WorldWideScience

Sample records for steel-9cr

  1. Effect of laser absorption on picosecond laser ablation of Cr12MoV mold steel, 9Cr18 stainless steel and H13A cemented carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Baoye; Liu, Peng; Wang, Xizhao; Zhang, Fei; Deng, Leimin; Duan, Jun; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2018-05-01

    Due to excellent properties, Cr12MoV mold steel, 9Cr18 stainless steel and H13A cemented carbide are widely used in industry. In this paper, the effect of absorption of laser light on ablation efficiency and roughness have been studied using a picosecond pulse Nd:YVO4 laser. The experimental results reveal that laser wavelength, original surface roughness and chemical composition play an important role in controlling ablation efficiency and roughness. Firstly, higher ablation efficiency with lower surface roughness is achieved on the ablation of 9Cr18 at 532, comparing with 1064 nm. Secondly, the ablation efficiency increases while the Ra of the ablated region decreases with the decrease of original surface roughness on ablation of Cr12MoV mold steel at 532 nm. Thirdly, the ablation efficiency of H13A cemented carbide is much higher than 9Cr18 stainless steel and Cr12MoV mold steel at 1064 nm. Scanning electron microscopy images reveals the formation of pores on the surface of 9Cr18 stainless steel and Cr12MoV mold steel at 532 nm while no pores are formed at 1064 nm. As to H13A cemented carbide, worm-like structure is formed at 1064 nm. The synergetic effects of the heat accumulation, plasma shielding and ablation threshold on laser ablation efficiency and machining quality were analyzed and discussed systematically in this paper.

  2. Quantification by image analysis of grain size of the high temperature phase (austenite) of martensitic steels 9Cr-1Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barcelo, F.; Brachet, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    In martensitic steels, the austenitic grain size before transformation may influence mechanical properties. 9Cr-1Mo steel (EM10) is used in hexagonal pipes fabrication in fast neutrons reactors. Image analysis allows to quantify the older grain size in function of the austenization heat treatment conditions. (A.B.). 2 figs

  3. The capability of pulsed laser radiation for cutting band saws hardening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinin Evgeny

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the possibilities of pulsed laser radiation for hardening the band saws. The regimes of pulsed laser hardening the band saws of 1 mm thick made of tool steel 9CrV are grounded theoretically and experimentally tested. Selected and justified modes of treatment harden in the autohardening mode without additional heat removal. The results of the experimental research of microhardness are presented and formed as a result of processing of the microstructure. Selected modes increase the microhardness of the surface to 8500 MPa and form ultra highly dispersed structure in the surface layer characterized by high resistance to abrasion.

  4. Evaluation of temper embrittlement of martensitic and ferritic-martensitic steels by acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Yusho; Takahashi, Hideaki; Shoji, Tetsuo

    1987-01-01

    Martensitic (HT-9) and ferritic-martensitic steels (9Cr-2Mo) are considered as fusion first wall materials. In this investigation in order to understand the sensitivity of temper embrittlement in these steels under actual service condition, fracture toughness testing was made by use of acoustic emission technique. The temper embrittlement was characterized in terms of fracture toughness. The fracture toughness of these steels under 500 deg C, 100 hrs, and 1000 hrs heat treatment was decreased and their changes in micro-fracture process have been observed. The fracture toughness changes by temper embrittlement was discussed by the characteristic of AE, AE spectrum analysis and fractographic investigation. The relation between micro-fracture processes and AE has been clarified. (author)

  5. Research and survey of structural materials for fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Kyozi

    1986-01-01

    In the development of FBRs, the selection of the materials for high temperature use is an important factor which determines the reliability of plants. The materials for secondary sodium system equipment centering around steam generators are affected by the type of steam generators, economical efficiency, aseismatic ability, fuel design and the method of removing core decay heat. At present, the conceptual design of demonstration FBRs (tank type, loop type) is in progress, and the research on the materials for steam generator tubes was completed in fiscal year 1984 by 10 electric power companies and 4 other companies. The four kinds of the steel tested were modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, 9Cr-2Mo steel, 12Cr-1Mo-V-Nb steel and Alloy 800. The specifications of the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel and Alloy 800 are shown. The results of tensile strength, creep strength, fatique strength, the characteristics after high temperature heating, weldability, and the strength of welded joints are reported. Also the weight of heating tubes was compared. The results of the general evaluation showed that 9Cr group steels were most promising. The matters to be examined hereafter are pointed out. (Kako, I.)

  6. Effect of microstructure on low cycle fatigue properties of ODS steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubena, Ivo, E-mail: kubena@ipm.cz [IPM, Institute of Physics of Materials, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Zizkova 22, Brno (Czech Republic); Fournier, Benjamin [CEA/DEN/DANS/DMN/SRMA, Bat. 453, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Kruml, Tomas [CEITEC IPM, Institute of Physics of Materials, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Zizkova 22, Brno (Czech Republic)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three various ODS steels are studied and compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low cycle fatigue data at RT, 650 Degree-Sign C and 750 Degree-Sign C are given. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructural characterization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Detailed discussion of strengthening mechanisms. - Abstract: Low cycle fatigue properties at room temperature, 650 Degree-Sign C and 750 Degree-Sign C of three high chromium steels (9%Cr ferritic-martensitic and two 14%Cr ferritic steels) strengthened by oxide dispersion were studied and compared. Cyclic softening/hardening curves, cyclic deformation curves, S-N curves and Coffin-Manson curves are presented together with microstructural observations. Differences in cyclic response, stress level and fatigue life are attributed to differences in the matrix microstructure. The oxide particles stabilize the cyclic response, even if cyclic softening is detected for some experimental conditions. The strength of these steels is discussed in terms of strengthening mechanisms such as grain size effect, particle-dislocations interaction and dislocation density. Comparing three different ODS steels offers an opportunity to tests the contribution of individual mechanisms to the cyclic strength. The reduction of fatigue life in one of the ferritic steels is explained by the presence of large grains, facilitating the fatigue crack nucleation and the early growth.

  7. Helium effect on mechanical property of fusion reactor structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Norikazu; Chuto, Toshinori; Murase, Yoshiharu; Nakagawa, Johsei

    2004-01-01

    High-energy neutrons produced in fusion reactor core caused helium in the structural materials of fusion reactors, such as blankets. We injected alpha particles accelerated by the cyclotron to the samples of martensite steel (9Cr3WVTaB). Equivalent helium doses injected to the sample is estimated to be up to 300 ppm, which were estimated to be equivalent to helium accumulation after the 1-year reactor operation. Creep tests of the samples were made to investigate helium embrittlement. There were no appreciable changes in the relation between the stresses and the rupture time, the minimum creep rate and the applied stress. Grain boundary effect by helium was not observed in ruptured surfaces. Fatigue tests were made for SUS304 samples, which contain helium up to 150 ppm. After 0.05 Hz cyclic stress tests, it was shown that the fatigue lifetime (cycles to rupture and extension to failure) are 1/5 in 150 ppm helium samples compared with no helium samples. The experimental results suggest martensite steel is promising for structural materials of fusion reactors. (Y. Tanaka)

  8. Control of molten salt corrosion of fusion structural materials by metallic beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderoni, P.; Sharpe, P.; Nishimura, H.; Terai, T.

    2009-01-01

    A series of tests have been performed between 2001 and 2006 at the Safety and Tritium Applied Research facility of the Idaho National Laboratory to demonstrate chemical compatibility between the molten salt flibe (2LiF + BeF 2 in moles) and fusion structural materials once suitable fluoride potential control methods are established. The tests adopted metallic beryllium contact as main fluoride potential control, and the results have been published in recent years. A further step was to expose two specimens of low activation ferritic/martensitic steel 9Cr-2W to static corrosion tests that include an active corrosion agent (hydrofluoric gas) in controlled conditions at 530 deg. C, and the results of the tests are presented in this paper. The results confirmed the expected correlation of the HF recovery with the concentration of metallic impurities dissolved in the salt because of specimen corrosion. The metals concentration dropped to levels close to the detectable limit when the beryllium rod was inserted and increased once the content of excess beryllium in the system had been consumed by HF reduction and specimen corrosion progressed. Metallographic analysis of the samples after 500 h exposure in reactive conditions showed evidence of the formation of unstable chromium oxide layers on the specimen's surface.

  9. Influence of strain rate and temperature on tensile properties and flow behaviour of a reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanaja, J., E-mail: jvanaja4@gmail.com [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Laha, K. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Sam, Shiju [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Nandagopal, M.; Panneer Selvi, S.; Mathew, M.D.; Jayakumar, T. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Rajendra Kumar, E. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India)

    2012-05-15

    Tensile strength and flow behaviour of a Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic (RAFM) steel (9Cr-1W-0.06Ta-0.22V-0.08C) have been investigated over a temperature range of 300-873 K at different strain rates. Tensile strength of the steel decreased with temperature and increased with strain rate except at intermediate temperatures. Negative strain rate sensitivity of flow stress of the steel at intermediate temperatures revealed the occurrence of dynamic strain ageing in the steel, even though no serrated flow was observed. The tensile flow behaviour of the material was well represented by the Voce strain hardening equation for all the test conditions. Temperature and strain rate dependence of the various parameters of Voce equation were interpreted with the possible deformation mechanisms. The equivalence between the saturation stress at a given strain rate in tensile test and steady state deformation rate at a given stress in creep test was found to be satisfied by the RAFM steel.

  10. Influence of strain rate and temperature on tensile properties and flow behaviour of a reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanaja, J.; Laha, K.; Sam, Shiju; Nandagopal, M.; Panneer Selvi, S.; Mathew, M. D.; Jayakumar, T.; Rajendra Kumar, E.

    2012-05-01

    Tensile strength and flow behaviour of a Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic (RAFM) steel (9Cr-1W-0.06Ta-0.22V-0.08C) have been investigated over a temperature range of 300-873 K at different strain rates. Tensile strength of the steel decreased with temperature and increased with strain rate except at intermediate temperatures. Negative strain rate sensitivity of flow stress of the steel at intermediate temperatures revealed the occurrence of dynamic strain ageing in the steel, even though no serrated flow was observed. The tensile flow behaviour of the material was well represented by the Voce strain hardening equation for all the test conditions. Temperature and strain rate dependence of the various parameters of Voce equation were interpreted with the possible deformation mechanisms. The equivalence between the saturation stress at a given strain rate in tensile test and steady state deformation rate at a given stress in creep test was found to be satisfied by the RAFM steel.

  11. Impact fretting wear in CO2-based environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, G.; Morri, J.

    1985-01-01

    An impact wear model, based on the load-sliding distance proportionality of wear and the mechanical response of the impacting bodies, was derived and tested against experiment. The experimental work was carried out on a twin vibrator rig capable of repetitive impact of a moving specimen against a stationary target material. The impact wear characteristics of three materials (mild steel, 9Cr-1Mo steel and austenitic 316 steel) against 310 stainless steel were examined over a range of temperatures (18-600 0 C). Additionally the effects of variations in the mechanical parameters (incident energy, ξ i , number N of impacts and angle of incidence φ) as a function of temperature were evaluated for mild steel only. The model was verified for impacting within a stable wear regime at 100 0 C for 9Cr-1Mo steel. The emergence of a severe-to-mild wear transition at elevated temperatures (200-400 0 C), however, introduced an energy and a 'numbers of cycles' effect that caused apparent deviations from theory. It was concluded that for stable single-mechanism wear regimes (metallic, oxidative etc.) oblique elastic impacts with a gross slip component were accurately described by the proposed impact wear model. (orig.)

  12. Impression creep behaviour of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridhin Raj, V.R.; Kottda, Ravi Sankar; Kamaraj, M.; Maduraimuthu, V.M.; Vasudevan, M.

    2016-01-01

    P91 steel (9Cr-1Mo) steel is extensively used in power plants for super heater coils, headers and steam piping. The aim of the present work is to study the creep behaviour of different zones of A-TIG weld joint using impression creep technique and compare it with that of the TIG weld joint. P91 steel weld joints were made by A-TIG welding without using any filler material and multi-pass TIG welding is done using ER90S-B9 filler rods. Welds were subjected to post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). Impression creep tests were carried out at 650 °C on the base metal, weld metal and HAZ regions. Optical Microscope and TEM were used to correlate microstructures with observed creep rates. The FGHAZ showed significantly higher impression creep rate compared to that of the base metal and weld metal. Fine grain size and relatively coarser M 23 C 6 carbide particles are responsible for higher creep rate. The impression creep rate of A-TIG weld metal and coarse grain HAZ was found to be lower than that of base metal. This is attributed to the higher grain size in weld metal and coarse HAZ attributed to the higher grain size in weld metal and to the higher peak temperature observed during A-TIG welding. (author)

  13. A comparison of low-chromium and high-chromium reduced-activation steels for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.; Alexander, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    Ferritic steels have been considered candidate structural materials for first wall and blanket structures for fusion power plants since the late 1970s. The first steels considered in the United States were the conventional Cr-Mo steels Sandvik HT9 (nominally 12Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.2C, here designated l2Cr-1MoVW), modified 9Cr-1Mo steel (9Cr-1Mo-0.2V-0.06Nb-0. IC, designated 9Cr-1MoVNb) and, to a lesser extent, 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel (2.25Cr-Mo-0.1C). All compositions are in wt. %. The normalized-and-tempered 9 and 12Cr steels had a tempered martensite microstructure, and the normalized-and-tempered 2 1/4 Cr steel had a tempered bainite microstructure. This report describes chromium steels tested in normalized and tempered conditions. Miniature tensile and Charpy specimens were tested

  14. Design and selection of materials for sodium cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chetal, S.C.

    2011-01-01

    Sodium cooled fast reactors are currently in operation, under construction or under design by a number of countries. The design of sodium cooled fast reactor is covered by French RCC - MR code and ASME code NH. The codes cover rules as regards to materials, design and construction. These codes do not cover the effect of irradiation and environment. Elevated temperature design criteria in nuclear codes are much stringent in comparison to non nuclear codes. Sodium corrosion is not an issue in selection of materials provided oxygen impurity in sodium is controlled for which excellent reactor operating experience is available. Austenitic stainless steels have remained the choice for the permanent structures of primary sodium system. Stabilized austenitic stainless steel are rejected because of poor operating experience and non inclusion in the design codes. Route for improved creep behaviour lies in compositional modifications in 316 class steel. However, the weldability needs to be ensured. For cold leg component is non creep regime, SS 304 class steel is favoured from overall economics. Enhanced fuel burn up can be realized by the use of 9-12%Cr 1%Mo class steel for the wrapper of MOX fuel design, and cladding and wrapper for metal fuel reactors. Minor compositional modifications of 20% cold worked 15Cr-15Ni class austenitic stainless steel will be a strong candidate for the cladding of MOX fuel design in the short term. Long term objective for the cladding will be to develop oxide dispersion strengthened steel. 9%Cr 1%Mo class steel (Gr 91) is an ideal choice for integrated once through sodium heated steam generators. One needs to incorporate operating experience from reactors and thermal power stations, industrial capability and R and D feedback in preparing the technical specifications for procurement of wrought products and welding consumables to ensure reliable operation of the components and systems over the design life. The paper highlights the design approach

  15. Atom probe characterization of yttria particles in ODS Eurofer steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleev, A.A.; Zaluzhny, A.G.; Nikitin, A.A.; Rogozhkin, S.V.; Iskandarov, N.A.; Vladimirov, P.; Moeslang, A.; Lindau, R.; Klimenkov, M.

    2009-01-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened steels exhibit higher temperature and radiation resistance than conventionally produced ferritic/martensitic steels. Such behaviour, as believed, is mainly caused by presence of highly dispersed and extremely stable oxide particles with sizes of few nanometers. It was shown that the most promising oxide additive was yttria (Y 2 O 3 ) and as mechanical parameters were strongly depended on size and number density of formed peculiarities it is required to reduce their dimensions to few nanometers and drastically increase their number. At present, considerable effort is focused on investigation of behaviour and properties of such particles. Recent studies of Eurofer ODS steel (9%-CrWVTa) by SANS and PoAS revealed the presence of high number density structural peculiarities with size approximately one nanometer. At the same time, previous studies by TEM identified only high number of small (5-10 nm) Y 2 O 3 particles. So, the purpose of this work was to look into this material by means of tomographic atom probe and find out the chemistry and origin of peculiarities with sizes less than 5 nm. These investigations revealed fine (∼ 2 nm) particles that were enriched not only in yttrium and oxygen but also in vanadium and nitrogen. Concentration of vanadium in them is approximately at the same level as yttrium. Moreover, some particles were found to be enriched in only three or even two elements mentioned above. However, total concentration of chemical elements in these particles is considerably less than that of iron. Estimated number density for detected particles is (1 / 5) x 10 23 m -3 . (author)

  16. Investigations of oxide particles in unirradiated ODS-Eurofer by TEM and 3D atom probe methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleev, A.A.; Iskandarov, N.A.; Nikitin, A.A.; Rogizhkin, S.V.; Zaluzhny, A.G.; Klimenkov, M.; Lindau, R.; Moeslang, A.; Vladimirov, P.

    2009-01-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened steels possess better high-temperature creep and radiation resistance than conventionally produced ferritic/martensitic steels. This behavior is mainly caused by the presence of highly dispersed and extremely stable oxide particles with sizes of few nanometers. One of the promising oxides used for dispersion strengthening was yttria (Y 2 O 3 ), which was introduced into EUROFER by mechanical alloying followed by the hot isostatic pressing at temperature around 1000-1200 dg. C and pressure ∼100 MPa. It was found that mechanical properties were strongly depended on size and spatial distribution of the precipitates. Therefore considerable efforts are focused on the investigation of the chemical composition and orientation of precipitates with respect to the steel matrix. Recent studies of Eurofer ODS steel (9%-CrWVTa) by SANS revealed the presence of high number density structural features with a size of approximately one nanometer. At the same time, previous studies by TEM identified only high number of small (6-40 nm) Y 2 O 3 particles. In this work we tried to get a deeper inside into the nanostructure of this material by means of tomographic atom probe and to correlate the results with the picture obtained by TEM. The present investigations revealed fine (∼2 nm) enrichments containing not only yttrium and oxygen but also vanadium and nitrogen. Concentration of vanadium was found to be approximately at the same level as yttrium. Some of the enrichments contained only three or even two elements mentioned above. Estimated number density of enrichments is about (1/5) x 10 23 m -3 . We suppose that these enriched zones might be precursors of the larger precipitates observed by TEM. The thesis seems to be supported by the similarities of the chemical composition and spatial distribution of elements inside enriched zones and nano precipitates studied by atomic probe and analytical TEM methods. (author)

  17. Experimental study and simulation of cyclic softening of tempered martensite ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giroux, P.-F.

    2011-01-01

    The present work focuses on the high temperature mechanical behaviour of 9% Cr tempered martensite steels, considered as potential candidates for structural components in the next Generation IV nuclear power plants. Already used for energy production in fossil power plants, they are sensitive to softening during high-temperature cycling and creep-fatigue. This phenomenon is coupled to a pronounced microstructural degradation: mainly vanishing of subgrain boundaries and decrease in dislocation density. This study aims at (i) linking the macroscopic cyclic softening of 9% Cr steels and their microstructural evolution during cycling and (ii) proposing a physically-based modelling of deformation mechanisms in order to predict the macroscopic mechanical behaviour of these steels during cycling. Mechanical study includes uniaxial tensile and cyclic test at 550 C performed on a Grade 92 steel (9Cr-0,5Mo-1,8W-V-Nb). The effect of both strain amplitude and rate on mechanical behaviour is studied. Examination of tensile specimens suggests that the physical mechanism responsible for slight measured softening is mainly the necking phenomenon and the evolution of mean subgrain size, which increases by more than 15 % compared to the as-received state. The evolution of the macroscopic stress during cycling shows that cyclic softening is due to the decrease in kinematic stress. TEM observations highlights that the mean subgrain size increases by 60 to 100 % while the dislocation density decreases by more than 50 % during cycling, compared to the as-received state. A self-consistent homogenization model based on crystalline elasto-visco-plasticity and dislocation densities, predicting the mechanical behaviour of the material and its microstructural evolution during deformation is proposed. This model takes some of the main physical deformation mechanisms into account and only the two parameters of crystalline visco-plasticity should be adjusted (the effective activation energy and

  18. Materials and coating technology for pyrochemical reprocessing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, T.; Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2013-01-01

    Metallic fuelled fast breeder reactors with co-located pyrochemical reprocessing plants have been proposed as the best option in order to increase the breeding gain, reduce the doubling time of the fuel and reprocess short cooled and high burnup fuel. To establish the pyrochemical reprocessing plants with various unit operations, it is necessary to identify, develop and qualify reliable corrosion resistant materials and coatings for service in molten LiCI-KCI salt and molten uranium environment operating at 773 to 1573 K. Towards materials and coating technology development and testing for molten salt environment a high temperature corrosion testing laboratory was established and studies were initiated. Molten salt test assembly for testing materials and coatings in molten LiCI-KCI salt under controlled ultra high pure (UHP) argon environment at high temperatures has been designed, fabricated, commissioned and tests were carried out on various candidate materials and coatings. Electro-formed (EF) Ni, Ni with Ni-W coating, coatings of ZrN, TiN, HfN and Ti-Si-N on high density (HD) graphite, candidate materials like 2.25Cr-1Mo steel, 9Cr-1Mo steel, 316L stainless steel, Ni base alloys (INCONEL 600, 625 and 690), HD graphite, pyrolytic graphite (PyG), and yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and alumina-40wt% titania thermal barrier coatings were tested for their suitability for molten salt applications. Corrosion studies indicated that YSZ and PyG showed superior corrosion resistance in molten LiCI-KCI salt at 873 K up to 2000 h exposure. Surface modification techniques like annealing, laser remelting and laser shock processing were pursued to consolidate the coatings and improve their high temperature performance. Coating integrity using dielectric electrochemical system and thermal cycling furnace established that, compared to plain 9Cr-1Mo steel YSZ coated 9Cr-1Mo steel performed better from 473 K to 1223 K. The presentation highlights the results of the

  19. Control of molten salt corrosion of reduced activation steel for fusion applications by metallic beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderoni, P.; Sharpe, P.; Nishimura, H.; Terai, T.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In 2001 the INL started a research program as a part of the 2. Japan/US Program on Irradiation Tests for Fusion Energy Research (JUPITER-II collaboration) aimed at the characterization of the 2LiF-BeF2 (Flibe) molten salt as a breeder and coolant material for fusion applications. A key objective of the work was to demonstrate chemical compatibility between Flibe and potential fusion structural materials once suitable fluoride potential control methods are established. A series of tests performed at INL demonstrated that this can be achieved by contacting the salt with metallic beryllium, and the results have been published in recent years. A further step was to expose two specimens of low activation ferritic/martensitic steel 9Cr-2W JLF-1 to static corrosion tests that include an active corrosion agent (hydrofluoric gas) and fluoride potential control (metallic Be) at 530 C, and the results of the tests are presented in this paper. The specimen and a beryllium rod were simultaneously immersed in the molten salt through gas tight fittings mounted on risers extending from the top lid of the test vessel; the beryllium rod was extracted after 5 hours, while the sample was left in the salt for 250 hours during which salt samples were withdrawn from the melt at fixed intervals. A diagnostic system based on the measurement of reacting HF through on-line titration was coupled with the analysis of metallic components in the salt samples that were dissolved and analyzed using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). Impurity levels of oxygen, nitrogen and carbon were determined from pieces of the solidified melt using Leco analytical systems. The results confirmed the expected correlation of the HF recovery with the concentration of metallic elements dissolved in the salt because of specimen corrosion. The metals concentration falls below the detectable limit when the beryllium rod is inserted and increases when the

  20. Mitigating the Risk of Stress Corrosion of Austenitic Stainless Steels in Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bull, A.; Owen, J.; Quirk, G.; G, Lewis; Rudge, A.; Woolsey, I.S.

    2012-09-01

    Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors (AGRs) operated in the UK by EDF Energy have once-through boilers, which deliver superheated steam at high temperature (∼500 deg. C) and pressure (∼150 bar) to the HP turbine. The boilers have either a serpentine or helical geometry for the tubing of the main heat transfer sections of the boiler and each individual tube is fabricated from mild steel, 9%Cr1%Mo and Type 316 austenitic stainless steel tubing. Type 316 austenitic stainless steel is used for the secondary (final) superheater and steam tailpipe sections of the boiler, which, during normal operation, should operate under dry, superheated steam conditions. This is achieved by maintaining a specified margin of superheat at the upper transition joint (UTJ) between the 9%Cr1%Mo primary superheater and the Type 316 secondary superheater sections of the boiler. Operating in this mode should eliminate the possibility of stress corrosion cracking of the Type 316 tube material on-load. In recent years, however, AGRs have suffered a variety of operational problems with their boilers that have made it difficult to maintain the specified superheat margin at the UTJ. In the case of helical boilers, the combined effects of carbon deposition on the gas side and oxide deposition on the waterside of the tubing have resulted in an increasing number of austenitic tubes operating with less than the specified superheat margin at the UTJ and hence the possibility of wetting the austenitic section of the boiler. Some units with serpentine boilers have suffered creep-fatigue damage of the high temperature sections of the boiler, which currently necessitates capping the steam outlet temperature to prevent further damage. The reduction in steam outlet temperature has meant that there is an increased risk of operation with less than the specified superheat margin at the UTJ and hence stress corrosion cracking of the austenitic sections of the boiler. In order to establish the risk of stress

  1. Effects of helium on ductile brittle transition behavior of reduced activation ferritic steels after high concentration he implantation at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, A.; Ejiri, M.; Nogami, S.; Ishiga, M.; Abe, K. [Tohoku Univ., Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engr, Sendai (Japan); Kasada, R.; Kimura, A. [Kyoto Univ., Institute of Advanced Energy (Japan); Jitsukawa, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Influence of Helium (He) on fracture behavior of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels including Oxide Dispersion Strengthening (ODS) steels and F82H were examined. To study the He effects on fracture behavior of these steels after He bubble formation conditions, higher concentration of He implantation at around 550 C were performed and examined the relationship between microstructure evolution and fracture behavior of the steels. The 1.5CVN mini size Charpy specimens were used to evaluate impact test behavior. Reduced activation ferritic ODS steels, 9Cr-ODS and 12Cr-ODS steels were examine. F82H was also examined as reference material. Helium implantation was performed by a cyclotron of Tohoku University with a beam of 50 MeV {alpha}-particles at temperature around 550 C. A tandem-type energy degrader system was used to implant He into the specimen from the irradiated surface to the range of 50 MeV {alpha}-particles, that was about 380 {mu}m in iron. Implanted He concentration were about 1000 appm. Charpy impact test was performed using a instrumented impact test apparatus in Oarai branch of IMR, Tohoku University. Analyses of absorbed energy change and fracture surface were carried out. Vickers hardness test was also carried out on He implanted area of the 1.5CVN specimen to estimate irradiation hardening. Microstructural observation was performed by TEM. In the case of F82H, DBTT increased by the 1000 appm He implantation condition was about 80 C and grain boundary fracture surface was only observed in the He implanted area of all the ruptured specimens in brittle manner. On the other hand, DBTT shift and fracture mode change of He implanted 9Cr-ODS steel was not observed after He implantation. Microstructural observation showed that He bubble formation on the lath boundaries and grain boundaries were significant in F82H, but the bubble segregation on grain boundary in ODS steel was not apparent. The bubble formation