is less than the corresponding pressure during expansion. Therefore, negative work is done on the plasma over a complete cycle. This work manifests itself as a back-voltage in the toroidal field coils. Direct electrical energy is obtained from this voltage. Alternatively, after the compression step, the plasma can be expanded at constant pressure. The cycle can be made self-sustaining by operating a system of two stellarator reactors in tandem. Part of the energy derived from the expansion phase of a first stellarator reactor is used to compress the plasma in a second stellarator reactor.

  16. Stellar pulsations in beyond Horndeski gravity theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakstein, Jeremy; Kenna-Allison, Michael; Koyama, Kazuya

    2017-03-01

    Theories of gravity in the beyond Horndeski class recover the predictions of general relativity in the solar system whilst admitting novel cosmologies, including late-time de Sitter solutions in the absence of a cosmological constant. Deviations from Newton's law are predicted inside astrophysical bodies, which allow for falsifiable, smoking-gun tests of the theory. In this work we study the pulsations of stars by deriving and solving the wave equation governing linear adiabatic oscillations to find the modified period of pulsation. Using both semi-analytic and numerical models, we perform a preliminary survey of the stellar zoo in an attempt to identify the best candidate objects for testing the theory. Brown dwarfs and Cepheid stars are found to be particularly sensitive objects and we discuss the possibility of using both to test the theory.

  17. Stellar Pulsations in Beyond Horndeski Gravity Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Sakstein, Jeremy; Koyama, Kazuya

    2016-01-01

    Theories of gravity in the beyond Horndeski class recover the predictions of general relativity in the solar system whilst admitting novel cosmologies, including late-time de Sitter solutions in the absence of a cosmological constant. Deviations from Newton's law are predicted inside astrophysical bodies, which allow for falsifiable, smoking-gun tests of the theory. In this work we study the pulsations of stars by deriving and solving the wave equation governing linear adiabatic oscillations to find the modified period of pulsation. Using both semi-analytic and numerical models, we perform a preliminary survey of the stellar zoo in an attempt to identify the best candidate objects for testing the theory. Brown dwarfs and Cepheid stars are found to be particularly sensitive objects and we discuss the possibility of using both to test the theory.

  18. Molecules in Outflows from Young Stellar Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafalla, M.

    2013-10-01

    Bipolar outflows from young stellar objects are excellent laboratories to study shock chemistry in the interstellar medium. Observations show that a number of molecular species suffer order-of-magnitude abundance enhancements in the outflow gas, likely due to a combination of dust-mantle disruption and high-temperature gas chemistry. The study of these enhanced species is of great interest to characterize shock chemistry. It also offers a highly selective tool to trace the interaction between the outflow and the cloud, which is necessary to elucidate the still mysterious nature of the outflow driving wind. This contribution reviews some of the recent progress in the study of the molecular composition of bipolar outflows with emphasis on the tracers most relevant for shock chemistry and on the new data from the Herschel Space Observatory.

  19. STRESS - STEREO TRansiting Exoplanet and Stellar Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangaralingam, Vinothini; Stevens, Ian R.; Spreckley, Steve; Debosscher, Jonas

    2010-02-01

    The Heliospheric Imager (HI) instruments on board the two STEREO (Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory) spacecraft provides an excellent opportunity for space based stellar photometry. The HI instruments provide a wide area coverage (20° × 20° for the two HI-1 instruments and 70° × 70° for the two HI-2 instruments) and long continuous periods of observations (20 days and 70 days respectively). Using HI-1A which has a pass band of 6500Å to 7500Å and a cadence of 40 minutes, we have gathered photometric information for more than a million stars brighter than 12th magnitude for a period of two years. Here we present some early results from this study on a range of variable stars and the future prospects for the data.

  20. Carbon impurity measurements in the HSX stellarator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohoney, J. M.; Kumar, S. T. A.; Likin, K. M.; Anderson, D. T.

    2017-10-01

    Impurity behavior in stellarators is not fully understood despite important implications on device performance, in particular, an accumulation of core impurities can lead to degradation of plasma energy due to radiative losses. Experiments are being conducted at HSX to measure the radial profiles and the time history of carbon impurity density using the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostic. Measurements of fully ionized carbon have been performed on various magnetic configurations, showing a peaked profile at the core in the standard configuration. An inversion technique was also developed to calculate localized C +5 profiles. Comparisons of impurity behavior between the standard and broken-symmetry configurations are presented. Work supported by the US DOE under Grant DE-FG02-93ER54222 and the Hilldale Research Fellowship.

  1. Habitable zone dependence on stellar parameter uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kane, Stephen R., E-mail: skane@sfsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Francisco State University, 1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94132 (United States)

    2014-02-20

    An important property of exoplanetary systems is the extent of the Habitable Zone (HZ), defined as that region where water can exist in a liquid state on the surface of a planet with sufficient atmospheric pressure. Both ground- and space-based observations have revealed a plethora of confirmed exoplanets and exoplanetary candidates, most notably from the Kepler mission using the transit detection technique. Many of these detected planets lie within the predicted HZ of their host star. However, as is the case with the derived properties of the planets themselves, the HZ boundaries depend on how well we understand the host star. Here we quantify the uncertainties of HZ boundaries on the parameter uncertainties of the host star. We examine the distribution of stellar parameter uncertainties from confirmed exoplanet hosts and Kepler candidate hosts and translate these into HZ boundary uncertainties. We apply this to several known systems with an HZ planet to determine the uncertainty in their HZ status.

  2. Exoplanet Transits of Stellar Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampapa, Mark S.; Andretta, Vincenzo; Covino, Elvira; Reiners, Ansgar; Esposito, Massimiliano

    2018-01-01

    We report preliminary results of a program to obtain high spectral- and temporal-resolution observations of the neutral helium triplet line at 1083.0 nm in transiting exoplanet systems. The principal objective of our program is to gain insight on the properties of active regions, analogous to solar plages, on late-type dwarfs by essentially using exoplanet transits as high spatial resolution probes of the stellar surface within the transit chord. The 1083 nm helium line is a particularly appropriate diagnostic of magnetized areas since it is weak in the quiet photosphere of solar-type stars but appears strongly in absorption in active regions. Therefore, during an exoplanet transit over the stellar surface, variations in its absorption equivalent width can arise that are functions of the intrinsic strength of the feature in the active region and the known relative size of the exoplanet. We utilized the Galileo Telescope and the GIANO-B near-IR echelle spectrograph to obtain 1083 nm spectra during transits in bright, well-known systems that include HD 189733, HD 209458, and HD 147506 (HAT-P-2). We also obtained simultaneous auxiliary data on the same telescope with the HARPS-N UV-Visible echelle spectrograph. We will present preliminary results from our analysis of the observed variability of the strength of the He I 1083 nm line during transits.Acknowledgements: Based on observations made with the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) operated on the island of La Palma by the Fundación Galileo Galilei of the INAF (Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica) at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias. The NSO is operated by AURA under a cooperative agreement with the NSF.

  3. Rapid mass segregation in small stellar clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spera, Mario; Capuzzo-Dolcetta, Roberto

    2017-12-01

    In this paper we focus our attention on small-to-intermediate N-body systems that are, initially, distributed uniformly in space and dynamically `cool' (virial ratios Q=2T/|Ω| below ˜0.3). In this work, we study the mass segregation that emerges after the initial violent dynamical evolution. At this scope, we ran a set of high precision N-body simulations of isolated clusters by means of HiGPUs, our direct summation N-body code. After the collapse, the system shows a clear mass segregation. This (quick) mass segregation occurs in two phases: the first shows up in clumps originated by sub-fragmentation before the deep overall collapse; this segregation is partly erased during the deep collapse to re-emerge, abruptly, during the second phase, that follows the first bounce of the system. In this second stage, the proper clock to measure the rate of segregation is the dynamical time after virialization, which (for cold and cool systems) may be significantly different from the crossing time evaluated from initial conditions. This result is obtained for isolated clusters composed of stars of two different masses (in the ratio mh/ml=2), at varying their number ratio, and is confirmed also in presence of a massive central object (simulating a black hole of stellar size). Actually, in stellar systems starting their dynamical evolution from cool conditions, the fast mass segregation adds to the following, slow, secular segregation which is collisionally induced. The violent mass segregation is an effect persistent over the whole range of N (128 ≤ N ≤1,024) investigated, and is an interesting feature on the astronomical-observational side, too. The semi-steady state reached after virialization corresponds to a mass segregated distribution function rather than that of equipartition of kinetic energy per unit mass as it should result from violent relaxation.

  4. Differential population studies using asteroseismology: Solar-like oscillating giants in CoRoT fields LRc01 and LRa01

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casagrande L.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Solar-like oscillating giants observed by the space-borne satellites CoRoT and Kepler can be used as key tracers of stellar populations in the Milky Way. When combined with additional photometric/spectroscopic constraints, the pulsation spectra of solar-like oscillating giant stars not only reveal their radii, and hence distances, but also provide well-constrained estimates of their masses, which can be used as proxies for the ages of these evolved stars. In this contribution we provide supplementary material to the comparison we presented in Miglio et al. (2013 between populations of giants observed by CoRoT in the fields designated LRc01 and LRa01.

  5. Galactic flows and the formation of stellar clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilgys, Romas; Bonnell, Ian A.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the formation of stellar clusters from a Galactic scale SPH simulation. The simulation traces star formation over a 5.6 Myr timescale, with local gravitational instabilities resulting in ~ 105 solar masses of star formation in the form of sink particles. We investigate the time evolution of the physical properties of the forming clusters including their half-mass radii, their energies and the depletion time of the gas. Star formation is driven by the large scale flows which compress the gas to higher densities where self gravity takes over and collapse occurs. We show that the more massive clusters (up to ~ 2 × 104 solar masses) gather their material from of order 10 pc due to these large scale motions associated with the spiral arm passage and shock. The bulk of the gas becomes gravitationally bound near 1-2 Myr before sink formation, and in the absence of feedback, significant accretion ongoing on longer timescales. We trace the hierarchical merging process of cluster formation which naturally results in age spreads of order the crossing time of the original region which provides the gas reservoir for the cluster.

  6. Electroweak stars: Electroweak Matter Destruction as an Exotic Stellar Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojkovic, Dejan; DAI, De Chang [Department of Physics, SUNY at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14260-1500 (United States); Starkman, Glenn [Department of Physics, Case Western Reserve University - CWRU, 10900 Euclid ave., Cleveland, Ohio 44106-7079 (United States); Lue, Arthur [Massachusetts Institute of Technology - MIT, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Stellar evolution from a protostar to neutron star is of one of the best studied subjects in modern astrophysics. Yet, it appears that there is still a lot to learn about the extreme conditions where the fundamental particle physics meets strong gravity regime. After all of the thermonuclear fuel is spent, and after the supernova explosion, but before the remaining mass crosses its own Schwarzschild radius, the temperature of the central core of the star might become higher than the electroweak symmetry restoration temperature. The source of energy, which can at least temporarily balance gravity, are baryon number violating instanton processes which are basically unsuppressed at temperatures above the electroweak scale. We constructed a solution to the Oppenheimer-Volkoff equation which describes such a star. The energy release rate is enormous at the core, but gravitational redshift and the enhanced neutrino interaction cross section at these densities make the energy release rate moderate at the surface of the star. The lifetime of this new quasi-equilibrium can be more than ten million years, which is long enough to represent a new stage in the evolution of a star. (authors)

  7. Deriving Stellar Masses for the ALFALFA α.100 Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Logan; Cornell 2017 Summer REU

    2018-01-01

    For this project, we explore different methods of deriving the stellar masses of galaxies in the ALFALFA (Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA) α.100 survey. In particular, we measure the effectiveness of SED (Spectral Energy Distribution) on the sample. SED fitting was preformed by MAGPHYS (Multi-wavelength Analysis of Galaxy Physical Properties), utilizing a wide range of photometry in the UV, optical, and IR bands. Photometry was taken from GALAX GR6/7 (UV), SDSS DR13 (optical), WISE All-Sky (near-IR), and Herschel PACS/SPIRE (far-IR). The efficiency of SED fitting increases with a broader range of photometry, however detection rates varied significantly across the different bands. Using a more “comprehensive” sample of galaxies, the GSWLC-A (GALAX, SDSS, WISE Legacy Catalog All-Sky Survey), we aimed to measure which combination of bands provided the largest sample return with the lowest amount of uncertainty, which could then be used to estimate the masses of the galaxies in the α.100 sample.

  8. Application of adjoint methods for stellarator geometry sensitivity using REGCOIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Elizabeth; Landreman, Matt; Dorland, William

    2017-10-01

    A significant challenge to the feasibility of the stellarator is the design of simple coils which allow for diagnostic access and optimal physics properties. REGCOIL employs a Tikhonov regularization approach to compute the current potential on a specified coil winding surface given a desired plasma surface. An objective function, which includes the normal magnetic field on the plasma surface and the squared current density, is minimized by solving a single linear system. This method achieves lower surface-integrated and maximum current potential and normal magnetic field and allows for greater control over the level of regularization than the NESCOIL method. We extend the REGCOIL approach by computing sensitivity of the objective function with respect to coil geometry parameters. We apply an adjoint method, a common technique for shape optimization problems in aerodynamics, allowing the gradients with respect to a large number of control parameters to be computed rapidly. We compute the sensitivity by analytically differentiating the objective function. This extended REGCOIL approach can be applied within an optimization iteration to obtain coil surfaces which better reproduce the desired plasma shape and maximize coil-coil separation.

  9. Stellar contributions to the diffuse soft X-ray background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookbinder, J.; Avni, Y.; Golub, L.; Rosner, R.; Vaiana, G.

    1981-01-01

    One of the results of the EINSTEIN/C.f.A. X-ray stellar survey was a determination of the contribution of the disk stellar population to the galactic component of the diffuse soft (0.28 - 1.0 keV) X-ray background. This analysis employed both binned and unbinned nonparametric statistical methods that have been developed by Avni, et al. (1980). These methods permitted the use of the information contained in both the 22 detections and 4 upper bounds on the luminosities of 26 dM stars in order to derive their luminosity function. Luminosity functions for earlier stellar types are not yet developed. For these earlier stellar types, the median luminosities as determined by Vaiana, et al., are used (1981), which underestimates their contribution to the background. We find that it is the M dwarfs that dominate the disk population stellar contribution to this background. To calculate the contribution of the stellar sources to the background, simple models both for the spatial distribution of the stars and for the properties of the intervening interstellar medium are used. A model is chosen in which all stellar classes have the same functional form for their spatial distribution: an exponentially decreasing distribution above the galactic equatorial plane, and a uniform distribution within the galactic plane for a region of several kiloparsecs centered on the Sun.

  10. Radial velocity planet detection biases at the stellar rotational period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderburg, Andrew; Plavchan, Peter; Johnson, John Asher; Ciardi, David R.; Swift, Jonathan; Kane, Stephen R.

    2016-07-01

    Future generations of precise radial velocity (RV) surveys aim to achieve sensitivity sufficient to detect Earth mass planets orbiting in their stars' habitable zones. A major obstacle to this goal is astrophysical RV noise caused by active areas moving across the stellar limb as a star rotates. In this paper, we quantify how stellar activity impacts exoplanet detection with radial velocities as a function of orbital and stellar rotational periods. We perform data-driven simulations of how stellar rotation affects planet detectability and compile and present relations for the typical time-scale and amplitude of stellar RV noise as a function of stellar mass. We show that the characteristic time-scales of quasi-periodic RV jitter from stellar rotational modulations coincides with the orbital period of habitable-zone exoplanets around early M-dwarfs. These coincident periods underscore the importance of monitoring the targets of RV habitable-zone planet surveys through simultaneous photometric measurements for determining rotation periods and activity signals, and mitigating activity signals using spectroscopic indicators and/or RV measurements at different wavelengths.

  11. Stellar neutron capture rates – key data for the s process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Käppeler F.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Neutron reactions are responsible for the formation of the elements heavier than iron. The corresponding scenarios relate to the He- and C- burning phases of stellar evolution (s process and to supernova explosions (r and p processes. The s process, which is characterized by low neutron densities, operates in or near the valley of β stability and has produced about half of the elemental abundances between Fe and Bi in the solar system and in the Universe. Because the s abundances are essentially determined by the (n, γ cross sections along the reaction path, accurate neutron data constitute the key input for s process studies. Important constraints for the physical conditions at the stellar sites can be inferred by comparison of the abundance patterns from current s-process models with solar system material or presolar grains. The experimental methods for the determination of stellar (n, γ rates are outlined at the example of recent cross section measurements and remaining quests will be discussed with respect to existing laboratory neutron sources and new developments.

  12. An emerging population of stripped, but isolated, stellar systems in the Virgo Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand, David

    2017-08-01

    We have recently uncovered a unique dwarf-like galaxy in the Virgo Cluster: a diffuse, low mass system with solely young stellar populations located at least 350 kpc from the nearest massive galaxy. We hypothesize that this galaxy may be formed from ram pressure stripped gas, making it distinct from other, similar systems such as tidal dwarfs. We request 10 orbits of HST/ACS to image a well-defined sample of five similar objects in Virgo which we postulate may also be ''ram pressure dwarfs. This data will allow us to measure the basic physical properties of this emerging class of objects, including their structure, luminosity, and star formation history. HST data is also needed to constrain any old stellar population; if present, it would be indicative of a standard dwarf galaxy origin rather than newly formed stars from stripped gas. With these observations we will better understand the fate of stripped gas in the cluster environment, and test whether we have uncovered a new class of isolated stellar systems formed through cluster interactions.

  13. The Dark Energy Survey: Prospects for resolved stellar populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossetto, Bruno M. [Observatorio Nacional, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Lab. Interinstitucional de e-Astronomia-LIneA, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Santiago, Basílio X. [Lab. Interinstitucional de e-Astronomia-LIneA, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica, Porto Alegre (Brazil); Girardi, Léo [Lab. Interinstitucional de e-Astronomia-LIneA, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Osservatorio Astronomica di Padova-INAF, Padova (Italy); Camargo, Julio I. B. [Observatorio Nacional, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Lab. Interinstitucional de e-Astronomia-LIneA, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Balbinot, Eduardo [Lab. Interinstitucional de e-Astronomia-LIneA, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica, Porto Alegre (Brazil); da Costa, Luiz N. [Observatorio Nacional, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Lab. Interinstitucional de e-Astronomia-LIneA, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Yanny, Brian [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Maia, Marcio A. G. [Observatorio Nacional, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Lab. Interinstitucional de e-Astronomia-LIneA, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Makler, Martin [Lab. Interinstitucional de e-Astronomia-LIneA, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Ogando, Ricardo L. C. [Observatorio Nacional, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Lab. Interinstitucional de e-Astronomia-LIneA, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Pellegrini, Paulo S. [Observatorio Nacional, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Lab. Interinstitucional de e-Astronomia-LIneA, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Ramos, Beatriz [Observatorio Nacional, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Lab. Interinstitucional de e-Astronomia-LIneA, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); de Simoni, Fernando [Observatorio Nacional, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Lab. Interinstitucional de e-Astronomia-LIneA, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Armstrong, R. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Bertin, E. [Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Desai, S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Kuropatkin, N. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Lin, H. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Mohr, J. J. [Max-Planck-Institut fur extraterrestrische Physik, Garching (Germany); Tucker, D. L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2011-05-06

    Wide angle and deep surveys, regardless of their primary purpose, always sample a large number of stars in the Galaxy and in its satellite system. We here make a forecast of the expected stellar sample resulting from the Dark Energy Survey and the perspectives that it will open for studies of Galactic structure and resolved stellar populations in general. An estimated 1.2 x 108 stars will be sampled in DES grizY filters in the southern equatorial hemisphere. This roughly corresponds to 20% of all DES sources. Most of these stars belong to the stellar thick disk and halo of the Galaxy.

  14. Dynamics of stellar filaments in f(G) gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, M.; Fatima, H. Ismat

    2017-03-01

    We discuss the dynamics of stellar filaments with cylindrical symmetry in the context of f( G) gravity. For this purpose, we consider the modified gravity coupled with a dissipative anisotropic fluid and construct scalar functions through orthogonal splitting of the Riemann tensor. We formulate the set of equations governing the evolution and structure of stellar filaments in terms of these scalars. Finally, we discuss all static solutions for cylindrical filaments with anisotropy as well as isotropy and conclude that stellar filaments are necessarily inhomogeneous in this gravity.

  15. CCFpams: Atmospheric stellar parameters from cross-correlation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavolta, Luca; Lovis, Christophe; Pepe, Francesco; Sneden, Christopher; Udry, Stephane

    2017-07-01

    CCFpams allows the measurement of stellar temperature, metallicity and gravity within a few seconds and in a completely automated fashion. Rather than performing comparisons with spectral libraries, the technique is based on the determination of several cross-correlation functions (CCFs) obtained by including spectral features with different sensitivity to the photospheric parameters. Literature stellar parameters of high signal-to-noise (SNR) and high-resolution HARPS spectra of FGK Main Sequence stars are used to calibrate the stellar parameters as a function of CCF areas.

  16. Physical physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Schulman, Mark

    2006-01-01

    "Protons, electrons, positrons, quarks, gluons, muons, shmuons! I should have paid better attention to my high scholl physics teacher. If I had, maybe I could have understood even a fration of what Israeli particle physicist Giora Mikenberg was talking about when explaining his work on the world's largest science experiment." (2 pages)

  17. Dynamics of stellar spin driven by planets undergoing Lidov-Kozai migration: paths to spin-orbit misalignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, Natalia I.; Lai, Dong; Anderson, Kassandra R.

    2017-03-01

    Many exoplanetary systems containing hot Jupiters (HJs) exhibit significant misalignment between the spin axes of the host stars and the orbital angular momentum axes of the planets ('spin-orbit misalignment'). High-eccentricity migration involving Lidov-Kozai oscillations of the planet's orbit induced by a distant perturber is a possible channel for producing such misaligned HJ systems. Previous works have shown that the dynamical evolution of the stellar spin axis during the high-e migration plays a dominant role in generating the observed spin-orbit misalignment. Numerical studies have also revealed various patterns of the evolution of the stellar spin axis leading to the final misalignment. Here, we develop an analytic theory to elucidate the evolution of spin-orbit misalignment during the Lidov-Kozai migration of planets in stellar binaries. Secular spin-orbit resonances play a key role in the misalignment evolution. We include the effects of short-range forces and tidal dissipation, and categorize the different possible paths to spin-orbit misalignment as a function of various physical parameters (e.g. planet mass and stellar rotation period). We identify five distinct spin-orbit evolution paths and outcomes, only two of which are capable of producing retrograde orbits. We show that these paths to misalignment and the outcomes depend only on two dimensionless parameters, which compare the stellar spin precession frequency with the rate of change of the planet's orbital axis, and the Lidov-Kozai oscillation frequency. Our analysis reveals a number of novel phenomena for the stellar spin evolution, ranging from bifurcation, adiabatic advection, to fully chaotic evolution of spin-orbit angles.

  18. A stellar interferometer on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porro, Irene

    present the results of the simulation of the interfering fringes obtained when polarization effects are present. In the fourth chapter (IV) I deal with the problem of how thermal e ects a ect the performance of a stellar interferometer. Knowing these effects and the thermal characteristic of the site when designing the instrument, allows to riduce its sensibility to the thermal changes. In the first part of the chapter I take into consideration the optical components, both reffective and refractive, of the system: I evaluate the wavefront error due to the alteration of the physical characteristics of the optical material as a consequence of a temperature variation. In the second part I consider the effects on the structure which supports and connects the primary and the secondary mirrors: a temperature variation may cause a perturbation in the telescope alignment and hence a wavefront error. The general expressions for the wavefront error obtained in the rst and second part are then applied to IOTA. In particular the result of this study are used to perform an a posteriori evaluation of the visibility loss for IOTA. Finally, I performed a detailed analysis for the evaluation of the wavefront error introduced by a non-perfect thermal compensation affecting the metric structure which connects the mirrors of the telescope. The fifth chapter (V) consists in a description of the causes of mechanical instability which can a effect the operation of IOTA. In most cases I only present a qualitative description of the phenomena and a rough evaluation of their effects. This is because an accurate evaluation of the wavefront error induced by each of them requires a specialistic study of the vibration propagation throughout the whole structure of the interferometer, a study which is beyond the purposes of this work. I performed a more detailed evaluation only to determine the efficiency of the insolation system applied to the vacuum pumps. One of the problems arisen the first times

  19. Hunting for Stellar Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Heidi; Vida, Krisztián; Leitzinger, Martin; Odert, Petra; Kovács, Orsolya Eszter

    2017-10-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are explosive events that occur basically daily on the Sun. It is thought that these events play a crucial role in the angular momentum and mass loss of late-type stars, and also shape the environment in which planets form and live. Stellar CMEs can be detected in optical spectra in the Balmer lines, especially in Hα, as blue-shifted extra emission/absorption. To increase the detection probability one can monitor young open clusters, in which the stars are due to their youth still rapid rotators, and thus magnetically active and likely to exhibit a large number of CMEs. Using ESO facilities and the Nordic Optical Telescope we have obtained time series of multi-object spectroscopic observations of late-type stars in six open clusters with ages ranging from 15 Myrs to 300 Myrs. Additionally, we have studied archival data of numerous active stars. These observations will allow us to obtain information on the occurrence rate of CMEs in late-type stars with different ages and spectral types. Here we report on the preliminary outcome of our studies.

  20. Exploration of turbulent optimization in stellarators & tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mynick, H.; Pomphrey, N.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Lucia, M.

    2012-03-01

    A methodfootnotetextH.E. Mynick, N. Pomphrey, P. Xanthopoulos, Phys. Rev. Letters, 105, 095004 (2010).^,footnotetextH.E. Mynick, N. Pomphrey, P. Xanthopoulos, Phys. Plasmas, 18, 056101 (2011). recently developed for evolving toroidal configurations to ones with reduced turbulent transport, using the STELLOPT optimization codes and the GENE gyrokinetic code, is being applied and extended. The growing body of results has found that the effectiveness of the current proxy measure Qprox used by STELLOPT to estimate transport levels depends on the class of toroidal device considered. The present proxy works well for quasi-axisymmetric stellarators and tokamaks, modestly for quasi-helically symmetric designs, but not for the W7X quasi-omnigenous/quasi-isodynamic design. We are exploring the origin of this variation, and improving the dependence of the proxy on key geometric factors, extending the proxy to apply to transport channels other than the ITG turbulence it was originally developed for, and are also examining the relative effectiveness of different search algorithms. To help in these efforts, we have adapted STELLOPT to provide a new capability for mapping the topography of the cost function in the search space.

  1. First Stellar Occultation Observation with SOFIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Edward W.; Bida, T.; Bosh, A.; Collins, P.; Levine, S.; Person, M.; Pfueller, E.; Roeser, H.; Taylor, B.; Wiedemann, M.; Wolf, J.; Zuluaga, C.

    2012-01-01

    We successfully observed the 2011 June 23 UT stellar occultation by Pluto with the High-speed Imaging Photometer for Occultations (HIPO) instrument from Lowell Observatory and the Fast Diagnostic Camera (FDC) from the Deutches SOFIA Institut (DSI) mounted on the SOFIA telescope. A major prediction astrometry effort focused at MIT combined with the willingness of the SOFIA project to entertain the idea of an in-flight change to the flight plan allowed us to target the center of the occultation shadow. This was accomplished by means of an in-flight prediction update by satellite telephone and a real-time onboard flight plan modification to accommodate the prediction update. We obtained excellent results with both channels of HIPO and the FDC with each light curve showing a small, extended brightening while the star was occulted. We will discuss analysis results as well as SOFIA's considerable potential for future occultation work. We thank the SOFIA program for its willingness to attempt this challenging observation at such an early stage of SOFIA science operations. Lowell's SOFIA work was supported by a grant from USRA, MIT's prediction work was supported by the NASA Planetary Astronomy Program and the National Science Foundation, and the FDC work was supported by the DSI. We thank the US Naval Observatory Flagstaff Station for allowing us to use their facilities to obtain our prediction astrometry observations.

  2. An Unusual Stellar Death on Christmas Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thone, C. C.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Fryer, C. L.; Page, K. L.; Gorosabel, J.; Aloy, M. A.; Perley, D. A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Janka, H. T.; Mimica, P.; hide

    2011-01-01

    Long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are the most dramatic examples of massive stellar deaths, usually associated with supernovae. They release ultra-relativistic jets producing non-thermal emission through synchrotron radiation as they interact with the surrounding medium. Here we report observations of the peculiar GRB 101225A (the "Christmas burst"). Its gamma-ray emission was exceptionally long and followed by a bright X-ray transient with a hot thermal component and an unusual optical couuterpart. During the first 10 days, the optical emission evolved as an expanding, cooling blackbody after which an additional component, consistent with a faint supernova, emerged. We determine its distance to 1.6 Gpc by fitting the spectral-energy distribution and light curve of the optical emission with a GRB-supernova template. Deep optical observations may have revealed a faint, unresolved host galaxy. Our proposed progenitor is a helium star-neutron star merger that underwent a common envelope phase expelling its hydrogen envelope. The resulting explosion created a GRB-like jet which gets thermalized by interacting with the dense, previously ejected material and thus creating the observed black-body, until finally the emission from the supernova dominated. An alternative explanation is a minor body falling onto a neutron star io the Galaxy

  3. Survival of planets around shrinking stellar binaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Diego J; Lai, Dong

    2015-07-28

    The discovery of transiting circumbinary planets by the Kepler mission suggests that planets can form efficiently around binary stars. None of the stellar binaries currently known to host planets has a period shorter than 7 d, despite the large number of eclipsing binaries found in the Kepler target list with periods shorter than a few days. These compact binaries are believed to have evolved from wider orbits into their current configurations via the so-called Lidov-Kozai migration mechanism, in which gravitational perturbations from a distant tertiary companion induce large-amplitude eccentricity oscillations in the binary, followed by orbital decay and circularization due to tidal dissipation in the stars. Here we explore the orbital evolution of planets around binaries undergoing orbital decay by this mechanism. We show that planets may survive and become misaligned from their host binary, or may develop erratic behavior in eccentricity, resulting in their consumption by the stars or ejection from the system as the binary decays. Our results suggest that circumbinary planets around compact binaries could still exist, and we offer predictions as to what their orbital configurations should be like.

  4. New views of the distant stellar halo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Robyn E.; Secunda, Amy; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Bochanski, John J.

    2017-10-01

    Currently, only a small number of Milky Way (MW) stars are known to exist beyond 100 kpc from the Galactic Centre. Though the distribution of these stars in the outer halo is believed to be sparse, they can provide evidence of more recent accretion events than in the inner halo and help map out the MW's dark matter halo to its virial radius. We have re-examined the outermost regions of 11 existing stellar halo models with two synthetic surveys: one mimicking present-day searches for distant M giants and another mimicking RR Lyra (RRL) projections for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). Our models suggest that colour and proper motion cuts currently used to select M giant candidates for follow-up successfully remove nearly all self-contamination from foreground halo dwarf stars and are useful for focusing observations on distant M giants, of which there are thousands to tens of thousands beyond 100 kpc in our models. We likewise expect that LSST will identify comparable numbers of RRLe at these distances. We demonstrate that several observable properties of both tracers, such as proximity of neighbouring stars, proper motions and distances (for RRLe), could help us separate different accreted dwarf galaxies from one another in the distant MW halo. We also discuss prospects for using ratios of M giants to RRLe as a proxy for accretion time, which in the future could provide new constraints on the recent accretion history of our Galaxy.

  5. Modeling nonthermal emission from stellar bow shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, V.; López-Santiago, J.; Miceli, M.; Bonito, R.; de Castro, E.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Runaway O- and early B-type stars passing through the interstellar medium at supersonic velocities and characterized by strong stellar winds may produce bow shocks that can serve as particle acceleration sites. Previous theoretical models predict the production of high-energy photons by nonthermal radiative processes, but their efficiency is still debated. Aims: We aim to test and explain the possibility of emission from the bow shocks formed by runaway stars traveling through the interstellar medium by using previous theoretical models. Methods: We applied our model to AE Aurigae, the first reported star with an X-ray detected bow shock, to BD+43 3654, in which the observations failed in detecting high-energy emission, and to the transition phase of a supergiant star in the late stages of its life. Results: From our analysis, we confirm that the X-ray emission from the bow shock produced by AE Aurigae can be explained by inverse Compton processes involving the infrared photons of the heated dust. We also predict low high-energy flux emission from the bow shock produced by BD+43 3654, and the possibility of high-energy emission from the bow shock formed by a supergiant star during the transition phase from blue to red supergiant. Conclusions: Bow shocks formed by different types of runaway stars are revealed as a new possible source of high-energy photons in our neighborhood.

  6. The Ancient stellar population of Leo A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Abhijit; Fiorentino, Giuliana; Tolstoy, Eline; Cole, Andrew

    2010-02-01

    The primary goal of our proposal is the characterisation of the oldest stellar populations in Leo A using the properties of ancient RR Lyrae variable stars as tracers. Well known and long established correlations exist between the periods and luminosities of RR Lyrae variable stars and their ages and metallicities. Combining our Gemini study of the properties of RR Lyrae variable stars with deep HST/ACS imaging of the oldest main sequence turnoffs in Leo A will allow us to make a uniquely detailed study of the star formation history of Leo A at the earliest times. This will enable us to study how the formation and evolution of Leo A was affected (if at all) by events in the early universe, such as the formation of the first stars and the Epoch of Reionisation. This is a re-submission because our previous observations, in February-March 2009, suffered from bad weather conditions and did not allow us to complete more than 15% of our programme.

  7. Hydrogen-poor superluminous stellar explosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quimby, R M; Kulkarni, S R; Kasliwal, M M; Gal-Yam, A; Arcavi, I; Sullivan, M; Nugent, P; Thomas, R; Howell, D A; Nakar, E; Bildsten, L; Theissen, C; Law, N M; Dekany, R; Rahmer, G; Hale, D; Smith, R; Ofek, E O; Zolkower, J; Velur, V; Walters, R; Henning, J; Bui, K; McKenna, D; Poznanski, D; Cenko, S B; Levitan, D

    2011-06-08

    Supernovae are stellar explosions driven by gravitational or thermonuclear energy that is observed as electromagnetic radiation emitted over weeks or more. In all known supernovae, this radiation comes from internal energy deposited in the outflowing ejecta by one or more of the following processes: radioactive decay of freshly synthesized elements (typically (56)Ni), the explosion shock in the envelope of a supergiant star, and interaction between the debris and slowly moving, hydrogen-rich circumstellar material. Here we report observations of a class of luminous supernovae whose properties cannot be explained by any of these processes. The class includes four new supernovae that we have discovered and two previously unexplained events (SN 2005ap and SCP 06F6) that we can now identify as members of the same class. These supernovae are all about ten times brighter than most type Ia supernova, do not show any trace of hydrogen, emit significant ultraviolet flux for extended periods of time and have late-time decay rates that are inconsistent with radioactivity. Our data require that the observed radiation be emitted by hydrogen-free material distributed over a large radius (∼10(15) centimetres) and expanding at high speeds (>10(4) kilometres per second). These long-lived, ultraviolet-luminous events can be observed out to redshifts z > 4.

  8. Report on the Workshop "Stellar Populations in Stellar Clusters and Dwarf Galaxies — New Astronomical and Astrophysical Challenges"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, B.; Saviane, I.

    2017-06-01

    Chile hosts many world-leading expert groups working on stellar populations and stellar clusters. This field has undergone something of a revolution during the last decade with the advent of large photometric and spectroscopic surveys, and preparations for relevant new facilities are underway. A Chilean meeting on stellar populations and star clusters was therefore timely. The goal was to bring together experts in the field for discussion and to encourage collaboration. The workshop was open to all astronomers and advanced students, especially those in Chilean institutes, limited to a maximum of 50 participants in order to foster discussion.

  9. GrayStarServer: Stellar atmospheric modeling and spectrum synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, C. Ian

    2017-01-01

    GrayStarServer is a stellar atmospheric modeling and spectrum synthesis code of pedagogical accuracy that is accessible in any web browser on commonplace computational devices and that runs on a timescale of a few seconds.

  10. Absolute stellar photometry on moderate-resolution FPA images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, T.C.

    2009-01-01

    An extensive database of star (and Moon) images has been collected by the ground-based RObotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO) as part of the US Geological Survey program for lunar calibration. The stellar data are used to derive nightly atmospheric corrections for the observations from extinction measurements, and absolute calibration of the ROLO sensors is based on observations of Vega and published reference flux and spectrum data. The ROLO telescopes were designed for imaging the Moon at moderate resolution, thus imposing some limitations for the stellar photometry. Attaining accurate stellar photometry with the ROLO image data has required development of specialized processing techniques. A key consideration is consistency in discriminating the star core signal from the off-axis point spread function. The analysis and processing methods applied to the ROLO stellar image database are described. ?? 2009 BIPM and IOP Publishing Ltd.

  11. Exclusion of Stellar Companions to Exoplanet Host Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittrock, Justin M.; Kane, Stephen R.; Horch, Elliott P.; Howell, Steve B.; Ciardi, David R.; Everett, Mark E.

    2017-11-01

    Given the frequency of stellar multiplicity in the solar neighborhood, it is important to study the impacts this can have on exoplanet properties and orbital dynamics. There have been numerous imaging survey projects established to detect possible low-mass stellar companions to exoplanet host stars. Here, we provide the results from a systematic speckle imaging survey of known exoplanet host stars. In total, 71 stars were observed at 692 and 880 nm bands using the Differential Speckle Survey Instrument at the Gemini-north Observatory. Our results show that all but two of the stars included in this sample have no evidence of stellar companions with luminosities down to the detection and projected separation limits of our instrumentation. The mass-luminosity relationship is used to estimate the maximum mass a stellar companion can have without being detected. These results are used to discuss the potential for further radial velocity follow-up and interpretation of companion signals.

  12. Diagnostics Plan for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Johnson; T. Brown; H. Neilson; G. Schilling; H. Takahashi; M. Zarnstorff; M. Cole; E. Lazarus; and M. Fenstermacher

    2002-07-12

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is a stellarator-tokamak hybrid seeking to combine the good confinement, high beta and moderate aspect ratio of the tokamak with the quasi-steady-state operation and good stability properties of the stellarator. A preliminary list of measurement requirements, intended to satisfy the needs of the phased research plan, provides the basis for a full complement of plasma diagnostics. It is important to consider this full set, even at this early stage, to assess the adequacy of the stellarator design for diagnostic port access. The 3-D nature of the plasma is a measurement challenge, as is the necessity for high spatial resolution to assess the quality of magnetic surfaces. Other diagnostic requirements include the need for re-entrant views that penetrate the cryostat, for a convenient e-beam probe for field line mapping, and for a diagnostic neutral beam for active spectroscopy.

  13. Stellar winds, dead zones, and coronal mass ejections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keppens, R.; Goedbloed, J. P.

    2000-01-01

    Axisymmetric stellar wind solutions are presented that were obtained by numerically solving the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. Stationary solutions are critically analyzed using the knowledge of the flux functions. These flux functions enter in the general variational principle governing

  14. Seyfert galaxies: A study of brightness variation and stellar concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, D. W.

    1976-01-01

    Ultraviolet photometry of Seyfert galaxies is analyzed for variations in nuclear magnitude. Using multiple apertures permits the estimation of stellar concentration; four Seyfert and two normal spiral galaxies are compared.

  15. Space Weather: Linking Stellar Explosions to the Human Endeavor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipp, Delores

    2017-06-01

    Arguably humans have flourished as a result of stellar explosions; we are, after all, stardust. Nonetheless, rapid technology advances of the last 200 years sometimes put society and individuals on a collision course with the natural variability of stellar and solar atmospheres. Human space exploration, routine satellite navigation system applications, aviation safety, and electric power grids are examples of such vulnerable endeavors. In this presentation I will outline how global society relies on ‘normal’ solar and stellar emissions, yet becomes susceptible to extremes of these emissions. The imprints of these astronomical-terrestrial interactions abound. In particular, I will highlight ways in which stellar/solar bursts link with our space-atmosphere-interaction region, producing multi-year patterns in cosmic ray detection, gorgeous aurora, and deep concern for good order and function of global community.

  16. Starchive: The Open Access, Open Source Stellar Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, A. M.; Muna, D.; Addison, B.; Zohrabi, F.; Geneser, C.; Niffenegger, R.

    2017-11-01

    It has become clear that we must understand the host stars as well as their exoplanets. The Starchive is an open source, open access stellar database and intuitive front-end to help astronomers find planets and determine habitability.

  17. Young Stellar Objects in the Orion B Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petr-Gotzens, M. G.; Alcalá, J. M.; Spezzi, L.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Stanke, Th.; Lombardi, M.; Alves, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Wide-field near-infrared imaging surveys offer an excellent opportunity to obtain spatially complete samples of young stars in nearby star-forming regions. By studying their spatial distribution and individual properties, the global star formation characteristics of a region can be established. Near-infrared wide-field imaging observations of a significantly large area in the Orion Molecular Cloud B, obtained with the VISTA telescope on Cerro Paranal are presented. On the basis of photometric selection criteria, we have identified 186 candidate young stellar objects that are associated with the stellar clusters NGC 2068 and NGC 2071, and with the stellar group around HH24-26. Overall, Orion B shows a lot of similarities in its star formation characteristics with other Galactic star-forming regions: a star formation efficiency of a few percent, a stellar mass distribution very similar to that of the Orion Trapezium cluster, and a high observed fraction of circumstellar discs.

  18. Stellar population gradients in isolated, local group dwarf galaxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidalgo S.L.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the detailed star formation as a function of radius that we have derived for the LCID galaxies, with particular emphasis on the stellar populations gradient and the effect of the UV-background.

  19. KINEMATICS OF CLASSICAL CEPHEIDS IN THE NUCLEAR STELLAR DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Fukue, Kei [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Yamamoto, Ryo; Kobayashi, Naoto; Hamano, Satoshi [Institute of Astronomy, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Inno, Laura [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Genovali, Katia; Bono, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Baba, Junichi [Earth-Life Science Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Fujii, Michiko S.; Aoki, Wako; Tsujimoto, Takuji [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Kondo, Sohei; Ikeda, Yuji [Koyama Astronomical Observatory, Kyoto Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Nishiyama, Shogo [Miyagi University of Education, 149 Aramaki-aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-0845 (Japan); Nagata, Tetsuya, E-mail: matsunaga@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2015-01-20

    Classical Cepheids are useful tracers of the Galactic young stellar population because their distances and ages can be determined from their period-luminosity and period-age relations. In addition, the radial velocities and chemical abundance of the Cepheids can be derived from spectroscopic observations, providing further insights into the structure and evolution of the Galaxy. Here, we report the radial velocities of classical Cepheids near the Galactic center, three of which were reported in 2011 and a fourth being reported for the first time. The velocities of these Cepheids suggest that the stars orbit within the nuclear stellar disk, a group of stars and interstellar matter occupying a region of ∼200 pc around the center, although the three-dimensional velocities cannot be determined until the proper motions are known. According to our simulation, these four Cepheids formed within the nuclear stellar disk like younger stars and stellar clusters therein.

  20. ASTEROID ALBEDOS FROM STELLAR OCCULTATIONS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains albedos for 57 asteroids determined from diameters obtained from stellar occultations. These albedos are from Shevchenko and Tedesco (2006).

  1. Three-Dimensional Analysis of Tokamaks and Stellarators

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paul R. Garabedian

    2008-01-01

    The NSTAB equilibrium and stability code and the TRAN Monte Carlo transport code furnish a simple but effective numerical simulation of essential features of present tokamak and stellarator experiments...

  2. Andromeda Optical & Infrared Disk Survey: Stellar Populations and Mass Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sick, Jonathan; Courteau, Stephane; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Dalcanton, Julianne; de Jong, Roelof S.; McDonald, Michael; Tully, R. Brent

    2015-01-01

    M31 is ideal for understanding the structure and stellar populations of spiral galaxies thanks to its proximity and our external vantage point. The Andromeda Optical & Infrared Disk Survey (ANDROIDS) has used MegaCam and WIRCam on the Canada-France Hawaii Telescope to map the M31 bulge and disk out to R=40 kpc in ugriJKs bands. Through careful sky monitoring and modelling, ANDROIDS is uniquely able to observe both the resolved stars and integrated spectral energy distributions (SEDs) over M31's entire disk (complimenting HST's PHAT program). By simultaneously fitting stellar populations with isochrones and SED models for M31, we can assess the systematic uncertainties of SED fits to more distant unresolved systems, and constrain the stellar populations that contribute to each bandpass. We pay close attention to the near-IR light of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in stellar population models. ANDROIDS has also surveyed M31 in narrowband TiO and CN bands, enabling a clean classification of Carbon AGB stars, and a mapping the ratio of Carbon and M-type AGB stars (C/M) across the entire disk. The correlation between C/M and stellar metallicity is useful for constraining the NIR colors of more distant galaxies. We also present a hierarchical Bayesian model of pixel-by-pixel stellar populations, yielding the most detailed map of M31's stellar mass and star formation history to date. We find that a full six-band optical-NIR fit provides the best constraints to stellar mass, a triumph for modern NIR stellar population synthesis models, though the results are consistent with an optical-only fits. Fits based on the popular g-i color combination find M/L* ratios biased by 0.1 dex, while color-mass-to-light prescriptions in the literature may differ by 0.3 dex. This result affirms that panchromatic SED modelling is crucial even for stellar mass estimation, let alone age and metallicity. Overall, we estimate the stellar mass of M31, within R=30 kpc, to be 10.3 (+2.3, -1

  3. New Classes of Quasi-helically Symmetric Stellarators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L.P. Ku and A.H. Boozer

    2010-08-09

    New classes of quasi-helically symmetric stellarators with aspect ratios ≤ 10 have been found which are stable to the perturbation of magnetohydrodynamic modes at plasma pressures of practical interest. These configurations have large rotational transform and good quality of flux surfaces. Characteristics of some selected examples are discussed in detail. The feasibility of using modular coils for these stellarators has been investigated. It is shown that practical designs for modular coils can be achieved.

  4. GrayStar: Web-based pedagogical stellar modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, C. Ian

    2017-01-01

    GrayStar is a web-based pedagogical stellar model. It approximates stellar atmospheric and spectral line modeling in JavaScript with visualization in HTML. It is suitable for a wide range of education and public outreach levels depending on which optional plots and print-outs are turned on. All plots and renderings are pure basic HTML and the plotting module contains original HTML procedures for automatically scaling and graduating x- and y-axes.

  5. Forecasting the Impact of Stellar Activity on Transiting Exoplanet Spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Zellem, Robert T.; Swain, Mark R.; Roudier, Gael; Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Creech-Eakman, Michelle J.; Ciardi, David R.; Line, Michael R.; Iyer, Aishwarya R.; Bryden, Geoffrey; Llama, Joe; Fahy, Kristen A.

    2017-01-01

    Exoplanet host star activity, in the form of unocculted starspots or faculae, alters the observed transmission and emission spectra of the exoplanet. This effect can be exacerbated when combining data from different epochs if the stellar photosphere varies between observations due to activity. Here, we present a method to characterize and correct for relative changes due to stellar activity by exploiting multi-epoch (⩾2 visits/transits) observations to place them in a consistent reference fra...

  6. Non-Gaussian statistics, maxwellian derivation and stellar polytropes

    OpenAIRE

    Bento, E. P.; Silva, J.R.P.; Silva, R.

    2012-01-01

    In this letter we discuss the Non-gaussian statistics considering two aspects. In the first, we show that the Maxwell's first derivation of the stationary distribution function for a dilute gas can be extended in the context of Kaniadakis statistics. The second one, by investigating the stellar system, we study the Kaniadakis analytical relation between the entropic parameter $\\kappa$ and stellar polytrope index $n$. We compare also the Kaniadakis relation $n=n(\\kappa)$ with $n=n(q)$ proposed...

  7. Experience with the commissioning of the superconducting stellarator Wendelstein 7-X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosch, Hans-Stephan, E-mail: Bosch@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Bykov, V.; Brakel, R.; Eeten, P. van; Feist, J.-H.; Gasparotto, M.; Grote, H.; Klinger, T.; Nagel, M.; Naujoks, D. [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Neilson, G.H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Rummel, T.; Schacht, J.; Vilbrandt, R.; Wegener, L.; Werner, A. [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Present status of W7-X assembly. • Preparation of commissioning. • Recent results of commission. • Further step in the commissioning of W7-X. • Lessens learned. - Abstract: The super-conducting stellarator Wendelstein 7-X is presently under construction at the Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics in Greifswald, Germany. Assembly of the device is almost completed and the periphery systems and the diagnostic and heating systems are well advanced. Commissioning of the device has been prepared over the last 2 years and has started in April 2014. This is the first time since decades that a superconducting fusion device is commissioned in Europe.

  8. AXISYMMETRIC SIMULATIONS OF HOT JUPITER–STELLAR WIND HYDRODYNAMIC INTERACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christie, Duncan; Arras, Phil; Li, Zhi-Yun [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States)

    2016-03-20

    Gas giant exoplanets orbiting at close distances to the parent star are subjected to large radiation and stellar wind fluxes. In this paper, hydrodynamic simulations of the planetary upper atmosphere and its interaction with the stellar wind are carried out to understand the possible flow regimes and how they affect the Lyα transmission spectrum. Following Tremblin and Chiang, charge exchange reactions are included to explore the role of energetic atoms as compared to thermal particles. In order to understand the role of the tail as compared to the leading edge of the planetary gas, the simulations were carried out under axisymmetry, and photoionization and stellar wind electron impact ionization reactions were included to limit the extent of the neutrals away from the planet. By varying the planetary gas temperature, two regimes are found. At high temperature, a supersonic planetary wind is found, which is turned around by the stellar wind and forms a tail behind the planet. At lower temperatures, the planetary wind is shut off when the stellar wind penetrates inside where the sonic point would have been. In this regime mass is lost by viscous interaction at the boundary between planetary and stellar wind gases. Absorption by cold hydrogen atoms is large near the planetary surface, and decreases away from the planet as expected. The hot hydrogen absorption is in an annulus and typically dominated by the tail, at large impact parameter, rather than by the thin leading edge of the mixing layer near the substellar point.

  9. Stellar-to-halo mass relation of cluster galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemiec, Anna; Jullo, Eric; Limousin, Marceau; Giocoli, Carlo; Erben, Thomas; Hildebrant, Hendrik; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Leauthaud, Alexie; Makler, Martin; Moraes, Bruno; Pereira, Maria E. S.; Shan, Huanyuan; Rozo, Eduardo; Rykoff, Eli; Van Waerbeke, Ludovic

    2017-10-01

    In the formation of galaxy groups and clusters, the dark matter haloes containing satellite galaxies are expected to be tidally stripped in gravitational interactions with the host. We use galaxy-galaxy weak lensing to measure the average mass of dark matter haloes of satellite galaxies as a function of projected distance to the centre of the host, since stripping is expected to be greater for satellites closer to the centre of the cluster. We further classify the satellites according to their stellar mass: Assuming that the stellar component of the galaxy is less disrupted by tidal stripping, stellar mass can be used as a proxy of the infall mass. We study the stellar-to-halo mass relation of satellites as a function of the cluster-centric distance to measure tidal stripping. We use the shear catalogues of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) science verification archive, the Canada-France-Hawaii Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS) and the CFHT Stripe 82 surveys, and we select satellites from the redMaPPer catalogue of clusters. For galaxies located in the outskirts of clusters, we find a stellar-to- halo mass relation in good agreement with the theoretical expectations from Moster et al. for central galaxies. In the centre of the cluster, we find that this relation is shifted to smaller halo mass for a given stellar mass. We interpret this finding as further evidence for tidal stripping of dark matter haloes in high-density environments.

  10. Two-component magnetohydrodynamical outflows around young stellar objects Interplay between stellar magnetospheric winds and disc-driven jets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Meliani, Z; Casse, F; Sauty, C

    2006-01-01

    We present the first-ever simulations of non-ideal magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) stellar magnetospheric winds coupled with disc-driven jets where the resistive and viscous accretion disc is self-consistently described...

  11. Early Hydrodynamic Evolution of a Stellar Collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnir, Doron; Katz, Boaz

    2014-04-01

    The early phase of the hydrodynamic evolution following the collision of two stars is analyzed. Two strong shocks propagate from the contact surface and move toward the center of each star at a velocity that is a small fraction of the velocity of the approaching stars. The shocked region near the contact surface has a planar symmetry and a uniform pressure. The density vanishes at the (Lagrangian) surface of contact, and the speed of sound diverges there. The temperature, however, reaches a finite value, since as the density vanishes, the finite pressure is radiation dominated. For carbon-oxygen white dwarf (CO WD) collisions, this temperature is too low for any appreciable nuclear burning shortly after the collision, which allows for a significant fraction of the mass to be highly compressed to the density required for efficient 56Ni production in the detonation wave that follows. This property is crucial for the viability of collisions of typical CO WD as progenitors of type Ia supernovae, since otherwise only massive (>0.9 M ⊙) CO WDs would have led to such explosions (as required by all other progenitor models). The divergence of the speed of sound limits numerical studies of stellar collisions, as it makes convergence tests exceedingly expensive unless dedicated schemes are used. We provide a new one-dimensional Lagrangian numerical scheme to achieve this. A self-similar planar solution is derived for zero-impact parameter collisions between two identical stars, under some simplifying assumptions (including a power-law density profile), which is the planar version of previous piston problems that were studied in cylindrical and spherical symmetries.

  12. Edge biasing in the WEGA stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lischtschenko, Oliver

    2009-02-27

    The WEGA stellarator is used to confine low temperature, overdense (densities exceeding the cut-off density of the heating wave) plasmas by magnetic fields in the range of B=50-500 mT. Microwave heating systems are used to ignite gas discharges using hydrogen, helium, neon or argon as working gases. The produced plasmas have been analyzed using Langmuir and emissive probes, a single-channel interferometer and ultra-high resolution Doppler spectroscopy. For a typical argon discharge in the low field operation, B=56 mT, the maximum electron density is n{sub e}{proportional_to}10{sup 18} m{sup -3} with temperatures in the range of T=4-12 eV. The plasma parameters are determined by using Langmuir probes and are cross-checked with interferometry. It is demonstrated within this work that the joint use of emissive probes and ultra-high resolution Doppler spectroscopy allows a precise measurement of the radial electric field. The focus of this work is on demonstrating the ability to modify the existing radial electric field in a plasma by using the biasing probe. This work commences with a basic approach and first establishes the diagnostic tools in a well-known discharge. Then the perturbation caused by the biasing probe is assessed. Following the characterization of the unperturbed plasmas, plasma states altered by the operation of the energized biasing probe are characterized. During biasing the plasma two different stable plasma states have been found. The two observed plasma states differ in plasma parameter profiles, such as density, temperature, electric field and confined energy. (orig.)

  13. The PASTEL catalogue of stellar parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soubiran, C.; Le Campion, J.-F.; Cayrel de Strobel, G.; Caillo, A.

    2010-06-01

    Aims: The PASTEL catalogue is an update of the [Fe/H] catalogue, published in 1997 and 2001. It is a bibliographical compilation of stellar atmospheric parameters providing (T_eff, log g, [Fe/H]) determinations obtained from the analysis of high resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra, carried out with model atmospheres. PASTEL also provides determinations of the one parameter T_eff based on various methods. It is aimed in the future to provide also homogenized atmospheric parameters and elemental abundances, radial and rotational velocities. A web interface has been created to query the catalogue on elaborated criteria. PASTEL is also distributed through the CDS database and VizieR. Methods: To make it as complete as possible, the main journals have been surveyed, as well as the CDS database, to find relevant publications. The catalogue is regularly updated with new determinations found in the literature. Results: As of Febuary 2010, PASTEL includes 30151 determinations of either T_eff or (T_eff, log g, [Fe/H]) for 16 649 different stars corresponding to 865 bibliographical references. Nearly 6000 stars have a determination of the three parameters (T_eff, log g, [Fe/H]) with a high quality spectroscopic metallicity. The catalogue can be queried through a dedicated web interface at http://pastel.obs.u-bordeaux1.fr/. It is also available in electronic form at the Centre de Données Stellaires in Strasbourg (http://vizier.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/VizieR?-source=B/pastel), at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/515/A111

  14. YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE GOULD BELT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunham, Michael M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS 78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Allen, Lori E. [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ (United States); Evans II, Neal J.; Harvey, Paul M. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States); Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, V8W 3P6 (Canada); Cieza, Lucas A. [Núcleo de Astronomía de la Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejército 441, Santiago (Chile); Di Francesco, James; Johnstone, Doug; Matthews, Brenda C. [National Research Council of Canada, Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics Programs, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC, V9E 2E7 (Canada); Gutermuth, Robert A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Hatchell, Jennifer [Physics and Astronomy, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Heiderman, Amanda [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Huard, Tracy L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Kirk, Jason M. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Miller, Jennifer F. [Gemini Observatory, 670 N. A’ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Peterson, Dawn E. [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut Street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Young, Kaisa E., E-mail: mdunham@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Physical Sciences, Nicholls State University, P.O. Box 2022, Thibodaux, LA 70310 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    We present the full catalog of Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) identified in the 18 molecular clouds surveyed by the Spitzer Space Telescope “cores to disks” (c2d) and “Gould Belt” (GB) Legacy surveys. Using standard techniques developed by the c2d project, we identify 3239 candidate YSOs in the 18 clouds, 2966 of which survive visual inspection and form our final catalog of YSOs in the GB. We compile extinction corrected spectral energy distributions for all 2966 YSOs and calculate and tabulate the infrared spectral index, bolometric luminosity, and bolometric temperature for each object. We find that 326 (11%), 210 (7%), 1248 (42%), and 1182 (40%) are classified as Class 0 + I, Flat-spectrum, Class II, and Class III, respectively, and show that the Class III sample suffers from an overall contamination rate by background Asymptotic Giant Branch stars between 25% and 90%. Adopting standard assumptions, we derive durations of 0.40–0.78 Myr for Class 0 + I YSOs and 0.26–0.50 Myr for Flat-spectrum YSOs, where the ranges encompass uncertainties in the adopted assumptions. Including information from (sub)millimeter wavelengths, one-third of the Class 0 + I sample is classified as Class 0, leading to durations of 0.13–0.26 Myr (Class 0) and 0.27–0.52 Myr (Class I). We revisit infrared color–color diagrams used in the literature to classify YSOs and propose minor revisions to classification boundaries in these diagrams. Finally, we show that the bolometric temperature is a poor discriminator between Class II and Class III YSOs.

  15. Application of Multi-task Sparse Lasso Feature Extraction and Support Vector Machine Regression in the Stellar Atmospheric Parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Li, Xiang-ru

    2017-07-01

    The multi-task learning takes the multiple tasks together to make analysis and calculation, so as to dig out the correlations among them, and therefore to improve the accuracy of the analyzed results. This kind of methods have been widely applied to the machine learning, pattern recognition, computer vision, and other related fields. This paper investigates the application of multi-task learning in estimating the stellar atmospheric parameters, including the surface temperature (Teff), surface gravitational acceleration (lg g), and chemical abundance ([Fe/H]). Firstly, the spectral features of the three stellar atmospheric parameters are extracted by using the multi-task sparse group Lasso algorithm, then the support vector machine is used to estimate the atmospheric physical parameters. The proposed scheme is evaluated on both the Sloan stellar spectra and the theoretical spectra computed from the Kurucz's New Opacity Distribution Function (NEWODF) model. The mean absolute errors (MAEs) on the Sloan spectra are: 0.0064 for lg (Teff /K), 0.1622 for lg (g/(cm · s-2)), and 0.1221 dex for [Fe/H]; the MAEs on the synthetic spectra are 0.0006 for lg (Teff /K), 0.0098 for lg (g/(cm · s-2)), and 0.0082 dex for [Fe/H]. Experimental results show that the proposed scheme has a rather high accuracy for the estimation of stellar atmospheric parameters.

  16. Stellar structures in the outer regions of M 33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossi, M.; Hwang, N.; Corbelli, E.; Giovanardi, C.; Okamoto, S.; Arimoto, N.

    2011-09-01

    Aims: We present Subaru/Suprime-Cam deep V and I imaging of seven fields in the outer regions of M 33. Our aim is to search for stellar structures corresponding to extended Hi clouds found in a recent 21-cm survey of the galaxy. Three fields probe a large Hi complex to the southeastern (SE) side of the galaxy. An additional three fields cover the northwestern (NW) side of the galaxy along the Hi warp. A final target field was chosen further north, at a projected distance of approximately 25 kpc, to study part of the large stellar plume recently discovered around M 33. Methods: We analyse the stellar population at R > 10 kpc by means of V, I colour magnitude diagrams reaching the red clump. We constrain the age and metallicity of the different stellar populations, search for density enhancements that correspond to the Hi features, and investigate the radial surface distribution of the stars. Results: We find evolved stellar populations in all fields out to 120'(~30 kpc), while a diffuse population of young stars (~200 Myr) is detected out to a galactocentric radius of 15 kpc. The mean metallicity in the southern fields remains approximately constant at [M/H] = -0.7 beyond the edge of the optical disc, from 40'out to 80'. Along the northern fields probing the outer Hi disc, we also find a metallicity of [M/H] = -0.7 between 35'and 70'from the centre, which decreases to [M/H] = -1.0 at larger angular radii out to 120'. In the northernmost field, outside the disc extent, the stellar population of the large stellar plume possibly related to a M 33-M 31 interaction is on average more metal-poor ([M/H] = -1.3) and older (≳6 Gyr). Conclusions: An exponential disc with a large scale-length (~7 kpc) fits well the average distribution of stars detected in both the SE and NW regions from a galactocentric distance of 11 kpc out to 30 kpc. The stellar disc extends beyond the Hi disc. The stellar distribution at large radii is disturbed and, although there is no clear

  17. The Relationship Between Infrared Dark Cloud and Stellar Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calahan, Jenny; Hora, Joseph L.

    2018-01-01

    Massive stars are known to form within infrared dark clouds (IRDCs), but many details about how molecular clouds collapse and form stars remain poorly understood.We determine the relationship between the dark cloud mass and the population of young stellar objects (YSOs) associated with the cloud to shed light on the physical processes occurring within these star forming regions. We chose to use a sample of IRDCs and YSOs within the Cygnus-X region, a close-by giant star formation complex that has every stage of star formation represented. Using observations from IRAC, MIPS, PACS, and SPIRE on Spitzer and Herschel we identified a sample of 30,903 YSOs and 167 IRDCs. We derived the class of each YSO as well as the mass of YSO and IRDCs from the flux information. Using these parameters, as well as their locations in the cloud, we were sorted IRDC fragments into larger filaments and associate a set of YSOs with each IRDC. By measuring and comparing parameters such as YSO total mass, number of YSOs, Class 0, Class I, and Class II populations, distance from host filament, and filament mass we tested for correlations between the YSO and IRDC parameters. Using this treasure trove of information, we find that Class 0 and I objects are located more closely to their host IRDC than their Class II counterparts. We also find that high-density IRDCs are better environments for star formation than low-density IRDCs. However, we find no correlation between the total mass of the IRDC and the largest YSO mass in the IRDC, suggesting that IRDCs of any mass can have massive YSOs associated with them.The SAO REU program is funded by the National Science Foundation REU and Department of Defense ASSURE programs under NSF Grant AST-1659473, and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  18. Pressure surge in Wendelstein 7-X experimental stellarator facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaliatka, Algirdas; Uspuras, Eugenijus; Kaliatka, Tadas [Lithuanian Energy Institute, Kaunas (Lithuania). Lab. of Nuclear Installation Safety

    2012-05-15

    Fusion is the energy production technology, which could potentially solve problems with growing energy demand of population in the future. Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) is an experimental stellarator facility currently being built in Greifswald, Germany, which shall demonstrate that in the future energy could be produced in such type of fusion reactors. Lithuanian energy institute (LEI) in the frames of European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) program is cooperating with Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics (IPP, Germany) by performing safety analysis of fusion device W7-X. In this paper the consequences of potential water hammer effects were analysed only for the case, when the plasma vessel is operating in the 'baking' mode. 'Baking' is the mode of facility operation during which the plasma vessel structures are heated up to 150 C in order to release absorbed gases from the surfaces and to pump them out of the plasma vessel before plasma operation. For the analysis the thermal-hydraulic model of target (torus) modules cooling / heating systems in W7-X facility was developed using RELAP5/Mod3.3 code. The performed analyses showed that the pressure pulsations in pipelines of cooling / heating systems are possible only in case of very fast closure of automatic valves in torus modules inlets and check valves in torus modules outlets. The maximum dynamic loading to cooling / heating systems pipelines due to such valves activations is in the range 0.12-0.28 MPa. Such dynamic load is insignificant and integrity of pipelines remains not violated. The pressure surge in pipeline connecting torus module in case of erroneous closure of automatic valve is eliminated due to operation of check valve on pipeline in torus module outlet. (orig.)

  19. Pressure surge in Wendelstein 7-X experimental stellarator facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaliatka, A.; Uspuras, E.; Kaliatka, T. [Lithuanian Energy Inst., Kaunas (Lithuania)

    2011-07-01

    Fusion is the energy production technology, which could potentially solve problems with growing energy demand of population in the future. Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) is an experimental stellarator facility currently being built in Greifswald, Germany, which shall demonstrate that in the future energy could be produced in such type of fusion reactors. Lithuanian energy institute (LEI) in the frames of European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) program is cooperating with Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics (IPP, Germany) by performing safety analysis of fusion device W7-X. In this paper the consequences of potential water hammer effects were analysed only for the case, when the plasma vessel is operating in the “baking” mode. “Baking” is the mode of facility operation during which the vacuum vessel structures are heated up to 150 C in order to release absorbed gases from the surfaces and to pump them out of the plasma vessel before plasma operation. For the analysis the thermal-hydraulic model of target (torus) modules cooling / heating systems in W7-X facility was developed using RELAP5/Mod3.3 code. The performed analyses showed that the pressure pulsations in pipelines of cooling / heating systems are possible only in case of very fast closure of automatic valves in torus modules inlets and check valves in torus modules outlets. The maximum dynamic loading to cooling / heating systems pipelines due to such valves activations is in the range 0.12 - 0.28 MPa. Such dynamic load is insignificant and integrity of pipelines remains not violated. The pressure surge in pipeline connecting torus module in case of erroneous closure of automatic valve is eliminated due to operation of check valve on pipeline in torus module outlet. (author)

  20. Stellar parameters for stars of the CoRoT exoplanet field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, C.; Maciel, S. C.; Vieira, S.; Ferreira Lopes, C. E.; Leão, I. C.; de Oliveira, G. P.; Correia, C.; Canto Martins, B. L.; Catelan, M.; De Medeiros, J. R.

    2015-09-01

    Context. Spectroscopic observations represent a fundamental step in the physical characterization of stars and, in particular, in the precise location of stars in the HR diagram. Rotation is also a key parameter, impacting stellar properties and evolution, which modulates the interior and manifests itself on the surface of stars. To date, the lack of analysis based on large samples has prevented our understanding of the real impact of stellar parameters and rotation on the stellar evolution as well as on the behavior of surface abundances. The space missions, CoRoT and Kepler, are providing us with rotation periods for thousands of stars, thus enabling a robust assessment of the behavior of rotation for different populations and evolutionary stages. For these reasons, the follow-up programs are fundamental to increasing the returns of these space missions. An analysis that combines spectroscopic data and rotation/modulation periods obtained from these space missions provides the basis for establishing the evolutionary behavior of the angular momentum of solar-like stars at different evolutionary stages, and the relation of rotation with other relevant physical and chemical parameters. Aims: To support the computation and evolutionary interpretation of periods associated with the rotational modulation, oscillations, and variability of stars located in the CoRoT fields, we are conducting a spectroscopic survey for stars located in the fields already observed by the satellite. These observations allow us to compute physical and chemical parameters for our stellar sample. Methods: Using spectroscopic observations obtained with UVES/VLT and Hydra/Blanco, and based on standard analysis techniques, we computed physical and chemical parameters (Teff, log (g), [Fe/H], vmic, vrad, vsin (i), and A(Li)) for a large sample of CoRoT targets. Results: We provide physical and chemical parameters for a sample comprised of 138 CoRoT targets. Our analysis shows the stars in our

  1. Stellar mass distribution of S4G disk galaxies and signatures of bar-induced secular evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-García, S.; Salo, H.; Laurikainen, E.

    2016-12-01

    Context. Models of galaxy formation in a cosmological framework need to be tested against observational constraints, such as the average stellar density profiles (and their dispersion) as a function of fundamental galaxy properties (e.g. the total stellar mass). Simulation models predict that the torques produced by stellar bars efficiently redistribute the stellar and gaseous material inside the disk, pushing it outwards or inwards depending on whether it is beyond or inside the bar corotation resonance radius. Bars themselves are expected to evolve, getting longer and narrower as they trap particles from the disk and slow down their rotation speed. Aims: We use 3.6 μm photometry from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G) to trace the stellar distribution in nearby disk galaxies (z ≈ 0) with total stellar masses 108.5 ≲ M∗/M⊙ ≲ 1011 and mid-IR Hubble types - 3 ≤ T ≤ 10. We characterize the stellar density profiles (Σ∗), the stellar contribution to the rotation curves (V3.6 μm), and the m = 2 Fourier amplitudes (A2) as a function of M∗ and T. We also describe the typical shapes and strengths of stellar bars in the S4G sample and link their properties to the total stellar mass and morphology of their host galaxy. Methods: For 1154 S4G galaxies with disk inclinations lower than 65°, we perform a Fourier decomposition and rescale their images to a common frame determined by the size in physical units, by their disk scalelength, and for 748 barred galaxies by both the length and orientation of their bars. We stack the resized density profiles and images to obtain statistically representative average stellar disks and bars in bins of M∗ and T. Based on the radial force profiles of individual galaxies we calculate the mean stellar contribution to the circular velocity. We also calculate average A2 profiles, where the radius is normalized to R25.5. Furthermore, we infer the gravitational potentials from the synthetic bars to

  2. Water in star-forming regions with Herschel (WISH). III. Far-infrared cooling lines in low-mass young stellar objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karska, A.; Herczeg, G. J.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Wampfler, S. F.; Kristensen, L. E.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Visser, R.; Nisini, B.; San José-García, I.; Bruderer, S.; Śniady, P.; Doty, S.; Fedele, D.; Yıldız, U. A.; Benz, A. O.; Bergin, E.; Caselli, P.; Herpin, F.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Johnstone, D.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Liseau, R.; Tafalla, M.; van der Tak, F.; Wyrowski, F.

    Context. Understanding the physical phenomena involved in the earlierst stages of protostellar evolution requires knowledge of the heating and cooling processes that occur in the surroundings of a young stellar object. Spatially resolved information from its constituent gas and dust provides the

  3. Water in star-forming regions with Herschel (WISH) : III. Far-infrared cooling lines in low-mass young stellar objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karska, A.; Herczeg, G. J.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Wampfler, S. F.; Kristensen, L. E.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Visser, R.; Nisini, B.; San Jose-Garcia, I.; Bruderer, S.; Sniady, P.; Doty, S.; Fedele, D.; Yildiz, U. A.; Benz, A. O.; Bergin, E.; Caselli, P.; Herpin, F.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Johnstone, D.; Jorgensen, J. K.; Liseau, R.; Tafalla, M.; van der Tak, F.; Wyrowski, F.

    Context. Understanding the physical phenomena involved in the earlierst stages of protostellar evolution requires knowledge of the heating and cooling processes that occur in the surroundings of a young stellar object. Spatially resolved information from its constituent gas and dust provides the

  4. Sub-1% accuracy in fundamental stellar parameters from triply eclipsing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prsa, Andrej

    The current state-of-the-art level of accuracy in fundamental stellar parameters from eclipsing binary stars is 2-3%. Here we propose to use eclipsing triple stars to reduce the error bars by an entire order of magnitude, i.e. to 0.2-0.3%. This can be done because a presence of the third component breaks most of the degeneracy inherent in binary systems between the inclination and stellar sizes. We detail the feasibility arguments and foresee that these results will provide exceptional benchmark objects for stringent tests of stellar evolution and population models. The formation channel of close binary stars (with separations of several stellar radii) is a matter of debate. It is clear that close binaries cannot form in situ because (1) the physical radius of a star shrinks by a large factor between birth and the main sequence, yet many main-sequence stars have companions orbiting at a distance of only a few stellar radii, and (2) in current theories of planet formation, the region within 0.1 AU of a protostar is too hot and rarefied for a Jupiter-mass planet to form, yet many hot jupiters are observed at such distances. Current theories of dynamic orbital evolution attribute orbital shrinking to Kozai cycles and tidal friction, which are long-lasting, perturbative effects that take Gyrs to shrink orbits by 1-2 orders of magnitude. This implies that, if a binary star system has a tertiary companion, it will be in a hierarchical structure, and any disruptive orbital encounters should be exceedingly rare after a certain period. The Kepler satellite observed continuously over 2800 eclipsing binary stars over 4 years of its mission lifetime. The ultra-high precision photometry and essentially uninterrupted time coverage enables us to time the eclipses to a 6 second precision. Because of the well understood physics that governs the orbital motion of two bodies around the center of mass, the expected times of eclipses can be predicted to a fraction of a second. When

  5. Energy balance of stellar coronae. III - Effect of stellar mass and radius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, R.

    1984-01-01

    A homologous transformation is derived which permits the application of the numerical coronal models of Hammer from a star with solar mass and radius to other stars. This scaling requires a few approximations concerning the lower boundary conditions and the temperature dependence of the conductivity and emissivity. These approximations are discussed and found to be surprisingly mild. Therefore, the scaling of the coronal models to other stars is rather accurate; it is found to be particularly accurate for main-sequence stars. The transformation is used to derive an equation that gives the maximum temperature of open coronal regions as a function of stellar mass and radius, the coronal heating flux, and the characteristic damping length over which the corona is heated.

  6. The Early History of Stellar Spin: the Theory of Accretion onto Young Stellar Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pudritz Ralph E.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of the magnetospheres of forming stars with their surrounding protostellar disks results in magnetospheric accretion flow onto the star. How is the associated angular momentum of accreting material channelled? The resolution of this issue is crucial for understanding the origin of the spins of pre main sequence stars. A significant fraction of these rotate very slowly, which indicates that an efficient angular momentum transport mechanism is at work to counteract the strong accretion spin up torques. We review the observational, theoretical, and computational advances in the field and argue that an accretion powered stellar winds together with highly time variable mass ejections from the disk/magnetosphere interface is a likely solution.

  7. Transfer reaction measurements and the stellar nucleosynthesis of 26Al and 44Ti

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2086831

    Progress in the description of stellar evolution is driven by the collaborative effort of nuclear physics, astrophysics and astronomy. Using those developments, the theory of the origin of elements in the Universe is challenged. This thesis addresses the problem behind the abundance of 44Ti and the origin of 26Al. The mismatch between the predicted abundance of 44Ti as produced by the only sites known to be able to create 44Ti, core collapse supernovae (CCSNe), and the observations, highlight the current uncertainty that exists in the physics of these stars. Several satellite based gamma-ray observations of the isotope 44Ti have been reported in recent times and conrm the disagreement. As the amount of this isotope in stellar ejecta is thought to critically depend on the explosion mechanism, the ability to accurately model the observed abundance would be a pivotal step towards validating that theory. The most in influential reaction to the amount of 44Ti in supernovae is 44Ti(alpha, p)47V. Here we report on a...

  8. Theory of turbulent saturation in stellarators: identifying mechanisms to reduce turbulent transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegna, C. C.; Terry, P. W.; Faber, B. J.

    2017-10-01

    A theory for ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulent saturation in stellarators is developed using a three field fluid model that allows for general 3D geometry. The model relies on the paradigm of nonlinear energy transfer from unstable to damped eigenmodes at comparable wavelength as the dominant saturation process. This mechanism is enabled by a three-wave interaction where the third mode primarily regulates the nonlinear energy transfer rate and depends upon the properties of the magnetic geometry. In particular, this work suggests that quasi-helically symmetric configurations may have an intrinsic advantage with regard to turbulent saturation physics relative to other configurations as multiple energy transfer channels can be exploited. Nonlinear energy transfer physics is quantified by the product of a turbulent correlation lifetime as computed from a three-wave frequency mismatch and a geometric coupling coefficient with larger turbulent correlation times denoting larger levels of nonlinear energy transfer and hence smaller turbulent transport. The theory provides an analytic prediction for how 3D shaping can be tuned to lower turbulent transport through saturation processes that can by used in optimization schemes for improved stellarator design. Research supported by U. S. DoE Grants DE-FG02-99ER54546, DE-FG02-93ER54222 and DE-FG02-89ER53291.

  9. Stellar signatures of AGN-jet-triggered star formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dugan, Zachary; Silk, Joseph [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Bloomberg Center for Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Room 366, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bryan, Sarah [School of Physics and Astronomy, Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, The University of Manchester, Alan Turing Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Gaibler, Volker [Universität Heidelberg, Zentrum für Astronomie, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Haas, Marcel, E-mail: zdugan1@jhu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    To investigate feedback between relativistic jets emanating from active galactic nuclei and the stellar population of the host galaxy, we analyze the long-term evolution of the orbits of the stars formed in the galaxy-scale simulations by Gaibler et al. of jets in massive, gas-rich galaxies at z ∼ 2-3. We find strong, jet-induced differences in the resulting stellar populations of galaxies that host relativistic jets and galaxies that do not, including correlations in stellar locations, velocities, and ages. Jets are found to generate distributions of increased radial and vertical velocities that persist long enough to effectively augment the stellar structure of the host. The jets cause the formation of bow shocks that move out through the disk, generating rings of star formation within the disk. The bow shock often accelerates pockets of gas in which stars form, yielding populations of stars with significant radial and vertical velocities, some of which have large enough velocities to escape the galaxy. These stellar population signatures can serve to identify past jet activity as well as jet-induced star formation.

  10. STELLAR, GAS, AND DARK MATTER CONTENT OF BARRED GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervantes Sodi, Bernardo, E-mail: b.cervantes@crya.unam.mx [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Campus Morelia, A.P. 3-72, C.P. 58089 Michoacán, México (Mexico)

    2017-01-20

    We select a sample of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS-DR7) where galaxies are classified, through visual inspection, as hosting strong bars, weak bars, or as unbarred galaxies, and make use of H i mass and kinematic information from the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey catalog, to study the stellar, atomic gas, and dark matter content of barred disk galaxies. We find, in agreement with previous studies, that the bar fraction increases with increasing stellar mass. A similar trend is found with total baryonic mass, although the dependence is not as strong as with stellar mass, due to the contribution of gas. The bar fraction shows a decrease with increasing gas mass fraction. This anticorrelation between the likelihood of a galaxy hosting a bar with the gas richness of the galaxy results from the inhibiting effect the gas has in the formation of bars. We also find that for massive galaxies with stellar masses larger than 10{sup 10} M {sub ⊙}, at fixed stellar mass, the bar fraction decreases with increasing global halo mass (i.e., halo mass measured up to a radius of the order of the H i disk extent).

  11. AN EXPLORATION OF THE STATISTICAL SIGNATURES OF STELLAR FEEDBACK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyden, Ryan D.; Offner, Stella S. R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Koch, Eric W.; Rosolowsky, Erik W., E-mail: soffner@astro.umass.edu [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6G 2E1 (Canada)

    2016-12-20

    All molecular clouds are observed to be turbulent, but the origin, means of sustenance, and evolution of the turbulence remain debated. One possibility is that stellar feedback injects enough energy into the cloud to drive observed motions on parsec scales. Recent numerical studies of molecular clouds have found that feedback from stars, such as protostellar outflows and winds, injects energy and impacts turbulence. We expand upon these studies by analyzing magnetohydrodynamic simulations of molecular clouds, including stellar winds, with a range of stellar mass-loss rates and magnetic field strengths. We generate synthetic {sup 12}CO(1–0) maps assuming that the simulations are at the distance of the nearby Perseus molecular cloud. By comparing the outputs from different initial conditions and evolutionary times, we identify differences in the synthetic observations and characterize these using common astrostatistics. We quantify the different statistical responses using a variety of metrics proposed in the literature. We find that multiple astrostatistics, including the principal component analysis, the spectral correlation function, and the velocity coordinate spectrum (VCS), are sensitive to changes in stellar mass-loss rates and/or time evolution. A few statistics, including the Cramer statistic and VCS, are sensitive to the magnetic field strength. These findings demonstrate that stellar feedback influences molecular cloud turbulence and can be identified and quantified observationally using such statistics.

  12. Luck Reveals Stellar Explosion's First Moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    Through a stroke of luck, astronomers have witnessed the first violent moments of a stellar explosion known as a supernova. Astronomers have seen thousands of these stellar explosions, but all previous supernovae were discovered days after the event had begun. This is the first time scientists have been able to study a supernova from its very beginning. Seeing one just moments after the event began is a major breakthrough that points the way to unraveling longstanding mysteries about how such explosions really work. Galaxy Before Supernova Explosion NASA's Swift satellite took these images of SN 2007uy in galaxy NGC 2770 before SN 2008D exploded. An X-ray image is on the left; image at right is in visible light. CREDIT: NASA/Swift Science Team/Stefan Immler. Large Image With Labels Large Image Without Labels Galaxy After Supernova Explosion On January 9, 2008, Swift caught a bright X-ray burst from an exploding star. A few days later, SN 2008D appeared in visible light. CREDIT: NASA/Swift Science Team/Stefan Immler. Large Image With Labels Large Image Without Labels "For years, we have dreamed of seeing a star just as it was exploding," said team leader Alicia Soderberg, a Hubble and Carnegie-Princeton Fellow at Princeton University. "This newly-born supernova is going to be the Rosetta Stone of supernova studies for years to come." Theorists had predicted for four decades that a bright burst of X-rays should be produced as the shock wave from a supernova blasts out of the star and through dense material surrounding the star. However, in order to see this burst, scientists faced the nearly-impossible challenge of knowing in advance where to point their telescopes to catch a supernova in the act of exploding. On January 9, luck intervened. Soderberg and her colleagues were making a scheduled observation of the galaxy NGC 2770, 88 million light-years from Earth, using the X-ray telescope on NASA's Swift satellite. During that observation, a bright burst of X

  13. Stars defy theories of stellar matter

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Two bizarre objects called RXJ1856 and 3C58, found by an orbiting X-ray telescope may represent a new class of star and may contain a new form of matter, defying current particle physics theories (1/2 page).

  14. UV Stellar Distribution Model for the Derivation of Payload

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Jun Choi

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of a model calculation of the stellar distribution in a UV and centered at 2175Å corresponding to the well-known bump in the interstellar extinction curve. The stellar distribution model used here is based on the Bahcall-Soneira galaxy model (1980. The source code for model calculation was designed by Brosch (1991 and modified to investigate various designing factors for UV satellite payload. The model predicts UV stellar densities in different sky directions, and its results are compared with the TD-1 star counts for a number of sky regions. From this study, we can determine the field of view, size of optics, angular resolution, and number of stars in one orbit. There will provide the basic constrains in designing a satellite payload for UV observations.

  15. The Beginnings of Stellar X-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, R.

    2000-09-01

    I review the beginnings of the field of stellar X-ray astronomy, concentrating on the period immediately preceeding, and immediately following, the launch of the Einstein Observatory. The wealth of data was such that, within the first two years following launch, major discoveries were made by scientists from both the Einstein Observatory PI groups and Einstein Observatory Guest Observers which established stellar X-ray astronomy as a new astronomical discipline: Discovery of early and late-type stars, as well as young protostars, as soft X-ray sources; discovery of the "dividing line" separating X-ray emitting and X-ray quiet giant and supergiant stars; and establishment of the "solar-stellar connection" as a paradigm for understanding X-ray emission from late-type stars.

  16. Grinding Down Stars and Stellar Remnants Into Accretion Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadika Nasim, Syeda; Fabj, Gaia; McKernan, Barry; Ford, K. E. Saavik

    2018-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are powered by the accretion of matter onto supermassive black holes (SMBH). Most accretion models take the form of disks of gas around the SMBH. Stars and stellar remnants also orbit the SMBH. Orbiting objects plunging through the disk experience a drag force, and through repeated passage, orbiters can have their orbits ground-down into the plane of the disk. Using two different accretion disk models, TQM (Thompson, Quataert & Murray), and SG (Sirko & Goodman), we determine the grind-down time for stars and stellar remnants, as a function of initial inclination angle, and initial radius. Orbital grind-down time is important because stellar-mass black holes (sBH) within AGN disks are likely to merge at a higher rate than in the field. Accurate estimates of orbital grind-down time can help constrain predictions of the AGN channel for LIGO.

  17. Stellar magnetic activity – Star-Planet Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poppenhaeger, K.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stellar magnetic activity is an important factor in the formation and evolution of exoplanets. Magnetic phenomena like stellar flares, coronal mass ejections, and high-energy emission affect the exoplanetary atmosphere and its mass loss over time. One major question is whether the magnetic evolution of exoplanet host stars is the same as for stars without planets; tidal and magnetic interactions of a star and its close-in planets may play a role in this. Stellar magnetic activity also shapes our ability to detect exoplanets with different methods in the first place, and therefore we need to understand it properly to derive an accurate estimate of the existing exoplanet population. I will review recent theoretical and observational results, as well as outline some avenues for future progress.

  18. Configurations for a proof of principle stellarator experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garabedian, P R

    2000-02-01

    One of the serious limitations of tokamaks as reactors is the occurrence of disruptions. Stellarators designed by advanced computational methods provide an attractive alternative for a major experiment in magnetic fusion research. Configurations with approximate two-dimensional magnetic symmetry have been found with high beta limits and good transport. Specifications are given for a compact stellarator with three field periods and 18 moderately twisted modular coils that has equilibrium with robust flux surfaces, a deep magnetic well assuring favorable stability, and adequate confinement of hot particles at reactor conditions. Fast computer codes with sufficient accuracy to resolve the mathematical problems of equilibrium, stability and transport that arise in the more complicated geometry of the stellarator have produced this breakthrough. The mathematical analysis of the methods used is presented.

  19. Configurations for a proof of principle stellarator experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garabedian, P. R.

    2000-01-01

    One of the serious limitations of tokamaks as reactors is the occurrence of disruptions. Stellarators designed by advanced computational methods provide an attractive alternative for a major experiment in magnetic fusion research. Configurations with approximate two-dimensional magnetic symmetry have been found with high β limits and good transport. Specifications are given for a compact stellarator with three field periods and 18 moderately twisted modular coils that has equilibrium with robust flux surfaces, a deep magnetic well assuring favorable stability, and adequate confinement of hot particles at reactor conditions. Fast computer codes with sufficient accuracy to resolve the mathematical problems of equilibrium, stability and transport that arise in the more complicated geometry of the stellarator have produced this breakthrough. The mathematical analysis of the methods used is presented. PMID:11038620

  20. Stellar Rubble May be Planetary Building Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for animation Birth of 'Phoenix' Planets? This artist's concept depicts a type of dead star called a pulsar and the surrounding disk of rubble discovered by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The pulsar, called 4U 0142+61, was once a massive star until about 100,000 years ago when it blew up in a supernova explosion and scattered dusty debris into space. Some of that debris was captured into what astronomers refer to as a 'fallback disk,' now circling the remaining stellar core, or pulsar. The disk resembles protoplanetary disks around young stars, out of which planets are thought to be born. Supernovas are a source of iron, nitrogen and other 'heavy metals' in the universe. They spray these elements out into space, where they eventually come together in clouds that give rise to new stars and planets. The Spitzer finding demonstrates that supernovas might also contribute heavy metals to their own planets, a possibility that was first suggested when astronomers discovered planets circling a pulsar called PSR B1257+12 in 1992. Birth of 'Phoenix' Planets? About the Movie This artist's animation depicts the explosive death of a massive star, followed by the creation of a disk made up of the star's ashes. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope was able to see the warm glow of such a dusty disk using its heat-seeking infrared vision. Astronomers believe planets might form in this dead star's disk, like the mythical Phoenix rising up out of the ashes. The movie begins by showing a dying massive star called a red giant. This bloated star is about 15 times more massive than our sun, and approximately 40 times bigger in diameter. When the star runs out of nuclear fuel, it collapses and ultimately blows apart in what is called a supernova. A lone planet around the star is shown being incinerated by the fiery blast. Astronomers do not know if stars of this heft host planets, but if they do, the planets would probably be

  1. Constraints on the Formation of M31’s Stellar Halo from the SPLASH Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karoline Gilbert

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The SPLASH (Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda’s Stellar Halo Survey has observed fields throughout M31’s stellar halo, dwarf satellites, and stellar disk. The observations and derived measurements have either been compared to predictions from simulations of stellar halo formation or modeled directly in order to derive inferences about the formation and evolution of M31’s stellar halo. We summarize some of the major results from the SPLASH survey and the resulting implications for our understanding of the build-up of M31’s stellar halo.

  2. The Resolved Stellar Populations Early Release Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz, Daniel; Anderson, J.; Boyer, M.; Cole, A.; Dolphin, A.; Geha, M.; Kalirai, J.; Kallivayalil, N.; McQuinn, K.; Sandstrom, K.; Williams, B.

    2017-11-01

    We propose to obtain deep multi-band NIRCam and NIRISS imaging of three resolved stellar systems within 1 Mpc (NOI 104). We will use this broad science program to optimize observational setups and to develop data reduction techniques that will be common to JWST studies of resolved stellar populations. We will combine our expertise in HST resolved star studies with these observations to design, test, and release point spread function (PSF) fitting software specific to JWST. PSF photometry is at the heart of resolved stellar populations studies, but is not part of the standard JWST reduction pipeline. Our program will establish JWST-optimized methodologies in six scientific areas: star formation histories, measurement of the sub-Solar mass stellar IMF, extinction maps, evolved stars, proper motions, and globular clusters, all of which will be common pursuits for JWST in the local Universe. Our observations of globular cluster M92, ultra-faint dwarf Draco II, and star-forming dwarf WLM, will be of high archival value for other science such as calibrating stellar evolution models, measuring properties of variable stars, and searching for metal-poor stars. We will release the results of our program, including PSF fitting software, matched HST and JWST catalogs, clear documentation, and step-by-step tutorials (e.g., Jupyter notebooks) for data reduction and science application, to the community prior to the Cycle 2 Call for Proposals. We will host a workshop to help community members plan their Cycle 2 observations of resolved stars. Our program will provide blueprints for the community to efficiently reduce and analyze JWST observations of resolved stellar populations.

  3. Stellar streams and the galaxies they reside in

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    As galaxies collide, as smaller galaxies are disrupted by larger galaxies, or as clusters of stars orbit a galaxy, a gravitational tidal interaction unfolds and the systems tear apart into distinct morphological and kinematic structures. In my thesis, I have exploited these structures to understand various components of galaxies, such as the baryon cycle in dwarf galaxy interactions (Pearson et al. 2016, Pearson et al. 2017b). In this talk, I will focus on my thesis work related to the stellar stream emerging from the old, globular cluster, Palomar 5 (Pal 5), orbiting our own Milky Way. As the stellar stream members were once closely tied together in energy and angular momentum space, we can use their distribution in phase space to trace back where they were once located and what affected them along their paths. In particular, I will show that the mere existence of Pal 5’s thin stream can rule out a moderately triaxial potential model of our Galaxy (Pearson et al. 2015) and that the debris of Pal 5-like streams will spread much further in space in a triaxial potential (a mechanism which I dubbed “stream fanning”) . Additionally, I will show that the Milky Way's Galactic bar, can punch holes in stellar streams and explain the recently discovered length asymmetry between Pal 5’s leading and trailing arm (Pearson et al. 2017a). These holes grow and have locations along stellar streams dependent on the Galactic bar orientation, mass and rotational speed, which provides an intriguing methodology for studying our own Milky Way’s Galactic bar in more detail. The fact that the bar can create under densities in stellar streams, further demonstrates that we should be careful when interpreting gaps in stellar streams as indirect evidence of the existence of dark matter subhalos in our Galaxy.

  4. Semi-analytic stellar structure in scalar-tensor gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horbatsch, M. W.; Burgess, C. P.

    2011-08-01

    Precision tests of gravity can be used to constrain the properties of hypothetical very light scalar fields, but these tests depend crucially on how macroscopic astrophysical objects couple to the new scalar field. We study the equations of stellar structure using scalar-tensor gravity, with the goal of seeing how stellar properties depend on assumptions made about the scalar coupling at a microscopic level. In order to make the study relatively easy for different assumptions about microscopic couplings, we develop quasi-analytic approximate methods for solving the stellar-structure equations rather than simply integrating them numerically. (The approximation involved assumes the dimensionless scalar coupling at the stellar center is weak, and we compare our results with numerical integration in order to establish its domain of validity.) We illustrate these methods by applying them to Brans-Dicke scalars, and their generalization in which the scalar-matter coupling slowly runs — or `walks' — as a function of the scalar field: a(phi) simeq as+bsphi. (Such couplings can arise in extra-dimensional applications, for instance.) The four observable parameters that characterize the fields external to a spherically symmetric star are the stellar radius, R, mass, M, scalar `charge', Q, and the scalar's asymptotic value, phi∞. These are subject to two relations because of the matching to the interior solution, generalizing the usual mass-radius, M(R), relation of General Relativity. Since phi∞ is common to different stars in a given region (such as a binary pulsar), all quantities can be computed locally in terms of the stellar masses. We identify how these relations depend on the microscopic scalar couplings, agreeing with earlier workers when comparisons are possible. Explicit analytical solutions are obtained for the instructive toy model of constant-density stars, whose properties we compare to more realistic equations of state for neutron star models.

  5. Concepts in Thermal Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Blundell, Stephen J

    2006-01-01

    This modern introduction to thermal physics contains a step-by-step presentation of the key concepts. The text is copiously illustrated and each chapter contains several worked examples. - ;An understanding of thermal physics is crucial to much of modern physics, chemistry and engineering. This book provides a modern introduction to the main principles that are foundational to thermal physics, thermodynamics, and statistical mechanics. The key concepts are carefully presented in a clear way, and new ideas are illustrated with copious worked examples as well as a description of the historical background to their discovery. Applications are presented to subjects as. diverse as stellar astrophysics, information and communication theory, condensed matter physics, and climate change. Each chapter concludes with detailed exercises. -

  6. The modelling of intermediate-age stellar populations. I. Near-infrared properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouhcine, M.; Lançon, A.

    2002-10-01

    Evolutionary population synthesis predictions for stellar systems with complex star formation histories rest on their major building blocks: single-burst population models. In this paper, we discuss how the integrated properties of intermediate-age single-burst populations, especially in the near-infrared, behave as a function of age and metallicity. Our models take into account all stellar evolutionary phases that affect the evolution of the integrated optical and near-infrared spectrum of such a population. Particular care was dedicated to the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars, which can be dominant at near-infrared wavelengths. First, we present a new synthetic model that takes into account the relevant physical processes that control the evolution through the thermally pulsing AGB, namely (i) the mass-loss, (ii) the third dredge-up, and (iii) the envelope burning. We use this model to evaluate the AGB-termination luminosity, carbon star properties as function of initial metallicity and initial mass, and the contribution of these stars to the integrated light. In the isochrones presented in this paper the lifetime and the nature of the AGB stars (oxygen-rich or carbon-rich) are established as consequences of the interplay between the physical processes that control the AGB star evolution. The contribution of these stars to the integrated light of the population is thus obtained in a consistent way. We optimize our models by using a new stellar spectral library that explicitly takes into account the spectral features that characterize only AGB stars in comparison to other cool and luminous stars. We analyze the contribution of the upper AGB to the bolometric and the near-infrared light. Our models reproduce the contributions of luminous AGB stars to the bolometric and K-band light, and the carbon star contribution to the bolometric light as observed in the Magellanic Cloud star clusters in a satisfactory way, without ad hoc correction factors that could force

  7. Energy confinement scaling from the international stellarator database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroth, U. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Murakami, M.; Dory, R.A.; Yamada, H.; Okamura, S.; Sano, F.; Obiki, T.

    1995-09-01

    An international stellarator database on global energy confinement is presented comprising data from the ATF, CHS and Heliotron E heliotron/torsatrons and the W7-A and W7-AS shearless stellarators. Regression expressions for the energy confinement time are given for the individual devices and the combined dataset. A comparison with tokamak L mode confinement is discussed on the basis of various scaling expressions. In order to make this database available to interested colleagues, the structure of the database and the parameter list are explained in detail. More recent confinement results incorporating data from enhanced confinement regimes such as H mode are reported elsewhere. (author).

  8. Blue stellar objects of the first byurakan survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickaelian, A. M.

    The second part of the First Byurakan Survey is devoted to the search and investigation of blue stellar objects, hot subdwarfs, white dwarfs, HBB stars, cataclysmic variables, quasars, compact Seyfert galaxies. 1103 object were selected on a surface of 4009 square degrees at high Galactic latitudes, 716 of which are new. Many of these objects are being investigated with spectral and polarimetric methods, and photometric estimates of objects are being made. An analysis of the sample of blue stellar objects is made and subsamples of different types of objects within this sample are separated for further study.

  9. Investigating stellar surface rotation using observations of starspots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korhonen, Heidi Helena

    2011-01-01

    information on the rotation of the star. At times even information on the spot rotation at different stellar latitudes can be obtained, similarly to the solar surface differential rotation measurements using magnetic features as tracers. Here, I will review investigations of stellar rotation based....... Also older stars in close binary systems are often rapid rotators. These types of stars can show strong magnetic activity and large starspots. In the case of large starspots which cause observable changes in the brightness of the star, and even in the shapes of the spectral line profiles, one can get...

  10. Coronal seismology waves and oscillations in stellar coronae

    CERN Document Server

    Stepanov, Alexander; Nakariakov, Valery M

    2012-01-01

    This concise and systematic account of the current state of this new branch of astrophysics presents the theoretical foundations of plasma astrophysics, magneto-hydrodynamics and coronal magnetic structures, taking into account the full range of available observation techniques -- from radio to gamma. The book discusses stellar loops during flare energy releases, MHD waves and oscillations, plasma instabilities and heating and charged particle acceleration. Current trends and developments in MHD seismology of solar and stellar coronal plasma systems are also covered, while recent p

  11. Non-Gaussian statistics, Maxwellian derivation and stellar polytropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, E. P.; Silva, J. R. P.; Silva, R.

    2013-02-01

    In this letter we discuss two aspects of non-Gaussian statistics. In the first, we show that Maxwell’s first derivation of the stationary distribution function for a dilute gas can be extended in the context of Kaniadakis statistics. In the second, by investigating the stellar system, we study the Kaniadakis analytical relation between the entropic parameter κ and the stellar polytrope index n. We compare also the Kaniadakis relation n=n(κ) with n=n(q) proposed in the Tsallis framework.

  12. Stellar candles for the extragalactic distance scale

    CERN Document Server

    Gieren, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    This volume reviews the current status with respect to both theory and observation of the extragalactic distance scale. A sufficient accuracy is required both for a precise determination of the cosmological parameters and also in order to achieve a better understanding of physical processes in extragalactic systems. The "standard candles", used to set up the extragalactic distance scale, reviewed in this book include cepheid variables, RR Lyrae variables, novae, Type Ia and Type II supernovae as well as globular clusters and planetary nebulae.

  13. Revised Distances, Kinematics, and Classifications of the Nearest Stellar Groups within 100 pc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamajek, Eric E.

    2010-01-01

    Given the recent interest in assigning membership of low-mass or substellar field objects to clusters of "known" age, a modern analysis of the distances, kinematics, memberships, and physicality of purported nearby young stellar groups is needed. Van Leeuwen (2007) recently published a new astrometric analysis of data from the Hipparcos mission. Here I use the revised Hipparcos astrometry to estimate updated distances and parameters for the young stellar groups with obvious nuclei previously reported to lie within 100 pc of the Sun (except for the Hyades and Coma Ber, which were reported by van Leeuwen). Among the highlights of the results reported are: (1) the revised mean distances to the nuclei of the following groups: AB Dor (20.1+-1.5 pc), Ursa Major (25.2+-0.3 pc), Carina-Near (32.7+-1.2 pc), Tucana (43.0+-1.0 pc), TW Hya (52.7+-3.0 pc), 32 Ori (92.9+-2.4 pc), and eta Cha (94.3+-1.2 pc), (2) the 5-Myr-old epsilon Cha group appears to be the nearest known group associated with molecular gas (117+-4 pc), (3) the 8 Myr-old eta Cha cluster is the densest cluster within 100 pc ( 36 Msun/pc3), (4) the convergent point for the AB Dor group nucleus appears to be near its geometric center, a phenomena unique among nearby kinematic groups, and (5) the intrinsic 1D velocity dispersions of the nuclei are all remarkably similar (all 1 km/s), and are larger than that predicted assuming the nuclei are virialized (typically Polaris are probably unphysical. With refined kinematic parameters for the nearby stellar groups, one can now conduct a more refined membership analysis for others stars purported to be distant ``members'' of these groups.

  14. Stellar winds near massive black holes - the case of the S-stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lützgendorf, N.; Helm, E. van der; Pelupessy, F. I.; Portegies Zwart, S.

    2016-03-01

    The Galactic Centre provides a unique laboratory to study the interaction of a supermassive black hole (SMBH) with its gaseous and stellar environment. Simulations to determine the accretion of stellar winds from the surrounding O-stars on to the black hole have been performed earlier, but in those the presence of the S-star system was ignored. The S-stars are a group of young massive B-stars in relatively close orbits around the black hole. Here, we simulate those stars in order to study their contribution to the accretion rate, without taking the more distant and massive O-stars into account. We use the Astrophysical Multipurpose Software Environment to combine gravitational physics, stellar evolution and hydrodynamics in a single simulation of the S-stars orbiting the SMBH, and use this framework to determine the amount of gas that is accreted on to the black hole. We find that the accretion rate is sensitive to the wind properties of the S-stars (rate of mass-loss and terminal velocity). Our simulations are consistent with the observed accretion rate of the black hole only if the stars exhibit high wind mass-loss rates that are comparable with those of evolved 7-10 Myr old stars with masses of M = 19-25 M⊙. This is in contrast with observations that have shown that these stars are rather young, main-sequence B-stars. We therefore conclude that the S-stars cannot account for the accretion rate alone.

  15. A new quasi-stationary, very high density plasma regime on the W7-AS stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaenicke, R; Baeumel, S; Baldzuhn, J; Brakel, R; Burhenn, R; Ehmler, H; Endler, M; Erckmann, V; Feng, Y; Gadelmeier, F; Geiger, J; Giannone, L; Grigull, P; Hartfuss, H J; Hartmann, D; Hildebrandt, D; Hirsch, M; Holzhauer, E; Kick, M; Kisslinger, J; Klinger, T; Klose, S; Knauer, J; Koenig, R; Kuehner, G; Laqua, H; Maassberg, H; McCormick, K; Narayanan, R; Niedermeyer, H; Pasch, E; Ruhs, N; Rust, N; Saffert, J; Sardei, F; Schneider, F; Schubert, M; Speth, E; Wagner, F; Weller, A; Wenzel, U; Werner, A; Wuersching, E [Max-Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2002-12-01

    Stellarators have the intrinsic property of steady state operation. However, on present-day stellarators the pulse length is usually not only limited due to technical reasons, but also by physical problems. Lack of density control and a subsequent radiation collapse terminate the discharges quite often at high densities. To improve the control of the plasma-wall interaction, the island divertor concept was developed for optimized stellarators. To test this divertor concept on W7-AS, all limiters were removed and replaced by ten divertor modules. In subsequent divertor experiments a promising new plasma operational regime has been discovered which is termed 'high density H-mode' (HDH-mode). During the transition into that regime a clear reduction of ELM-like events and turbulent fluctuations is observed. The HDH-mode combines good energy confinement with very low impurity confinement resulting in low core radiation, but high edge-localized radiation. Consequently, stationary discharges at densities of typically 2x10{sup 20} m{sup -3} can be performed within the accessible pulse length of about 1 s. At densities above 3x10{sup 20} m{sup -3} a controlled transition from attached to partially detached plasmas is observed. The still edge-localized radiation reaches 90% of the heating power so that the power load onto the divertor target plates is further reduced. At a lower toroidal field of 0.9 T average {beta}-values could be raised from earlier 2% to more than 3% in magnetic field configurations with rather smooth flux surfaces at the plasma boundary. The recently obtained results render excellent prospects for W7-X, the larger superconducting successor experiment of W7-AS.

  16. Stellar Midlife Crises: Challenges and Advances in Simulating Convection and Differential Rotation in Sun-like Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Nicholas J.; Payne, Charles; Sorensen, Cameron Michael

    2017-10-01

    Low mass, main sequence stars like our Sun exhibit a wide variety of rotational and magnetic states. Observational and theoretical advances have led to a renewed emphasis on understanding the rotational and magnetic evolution of sun-like stars has become a pressing problem in stellar physics. We use global 3D convection and convective dynamo simulations in rotating spherical shells and with realistic stellar stratification to explore the behavior of ``middle-aged'' stars. We show that for stars with slightly less rotational influence than our Sun a transition occurs from solar-like (fast equator, slow poles) to anti-solar (slow equator, fast poles) differential rotation. We investigate this transition using two different treatments for the upper boundary of our simulations and we hypothesize that this transition from solar-like to anti-solar differential rotation may be responsible for observations of anomalously rapid rotation for stars older than our Sun.

  17. Are Stellar Storms Bad News for M-Dwarf Planets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    active.Dodging Deflected StormsInterestingly, an important factor in the survival of an M dwarfs habitable-zone planet is the plane in which the planets orbit lies. A team of scientists led by Christina Kay (NASA Goddards Solar Physics Laboratory and Boston University) recently modeled CMEs from V374 Peg, a mid-type M dwarf of roughly a third of the Suns mass and radius, to determine how the CMEs propagate and the probability that theyll impact a hypothetical planet in the stars habitable zone.The team shows that traveling CMEs tend to be deflected by the stars magnetic field. Instead of propagating purely radially outward, the CMEs are pushed toward the astrospheric current sheet the minimum point of the background magnetic field which moves around, but is generally located toward the stellar equatorial plane.Kay and collaborators find that planet orbits roughly aligned with the current sheet therefore have a higher probability of getting hit by a CME: around 10%. In contrast, planets with higher-inclination orbits have CME impact probabilities around 1%. These probabilities translate to an impact rate of about 0.55 times per day for a habitable-zone planet around a mid-type M dwarf which is 220 times the average at Earth during solar maximum!Minimum planetary magnetic field strength required to sustain a magnetosphere twice the size of the planetary radius for different CME masses and speeds, for a 1 kG (left) and 20 kG (right) initial CME magnetic field strength. A typical CME requires a field strength of 10100 G. [Adapted from Kay et al. 2016]Is There Hope for Planet Habitability?With this many CME impacts even outside of the current-sheet plane, how can a planet hope to survive? The key lies in having a strong magnetic field to protect the planet. Such a field would deflect the charged particles from the CME, preventing the CME from stripping the planets atmosphere.Kay and collaborators calculate that a habitable-zone mid-type M-dwarf exoplanet would need a

  18. THE EFFECT OF WARM DARK MATTER ON GALAXY PROPERTIES: CONSTRAINTS FROM THE STELLAR MASS FUNCTION AND THE TULLY-FISHER RELATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Xi [Purple Mountain Observatory, the Partner Group of MPI fuer Astronomie, 2 West Beijing Road, Nanjing 210008 (China); Maccio, Andrea V.; Dutton, Aaron A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-04-10

    In this paper, we combine high-resolution N-body simulations with a semi-analytical model of galaxy formation to study the effects of a possible warm dark matter (WDM) component on the observable properties of galaxies. We compare three WDM models with a dark matter (DM) mass of 0.5, 0.75, and 2.0 keV with the standard cold dark matter case. For a fixed set of parameters describing the baryonic physics, the WDM models predict fewer galaxies at low (stellar) masses, as expected due to the suppression of power on small scales, while no substantial difference is found at the high-mass end. However, these differences in the stellar mass function vanish when a different set of parameters is used to describe the (largely unknown) galaxy formation processes. We show that it is possible to break this degeneracy between DM properties and the parameterization of baryonic physics by combining observations on the stellar mass function with the Tully-Fisher relation (the relation between stellar mass and the rotation velocity at large galactic radii as probed by resolved H I rotation curves). WDM models with a too warm candidate (m{sub {nu}} < 0.75 keV) cannot simultaneously reproduce the stellar mass function and the Tully-Fisher relation. We conclude that accurate measurements of the galaxy stellar mass function and the link between galaxies and DM halos down to the very low mass end can give very tight constraints on the nature of DM candidates.

  19. Action Replay of Powerful Stellar Explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    the new optical study, an estimate of the explosion's energy came from studying an echo of the original light of the explosion. Just as sound bounces off walls of a canyon, so too can light waves create an echo by bouncing off dust clouds in space. The light from these echoes travels a longer path than the light that travels straight toward us, and so can be seen hundreds of years after the supernova itself. First seen by the Cerro-Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile, the light echoes were observed in greater detail by Gemini Observatory in Chile. The optical spectra of the light echo were used to confirm that the supernova was a Type Ia and to unambiguously determine the particular class of explosion and therefore its energy. The Chandra data, along with XMM data obtained in 2000, were then independently used to calculate the amount of energy involved in the original explosion, using an analysis of the supernova remnant and state-of-the-art explosion models. Their conclusion confirmed the results from the optical data, namely that the explosion was an especially energetic and bright variety of Type Ia supernova. This agreement provides strong evidence that the detailed explosion models are accurate. "Having these two methods agree lets us breathe a sigh of relief," said Carlos Badenes of Princeton University who led the Chandra and XMM study. "It looks like we're on the right track with trying to understand these big explosions. Their stellar debris really can retain a memory of what created them hundreds of years earlier." Both methods estimated a similar time since the explosion of about 400 years. An extra constraint on the age comes from the lack of recorded historical evidence for a recent supernova in the LMC. Because this star appears in the Southern Hemisphere, it likely would have been seen by navigators who noted similarly bright celestial events if it had occurred less than about 400 years ago. Because Type Ia supernovas have nearly uniform

  20. Effects of Combined Stellar Feedback on Star Formation in Stellar Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Joshua Edward; McMillan, Stephen; Pellegrino, Andrew; Mac Low, Mordecai; Klessen, Ralf; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2018-01-01

    We present results of hybrid MHD+N-body simulations of star cluster formation and evolution including self consistent feedback from the stars in the form of radiation, winds, and supernovae from all stars more massive than 7 solar masses. The MHD is modeled with the adaptive mesh refinement code FLASH, while the N-body computations are done with a direct algorithm. Radiation is modeled using ray tracing along long characteristics in directions distributed using the HEALPIX algorithm, and causes ionization and momentum deposition, while winds and supernova conserve momentum and energy during injection. Stellar evolution is followed using power-law fits to evolution models in SeBa. We use a gravity bridge within the AMUSE framework to couple the N-body dynamics of the stars to the gas dynamics in FLASH. Feedback from the massive stars alters the structure of young clusters as gas ejection occurs. We diagnose this behavior by distinguishing between fractal distribution and central clustering using a Q parameter computed from the minimum spanning tree of each model cluster. Global effects of feedback in our simulations will also be discussed.