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Sample records for steel welded structures

  1. Comparison of Welding Residual Stresses of Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding and Submerged Arc Welding in Offshore Steel Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Michael Joachim; Yu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    In the offshore industry, welding-induced distortion and tensile residual stresses have become a major concern in relation to the structural integrity of a welded structure. Particularly, the continuous increase in size of welded plates and joints needs special attention concerning welding induced...... are hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) and submerged arc welding (SAW). Both welding methods are applied for a full penetration butt-weld of 10 mm thick plates made of thermomechanically hot-rolled, low-carbon, fine-grain S355ML grade steel used in offshore steel structures. The welding residual stress state...

  2. Mechanical and Microstructural Evaluation of DMAG Welding of Structural Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Mert

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Double channel torch, which allows concentric flow of two different shielding gases, was designed and manufactured in order to pursue double channel torch gas metal arc welding of unalloyed structural steel S235JR (EN 10025-2 with fourteen passes. Tensile and Charpy V-notch tests were realized and the results were compared with those of conventional gas metal arc welding. In order to evaluate mechanical testing results, microstructural analyses were conducted. It was found that the increase with double channel gas metal arc welding process in yield and tensile strengths as well as in toughness tests, especially in subzero temperatures, compared with conventional gas metal arc welding was due to longer columnar grains and finer tempered zone grain structure between passes and due to solidification and less dendritic structure formation in all-weld metal in double channel gas metal arc welding.

  3. Stainless Steel Cladding Of Structural Steels By CO2 Laser Welding Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludovico, A.; Daurelio, G.; Arcamone, O.

    1989-01-01

    Steel cladding processes are usually performed in different ways: hot roll cladding, strip cladding, weld cladding, explosion forming. For the first time, a medium power (2 KW c.w.) CO2 laser was used to clad structural steels (Fe 37C), 3 and 5 mm thick, with austenitic stainless steels (AISI 304 and AISI 316), 0.5 and 1.5 mm thick. The cladding technique we have developed uses the laser penetration welding process.

  4. Welding stainless steels for structures operating at liquid helium temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witherell, C.E.

    1980-04-18

    Superconducting magnets for fusion energy reactors require massive monolithic stainless steel weldments which must operate at extremely low temperatures under stresses approaching 100 ksi (700 MPa). A three-year study was conducted to determine the feasibility of producing heavy-section welds having usable levels of strength and toughness at 4.2/sup 0/K for fabrication of these structures in Type 304LN plate. Seven welding processes were evaluated. Test weldments in full-thickness plate were made under severe restraint to simulate that of actual structures. Type 316L filler metal was used for most welds. Welds deposited under some conditions and which solidify as primary austenite have exhibited intergranular embrittlement at 4.2/sup 0/K. This is believed to be associated with grain boundary metal carbides or carbonitrides precipitated during reheating of already deposited beads by subsequent passes. Weld deposits which solidify as primary delta ferrite appear immune. Through use of fully austenitic filler metals of low nitrogen content under controlled shielded metal arc welding conditions, and through use of filler metals solidifying as primary delta ferrite where only minimum residuals remain to room temperature, welds of Type 316L composition have been made with 4.2K yield strength matching that of Type 304LN plate and acceptable levels of soundness, ductility and toughness.

  5. Structural and mechanical properties of welded joints of reduced activation martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filacchioni, G. E-mail: gianni.filacchioni@casaccia.enea.it; Montanari, R.; Tata, M.E.; Pilloni, L

    2002-12-01

    Gas tungsten arc welding and electron beam welding methods were used to realise welding pools on plates of reduced activation martensitic steels. Structural and mechanical features of these simulated joints have been investigated in as-welded and post-welding heat-treated conditions. The research allowed to assess how each welding technique affects the original mechanical properties of materials and to find suitable post-welding heat treatments. This paper reports results from experimental activities on BATMAN II and F82H mod. steels carried out in the frame of the European Blanket Project - Structural Materials Program.

  6. Effect of Welding Current on the Structure and Properties of Resistance Spot Welded Dissimilar (Austenitic Stainless Steel and Low Carbon Steel) Metal Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawon, M. R. A.; Gulshan, F.; Kurny, A. S. W.

    2015-04-01

    1.5 mm thick sheet metal coupons of austenitic stainless steel and plain low carbon steel were welded by resistance spot welding technique. The effects of welding current in the range 3-9 kA on the structure and mechanical properties of welded joint were investigated. The structure was studied by macroscopic, microscopic and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Mechanical properties were determined by tensile testing and microhardness measurements. Asymmetrical shape weld nugget was found to have formed in the welded joint which increased in size with an increase in welding current. The fusion zone showed cast structure with coarse columnar grain and dendritic with excess delta ferrite in austenitic matrix. Microhardness of the weld nugget was maximum because of martensite formation. An increase in welding current also increased tensile strength of the weld coupon. An attempt has also been made to relate the mode of fracture with the welding current.

  7. A study on the fatigue strength characteristics of ship structural steel with gusset welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Jo Park

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to assess fatigue property by the static overload and average load in the fillet welded joints which is on the ship structural steel having gusset welds. To this end, a small specimen was made, to which the same welding condition for the actual ship structure was applied, to perform fatigue tests. In this study, a method to simply assess changes in welding residual stress according to different static overload was suggested. By measuring actual strain at the weld toe, the weld stress concentration factor and property which is determined by recrystallization in the process of welding were estimated to investigate the relation between overload and fatigue strength.

  8. Structural stability of dissimilar weld joints of steel P91

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Foret, R.; Million, Bořivoj; Svoboda, Milan; Stránský, K.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 6 (2001), s. 405-411 ISSN 1362-1718 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/98/1367; GA ČR GA106/00/0855 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : steel * welding Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 0.295, year: 2001

  9. Application of the S690QL class steels in responsible welded structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan Arsić

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper are considered the most important properties of a special class of high strength steels S690QL, which can be classified into the group of special low alloyed steels. The high strength steels belong into a group of high quality steels. They possess exceptional mechanical properties, especially tensile strength and toughness. Those favorable properties are being achieved by application of special procedures of thermo-mechanical processing and simultaneous alloying with adequate elements. The advantages that the S690QL steels have with respect to other steels are being presented here. However, possibilities for application of those steels in responsible welded structures are limited due to their only relatively good weldability.  The special procedures for improving it are discussed here, primarily preheating, controlled heat input during welding and additional heat treatment of the welded joint.

  10. Welding heat effect on structure and properties of 25Kh2NMFA steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bugaets, A.A.; Levenberg, N.E.; Romanenchuk, N.V.; Medvedik, I.M.

    1989-01-01

    To study the effect of welding heating on the structure and properties of rotor steel 25Kh2NMFA as well as metal tendency for brittle fracture parts of heat affected zone (HAZ) are reproduced by means of imitation of welding thermal cycle (WTC). It is shown that welding heating of steel 25Kh2NMFA result in a considerable strengthening of metal owing to formation of bainitic, bainitic-martensitic and martensitic structures and sharp decrease of plasticity characteristics and impact toughness. With an increase in the cooling rate after heating up to 1400 deg C both strength and impact toughness increase which is related to the formation of homogeneous martensite

  11. Low Alloy Steel Structures After Welding with Micro-Jet Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Węgrzyn T.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on low alloy steel after innovate welding method with micro-jet cooling. Weld metal deposit (WMD was carried out for welding and for MIG and MAG welding with micro-jet cooling. This method is very promising mainly due to the high amount of AF (acicular ferrite and low amount of MAC (self-tempered martensite, retained austenite, carbide phases in WMD. That structure corresponds with very good mechanical properties, ie. high impact toughness of welds at low temperature. Micro-jet cooling after welding can find serious application in automotive industry very soon. Until that moment only argon, helium and nitrogen were tested as micro-jet gases. In that paper first time various gas mixtures (gas mixtures Ar-CO2 were tested for micro-jet cooling after welding.

  12. Weld bonding of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, I. O.; Zhang, Wenqi; Goncalves, V.M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive theoretical and experimental investigation of the weld bonding process with the purpose of evaluating its relative performance in case of joining stainless steel parts, against alternative solutions based on structural adhesives or conventional spot-welding. Th...

  13. Research on Ultrasonic Flaw Detection of Steel Weld in Spatial Grid Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Tao; Sun, Jiandong; Fu, Shengguang; Zhang, Changquan; Gao, Qing

    2017-06-01

    The welding quality of spatial grid member is an important link in quality control of steel structure. The paper analyzed the reasons that the welding seam of small-bore pipe with thin wall grid structure is difficult to be detected by ultrasonic wave from the theoretical and practical aspects. A series of feasible detection methods was also proposed by improving probe and operation approaches in this paper, and the detection methods were verified by project cases. Over the years, the spatial grid structure is widely used the engineering by virtue of its several outstanding characteristics such as reasonable structure type, standard member, excellent space integrity and quick installation. The wide application of spatial grid structure brings higher requirements on nondestructive test of grid structure. The implementation of new Code for Construction Quality Acceptance of Steel Structure Work GB50205-2001 strengthens the site inspection of steel structure, especially the site inspection of ultrasonic flaw detection in steel weld. The detection for spatial grid member structured by small-bore and thin-walled pipes is difficult due to the irregular influence of sound pressure in near-field region of sound field, sound beam diffusion generated by small bore pipe and reduction of sensitivity. Therefore, it is quite significant to select correct detecting conditions. The spatial grid structure of welding ball and bolt ball is statically determinate structure with high-order axial force which is connected by member bars and joints. It is welded by shrouding or conehead of member bars and of member bar and bolt-node sphere. It is obvious that to ensure the quality of these welding positions is critical to the quality of overall grid structure. However, the complexity of weld structure and limitation of ultrasonic detection method cause many difficulties in detection. No satisfactory results will be obtained by the conventional detection technology, so some special

  14. Quantitative Acoustic Emission Fatigue Crack Characterization in Structural Steel and Weld

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adutwum Marfo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The fatigue crack growth characteristics of structural steel and weld connections are analyzed using quantitative acoustic emission (AE technique. This was experimentally investigated by three-point bending testing of specimens under low cycle constant amplitude loading using the wavelet packet analysis. The crack growth sequence, that is, initiation, crack propagation, and fracture, is extracted from their corresponding frequency feature bands, respectively. The results obtained proved to be superior to qualitative AE analysis and the traditional linear elastic fracture mechanics for fatigue crack characterization in structural steel and welds.

  15. Validation of Temperature Histories for Structural Steel Welds Using Estimated Heat-Affected-Zone Edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-12

    possibly not convenient. A classification of steels that can be characterized for quantitative estimation of solidification and HAZ edge boundaries is...Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6394--16-9690 Validation of Temperature Histories for Structural Steel Welds Using...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a. REPORT 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) b. ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE 18. NUMBER OF

  16. The influence of plate thickness on the welding residual stresses from submerged arc welding in offshore steel structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Michael Joachim; Yu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    to an improved design, which consequently may be included in future norms and standards. Submerged Arc Welding (SAW) was used to make a fully penetrated butt weld in 10 mm and 40 mm thick steel plates with the same welding parameters as used in the production procedures. The base material is thermomechanical hot...

  17. Influence of deformation on structural-phase state of weld material in St3 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, Alexander, E-mail: galvas.kem@gmail.ru; Ababkov, Nicolay, E-mail: n.ababkov@rambler.ru; Ozhiganov, Yevgeniy, E-mail: zhigan84@mail.ru [Kuzbass State Technical University, 25-54, Krasnaya Str., 650000, Kemerovo (Russian Federation); LLC “Kuzbass Center of Welding and Control”, 33/2, Lenin Str., 650055, Kemerovo (Russian Federation); Kozlov, Eduard, E-mail: kozlov@tsuab.ru [Kuzbass State Technical University, 25-54, Krasnaya Str., 650000, Kemerovo (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Popova, Natalya, E-mail: natalya-popova-44@mail.ru [Kuzbass State Technical University, 25-54, Krasnaya Str., 650000, Kemerovo (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, SB RAS, 2/4, Akademicheskii Ave., 634021, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Nikonenko, Elena, E-mail: vilatomsk@mail.ru [Kuzbass State Technical University, 25-54, Krasnaya Str., 650000, Kemerovo (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30, Lenin Str., 634050, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Zboykova, Nadezhda, E-mail: tezaurusn@gmail.com; Koneva, Nina, E-mail: koneva@tsuab.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The structural-phase condition of the weld material subjected to the plastic deformation was investigated using the translucent diffraction electron microscopy method. The investigations were carried out near the joint of the weld and the base metal. The seam was done by the method of manual arc welding without artificial defects. The St3 steel was taken as the welded material. Influence of the plastic deformation on morphology, phase composition, defect structure and its parameters of weld metal was revealed. All investigations were done at the distance of 0.5 mm from the joint of the weld and the base metal at the deformation degrees from 0 to 5% and after destruction of a sample. It was established that deformation of the sample did not lead to qualitative changes in the structure (the structure is still presented by ferrite-pearlite mixture) but changed the quantitative parameters of the structure, namely, with the increase of plastic deformation a part of the pearlite component becomes more and more imperfect. In the beginning it turns into the destroyed pearlite then into ferrite, the volume fraction of pearlite is decreased. The polarization of dislocation structure takes place but it doesn’t lead to the internal stresses that can destroy the sample.

  18. Experimental and Computational Investigation of Structural Integrity of Dissimilar Metal Weld Between Ferritic and Austenitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosh, R.; Das, G.; Kumar, S.; Singh, P. K.; Ghosh, M.

    2018-03-01

    The structural integrity of dissimilar metal welded (DMW) joint consisting of low-alloy steel and 304LN austenitic stainless steel was examined by evaluating mechanical properties and metallurgical characteristics. INCONEL 82 and 182 were used as buttering and filler materials, respectively. Experimental findings were substantiated through thermomechanical simulation of the weld. During simulation, the effect of thermal state and stress distribution was pondered based on the real-time nuclear power plant environment. The simulation results were co-related with mechanical and microstructural characteristics. Material properties were varied significantly at different fusion boundaries across the weld line and associated with complex microstructure. During in-situ deformation testing in a scanning electron microscope, failure occurred through the buttering material. This indicated that microstructure and material properties synergistically contributed to altering the strength of DMW joints. Simulation results also depicted that the stress was maximum within the buttering material and made its weakest zone across the welded joint during service exposure. Various factors for the failure of dissimilar metal weld were analyzed. It was found that the use of IN 82 alloy as the buttering material provided a significant improvement in the joint strength and became a promising material for the fabrication of DMW joint.

  19. Structure and properties of the weld-up joints of chromium stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogrebnoj, N.A.; Zozulya, V.F.; Ivanova, L.P.; Bugaev, A.M.

    1976-01-01

    The structure and properties are studied of melted joints of chromium stainless steels, in particular melted vanes, and also the possibility of their utilization in steam-turbine engineering. The investigation was carried out on steel 15Kh11MF, with steel 20Kh13 used as additive. It has been established that the base metal of the thermal effect zone has two regions. The region of metal of increased hardness directly adjoins the fusion boundary. The second region is associated with the softening zone. The non-uniform distribution of structure and hardness across the section of the melted metal on steels 20Kh13 and 15Kh11MF (particularly the presence of the softening zone) points to an unfavourable effect of the melt on the strength of structures made of these steels as a whole. Tensile tests showed that the mechanical properties of steel 20Kh11MF after melting and welding are below the standards allowed for this steel in critical parts of steam turbines

  20. Temperature and heating time effect on the structure and mechanical properties of niobium-to-steel welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivov, E.N.; D'yachenko, V.V.; Krutogolovov, N.P.

    1975-01-01

    A study was made of the Nb-steel joints with the samples of VN2-AEH Nb base lloy and KH18N10T stainless steel 0.5 mm thick welded up both with intermetallic compound filler material and without it as an overlapping structure with steel flare. The samples for a rupture tests were cut out across the joint. The welded joint of Nb with steel were tested at 700 to 1200 deg C (with a short-term hold-up), and also at room temperature. The tests have shown that the tensile strength of welded joints under static rupture at room temperature is determined by the Nb strength (54 to 59 kg/mm 2 ), at the temperature of 700 to 1200 deg C with a short-term hold-up by the strength of stainless steel (27 to 2.8 kO/mm 2 ). A prolonged heating (700 to 1300 deg C) of the welded joints of Nb with steel was conducted in a crucible vacuum furnace under vacuum of 10 -5 to 10 -6 mm Hg. The samples cooled down to the room temperature underwent mechanical tests and metallographic analysis. A prolonged hold-up of the welded joint at 700 deg C does not substantially affect the metal structure and tensile strength. The heating above 1000 deg C results in the formation of an intermetallic compound layer in the weld metal, which sharply decreases the mechanical properties of the welded joints. The results of testing are presented in tables and diagrams. Thus, the welded joints of Nb with stainless steel, when heated within a prolonged period at 700 deg C, exhibit workability under a static rupture test. Increasing the heating temperature up to 1000 deg C brings to the decrease in the mechanical properties of the welded joints

  1. Vibration analysis of resistance spot welding joint for dissimilar plate structure (mild steel 1010 and stainless steel 304)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, M. S. M.; Nazri, N. A.; Alawi, D. A. J.

    2017-09-01

    Resistance spot welding (RSW) is a proficient joining method commonly used for sheet metal joining and become one of the oldest spot welding processes use in industry especially in the automotive. RSW involves the application of heat and pressure without neglecting time taken when joining two or more metal sheets at a localized area which is claimed as the most efficient welding process in metal fabrication. The purpose of this project is to perform model updating of RSW plate structure between mild steel 1010 and stainless steel 304. In order to do the updating, normal mode finite element analysis (FEA) and experimental modal analysis (EMA) have been carried out. Result shows that the discrepancies of natural frequency between FEA and EMA are below than 10 %. Sensitivity model updating is evaluated in order to make sure which parameters are influences in this structural dynamic modification. Young’s modulus and density both materials are indicate significant parameters to do model updating. As a conclusion, after perform model updating, total average error of dissimilar RSW plate is improved significantly.

  2. Thin stainless steel sandwich structural panels all welded by laser technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daurelio, Giuseppe; Ludovico, Antonio D.; Nenci, Fabio; Chiasera, Albino; Guadio, Maurizio

    1997-08-01

    This paper reports the results obtained by employing materials such as austenitic stainless steel (AISI 304) sheets, with different face thicknesses and core geometry's, usually some trapezoidal ones. A ROFIN SINAR C.W.CO2 laser has been used as a fast axial flow source and a 1500 W max power level to weld the many bases of the corrugated cores to the external faces has been utilized. Four different constructional solutions, for the preparation of some new modular structural elements, with one or two beads for each welded base, have been experimented. Each modular structure has sizes 300 mm wide, 700 mm length and 60 mm height. After studying many different mechanical clampings, the best one has been realized. So, eight different constructional solutions and different operative sequences of the welds have been made. All this for evaluating the effect of the weld sequence on the distortion of the panel and for obtaining different localization of the residual stresses on the structural element.

  3. Strength of gusset plates in welded steel structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Aage

    2004-01-01

    The design of gusset plates is normally carried out on the bases of the technical beam theory or other assumptions proved safe by experience. This design procedure has proved its usefulness by the length of life and use of existing structures, and is to some extend justified in simple loading cases...

  4. Steel, specially for the fabrication of welded structure working under pressure in nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolbenko, E.T.; Astafiev, A.A.; Kark, G.S.

    1981-01-01

    The present invention is in the field of metallurgy. Steels have found an increasing number of applications in mechanical constructions, and notably in the construction of materials for the production of energy and for the fabrication of welded structures operating under pressure at temperatures as high as 450 0 C. A possible application is the pressurized vessels of nuclear facilities. The steels of interest contain carbon, silicon, manganese, nickel, molybdenum, vanadium, aluminium, nitrogen, phosphorus and iron, but are characterized by the fact that they also contain arsenic, tin and calcium. The sum of the weighted percentages of nickel and manganese and the weighted percentage of phosphorous are related as follows: (Ni + Mn) . P [fr

  5. Investigation of the structure and properties of a composite insert applied at laser welding of steel with titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugacheva, N. B.; Cherepanov, A. N.; Orishich, A. M.; Malikov, A. G.; Drozdov, V. O.; Mali, V. I.; Senaeva, E. I.

    2017-10-01

    Production of welded bimetallic structures of titanium and steel using a laser beam is a very urgent and important task in the shipbuilding, airspace and power engineering. Laser welding using an intermediate insert is one of the ways to solve this problem. In this paper, we present the results of experimental studies of formation of the structure and properties of composite insert, obtained by explosion welding, after its application at laser welding steel with titanium. A study of a four-layer composite insert obtained by explosion welding showed that it has no brittle intermetallic phases and defects in the form of cracks and pores. The boundaries between the plates to be welded in the composite insert have a characteristic wavy structure with narrow zones of mutual diffusion penetration of elements of the adjacent metals. It is established that the strength of the composite insert is comparable with the maximum strength of Grade 4 alloy, and the destruction of the product during the tensile tests in most cases occurred along the weakest component of the composite insert, i.e. the copper layer, whose strength was significantly increased due to the hardening that took place in the explosion welding.

  6. Corrosion of carbon steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, B.

    1988-09-01

    This report assesses the factors which cause preferential attack to occur in carbon steel fusion welds. It was concluded that the main factors were: the inclusion content of the weld metal, the potential of the weld metal being less noble than that of the parent, and the presence of low-temperature transformation products in the heat-affected zone of the weld. These factors should be minimized or eliminated as appropriate so that the corrosion allowances determined for carbon steel waste drums is also adequate for the welds. An experimental/theoretical approach is recommended to evaluate the relative corrosion resistance of welds prepared from BS 4360 grade 43A steel to that of the parent material. (author)

  7. Resistance Spot Welding of dissimilar Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Kolařík

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of the properties of resistance spot welds between low carbon steel and austenitic CrNi stainless steel. The thickness of the welded dissimilar materials was 2 mm. A DeltaSpot welding gun with a process tape was used for welding the dissimilar steels. Resistance spot welds were produced with various welding parameters (welding currents ranging from 7 to 8 kA. Light microscopy, microhardness measurements across the welded joints, and EDX analysis were used to evaluate the quality of the resistance spot welds. The results confirm the applicability of DeltaSpot welding for this combination of materials.

  8. Method for welding chromium molybdenum steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, Vinod K.

    1986-01-01

    Chromium-molybdenum steels exhibit a weakening after welding in an area adjacent to the weld. This invention is an improved method for welding to eliminate the weakness by subjecting normalized steel to a partial temper prior to welding and subsequently fully tempering the welded article for optimum strength and ductility.

  9. Steel Collet For Welding Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Gutow, David A.; Burley, Richard K.; Fogul, Irving

    1992-01-01

    Improved steel collet holds electrode for tungsten inert-gas welding but allows quick and easy replacement. Also ensures reliable arc starting. Slip-on compression ring compresses tapered section of body of collet around inner end of welding electrode. Collet mounted in receptacle below stack of lenses and filters in coaxial-vision welding torch. Blind hole in collet protects outermost lens from damage by electrode.

  10. Structural state and geometric representation of a laser-welded joint between corrosion-resistant steel and titanium alloy with copper insert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michurov, N. S.; Veretennikova, I. A.; Pugacheva, N. B.; Smirnova, E. O.

    2017-12-01

    The paper shows a characteristic structure of a welded joint between titanium alloy and corrosion-resistant steel, with a copper insert, produced by carbon dioxide laser welding. In the formation of the joint, the materials being welded are dissolved and mixed in the copper interlayer. The material of the welded joint is an oversaturated solid solution of Fe, Ni, Cr and Ti in the copper lattice with distributed TiFe, Ti(Fe, Cr)2 and CuTi2 intermetallic particles. A 10-150 µm thick diffusion zone with an altered chemical composition appears at the boundary with the steel, and a 50- 100 µm thick zone of the kind is formed at the boundary with the titanium alloy. The phase composition is determined and recrystallization maps at the boundaries of the welded joint are obtained. A geometric representation of a laser welded joint between titanium alloy and corrosion-resistant steel with a copper insert is constructed.

  11. Horizontal electron beam welding for stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.; Olivera, J.J.

    1977-01-01

    Stainless steel samples have been realized by local vacuum apparatus for electron beam welding applications to reactor core shell realizations. The best welding parameters have been determined by a systematic study. The welds have been characterized by mechanical tests [fr

  12. Spot Welding of Honeycomb Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohal, V.

    2017-08-01

    Honeycomb structures are used to prepare meals water jet cutting machines for textile. These honeycomb structures are made of stainless steel sheet thickness of 0.1-0.2 mm. Corrugated sheet metal strips are between two gears with special tooth profile. Hexagonal cells for obtaining these strips are welded points between them. Spot welding device is three electrodes in the upper part, which carries three welding points across the width of the strip of corrugated sheet metal. Spot welding device filled with press and advance mechanisms. The paper presents the values of the regime for spot welding.

  13. Optimal welding technology of high strength steel S690QL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Arsic

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is presented the detailed procedure for defining the optimal technology for welding the structures made of the high strength steel S690QL. That steel belongs into a group of steels with exceptional mechanical properties. The most prominent properties are the high tensile strength and impact toughness, at room and at elevated temperatures, as well. However, this steel has a negative characteristic - proneness to appearance of cold cracks.  That impedes welding and makes as an imperative to study different aspects of this steel's properties as well as those of eventual filler metal. Selection and defining of the optimal welding technology of this high strength steel is done for the purpose of preserving the favorable mechanical properties once the welded joint is realized; properties of the welded metal and the melting zone, as well as in the heat affected zone, which is the most critical zone of the welded joint.

  14. Weld-bonding: a very well adapted joining technique to decrease the weight of steel structures; Le soudo-collage: une technique d'assemblage performante pour alleger les structures en acier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charbonnet, Ph.; Clad, A.; Di Fant-Jaeckels, H.; Thirion, J.L. [Usinor RD, 92 - Puteaux (France)

    2000-04-01

    The association of spot welding and adhesive bonding, named weld-bonding, is a steel joining technique which increasingly interests car manufacturers. Nevertheless, weld-bonding is not at present used extensively by them due to a lack of data related to the performance of this technique. Studies carried out by Usinor have succeeded in demonstrating that weld-bonding is a very well adapted joining technique to decrease the weight of steel structures. (author)

  15. Numerical Modelling Of Thermal And Structural Phenomena In Yb:YAG Laser Butt-Welded Steel Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubiak M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The numerical model of thermal and structural phenomena is developed for the analysis of Yb:YAG laser welding process with the motion of the liquid material in the welding pool taken into account. Temperature field and melted material velocity field in the fusion zone are obtained from the numerical solution of continuum mechanics equations using Chorin projection method and finite volume method. Phase transformations in solid state are analyzed during heating and cooling using classical models of the kinetics of phase transformations as well as CTA and CCT diagrams for welded steel. The interpolated heat source model is developed in order to reliably reflect the real distribution of Yb:YAG laser power obtained by experimental research on the laser beam profile.

  16. Optimization of the A-TIG welding for stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurica, M.; Kožuh, Z.; Garašić, I.; Bušić, M.

    2018-03-01

    The paper presents the influence of the activation flux and shielding gas on tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) welding of the stainless steel. In introduction part, duplex stainless steel was analysed. The A-TIG process was explained and the possibility of welding stainless steels using the A-TIG process to maximize productivity and the cost-effectiveness of welded structures was presented. In the experimental part duplex, 7 mm thick stainless steel has been welded in butt joint. The influence of activation flux chemical composition upon the weld penetration has been investigated prior the welding. The welding process was performed by a robot with TIG equipment. With selected A-TIG welding technology preparation of plates and consumption of filler material (containing Cr, Ni and Mn) have been avoided. Specimens sectioned from the produced welds have been subjected to tensile strength test, macrostructure analysis and corrosion resistance analysis. The results have confirmed that this type of stainless steel can be welded without edge preparation and addition of filler material containing critical raw materials as Cr, Ni and Mn when the following welding parameters are set: current 200 A, welding speed 9,1 cm/min, heat input 1,2 kJ/mm and specific activation flux is used.

  17. Laser welding and post weld treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Z. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2012-04-03

    Laser welding and post weld laser treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steels (Grade P91) were performed in this preliminary study to investigate the feasibility of using laser welding process as a potential alternative to arc welding methods for solving the Type IV cracking problem in P91 steel welds. The mechanical and metallurgical testing of the pulsed Nd:YAG laser-welded samples shows the following conclusions: (1) both bead-on-plate and circumferential butt welds made by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser show good welds that are free of microcracks and porosity. The narrow heat affected zone has a homogeneous grain structure without conventional soft hardness zone where the Type IV cracking occurs in conventional arc welds. (2) The laser weld tests also show that the same laser welder has the potential to be used as a multi-function tool for weld surface remelting, glazing or post weld tempering to reduce the weld surface defects and to increase the cracking resistance and toughness of the welds. (3) The Vicker hardness of laser welds in the weld and heat affected zone was 420-500 HV with peak hardness in the HAZ compared to 240 HV of base metal. Post weld laser treatment was able to slightly reduce the peak hardness and smooth the hardness profile, but failed to bring the hardness down to below 300 HV due to insufficient time at temperature and too fast cooling rate after the time. Though optimal hardness of weld made by laser is to be determined for best weld strength, methods to achieve the post weld laser treatment temperature, time at the temperature and slow cooling rate need to be developed. (4) Mechanical testing of the laser weld and post weld laser treated samples need to be performed to evaluate the effects of laser post treatments such as surface remelting, glazing, re-hardening, or tempering on the strength of the welds.

  18. Fracture Mechanics Approach to X-Ray Diffraction Method for Spot Welded Lap Joint Structure of Rolled Steel Considered Residual Stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Seung Yeb; Bae, Dong Ho

    2011-01-01

    Cold and hot-rolled carbon steel sheets are commonly used in railroad cars or commercial vehicles such as the automobile. The sheets used in these applications are mainly fabricated by spot welding, which is a type of electric resistance welding. However, the fatigue strength of a spot-welded joint is lower than that of the base metal because of high stress concentration at the nugget edge of the spot-welded part. In particular, the fatigue strength of the joint is influenced by not only geometrical and mechanical factors but also the welding conditions for the spot-welded joint. Therefore, there is a need for establishing a reasonable criterion for a long-life design for spot-welded structures. In this thesis, ΔP-N f relation curves have been used to determine a long-life fatigue-design criterion for thin-sheet structures. However, as these curves vary under the influence of welding conditions, mechanical conditions, geometrical factors, etc. It is very difficult to systematically determine a fatigue-design criterion on the basis of these curves. Therefore, in order to eliminate such problems, the welding residual stresses generated during welding and the stress distributions around the weld generated by external forces were numerically and experimentally analyzed on the basis of the results, reassessed fatigue strength of gas welded joints

  19. Laser welded steel sandwich panel bridge deck development : finite element analysis and stake weld strength tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    This report summarizes the analysis of laser welded steel sandwich panels for use in bridge structures and : static testing of laser stake welded lap shear coupons. Steel sandwich panels consist of two face sheets : connected by a relatively low-dens...

  20. Effects of LSP on micro-structures and residual stresses in a 4 mm CLAM steel weld joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xizhang, E-mail: chenxizhang@wzu.edu.cn [School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Wenzhou University., Wenzhou 325035 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu (China); Fang, Yuanyuan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu (China); Zhang, Shuyan; Kelleher, Joe F. [ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Zhou, Jianzhong [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu (China)

    2015-05-15

    The effects of laser shock processing (LSP) on the distribution of residual stress and micro-structure of China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel weldment were investigated via neutron diffraction and optical microscope (OM). A pair of 4 mm CLAM steel plates joined by GTA welding. Special attention is paid to the generation of high level compressive residual stresses introduced by LSP. Residual stress in longitudinal, normal and transversal direction at weldment surface and longitudinal stress through thickness are evaluated via neutron diffraction. Compressive residual stress after LSP occurred at more than 90% areas within the weld joint, it is almost double the areas of compressive stress compare to weldment surface before LSP. The maximum compressive normal residual stress becomes to −183 MPa after LSP from −63 MPa before LSP. The Modification of surface micro-structures including weld zone (WZ), heat affected zone (HAZ) and base metal (BM) are also discussed. Results to date demonstrate that laser shock processing has been a great potential method for the improvement of mechanical performance of components.

  1. Effects of LSP on micro-structures and residual stresses in a 4 mm CLAM steel weld joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xizhang; Fang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Shuyan; Kelleher, Joe F.; Zhou, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    The effects of laser shock processing (LSP) on the distribution of residual stress and micro-structure of China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel weldment were investigated via neutron diffraction and optical microscope (OM). A pair of 4 mm CLAM steel plates joined by GTA welding. Special attention is paid to the generation of high level compressive residual stresses introduced by LSP. Residual stress in longitudinal, normal and transversal direction at weldment surface and longitudinal stress through thickness are evaluated via neutron diffraction. Compressive residual stress after LSP occurred at more than 90% areas within the weld joint, it is almost double the areas of compressive stress compare to weldment surface before LSP. The maximum compressive normal residual stress becomes to −183 MPa after LSP from −63 MPa before LSP. The Modification of surface micro-structures including weld zone (WZ), heat affected zone (HAZ) and base metal (BM) are also discussed. Results to date demonstrate that laser shock processing has been a great potential method for the improvement of mechanical performance of components

  2. HIGH FREQUENCY INDUCTION WELDING OF HIGH SILICON STEEL TUBES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Miranda Alé

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available High-Si steel is a low cost alternative for the fabrication of tubular structures resistant to atmospheric corrosion. However, the literature has often pointed out that steels presenting a higher Si content and/or a lower Mn/Si ratio have higher susceptibility to defects at the weld bond line during HFIW (High Frequency Induction Welding process, which has been widely used for manufacturing small diameter tubes. In this study the effect of the HFIW conditions on the quality of steel tubes with high-Si content and low Mn/Si ratio is investigated. The quality of welded tubes was determined by flare test and the defects in the bond line were identified by SEM. It has been found that higher welding speeds, V-convergence angles and power input should be applied in welding of high-Si steel, when compared to similar strength C-Mn steel.

  3. Plasma spot welding of ferritic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesnjak, A.; Tusek, J.

    2002-01-01

    Plasma spot wedding of ferritic stainless steels studied. The study was focused on welding parameters, plasma and shieldings and the optimum welding equipment. Plasma-spot welded overlap joints on a 0.8 mm thick ferritic stainless steel sheet were subjected to a visual examination and mechanical testing in terms of tension-shear strength. Several macro specimens were prepared Plasma spot welding is suitable to use the same gas as shielding gas and as plasma gas , i. e. a 98% Ar/2% H 2 gas mixture. Tension-shear strength of plasma-spot welded joint was compared to that of resistance sport welded joints. It was found that the resistance welded joints withstand a somewhat stronger load than the plasma welded joints due to a large weld sport diameter of the former. Strength of both types of welded joints is approximately the same. (Author) 32 refs

  4. Corrosion Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weldingh, Jakob; Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the corrosion properties of laser welded AISI 316L stainless steel are examined. A number of different welds has been performed to test the influence of the weld parameters of the resulting corrosion properties. It has been chosen to use the potential independent critical pitting...... temperature (CPT) test as corrosion test. The following welding parameters are varied: Welding speed, lsser power, focus point position and laser operation mode (CW or pulsed)....

  5. Welding of structural components and vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    'Welding of structural components and vessels' was chosen as the guiding topic for the 17th special conference in Munich so that current problems of this important area of application for welding engineering could be discussed in detail. The following topics were in the focus of the discussions: developments in steel, steel production and steel processing, reports on the practical application of welding in the manufacture of containers and pipes, quality assurance, product liability, safety considerations regarding creep-stressed components, problems of welding in large structures. 7 of the total number of 12 contributions were recorded separately for the data base ENERGY. (orig./MM) [de

  6. Examination Of Mechanical Properties And Weld Zone Of X70 Pipe Steel After Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakir Tas

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The demand for large diameter pipes in terms of their strength and toughness properties is increasing day by day. The quality and mechanical strength values of the steels used in new gas pipeline projects are gradually increasing. Today high strength steels are used instead of the steels with low yield values. In this study the micro-structure mechanical properties of the high strength X70 steel used in the Trans Anatolian Gas Pipeline Project TANAP were investigated before and after the welding process and the weld zone was examined. The submerger arc welding process has been employed for the weld process. While the mechanical properties were determined by tensile notched bend impact bend and hardness measurements the microstructures were examined by using optical microscope and scanning electron microscope SEM. The radiographic and ultrasonic methods were employed in the non-destructive test of the weld zone.

  7. Defect rates in butt welded steel pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guille-Stevens, D.; Silcock, P.

    1980-01-01

    As the primary circuit of CANDU reactors consists largely of pipe, the reliability of pipe welds is of interest to reactor designers. A project involving 64 000 manual and semi-automatic pipe welds was inspected to the requirements of ANSI B31.3. Records of 6 000 carbon steel and 1 900 alloy steel butt welds ranging from 50 to 400 mm were inspected by radiography and ultrasonics, and analysed. No correlation between defects and number of weld passes was observed. However, small pipes exhibited a higher defect rate, per weld length and per weld volume, than did large pipes. Porosity was the major cause of defects (60 per cent) followed by root defects (27 per cent); only one crack was recorded. The results show that small (50 mm) pipe welds have the highest defect rate; however, the low overall rate shows that high standards can be maintained over many thousand welds [af

  8. Occupational rhinitis due to steel welding fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castano, Roberto; Suarthana, Eva

    2014-12-01

    Exposure to welding fumes is a recognized respiratory hazard. Occupational asthma but not occupational rhinitis has been documented in workers exposed to steel welding fumes. We report a 26-year-old male with work-related rhinitis symptoms as well as lower airways symptoms suggestive of occupational asthma and metal fume fever associated with exposure to steel welding fumes. The diagnosis of occupational rhinitis was confirmed by specific inhalation challenge. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Comparison of Post Weld Treatment of High Strength Steel Welded Joints in Medium Cycle Fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mikkel Melters; Mouritsen, Ole Ø.; Hansen, Michael Rygaard

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of three post-weld treatments for fatigue life improvement of welded joints. The objective is to determine the most suitable post-weld treatment for implementation in mass production of certain crane components manufactured from very high-strength steel...... the stress range can exceed the yield-strength of ordinary structural steel, especially when considering positive stress ratios (R > 0). Fatigue experiments and qualitative evaluation of the different post-weld treatments leads to the selection of TIG dressing. The process of implementing TIG dressing...... in mass production and some inherent initial problems are discussed. The treatment of a few critical welds leads to a significant increase in fatigue performance of the entire structure and the possibility for better utilization of very high-strength steel....

  10. The structure and properties of filler metal-free laser beam welded joints in steel S700MC subjected to TMCP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górka, Jacek; Stano, Sebastian

    2016-12-01

    The research-related tests aimed to determine the effect of filer-metal free laser beam welding on the structure and properties of 10 mm thick steel S700MC subjected to the Thermo-Mechanical Control Process (TMCP). The nondestructive tests revealed that the welded joints represented quality level B according to the requirements of standard 13919-1. The destructive tests revealed that the joints were characterised by tensile strength being by approximately 5% lower than that of the base material. The tests of thin foils performed using a high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscope revealed that filler metal-free welding led to the increased amount of alloying microagents (Ti and Nb) in the weld (particularly near fusion line) in comparison with welding performed using a filler metal. The significant content of hardening phases in the welds during cooling resulted in considerable precipitation hardening through finedispersive (Ti,Nb)(C,N) type precipitates (several nm in size) leading to the deterioration of plastic properties. The destructive tests revealed that the joints were characterised by tensile strength being by approximately 5% lower than that of the base material. The increase in the concentration of microagents responsible for steel hardening (Ti and Nb) also contributed to the decrease in weld toughness being below the allowed value of 25 J/cm2.

  11. New generation of welded semiautomatic for production of structures out of steels and aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belousov, A.N.; Poloskov, S.I.; Efanov, V.A.; Sedov, Yu.S.; Bukhta, O.Ya.

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of the type of semiautomatic welding machines, produced in our country and abroad, is presented. New designs, realized in the 80th, are described. Design of KOMBI-500 and PRM-4M semiautomatic welding machines is described

  12. Examination Of Mechanical Properties And Weld Zone Of X70 Pipe Steel After Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Zakir Tas

    2017-01-01

    The demand for large diameter pipes in terms of their strength and toughness properties is increasing day by day. The quality and mechanical strength values of the steels used in new gas pipeline projects are gradually increasing. Today high strength steels are used instead of the steels with low yield values. In this study the micro-structure mechanical properties of the high strength X70 steel used in the Trans Anatolian Gas Pipeline Project TANAP were investigated before and after the weld...

  13. Investigation on fracture toughness of laser beam welded steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riekehr, S.; Cam, G.; Santos, J.F. dos; Kocak, M. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany); Klein, R.M.; Fischer, R. [Thyssen Laser-Technik GmbH, Aachen (Germany)

    1999-11-01

    Laser beam welding is currently used in the welding of a variety of structural materials including hot and cold rolled steels, high strength low alloy and stainless steels, aluminium and titanium alloys, refractory and high temperature alloys and dissimilar materials. This high power density welding process has unique advantages of cost effectiveness, low distortion, high welding speed, easy automation, deep penetration, narrow bead width, and narrow HAZ compared to the conventional fusion welding processes. However, there is a need to understand the deformation and fracture properties of laser beam weld joints in order to use this cost effective process for fabrication of structural components fully. In the present study, an austenitic stainless steel, X5CrNi18 10 (1.4301) and a ferritic structural steel, RSt37-2 (1.0038), with a thickness of 4 mm were welded by 5 kW CO{sub 2} laser process. Microhardness measurements were conducted to determine the hardness profiles of the joints. Flat microtensile specimens were extracted from the base metal, fusion zone, and heat affected zone of ferritic joint to determine the mechanical property variation across the joint and the strength mismatch ratio between the base metal and the fusion zone. Moreover, fracture mechanics specimens were extracted from the joints and tested at room temperature to determine fracture toughness, Crack Tip Opening Displacement (CTOD), of the laser beam welded specimens. The effect of the weld region strenght mis-matching on the fracture toughness of the joints have been evaluated. Crack initiation, crack growth and crack deviation processes have also been examined. These results were used to explain the influence of mechanical heterogeneity of the weld region on fracture behaviour. This work is a part of the ongoing Brite-Euram project Assessment of Quality of Power Beam Weld Joints (ASPOW). (orig.)

  14. Effect of welding parameters on the mechanical properties of GMA-welded HY-80 steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durmusoglu, Senol [Gazi Univ., Ankara (Turkey); Tuerker, Mehmet [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). ISF - Welding and Joining Inst.; Tosun, Murat [Gedik Univ., Istanbul (Turkey)

    2015-07-01

    In this publication, investigations of HY-80 steels joined by gas metal arc welding by using different welding parameters are described. Different samples obtained from the welded joints were subjected to mechanical testing by means of tensile, hardness and impact toughness tests. The tensile test results showed that the strength of weld metal and heat affected zone were higher than of base metal. Similar Charpy impact toughness test results were obtained for weld metal and heat affected zone. Weld metal hardness was almost similar to the base metal hardness, nevertheless, the heat affected zone indicated higher values. The base metal has ferritic-perlitic structure with fine grains. Martensite needles and bainite are seen in the heat affected zone. Weld metal has martensite needles, partial bainite and residual austenite.

  15. Friction Stir Welding of Steel Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The friction stir welding process has been developed primarily for the welding of aluminum alloys. Other higher melting allows such, as steels are much more difficult to join. Special attention must be given to pin tool material selection and welding techniques. This paper addresses the joining of steels and other high melting point materials using the friction stir welding process. Pin tool material and welding parameters will be presented. Mechanical properties of weldments will also be presented. Significance: There are many applications for the friction stir welding process other than low melting aluminum alloys. The FSW process can be expanded for use with high melting alloys in the pressure vessel, railroad and ship building industries.

  16. Microstructure and fatigue properties of Mg-to-steel dissimilar resistance spot welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, L.; Xiao, L.; Chen, D.L.; Feng, J.C.; Kim, S.; Zhou, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Mg/steel dissimilar spot weld had the same fatigue strength as Mg/Mg similar weld. ► Crack propagation path of Mg/Mg and Mg/steel welds was the same. ► Penetration of Zn into the Mg base metal led to crack initiation of Mg/steel weld. ► HAZ weakening and stress concentration led to crack initiation of Mg/Mg weld. -- Abstract: The structural application of lightweight magnesium alloys in the automotive industry inevitably involves dissimilar welding with steels and the related durability issues. This study was aimed at evaluating the microstructural change and fatigue resistance of Mg/steel resistance spot welds, in comparison with Mg/Mg welds. The microstructure of Mg/Mg spot welds can be divided into: base metal, heat affected zone and fusion zone (nugget). However, the microstructure of Mg/steel dissimilar spot welds had three different regions along the joined interface: weld brazing, solid-state joining and soldering. The horizontal and vertical Mg hardness profiles of Mg/steel and Mg/Mg welds were similar. Both Mg/steel and Mg/Mg welds were observed to have an equivalent fatigue resistance due to similar crack propagation characteristics and failure mode. Both Mg/steel and Mg/Mg welds failed through thickness in the magnesium sheet under stress-controlled cyclic loading, but fatigue crack initiation of the two types of welds was different. The crack initiation of Mg/Mg welds was occurred due to a combined effect of stress concentration, grain growth in the heat affected zone (HAZ), and the presence of Al-rich phases at HAZ grain boundaries, while the penetration of small amounts of Zn coating into the Mg base metal stemming from the liquid metal induced embrittlement led to crack initiation in the Mg/steel welds.

  17. Ultrasonic testing of austenitic stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Shunichi; Hida, Yoshio; Yamamoto, Michio; Ando, Tomozumi; Shirai, Tasuku.

    1982-05-01

    Ultrasonic testing of austenitic stainless steel welds has been considered difficult because of the high noise level and remarkable attenuation of ultrasonic waves. To improve flaw detectability in this kind of steel, various inspection techniques have been studied. A series of tests indicated: (1) The longitudinal angle beam transducers newly developed during this study can detect 4.8 mm dia. side drilled holes in dissimilar metal welds (refraction angle: 55 0 from SUS side, 45 0 from CS side) and in cast stainless steel welds (refraction angle: 45 0 , inspection frequency: 1 MHz). (2) Cracks more than 5% t in depth in the heat affected zones of fine-grain stainless steel pipe welds can be detected by the 45 0 shear wave angle beam method (inspection frequency: 2 MHz). (3) The pattern recognition method using frequency analysis technology was presumed useful for discriminating crack signals from spurious echoes. (author)

  18. Numerical evaluation of multipass welding temperature field in API 5L X80 steel welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Nóbrega

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Many are the metallurgical changes suffered by materials when subjected to welding thermal cycle, promoting a considerable influence on the welded structures thermo mechanical properties. In project phase, one alternative for evaluating the welding cycle variable, would be the employment of computational methods through simulation. So, this paper presents an evaluation of the temperature field in a multipass welding of API 5L X80 steel used for oil and gas transportation, using the ABAQUS ® software, based on Finite Elements Method (FEM. During the simulation complex phenomena are considerable including: Variation in physical and mechanical properties of materials as a function of temperature, welding speed and the different mechanisms of heat exchange with the environment (convection and radiation were used. These considerations allow a more robust mathematical modeling for the welding process. An analytical heat source proposed by Goldak, to model the heat input in order to characterize the multipass welding through the GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding process on root and the SMAW (Shielded Metal Arc Welding process for the filling passes were used. So, it was possible to evaluate the effect of each welding pass on the welded joint temperature field, through the temperature peaks and cooling rates values during the welding process.

  19. Structural degradation of heterogeneous welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Schmidová

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Developing the techniques of welding materials with higher dynamic strength onto the rolling surfaces of rails is one of the options for increasing their operational endurance. The subject of this paper is an analyses of heterogeneous weld interfaces experimentally manufactured by welding medium-carbon austenitic steels onto high-carbon unalloyed pearlitic steels. The analyses focus on examinations of the marginal mixing of the materials at the weld interface and the circumstances under which intercrystalline cracks form in the weld deposit layers. Structural analyses, chemical microanalyses and a hardness assessment were performed in order to identify the corresponding structural changes. The proportion of zonal vs. interdendritic segregation of the alloying elements in the degradation of the welded joint was distinguished. We described the nature of the structural heterogeneities produced, locally connected with the martensitic transformation. The chemical heterogeneity leading to the formation of martensite at grain boundaries was identified as the limiting effect.

  20. Fracture toughness of stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, W.J.

    1985-11-01

    The effects of temperature, composition and weld-process variations on the fracture toughness behavior for Types 308 and 16-8-2 stainless steel (SS) welds were examined using the multiple-specimen J/sub R/-curve procedure. Fracture characteristics were found to be dependent on temperature and weld process but not on filler material. Gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) welds exhibited the highest fracture toughness, a shielded metal-arc (SMA) weld exhibited an intermediate toughness and submerged-arc (SA) welds yielded the lowest toughness. Minimum-expected fracture properties were defined from lower-bound J/sub c/ and tearing modulus values generated here and in previous studies. Fractographic examination revealed that microvoid coalescence was the operative fracture mechanism for all welds. Second phase particles of manganese silicide were found to be detrimental to the ductile fracture behavior because they separated from the matrix during the initial stages of plastic straining. In SA welds, the high density of inclusions resulting from silicon pickup from the flux promoted premature dimple rupture. The weld produced by the SMA process contained substantially less manganese silicide, while GTA welds contained no silicide inclusions. Delta ferrite particles present in all welds were substantially more resistant to local failure than the silicide phase. In welds containing little or no manganese silicide, delta ferrite particles initiated microvoid coalescence but only after extensive plastic straining

  1. IMPACT STRENGTH AND FAILURE ANALYSIS OF WELDED DAMASCUS STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastislav Mintách

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was the experimental research of damascus steel from point of view of the structural analyze, impact strength and failure analyzes. The damascus steel was produced by method of forged welding from STN 41 4260 spring steel and STN 41 9312 tool steel. The damascus steel consisted of both 84 and 168 layers. The impact strength was experimentally determined for original steels and damascus steels after heat treatment in dependence on temperature in the range from -60 to 160 °C. It has been found that the impact strength of experimental steels decreased with decreasing temperature behind with correlated change of damage mode. In the case of experimental tests performed at high temperature ductile fracture was revealed and with decreasing temperature proportion of cleavage facets increased. Only the STN 41 9312 steel did not show considerable difference in values of the impact strength with changing temperature.

  2. Solidification cracking in austenitic stainless steel welds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    V Shankar et al. Although much research experience exists on the nature of hot cracking in stainless steels ... that crack-resistant weld deposits could be produced if the composition is adjusted to result in 5–35% fer- .... A large volume of literature is devoted to the prediction and measurement of δ-ferrite in stainless steel ...

  3. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Copper and Mild Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel T; Timotius P; Maziar R

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, copper and mild steel were welded using a gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. To determine the weldablity factor, tests are needed to provide information on mechanical strength, potential defects in structure, and nature of failure. Mechanical testing included transverse tensile tests, micro hardness tests, and bend tests. The results for the transverse tensile test revealed failure occurred at the copper heat affected zone (HAZ) with an ultimate tensile strength of 220MPa...

  4. Fracture behavior of various welded steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozdemir, Tevfik Ertugrul; Cetinel, Hakan [Celal Bayar Univ., Manisa (Turkey). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Uyulgan, Bahadir [Dokuz Eyluel Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

    2016-02-01

    In this study, P295GH (17Mn4) pressure vessel steel and AISI 304 stainless steel were joined by using ER 309L electrodes. Welded specimens were fatigued by four point bending experiments. Cracks occurred on the stainless steel side of the weldment during the fatigue tests. Finite element (FE) analyses were conducted by fixing 2-D precracked model for welded 17Mn4 pressure vessel steel and AISI 304 stainless steel by using ER 309L electrodes. True stress and true strain values of the AISI 304, 17Mn4 steels and ER 309L electrodes were determined by tensile tests. Stress analyses were conducted after entering the linear and nonlinear properties of the materials into software manually. Eventually, fracture mechanics analyses were conducted for the model, and J integral fracture toughness values of the crack on the weldment were calculated.

  5. Welding of carbon steel vessels without post weld heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibb, M.; Bala, S.R.

    1984-01-01

    The methods available for the repair welding of carbon steel vessels without post weld heat treatment and with particular reference to service in a sour environment have been reviewed. All the available techniques have the common aim of providing adequate properties in the weld metal and heat affected zone without the need for a full post weld stress relief. The heat that is required to provide the necessary metallurgical changes comes, therefore, from an alternate source. The two sources used are heat from suitably placed subsequent weld passes or from localized external heat sources. The technique presently being used by Ontario Hydro to repair vessels subject to sour service utilizes both a high preheat and a welding technique which is designed to temper the heat affected zone formed in the base material by the first weld pass. This technique is an improvement over the 'half bead' techniques given in the ASME X1 code and has been shown to be capable of reducing the hardness of the heat affected zone to an acceptable level. Certain recommendations have been made which could improve control of the technique presently used by Ontario Hydro and provide measurable parameters between procedural tests and the actual weld repairs

  6. Mechanical and structural characteristics in high temperature of stainless steel welded joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, S.N.; Carvalho Mota, A.F. de

    1980-01-01

    The mechanical behavior at 600 0 C of weldments made of type 304 stainless as base metal and niobium containing type 347 stainless as weld metal has been investigated. This was done through tensile and creep tests. Heat treatments at 600 0 C and up to 6000 hours permited a simultaneous follow up of the mechanical and microstructural changes. It was observed that the exposure at 600 0 C under load contributes, from the begining, to the strengthening of the weld. This is due to the acceleration of the second phase precipitation hardening. (Author) [pt

  7. STRUCTURAL DEGRADATION OF HETEROGENEOUS WELDED JOINTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Schmidová

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Developing the techniques of welding materials with higher dynamic strength onto the rolling surfaces of rails is one of the options for increasing their operational endurance. The subject of this paper is an analysis of heterogeneous weld joints experimentally manufactured by welding medium-carbon austenitic steels onto high-carbon unalloyed pearlitic steels. The analyses focus on examinations of the marginal mixing of the materials at the fusion line and the circumstances under which intercrystalline cracks form in the weld deposit layers. Structural analyses, chemical microanalyses and a hardness assessment were performed in order to identify the corresponding structural changes. The proportion of zonal vs. interdendritic segregation of the alloying elements in the degradation of the welded joint was distinguished. We described the nature of the structural heterogeneities produced, locally connected with the martensitic transformation. The chemical heterogeneity leading to the formation of martensite at grain boundaries was identified as the limiting effect.

  8. Influence of modes of metal transfer on grain structure and direction of grain growth in low nickel austenitic stainless steel weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, Manidipto; Saha, Saptarshi; Pal, Tapan Kumar; Kanjilal, Prasanta

    2015-01-01

    The present study elaborately discussed the effect of different modes of metal transfer (i.e., short circuit mode, spray mode and pulse mode) on grain structure and direction of grain growth in low nickel austenitic stainless steel weld metals. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis was used to study the grain growth direction and grain structure in weld metals. The changes in grain structure and grain growth direction were found to be essentially varied with the weld pool shape and acting forces induced by modes of metal transfer at a constant welding speed. Short circuit mode of metal transfer owing to higher Marangoni force (M a ) and low electromagnetic force (R m ) promotes the lower weld pool volume (Γ) and higher weld pool maximum radius (r m ). Short circuit mode also shows curved and tapered columnar grain structures and the grain growth preferentially occurred in <001> direction. In contrast, spray mode of metal transfer increases the Γ and reduces the r m values due to very high R m and typically reveals straight and broad columnar grain structures with preferential growth direction in <111>. In the pulse mode of metal transfer relatively high M a and R m simultaneously increase the weld pool width and the primary penetration which might encourage relatively complex grain growth directions in the weld pool and cause a shift of major intensity from <001> to <111> direction. It can also be concluded that the fusion zone grain structure and direction of grain growth are solely dependent on modes of metal transfer and remain constant for a particular mode of metal transfer irrespective of filler wire used. - Highlights: • Welded joints of LNiASS were prepared by varying modes of metal transfer. • Weld pool shape, grain structure and grain growth direction were studied. • Short circuit mode shows curved and tapered grain growth in <001> direction. • Spray mode shows straight and broad columnar grain growth in <111> direction. • Pulse

  9. Robustness of numerical TIG welding simulation of 3D structures in stainless steel 316L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Ahmar, W.

    2007-04-01

    The numerical welding simulation is considered to be one of those mechanical problems that have the great level of nonlinearity and which requires a good knowledge in various scientific fields. The 'Robustness Analysis' is a suitable tool to control the quality and guarantee the reliability of numerical welding results. The robustness of a numerical simulation of welding is related to the sensitivity of the modelling assumptions on the input parameters. A simulation is known as robust if the result that it produces is not very sensitive to uncertainties of the input data. The term 'Robust' was coined in statistics by G.E.P. Box in 1953. Various definitions of greater or lesser mathematical rigor are possible for the term, but in general, referring to a statistical estimator, it means 'insensitive to small deviation from the idealized assumptions for which the estimator is optimized. In order to evaluate the robustness of numerical welding simulation, sensitivity analyses on thermomechanical models and parameters have been conducted. At the first step, we research a reference solution which gives the best agreement with the thermal and mechanical experimental results. The second step consists in determining through numerical simulations which parameters have the largest influence on residual stresses induced by the welding process. The residual stresses were predicted using finite element method performed with Code-Aster of EDF and SYSWELD of ESI-GROUP. An analysis of robustness can prove to be heavy and expensive making it an unjustifiable route. However, only with development such tool of analysis can predictive methods become a useful tool for industry. (author)

  10. FRICTION WELDING OF DISSIMILAR AISI 304 AND AISI 8640 STEELS

    OpenAIRE

    BATI, Serkan; KILIÇ, Musa; KIRIK, İhsan

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the joinability of AISI 8640 heat treatable steel and AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel combined with friction welding. These steels have completely different properties and widely used in industrial applications. Welding is applied on steels with the parameters of 1800 rev/min turning speed, 50 MPa friction pressure and 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 sec friction time by using continuously driven friction welding machine. After the welding process, tensile and hardness testing a...

  11. Investigation of the structure and properties of titanium-stainless steel permanent joints obtained by laser welding with the use of intermediate inserts and nanopowders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherepanov, A. N.; Orishich, A. M.; Pugacheva, N. B.; Shapeev, V. P.

    2015-03-01

    Results of an experimental study of the structure, the phase composition, and the mechanical properties of laser-welded joints of 3-mm thick titanium and 12Kh18N10T steel sheets obtained with the use of intermediate inserts and nanopowdered modifying additives are reported. It is shown that that such parameters as the speed of welding, the radiation power, and the laser-beam focal spot position all exert a substantial influence on the welding-bath process and on the seam structure formed. In terms of chemical composition, most uniform seams with the best mechanical strength are formed at a 1-m/min traverse speed of laser and 2.35-kW laser power, with the focus having been positioned at the lower surface of the sheets. Under all other conditions being identical, uplift of the focus to workpiece surface or to a higher position results in unsteady steel melting, in a decreased depth and reduced degree of the diffusion-induced mixing of elements, and in an interpolate connection formed according to the soldering mechanism in the root portion of the seam. The seam material is an over-saturated copper-based solid solution of alloying elements with homogeneously distributed intermetallic disperse particles (Ti(Fe, Cr)2 and TiCu3) contained in this alloy. Brittle fracture areas exhibiting cleavage and quasi-cleavage facets correspond to coarse Ti(Fe, Cr)2 intermetallic particles or to diffusion zones primarily occurring at the interface with the titanium alloy. The reported data and the conclusions drawn from the numerical calculations of the thermophysical processes of welding of 3-mm thick titanium and steel sheets through an intermediate copper insert are in qualitative agreement with the experimental data. The latter agreement points to adequacy of the numerical description of the melting processes of contacting materials versus welding conditions and focal-spot position in the system.

  12. HEAT INPUT AND POST WELD HEAT TREATMENT EFFECTS ON REDUCED-ACTIVATION FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEEL FRICTION STIR WELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Wei [ORNL; Chen, Gaoqiang [ORNL; Chen, Jian [ORNL; Yu, Xinghua [ORNL; Frederick, David Alan [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are an important class of structural materials for fusion reactor internals developed in recent years because of their improved irradiation resistance. However, they can suffer from welding induced property degradations. In this paper, a solid phase joining technology friction stir welding (FSW) was adopted to join a RAFM steel Eurofer 97 and different FSW parameters/heat input were chosen to produce welds. FSW response parameters, joint microstructures and microhardness were investigated to reveal relationships among welding heat input, weld structure characterization and mechanical properties. In general, FSW heat input results in high hardness inside the stir zone mostly due to a martensitic transformation. It is possible to produce friction stir welds similar to but not with exactly the same base metal hardness when using low power input because of other hardening mechanisms. Further, post weld heat treatment (PWHT) is a very effective way to reduce FSW stir zone hardness values.

  13. Truck frame welding reparation by steel covered electrodes with varied amount of Ni and Mo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz WĘGRZYN

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to study safety and exploitation conditions of weld steel structure reparation of car body truck frames. Car (auto body is the name given to the portion of an automobile which gives it shape. The work is a theoretical investigation and concentrates on structural integrity and vehicle safety after the reparation welding of truck frames. To study the effects of the frame flexibility and resistance, the truck frame has been welded by steel electrodes with varied amount of Ni and Mo. The most significant of factors influencing that conditions are connected with material choice, welding technology, state of stress and temperature. Because of that a good selection of steel and welding method is crucial to obtain proper steel structure. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW is a very popular method of welding used for car body reparation. Car body elements of higher durability are made of low carbon and low alloy steel, very often with small amount of carbon and the amount of alloy elements such as Ni, Mn, Mo, Cr, Ti, Al, V in low alloy steel and their welds. In the paper only the influence of the variable amounts of nickel, molybdenum on impact and fatigue properties of low alloy metal weld deposit was tested. The results show that there is good agreement between proper chemical composition of weld metal deposit (WMD and truck structure properties.

  14. Truck frame welding reparation by steel covered electrodes with varied amount of Ni and Mo

    OpenAIRE

    Tomasz WĘGRZYN; Michał MIROS; Damian HADRYŚ; Abilio Manuel Pereira da SILVA

    2010-01-01

    This paper attempts to study safety and exploitation conditions of weld steel structure reparation of car body truck frames. Car (auto) body is the name given to the portion of an automobile which gives it shape. The work is a theoretical investigation and concentrates on structural integrity and vehicle safety after the reparation welding of truck frames. To study the effects of the frame flexibility and resistance, the truck frame has been welded by steel electrodes with varied amount of Ni...

  15. Analysis of the Mechanism of Longitudinal Bending Deformation Due to Welding in a Steel Plate by Using a Numerical Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Rae; Yan, Jieshen; Kim, Jae-Woong [Yeungnam Univ., Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of); Song, Gyu Yeong [Gyeongbuk Hybrid Technology Institute, Yeongcheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Welding deformation is a permanent deformation that is caused in structures by welding heat. Welding distortion is the primary cause of reduced productivity, due to welded structural strength degradation, low dimensional accuracy, and appearance. As a result, research and numerous experiments are being carried out to control welding deformation. The aim of this study is to analyze the mechanism of longitudinal bending deformation due to welding. Welding experiments and numerical analyses were performed for this study. The welding experiments were performed on 4 mm and 8.5 mm thickness steel plates, and the numerical analysis was conducted on the welding deformation using the FE software MSC.marc.

  16. Strain-based design procedures for spiral-welded steel tubes in combined walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gresnigt, A.M.; van Es, S.H.J.; Vasilikis, D; Karamanos, SA; Dubina, D.; Ungureanu, V.

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the structural behaviour of large-diameter spiral-welded steel tubes under bending, a full scale experimental program has been performed, consisting of thirteen 42-inch diameter, spiral-welded steel tubes with D/t ratios ranging between 65 and 120. Additionally, numerical studies have

  17. Quality improvement of steel cast-welded constructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Аркадій Васильович Лоза

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Among the various types of metallurgical equipment there are structures which are welded compounds of a cast base and additional elements produced by casting or any other means. Such structures are called cast-welded constructions. Besides new working properties such constructions appear to be more efficient and provide better durability as compared to the similar structures produced by other industrial means. Meanwhile the advantages of the technology are not used in full. One reason is low quality of the compound products caused by lack of proper preparation of the elements to be welded and poor quality of the welds themselves. In the article the methods of quality production and the maintenance of steel cast-welded constructions have been considered. A ladle of a blast-furnace slag car is used as the subject of investigation and further testing of the mentioned above technologies. The ladle is a cast product. Under operating conditions, the ladle undergoes mechanical and thermal load, which results in deformation of its sides that deflect inside. To prevent the deflection stiffening ribs are welded onto the outer surface of the ladle. However, there may be casting defects in the base metal that could reduce the durability of the welds. It has been proved that welds on the unprepared cast base of the steel product cannot guarantee the combination’s durability and reliability. To prevent the influence of the casting defects it has been recommended to cover the base metal with one more metal layer before welding the elements on. Two-layer surfacing provides best result as the first layer serves for the weld penetration of the casting defects since this layer has a significant share of base metal therefore it is less malleable; the second layer is necessary for making the layer viscous enough. The viscous layer ensures the absence of sharp transition from the deposited metal to the base metal and increases the crack resistance of the weld. In

  18. Laser Welding of Ship Steel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brayton, W. C; Banas, C. M; Peters, G. T

    1979-01-01

    ... joint cleanliness and fitup conditions. In the current program, welds were formed between surfaces with nonperfect fitup, between plasma-cut surfaces, between surfaces deliberately mismatched to provide a varging joint gap and under out...

  19. Optimization of resistance spot welding parameters for microalloyed steel sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viňáš, Ján; Kaščák, Ľuboš; Greš, Miroslav

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents the results of resistance spot welding of hot-dip galvanized microalloyed steel sheets used in car body production. The spot welds were made with various welding currents and welding time values, but with a constant pressing force of welding electrodes. The welding current and welding time are the dominant characteristics in spot welding that affect the quality of spot welds, as well as their dimensions and load-bearing capacity. The load-bearing capacity of welded joints was evaluated by tensile test according to STN 05 1122 standard and dimensions and inner defects were evaluated by metallographic analysis by light optical microscope. Thewelding parameters of investigated microalloyed steel sheets were optimized for resistance spot welding on the pneumatic welding machine BPK 20.

  20. Experimental Study on Welded Headed Studs Used In Steel Plate-Concrete Composite Structures Compared with Contactless Method of Measuring Displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisała, Dawid; Tekieli, Marcin

    2017-10-01

    Steel plate-concrete composite structures are a new innovative design concept in which a thin steel plate is attached to the reinforced concrete beam by means of welded headed studs. The comparison between experimental studies and theoretical analysis of this type of structures shows that their behaviour is dependent on the load-slip relationship of the shear connectors used to ensure sufficient bond between the concrete and steel parts of the structure. The aim of this paper is to describe an experimental study on headed studs used in steel plate-concrete composite structures. Push-out tests were carried out to investigate the behaviour of shear connectors. The test specimens were prepared according to standard push-out tests, however, instead of I-beam, a steel plate 16 mm thick was used to better reflect the conditions in the real structure. The test specimens were produced in two batches using concrete with significantly different compressive strength. The experimental study was carried out on twelve specimens. Besides the traditional measurements based on LVDT sensors, optical measurements based on the digital image correlation method (DIC) and pattern tracking methods were used. DIC is a full-field contactless optical method for measuring displacements in experimental testing, based on the correlation of the digital images taken during test execution. With respect to conventional methods, optical measurements offer a wider scope of results and can give more information about the material or construction behaviour during the test. The ultimate load capacity and load-slip curves obtained from the experiments were compared with the values calculated based on Eurocodes, American and Chinese design specifications. It was observed that the use of the relationships developed for the traditional steel-concrete composite structures is justified in the case of ultimate load capacity of shear connectors in steel plate-concrete composite structures.

  1. Mechanical properties of welded joints of duplex steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawiak, M.; Nowacki, J.

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents the study results of mechanical properties of duplex steels UNS S31803 welded joints as well as duplex and NV A36 steels welded joints. They have ben welded by FCAW method in CO 2 using FCW 2205-H flux-cored wire. The joints have been subjected: tensile tests, impact tests, bending tests, hardness tests and metallographic investigations. The influence of welding parameters and mechanical properties of the joints was appreciated. The welding method assured high tensile strength of the joints (approximately 770 MPa) and high impact strength of the welds (approximately 770 J). All samples were broken outside of welds. (author)

  2. Design automation of the two-layered steels welding technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strel'tsov, A.I.

    2000-01-01

    Approach to the design process modeling of two-layered steels welding technology is presented. The area calculation formulas for main, transitive and cladding weld layers are derived. Realization methods of main tasks solved at design of technological processes for two-layered steels welding are described [ru

  3. Application of lap laser welding technology on stainless steel railway vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongxiao; Wang, Chunsheng; He, Guangzhong; Li, Wei; Liu, Liguo

    2016-10-01

    Stainless steel railway vehicles with so many advantages, such as lightweight, antirust, low cost of maintenance and simple manufacturing process, so the production of high level stainless steel railway vehicles has become the development strategy of European, American and other developed nations. The current stainless steel railway vehicles body and structure are usually assembled by resistance spot welding process. The weak points of this process are the poor surface quality and bad airtight due to the pressure of electrodes. In this study, the partial penetration lap laser welding process was investigated to resolve the problems, by controlling the laser to stop at the second plate in the appropriate penetration. The lap laser welding joint of stainless steel railway vehicle car body with partial penetration has higher strength and surface quality than those of resistance spot welding joint. The biggest problem of lap laser welding technology is to find the balance of the strength and surface quality with different penetrations. The mechanism of overlap laser welding of stainless steel, mechanical tests, microstructure analysis, the optimization of welding parameters, analysis of fatigue performance, the design of laser welding stainless steel railway vehicles structure and the development of non-destructive testing technology were systematically studied before lap laser welding process to be applied in manufacture of railway vehicles. The results of the experiments and study show that high-quality surface state and higher fatigue strength can be achieved by the partial penetration overlap laser welding of the side panel structure, and the structure strength of the car body can be higher than the requirements of En12663, the standard of structural requirements of railway vehicles bodies. Our company has produced the stainless steel subway and high way railway vehicles by using overlap laser welding technology. The application of lap laser welding will be a big

  4. Microgalvanic corrosion of laser-welded HSLA steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looi, Y.M.

    2008-01-01

    Laser welding of galvanized high strength low alloy (HSLA) steels leads to the evaporation of zinc at the weld and the formation of a heat-affected-zone (HAZ). High heat input due to welding generates macro galvanic coupling between the weld and the parent metal as well as micro galvanic corrosion

  5. Plasma spot welding of ferritic stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lešnjak, A.

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma spot welding of ferritic stainless steels is studied. The study was focused on welding parameters, plasma and shielding gases and the optimum welding equipment. Plasma-spot welded overlap joints on a 0.8 mm thick ferritic stainless steel sheet were subjected to a visual examination and mechanical testing in terms of tension-shear strength. Several macro specimens were prepared. Plasma spot welding is suitable to use the same gas as shielding gas and as plasma gas, i.e., a 98 % Ar/2 % H 2 gas mixture. Tension-shear strength of plasma-spot welded joints was compared to that of resistance-spot welded joints. It was found that the resistance welded joints withstand a somewhat stronger load than the plasma welded joints due to a larger weld spot diameter of the former. Strength of both types of welded joints is approximately the same.

    El artículo describe el proceso de soldeo de aceros inoxidables ferríticos por puntos con plasma. La investigación se centró en el establecimiento de los parámetros óptimos de la soldadura, la definición del gas de plasma y de protección más adecuado, así como del equipo óptimo para la realización de la soldadura. Las uniones de láminas de aceros inoxidables ferríticos de 0,8 mm de espesor, soldadas a solape por puntos con plasma, se inspeccionaron visualmente y se ensayaron mecánicamente mediante el ensayo de cizalladura por tracción. Se realizaron macro pulidos. Los resultados de la investigación demostraron que la solución más adecuada para el soldeo por puntos con plasma es elegir el mismo gas de plasma que de protección. Es decir, una mezcla de 98 % de argón y 2 % de hidrógeno. La resistencia a la cizalladura por tracción de las uniones soldadas por puntos con plasma fue comparada con la resistencia de las uniones soldadas por resistencia por puntos. Se llegó a la conclusión de que las uniones soldadas por resistencia soportan una carga algo mayor que la uniones

  6. Advanced Functions of a Modern Power Source for GMAW Welding of Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Kolařík

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the use of a modern welding power source equipped with advanced arc control functions. At the Laboratory of Welding Technologies of CTU in Prague we have focused on GMAW welding of steel using Sigma Galaxy, a modern welding power source produced by Migatronic. Sigma Galaxy is equipped with functions called Intelligent Arc Control and Sequence Repeat. According to the manufacturer, controlling an arc by these functions should significantly stabilize the welding process, lower the heat input and the deformation, and improve the weld quality. To evaluate the benefits of these functions completely, single V butt welds were performed on S275J2 structural steel 10 mm in thickness (2 weld layers: root+capping layer in PF and PG positions. Welding was monitored by the Welding Information System, and was compared with standard GMAW welding. The results have shown that these “intelligent” functions offer significant advantages for steel welding, especially in vertical and overhead positions, because they lower the heat input and improve the weld metal control.

  7. Studies on Fusion Welding of High Nitrogen Stainless Steel: Microstructure, Mechanical and corrosion Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Srinivasa Rao, K.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2018-03-01

    An attempt has been made in the present investigation to weld high nitrogen steel of 5mm thick plates using various process i.e., shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and autogenous electron beam welding (EBW) process. Present work is aimed at studying the microstructural changes and its effects on mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Microstructure is characterized by optical, scanning electron microscopy and electron back scattered diffraction technique. Vickers hardness, tensile properties, impact toughness and face bend ductility testing of the welds was carried out. Pitting corrosion resistance of welds was determined using potentio-dynamic polarization testing in 3.5%NaCl solution. Results of the present investigation established that SMA welds made using Cr-Mn-N electrode were observed to have a austenite dendritic grain structure in the weld metal and is having poor mechanical properties but good corrosion resistance. GTA welds made using 18Ni (MDN 250) filler wire were observed to have a reverted austenite in martensite matrix of the weld metal and formation of unmixed zone at the fusion boundary which resulted in better mechanical properties and poor corrosion resistance. Fine grains and uniform distribution of delta ferrite in the austenite matrix and narrow width of weld zone are observed in autogeneous electron beam welds. A good combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance was achieved for electron beam welds of high nitrogen steel when compared to SMA and GTA welds.

  8. Welding of nickel free high nitrogen stainless steel: Microstructure and mechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffi Mohammed

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available High nitrogen stainless steel (HNS is a nickel free austenitic stainless steel that is used as a structural component in defence applications for manufacturing battle tanks as a replacement of the existing armour grade steel owing to its low cost, excellent mechanical properties and better corrosion resistance. Conventional fusion welding causes problems like nitrogen desorption, solidification cracking in weld zone, liquation cracking in heat affected zone, nitrogen induced porosity and poor mechanical properties. The above problems can be overcome by proper selection and procedure of joining process. In the present work, an attempt has been made to correlate the microstructural changes with mechanical properties of fusion and solid state welds of high nitrogen steel. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW, gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW, electron beam welding (EBW and friction stir welding (FSW processes were used in the present work. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction were used to characterize microstructural changes. Hardness, tensile and bend tests were performed to evaluate the mechanical properties of welds. The results of the present investigation established that fully austenitic dendritic structure was found in welds of SMAW. Reverted austenite pools in the martensite matrix in weld zone and unmixed zones near the fusion boundary were observed in GTA welds. Discontinuous ferrite network in austenite matrix was observed in electron beam welds. Fine recrystallized austenite grain structure was observed in the nugget zone of friction stir welds. Improved mechanical properties are obtained in friction stir welds when compared to fusion welds. This is attributed to the refined microstructure consisting of equiaxed and homogenous austenite grains.

  9. Appropriate welding conditions of temper bead weld repair for SQV2A pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, R.; Matsuda, F.; Brziak, P.; Lomozik, M.

    2004-01-01

    Temper bead welding technique is one of the most important repair welding methods for large structures for which it is difficult to perform the specified post weld heat treatment. In this study, appropriate temper bead welding conditions to improve the characteristics of heat affected zone (HAZ) are studied using pressure vessel steel SQV2A corresponding to ASTM A533 Type B Class 1. Thermal/mechanical simulator is employed to give specimens welding thermal cycles from single to quadruple cycle. Charpy absorbed energy and hardness of simulated CGHAZ by first cycle were degraded as compared with base metal. Improvability of these degradations by subsequent cycles is discussed and appropriate temper bead thermal cycles are clarified. When the peak temperature lower than Ac1 and near Ac1 in the second thermal cycle is applied to CGAHZ by first thermal cycle, the characteristics of CGHAZ improve enough. When the other peak temperatures (that is, higher than Ac1) in the second thermal cycle are applied to the CGHAZ, third or more thermal cycle temper bead process should be applied to improve the properties. Appropriate weld condition ranges are selected based on the above results. The validity of the selected ranges is verified by the temper bead welding test. (orig.)

  10. Segregation effects in welded stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhter, J.I.; Shoaid, K.A.; Ahmed, M.; Malik, A.Q.

    1987-01-01

    Welding of steels causes changes in the microstructure and chemical composition which could adversely affect the mechanical and corrosion properties. The report describes the experimental results of an investigation of segregation effects in welded austenitic stainless steels of AISI type 304, 304L, 316 and 316L using the techniques of scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis. Considerable enhancement of chromium and carbon has been observed in certain well-defined zones on the parent metal and on composition, particularly in the parent metal, in attributed to the formation of (M 23 C 6 ) precipitates. The formation of geometrically well-defined segregation zones is explained on the basis of the time-temperature-precipitation curve of (M 23 C 6 ). (author)

  11. Mechanical properties and microstructures of the welded union of steel micro-alloyed to niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bejar-Gomez, L; Medina-Flores, A; Bedolla-Jacuinde, A; Alfonso, I; Saavedra, M

    2006-01-01

    Experimental structural steel was used for this work, produced by welding and thermo-mechanical treatment, micro-alloyed with niobium and developed for structural applications. Its carbon content was 0.06 and niobium 0.03 weight %. This material was welded by electrical arc and manually by coated electrode, since it is a widely used application. The chemical composition of the steel, its resistance, the selection of the supporting material, and the position of the welding were taken into consideration. The welded union includes all the parts involved with the welding such as the welding metal or support, the thermally affected zone and the base material with no affects. The metallurgy for each part is associated with the type of material, with the welding process applied and with its procedure. This work analyzes the mechanical properties of the welded union of a steel micro-alloyed with niobium, and also studies the microstructure of the union in the sediment metal, in the thermally affected zone and in the base material. The importance of this work lies in establishing the facility or difficulty of an experimental steel micro-alloyed with niobium, containing 0.06% carbon, to avoid outlining or cracking in the welded union. Another basic aspect was to valuate the mechanical properties of the base metal and of the sediment, reinforcing the study with an analysis of the hardness profiles and of the microstructures found in the parts of the welded union (CW)

  12. Overall Stability of Welded Q460GJ Steel Box Columns: Experimental Study and Numerical Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou Xiong; Kang Shao Bo; Yang Bo

    2017-01-01

    To date, high-performance structural steel has been widely used for columns in construction practices due to its significant advantages over conventional steel. However, the same design approach with conventional steel columns is still adopted in the design of high-performance steel columns. As a result, its superior properties cannot be fully considered in design. This paper conducts a test and finite element analysis on the overall stability behaviour of welded Q460GJ steel box columns. In ...

  13. Microstructure and mechanical properties of weld-bonded and resistance spot welded magnesium-to-steel dissimilar joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, W.; Chen, D.L.; Liu, L.; Mori, H.; Zhou, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Adhesive reduces shrinkage porosity and stress concentration around the weld nugget. ► Adhesive promotes the formation of intermetallic compounds during weld bonding. ► In Mg/steel joints fusion zone appears only at the Mg side with dendritic structures. ► Weld-bonded Mg/steel joints are considerably stronger than RSW Mg/steel joints. ► Fatigue strength is three-fold higher for weld-bonded joints than for RSW joints. - Abstract: The aim of this study was to evaluate microstructures, tensile and fatigue properties of weld-bonded (WB) magnesium-to-magnesium (Mg/Mg) similar joints and magnesium-to-steel (Mg/steel) dissimilar joints, in comparison with resistance spot welded (RSW) Mg/steel dissimilar joints. In the WB Mg/Mg joints, equiaxed dendritic and divorced eutectic structures formed in the fusion zone (FZ). In the dissimilar joints of RSW and WB Mg/steel, FZ appeared only at Mg side with equiaxed and columnar dendrites. At steel side no microstructure changed in the WB Mg/steel joints, while the microstructure in the RSW Mg/steel joints consisted of lath martensite, bainite, pearlite and retained austenite leading to an increased microhardness. The relatively low cooling rate suppressed the formation of shrinkage porosity but promoted the formation of MgZn 2 and Mg 7 Zn 3 in the WB Mg/steel joints. The added adhesive layer diminished stress concentration around the weld nugget. Both WB Mg/Mg and Mg/steel joints were significantly stronger than RSW Mg/steel joints in terms of the maximum tensile shear load and energy absorption, which also increased with increasing strain rate. Fatigue strength was three-fold higher for WB Mg/Mg and Mg/steel joints than for RSW Mg/steel joints. Fatigue failure in the RSW Mg/steel joints occurred from the heat-affected zone near the notch root at lower load levels, and in the mode of interfacial fracture at higher load levels, while it occurred in the Mg base metal at a maximum cyclic load up to ∼10 kN in

  14. Influence of stress relieve heat treatment on fatigue crack propagation in structural steel resistant to atmospheric corrosion welded joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Geraldo de Paula; Villela, Jefferson Jose; Rabello, Emerson Giovani [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mails: gpm@cdtn.br; jjv@cdtn.br; egr@cdtn.br; Cimini Junior, Carlos Alberto[Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica]. E-mail: cimini@demet.ufmg.br; Godefroid, Leonardo Barbosa [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Metalurgia]. E-mails: leonardo@demet.em.ufop.br

    2007-07-01

    In this work, the influence of stress relieve heat treatment (SRHT) on the fatigue crack propagation in USI-SAC 50 structural welded joints at the heat affected zone (HAZ) region was studied. Hardness measurements before and after the SRHT were made and crack propagation tests in specimens as welded (AW) and in specimens that were submitted to SRHT, which were accomplished. A reduction in hardness at the regions of HAZ and melted zone (MZ) after the SRHT were observed. It were also verified that the crack propagation rates (da/dN) versus DK on the specimens AW presented regions of retardation on the crack propagation rate, and in the specimens that were submitted to SRHT the crack propagation rate were homogeneous. (author)

  15. Application of activating flux to nonconsumable electrode argon-arc welding of the Kh18N9T stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demin, E.A.; Khramushin, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    Results of experimental introduction of mechanized argon-arc welding of Kh18N9T stainless steel structures with a nonmelted electrode using activating fluxes are given. The application of the new welding technique during the fabrication and erection of equipment assemblies of nuclear power stations permits to increase labour productivity and welded joint quality; to expand the range of metal thickness welded in one operation with complete edge melting; to diminish the deposited weld metal consumption, protective gas and electric energy

  16. Pulsed Magnetic Welding for Advanced Core and Cladding Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Guoping [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Yang, Yong [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2013-12-19

    To investigate a solid-state joining method, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW), for welding the advanced core and cladding steels to be used in Generation IV systems, with a specific application for fuel pin end-plug welding. As another alternative solid state welding technique, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW) has not been extensively explored on the advanced steels. The resultant weld can be free from microstructure defects (pores, non-metallic inclusions, segregation of alloying elements). More specifically, the following objectives are to be achieved: 1. To design a suitable welding apparatus fixture, and optimize welding parameters for repeatable and acceptable joining of the fuel pin end-plug. The welding will be evaluated using tensile tests for lap joint weldments and helium leak tests for the fuel pin end-plug; 2 Investigate the microstructural and mechanical properties changes in PMW weldments of proposed advanced core and cladding alloys; 3. Simulate the irradiation effects on the PWM weldments using ion irradiation.

  17. Pulsed Magnetic Welding for Advanced Core and Cladding Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Guoping; Yang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    To investigate a solid-state joining method, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW), for welding the advanced core and cladding steels to be used in Generation IV systems, with a specific application for fuel pin end-plug welding. As another alternative solid state welding technique, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW) has not been extensively explored on the advanced steels. The resultant weld can be free from microstructure defects (pores, non-metallic inclusions, segregation of alloying elements). More specifically, the following objectives are to be achieved: 1. To design a suitable welding apparatus fixture, and optimize welding parameters for repeatable and acceptable joining of the fuel pin end-plug. The welding will be evaluated using tensile tests for lap joint weldments and helium leak tests for the fuel pin end-plug; 2 Investigate the microstructural and mechanical properties changes in PMW weldments of proposed advanced core and cladding alloys; 3. Simulate the irradiation effects on the PWM weldments using ion irradiation.

  18. Friction Welding of Aluminium and Aluminium Alloys with Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Ambroziak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents our actual knowledge and experience in joining dissimilar materials with the use of friction welding method. The joints of aluminium and aluminium alloys with the different types of steel were studied. The structural effects occurring during the welding process were described. The mechanical properties using, for example, (i microhardness measurements, (ii tensile tests, (iii bending tests, and (iv shearing tests were determined. In order to obtain high-quality joints the influence of different configurations of the process such as (i changing the geometry of bonding surface, (ii using the interlayer, or (iii heat treatment was analyzed. Finally, the issues related to the selection of optimal parameters of friction welding process were also investigated.

  19. Laser welding of maraging steel rocket motor casing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Rooyen, C

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This presentation looks at the experimental procedure and results of laser welding of maraging steel rocker motor casing. It concludes that a fracture occurred in weld metal of autogenous welding and that a fracture occurred in base material when...

  20. Effect of Weld Schedule on the Residual Stress Distribution of Boron Steel Spot Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raath, N. D.; Norman, D.; McGregor, I.; Dashwood, R.; Hughes, D. J.

    2017-06-01

    Press-hardened boron steel has been utilized in anti-intrusion systems in automobiles, providing high strength and weight-saving potential through gage reduction. Boron steel spot welds exhibit a soft heat-affected zone which is surrounded by a hard nugget and outlying base material. This soft zone reduces the strength of the weld and makes it susceptible to failure. Additionally, different welding regimes lead to significantly different hardness distributions, making failure prediction difficult. Boron steel sheets, welded with fixed and adaptive schedules, were characterized. These are the first experimentally determined residual stress distributions for boron steel resistance spot welds which have been reported. Residual strains were measured using neutron diffraction, and the hardness distributions were measured on the same welds. Additionally, similar measurements were performed on spot welded DP600 steel as a reference material. A correspondence between residual stress and hardness profiles was observed for all welds. A significant difference in material properties was observed between the fixed schedule and adaptively welded boron steel samples, which could potentially lead to a difference in failure loads between the two boron steel welds.

  1. Welding of Thin Steel Plates by Hybrid Welding Process Combined TIG Arc with YAG Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taewon; Suga, Yasuo; Koike, Takashi

    TIG arc welding and laser welding are used widely in the world. However, these welding processes have some advantages and problems respectively. In order to improve problems and make use of advantages of the arc welding and the laser welding processes, hybrid welding process combined the TIG arc with the YAG laser was studied. Especially, the suitable welding conditions for thin steel plate welding were investigated to obtain sound weld with beautiful surface and back beads but without weld defects. As a result, it was confirmed that the shot position of the laser beam is very important to obtain sound welds in hybrid welding. Therefore, a new intelligent system to monitor the welding area using vision sensor is constructed. Furthermore, control system to shot the laser beam to a selected position in molten pool, which is formed by TIG arc, is constructed. As a result of welding experiments using these systems, it is confirmed that the hybrid welding process and the control system are effective on the stable welding of thin stainless steel plates.

  2. Microstructure characterization of Friction Stir Spot Welded TRIP steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Trine Colding; Adachi, Yoshitaka; Peterson, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels have not yet been successfully joined by any welding technique. It is desirable to search for a suitable welding technique that opens up for full usability of TRIP steels. In this study, the potential of joining TRIP steel with Friction Stir Spot...... Welding (FSSW) is investigated. The aim of the study is to investigate whether acceptable welds can be produced, and additionally, to obtain an understanding of the microstructural changes during welding. The microstructure was investigated with a combination of microscopical techniques with the aim...... of identifying the transformations occurring during welding. Reflected light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and electron backscatter diffraction were among the methods applied for detailed investigations. The microstructure adjacent to the welds can generally be subdivided in two thermo...

  3. Microstructure Evolution during Friction Stir Spot Welding of TRIP steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Trine Colding

    and thereby reduced weight of the vehicles. One of the limitations for the wide application of TRIP steel is associated with joining, since so far no method has succeeded in joining TRIP steel, without comprising the steel properties. In this study, the potential of joining TRIP steel with Friction Stir Spot...... Welding (FSSW) is investigated. The aim of the study is to assess whether high quality welds can be produced and, in particular, to obtain an understanding of the microstructural changes during welding. The microstructure of the welded samples was investigated by means of reflected light microscopy......, scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. Microhardness measurements and lab-shear tests completed the investigations of the welded samples and allow evaluation of the quality of the welds as seen from a practical point of view. Selected samples were also investigated by X...

  4. The fracture toughness of Type 316 steel and weld metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picker, C.

    This paper describes the results of fracture toughness tests on Type 316 steel and Manual Metal Arc (MMA) weld metal over a range of temperatures from 20 deg. C to 550 deg. C, and includes the effects on toughness of specimen size, post weld heat treatment and thermal ageing. The conclusions reached are that Type 316 steel possesses a superior toughness to the weld metal in the as-welded or stress relieved conditions but the toughness of the steel is degraded to a level similar to that of the weld metal following thermal ageing at temperatures over 600 deg. C. Relatively short term thermal ageing in the temperature range 370 deg. C to 450 deg. C does not appear to affect the toughness of either Type 316 steel or weld metal. (author)

  5. Solidification cracking in austenitic stainless steel welds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Solidification cracking is a significant problem during the welding of austenitic stainless steels, particularly in fully austenitic and stabilized compositions. Hot cracking in stainless steel welds is caused by low-melting eutectics containing impurities such as S, P and alloy elements such as Ti, Nb. The WRC-92 diagram can be ...

  6. Underwater Wet Repair Welding of API 5L X65M Pipeline Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Rogalski Grzegorz; Fydrych Dariusz; Łabanowski Jerzy

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents results of the research of effect of polymer insulation of pipeline made of API 5L X65M steel as well as underwater wet welding parameters on properties of joints made by covered electrodes. Effect of heat input on structure and hardness of joints during repair of underwater pipeline was analyzed. Welding defects like microcracks, micro-lacks of fusion, slag inclusions, as well as HAZ hardness increase over an assumed acceptance criterion for welded joints in pipes without...

  7. Investigation of defect rate of lap laser welding of stainless steel railway vehicles car body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongxiao

    2015-02-01

    In order to resolve the disadvantages such as poor appearance quality, poor tightness, low efficiency of resistance spot welding of stainless steel rail vehicles, partial penetration lap laser welding process was investigated widely. But due to the limitation of processing technology, there will be local incomplete fusion in the lap laser welding seam. Defect rate is the ratio of the local incomplete fusion length to the weld seam length. The tensile shear strength under different defect rate and its effect on the car body static strength are not clear. It is necessary to find the biggest defect rate by numerical analysis of effects of different defect rates on the laser welding stainless steel rail vehicle body structure strength ,and tests of laser welding shear tensile strength.

  8. Carbide-Free Bainitic Weld Metal: A New Concept in Welding of Armor Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Murthy, N.; Janaki Ram, G. D.; Murty, B. S.; Reddy, G. M.; Rao, T. J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Carbide-free bainite, a fine mixture of bainitic ferrite and austenite, is a relatively recent development in steel microstructures. Apart from being very strong and tough, the microstructure is hydrogen-tolerant. These characteristics make it well-suited for weld metals. In the current work, an armor-grade quenched and tempered steel was welded such that the fusion zone developed a carbide-free bainitic microstructure. These welds showed very high joint efficiency and ballistic performance compared to those produced, as per the current industrial practice, using austenitic stainless steel fillers. Importantly, these welds showed no vulnerability to cold cracking, as verified using oblique Y-groove tests. The concept of carbide-free bainitic weld metal thus promises many useful new developments in welding of high-strength steels.

  9. Microstructures and mechanical properties of magnesium alloy and stainless steel weld-joint made by friction stir lap welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Yanni; Li, Jinglong; Xiong, Jiangtao; Huang, Fu; Zhang, Fusheng

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → Friction stir lap welding technology with cutting pin was successfully employed to form lap joint of magnesium and steel. → The cutting pin made the lower steel participate in deformation and the interface was no longer flat. → A saw-toothed structure formed due to a mechanical mixing of the magnesium and steel was found at the interface. → A high-strength joint was produced which fractured in the magnesium side. -- Abstract: Friction stir lap welding was conducted on soft/hard metals. A welding tool was designed with a cutting pin of rotary burr made of tungsten carbide, which makes the stirring pin possible to penetrate and cut the surface layer of the hard metal. Magnesium alloy AZ31 and stainless steel SUS302 were chosen as soft/hard base metals. The structures of the joining interface were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The joining strength was evaluated by tensile shear test. The results showed that flower-like interfacial morphologies were presented with steel flashes and scraps, which formed bonding mechanisms of nail effect by long steel flashes, zipper effect by saw-tooth structure and metallurgical bonding. The shear strength of the lap joint falls around the shear strength of butt joint of friction stir welded magnesium alloy.

  10. Post-irradiation tensile, creep and creep rupture data of DIN 1.4948 steel weld metal, heat-affected zones and welded joints of the SNR-300 permanent primary structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaaf, B. van der.

    1987-01-01

    DIN 1.4948 (Type 304) austenitic stainless steel has been tested for use in the SNR-300. Full weld metal specimens from a wide groove weld have been subjected to tensile and creep tests in as-deposited and stress-relieved condition. Heat-affected zones were simulated in full size standard specimens by subjecting raw cylinders to temperature cycles representative for the heat-affected zone (HAZ). The welded joints were taken from qualification welds from components, such as reactor vessel and core shield, built for the SNR-300. Half of all the specimens were irradiated in the HFR, Petten at 823 K submerged in sodium to a total neutron fluence, representative for end of life fluences of SNR-300 reactor vessel and shield tank. The tensile and creep properties of as-deposited and stress-relieved weld metal are not affected by the neutron irradiation. The stress relief treatment of 3 h at 1175 K improves both tensile and creep ductility, without affecting strength too much, by reducing the dislocation density in weld metal and HAZ and coarsening the carbides in weld metal. The HAZ shows a pronounced decrease in post-irradiation tensile ductility, strength, creep strength and ductility. Ductility of weld metal can be improved by stress-relieving and adapting the chemical composition of the filler metal. In order to prevent the HAZ to become the weakest link of a welded joint after irradiation grain growth and boron precipitation on grain boundaries must be suppressed. Low heat input welding techniques such as electron beam welding and automated gas metal arc welding might offer a solution for HAZ post-irradiation embrittlement. 144 figs.; 20 refs.; 45 tables

  11. Variant selection of martensites in steel welded joints with low transformation temperature weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Masaru; Yasuda, Hiroyuki Y.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We examined the variant selection of martensites in the weld metals. ► We also measured the residual stress developed in the butt and box welded joints. ► 24 martensite variants were randomly selected in the butt welded joint. ► High tensile residual stress in the box welded joint led to the strong variant selection. ► We discussed the rule of the variant selection focusing on the residual stress. -- Abstract: Martensitic transformation behavior in steel welded joints with low transformation temperature weld (LTTW) metal was examined focusing on the variant selection of martensites. The butt and box welded joints were prepared with LTTW metals and 980 MPa grade high strength steels. The residual stress of the welded joints, which was measured by a neutron diffraction technique, was effectively reduced by the expansion of the LTTW metals by the martensitic transformation during cooling after the welding process. In the LTTW metals, the retained austenite and martensite phases have the Kurdjumov–Sachs (K–S) orientation relationship. The variant selection of the martensites in the LTTW metals depended strongly on the type of welded joints. In the butt welded joint, 24 K–S variants were almost randomly selected while a few variants were preferentially chosen in the box welded joint. This suggests that the high residual stress developed in the box welded joint accelerated the formation of specific variants during the cooling process, in contrast to the butt welded joint with low residual stress

  12. Underwater Wet Repair Welding of API 5L X65M Pipeline Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogalski Grzegorz

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of the research of effect of polymer insulation of pipeline made of API 5L X65M steel as well as underwater wet welding parameters on properties of joints made by covered electrodes. Effect of heat input on structure and hardness of joints during repair of underwater pipeline was analyzed. Welding defects like microcracks, micro-lacks of fusion, slag inclusions, as well as HAZ hardness increase over an assumed acceptance criterion for welded joints in pipes without anticorrosion polymer insulation, were identified. A significant effect of polimer insulation on structure and properties of welded joints, was found.

  13. Fatigue behavior of welded austenitic stainless steel in different environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.S. Yawas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The fatigue behavior of welded austenitic stainless steel in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid and wet steam corrosive media has been investigated. The immersion time in the corrosive media was 30 days to simulate the effect on stainless steel structures/equipment in offshore and food processing applications and thereafter annealing heat treatment was carried out on the samples. The findings from the fatigue tests show that seawater specimens have a lower fatigue stress of 0.5 × 10−5 N/mm2 for the heat treated sample and 0.1 × 10−5 N/mm2 for the unheat-treated sample compared to the corresponding hydrochloric acid and steam samples. The post-welding heat treatment was found to increase the mechanical properties of the austenitic stainless steel especially tensile strength but it reduces the transformation and thermal stresses of the samples. These findings were further corroborated by the microstructural examination of the stainless steel specimen.

  14. Structural degradation of heterogeneous welded joints

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Schmidová; Petr Hanus

    2012-01-01

    Developing the techniques of welding materials with higher dynamic strength onto the rolling surfaces of rails is one of the options for increasing their operational endurance. The subject of this paper is an analyses of heterogeneous weld interfaces experimentally manufactured by welding medium-carbon austenitic steels onto high-carbon unalloyed pearlitic steels. The analyses focus on examinations of the marginal mixing of the materials at the weld interface and the circumstances under which...

  15. Effect of Weld Current on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of a Resistance Spot-Welded TWIP Steel Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumin Tutar

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study the effect of the weld current on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a resistance spot-welded twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP steel sheet was investigated using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy–electron back-scattered diffraction (SEM–EBSD, microhardness measurements, a tensile shear test and fractography. Higher weld currents promoted the formation of a macro expulsion cavity in the fusion zone. Additionally, higher weld currents led to a higher indentation depth, a wider heat-affected zone (HAZ, coarser grain structure and thicker annealing twins in the HAZ, and a relatively equiaxed dendritic structure in the centre of the fusion zone. The hardness values in the weld zone were lower than that of the base metal. The lowest hardness values were observed in the HAZ. No strong relationship was observed between the hardness values in the weld zone and the weld current. A higher joint strength, tensile deformation and failure energy absorption capacity were obtained with a weld current of 12 kA, a welding time of 300 ms and an electrode force of 3 kN. A complex fracture surface with both brittle and limited ductile manner was observed in the joints, while the base metal exhibited a ductile fracture. Joints with a higher tensile shear load (TSL commonly exhibited more brittle fracture characteristics.

  16. Studies on the Parametric Effects of Plasma Arc Welding of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selva Bharathi, R.; Siva Shanmugam, N.; Murali Kannan, R.; Arungalai Vendan, S.

    2018-03-01

    This research study attempts to create an optimized parametric window by employing Taguchi algorithm for Plasma Arc Welding (PAW) of 2 mm thick 2205 duplex stainless steel. The parameters considered for experimentation and optimization are the welding current, welding speed and pilot arc length respectively. The experimentation involves the parameters variation and subsequently recording the depth of penetration and bead width. Welding current of 60-70 A, welding speed of 250-300 mm/min and pilot arc length of 1-2 mm are the range between which the parameters are varied. Design of experiments is used for the experimental trials. Back propagation neural network, Genetic algorithm and Taguchi techniques are used for predicting the bead width, depth of penetration and validated with experimentally achieved results which were in good agreement. Additionally, micro-structural characterizations are carried out to examine the weld quality. The extrapolation of these optimized parametric values yield enhanced weld strength with cost and time reduction.

  17. TIG-dressing of high strength steel butt welded connections - Part 1: weld toe geometry and local hardness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Es, S.H.J. van; Kolstein, M.H.; Pijpers, R.J.M.; Bijlaard, F.S.K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of extensive measurements on weld toe geometry of as-welded and TIG-dressed butt welded connections in high strength steels S460, S690 and very high strength steels S890 and S1100. Descriptions of the measurement techniques and data analysis are presented. Four weld

  18. TIG-dressing of High Strength Steel Butt Welded Connections. Part 1 : Weld Toe Geometry and Local Hardness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Es, S.H.J.; Kolstein, M.H.; Pijpers, R.J.M.; Bijlaard, F.S.K.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of extensive measurements on weld toe geometry of as-welded and TIG-dressed butt welded connections in high strength steels S460, S690 and very high strength steels S890 and S1100. Descriptions of the measurement techniques and data analysis are presented. Four weld

  19. Finite element thermal analysis of the fusion welding of a P92 steel pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Yaghi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Fusion welding is common in steel pipeline construction in fossil-fuel power generation plants. Steel pipes in service carry steam at high temperature and pressure, undergoing creep during years of service; their integrity is critical for the safe operation of a plant. The high-grade martensitic P92 steel is suitable for plant pipes for its enhanced creep strength. P92 steel pipes are usually joined together with a similar weld metal. Martensitic pipes are sometimes joined to austenitic steel pipes using nickel based weld consumables. Welding involves severe thermal cycles, inducing residual stresses in the welded structure, which, without post weld heat treatment (PWHT, can be detrimental to the integrity of the pipes. Welding residual stresses can be numerically simulated by applying the finite element (FE method in Abaqus. The simulation consists of a thermal analysis, determining the temperature history of the FE model, followed by a sequentially-coupled structural analysis, predicting residual stresses from the temperature history.

    In this paper, the FE thermal analysis of the arc welding of a typical P92 pipe is presented. The two parts of the P92 steel pipe are joined together using a dissimilar material, made of Inconel weld consumables, producing a multi-pass butt weld from 36 circumferential weld beads. Following the generation of the FE model, the FE mesh is controlled using Model Change in Abaqus to activate the weld elements for each bead at a time corresponding to weld deposition. The thermal analysis is simulated by applying a distributed heat flux to the model, the accuracy of which is judged by considering the fusion zones in both the parent pipe as well as the deposited weld metal. For realistic fusion zones, the heat flux must be prescribed in the deposited weld pass and also the adjacent pipe elements. The FE thermal results are validated by comparing experimental temperatures measured by five thermocouples on the

  20. Weld failure analysis of 2205 duplex stainless steel nozzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingqiang Yang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Failure analyses of weld joint between the nozzle and the head of the reactor made of 2205 duplex stainless steel was performed by optical microscopy (OM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Cracks were found in HAZ of the weld. The depth of the cracks is equal to the thickness of the inner weld. Localized uneven distribution of ferrite/austenite with 80–90% ferrite in weld is found. Results show that the cracks occurred along columnar granular with cleavage fracture. Poor weld process probably results in these cracks.

  1. Weld failure analysis of 2205 duplex stainless steel nozzle

    OpenAIRE

    Jingqiang Yang; Qiongqi Wang; Zhongkun Wei; Kaishu Guan

    2014-01-01

    Failure analyses of weld joint between the nozzle and the head of the reactor made of 2205 duplex stainless steel was performed by optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Cracks were found in HAZ of the weld. The depth of the cracks is equal to the thickness of the inner weld. Localized uneven distribution of ferrite/austenite with 80–90% ferrite in weld is found. Results show that the cracks occurred along columnar granular with cleavage fracture. Poor weld process pr...

  2. Microstructure, Texture, and Mechanical Property Analysis of Gas Metal Arc Welded AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Saptarshi; Mukherjee, Manidipto; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2015-03-01

    The present study elaborately explains the effect of welding parameters on the microstructure, texture, and mechanical properties of gas metal arc welded AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel sheet (as received) of 4 mm thickness. The welded joints were prepared by varying welding speed (WS) and current simultaneously at a fixed heat input level using a 1.2-mm-diameter austenitic filler metal (AISI 316L). The overall purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the variation of welding conditions on: (i) Microstructural constituents using optical microscope and transmission electron microscope; (ii) Micro-texture evolution, misorientation distributions, and grain boundaries at welded regions by measuring the orientation data from electron back scattered diffraction; and (iii) Mechanical properties such as hardness and tensile strength, and their correlation with the microstructure and texture. It has been observed that the higher WS along with the higher welding current (weld metal W1) can enhance weld metal mechanical properties through alternation in microstructure and texture of the weld metal. Higher δ-ferrite formation and high-angle boundaries along with the + grain growth direction of the weld metal W1 were responsible for dislocation pile-ups, SFs, deformation twinning, and the induced martensite with consequent strain hardening during tensile deformation. Also, fusion boundary being the weakest link in the welded structure, failure took place mainly at this region.

  3. Evaluation of High Temperature Properties and Microstructural Characterization of Resistance Spot Welded Steel Lap Shear Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, R. K.; Anil Kumar, V.; Panicker, Paul G.

    2016-02-01

    Joining of thin sheets (0.5 mm) of stainless steel 304 and 17-4PH through resistance spot welding is highly challenging especially when joint is used for high temperature applications. Various combinations of stainless steel sheets of thickness 0.5 mm are spot welded and tested at room temperature as well as at high temperatures (800 K, 1,000 K, 1,200 K). Parent metal as well as spot welded joints are tested and characterized. It is observed that joint strength of 17-4PH steel is highest and then dissimilar steel joint of 17-4PH with SS-304 is moderate and of SS-304 is lowest at all the temperatures. Joint strength of 17-4PH steel is found to be >80% of parent metal properties up to 1,000 K then drastic reduction in strength is noted at 1,200 K. Gradual reduction in strength of SS-304 joint with increase in temperature from 800 to 1,200 K is noted. At 1,200 K, joint strength of all combinations of joints is found to be nearly same. Microstructural evaluation of weld nugget after testing at different temperatures shows presence of tempered martensite in 17-4PH containing welds and homogenized structure in stainless steel 304 weld.

  4. Characterization of Stainless Steel Welding Fume Particles : Influence of Stainless Steel Grade, Welding Parameters and Particle Size

    OpenAIRE

    Mei, Nanxuan

    2016-01-01

    Welding is a widely used method to join two pieces of stainless steel. Since it produces a large amount of fume during the process, it can cause adverse health effects. The welding fume particles contain many elements. Among them Cr, Mn and Ni are of concern. These three elements can cause diseases if inhaled by humans, especially Cr(VI). In this project, welding fume particles are collected during welding of different stainless steel grades (austenitic AISI 304L and duplex LDX2101). Furtherm...

  5. Effect of Single and Double Pass Arc Welding on HAZ of High Carbon Steel Weldments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Abdul Hasan Atiyah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of heat affected zone width for multi high carbon steel joint in case of single and double pass arc welded have been studied. These measurements are carried out in accompanying of hardness and microstructural observations. Knowing that, high carbon steel has a poor weld ability and most of welding processes are carried out for repairing components. It is found that a preheating was a very important parameter in identifying the width of heat-affected zone. Preheating the joint at 450°C was found to gives less width heat affected zone (i.e.5.93mm in the case of single pass welding practices. While, in the case of double pass welding, the heat affected zone becomes wider because the excessive heating during welding cycle. The double pass welding has coarsening the structure of first pass. Microscopic observations indicated that the structure of HAZ of high carbon steel was mainly lath martensite (ML under the condition of lower weld heat input. 

  6. Microstructure-property relationship in microalloyed high-strength steel welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lei

    2017-04-01

    High-strength steels are favoured materials in the industry for production of safe and sustainable structures. The main technology used for joining the components of such steel is fusion welding. Steel alloy design concepts combined with advanced processing technologies have been extensively investigated during the development of High-Strength Low-Alloy (HSLA) steels. However, very few studies have addressed the issue of how various alloy designs, even with limited microalloy addition, can influence the properties of high-strength steel welds. In high-strength steel welding practices, the challenges regarding microstructure evolution and the resulting mechanical properties variation, are of great interest. The main focus is the debate regarding the role of microalloy elements on phase transformation and weld performance. Limited Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) softening and limited austenite grain coarsening are significant design essentials, but the primary goal is to ensure excellent toughness and tensile properties in the steel weld. To achieve this purpose, microalloy elements such as Ti, Nb, or V were intentionally added to modern high-strength steels. The focus of this work was to understand the mechanical properties of HSLA steels resulting from differences in alloy design after joining by modern welding processes. To begin, three microalloyed S690QL steels (Nb, Ti, and Ti+V addition) were investigated. Optical microscopy confirmed that similar mixtures of tempered bainite and martensite predominated the parent microstructure in the three steels, different types of coarse microalloy precipitates were also visible. These precipitates were analysed by using a thermodynamic-based software and then identified by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Results of mechanical testing revealed that all three steels performed above the standard toughness and tensile strength values, but with varied yielding phenomena. During the welding operation, each of the three steels

  7. Microstructure-property relationship in microalloyed high-strength steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Lei

    2017-01-01

    High-strength steels are favoured materials in the industry for production of safe and sustainable structures. The main technology used for joining the components of such steel is fusion welding. Steel alloy design concepts combined with advanced processing technologies have been extensively investigated during the development of High-Strength Low-Alloy (HSLA) steels. However, very few studies have addressed the issue of how various alloy designs, even with limited microalloy addition, can influence the properties of high-strength steel welds. In high-strength steel welding practices, the challenges regarding microstructure evolution and the resulting mechanical properties variation, are of great interest. The main focus is the debate regarding the role of microalloy elements on phase transformation and weld performance. Limited Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) softening and limited austenite grain coarsening are significant design essentials, but the primary goal is to ensure excellent toughness and tensile properties in the steel weld. To achieve this purpose, microalloy elements such as Ti, Nb, or V were intentionally added to modern high-strength steels. The focus of this work was to understand the mechanical properties of HSLA steels resulting from differences in alloy design after joining by modern welding processes. To begin, three microalloyed S690QL steels (Nb, Ti, and Ti+V addition) were investigated. Optical microscopy confirmed that similar mixtures of tempered bainite and martensite predominated the parent microstructure in the three steels, different types of coarse microalloy precipitates were also visible. These precipitates were analysed by using a thermodynamic-based software and then identified by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Results of mechanical testing revealed that all three steels performed above the standard toughness and tensile strength values, but with varied yielding phenomena. During the welding operation, each of the three steels

  8. Effect of molybdenum addition on microstructure and mechanical properties of plain carbon steel weld

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Menghani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation has two main objectives; first is optimization of welding process parameters of submerged arc welding (SAW using Taguchi philosophy and second is to improve the mechanical properties such as strength and microhardness of weld joint by alloying with varying amounts of molybdenum. For optimization of welding process, parameters Taguchi philosophy have been applied on a mild steel plate (AISI C- 1020 of 10 mm thickness with 60o groove angle with arc voltage and welding speed as variables and bead width as output variables. A mathematical relationship between bead width, arc voltage and welding speed has also been found using multiple regression analysis for the present base metal plate geometry. After optimizing welding parameters, molybdenum has been added individually to the welding area in varying percentages. The properties of alloyed and unalloyed weld metal bead are compared. The mechanical characterization of weld has been done in terms of microhardness, tensile strength, whereas microstructural characterization has been performed using optical microscopy, XRD and EDS. The presence of molybdenum resulted in bainite structure in weld bead having a refined grain structure, enhancement in tensile strength and microhardness. The XRD results showed the formation of molybdenum carbides justifying the increase in microhardness value.

  9. Standard reference radiographs for steel fusion welds

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This standard provides reference radiographs for steel fusion welds that contain typical discontinuities with varying severity levels in different thicknesses of material. The reference radiograph films are an adjunct to this standard and must be purchased separately from ASTM International if needed. 1.2 There are three volumes of reference radiographs based on seven nominal weld thicknesses as follows: Vol ISet of 16 plates (81/2 by 11 in.) covering base material up to and including ¼ in. (6.4 mm) in thickness. Vol IISet of 29 plates (8½ by 11 in.) covering base material over ¼ to and including 3 in. (6.4 to 76 mm) in thickness. Vol IIISet of 32 plates (8 ½ by 11 in.) covering base material over 3 to including 8 in. (76 to 203 mm) in thickness. 1.3 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport t...

  10. Evaluation of weld defects in stainless steel 316L pipe using guided wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joon Hyun; Lee, Jin Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Stainless steel is a popular structural materials for liquid-hydrogen storage containers and piping components for transporting high-temperature fluids because of its superior material properties such as high strength and high corrosion resistance at elevated temperatures. In general, tungsten inert gas (TIG) arc welding is used for bonding stainless steel. However, it is often reported that the thermal fatigue cracks or initial defects in stainless steel after welding decreases the reliability of the material. The objective of this paper is to clarify the characteristics of ultrasonic guided wave propagation in relation to a change in the initial crack length in the welding zone of stainless steel. For this purpose, three specimens with different artificial defects of 5 mm, 10 mm, and 20 mm in stainless steel welds were prepared. By considering the thickness of s stainless steel pipe, special attention was given to both the L(0,1) mode and L(0,2) mode in this study. It was clearly found that the L(0,2) mode was more sensitive to defects than the L(0,1) mode. Based on the results of the L(0,1) and L(0,2) mode analyses, the magnitude ratio of the two modes was more effective than studying each mode when evaluating defects near the welded zone of stainless steel because of its linear relationship with the length of the artificial defect.

  11. Investigation of the Weld Properties of Dissimilar S32205 Duplex Stainless Steel with AISI 304 Steel Joints Produced by Arc Stud Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Barış Başyiğit

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available UNS S32205 duplex stainless steel plates with a thickness of 3 mm are arc stud welded by M8 × 40 mm AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel studs with constant stud lifts in order to investigate the effects of welding arc voltages on mechanical and microstructural behaviors of the joints. As the welding arc voltage increases starting from 140 V, the tensile strength of the weldment also increases but the higher arc values results in more spatters around the weld seam up to 180 V. Conversely, the lower arc voltages causes poor tensile strength values to weldments. Tensile tests proved that all of the samples are split from each other in the welding zone but deformation occurs in duplex plates during the tensile testing of weldments so that the elongation values are not practically notable. The satisfactory tensile strength and bending values are determined by applying 180 volts of welding arc voltage according to ISO 14555 standard. Peak values of micro hardness occurred in weld metal most probably as a consequence of increasing heat input decreasing the delta ferrite ratios. As the arc voltage increases, the width of the heat affected zone increases. Coarsening of delta-ferrite and austenite grains was observed in the weld metal peak temperature zone but it especially becomes visible closer to the duplex side in all samples. The large voids and unwelded zones up to approximately 1 mm by length are observed by macro-structure inspections. Besides visual tests and micro-structural surveys; bending and microhardness tests with radiographic inspection were applied to samples for maintaining the correct welding parameters in obtaining well-qualified weldments of these two distinct groups of stainless steel materials.

  12. Metallurgy and mechanical properties variation with heat input,during dissimilar metal welding between stainless and carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdan, RD; Koswara, AL; Surasno; Wirawan, R.; Faturohman, F.; Widyanto, B.; Suratman, R.

    2018-02-01

    The present research focus on the metallurgy and mechanical aspect of dissimilar metal welding.One of the common parameters that significantly contribute to the metallurgical aspect on the metal during welding is heat input. Regarding this point, in the present research, voltage, current and the welding speed has been varied in order to observe the effect of heat input on the metallurgical and mechanical aspect of both welded metals. Welding was conducted by Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) on stainless and carbon steel with filler metal of ER 309. After welding, hardness test (micro-Vickers), tensile test, macro and micro-structure characterization and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) characterization were performed. It was observed no brittle martensite observed at HAZ of carbon steel, whereas sensitization was observed at the HAZ of stainless steel for all heat input variation at the present research. Generally, both HAZ at carbon steel and stainless steel did not affect tensile test result, however the formation of chromium carbide at the grain boundary of HAZ structure (sensitization) of stainless steel, indicate that better process and control of welding is required for dissimilar metal welding, especially to overcome this issue.

  13. Welding procedure specification for arc welding of St 52-3N steel plates with covered electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cvetkovski, S.; Slavkov, D.; Magdeski, J.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper the results of approval welding technology for arc welding of plates made of St 52-3N steel are presented. Metal arc welding with covered electrode is used welding process. Test specimens are butt welded in different welding positions P A , P F , P C and P D . Before start welding preliminary welding procedure was prepared. After welding of test specimens non destructive and destructive testing was performed. Obtained results were compared with standard DIN 17100 which concerns to chemical composition and mechanical properties of base material. It was confirmed that in all cases mechanical properties of welded joint are higher than those of base material, so preliminary welding procedure (pWTS) can be accepted as welding procedure specification WPS for metal arc welding of St52-3N steel. (Original)

  14. A comparative study of the microstructure and mechanical properties of HTLA steel welds obtained by the tungsten arc welding and resistance spot welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghazanfari, H.; Naderi, M.; Iranmanesh, M.; Seydi, M.; Poshteban, A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Hardness mapping is a novel method to identify different phases. ► Surface hardness mapping, tabulates the hardness of a large area of weld. ► Hardness maps can be used to depict the strength map through the specimen. ► Hardness mapping is an easy way to identify the phase fractions within the specimen. - Abstract: Hardness tests are routinely employed as simple and efficient methods to investigate the microstructure and mechanical properties of steels. Each microstructural phase in steel has its own hardness level. Therefore, using surface hardness mapping data over a large area of weld zone would be a reasonable method to identify the present phases in steel. The microstructure distribution and mechanical properties variation through welded structures is inhomogeneous and not suitable for certain applications. So, studying the microstructure of weld zone has a significant importance. 4130 steel is classified in HTLA steels and it is widely used in marine industry due to its superior hardenability, good corrosion resistance and high strength. Gas tungsten arc and resistance spot welding are the most usable processes in joining of 4130 sheets. In this work a series of welds have been fabricated in 4130 steel tube by gas tungsten arc and resistance spot welding. The tube was subjected to quench-tempered heat treatment. Slices from the welds before and after heat treatment were polished and etched and the macrostructure and microstructure were observed. Hardness maps were then determined over the large area of weld zone, including the heat affected zone and base plate. Results show good relations between the various microstructures, strength and hardness values. It is also proved that this method is precise and applicable to estimate phase fraction of each phase in various regions of weld. In the current study some equations were proposed to calculate the ultimate tensile stress and yield stress from the weld. The calculated data were compared

  15. Assessment of Hot Crack Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2003-01-01

    Crack testing concerning small and fast solidifying laser welds in austenitic stainless steel has been studied. A set of methods has been applied to investigate alloy properties, including (1) Application of known information to predict solidification phases, (2) Weld metal solidification rate me...

  16. Characterization of duplex stainless steel weld metals obtained by hybrid plasma-gas metal arc welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koray Yurtisik

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite its high efficiency, autogenous keyhole welding is not well-accepted for duplex stainless steels because it causes excessive ferrite in as-welded duplex microstructure, which leads to a degradation in toughness and corrosion properties of the material. Combining the deep penetration characteristics of plasma arc welding in keyhole mode and metal deposition capability of gas metal arc welding, hybrid plasma - gas metal arc welding process has considered for providing a proper duplex microstructure without compromising the welding efficiency. 11.1 mm-thick standard duplex stainless steel plates were joined in a single-pass using this novel technique. Same plates were also subjected to conventional gas metal arc and plasma arc welding processes, providing benchmarks for the investigation of the weldability of the material. In the first place, the hybrid welding process enabled us to achieve less heat input compared to gas metal arc welding. Consequently, the precipitation of secondary phases, which are known to be detrimental to the toughness and corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steels, was significantly suppressed in both fusion and heat affected zones. Secondly, contrary to other keyhole techniques, proper cooling time and weld metal chemistry were achieved during the process, facilitating sufficient reconstructive transformation of austenite in the ferrite phase.

  17. Low temperature friction stir welding of P91 steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Rao Kalvala

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bead-on-plate friction stir welds were made on P91 alloy with low and high rotational speeds (100 and 1000 RPM to study their effects on weld microstructural changes and impression creep behavior. Temperatures experienced by the stir zone were recorded at the weld tool tip. Different zones of welds were characterized for their microstructural changes, hardness and creep behavior (by impression creep tests. The results were compared with submerged arc fusion weld. Studies revealed that the stir zone temperature with 100 RPM was well below Ac1 temperature of P91 steel while it was above Ac3 with 1000 RPM. The results suggest that the microstructural degradation in P91 welds can be controlled by low temperature friction stir welding technique.

  18. Microstructure Evolution during Friction Stir Spot Welding of TRIP Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Trine Colding; Pantleon, Karen; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the feasibility of friction stir spot welding of TRIP steel is investigated. In addition to manufacturing successful welds, the present study aims at a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms occurring at the (sub)micron scale during friction stir spot welding. As one of the main...... parameters to control friction stir welding, the influence of the rotational speed of the tool was investigated. Three different rotational speeds (500 rpm, 1000 rpm and 1500 rpm, respectively) were applied. The microstructure of the welded samples was investigated with reflected light microscopy, scanning...... electron microscopy, and electron backscatter diffraction. Microhardness measurements and lap-shear tensile tests completed the investigations of the welded samples and allow evaluation of the quality of the welds....

  19. Influence of weld discontinuities on strain controlled fatigue behavior of 308 stainless steel weld metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.; Valsan, M.; Sandhya, R.; Mannan, S.L.; Rodriguez, P.

    1994-01-01

    Detailed investigations have been performed for assessing the importance of weld discontinuities in strain controlled low cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of 308 stainless steel (SS) welds. The LCF behavior of 308 SS welds containing defects was compared with that of type 304 SS base material and 308 SS sound weld metal. Weld pads were prepared by shielded metal arc welding process. Porosity and slag inclusions were introduced deliberately into the weld metal by grossly exaggerating the conditions normally causing such defects. Total axial strain controlled LCF tests have been conducted in air at 823 K on type 304 SS base and 308 SS sound weld metal employing strain amplitudes in the range from ±0.25 to ±0.8 percent. A single strain amplitude of ±0.25 percent was used for all the tests conducted on weld samples containing defects. The results indicated that the base material undergoes cyclic hardening whereas sound and defective welds experience cyclic softening. Base metal showed higher fatigue life than sound weld metal at all strain amplitudes. The presence of porosity and slag inclusions in the weld metal led to significant reduction in life. Porosity on the specimen surface has been found to be particularly harmful and caused a reduction in life by a factor of seven relative to sound weld metal

  20. Evaluation of ARAA steel E-beam welding characteristics for the fabrication of KO HCCR TBM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jae Sung, E-mail: jsyoon2@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Research Energy Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Suk-Kwon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Dong Won [Korea Atomic Research Energy Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kyu In [Gentec Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seungyon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • For confirming the evaluation of ARAA steel E-beam welding characteristics for the fabrication of KO HCCR TBM, the followings are performed. • E-beam welding in ARAA plate. • Evaluation for the penetration depth and beam width according to the E-beam welding current. • Performed micro-hardness and Charpy impact test after PWHT. • Determine the optimized PWHT condition. - Abstract: Korea has designed a helium cooled ceramic reflector (HCCR) test blanket module (TBM), including a TBM shield, called a TBM set, that will be tested in ITER. Korean RAFM steel was developed as a structural material for the HCCR TBM, and advanced reduced activation alloy (ARAA) was selected as the primary candidate from various program alloys. Fabrication technologies for the HCCR TBM were developed using ARAA to provide the method and procedure for fabricating the TBM for testing in ITER based on RCC-MRx, which was selected as the design and fabrication code and standard for the HCCR TBM. To establish and optimize welding procedures for electron beam welding of an ARAA material, variations in welding current and speed were investigated. A series of performance tests was performed before and after post-weld heat treatment to evaluate the welded specimen under the determined welding conditions.

  1. Comparative Studies on microstructure, mechanical and corrosion behaviour of DMR 249A Steel and its welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Dilkush; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    DMR249A Medium strength (low carbon) Low-alloy steels are used as structural components in naval applications due to its low cost and high availability. An attempt has been made to weld the DMR 249A steel plates of 8mm thickness using shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Welds were characterized for metallography to carry out the microstructural changes, mechanical properties were evaluated using vickers hardness tester and universal testing machine. Potentio-dynamic polarization tests were carried out to determine the pitting corrosion behaviour. Constant load type Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) testing was done to observe the cracking tendency of the joints in a 3.5%NaCl solution. Results of the present study established that SMA welds resulted in formation of relatively higher amount of martensite in ferrite matrix when compared to gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). It is attributed to faster cooling rates achieved due to high thermal efficiency. Improved mechanical properties were observed for the SMA welds and are due to higher amount of martensite. Pitting corrosion and stress corrosion cracking resistance of SMA welds were poor when compared to GTA welds.

  2. Mechanical characteristics of welded joints between different stainless steels grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topolska, S.; Łabanowski, J.

    2017-08-01

    Investigation of mechanical characteristics of welded joints is one of the most important tasks that allow determining their functional properties. Due to the very high, still rising, cost of some stainless steels it is justified, on economic grounds, welding austenitic stainless steel with steels that are corrosion-resistant like duplex ones. According to forecasts the price of corrosion resistant steels stil can increase by 26 ÷ 30%. For technical reasons welded joints require appropriate mechanical properties such as: tensile strength, bending, ductility, toughness, and resistance to aggressive media. Such joints are applied in the construction of chemical tankers, apparatus and chemical plants and power steam stations. Using the proper binder makes possible the welds directly between the elements of austenitic stainless steels and duplex ones. It causes that such joits behave satisfactorily in service in such areas like maritime constructions and steam and chemical plants. These steels have high mechanical properties such as: the yield strength, the tensile strength and the ductility as well as the resistance to general corrosion media. They are resistant to both pitting and stress corrosions. The relatively low cost of production of duplex steels, in comparison with standard austenitic steels, is inter alia, the result of a reduced amount of scarce and expensive Nickel, which is seen as a further advantage of these steels.

  3. Resistance Element Welding of Magnesium Alloy/austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manladan, S. M.; Yusof, F.; Ramesh, S.; Zhang, Y.; Luo, Z.; Ling, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Multi-material design is increasingly applied in the automotive and aerospace industries to reduce weight, improve crash-worthiness, and reduce environmental pollution. In the present study, a novel variant of resistance spot welding technique, known as resistance element welding was used to join AZ31 Mg alloy to 316 L austenitic stainless steel. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints were evaluated. It was found that the nugget consisted of two zones, including a peripheral fusion zone on the stainless steel side and the main fusion zone. The tensile shear properties of the joints are superior to those obtained by traditional resistance spot welding.

  4. Welding of duplex and super-duplex stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Nassau, L.; Meelker, H.; Hilkes, J.

    1994-01-01

    After a recall of the commercial designation of duplex or super-duplex steels (22-27% Cr, 4-8% Ni, 0.1-0.3% N with or without Mo (1.5-4%)) and of some metallurgical properties (phase diagrams, microstructure, ferrite determination, heat treatment and aging), welding technologies are synthetically presented (advantages-disadvantages of each process, metals filler, parameters of the welding processes, heat treatments after welding, cleaning, passivation, properties (mechanical, corrosion resistance) of the welded pieces). (A.B.). 28 refs. 5 figs., 15 tabs., 1 annexe

  5. Lap and butt joints of dissimilar stainless steels welded by CO2 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daurelio, Giuseppe; Dionoro, G.; Memola Capece Minutolo, F.; Panagopoulos, Christos N.

    1993-05-01

    This work concerns the lap welding of dissimilar (AISI 304 - 430, AISI 430 - 304, AISI 316 - 430, and AISI 430 - 316) stainless steels and the butt welding of dissimilar (AISI 304 - 316 and AISI 304 - 430) ones using a fast axial flow 2 kW cw CO2 laser (B.O.C. Laser Ltd.). Two covering gases, He and N2, are used fed coaxially to the laser beam through a 12 mm outlet diameter nozzle at a flow rate varying from 1.67 to 1.87 X 10-3)m3/s. The influence of the process parameters, such as power level, covering gas, and speed on the quality of the welded joints is examined. In the second part of the work laser lap and butt welds of dissimilar stainless steels are characterized by macro and micro graphic investigations to enable structural evaluations. Fillet weld morphology and quality of the same specimens is examined for the two different covering gases, He and N2. Moreover, the different structural aspects of the melted zones obtained with laser welds of the same pair of stainless steels, but with the beam impinging first on the austenitic stainless steel (e.g., AISI 304 - 430) and then the ferritic one (e.g., AISI 430 - 304), or vice versa, are also studied and evaluated.

  6. STRUCTURAL DEGRADATION OF HETEROGENEOUS WELDED JOINTS

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Schmidová

    2012-01-01

    Developing the techniques of welding materials with higher dynamic strength onto the rolling surfaces of rails is one of the options for increasing their operational endurance. The subject of this paper is an analysis of heterogeneous weld joints experimentally manufactured by welding medium-carbon austenitic steels onto high-carbon unalloyed pearlitic steels. The analyses focus on examinations of the marginal mixing of the materials at the fusion line and the circumstances under which interc...

  7. Overview on the welding technologies of CLAM steel and the DFLL TBM fabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyu Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Dual Functional Lithium Lead (DFLL blanket was proposed for its advantages of high energy exchange efficiency and on-line tritium extraction, and it was selected as the candidate test blanket module (TBM for China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR and the blanket for Fusion Design Study (FDS series fusion reactors. Considering the influence of high energy fusion neutron irradiation and high heat flux thermal load on the blanket, China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM steel was selected as the structural material for DFLL blanket. The structure of the blanket and the cooling internal components were pretty complicated. Meanwhile, high precision and reliability were required in the blanket fabrication. Therefore, several welding techniques, such as hot isostatic pressing diffusion bonding, tungsten inner gas welding, electron beam welding and laser beam welding were developed for the fabrication of cooling internals and the assembly of the blanket. In this work, the weldability on CLAM steel by different welding methods and the properties of as-welded and post-weld heat-treated joints were investigated. Meanwhile, the welding schemes and the assembly strategy for TBM fabrication were raised. Many tests and research efforts on scheme feasibility, process standardization, component qualification and blanket assembly were reviewed.

  8. Analysis of properties laser welded RAK 40/70 steel sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evin, E.; Tomáš, M.; Fujda, M.

    2017-11-01

    Both, the ecological production and operation of vehicles demand using such materials for deformation zones’ structural parts, which show some specific properties and use innovative technologies to process them. Specific requirements for functionality (strength, stiffness, deformation work, fatigue properties) are closely linked to processability (formability). In the paper are presented results for multiphase TRIP steel RAK40/70 when welded by pulse solid-state fiber laser YLS-5000. Based on microstructure analysis in the fusion zone and heat affected zone the welding parameters were optimised. The influence of laser welding on the strength and deformation properties was verified by characteristics of strength, stiffness and deformation work, as they were calculated from mechanical properties measured by tensile test and three-point bending test. The knowledge gathered in the field of laser welding influence on the strength and deformation properties of multiphase TRIP steel RAK40/70 should help designers when design the lightweight structural parts of the car body.

  9. Evaluation of residual stresses for the multipass welds of 316L stainless steel pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. H.; Joo, Y. S.; Lee, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    It is necessary to evaluate the influence of the residual stress and distortion in the design and fabrication of welded structure and the sound welded structure can be maintained by this consideration. Multipass welds of the 316L stainless steel have been widely employed in the pipes of Liquid Metal Reactor. In this study, the residual stresses in the 316L stainless steel pipe welds were calculated by the finite element method using ANSYS code. Also, the residual stresses both on the surface and in the interior of the thickness were measured by HRPD(High Resolution Powder Diffractometer) instrumented in HANARO Reactor. The residual stresses were measured for each 18 points in small(t/d=0.075) and large pipe specimens (t/d=0.034). The experimental and calculated results were compared and the characteristics of the distribution of the residual stress discussed

  10. Microstructure–hardness relationship in the fusion zone of TRIP steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayak, S.S.; Baltazar Hernandez, V.H.; Okita, Y.; Zhou, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Fusion zone of TRIP steels in resistance spot welding was analyzed. ► Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used for characterizing microstructure. ► Fusion zone microstructure was found to depend on the chemistry. ► Hardness values were in accordance with the microstructural constituents in the fusion zone. - Abstract: Fusion zone of three TRIP steels, categorized as AT: C–Mn–Al, AST: C–Mn–Al–Si and ST: C–Mn–Si, in resistance spot welding was characterized with respect to microstructure, phase analysis, and hardness. The fusion zone microstructure was found to depend on chemistry: (i) AT steel contained ferrite phase surrounded by bainite and martensite regions, (ii) AST steel showed a bainite structures along with martensite laths and interlath retained austenite, whereas (iii) ST steel constituted single phase martensite laths with interlath austenite. X-ray diffraction study indicated that retained austenite fraction in the fusion zone increases with increase in Si content in it. The AST fusion zone hardness lies between those of the AT and ST steels; the ST fusion zone hardness was higher than that of AT steel because of the single phase martensite microstructure. Comparison of fusion zone microstructure and hardness to earlier study on laser welding of the TRIP steels with similar chemistries revealed that higher cooling rate in resistance spot welding led to higher fusion zone hardness compared to laser welding; which was attributed either to decrease in softer ferrite phase (AT steel) in the microstructure or refinement of martensite laths (ST steel).

  11. Welding of Aluminum Alloys to Steels: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    51] in which the bimetal wires can be roll welded Al/ Steel strips and the welding is a kind of tricky process to have similar metals joined together...Al 1060) and steel (1Cr18Ni9Ti) were joined together using the vacuum furnace and A-Si alloy as the strip layer. The interface of the joints showed...also greatly appreciated. References [1] A. Kelkar, R. Roth, J. Clark, Automobile bodies: can aluminum be an economical alternative to steel ? , JOM

  12. Effect of weld line shape on material flow during friction stir welding of aluminum and steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasui, Toshiaki; Ando, Naoyuki; Morinaka, Shinpei; Mizushima, Hiroki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    The effect of weld line shape on material flow during the friction stir welding of aluminum and steel was investigated. The material flow velocity was evaluated with simulated experiments using plasticine as the simulant material. The validity of the simulated experiments was verified by the marker material experiments on aluminum. The circumferential velocity of material around the probe increased with the depth from the weld surface. The effect is significant in cases where the advancing side is located on the outside of curve and those with higher curvature. Thus, there is an influence of weld line shape on material flow

  13. Influence of heat input on weld bead geometry using duplex stainless steel wire electrode on low alloy steel specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit Mondal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gas metal arc welding cladding becomes a popular surfacing technique in many modern industries as it enhances effectively corrosion resistance property and wear resistance property of structural members. Quality of weld cladding may be enhanced by controlling process parameters. If bead formation is found acceptable, cladding is also expected to be good. Weld bead characteristics are often assessed by bead geometry, and it is mainly influenced by heat input. In this paper, duplex stainless steel E2209 T01 is deposited on E250 low alloy steel specimens with 100% CO2 gas as shielding medium with different heats. Weld bead width, height of reinforcement and depth of penetration are measured. Regression analysis is done on the basis of experimental data. Results reveal that within the range of bead-on-plate welding experiments done, parameters of welding geometry are on the whole linearly related with heat input. A condition corresponding to 0.744 kJ/mm heat input is recommended to be used for weld cladding in practice.

  14. Modeling of laser welding of steel and titanium plates with a composite insert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaev, V. I.; Cherepanov, A. N.; Shapeev, V. P.

    2017-10-01

    A 3D model of laser welding proposed before by the authors was extended to the case of welding of metallic plates made of dissimilar materials with a composite multilayer intermediate insert. The model simulates heat transfer in the welded plates and takes into account phase transitions. It was proposed to select the composition of several metals and dimensions of the insert to avoid the formation of brittle intermetallic phases in the weld joint negatively affecting its strength properties. The model accounts for key physical phenomena occurring during the complex process of laser welding. It is capable to calculate temperature regimes at each point of the plates. The model can be used to select the welding parameters reducing the risk of formation of intermetallic plates. It can forecast the dimensions and crystalline structure of the solidified melt. Based on the proposed model a numerical algorithm was constructed. Simulations were carried out for the welding of titanium and steel plates with a composite insert comprising four different metals: copper and niobium (intermediate plates) with steel and titanium (outer plates). The insert is produced by explosion welding. Temperature fields and the processes of melting, evaporation, and solidification were studied.

  15. Residual stress relief in MAG welded joints of dissimilar steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seodek, P.; Brozda, J.; Wang, L.; Withers, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses the relief of residual stress in welded joints between austenitic and non-alloyed ferritic-pearlitic steels. A series of similar and dissimilar steel joints based on the 18G2A (ferritic-pearlitic) and 1H18N10T (austenitic) steels were produced, some of which were stress relieved by annealing and some by mechanical prestressing. For the as-welded and stress relieved test joints the residual stresses were measured by trepanning. To aid the interpretation of these results, 2D plane stress finite element analysis has been performed to simulate the residual stress relieving methods. Analysis of the results has shown that thermal stress relieving of welded joints between dissimilar steels is not effective and may even increase residual stresses, due to the considerable difference in thermal expansion of the joined steels. It was found that, for the loads imposed, the effectiveness of the mechanical stress relieving of dissimilar steel welded joints was much lower than that of similar steel joints

  16. The Investigation of Structure Heterogeneous Joint Welds in Pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyubimova Lyudmila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Welding joints of dissimilar steels don’t withstand design life. One of the important causes of premature destructions can be the acceleration of steel structural degradation due to cyclic mechanical and thermal gradients. Two zones of tube from steel 12H18N9T, exhibiting the structural instability at early stages of the decomposition of a supersaturated solid austenite solution, were subjected to investigation. Methods of x-ray spectral and structure analysis, micro hardnessmetry were applied for the research. Made the following conclusions, inside and outside tube wall surfaces of hazardous zones in welding joint have different technological and resource characteristics. The microhardness very sensitive to changes of metal structure and can be regarded as integral characteristic of strength and ductility. The welding processes are responsible for the further fibering of tube wall structure, they impact to the characteristics of hot-resistance and long-term strength due to development of ring cracks in the welding joint of pipeline. The monitoring of microhardness and structural phase conversions can be used for control by changes of mechanical properties in result of post welding and reductive heat treatment of welding joints.

  17. Double Fillet Welding of Carbon Steel T-Joint by Double Channel Shielding Gas Metal Arc Welding Method Using Metal Cored Wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mert T.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Low carbon steel material and T-joints are frequently used in ship building and steel constructions. Advantages such as high deposition rates, high quality and smooth weld metals and easy automation make cored wires preferable in these industries. In this study, low carbon steel materials with web and flange thicknesses of 6 mm, 8 mm and 10 mm were welded with conventional GMAW and double channel shielding gas metal arc welding (DMAG method to form double fillet T-joints using metal cored wire. The difference between these two methods were characterized by measurements of mean welding parameters, Vickers hardness profiles, weld bead and HAZ geometry of the joints and thermal camera temperature measurements. When weld bead and HAZ geometries are focused, it was seen filler metal molten area increased and base metal molten area decreased in DMAG of low carbon steel. When compared with traditional GMAW, finer and acicular structures in weld metal and more homogenous and smaller grains in HAZ are obtained with double channel shielding gas metal arc welding.

  18. Surface cracking in resistance seam welding of coated steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adonyi, Y.; Kimchi, M.

    1994-12-31

    In this experimental work, the focus was on the understanding the electrode-wheel/coated steel surface phenomena by building operational lobes and by correlating the weld quality with static-and dynamic-contact-resistance variation during welding. Conventional AC, DC, and electrode-wire resistance-seam weldability of printed zinc-coated and hot-dipped tin-coated steel was performed in this work, as compared with traditional lead-tin (terne) coating used as reference material. Variables included steel substrate type, welding equipment type, electrode-wheel cleaning practice, and electrode-wire geometry. Optic and electron microscopy were used for the evaluation of specimens extracted from longitudinal cross-sections of representative welds. The size and morphology of surface cracks was characterized and correlated with variations in the above-mentioned parameters. It was found that the tin-coated (unpainted) steel sheet had a superior all-together performance to the zinc-coated steel and terne-coated steel, both in terms of wider weldability lobes and lesser surface cracking. The extent of surface cracking was greatly reduced by using the electrode-wire seam welding process using a longitudinally grooved wire profile, which also widened the corresponding weldability lobes. It was also found that the extent of cracking depended on the electrode knurl geometry, substrate type, and the presence of conductive paint applied on top of the metallic coating. An attempt was made to characterize the specific mechanisms governing the LME phenomenon for the lead-, zinc and tin-based coating systems and to assess the potential for crack propagation in the welds. The dynamic contact resistance was found to be a good measure of the welding process stability and an indicator of defect formation. It was found that the ratio between the static and dynamic contact resistances of the tin-coated sheet was considerably lower than similar ratios for bare and zinc-coated sheet.

  19. Fatigue strength of repaired cracks in welded connections made of very high strength steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akyel, A.

    2017-01-01

    For cyclically loaded structures, fatigue design becomes one of the important design criteria. The state of art shows that with modification of the conventional structural design methodology, the use of very high strength steels may have a positive effect on fatigue strength of welded connections.

  20. Hybrid laser-arc welding of galvanized high-strength steels in a gap-free lap-joint configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shanglu

    In order to meet the industry demands for increased fuel efficiency and enhanced mechanical and structural performance of vehicles as well as provided excellent corrosion resistance, more and more galvanized advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) have been used to fabricate automobile parts such as panels, bumpers, and front rails. The automotive industry has shown tremendous interest in using laser welding to join galvanized dual phase steels because of lower heat input and higher welding speed. However, the laser welding process tends to become dramatically unstable in the presence of highly pressurized zinc vapor because of the low boiling point of zinc, around 906°C, compared to higher melting point of steel, over 1500°C. A large number of spatters are produced by expelling the liquid metal from the molten pool by the pressurized zinc vapor. Different weld defects such as blowholes and porosities appear in the welds. So far, limited information has been reported on welding of galvanized high strength dual-phase steels in a gap-free lap joint configuration. There is no open literature on the successful attainment of defect-free welds from the laser or hybrid welding of galvanized high-strength steels. To address the significant industry demand, in this study, different welding techniques and monitoring methods are used to study the features of the welding process of galvanized DP steels in a gap-free lap joint configuration. The current research covers: (i) a feasibility study on the welding of galvanized DP 980 steels in a lap joint configuration using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), laser welding, hybrid laser/arc welding with the common molten pool, laser welding with the assistance of GTAW preheating source and hybrid laser-variable polarity gas tungsten arc welding (Laser-VPGTAW) techniques (Chapter 2-4); (ii) a welding process monitoring of the welding techniques including the use of machine vision and acoustic emission technique (Chapter 5); (iii

  1. The effects of dynamic load on behaviour of welded joint A-387 Gr. 11 alloyed steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Popović

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The in-service behaviour of alloyed steel A-387 Gr. 11 Class 1, for pressure vessels, used for high temperature applications, depends on the properties of its welded joint, with parent metal (BM, heat-affected-zone (HAZ and weld metal (WM, as constituents. Charpy testing of BM, WM and HAZ, together with, determination of the parameters of fatigue-crack growth and fatigue threshold ΔKth was used, in order to understand, how heterogeneity of structure and different mechanical properties of welded joint constituents affect on crack initiation and propagation.

  2. Welding of stainless steel clad fuel rods for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neves, Mauricio David Martins das

    1986-01-01

    This work describes the obtainment of austenitic stainless steel clad fuel rods for nuclear reactors. Two aspects have been emphasized: (a) obtainment and qualification of AISI 304 and 304 L stainless steel tubes; b) the circumferential welding of pipe ends to end plugs of the same alloy followed by qualification of the welds. Tubes with special and characteristic dimensions were obtained by set mandrel drawing. Both, seamed and seamless tubes of 304 and 304 L were obtained.The dimensional accuracy, surface roughness, mechanical properties and microstructural characteristics of the tubes were found to be adequate. The differences in the properties of the tubes with and without seams were found to be insignificant. The TIG process of welding was used. The influence of various welding parameters were studied: shielding gas (argon and helium), welding current, tube rotation speed, arc length, electrode position and gas flow. An inert gas welding chamber was developed and constructed with the aim of reducing surface oxidation and the heat affected zone. The welds were evaluated with the aid of destructive tests (burst-test, microhardness profile determination and metallographic analysis) and non destructive tests (visual inspection, dimensional examination, radiography and helium leak detection). As a function of the results obtained, two different welding cycles have been suggested; one for argon and another for helium. The changes in the microstructure caused by welding have been studied in greater detail. The utilization of work hardened tubes, permitted the identification by optical microscopy and microhardness measurements, of the different zones: weld zone; heat affected zone (region of grain growth, region of total and partial recrystallization) and finally, the zone not affected by heat. Some correlations between the welding parameters and metallurgical phenomena such as: solidification, recovery, recrystallization, grain growth and precipitation that occurred

  3. Welding of Thermomechanically Rolled Steel by Yb:YAG Disk Laser / Spawanie Stali Walcowanej Termomechanicznie Laserem Dyskowym Yb:YAG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisiecki A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Autogenous laser welding of 5.0 mm thick butt joints of thermomechanically rolled steel S700MC was investigated. The Yb:YAG disk laser TruDisk 3302 emitted at 1.03 μm was used for the trials of autogenous welding. The effect of laser welding parameters and thus thermal conditions of welding on weld shape, microstructure of weld metal and heat affected zone (HAZ, tensile strength, bending angle, impact toughness and microhardness profile was determined. Studies have shown that it is advantageous to provide a high welding speed and low heat input. High cooling rate of weld metal and HAZ leads to the formation of a favorable structure characterized by a large proportion of fine-grained acicular ferrite and provides high mechanical properties of butt joints.

  4. Relation between hardness and ultrasonic velocity on pipeline steel welded joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreón, H.; Barrera, G.; Natividad, C.; Salazar, M.; Contreras, A.

    2016-04-01

    In general, the ultrasonic techniques have been used to determine the mechanical properties of materials based on their relationship with metallurgical characteristics. In this research work, the relationship between ultrasonic wave velocity, hardness and the microstructure of steel pipeline welded joints is investigated. Measurements of ultrasonic wave velocity were made as a function of the location across the weld. Hardness measurements were performed in an attempt to correlate with ultrasonic response. In addition, the coarse and dendritic grain structure of the weld material is extreme and unpredictably anisotropic. Thus, due to the acoustic anisotropy of the crystal, weld material of studied joints is anisotropic too. Such structure is no longer direction-independent to the ultrasonic wave propagation; therefore, the ultrasonic beam deflects and redirects and the wave front becomes distorted. Thus, the use of conventional ultrasonic testing techniques using fixed beam angles is very limited and the application of conventional ultrasonic phased array techniques becomes desirable. This technique is proposed to assist pipeline operators in estimating the hardness through ultrasonic measures to evaluate the susceptibility to stress sulphide cracking and hydrogen-induced cracking due to hard spots in steel pipeline welded joints in service. Sound wave velocity and hardness measurements have been carried out on a steel welded joint. For each section of the welding, weld bead, fusion zone, heat affected zone and base metal were found to correspond particular values of the ultrasound velocity. These results were correlated with electron microscopy observations of the microstructure and sectorial scan view of welded joints by ultrasonic phased array.

  5. Re-austenitisation of chromium-bearing pressure vessel steels during the weld thermal cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunne, Druce; Li, Huijun; Jones, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Steels with chromium contents between 0.5 and 12 wt% are commonly used for fabrication of creep resistant pressure vessels (PV) for the power generation industry. Most of these steels are susceptible to Type IV creep failure in the intercritical and/ or grain refined regions of the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the parent metal. The re-austenitisation process plays a central role in establishing the transformed microstructures and the creep resistance of the various sub-zones of the HAZ. The high alloy content and the presence of alloy-rich carbides in the as-supplied parent plate can significantly retard the kinetics of transformation to austenite, resulting in both incomplete austenitisation and inhomogeneous austenite. Overlapping weld thermal cycles in multi-pass welds add further complexity to the progressive development of microstructure over the course of the welding process. In order to clarify structural evolution, thermal simulation has been used to study the effects of successive thermal cycles on the structures and properties of the HAZ of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel. The results showed that, before post-weld heat treatment (PWHT), the HAZ microstructures and properties, particularly in doubly reheated sub-zones, were highly heterogeneous and differed markedly from those of the base steel. It is concluded that close control of the thermal cycle by pre-heat, weld heat input and post-heat is necessary to obtain a heat affected zone with microstructures and properties compatible with those of the base plate.

  6. 46 CFR 54.25-25 - Welding of quenched and tempered steels (modifies UHT-82).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding of quenched and tempered steels (modifies UHT-82... ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-25 Welding of quenched and tempered steels (modifies UHT-82). (a) The qualification of welding procedures, welders, and...

  7. 76 FR 76437 - Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe From Korea and Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-07

    ... COMMISSION Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe From Korea and Taiwan Determination On the basis of the record... revocation of the antidumping duty orders on certain welded stainless steel pipe from Korea and Taiwan would... Publication 4280 (December 2011), entitled Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe from Korea and Taiwan...

  8. 75 FR 53714 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, Korea, and Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ... 564 (Third Review)] Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, Korea, and Taiwan AGENCY... antidumping duty orders on stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Japan, Korea, and Taiwan. SUMMARY: The... stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Japan, Korea, and Taiwan would be likely to lead to...

  9. 78 FR 63517 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... steel welds, the original version of this guide, Safety Guide 31, ``Control of Stainless Steel Welding... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0231] Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld.... Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is issuing a revision to Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.31, ``Control of...

  10. Microstructure and Hardness Distribution of Resistance Welded Advanced High Strength Steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Richardt; Harthøj, Anders; Friis, Kasper Leth

    2008-01-01

    In this work a low carbon steel and two high strength steels (DP600 and TRIP700) have been resistance lap welded and the hardness profiles were measured by micro hardness indentation of cross sections of the joint. The resulting microstructure of the weld zone of the DP-DP and TRIP-TRIP joints were...... found to consist of a martensitic structure with a significant increase in hardness. Joints of dissimilar materials mixed completely in the melted region forming a new alloy with a hardness profile lying in between the hardness measured in joints of the similar materials. Furthermore the joints were...

  11. Micro stresses in welded high-strength stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukas, P.; Mikula, P.; Strunz, P.; Vrana, M.; Zaffagnini, M.; Janovec, J.; Macek, K.

    1995-01-01

    The dependence of residual stresses in martensitic-austenitic age-hardenable steels on a different technological treatment (welding by electron beam, postweld heat treatment) were investigated using neutron diffraction. Experiments were performed in NPI Rez on a high-resolution diffractometer equipped with cylindrically bent perfect crystals. The resolution of the instrument (Δd/d ∼ 10 -4 ; d-lattice spacing) enabled the authors to investigate plastic strains in weld joints

  12. NDE of explosion welded copper stainless steel first wall mock-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taehtinen, S.; Kauppinen, P.; Jeskanen, H.; Lahdenperae, K.; Ehrnsten, U.

    1997-04-01

    The study showed that reflection type C-mode scanning acoustic microscope (C-SAM) and internal ultrasonic inspection (IRIS) equipment can be applied for ultrasonic examination of copper stainless steel compound structures of ITER first wall mock-ups. Explosive welding can be applied to manufacture fully bonded copper stainless steel compound plates. However, explosives can be applied only for mechanical tightening of stainless steel cooling tubes within copper plate. If metallurgical bonding between stainless steel tubes and copper plate is required Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) method can be applied. (orig.)

  13. Pulmonary fibrosis and exposure to steel welding fume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, M P

    2015-12-01

    Arc welders who have been exposed to high concentrations of steel welding fume for prolonged periods of time may develop pulmonary fibrosis but the nature of the fibrotic changes has been debated over the last 80 years without any clear international consensus. To characterize the nature of the pulmonary fibrosis that develops in response to steel welding fume exposure and to provide a working hypothesis that would explain the findings of the existing research, to provide a platform for future research and to inform future occupational and clinical management of welders with pulmonary effects from welding fume. Review of the world literature on pulmonary fibrosis and welding of steel in all languages using PubMed, with further secondary search of references in the articles found in the primary search. Google and Reference Manager were used as further confirmatory search tools. Only case series and case reports were found but these provided consistent evidence that the consequence of exposure to steel welding fume at high levels for a prolonged period of time is a type of pulmonary fibrosis similar to, and possibly the same as, respiratory bronchiolitis which eventually develops into desquamative interstitial pneumonia with ongoing exposure. Steel welding fume may cause an occupational respiratory bronchiolitis which may develop into de squamative interstitial pneumonia with ongoing exposure. This concept may explain the difficulties in interpreting the wider literature on welding fume and lung function at lower exposures and may also explain the increased risk of lung cancer in welders. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Experimental evaluation of mechanical properties of friction welded AISI steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Handa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, an experimental setup was designed and fabricated in order to accomplish friction welded joints between austenitic stainless steel and low-alloy steel. Thereafter, the effect of axial pressures on the mechanical properties of friction welded AISI 304 with AISI 1021 steels, produced by mechanical joining, have been investigated. Samples were welded under different axial pressures ranging from 75 to 135 MPa, at constant speed of 1250 rpm. The tensile strength, impact strength, and micro-hardness values of the weldments were determined and evaluated. Simultaneously, the fractrography of the tensile-tested specimens were carried out, so as to understand the failure analysis.

  15. Hydrogen induced ductility losses in austenitic stainless steel welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, J.A.; West, A.J.

    1978-06-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the tensile behavior of austenitic stainless steel welds was studied in two AISI 300 series alloys and two nitrogen strengthened alloys. The microstructure of these welds typically contained several percent ferrite in an austenite matrix. Hydrogen was found to reduce the ductility of all welds; however, the severity of ductility loss decreased with increasing stacking fault energy, as observed in previous studies on wrought material. In the lowest stacking fault energy welds, 304L and 308L, hydrogen changed the fracture mode from simple rupture to a mixed mode of ductile and brittle fracture associated with the austenite ferrite interface. Higher stacking fault energy welds, 309S and 22-13-5, showed smaller losses in ductility. In these materials hydrogen assisted the ductile rupture process by aiding void growth and coalescence, without changing the fracture mode. Varying the amount of ferrite from approximately one to 10 percent had no significant effect on performance in hydrogen.

  16. Residual stresses associated with welds in austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidler, R.

    1978-01-01

    Two exploratory welds have been made with AISI 316 austenitic steel and Armex GT electrodes by the manual metal-arc process, and residual stress measurements made in the as-welded condition and after various periods of stress relief. The results show that substantial stress relief occurs at temperatures of 850 0 and 750 0 C after 1 hr, but is not complete. The stress distributions are compared with those obtained from ferritic welds and the effect of differences in thermal expansion coefficients is examined using finite element analysis. (author)

  17. Microstructural Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-Steel Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Erin E.; Hovanski, Yuri; Field, David P.

    2016-06-01

    This work focuses on the microstructural characterization of aluminum to steel friction stir welded joints. Lap weld configuration coupled with scribe technology used for the weld tool have produced joints of adequate quality, despite the significant differences in hardness and melting temperatures of the alloys. Common to friction stir processes, especially those of dissimilar alloys, are microstructural gradients including grain size, crystallographic texture, and precipitation of intermetallic compounds. Because of the significant influence that intermetallic compound formation has on mechanical and ballistic behavior, the characterization of the specific intermetallic phases and the degree to which they are formed in the weld microstructure is critical to predicting weld performance. This study used electron backscatter diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Vickers micro-hardness indentation to explore and characterize the microstructures of lap friction stir welds between an applique 6061-T6 aluminum armor plate alloy and a RHA homogeneous armor plate steel alloy. Macroscopic defects such as micro-cracks were observed in the cross-sectional samples, and binary intermetallic compound layers were found to exist at the aluminum-steel interfaces of the steel particles stirred into the aluminum weld matrix and across the interfaces of the weld joints. Energy dispersive spectroscopy chemical analysis identified the intermetallic layer as monoclinic Al3Fe. Dramatic decreases in grain size in the thermo-mechanically affected zones and weld zones that evidenced grain refinement through plastic deformation and recrystallization. Crystallographic grain orientation and texture were examined using electron backscatter diffraction. Striated regions in the orientations of the aluminum alloy were determined to be the result of the severe deformation induced by the complex weld tool geometry. Many of the textures observed in the weld

  18. Fatigue in Steel Structures under Random Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerskov, Henning

    1999-01-01

    test results. Both the fracture mechanics analysis and the fatigue test results indicate that Miner's rule, which is normally used in the design against fatigue in steel structures, may give results, which are unconservative, and that the validity of the results obtained from Miner's rule will depend......Fatigue damage accumulation in steel structures under random loading is studied. The fatigue life of welded joints has been determined both experimentally and from a fracture mechanics analysis. In the experimental part of the investigation, fatigue test series have been carried through on various...... types of welded plate test specimens and full-scale offshore tubular joints. The materials that have been used are either conventional structural steel with a yield stress of ~ 360-410 MPa or high-strength steel with a yield stress of ~ 810-1010 MPa. The fatigue tests and the fracture mechanics analyses...

  19. The effect of different rutile electrodes on mechanical properties of underwater wet welded AH-36 steel plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winarto, Winarto; Purnama, Dewin; Churniawan, Iwan

    2018-04-01

    Underwater welding is an important role in the rescue of ships and underwater structures, in case of emergency. In this study, the marine steel plates used are AH-36 steel as parent material. This type of steel is included in the High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA). Electrodes used for welding AH-36 steel plates are commonly the E6013 and E 7024 which are the type of based rutile electrodes. Those electrodes are widely available on the market and they would be compared with the original electrode for underwater which is the type of E7014 with the trade name of Broco UW-CS-1. Welding method used is Shielding Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) with the variation of 5 m and 10 m underwater depth and also varied with the electric current of 120A, 140A and 250A. It was found that hardness value of increased in the area of weld metal and HAZ. HAZ also tends to have the highest hardness compared to both of weld metal and base metal. Non destructive test by radiographed test (RT) on welds showed that there are found welding defects in the form of incomplete penetration on all variations of welding parameters, but there is no porosity defect detected. The results of the hardness tests of underwater wet welded steel plates show that the hardness value of both rutile electrodes (E6013 and E 7024) is apparently similar hardness value compared with the existing commercial electrode (E7014 of Broco UW-CS- 1). The tensile test results of underwater wet welded steel plates show that the use of rutile electrode of E6013 gives a better tensile properties than other rutile electrodes.

  20. Effect of electromagnetic interaction during fusion welding of AISI 2205 duplex stainless steel on the corrosion resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Rentería, M.A., E-mail: marcogarciarenteria@uadec.edu.mx [Faculty of Metallurgy, Autonomous University of Coahuila, Carretera 57 Km. 5, CP 25720, Monclova, Coahuila (Mexico); López-Morelos, V.H., E-mail: vhlopez@umich.mx [Instituto de Investigación en Metalurgia y Materiales, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, A.P. 888, CP 58000, Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); González-Sánchez, J., E-mail: jagonzal@uacam.mx [Centre for Corrosion Research, Autonomous University of Campeche, Av. Agustín Melgar s/n, Col. Buenavista, CP 24039, Campeche, Cam (Mexico); García-Hernández, R., E-mail: rgarcia@umich.mx [Instituto de Investigación en Metalurgia y Materiales, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, A.P. 888, CP 58000, Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Dzib-Pérez, L., E-mail: franciscocl7@yahoo.com.mx [Centre for Corrosion Research, Autonomous University of Campeche, Av. Agustín Melgar s/n, Col. Buenavista, CP 24039, Campeche, Cam (Mexico); Curiel-López, F.F., E-mail: franciscocl7@yahoo.com.mx [Faculty of Metallurgy, Autonomous University of Coahuila, Carretera 57 Km. 5, CP 25720, Monclova, Coahuila (Mexico)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Application of EMILI during welding 2205 Duplex stainless steel hindered the coarsening of δ grains in HTHAZ and promoted regeneration of γ. • Welds made with simultaneous EMILI presented TPI values at the HTHAZ similar to those for BM. • Welds made under 3, 12 and 15 mT presented a mass loss by anodic polarisation similar to that observed for the as-received BM. • This behaviour is due to changes in the dynamics of microstructural evolution during welding with EMILI. - Abstract: The effect of electromagnetic interaction of low intensity (EMILI) applied during fusion welding of AISI 2205 duplex stainless steel on the resistance to localised corrosion in natural seawater was investigated. The heat affected zone (HAZ) of samples welded under EMILI showed a higher temperature for pitting initiation and lower dissolution under anodic polarisation in chloride containing solutions than samples welded without EMILI. The EMILI assisted welding process developed in the present work enhanced the resistance to localised corrosion due to a modification on the microstructural evolution in the HAZ and the fusion zone during the thermal cycle involved in fusion welding. The application of EMILI reduced the size of the HAZ, limited coarsening of the ferrite grains and promoted regeneration of austenite in this zone, inducing a homogeneous passive condition of the surface. EMILI can be applied during fusion welding of structural or functional components of diverse size manufactured with duplex stainless steel designed to withstand aggressive environments such as natural seawater or marine atmospheres.

  1. Microstructural Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-Steel Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    joint of 304 stainless steel and AA6056 were also rich in chromium, nickel and manganese [33]. Precipitation of second phase particles rich in Cu, Mg...joints/. Accessed July 11, 2012. 19. W.H. Jiang, R. Kovacevic. “Feasibility study of friction stir welding of 6061-T6 aluminium alloy with AISI ...alloy to AISI 1018 steel by combined effects of fusion and solid state welding.” Int J Mach Tool Manu 44 (2004) 1205-1214. 23. Y. Hovanski, M.L

  2. Microstructure and mechanical properties of hard zone in friction stir welded X80 pipeline steel relative to different heat input

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydin, Hakan; Nelson, Tracy W.

    2013-01-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the microstructure and mechanical properties of the hard zone in friction stir welded X80 pipeline steel at different heat inputs. Microstructural analysis of the welds was carried out using optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and microhardness. Heat input during friction stir welding process had a significant influence on the microstructure and mechanical properties in the hard zone along the advancing side of the weld nugget. Based on the results, the linear relationships between heat input and post-weld microstructures and mechanical properties in the hard zone of friction stir welded X80 steels were established. It can be concluded that with decrease in heat input the bainitic structure in the hard zone becomes finer and so hard zone strength increases

  3. Residual Stresses Due to Circumferential Girth Welding of Austenitic Stainless Steel Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarak, Farzan

    Welding, as a joining method in fabrication of engineering products and structural elements, has a direct influence on thermo-mechanical behavior of components in numerous structural applications. Since these thermo-mechanical behaviors have a major role in the life of welding components, predicting thermo-mechanical effects of welding is a major factor in designing of welding components. One of the major of these effects is generation of residual stresses due to welding. These residual stresses are not the causes of failure in the components solely, but they will add to external loads and stresses in operating time. Since, experimental methods are time consuming and expensive, computational simulation of welding process is an effective method to calculate these residual stresses. This investigation focuses on the evaluation of residual stresses and distortions due to circumferential girth welding of austenitic stainless steel pipes using the commercial finite element software ESI Visual-Environment and SYSWELDRTM to simulate welding process. Of particular importance is the comparison of results from three different types of mechanics models: 1) Axisymmetric, 2) Shell, and 3) Full 3-D.

  4. Characteristics comparison of weld metal zones welded to cast and forged steels for piston crown material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Kyung-Man; Kim, Yun-Hae; Lee, Myeong-Hoon; Baek, Tae-Sil

    2015-03-01

    An optimum repair welding for the piston crown which is one of the engine parts exposed to the combustion chamber is considered to be very important to prolong the engine lifetime from an economical point of view. In this study, two types of filler metals such as 1.25Cr-0.5Mo, 0.5Mo were welded with SMAW method and the other two types of filler metals such as Inconel 625 and 718 were welded with GTAW method, respectively, and the used base metals were the cast and forged steels of the piston crown material. The weld metal zones welded with Inconel 625 and 718 filler metals exhibited higher corrosion resistance compared to 1.25Cr-0.5Mo and 0.5Mo filler metals. In particular, the weld metal zone welded with Inconel 718 and 0.5Mo, filler metals indicated the best and worst corrosion resistance, respectively. Consequently, it is suggested that the corrosion resistance of the weld metal zone surely depends on the chemical components of each filler metal and welding method irrespective of the types of piston crown material.

  5. Welding of AA1050 aluminum with AISI 304 stainless steel by rotary friction welding process

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Ying An; Francisco Piorino Neto; Eder Paduan Alves

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: The purpose of this work was to assess the development of solid state joints of dissimilar material AA1050 aluminum and AISI 304 stainless steel, which can be used in pipes of tanks of liquid propellants and other components of the Satellite Launch Vehicle. The joints were obtained by rotary friction welding process (RFW), which combines the heat generated from friction between two surfaces and plastic deformation. Tests were conducted with different welding process parameters. The ...

  6. Effect of welding processes and joint configuration on the residual stresses and distortion in type 316 LN stainless steel weld joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasantharaja, P.; Vasudevan, M.; Palanichamy, P.

    2012-01-01

    Fabrication by welding introduces significant residual stresses in the welded structure/component due to non-uniform heat distribution during heating and cooling cycle. To control, reduce, or beneficially redistribute the residual stresses in weld joints, the stress distribution needs to be known. In the present study, weld joints of 16 mm thick 316LN stainless steel were made by multi-pass TIG, A-TIG welding and combination of TIG and A-TIG welding processes with various joint configurations. While V-groove edge preparation was required for making multi-pass TIG weld joint, square-edge preparation was sufficient for making A-TIG weld joint. Ultrasonic nondestructive technique based on the critically refracted longitudinal waves (LCR waves) has been used for the quantitative surface/sub-surface residual stress measurements in the weld joints. Distortion measurements were carried out before and after welding using height gauge. A-TIG weld joint was found to exhibit significant reduction in tensile residual stresses and distortion in comparison to that of other joints. (author)

  7. Recent Ship Steels and Some Considerations in Their Welding-TMCP Steel-

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroshige, Kitada; Hull Department

    1986-01-01

    The volume of ships built with high tensile steel (HT steel) at various shipyards has been on the steep increase these days. Among HT steels, the consumption of TMCP steel (TM type HT) is particularly significant. The reasons behind such a sharp increase in the use of TMCP steel may be identified in that the steel of this type can be manufactured with less consumptions of energy and natural resources and that it promises an added advantage of better welding results by the improved material ch...

  8. Effect of dual torch technique on duplex stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Z.; Kuo, M.; Annergren, I.; Pan, D.

    2003-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels are characterized by balanced ferrite/austenite microstructures and are well known for their superior corrosion resistance and higher strength compared with the common austenitic stainless steels. One major concern, however, is that welding might degrade the corrosion resistance by producing unbalanced phase content, detrimental precipitates, and possible embrittlement of the weldment. In this paper, a dual-torch arc welding technique (plasma torch followed by a gas tungsten arc (GTA) torch) was proposed. Effects of the dual-torch technique on the microstructural changes and corrosion properties were investigated. The preliminary study indicated that a correlation between the welding parameters and the microstructural changes and corrosion resistance existed. It was found that the corrosion rate increases with increasing torch pitch and/or decreasing GTA welding current. By adjusting the distance between the torches, modification of weld microstructure may be realized. Although further studies are required to fine-tune the technique, the present study demonstrated the potential of using dual torch technique to improve weldability of duplex stainless steels

  9. Environmental Degradation of Dissimilar Austenitic 316L and Duplex 2205 Stainless Steels Welded Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topolska S.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes structure and properties of dissimilar stainless steels welded joints between duplex 2205 and austenitic 316L steels. Investigations were focused on environmentally assisted cracking of welded joints. The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC and hydrogen embrittlement was determined in slow strain rate tests (SSRT with the strain rate of 2.2 × 10−6 s−1. Chloride-inducted SCC was determined in the 35% boiling water solution of MgCl2 environment at 125°C. Hydrogen assisted SCC tests were performed in synthetic sea water under cathodic polarization condition. It was shown that place of the lowest resistance to chloride stress corrosion cracking is heat affected zone at duplex steel side of dissimilar joins. That phenomenon was connected with undesirable structure of HAZ comprising of large fractions of ferrite grains with acicular austenite phase. Hydrogen assisted SCC tests showed significant reduction in ductility of duplex 2205 steel while austenitic 316L steel remains almost immune to degradation processes. SSR tests of dissimilar welded joints revealed a fracture in the area of austenitic steel.

  10. Numerical simulation and experimental investigation of laser dissimilar welding of carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekouie Esfahani, M. R.; Coupland, J.; Marimuthu, S.

    2015-07-01

    This study reports an experimental and numerical investigation on controlling the microstructure and brittle phase formation during laser dissimilar welding of carbon steel to austenitic stainless steel. The significance of alloying composition and cooling rate were experimentally investigated. The investigation revealed that above a certain specific point energy the material within the melt pool is well mixed and the laser beam position can be used to control the mechanical properties of the joint. The heat-affected zone within the high-carbon steel has significantly higher hardness than the weld area, which severely undermines the weld quality. A sequentially coupled thermo-metallurgical model was developed to investigate various heat-treatment methodology and subsequently control the microstructure of the HAZ. Strategies to control the composition leading to dramatic changes in hardness, microstructure and service performance of the dissimilar laser welded fusion zone are discussed.

  11. Fatigue classification of welded joints in orthotropic steel bridge decks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolstein, M.H.

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation presents the research into fatigue classifications of welded joints in orthotropic steel bridge decks. These classifications are needed to calculate the fatigue life of these joints and should be included in the design codes. For years bridge design was mainly based on static

  12. Tensile Strength of Welded Steel Tubes : First Series of Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechtlich, A

    1928-01-01

    The purpose of the experiments was to determine the difference in the strength of steel tubes welded by different methods, as compared with one another and also with unwelded, unannealed tubes, including; moreover, a comparison of the results obtained by experienced and inexperienced welders.

  13. Study on laser welding of austenitic stainless steel by varying incident angle of pulsed laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nikhil; Mukherjee, Manidipto; Bandyopadhyay, Asish

    2017-09-01

    In the present work, AISI 304 stainless steel sheets are laser welded in butt joint configuration using a robotic control 600 W pulsed Nd:YAG laser system. The objective of the work is of twofold. Firstly, the study aims to find out the effect of incident angle on the weld pool geometry, microstructure and tensile property of the welded joints. Secondly, a set of experiments are conducted, according to response surface design, to investigate the effects of process parameters, namely, incident angle of laser beam, laser power and welding speed, on ultimate tensile strength by developing a second order polynomial equation. Study with three different incident angle of laser beam 89.7 deg, 85.5 deg and 83 deg has been presented in this work. It is observed that the weld pool geometry has been significantly altered with the deviation in incident angle. The weld pool shape at the top surface has been altered from semispherical or nearly spherical shape to tear drop shape with decrease in incident angle. Simultaneously, planer, fine columnar dendritic and coarse columnar dendritic structures have been observed at 89.7 deg, 85.5 deg and 83 deg incident angle respectively. Weld metals with 85.5 deg incident angle has higher fraction of carbide and δ-ferrite precipitation in the austenitic matrix compared to other weld conditions. Hence, weld metal of 85.5 deg incident angle achieved higher micro-hardness of ∼280 HV and tensile strength of 579.26 MPa followed by 89.7 deg and 83 deg incident angle welds. Furthermore, the predicted maximum value of ultimate tensile strength of 580.50 MPa has been achieved for 85.95 deg incident angle using the developed equation where other two optimum parameter settings have been obtained as laser power of 455.52 W and welding speed of 4.95 mm/s. This observation has been satisfactorily validated by three confirmatory tests.

  14. Microstructure-Fracture Behavior Relationships of Slot-Welded Rail Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allie, Aldinton; Aglan, Heshmat; Fateh, Mahmood

    2011-09-01

    Microstructural analyses of the parent pearlitic and bainitic rail steels were performed, and the results were compared with the microstructure of the welded pearlitic and bainitic steels. An increase in the ASTM grain size number of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) for both pearlitic and bainitic slot welds was observed. The microstructural features that were identified in the weldment of both slot-welded steels were very similar. This was expected since the same welding wire was used to weld both rail steels. The weld consisted of mainly ferrite and had similar grain size. The fusion zones of the welded pearlitic and bainitic rail steels were examined after flexural tests to determine if there were any cracks present due to improper or weak fusion. Examination of the entire fusion zone under high optical magnification revealed no cracks, indicating that a perfect fusion was achieved. The three-point flexural behavior of the parent pearlitic and bainitic steels was evaluated and compared with that of the slot-welded steels. It was found that that the welded pearlitic steel has superior fracture resistance properties when compared to the parent pearlitic steel. The average fracture resistance of the parent pearlitic steel was 79 MPa√m compared to 119 MPa√m for the welded pearlitic steel. The slot-welded bainitic steel, however, showed similar fracture resistance properties to the parent bainitic steel with average values of 121 and 128 MPa√m, respectively. The failure mechanism of the welded and parent pearlitic and bainitic steels was also identified. Microvoid coalescence was observed in both welded rail steel samples. This was manifested by dimpled features, which are associated with ductile failure.

  15. The effect of initial stress induced during the steel manufacturing process on the welding residual stress in multi-pass butt welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-ung Park

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A residual stress generated in the steel structure is broadly categorized into initial residual stress during manufacturing steel material, welding residual stress caused by welding, and heat treatment residual stress by heat treatment. Initial residual stresses induced during the manufacturing process is combined with welding residual stress or heat treatment residual stress, and remained as a final residual stress. Because such final residual stress affects the safety and strength of the structure, it is of utmost importance to measure or predict the magnitude of residual stress, and to apply this point on the design of the structure. In this study, the initial residual stress of steel structures having thicknesses of 25 mm and 70 mm during manufacturing was measured in order to investigate initial residual stress (hereinafter, referred to as initial stress. In addition, thermal elastic plastic FEM analysis was performed with this initial condition, and the effect of initial stress on the welding residual stress was investigated. Further, the reliability of the FE analysis result, considering the initial stress and welding residual stress for the steel structures having two thicknesses, was validated by comparing it with the measured results. In the vicinity of the weld joint, the initial stress is released and finally controlled by the weld residual stress. On the other hand, the farther away from the weld joint, the greater the influence of the initial stress. The range in which the initial stress affects the weld residual stress was not changed by the initial stress. However, in the region where the initial stress occurs in the compressive stress, the magnitude of the weld residual compressive stress varies with the compression or tension of the initial stress. The effect of initial stress on the maximum compression residual stress was far larger when initial stress was considered in case of a thickness of 25 mm with a value of 180

  16. Fracture toughness of a welded super duplex stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilhagen, Johan, E-mail: pilhagen@kth.se [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Sieurin, Henrik [Scania CV AB, Södertälje (Sweden); Sandström, Rolf [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-06-01

    Fracture toughness testing was conducted on standard single-edge notched bend bar specimens of base and weld metal. The material was the SAF 2906 super duplex stainless steel. The aim was to evaluate the susceptibility for brittle failure at sub-zero temperatures for the base and weld metal. The base metal was tested between −103 and −60 °C and was evaluated according to the crack-tip opening displacement method. The fracture event at and below −80 °C can be described as ductile until critical cleavage initiation occurs, which caused unstable failure of the specimen. The welding method used was submerged arc welding with a 7 wt% nickel filler metal. The welded specimens were post-weld heat treated (PWHT) at 1100 °C for 20 min and then quenched. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis showed that during PWHT substitutional element partitioning occurred which resulted in decreased nickel content in the ferrite. The PWHT weld metal specimens were tested at −72 °C. The fracture sequence was critical cleavage fracture initiation after minor crack-tip blunting and ductile fracture.

  17. Microstructure and mechanical properties of laser-welded joints of TWIP and TRIP steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mujica, L.; Weber, S.; Pinto, H.; Thomy, C.; Vollertsen, F.

    2010-01-01

    With the aim of investigating a laser-welded dissimilar joint of TWIP and TRIP steel sheets, the microstructure was characterized by means of OM, SEM, and EBSD to differentiate the fusion zone, heat-affected zone, and the base material. OIM was used to differentiate between ferritic, bainitic, and martensitic structures. Compositions were measured by means of optical emission spectrometry and EDX to evaluate the effect of manganese segregation. Microhardness measurements and tensile tests were performed to evaluate the mechanical properties of the joint. Residual stresses and XRD phase quantification were used to characterize the weld. Grain coarsening and martensitic areas were found in the fusion zone, and they had significant effects on the mechanical properties of the weld. The heat-affected zone of the TRIP steel and the corresponding base material showed considerable differences in the microstructure and properties.

  18. Crack initiation and growth in welded structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assire, A.

    2000-01-01

    This work concerns the remaining life assessment of a structure containing initial defects of manufacturing. High temperature crack initiation and growth are studied for austenitic stainless steels, and defect assessment methods are improved in order to take into account welded structures. For these one, the probability to have a defect is significant. Two kinds of approaches are commonly used for defect assessment analysis. Fracture mechanics global approach with an energetic criterion, and local approach with a model taking into account the physical damage mechanism. For both approaches mechanical fields (stress and strain) have to be computed everywhere within the structure. Then, Finite Element computation is needed. The first part of the thesis concerns the identification of non linear kinematic and isotropic constitutive models. A pseudo-analytical method is proposed for a 'Two Inelastic Strain' model. This method provides a strategy of identification with a mechanical meaning, and this enables to associate each parameter to a physical phenomenon. Existing identifications are improved for cyclic plasticity and creep on a large range of stress levels. The second part concerns high temperature crack initiation and growth in welded structures. Finite Element analysis on plate and tube experimental configuration enable to understand the phenomenons of interaction between base metal and weld metal under mechanical and thermal loading. Concerning global approach, criteria based on C* parameter (Rice integral for visco-plasticity) are used. Finite Element computations underline the fact that for a defect located in the weld metal, C* values strongly depend on the base metal creep strain rate, because widespread visco-plasticity is located in both metals. A simplified method, based on the reference stress approach, is proposed and validated with Finite Element results. Creep crack growth simplified assessment is a quite good validation of the experimental results

  19. Weldability prediction of high strength steel S960QL after weld thermal cycle simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dunđer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents weld thermal cycle simulation of high strength steel S960QL, and describes influence of cooling time t8/5 on hardness and impact toughness of weld thermal cycle simulated specimens. Furthermore, it presents analysis of characteristic fractions done by electron scanning microscope which can contribute to determination of welding parameters for S960QL steel.

  20. The behavior of welded joint in steel pipe members under monotonic and cyclic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Kyong-Ho; Jang, Gab-Chul; Shin, Young-Eui; Han, Jung-Guen; Kim, Jong-Min

    2006-01-01

    Most steel pipe members are joined by welding. The residual stress and weld metal in a welded joint have the influence on the behavior of steel pipes. Therefore, to accurately predict the behavior of steel pipes with a welded joint, the influence of welding residual stress and weld metal on the behavior of steel pipe must be investigated. In this paper, the residual stress of steel pipes with a welded joint was investigated by using a three-dimensional non-steady heat conduction analysis and a three-dimensional thermal elastic-plastic analysis. Based on the results of monotonic and cyclic loading tests, a hysteresis model for weld metal was formulated. The hysteresis model was proposed by the authors and applied to a three-dimensional finite elements analysis. To investigate the influence of a welded joint in steel pipes under monotonic and cyclic loading, three-dimensional finite elements analysis considering the proposed model and residual stress was carried out. The influence of a welded joint on the behavior of steel pipe members was investigated by comparing the analytical result both steel pipe with a welded joint and that without a welded joint

  1. Upset Resistance Welding of Carbon Steel to Austenitic Stainless Steel Narrow Rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozlati, Ashkaan; Movahedi, Mojtaba; Mohammadkamal, Helia

    2016-11-01

    Effects of welding current (at the range of 2-4 kA) on the microstructure and mechanical properties of upset resistance welds of AISI-1035 carbon steel to AISI-304L austenitic stainless steel rods were investigated. The results showed that the joint strength first increased by raising the welding current up to 3 kA and then decreased beyond it. Increasing trend was related to more plastic deformation, accelerated diffusion, reduction of defects and formation of mechanical locks at the joint interface. For currents more than 3 kA, decrease in the joint strength was mainly caused by formation of hot spots. Using the optimum welding current of 3 kA, tensile strength of the joint reached to 76% of the carbon steel base metal strength. Microstructural observations and microhardness results confirmed that there was no hard phase, i.e., martensite or bainite, at the weld zone. Moreover, a fully austenitic transition layer related to carbon diffusion from carbon steel was observed at the weld interface.

  2. An ultrasonic non-destructive testing method for the measurement of weld width in laser welding of stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Liu, Fang; Liu, Chang; Li, Jingming; Zhang, Baojun; Zhou, Qingxiang; Han, Xiaohui; Zhao, Yang

    2017-10-01

    In order to inspect welding defects of the laser welding of stainless steel, the piezoelectric bimorph focusing method is presented, the non-destructive testing system is setup. The cutting part of the laser weld sample is used to measure the welding width by metallography and the non-destructive testing system. The results show that the welding width is unevenly distributed, the relation between the ultrasonic signal amplitude and metallography is showed a good linearity, which means the ultrasonic signal amplitude can be used to measure the welding width.

  3. Resistance spot welding of a complicated joint in new advanced high strength steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joop Pauwelussen; Nick den Uijl

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this article is to investigate resistance spot welding of a complicated welding configuration of three sheets of dissimilar steel sheet materials with shunt welds, using simulations. The configuration used resembles a case study of actual welds in automotive applications. One of the

  4. Finite element modeling of multipass GMA welds in steel plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    Distortions from gas metal arc (GMA) multipass welds of thick steel plates were measured in experiments and calculated using finite element analysis. Two- and three-dimensional finite element simulations were compared with the experimentally measured in-plane distortions in a 2-3/4 in. thick steel plate. Thermal analyses were performed using 2D models of the weld cross-section. These temperature histories were used for 2D and 3D mechanical analyses. Data for verification of thermal analyses included weld cross-sections, weld pool crater shape from power-off tests, and embedded and surface thermocouple temperature histories. Mechanical analyses were verified using caliper measurements of shrinkage transverse to the weld and strain gage measurements. Calculated in-plane shrinkage from the 3D model for 4 passes compared well with caliper measurements of a test specimen`s distortion. Two-dimensional mechanical analyses were not capable of predicting the accumulation of shrinkage occurring after the first pass.

  5. High power laser welding of thick steel plates in a horizontal butt joint configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atabaki, M. Mazar; Yazdian, N.; Ma, J.; Kovacevic, R.

    2016-09-01

    In this investigation, two laser-based welding techniques, autogenous laser welding (ALW) and laser welding assisted with a cold wire (LWACW), were applied to join thick plates of a structural steel (A36) in a horizontal narrow gap butt joint configuration. The main practical parameters including welding method and laser power were varied to get the sound weld with a requirement to achieve a full penetration with the reinforcement at the back side of weld in just one pass. The weld-bead shape, cross-section and mechanical properties were evaluated by profilometer, micro-hardness test and optical microscope. In order to investigate the stability of laser-induced plasma plume, the emitted optical spectra was detected and analyzed by the spectroscopy analysis. It was found that at the laser power of 7 kW a fully penetrated weld with a convex back side of weld could be obtained by the LWACW. The microstructural examinations showed that for the ALW the acicular ferrite and for the LWACW the pearlite were formed in the heat affected zone (HAZ). The prediction of microstructure based on continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagram and cooling curves obtained by thermocouple measurement were in good agreement with each other. According to the plasma ionization values obtained from the spectroscopy analysis the plume for both processes was recognized as dominated weakly ionized plasma including the main vaporized elemental composition. At the optimum welding condition (LWACW at the laser power of 7 kW) the fluctuation of the electron temperature was reduced. The spectroscopy analysis demonstrated that at the higher laser power more of the elemental compositions such as Mn and Fe were evaporated.

  6. Modeling the damage of welded steel, using the GTN model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Ahmar Kadi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our work is the modeling of the damage in the weld metal according to the finite element method and the concepts of fracture mechanics based on local approaches using the code ABAQUS calculates. The use of the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman model axisymmetric specimens AE type to three different zones (Base metal, molten metal and heat affected Zone with four levels of triaxiality (AE2, AE4, AE10 and AE80, we have used to model the behavior of damage to welded steel, which is described as being due to the growth and coalescence of cavities with high rates of triaxiality

  7. Assessment of methods in girth welds of steel pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, G.; Lukacs, J.; Toeroek, I. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Univ. of Miskolc Miskolc-Egyetemvaros (Hungary)

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents two basic methods for the assessment of failed girth welds of steel hydrocarbon transporting pipelines. One of them is based on the principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) and stress intensity factor conception for planar material discontinuities, and the other can be used for the complex assessment of all kinds of occurring defects. The results of the presented methods are compared to the results of burst test of pipeline sections containing a failed girth weld and cut from a Hungarian gas pipeline. (orig.)

  8. Microstructure characteristics of laser MIG hybrid welded mild steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ming; Zeng, Xiaoyan; Yan, Jun; Hu, Qianwu

    2008-07-01

    To deepen the understanding of laser-arc hybrid welding, the weld shape and microstructure characteristics of laser-metal inert gas hybrid welded mild steel were analyzed. The results showed typical hybrid weld could be classified as two parts: the wide upper zone and the narrow nether zone, which were defined as arc zone and laser zone, respectively. In the hybrid weld, the microstructure, alloy element distribution and microhardness all have evident difference between laser zone and arc zone. The microstructure of arc zone consists of coarse columnar dendrite and fine acicular dendrite between the columnar dendrites, but that of laser zone is composed of fine equiaxed dendrite in weld center and columnar dendrite around the equiaxed dendrite. Compared to arc zone, laser zone has finer grain size, higher microhardness, smaller alloy element content in the fusion zone and narrower heat affected zone. The discussions demonstrated that the observed difference was caused by the difference of temperature gradient, crystallizing and the effects of arc pressure on the molten pool between laser zone and arc zone.

  9. Effect of PTA Hardfaced Interlayer Thickness on Ballistic Performance of Shielded Metal Arc Welded Armor Steel Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, M.; Balasubramanian, V.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2013-03-01

    Ballistic performance of armor steel welds is very poor due to the usage of low strength and low hardness austenitic stainless steel fillers, which are traditionally used to avoid hydrogen induced cracking. In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to study the effect of plasma transferred arc hardfaced interlayer thickness on ballistic performance of shielded metal arc welded armor steel weldments. The usefulness of austenitic stainless steel buttering layer on the armor grade quenched and tempered steel base metal was also considered in this study. Joints were fabricated using three different thickness (4, 5.5, and 7 mm) hardfaced middle layer by plasma transferred arc hardfacing process between the top and bottom layers of austenitic stainless steel using shielded metal arc welding process. Sandwiched joint, in addition with the buttering layer served the dual purpose of weld integrity and ballistic immunity due to the high hardness of hardfacing alloy and the energy absorbing capacity of soft backing weld deposits. This paper will provide some insight into the usefulness of austenitic stainless steel buttering layer on the weld integrity and plasma transferred arc hardfacing layer on ballistic performance enhancement of armor steel welds.

  10. Numerical microstructural analysis of automotive-grade steels when joined with an array of welding processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, J.E.; Khurana, S.P.; Li, T.

    2004-01-01

    Weld strength, formability, and impact resistance for joints on automotive steels is dependent on the underlying microstructure. A martensitic weld area is often a precursor to reduced mechanical performance. In this paper, efforts are made to predict underlying joint microstructures for a range of processing approaches, steel types, and gauges. This was done first by calculating cooling rates for some typical automotive processes [resistance spot welding (RSW), resistance mash seam welding (RMSEW), laser beam welding (LBW), and gas metal arc welding (GMAW)]. Then, critical cooling rates for martensite formation were calculated for a range of automotive steels using an available thermodynamically based phase transformation model. These were then used to define combinations of process type, steel type, and gauge where welds could be formed avoiding martensite in the weld area microstructure

  11. Tig welding of stainless steel AISI 316 tubes for fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siqueira Queiroz Bittencourt, M. de.

    1985-01-01

    Sealing of austenitic stainless steel AISI 316 tubes (20% cold worked). By welding end-caps material was studied, aiming their utilization as fuel rods for nuclear reactors. It was used the autogenous TIG welding process. (author)

  12. Microstructure Characterization of Fiber Laser Welds of S690QL High-Strength Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baoming; Xu, Peiquan; Lu, Fenggui; Gong, Hongying; Cui, Haichao; Liu, Chuangen

    2018-02-01

    The use of fiber laser welding to join S690QL steels has attracted interest in the field of construction and assembly. Herein, 13-mm-thick S690QL welded joints were obtained without filler materials using the fiber laser. The as-welded microstructures and the impact energies of the joints were characterized and measured using electron microscopy in conjunction with high-resolution transmission electron images, X-ray diffraction, and impact tests. The results indicated that a single-sided welding technique could be used to join S690QL steels up to a thickness of 12 mm (fail to fuse the joint in the root) when the laser power is equal to 12 kW (scan speed 1 m/min). Double-side welding technique allows better weld penetration and better control of heat distribution. Observation of the samples showed that the fusion zone exhibited bainitic and martensitic microstructures with increased amounts of martensites (Ms) compared with the base materials. Also, the grains in the fusion zone increased in coarseness as the heat input was increased. The fusion zone exhibited increased hardness (397 HV0.2) while exhibiting a simultaneous decrease in the impact toughness. The maximum impact energy value of 26 J was obtained from the single-side-welded sample, which is greater than those obtained from the double-side-welded samples (maximum of 18 J). Many more dislocations and plastic deformations were found in the fusion zone than the heat-affected zone in the joint, which hardened the joints and lowered the impact toughness. The microstructures characterized by FTEM-energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer also exhibited laths of M, as well as stacking faults and dislocations featuring high-density, interfacial structure ledges that occur between the high-angle grain boundaries and the M and bainite.

  13. Defects detection on the welded reinforcing steel with self-shielded wires by vibration tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crâştiu Ion

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is the development and validation of a vibroacustic technique to welding defects detection, especially for welded reinforcing structures. In welded structures subjected to dynamic cyclic loads may appear and propagate fatigue cracks due to local structural damage. These cracks may initiate due to the technological parameters used in welding process, or due to environmental operating conditions. By the means of Finite Element Method (FEM, the natural frequencies and shape modes of more welded steel specimens are determined. The analysis is carried out in undamaged condition as well as damaged one, after artificially induced damages. The experimental measurement of the vibroacustic response is carried out by using a condenser microphone, which is suitable for high-fidelity acoustic measurements in the frequency range of 20 – 20.000 Hz. The vibration responses of the welded specimens, in free-free conditions, are carried out using algorithms based on Fast Fourier Transform (FFT, and Prony's series. The results are compared to modal parameters estimated using FE Analysis.

  14. Hardness analysis of welded joints of austenitic and duplex stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topolska, S.

    2016-08-01

    Stainless steels are widely used in the modern world. The continuous increase in the use of stainless steels is caused by getting greater requirements relating the corrosion resistance of all types of devices. The main property of these steels is the ability to overlap a passive layer of an oxide on their surface. This layer causes that they become resistant to oxidation. One of types of corrosion-resistant steels is ferritic-austenitic steel of the duplex type, which has good strength properties. It is easily formable and weldable as well as resistant to erosion and abrasive wear. It has a low susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking, to stress corrosion, to intercrystalline one, to pitting one and to crevice one. For these reasons they are used, among others, in the construction of devices and facilities designed for chemicals transportation and for petroleum and natural gas extraction. The paper presents the results which shows that the particular specimens of the ][joint representing both heat affected zones (from the side of the 2205 steel and the 316L one) and the weld are characterized by higher hardness values than in the case of the same specimens for the 2Y joint. Probably this is caused by machining of edges of the sections of metal sheets before the welding process, which came to better mixing of native materials and the filler metal. After submerged arc welding the 2205 steel still retains the diphase, austenitic-ferritic structure and the 316L steel retains the austenitic structure with sparse bands of ferrite σ.

  15. Risk of lung cancer according to mild steel and stainless steel welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anita Rath; Thulstrup, Ane Marie; Hansen, Johnni

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Whether the elevated risk of lung cancer observed among welders is caused by welding emissions or by confounding from smoking or asbestos exposure is still not resolved. This question was addressed in a cohort with a long follow-up and quantified estimates of individual exposure...... to welding fume particulates. METHODS: Male metal workers employed at least 1 year at one or more Danish stainless or mild steel industrial companies from 1964 through 1984 were enrolled in a cohort. Data on occupational and smoking history were obtained by questionnaire in 1986. Welders in the cohort who.......06-1.70)]. Among the stainless steel welders, the risk increased significantly with increasing accumulative welding particulate exposure, while no exposure-response relation was found for mild steel welders, even after adjustment for tobacco smoking and asbestos exposure. CONCLUSIONS: The study corroborates...

  16. The analysis of spot welding joints of steel sheets with closed profile by ultrasonic method

    OpenAIRE

    Dariusz Ulbrich; Jakub Kowalczyk; Marian Jósko; Jarosław Selech

    2015-01-01

    Resistance spot welding is widely used in the fabrication of vehicle bodies and parts of their equipment. The article presents the methodology and the results of non-destructive ultrasonic testing of resistance spot welded joints of thin steel sheet with closed profile. Non-destructive test results were verified on the basis of welded joint area after destructive testing. The obtained results were used to develop an assessment technique for spot welded joints of closed profile with steel shee...

  17. Residual Stresses in Inertia-Friction-Welded Dissimilar High-Strength Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moat, R. J.; Hughes, D. J.; Steuwer, A.; Iqbal, N.; Preuss, M.; Bray, S. E.; Rawson, M.

    2009-09-01

    The welding of dissimilar alloys is seen increasingly as a way forward to improve efficiencies in modern aeroengines, because it allows one to tailor varying material property demands across a component. Dissimilar inertia friction welding (IFW) of two high-strength steels, Aermet 100 and S/CMV, has been identified as a possible joint for rotating gas turbine components and the resulting welds are investigated in this article. In order to understand the impact of the welding process and predict the life expectancy of such structures, a detailed understanding of the residual stress fields present in the welded component is needed. By combining energy-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction (EDSXRD) and neutron diffraction, it has been possible to map the variations in lattice spacing of the ferritic phase on both sides of two tubular Aermet 100-S/CMV inertia friction welds (as-welded and postweld heat-treated condition) with a wall thickness of 37 mm. Laboratory-based XRD measurements were required to take into account the variation in the strain-free d-spacing across the weld region. It was found that, in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) slightly away from the weld line, residual stress fields showed tensile stresses increasing most dramatically in the hoop direction toward the weld line. Closer to the weld line, in the plastically affected zone, a sharp drop in the residual stresses was observed on both sides, although more dramatically in the S/CMV. In addition to residual stress mapping, synchrotron XRD measurements were carried out to map microstructural changes in thin slices cut from the welds. By studying the diffraction peak asymmetry of the 200- α diffraction peak, it was possible to demonstrate that a martensitic phase transformation in the S/CMV is responsible for the significant stress reduction close to the weld line. The postweld heat treatment (PWHT) chosen to avoid any overaging of the Aermet 100 and to temper the S/CMV martensite resulted in little

  18. Residual strains and microstructure development in single and sequential double sided friction stir welds in RQT-701 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, S.J.; Steuwer, A.; Mahawish, S.; Johnson, R.; Withers, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    Single and double sided partial penetration friction stir butt welds, in a rolled, quenched and tempered steel (RQT-701), were produced at The Welding Institute (TWI) under controlled process conditions. The residual strain distributions in the longitudinal and transverse directions have been measured using energy dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The measured strains were indicative of longitudinal tensile residual stresses at levels greater than the 0.2% yield stress of the parent metal in both the single and double pass welds. In both cases, the maximum tensile strain was found in the parent metal at the boundary of the heat affected zone (HAZ). Microstructural analysis of the welds was carried out using optical microscopy and hardness variations were also mapped across the weld-plate cross-section. The maximum hardness was observed in the mixed bainite/martensite structure of the weld nugget on the advancing side of the stir zone. The minimum hardness was observed in the HAZ

  19. Laser Welding Of Finned Tubes Made Of Austenitic Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stolecki M.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the technology of welding of finned tubes made of the X5CrNi1810 (1.4301 austenitic steel, developed at Energoinstal SA, allowing one to get high quality joints that meet the requirements of the classification societies (PN-EN 15614, and at the same time to significantly reduce the manufacturing costs. The authors described an automatic technological line equipped with a Trumph disc laser and a tube production technological process. To assess the quality of the joints, one performed metallographic examinations, hardness measurements and a technological attempt to rupture the fin. Analysis of the results proved that the laser-welded finned tubes were performed correctly and that the welded joints had shown no imperfections.

  20. Technology of Welding Joints Mixed with Duplex Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Słania J.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Results of the examinations of sample plates of mixed joints with the duplex steel were discussed. Examinations were taken on the sample plates of mixed joints of sheet plates type P355NL1 and X2CrNiMoN22-5-3 welded by the flux-cored wire DW-329A by the Kobelco company of the following category T 22 9 3 NL RC/M3 in the gas shroud M21 (Ar+18%CO2 (plate no.1, and nickel covered electrodes E Ni 6082 by the Böhler company (plate no. 2. Results of the side bend test of welded joint, transverse tensile test, stretching of the weld metal, impact strength, micro and macroscopic metallographic examinations, and measurements of the delta ferrite content were presented.

  1. Effect of Welding Processes on the Microstructure, Mechanical Properties and Residual Stresses of Plain 9Cr-1Mo Steel Weld Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraju, S.; Vasantharaja, P.; Brahadees, G.; Vasudevan, M.; Mahadevan, S.

    2017-12-01

    9Cr-1Mo steel designated as P9 is widely used in the construction of power plants and high-temperature applications. It is chosen for fabricating hexcan fuel subassembly wrapper components of fast breeder reactors. Arc welding processes are generally used for fabricating 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints. A-TIG welding process is increasingly being adopted by the industries. In the present study, shielded metal arc (SMA), tungsten inert gas (TIG) and A-TIG welding processes are used for fabricating the 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints of 10 mm thickness. Effect of the above welding processes on the microstructure evolution, mechanical properties and residual stresses of the weld joints has been studied in detail. All the three weld joints exhibited comparable strength and ductility values. 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joint fabricated by SMAW process exhibited lower impact toughness values caused by coarser grain size and inclusions. 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joint fabricated by TIG welding exhibited higher toughness due to finer grain size, while the weld joint fabricated by A-TIG welding process exhibited adequate toughness values. SMA steel weld joint exhibited compressive residual stresses in the weld metal and HAZ, while TIG and A-TIG weld joint exhibited tensile residual stresses in the weld metal and HAZ.

  2. IASCC susceptibility under BWR conditions of welded 304 and 347 stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castano, M.L.; Schaaf, B. van der; Roth, A.; Ohms, C.; Gavillet, D.; Dyck, S. van

    2004-01-01

    In-service cracking of Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) internal components has been attributed to Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC), a high temperature degradation process that austenitic stainless steels exhibit, when subjected to stress and exposed to relatively high fast neutron flux. Most of the cracking incidents in BWRs were associated to the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of welds. Although the maximum end-of- life dose for this structure is about 3 x 10 20 n/cm 2 , below the threshold fluence of 5 x 10 20 n/cm 2 (equivalent to ∼ 1 dpa) for IASCC in BWR of annealed materials, the influence of neutron irradiation in the weld and HAZ is still an open question. As a consequence of the welding process, residual stresses, microstructural and microchemical modifications are expected. In addition, exposure to neutron irradiation can induce variations in the material's characteristics that can modify the stress corrosion resistance of the welded components. While the IASCC susceptibility of base materials is being widely studied in many international projects, the specific conditions of irradiated weldments are rarely assessed. The INTERWELD project, partially financed by the 5. Framework program of the European Commission, was defined to elucidate neutron radiation induced changes in the HAZ of austenitic stainless steel welds that may promote intergranular cracking. To achieve this goal the evolution of residual stresses, microstructure, micro-chemistry, mechanical properties and the stress corrosion behaviour of irradiated materials are being evaluated. Fabrication of appropriate welds of 304 and 347 stainless steels, representative of core components, was performed. These weld materials were irradiated in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten to two neutron dose levels, i.e. 0.3 and 1 dpa. Complete characterization of the HAZ of both materials, before and after irradiation is performed. Measurements of residual

  3. Weldability of class 2 armor steel using gas tungsten arc welding

    OpenAIRE

    A. Karaaslan; C. Akca

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, microstructural and mechanical evaluations of class 2 armor steel after single-pass andpre-heated/single-pass welding were investigated to reveal the effect of pre-heating on heat affected zone (HAZ)in thin armor steel parts.Design/methodology/approach: In this research, class 2 armor steel parts were welded using single-passand pre-heated/single-pass conditions to examine optimal welding parameters in relatively thin parts. Weldedspecimens were investigated using opti...

  4. Laser-Beam Welding Impact on the Deformation Properties of Stainless Steels When Used for Automotive Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evin Emil

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Materials other than standard and advanced high strength steels are remarkable for the thin-walled structures of the car-body in recent years in order to safety enhancement, weight and emission reduction, corrosion resistance improvement. Thus, there are presented in the paper the deformation properties of laser welded austenitic AISI 304 and ferritic AISI 430 stainless steels compared to these one measured for the high strength low alloyed steel H220PD. The properties were researched by tensile test and 3-point bending test with fixed ends on specimens made of basic material and laser welded one. The specimens were welded by solid state fiber laser YLS-5000 in longitudinal direction (the load direction. The deformation properties such as strength, stiffness and deformation work were evaluated and compared. The strength and stiffness were calculated from tensile test results and the deformation work was calculated from both, tensile test and 3-point bending test results. There has been found only minor effect of laser welding to the deformation properties for high strength low alloyed steel H220PD and austenitic stainless steel AISI 304. Otherwise, the laser welding strongly influenced the deformation work of the ferritic stainless steel AISI 430 as well as the elongation at tensile test.

  5. Mitigation of sensitisation effects in unstabilised 12%Cr ferritic stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warmelo, Martin van; Nolan, David; Norrish, John

    2007-01-01

    Sensitisation in the heat-affected zones of ferritic stainless steel welds is typically prevented by stabilisation of the parent material with titanium or niobium, and suitable design of the overall composition to produce a suitably high ferrite factor. However, such alloy modification has proven to be economically unviable for thick gauge (>10 mm) plate products and therefore unstabilised 12%Cr (3CR12) material is still currently being used for heavy gauge structural applications in many parts of the world. The aim of the current work was to review the mechanisms responsible for sensitisation in these unstabilised ferritic stainless steels, and to characterise the sensitisation effects arising from multipass welding procedures. The objective was to determine the influence of welding parameters, and thereby to recommend mitigating strategies. Two particular sensitisation modes were found to occur in the current work, although only one was predominant and considered problematic from a practical perspective. It was found that with proper positioning of weld capping runs and control of weld overlap, it is possible to ensure that sensitising isotherms remain buried beneath the parent surface, and so reduce harmful corrosion effects

  6. Corrosion of Ultrasonic spot Welded Joints of Magnesium to Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Tsung-Yu; Santella, Michael L.

    Mixed-metal joining, especially between magnesium and steel, is one of the critical technologies in achieving light-weighting vehicle body construction. However, galvanic corrosion between mixed metal joints is inevitable but not well quantified. In this study, 1.6 mm thick Mg AZ31B-H24 was joined to 0.8 mm thick hot-dipped galvanized (HDG) mild steel by ultrasonic spot welding in lap-shear configuration. No specific corrosion protection was applied in order to study worst-case conditions for corrosion behavior. The approach used an automotive cyclic corrosion test — Ford Arizona Proving Ground Equivalent Corrosion Cycle (APGE), which includes cycles of dipping in a salt bath, air drying, then holding in constant humidity environment. Lap-shear strength of the joints decreased linearly with the exposure cycles. All the joints were either taken out of test cycle for mechanical test or they separated within the humidity chamber before 25th cycle. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the formation of Mg(OH)2 deposit in the crevice between the AZ31 and steel sheets and on the surface of the AZ31. The deposit grew thicker with cycles with exerting enough force to deform the AZ31 and HDG steel and causing a gradual opening of joints. The corrosion of the AZ31 was localized and nonuniform. The most severe corrosion occurred not at the intersection of AZ31 and the steel but rather 15-20 mm away from the spot welds.

  7. Radiographic evaluation for inspection of steel casting and welding parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilge, A.N.; Tugrul, B.

    1986-01-01

    Evaluation of the radiographs is an important stage of the radiography technique. In this study,the basis of the evaluation are defined and related international references are given with examples. Radiographic inspections for steel casting and welding parts are expanded applications. In Turkey,industrial quality controls are realized mostly on this type of the materials. The important points and different types of the discontinuities are explained with some radiographs. (author)

  8. Hazard of ultraviolet radiation emitted in gas metal arc welding of mild steel

    OpenAIRE

    Nakashima, Hitoshi; Utsunomiya, Akihiro; Takahashi, Jyunya; Fujii, Nobuyuki; Okuno, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) emitted during arc welding frequently causes keratoconjunctivitis and erythema in the workplace. The degree of hazard from UVR exposure depends on the welding method and conditions. Therefore, it is important to identify the UVR levels present under various conditions. Methods: We experimentally evaluated the UVR levels emitted in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of mild steel. We used both a pulsed welding current and a non-pulsed welding current. The shie...

  9. Microstructure and corrosion behavior of shielded metal arc-welded dissimilar joints comprising duplex stainless steel and low alloy steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, P. Bala; Muthupandi, V.; Sivan, V.; Srinivasan, P. Bala; Dietzel, W.

    2006-12-01

    This work describes the results of an investigation on a dissimilar weld joint comprising a boiler-grade low alloy steel and duplex stainless steel (DSS). Welds produced by shielded metal arc-welding with two different electrodes (an austenitic and a duplex grade) were examined for their microstructural features and properties. The welds were found to have overmatching mechanical properties. Although the general corrosion resistance of the weld metals was good, their pitting resistance was found to be inferior when compared with the DSS base material.

  10. CFRP-Strengthening and Long-Term Performance of Fatigue Critical Welds of a Steel Box Girder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland E. Koller

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Empa’s research efforts in the 1990s provided evidence that a considerable increase of the fatigue strength of welded aluminum beams can be achieved by externally bonding pultruded carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP laminates using rubber-toughened epoxies over the fatigue-weak welding zone on their tensile flange. The reinforcing effect obtained is determined by the stiffness of the unidirectional CFRP laminate which has twice the elastic modulus of aluminum. One can therefore easily follow that an unstressed CFRP laminate reinforcement of welded beams made of steel will not lead to a substantial increase in fatigue strength of the steel structure. This consideration led to the idea of prestressing an external reinforcement of the welded zone. The present investigation describes experimental studies to identify the adhesive system suitable for achieving high creep and fatigue strength of the prestressed CFRP patch. Experimental results (Wöhler-fields of shear-lap-specimens and welded steel beams reinforced with prestressed CFRP laminates are presented. The paper concludes by presenting a field application, the reinforcement of a steel pendulum by adhesively bonded prestressed CFRP laminates to the tensile flanges of the welded box girder. Inspections carried out periodically on this structure revealed neither prestress losses nor crack initiation after nine years of service.

  11. A Comparative Study of Fracture Toughness at Cryogenic Temperature of Austenitic Stainless Steel Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviles Santillana, I.; Boyer, C.; Fernandez Pison, P.; Foussat, A.; Langeslag, S. A. E.; Perez Fontenla, A. T.; Ruiz Navas, E. M.; Sgobba, S.

    2018-03-01

    The ITER magnet system is based on the "cable-in-conduit" conductor (CICC) concept, which consists of stainless steel jackets filled with superconducting strands. The jackets provide high strength, limited fatigue crack growth rate and fracture toughness properties to counteract the high stress imposed by, among others, electromagnetic loads at cryogenic temperature. Austenitic nitrogen-strengthened stainless steels have been chosen as base material for the jackets of the central solenoid and the toroidal field system, for which an extensive set of cryogenic mechanical property data are readily available. However, little is published for their welded joints, and their specific performance when considering different combinations of parent and filler metals. Moreover, the impact of post-weld heat treatments that are required for Nb3Sn formation is not extensively treated. Welds are frequently responsible for cracks initiated and propagated by fatigue during service, causing structural failure. It becomes thus essential to select the most suitable combination of parent and filler material and to assess their performance in terms of strength and crack propagation at operation conditions. An extensive test campaign has been conducted at 7 K comparing tungsten inert gas (TIG) welds using two fillers adapted to cryogenic service, EN 1.4453 and JK2LB, applied to two different base metals, AISI 316L and 316LN. A large set of fracture toughness data are presented, and the detrimental effect on fracture toughness of post-weld heat treatments (unavoidable for some of the components) is demonstrated. In this study, austenitic stainless steel TIG welds with various filler metals have undergone a comprehensive fracture mechanics characterization at 7 K. These results are directly exploitable and contribute to the cryogenic fracture mechanics properties database of the ITER magnet system. Additionally, a correlation between the impact in fracture toughness and microstructure

  12. Friction stir scribe welding technique for dissimilar joining of aluminium and galvanised steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tianhao [Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA; Sidhar, Harpreet [Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA; Mishra, Rajiv S. [Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA; Hovanski, Yuri [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Energy Materials and Manufacturing, Richland, WA, USA; Upadhyay, Piyush [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Energy Materials and Manufacturing, Richland, WA, USA; Carlson, Blair [General Motors Technical Center, Warren, MI, USA

    2017-10-04

    Friction stir scribe technology, a derivative of friction stir welding, was applied for the dissimilar lap welding of an aluminum alloy and galvanized mild steel sheets. During the process, the rotating tool with a cobalt steel scribe first penetrated the top material — aluminum — and then the scribe cut the bottom material — steel. The steel was displaced into the upper material to produce a characteristic hook feature. Lap welds were shear tested, and their fracture paths were studied. Welding parameters affected the welding features including hook height, which turned out to be highly related to fracture position. Therefore, in this paper, the relationships among welding parameters, hook height, joint strength and fracture position are presented. In addition, influence of zinc coating on joint strength was also studied. Keywords: friction stir scribe technology; dissimilar material welding; zinc coating; hook height; joint strength; fracture position

  13. Austenitic stainless steel-to-ferritic steel transition joint welding for elevated temperature service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, J.F.; Goodwin, G.M.; Slaughter, G.M.

    1978-01-01

    Transition weld joints between ferritic steels and austenitic stainless steels are required for fossil-fired power plants and proposed nuclear plants. The experience with these dissimilar-metal transition joints has been generally satisfactory, but an increasing number of failures of these joints is occurring prematurely in service. These concerns with transition joint service history prompted a program to develop more reliable joints for application in proposed nuclear power plants

  14. Fatigue in Welded High-Strength Steel Plate Elements under Stochastic Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerskov, Henning; Petersen, R.I.; Martinez, L. Lopez

    1999-01-01

    The present project is a part of an investigation on fatigue in offshore structures in high-strength steel. The fatigue life of plate elements with welded attachments is studied. The material used has a yield stress of ~ 810-840 MPa, and high weldability and toughness properties. Fatigue test...... series with constant amplitude loading and with various types of stochastic loading have been carried through on test specimens in high-strength steel, and - for a comparison - on test specimens in conventional offshore structural steel with a yield stress of ~ 400-410 MPa.A comparison between constant...... amplitude and variable amplitude fatigue test results shows shorter fatigue lives in variable amplitude loading than should be expected from the linear fatigue damage accumulation formula. Furthermore, in general longer fatigue lives were obtained for the test specimens in high-strength steel than those...

  15. Microstructures and mechanical properties of friction stir welded dissimilar steel-copper joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafari, M.; Abbasi, M.; Poursina, D.; Gheysarian, A. [University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bagheri, B. [Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Welding dissimilar metals by fusion welding is challenging. It results in welding defects. Friction stir welding (FSW) as a solid-state joining method can overcome these problems. In this study, 304L stainless steel was joined to copper by FSW. The optimal values of the welding parameters traverse speed, rotational speed, and tilt angle were obtained through Response surface methodology (RSM). Under optimal welding conditions, the effects of welding pass number on the microstructures and mechanical properties of the welded joints were investigated. Results indicated that appropriate values of FSW parameters could be obtained by RSM and grain size refinement during FSW mainly affected the hardness in the weld regions. Furthermore, the heat from the FSW tool increased the grain size in the Heat-affected zones (HAZs), especially on the copper side. Therefore, the strength and ductility decreased as the welding pass number increased because of grain size enhancement in the HAZs as the welding pass number increased.

  16. Through-Thickness Residual Stress Profiles in Austenitic Stainless Steel Welds: A Combined Experimental and Prediction Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, J.; Moat, R. J.; Paddea, S.; Francis, J. A.; Fitzpatrick, M. E.; Bouchard, P. J.

    2017-12-01

    Economic and safe management of nuclear plant components relies on accurate prediction of welding-induced residual stresses. In this study, the distribution of residual stress through the thickness of austenitic stainless steel welds has been measured using neutron diffraction and the contour method. The measured data are used to validate residual stress profiles predicted by an artificial neural network approach (ANN) as a function of welding heat input and geometry. Maximum tensile stresses with magnitude close to the yield strength of the material were observed near the weld cap in both axial and hoop direction of the welds. Significant scatter of more than 200 MPa was found within the residual stress measurements at the weld center line and are associated with the geometry and welding conditions of individual weld passes. The ANN prediction is developed in an attempt to effectively quantify this phenomenon of `innate scatter' and to learn the non-linear patterns in the weld residual stress profiles. Furthermore, the efficacy of the ANN method for defining through-thickness residual stress profiles in welds for application in structural integrity assessments is evaluated.

  17. Laser Overlap Welding of Zinc-coated Steel on Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashani, Hamed Tasalloti; Kah, Paul; Martikainen, Jukka

    Local reinforcement of aluminum with laser welded patches of zinc-coated steel can effectively contribute to crashworthiness, durability and weight reduction of car body. However, the weld between Zn-coated steel and aluminum is commonly susceptible to defects such as spatter, cavity and crack. The vaporization of Zn is commonly known as the main source of instability in the weld pool and cavity formation, especially in a lap joint configuration. Cracks are mainly due to the brittle intermetallic compounds growing at the weld interface of aluminum and steel. This study provides a review on the main metallurgical and mechanical concerns regarding laser overlap welding of Zn-coated steel on Al-alloy and the methods used by researchers to avoid the weld defects related to the vaporization of Zn and the poor metallurgical compatibility between steel and aluminum.

  18. Fitness-for-Purpose Evaluation of Hydraulic Steel Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    sample of the steel , then make and test some Charpy specimens. A minimum of three specimens should be tested from each plate or structural shape...48 Relating Charpy Test to Fracture Toughness...requires some knowledge of the fracture toughness of the steel and/or weld metal, which may be estimated from the Charpy energy, or CVN (Barsom and Rolfe

  19. Effect of process parameters on optimum welding condition of DP590 steel by friction stir welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Gon; Kim, Ji Sun; Kim, In Ju

    2014-01-01

    In the automotive industry, vehicle weight reduction techniques have been actively studied to improve the rate of fuel consumption and to cope with the regulation restricting exhaust gas. For this reason, advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) is preferred in the automobile industry as its tensile strength is 590 MPa and over. In this study, to obtain the optimum welding condition, the friction stir welding (FSW) process applied to AHSS was considered. The FSW experiment was performed on a stir plate using a Si 3 N 4 tool and a 1.4-mm thick DP590 steel sheet manufactured by cold rolling. In addition, to investigate the temperature distribution of the advancing and retreating sides in the welding state, the tool rotation speed of 800 rpm, and the welding speed of 180 mm/min, a K-type thermocouple was inserted in the backing plate, and the peak temperature was evaluated at each point. Especially, the correlation between the heat input per unit length and the formation of the FSW zone was minutely analyzed.

  20. Multi objective Taguchi optimization approach for resistance spot welding of cold rolled TWIP steel sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutar, Mumin; Aydin, Hakan; Bayram, Ali

    2017-08-01

    Formability and energy absorption capability of a steel sheet are highly desirable properties in manufacturing components for automotive applications. TWinning Induced Plastisity (TWIP) steels are, new generation high Mn alloyed steels, attractive for the automotive industry due to its outstanding elongation (%40-45) and tensile strength (~1000MPa). So, TWIP steels provide excellent formability and energy absorption capability. Another required property from the steel sheets is suitability for manufacturing methods such as welding. The use of the steel sheets in the automotive applications inevitably involves welding. Considering that there are 3000-5000 welded spots on a vehicle, it can be interpreted that one of the most important manufacturing method is Resistance Spot Welding (RSW) for the automotive industry. In this study; firstly, TWIP steel sheet were cold rolled to 15% reduction in thickness. Then, the cold rolled TWIP steel sheets were welded with RSW method. The welding parameters (welding current, welding time and electrode force) were optimized for maximizing the peak tensile shear load and minimizing the indentation of the joints using a Taguchi L9 orthogonal array. The effect of welding parameters was also evaluated by examining the signal-to-noise ratio and analysis of variance (ANOVA) results.

  1. Stainless steel welding and semen quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelnes, J E; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.

    1988-01-01

    Questionnaire studies of patients from fertility clinics suggest that welders may have an increased risk of reduced semen quality. In this study, welders and nonwelders from the same plants were asked to provide blood, urine, and semen samples. Urine was analyzed for chromium and nickel, and for ......Questionnaire studies of patients from fertility clinics suggest that welders may have an increased risk of reduced semen quality. In this study, welders and nonwelders from the same plants were asked to provide blood, urine, and semen samples. Urine was analyzed for chromium and nickel...... and nonwelders. Because the metal dust exposure of nonwelders in the plant may be higher than that in the general population, welders were also compared to referents not working in the metal industry. Again, no decrease in semen quality associated with welding was demonstrated....

  2. Three-Sheet Spot Welding of Advanced High-Strength Steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Friis, Kasper Storgaard; Zhang, W.

    2011-01-01

    The automotive industry has introduced the three-layer weld configuration, which represents new challenges compared to normal two-sheet lap welds. The process is further complicated by introducing high-strength steels in the joint. The present article investigates the weldability of thin, low....... The weld mechanisms are analyzed numerically and compared with metallographic analyses showing how the primary bonding mechanism between the thin, low-carbon steel sheet and the thicker sheet of high-strength steel is solid-state bonding, whereas the two high-strength steels are joined by melting, forming...... a weld nugget at their mutual interface. Despite the absence of the typical fusion nugget through the interface between the low-carbon steel and high-strength steel, the weld strengths obtained are acceptable. The failure mechanism in destructive testing is ductile fracture with plug failure....

  3. Welding simulation and fatigue assessment of tubular K-joints in high-strength steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamiri Akhlaghi, F.

    2014-01-01

    Application of newly developed high strength steel hollow sections is increasing in construction industry – especially for bridge structures – due to their satisfactory material properties and fabrication advantages. These sections allow for longer spans, more slender structures. Savings in weight and volume of material compared to traditional steel grades increase sustainability of construction and compensate for part of higher unit cost of material. Nevertheless, use of high strength steels cannot be promoted unless potential fatigue issues are properly addressed. Two fabrication methods are currently available for the planar Warren trusses made of circular hollow sections (CHS): welding the tubes together, or using cast steel nodes and connecting truss members to them by girth welds. Previous research on tubular bridge trusses indicates that the problematic fatigue cracking sites for the first fabrication method are located at weld toes in the gap region of the truss joints. For the second method, cracking occurs at the root of CHS–cast butt welds. Fatigue performance of these two methods were investigated by constant amplitude fatigue testing of two full scale trusses made of steel grade S690QH and with a geometry similar to previous S355J2H investigation. Fatigue lives of K-joints were in agreement with current recommended code values. For CHS–cast welded connections, no visible cracking was observed up to 2£10 6 cycles. Due to the effect of residual stresses, fatigue cracking was observed in compressive joints as well as tensile joints. Indeed, tensile welding residual stresses keep the crack open during all or part of the compressive load cycle. Their distribution and impact on fatigue life of tubular joints has not been fully investigated before for a complex detail such as Tubular K-joint made of high strength steel. Experimental and numerical methods were utilized for assessment of welding residual stresses. Neutron diffraction experiments were

  4. Welding simulation and fatigue assessment of tubular K-joints in high-strength steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamiri Akhlaghi, F.

    2014-07-01

    Application of newly developed high strength steel hollow sections is increasing in construction industry – especially for bridge structures – due to their satisfactory material properties and fabrication advantages. These sections allow for longer spans, more slender structures. Savings in weight and volume of material compared to traditional steel grades increase sustainability of construction and compensate for part of higher unit cost of material. Nevertheless, use of high strength steels cannot be promoted unless potential fatigue issues are properly addressed. Two fabrication methods are currently available for the planar Warren trusses made of circular hollow sections (CHS): welding the tubes together, or using cast steel nodes and connecting truss members to them by girth welds. Previous research on tubular bridge trusses indicates that the problematic fatigue cracking sites for the first fabrication method are located at weld toes in the gap region of the truss joints. For the second method, cracking occurs at the root of CHS–cast butt welds. Fatigue performance of these two methods were investigated by constant amplitude fatigue testing of two full scale trusses made of steel grade S690QH and with a geometry similar to previous S355J2H investigation. Fatigue lives of K-joints were in agreement with current recommended code values. For CHS–cast welded connections, no visible cracking was observed up to 2£10{sup 6} cycles. Due to the effect of residual stresses, fatigue cracking was observed in compressive joints as well as tensile joints. Indeed, tensile welding residual stresses keep the crack open during all or part of the compressive load cycle. Their distribution and impact on fatigue life of tubular joints has not been fully investigated before for a complex detail such as Tubular K-joint made of high strength steel. Experimental and numerical methods were utilized for assessment of welding residual stresses. Neutron diffraction experiments

  5. Influence of explosive welding parameters on properties of bimetal Ti-carbon steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prazmowski Mariusz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Explosion welding of metals is a process of great technological significance in terms of modern metal composites manufacturing possibilities Nevertheless, selecting welding parameters is not an easy task. This paper assesses the effect of various values of distance of sheets on the quality of the bond zone in titanium (Ti Gr.1 - carbon steel (P355GH structure. The research was carried out for initial state bonds i.e. immediately following explosion welding. The results of mechanical and structural investigations were presented. In order to determine changes in the value of strengthening, microhardness tests of both the weld and the joined plates were performed. Performed metallographic analysis shows that the standoff distance affects the quality of the bond zone boundary. Smaller distance promotes the formation of waves with lower parameters (of length and height, whereas greater distances allow forming the bond of a more pronounced, repetitive wavy character, however, increasing the quantity of the fusion zone at the same time. Also, the initial distance between the materials to be joined makes for the strengthening in the areas adjacent to bond boundary. The results received allowed to conclude that for the assumed parameters it is possible to obtain Ti -carbon steel bi-metal with properties meeting the standard’s requirements.

  6. Modeling growth and dissolution of inclusions during fusion welding of steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Tao

    The characteristics of inclusions in the weld metals are critical factors to determine the structure, properties and performance of weldments. The research in the present thesis applied computational modeling to study inclusion behavior considering thermodynamics and kinetics of nucleation, growth and dissolution of inclusion along its trajectory calculated from the heat transfer and fluid flow model in the weld pool. The objective of this research is to predict the characteristics of inclusions, such as composition, size distribution, and number density in the weld metal from different welding parameters and steel compositions. To synthesize the knowledge of thermodynamics and kinetics of nucleation, growth and dissolution of inclusion in the liquid metal, a set of time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagrams are constructed to represent the effects of time and temperature on the isothermal growth and dissolution behavior of fourteen types of individual inclusions. The non-isothermal behavior of growth and dissolution of inclusions is predicted from their isothermal behavior by constructing continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams using Scheil additive rule. A well verified fluid flow and heat transfer model developed at Penn State is used to calculate the temperature and velocity fields in the weld pool for different welding processes. A turbulent model considering enhanced viscosity and thermal conductivity (k-ε model) is applied. The calculations show that there is vigorous circulation of metal in the weld pool. The heat transfer and fluid flow model helps to understand not only the fundamentals of the physical phenomena (luring welding, but also the basis to study the growth and dissolution of inclusions. The calculations of particle tracking of thousands of inclusions show that most inclusions undergo complex gyrations and thermal cycles in the weld pool. The inclusions experience both growth and dissolution during their lifetime. Thermal cycles of

  7. Effect of Heat Input on Microstructure and Hardness Distribution of Laser Welded Si-Al TRIP-Type Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Grajcar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is concerned with issues related to laser welding of Si-Al type TRIP steels with Nb and Ti microadditions. The tests of laser welding of thermomechanically rolled sheet sections were carried out using keyhole welding and a solid-state laser. The tests carried out for various values of heat input were followed by macro- and microscopic metallographic investigations as well as by microhardness measurements of welded areas. A detailed microstructural analysis was carried out in the penetration area and in various areas of the heat affected zone (HAZ. Special attention was paid to the influence of cooling conditions on the stabilisation of retained austenite, the most characteristic structural component of TRIP steels. The tests made it possible to determine the maximum value of heat input preventing the excessive grain growth in HAZ and to identify the areas of the greatest hardness reaching 520 HV0.1.

  8. Welded repair joints of boiler steels following operation in creep conditions exceeding the design time of operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrzanski, J.; Paszkowska, H.; Zielinski, A. [Institute for Ferrous Metallurgy, Gliwice (Poland)

    2010-07-01

    The assessment of suitability for further operation for materials and welded repair joints of thick-walled main steam pipeline components, made of steel 14MoV63, as well as steam superheater outlet headers made of steel X20CrMoV121 following operation in creep conditions in time periods considerably longer than the specified calculated time of operation. Strength properties, impact strength and transition temperature into brittle condition, as well as structure condition have been evaluated. On the basis of shortened creep tests, the residual life and disposable residual life of materials and welded joints have been determined. Material properties following operation and those of fabricated circumferential welded repair joints have been compared. The condition of examined components and suitability of the fabricated welded repair joints for further operation have been assessed. (orig.)

  9. Evaluation of cold crack susceptibility on HSLA steel welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silverio-Freire Júnior, R. C.

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study addresses an evaluation of the effect of several welding parameters on cold cracking formation in welded joints of High Strength and Low Alloy steels, as well as the resulting microstructures and hardness values. The main parameters studied include the variation of the preheating temperature, drying time of the electrode, chemical composition and thickness of the base metal. The presence of cold cracking in the joints was analyzed from Tekken tests using steel plates made of SAR 80 T, 100 T and 120 T with of various thickness. The plates were welded by Shielded Metal Arc Welding either with or without pre-heating. Different preheating temperatures were studied, i.e., 375, 455 and 525 K. AWS E 12018 G and 11018 G electrodes were used under different conditions, i.e., not dried or dried up to 2, 3 and 4 h at 515 K. The results indicated the presence of cracks in the welded metals with the combination of hardness values above 230 HV and the formation of high contents of acicular ferrite (above 93 % in the welds without preheating. Higher crack susceptibility was also observed in the thick welded metal plates.

    Este trabajo evalúa la influencia de la variación de temperatura de precalentamiento, del tiempo de secado del electrodo, de la composición química y del espesor del metal base sobre la formación de fisuras en frío, inducidas por el hidrógeno en juntas soldadas de aceros de alta resistencia y baja aleación y su relación con la microestructura y dureza resultante. Para esto, se analizó la presencia de fisuras en frío en probetas para ensayos Tekken, fabricadas a partir de chapas de aceros SAR 80 T, 100 T y 120 T, con diferentes espesores y soldados por proceso de arco eléctrico con electrodo revestido, sin precalentamiento y con precalentamiento, a 375, 455 y 525 K, empleando electrodos AWS E 12018 G y 11018 G no secados y secados durante 2, 3 y 4 h. Los resultados obtenidos indicaron la presencia de fisuras

  10. Performance of high molybdenum superaustenitic stainless steel welds in harsh chloride environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenvall, P.; Liljas, M.; Wallen, B.

    1996-01-01

    Superaustenitic steels are normally welded with nickel-based alloys as filler materials. To clarify the understanding of weld behavior in superaustenitic stainless steels this paper presents the development history of 6Mo and 7Mo steels, and results of laboratory tests and field tests on welds of UNS S31254 (6Mo) and UNS S32654 (7 Mo) in different types of chloride containing environments. The laboratory tests consisted of the well known ferric chloride test (ASTM G 48 Method A). Shielded metal arc welds, gas tungsten arc welds and submerged arc welds in both grades were tested. The critical pitting temperatures were determined and the locations of the attack were noted. Some specimens were sectioned at the position of the attack followed by studies using light optical microscopy. The critical pitting temperatures of the welds in S31254 and S32654 were at normal levels for both grades, i.e., 40--50 C for S31254 and 60--75 C for S32654. The locations of the attack differed depending on the welding process. In shielded metal arc welds the attack was mostly located in the weld metal. In gas tungsten arc welds the attack was predominantly located next to the fusion line. The field tests showed that the behavior of welds and parent metal of superaustenitic stainless steels, as well as of nickel-based alloys, is much dependent on the corrosive environment. In oxidizing chloride solutions, similar results to those of the ferric chloride test, are observed. However, crevice corrosion in the parent material is at a greater risk than pitting corrosion in the welds. In very oxidizing solutions of low chloride concentrations, welds made of nickel-based fillers may corrode faster than the stainless steel base metal due to transpassive uniform corrosion. The opposite situation exists when active uniform corrosion prevails, i.e., welds made of nickel-based fillers corrode less than the stainless steel parent material

  11. Systematic investigation of the fatigue performance of a friction stir welded low alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toumpis, Athanasios; Galloway, Alexander; Molter, Lars; Polezhayeva, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The fatigue behaviour of a friction stir welded low alloy steel has been assessed. • The welds’ fatigue lives outperform the International Institute of Welding’s recommendations for fusion welds. • The slow weld exhibits the best fatigue performance of the investigated welds. • Fracture surface analysis shows that minor embedded flaws do not offer crack initiation sites. • Process-related surface breaking flaws have a significant effect on the fatigue life. - Abstract: A comprehensive fatigue performance assessment of friction stir welded DH36 steel has been undertaken to address the relevant knowledge gap for this process on low alloy steel. A detailed set of experimental procedures specific to friction stir welding has been put forward, and the consequent study extensively examined the weld microstructure and hardness in support of the tensile and fatigue testing. The effect of varying welding parameters was also investigated. Microstructural observations have been correlated to the weldments’ fatigue behaviour. The typical fatigue performance of friction stir welded steel plates has been established, exhibiting fatigue lives well above the weld detail class of the International Institute of Welding even for tests at 90% of yield strength, irrespective of minor instances of surface breaking flaws which have been identified. An understanding of the manner in which these flaws impact on the fatigue performance has been established, concluding that surface breaking irregularities such as these produced by the tool shoulder’s features on the weld top surface can be the dominant factor for crack initiation under fatigue loading

  12. Weld metal characterization of 316L(N) austenitic stainless steel by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present work is focused on EBW of 316L(N) austenitic stainless steel varying the welding parameters such as beam power and welding speed. This study is carried out by analyzing the mechanical and metallurgical properties of the welded material. The mechanical properties have been evaluated using tensile, impact, ...

  13. Mechanical Properties of Steel P92 Welded Joints Obtained By TIG Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohyla, P.; Havelka, L.; Schmidová, E.; Vontorová, J.

    2017-11-01

    Mechanical properties of P92 steel welded joints obtained using the TIG (141) technology have been studied upon post-welding heat treatment (PWHT). The microhardness, tensile strength, and impact toughness of metal in the weld and heat-affected zone are determined. The PWHT is shown to be obligatory.

  14. Metallographic Characteristics of Stainless Steel Overlay Weld with Resistance to Hydrogen-Induced Disbonding : Study on a Stainless Steel Overlay Welding Process for Superior Resistance to Disbonding (Report 3)

    OpenAIRE

    Akiyoshi, FUJI; Etsuo, KUDO; Tomoyuki, TAKAHASHI; The Japan Steel Works, Ltd., Muroran Plant; The Japan Steel Works, Ltd., Muroran Plant; The Japan Steel Works, Ltd., Muroran Plant

    1986-01-01

    The metallographic characteristics of the disbanding resistant stainless steel overlay weld were studied and compared with those of the conventional overlay weld. It was found that the first layer overlay weld metal of the disbanding resistant overlay weld consisted of austenite and martensite after regular post-weld heat treatment. A coarse planar grain, which strongly affects the disbanding resistance of over-lay welds, scarcely existed in the disbanding resistant overlay weld. A higher wel...

  15. Effect of beam oscillation on borated stainless steel electron beam welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RajaKumar, Guttikonda [Tagore Engineering College, Chennai (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Ram, G.D. Janaki [Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Chennai (India). Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering; Rao, S.R. Koteswara [SSN College of Engineering, Chennai (India). Mechanical Engineering

    2015-07-01

    Borated stainless steels are used in nuclear power plants to control neutron criticality in reactors as control rods, shielding material, spent fuel storage racks and transportation casks. In this study, bead on plate welds were made using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and electron beam welding (EBW) processes. Electron beam welds made using beam oscillation technique exhibited higher tensile strength values compared to that of GTA welds. Electron beam welds were found to show fine dendritic microstructure while GTA welds exhibited larger dendrites. While both processes produced defect free welds, GTA welds are marked by partially melted zone (PMZ) where the hardness is low. EBW obviate the PMZ failure due to low heat input and in case of high heat input GTA welding process failure occurs in the PMZ.

  16. Tensile properties of shielded metal arc welded dissimilar joints of nuclear grade ferritic steel and austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthick, K.; Malarvizhi, S.; Balasubramanian, V.; Krishnan, S. A.; Sasikala, G.; Albert, Shaju K.

    2016-12-01

    In nuclear power plants, modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel (Grade 91 or P91) is used for constructing steam generators (SG's) whereas austenitic stainless steel (AISI 316LN) is a major structural member for intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). Therefore, a dissimilar joint between these materials is unavoidable. In this investigation, dissimilar joints were fabricated by Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) process with Inconel 82/182 filler metals. Transverse tensile properties and Charpy V-notch impact toughness for different regions of dissimilar joints of modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel and AISI 316LN austenitic stainless steel were evaluated as per the standards. Microhardness distribution across the dissimilar joint was recorded. Microstructural features of different regions were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The transverse tensile properties of the joint is found to be inferior to base metals. Impact toughness values of different regions of dissimilar metal weld joint (DMWJ) is slightly higher than the prescribed value. Formation of a soft zone at the outer edge of the HAZ will reduce the tensile properties of DMWJ. The complex microstructure developed at the interfaces of DMWJ will reduce the impact toughness values.

  17. Tensile Properties of Under-Matched Weld Joints for 950 MPa Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kouji; Arakawa, Toshiaki; Akazawa, Nobuki; Yamamoto, Kousei; Matsuo, Hiroki; Nakagara, Kiyoyuki; Suita, Yoshikazu

    In welding of 950 MPa-class high tensile strength steel, preheating is crucial in order to avoid cold cracks, which, however, eventually increases welding deformations. One way to decrease welding deformations is lowering preheating temperature by using under-matched weld metal. Toyota and others clarify that although breaking elongation can decrease due to plastic constraint effect under certain conditions, static tensile of under-matched weld joints is comparable to that of base metal. However, there has still been no report about joint static tensile of under-matched weld joints applied to 950 MPa-class high tensile strength steel. In this study, we aim to research tensile strength and fatigue strength of under-matched weld joints applied to 950 MPa-class high tensile steel.

  18. Recent studies on the welding of austenitic stainless steel piping for BWR service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    The incidence of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in stainless steel piping in BWR power plants has led to the development of various countermeasures. Replacement of the susceptible Type 304 stainless steel with Type 316 nuclear grade stainless steel has been done by a number of plants. In order to minimize radiation exposure to welding personnel, automatic GTA welding has been used wherever possible when we make the field welds. Studies have shown that the residual stresses in the welded butt joints are affected by the welding process, weld joint design and welding procedures. A new weld joint design has been developed which minimizes the volume of deposited metal while providing adequate access for welding. It also minimizes axial and radial shrinkage and the resulting residual stresses. Other countermeasures, which have been used, include stress modifications such as induction heating stress improvement (IHSI) and last pass heat sink welding (LPHSW). It has been shown that these remedies must be process adjusted to account for the welding process employed. In some cases where UT cracking indication have been detected or where through wall cracking has occurred, weld surfacing has been used to extend life. A further approach to preventing IGSCC in the weld HAZ has been through improvement of the water chemistry by injecting hydrogen to reduce the oxygen level and by keeping the impurity level low

  19. Microstructural, Micro-hardness and Sensitization Evaluation in HAZ of Type 316L Stainless Steel Joint with Narrow Gap Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Faisal Shafiqul; Jang, Changheui [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Shi Chull [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    From Micro-hardness measurement HAZ zone was found approximately 1-1.5 mm in NGW and DL-EPR test confirmed that 316L NGW HAZ was not susceptible to sensitization as DOS <1% according to sensitization criteria based on reference. In nuclear power plants 316L stainless steels are commonly used material for their metallurgical stability, high corrosion resistance, and good creep and ductility properties at elevated temperatures. Welding zone considered as the weakest and failure initiation source of the components. For safety and economy of nuclear power plants accurate and dependable structural integrity assessment of main components like pressure vessels and piping are need as it joined by different welding process. In similar and dissimilar metal weld it has been observed that weld microstructure cause the variation of mechanical properties through the thickness direction. In the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) relative to the fusion line face a unique thermal experience during welding.

  20. 77 FR 60478 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... Metal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft regulatory guide; request for comment... draft regulatory guide (DG), DG-1279, ``Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.'' This... stainless steel weld metal. Revision 4 updates the guide to remove references to outdated standards and to...

  1. 75 FR 76025 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, Korea, and Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, Korea, and Taiwan AGENCY: United States... stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Japan, Korea, and Taiwan would be likely to lead to...

  2. 76 FR 66893 - Certain Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From India, Thailand, and Turkey; Final...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ...] Certain Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From India, Thailand, and Turkey; Final Results of... circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from India, Thailand, and Turkey, pursuant to section 751(c..., Thailand, and Turkey. See Antidumping Duty Order; Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipes and Tubes from...

  3. 76 FR 78614 - Welded ASTM A-312 Stainless Steel Pipe From South Korea and Taiwan: Continuation of Antidumping...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-19

    ... International Trade Administration Welded ASTM A-312 Stainless Steel Pipe From South Korea and Taiwan... welded ASTM A-312 stainless steel pipe from South Korea (Korea) and Taiwan would likely lead to.... See Welded ASTM A-312 Stainless Steel Pipe From South Korea and Taiwan: Final Results of Expedited...

  4. Structural amorphous steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Z.P.; Liu, C.T.; Porter, W.D.; Thompson, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    Recent advancement in bulk metallic glasses, whose properties are usually superior to their crystalline counterparts, has stimulated great interest in fabricating bulk amorphous steels. While a great deal of effort has been devoted to this field, the fabrication of structural amorphous steels with large cross sections has remained an alchemist's dream because of the limited glass-forming ability (GFA) of these materials. Here we report the discovery of structural amorphous steels that can be cast into glasses with large cross-section sizes using conventional drop-casting methods. These new steels showed interesting physical, magnetic, and mechanical properties, along with high thermal stability. The underlying mechanisms for the superior GFA of these materials are discussed

  5. Friction Welding For Cladding Applications: Processing, Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Inertia Friction Welds of Stainless Steel to Low Carbon Steel and Evaluation of Wrought and Welded Austenitic Stainless Steels for Cladding Applications in Acidchloride Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzner, Nathan

    Friction welding, a solid-state joining method, is presented as a novel alternative process step for lining mild steel pipe and forged components internally with a corrosion resistant (CR) metal alloy for petrochemical applications. Currently, fusion welding is commonly used for stainless steel overlay cladding, but this method is costly, time-consuming, and can lead to disbonding in service due to a hard martensite layer that forms at the interface due to partial mixing at the interface between the stainless steel CR metal and the mild steel base. Firstly, the process parameter space was explored for inertia friction butt welding using AISI type 304L stainless steel and AISI 1018 steel to determine the microstructure and mechanical properties effects. A conceptual model for heat flux density versus radial location at the faying surface was developed with consideration for non-uniform pressure distribution due to frictional forces. An existing 1 D analytical model for longitudinal transient temperature distribution was modified for the dissimilar metals case and to account for material lost to the flash. Microstructural results from the experimental dissimilar friction welds of 304L stainless steel to 1018 steel were used to discuss model validity. Secondly, the microstructure and mechanical property implications were considered for replacing the current fusion weld cladding processes with friction welding. The nominal friction weld exhibited a smaller heat softened zone in the 1018 steel than the fusion cladding. As determined by longitudinal tensile tests across the bond line, the nominal friction weld had higher strength, but lower apparent ductility, than the fusion welds due to the geometric requirements for neck formation adjacent to a rigid interface. Martensite was identified at the dissimilar friction weld interface, but the thickness was smaller than that of the fusion welds, and the morphology was discontinuous due to formation by a mechanism of solid

  6. Effect of Welding Process on Microstructure, Mechanical and Pitting Corrosion Behaviour of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    An attempt has been made to weld 2205 Duplex stainless steel of 6mm thick plate using conventional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and activated gas tungsten arc welding (A- GTAW) process using silica powder as activated flux. Present work is aimed at studying the effect of welding process on depth of penetration, width of weld zone of 2205 duplex stainless steel. It also aims to observe the microstructural changes and its effect on mechanical properties and pitting corrosion resistance of 2205 duplex stainless steel welds. Metallography is done to observe the microstructural changes of the welds using image analyzer attached to the optical microscopy. Hardness studies, tensile and ductility bend tests were evaluated for mechanical properties. Potentio-dynamic polarization studies were carried out using a basic GillAC electro-chemical system in 3.5% NaCl solution to observe the pitting corrosion behaviour. Results of the present investigation established that increased depth of penetration and reduction of weld width in a single pass by activated GTAW with the application of SiO2 flux was observed when compared with conventional GTAW process. It may be attributed to the arc constriction effect. Microstructure of the weld zones for both the welds is observed to be having combination of austenite and delta ferrite. Grain boundary austenite (GBA) with Widmanstatten-type austenite (WA) of plate-like feature was nucleated from the grain boundaries in the weld zone of A-GTAW process. Mechanical properties are relatively low in activated GTAW process and are attributed to changes in microstructural morphology of austenite. Improved pitting corrosion resistance was observed for the welds made with A-GTAW process.

  7. Special Features of Induction Annealing of Friction Stir Welded Joints of Medium-Alloy Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priymak, E. Yu.; Stepanchukova, A. V.; Bashirova, E. V.; Fot, A. P.; Firsova, N. V.

    2018-01-01

    Welded joints of medium-alloy steels XJY750 and 40KhN2MA are studied in the initial condition and after different variants of annealing. Special features of the phase transformations occurring in the welded steels are determined. Optimum modes of annealing are recommended for the studied welded joints of drill pipes, which provide a high level of mechanical properties including the case of impact loading.

  8. Qualification of electron-beam welded joints between copper and stainless steel for cryogenic application

    OpenAIRE

    Lusch, C.; Borsch, M.; Heidt, C.; Magginetti, N.; Sas, J.; Weiss, K.-P.; Grohmann, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Joints between copper and stainless steel are commonly applied in cryogenic systems. A relatively new and increasingly important method to combine these materials is electron-beam (EB) welding. Typically, welds in cryogenic applications need to withstand a temperature range from 300K down to 4 K, and pressures of several MPa. However, few data are available for classifying EB welds between OFHC copper and 316L stainless steel. A broad test program was conducted in order to qualify this kind o...

  9. Occupational asthma due to manual metal-arc welding of special stainless steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannu, T; Piipari, R; Kasurinen, H; Keskinen, H; Tuppurainen, M; Tuomi, T

    2005-10-01

    Occupational asthma (OA) can be induced by fumes of manual metal-arc welding on stainless steel. In recent years, the use of special stainless steels (SSS) with high chromium content has increased. This study presents two cases of OA caused by manual metal-arc welding on SSS. In both cases, the diagnosis of OA was based on respiratory symptoms, occupational exposure and positive findings in the specific challenge tests. In the first case, a 46-yr-old welder had experienced severe dyspnoea while welding SSS (SMO steel), but not in other situations. Challenge tests with both mild steel and stainless steel using a common electrode were negative. Welding SSS with a special electrode caused a delayed 37% drop in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1). In the second case, a 34-yr-old male had started to experience dyspnoea during the past few years, while welding especially SSS (Duplex steel). The workplace peak expiratory flow monitoring was suggestive of OA. Challenge tests with both mild steel and stainless steel using a common electrode did not cause bronchial obstruction. Welding SSS with a special electrode caused a delayed 31% drop in FEV1. In conclusion, exposure to manual metal-arc welding fumes of special stainless steel should be considered as a new cause of occupational asthma.

  10. Research on the Mechanical Properties of the Weld Seams of Constructional Steel Using Vibration Energy Method During Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurynas Rumbutis

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes changes in the mechanical properties of the welded joints of steel S355J2 (LST EN 10025 using vibration energy method during welding done by applying semi automatic equipment under CO2 environment using supplementary wire ESAB OK 12.51. When welding, several levels of vibration energy are applied. For vibration treatment, proprietary equipment “MetaLax 2725” produced by the U.S. Company “Bonal” was employed. To investigate the effects of vibration energy on the weld seam, radiographic control and mechanical experiments on tensile, hardness distribution and impact resistance were performed.Article in Lithuanian

  11. Innovative Technology of Mechanized Wet Underwater Welding of High-Alloy Corrosion Resistant Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kakhovskyi, M.Yu.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The results of the practice of welding-repair technology using self-shielded flux-cored wire for wet underwater welding of high-alloy stainless steels type 18-10 are presented. The application of the technology allows reducing human participation in welding process under the extreme conditions. The practical value of the technology consists in the possibility of welding-repair works directly under water without any additional assembly works.

  12. Fracture toughness of welded joints of a high strength low alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veiga, S.M.B. da; Bastian, F.L.; Pope, A.M.

    1985-10-01

    The fracture toughness of the different regions of welded joints of a high strength low alloy steel, Niocor 2, was evaluated at different temperatures and compared with the toughness of the base metal. The studied regions were: the weld metal, fusion boundary and heat affected zone. The welding process used was the manual metal arc. It is shown that the weld metal region has the highest toughness values. (Author) [pt

  13. Creep rupture behavior of welded Grade 91 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrestha, Triratna [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States); Basirat, Mehdi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States); Alsagabi, Sultan; Sittiho, Anumat [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States); Charit, Indrajit, E-mail: icharit@uidaho.edu [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States); Potirniche, Gabriel P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States)

    2016-07-04

    Creep rupture behavior of fusion welded Grade 91 steel was studied in the temperature range of 600 – 700 °C and at stresses of 50–200 MPa. The creep data were analyzed in terms of the Monkman-Grant relation and Larson-Miller parameter. The creep damage tolerance factor was used to identify the origin of creep damage. The creep damage was identified as the void growth in combination with microstructural degradation. The fracture surface morphology of the ruptured specimens was studied by scanning electron microscopy and deformed microstructure examined by transmission electron microscopy, to further elucidate the rupture mechanisms.

  14. Studies on microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties of high nitrogen stainless steel shielded metal arc welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    The present work is aimed at studying the microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties of high nitrogen stainless steel shielded metal arc (SMA) welds made with Cromang-N electrode. Basis for selecting this electrode is to increase the solubility of nitrogen in weld metal due to high chromium and manganese content. Microstructures of the welds were characterized using optical microscopy (OM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) mainly to determine the morphology, phase analysis, grain size and orientation image mapping. Hardness, tensile and ductility bend tests were carried out to determine mechanical properties. Potentio-dynamic polarization testing was carried out to study the pitting corrosion resistance using a GillAC basic electrochemical system. Constant load type testing was carried out to study stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour of welds. The investigation results shown that the selected Cr–Mn–N type electrode resulted in favourable microstructure and completely solidified as single phase coarse austenite. Mechanical properties of SMA welds are found to be inferior when compared to that of base metal and is due to coarse and dendritic structure.

  15. Effect of residual stress on fatigue crack propagation at 200 C in a welded joint austenitic stainless steel - ferritic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahouane, A.I.; Gauthier, J.P.; Petrequin, P.

    1988-01-01

    Fatigue resistance of heterogeneous welded joints between austenitic stainless steels and ferritic steels is evaluated for reactor components and more particularly effect of residual stress on fatigue crack propagation in a heterogeneous welded joint. Residual stress is measured by the hole method in which a hole is drilled through the center of a strain gage glued the surface of the materials. In the non uniform stress field a transmissibility function is used for residual stress calculation. High compression residual stress in the ferritic metal near the interface ferritic steel/weld slow down fatigue crack propagation. 5 tabs., 15 figs., 19 refs [fr

  16. Elucidation of high-power fibre laser welding phenomena of stainless steel and effect of factors on weld geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahito, Yousuke; Mizutani, Masami; Katayama, Seiji

    2007-01-01

    The fibre laser has been receiving great attention due to its advantages of high efficiency, high power and high beam quality, and is expected to be one of the most desirable heat sources for high-speed and deep-penetration welding. In this study, therefore, in bead-on-plate welding of Type 304 stainless steel plates with 6 kW fibre laser, the effects of laser power, power density and welding speed on the formation of sound welds were investigated with four laser beams of 130, 200, 360 and 560 μm in spot diameter, and their welding phenomena were clarified with high-speed video cameras and an x-ray transmission real-time imaging system. The weld beads showed a keyhole type of penetration at any diameter, and the maximum penetration of 11 mm in depth was obtained at 130 μm spot diameter and 0.6 m min -1 welding speed. It was found that the laser power density exerted a remarkable effect on the increase in weld penetration at higher welding speeds, and sound partially penetrated welds without welding defects such as porosity, underfilling or humping could be produced at wide process windows of welding speeds between 4.5 and 10 m min -1 with fibre laser beams of 360 μm or 560 μm in spot diameter. The high-speed video observation pictures and the x-ray images of the welding phenomena at 6 m min -1 welding speed and 360 μm spot diameter show that a sound weld bead was formed owing to a long molten pool suppressing and accommodating spattering and a stable keyhole generating no bubbles from the tip, respectively

  17. Characterisation of microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties of pulsed MIG welded modified P91 steel weld metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararaj, P.; Muthukumar, M.

    2018-02-01

    Varying the shielding gas composition with argon and carbon dioxide influences the properties of the weldments which are evaluated using microstructural, micro-hardness and corrosion studies. The modified P91 steel samples are welded by Pulsed Metal Inert Gas welding process with different shielding gas mixture, i.e., 95%Ar-5%CO2, 80%Ar-20%CO2 and 60%Ar- 40%CO2. The welded steels are studied metallographically by observing microstructures at three different regions namely at the base metal, Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) and the Weld zone. Hardness measurements are also done using Vicker’s micro-hardness tester. Corrosion studies in acidic media (sulphuric and nitric acid media of four different normalities 0.5, 1.0,1.5 and 2.0) are done in the welded region and the parent metal to compare the corrosion resistance. Of all the welded samples, welds made with the shielding gas composition of 95%Ar-5%CO2 exhibits good corrosion resistance over the other two welds while the weld made with the shielding gas composition of 60%Ar -40%, shows very poor corrosion resistance.

  18. Microstructure and corrosion behaviour of gas tungsten arc welds of maraging steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Madhusudhan Reddy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Superior properties of maraging steels make them suitable for the fabrication of components used for military applications like missile covering, rocket motor casing and ship hulls. Welding is the main process for fabrication of these components, while the maraging steels can be fusion welded using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW process. All these fabricated components require longer storage life and a major problem in welds is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC. The present study is aimed at studying the SCC behaviour of MDN 250 (18% Ni steel and its welds with respect to microstructural changes. In the present study, 5.2 mm thick sheets made of MDN 250 steel in the solution annealed condition was welded using GTAW process. Post-weld heat treatments of direct ageing (480 °C for 3 h, solutionizing (815 °C for 1 h followed by ageing and homogenizing (1150 °C for 1 h followed by ageing were carried out. A mixture of martensite and austenite was observed in the microstructure of the fusion zone of solutionized and direct aged welds and only martensite in as-welded condition. Homogenization and ageing treatment have eliminated reverted austenite and elemental segregation. Homogenized welds also exhibited a marginal improvement in the corrosion resistance compared to those in the as-welded, solutionized and aged condition. Constant load SCC test data clearly revealed that the failure time of homogenized weld is much longer compared to other post weld treatments, and the homogenization treatment is recommended to improve the SCC life of GTA welds of MDN 250 Maraging steel.

  19. Studies on microstructure, mechanical and pitting corrosion behaviour of similar and dissimilar stainless steel gas tungsten arc welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Dilkush; Srinivasa Rao, K.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2018-03-01

    In the present study, an attempt has been made to weld dissimilar alloys of 5mm thick plates i.e., austenitic stainless steel (316L) and duplex stainless steel (2205) and compared with that of similar welds. Welds are made with conventional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process with two different filler wires namely i.e., 309L and 2209. Welds were characterized using optical microscopy to observe the microstructural changes and correlate with mechanical properties using hardness, tensile and impact testing. Potentio-dynamic polarization studies were carried out to observe the pitting corrosion behaviour in different regions of the welds. Results of the present study established that change in filler wire composition resulted in microstructural variation in all the welds with different morphology of ferrite and austenite. Welds made with 2209 filler showed plate like widmanstatten austenite (WA) nucleated at grain boundaries. Compared to similar stainless steel welds inferior mechanical properties was observed in dissimilar stainless steel welds. Pitting corrosion resistance is observed to be low for dissimilar stainless steel welds when compared to similar stainless steel welds. Overall study showed that similar duplex stainless steel welds having favorable microstructure and resulted in better mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Relatively dissimilar stainless steel welds made with 309L filler obtained optimum combination of mechanical properties and pitting corrosion resistance when compared to 2209 filler and is recommended for industrial practice.

  20. 76 FR 77770 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-14

    ... previous review or the original less-than-fair-value (LTFV) investigation, the cash deposit rate will... Determination of Sales at Less Than Fair Value: Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico, 57 FR 42953... structural pipe tubing used for framing and support members for reconstruction or load-bearing purposes in...

  1. Influence of welding current in resistance spot welding on the properties of Zn coated steel DX51D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luboš Kaščák

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the resistance spot welding of three galvanized car body sheets DX51D + Z - EN 10142/2000. The quality of welded joints was evaluated by destructive tests and non-destructive tests. For evaluation of joints quality the shear tension test on spot joints according to DIN 50 124 standard was used. The influence of welding parameters on the structure of a welded joint was observed by metallographic analysis. Influence of welding current from 6.0 to 7.7 kA and influence of welding time from 10 to 12 periods on weld properties was observed. Increasing the welding current led to increased load-bearing capacity of the welded joints. The spot welded joints without any internal defects occurred in samples welded up to 7.0 kA. Increasing the welding time to 12 periods led to increased load-bearing capacity of the welded joints, within all observed values of welding current.

  2. Mechanical properties and fatigue strength of high manganese non-magnetic steel/carbon steel welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakaji, Eiji; Ikeda, Soichi; Kim, You-Chul; Nakatsuji, Yoshihiro; Horikawa, Kosuke.

    1997-01-01

    The dissimilar materials welded joints of high manganese non-magnetic steel/carbon steel (hereafter referred to as DMW joints), in which weld defects such as hot crack or blowhole are not found, were the good quality. Tensile strength of DMW joints was 10% higher than that of the base metal of carbon steel. In the bend tests, the DMW joints showed the good ductility without crack. Charpy absorbed energy at 0(degC) of the DMW joints was over 120(J) in the bond where it seems to be the lowest. Large hardening or softening was not detected in the heat affected zone. Fatigue strength of the DMW joints is almost the same with that of the welded joints of carbon steel/carbon steel. As the fatigue strength of the DMW joints exceeds the fatigue design standard curve of JSSC for carbon steel welded joints, the DMW joints can be treated the same as the welded joints of carbon steel/carbon steel of which strength is lower than that of high manganese non-magnetic steel, from the viewpoint of the fatigue design. (author)

  3. Fracture toughness of partially welded joints of SUS316 stainless steel at 4 K by large bend tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, A.; Tobler, R.L.; Tamura, H.; Imagawa, S.; Mito, T.; Yamamoto, J.; Motojima, O.; Takahashi, H.; Suzuki, S.

    1996-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels in relatively thick sections are specified in support structure designs for huge superconducting magnets in fusion energy machines such as the Large Helical Device (LHD). In the LHD under construction at the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) in Japan, partial welding of SUS 316 stainless steel is employed to fabricate the 100-mm thick coil can and coil support structures. Partial welding lowers the heat input and reduces residual deformation after welding. The main disadvantage is that a sizable crack-like defect remains embedded in the unwelded portion of the primary structural component. Here, SUS 316 stainless steel bars were partially welded and tested in 3-point bending to evaluate the effect of natural cracks on fusion zone toughness at 4 K. The specimens had a cross-section 87.5 mm x 175 mm and were fractured in liquid helium using a 10 MN cryogenic mechanical testing machine. In two tests, unstable fracture occurred at maximum load and at critical stress intensity factors K max = 227 and 228 MPa√m. Results indicate a high resistance to fracture initiation but no stable tearing. Therefore, no resistance to crack propagation may exist in a fusion zone at a weld root under cryogenic temperature

  4. Twin-Wire Pulsed Tandem Gas Metal Arc Welding of API X80 Steel Linepipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhao Wu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Twin-Wire Pulsed Tandem Gas Metal Arc Welding process with high welding production efficiency was used to join the girth weld seam of API X80 steel linepipe of 18.4 mm wall thickness and 1422 mm diameter. The macrostructure, microstructure, hardness, and electrochemical corrosion behavior of welded joints were studied. Effects of temperature and Cl− concentration on the corrosion behavior of base metal and weld metal were investigated. Results show that the welded joint has good morphology, mechanical properties, and corrosion resistance. The corrosion resistance of both the base metal and the weld metal decreases with increasing temperature or Cl− concentration. In the solution with high Cl− concentration, the base metal and weld metal are more susceptible to pitting. The corrosion resistance of the weld metal is slightly lower than that of the base metal.

  5. Plastic strain and residual stress distributions in an AISI 304 stainless steel BWR pipe weld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saukkonen, Tapio; Aalto, Miikka; Virkkunen, Iikka; Ehrnstén, Ulla; Hänninen, Hannu

    In AISI 304 stainless steel pipe welds weld shrinkage causes large variations in residual plastic strain in different parts of the weld metal and heat-affected zone (HAZ). The amount of strain was analyzed by EBSD quantitatively by comparing the intra-grain misorientations to the calibration curve. Highest degrees of plastic strain (10...20%) were detected in the HAZ close to the root area of a prototypical BWR plant weld. Strain in the weld metal varies in the different directions of solidification, being high in the weld bead boundaries and near the fusion lines. Preliminary studies of the effects of mechanical and elastic anisotropy of the weld metal microstructure on the grain size level were performed by EBSD and nanoindentation. The residual stress distribution in the same weld cross-section was determined by a contour method. The residual strain and stress distributions are superimposed and EAC susceptibility of various areas of the pipe weld is evaluated and discussed.

  6. Experimental Characterization of Electron Beam Welded SAE 5137H Thick Steel Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattire, Prakash; Bhawar, Valmik; Thakare, Sandeep; Patil, Sachin; Mane, Santosh; Singh, Rajkumar, Dr.

    2017-09-01

    Electron beam welding is known for its narrow weld zone with high depth to width ratio, less heat affected zone, less distortion and contamination. Electron beam welding is fusion welding process, where high velocity electrons impinge on material joint to be welded and kinetic energy of this electron is transformed into heat upon impact to fuse the material. In the present work electron beam welding of 60 mm thick SAE 5137H steel is studied. Mechanical and metallurgical properties of electron beam welded joint of SAE 5137H were evaluated. Mechanical properties are analysed by tensile, impact and hardness test. Metallurgical properties are investigated through optical and scanning electron microscope. The hardness traverse across weld zone shows HV 370-380, about 18% increase in the tensile strength and very low toughness of weld joint compared to parent metal. Microstructural observation shows equiaxed dendrite in the fusion zone and partial grain refinement was found in the HAZ.

  7. Active flux tungsten inert gas welding of austenitic stainless steel AISI 304

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Klobčar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the effects of flux assisted tungsten inert gas (A-TIG welding of 4 (10 mm thick austenitic stainless steel EN X5CrNi1810 (AISI 304 in the butt joint. The sample dimensions were 300 ´ 50 mm, and commercially available active flux QuickTIG was used for testing. In the planned study the influence of welding position and weld groove shape was analysed based on the penetration depth. A comparison of microstructure formation, grain size and ferrit number between TIG welding and A-TIG welding was done. The A-TIG welds were subjected to bending test. A comparative study of TIG and A-TIG welding shows that A-TIG welding increases the weld penetration depth.

  8. Characterization of the mechanical properties and structural integrity of T-welded connections repaired by grinding and wet welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terán, G., E-mail: gteran@imp.mx [Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo, Eje central Lázaro Cárdenas 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, México D.F. CP 07730, México (Mexico); Cuamatzi-Meléndez, R., E-mail: rcuamatzi@imp.mx [Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo, Eje central Lázaro Cárdenas 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, México D.F. CP 07730, México (Mexico); Albiter, A., E-mail: aalbiter@imp.mx [Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo, Eje central Lázaro Cárdenas 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, México D.F. CP 07730, México (Mexico); Maldonado, C., E-mail: cmzepeda@umich.mx [Instituto de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas, UMSNH, PO Box 52-B, 58000, México (Mexico); Bracarense, A.Q., E-mail: bracarense@ufmg.br [UFMG Departamento de Engeharia Mecánica Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2014-04-01

    ferrite, followed by ferrite with second aligned phases and ferrite with second phases not aligned in the welding bead, which are typical microstructures of wet welding of A36 steel and electrodes E6013. The results also showed that with the methodology present in this work, one can restore the mechanical properties of localized damage in offshore structures when damage occurs at different water depths.

  9. Characterization of the mechanical properties and structural integrity of T-welded connections repaired by grinding and wet welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terán, G.; Cuamatzi-Meléndez, R.; Albiter, A.; Maldonado, C.; Bracarense, A.Q.

    2014-01-01

    ferrite, followed by ferrite with second aligned phases and ferrite with second phases not aligned in the welding bead, which are typical microstructures of wet welding of A36 steel and electrodes E6013. The results also showed that with the methodology present in this work, one can restore the mechanical properties of localized damage in offshore structures when damage occurs at different water depths

  10. Acoustoelastic evaluation of welding and heat treatment stress relieving of pressure vessel steel for Angra 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, Bruno C. de, E-mail: bruno.cesar@nuclep.gov.br [Nuclebras Equipamentos Pesados S.A (NUCLEP), Itaguai, RJ (Brazil); Bittencourt, Marcelo de S.Q., E-mail: bruno.cesar@nuclep.gov.br, E-mail: bittenc@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Currently the knowledge of non-destructive techniques allows to evaluate the stresses on components and mechanical structures, aiming at physical security, preservation of the environment and avoid financial losses associated with the construction and operation of industrial plants. The search for new techniques, especially applied in the nuclear industry to assess status more accurately, voltage safety and to ensure structural integrity, for example, core components of the primary circuit, such as the reactor pressure vessel and steam generator has become of great importance within the community of non-destructive testing .This paper aims to contribute to the non-destructive technique development in order to ensure the structural integrity of nuclear components. One acoustoelastic evaluation of steel 20 MnMoNi 55, used in pressure vessels of nuclear power plants were performed. The acoustic birefringence technique was use to evaluate the acoustoelastic behavior of the test material in the as received condition, after welding and after the stress relief heat treatment. The constant acoustoelastic material was obtained by an uniaxial loading test. It was found a slight anisotropy in the material as received. After welding, a marked variation of acoustic birefringence in the region near the weld bead was observed. The heat treatment indicated a new change of acoustic birefringence. Obtaining the acoustoelastic constant allowed the evaluation of stress in the different conditions of the weld and treated material. (author)

  11. New developments for the ultrasonic inspection of austenitic stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chassignole, Bertrand; Doudet, Loic; Dupond, Olivier; Fouquet, Thierry; Richard, Benoit

    2006-01-01

    EDF R and D undertakes studies in non destructive testing (NDT) for better understanding the influence of various parameters (material, type of defect, geometry) on the 'controllability' of the critical components for nuclear safety. In the field of ultrasonic testing, one of the principal research orientations is devoted to the study of the austenitic stainless steel welds of the primary cooling system. Indeed, the structure of these welds present characteristics making difficult their examination, for example: - a strong anisotropy of the properties of elasticity which, coupled with the heterogeneity of the grain orientations, can involve phenomena of skewing, division and distortion of the beam; - a significant scattering of the waves by the grains involving an high attenuation and sometimes backscattered signals. For several years, actions have been launched to improve comprehension of these disturbing phenomena and to evaluate the controllability of those welds. This work is based on the one hand on experimental analyses on representative mock-ups and on the other hand on the developments of modelling codes taking into account the characteristics of the materials. We present in this document a synthesis of this work by developing the following points in particular: - a description of the phenomena of propagation; - the works undertaken to characterize the structure of the welds; - an example of study coupling experimental and modelling analyses for a butt weld achieved by manual arc welding with coated electrodes. The paper has the following contents: 1. Context; 2. Presentation of the problem; 3. Characterization of austenitic welds; 4. From comprehension to industrial application; 5. Conclusion and perspectives; 5. Conclusion and perspectives. This synthesis shows that each austenitic stainless steel weld is a particular case for the ultrasonic testing. This work allowed to better apprehend the disturbances of the ultrasonic propagation in the welds and thus

  12. Recent developments in the ultrasonic testing of austenitic steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Launay, J.P.; Olivera, J.J.; Thomas, A.

    1980-12-01

    The case of the longitudinal welding of the primary tube rings of the Fessenheim-1 power station has been studied. The methodology utilized includes the following aspects; metallographic study, effect of the orientation of the structure on the spreading of longitudinal ultrasonic waves, parametric study of the detection of artificial reflectors in different positions and the fabrication of special sensors [fr

  13. Fracture toughness of steel--aluminum deformation welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albright, C.E.

    1978-11-01

    A study of the fracture toughness (in this case, G/sub Ic/) of steel--aluminum deformation welds using a specially developed double cantilever beam fracture toughness specimen is presented. Welds made at 350 0 C were heat treated at 360, 380, 400, 420, and 440 0 C. An intermetallic reaction product layer of Fe 2 Al 5 is formed at the steel--aluminum interface with increasing heat treating temperature and time by a process of nucleation and growth of discrete particles. A transition in toughness from a higher average G/sub Ic/ value (6097 N/m) to a very low average G/sub Ic/ value (525 N/m) is observed. The decrease in toughness is accompanied by an increase in Fe 2 Al 5 particle diameter from 4 to 8 μm. Failure at the higher toughness values is characterized by ductile rupture through the aluminum. At the lower toughness values, failure occurs between the aluminum and the Fe 2 Al 5 reaction product layer. A void layer forming by a vacancy condensation mechanism in the aluminum adjacent to the Fe 2 Al 5 is shown to cause the embrittlement

  14. Dissimilar Impact Welding of 6111-T4, 5052-H32 Aluminum Alloys to 22MnB5, DP980 Steels and the Structure-Property Relationship of a Strongly Bonded Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bert; Vivek, Anupam; Presley, Michael; Daehn, Glenn S.

    2018-03-01

    The ability to weld high-strength aluminum to high-strength steel is highly desired for vehicle lightweighting but difficult to attain by conventional means. In this work, vaporizing foil actuator welding was used to successfully weld four Al/Fe combinations consisting of high-strength alloys: AA5052-H32, AA6111-T4, DP980, and 22MnB5. Flyer velocities up to 727 m/s were reached using 10 kJ input energy. In lap-shear testing, samples primarily failed in base aluminum near the aluminum's native strength, showing that the welds were stronger than a base metal and that the base metal was not significantly weakened by the welding process. A particularly strong weld area was studied by transmission electron microscopy to shed light on the microstructural features of strong impact welds. It was found to be characterized by a continuously bonded, fully crystalline interface, extremely fine (nanoscale) grains, mesoscopic as well as microscopic wavy features, and lack of large continuous intermetallic compounds.

  15. Dissimilar Impact Welding of 6111-T4, 5052-H32 Aluminum Alloys to 22MnB5, DP980 Steels and the Structure-Property Relationship of a Strongly Bonded Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bert; Vivek, Anupam; Presley, Michael; Daehn, Glenn S.

    2018-01-01

    The ability to weld high-strength aluminum to high-strength steel is highly desired for vehicle lightweighting but difficult to attain by conventional means. In this work, vaporizing foil actuator welding was used to successfully weld four Al/Fe combinations consisting of high-strength alloys: AA5052-H32, AA6111-T4, DP980, and 22MnB5. Flyer velocities up to 727 m/s were reached using 10 kJ input energy. In lap-shear testing, samples primarily failed in base aluminum near the aluminum's native strength, showing that the welds were stronger than a base metal and that the base metal was not significantly weakened by the welding process. A particularly strong weld area was studied by transmission electron microscopy to shed light on the microstructural features of strong impact welds. It was found to be characterized by a continuously bonded, fully crystalline interface, extremely fine (nanoscale) grains, mesoscopic as well as microscopic wavy features, and lack of large continuous intermetallic compounds.

  16. Effect of welding processes and consumables on fatigue crack growth behaviour of armour grade quenched and tempered steel joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Magudeeswaran

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Quenched and Tempered (Q&T steels are widely used in the construction of military vehicles due to its high strength to weight ratio and high hardness. These steels are prone to hydrogen induced cracking (HIC in the heat affected zone (HAZ after welding. The use of austenitic stainless steel (ASS consumables to weld the above steel was the only available remedy because of higher solubility for hydrogen in austenitic phase. The use of stainless steel consumables for a non-stainless steel base metal is not economical. Hence, alternate consumables for welding Q&T steels and their vulnerability to HIC need to be explored. Recent studies proved that low hydrogen ferritic steel (LHF consumables can be used to weld Q&T steels, which can give very low hydrogen levels in the weld deposits. The use of ASS and LHF consumables will lead to distinct microstructures in their respective welds. This microstructural heterogeneity will have a drastic influence in the fatigue crack growth resistance of armour grade Q&T steel welds. Hence, in this investigation an attempt has been made to study the influence of welding consumables and welding processes on fatigue crack growth behaviour of armour grade Q&T Steel joints. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW and Flux cored arc welding (FCAW were used for fabrication of joints using ASS and LHF consumables. The joints fabricated by SMAW process using LHF consumable exhibited superior fatigue crack growth resistance than all other joints.

  17. Characterization of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Resistance Spot Welded DP600 Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ramazani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Resistance spot welding (RSW as a predominant welding technique used for joining steels in automotive applications needs to be studied carefully in order to improve the mechanical properties of the spot welds. The objectives of the present work are to characterize the resistance spot weldment of DP600 sheet steels. The mechanical properties of the welded joints were evaluated using tensile-shear and cross-tensile tests. The time-temperature evolution during the welding cycle was measured. The microstructures observed in different sites of the welds were correlated to thermal history recorded by thermocouples in the corresponding areas. It was found that cracks initiated in the periphery region of weld nuggets with a martensitic microstructure and a pull-out failure mode was observed. It was also concluded that tempering during RSW was the main reason for hardness decrease in HAZ.

  18. Microstructural Characterization of the Heat-Affected Zones in Grade 92 Steel Welds: Double-Pass and Multipass Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X.; West, G. D.; Siefert, J. A.; Parker, J. D.; Thomson, R. C.

    2018-04-01

    The microstructure in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of multipass welds typical of those used in power plants and made from 9 wt pct chromium martensitic Grade 92 steel is complex. Therefore, there is a need for systematic microstructural investigations to define the different regions of the microstructure across the HAZ of Grade 92 steel welds manufactured using the traditional arc welding processes in order to understand possible failure mechanisms after long-term service. In this study, the microstructure in the HAZ of an as-fabricated two-pass bead-on-plate weld on a parent metal of Grade 92 steel has been systematically investigated and compared to a complex, multipass thick section weldment using an extensive range of electron and ion-microscopy-based techniques. A dilatometer has been used to apply controlled thermal cycles to simulate the microstructures in distinctly different regions in a multipass HAZ using sequential thermal cycles. A wide range of microstructural properties in the simulated materials were characterized and compared with the experimental observations from the weld HAZ. It has been found that the microstructure in the HAZ can be categorized by a combination of sequential thermal cycles experienced by the different zones within the complex weld metal, using the terminology developed for these regions based on a simpler, single-pass bead-on-plate weld, categorized as complete transformation, partial transformation, and overtempered.

  19. Specification for corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel welding rods and bare electrodes - approved 1969

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    This specification covers corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel welding rods for use with the atomic hydrogen and gas-tungsten-arc welding processes and bare electrodes for use with the submerged arc and gas metal-arc welding processes. These welding rods and electrodes include those alloy steels designated as corrosion- or heat-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steels, in which chromium exceeds 4% and nickel does not exceed 50%

  20. Low activation steels welding with PWHT and coating for ITER Test Blanket Modules and DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, P.; Tavassoli, F.; Rieth, M.; Diegele, E.; Poitevin, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Eurofer weldability is established for data base assessment and TBM manufacturing support. Electron Beam, Hybrid (Laser combined with MIG/MAG), Laser and Narrow Gap TIG processes have been carried out on Eurofer Low activation steel. Electron Beam produces very narrow fusion zone width, in the range of 3 to 4 mm, and too strong enhanced weld shape with brittle joints with δ-ferrite and pores. This process is considered only for low penetration depth (cooling plates). The other processes produce 2 families of similar results: one for Hybrid (MIG + Laser) and Laser processes, and a second one for TIG and Narrow Gap TIG processes. The first one procures less distortion and coarsened fusion zone, due to higher cooling rate. For all the welding processes, high hardness values, increasing brittleness and softening effects in the Heat Affected Zone are observed for each welding configuration that could signal creep problems. The Fusion Zones are typically composed of martensite laths, with small grain sizes. In the Heat Affected Zones, martensite grains are observed with carbide precipitation. Eurofer filler wire with optimized chemical composition is developed for producing welds with good properties and high joint coefficient value. To restore mechanical properties after welding, PWHT have been developed: single step for the first family and 2 steps for the second one. Distortions of different mock-ups with and without PWHT have been managed to assess manufacturing rules and clamping devices. Welding data base has thus been established. W coating on the TBM structure has shown no strong effect on the TBM structure. (author)

  1. Effect of Heat Input During Disk Laser Bead-On-Plate Welding of Thermomechanically Rolled Steel on Penetration Characteristics and Porosity Formation in the Weld Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisiecki A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a detailed analysis of the influence of heat input during laser bead-on-plate welding of 5.0 mm thick plates of S700MC steel by modern Disk laser on the mechanism of steel penetration, shape and depth of penetration, and also on tendency to weld porosity formation. Based on the investigations performed in a wide range of laser welding parameters the relationship between laser power and welding speed, thus heat input, required for full penetration was determined. Additionally the relationship between the laser welding parameters and weld quality was determined.

  2. Specification for corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel bare and composite metal cored and stranded arc welding electrodes and welding rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    This specification prescribes requirements for corrosion or heat resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel electrodes and welding rods. These electrodes and welding rods are normally used for arc welding and include those alloy steels designated as corrosion or heat-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steels, in which chromium exceeds 4.0 percent and nickel does not exceed 50.0 percent

  3. Joining of hybrid AA6063-6SiCp-3Grp composite and AISI 1030 steel by friction welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Rajesh Jesudoss Hynes

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Joining of metals and aluminium hybrid metal matrix composites has significant applications in aviation, ship building and automotive industries. In the present work, investigation is carried out on Friction Welding of AISI 1030 steel and hybrid AA6063-6SiCp-3Grpcomposite, that are difficult to weld by fusion welding technique. Silicon carbide and graphite particle reinforced AA6063 matrix hybrid composite was developed successfully using stir casting method and the joining feasibility of AISI1030 steel with AA6063-6SiCp-3Grp hybrid composite was tried out by friction stud welding technique. During friction stage of welding process, the particulates (SiC & Graphite used for reinforcement, tend to increase the viscosity and lead to improper mixing of matrix and reinforcement. This eventually results in lower strength in dissimilar joints. To overcome this difficulty AA1100 interlayer is used while joining hybrid composite to AISI 1030 steel. Experimentation was carried out using Taguchi based design of experiments (DOE technique. Multiple regression methods were applied to understand the relationship between process parameters of the friction stud welding process. Micro structural examination reveals three separate zones namely fully plasticized zone, partially deformed zone and unaffected base material zone. Ultra fine dynamically recrystallized grains of about 341 nm were observed at the fully plasticized zone. EDX analysis confirms the presence of intermetallic compound Fe2Al5 at the joint interface. According to the experimental analysis using DOE, rotational speed and interlayer sheet thickness contribute about 39% and 36% respectively in determining the impact strength of the welded joints. It is found that joining with 0.5 mm interlayer sheet provides efficient joints. Developed regression model could be used to predict the axial shortening distance and impact strength of the welded joint with reasonable accuracy.

  4. The analysis of spot welding joints of steel sheets with closed profile by ultrasonic method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Ulbrich

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Resistance spot welding is widely used in the fabrication of vehicle bodies and parts of their equipment. The article presents the methodology and the results of non-destructive ultrasonic testing of resistance spot welded joints of thin steel sheet with closed profile. Non-destructive test results were verified on the basis of welded joint area after destructive testing. The obtained results were used to develop an assessment technique for spot welded joints of closed profile with steel sheet, which could be used in factories employing such joints. In addition, the article makes comparison between the costs of the developed assessment technique and currently used destructive method.

  5. Mechanical properties of friction stir welded 11Cr-ferritic/martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Y.; Sato, Y.S.; Sekio, Y.; Ohtsuka, S.; Kaito, T.; Ogawa, R.; Kokawa, H.

    2013-01-01

    Friction stir welding was applied to the wrapper tube materials, 11Cr-ferritic/martensitic steel, designed for fast reactors and defect-free welds were successfully produced. The mechanical and microstructural properties of the friction stir welded steel were subsequently investigated. The hardness values of the stir zone were approximately 550 Hv (5.4 GPa) with minimal dependence on the rotational speed, even though they were much higher than those of the base material. However, tensile strengths and elongations of the stir zones were high at 298 K, compared to those of the base material. The excellent tensile properties are attributable to the fine grain formation during friction stir welding

  6. Microstructural Characteristic of Dissimilar Welded Components (AISI 430 Ferritic-AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steels) by CO2 Laser Beam Welding (LBW)

    OpenAIRE

    CALIGULU, Ugur; DIKBAS, Halil; TASKIN, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    In this study, microstructural characteristic of dissimilar welded components (AISI 430 ferritic-AISI 304 austenitic stainless steels) by CO2 laser beam welding (LBW) was investigated. Laser beam welding experiments were carried out under argon and helium atmospheres at 2000 and 2500 W heat inputs and 100-200-300 cm/min. welding speeds. The microstructures of the welded joints and the heat affected zones (HAZ) were examined by optical microscopy, SEM, EDS and XRD analysis. The tensile strengt...

  7. Microstructural Characteristic of Dissimilar Welded Components (AISI 430 Ferritic-AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steels) by CO2 Laser Beam Welding (LBW)

    OpenAIRE

    ÇALIGÜLÜ, Uğur; CALIGULU, Ugur; DIKBAS, Halil; TASKIN, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    In this study, microstructural characteristic of dissimilar welded components (AISI 430 ferritic-AISI 304 austenitic stainless steels) by CO2 laser beam welding (LBW) was investigated. Laser beam welding experiments were carried out under argon and helium atmospheres at 2000 and 2500 W heat inputs and 100-200-300 cm/min. welding speeds. The microstructures of the welded joints and the heat affected zones (HAZ) were examined by optical microscopy, SEM, EDS and XRD analysis. The tensile strengt...

  8. Effect of Interfacial Reaction on the Mechanical Performance of Steel to Aluminum Dissimilar Ultrasonic Spot Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Wang, Li; Chen, Ying-Chun; Robson, Joe D.; Prangnell, Philip B.

    2016-01-01

    The early stages of formation of intermetallic compounds (IMC) have been investigated in dissimilar aluminum to steel welds, manufactured by high power (2.5 kW) ultrasonic spot welding (USW). To better understand the influence of alloy composition, welds were produced between a low-carbon steel (DC04) and two different aluminum alloys (6111 and 7055). The joint strengths were measured in lap shear tests and the formation and growth behavior of IMCs at the weld interface were characterized by electron microscopy, for welding times from 0.2 to 2.4 seconds. With the material combinations studied, the η (Fe2Al5) intermetallic phase was found to form first, very rapidly in the initial stage of welding, with a discontinuous island morphology. Continuous layers of η and then θ (FeAl3) phase were subsequently seen to develop on extending the welding time to greater than 0.7 second. The IMC layer formed in the DC04-AA7055 combination grew thicker than for the DC04-AA6111 welds, despite both weld sets having near identical thermal histories. Zinc was also found to be dissolved in the IMC phases when welding with the AA7055 alloy. After post-weld aging of the aluminum alloy, fracture in the lap shear tests always occurred along the joint interface; however, the DC04-AA6111 welds had higher fracture energy than the DC04-AA7055 combination.

  9. Welding of AA1050 aluminum with AISI 304 stainless steel by rotary friction welding process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ying An

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to assess the development of solid state joints of dissimilar material AA1050 aluminum and AISI 304 stainless steel, which can be used in pipes of tanks of liquid propellants and other components of the Satellite Launch Vehicle. The joints were obtained by rotary friction welding process (RFW, which combines the heat generated from friction between two surfaces and plastic deformation. Tests were conducted with different welding process parameters. The results were analyzed by means of tensile tests, Vickers microhardness, metallographic tests and SEM-EDX. The strength of the joints varied with increasing friction time and the use of different pressure values. Joints were obtained with superior mechanical properties of the AA1050 aluminum, with fracture occurring in the aluminum away from the bonding interface. The analysis by EDX at the interface of the junction showed that interdiffusion occurs between the main chemical components of the materials involved. The RFW proves to be a great method for obtaining joints between dissimilar materials, which is not possible by fusion welding processes.

  10. Thermomechanical history measurements on Type 304L stainless steel pipe girth welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ming; Atteridge, D.G.; Anderson, W.E.; Turpin, R.; West, S.L.

    1993-01-01

    Thermal and strain histories were recorded for three 40-cm-diameter (16 inch), Type 304L stainless steel (SS), schedule 40 (1.27 cm thickness) pipe girth welds. Two weld groove preparations were standard V grooves while the third was a narrow groove configuration. The welding parameters for the three pipe welds simulated expected field practice as closely as possible. The narrow gap weld was completed in four continuous passes while the other two welds required six and nine (discontinuous) passes, due to the use of different weld wire diameters. Thermomechanical history measurements were taken on the inner counterbore surface, encompassing the weld centerline and heat-affected zone (HAZ), as well as 10 cm of inner counterbore surface on either side of the weld centerline; a total of 47 data acquisition instruments were used for each weld. These instruments monitored: (1) weld shrinkages parallel to the pipe axis; (2) surface temperatures; (3) surface strains parallel to weld centerline; and (4) radial deformations. Results show that the weld and HAZ experienced cyclic deformation in the radial direction during welding, indicating that the final residual stress distribution in multi-pass pipe weldments is not axisymmetric. Measured radial and axial deformations were smaller for the narrow gap groove than for the standard V grooves, suggesting that the narrow gap groove weldment may have lower residual stress levels than the standard V groove weldments. This study provides the experimental database and a guideline for further computational modeling work

  11. Specification for corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel covered welding electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    This specification prescribes requirements for covered corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel electrodes. These electrodes normally are used for shielded metal arc welding, and include those alloy steels designated as corrosion or heat-resisting chromium-nickel steels in which chromium exceeds 4.0 percent and nickel does not exceed 50.0 percent

  12. Specification for corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel covered welding electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    This specification prescribes requirements for covered corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel electrodes. These electrodes are normally used for shielded metal arc welding, and include those alloy steels designated as corrosion or heat-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steels, in which chromium exceeds 4.0% and nickel does not exceed 50.0%

  13. Specification for corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel covered welding electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    This specification prescribes requirements for covered corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel electrodes. These electrodes are normally used for shielded metal arc welding, and include those alloy steels designated as corrosion or heat-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steels, in which chromium exceeds 4.0 percent and nickel does not exceed 50.0 percent

  14. Thin-Sheet zinc-coated and carbon steels laser welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecas, P.; Gouveia, H.; Quintino, L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a research on CO 2 laser welding of thin-sheet carbon steels (Zinc-coated and uncoated), at several thicknesses combinations. Laser welding has an high potential to be applied on sub-assemblies welding before forming to the automotive industry-tailored blanks. The welding process is studied through the analysis of parameters optimization, metallurgical quality and induced distortions by the welding process. The clamping system and the gas protection system developed are fully described. These systems allow the minimization of common thin-sheet laser welding defects like misalignment, and zinc-coated laser welding defects like porous and zinc ventilation. The laser welding quality is accessed by DIN 8563 standard, and by tensile, microhardness and corrosion test. (Author) 8 refs

  15. Characterization of Phase Transformations and Stresses During the Welding of a Ferritic Mild Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, D.; Stone, H. J.; Watson, M.; Rogge, R. B.

    2014-04-01

    The transient stresses and phase evolution have been characterized in the quasi-steady state produced around a gas tungsten arc welding torch in a plain carbon (ASTM 1018) steel using in situ neutron diffraction. A novel method has been developed to isolate the deviatoric or plane stress state in the presence of isotropic contributions to the lattice parameter, such as thermal expansion and solute content. The stress state was found to evolve in the anticipated manner, with compressive stresses ahead of the weld and tensile stresses behind the weld, in the weld and heat-affected zone, and compression in the far field behind the weld. In particular, the region of compression in the heat-affected zone adjacent to and just behind the welding torch expected from weld models was observed. The evolution of phase fraction around the weld was also determined using the technique and the stresses obtained from the ferrite phase.

  16. Measurement of internal stresses in a welded assembly made of 20 MND 53 ferritic steel. Stress relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, J.L.

    1981-05-01

    An assembly consisting of two flanged plates welded end to end was realized, the plates being made of 20 MND 53 ferritic steel. This grade of steel is used to fabricate PWR reactor vessels. At each important stage in the realization of the assembly, internal stresses were measured by X-ray diffraction techniques. These measurements showed that the finished realization manifested compression stresses in the main parts of its structure and large amplitude tensile stresses in the central weld seam. A heat treatment was performed (615 0 C - 17 hours). Stresses levels almost every where in the assembly dropped to practically zero. Although stress relaxation kinetics are probably slower in voluminous parts, this result and most of the results published in literature on this subject, indicate that such treatment notably diminishes internal welding stress even in thick parts [fr

  17. Physicochemical Characterization of Aerosol Generated in the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Stainless Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miettinen, Mirella; Torvela, Tiina; Leskinen, Jari T T

    2016-10-01

    Exposure to stainless steel (SS) welding aerosol that contain toxic heavy metals, chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), and nickel (Ni), has been associated with numerous adverse health effects. The gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) is commonly applied to SS and produces high number concentration of substantially smaller particles compared with the other welding techniques, although the mass emission rate is low. Here, a field study in a workshop with the GTAW as principal welding technique was conducted to determine the physicochemical properties of the airborne particles and to improve the understanding of the hazard the SS welding aerosols pose to welders. Particle number concentration and number size distribution were measured near the breathing zone (50cm from the arc) and in the middle of the workshop with condensation particle counters and electrical mobility particle sizers, respectively. Particle morphology and chemical composition were studied using scanning and transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. In the middle of the workshop, the number size distribution was unimodal with the geometric mean diameter (GMD) of 46nm. Near the breathing zone the number size distribution was multimodal, and the GMDs of the modes were in the range of 10-30nm. Two different agglomerate types existed near the breathing zone. The first type consisted of iron oxide primary particles with size up to 40nm and variable amounts of Cr, Mn, and Ni replacing iron in the structure. The second type consisted of very small primary particles and contained increased proportion of Ni compared to the proportion of (Cr + Mn) than the first agglomerate type. The alterations in the distribution of Ni between different welding aerosol particles have not been reported previously. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  18. Laser Welding Of Stainless Steel By Means Of "Flat-Top" Energy Distribution Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionoro, G.; Minutolo, F. Memola C.; Tagliaferri, V.

    1989-06-01

    Laser welding of stainless steel AISI 304 and AISI 405 is investigated. Laser source with "flat-top" energy distribution is employed which produces welded joints with similar geometry to other conventional welding techniques. Mechanical properties of the welds are however very similar to those typical of deep penetration processes. Microhardness and bend tests as well as micrograph examinations have been carried out on the welds. The test pieces exhibited good mechanical strength and in particular acceptable ductility. Theoretical considerations based on widely accepted thermal models have also confirmed that the process proceeds at high efficiency energy transfer.

  19. Problems in repair-welding of duplex-treated tool steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Muhič

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper addresses problems in laser welding of die-cast tools used for aluminum pressure die-castings and plastic moulds. To extend life cycle of tools various surface improvements are used. These surface improvements significantly reduce weldability of the material. This paper presents development of defects in repair welding of duplex-treated tool steel. The procedure is aimed at reduction of defects by the newly developed repair laser welding techniques. Effects of different repair welding process parameters and techniques are considered. A microstructural analysis is conducted to detect defect formation and reveal the best laser welding method for duplex-treated tools.

  20. Effect of Strength Matching on Mechanical Properties of WELDOX 960 Steel Welded Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiling

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, WELDOX 960 high strength steel sheet was used as the research object, and the welding method was adopted with Ar-CO2 mixed gas welding method. The change of microstructure and properties under different strength matching was studied by changing the strength matching method of welded joint. The main research contents are as follows: The comprehensive mechanical properties of the weld are tested, including the tensile, impact and microhardness tests. The changes of the comprehensive mechanical properties of the welds under different strength matching are obtained, and the selection of the best strength matching under different application conditions is put forward.

  1. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Inconel 625 Alloy on Low Carbon Steel by Heat Treatment after Overlay Welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seungpil; Jang, Jaeho; Kim, Jungsoo; Kim, Byung Jun; Sohn, Keun Yong; Nam, Dae-Geun

    2016-01-01

    Overlay welding technique is one of methods used to improve metal mechanical properties such as strength, toughness and corrosion resistance. Generally, Inconel 625 alloy is used for overlay welding layer on low carbon steels for economic consideration. However, the method produces some problems in the microstructure of the cast structure and some defects, caused by the elevated temperatures of the overlay process. To resolve these problems, heat treatments are required. In this study, Inconel 625 alloy was welded on a low carbon steel by the overlay welding process to investigate the resulting microstructure and mechanical properties. A double heat treatment was performed to improve the mechanical properties of the welding and substrate layers. It was found that Inconel 625 alloy had an austenite microstructure after the first heat treatment, but the low carbon steel had a ferrite-pearlite microstructure after the second heat treatment. After the double heat treatment, the sample showed the optimum hardness because of grain refinement and homogenization of the microstructure.

  2. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Inconel 625 Alloy on Low Carbon Steel by Heat Treatment after Overlay Welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seungpil; Jang, Jaeho; Kim, Jungsoo; Kim, Byung Jun; Sohn, Keun Yong; Nam, Dae-Geun [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Overlay welding technique is one of methods used to improve metal mechanical properties such as strength, toughness and corrosion resistance. Generally, Inconel 625 alloy is used for overlay welding layer on low carbon steels for economic consideration. However, the method produces some problems in the microstructure of the cast structure and some defects, caused by the elevated temperatures of the overlay process. To resolve these problems, heat treatments are required. In this study, Inconel 625 alloy was welded on a low carbon steel by the overlay welding process to investigate the resulting microstructure and mechanical properties. A double heat treatment was performed to improve the mechanical properties of the welding and substrate layers. It was found that Inconel 625 alloy had an austenite microstructure after the first heat treatment, but the low carbon steel had a ferrite-pearlite microstructure after the second heat treatment. After the double heat treatment, the sample showed the optimum hardness because of grain refinement and homogenization of the microstructure.

  3. Low activation steels welding with PWHT and coating for ITER test blanket modules and DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, P.; Tavassoli, F.; Rieth, M.; Diegele, E.; Poitevin, Y.

    2011-01-01

    EUROFER weldability is investigated in support of the European material properties database and TBM manufacturing. Electron Beam, Hybrid, laser and narrow gap TIG processes have been carried out on the EUROFER-97 steel (thickness up to 40 mm), a reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel developed in Europe. These welding processes produce similar welding results with high joint coefficients and are well adapted for minimizing residual distortions. The fusion zones are typically composed of martensite laths, with small grain sizes. In the heat-affected zones, martensite grains contain carbide precipitates. High hardness values are measured in all these zones that if not tempered would degrade toughness and creep resistance. PWHT developments have driven to a one-step PWHT (750 o C/3 h), successfully applied to joints restoring good material performances. It will produce less distortion levels than a full austenitization PWHT process, not really applicable to a complex welded structure such as the TBM. Different tungsten coatings have been successfully processed on EUROFER material. It has shown no really effect on the EUROFER base material microstructure.

  4. Crack growth rates of irradiated austenitic stainless steel weld heat affected zone in BWR environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O. K.; Alexandreanu, B.; Gruber, E. E.; Daum, R. S.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2006-01-31

    Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in the internal components of reactor pressure vessels because of their superior fracture toughness. However, exposure to high levels of neutron irradiation for extended periods can exacerbate the corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of these steels by affecting the material microchemistry, material microstructure, and water chemistry. Experimental data are presented on crack growth rates of the heat affected zone (HAZ) in Types 304L and 304 SS weld specimens before and after they were irradiated to a fluence of 5.0 x 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV) ({approx} 0.75 dpa) at {approx}288 C. Crack growth tests were conducted under cycling loading and long hold time trapezoidal loading in simulated boiling water reactor environments on Type 304L SS HAZ of the H5 weld from the Grand Gulf reactor core shroud and on Type 304 SS HAZ of a laboratory-prepared weld. The effects of material composition, irradiation, and water chemistry on growth rates are discussed.

  5. Effect of Brass Interlayer Sheet on Microstructure and Joint Performance of Ultrasonic Spot-Welded Copper-Steel Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpathy, Mantra Prasad; Kumar, Abhishek; Sahoo, Susanta Kumar

    2017-07-01

    Solid-state ultrasonic spot welding (USW) inevitably offers a potential solution for joining dissimilar metal combination like copper (Cu) and steel (SS). In this study, the USW has been performed on Cu (UNS C10100) and SS (AISI 304) with brass interlayer by varying various welding parameters, aiming to identify the interfacial reaction, changes in microstructure and weld strength. The highest tensile shear and T-peel failure loads of 1277 and 174 N are achieved at the optimum conditions like 68 µm of vibration amplitude, 0.42 MPa of weld pressure and 1 s of weld time. The fractured surface analysis of brass interlayer and AISI 304 stainless steel samples reveals the features like swirls, voids and intermetallic compounds (IMCs). These IMCs are composed of CuZn and FeZn composite-like structures with 1.0 μm thickness. This confirms that the weld quality is specifically sensitive to the levels of input parameter combinations as well as the type of material present on the sonotrode side.

  6. Analysis of Pulsed Laser Welding Parameters Effect on Weld Geometry of 316L Stainless Steel using DOE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Pakmanesh

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the optimization of pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding parameters was done on a lap-joint of a 316L stainless steel foil in order to predict the weld geometry through response surface methodology. For this purpose, the effects of laser power, pulse duration, and frequency were investigated. By presenting a second-order polynomial, the above-mentioned statistical method was managed to be well employed to evaluate the effect of welding parameters on weld width. The results showed that the weld width at the upper, middle and lower surfaces of weld cross section increases by increasing pulse durationand laser power; however, the effects of these parameters on the mentioned levels are different. The effect of pulse duration in the models of weld upper, middle and lower widths was calculated as 76, 73 and 68%, respectively. Moreover, the effect of power on theses widths was determined as 18, 24 and 28%, respectively. Finally, by superimposing these models, optimum conditions were obtained to attain a full penetration weld and the weld with no defects.

  7. Improving Joint Properties of Friction Welded Joint of High Tensile Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Masaaki; Kusaka, Masahiro; Seo, Kenji; Fuji, Akiyoshi

    This report describes the improvements in the joint properties of friction welded joint of 780MPa class high tensile steel. Welded joint made by a continuous drive friction welding machine, the conventional method, had not obtained 100% joint efficiency despite applying forge pressure. This was due to the softening of the welded interface zone for heat input during braking times. Therefore, we developed a continuous drive friction welding machine with an electromagnetic clutch to prevent heat input during braking time. We proposed the process as “The Low Heat Input Friction Welding Method (the LHI method).” In this case, the joint had the same tensile strength as the base metal at friction time when the friction torque reached the initial peak torque. That is, the welded joint obtained 100% joint efficiency by using only the friction stage up to the initial peak torque without the forge (upsetting) stage, despite the existence of a slightly softened region adjacent to the welded interface. Furthermore, the softened region was hardly generated when this joint was made by applying forge pressure at the initial peak torque. In conclusion, a welded joint of high tensile steel made by only the friction stage of the LHI method had excellent joint properties. The LHI method has a lot of advantages for joining such materials as super fine grain steel with which conventional fusion welding processes have difficulty.

  8. Qualification of electron-beam welded joints between copper and stainless steel for cryogenic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusch, C.; Borsch, M.; Heidt, C.; Magginetti, N.; Sas, J.; Weiss, K.-P.; Grohmann, S.

    2015-12-01

    Joints between copper and stainless steel are commonly applied in cryogenic systems. A relatively new and increasingly important method to combine these materials is electron-beam (EB) welding. Typically, welds in cryogenic applications need to withstand a temperature range from 300K down to 4K, and pressures of several MPa. However, few data are available for classifying EB welds between OFHC copper and 316L stainless steel. A broad test program was conducted in order to qualify this kind of weld. The experiments started with the measurement of the hardness in the weld area. To verify the leak-tightness of the joints, integral helium leak tests at operating pressures of 16 MPa were carried out at room- and at liquid nitrogen temperature. The tests were followed by destructive tensile tests at room temperature, at liquid nitrogen and at liquid helium temperatures, yielding information on the yield strength and the ultimate tensile strength of the welds at these temperatures. Moreover, nondestructive tensile tests up to the yield strength, i.e. the range in which the weld can be stressed during operation, were performed. Also, the behavior of the weld upon temperature fluctuations between room- and liquid nitrogen temperature was tested. The results of the qualification indicate that EB welded joints between OFHC copper and 316L stainless steel are reliable and present an interesting alternative to other technologies such as vacuum brazing or friction welding.

  9. Effects of X-rays Radiation on AISI 304 Stainless Steel Weldings with AISI 316L Filler Material: A Study of Resistance and Pitting Corrosion Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Cárcel-Carrasco

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the effect of low-level ionizing radiation, namely X-rays, on the micro structural characteristics, resistance, and corrosion resistance of TIG-welded joints of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel made using AISI 316L filler rods. The welds were made in two different environments: natural atmospheric conditions and a closed chamber filled with inert argon gas. The influence of different doses of radiation on the resistance and corrosion characteristics of the welds is analyzed. Welded material from inert Ar gas chamber TIG showed better characteristics and lesser irradiation damage effects.

  10. Numerical simulation of temperature field in multiple-wire submerged arc welding of X80 pipeline steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chunyan; Jiang, Han; Wu, Lichao; Kan, Chenxia; Yu, Wen

    2018-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) simulation was implemented to predict the temperature distribution during multiple-wire submerged arc welding (SAW) throughout the welded joint of X80 pipeline steel. A moving heat source model based on Goldak’s double-ellipsoid heat flux distribution was applied in the simulation to capture the heating effect of the welding arc. Effects of welding speed, wire spacing and leading wire current on temperature distribution were further investigated. The simulation results show that both welding speed and wire spacing have significant effects on welding temperature distribution in X80 pipeline steel welded joint.

  11. Effects of Thermocapillary Forces during Welding of 316L-Type Wrought, Cast and Powder Metallurgy Austenitic Stainless Steels

    CERN Document Server

    Sgobba, Stefano

    2003-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is now under construction at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). This 27 km long accelerator requires 1248 superconducting dipole magnets operating at 1.9 K. The cold mass of the dipole magnets is closed by a shrinking cylinder with two longitudinal welds and two end covers at both extremities of the cylinder. The end covers, for which fabrication by welding, casting or Powder Metallurgy (PM) was considered, are dished-heads equipped with a number of protruding nozzles for the passage of the different cryogenic lines. Structural materials and welds must retain high strength and toughness at cryogenic temperature. AISI 316L-type austenitic stainless steel grades have been selected because of their mechanical properties, ductility, weldability and stability of the austenitic phase against low-temperature spontaneous martensitic transformation. 316LN is chosen for the fabrication of the end covers, while the interconnection components to be welded on the protrud...

  12. Dissimilar steel welding and overlay covering with nickel based alloys using SWAM (Shielded Metal Arc Welding) and GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) processes in the nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arce Chilque, Angel Rafael [Centro Tecnico de Engenharia e Inovacao Empresarial Ltda., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Bracarense, Alexander Queiroz; Lima, Luciana Iglesias Lourenco [Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Quinan, Marco Antonio Dutra; Schvartzman, Monica Maria de Abreu Mendonca [Nuclear Technology Development Centre (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Marconi, Guilherme [Federal Center of Technological Education (CEFET-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This work presents the welding of dissimilar ferritic steel type A508 class 3 and austenitic stainless steel type AISI 316 L using Inconel{sup R} 600 (A182 and A82) and overlay covering with Inconel{sup R} 690 (A52) as filler metal. Dissimilar welds with these materials without defects and weldability problems such as hot, cold, reheat cracking and Ductility Dip Crack were obtained. Comparables mechanical properties to those of the base metal were found and signalized the efficiency of the welding procedure and thermal treatment selected and used. This study evidences the importance of meeting compromised properties between heat affected zone of the ferritic steel and the others regions presents in the dissimilar joint, to elaborate the dissimilar metal welding procedure specification and weld overlay. Metallographic studies with optical microscopy and Vickers microhardness were carried out to justified and support the results, showing the efficiency of the technique of elaboration of dissimilar metal welding procedure and overlay. The results are comparables and coherent with the results found by others. Some alternatives of welding procedures are proposed to attain the efficacy. Further studies are proposed like as metallographic studies of the fine microstructure, making use, for example, of scanning electron microscope (SEM adapted with an EDS) to explain looking to increase the resistance to primary water stress corrosion (PWSCC) in nuclear equipment. (author)

  13. Residual stress distribution in carbon steel pipe welded joint measured by neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Makoto; Ishiwata, Masayuki; Morii, Yukio; Minakawa, Nobuaki

    2000-01-01

    In order to estimate crack growth behavior of fatigue and stress corrosion cracking in pipes, the residual stress distribution near the pipe weld region has to be measured through the wall thickness. Since the penetration depth of neutron is deep enough to pass through the thick pipe wall, the neutron diffraction technique for the residual stress measurement is effective for this purpose. At the first step the residual stress distribution near the weld region in a butt-welded carbon steel pipe was measured by the neutron diffraction. Significant stresses extended only to a distance of 30 mm from the center of the weld. The major tensile stresses occurred in the hoop direction in the fusion and heat affected zones of the weldment, and they attained a level greater than 200 MPa through the thickness. While the axial residual stress at the inside surface was 50 MPa, the stress at the outside surface was -100 MPa. The comparison of residual stress distributions measured by the neutron diffraction, the X-ray diffraction and the strain gauge method reveals that the neutron diffraction is the most effective for measuring the residual stress inside the structural components. (author)

  14. 77 FR 37711 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India, Oman, the United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-22

    ... COMMISSION Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India, Oman, the United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam...-fair-value imports from India, Oman, the United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam of circular welded carbon... respect to circular welded carbon-quality steel pipe from Oman and the United Arab Emirates being sold in...

  15. 76 FR 67473 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings from Italy, Malaysia, and The Philippines; Institution of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    ... Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings from Italy, Malaysia, and The Philippines; Institution of Five-Year Reviews Concerning the Antidumping Duty Orders on Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy, Malaysia, and... antidumping duty orders on imports of stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Italy, Malaysia, and the...

  16. 76 FR 21331 - Certain Carbon Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Brazil, Japan, Taiwan, Thailand, and the People...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-15

    ...-807, A-570-814] Certain Carbon Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Brazil, Japan, Taiwan, Thailand, and... butt-weld pipe fittings from Brazil, Japan, Taiwan, Thailand, and the People's Republic of China (PRC... duty orders on carbon steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Brazil, Japan, Taiwan, Thailand, and the PRC...

  17. Austenitic steels of the new generation used for power plant installations with supercritical parameters and their welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brozda, J.

    2006-01-01

    Combustion of bituminous coal and lignite in power boilers brings into the atmosphere a lot of contaminations. The emission of pollutants can be reduced by the application of supercritical steam parameters, which also improves the efficiency of power units, but in that case constructional materials of the new generation are needed, among them austenitic steels. The development of power units with supercritical and ultra supercritical steam parameters is presented as well as applied structural materials. Austenitic steels used in power boiler constructions are listed. Basic characteristics of austenitic steels of the new generation are given and principles of their forming and welding. (author)

  18. Influence of welding current in resistance spot welding on the properties of Zn coated steel DX51D

    OpenAIRE

    Luboš Kaščák; Ján Viňáš; Rudolf Mišičko

    2016-01-01

    The paper deals with the resistance spot welding of three galvanized car body sheets DX51D + Z - EN 10142/2000. The quality of welded joints was evaluated by destructive tests and non-destructive tests. For evaluation of joints quality the shear tension test on spot joints according to DIN 50 124 standard was used. The influence of welding parameters on the structure of a welded joint was observed by metallographic analysis. Influence of welding current from 6.0 to 7.7 kA and infl...

  19. Corrosion resistance of ERW (Electric Resistance Welded) seam welds as compared to metal base in API 5L steel pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Velasquez, Jorge L.; Godinez Salcedo, Jesus G.; Lopez Fajardo, Pedro [Instituto Politecnico Nacional (IPN), Mexico D.F. (Mexico). Escuela Superior de Ingenieria Quimica e Industrias Extractivas (ESIQIE). Dept. de Ingenieria Metalurgica

    2009-07-01

    The corrosion resistance of ERW seam welds and the base metal in API 5L X70 steel pipes was evaluated by Tafel tests. The procedure was according to ASTM G3 standard. The study was completed with metallographic and chemical characterization of the tested zones, that is, the welded zone and the base metal away of the weld. All tests were made on the internal surface of the pipe in order to assess the internal corrosion of an in-service pipeline made of the API 5L X70 steel. The test solution was acid brine prepared according to NACE Publications 1D182 and 1D196. The results showed that the ERW seam weld corrodes as much as three times faster than the base material. This behavior is attributed to a more heterogeneous microstructure with higher internal energy in the ERW seam weld zone, as compared to the base metal, which is basically a ferrite pearlite microstructure in a normalized condition. This result also indicates that pipeline segments made of ERW steel pipe where the seam weld is located near or at the bottom of the pipe are prone to a highly localized attack that may form channels of metal loss if there is water accumulation at the bottom of the pipeline. (author)

  20. Evaluation of Distortion in Welding Unions of 304 Stainless Steel with Elliptic Trajectory Using a Welding Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-González, L. A.; Hurtado-Delgado, E.; Reyes-Valdés, F. A.

    The aim of this investigation is to evaluate the distortions generated in welding unions of stainless steel 304 by effect of the welding temperature and the microestructural changes. The joint design is a 100 × 100 mm steel plate of 3 mm thickness. The plate was joined to a tube of 50 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness, which has a defined angular cut; therefore, the trajectory followed by the seam has an elliptic form. Temperature data acquisition was developed by type K thermocouples, placed in pairs at 0°, 90°, 180° and 270° along the welding trajectory and connected to a data acquisition device yo obtain the measures to generate time-temperature plots. The welding process was executed by a KUKA ®; KR16 welding robot with an integrated GMAW (Gas metal arc welding) process where the input parameters of voltage, wire feed and travel speed are set to constant. The distortion of the work piece was measured using a laser scanning technique that generates a point cloud with the VXelements TM software for comparison between the pre and post-weld condition. Microstructural evaluation was performed on transversal sections of the seam, at the mentioned angles for correlation.

  1. Design of welding parameters for laser welding of thin-walled stainless steel tubes using numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, M.; Behúlová, M.

    2017-11-01

    Nowadays, the laser technology is used in a wide spectrum of applications, especially in engineering, electronics, medicine, automotive, aeronautic or military industries. In the field of mechanical engineering, the laser technology reaches the biggest increase in the automotive industry, mainly due to the introduction of automation utilizing 5-axial movements. Modelling and numerical simulation of laser welding processes has been exploited with many advantages for the investigation of physical principles and complex phenomena connected with this joining technology. The paper is focused on the application of numerical simulation to the design of welding parameters for the circumferential laser welding of thin-walled exhaust pipes from theAISI 304 steel for automotive industry. Using the developed and experimentally verified simulation model for laser welding of tubes, the influence of welding parameters including the laser velocity from 30 mm.s-1 to 60 mm.s-1 and the laser power from 500 W to 1200 W on the temperature fields and dimensions of fusion zone was investigated using the program code ANSYS. Based on obtained results, the welding schedule for the laser beam welding of thin-walled tubes from the AISI 304 steel was suggested.

  2. HAZ microstructure in joints made of X13CrMoCoVNbNB9-2-1 (PB2 steel welded with and without post-weld heat treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Łomozik

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of research butt welded joints made of X13CrMoCoVNbNB9-2-1 steel. The joints were welded with post-weld heat treatment PWHT and without PWHT, using the temper bead technique TBT. After welding the joint welded with PWHT underwent stress-relief annealing at 770 °C for 3 hours. The scope of structural tests included the microstructural examination of the coarse-grained heat affected zone (HAZ areas of the joints, the comparison of the morphology of these areas and the determination of carbide precipitate types of the coarse grain heat affected zone (CGHAZ of the joints welded with and without PWHT.

  3. Microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir welded SAF 2507 super duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Y.S.; Nelson, T.W.; Sterling, C.J.; Steel, R.J.; Pettersson, C.-O.

    2005-01-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir (FS) welded SAF 2507 super duplex stainless steel were examined. High-quality, full-penetration welds were successfully produced in the super duplex stainless steel by friction stir welding (FSW) using polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN) tool. The base material had a microstructure consisting of the ferrite matrix with austenite islands, but FSW refined grains of the ferrite and austenite phases in the stir zone through dynamic recrystallisation. Ferrite content was held between 50 and 60% throughout the weld. The smaller grain sizes of the ferrite and austenite phases caused increase in hardness and strength within the stir zone. Welded transverse tensile specimen failed near the border between the stir zone and TMAZ at the retreating side as the weld had roughly the same strengths as the base material

  4. Amorphization by friction welding between 5052 aluminum alloy and 304 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumoto, S.; Tsubakino, H.; Okita, K.; Aritoshi, M.; Tomita, T.

    2000-04-14

    The joining of dissimilar metals such as aluminum/stainless steel is a very important technique. In the case of fusion welding of an Fe-Al system, excess formation of brittle intermetallic compounds degrades the joint. Since friction welding is one of the solid-state bonding procedures, few intermetallic compounds are formed at the weld interface. However, in the Al-Fe system, the solid solubility is almost nil, so some intermetallic compounds will be formed in spite of the friction welding. In the present study, microstructure of the friction weld interface between Al-Mg alloy and austenitic stainless steel was investigated by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and the mechanism of friction welding was examined.

  5. Influence of the welding process on martensitic high strength steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Hanus

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the study is martensitic 22MnB5 steels, which are used in the automotive industry. The main purpose of the performed analyses is a study of strength differences in heat affected zones of the spot welding. For the needs of the strength decrease assessment, the critical layer of the heat affected area was experimentally simulated. The aim of the work is to determine the most suitable methodology for evaluating the local changes of the elastic-plastic material response. The aim of this work is to determine the optimal methods for the determination of the yield strength and to find a firming trend in these zones.

  6. Surface preparation for residual stress measurement of an accelerated corrosion tested welded marine steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Bilal; Fitzpatrick, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Residual stress measurement is often required for the assessment of structural integrity of components. Measurement of residual stress in corrosion tested specimens is challenging owing to the difficulty of accessing the surface because of the rust layer. This study explored the potential methods for the surface preparation of an ultrasonically-peened and accelerated corrosion tested DH36 marine steel fillet welded specimen to ease the way for subsequent residual stress measurement using neutron diffraction and the contour method. We find that hydroblasting introduces compressive residual stress at the surface that will alter the surface stress to be measured

  7. Multiphysical Modeling of Transport Phenomena During Laser Welding of Dissimilar Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Métais, A.; Matteï, S.; Tomashchuk, I.; Gaied, S.

    The success of new high-strength steels allows attaining equivalent performances with lower thicknesses and significant weight reduction. The welding of new couples of steel grades requires development and control of joining processes. Thanks to high precision and good flexibility, laser welding became one of the most used processes for joining of dissimilar welded blanks. The prediction of the local chemical composition in the weld formed between dissimilar steels in function of the welding parameters is essential because the dilution rate and the distribution of alloying elements in the melted zone determines the final tensile strength of the weld. The goal of the present study is to create and to validate a multiphysical numerical model studying the mixing of dissimilar steels in laser weld pool. A 3D modelling of heat transfer, turbulent flow and transport of species provides a better understanding of diffusion and convective mixing in laser weld pool. The present model allows predicting the weld geometry and element distribution. The model has been developed based on steady keyhole approximation and solved in quasi-stationary form in order to reduce the computation time. Turbulent flow formulation was applied to calculate velocity field. Fick law for diluted species was used to simulate the transport of alloying elements in the weld pool. To validate the model, a number of experiments have been performed: tests using pure 100 μm thick Ni foils like tracer and weld between a rich and poor manganese steels. SEM-EDX analysis of chemical composition has been carried out to obtain quantitative mapping of Ni and Mn distributions in the melted zone. The results of simulations have been found in good agreement with experimental data.

  8. Residual stress distribution in ferritic to austenitic steel joints made by laser welding,

    OpenAIRE

    Iordachescu, Mihaela; Ruiz Hervías, Jesús; Luzin, V.; Scutelnicu, Elena; Valiente Cancho, Andrés; Ocaña Moreno, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    In this study, autogenous laser welding was used to join thin plates of low carbon ferritic and austenitic stainless steel. Due to the differences in the thermo-physical properties of base metals, this kind of weld exhibits a complex microstructure, which frequently leads to an overall loss of joint quality. Four welded samples were prepared by using different sets of processing parameters, with the aim of minimizing the induced residual stress field. The dissimilar austenitic-ferritic joints...

  9. Deformation behavior of welded steel sandwich panels under quasi-static loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    This report describes engineering studies that were conducted to examine the deformation behavior of flat, welded steel sandwich panels under two quasi-static loading conditions: (1) uniaxial compression; and (2) bending with an indenter. Testing and...

  10. Local microstructures, Hardness and mechanical properties of a stainless steel pipe-welded joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yongxiang; Gao Qing; Cai Lixun

    2000-01-01

    An experimental investigation is carefully performed into the local microstructures, hardness values and monotonic mechanical properties of the three zones (the base metal, heat affecting zone and weld metal) of 1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel pipe-welded joint. The local microstructures are observed by a metallurgical test and a surface replica technology, the local hardness values are measures by a random Vickers hardness test, and the local mechanical properties are characterized by the Ramberg-Osgood and modified Ramberg-Osgood stress-stain relations. The investigation reveals that there are significant differences of the three zones in the local microstructures, hardness values and monotonic mechanical properties, especially of the three zones in the local microstructure, hardness values and monotonic mechanical properties, especially of the weld metal. The weld metal exhibits the largest heterogeneity of local microstructures and monotonic mechanical properties, and the largest scatter of local hardness values. It is necessary to consider these difference and introduce the reliability method to model the scatter in the pipe analysis. In addition, it is verified that a columnar grain structure, which is made up of matrix-rich δ ferrite bands, can characterize the weld metal and the distance between the neighboring rich δ ferrite bands is an appropriate measurement of the columnar grain structure. This measurement is in accordance with the transition point between the microstructural short crack and physical small crack stages, which are generally used for characterizing the short fatigue crack behavior of materials. This indicates that the microstructure controls the fatigue damage character of the present material

  11. Study about the structural behavior of WStE-36N steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos Pinto, M. dos; Trindade, M.B.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of a stress relaxation heat treatment in welding done by submerged-arc-welding is studied. This influence was studied in a structural steel, WStE-36N, niobium alloy, made in Brazil, through Charpy V test, hardness measurements, micro-structural aspects and X-ray diffraction. (E.G.) [pt

  12. 77 FR 39735 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy, Malaysia, and the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-05

    ... revocation of the antidumping duty orders on stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings From Italy, Malaysia... Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy, Malaysia, and the Philippines Determination On the basis of the..., Malaysia, and the Philippines: Inv. Nos. 731-TA-865-867 (Second Review). Issued: June 28, 2012. By order of...

  13. Laser welding optimization of stainless steel lap joints by design of experiment method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caiazzo, F.; Curcio, F.; Daurelio, G.; Capece Minutolo, F. Memola; Sergi, V.

    2003-11-01

    This paper reports the findings of a research Design of Experiment (DOE) based to assess the impact of changes in a set of technological parameters on the morphological characteristics - in particular the microhardness of the welded section - of laser welded stainless steel (AISI 304 and AISI 430) lap joints. The Authors also highlight future research directions.

  14. Welding procedure for 06Kh13N7D2 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muromtsev, B.I.; Turkov, I.I.

    1990-01-01

    Based on the results of investigations into the process strength, mechanical and corrosion properties of 08Kh13N7D2 steel welded joints, the optimal method of its welding and a possibility of applying it for high-strength mounting in nuclear power plants are determined

  15. Numerical simulation and experimental validation of arc welding of DMR-249A steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishi Pamnani

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The thermo-mechanical attributes of DMR-249A steel weld joints manufactured by shielded metal arc welding (SMAW and activated gas tungsten arc welding (A-GTAW processes were studied using Finite Element Model (FEM simulation. The thermal gradients and residual stresses were analyzed with SYSWELD software using double ellipsoidal heat source distribution model. The numerically estimated temperature distribution was validated with online temperature measurements using thermocouples. The predicted residual stresses profile across the weld joints was compared with the values experimentally measured using non-destructive techniques. The measured and predicted thermal cycles and residual stress profile was observed to be comparable. The residual stress developed in double sided A-GTAW joint were marginally higher in comparison to five pass SMAW joint due to phase transformation associated with high heat input per weld pass for A-GTAW process. The present investigations suggest the applicability of numerical modeling as an effective approach for predicting the thermo-mechanical properties influenced by welding techniques for DMR-249A steel weld joints. The tensile, impact and micro-hardness tests were carried to compare the welds. Considering benefits of high productivity and savings of labor and cost associated with A-GTAW compared to SMAW process, the minor variation in residual stress build up of A-GTAW joint can be neglected to develop A-GTAW as qualified alternative welding technique for DMR-249A steel.

  16. Structural integrity and fatigue crack propagation life assessment of welded and weld-repaired structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mohammad Shah

    2005-11-01

    Structural integrity is the science and technology of the margin between safety and disaster. Proper evaluation of the structural integrity and fatigue life of any structure (aircraft, ship, railways, bridges, gas and oil transmission pipelines, etc.) is important to ensure the public safety, environmental protection, and economical consideration. Catastrophic failure of any structure can be avoided if structural integrity is assessed and necessary precaution is taken appropriately. Structural integrity includes tasks in many areas, such as structural analysis, failure analysis, nondestructive testing, corrosion, fatigue and creep analysis, metallurgy and materials, fracture mechanics, fatigue life assessment, welding metallurgy, development of repairing technologies, structural monitoring and instrumentation etc. In this research fatigue life assessment of welded and weld-repaired joints is studied both in numerically and experimentally. A new approach for the simulation of fatigue crack growth in two elastic materials has been developed and specifically, the concept has been applied to butt-welded joint in a straight plate and in tubular joints. In the proposed method, the formation of new surface is represented by an interface element based on the interface potential energy. This method overcomes the limitation of crack growth at an artificial rate of one element length per cycle. In this method the crack propagates only when the applied load reaches the critical bonding strength. The predicted results compares well with experimental results. The Gas Metal Arc welding processes has been simulated to predict post-weld distortion, residual stresses and development of restraining forces in a butt-welded joint. The effect of welding defects and bi-axial interaction of a circular porosity and a solidification crack on fatigue crack propagation life of butt-welded joints has also been investigated. After a weld has been repaired, the specimen was tested in a universal

  17. Properties and Microstructure of Laser Welded VM12-SHC Steel Pipes Joints

    OpenAIRE

    Skrzypczyk A.; Danielewski H.

    2016-01-01

    Paper presents results of microstructure and tests of welded joints of new generation VM12-SHC martensitic steel using high power CO2 laser (LBW method) with bifocal welding head. VM12-SHC is dedicated to energetic installation material, designed to replace currently used. High content of chromium and others alloying elements improve its resistance and strength characteristic. Use of VM12-SHC steel for production of the superheaters, heating chambers and walls in steam boilers resulted in var...

  18. Computational Modeling of Microstructural-Evolution in AISI 1005 Steel During Gas Metal Arc Butt Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    REPORT Computational Modeling of Microstructural-Evolution in AISI 1005 Steel During Gas Metal Arc Butt Welding 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY...NAMES AND ADDRESSES U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS AISI 1005, finite-element...Computational Modeling of Microstructural-Evolution in AISI 1005 Steel During Gas Metal Arc Butt Welding Report Title ABSTRACT A fully coupled (two-way

  19. Friction welding of Al-Cu-SiC composite to AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel

    OpenAIRE

    Özdemir, Niyazi; Balaban, Zülküf

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigates thefeasibility of joining an aluminium matrix composite reinforced with 5, 10 and15 vol. % of SiCp particles to AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel by usingfriction welding technique. In the present study, optical and electronmicroscopy as well as lap shear strength test and microhardness measurementswere used to evaluate the quality of bonding of Al-Cu-SiC and AISI 304austenitic stainless steel joints produced by friction welding

  20. UNS S31603 Stainless Steel Tungsten Inert Gas Welds Made with Microparticle and Nanoparticle Oxides

    OpenAIRE

    Tseng, Kuang-Hung; Lin, Po-Yu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference between tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of austenitic stainless steel assisted by microparticle oxides and that assisted by nanoparticle oxides. SiO2 and Al2O3 were used to investigate the effects of the thermal stability and the particle size of the activated compounds on the surface appearance, geometric shape, angular distortion, delta ferrite content and Vickers hardness of the UNS S31603 stainless steel TIG weld. The results sh...

  1. Heat-affected zone liquation crack on resistance spot welded TWIP steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Dulal Chandra; Chang, InSung; Park, Yeong-Do

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the heat affected zone (HAZ) liquation crack and segregation behavior of the resistance spot welded twinning induced plasticity (TWIP) steel have been reported. Cracks appeared in the post-welded joints that originated at the partially melted zone (PMZ) and propagated from the PMZ through the heat affected zone (HAZ) to the base metal (BM). The crack length and crack opening widths were observed increasing with heat input; and the welding current was identified to be the most influencing parameter for crack formation. Cracks appeared at the PMZ when nugget diameter reached at 4.50 mm or above; and the liquation cracks were found to occur along two sides of the notch tip in the sheet direction rather than in the electrode direction. Cracks were backfilled with the liquid films which has lamellar structure and supposed to be the eutectic constituent. Co-segregation of alloy elements such as, C and Mn were detected on the liquid films by electron-probe microanalysis (EPMA) line scanning and element map which suggests that the liquid film was enrich of Mn and C. The eutectic constituent was identified by analyzing the calculated phase diagram along with thermal temperature history of finite element simulation. Preliminary experimental results showed that cracks have less/no significant effect on the static cross-tensile strength (CTS) and the tensile-shear strength (TSS). In addition, possible ways to avoid cracking were discussed. - Highlights: • The HAZ liquation crack during resistance spot welding of TWIP steel was examined. • Cracks were completely backfilled and healed with divorced eutectic secondary phase. • Co-segregation of C and Mn was detected in the cracked zone. • Heat input was the most influencing factor to initiate liquation crack. • Cracks have less/no significant effect on static tensile properties

  2. Welding hot cracking in an austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerrouault, N.

    2001-01-01

    The occurrence of hot cracking is linked to several conditions, in particular, the composition of the material and the local strains due to clambering. The aim of this study is to better analyse the implied mechanisms and to lead to a local thermomechanical criterion for hot cracking. The example studied is an AISI 321-type stainless steel (X10CrNiTi18-12) strongly prone to cracking. Two weldability tests are studied: - the first one consists in carrying out a fusion line by the TIG process on a thin sheet. In the case of the defect occurrence, the crack is longitudinal and follows the back of the molten bath. The influence of the operating conditions welding (speed, welding heat input, width test sample) is studied. - the second one is the Varestraint test. It is widely used to evaluate the sensitivity of a material to hot cracking. It consists in loading the material by bending during a fusion line by the TIG process and in characterising the defects quantity (length, number). Various thermal and mechanical instrumentation methods were used. The possibilities of a local instrumentation instrumentation being limited because of the melting, the experimental results were complemented by a numerical modelling whose aim is to simulate the thermomechanical evolution of the loading thanks to the finite element analysis code ABAQUS. First, the heat input for thermal simulation is set by the use of an inverse method in order to optimise the energy deposit mode during welding in the calculation. Then, the mechanical simulation needs the input of a constitutive law that fits the mechanical behaviour over a wide temperature range from ambient to melting temperature. Thus, a mechanical characterization is performed by selecting strain values and strain rates representative of what the material undergoes during the tests. The results come from tensile and compressive tests and allow to settle an elasto-visco-plastic constitutive law over temperatures up to liquidus. Once

  3. Research on Microstructure and Properties of Welded Joint of High Strength Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Pengxiao; Li, Yi; Chen, Bo; Ma, Xuejiao; Zhang, Dongya; Tang, Cai

    2018-01-01

    BS960 steel plates were welded by Laser-MAG and MAG. The microstructure and properties of the welded joints were investigated by optical microscope, micro-hardness tester, universal tensile testing machine, impact tester, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and fatigue tester. By a series of experiments, the following results were obtained: The grain size of the coarse grain zone with Laser-MAG welded joint is 20μm, and that with MAG welded joint is about 32μm, both of the fine grain region are composed of fine lath martensite and granular bainite; the width of the heat affected region with Laser-MAG is lower than that with MAG. The strength and impact energy of welded joints with Laser-MAG is higher than that with MAG. The conditioned fatigue limit of welded joint with Laser-MAG is 280MPa; however, the conditioned fatigue limit of welded joint with MAG is 250MPa.

  4. UNS S32750 super duplex steel welding using pulsed Nd:YAG laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francini, O.D.; Andrade, G.G.; Clemente, M.S.; Gallego, J.; Ventrella, V.A.

    2016-01-01

    Laser is a flexible and powerful tool with many relevant applications in industry, mainly in the welding area. Lasers today provide the welding industry technical solutions to many problems. This work studied the weld metal obtained by pulsed laser welding of Nd: YAG super duplex stainless steel UNS S32750 employed in the oil and natural gas, analyzing the influence of high cooling rate, due to the laser process, the swing phase ferrite / austenite. Were performed weld beads in butt joint with different repetition rates. The different microstructures were obtained by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that the effect of varying the welding energy of Nd: YAG laser on the volume fractions of the phases ferrite/austenite in the weld metal was its ferritization and low austenite amount on the grain boundary. (author)

  5. Experimental study of hot cracking at circular welding joints of 42CrMo steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Chen, Genyu; Chen, Binghua; Wang, Jinhai; Zhou, Cong

    2017-12-01

    The hot cracking at circular welding joints of quenched and tempered 42CrMo steel were studied. The flow of the molten pool and the solidification process of weld were observed with a high-speed video camera. The information on the variations in the weld temperature was collected using an infrared (IR) thermal imaging system. The metallurgical factors of hot cracking were analyzed via metallographic microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The result shows that leading laser laser-metal active gas (MAG) hybrid welding process has a smaller solid-liquid boundary movement rate (VSL) and a smaller solid-liquid boundary temperature gradient (GSL) compared with leading arc laser-MAG hybrid welding process and laser welding process. Additionally, the metal in the molten pool has superior permeability while flowing toward the dendritic roots and can compensate for the inner-dendritic pressure balance. Therefore, leading laser laser-MAG hybrid welding process has the lowest hot cracking susceptibility.

  6. Thermal Behavior of an HSLA Steel and the Impact in Phase Transformation: Submerged Arc Welding (SAW) Process Approach to Pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, P. S.; Reyes-Valdés, F. A.; Saldaña-Garcés, R.; Delgado, E. R.; Salinas-Rodríguez, A.

    Heat input during welding metal fusion generates different transformations, such as grain growth, hydrogen cracking, and the formation of brittle structures, generally associated with the heat-affected zone (HAZ). For this reason, it is very important to know the behavior of this area before welding. This paper presents a study of the thermal behavior and its effect on phase transformations in the HAZ, depending on cooling rates (0.1-200 °C/s) to obtain continuous cooling transformation (CCT) curves for an high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steel. In order to determine the formed phases, optical microscopy and Vickers microhardness measurement were used. The experimental CCT curve was obtained from an HSLA steel, and the results showed that, with the used cooling conditions, the steel did not provide formation of brittle structures. Therefore, it is unlikely that welds made by submerged arc welding (SAW) may lead to hydrogen embrittlement in the HAZ, which is one of the biggest problems of cracking in gas conduction pipelines. In addition, with these results, it will be possible to control the microstructure to optimize the pipe fabrication with SAW process in industrial plants.

  7. Hydrogen embrittlement of super austenitic stainless steel welded joints; Fragilizacao por hidrogenio em juntas soldadas de acos inoxidaveis superausteniticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paredes, Ramon S. Cortes [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Centro Politecnico. Inst. de Tecnologia para o Desenvolvimento (LACTEC); Berthier, Thiana; Kuromoto, Neide K. [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Lab. de Materiais e Tratamento de Superficies. Lab. de Nanopropriedades Mecanicas

    2004-09-15

    The austenitic stainless steel embrittlement is usually present on sulphurous medium due to the hydrogen presence, resulting on cracks and corrosion on acid medium. Several researches carried out on the behaviour of hydrogenated stainless steel structures, had shown that the hydrogen induces superficial phase transformation during hydrogenation period and cracks formation after this period. These are due to the permeation of the hydrogen into the material, which is apprehended on preferential site, resulting on high pressure zones of molecular hydrogen. These zones may lead the crack formation, compromising the mechanical properties. There are few results on austenitic and super austenitic stainless steel, considering the transformations induced on welded unions. This work evaluates the cracks nucleation on welded unions of super austenitic stainless steel AISI 904L exposed to hydrogen rich environments and its relation to the reduction of material ductility. The samples were welded by the Mig/Mag process, followed by hydrogenation which were cathodic on sulfuric acid solution at room temperature. The results showed that the tested super austenitic stainless steel has a significant amount of cracks and no phase transformation has occurred after hydronization. (author)

  8. Effect of Welding Current and Time on the Microstructure, Mechanical Characterizations, and Fracture Studies of Resistance Spot Welding Joints of AISI 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kianersi, Danial; Mostafaei, Amir; Mohammadi, Javad

    2014-09-01

    This article aims at investigating the effect of welding parameters, namely, welding current and welding time, on resistance spot welding (RSW) of the AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel sheets. The influence of welding current and welding time on the weld properties including the weld nugget diameter or fusion zone, tensile-shear load-bearing capacity of welded materials, failure modes, energy absorption, and microstructure of welded nuggets was precisely considered. Microstructural studies and mechanical properties showed that the region between interfacial to pullout mode transition and expulsion limit is defined as the optimum welding condition. Electron microscopic studies indicated different types of delta ferrite in welded nuggets including skeletal, acicular, and lathy delta ferrite morphologies as a result of nonequilibrium phases, which can be attributed to a fast cooling rate in the RSW process. These morphologies were explained based on Shaeffler, WRC-1992, and pseudo-binary phase diagrams. The optimum microstructure and mechanical properties were achieved with 8-kA welding current and 4-cycle welding time in which maximum tensile-shear load-bearing capacity or peak load of the welded materials was obtained at 8070 N, and the failure mode took place as button pullout with tearing from the base metal. Finally, fracture surface studies indicated that elongated dimples appeared on the surface as a result of ductile fracture in the sample welded in the optimum welding condition.

  9. 77 FR 73674 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India, Oman, The United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-11

    ...-1191-1194 (Final)] Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India, Oman, The United Arab Emirates... of circular welded carbon-quality steel pipe from India, Oman, the United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam...- quality steel pipe from India, Oman, the United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam were subsidized and/or dumped...

  10. Submerged arc narrow gap welding of the steel DIN 20MnMoNi55

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    The methodology for submerged arc narrow gap welding for high thickness rolled steel DIN 20MnMoNi55 was developed, using din S3NiMo1 04 mm and 05 mm wires, and DIN 8B435 flux. For this purpose, submerged arc narrow gap welded joints with 50 mm and 120 mm thickness were made aiming the welding parameters optimization and the study of the influence of welding voltage, wire diameter and wire to groove face distance on the operational performance and on the welded joint quality, specially on the ISO-V impact toughness. These welded joints were checked by non-destructive mechanical and metallographic tests. Results were compared with those obtained by one 120 mm thickness submerged arc conventional gap welded joint, using the same base metal and consumables (05 mm wire). The analysis of the results shows that the increasing of the wire to groove face distance and the welding voltage increases the hardness and the ISO-V impact toughness of the weld metal. It shows that the reduction of the gap angle is the main cause for the obtained of a heat affected zone free from coarse grains, the reduction of the welding voltage, the increasing of the wire to groove face distance, and the grounding optimization also contribute for that. It was also concluded that the quality and the execution complexity level of a narrow gap welded joint are identical to a conventional gap welded joint. (author) [pt

  11. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Resistance Spot Welding Joints of Carbonitrided Low-Carbon Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taweejun, Nipon; Poapongsakorn, Piyamon; Kanchanomai, Chaosuan

    2017-04-01

    Carbonitrided low-carbon steels are resistance welded in various engineering components. However, there are no reports on the microstructure and mechanical properties of their resistance spot welding (RSW) joints. Therefore, various carbonitridings were performed on the low-carbon steel sheets, and then various RSWs were applied to these carbonitrided sheets. The metallurgical and mechanical properties of the welding joint were investigated and discussed. The peak load and failure energy increased with the increases of welding current and fusion zone (FZ) size. At 11 kA welding current, the carbonitrided steel joint had the failure energy of 16 J, i.e., approximately 84 pct of untreated steel joint. FZ of carbonitrided steel joint consisted of ferrite, Widmanstatten ferrite, and untempered martensite, i.e., the solid-state transformation products, while the microstructure at the outer surfaces consisted of untempered martensite and retained austenite. The surface hardening of carbonitrided steel after RSW could be maintained, i.e., approximately 810 HV. The results can be applied to carbonitriding and RSW to achieve a good welding joint.

  12. Fracture toughness and crack growth resistance of pressure vessel plate and weld metal steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskovic, R.

    1988-01-01

    Compact tension specimens were used to measure the initiation fracture toughness and crack growth resistance of pressure vessel steel plates and submerged arc weld metal. Plate test specimens were manufactured from four different casts of steel comprising: aluminium killed C-Mn-Mo-Cu and C-Mn steel and two silicon killed C-Mn steels. Unionmelt No. 2 weld metal test specimens were extracted from welds of double V butt geometry having either the C-Mn-Mo-Cu steel (three weld joints) or one particular silicon killed C-Mn steel (two weld joints) as parent plate. A multiple specimen test technique was used to obtain crack growth data which were analysed by simple linear regression to determine the crack growth resistance lines and to derive the initiation fracture toughness values for each test temperature. These regression lines were highly scattered with respect to temperature and it was very difficult to determine precisely the temperature dependence of the initiation fracture toughness and crack growth resistance. The data were re-analysed, using a multiple linear regression method, to obtain a relationship between the materials' crack growth resistance and toughness, and the principal independent variables (temperature, crack growth, weld joint code and strain ageing). (author)

  13. The Fatigue Behavior of Steel Structures under Random Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerskov, Henning

    2009-01-01

    Fatigue damage accumulation in steel structures under random loading has been studied in a number of investigations at the Technical University of Denmark. The fatigue life of welded joints has been determined both experimentally and from a fracture mechanics analysis. In the experimental part...

  14. The Fatigue Behavior of Steel Structures under Random Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerskov, Henning

    2008-01-01

    Fatigue damage accumulation in steel structures under random loading has been studied in a number of investigations at the Technical University of Denmark. The fatigue life of welded joints has been determined both experimentally and from a fracture mechanics analysis. In the experimental part...

  15. The Effect of Shielding N{sub 2} gas on The Pitting Corrosion of Seal-welded Super Austenitic Stainless Steel by Autogenous Welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Tae; Kim, Young Sik [Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hyun Young [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Company, Gimcheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Many research efforts on the effect of nitrogen on the corrosion resistance of stainless steels have been reported, but little research has been conducted on the effect of nitrogen for the weldment of stainless steels by the seal-weld method. Therefore, this work focused on the determining the corrosion resistance of tube/tube sheet mock-up specimen for sea water condensers, and elucidating the effect of shielding nitrogen gas on its resistance. The pitting corrosion of autogenously welded specimen propagated preferentially along the dendritic structure. Regardless of the percent of shielding nitrogen gas, the analyzed nitrogen contents were very much lower than that of the bulk specimen. This can be arisen because the nitrogen in shielding gas may partly dissolve into the weldment, but simultaneously during the welding process, nitrogen in the alloy may escape into the atmosphere. However, the pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN) of the interdendrite area was higher than that of the dendrite arm, regardless of the shielding gas percent; and the PREN of the interdendrite area was higher than that of the base metal; the PREN of the dendrite arm was lower than that of the base metal because of the formation of (Cr, Mo) rich phases by welding.

  16. Microstructure and mechanical properties of resistance upset butt welded 304 austenitic stainless steel joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharifitabar, M.; Halvaee, A.; Khorshahian, S.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Three different microstructural zones formed at different distances from the joint interface in resistance upset butt welding of 304 austenitic stainless steel. Highlights: → Evaluation of microstructure in resistance upset welding of 304 stainless steel. → Evaluation of welding parameters effects on mechanical properties of the joint. → Introducing the optimum welding condition for joining stainless steel bars. -- Abstract: Resistance upset welding (UW) is a widely used process for joining metal parts. In this process, current, time and upset pressure are three parameters that affect the quality of welded products. In the present research, resistance upset butt welding of 304 austenitic stainless steel and effect of welding power and upset pressure on microstructure, tensile strength and fatigue life of the joint were investigated. Microstructure of welds were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was used to distinguish the phase(s) that formed at the joint interface and in heat affected zone (HAZ). Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) linked to the SEM was used to determine chemical composition of phases formed at the joint interface. Fatigue tests were performed using a pull-push fatigue test machine and the fatigue properties were analyzed drawing stress-number of cycles to failure (S-N) curves. Also tensile strength tests were performed. Finally tensile and fatigue fracture surfaces were studied by SEM. Results showed that there were three different microstructural zones at different distances from the joint interface and delta ferrite phase has formed in these regions. There was no precipitation of chromium carbide at the joint interface and in the HAZ. Tensile and fatigue strengths of the joint decreased with welding power. Increasing of upset pressure has also considerable influence on tensile strength of the joint. Fractography of fractured samples showed that formation of hot spots at

  17. UNS S31603 Stainless Steel Tungsten Inert Gas Welds Made with Microparticle and Nanoparticle Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang-Hung Tseng

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference between tungsten inert gas (TIG welding of austenitic stainless steel assisted by microparticle oxides and that assisted by nanoparticle oxides. SiO2 and Al2O3 were used to investigate the effects of the thermal stability and the particle size of the activated compounds on the surface appearance, geometric shape, angular distortion, delta ferrite content and Vickers hardness of the UNS S31603 stainless steel TIG weld. The results show that the use of SiO2 leads to a satisfactory surface appearance compared to that of the TIG weld made with Al2O3. The surface appearance of the TIG weld made with nanoparticle oxide has less flux slag compared with the one made with microparticle oxide of the same type. Compared with microparticle SiO2, the TIG welding with nanoparticle SiO2 has the potential benefits of high joint penetration and less angular distortion in the resulting weldment. The TIG welding with nanoparticle Al2O3 does not result in a significant increase in the penetration or reduction of distortion. The TIG welding with microparticle or nanoparticle SiO2 uses a heat source with higher power density, resulting in a higher ferrite content and hardness of the stainless steel weld metal. In contrast, microparticle or nanoparticle Al2O3 results in no significant difference in metallurgical properties compared to that of the C-TIG weld metal. Compared with oxide particle size, the thermal stability of the oxide plays a significant role in enhancing the joint penetration capability of the weld, for the UNS S31603 stainless steel TIG welds made with activated oxides.

  18. UNS S31603 Stainless Steel Tungsten Inert Gas Welds Made with Microparticle and Nanoparticle Oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Kuang-Hung; Lin, Po-Yu

    2014-06-20

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference between tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of austenitic stainless steel assisted by microparticle oxides and that assisted by nanoparticle oxides. SiO₂ and Al₂O₃ were used to investigate the effects of the thermal stability and the particle size of the activated compounds on the surface appearance, geometric shape, angular distortion, delta ferrite content and Vickers hardness of the UNS S31603 stainless steel TIG weld. The results show that the use of SiO₂ leads to a satisfactory surface appearance compared to that of the TIG weld made with Al₂O₃. The surface appearance of the TIG weld made with nanoparticle oxide has less flux slag compared with the one made with microparticle oxide of the same type. Compared with microparticle SiO₂, the TIG welding with nanoparticle SiO₂ has the potential benefits of high joint penetration and less angular distortion in the resulting weldment. The TIG welding with nanoparticle Al₂O₃ does not result in a significant increase in the penetration or reduction of distortion. The TIG welding with microparticle or nanoparticle SiO₂ uses a heat source with higher power density, resulting in a higher ferrite content and hardness of the stainless steel weld metal. In contrast, microparticle or nanoparticle Al₂O₃ results in no significant difference in metallurgical properties compared to that of the C-TIG weld metal. Compared with oxide particle size, the thermal stability of the oxide plays a significant role in enhancing the joint penetration capability of the weld, for the UNS S31603 stainless steel TIG welds made with activated oxides.

  19. Development of High Heat Input Welding High Strength Steel Plate for Oil Storage Tank in Xinyu Steel Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hemin; Dong, Fujun; Liu, Xiaolin; Xiong, Xiong

    This essay introduces the developed high-heat input welding quenched and tempered pressure vessel steel 12MnNiVR for oil storage tank by Xinyu Steel, which passed the review by the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Standards Technical Committee in 2009. The review comments that compared to the domestic and foreign similar steel standard, the key technical index of enterprise standard were in advanced level. After the heat input of 100kJ/cm electro-gas welding, welded points were still with excellent low temperature toughness at -20°C. The steel plate may be constructed for oil storage tank, which has been permitted by thickness range from 10 to 40mm, and design temperature among -20°C-100°C. It studied microstructure genetic effects mechanical properties of the steel. Many production practices indicated that the mechanical properties of products and the steel by stress relief heat treatment of steel were excellent, with pretreatment of hot metal, converter refining, external refining, protective casting, TMCP and heat treatment process measurements. The stability of performance and matured technology of Xinyu Steel support the products could completely service the demand of steel constructed for 10-15 million cubic meters large oil storage tank.

  20. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Dissimilar Friction Stir Spot Welding Between St37 Steel and 304 Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadadi, Ali; Shamanian, Morteza; Karimzadeh, Fathallah

    2017-05-01

    In the present study, St37 low-carbon steel and 304 stainless steel were welded successfully, with the thickness of 2 mm, by a friction stir spot welding process carried out at the tool dwell time of 6 s and two different tool rotational speeds of 630 and 1250 rpm. Metallographic examinations revealed four different zones including SZ and HAZ areas of St37 steel and SZ and TMAZ regions of 304 stainless steel in the weld nugget, except the base metals. X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy experiments were used to investigate the possible formation of such phases as chromium carbide. Based on these experiments, no chromium carbide precipitation was found. The recrystallization of the weld nugget in the 304 steel and the phase transformations of the weld regions in the St37 steel enhanced the hardness of the weld joint. Hardness changes of joint were acceptable and approximately uniform, as compared to the resistance spot weld. In this research, it was also observed that the tensile/shear strength, as a crucial factor, was increased with the rise in the tool rotational speed. The bond length along the interface between metals, as an effective parameter to increase the tensile/shear strength, was also determined. At higher tool rotational speeds, the bond length was found to be improved, resulting in the tensile/shear strength of 6682 N. Finally, two fracture modes were specified through the fracture mode analysis of samples obtained from the tensile/shear test consisting of the shear fracture mode and the mixed shear/tensile fracture mode.

  1. Development of a process envelope for friction stir welding of DH36 steel – A step change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toumpis, Athanasios; Galloway, Alexander; Cater, Stephen; McPherson, Norman

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The friction stir welding speed on DH36 steel has been substantially increased. • Excellent quality welds offering potential economic advantages are obtained. • Friction stir welding of steel generates a very complex metallurgical system. • Slow and intermediate welding speed tensile samples fractured in the parent material. • Increasing traverse speed is seen to improve the impact toughness of the weld. - Abstract: Friction stir welding of steel presents an array of advantages across many industrial sectors compared to conventional fusion welding techniques. However, the fundamental knowledge of the friction stir welding process in relation to steel remains relatively limited. A microstructure and property evaluation of friction stir welded low alloy steel grade DH36 plate, commonly used in ship and marine applications has been undertaken. In this comprehensive study, plates of 2000 × 200 × 6 mm were butt welded together at varying rotational and traverse speeds. Samples were examined microscopically and by transverse tensile tests. In addition, the work was complemented by Charpy impact testing and micro-hardness testing in various regions of the weld. The study examined a wide range of process parameters; from this, a preliminary process parameter envelope has been developed and initial process parameter sets established that produce commercially attractive excellent quality welds through a substantial increase in the conventionally recognised weld traverse speed

  2. Failure of Stainless Steel Welds Due to Microstructural Damage Prevented by In Situ Metallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Salgado Lopez

    Full Text Available Abstract In stainless steels, microstructural damage is caused by precipitation of chromium carbides or sigma phase. These microconstituents are detrimental in stainless steel welds because they lead to weld decay. Nevertheless, they are prone to appear in the heat affected zone (HAZ microstructure of stainless steel welds. This is particularly important for repairs of industrial components made of austenitic stainless steel. Non-destructive metallography can be applied in welding repairs of AISI 304 stainless steel components where it is difficult to ensure that no detrimental phase is present in the HAZ microstructure. The need of microstructural inspection in repairs of AISI 304 is caused because it is not possible to manufacture coupons for destructive metallography, with which the microstructure can be analyzed. In this work, it is proposed to apply in situ metallography as non-destructive testing in order to identify microstructural damage in the microstructure of AISI 304 stainless steel welds. The results of this study showed that the external surface micrographs of the weldment are representative of HAZ microstructure of the stainless steel component; because they show the presence of precipitated metallic carbides in the grain boundaries or sigma phase in the microstructure of the HAZ.

  3. Non-destructive evaluation of weld discontinuity in steel tubes by gamma ray CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, A. E.; Dantas, C. C.; Nery, M. S.; Barbosa, J. M.; Rolim, T. L.; Lima, E. A. O.; Melo, S. B.; Dos Santos, V. A.

    2015-04-01

    Weld discontinuity in steel tubes was investigated and dimensioned in a data analysis sequence. The correlation matrix, cosine distance and hierarchical cluster were applied as multivariate data processing in this analysis. Welded rings of 9236 mm3 were scanned in gamma ray CT in test tubes and compared with steel base and references. The discontinuity volume detected in the welded rings was assessed based on the pixel volume in data sampling. By modeling gamma ray trajectories and rotation angles in CT scanning, a discontinuity of 0.3 mm was determined and a limit detection of 23 mm3 was obtained.

  4. An analysis of the joints’ properties of thick-grained steel welded by the SAW and ESW methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krawczyk R.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an analysis of properties of welded joints of thick-grained steel of P460NH type used more and more often in the modern constructions. A process of examining a technology of welding has been carried out on the thick-walled butt joints of sheet metal by two methods of welding namely submerged arc welding (SAW - 121 and electroslag (ESW - 722. The article deals with a topic of optimizing a process of welding thick-walled welded joints of fine-grained steel due to their mechanical properties and efficiency.

  5. Surface Plastic Deformation and Nanocrystallization Mechanism of Welded Joint of 16MnR Steel Treated by Ultrasonic Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingxia YU

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The welded joint surfaces of 16MnR steel were treated using an ultrasonic impact machine. The effects of ultrasonic impact treating (UIT on the plastic deformation and nanocrystallization mechanism of the welded joints of 16MnR steel were studied. The micro-structural features of the surface layer produced by UIT were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM, and micro-hardness measurements were performed. Experimental results showed that the thickness of the plastic deformation layer was approximately 80 μm. It was found that grains in the surfaces of the welded joints of 16MnR were greatly refined by UIT. Obvious grain refinement was observed, with resultant gain sizes less than 100nm. The micro-hardness of the treated surface layer of the welded joint was enhanced significantly compared to that of the un-treated sample. The micro-hardness on the treated surface of the welded joint was 62.3% higher than that of the un-treated surface.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.4.9563

  6. Influence of the Annealing Time After Welding on the Mechanical Properties of Welded Joint of T91 Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojsyk K.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of research on the influence of the time of annealing after welding at the temperature of 750°C on the mechanical properties of a homogeneous welded joint of T91 steel. The welded joints were annealed at 750°C for 0.5; 1.0; 1.5 and 2.0 hours. The research scope included the basic study, i.e. the measurement of hardness, the test of impact energy, the static tensile test, bending test, as well as the accelerated creep test. The results of the tests of mechanical properties indicate the possibility of using shorter annealing times for thin-walled welded joints, and thus the possibility of savings as a result of flexible heat treatments.

  7. Resistance Spot Welding of Aluminum Alloy to Steel with Transition Material - From Process to Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Shao, H; Kimchi, Menachem; Menachem Kimchi and Wanda Newman

    2004-05-11

    This paper summarizes work to date on resistance spot welding (RSW) of aluminum alloy to mild steel from process development to performance evaluation. A cold-rolled strip material is introduced as a transition material to aid the resistance welding process. The optimal welding parameters and electrode selections were established using a combination of experimental and analytical approaches. The mechanical behaviors of welded samples was evaluated using static and dynamic strength tests and cyclic fatigue tests. A statistical analysis was also performed to analyze the effect of different failure modes on the sample's peak load and energy absorption.

  8. Behaviour under fatigue of AISI 304-L stainless steel welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scal, M.W.; Joia, C.J.B.M.; Sousa e Silva, A.S. de

    1979-01-01

    The fatigue behaviour at room temperature of AISI-304-L stainless steel welded joints obtained by two distinct welding methods was studied. The results obtained were compared to those characteristic of the base metal. The welded joint fatigue samples were rectified in order to eliminate the effect of the welded seam geometry. It was concluded that the mechanisms of fatigue crack start in this case is commanded by the austenitic matrix, there being no influence of the delta ferrite rate and distribution present at the melted zone. (Author) [pt

  9. A Plasma Control and Gas Protection System for Laser Welding of Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    1997-01-01

    stability and protection against oxidation. Also oxidation related to special conditions at the starting edge has been investigated. The interaction between coaxial and plasma gas flow show that the coaxial flow widens the band in which the plasma gas flow suppresses the metal plasma. In this band the welds......A prototype shield gas box with different plasma control nozzles have been investigated for laser welding of stainless steel (AISI 316). Different gases for plasma control and gas protection of the weld seam have been used. The gas types, welding speed and gas flows show the impact on process...

  10. Plasma Control and Gas Protection System for Laser Welding of Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Olsen, Flemming Ove; Petersen, Kaj

    1997-01-01

    stability and protection against oxidation. Also oxidation related to special conditions at the starting edge has been investigated. The interaction between coaxial and plasma gas flow show that the coaxial flow widens the band in which the plasma gas flow suppresses the metal plasma. In this band the welds......An integrated plasma nozzle and a shield gas box have been investigated for laser welding of 2 mm stainless steel sheets. Different gases for plasma control and gas protection of the weld seam have been used. The gas types, welding speed and coaxial and plasma flow show the impact on process...

  11. Active flux tungsten inert gas welding of austenitic stainless steel AISI 304

    OpenAIRE

    Klobčar, D.; Tušek; Bizjak, M.; Simončič, S.; Lešer, V.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the effects of flux assisted tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) welding of 4 (10) mm thick austenitic stainless steel EN X5CrNi1810 (AISI 304) in the butt joint. The sample dimensions were 300 ´ 50 mm, and commercially available active flux QuickTIG was used for testing. In the planned study the influence of welding position and weld groove shape was analysed based on the penetration depth. A comparison of microstructure formation, grain size and ferrit number between TIG welding a...

  12. Metallurgical and mechanical properties of laser welded high strength low alloy steel

    OpenAIRE

    Oyyaravelu, Ramachandran; Kuppan, Palaniyandi; Arivazhagan, Natarajan

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed at investigating the microstructure and mechanical properties of Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser welded high strength low alloy (HSLA) SA516 grade 70 boiler steel. The weld joint for a 4 mm thick plate was successfully produced using minimum laser power of 2 kW by employing a single pass without any weld preheat treatment. The micrographs revealed the presence of martensite phase in the weld fusion zone which could be due to faster cooling rate of the la...

  13. Residual stress distribution in steel butt welds measured using neutron and synchrotron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradowska, A M; Price, J W H; Finlayson, T R; Lienert, U; Walls, P; Ibrahim, R

    2009-03-25

    70 keV synchrotron radiation and thermal neutrons have been employed to investigate the residual stress characteristics in a fully restrained, steel, butt weld. The focus is on the values of the subsurface and through-thickness strain/stress variation in the middle of the weld. The advantages and limitations of the techniques have been addressed, in relation to the gauge volume, the stress-free reference sample and positioning. The measurement of residual stress around the weld achieved in this work significantly improves the resolution at which residual stress in welded components has been determined.

  14. Pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding of AISI 304 to AISI 420 stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berretta, José Roberto; de Rossi, Wagner; David Martins das Neves, Maurício; Alves de Almeida, Ivan; Dias Vieira Junior, Nilson

    2007-09-01

    The technique to weld AISI 304 stainless steel to AISI 420 stainless steel with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser has been investigated. The main objective of this study was to determine the influence of the laser beam position, with respect to the joint, on weld characteristics. Specimens were welded with the laser beam incident on the joint and moved 0.1 and 0.2 mm on either side of the joint. The joints were examined in an optical microscope for cracks, pores and to determine the weld geometry. The microstructure of the weld and the heat affected zones were observed in a scanning electron microscope. An energy dispersive spectrometer, coupled to the scanning electron microscope, was used to determine variations in (weight %) the main chemical elements across the fillet weld. Vickers microhardness testing and tensile testing were carried out to determine the mechanical properties of the weld. The results of the various tests and examinations enabled definition of the best position for the incident laser beam with respect to the joint, for welding together the two stainless steels.

  15. Effects of Ar and He on Microstructures and Properties of Laser Welded 800MPa TRIP Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Wen-Quan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fiber laser welding of cold rolled TRIP steel (transformation Induced Plasticity steel sheet with tensile strength of 820MPa and thickness of 1.4mm was carried out using shielding gases Ar and He, respectively. For the same laser power and welding speed, the effects of different shielding gases on penetration and bead section morphologies were investigated. The microstructures and properties of the TRIP steel joints were also studied. The investigation showed that higher penetration and lower porosity could be obtained under shielding gas He using the same laser power and welding speed. The microstructures of the TRIP joint mainly included martensite and retained austenite. But the joint microhardness and tensile strength were higher under the shielding gas He. The tensile strength of the welded joint perpendicular to the weld line was equal to that of the base metal. But the tensile strength of the joint parallel with the weld line was higher than that of the base metal. The plasticity and formability of the welded joint were impaired due to the formation of martensite in the weld metal.

  16. Mechanical Properties of Welded Deformed Reinforcing Steel Bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghafur H. Ahmed

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Reinforcement strength, ductility and bendability properties are important components in design of reinforced concrete members, as the strength of any member comes mainly from reinforcement. Strain compatibility and plastic behaviors are mainly depending on reinforcement ductility. In construction practice, often welding of the bars is required. Welding of reinforcement is an instant solution in many cases, whereas welding is not a routine connection process. Welding will cause deficiencies in reinforcement bars, metallurgical changes and re-crystallization of microstructure of particles. Weld metal toughness is extremely sensitive to the welding heat input that decreases both of its strength and ductility. For determining the effects of welding in reinforcement properties, 48 specimens were tested with 5 different bar diameters, divided into six groups. Investigated parameters were: properties of un-welded bars; strength, ductility and density of weld metal; strength and ductility reduction due to heat input for bundled bars and transverse bars; welding effect on bars’ bending properties; behavior of different joint types; properties of three weld groove shapes also the locations and types of failures sections. Results show that, strength and elongation of the welded bars decreased by (10-40% and (30-60% respectively. Cold bending of welded bars and groove welds shall be prevented.

  17. Friction stir welding of F/M ODS steel plug and F/M steel tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Suk Hoon, E-mail: shkang77@kaeri.re.kr [Nuclear Materials Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of); Vasudevan, M. [Materials Technology Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Noh, Sanghoon; Jin, Hyun Ju; Jang, Jinsung; Kim, Tae Kyu [Nuclear Materials Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Friction stir welding (FSW) was used for joining of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel plug and F/M steel tube. • The curvature and smaller thickness of tube was the major limitation for applying FSW method, it was solved using specially designed jig. • Considerable hardening occurs in the joint because the cooling rate was sufficient to reproduce a martensitic microstructure. • The measured hoop strength of the FSWed joint was 70–90 MPa, the value was at around 70% of the tube. - Abstract: Friction stir welding (FSW) was used for joining of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel plug and F/M steel tube. The dimensions of the tube included outer diameter of 7 mm, wall thickness of 0.5 mm. The objective was to find suitable process variables for gaining enough frictional heat from those thin and curved pieces. A specially designed jig was used for stabilization and slow rotation of tube during FSW. Additionally, the plug was designed to overlap the tube. Inconel 718 was used as FSW tool, the diameter was 3.5 mm. The adequate rotation speed of the tool and jig were 1200 rpm and 1.5 rpm, respectively. The joining was successfully accomplished using above combination, showing a good possibility. The hoop stress tests of joint were conducted by blowing Ar gas into the tube, the flow rate of gas was 10 MPa/min. The measured hoop stress was 70–90 MPa, the value was at around 70% of the tube.

  18. Effects of activating fluxes on the weld penetration and corrosion resistant property of laser welded joint of ferritic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yonghui; Hu, Shengsun; Shen, Junqi

    2015-10-01

    This study was based on the ferritic stainless steel SUS430. Under the parallel welding conditions, the critical penetration power values (CPPV) of 3mm steel plates with different surface-coating activating fluxes were tested. Results showed that, after coating with activating fluxes, such as ZrO2, CaCO3, CaF2 and CaO, the CPPV could reduce 100~250 W, which indicating the increases of the weld penetrations (WP). Nevertheless, the variation range of WP with or without activating fluxes was less than 16.7%. Compared with single-component ones, a multi-component activating flux composed of 50% ZrO2, 12.09% CaCO3, 10.43% CaO, and 27.49% MgO was testified to be much more efficient, the WP of which was about 2.3-fold of that without any activating fluxes. Furthermore, a FeCl3 spot corrosion experiment was carried out with samples cut from weld zone to test the effects of different activating fluxes on the corrosion resistant (CR) property of the laser welded joints. It was found that all kinds of activating fluxes could improve the CR of the welded joints. And, it was interesting to find that the effect of the mixed activating fluxes was inferior to those single-component ones. Among all the activating fluxes, the single-component of CaCO3 seemed to be the best in resisting corrosion. By means of Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) testing, it was found that the use of activating fluxes could effectively restrain the loss of Cr element of weld zone in the process of laser welding, thus greatly improving the CR of welded joints.

  19. Metallurgical and mechanical properties of laser welded high strength low alloy steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyyaravelu, Ramachandran; Kuppan, Palaniyandi; Arivazhagan, Natarajan

    2016-05-01

    The study aimed at investigating the microstructure and mechanical properties of Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser welded high strength low alloy (HSLA) SA516 grade 70 boiler steel. The weld joint for a 4 mm thick plate was successfully produced using minimum laser power of 2 kW by employing a single pass without any weld preheat treatment. The micrographs revealed the presence of martensite phase in the weld fusion zone which could be due to faster cooling rate of the laser weldment. A good correlation was found between the microstructural features of the weld joints and their mechanical properties. The highest hardness was found to be in the fusion zone of cap region due to formation of martensite and also enrichment of carbon. The hardness results also showed a narrow soft zone at the heat affected zone (HAZ) adjacent to the weld interface, which has no effect on the weld tensile strength. The yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the welded joints were 338 MPa and 549 MPa, respectively, which were higher than the candidate metal. These tensile results suggested that the laser welding process had improved the weld strength even without any weld preheat treatment and also the fractography of the tensile fractured samples showed the ductile mode of failure.

  20. Neutron Diffraction Evaluation of Near Surface Residual Stresses at Welds in 1300 MPa Yield Strength Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Harati

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of residual stress in the weld toe region is of critical importance. In this paper, the residual stress distribution both near the surface and in depth around the weld toe was investigated using neutron diffraction, complemented with X-ray diffraction. Measurements were done on a 1300 MPa yield strength steel welded using a Low Transformation Temperature (LTT consumable. Near surface residual stresses, as close as 39 µm below the surface, were measured using neutron diffraction and evaluated by applying a near surface data correction technique. Very steep surface stress gradients within 0.5 mm of the surface were found both at the weld toe and 2 mm into the heat affected zone (HAZ. Neutron results showed that the LTT consumable was capable of inducing near surface compressive residual stresses in all directions at the weld toe. It is concluded that there are very steep stress gradients both transverse to the weld toe line and in the depth direction, at the weld toe in LTT welds. Residual stress in the base material a few millimeters from the weld toe can be very different from the stress at the weld toe. Care must, therefore, be exercised when relating the residual stress to fatigue strength in LTT welds.

  1. Neutron Diffraction Evaluation of Near Surface Residual Stresses at Welds in 1300 MPa Yield Strength Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harati, Ebrahim; Karlsson, Leif; Svensson, Lars-Erik; Pirling, Thilo; Dalaei, Kamellia

    2017-05-29

    Evaluation of residual stress in the weld toe region is of critical importance. In this paper, the residual stress distribution both near the surface and in depth around the weld toe was investigated using neutron diffraction, complemented with X-ray diffraction. Measurements were done on a 1300 MPa yield strength steel welded using a Low Transformation Temperature (LTT) consumable. Near surface residual stresses, as close as 39 µm below the surface, were measured using neutron diffraction and evaluated by applying a near surface data correction technique. Very steep surface stress gradients within 0.5 mm of the surface were found both at the weld toe and 2 mm into the heat affected zone (HAZ). Neutron results showed that the LTT consumable was capable of inducing near surface compressive residual stresses in all directions at the weld toe. It is concluded that there are very steep stress gradients both transverse to the weld toe line and in the depth direction, at the weld toe in LTT welds. Residual stress in the base material a few millimeters from the weld toe can be very different from the stress at the weld toe. Care must, therefore, be exercised when relating the residual stress to fatigue strength in LTT welds.

  2. Evaluation of AISI 316L stainless steel welded plates in heavy petroleum environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho Silva, Cleiton; Pereira Farias, Jesualdo; Batista de Sant'Ana, Hosiberto

    2009-01-01

    This work presents the study done on the effect of welding heating cycle on AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel corrosion resistance in a medium containing Brazilian heavy petroleum. AISI 316L stainless steel plates were welded using three levels of welding heat input. Thermal treatments were carried out at two levels of temperatures (200 and 300 deg. C). The period of treatment in all the trials was 30 h. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and analysis of X-rays dispersive energy (EDX) were used to characterize the samples. Weight loss was evaluated to determine the corrosion rate. The results show that welding heating cycle is sufficient to cause susceptibility to corrosion caused by heavy petroleum to the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel

  3. Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding of the High-Strength Shipbuilding Steels: Equipment and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turichin, G.; Kuznetsov, M.; Tsibulskiy, I.; Firsova, A.

    Hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) allows getting weld joints with thickness up to 35 mm for one pass, provide good quality formation of joints, minimal thermal deformations, the productivity in 10 times more in comparison with arc welding. In addition, replacement arc welding to the HLAW allows economizing filler materials, shielding gas and consumable electricity more than 4 times. Therefore, HLAW is actually technology for basic engineering branches and especially for shipbuilding. The Institute of Laser and Welding Technologies (ILWT) developed laser and hybrid laser-arc welding technologies for different type of steels and alloys including high-strength shipbuilding steels. Also ILWT produced portal and robotic systems for HLAW process realization. Portal system for hybrid laser-arc welding of panels with dimensions 6x6 m using at the manufacturing of flat curvilinear sections in the shipbuilding is depicted in the article. Results of experimental researches of the hybrid laser-arc welding parameters influence on the formation and mechanical properties of weld joint are described at the publication also. Experimental part was made with using of the portal system.

  4. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of 21-6-9 Stainless Steel Electron Beam Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmer, John W.; Ellsworth, G. Fred; Florando, Jeffrey N.; Golosker, Ilya V.; Mulay, Rupalee P.

    2017-04-01

    Welds can either be stronger or weaker than the base metals that they join depending on the microstructures that form in the fusion and heat-affected zones of the weld. In this paper, weld strengthening in the fusion zone of annealed 21-6-9 stainless steel is investigated using cross-weld tensile samples, hardness testing, and microstructural characterization. Due to the stronger nature of the weld, the cross-weld tensile tests failed in the base metal and were not able to generate true fusion zone mechanical properties. Nanoindentation with a spherical indenter was instead used to predict the tensile behavior for the weld metal. Extrapolation of the nanoindentation results to higher strains was performed using the Steinberg-Guinan and Johnson-Cook strength models, and the results can be used for weld strength modeling purposes. The results illustrate how microstructural refinement and residual ferrite formation in the weld fusion zone can be an effective strengthener for 21-6-9 stainless steel.

  5. Characterization of Loading Responses and Failure Loci of a Boron Steel Spot Weld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raath, N. D.; Norman, D.; McGregor, I.; Hepple, S.; Dashwood, R.; Hughes, D. J.

    2018-02-01

    Boron steel, classed as an ultra high-strength steel (UHSS), has been utilized in anti-intrusion systems in automobiles, providing high strength and weight-saving potential through gage reduction. UHSS spot welds exhibit unique hardness distributions, with a hard nugget and outlying base material, but with a soft heat-affected zone in-between these regions. This soft zone reduces the strength of the weld and makes it susceptible to failure. Due to the interaction of various weld zones that occurs during loading, there is a need to characterize the loading response of the weld for accurate failure predictions. The loading response of certain weld zones, as well as failure loci, was obtained through physical simulation of the welding process. The results showed a significant difference in mechanical behavior through the weld length. An important result is that instrumented indentation was shown to be a valid, quantitative method for verifying the accuracy with which weld microstructure has been recreated with regard to the target weld microstructure.

  6. Process stability during fiber laser-arc hybrid welding of thick steel plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunaziv, Ivan; Frostevarg, Jan; Akselsen, Odd M.; Kaplan, Alexander F. H.

    2018-03-01

    Thick steel plates are frequently used in shipbuilding, pipelines and other related heavy industries, and are usually joined by arc welding. Deep penetration laser-arc hybrid welding could increase productivity but has not been thoroughly investigated, and is therefore usually limited to applications with medium thickness (5-15 mm) sections. A major concern is process stability, especially when using modern welding consumables such as metal-cored wire and advanced welding equipment. High speed imaging allows direct observation of the process so that process behavior and phenomena can be studied. In this paper, 45 mm thick high strength steel was welded (butt joint double-sided) using the fiber laser-MAG hybrid process utilizing a metal-cored wire without pre-heating. Process stability was monitored under a wide range of welding parameters. It was found that the technique can be used successfully to weld thick sections with appropriate quality when the parameters are optimized. When comparing conventional pulsed and the more advanced cold metal transfer pulse (CMT+P) arc modes, it was found that both can provide high quality welds. CMT+P arc mode can provide more stable droplet transfer over a limited range of travel speeds. At higher travel speeds, an unstable metal transfer mechanism was observed. Comparing leading arc and trailing arc arrangements, the leading arc configuration can provide higher quality welds and more stable processing at longer inter-distances between the heat sources.

  7. 78 FR 45271 - Welded Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam Determination On the basis of the record... reason of imports from Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam of welded stainless steel pressure pipe, provided... appear as parties in Commission antidumping and countervailing duty investigations. The Secretary will...

  8. The possibility of tribopair lifetime extending by welding of quenched and tempered stainless steel with quenched and tempered carbon steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Marušić

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the conditions of tribocorrosion wear, extending of parts lifetime could be achieved by using stainless steel,which is hardened to sufficiently high hardness. In the tribosystem bolt/ bushing shell/link plate of the bucket elevator transporter conveyor machine, the previously quenched and tempered martensitic stainless steel for bolts is hardened at ≈47 HRC and welded with the quenched and tempered high yield carbon steel for bolts. Additional material, based on Cr-Ni-Mo (18/8/6 is used. The microstructure and hardness of welded samples are tested. On the tensile tester, resistance of the welded joint is tested with a simulated experiment. Dimensional control of worn tribosystem elements was performed after six months of service.

  9. Microstructure and Tensile-Shear Properties of Resistance Spot Welded 22MnMoB Hot-Stamping Annealed Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Cui, Xuetuan; Luo, Zhen; Ao, Sansan

    2017-01-01

    The present paper deals with the joining of 22MnMoB hot-stamping annealed steel carried out by the spot welding process. Microstructural characterization, microhardness testing and tensile-shear testing were conducted. The effects of the welding parameters, including the electrode tip diameter, welding current, welding time and electrode force upon the tensile-shear properties of the welded joints, were investigated. The results showed that a weld size of 9.6 mm was required to ensure pullout failure for the 1.8 -mm-thick hot-stamping annealed steel sheet. The welding current had the largest influence upon the tensile-shear properties of the 22MnMoB steel welded joint. The bulk resistance should play an important role in the nugget formation. In pullout failure mode, failure was initiated at the heat-affected zone, where softening occurs owing to the tempering of martensite.

  10. Welding Characteristics of Nitrogen Added Stainless Steels for Nuclear Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. D. [Pohang Iron and Steel Co., Ltd, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    Characteristics of properties and manufacturing process was evaluated in development of high strength and corrosion resistant stainless steel. The continuous cast structure of STS 316L was similar to that of STS 304. The most of residual {delta}-ferrite of STS 316L was vermicular type. The residual {delta}-ferrite content increased from the surface towards the center of the slab and after reaching a maximum value at about 50mm distance from surface and steeply decreased towards the center itself. Hot ductility of STS 304L and STS 316L stainless steels containing below 1000 ppm N was appeared to be reasonably good in the range of hot rolling temperature. In case of the steels containing over 1000 ppm N, the hot ductility was decreased rapidly when sulfur content of the steel was above 20 ppm. Therefore, to achieve good hot ductility of the high nitrogen containing steel, reduction of sulfur contents is required as low as possible. The inter granular corrosion resistance and impact toughness of STS 316L were increased with increasing the nitrogen contents. Yield strength and tensile strength of 304 and 316 stainless steels are increased linearly with increasing the nitrogen contents but their elongations are decreased with increasing the nitrogen contents. Therefore, the mechanical properties of these stainless steels could be controlled with variation of nitrogen. The effects of nitrogen on the resistance of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) can be explained by improvement of the load bearing capacity with increasing tensile strength rather than inhibition of trans granular SCC crack generation and propagation. 101 refs., 17 tabs., 105 figs. (author)

  11. Development of stress corrosion cracking resistant welds of 321 stainless steel by simple surface engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankari, Kamal; Acharyya, Swati Ghosh

    2017-12-01

    We hereby report a simple surface engineering technique to make AISI grade 321 stainless steel (SS) welds resistant to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in chloride environment. Heat exchanger tubes of AISI 321 SS, welded either by (a) laser beam welding (LBW) or by (b) metal inert gas welding (MIG) were used for the study. The welds had high magnitude of tensile residual stresses and had undergone SCC in chloride environment while in service. The welds were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Subsequently, the welded surfaces were subjected to buffing operation followed by determination of residual stress distribution and surface roughness by XRD and surface profilometer measurements respectively. The susceptibility of the welds to SCC was tested in buffed and un-buffed condition as per ASTM G-36 in boiling MgCl2 for 5 h and 10 h, followed by microstructural characterization by using optical microscope and FESEM. The results showed that the buffed surfaces (both welds and base material) were resistant to SCC even after 10 h of exposure to boiling MgCl2 whereas the un-buffed surfaces underwent severe SCC for the same exposure time. Buffing imparted high magnitude of compressive stresses on the surface of stainless steel together with reduction in its surface roughness and reduction in plastic strain on the surface which made the welded surface, resistant to chloride assisted SCC. Buffing being a very simple, portable and economic technique can be easily adapted by the designers as the last step of component fabrication to make 321 stainless steel welds resistant to chloride assisted SCC.

  12. Eddy-Current Testing of Welded Stainless Steel Storage Containers to Verify Integrity and Identity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolk, Keith M.; Stoker, Gerald C.

    1999-01-01

    An eddy-current scanning system is being developed to allow the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to verify the integrity of nuclear material storage containers. Such a system is necessary to detect attempts to remove material from the containers in facilities where continuous surveillance of the containers is not practical. Initial tests have shown that the eddy-current system is also capable of verifying the identity of each container using the electromagnetic signature of its welds. The DOE-3013 containers proposed for use in some US facilities are made of an austenitic stainless steel alloy, which is nonmagnetic in its normal condition. When the material is cold worked by forming or by local stresses experienced in welding, it loses its austenitic grain structure and its magnetic permeability increases. This change in magnetic permeability can be measured using an eddy-current probe specifically designed for this purpose. Initial tests have shown that variations of magnetic permeability and material conductivity in and around welds can be detected, and form a pattern unique to the container. The changes in conductivity that are present around a mechanically inserted plug can also be detected. Further development of the system is currently underway to adapt the system to verifying the integrity and identity of sealable, tamper-indicating enclosures designed to prevent unauthorized access to measurement equipment used to verify international agreements

  13. Formation of structure and properties in welded joints of oil line pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyboishchik, L. M.; Ioffe, A. V.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of welding and heat treatment modes on mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of welded joints of oil line pipes is studied. It is shown that high-frequency welding followed by high-temperature annealing provides strength and corrosion properties in welds of pipes from low-carbon low-alloy steels at the level of the welded metal.

  14. 46 CFR 154.180 - Contiguous hull structure: Welding procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contiguous hull structure: Welding procedure. 154.180 Section 154.180 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.180 Contiguous hull structure: Welding procedure. Welding procedure tests for...

  15. Residual stress distribution in ferritic-austenitic steel joints made by laser welding

    OpenAIRE

    Iordachescu, Mihaela; Ocaña Moreno, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    The present investigation addresse the influence of laser welding process-ing parameters used for joining dis-similar metals (ferritic to austenitic steel), on the induced residual stress field. Welding was performed on a Nd:YAG laser DY033 (3300 W) in a continuous wave (CW), keyhole mode. The base metals (BM) employed in this study are AISI 1010 carbon steel (CS) and AISI 304L austenitic stainless steel (SS). Pairs of dissimilar plates of 200 mm x 45 mm x 3 mm were butt joined by laser weldi...

  16. Numerical Evaluation of Temperature Field and Residual Stresses in an API 5L X80 Steel Welded Joint Using the Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jailson A. Da Nóbrega

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metallic materials undergo many metallurgical changes when subjected to welding thermal cycles, and these changes have a considerable influence on the thermo-mechanical properties of welded structures. One method for evaluating the welding thermal cycle variables, while still in the project phase, would be simulation using computational methods. This paper presents an evaluation of the temperature field and residual stresses in a multipass weld of API 5L X80 steel, which is extensively used in oil and gas industry, using the Finite Element Method (FEM. In the simulation, the following complex phenomena were considered: the variation in physical and mechanical properties of the material as a function of the temperature, welding speed and convection and radiation mechanisms. Additionally, in order to characterize a multipass weld using the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding process for the root pass and the Shielded Metal Arc Welding process for the filling passes, the analytical heat source proposed by Goldak and Chakravarti was used. In addition, we were able to analyze the influence of the mesh refinement in the simulation results. The findings indicated a significant variation of about 50% in the peak temperature values. Furthermore, changes were observed in terms of the level and profile of the welded joint residual stresses when more than one welding pass was considered.

  17. Correlation Between Microstructure and Low-Temperature Impact Toughness of Simulated Reheated Zones in the Multi-pass Weld Metal of High-Strength Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yongjoon; Park, Gitae; Jeong, Seonghoon; Lee, Changhee

    2018-01-01

    A large fraction of reheated weld metal is formed during multi-pass welding, which significantly affects the mechanical properties (especially toughness) of welded structures. In this study, the low-temperature toughness of the simulated reheated zone in multi-pass weld metal was evaluated and compared to that of the as-deposited zone using microstructural analyses. Two kinds of high-strength steel welds with different hardenabilities were produced by single-pass, bead-in-groove welding, and both welds were thermally cycled to peak temperatures above Ac3 using a Gleeble simulator. When the weld metals were reheated, their toughness deteriorated in response to the increase in the fraction of detrimental microstructural components, i.e., grain boundary ferrite and coalesced bainite in the weld metals with low and high hardenabilities, respectively. In addition, toughness deterioration occurred in conjunction with an increase in the effective grain size, which was attributed to the decrease in nucleation probability of acicular ferrite; the main cause for this decrease changed depending on the hardenability of the weld metal.

  18. Heat transfer and fluid flow during laser spot welding of 304 stainless steel

    CERN Document Server

    He, X; Debroy, T

    2003-01-01

    The evolution of temperature and velocity fields during laser spot welding of 304 stainless steel was studied using a transient, heat transfer and fluid flow model based on the solution of the equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy in the weld pool. The weld pool geometry, weld thermal cycles and various solidification parameters were calculated. The fusion zone geometry, calculated from the transient heat transfer and fluid flow model, was in good agreement with the corresponding experimentally measured values for various welding conditions. Dimensional analysis was used to understand the importance of heat transfer by conduction and convection and the roles of various driving forces for convection in the weld pool. During solidification, the mushy zone grew at a rapid rate and the maximum size of the mushy zone was reached when the pure liquid region vanished. The solidification rate of the mushy zone/liquid interface was shown to increase while the temperature gradient in the liquid zone at...

  19. High temperature fatigue of austenitic stainless steel welds and weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.; Valsan, M.; Srinivasan, V.S.; Mannan, S.L.

    1997-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of LCF lives and cyclic stress response of type 304 SS base metal, 308 SS weld metal and 304/308 SS weld joints, prepared by manual metal arc welding process, has been carried out at 823 and 923 K. Further, a comparative evaluation of LCF behaviour of 316L(N) SS base metal, 316 SS weld metal and 316L(N)/316 weld joint has also been conducted at 773 and 873 K. A detailed examination of the microstructural changes and crack initiation and propagation behaviour has been studied with a view to understanding the features which influence the cyclic stress response and fatigue lives of base metal, weld metal and composite specimens. In particular, the role of delta ferrite on the LCF life has been examined. The LCF resistance of 304 SS and its welds were in the order, 304 SS base metal > 308 SS weld metal > 304/308 weld joint, whereas the LCF resistance of 316 SS weld metal was found to be better than that of 316L(N) base metal. 316L(N)/316 weld joints displayed the least fatigue resistance. Detailed investigations have also been performed for assessing the importance of weld discontinuities such as porosity and slag inclusions, on strain controlled LCF behaviour of 308 SS welds. Porosity on the specimen surface has been found to be particularly harmful and caused a life reduction by a factor of seven relative to sound weld metal. Defect combination of porosity and slag inclusions was found to be more deleterious than the case when either the slag inclusions or porosity was present alone. The higher volume fraction of δ-ferrite in weld metal was found to be harmful for fatigue life. Creep-fatigue interaction behaviour of 304 SS base metal, 308 SS weld metal has also been evaluated at 923 K. (author). 6 refs, 16 figs, 4 tabs

  20. Effects of shot peening on the residual stress of welded SS400 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Man; Kim, Tae Hyung; Cheong, Seong Kyun; Lee, Seung Ho

    2002-01-01

    The fatigue life of structures is usually determined by welding zone. The tensile residual stress, which is induced by welding, reduces the fatigue life and fatigue strength of welded structures. If we remove the tensile residual stress or induce the compressive residual stress, the fatigue life of welded structures will be improved. The change of hardness and compressive residual stress of welded zone after shot peening was investigated in this paper. The results show that the hardness was increased by shot peening. The residual stress was reduced by shot peening

  1. EFFECTS OF ELECTRODE DEFORMATION OF RESISTANCE SPOT WELDING ON 304 AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL WELD GEOMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nachimani Charde

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The resistance spot welding process is accomplished by forcing huge amounts of current flow from the upper electrode tip through the base metals to the lower electrode tip, or vice versa or in both directions. A weld joint is established between the metal sheets through fusion, resulting in a strong bond between the sheets without occupying additional space. The growth of the weld nugget (bond between sheets is therefore determined from the welding current density; sufficient time for current delivery; reasonable electrode pressing force; and the area provided for current delivery (electrode tip. The welding current and weld time control the root penetration, while the electrode pressing force and electrode tips successfully accomplish the connection during the welding process. Although the welding current and weld time cause the heat generation at the areas concerned (electrode tip area, the electrode tips’ diameter and electrode pressing forces also directly influence the welding process. In this research truncated-electrode deformation and mushrooming effects are observed, which result in the welded areas being inconsistent due to the expulsion. The copper to chromium ratio is varied from the tip to the end of the electrode whilst the welding process is repeated. The welding heat affects the electrode and the electrode itself influences the shape of the weld geometry.

  2. Welding Residual Stress Analysis and Fatigue Strength Assessment at Elevated Temperature for Multi-pass Dissimilar Material Weld Between Alloy 617 and P92 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juhwa; Hwang, Jeongho; Bae, Dongho

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, welding residual stress analysis and fatigue strength assessment were performed at elevated temperature for multi-pass dissimilar material weld between Alloy 617 and P92 steel, which are used in thermal power plant. Multi-pass welding between Alloy 617 and P92 steel was performed under optimized welding condition determined from repeated pre-test welding. In particular, for improving dissimilar material weld-ability, the buttering welding technique was applied on the P92 steel side before multi-pass welding. Welding residual stress distribution at the dissimilar material weld joint was numerically analyzed by using the finite element method, and compared with experimental results which were obtained by the hole-drilling method. Additionally, fatigue strength of dissimilar material weld joint was assessed at the room temperature (R.T), 300, 500, and 700 °C. In finite element analysis results, numerical peak values; longitudinal (410 MPa), transverse (345 MPa) were higher than those of experiments; longitudinal (298 MPa), transverse (245 MPa). There are quantitatively big differences between numerical and experimental results, due to some assumption about the thermal conductivity, specific heat, effects of enforced convection of the molten pool, dilution, and volume change during phase transformation caused by actual shield gas. The low fatigue limit at R.T, 300 °C, 500 °C and 700 °C was assessed to be 368, 276, 173 and 137 MPa respectively.

  3. Microstructure Evolution and Mechanical Properties of Underwater Dry and Local Dry Cavity Welded Joints of 690 MPa Grade High Strength Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kun; Cui, Shuwan; Zeng, Min; Yi, Jianglong; Shen, Xiaoqin; Yi, Yaoyong

    2018-01-01

    Q690E high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel plays an important role in offshore structures. In addition, underwater local cavity welding (ULCW) technique was widely used to repair important offshore constructions. However, the high cooling rate of ULCW joints results in bad welding quality compared with underwater dry welding (UDW) joints. Q690E high strength low alloy steels were welded by multi-pass UDW and ULCW techniques, to study the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of underwater welded joints. The microstructure and fracture morphology of welded joints were observed by scanning electron microscope and optical microscope. The elemental distribution in the microstructure was determined with an Electron Probe Microanalyzer. The results indicated that the microstructure of both two welded joints was similar. However, martensite and martensite-austenite components were significantly different with different underwater welding methods such that the micro-hardness of the HAZ and FZ in the ULCW specimen was higher than that of the corresponding regions in UDW joint. The yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the ULCW specimen are 109 MPa lower and 77 MPa lower, respectively, than those of the UDW joint. The impact toughness of the UDW joint was superior to those of the ULCW joint. PMID:29361743

  4. Microstructure Evolution and Mechanical Properties of Underwater Dry and Local Dry Cavity Welded Joints of 690 MPa Grade High Strength Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yonghua; Sun, Kun; Cui, Shuwan; Zeng, Min; Yi, Jianglong; Shen, Xiaoqin; Yi, Yaoyong

    2018-01-22

    Q690E high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel plays an important role in offshore structures. In addition, underwater local cavity welding (ULCW) technique was widely used to repair important offshore constructions. However, the high cooling rate of ULCW joints results in bad welding quality compared with underwater dry welding (UDW) joints. Q690E high strength low alloy steels were welded by multi-pass UDW and ULCW techniques, to study the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of underwater welded joints. The microstructure and fracture morphology of welded joints were observed by scanning electron microscope and optical microscope. The elemental distribution in the microstructure was determined with an Electron Probe Microanalyzer. The results indicated that the microstructure of both two welded joints was similar. However, martensite and martensite-austenite components were significantly different with different underwater welding methods such that the micro-hardness of the HAZ and FZ in the ULCW specimen was higher than that of the corresponding regions in UDW joint. The yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the ULCW specimen are 109 MPa lower and 77 MPa lower, respectively, than those of the UDW joint. The impact toughness of the UDW joint was superior to those of the ULCW joint.

  5. Fundamental Studies on Phase Transformations and Mechanical Properties of Fusion Welds in Advanced Naval Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-31

    Steel , Phase Transformations 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF 18. NUMBER a. REPORT b.ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE ABSTRACT OF PAGES u u...Studies on Phase Transformations and Mechanical Properties of Fusion Welds in Advanced Naval Steels Sb. GRANT NUMBER N00014-12-1-0475 Sc. PROGRAM...Release; distribution is unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT NUCu-140 and 10 wt% Ni steel were developed as candidate materials for use in

  6. Assessment of hydrogen cracking sensitivity of interfaces in welds between stainless and low alloy steels by a tensile separation test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocquet, P.; Perrat, G.; Faure, F.; Robin, Y.

    1988-01-01

    In PWR the primary coolant circuit is coated with 23 CN 20-10 and intermediary alloys are used for welds between main components (pressure vessel, steam generators, pressurizers) made of low alloy steels and stainless steel pipes. After description of the chemical and structural particularities of the bonding zone and evidencing of the interface sensitivity to H 2 induced cracking, the paper presents the implementation of the tensile shearing test: preparation, procedure, evaluation, results achieved. The prominent role of the stress relief treatment is highlighted [fr

  7. Characterization of Mechanical Properties and Residual Stress in API 5L X80 Steel Welded Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa Lins, Amilton; de Souza, Luís Felipe Guimarães; Fonseca, Maria Cindra

    2018-01-01

    The use of high-strength and low-alloy steels, high design factors and increasingly stringent safety requirements have increased the operating pressure levels and, consequently, the need for further studies to avoid and prevent premature pipe failure. To evaluate the possibility of improving productivity in manual arc welding of this type of steel, this work characterizes the mechanical properties and residual stresses in API 5L X80 steel welded joints using the SMAW and FCAW processes. The residual stresses were analyzed using x-ray diffraction with the sin2 ψ method at the top and root of the welded joints in the longitudinal and transverse directions of the weld bead. The mechanical properties of the welded joints by both processes were characterized in terms of tensile strength, impact toughness and Vickers microhardness in the welded and shot peening conditions. A predominantly compressive residual stress was found, and shot peening increased the tensile strength and impact toughness in both welded joints.

  8. Blue-light hazard from CO2 arc welding of mild steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuno, T; Ojima, J; Saito, H

    2010-04-01

    The objective was to quantify the blue-light hazard from CO(2) arc welding of mild steel. The spectral radiance of arcs in CO(2) arc welding of mild steel was measured for solid and flux-cored wires at welding currents of 120-480 A. Effective blue-light radiance and the maximum acceptable exposure duration were calculated from the spectral radiance using their definitions in American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists guidelines. The effective blue-light radiance ranged from 22.9 to 213.1 Wcm(-2)sr(-1). The corresponding maximum acceptable exposure duration was only 0.47-4.36 s, meaning that the total daily exposure to the welding arc without eye protection should not exceed this duration. It is very hazardous to view the arcs in CO(2) arc welding of mild steel. Welders and their helpers should use appropriate eye protectors in these arc-welding operations. Also, they should avoid direct light exposure when starting an arc-welding operation.

  9. Friction stir welding of F82H steel for fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Sanghoon, E-mail: shnoh@kaeri.re.kr [Fusion Structural Materials Division, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan); Nuclear Materials Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ando, Masami; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu [Fusion Structural Materials Division, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan); Fujii, Hidetoshi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka (Japan); Kimura, Akihiko [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto (Japan)

    2016-09-15

    In the present study, friction stir welding was employed to join F82H steels and develop a potential joining technique for a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel. The microstructures and mechanical properties on the joint region were investigated to evaluate the applicability of friction stir welding. F82H steel sheets were successfully butt-joined with various welding parameters. In welding conditions, 100 rpm and 100 mm/min, the stirred zone represented a comparable hardness distribution with a base metal. Stirred zone induced by 100 rpm reserved uniformly distributed precipitates and very fine ferritic grains, whereas the base metal showed a typical tempered martensite with precipitates on the prior austenite grain boundary and lath boundary. Although the tensile strength was decreased at 550 °C, the stirred zone treated at 100 rpm showed comparable tensile behavior with base metal up to 500 °C. Therefore, friction stir welding is considered a potential welding method to preserve the precipitates of F82H steel.

  10. Properties of welded joints of 2,25Cr-1Mo steel with various carbon content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vornovitskij, I.N.; Brodetskaya, E.Z.; Pozdnyakova, A.S.

    1980-01-01

    Properties of welded joints of 2,25 Cr - 1 Mo steel pipelines with different carbon content are considered. It is shown that application of electrodes developed in some countries for welding permits in many cases to exclude heat treatment of welded joints owing to high ductility of weld deposited metal. To improve the ductility, it is necessary to limit both carbon content down to 0,03-0,06% and detrimental elements (sulfur, phosphorus). Heat affected zone hardness may be increased at the expense of carbon. Weld deposited metal possesses the highest long-term strength at the given test temperature; in this case long-term strength of welded joints and base metal is practically the same. The long-term strength of high-carbon steel is higher at the test temperature of 565 deg C as compared to mean-carbon and low-carbon steels, whose long-term strength is practically equal at this temperature. The long-term strength of high-carbon and mean-carbon steels is practically the same and higher as compared with low-carbon one at the test temperature of 510 deg C

  11. Steel structures for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    In the guide the requirements concerning design and fabrication of steel structures for nuclear facilities and documents to be submitted to the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) are presented. Furthermore, regulations concerning inspection of steel structures during construction of nuclear facilities and during their operation are set forth

  12. Hazard of ultraviolet radiation emitted in gas metal arc welding of mild steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Hitoshi; Utsunomiya, Akihiro; Takahashi, Jyunya; Fujii, Nobuyuki; Okuno, Tsutomu

    2016-09-30

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) emitted during arc welding frequently causes keratoconjunctivitis and erythema in the workplace. The degree of hazard from UVR exposure depends on the welding method and conditions. Therefore, it is important to identify the UVR levels present under various conditions. We experimentally evaluated the UVR levels emitted in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of mild steel. We used both a pulsed welding current and a non-pulsed welding current. The shielding gases were 80% Ar + 20% CO 2 and 100% CO 2 . The effective irradiance defined in the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists guidelines was used to quantify the UVR hazard. The effective irradiance measured in this study was in the range of 0.51-12.9 mW/cm 2 at a distance of 500 mm from the arc. The maximum allowable exposure times at these levels are only 0.23-5.9 s/day. The following conclusions were made regarding the degree of hazard from UVR exposure during the GMAW of mild steel: (1) It is more hazardous at higher welding currents than at lower welding currents. (2) At higher welding currents, it is more hazardous when 80% Ar + 20% CO 2 is used as a shielding gas than when 100% CO 2 is used. (3) It is more hazardous for pulsed welding currents than for non-pulsed welding currents. (4) It appears to be very hazardous when metal transfer is the spray type. This study demonstrates that unprotected exposure to UVR emitted by the GMAW of mild steel is quite hazardous.

  13. Fabrication of Aluminum Foam-Filled Thin-Wall Steel Tube by Friction Welding and Its Compression Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiko Hangai

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum foam has received considerable attention in various fields and is expected to be used as an engineering material owing to its high energy absorption properties and light weight. To improve the mechanical properties of aluminum foam, combining it with dense tubes, such as aluminum foam-filled tubes, was considered necessary. In this study, an aluminum foam-filled steel tube, which consisted of ADC12 aluminum foam and a thin-wall steel tube, was successfully fabricated by friction welding. It was shown that a diffusion bonding layer with a thickness of approximately 10 μm was formed, indicating that strong bonding between the aluminum foam and the steel tube was realized. By the X-ray computed tomography observation of pore structures, the fabrication of an aluminum foam-filled tube with almost uniform pore structures over the entire specimen was confirmed. In addition, it was confirmed that the aluminum foam-filled steel tube exhibited mechanical properties superior to those of the ADC12 aluminum foam and steel tube. This is considered to be attributed to the combination of the aluminum foam and steel tube, which particularly prevents the brittle fracture and collapse of the ADC12 foam by the steel tube, along with the strong metal bonding between the aluminum foam and the steel tube.

  14. Fabrication of Aluminum Foam-Filled Thin-Wall Steel Tube by Friction Welding and Its Compression Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangai, Yoshihiko; Saito, Masaki; Utsunomiya, Takao; Kitahara, Soichiro; Kuwazuru, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiro

    2014-09-19

    Aluminum foam has received considerable attention in various fields and is expected to be used as an engineering material owing to its high energy absorption properties and light weight. To improve the mechanical properties of aluminum foam, combining it with dense tubes, such as aluminum foam-filled tubes, was considered necessary. In this study, an aluminum foam-filled steel tube, which consisted of ADC12 aluminum foam and a thin-wall steel tube, was successfully fabricated by friction welding. It was shown that a diffusion bonding layer with a thickness of approximately 10 μm was formed, indicating that strong bonding between the aluminum foam and the steel tube was realized. By the X-ray computed tomography observation of pore structures, the fabrication of an aluminum foam-filled tube with almost uniform pore structures over the entire specimen was confirmed. In addition, it was confirmed that the aluminum foam-filled steel tube exhibited mechanical properties superior to those of the ADC12 aluminum foam and steel tube. This is considered to be attributed to the combination of the aluminum foam and steel tube, which particularly prevents the brittle fracture and collapse of the ADC12 foam by the steel tube, along with the strong metal bonding between the aluminum foam and the steel tube.

  15. Effect of Laser Heat Treatment on Microstructures of 1Cr5Mo Steel Welded Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUO Wei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The surface of 1Cr5Mo heat-resistant steel welded joint was treated with CO2 laser,the microstructure and grain size grades of welded joints before and after laser heat treatment (LHT were analyzed with 4XC type optical microscope (OM,and the distribution of residual stress and retained austenite content in the surface of the welded joints were measured with X-ray diffraction (XRD stress tester.The results show that the grains of 1Cr5Mo steel welded joints are refined by LHT,and the microstructure uniformity improves significantly,the grain levels of welded zone,fusion zone,overheated zone and normalized zone increase from level 9,level 9.8,level 8 and level 10.7 to level 10,level 10.2,level 8.5 and level 11 respectively,the mechanical weak areas reduce from overheated zone,welded zone and fusion zone to the overheated zone.The tensile residual stress in the welded joint surface is eliminated by LHT and a layer of compressive residual stress with thickness of about 0.28mm is formed.The residual austenite content in the welded joint surface increases after LHT,of which the distribution is more uniform and conducive to the improvement of mechanical properties.

  16. Numerical analysis of weld pool for galvanized steel with lap joint in GTAW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Hunchul; Park, Kyungbae; Kim, Yougjun; Cho, Jungho [Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Yoon; Kang, Moon-Jin [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Galvanized steel is widely used and its demand is growing in automotive industry due to high quality requirement for corrosion resistance. Although there are a lot of demands on using galvanized steel as automotive parts especially for outer body, it has a grave flaw in its welding process. The difficulty is low weldability due to various defects such as porosities and blow holes in weldment, which occurred during welding. A solution to prevent these defects is using hybrid welding process, with two more welding processes. One of the hybrid solutions is using Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) as leading position in order to remove the zinc (Zn) coating on the surface before the followed practical fusion welding process. In this research, a numerical analysis model which can predict the eliminated Zn coated layers and the area of Fusion zone (FZ). Developed numerical analysis model was validated through comparing experiment to simulation. Basically, arc heat flux, arc pressure, electromagnetic force and Marangoni flow were employed as the boundary conditions and body force terms. Governing equations such as the continuity, momentum, Volume of fluid (VOF) and energy equations were adopted as usual. In addition to previous model, concentrated arc heat flux and contact thermal conductance models are newly suggested and showed successful result. They are adopted to realize edge concentrated arc and interfacial thermal conductance in lap joint fillet arc welding. Developed numerical analysis model successfully simulated the weld pool and temperature profile therefore the predicted Zn removed area considerably coincided with experimental result.

  17. Analysis of High-Power Diode Laser Heating Effects on HY-80 Steel for Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiechec, Maxwell; Baker, Brad; McNelley, Terry; Matthews, Manyalibo; Rubenchik, Alexander; Rotter, Mark; Beach, Ray; Wu, Sheldon

    2017-01-01

    In this research, several conditions of high power diode laser heated HY-80 steel were characterized to determine the viability of using such lasers as a preheating source before friction stir welding in order to reduce frictional forces thereby reducing tool wear and increasing welding speeds. Differences in microstructures within heat affected zones were identified at specific laser powers and traverse speeds. Vickers hardness values were recorded and analyzed to validate the formation of additional martensite in diode laser heated regions of HY-80 steel. Conditions that produced little to no additional martensite were identified and relationships among high power diode laser power, traverse speed, and martensite formation were determined. The development of heat affected zones, change in grain structure, and creation of additional martensite in HY-80 can be prevented through the optimization of laser amperage and transverse speed.

  18. Mechanical properties and fracture toughness of rail steels and thermite welds at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-qing; Zhou, Hui; Shi, Yong-jiu; Feng, Bao-rui

    2012-05-01

    Brittle fracture occurs frequently in rails and thermite welded joints, which intimidates the security and reliability of railway service. Railways in cold regions, such as Qinghai-Tibet Railway, make the problem of brittle fracture in rails even worse. A series of tests such as uniaxial tensile tests, Charpy impact tests, and three-point bending tests were carried out at low temperature to investigate the mechanical properties and fracture toughness of U71Mn and U75V rail steels and their thermite welds. Fracture micromechanisms were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on the fracture surfaces of the tested specimens. The ductility indices (percentage elongation after fracture and percentage reduction of area) and the toughness indices (Charpy impact energy A k and plane-strain fracture toughness K IC) of the two kinds of rail steels and the corresponding thermite welds all decrease as the temperature decreases. The thermite welds are more critical to fracture than the rail steel base metals, as indicated by a higher yield-to-ultimate ratio and a much lower Charpy impact energy. U71Mn rail steel is relatively higher in toughness than U75V, as demonstrated by larger A k and K IC values. Therefore, U71Mn rail steel and the corresponding thermite weld are recommended in railway construction and maintenance in cold regions.

  19. Experimental investigation of the thickness effect for large as-welded SAW S355 steel specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ólafsson, Ólafur Magnús; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher; Berggreen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The presented work aims to investigate and establish a pre-cise, thorough and detailed database from series of experi-mental testing of submerged arc welded (SAW) specimens of various thicknesses typically applied in ships and offshore structures and foundations. Welded structures of all sizes...... and shapes exhibit fatigue failure primarily in the welded region, rather than in the base material, due to imperfections and flaws relating to the welding procedure. The welded region has therefore received much attention from universities, re-search institutions along with industry as it is of significant...

  20. 77 FR 14002 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy, Malaysia, and the Philippines: Final Results...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-08

    ... antidumping duty orders on butt-weld pipe fittings from Italy, Malaysia, or the Philippines. Additionally, we... revocation of the antidumping duty orders on butt-weld pipe fittings from Italy, Malaysia, and the... Duty Orders on Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings from Italy, Malaysia, and the Philippines'' from...

  1. Characterization of 2.25Cr1Mo welded ferritic steel plate by using diffractometric and ultrasonic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cernuschi, F.; Ghia, S.; Albertini, G.; Ceretti, M.; Rustichelli, F.

    1995-12-01

    Four different techniques (X-ray and neutron diffraction, ultrasonic birefringence and incremental hole drilling method) were applied for evaluating residual stress in a butt-welded ferritic steel palte. Measurements were carried out both before and after welding. Effects of post-welding heat treatment is also considered. A comparison between results obtained by using four different techniques is done

  2. Ageing of the welds of pipes in austenitic stainless steels of the sodium fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubuisson, Ph.; Monnet, I.; Bougault, A.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The austenitic stainless steels are largely employed for the industrial components which operate at temperatures ranging between 300 deg. C and 600 deg. C. In the Sodium Fast Reactors (SFR), these steels and in particular the steels stabilized with titanium are employed for pipes of the secondary circuit and the exchangers. The whole of these components, and more particularly those in Ti-stabilized steel (AISI 321), have been the subject of an attention supported for more than ten years. The non destructive examinations carried out on these pipes showed indications on the heat affected zones (HAZ) of some circular welds. The first metallographic expertises carried out on the welds confirm the presence of real defects, intergranular cracks which appear on the intern surface at the weld toes and parallel with the fusion line. These defects were attributed to the stress relief cracking. The expertises made it possible to highlight a certain number of significant parameters for this mechanism. Temperature. No case of cracking was observed on the circuits working at 350 deg. C, whereas some cases were revealed on the circuits at 475 deg. C, the percentage of affected welds increasing for the circuit at 550 deg. C. The presence of a defect at the weld root. Each cracked weld shows that intergranular crack was propagated from a shrinkage or a defect of rolling. Initial work hardening in weld root generally observed on the cracked welds. Local loadings, and in particular the residual stresses of welding. Geometrical discontinuities or difference in materials also constitute factors worsening with respect to the mechanism. Microstructural examinations carried out by transmission electron microscopy on different welds affected or not by the stress relief cracking mechanism made it possible to establish a grid of risk of appearance of this type of cracking based on four microstructural features: Dislocations density close to the interface

  3. Investigation of Nd:YAG pulsed laser dissimilar welding of AISI 4340 and AISI 316L stainless steels on weld geometry and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sufizadeh, A. R.; Akbari Mousavi, S. A. A.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, laser welding of 316L and AISI 4340 steel is studied. Studies are focused on the effects of laser parameters on the depth and width of the welds. The results show that increasing in pulse energy and frequency will increase the weld depth and the weld width. The calculation of effective peak power density related to the welded joints results in optimum operating welding parameters with full penetration and proper dimensions and strengths. The tensile strength values of the full penetrated weldments are greater than the tensile strength values of AISI 316 base metal. The effects of laser parameters on weld grain size and HAZ size were investigated. The results show that the weld grain size and HAZ size increase with pulse energy and frequency.

  4. An Analysis of the Joints’ Properties of Fine-Grained Steel Welded by the MAG and SAW Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krawczyk R.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an analysis of properties of welded joints of fine-grained steel of P460NH type used more and more often in the modern constructions. A process of examining a technology of welding has been carried out on the thick-walled butt joints of sheet metal by two methods of welding namely MAG – 135 and SAW – 121. The article deals with a topic of optimizing a process of welding thick-walled welded joints of fine-grained steel due to their mechanicalproperties and efficiency.

  5. Effects of Heat Input on Microstructure, Corrosion and Mechanical Characteristics of Welded Austenitic and Duplex Stainless Steels: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghusoon Ridha Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of input heat of different welding processes on the microstructure, corrosion, and mechanical characteristics of welded duplex stainless steel (DSS are reviewed. Austenitic stainless steel (ASS is welded using low-heat inputs. However, owing to differences in the physical metallurgy between ASS and DSS, low-heat inputs should be avoided for DSS. This review highlights the differences in solidification mode and transformation characteristics between ASS and DSS with regard to the heat input in welding processes. Specifically, many studies about the effects of heat energy input in welding process on the pitting corrosion, intergranular stress, stresscorrosion cracking, and mechanical properties of weldments of DSS are reviewed.

  6. Fatigue crack growth of 316NG austenitic stainless steel welds at 325 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y. F.; Xiao, J.; Chen, Y.; Zhou, J.; Qiu, S. Y.; Xu, Q.

    2018-02-01

    316NG austenitic stainless steel is a commonly-used material for primary coolant pipes of pressurized water reactor systems. These pipes are usually joined together by automated narrow gap welding process. In this study, welds were prepared by narrow gap welding on 316NG austenitic stainless steel pipes, and its microstructure of the welds was characterized. Then, fatigue crack growth tests were conducted at 325 °C. Precipitates enriched with Mn and Si were found in the fusion zone. The fatigue crack path was out of plane and secondary cracks initiated from the precipitate/matrix interface. A moderate acceleration of crack growth was also observed at 325°Cair and water (DO = ∼10 ppb) with f = 2 Hz.

  7. Finite element based simulation on friction stud welding of metal matrix composites to steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, N. Rajesh Jesudoss; Tharmaraj, R.; Velu, P. Shenbaga; Kumar, R.

    2016-05-01

    Friction welding is a solid state joining technique used for joining similar and dissimilar materials with high integrity. This new technique is being successfully applied to the aerospace, automobile, and ship building industries, and is attracting more and more research interest. The quality of Friction Stud Welded joints depends on the frictional heat generated at the interface. Hence, thermal analysis on friction stud welding of stainless steel (AISI 304) and aluminium silicon carbide (AlSiC) combination is carried out in the present work. In this study, numerical simulation is carried out using ANSYS software and the temperature profiles are predicted at various increments of time. The developed numerical model is found to be adequate to predict temperature distribution of friction stud weld aluminium silicon carbide/stainless steel joints.

  8. Finite Element Modeling of the Inertia Friction Welding of Dissimilar High-Strength Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, C. J.; Attallah, M. M.; Preuss, M.; Shipway, P. H.; Hyde, T. H.; Bray, S.

    2013-11-01

    Finite element (FE) process modeling of inertia friction welding between dissimilar high-strength steels, AerMet® 100 and SCMV, has been carried out using the DEFORM™-2D (v10.0) software. This model was validated against experimental data collected for a test weld performed between the materials; this included process data such as upset and rotational velocities as well as thermal data collected during the process using embedded thermocouples. The as-welded hoop residual stress from the FE model was also compared with experimental measurements taken on the welded component using synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction techniques. The modeling work considered the solid-state phase transformations which occur in the steels, and the trends in the residual stress data were well replicated by the model.

  9. An Investigation on the Effect of Axial Pressures on the Mechanical Properties of Friction Welded Dissimilar Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Handa

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of axial pressures on the mechanical properties of friction welded AISI 304 with AISI 1021 steels, produced by mechanical joining. In the present study, an experimental setup was designed in order to accomplish friction welded joints between austenitic stainless steel and low alloy steel. Samples were welded under different axial pressures, at a constant speed of 800 rpm. The tensile strength, impact strength, and microhardness values of the welded joints were determined and evaluated and on the basis of the results obtained from the experimentation, the graphs were plotted.

  10. 76 FR 78313 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India, Oman, the United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ... COMMISSION Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India, Oman, the United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam... United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam of circular welded carbon- quality steel pipe, provided for in... of India, Oman, the United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam.\\2\\ \\1\\ The record is defined in sec. 207.2(f...

  11. 75 FR 44763 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico; Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-29

    ... welded non- alloy steel pipe from Mexico. We also received review requests on November 30, 2009, from companies Tuberia Nacional, S.A. de C.V.'s (TUNA), Mueller Comercial de Mexico, S. de R.L. de C.V. (Mueller... International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico; Extension of Time...

  12. 76 FR 3083 - Certain Welded Carbon Steel Pipe and Tube From Turkey: Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Welded Carbon Steel Pipe and Tube From Turkey: Extension of Time... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on certain welded carbon steel pipe and tube from Turkey... published in accordance with section 751(a)(3)(A) of the Act. Dated: January 12, 2011. Christian Marsh...

  13. 76 FR 71938 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Extension of Time Limit for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Extension of Time... the antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Thailand for the...: November 15, 2011. Christian Marsh, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Antidumping and Countervailing Duty...

  14. 77 FR 2511 - Certain Welded Carbon Steel Pipe and Tube From Turkey: Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-18

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Welded Carbon Steel Pipe and Tube From Turkey: Extension of Time... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on certain welded carbon steel pipe and tube from Turkey...)(A) and 777(i)(1) of the Act. Dated: January 11, 2012. Christian Marsh, Deputy Assistant Secretary...

  15. 76 FR 65179 - Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe From Turkey: Extension of Time for Preliminary Results...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-20

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe From Turkey: Extension of Time for... countervailing duty order on certain welded carbon steel standard pipe from Turkey covering the period of review...: October 14, 2011. Christian Marsh, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Antidumping and Countervailing Duty...

  16. 76 FR 3612 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan; Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan; Extension of Time... rescinding the review with respect to Yieh Hsing. See Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From... accordance with sections 751(a)(3)(A) and 777(i) of the Act. Dated: January 13, 2011. Christian Marsh, Deputy...

  17. Texture of welded joints of 316L stainless steel, multi-scale orientation analysis of a weld metal deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouche, G.; Bechade, J.L.; Mathon, M.H.; Allais, L.; Gourgues, A.F.; Naze, L.

    2000-01-01

    Weld material of type 316L is widely used in stainless steel X weldments in fast breeder reactors. As it is difficult to cut test specimens from an X weldment, the two-phase microstructure of 316L welds was simulated by manually filling a mould with longitudinally deposited weld beads. The material consists of γ columnar grains which form a matrix where δ-ferrite dendrites can be found. The crystallographic texture of the material was investigated on the basis of a multi-scale approach. Neutron diffraction analysis showed that on a macroscopic scale both phases had predominantly the same fibre texture with some reinforcements, {1 0 0} γ being parallel to {1 0 0} δ . Further analysis on an increasingly fine scale were then carried out by EBSD and by TEM, showing that the ferrite dendrites were nearly parallel to the neighbouring austenite columnar grains

  18. Texture of welded joints of 316L stainless steel, multi-scale orientation analysis of a weld metal deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouche, G.; Béchade, J. L.; Mathon, M. H.; Allais, L.; Gourgues, A. F.; Nazé, L.

    2000-01-01

    Weld material of type 316L is widely used in stainless steel X weldments in fast breeder reactors. As it is difficult to cut test specimens from an X weldment, the two-phase microstructure of 316L welds was simulated by manually filling a mould with longitudinally deposited weld beads. The material consists of γ columnar grains which form a matrix where δ-ferrite dendrites can be found. The crystallographic texture of the material was investigated on the basis of a multi-scale approach. Neutron diffraction analysis showed that on a macroscopic scale both phases had predominantly the same fibre texture with some reinforcements, {1 0 0} γ being parallel to {1 0 0} δ. Further analysis on an increasingly fine scale were then carried out by EBSD and by TEM, showing that the ferrite dendrites were nearly parallel to the neighbouring austenite columnar grains

  19. Mechanical properties of electron beam welds of 316LN austenitic steels at low temperature for ITER gravity support system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, P.Y.; Huo, B.L.; Kuai, K.W.

    2007-01-01

    The gravity support system in ITER not only sustains magnet system, the vacuum vessel and in-vessel components, but also endures several large forces, such as electromagnetic force, thermal load and seismic loads. Based on the ITER design report, the maximum displacement of the gravity support system is estimated to be 32 mm in radial direction at the top flange of the flexible plates during the TF coil cool down from room temperature to 80 k. Welds are located in the peak stress region and subject to cyclic loads in the top flange is a potential problem. Therefore, the mechanical properties of the welds are extremely important for this system. 316LN austenitic stainless steel has been selected as the gravity support structure materials. However, there is still lack of the related mechanical data of the welding components of 316LN stainless steel at present. In this study, we are systematically investigated the mechanical properties of the welding components at low temperature. (authors)

  20. Effects of delta ferrite content on the mechanical properties of E308-16 stainless steel weld metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmonds, D. P.; Vandergriff, D. M.; Gray, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of ferrite content on the properties of type 308 stainless steel shielded metal-arc (SMA) welds were investigated. Welds were made at four levels of ferrite content ranging from 2 to 15 FN (Ferrite Number). Creep and tensile tests were performed. Specimens were aged at 1100/sup 0/C (593/sup 0/C) for times up to 10,000 h (36 Ms) and Charpy V-notch impact tests were performed. Chemical analysis of the original deposits, Magne-gage evaluations, and metallographic evaluation of tested specimens were made. The E308-16 stainless steel electrodes were formulated to produce SMA welds with 2, 5, 9, and 15 FN. The ferrite number was made to vary by varying the nickel and chromium concentrations. Magne-gage determinations revealed that as-welded structures contained an average of 1.8, 4.2, 9.6, and 14.5 FN, respectively. Chemical anslysis of these deposits revealed no unusually high concentrations of tramp elements that would significantly affect mechanical properties. The extra low-ferrite electrodes were made with a different core wire, which produced deposits with slightly higher molybdenum concentrations. This variation in molybdenum should affect properties only minimally. From these chemical analyses and a constitutional diagram, ferrite concentrations were calculated, and the results correlated with the Magne-gage values

  1. The Microstructure and Pitting Resistance of Weld Joints of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mingfang; Liu, Fei; Pu, Juan; Anderson, Neil E.; Li, Leijun; Liu, Dashuang

    2017-11-01

    2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) was welded by submerged arc welding. The effects of both heat input and groove type on the ferrite/austenite ratio and elemental diffusion of weld joints were investigated. The relationships among welding joint preparation, ferrite/austenite ratio, elemental diffusion, and pitting corrosion resistance of weld joints were analyzed. When the Ni content of the weld wire deposit was at minimum 2-4% higher than that of 2205 DSS base metal, the desired ratio of ferrite/austenite and elemental partitioning between the austenite and ferrite phases were obtained. While the pitting sensitivity of weld metal was higher than that of base metal, the self-healing capability of the passive film of weld metal was better than that of the base metal when a single V-type groove was used. Furthermore, the heat input should be carefully controlled since pitting corrosion occurred readily in the coarse-grained heat-affected zone near the fusion line of welded joints.

  2. Effects of stop–start features on residual stresses in a multipass austenitic stainless steel weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turski, M.; Francis, J.A.; Hurrell, P.R.; Bate, S.K.; Hiller, S.; Withers, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    In this article we describe experiments that characterise and quantify the localised perturbations in residual stress associated with both ramped and abrupt stop–start features in a multipass weld. Residual stress distributions in AISI Grade 304L/308L stainless steel groove-welded specimens, containing weld interruptions that were introduced in a controlled manner, have been characterised using both neutron diffraction and the incremental deep hole drilling method. The extent to which the localised stresses associated with the interruptions were annealed by overlayed passes was also assessed. The results suggest that, regardless of the type of interruption, there can be significant localised increases in residual stress if the stop–start feature is left exposed. If further weld passes are deposited, then the localised increases in stress are likely to persist if the interruption was abrupt, whereas for a ramped interruption they may be dissipated. - Highlights: ► In this study the residual stress-field surrounding weld interruptions was measured. ► Localised stresses were found to increase at weld interruptions. ► Both ramped and abrupt weld interruptions were investigated. ► After subsequent weld passes, localised stresses persisted for abrupt interruptions. ► After subsequent weld passes, localised stresses dissipated for ramped interruptions.

  3. Comparative analysis of weld properties of titanium-niobium, titanium molybdenum and stainless steel archwires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Pattabiraman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Ability to achieve sound weld joints is a desirable characteristic for orthodontic archwires. Titanium molybdenum alloy (TMA has been the only truly weldable orthodontic archwire alloy until now. Titanium-niobium (Ti-Nb alloy archwires exhibit similar mechanical properties as TMA. Whether sound weld joints can be produced in these wires has not been evaluated thus far. In this study Ti-Nb alloy archwires were compared with TMA and stainless steel (SS for weld quality, with SS wires serving as the control group. Materials and Methods: Weld joint strength was assessed by subjecting welded samples of TMA, Ti-Nb and SS wires (0.017 Χ 0.025-inch to a tensile load. The weld joints were also qualitatively assessed by studying the surface characteristics under a scanning electron microscope and the metallographic features under an optical microscope. Results: The weld joint of TMA wire was found to be superior in terms of the strength, surface and metallographic characteristics of the weld joint. Weld joints in Ti-Nb wires had higher strength than those of SS though statistically insignificant. Conclusion: The study concluded that TMA wires are superior to Ti-Nb and SS wires in situations where weldability is a desirable characteristic.

  4. Variation behavior of residual stress distribution by manufacturing processes in welded pipes of austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihara, Ryohei; Hashimoto, Tadafumi; Mochizuki, Masahito

    2012-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been observed near heat affected zone (HAZ) of primary loop recirculation pipes made of low-carbon austenitic stainless steel type 316L in the nuclear power plants. For the non-sensitization material, residual stress is the important factor of SCC, and it is generated by machining and welding. In the actual plants, welding is conducted after machining as manufacturing processes of welded pipes. It could be considered that residual stress generated by machining is varied by welding as a posterior process. This paper presents residual stress variation due to manufacturing processes of pipes using X-ray diffraction method. Residual stress distribution due to welding after machining had a local maximum stress in HAZ. Moreover, this value was higher than residual stress generated by welding or machining. Vickers hardness also had a local maximum hardness in HAZ. In order to clarify hardness variation, crystal orientation analysis with EBSD method was performed. Recovery and recrystallization were occurred by welding heat near the weld metal. These lead hardness decrease. The local maximum region showed no microstructure evolution. In this region, machined layer was remained. Therefore, the local maximum hardness was generated at machined layer. The local maximum stress was caused by the superposition effect of residual stress distributions due to machining and welding. Moreover, these local maximum residual stress and hardness are exceeded critical value of SCC initiation. In order to clarify the effect of residual stress on SCC initiation, evaluation including manufacturing processes is important. (author)

  5. Development of low-cost welding procedures for thick sections of HY-150 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, P. M.; Snow, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    Low cost welding procedures were developed for welding 6-inch thick HY-150 steel to be used in the manufacture of large diameter motor case Y rings and nozzle attachment flanges. An extensive investigation was made of the mechanical and metallurgical properties and fracture toughness of HY-150 base plate and welds made with manual shielded metal arc process and semi-automatic gas metal arc process in the flat position. Transverse tensiles, all-weld metal tensiles, Charpy V-notch specimens and edge notched bend specimens were tested in the course of the program. In addition metallographic studies and hardness tests were performed on the weld, weld HAZ and base metal. The results of the work performed indicate that both the shielded metal arc and gas metal arc processes are capable of producing consistently sound welds as determined by radiographic and ultrasonic inspection. In addition, the weld metal, deposited by each process was found to exhibit a good combination of strength and toughness such that the selection of a rolled and welded procedure for fabricating rocket motor case components would appear to be technically feasible.

  6. The Similar and Dissimilar Spot Welding of 304 and 316L Austenitic Stainless Steels

    OpenAIRE

    ÇINAR, Özgür; ALYANAKOĞLU, Ahmet Erdem; ÇAKIR, Talha; ÇETİNER, Burcu Nilgün; TOPCU, İsmail; EKİCİ, Bülent; GÜLLÜOĞLU, Arif Nihat

    2017-01-01

    Being one of the eldest electric welding process, theresistance spot welding offers practical and time saving applications in thefield of joining metals of several manufacturing industries such as automotive,white goods and machinery. Even light weight metals, i.e. aluminum andmagnesium has lately been taking attention of researchers and producers, thesteels, especially austenitic stainless steels are still being used in widerange of applications due to their combination of excellent corrosio...

  7. Deviation of longitudinal and shear waves in austenitic stainless steel weld metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupperman, D.S.; Reimann, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    One of the difficulties associated with the ultrasonic inspection of stainless steel weld metal is the deviation of the ultrasonic beams. This can lead to errors in determining both the location and size of reflectors. The present paper compares experimental and theoretical data related to beam steering for longitudinal and shear waves in a sample of 308 SS weld metal. Agreement between predicted and measured beam deviations is generally good. Reasons for discrepancies are discussed

  8. Welding of Nb micro-alloyed steel by the submerged arc process using Brazilian consumables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scotti, A.; Quites, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    A set of procedures was established for welding of Nb micro-alloyed steel by the submerged arc process, using national consumables, in order to simultaneously achieve a more economic welding and better mechanical properties. From all the wire-flux combinations the better were the correspondent to AWS F84ED1, F74EM12K and F84EH14, the last being the best. (Author) [pt

  9. Mechanical properties and fracture behaviour of ODS Steel Friction Stir Welds at variable temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Dawson, Huw; Serrano, Marta; Hernandez, Roberto; Cater, Steve; Jimenez-Melero, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    We have assessed the microstructure and the temperature-dependent mechanical behaviour of five bead-on-plate friction stir welds of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) steel, produced using systematic changes to the tool rotation and traverse speed. Friction stir welding can potentially retain the fine dispersion of nanoparticles, and therefore also the high-temperature strength and radiation damage resistance of these materials. Tensile testing was carried out on the MA956 base material at a...

  10. Determination of the sensitized zone extension in welded AISI 304 stainless steel using non-destructive electrochemical techniques

    OpenAIRE

    De Lima-Neto, Pedro; Farias, Jesualdo P.; Herculano, Luis Flávio G.; Miranda, Hélio C. de; Araújo, Walney S.; Jorcin, Jean-Baptiste; Pébère, Nadine

    2008-01-01

    Extension of sensitized zone (SZ) in welded AISI 304 stainless steel was determined by two non-destructive electrochemical tests: double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation technique (DLEPR) and local electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (LEIS). Welding was carried out using the shielded metal arc with two selected welding energies: the first one (0.7 kJ mm¡1) does not promote the sensitization of the 304 steel and it constitutes the reference sample and the second...

  11. Full structural weld overlay application as a repair or mitigation measure for PWSCC susceptible alloy 82/182 DM welds in PWR plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Sung Soo [KHNP, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Tae [KPS, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Charlie [WEC, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-04-15

    In recent years, cracking due to Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC) have been observed in Alloy 82/182 dissimilar metal (DM) welds both in the United States and abroad. These DM welds are used to connect stainless steel piping to low alloy steel or carbon steel components in Pressurizer Water Reactor (PWR) plants. Full Structural weld overlay (FSWOL) was implemented in some cases as a repair technique to mitigate PWSCC at these welds. Such repair technique is an acceptable ASME Code repair method and has already been successfully used to repair Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) at the stainless steel pipe welds in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) plants in the United States for over twenty years. FSWOL is a repair technique that can be used to reinforce nozzle safe end regions and pipes in PWR plants susceptible to PWSCC with cracks present. Such technique can also be used as a mitigation technique at locations without any cracking but are susceptible to PWSCC. The technique involves the application of a specified thickness and length of PWSCC resistant weld material over the region of interest in a configuration that maintains structural integrity and meets the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section XI Code margins with cracks present. The reinforcement material forms a structural barrier to PWSCC and produces a compressive residual stress condition at the inner portion of the pipe that mitigates future crack initiation and/or propagation due to PWSCC. In addition, full structural weld overlay improves inspectability of the nozzle safe end weld regions and facilitates volumetric examinations by minimizing discontinuities in the nozzle safe end weld regions. Purpose of this paper is to describe the methodology and criteria for applying FSWOL as either a repair or mitigation measure for PWSCC susceptible Alloy 82/182 DM welds in PWR plants. It is planned by KHNP to have the methodology and criteria be implemented for the

  12. Microstructure and mechanical characterization of friction stir welded high strength low alloy steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramesh, R.; Dinaharan, I.; Kumar, Ravi; Akinlabi, E.T.

    2017-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a promising technique to join HSLA steels without the problems encountered during fusion based welding processes. In the present work, 3 mm thick HSLA plates were successfully welded using FSW. A tool made of tungsten-rhenium alloy was used in this work. The relationship between microstructure and tensile strength was studied under various welding conditions i.e. change in traverse speed (57–97 mm/min). The microstructure of the weld nugget revealed the presence of upper bainite and fine ferrite phases. The amount of upper bainite reduced with increase in traverse speed. EBSD images showed a reducing trend for grain size. The details of hardness, tensile strength and bending test were reported.

  13. Process Control of Stainless Steel Laser Welding using an Optical Spectroscopic Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konuk, A. R.; Aarts, R. G. K. M.; Veld, A. J. Huis in't.; Sibillano, T.; Rizzi, D.; Ancona, A.

    The in-process monitoring and real-time control of the penetration depth during laser welding is evaluated. An optical collimator collects the optical emission for measurement with a fast spectrometer. The sensor data are used to calculate the electron temperature and subsequently to determine the weld quality of overlap welds in AISI 304 stainless steel sheets performed both with CW Nd:YAG and CO2 lasers. A PI-controller adjusts the laser power aiming at a constant penetration depth and has been tested for Nd:YAG laser welding. Optical inspection of the weld verifies the results obtained with the proposed closed-loop system of spectroscopic sensor and controller.

  14. Evaluation of residual stress distribution in austenitic stainless steel pipe butt-welded joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, Akira; Noda, Michiyasu; Takahashi, Shigeru; Oumaya, Toru; Serizawa, Hisashi; Murakawa, Hidekazu

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports measured and estimated results of residual stress distributions of butt-welded austenitic stainless steel pipe in order to improve estimation accuracy of welding residual stress. Neutron diffraction and strain gauge method were employed for the measurement of the welding residual stress and its detailed distributions on inner and outer surface of the pipe as well as the distributions within the pipe wall were obtained. Finite element method was employed for the estimation. Transient and residual stresses in 3D butt-welded joint model were computed by employing Iterative Substructure Method and also commercial FEM code ABAQUS for a reference. The measured and estimated distributions presented typical characteristic of straight butt-welded pipe which had decreasing trend along the axial direction and bending type distributions through wall of the pipe. Both results were compared and the accuracy of measurement and estimation was discussed. (author)

  15. Microstructure, Pitting Corrosion Resistance and Impact Toughness of Duplex Stainless Steel Underwater Dry Hyperbaric Flux-Cored Arc Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yu; Shen, Xiao-Qin; Wang, Zhong-Min

    2017-01-01

    Duplex stainless steel multi-pass welds were made at 0.15 MPa, 0.45 MPa, and 0.75 MPa pressure, simulating underwater dry hyperbaric welding by the flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) method, with welds of normal pressure as a benchmark. The purpose of this work was to estimate the effect of ambient pressure on the microstructure, pitting corrosion resistance and impact toughness of the weld metal. The microstructure measurement revealed that the ferrite content in the weld metal made at 0.45 MPa is the lowest, followed by that of 0.75 MPa and 0.15 MPa. The analysis of potentiodynamic polarization tests at 30 °C and 50 °C demonstrated that the pitting corrosion resistance depends on the phases of the lower pitting resistance equivalent numbers (PREN), secondary austenite and ferrite. The weld metal made at 0.45 MPa had the best resistance to pitting corrosion at 30 °C and 50 °C with the highest PRENs of secondary austenite and ferrite. The weld metal made at 0.15 MPa displayed the lowest pitting corrosion resistance at 30 °C with the lowest PREN of secondary austenite, while the weld metal made at 0.75 MPa was the most seriously eroded after being tested at 50 °C for the lowest PREN of ferrite, with large cluster pits seen in ferrite at 50 °C. The impact tests displayed a typical ductile-brittle transition because of the body-centered cubic (BCC) structure of the ferrite when the test temperature was lowered. All the weld metals met the required value of 34 J at −40 °C according to the ASTM A923. The highest ferrite content corresponded to the worst impact toughness, but the highest toughness value did not correspond to the greatest austenite content. With the decreasing of the test temperature, the drop value of absorbed energy was correlated to the ferrite content. Additionally, in this work, the weld metal made at 0.45 MPa had the best combined properties of pitting resistance and impact toughness. PMID:29258262

  16. Microstructure, Pitting Corrosion Resistance and Impact Toughness of Duplex Stainless Steel Underwater Dry Hyperbaric Flux-Cored Arc Welds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yu; Shi, Yong-Hua; Shen, Xiao-Qin; Wang, Zhong-Min

    2017-12-18

    Duplex stainless steel multi-pass welds were made at 0.15 MPa, 0.45 MPa, and 0.75 MPa pressure, simulating underwater dry hyperbaric welding by the flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) method, with welds of normal pressure as a benchmark. The purpose of this work was to estimate the effect of ambient pressure on the microstructure, pitting corrosion resistance and impact toughness of the weld metal. The microstructure measurement revealed that the ferrite content in the weld metal made at 0.45 MPa is the lowest, followed by that of 0.75 MPa and 0.15 MPa. The analysis of potentiodynamic polarization tests at 30 °C and 50 °C demonstrated that the pitting corrosion resistance depends on the phases of the lower pitting resistance equivalent numbers (PREN), secondary austenite and ferrite. The weld metal made at 0.45 MPa had the best resistance to pitting corrosion at 30 °C and 50 °C with the highest PRENs of secondary austenite and ferrite. The weld metal made at 0.15 MPa displayed the lowest pitting corrosion resistance at 30 °C with the lowest PREN of secondary austenite, while the weld metal made at 0.75 MPa was the most seriously eroded after being tested at 50 °C for the lowest PREN of ferrite, with large cluster pits seen in ferrite at 50 °C. The impact tests displayed a typical ductile-brittle transition because of the body-centered cubic (BCC) structure of the ferrite when the test temperature was lowered. All the weld metals met the required value of 34 J at -40 °C according to the ASTM A923. The highest ferrite content corresponded to the worst impact toughness, but the highest toughness value did not correspond to the greatest austenite content. With the decreasing of the test temperature, the drop value of absorbed energy was correlated to the ferrite content. Additionally, in this work, the weld metal made at 0.45 MPa had the best combined properties of pitting resistance and impact toughness.

  17. Microstructure and mechanical properties of laser welded DP600 steel joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farabi, N. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Chen, D.L., E-mail: dchen@ryerson.ca [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Li, J.; Zhou, Y. [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Dong, S.J. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Hubei University of Technology, Wuhan, Hubei (China)

    2010-02-15

    To reduce fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions, dual phase (DP) steels have been considered for automotive applications due to their higher tensile strength, better initial work hardening along with larger elongation compared to conventional grade of steels. In such applications welding and joining have to be involved, which would lead to a localized alteration of materials and create potential safety and reliability issues under cyclic loading. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate microstructural change after laser welding and its effect on the tensile and fatigue properties in DP600 steel. The welding resulted in a significant increase of hardness in the fusion zone, but also the formation of a soft zone in the outer heat-affected zone (HAZ). While the ductility decreased after welding, the yield strength increased and the ultimate tensile strength remained almost unchanged. Fatigue life at higher stress amplitudes was almost the same between the base metal and welded joints despite slightly lower fatigue limit after welding. Tensile fracture and fatigue failure at higher stress amplitudes occurred at the outer HAZ. Fatigue crack initiation was observed to occur from the specimen surface and crack propagation was characterized by the characteristic mechanism of striation formation. Dimples and deformation bands were observed in the fast propagation area.

  18. Comparison of stainless and mild steel welding fumes in generation of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Stephen S; Chen, Bean T; Stone, Samuel G; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Kenyon, Allison J; Frazer, David; Antonini, James M

    2010-11-03

    Welding fumes consist of a wide range of complex metal oxide particles which can be deposited in all regions of the respiratory tract. The welding aerosol is not homogeneous and is generated mostly from the electrode/wire. Over 390,000 welders were reported in the U.S. in 2008 while over 1 million full-time welders were working worldwide. Many health effects are presently under investigation from exposure to welding fumes. Welding fume pulmonary effects have been associated with bronchitis, metal fume fever, cancer and functional changes in the lung. Our investigation focused on the generation of free radicals and reactive oxygen species from stainless and mild steel welding fumes generated by a gas metal arc robotic welder. An inhalation exposure chamber located at NIOSH was used to collect the welding fume particles. Our results show that hydroxyl radicals (.OH) were generated from reactions with H2O2 and after exposure to cells. Catalase reduced the generation of .OH from exposed cells indicating the involvement of H2O2. The welding fume suspension also showed the ability to cause lipid peroxidation, effect O2 consumption, induce H2O2 generation in cells, and cause DNA damage. Increase in oxidative damage observed in the cellular exposures correlated well with .OH generation in size and type of welding fumes, indicating the influence of metal type and transition state on radical production as well as associated damage. Our results demonstrate that both types of welding fumes are able to generate ROS and ROS-related damage over a range of particle sizes; however, the stainless steel fumes consistently showed a significantly higher reactivity and radical generation capacity. The chemical composition of the steel had a significant impact on the ROS generation capacity with the stainless steel containing Cr and Ni causing more damage than the mild steel. Our results suggest that welding fumes may cause acute lung injury. Since type of fume generated, particle size

  19. Comparison of stainless and mild steel welding fumes in generation of reactive oxygen species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frazer David

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Welding fumes consist of a wide range of complex metal oxide particles which can be deposited in all regions of the respiratory tract. The welding aerosol is not homogeneous and is generated mostly from the electrode/wire. Over 390,000 welders were reported in the U.S. in 2008 while over 1 million full-time welders were working worldwide. Many health effects are presently under investigation from exposure to welding fumes. Welding fume pulmonary effects have been associated with bronchitis, metal fume fever, cancer and functional changes in the lung. Our investigation focused on the generation of free radicals and reactive oxygen species from stainless and mild steel welding fumes generated by a gas metal arc robotic welder. An inhalation exposure chamber located at NIOSH was used to collect the welding fume particles. Results Our results show that hydroxyl radicals (.OH were generated from reactions with H2O2 and after exposure to cells. Catalase reduced the generation of .OH from exposed cells indicating the involvement of H2O2. The welding fume suspension also showed the ability to cause lipid peroxidation, effect O2 consumption, induce H2O2 generation in cells, and cause DNA damage. Conclusion Increase in oxidative damage observed in the cellular exposures correlated well with .OH generation in size and type of welding fumes, indicating the influence of metal type and transition state on radical production as well as associated damage. Our results demonstrate that both types of welding fumes are able to generate ROS and ROS-related damage over a range of particle sizes; however, the stainless steel fumes consistently showed a significantly higher reactivity and radical generation capacity. The chemical composition of the steel had a significant impact on the ROS generation capacity with the stainless steel containing Cr and Ni causing more damage than the mild steel. Our results suggest that welding fumes may cause acute

  20. In situ laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements of chemical compositions in stainless steels during tungsten inert gas welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taparli, Ugur Alp; Jacobsen, Lars; Griesche, Axel; Michalik, Katarzyna; Mory, David; Kannengiesser, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system was combined with a bead-on-plate Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding process for the in situ measurement of chemical compositions in austenitic stainless steels during welding. Monitoring the weld pool's chemical composition allows governing the weld pool solidification behavior, and thus enables the reduction of susceptibility to weld defects. Conventional inspection methods for weld seams (e.g. ultrasonic inspection) cannot be performed during the welding process. The analysis system also allows in situ study of the correlation between the occurrence of weld defects and changes in the chemical composition in the weld pool or in the two-phase region where solid and liquid phase coexist. First experiments showed that both the shielding Ar gas and the welding arc plasma have a significant effect on the selected Cr II, Ni II and Mn II characteristic emissions, namely an artificial increase of intensity values via unspecific emission in the spectra. In situ investigations showed that this artificial intensity increase reached a maximum in presence of weld plume. Moreover, an explicit decay has been observed with the termination of the welding plume due to infrared radiation during sample cooling. Furthermore, LIBS can be used after welding to map element distribution. For austenitic stainless steels, Mn accumulations on both sides of the weld could be detected between the heat affected zone (HAZ) and the base material.

  1. Residual Stress Distribution In Heat Affected Zone Of Welded Steel By Means Of Neutron Diffraction Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajar, Andika; Prasuad; Gunawan; Muslich, M. Rifai

    1996-01-01

    Three dimensional residual stress distribution in the heat affected zone of 10 mm thick welded steel by means of neutron diffraction technique has been measured. The results showed that the residual stress was distributed near the welded metal, namely within about 46,25 mm. The major tensile stresses occurred in the X-direction, and they attained a level greater than 2000 MPa through the position far away fram the weld. The tensile stresses in the Y and Z- directions lied between 500 and 1500 MPa, The results also suggest that the stress in the surface was greater than that in the middle of the sample

  2. Porosity in millimeter-scale welds of stainless steel : three-dimensional characterization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aagesen, Larry K. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI); Madison, Jonathan D.

    2012-05-01

    A variety of edge joints utilizing a continuous wave Nd:YAG laser have been produced and examined in a 304-L stainless steel to advance fundamental understanding of the linkage between processing and resultant microstructure in high-rate solidification events. Acquisition of three-dimensional reconstructions via micro-computed tomography combined with traditional metallography has allowed for qualitative and quantitative characterization of weld joints in a material system of wide use and broad applicability. The presence, variability and distribution of porosity, has been examined for average values, spatial distributions and morphology and then related back to fundamental processing parameters such as weld speed, weld power and laser focal length.

  3. Inertia and friction welding of aluminum alloy 1100 to type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, M.A.

    1979-01-01

    The inertia and friction-welding processes were evaluated for joining aluminum alloy 1100-H14 and Type 316 vacuum-induction melted, vacuum-arc remelted (VIM VAR) stainless steel. While both processes consistently produced joints in which the strength exceeded the strength of the aluminum base metal, 100 percent bonding was not reliably achieved with inertia welding. The deficiency points out the need for development of nondestructive testing techniques for this type of joint. Additionally, solid-state volume diffusion did not appear to be a satisfactory explanation for the inertia and friction-welding bonding mechanism

  4. Residual Stress Distribution in Carbon Steel Pipe Welded Joint Measured by Neutron Diffraction

    OpenAIRE

    Makoto, HAYASHI; Masayuki, ISHIWATA; Yukio, MORII; Nobuaki, MINAKAWA; ROOT, John H.; Mechanical Engineering Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd.,; Nuclear Engineering Division, Hitachi Ltd.,; Tokai Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute; Tokai Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute; National Research Council of Canada

    2000-01-01

    In order to estimate crack growth behavior of fatigue and stress corrosion cracking in pipes, the residual stress distribution near the pipe weld region has to be measured through the wall thickness.Since the penetration depth of neutron is deep enough to pass through the thick pipe wall, the neutron diffraction technique for the residual stress measurement is effective for this purpose.At the first step the residual stress distribution near the weld region in a butt-welded carbon steel pipe ...

  5. Hydrogen Sulfide Corrosion of Weld Regions in API X52 Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Cerecero G.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of gas metal arc welding (GMAW regions has been studied using potentiodynamic polarization and polarization resistance (LPR techniques. Experiments were conducted in hydrogen sulfide (H2S-containing brine and in H2S-free brine. Welds were made on API 5L X52 steel. Due to differences in their microstructure, chemical composition and residual stress level, weld regions exhibited different responses under H2S corrosion. Base metal exhibited the highest corrosion rate (CR and the most cathodic corrosion potential.

  6. Comparison of Metallurgical and Ultrasonic Inspections of Galvanized Steel Resistance Spot Welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, Timothy J.; Ghaffari, Bita; Mozurkewich, George; Reverdy, Frederic; Hopkins, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    Metallurgical examination of galvanized steel resistance spot welds was used to gauge the capabilities of two ultrasonic, non-destructive, scanning techniques. One method utilized the amplitude of the echo from the weld faying surface, while the other used the spectral content of the echo train to map the fused area. The specimens were subsequently sectioned and etched, to distinguish the fused, zinc-brazed, and non-fused areas. The spectral maps better matched the metallurgical maps, while the interface-amplitude method consistently overestimated the weld size

  7. Research of Technological Properties of Steel X6CRNITI18-10 Welded Joints Exploited in Nitric Acid Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gediminas Mikalauskas

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The repair of chemical industry equipments often requires to replace long time operated pipes or welded inserts with the simi-lar chemical composition. During the study the joints from corro-sion resistant steel X6CrNiTi18-10 were welded by manual metal arc welding with covered electrodes (MMA process 111 and tungsten inert gas welding (TIG process 141 at different welding parameters. The visual, radiographic, penetrant control and ferrite content analysis were carried out. The transverse tensile and bending samples were produced from welded samples; also the macroscopic and microscopic analyse were carried out.

  8. Characterization and Strain-Hardening Behavior of Friction Stir-Welded Ferritic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Dwivedi, Dheerendra Kumar; Jain, Pramod Kumar

    2017-12-01

    In this study, friction stir-welded joint of 3-mm-thick plates of 409 ferritic stainless steel (FSS) was characterized in light of microstructure, x-ray diffraction analysis, hardness, tensile strength, ductility, corrosion and work hardening properties. The FSW joint made of ferritic stainless steel comprises of three distinct regions including the base metal. In stir zone highly refined ferrite grains with martensite and some carbide precipitates at the grain boundaries were observed. X-ray diffraction analysis also revealed precipitation of Cr23C6 and martensite formation in heat-affected zone and stir zone. In tensile testing of the transverse weld samples, the failure eventuated within the gauge length of the specimen from the base metal region having tensile properties overmatched to the as-received base metal. The tensile strength and elongation of the longitudinal (all weld) sample were found to be 1014 MPa and 9.47%, respectively. However, in potentiodynamic polarization test, the corrosion current density of the stir zone was highest among all the three zones. The strain-hardening exponent for base metal, transverse and longitudinal (all weld) weld samples was calculated using various equations. Both the transverse and longitudinal weld samples exhibited higher strain-hardening exponents as compared to the as-received base metal. In Kocks-Mecking plots for the base metal and weld samples at least two stages of strain hardening were observed.

  9. Bulging Behavior of Thin-walled Welded Low Carbon Steel Tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XIE Wen-cai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the deformation behaviour of welded tubes during hydraulic bulging process,the hydraulic bulging tests of thin-walled welded low carbon steel tubes (STKM11A were conducted on the tube hydroformability testing unit.The thickness distribution,profiles of bulging area and the strain distribution were all obtained.Results show that the thickness reduction of weld zone is just 2.4%-5.5% while its effective strain is just 0.05-0.10,which is very small and negligible compared with the parent material and means that just the geometric position of weld zone is changed with the continuous bulging.The thinnest points are located on the both sides of weld seam symmetrically and the angle between the thinnest point and weld seam is about 30°,at which the necking has been occurred.When the length of bulging area increases,the fracture pressure,the thickness reduction and the ultimate expansion ratio all decrease,and the profile of the bulging area gradually steps away from the elliptical model which is powerless for the ratio of length to diameter up to 2.0.Moreover,the strain state of the tube is transformed from biaxial tension to plane strain state with the increasing length of bulging area,on the basis of this the forming limit diagram of welded STKM11A steel tubes can be established.

  10. Characterization of welding of AISI 304l stainless steel similar to the core encircling of a BWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gachuz M, M.E.; Palacios P, F.; Robles P, E.F.

    2003-01-01

    Plates of austenitic stainless steel AISI 304l of 0.0381 m thickness were welded by means of the SMAW process according to that recommended in the Section 9 of the ASME Code, so that it was reproduced the welding process used to assemble the encircling of the core of a BWR/5 reactor similar to that of the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric plant, there being generated the necessary documentation for the qualification of the one welding procedure and of the welder. They were characterized so much the one base metal, as the welding cord by means of metallographic techniques, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, mechanical essays and fracture mechanics. From the obtained results it highlights the presence of an area affected by the heat of up to 1.5 mm of wide and a value of fracture tenacity (J IC ) to ambient temperature for the base metal of 528 KJ/m 2 , which is diminished by the presence of the welding and by the increment in the temperature of the one essay. Also it was carried out an fractographic analysis of the fracture zone generated by the tenacity essays, what evidence a ductile fracture. The experimental values of resistance and tenacity are important for the study of the structural integrity of the encircling one of the core. (Author)

  11. Evaluation of the Sensitization of 316L Stainless Steels After the Post Weld Heat Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Junho; Jang, Changheui; Lee, Kyoung Soo

    2014-01-01

    It was observed that the PWSCC growth rate of alloy 182 was markedly decreased after PWHT. However, the PWHT of components made of stainless steels (SSs) would be limited because of the concerns about sensitization when they are exposed to temperature range of 500 to 800 .deg. C. Also, the sensitization of austenitic stainless steels could increase the susceptibility to intergrannular stress corrosion cracking. Therefore, the effect of PWHT on the sensitization behaviors of 316L SSs having predominant austenitic structure with small amount of ferrite was investigated to assess the applicability of PWHT to dissimilar weld area with austenitic stainless steels. The sensitization behaviors of two heats of 316L SSs with small amount of ferrite were investigated after heat treatment at 600, 650 and 700 .deg. C. Grain boundary sensitization was not observed in 316L SSs after the heat treatment at 600, 650 and 700 .deg. C up to 30 h. The increase in degree of sensitization (DOS) was caused by reduction of corrosion resistance in ferrite phase due to formation of chromium carbide and intermatallic phases during heat treatment. The DOS value of 316L SSs depended on the ferrite morphology. The stringer type of ferrite (316L-heat A) showed relatively higher DOS in comparison with 316L containing blocky type of ferrite (316L-heat B). It could be due to sufficient supplement of chromium in larger size of ferrite phase

  12. A comparative evaluation of microstructural and mechanical behavior of fiber laser beam and tungsten inert gas dissimilar ultra high strength steel welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaiteerth R. Joshi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of different welding processes on the mechanical properties and the corresponding variation in the microstructural features have been investigated for the dissimilar weldments of 18% Ni maraging steel 250 and AISI 4130 steel. The weld joints are realized through two different fusion welding processes, tungsten inert arc welding (TIG and laser beam welding (LBW, in this study. The dissimilar steel welds were characterized through optical microstructures, microhardness survey across the weldment and evaluation of tensile properties. The fiber laser beam welds have demonstrated superior mechanical properties and reduced heat affected zone as compared to the TIG weldments.

  13. Dynamic fracture toughness (JId) behavior of armor-grade Q&T steel weldments: Effect of weld metal composition and microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magudeeswaran, Govindaraj; Balasubramanian, Visvalingam; Sathyanarayanan, S.; Madhusudhan Reddy, Gankidi; Moitra, A.; Venugopal, S.; Sasikala, G.

    2009-12-01

    Austenitic stainless steel, low hydrogen ferritic steel and high nickel steel consumables are used for the welding of armor-grade quenched and tempered (Q&T) steels. The use of such consumables in the welding of armorgrade Q&T steel leads to the formation of distinct microstructures in the respective welds and has a major influence on the dynamic fracture toughness. Hence, this paper examines how shielded metal arc welding consumables affect the dynamic fracture toughness (J1d) of armor-grade Q&T steel joints. The J1d values of joints fabricated with high nickel steel joints are superior than all other joints.

  14. Characteristics of GMAW Narrow Gap Welding on the Armor Steel of Combat Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Seong Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The primary purpose of this investigation was to study the characteristics of the armor steel weldment of combat vehicles by using GMAW narrow gap welding (NGW. The results showed that the mechanical properties and residual stress distribution of NGW weldment were improved, compared with conventional X-groove weldment. Additionally, ballistic tests according to MIL-HDBK-1941 were carried out to verify the ballistic ability of NGW weldment and the result showed that the NGW process was qualified for welding the armor steel of combat vehicle.

  15. THE ROLE OF SHIELDING GAS ON MECHANICAL, METALLURGICAL AND CORROSION PROPERTIES OF CORTEN STEEL WELDED JOINTS OF RAILWAY COACHES USING GMAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byju John

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This analysis lays emphasis on finding a suitable combination of shielding gas for welding underframe members such as sole bar of Railway Coaches made of corten steel; for improved mechanical, metallurgical and corrosion properties of welds using copper coated solid MIG/MAG welding filler wire size 1.2 mm conforming to AWS/SFA 5.18 ER 70 S in Semi-automatic GMAW process. Solid filler wire is preferred by welders due to less fumes, practically no slag and easy manipulation of welding torch with smooth wire flow during corrosion repair attention, when compared to Flux cored wire. Three joints using Gas metal arc welding (GMAW with shielding gases viz., Pure CO2, (80% Ar – 20% CO2 and (90% Ar – 10% CO2 were made from test pieces cut from Sole bar material of Railway Coach. Study of Mechanical properties such as tensile strength, hardness and toughness revealed that welded joint made using shielding gas (80% Ar – 20% CO2 has better Mechanical properties compared to the other two shielding gases and comparable to that of Parent metal. Type of Shielding gas used has influence on the chemical composition and macro & micro structures. The Tafel extrapolation study of freshly ground samples in 3.5% NaCl solution revealed that the welded joint made using shielding gas (80% Ar – 20% CO2 has also better corrosion resistance which is comparable to the Parent metal as well as similar commercial steels.

  16. austenitic stainless steel by electron beam welding process

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    ://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ijest.v4i2.13. 1. Introduction. Due to an increasing demand for high-speed and low distortion welding, electron beam welding (EBW) has become useful in the fabrication of engineering parts with low-distortion joints, ...

  17. Study of austenitic stainless steel welded with low alloy steel filler metal. [tensile and impact strength tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, F. A.; Dyke, R. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The tensile and impact strength properties of 316L stainless steel plate welded with low alloy steel filler metal were determined. Tests were conducted at room temperature and -100 F on standard test specimens machined from as-welded panels of various chemical compositions. No significant differences were found as the result of variations in percentage chemical composition on the impact and tensile test results. The weldments containing lower chromium and nickel as the result of dilution of parent metal from the use of the low alloy steel filler metal corroded more severely in a marine environment. The use of a protective finish, i.e., a nitrile-based paint containing aluminum powder, prevented the corrosive attack.

  18. The IAEA data base ageing of reactor pressure vessel steels and welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillemot, F.; Ianko, L.; Davies, L.M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes one aspect of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) data base, that is to do with the ageing of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels and welds. It describes the background and the need for and the benefits deriving from such an international data base encompassing a greater number of sources than currently incorporated in existing international and national data bases. The paper describes the organization of this data base and the controls necessary for data acquisition and control. The current state of progress is described. Membership of and participation in this project is given and data access is also described. The technical features of the data base are described in terms of the structure of the data base and the hardware and software. New features are proposed such as the inclusion of measured curve data and metallographic data. Technical aspects of data evaluation are also included. (author). 1 ref., 6 figs

  19. Inhibition of the formation of intermetallic compounds in aluminum-steel welded joints by friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres López, Edwar A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Formation of deleterious phases during welding of aluminum and steel is a challenge of the welding processes, for decades. Friction Stir Welding (FSW has been used in an attempt to reduce formation of intermetallic compounds trough reducing the heat input. In this research, dissimilar joint of 6063-T5 aluminum alloy and AISI-SAE 1020 steel were welded using this technique. The temperature of welded joints was measured during the process. The interface of the welded joints was characterized using optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Additionally, composition measurements were carried out by X-EDS and DRX. The experimental results revealed that the maximum temperature on the joint studied is less than 360 °C. The microstructural characterization in the aluminum-steel interface showed the absence of intermetallic compounds, which is a condition attributed to the use of welding with low thermal input parameters.La unión de juntas aluminio-acero, sin la formación de fases deletéreas del tipo FexAly, ha sido, por décadas, un desafío para los procesos de soldadura. La soldadura por fricción-agitación ha sido empleada para intentar reducir el aporte térmico y evitar la formación de compuestos intermetálicos. Usando esta técnica fueron soldadas juntas disimilares de aluminio 6063-T5 y acero AISI-SAE 1020. La soldadura fue acompañada de medidas de temperatura durante su ejecución. La interfase de las juntas soldadas fue caracterizada utilizando microscopía óptica, electrónica de barrido y electrónica de transmisión. Adicionalmente fueron realizadas medidas puntuales X-EDS y DRX. Los resultados experimentales revelan que la temperatura máxima en la junta es inferior a 360 °C. La caracterización microestructural en la interfase aluminio-acero demostró la ausencia de compuestos intermetálicos, condición atribuida al uso de parámetros de soldadura con bajo aporte térmico.

  20. A review of inducing compressive residual stress - shot peening; on structural metal and welded connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanchidurai, S.; Krishanan, P. A.; Baskar, K.; Saravana Raja Mohan, K.

    2017-07-01

    Shot peening treatment (SPT) is a significant mechanical method to enhance the surface of the material by inducing compressive residual stress on the layer. This study provides a review of prominent improvement in fatigue life on high strength aluminium alloy, steel and welded connection by SPT. Compressive residual stress measurement and its factors data are extracted from assorted literature, optimized peening process commented in this paper, also different types of mechanical peening methods and its effectiveness are mentioned. Fatigue life improvement is focused commented to welded structural connections. The extracted results shows significant changes in the surface layer of metals, aluminium alloy 15 - 250% of fatigue life improvement, steel plain members 6-200% of fatigue life improvement, welded connections 50-75% of fatigue life improvement and significant improvement in mechanical properties like roughness reduction, wear, hardness, tensile strength, corrosion and scuffing.