WorldWideScience

Sample records for steel heat affected

  1. Mechanical Properties of Heat Affected Zone of High Strength Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefcikova, K.; Brtnik, T.; Dolejs, J.; Keltamaki, K.; Topilla, R.

    2015-11-01

    High Strength Steels became more popular as a construction material during last decade because of their increased availability and affordability. On the other hand, even though general use of Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) is expanding, the wide utilization is limited because of insufficient information about their behaviour in structures. The most widely used technique for joining steels is fusion welding. The welding process has an influence not only on the welded connection but on the area near this connection, the so-called heat affected zone, as well. For that reason it is very important to be able to determine the properties in the heat affected zone (HAZ). This area of investigation is being continuously developed in dependence on significant progress in material production, especially regarding new types of steels available. There are currently several types of AHSS on the world market. Two most widely used processes for AHSS production are Thermo-Mechanically Controlled Processing (TMCP) and Quenching in connection with Tempering. In the presented study, TMCP and QC steels grade S960 were investigated. The study is focused on the changes of strength, ductility, hardness and impact strength in heat affected zone based on the used amount of heat input.

  2. Validation of Temperature Histories for Structural Steel Welds Using Estimated Heat-Affected-Zone Edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-12

    Metallurgy , 2nd Ed., John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2003. DOI: 10.1002/0471434027. 2. O. Grong, Metallurgical Modelling of Welding , 2ed., Materials Modelling...Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6394--16-9690 Validation of Temperature Histories for Structural Steel Welds Using...PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Validation of Temperature Histories for Structural Steel Welds Using Estimated Heat-Affected-Zone Edges S.G. Lambrakos

  3. Heat affected zone and fatigue crack propagation behavior of high performance steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sung Won; Kang, Dong Hwan; Kim, Tae Won; Lee, Jong Kwan

    2009-01-01

    The effect of heat affected zone in high performance steel on fatigue crack propagation behavior, which is related to the subsequent microstructure, was investigated. A modified Paris-Erdogan equation was presented for the analysis of fatigue crack propagation behavior corresponding to the heat affected zone conditions. Fatigue crack propagation tests under 0.3 stress ratio and 0.1 load frequency were conducted for both finegrained and coarse-grained heat affected zones, respectively. As shown in the results, much higher crack growth rate occurred in a relatively larger mean grain size material under the same stress intensity range of fatigue crack propagation process for the material.

  4. Creep properties of simulated heat-affected zone of HR3C austenitic steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sklenička, Václav; Kuchařová, Květa; Kvapilová, Marie; Svoboda, Milan; Král, Petr; Dvořák, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 128, JUN (2017), s. 238-247 ISSN 1044-5803 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : HR3C steel * Welding * Heat affected zone * Creep * Microstructure * Fractography Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy OBOR OECD: Materials engineering Impact factor: 2.714, year: 2016

  5. Corrosion Behavior of Heat Affected Zone of AISI 321 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Yong Sik; Park, Hwa Soon; Kim, Yeong Hwan; Won, Tae Yeon; Lee, Sang Lae

    1994-01-01

    Intergranular corrosion behavior of heat affected zone(HAZ) has been investigated for Ti-stabilized austenitic stainless steel AISI 321. It was observed that grain boundaries at HAZ of the steel with Ti/C ratio of 6.2 were corroded significantly after sensitization heat treatment. The increase of the Ti/C ratio up to 9.6 results in the evident decrease of intergranular corrosion. Weld simulation and intergranular corrosion test in 65% HNO 3 was performed. Influence of various thermal cycles on the intergranular corrosion was investigated. These results are discussed in terms of the behavior of TiC and Cr 23 C 6 precipitates

  6. Reheat cracking in 1/2 CrMoV steel. Heat affected zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batte, A.D.; Miller, R.C.; Murphy, M.C.

    1976-01-01

    Low alloy creep resisting steels are inherently susceptible to cracking during stress relief heat treatment (reheat cracking) though few welds give rise to problems in manufacture or service. Mechanical tests on simulated affected zone structures in CrMoV forgings have shown that cracking occurs when the high temperature ductility is inadequate to accommodate the residual welding strain. Differences in susceptibility result from differences in heat affected zone grain size if the purity level is sufficiently high; reheat cracking may then be avoided by ensuring complete grain refinement during welding. The susceptibility of a lower purity forging was insensitive to grain size; heat affected zone refinement is unlikely to eliminate cracking in such steel. (orig.) [de

  7. Analysis of the heat affected zone in CO2 laser cutting of stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madić Miloš J.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an investigation into the effect of the laser cutting parameters on the heat affected zone in CO2 laser cutting of AISI 304 stainless steel. The mathematical model for the heat affected zone was expressed as a function of the laser cutting parameters such as the laser power, cutting speed, assist gas pressure and focus position using the artificial neural network. To obtain experimental database for the artificial neural network training, laser cutting experiment was planned as per Taguchi’s L27 orthogonal array with three levels for each of the cutting parameter. Using the 27 experimental data sets, the artificial neural network was trained with gradient descent with momentum algorithm and the average absolute percentage error was 2.33%. The testing accuracy was then verified with 6 extra experimental data sets and the average predicting error was 6.46%. Statistically assessed as adequate, the artificial neural network model was then used to investigate the effect of the laser cutting parameters on the heat affected zone. To analyze the main and interaction effect of the laser cutting parameters on the heat affected zone, 2-D and 3-D plots were generated. The analysis revealed that the cutting speed had maximum influence on the heat affected zone followed by the laser power, focus position and assist gas pressure. Finally, using the Monte Carlo method the optimal laser cutting parameter values that minimize the heat affected zone were identified.

  8. Austenite grain growth and microstructure control in simulated heat affected zones of microalloyed HSLA steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lei [Department of Machine Tools and Factory Management, Technical University of Berlin, Pascalstraße 8 – 9, 10587, Berlin (Germany); Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205, Berlin (Germany); Kannengiesser, Thomas [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205, Berlin (Germany); Institute of Materials and Joining Technology, Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg, Universitetsplatz 2, 39106, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2014-09-08

    The roles of microalloying niobium, titanium and vanadium for controlling austenite grain growth, microstructure evolution and hardness were investigated at different simulated heat affected zones (HAZ) for high strength low alloy (HSLA) S690QL steel. High resolution FEG-SEM has been used to characterize fine bainitic ferrite, martensite and nanosized second phases at simulated coarse and fine grain HAZs. It was found that for Ti bearing steel (Ti/N ratio is 2) austenite grain had the slowest growth rate due to the presence of most stable TiN. The fine cuboidal particles promoted intragranular acicular ferrite (IGF) formation. Nb bearing steel exhibited relatively weaker grain growth retardation compared with titanium bearing steels and a mixed microstructure of bainite and martensite was present for all simulated HAZs. IGF existed at coarse grain HAZ of Ti+V bearing steel but it was totally replaced by bainite at fine grain HAZs. Hardness result was closely related to the morphology of bainitic ferrite, intragranular ferrite and second phases within ferrite. The microstructure and hardness results of different simulated HAZs were in good agreement with welded experimental results.

  9. Factors Affecting Impact Toughness in Stabilized Intermediate Purity 21Cr Ferritic Stainless Steels and Their Simulated Heat-Affected Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anttila, Severi; Alatarvas, Tuomas; Porter, David A.

    2017-12-01

    The correlation between simulated weld heat-affected zone microstructures and toughness parameters has been investigated in four intermediate purity 21Cr ferritic stainless steels stabilized with titanium and niobium either separately or in combination. Extensive Charpy V impact toughness testing was carried out followed by metallography including particle analysis using electron microscopy. The results confirmed that the grain size and the number density of particle clusters rich in titanium nitride and carbide with an equivalent circular diameter of 2 µm or more are statistically the most critical factors influencing the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature. Other inclusions and particle clusters, as well as grain boundary precipitates, are shown to be relatively harmless. Stabilization with niobium avoids large titanium-rich inclusions and also suppresses excessive grain growth in the heat-affected zone when reasonable heat inputs are used. Thus, in order to maximize the limited heat-affected zone impact toughness of 21Cr ferritic stainless steels containing 380 to 450 mass ppm of interstitials, the stabilization should be either titanium free or the levels of titanium and nitrogen should be moderated.

  10. SCC growth behavior of stainless steel weld heat-affected zone in hydrogenated high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takuyo; Terachi, Takumi; Miyamoto, Tomoki; Arioka, Koji

    2010-01-01

    It is known that the SCC growth rate of stainless steels in high-temperature water is accelerated by cold-work (CW). The weld heat-affected-zone (HAZ) of stainless steels is also deformed by weld shrinkage. However, only little have been reported on the SCC growth of weld HAZ of SUS316 and SUS304 in hydrogenated high-temperature water. Thus, in this present study, SCC growth experiments were performed using weld HAZ of stainless steels, especially to obtain data on the dependence of SCC growth on (1) temperature and (2) hardness in hydrogenated water at temperatures from 250degC to 340degC. And then, the SCC growth behaviors were compared between weld HAZ and CW stainless steels. The following results have been obtained. Significant SCC growth were observed in weld HAZ (SUS316 and SUS304) in hydrogenated water at 320degC. The SCC growth rates of the HAZ are similar to that of 10% CW non-sensitized SUS316, in accordance with that the hardness of weld HAZ is also similar to that of 10% CW SUS316. Temperature dependency of SCC growth of weld HAZ (SUS316 and SUS304) is also similar to that of 10% CW non-sensitized SUS316. That is, no significant SCC were observed in the weld HAZ (SUS316 and SUS304) in hydrogenated water at 340degC. This suggests that SCC growth behaviors of weld HAZ and CW stainless steels are similar and correlated with the hardness or yield strength of the materials, at least in non-sensitized regions. And the similar temperature dependence between the HAZ and CW stainless steels suggests that the SCC growth behaviors are also attributed to the common mechanism. (author)

  11. Residual Stress Distribution In Heat Affected Zone Of Welded Steel By Means Of Neutron Diffraction Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajar, Andika; Prasuad; Gunawan; Muslich, M. Rifai

    1996-01-01

    Three dimensional residual stress distribution in the heat affected zone of 10 mm thick welded steel by means of neutron diffraction technique has been measured. The results showed that the residual stress was distributed near the welded metal, namely within about 46,25 mm. The major tensile stresses occurred in the X-direction, and they attained a level greater than 2000 MPa through the position far away fram the weld. The tensile stresses in the Y and Z- directions lied between 500 and 1500 MPa, The results also suggest that the stress in the surface was greater than that in the middle of the sample

  12. Microstructural investigation of the heat-affected zone of simulated welded joint of P91 steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Vuherer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In the process of testing real components exposed to elevated temperature, it is not possible to neglect cracks. The most significant cracks can be induced by welding, which is applied for joining of structural components. Pressure equipment in service is also exposed to high pressure and high stresses. Materials for their manufacturing are designed to resist high stress at elevated temperature, and to meet requirements regarding creep resistance. The objective of this study is to investigate microstructure of different regions of the heat affected zone in T/P91 steels by using thermal simulation instead of welding.

  13. High-Power Laser Cutting of Steel Plates: Heat Affected Zone Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imed Miraoui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal effect of CO2 high-power laser cutting on cut surface of steel plates is investigated. The effect of the input laser cutting parameters on the melted zone depth (MZ, the heat affected zone depth (HAZ, and the microhardness beneath the cut surface is analyzed. A mathematical model is developed to relate the output process parameters to the input laser cutting parameters. Three input process parameters such as laser beam diameter, cutting speed, and laser power are investigated. Mathematical models for the melted zone and the heat affected zone depth are developed by using design of experiment approach (DOE. The results indicate that the input laser cutting parameters have major effect on melted zone, heat affected zone, and microhardness beneath cut surface. The MZ depth, the HAZ depth, and the microhardness beneath cut surface increase as laser power increases, but they decrease with increasing cutting speed. Laser beam diameter has a negligible effect on HAZ depth but it has a remarkable effect on MZ depth and HAZ microhardness. The melted zone depth and the heat affected zone depth can be reduced by increasing laser cutting speed and decreasing laser power and laser beam diameter.

  14. Heat-affected zone liquation crack on resistance spot welded TWIP steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Dulal Chandra [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Dong-Eui University, 995 Eomgwangno, Busanjin-gu, Busan 614-714 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, InSung [Automotive Production Development Division, Hyundai Motor Company (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yeong-Do, E-mail: ypark@deu.ac.kr [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Dong-Eui University, 995 Eomgwangno, Busanjin-gu, Busan 614-714 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the heat affected zone (HAZ) liquation crack and segregation behavior of the resistance spot welded twinning induced plasticity (TWIP) steel have been reported. Cracks appeared in the post-welded joints that originated at the partially melted zone (PMZ) and propagated from the PMZ through the heat affected zone (HAZ) to the base metal (BM). The crack length and crack opening widths were observed increasing with heat input; and the welding current was identified to be the most influencing parameter for crack formation. Cracks appeared at the PMZ when nugget diameter reached at 4.50 mm or above; and the liquation cracks were found to occur along two sides of the notch tip in the sheet direction rather than in the electrode direction. Cracks were backfilled with the liquid films which has lamellar structure and supposed to be the eutectic constituent. Co-segregation of alloy elements such as, C and Mn were detected on the liquid films by electron-probe microanalysis (EPMA) line scanning and element map which suggests that the liquid film was enrich of Mn and C. The eutectic constituent was identified by analyzing the calculated phase diagram along with thermal temperature history of finite element simulation. Preliminary experimental results showed that cracks have less/no significant effect on the static cross-tensile strength (CTS) and the tensile-shear strength (TSS). In addition, possible ways to avoid cracking were discussed. - Highlights: • The HAZ liquation crack during resistance spot welding of TWIP steel was examined. • Cracks were completely backfilled and healed with divorced eutectic secondary phase. • Co-segregation of C and Mn was detected in the cracked zone. • Heat input was the most influencing factor to initiate liquation crack. • Cracks have less/no significant effect on static tensile properties.

  15. Heat-affected zone liquation crack on resistance spot welded TWIP steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Dulal Chandra; Chang, InSung; Park, Yeong-Do

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the heat affected zone (HAZ) liquation crack and segregation behavior of the resistance spot welded twinning induced plasticity (TWIP) steel have been reported. Cracks appeared in the post-welded joints that originated at the partially melted zone (PMZ) and propagated from the PMZ through the heat affected zone (HAZ) to the base metal (BM). The crack length and crack opening widths were observed increasing with heat input; and the welding current was identified to be the most influencing parameter for crack formation. Cracks appeared at the PMZ when nugget diameter reached at 4.50 mm or above; and the liquation cracks were found to occur along two sides of the notch tip in the sheet direction rather than in the electrode direction. Cracks were backfilled with the liquid films which has lamellar structure and supposed to be the eutectic constituent. Co-segregation of alloy elements such as, C and Mn were detected on the liquid films by electron-probe microanalysis (EPMA) line scanning and element map which suggests that the liquid film was enrich of Mn and C. The eutectic constituent was identified by analyzing the calculated phase diagram along with thermal temperature history of finite element simulation. Preliminary experimental results showed that cracks have less/no significant effect on the static cross-tensile strength (CTS) and the tensile-shear strength (TSS). In addition, possible ways to avoid cracking were discussed. - Highlights: • The HAZ liquation crack during resistance spot welding of TWIP steel was examined. • Cracks were completely backfilled and healed with divorced eutectic secondary phase. • Co-segregation of C and Mn was detected in the cracked zone. • Heat input was the most influencing factor to initiate liquation crack. • Cracks have less/no significant effect on static tensile properties

  16. Metallurgical interpretation of the change of notched bar impact strength in the heat-affected zone of weldable structural steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forch, K.; Forch, U.; Piehl, K.H.

    1978-01-01

    Notched bar impact energy in the heat-affected zone of joint welds of the steels StE 36, StE 51 and 20 MnMoNi55. Manual arc welding and submerged arc welding with heat input between 10,000 and 35,000 J/cm, stress relieving between 530 and 600 0 C. Significance of the structure in the heat-affected zone, the effect of heat treatment, the precipitation processes and of temper embrittlement. (orig.) [de

  17. Embrittlement of Intercritically Reheated Coarse Grain Heat-Affected Zone of ASTM4130 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liying; Han, Tao; Han, Bin

    2018-04-01

    In this investigation, a thermal welding simulation technique was used to investigate the microstructures and mechanical properties of the intercritically reheated coarse grain heat-affected zone (IR CGHAZ) of ASTM4130 steel. The effect of post weld heat treatment (PWHT) on the toughness of IR CGHAZ was also analyzed. The toughness of IR CGHAZ was measured by means of Charpy impact, and it is found that IR CGHAZ has the lowest toughness which is much lower than that of the base metal regardless of whether PWHT is applied or not. The as-welded IR CGHAZ is mainly composed of ferrite, martensite, and many blocky M-A constituents distributing along grain boundaries and subgrain boundaries in a near-connected network. Also, the prior austenite grains are still as coarse as those in the coarse grain heat-affected zone (CGHAZ). The presence of the blocky M-A constituents and the coarsened austenite grains result in the toughness deterioration of the as-welded IR CGHAZ. Most of the blocky M-A constituents are decomposed to granular bainite due to the effect of the PWHT. However, PWHT cannot refine the prior austenite grains. Thus, the low toughness of IR CGHAZ after PWHT can be attributed to two factors, i.e., the coarsened austenite grains, and the presence of the remaining M-A constituents and granular bainite, which are located at grain boundaries and subgrain boundaries in a near-connected network. The absorbed energy of the IR CGHAZ was increased by about 3.75 times, which means that the PWHT can effectively improve the toughness but it cannot be recovered to the level of base metal.

  18. Fatigue crack propagation behavior and acoustic emission characteristics of the heat affected zone of super duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do, Jae Yoon; Kim, Jin Hwan; Ahn, Seok Hwan; Park, In Duck; Kang, Chang Yong; Nam, Ki Woo

    2002-01-01

    Because duplex stainless steel shows the good strength and corrosion resistance properties, the necessity of duplex stainless steel, which has long life in severe environments, has been increased with industrial development. The fatigue crack propagation behavior of Heat Affected Zone(HAZ) has been investigated in super duplex stainless steel. The fatigue crack propagation rate of HAZ of super duplex stainless steel was faster than that of base metal of super duplex stainless steel. We also analysed acoustic emission signals during the fatigue test with time-frequency analysis method. According to the results of time-frequency analysis, the frequency ranges of 200-400 kHz were obtained by striation and the frequency range of 500 kHz was obtained due to dimple and separate of inclusion

  19. Characterization of microstructural strengthening in the heat-affected zone of a blast-resistant naval steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Xinghua, E-mail: yu.345@osu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43221 (United States); Caron, Jeremy L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43221 (United States)] [Welding and Joining Metallurgy Group, Welding Engineering Program, 1248 Arthur E. Adams Drive, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43221 (United States); Babu, S.S., E-mail: babu.13@osu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43221 (United States) and Welding and Joining Metallurgy Group, Welding Engineering Program, 1248 Arthur E. Adams Drive, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43221 (United States); Lippold, John C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43221 (United States)] [Welding and Joining Metallurgy Group, Welding Engineering Program, 1248 Arthur E. Adams Drive, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43221 (United States); Isheim, Dieter; Seidman, David N. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, 2220 North Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)] [Northwestern University Center for Atom-Probe Tomography, 2220 North Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The influence of simulated heat-affected zone thermal cycles on the microstructural evolution in a blast-resistant naval steel was investigated by dilatometry, microhardness testing, optical microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction and atom-probe tomography (APT) techniques. Coarsening of Cu precipitates were observed in the subcritical and intercritical heat-affected zones, with partial dissolution in the latter. A small number density of Cu precipitates and high Cu concentration in the matrix of the fine-grained heat-affected zone indicates the onset of Cu precipitate dissolution. Cu clustering in the coarse-grained heat-affected zone indicated the potential initiation of Cu reprecipitation during cooling. Segregation of Cu was also characterized by APT. The hardening and softening observed in the heat-affected zone regions was rationalized using available strengthening models.

  20. Effects of a laser surface processing induced heat-affected zone on the fatigue behavior of AISI 4340 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDaniels, R.L.; White, S.A.; Liaw, K.; Chen, L.; McCay, M.H.; Liaw, P.K.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) in AISI 4340 steel created by laser-surface alloying (LSA) on high-cycle fatigue behavior have been investigated. This research was performed by producing several lots of laser-processed AISI 4340 steel using different laser processing parameters, and then subjecting the samples to high-cycle fatigue and Knoop microindentation hardness studies. Samples of tested material from each lot were examined using scanning-electron microscopy (SEM) in order to establish the effects of laser processing on the microstructure of the fatigue-tested AISI 4340 steel. When these three techniques, microindentation hardness testing, high-cycle fatigue testing, and SEM, are combined, a mechanistic understanding of the effect of the HAZ on the fatigue behavior of this alloy might be gained. It was found that the HAZ did not appear to have an adverse effect on the high-cycle fatigue behavior of LSA-processed AISI 4340 steel

  1. An investigation of reheat cracking in the weld heat affected zone of type 347 stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phung-On, Isaratat

    2007-12-01

    Reheat cracking has been a persistent problem for welding of many alloys such as the stabilized stainless steels: Types 321 and 347 as well as Cr-Mo-V steels. Similar problem occurs in Ni-base superalloys termed "strain-age cracking". Cracking occurs during the post weld heat treatment. The HAZ is the most susceptible area due to metallurgical reactions in solid state during both heating and cooling thermal cycle. Many investigations have been conducted to understand the RHC mechanism. There is still no comprehensive mechanism to explain its underlying mechanism. In this study, there were two proposed cracking mechanisms. The first is the formation of a PFZ resulting in local weakening and strain localization. The second is the creep-like grain boundary sliding that causes microvoid formation at the grain boundaries and the triple point junctions. Cracking occurs due to the coalescence of the microvoids that form. In this study, stabilized grade stainless steel, Type 347, was selected for investigation of reheat cracking mechanism due to the simplicity of its microstructure and understanding of its metallurgical behavior. The Gleeble(TM) 3800 system was employed due to its capability for precise control of both thermal and mechanical simulation. Cylindrical samples were subjected to thermal cycles for the HAZ simulation followed by PWHT as the reheat cracking test. "Susceptibility C-curves" were plotted as a function of PWHT temperatures and time to failure at applied stress levels of 70% and 80% yield strength. These C-curves show the possible relationship of the reheat cracking susceptibility and carbide precipitation behavior. To identify the mechanism, the sample shape was modified containing two flat surfaces at the center section. These flat surfaces were electro-polished and subjected to the HAZ simulation followed by the placement of the micro-indentation arrays. Then, the reheat cracking test was performed. The cracking mechanism was identified by tracing

  2. Intrinsic Mechanisms of Ductile-brittle Transition for F460 Steel Welding Coarse Grained Heat Affected Zones with Different Heat Inputs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Jing

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Coarse grain heat affected zone (HAZ of F460 steel was simulated by a Gleeble 3800 thermo-mechanical simulator. The microstructure, critical event of the HAZ formed at various heat inputs (E were characterized and determined by optical microscopy (OM and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM, and cleavage fracture stress σf was also calculated by ABAQUS software. Based on above systematic analysis, the intrinsic mechanism of ductile-brittle transition for F460 steel heat affected zones with different heat inputs were revealed. The results indicate that:with the improvement of heat input, the microstructures in sequence are a minority of lath martensite and massive fine lath bainite, more lath bainite with less granular bainite, more granular bainite with less lath bainite, bulky of granular bainite; and the maximum size of the original austenite grain and bainite packet becomes bigger with the improvement of heat input. The size of bainite packet is critical event of the cleavage fracture for coarse grain heat affected zone specimens with various heat inputs by comparing the relationships among residual crack length, original austenite grain size and bainite packet size. With the decreasing of the bainitic packet, the ductile to brittle transition temperature decreases. In addition, cleavage fracture stress σf is also calculated by ABAQUS software, σf gradually decreases with the increase of the heat input, which can explain the intrinsic mechanism of ductile to brittle transition temperature Tk with the change of the heat input.

  3. Correlation Between Intercritical Heat-Affected Zone and Type IV Creep Damage Zone in Grade 91 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiyu; Kannan, Rangasayee; Li, Leijun

    2018-04-01

    A soft zone in Cr-Mo steel weldments has been reported to accompany the infamous Type IV cracking, the highly localized creep damage in the heat-affected zone of creep-resistant steels. However, the microstructural features and formation mechanism of this soft zone are not well understood. In this study, using microhardness profiling and microstructural verification, the initial soft zone in the as-welded condition was identified to be located in the intercritical heat-affected zone of P91 steel weldments. It has a mixed structure, consisting of Cr-rich re-austenitized prior austenite grains and fine Cr-depleted, tempered martensite grains retained from the base metal. The presence of these further-tempered retained grains, originating from the base metal, is directly responsible for the hardness reduction of the identified soft zone in the as-welded condition. The identified soft zone exhibits a high location consistency at three thermal stages. Local chemistry analysis and thermodynamic calculation show that the lower chromium concentrations inside these retained grains thermodynamically decrease their potentials for austenitic transformation during welding. Heterogeneous grain growth is observed in the soft zone during postweld heat treatment. The mismatch of strengths between the weak Cr-depleted grains and strong Cr-rich grains enhances the creep damage. Local deformation of the weaker Cr-depleted grains accelerates the formation of creep cavities.

  4. Effect of Heat Input on Inclusion Evolution Behavior in Heat-Affected Zone of EH36 Shipbuilding Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jincheng; Zou, Xiaodong; Matsuura, Hiroyuki; Wang, Cong

    2018-03-01

    The effects of heat input parameters on inclusion and microstructure characteristics have been investigated using welding thermal simulations. Inclusion features from heat-affected zones (HAZs) were profiled. It was found that, under heat input of 120 kJ/cm, Al-Mg-Ti-O-(Mn-S) composite inclusions can act effectively as nucleation sites for acicular ferrites. However, this ability disappears when the heat input is increased to 210 kJ/cm. In addition, confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) was used to document possible inclusion-microstructure interactions, shedding light on how inclusions assist beneficial transformations toward property enhancement.

  5. Continuous cooling transformation behavior and impact toughness in heat-affected zone of Nb-containing fire-resistant steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong Hong; Qin, Zhan Peng; Wan, Xiang Liang; Wei, Ran; Wu, Kai Ming; Misra, Devesh

    2017-09-01

    Simulated heat-affected zone continuous cooling transformation diagram was developed for advanced fireresistant steel. Over a wide range of cooling rates, corresponding to t8/5 from 6 s to 150 s, granular bainite was the dominant transformation constituent, while the morphology of less dominant martensite-austenite (M-A) constituent changed from film-like to block-type constituent; but the hardness remained similar to the average value of 190-205 HV (0.2). The start and finish transformation temperature was high at 700 °C and 500 °C, and is different from the conventional high strength low alloy steels. It is believed that the high-content (0.09 wt%) of Nb may promote bainite transformation at relatively high temperatures. Martenistic matrix was not observed at high cooling rate and the film-like M-A constituent and blocky M-A constituent with thin film of retained austenite and lath martensite were observed on slow cooling. Excellent impact toughness was obtained in the heat-affected zone with 15-75 kJ/cm welding heat input.

  6. A process model for the heat-affected zone microstructure evolution in duplex stainless steel weldments: Part I. the model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmer, H.; Grong, Ø.

    1999-11-01

    The present investigation is concerned with modeling of the microstructure evolution in duplex stainless steels under thermal conditions applicable to welding. The important reactions that have been modeled are the dissolution of austenite during heating, subsequent grain growth in the delta ferrite regime, and finally, the decomposition of the delta ferrite to austenite during cooling. As a starting point, a differential formulation of the underlying diffusion problem is presented, based on the internal-state variable approach. These solutions are later manipulated and expressed in terms of the Scheil integral in the cases where the evolution equation is separable or can be made separable by a simple change of variables. The models have then been applied to describe the heat-affected zone microstructure evolution during both thick-plate and thin-plate welding of three commercial duplex stainless steel grades: 2205, 2304, and 2507. The results may conveniently be presented in the form of novel process diagrams, which display contours of constant delta ferrite grain size along with information about dissolution and reprecipitation of austenite for different combinations of weld input energy and peak temperature. These diagrams are well suited for quantitative readings and illustrate, in a condensed manner, the competition between the different variables that lead to structural changes during welding of duplex stainless steels.

  7. Structure of the heat-affected zone in the 24 Kh2NMFA steel welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    German, S.I.; Levenberg, N.E.; Netesa, E.M.; Fomina, O.P.

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that in the heat-affected zone of the joints welded with preheating there appears a bainite having a complex composition and the following structure: asub(m)+(M+Asub(ret)). The matrix of the bainite is represented by an a-solid solution formed by martensite kinetics (asub(m)). Small regions of granular or elongated shape, uniformly distributed over the bainite matrix, are either a retained austenite (Asub(ret)) or a martensite with a retained austenite (M+Asub(ret)). The non-equilibrium character of the bainite phases is, to a large extent, responsible for the inadmissably high hardness of the heat-affected zone immediately after welding

  8. Microstructural Characterization of the Heat-Affected Zones in Grade 92 Steel Welds: Double-Pass and Multipass Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X.; West, G. D.; Siefert, J. A.; Parker, J. D.; Thomson, R. C.

    2018-04-01

    The microstructure in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of multipass welds typical of those used in power plants and made from 9 wt pct chromium martensitic Grade 92 steel is complex. Therefore, there is a need for systematic microstructural investigations to define the different regions of the microstructure across the HAZ of Grade 92 steel welds manufactured using the traditional arc welding processes in order to understand possible failure mechanisms after long-term service. In this study, the microstructure in the HAZ of an as-fabricated two-pass bead-on-plate weld on a parent metal of Grade 92 steel has been systematically investigated and compared to a complex, multipass thick section weldment using an extensive range of electron and ion-microscopy-based techniques. A dilatometer has been used to apply controlled thermal cycles to simulate the microstructures in distinctly different regions in a multipass HAZ using sequential thermal cycles. A wide range of microstructural properties in the simulated materials were characterized and compared with the experimental observations from the weld HAZ. It has been found that the microstructure in the HAZ can be categorized by a combination of sequential thermal cycles experienced by the different zones within the complex weld metal, using the terminology developed for these regions based on a simpler, single-pass bead-on-plate weld, categorized as complete transformation, partial transformation, and overtempered.

  9. An Investigation of TIG welding parameters on microhardness and microstructure of heat affected zone of HSLA steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musa, M. H. A.; Maleque, M. A.; Ali, M. Y.

    2018-01-01

    Nowadays a wide variety of metal joining methods are used in fabrication industries. In this study, the effect of various welding parameters of the TIG welding process on microhardness, depth, and microstructure of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of L450 HSLA steel and optimizing these process parameters following Taguchi experimental design was investigated. The microhardness tended to increase significantly with the increase of welding speed from 1.0 to 2.5 mm/s whereas the width of HAZ decreased. The current and arc voltage was found to be less significant in relative comparison. Microstructures of the welded samples were also studied to analyze the changes in the microstructure of the material in terms of ferrite, pearlite, bainite, and martensite formations. Welding speed was found to be the most significant factors leading to changes in microhardness and metallurgical properties. The increase of welding heat input caused an increase in width (depth) of HAZ and the growth of prior austenite grains and then enlarged the grain size of coarse grain heat affected zone (CGHAZ). However, the amount of martensite in the HAZ decreased accompanied by an opposite change of paint. It was observed that the hardness properties and the microstructural feature of HAZ area was strongly affected by the welding parameters.

  10. Analysis of surface roughness and surface heat affected zone of steel S355J0 after plasma arc cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatala, Michal; Chep, Robert; Pandilov, Zoran

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with thermal cutting technology of materials with plasma arc. In the first part of this paper the theoretical knowledge of the principles of plasma arc cutting and current use of this technology in industry are presented. The cut of products with this technology is perpendicular and accurate, but the use of this technology affects micro-structural changes and depth of the heat affected zone (HAZ). This article deals with the experimental evaluation of plasma arc cutting technological process. The influence of technological factors on the roughness parameter Ra of the steel surface EN S355J0 has been evaluated by using planned experiments. By using the factor experiment, the significance of the four process factors such as plasma burner feed speed, plasma gas pressure, nozzle diameter, distance between nozzle mouth and material has been analyzed. Regression models obtained by multiple linear regression indicate the quality level of observed factors function. The heat from plasma arc cutting affects the micro-structural changes of the material, too.

  11. Impact Toughness of Subzones in the Intercritical Heat-Affected Zone of Low-Carbon Bainitic Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenshun Li

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The subzones of the intercritical heat-affected zone (IC HAZ of low-carbon bainitic steel were simulated by using a Gleeble-3500 simulator to study the impact toughness. The results showed that the IC HAZ is not entirely brittle and can be further divided into three subzones according to the impact toughness or peak welding temperature; the invariant subzone heated between the critical transformation start temperature (Ac1 and 770 °C exhibited unchanged high impact toughness. Furthermore, an extremely low impact toughness was found in the embrittlement subzone, heated between 770 and 830 °C, and the reduction subzone heated between 830 °C and the critical transformation finish temperature (Ac3 exhibited toughness below that of the original metal. The size of the blocky martensite-austenite (M-A constituents was found to have a remarkable level of influence on the impact toughness when heated below 830 °C. Additionally, it was found that, once the constituent size exceeds a critical value of 3.0 µm at a peak temperature of 770 °C, the IC HAZ becomes brittle regardless of lath or twinned martensite constitution in the M-A constituent. Essentially, embrittlement was observed to occur when the resolved length of initial cracks (in the direction of the overall fracture formed as a result of the debonding of M-A constituents exceeding the critical Griffith size. Furthermore, when the heating temperature exceeded 830 °C, the M-A constituents formed a slender shape, and the impact toughness increased as the area fraction of the slender M-A constituents decreased.

  12. Impact Toughness of Subzones in the Intercritical Heat-Affected Zone of Low-Carbon Bainitic Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenshun; Zhao, Xuemin; Shan, Dongri

    2018-06-06

    The subzones of the intercritical heat-affected zone (IC HAZ) of low-carbon bainitic steel were simulated by using a Gleeble-3500 simulator to study the impact toughness. The results showed that the IC HAZ is not entirely brittle and can be further divided into three subzones according to the impact toughness or peak welding temperature; the invariant subzone heated between the critical transformation start temperature ( A c1 ) and 770 °C exhibited unchanged high impact toughness. Furthermore, an extremely low impact toughness was found in the embrittlement subzone, heated between 770 and 830 °C, and the reduction subzone heated between 830 °C and the critical transformation finish temperature ( A c3 ) exhibited toughness below that of the original metal. The size of the blocky martensite-austenite (M-A) constituents was found to have a remarkable level of influence on the impact toughness when heated below 830 °C. Additionally, it was found that, once the constituent size exceeds a critical value of 3.0 µm at a peak temperature of 770 °C, the IC HAZ becomes brittle regardless of lath or twinned martensite constitution in the M-A constituent. Essentially, embrittlement was observed to occur when the resolved length of initial cracks (in the direction of the overall fracture) formed as a result of the debonding of M-A constituents exceeding the critical Griffith size. Furthermore, when the heating temperature exceeded 830 °C, the M-A constituents formed a slender shape, and the impact toughness increased as the area fraction of the slender M-A constituents decreased.

  13. Microstructure and mechanical properties in the weld heat affected zone of 9Cr-2W-VTa reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Changhoon; Lee, Taeho; Jang, Minho; Park, Mingu [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoung Chan [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel demonstrated excellent resistance to the neutron irradiation and mechanical properties. The investigation of weldability in company with the development of RAFM steel is essential for construction of the fusion reactor. Generally, the superior mechanical properties of the RAFM steel can be upset during welding process due to microstructural change by rapid heating and cooling in the weld heat affected zone (HAZ). The phase transformation and mechanical properties in the weld HAZ of RAFM steel were investigated. The base steel consisted of tempered martensite and two carbides. During rapid welding thermal cycle, the microstructure of the base steel was transformed into martensite and δ-ferrite. In addition, the volume fraction of δ-ferrite and grain size increased with increase in the peak temperature and heat input. The strength of the HAZs was higher than that of the base steel due to the formation of martensite, whereas the impact properties of the HAZs deteriorated as compared with the base steel due to the formation of δ-ferrite. The PWHT improved the impact properties of the HAZs, resulting from the formation of tempered martensite.

  14. Normalizing effect on fatigue crack propagation at the heat-affected zone of AISI 4140 steel shielded metal arc weldings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Vargas-Arista

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The fractography and mechanical behaviour of fatigue crack propagation in the heat-affected zone (HAZ of AISI 4140 steel welded using the shielded metal arc process was analysed. Different austenitic grain size was obtained by normalizing performed at 1200 °C for 5 and 10 hours after welding. Three point bending fatigue tests on pre-cracked specimens along the HAZ revealed that coarse grains promoted an increase in fatigue crack growth rate, hence causing a reduction in both fracture toughness and critical crack length, and a transgranular brittle final fracture with an area fraction of dimple zones connecting cleavage facets. A fractographic analysis proved that as the normalizing time increased the crack length decreased. The increase in the river patterns on the fatigue crack propagation in zone II was also evidenced and final brittle fracture because of transgranular quasicleavage was observed. Larger grains induced a deterioration of the fatigue resistance of the HAZ.

  15. 2017 Accomplishments – Tritium Aging Studies on Stainless Steel Weldments and Heat-Affected Zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, Michael J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hitchcock, Dale [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Krentz, Tim [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McNamara, Joy [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Duncan, Andrew [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2018-01-31

    In this study, the combined effects tritium and decay helium in forged and welded Types 304L and 21-6-9 stainless steels were studied. To measure these effects, fracture mechanic specimens were thermally precharged with tritium and aged for approximately 17 years to build in decay helium from tritium decay prior to testing. The results are compared to earlier measurements on the same alloys and weldments (4-5, 8-9). In support of Enhanced Surveillance, “Tritium Effects on Materials”, the fracture toughness properties of long-aged tritium-charged stainless-steel base metals and weldments were measured and compared to earlier measurements. The fracture-toughness data were measured by thermally precharging as-forged and as-welded specimens with tritium gas at 34.5 MPa and 350°C and aging for approximately 17 years to build-in decay helium prior to testing. These data result from the longest aged specimens ever tested in the history of the tritium effects programs at Savannah River and the fracture toughness values measured were the lowest ever recorded for tritium-exposed stainless steel. For Type 21-6-9 stainless steel, fracture toughness values were reduced to less than 2-4% of the as-forged values to 41 lbs / in specimens that contained more than 1300 appm helium from tritium decay. The fracture toughness properties of long-aged weldments were also measured. The fracture toughness reductions were not as severe because the specimens did not retain as much tritium from the charging and aging as did the base metals. For Type 304L weldments, the specimens in this study contained approximately 600 appm helium and their fracture toughness values averaged 750 lbs / in. The results for other steels and weldments are reported and additional tests will be conducted during FY18.

  16. Effects of Nb on microstructure and continuous cooling transformation of coarse grain heat-affected zone in 610 MPa class high-strength low-alloy structural steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.Q.; Zhang, H.Q.; Liu, W.M.; Hou, H.

    2009-01-01

    Continuous cooling transformation diagrams of the coarse grain heat-affected zone and microstructure after continuous cooling were investigated for 610 MPa class high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) structural steels with and without niobium. For the steel without Nb, grain boundary ferrite, degenerate pearlite and acicular ferrite are produced at slower cooling rates. Bainite phase is formed at faster cooling rates. However, for the steel with Nb, granular bainite is dominant at a large range of cooling rates. At cooling rates 32 K/s, Nb addition has no obvious influence on transformation start temperature, but it influences microstructure transformation significantly. Martensite is observed in steel with Nb at faster cooling rates, but not produced in steel without Nb

  17. Corrosion behavior in high heat input welded heat-affected zone of Ni-free high-nitrogen Fe–18Cr–10Mn–N austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Joonoh; Ha, Heon-Young; Lee, Tae-Ho

    2013-01-01

    The pitting corrosion and interphase corrosion behaviors in high heat input welded heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a metastable high-nitrogen Fe–18Cr–10Mn–N austenitic stainless steel were explored through electrochemical tests. The HAZs were simulated using Gleeble simulator with high heat input welding condition of 300 kJ/cm and the peak temperature of the HAZs was changed from 1200 °C to 1350 °C, aiming to examine the effect of δ-ferrite formation on corrosion behavior. The electrochemical test results show that both pitting corrosion resistance and interphase corrosion resistance were seriously deteriorated by δ-ferrite formation in the HAZ and their aspects were different with increasing δ-ferrite fraction. The pitting corrosion resistance was decreased by the formation of Cr-depleted zone along δ-ferrite/austenite (γ) interphase resulting from δ-ferrite formation; however it didn't depend on δ-ferrite fraction. The interphase corrosion resistance depends on the total amount of Cr-depleted zone as well as ferrite area and thus continuously decreased with increasing δ-ferrite fraction. The different effects of δ-ferrite fraction on pitting corrosion and interphase corrosion were carefully discussed in terms of alloying elements partitioning in the HAZ based on thermodynamic consideration. - Highlights: • Corrosion behavior in the weld HAZ of high-nitrogen austenitic alloy was studied. • Cr 2 N particle was not precipitated in high heat input welded HAZ of tested alloy. • Pitting corrosion and interphase corrosion show a different behavior. • Pitting corrosion resistance was affected by whether or not δ-ferrite forms. • Interphase corrosion resistance was affected by the total amount of δ-ferrite

  18. Hot Ductility Behaviors in the Weld Heat-Affected Zone of Nitrogen-Alloyed Fe-18Cr-10Mn Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Tae-Ho; Hong, Hyun-Uk

    2015-04-01

    Hot ductility behaviors in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) of nitrogen-alloyed Fe-18Cr-10Mn austenitic stainless steels with different nitrogen contents were evaluated through hot tension tests using Gleeble simulator. The results of Gleeble simulations indicated that hot ductility in the HAZs deteriorated due to the formation of δ-ferrite and intergranular Cr2N particles. In addition, the amount of hot ductility degradation was strongly affected by the fraction of δ-ferrite.

  19. Effect of silicon contents on the microstructures and mechanical properties of heat affected zones for 9Cr2WVTa steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jian [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Science, 110016, Shenyang (China); Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Science, 110016, Shenyang (China); Lu, Shanping, E-mail: shplu@imr.ac.cn [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Science, 110016, Shenyang (China); Rong, Lijian [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Science, 110016, Shenyang (China); Li, Dianzhong [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Science, 110016, Shenyang (China)

    2016-03-15

    The weldability of 9Cr2WVTa steels with silicon content varying from 0.30 wt.% to 1.36 wt.% was studied to meet the requirement of Generation-Ⅳ nuclear reactor. Samples of enlarged HAZs were fabricated by a thermal-mechanical simulator based on the simulation and measurement of non-equilibrium phase transformation. The content of δ-ferrite in the HAZs increased with the silicon content and the peak temperature of welding thermal cycle. The impact toughness in the HAZs decreased in different degrees when the δ-ferrite exhibits stripe (lower than 4.82%) or blocky types (higher than 4.82%). Post weld heat treatment (PWHT) has a significant role on improving the toughness. Adding silicon content increased the volume of δ-ferrite and therefore, decreased the tensile strength of the HAZs for 9Cr2WVTa steels. Silicon also as solid solution strengthening element increased the tensile strength. The 9Cr2WVTa steel has good weldability when the silicon content is lower than 0.60 wt.%. - Highlights: • The weldability of 9Cr2WVTa steel with different silicon contents was studied. • The impact toughness decreased in different degrees owing to the δ-ferrite. • PWHT has a significant role on improving the impact toughness. • The 9Cr2WVTa steel with silicon content not exceeding 0.60 wt.% has good weldability.

  20. Characteristics of heat affected zone in SAW and SMAW welding of microalloyed steel 450 EMZ studied by means of a welding simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Palma, R.; Carrillo Olivares, F.; Lopez Torres, E.

    1997-01-01

    In high elastic limit microalloyed steels the heat input remains limited to values around 3 kj/mm, since, from a theoretical point of view the metallurgic transformations produced in the heat affected zone (HAZ) may fragile the metal. The study of the transmission of heat in the HAZ from a theoretical point of view is carried out by solving Rosenthal's equation, which allows us to know the peak temperature reached and the heat cycle in every point of the HAZ. With these data and the CCT curves for 450 EMZ steel corresponding to our steel we will be able to determine the metallurgic transformations produced in those points, with the help of an electron microscope. The welding simulator is valuable help for laboratory study of heat cycles as it allows us to check that for the actual welding processes chosen, i.e. SMAW and SAW, and for the heat input, the transformation products obtained in the HAZ have the right toughness. (Author) 17 refs

  1. A process model for the heat-affected zone microstructure evolution in duplex stainless steel weldments: Part II. Application to electron beam welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmer, H.; Grong, Ø.; Klokkehaug, S.

    2000-03-01

    In the present investigation, a process model for electron beam (EB) welding of different grades of duplex stainless steels (i.e. SAF 2205 and 2507) has been developed. A number of attractive features are built into the original finite element code, including (1) a separate module for prediction of the penetration depth and distribution of the heat source into the plate, (2) adaptive refinement of the three-dimensional (3-D) element mesh for quick and reliable solution of the differential heat flow equation, and (3) special subroutines for calculation of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) microstructure evolution. The process model has been validated by comparison with experimental data obtained from in situ thermocouple measurements and optical microscope examinations. Subsequently, its aptness to alloy design and optimization of welding conditions for duplex stainless steels is illustrated in different numerical examples and case studies pertaining to EB welding of tubular joints.

  2. Microstructural characteristics and toughness of the simulated coarse grained heat affected zone of high strength low carbon bainitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan Liangyun; Qiu Chunlin; Zhao Dewen; Gao Xiuhua; Du Linxiu

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Total toughness can be separated into crack initiation energy and crack propagation energy. → Small effective grain size of lath martensite can improve the crack propagation energy. → MA constituent is mainly responsible for the low toughness of coarse bainite specimens. → High angle packet boundary in coarser bainite has few contributions to improving crack propagation energy. - Abstract: The correlation of microstructural characteristics and toughness of the simulated coarse grained heat affected zone (CGHAZ) of low carbon bainitic steel was investigated in this study. The toughness of simulated specimens was examined by using an instrumented Charpy impact tester after the simulation welding test was conducted with different cooling times. Microstructure observation and crystallographic feature analysis were conducted by means of optical microscope and scanning electron microscope equipped with electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) system, respectively. The main microstructure of simulated specimen changes from lath martensite to coarse bainite with the increase in cooling time. The deterioration of its toughness occurs when the cooling time ranges from 10 to 50 s compared with base metal toughness, and the toughness becomes even worse when the cooling time increases to 90 s or more. The MA (martensite-austenite) constituent is primary responsible for the low toughness of simulated CGHAZ with high values of cooling time because the large MA constituent reduces the crack initiation energy significantly. For crack propagation energy, the small effective grain size of lath martensite plays an important role in improving the crack propagation energy. By contrast, high misorientation packet boundary in coarse bainite seems to have few contributions to the improvement of the toughness because cleavage fracture micromechanism of coarse bainite is mainly controlled by crack initiation.

  3. Microstructural characteristics and toughness of the simulated coarse grained heat affected zone of high strength low carbon bainitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan Liangyun, E-mail: lly.liangyun@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Rolling Technology and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Qiu Chunlin; Zhao Dewen; Gao Xiuhua; Du Linxiu [State Key Laboratory of Rolling Technology and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2011-11-25

    Highlights: {yields} Total toughness can be separated into crack initiation energy and crack propagation energy. {yields} Small effective grain size of lath martensite can improve the crack propagation energy. {yields} MA constituent is mainly responsible for the low toughness of coarse bainite specimens. {yields} High angle packet boundary in coarser bainite has few contributions to improving crack propagation energy. - Abstract: The correlation of microstructural characteristics and toughness of the simulated coarse grained heat affected zone (CGHAZ) of low carbon bainitic steel was investigated in this study. The toughness of simulated specimens was examined by using an instrumented Charpy impact tester after the simulation welding test was conducted with different cooling times. Microstructure observation and crystallographic feature analysis were conducted by means of optical microscope and scanning electron microscope equipped with electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) system, respectively. The main microstructure of simulated specimen changes from lath martensite to coarse bainite with the increase in cooling time. The deterioration of its toughness occurs when the cooling time ranges from 10 to 50 s compared with base metal toughness, and the toughness becomes even worse when the cooling time increases to 90 s or more. The MA (martensite-austenite) constituent is primary responsible for the low toughness of simulated CGHAZ with high values of cooling time because the large MA constituent reduces the crack initiation energy significantly. For crack propagation energy, the small effective grain size of lath martensite plays an important role in improving the crack propagation energy. By contrast, high misorientation packet boundary in coarse bainite seems to have few contributions to the improvement of the toughness because cleavage fracture micromechanism of coarse bainite is mainly controlled by crack initiation.

  4. Abnormal Grain Growth in the Heat Affected Zone of Friction Stir Welded Joint of 32Mn-7Cr-1Mo-0.3N Steel during Post-Weld Heat Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijun Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The abnormal grain growth in the heat affected zone of the friction stir welded joint of 32Mn-7Cr-1Mo-0.3N steel after post-weld heat treatment was confirmed by physical simulation experiments. The microstructural stability of the heat affected zone can be weakened by the welding thermal cycle. It was speculated to be due to the variation of the non-equilibrium segregation state of solute atoms at the grain boundaries. In addition, the pressure stress in the welding process can promote abnormal grain growth in the post-weld heat treatment.

  5. The effect of particle size on the heat affected zone during laser cladding of Ni-Cr-Si-B alloy on C45 carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanigawa, Daichi; Abe, Nobuyuki; Tsukamoto, Masahiro; Hayashi, Yoshihiko; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Tatsumi, Yoshihiro; Yoneyama, Mikio

    2018-02-01

    Laser cladding is one of the most useful surface coating methods for improving the wear and corrosion resistance of material surfaces. Although the heat input associated with laser cladding is small, a heat affected zone (HAZ) is still generated within the substrate because this is a thermal process. In order to reduce the area of the HAZ, the heat input must therefore be reduced. In the present study, we examined the effects of the powdered raw material particle size on the heat input and the extent of the HAZ during powder bed laser cladding. Ni-Cr-Si-B alloy layers were produced on C45 carbon steel substrates in conjunction with alloy powders having average particle sizes of 30, 40 and 55 μm, while measuring the HAZ area by optical microscopy. The heat input required for layer formation was found to decrease as smaller particles were used, such that the HAZ area was also reduced.

  6. Heat affected zone structure in welded joints of 15Kh1M1FL, 25Kh2NMFA and 20KhN2MFA steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levenberg, N.E.; German, S.I.; Fomina, O.P.; Netesa, E.M.; Tsaryuk, A.K.; Kornienko, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    Heat affected zone (HAZ) structure of thick-walled, nature joints of 15Kh1M1FL steel for block structure of power reactors and 25Kh2NMFA and 20KhN2MFA steels for rotors - is investigated. Multi-layer arc welding is performed under conditions being created for standard components of turbines. Thermokinetics diagrams of austenite decomposition are built, phase composition and character of the structure forming at HAZ in the process of welding with preheating are studied. It is shown that at HAZ in joints of the steels under consideration in the process of welding with preheating is formed a structure of a grained bainite which is uniform in its structure and phase composition. Small volumes of round and elongated forms consisting of martensite and residual austenite are distributed in α-solid solution of the bainite. The bainite of the HAZ in welded joints possesses high hardness and great stability in the process of tempering

  7. Microstructural Characteristics and m23c6 Precipitate Behavior of the Course-Grained Heat-Affected Zone of T23 Steel without Post-Weld Heat Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Hyeong Lee

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The microstructural characteristics of a simulated heat-affected zone (HAZ in SA213-T23 (2.25Cr-1.6W steel used for boiler tubes employed in thermal power plants were investigated using nital, alkaline sodium picrate, and Murakami’s etchants. In order to investigate the microstructure formation process of the HAZ in the welding process, simulated HAZ specimens were fabricated at intervals of 100 °C for peak temperatures between 950 and 1350 °C, and the microstructural features and precipitate behavior at various peak temperatures were observed. The alkaline-sodium-picrate-etched microstructures exhibited a black dot or band, which was not observed in the natal-etched microstructure. As the temperature increased from 950 to 1350 °C, the black dot and band became wider and thicker. Experimental analyses using an electron probe micro-analyzer, electron backscatter diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy revealed the appearance of austenite in the black dot region at a peak temperature of 950 °C; its amount increased up to a peak temperature of 1050 °C and thereafter decreased as the peak temperature further increased. The amount of M23C6 decreased with an increase in peak temperature. Based on these results, we investigated the behaviors of austenite and M23C6 as functions of the peak temperature.

  8. Phase transformation and impact properties in the experimentally simulated weld heat-affected zone of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Joonoh, E-mail: mjo99@kims.re.kr [Ferrous Alloy Department, Advanced Metallic Materials Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwondaero, Seongsangu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Tae-Ho [Ferrous Alloy Department, Advanced Metallic Materials Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwondaero, Seongsangu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Min-Ho [Ferrous Alloy Department, Advanced Metallic Materials Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwondaero, Seongsangu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seongdong-ku, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Min-Gu [Ferrous Alloy Department, Advanced Metallic Materials Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwondaero, Seongsangu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Material Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, 30 Jangjeon-Dong, Geumjeong-gu, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Heung Nam [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    In this work, the phase transformation and impact properties in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel are investigated. The HAZs were experimentally simulated using a Gleeble simulator. The base steel consisted of tempered martensite through normalizing at 1000 °C and tempering at 750 °C, while the HAZs consisted of martensite, δ-ferrite and a small volume of autotempered martensite. The impact properties using a Charpy V-notch impact test revealed that the HAZs showed poor impact properties due to the formation of martensite and δ-ferrite as compared with the base steel. In addition, the impact properties of the HAZs further deteriorated with an increase in the δ-ferrite fraction caused by increasing the peak temperature. The impact properties of the HAZs could be improved through the formation of tempered martensite after post weld heat treatment (PWHT), but they remained lower than that of the base steel because the δ-ferrite remained in the tempered HAZs.

  9. Heat Treatment and Properties of Iron and Steel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Digges, Thomas

    1966-01-01

    .... Chemical compositions, heat treatments, and some properties and uses are presented for structural steels, tool steels, stainless and heat-resisting steels, precipitation-hardenable stainless steels...

  10. Corrosion Effects on the Fatigue Crack Propagation of Giga-Grade Steel and its Heat Affected Zone in pH Buffer Solutions for Automotive Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H. S.

    2018-03-01

    Corrosion fatigue crack propagation test was conducted of giga-grade steel and its heat affected zone in pH buffer solutions, and the results were compared with model predictions. Pure corrosion effect on fatigue crack propagation, particularly, in corrosive environment was evaluated by means of the modified Forman equation. As shown in results, the average corrosion rate determined from the ratio of pure corrosion induced crack length to entire crack length under a cycle load were 0.11 and 0.37 for base metal and heat affected zone, respectively, with load ratio of 0.5, frequency of 0.5 and pH 10.0 environment. These results demonstrate new interpretation methodology for corrosion fatigue crack propagation enabling the pure corrosion effects on the behavior to be determined.

  11. Effects of Cu and Ni additions on the heat affected zone (HAZ) microstructure and mechanical properties of a C-Mn niobium microalloyed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ale, Ricardo Miranda; Rebello, Joao Marques A.; Charlier, Jacques

    1996-01-01

    The influence of small additions of Cu and Ni on the heat affected zone microstructure and mechanical properties, particularly toughness, of C-Mn microalloyed steel has been evaluated. Cu and Ni additions improved the toughness of both coarse grained region and coarse grained region reheated intercritically due to the formation of lower bainite and avoiding Nb precipitation hardening, respectively. With Cu and Ni additions the embrittlement of the coarse grained region reheated intercritically, due to MA constituent, is counterbalanced by the formation of fine ferrite recrystallized grains near the prior austenite grain boundaries and the stabilisation of austenite between ferrite laths. (author)

  12. Hydrogen effect on the properties of the heat affected zone metal of welded joints of quenchable steel within a hold-up period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amosov, V.A.; Borovushkin, I.V.; Pocheptsov, A.V.

    1976-01-01

    The work of failure of the heat-affected zone after welding changes non-monotonously with time: at first it increases, then decreases down to the minimum, and increases again. This is related to a simultaneous action of the 'rest' process of the tempered structure and hydrogen distribution in a weld joint. Hydrogen enters the heat-affected zone during the welding. This is seen from the fact that the level of the work of failure is different as soon as the welding is performed a content of hydrogen in the weld being different. Redistribution of hydrogen in a weld joint of the investigated steel with a ferrite weld in the process of ag is as follows. The initial concentration of hydrogen in the weld decreases monotonously with time; in the heat-affected zone near the melting boundary the total concentration of hydrogen increases and reaches the maximum and then gradually decreases. A decrease in the rate of loading reduces the work of failure of the weld joint in the heat-affected zone

  13. Effect of Welding Thermal Cycles on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Simulated Heat Affected Zone for a Weldox 1300 Ultra-High Strength Alloy Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Węglowski M. St.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the investigation of weldability of ultra-high strength steel has been presented. The thermal simulated samples were used to investigate the effect of welding cooling time t8/5 on microstructure and mechanical properties of heat affected zone (HAZ for a Weldox 1300 ultra-high strength steel. In the frame of these investigation the microstructure was studied by light and transmission electron microscopies. Mechanical properties of parent material were analysed by tensile, impact and hardness tests. In details the influence of cooling time in the range of 2,5 ÷ 300 sec. on hardness, impact toughness and microstructure of simulated HAZ was studied by using welding thermal simulation test. The microstructure of ultra-high strength steel is mainly composed of tempered martensite. The results show that the impact toughness and hardness decrease with increase of t8/5 under condition of a single thermal cycle in simulated HAZ. The increase of cooling time to 300 s causes that the microstructure consists of ferrite and bainite mixture. Lower hardness, for t8/5 ≥ 60 s indicated that low risk of cold cracking in HAZ for longer cooling time, exists.

  14. Hardening Embrittlement and Non-Hardening Embrittlement of Welding-Heat-Affected Zones in a Cr-Mo Low Alloy Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhao

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The embrittlement of heat affected zones (HAZs resulting from the welding of a P-doped 2.25Cr-1Mo steel was studied by the analysis of the fracture appearance transition temperatures (FATTs of the HAZs simulated under a heat input of 45 kJ/cm with different peak temperatures. The FATTs of the HAZs both with and without tempering increased with the rise of the peak temperature. However, the FATTs were apparently lower for the tempered HAZs. For the as-welded (untempered HAZs, the FATTs were mainly affected by residual stress, martensite/austenite (M/A islands, and bainite morphology. The observed embrittlement is a hardening embrittlement. On the other hand, the FATTs of the tempered HAZs were mainly affected by phosphorus grain boundary segregation, thereby causing a non-hardening embrittlement. The results demonstrate that the hardening embrittlement of the as-welded HAZs was more severe than the non-hardening embrittlement of the tempered HAZs. Consequently, a post-weld heat treatment should be carried out if possible so as to eliminate the hardening embrittlement.

  15. Construction of continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagram using Gleeble for coarse grained heat affected zone of SA106 grade B steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vimalan, G.; Muthupandi, V.; Ravichandran, G.

    2018-05-01

    A continuous cooling transformation diagram is constructed for simulated coarse grain heat affected zone (CGHAZ) of SA106 grade B carbon steel. Samples are heated to a peak temperature of 1200°C in the Gleeble thermo mechanical simulator and then cooled at different cooling rates varying from 0.1°C/s to 100°C/s. Microstructure of the specimens simulated at different cooling rates were characterised by optical microscopy and hardness was assessed by Vicker's hardness test and micro-hardness test. Transformation temperatures and the corresponding phase fields were identified from dilatometric curves and the same could be confirmed by correlating with the microstructures at room temperature. These data were used to construct the CCT diagram. Phase fields were found to have ferrite, pearlite, bainite and martensite or their combinations. With the help of this CCT diagram it is possible to predict the microstructure and hardness of coarse grain HAZ experiencing different cooling rates. The constructed CCT diagram becomes an important tool in evaluating the weldability of SA106 grade B carbon steel.

  16. Atom-Probe Tomographic Investigation of Austenite Stability and Carbide Precipitation in a TRIP-Assisted 10 Wt Pct Ni Steel and Its Weld Heat-Affected Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Divya; Seidman, David N.; Barrick, Erin J.; DuPont, John N.

    2018-04-01

    Newly developed low-carbon 10 wt pct Ni-Mo-Cr-V martensitic steels rely on the Ni-enriched, thermally stable austenite [formed via multistep intercritical Quench-Lamellarization-Tempering ( QLT)-treatment] for their superior mechanical properties, specifically ballistic resistance. Critical to the thermal stability of austenite is its composition, which can be severely affected in the weld heat-affected zones (HAZs) and thus needs investigations. This article represents the first study of the nanoscale redistributions of C, Ni, and Mn in single-pass HAZ microstructures of QLT-treated 10 wt pct Ni steels. Local compositions of Ni-rich regions (representative of austenite compositions) in the HAZs are determined using site-specific 3-D atom-probe tomography (APT). Martensite-start temperatures are then calculated for these compositions, employing the Ghosh-Olson thermodynamic and kinetics approach. These calculations predict that austenite (present at high temperatures) in the HAZs is susceptible to a martensitic transformation upon cooling to room temperature, unlike the austenite in the QLT-treated base-metal. While C in the QLT-treated base-metal is consumed primarily in MC and M2C-type carbide precipitates (M is Mo, Cr, V), its higher concentration in the Ni-rich regions in the HAZs indicates the dissolution of carbide precipitates, particularly M2C carbide precipitates. The role of M2C carbide precipitates and austenite stability is discussed in relation to the increase in microhardness values observed in the HAZs, relative to the QLT-treated base-metal. Insights gained from this research on austenite stability and carbide precipitation in the single-pass HAZ microstructures will assist in designing multiple weld cycles for these novel 10 wt pct Ni steels.

  17. Corrosion Cyclic Voltammetry of Two Types of Heat-Affected Zones (HAZs) of API-X100 Steel in Bicarbonate Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliyan, Faysal Fayez; Alfantazi, Akram

    2014-12-01

    This paper examined the electrochemical corrosion behavior and corrosion products of two types of heat-affected HAZs made from API-X100 steel. Cyclic voltammetry, with different scan rates and potential ranges at 10 cycles, was applied to analyze the interdependent corrosion reactions of cathodic reduction, anodic dissolution, passivation, and transpassivation. The HAZ cooled at 60 K/s, from a peak temperature of 1470 K (1197 °C) that was held for 15 seconds, exhibited better passivation and lower cathodic activity than the HAZ cooled at 10 K/s. Increasing bicarbonate concentration, from 0.05 and 0.2 to 0.6 M, increases the anodic activity and cathodic reduction, but accordingly protects the active surfaces and enhances passivation.

  18. Carbide precipitation in the heat affected zone of a GTA weld in 21-6-9 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, M.J.; Thorvaldson, W.G.

    1979-01-01

    Grain boundary precipitation was observed in a multipass GTA weld in 21-6-9 stainless steel. The precipitate was identified by electron diffraction as M 23 C 6 -type carbide. The presence of these carbide particles did not cause intergranular attack in standard corrosion tests

  19. Welding-induced local maximum residual stress in heat affected zone of low-carbon austenitic stainless steel with machined surface layer and its influential factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Shigetaka; Ihara, Ryohei; Kanamaru, Daisuke; Mochizuki, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effects of work-hardening and pre-existing stress in the machined surface layer of low-carbon austenitic stainless steel on the welding-induced residual stress were experimentally investigated through the use of weld specimens with three different surface layers; as-cutout, mechanically-polished and electrolytically-polished. The high tensile and compressive stresses exist in the work-hardened surface layer of the as-cutout and mechanically-polished specimens, respectively. Meanwhile, no stress and work-hardened surface layer exist in the electrolytically-polished specimen. TIG bead-on-plate welding under the same welding heat input conditions was performed to introduce the residual stress into these specimens. Using these welded specimens, the distributions of welding-induced residual stress were measured by the X-ray diffraction method. Similarly, the distributions of hardness in welds were estimated by the Vickers hardness test. And then, these distributions were compared with one another. Based on the results, the residual stress in the weld metal (WM) is completely unaffected by the machined surface layer because the work-hardened surface layer disappears through the processes of melting and solidification during welding. The local maximum longitudinal tensile residual stress in the heat affected zone (HAZ) depends on the work-hardening but not on the existing stress, regardless of whether tensile or compressive, in the machined surface layer before welding. At the base metal far from WM and HAZ, the residual stress is formed by the addition of the welding-induced residual stress to the pre-existing stress in the machined surface layer before welding. The features of the welding-induced residual stress in low-carbon austenitic stainless steel with the machined surface layer and their influential factors were thus clarified. (author)

  20. Microstructure and toughness in the zone affected by heat in welding of steel-alloy with 3,5% Ni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussinger, E.R.

    1982-01-01

    The relation of microstructures obtained at different levels of Heat Input - from 1,7 kJ/cm to 30,6 kJ/cm- to the toughness, measured by Charpy impact test is studied. The specimens submitted to impact test were heat treated in such a way to abtain some microstructures similar to those obtained at real HAZ, however with a greater homogeneity. The results of this work show the existence of an optimal Heat Input of 14 kJ/cm, which gave the greatest toughness. (E.G.) [pt

  1. Failures of tool steels after heat treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunez-Gonzalez, G.

    1990-01-01

    The main objective of the work was to determine the most common defects occuring in tool steels of the AISI D-2, S-1, 0-1 and W-2 series during thermal treatment. Defects were evaluated by metallographic analyses, a method used to determine and recognize micro structural defects and their origin in order to be able to eliminate and correct some of the stages that are caused by heat treatment. Results show a large number of defects due to irregularities during thermal heating such as excess or lack of temperature, heating time, and atmosphere, rectifying and handling in service and, to a lesser extent, poor design. In conclusion, with the results obtained for each of the thermal treatments it is necessary to define, particularly the values each of these variables should have since they affect the material properties. (Author)

  2. High toughness in the intercritically reheated coarse-grained (ICRCG) heat-affected zone (HAZ) of low carbon microalloyed steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jun, E-mail: hujunral@163.com [The State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Du, Lin-Xiu [The State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Wang, Jian-Jun [Institute of Materials Research, School of Material and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Xie, Hui; Gao, Cai-Ru [The State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Misra, R.D.K. [Laboratory for Excellence in Advanced Steel Research, Center for Structural and Functional Materials, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA 70504-4130 (United States)

    2014-01-10

    Motivated by the small lattice mismatch between ferrite and vanadium nitride (VN), we describe here the welding thermal cycle simulation that provides high toughness in the ICRCG HAZ of low carbon V–N steel. This unique behavior is attributed to the formation of ultra-fine grained ferrite along prior austenite grain boundaries generated by the first pass welding thermal cycle with high misorientation boundaries, where V(C, N) precipitates provide potential nucleation sites for ferrite, leading to extraordinary refinement of martensite/austenite (M/A) constituent. Nitrogen stimulates the precipitation behavior of V(C, N). The nucleation of high density of V(C, N) precipitates consumes carbon-content in the austenite, leading to decrease in the carbon-content in the M/A constituent, with consequent decrease in hardness. The increase in toughness is explained in terms of Griffith's crack propagation theory.

  3. High toughness in the intercritically reheated coarse-grained (ICRCG) heat-affected zone (HAZ) of low carbon microalloyed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Jun; Du, Lin-Xiu; Wang, Jian-Jun; Xie, Hui; Gao, Cai-Ru; Misra, R.D.K.

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by the small lattice mismatch between ferrite and vanadium nitride (VN), we describe here the welding thermal cycle simulation that provides high toughness in the ICRCG HAZ of low carbon V–N steel. This unique behavior is attributed to the formation of ultra-fine grained ferrite along prior austenite grain boundaries generated by the first pass welding thermal cycle with high misorientation boundaries, where V(C, N) precipitates provide potential nucleation sites for ferrite, leading to extraordinary refinement of martensite/austenite (M/A) constituent. Nitrogen stimulates the precipitation behavior of V(C, N). The nucleation of high density of V(C, N) precipitates consumes carbon-content in the austenite, leading to decrease in the carbon-content in the M/A constituent, with consequent decrease in hardness. The increase in toughness is explained in terms of Griffith's crack propagation theory

  4. Control of the development of residual stresses and heat affected zone (HAZ) microstructure during welding of low alloy steels and influence on stress relieve cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storesund, J.; Rui Wu; Sandstroem, R.; von Walden, E. [Swedish Inst. for Metals Research, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1990-12-31

    Creep resistant 1 Cr 0.5 Mo steels are frequently used as steam pipes at operating temperature of 450 degree C to 500 degrees C. Welded joints have been post weld heat treated (PWHT). The results show: - In fully refined microstructures close to the fusion boundary of the weldments a reduction of the grain size by a factor of 3-4 was measured. The impact transition temperature was up to 27 degree C lower for test series notched in the refined HAZ (Heat Affected Zone) than in the coarse grained HAZ of the as welded condition. The overlay heat treatments were not observed to significantly influence the hardness and the room temperature tensile properties of the weldments. - The influence of refinement on impact transition temperature (ITT) and upper shelf energy was beneficial. In the coarse grained HAZ, for which the ITT was significantly higher than for weld metal and base metal, the refinement resulted in a 30 degrees C lower value of the ITT. The influence of PWHT on impact properties was also studied. The PWHT raised the upper shelf energy greatly. The effect on the ITT was smaller than that of refinement. - For cross welds in the as-welded (AW) condition refinement improved the creep properties. After PWHT the creep ductility was significantly increased at the same as a considerable reduction of life was observed. At lower stresses the effects of refinement and especially PWHT were less pronounced. Beneficial influence of refinement in inhibiting the formation of creep cavitation was apparent regardless stress level in both AW and PWHT conditions. (K.A.E).

  5. Effect of welding thermal cycles on the structure and properties of simulated heat-affected zone areas in X10CrMoVNb9-1 (T91) steel at a state after 100,000 h of operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Łomozik, Mirosław, E-mail: miroslaw.lomozik@is.gliwice.pl [Instytut Spawalnictwa, Testing of Materials Weldability and Welded Constructions Department, 44-100 Gliwice, Bł. Czesława 16-18 (Poland); Hernas, Adam, E-mail: adam.hernas@polsl.pl [Silesian University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Engineering and Metallurgy, 40-019 Katowice, Krasińskiego 8 str. (Poland); Zeman, Marian L., E-mail: marian.zeman@is.gliwice.pl [Instytut Spawalnictwa, Testing of Materials Weldability and Welded Constructions Department, 44-100 Gliwice, Bł. Czesława 16-18 (Poland)

    2015-06-18

    The article presents results of structural tests (light, scanning electron and scanning transmission electron microscopy) of X10CrMoVNb9-1 (T91) creep-resisting steel after approximately 100,000 h of operation. It was ascertained that the parent metal of T91 steel is characterized by the microstructure of tempered martensite with M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide precipitates and few dispersive precipitates of MX-type niobium and vanadium carbonitrides. The most inconvenient change in T91 steel precipitate morphology due to long-term operation is the appearance of the Laves Fe{sub 2}Mo phase which along with M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide particles forms elongated blocks and conglomerates on grain boundaries. The article also presents results of tests related to the effect of simulated welding thermal cycles on selected properties of X10CrMoVNb9-1 (T91) grade steel at a state after approximately 100,000 h of operation. The tests involved the determination of the chemical composition of the steel tested as well as impact tests, hardness measurements and microscopic metallographic examination (based on light microscopy) of simulated heat-affected zone (HAZ) areas for a cooling time (t{sub 8/5}) restricted within a range between 3 s and 120 s, with and without heat treatment. The tests revealed that, among other results, hardness values of simulated HAZ areas in X10CrMoVNb9-1 (T91) steel do not guarantee cold crack safety of the steel at the state without additional heat treatment. It was also observed that simulated welding thermal cycles of cooling times t{sub 8/5}=3, 12, 60 and 120 s do not significantly affect the toughness and hardness of simulated HAZ areas of the steel tested.

  6. Effect of inter-critically reheating temperature on microstructure and properties of simulated inter-critically reheated coarse grained heat affected zone in X70 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Zhixiong; Kuzmikova, Lenka; Li, Huijun; Barbaro, Frank

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of the inter-critical reheating temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a coarse grained heat affected zone (CGHAZ) in an API 5L grade X70 pipeline steel seam weld. A Gleeble 3500 thermo-mechanical simulator was employed to duplicate particular weld thermal cycles in order to accurately assess specific regions of the weld HAZ. Detailed microstructural analysis, including investigation of the martensite–austenite (M–A) constituent, was performed using optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and selective etching techniques. It is shown that the fracture toughness of the CGHAZ is significantly reduced following exposure to a subsequent inter-critical thermal cycle. Fracture toughness gradually improves as the inter-critical temperature is increased, but does not return to the value of the original CGHAZ due to the presence of isolated large M–A particles and coarse microstructure. Significance of M–A particles to the HAZ fracture toughness is first related to the location of particles along prior austenite grain boundaries, followed by the size of individual M–A particles

  7. Creep deformation behavior of weld metal and heat affected zone on 316FR steel thick plate welded joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hongo, Hiromichi; Yamazaki, Masayoshi; Watanabe, Takashi; Kinugawa, Junichi; Tanabe, Tatsuhiko; Monma, Yoshio; Nakazawa, Takanori

    1999-01-01

    Using hot-rolled 316FR stainless plate (50 mm thick) and 16Cr-8Ni-2Mo filler wire, a narrow-gap welded joint was prepared by GTAW (gas tungsten arc welding) process. In addition to conventional round bar specimens of base metals and weld metal, full-thickness joint specimens were prepared for creep test. Creep tests were conducted at 550degC in order to examine creep deformation and rupture behavior in the weld metal of the welded joint. Creep strain distribution on the surface of the joint specimen was measured by moire interferometry. In the welded joint, creep strength of the weld metal zone apart from the surface was larger than that in the vicinity of the surface due to repeating heat cycles during welding. Creep strain and creep rate within the HAZ adjacent to the weld metal zone were smaller than those within the base metal zone. Creep rate of the weld metal zone in the welded joint was smaller than that of the weld metal specimen due to the restraint of the hardened HAZ adjacent to the zone. The full-thickness welded joint specimens showed longer lives than weld metal specimens, though the lives of the latter was shorter than those of the base metal (undermatching). In the full-thickness welded joint specimen, crack started from the last pass layer of the weld metal zone and fracture occurred at the zone. From the results mentioned above, in order to evaluate the creep properties of the welded joint correctly, it is necessary to conduct the creep test using the full-thickness welded joint specimen which includes the weakest zones of the weld metal, the front and back sides of the plate. (author)

  8. Advances in the heat treatment of steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, J.W. Jr.; Kim, J.I.; Syn, C.K.

    1978-06-01

    A number of important recent advances in the processing of steels have resulted from the sophisticated uses of heat treatment to tailor the microstructure of the steels so that desirable properties are established. These new heat treatments often involve the tempering or annealing of the steel to accompish a partial or complete reversion from martensite to austenite. The influence of these reversion heat treatments on the product microstructure and its properties may be systematically discussed in terms of the heat treating temperature in relation to the phase diagram. From this perspective, four characteristic heat treatments are defined: (1) normal tempering, (2) inter-critical tempering, (3) intercritical annealing, and (4) austenite reversion. The reactions occurring during each of these treatments are described and the nature and properties of typical product microstructures discussed, with specific reference to new commercial or laboratory steels having useful and exceptional properties

  9. Microstructural Evolution and Mechanical Properties of Simulated Heat-Affected Zones in Cast Precipitation-Hardened Stainless Steels 17-4 and 13-8+Mo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, Robert J.; DuPont, John N.

    2017-01-01

    Cast precipitation-hardened (PH) stainless steels 17-4 and 13-8+Mo are used in applications that require a combination of high strength and moderate corrosion resistance. Many such applications require fabrication and/or casting repair by fusion welding. The purpose of this work is to develop an understanding of microstructural evolution and resultant mechanical properties of these materials when subjected to weld thermal cycles. Samples of each material were subjected to heat-affected zone (HAZ) thermal cycles in the solution-treated and aged condition (S-A-W condition) and solution-treated condition with a postweld thermal cycle age (S-W-A condition). Dilatometry was used to establish the onset of various phase transformation temperatures. Light optical microscopy (LOM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) were used to characterize the microstructures, and comparisons were made to gas metal arc welds that were heat treated in the same conditions. Tensile testing was also performed. MatCalc thermodynamic and kinetic modeling software was used to predict the evolution of copper (Cu)-rich body center cubic precipitates in 17-4 and β-NiAl precipitates in 13-8+Mo. The yield strength was lower in the simulated HAZ samples of both materials prepared in the S-A-W condition when compared to their respective base metals. Samples prepared in the S-W-A condition had higher and more uniform yield strengths for both materials. Significant changes were observed in the matrix microstructure of various HAZ regions depending on the peak temperature, and these microstructural changes were interpreted with the aid of dilatometry results, LOM, SEM, and EDS. Despite these significant changes to the matrix microstructure, the changes in mechanical properties appear to be governed primarily by the precipitation behavior. The decrease in strength in the HAZ samples prepared in the S-A-W condition was attributed to the dissolution of precipitates

  10. Heat transfer coefficients during quenching of steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasan, H.S.; Jalil, J.M. [University of Technology, Department of Electromechanical Engineering, Baghdad (Iraq); Peet, M.J.; Bhadeshia, H.K.D.H. [University of Cambridge, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-15

    Heat transfer coefficients for quenching in water have been measured as a function of temperature using steel probes for a variety of iron alloys. The coefficients were derived from measured cooling curves combined with calculated heat-capacities. The resulting data were then used to calculate cooling curves using the finite volume method for a large steel sample and these curves have been demonstrated to be consistent with measured values for the large sample. Furthermore, by combining the estimated cooling curves with time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagrams it has been possible to predict the variation of hardness as a function of distance via the quench factor analysis. The work should prove useful in the heat treatment of the steels studied, some of which are in the development stage. (orig.)

  11. Comparison of hot ductility and stress corrosion cracking sensitivity of heat affected zone among type 304, type 316 and type 347 austenitic stainless steels for BWR core shroud and recirculation line piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Yoshihiko; Kayano, Rinzo; Azuma, Tukasa; Tanaka, Yasuhiko; Ishio, Kotaro; Sasaki, Tomo; Suzuki, Komei

    2005-01-01

    The present paper proposes the weld structure shroud made by the integrated type forging. The proposed structure can minimize the occurrence of SCC in the joint weld portion in the shroud. Furthermore, based on the measurement on EPR (Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation) ratio of simulated HAZ (Heat Affected Zone) which was made by giving double thermal cycles and plastic deformation to the material, the requirement of carbon content of less than 0.04 % is proposed for type 316 steel. The requirement proposed is the same restriction as that of KTA regel

  12. Metallurgical transformations of high strength low alloys steels 450 EMZ type II in the heat affected zone during multipass submerged arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Palma, R.; Suarez-Bermejo, J. C.; Vicario, F. J.; Munoz, A.

    2006-01-01

    A considerable number of crack tip opening displacement tests in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of multipass welds. performed in accordance with standards BS 5762 and EEMUA, are rejected since the crack is not inside the coarse grain region at 0.5 mm from the fusion border, as well as the quantity of the crack length in percentage, that the crack goes through the inter critical region instead of in the grain coarse region as it would correspond. This circumstance make advisable to carry out a metallographic study of he inter critical zone in the HAZ as well as the corresponding tests, in order analyze the inter critical region brittleness reasons. The study is performed on a HSLA 75 mm thick panel 450 EMZ type II, welded under a SAW process with heat input and welded parameters controlled, without any post weld heat treatment. (Author)

  13. Lowcost automated control for steel heat treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zambaldi, Edimilson; Magalhães, Ricardo R.; Barbosa, Bruno H.G.; Silva, Sandro P. da; Ferreira, Danton D.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Control the furnace temperature measured by thermocouple and adjusts it. • Activating the furnace resistors through Pulse Width Modulation. • Appling heat treatments to steels by a low-cost controller. - Abstract: The aim of this paper is to propose a low cost, automated furnace control system for the heat treatment of steel. We used an open source electronic prototyping platform to control the furnace temperature, thus reducing human interaction during the heat process. The platform can be adapted to non-controlled commercial furnaces, which are often used by small businesses. A Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) controller was implemented to regulate the furnace temperature based on a defined heat treatment cycle. The embedded system activates the furnace resistors through Pulse Width Modulation (PWM), allowing for control of electrical power supplied to the furnace. Hardening and tempering were performed on standard steel samples using a traditional method (visual inspection without temperature control) as well the embedded system with PID feedback control. The results show that the proposed system can reproduce an arbitrary heat treatment curve with accuracy and provide the desired final hardness as inferred through metallographic analysis. In addition, we observed a 6% saving in energy consumption using the proposed control system. Furthermore, the estimated cost to implement the system is 42% lower than a commercial controller model implemented in commercial furnaces.

  14. Effect of long term thermal ageing on the mechanical properties of ASTM A533B and A508 steels in the quenched and tempered and simulated heat affected zone conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druce, S.G.; Gage, G.; Jordan, G.

    1985-04-01

    Manganese-molybdenum-nickel steels are used commonly in the fabrication of critical components in the PWR primary circuit operating at temperatures up to 345 C for periods up to several hundred thousand hours. Demonstration of structural integrity throughout service life requires quantification of the effects of thermal ageing on mechanical properties. Thermal ageing in the temperature range 300 to 550 C for durations up to 2000 h was studied in quenched and tempered A533B plate and simulated heat-affected-zone (HAZ) microstructures in A533B and A508 materials. A combination of tensile, hardness and Charpy impact tests were used to assess changes in rheological and toughness related properties. Quantitative fractography and Auger spectroscopy were used to characterize associated changes in fracture mode and grain boundary composition.

  15. INTERWELD - European project to determine irradiation induced material changes in the heat affected zones of austenitic stainless steel welds that influence the stress corrosion behaviour in high-temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, A.; Schaaf, Bob van der; Castano, M.L.; Ohms, C.; Gavillet, D.; Dyck, S. van

    2003-01-01

    PWR and BWR RPV internals have experienced stress corrosion cracking in service. The objective of the INTERWELD project is to determine the radiation induced material changes that promote stress corrosion cracking in the heat affected zone of austenitic stainless steel welds. To achieve this goal, welds in austenitic stainless steel types AISI 304/347 have been fabricated, respectively. Stress-relief annealing was applied optionally. The pre-characterisation of both the as-welded and stress relieved material conditions comprises the examination of the weld residual stresses by the ring-core-technique and neutron diffraction, the degree of sensitisation by EPR, and the stress corrosion behaviour by SSRT testing in high-temperature water. The weldments will be irratiated to 2 neutron fluence levels and a postirradiation examination will determine micromechanical, microchemical and microstructural changes in the materials. In detail, the evolution of the residual stress levels and the stress corrosion behaviour after irradiation will be determined. Neutron diffraction will be utilized for the first time with respect to neutron irradiated material. In this paper, the current state of the project will be described and discussed. (orig.)

  16. Analysis of heat transfer in plain carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Heung Nam; Lee, Kyung Jong

    1999-01-01

    During cooling of steels, the heat transfer was controlled by radiation, convection, conduction and heat evolution from phase transformation. To analyze the heat transfer during cooling precisely, the material constants such as density, heat capacity and the heat evolved during transformation were obtained as functions of temperature and chemical composition for each phase observed in plain carbon steel using a thermodynamic analysis based on the sublattice model of Fe-C-Mn system. The results were applied to 0.049 wt% and 0.155 wt% carbon steels with an austenitic stainless steel as reference by developing a proper heat transfer governing equation. The equation was solved using the lumped system method. In addition, using a transformation dilatometer with adequate experimental conditions to clarify the individual heat transfer effect, the transformation heat evolved during cooling and the transformation behavior as well as the temperature change were observed. The predicted temperature profiles during cooling were well agreed with the measured ones

  17. Ghost microstructure evolution and identification in the coarse grain heat affected zone of 2.25Cr-1Mo-V-Ti steel using tint etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyongwoon [Corporate R& D Institute, Doosan Heavy Industries & Construction,Gwigok-dong, Gyeongsangnam-do Seongsan-gu, Changwon-si 642-792 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seonghyeong; Na, Hyesung [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, San 30 Jangjeon-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Chungyun, E-mail: kangcy@pusan.ac.kr [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, San 30 Jangjeon-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Microstructural characteristics of the CGHAZ (coarse grained heat affected zone) made of the 2.25Cr-1Mo-V-Ti material for the thermal power plant boiler tube were discussed using the technique of tint etching. To conduct the micro structural characterization, the sample on which CGHAZ was produced by using a high temperature thermal cycle simulator, Gleeble 3500 equipment was used for comparative analyses using the existing Nital etching (ASTM E407-74) and the alkaline etching (ASTM E40785). The latter was used to observe a specific phase. For the microstructure on which the alkaline etching was experimented, the shape of a black strip (Ghost microstructure) in a few microns was observed, which was not observed from the Nital etching. It was found from the phase identifications based EPMA, EBSD and TEM experiments that the image of the black strip in a few microns represented the alpha phase in which C, Cr and Mo became segregated. In addition, it was verified that austenite and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} phase were present around the segregated zone. Based on such results, the mechanism by which the image of the black strip in a few microns was formed at the CGHAZ. In this study, we have investigated the mechanism of the appeared black strip in the CGHAZ. - Highlights: •Ghost microstructure was observed which was not observed from the nital etching. •Ghost microstructure has high concentrations of carbon and molybdenum than matrix. •Schematic illustration proposed of why Ghost microstructure was generated. •Ghost microstructure caused by partial dissolution of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitation.

  18. Corrosion protection of steel in ammonia/water heat pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfeld, Florian B.; Sun, Zhaoli

    2003-10-14

    Corrosion of steel surfaces in a heat pump is inhibited by adding a rare earth metal salt to the heat pump's ammonia/water working fluid. In preferred embodiments, the rare earth metal salt includes cerium, and the steel surfaces are cerated to enhance the corrosion-inhibiting effects.

  19. Heat treatment effect on impact strength of 40Kh steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golubev, V.K.; Novikov, S.A.; Sobolev, Yu.S.; Yukina, N.A.

    1984-01-01

    The paper presents results of studies on the effect of heat treatment on strength and pattern of 40Kh steel impact failure. Loading levels corresponding to macroscopic spalling microdamage initiation in the material are determined for three initial states. Metallographic study on the spalling failure pattern for 40Kh steel in different initial states and data on microhardness measurement are presented

  20. Effect of Al content on critical CTOD properties in heat affected zone of C-Mn microalloyed steel. Teitanso teigokin koyosetsu netsu eikyobu no genkai CTOD tokusei ni oyobosu Al ganyuryo no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukada, Y.; Komizo, Y. (Sumitomo Metal Industries Ltd., Osaka (Japan))

    1992-08-05

    Two types of molten alloys specimen with a base of 0.10%C-0.20%Si-1.40%Mn-0.01%Ti system and varied Al content, were studied. The critical crack tip opening displacement(CTOD) properties in heat effected zone(HAZ) of extreme low Al content steel was stable at. extremely low temperature and there was no formation of M-A. Fine ferrite has a texture of [alpha] main body and it has been thought that the the change in the CTOD properties with the variation in Al content has been due to the difference in the texture. In case of Al content steel plate, the interfacial energy has been decreased due to excessive carbon concentration at [gamma] /[alpha] interface, M-A formation has been easier by the suppression of [alpha] transformation. In case of extremely low Al content steel plate, [alpha] transformation has been promoted and cementite deposition has been estimated from a small amount. of left [gamma] of extremely high carbon concentration. As for SH-CCT diagram of extremely low Al content steel plate, compare to Al content steel plate, [alpha] noze has shifted toward shorter time and formation of [alpha] has been easier within the normal welding cooling rate, and microstructures of [alpha] texture have formed in HAZ. 21 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Simulation of Structural Transformations in Heating of Alloy Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurkin, A. S.; Makarov, E. L.; Kurkin, A. B.; Rubtsov, D. E.; Rubtsov, M. E.

    2017-07-01

    Amathematical model for computer simulation of structural transformations in an alloy steel under the conditions of the thermal cycle of multipass welding is presented. The austenitic transformation under the heating and the processes of decomposition of bainite and martensite under repeated heating are considered. Amethod for determining the necessary temperature-time parameters of the model from the chemical composition of the steel is described. Published data are processed and the results used to derive regression models of the temperature ranges and parameters of transformation kinetics of alloy steels. The method developed is used in computer simulation of the process of multipass welding of pipes by the finite-element method.

  2. Larson-Miller Constant of Heat-Resistant Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Manabu; Abe, Fujio; Shiba, Kiyoyuki; Sakasegawa, Hideo; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu

    2013-06-01

    Long-term rupture data for 79 types of heat-resistant steels including carbon steel, low-alloy steel, high-alloy steel, austenitic stainless steel, and superalloy were analyzed, and a constant for the Larson-Miller (LM) parameter was obtained in the current study for each material. The calculated LM constant, C, is approximately 20 for heat-resistant steels and alloys except for high-alloy martensitic steels with high creep resistance, for which C ≈ 30 . The apparent activation energy was also calculated, and the LM constant was found to be proportional to the apparent activation energy with a high correlation coefficient, which suggests that the LM constant is a material constant possessing intrinsic physical meaning. The contribution of the entropy change to the LM constant is not small, especially for several martensitic steels with large values of C. Deformation of such martensitic steels should accompany a large entropy change of 10 times the gas constant at least, besides the entropy change due to self-diffusion.

  3. Effect of heat input on dissimilar welds of ultra high strength steel and duplex stainless steel: Microstructural and compositional analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasalloti, H., E-mail: hamed.tasalloti.kashani@student.lut.fi; Kah, P., E-mail: paul.kah@lut.fi; Martikainen, J., E-mail: jukka.martikainen@lut.fi

    2017-01-15

    The effect of heat input on the microstructure and compositional heterogeneity of welds of direct-quenched ultra high strength steel (Optim 960 QC) and duplex stainless steel (UNS S32205) was studied. The dissimilar welds were made using GMAW with a fully austenitic filler wire. In addition to grain coarsening in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the ferritic side, it was found that an increase in heat input correlatively increased the proportional volume of bainitic to martensitic phases. Coarse ferritic grains were observed in the duplex HAZ. Higher heat input, however, had a beneficial effect on the nucleation of austenite in the HAZ. Heat input had a regulatory effect on grain growth within the austenitic weld and more favorable equiaxed austenite was obtained with higher heat input. On the ferritic side of the welds, macrosegregation in the form of a martensitic intermediate zone was observed for all the cooling rates studied. However, on the duplex side, macrosegregation in the fusion boundary was only noticed with higher cooling rates. Microstructural observations and compositional analysis suggest that higher heat input could be beneficial for the structural integrity of the weld despite higher heat input increasing the extent of adverse coarse grains in the HAZ, especially on the ferritic side. - Highlights: •The effect of heat input on dissimilar welds of UHSS and DSS was studied. •Transmutation of the microstructure was discussed in detail. •The influence of heat input on compositional heterogeneity of welds was described. •Higher heat input enhanced bainitic transformation on the ferritic side. •Macrosegregation was affected by the amount of heat input on the DSS side.

  4. The heat treatment of steel. A mathematical control problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoemberg, Dietmar; Kern, Daniela

    2009-07-21

    The goal of this paper is to show how the heat treatment of steel can be modelled in terms of a mathematical optimal control problem. The approach is applied to laser surface hardening and the cooling of a steel slab including mechanical effects. Finally, it is shown how the results can be utilized in industrial practice by a coupling with machine-based control. (orig.)

  5. Desensitization of stainless steels by laser surface heat-treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakao, Yoshikuni; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi

    1987-11-01

    Laser heating was applied for the desensitization heat-treatment of the surface layer in the sensitized HAZ of Type 304 stainless steel. The degree of sensitization was examined by EPR technique and the 10 % oxalic acid electrolytic etch test. The CO/sub 2/ laser with maximum power of 1.5 kW was used for heat-treatment. Time-Temperature-Desensitization diagram (TTDS diagram) for sensitized Type 304 stainless steels were developed by calculation assuming the chromium diffusion control for desensitization which might occur when the chromium depleted zone was healed up due to dissolution of chromium carbide and chromium diffusion from the matrix being heated at the solution annealing temperatures. TTDS diagrams calculated agree fairly well with ones determined by corrosion tests. Laser irradiation conditions (e.g., Laser power, beam diameter and traveling velocity) required for desensitization of sensitized Type 304 stainless steels were calculated using additivity rule from the TTDS diagram calculated and theoretical thermal curve of laser heating derived from the heat conduction theory. After laser beam irradiated under an optimum condition predicted by calculation, the sensitized HAZ of Type 304 stainless steel restored complete resistance to intergranular corrosion.

  6. Heating temperature effect on ferritic grain size of rotor steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheremnykh, V.G.; Derevyankin, E.V.; Sakulin, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    The heating temperature effect on ferritic grain size of two steels 13Kh1M1FA and 25Kh1M1FA is evaluated. It is shown that exposure time increase at heating temperatures below 1000 deg C up to 10h changes but slightly the size of the Cr-Mo-V ferritic grain of rotor steel cooled with 25 deg C/h rate. Heating up to 1000 deg C and above leads to substantial ferritic grain growth. The kinetics of ferritic grain growth is determined by the behaviour of phases controlling the austenitic grain growth, such as carbonitrides VCsub(0.14)Nsub(0.78) in 13Kh1M1FA steel and VCsub(0.18)Nsub(0.72) in 25Kh1M1FA steel. Reduction of carbon and alloying elements content in steel composition observed at the liquation over rotor length leads to a certain decrease of ferritic grain resistance to super heating

  7. Effect of heat treatment on the characteristics of tool steel deposited by the directed energy deposition process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun Seok; Lee, Min-Gyu; Cho, Yong-Jae; Sung, Ji Hyun; Jeong, Myeong-Sik; Lee, Sang-Kon; Choi, Yong-Jin; Kim, Da Hye

    2016-01-01

    The directed energy deposition process has been mainly applied to re-work and the restoration of damaged steel. Differences in material properties between the base and the newly deposited materials are unavoidable, which may affect the mechanical properties and durability of the part. We investigated the effect of heat treatment on the characteristics of tool steel deposited by the DED process. We prepared general tool steel materials of H13 and D2 that were deposited onto heat-treated substrates of H13 and D2, respectively, using a direct metal tooling process. The hardness and microstructure of the deposited steel before and after heat treatment were investigated. The hardness of the deposited H13 steel was higher than that of wrought H13 steel substrate, while that of the deposited D2 was lower than that of wrought D2. The evolution of the microstructures by deposition and heat treatment varied depending on the materials. In particular, the microstructure of the deposited D2 steel after heat treatment consisted of fine carbides in tempered martensite and it is expected that the deposited D2 steel will have isotropic properties and high hardness after heat treatment.

  8. Effect of Heat Input on Geometry of Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Bead on Low Carbon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Manas Kumar; Hazra, Ritesh; Mondal, Ajit; Das, Santanu

    2018-05-01

    Among different weld cladding processes, gas metal arc welding (GMAW) cladding becomes a cost effective, user friendly, versatile method for protecting the surface of relatively lower grade structural steels from corrosion and/or erosion wear by depositing high grade stainless steels onto them. The quality of cladding largely depends upon the bead geometry of the weldment deposited. Weld bead geometry parameters, like bead width, reinforcement height, depth of penetration, and ratios like reinforcement form factor (RFF) and penetration shape factor (PSF) determine the quality of the weld bead geometry. Various process parameters of gas metal arc welding like heat input, current, voltage, arc travel speed, mode of metal transfer, etc. influence formation of bead geometry. In the current experimental investigation, austenite stainless steel (316) weld beads are formed on low alloy structural steel (E350) by GMAW using 100% CO2 as the shielding gas. Different combinations of current, voltage and arc travel speed are chosen so that heat input increases from 0.35 to 0.75 kJ/mm. Nine number of weld beads are deposited and replicated twice. The observations show that weld bead width increases linearly with increase in heat input, whereas reinforcement height and depth of penetration do not increase with increase in heat input. Regression analysis is done to establish the relationship between heat input and different geometrical parameters of weld bead. The regression models developed agrees well with the experimental data. Within the domain of the present experiment, it is observed that at higher heat input, the weld bead gets wider having little change in penetration and reinforcement; therefore, higher heat input may be recommended for austenitic stainless steel cladding on low alloy steel.

  9. Welding of heat-resistant 20% Cr-5% Al steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tusek, J.; Arbi, D.; Kosmac, A.; Nartnik, U.

    2002-01-01

    The paper treats welding of heat-resistant ferritic stainless steels alloyed with approximately 20% Cr and 5% Al. The major part of the paper is dedicated to welding of 20% Cr-5% Al steel with 3 mm in thickness. Welding was carried out with five different welding processes, i. e., manual metal-arc, MIG, TIG, plasma arc, and laser beam welding processes, using a filler material and using no filler material, respectively. The welded joints obtained were subjected to mechanical tests and the analysis of microstructure in the weld metal and the transition zone. The investigations conducted showed that heat-resistant ferritic stainless 20% Cr-5% Al steel can be welded with fusion welding processes using a Ni-based filler material. (orig.)

  10. Grain Refinement of Low Carbon Martensitic Steel by Heat Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Kolebina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The low-carbon steels have good corrosion and technological properties. Hot deformation is the main operation in manufacturing the parts from these steels. So one of the important properties of the material is a property of plasticity. The grain size significantly influences on the ductility properties of steel. The grain size of steel depends on the chemical composition of the crystallization process, heat treatment, and steel machining. There are plenty methods to have grain refinement. However, taking into account the large size of the blanks for the hydro turbine parts, the thermal cycling is an advanced method of the grain refinement adaptable to streamlined production. This work experimentally studies the heat treatment influence on the microstructure of the low-carbon 01X13N04 alloy steel and proposes the optimal regime of the heat treatment to provide a significantly reduced grain size. L.M. Kleiner, N.P. Melnikov and I.N. Bogachyova’s works focused both on the microstructure of these steels and on the influence of its parameters on the mechanical properties. The paper focuses mainly on defining an optimal regime of the heat treatment for grain refinement. The phase composition of steel and temperature of phase transformation were defined by the theoretical analysis. The dilatometric experiment was done to determine the precise temperature of the phase transformations. The analysis and comparison of the experimental data with theoretical data and earlier studies have shown that the initial sample has residual stress and chemical heterogeneity. The influence of the heat treatment on the grain size was studied in detail. It is found that at temperatures above 950 ° C there is a high grain growth. It is determined that the optimal number of cycles is two. The postincreasing number of cycles does not cause further reducing grain size because of the accumulative recrystallization process. Based on the results obtained, the thermal cycling

  11. Thermoelectric System Absorbing Waste Heat from a Steel Ladle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Baiyi; Meng, Xiangning; Zhu, Miaoyong; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2018-06-01

    China's iron and steel industry has made great progress in energy savings and emission reductions with the application of many waste heat recovery technologies. However, most of the medium and low temperature waste heat and radiant waste heat has not been effectively utilized. This paper proposes a thermoelectric system that generates electricity by absorbing the radiant heat from the surface of steel ladles in a steel plant. The thermoelectric behavior of modules in this system is analyzed by a numerical simulation method. The effects of external resistance and module structure on thermoelectric performance are also discussed in the temperature range of the wall surface of a steel ladle. The results show that the wall temperature has a significant influence on the thermoelectric behavior of the module, so its uniformity and stability should be considered in practical application. The ratio of the optimum external resistance to the internal resistance of the thermoelectric module is in the range of 1.6-2.0, which indicates the importance of external load optimization for a given thermoelectric system. In addition, the output power and the conversion efficiency of the module can be significantly improved by increasing the length of the thermoelectric legs and adopting a double-layer structure. Finally, through the optimization of external resistance and structure, the power output can reach 83-304 W/m2. This system is shown to be a promising approach for energy recovery.

  12. Laser heat treatment of welds for various stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dontu, O.; Ganatsios, S.; Alexandrescu, N.; Predescu, C.

    2008-03-01

    The paper presents a study concerning the post - weld heat treatment of a duplex stainless steel. Welded joint samples were surface - treated using the same laser source adopted during welding in order to counterbalance the excess of ferrite formed in the welding process.

  13. Development of stress correction formulae for heat formed steel plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Kyun Lim

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The heating process such as line heating, triangular heating and so on is widely used in plate forming of shell plates found in bow and stern area of outer shell in a ship. Local shrinkage during heating process is main physical phenomenon used in plate forming process. As it is well appreciated, the heated plate undergoes the change in material and mechanical properties around heated area due to the harsh thermal process. It is, therefore, important to investigate the changes of physical and mechanical properties due to heating process in order to use them plate the design stage of shell plates. This study is concerned with the development of formula of plastic hardening constitutive equation for steel plate on which line heating is applied. In this study the stress correction formula for the heated plate has been developed based on the numerical simulation of tension test with varying plate thickness and heating speed through the regression analysis of multiple variable case. It has been seen the developed formula shows very good agreement with results of numerical simulation. This paper ends with usefulness of the present formula in examining the structural characteristic of ship's hull. Keywords: Heat input, Heat transfer analysis, Line heating, Shell plate, Stress correction, Thermo-elasto-plastic analysis

  14. Development of High Heat Input Welding Offshore Steel as Normalized Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei; Qin, Xiaomei

    The heavy plate used for offshore structure is one of the important strategic products. In recent years, there is an increasing demand for heavy shipbuilding steel plate with excellent weldability in high heat input welding. During the thermal cycle, the microstructure of the heat affected zone (HAZ) of plates was damaged, and this markedly reduced toughness of HAZ. So, how to improve the toughness of HAZ has been a key subject in the fields of steel research. Oxide metallurgy is considered as an effective way to improve toughness of HAZ, because it could be used to retard grain growth by fine particles, which are stable at the high temperature.The high strength steel plate, which satisfies the low temperature specification, has been applied to offshore structure. Excellent properties of the plates and welded joints were obtained by oxide metallurgy technology, latest controlled rolling and accelerated cooling technology using Ultra-Fast Cooling (an on-line accelerated cooling system). The 355MPa-grade high strength steel plates with normalizing condition were obtained, and the steels have excellent weldability with heat input energy of 79 287kJ/cm, and the nil ductility transition (NDT) temperature was -70°C, which can satisfy the construction of offshore structure in cold regions.

  15. Effect of heat treatment on carbon steel pipe welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Harun.

    1987-01-01

    The heat treatment to improve the altered properties of carbon steel pipe welds is described. Pipe critical components in oil, gasification and nuclear reactor plants require adequate room temperature toughness and high strength at both room and moderately elevated temperatures. Microstructure and microhardness across the welds were changed markedly by the welding process and heat treatment. The presentation of hardness fluctuation in the welds can produce premature failure. A number of heat treatments are suggested to improve the properties of the welds. (author) 8 figs., 5 refs

  16. Estimation of work capacity of welded mounting joints of pipelines of heat resisting steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorynin, I.V.; Ignatov, V.A.; Timofeev, B.T.; Blyumin, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    The analysis of a work capacity of circular welds made for the Dsub(y)850 pipeline connection with high pressure vessels of heat resisting steel of the 15Kh1NMFA type has been carried out on the base of test results with small samples and real units. Welds were performed using the manual electric arc welding without the following heat treatment. It has been shown that residual stresses in such welds do not produce an essential effect on the resistance of weld metal and heat affected zone on the formation and developments of cracks

  17. Studying microstructure of heat resistant steel deoxidized by barium ferrosilicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Z. Issagulov

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper examined the nature and distribution of non-metallic inclusions in the heat-resistant steel 12H1MF (0,12 % С, 1 % Сr, 0,5 - 0,6 Mo, 0,5 % V, ferrosilicobarim. As a reference, used by steel, deoxidized silicon. Melting was carried out in a laboratory, research-metallic inclusions, their shape and distribution, pollution index were studied according to conventional methods. Studies have shown that ferrosilicobarim deoxidation in an amount of 0,1 - 0,2 %, reduce the overall pollution index of non-metallic inclusions and change the nature of their distribution.

  18. The Development and Microstructure Analysis of High Strength Steel Plate NVE36 for Large Heat Input Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhang; Liangfa, Xie; Ming, Wei; Jianli, Li

    In the shipbuilding industry, the welding efficiency of the ship plate not only has a great effect on the construction cost of the ship, but also affects the construction speed and determines the delivery cycle. The steel plate used for large heat input welding was developed sufficiently. In this paper, the composition of the steel with a small amount of Nb, Ti and large amount of Mn had been designed in micro-alloyed route. The content of C and the carbon equivalent were also designed to a low level. The technology of oxide metallurgy was used during the smelting process of the steel. The rolling technology of TMCP was controlled at a low rolling temperature and ultra-fast cooling technology was used, for the purpose of controlling the transformation of the microstructure. The microstructure of the steel plate was controlled to be the mixed microstructure of low carbon bainite and ferrite. Large amount of oxide particles dispersed in the microstructure of steel, which had a positive effects on the mechanical property and welding performance of the steel. The mechanical property of the steel plate was excellent and the value of longitudinal Akv at -60 °C is more than 200 J. The toughness of WM and HAZ were excellent after the steel plate was welded with a large heat input of 100-250 kJ/cm. The steel plate processed by mentioned above can meet the requirement of large heat input welding.

  19. Survey of postirradiation heat treatment as a means to mitigate radiation embrittlement of reactor vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    Nuclear-radiation service typically produces a progressive reduction in the notch ductility of low-alloy steels. The reduction is manifested by a decrease in Charpy-V (Csub(v)) upper-shelf energy level and by an elevation in temperature of the ductile-to-brittle transition. Post irradiation heat treatment (annealing) is being investigated as a method for the reversal of these detrimental radiation effects for reactor-vessel steels. This study was undertaken to analyze factors which could affect annealing response, report data available to qualify suspected influences on annealing, and summarize experimental results generated for many commercially produced reactor materials and companion materials produced in the laboratory

  20. Influence of heat treatment on corrosive resistance of concrete steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woldan, A.; Suliga, I.; Kusinski, J.; Jazowy, R.

    1998-01-01

    The reinforcing bars are essential elements of ferro-concrete structures. During the building structure service the reinforcing bars should co-operate with surrounding concrete. Any bonding defects as well as corrosion induced strength reduction may result in construction failure. The reinforcing steel working environment is determined by concrete chemical and phase composition and surrounding environmental properties. The aggressive corrosive activity of the letter implies necessity of effective ways development to protect elements against corrosion. The effect of heat treatment, increased Si content in steel on corrosion resistance of reinforcing steel in concrete was studied in the current work. Corrosion tests and metallographic examinations proved a positive influence of hardening and Si enrichment on corrosion resistance of reinforcing bars in ferro-concrete structures. (author)

  1. Structural steels for power generating equipment and heat and chemical heat treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astaf'ev, A.A.

    1979-01-01

    Development of structural steels for power generating equipment and for reactor engineering, in particular, is elucidated. Noted is utilization of the 15Kh2NMFA steels for the WWER-1000 reactor vessels, the 10GN2MFA steels for steam generators, pressurizers, vessels of the automatic emergency shut down and safety system; the 00Kh12N3DL steel for cast pump vessels and main locking bars. The recommendations on heat treatment of big forgings, for instance, ensuring the necessary complex of mechanical properties are given. Diffusion chromizing with subsequent nitriding of austenitic steels which increase durability of the components in BN reactors more than 4 times, is practised on a large scale

  2. Ultrasonic evaluation of heat treatment for stress relief in steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittencourt, Marcelo de S.Q.; Lamy, Carlos A.; Goncalves Filho, Orlando J.A.; Payao Filho, Joao da C.

    2000-01-01

    Residual stresses in materials arise due to the manufacturing processes. As a consequence, in the nuclear area some components must suffer a stress relief treatment according to strict criteria. Although these treatments are carefully carried on, concern with nuclear safety is constantly growing. This work proposes a nondestructive ultrasonic method to guarantee the efficiency of the heat treatment. It was used a short peened steel plate with tensile and compressive stresses which was submitted to a stress relief treatment. The results show that the proposed ultrasonic method could be used to confirm the efficiency of the stress relief heat treatment. (author)

  3. Effects of heat input on mechanical properties of metal inert gas welded 1.6 mm thick galvanized steel sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafiqul, M I; Ishak, M; Rahman, M M

    2012-01-01

    It is usually a lot easier and less expensive to galvanize steel before it is welded into useful products. Galvanizing afterwards is almost impossible. In this research work, Galvanized Steel was welded by using the ER 308L stainless steel filler material. This work was done to find out an alternative way of welding and investigate the effects of heat input on the mechanical properties of butt welded joints of Galvanized Steel. A 13.7 kW maximum capacity MIG welding machine was used to join 1.6 mm thick sheet of galvanized steel with V groove and no gap between mm. Heat inputs was gradually increased from 21.06 to 25.07 joules/mm in this study. The result shows almost macro defects free welding and with increasing heat input the ultimate tensile strength and welding efficiency decrease. The Vickers hardness also decreases at HAZ with increasing heat input and for each individual specimen; hardness was lowest in heat affected zone (HAZ), intermediate in base metal and maximum in welded zone. The fracture for all specimens was in the heat affected zone while testing in the universal testing machine.

  4. Effects of heat input on mechanical properties of metal inert gas welded 1.6 mm thick galvanized steel sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiqul, M. I.; Ishak, M.; Rahman, M. M.

    2012-09-01

    It is usually a lot easier and less expensive to galvanize steel before it is welded into useful products. Galvanizing afterwards is almost impossible. In this research work, Galvanized Steel was welded by using the ER 308L stainless steel filler material. This work was done to find out an alternative way of welding and investigate the effects of heat input on the mechanical properties of butt welded joints of Galvanized Steel. A 13.7 kW maximum capacity MIG welding machine was used to join 1.6 mm thick sheet of galvanized steel with V groove and no gap between mm. Heat inputs was gradually increased from 21.06 to 25.07 joules/mm in this study. The result shows almost macro defects free welding and with increasing heat input the ultimate tensile strength and welding efficiency decrease. The Vickers hardness also decreases at HAZ with increasing heat input and for each individual specimen; hardness was lowest in heat affected zone (HAZ), intermediate in base metal and maximum in welded zone. The fracture for all specimens was in the heat affected zone while testing in the universal testing machine.

  5. Effect of heat treatment regime on structural lamination in ferritic-austenitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sizov, R.A.; Zakharova, M.I.; Novikov, I.I.; Bannykh, O.A.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of preliminary thermal treatment on lamination and viscosity of EhP-53 and KO-3 steels after durable aging at the temperature of 350 is studied. It is shown that preliminary heat treatment considerably affects lamination processes in the result of aging of 0Kh18G8N2T steel. The lowest rate of lamination and higher impact strength after aging at 350 deg C for 4500 hours corresponds to the following heat treatment: 10 hour aging at 650 deg C with cooling in the air, then quenching in water from 950 deg C after aging for 30 min and the following tempering (650 deg C, 5 hours). Unlike the 0Kh18G8N2T steel, lamination parameters of steel 0Kh22N6T practically do not change after the application of heat treatment. Nevertherless, taking into account results of impact strength, it is advisable to have thermal treatment according to the regime: quenching in water at 950 deg C after aging for 30 min

  6. Efeito da energia de soldagem sobre a microestrutura e propriedades mecânicas da zona afetada pelo calor de juntas de aço inoxidável duplex Effect of the welding heat input on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the heat affected zone of multipass welded joints of duplex stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everton Barbosa Nunes

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho é analisar a influência da energia de soldagem na zona afetada pelo calor (ZAC, de juntas soldadas do aço inoxidável duplex UNS S31803. Foram realizadas soldagens com eletrodo revestido AWS E2209-17 em junta tipo V de Aço Inoxidável Duplex UNS S31803, com dois níveis de energia (15 e 20 kJ/cm. A condição soldada com energia mais elevada apresentou uma ZAC mais extensa e microestrutura mais grosseira nos passes de acabamento. No entanto, nos passes de enchimento e de raiz, as ZAC's destas regiões foram mais refinadas e menos extensa. Em relação à microdureza, a condição soldada com energia de 15 kJ/cm apresentou níveis menores. Em relação à tenacidade, não foi verificada diferença significativa nos resultados.The aim this work is to evaluate the influence of multipass welding heat input on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the heat affected zone (HAZ of UNS S31803 duplex stainless steel multipass welded joints. The shielded metal arc welding process using as filler metal the AWS E2209-17 covered electrode were employed had been carried through V joint groove UNS S31803 DSS, so that two levels of energy (15 and 20 kJ/cm had been used in this experiment. The condition welded with higher energy higher a HAZ extensive and coarser microstructure in the finishing passes. On the other hand, in the wadding passes and root pass, the HAZ this region was more refined and less extensive. In respect of microhardness, the condition welded with energy of 15 kJ/cm got lower levels. In relation to toughness, it was not observed significant differences.

  7. Effect of heat treatment and irradiation temperature on impact behavior of irradiated reduced-activation ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    Charpy tests were conducted on eight normalized-and-tempered reduced-activation ferritic steels irradiated in two different normalized conditions. Irradiation was conducted in the Fast Flux Test Facility at 393 C to ∼14 dpa on steels with 2.25, 5, 9, and 12% Cr (0.1% C) with varying amounts of W, V, and Ta. The different normalization treatments involved changing the cooling rate after austenitization. The faster cooling rate produced 100% bainite in the 2.25 Cr steels, compared to duplex structures of bainite and polygonal ferrite for the slower cooling rate. For both cooling rates, martensite formed in the 5 and 9% Cr steels, and martensite with ∼25% δ-ferrite formed in the 12% Cr steel. Irradiation caused an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and a decrease in the upper-shelf energy. The difference in microstructure in the low-chromium steels due to the different heat treatments had little effect on properties. For the high-chromium martensitic steels, only the 5 Cr steel was affected by heat treatment. When the results at 393 C were compared with previous results at 365 C, all but a 5 Cr and a 9 Cr steel showed the expected decrease in the shift in DBTT with increasing temperature

  8. Effect of Microstructure on the Wear Behavior of Heat Treated SS-304 Stainless Steel

    OpenAIRE

    S. Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Sliding wear characteristics of some heat treated SS-304 stainless steel against EN-8 steel in dry condition have been studied in the present experimental work. Samples of SS-304 stainless steel have been heated in a muffle furnace in desired temperature and allowed to dwell for two hours. The heated specimen are then cooled in different media namely inside the furnace, open air, cutting grade oil (grade 44) and water at room temperature to obtain different grades of heat treatment. Microstr...

  9. Tribological Response of Heat Treated AISI 52100 Steels Against Steel and Ceramic Counterparts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Türedi E.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available AISI 52100 bearing steels are commonly used in applications requiring high hardness and abrasion resistance. The bearing steels are working under dynamic loads in service conditions and their toughness properties become important. In order to provide the desired mechanical properties, various heat treatments (austenizing, quenching and tempering are usually applied. In this study, AISI 52100 bearing steel samples were austenized at 900°C for ½ h and water quenched to room temperature. Then tempering was carried out at 795°C, 400°C and 200°C for ½ h. In order to investigate the effect of heat treatment conditions on wear behavior, dry friction tests were performed according to ASTM G99-05 Standard with a ‘ball-on-disk’ type tribometer. The samples were tested against steel and ceramic counterparts using the parameters of 100 m distance and 30 N load and 0.063 m/s rotational speed. After wear test, the surface characterization was carried out using microscopy. Wear loss values were calculated using a novel optical method on both flat and counterpart specimens.

  10. Fine structure in the inter-critical heat-affected zone of HQ130 super ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    †Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, ... The microstructure in the inter-critical heat-affected zone (ICHAZ) of HQ130 steel, has been .... Ac3. The microhardness was measured by using the.

  11. The use of nuclear heat in the steel industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coche, L.

    1976-01-01

    It is possible, but not easy, to use nuclear energy for steelmaking: low temperature level, and difficulty to get a continuous energy supply, are the main limiting factors. Practically, the nuclear reactor and the steel making units will not be coupled. Among the various possible systems, the most practical one for the near future consists in using nuclear heat to produce hydrogen (using natural gas or oil products as a feedstock) and electric power. Hydrogen is used to reduce iron ore in units such as Midrex, Hyl, Armco or Purofer. Steel is produced from this reduced material in electric arc furnaces. Industrial development will be slow, since economical conditions are presently pretty far from making such a process economically competitive [fr

  12. Development of High Heat Input Welding High Strength Steel Plate for Oil Storage Tank in Xinyu Steel Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hemin; Dong, Fujun; Liu, Xiaolin; Xiong, Xiong

    This essay introduces the developed high-heat input welding quenched and tempered pressure vessel steel 12MnNiVR for oil storage tank by Xinyu Steel, which passed the review by the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Standards Technical Committee in 2009. The review comments that compared to the domestic and foreign similar steel standard, the key technical index of enterprise standard were in advanced level. After the heat input of 100kJ/cm electro-gas welding, welded points were still with excellent low temperature toughness at -20°C. The steel plate may be constructed for oil storage tank, which has been permitted by thickness range from 10 to 40mm, and design temperature among -20°C-100°C. It studied microstructure genetic effects mechanical properties of the steel. Many production practices indicated that the mechanical properties of products and the steel by stress relief heat treatment of steel were excellent, with pretreatment of hot metal, converter refining, external refining, protective casting, TMCP and heat treatment process measurements. The stability of performance and matured technology of Xinyu Steel support the products could completely service the demand of steel constructed for 10-15 million cubic meters large oil storage tank.

  13. Processing and refinement of steel microstructure images for assisting in computerized heat treatment of plain carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shubhank; Panda, Aditi; Naskar, Ruchira; Mishra, Dinesh Kumar; Pal, Snehanshu

    2017-11-01

    Steels are alloys of iron and carbon, widely used in construction and other applications. The evolution of steel microstructure through various heat treatment processes is an important factor in controlling properties and performance of steel. Extensive experimentations have been performed to enhance the properties of steel by customizing heat treatment processes. However, experimental analyses are always associated with high resource requirements in terms of cost and time. As an alternative solution, we propose an image processing-based technique for refinement of raw plain carbon steel microstructure images, into a digital form, usable in experiments related to heat treatment processes of steel in diverse applications. The proposed work follows the conventional steps practiced by materials engineers in manual refinement of steel images; and it appropriately utilizes basic image processing techniques (including filtering, segmentation, opening, and clustering) to automate the whole process. The proposed refinement of steel microstructure images is aimed to enable computer-aided simulations of heat treatment of plain carbon steel, in a timely and cost-efficient manner; hence it is beneficial for the materials and metallurgy industry. Our experimental results prove the efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  14. Design and evaluation of a heat recuperator for steel slags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutiérrez Trashorras, Antonio J.; Álvarez, Eduardo Álvarez; Río González, José Luis; Suarez Cuesta, José Manuel; Bernat, Jorge Xiberta

    2013-01-01

    New techniques for emissions reduction and energy efficiency are important challenges of the steel industry. Although great advantages have been reached in these fields, there are still new opportunities. One of them is the possible development of systems to recover energy from slags. The recent policies that encourage the use of renewable and alternative energies determine a favorable scenario for the development of new techniques of heat recovering. In this context, this article presents a new heat recuperation system for the slags produced in the factories of Arcelor–Mittal in Asturias (Spain) and study in detail the design of an innovative slags heat exchanger. To adjust its performance and to determine the influence of the geometric and flow design parameters, the heat exchanger has been simulated using numerical analysis software (CFD). -- Highlights: • A new design of a heat recuperator for slags energy recovery is presented. • The effects of the design parameters have been studied with a numerical model. • Refractory materials with high thermal conductivity improve heat recuperation

  15. Effect of cooling rates on the weld heat affected zone coarse grain microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Celin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of a cooling rate on the S690Q quenched and tempered steel welded joint coarse grain heat affected zone microstructure was investigated using a dilatometer with controlled heating and cooling fixture. Steel samples were heated to a peak temperature of 1350 °C and cooled at the different cooling time Dt8/5. A dilatometric analysis and hardness measurements of the simulated thermal cycle coarse grain samples were done. Transformation start and finish temperature were determined using dilatation vs. temperature data analysis. The microstructure of the sample with a cooling time 5 s consists of martensite, whereas at cooling time 80 s a bainitic microstructure was observed. The investigated steel cooling cycle using simulation approach makes possible to determine the range of an optimum CG HAZ cooling time for the welding.

  16. THE HEAT TREATMENT ANALYSIS OF E110 CASE HARDENING STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAJID TOLOUEI-RAD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates mechanical and microstructural behaviour of E110 case hardening steel when subjected to different heat treatment processes including quenching, normalizing and tempering. After heat treatment samples were subjected to mechanical and metallographic analysis and the properties obtained from applying different processes were analysed. The heat treatment process had certain effects on the resultant properties and microstructures obtained for E110 steel which are described in details. Quenching produced a martensitic microstructure characterized by significant increase in material’s hardness and a significant decreased in its impact energy. Annealed specimens produced a coarse pearlitic microstructure with minimal variation in hardness and impact energy. For normalized samples, fine pearlitic microstructure was identified with a moderate increase in hardness and significant reduction in impact energy. Tempering had a significant effect on quenched specimens, with a substantial rise in material ductility and reduction of hardness with increasing tempering temperature. Furthermore, Results provide additional substantiation of temper embrittlement theory for low-carbon alloys, and indicate potential occurrence of temper embrittlement for fine pearlitic microstructures.

  17. Effects of heat treatment to the sound velocity and microstructural changes of ASTM A516 steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norasiah Abdul Kasim; Azali Muhammad; Amry Amin Abas; Zaiton Selamat

    2010-01-01

    Full-text: The used of ultrasonic testing as a thickness measurement for structural components (pipeline and pressure vessel) is among the popular inspection tool widely use in the industrial power plant such as at petrochemical and nuclear power plant. Currently, there are cases where the thickness grows and the result will affect the reliability of the test. There are many factors that can affect the reliability of measurement. One of it is the material under test itself. In the Malaysian Nuclear Agency, initial efforts are underway to study the understanding on the effects of heat treatment to the sound velocity and microstructure changes of ASTM A516 steel. Few samples of thin square shaped prepared were heat treated under the following conditions: austenitization at 9800 degree Celsius - 2 hours, quenching; tempering at various temperature 4000, 5000, 6000 and 7000 degree Celsius. The results show that the microstructure changes and samples exhibit different sound velocity at different heat treatment. (author)

  18. Heat Transfer Analysis of Localized Heat-Treatment for Grade 91 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jacob D.

    Many of the projects utilizing Grade 91 steel are large in scale, therefore it is necessary to assemble on site. The assembly of the major pieces requires welding in the assembly; this drastically changes the superior mechanical properties of Grade 91 steel that it was specifically developed for. Therefore, because of the adverse effects of welding on the mechanical properties of Grade 91, it is necessary to do a localized post weld heat treatment. As with most metallic materials grade 91 steel requires a very specific heat treatment process. This process includes a specific temperature and duration at that temperature to achieve the heat treatment desired. Extensive research has been done to determine the proper temperatures and duration to provide the proper microstructure for the superior mechanical properties that are inherent to Grade 91 steel. The welded sections are typically large structures that require local heat treatments and cannot be placed in an oven. The locations of these structures vary from indoors in a controlled environment to outdoors with unpredictable environments. These environments can be controlled somewhat, however in large part the surrounding conditions are unchangeable. Therefore, there is a need to develop methods to accurately apply the surrounding conditions and geometries to a theoretical model in order to provide the proper requirements for the local heat treatment procedure. Within this requirement is the requirement to define unknowns used in the heat transfer equations so that accurate models can be produced and accurate results predicted. This study investigates experimentally and numerically the heat transfer and temperature fields of Grade 91 piping in a local heat treatment. The objective of this thesis research is to determine all of the needed heat transfer coefficients. The appropriate heat transfer coefficients are determined through the inverse heat conduction method utilizing a ceramic heat blanket. This will be done

  19. Erosion of heat-treated AISI 4140 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goretta, K.C. (Materials and Components Tech. Div., Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Thompson, A.C. (Materials and Components Tech. Div., Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Routbort, J.L. (Materials Science Div., Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1993-03-15

    Solid-particle erosion was studied on AISI 4140 steel heat treated to have a Vickers hardness (Hv) of 288-650 kg mm[sup -2]. The experiments were conducted in vacuum with 143 [mu]m Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] abrasive impacting at 50-100 m s[sup -1] at an angle of 30 or 90 . Erosion rates were nearly independent of hardness for Hv[<=]365 kg mm[sup -2], but increased with hardness for Hv>365 kg mm[sup -2]. The improved erosion resistances of the softer alloys were attributed to increased ductilities. (orig.). Letter-to-the-editor

  20. Factors and mechanisms affecting corrosion of steel in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehqanian, Ch.

    1986-01-01

    Atomic power plants possess reinforced concrete structures which are exposed to sea water or sea atmosphere. Sea water or its surrounding environment contain very corrosive species which cause corrosion of metal in concrete. It should be mentioned that corrosion of steel in concrete is a complex problem that is not completely understood. Some of the factors which influence the corrosion mechanism and can be related to the pore solution composition is discussed. Chloride ion caused problems are the main source of the corrosion damage seen on the reinforced concrete structures. Corrosion rate in concrete varies and depends on the way chloride ion diffuses into concrete. In addition, the associated cations can influence diffusion of chloride into concrete. The type of portland cement and also the concrete mix design all affect the corrosion behaviour of steel in concrete

  1. Effect of Post-weld Heat Treatment on the Mechanical Properties of Supermartensitic Stainless Steel Deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappa, Sebastián; Svoboda, Hernán; Surian, Estela

    2017-02-01

    Supermartensitic stainless steels have good weldability and adequate tensile property, toughness and corrosion resistance. They have been developed as an alternative technology, mainly for oil and gas industries. The final properties of a supermartensitic stainless steel deposit depend on its chemical composition and microstructure: martensite, tempered martensite, ferrite, retained austenite and carbides and/or nitrides. In these steels, the post-weld heat treatments (PWHTs) are usually double tempering ones, to ensure both complete tempering of martensite and high austenite content, to increase toughness and decrease hardness. The aim of this work was to study the effect of post-weld heat treatments (solution treatment with single and double tempering) on the mechanical properties of a supermartensitic stainless steel deposit. An all-weld metal test coupon was welded according to standard ANSI/AWS A5.22-95 using a GMAW supermartensitic stainless steel metal cored wire, under gas shielding. PWHTs were carried out varying the temperature of the first tempering treatment with and without a second tempering one, after solution treatment. All-weld metal chemical composition analysis, metallurgical characterization, hardness and tensile property measurements and Charpy-V tests were carried out. There are several factors which can be affected by the PWHTs, among them austenite content is a significant one. Different austenite contents (0-42%) were found. Microhardness, tensile property and toughness were affected with up to 15% of austenite content, by martensite tempering and carbide precipitation. The second tempering treatment seemed not to have had an important effect on the mechanical properties measured in this work.

  2. Analysis of High-Power Diode Laser Heating Effects on HY-80 Steel for Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiechec, Maxwell; Baker, Brad; McNelley, Terry; Matthews, Manyalibo; Rubenchik, Alexander; Rotter, Mark; Beach, Ray; Wu, Sheldon

    2017-01-01

    In this research, several conditions of high power diode laser heated HY-80 steel were characterized to determine the viability of using such lasers as a preheating source before friction stir welding in order to reduce frictional forces thereby reducing tool wear and increasing welding speeds. Differences in microstructures within heat affected zones were identified at specific laser powers and traverse speeds. Vickers hardness values were recorded and analyzed to validate the formation of additional martensite in diode laser heated regions of HY-80 steel. Conditions that produced little to no additional martensite were identified and relationships among high power diode laser power, traverse speed, and martensite formation were determined. The development of heat affected zones, change in grain structure, and creation of additional martensite in HY-80 can be prevented through the optimization of laser amperage and transverse speed.

  3. Effect of heat input on microstructure and mechanical properties of dissimilar joints between super duplex stainless steel and high strength low alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeghian, M.; Shamanian, M.; Shafyei, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The microstructure of weld metal consists of austenite and ferrite. • The HAZ of the API X-65 shows different transformation. • Impact strength of sample with low heat input was lower than base metals. • The heat input at 0.506 kJ/mm is not the suitable for dissimilar joining between UNS S32750/API X-65. - Abstract: In the present study, microstructure and mechanical properties of UNS S32750 super duplex stainless steel (SDSS)/API X-65 high strength low alloy steel (HSLA) dissimilar joint were investigated. For this purpose, gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) was used in two different heat inputs: 0.506 and 0.86 kJ/mm. The microstructures investigation with optical microscope, scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction showed that an increase in heat input led to a decrease in ferrite percentage, and that detrimental phases were not present. It also indicated that in heat affected zone of HSLA base metal in low heat input, bainite and ferrite phases were created; but in high heat input, perlite and ferrite phases were created. The results of impact tests revealed that the specimen with low heat input exhibited brittle fracture and that with high heat input had a higher strength than the base metals

  4. Evaluation of carbon diffusion in heat treatment of H13 tool steel under different atmospheric conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maziar Ramezani

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Although the cost of the heat treatment process is only a minor portion of the total production cost, it is arguably the most important and crucial stage on the determination of material quality. In the study of the carbon diffusion in H13 steel during austenitization, a series of heat treatment experiments had been conducted under different atmospheric conditions and length of treatment. Four austenitization atmospheric conditions were studied, i.e., heat treatment without atmospheric control, heat treatment with stainless steel foil wrapping, pack carburization heat treatment and vacuum heat treatment. The results showed that stainless steel foil wrapping could restrict decarburization process, resulting in a constant hardness profile as vacuum heat treatment does. However, the tempering characteristic between these two heat treatment methods is different. Results from the gas nitrided samples showed that the thickness and the hardness of the nitrided layer is independent of the carbon content in H13 steel.

  5. Metallurgy and mechanical properties variation with heat input,during dissimilar metal welding between stainless and carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdan, RD; Koswara, AL; Surasno; Wirawan, R.; Faturohman, F.; Widyanto, B.; Suratman, R.

    2018-02-01

    The present research focus on the metallurgy and mechanical aspect of dissimilar metal welding.One of the common parameters that significantly contribute to the metallurgical aspect on the metal during welding is heat input. Regarding this point, in the present research, voltage, current and the welding speed has been varied in order to observe the effect of heat input on the metallurgical and mechanical aspect of both welded metals. Welding was conducted by Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) on stainless and carbon steel with filler metal of ER 309. After welding, hardness test (micro-Vickers), tensile test, macro and micro-structure characterization and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) characterization were performed. It was observed no brittle martensite observed at HAZ of carbon steel, whereas sensitization was observed at the HAZ of stainless steel for all heat input variation at the present research. Generally, both HAZ at carbon steel and stainless steel did not affect tensile test result, however the formation of chromium carbide at the grain boundary of HAZ structure (sensitization) of stainless steel, indicate that better process and control of welding is required for dissimilar metal welding, especially to overcome this issue.

  6. Effect of preliminary thermal treatment of EhP-56 on resistivity to cold cracks formation in the joint heat affected zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorov, V.G.; Shubin, V.I.; Belov, Yu.M.

    1975-01-01

    Data are given on the influence of the conditions of prior heat treatment on the resistance of steel EP56 to cold cracking in the joint heat affected zone /HAZ/. Other things being equal, the resistance of steel EP56 to cold cracking in the HAZ increases with reduction of hardness and increase of austenite content. Conditions for welding steel EP56, preventing cracking in the HAZ, have been determined

  7. Tensile flow behaviour of 2.25Cr-1Mo ferritic steel base metal an simulated heat affected zone structures of 2.25 Cr-1Mo weld joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K.S.; Rao, K.B.S.; Mannan, S. L.; Sastry, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    Tensile tests in the temperature range 298 to 873 K have been performed on 2.25Cr-1Mo base metal and simulated heat affected zone (HAZ) structures of its weld joint, namely coarse grain bainite, fine grain bainite and intercritical structure. Tensile flow behaviour of all the microstructural conditions could be adequately described by the Hollomon equation (σ = K 1 ε n1 ) at higher (>623 K) temperatures. Deviation from the Hollomon equation was observed at low strains and lower ( 1 ε n1 + exp (K 2 + n 2 ε), was found to describe the flow curve. In general, the flow parameters n 1 , K 1 , n 2 and K 2 were found to decrease with increase in temperature except in the intermediate temperature range (423 to 623 K). Peaks/plateaus were observed in their variation with temperature in the intermediate temperature range coinciding with the occurrence of serrated flow in the load-elongation curve. The n 1 value increased and the K 1 value decreased with the type of microstructure in the order: coarse grain bainite, fine grain bainite, base metal and intercritical structure. The variation of n 1 with microstructure has been rationalized on the basis of mean free path (MFP) of dislocations which is directly related to the inter-particle spacing. Larger MFP of dislocations lead to higher strain hardening exponents n 1 . (orig.)

  8. Phase transformations and mechanical properties in heat treated superaustenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koutsoukis, T.; Redjaïmia, A.; Fourlaris, G.

    2013-01-01

    A microstructure–properties relationship study in two superaustenitic stainless steels (S31254 and S32654) was carried out, following exposure at elevated temperatures for various ageing times. Due to high temperature ageing, most stainless steel grades suffer the formation of various precipitates, directly affecting their properties. The full characterization of those precipitates and the correlation with the mechanical behavior of the steels is the primary aim of this study. Samples of the steel grades studied, were exposed to isothermal heat treatments within the temperature range of 650–950 °C, for ageing times varying between 0.5 h and 3000 h, followed by water quenching at room temperature. Microstructural examination indicated the formation of four different secondary phases, sigma phase (σ), chi phase (χ), Laves phase and β-Cr 2 N nitride, which were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron diffraction. The results obtained permitted the construction of the time–temperature–precipitation (TTP) plots. In addition, tensile and Vickers hardness testing were utilized and the modulus of toughness was calculated. The kinetics of the formation of various precipitates with increasing temperature and aging duration was also observed. It was found that various precipitates had a significant effect on all mechanical properties studied.

  9. Evaluation of AISI 4140 Steel Repair Without Post-Weld Heat Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Cleiton C.; de Albuquerque, Victor H. C.; Moura, Cícero R. O.; Aguiar, Willys M.; Farias, Jesualdo P.

    2009-04-01

    The present work evaluates the two-layer technique on the heat affected zone (HAZ) of AISI 4140 steel welded with different heat input levels between the first and second layer. The weld heat input levels selected by the Higuchi test were 5/5, 5/10, and 15/5 kJ/cm. The evaluation of the refining and/or tempering of the coarsened grain HAZ of the first layer was carried out using metallographic tests, microhardness measurements, and the Charpy-V impact test. The tempering of the first layer was only reached when the weld heat input ratio was 5/5 kJ/cm. The results of the Charpy-V impact test showed that the two-layer technique was efficient, from the point of view of toughness, since the toughness values reached were greater than the base metal for all weld heat input ratios applied. The results obtained indicate that the best performance of the two-layer deposition technique was for the weld heat input ratio 5/5 kJ/cm employing low heat input.

  10. Study on Spheroidization and Related Heat Treatments of Medium Carbon Alloy Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harisha S. R.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of medium carbon steels as engineering materials is reflected by the fact that out of the vast majority of engineering grade ferrous alloys available and used in the market today, a large proportion of them are from the family of medium carbon steels. Typically medium carbon steels have a carbon range of 0.25 to 0.65% by weight, and a manganese content ranging from 0.060 to 1.65% by weight. Medium carbon steels are more resistive to cutting, welding and forming as compared to low carbon steels. From the last two decades a number of research scholars reported the use of verity of heat treatments to tailor the properties of medium carbon steels. Spheroidizing is the novel industrial heat treatment employed to improve formability and machinability of medium/high carbon low alloy steels. This exclusive study covers procedure, the effects and possible outcomes of various heat treatments on medium carbon steels. In the present work, other related heat treatments like annealing and special treatments for property alterations which serve as pretreatments for spheroidizing are also reviewed. Medium carbon steels with property alterations by various heat treatment processes are finding increased responsiveness in transportation, aerospace, space, underwater along with other variegated fields. Improved tribological and mechanical properties consisting of impact resistance, stiffness, abrasion and strength are the main reasons for the increased attention of these steels in various industries. In the present scenario for the consolidation of important aspects of various heat treatments and effects on mechanical properties of medium carbons steel, a review of different research papers has been attempted. This review may be used as a guide to provide practical data for heat treatment industry, especially as a tool to enhance workability and tool life.

  11. Analysis of creep effective stress in austenitic heat resistant steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, In Duck; Nam, Ki Woo

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the comparison of calculated effective stress with experimental one in austenitic heat resistant steels, STS310J1TB and STS310S with and without a small amount of Nb and N. Based on a solute atoms diffusion model, contribution from soluble nitrogen to the high-temperature strength was numerically examined for austenitic heat-resisting Fe-Cr-Ni-N(STS310J1TB) and Fe-Cr-Ni(STS310S) alloys. The solute atmosphere dragging stress of dislocation was calculated in optional dislocation velocity of STS310J1TB and STS310S at 650 degree C, 675 degree C and 700 degree C. As a result of the numerical calculation, the solute atmosphere dragging stress of STS310J1TB was about 50 times larger than that of STS310S. When the temperature became high, the maximum value of solute atmosphere dragging stress was small and the velocity of moving dislocation was fast. From the relationship between the dislocation rate and the solute atmosphere dragging stress, the relation of both was proportional and the inclination is about 1 in the level with low velocity of moving dislocation. From above results, the mechanism of dislocation movement in STS310J1TB was the solute atmosphere dragging stress. The solute atmosphere dragging stress, which was calculated from the numerical calculation was close to the effect stress in stress relaxation tests

  12. Hierarchical Cu precipitation in lamellated steel after multistage heat treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingdong; Gu, Jianfeng

    2017-09-01

    The hierarchical distribution of Cu-rich precipitates (CRPs) and related partitioning and segregation behaviours of solute atoms were investigated in a 1.54 Cu-3.51 Ni (wt.%) low-carbon high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steel after multistage heat treatment by using the combination of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atom probe tomography (APT). Intercritical tempering at 725 °C of as-quenched lathlike martensitic structure leads to the coprecipitation of CRPs at the periphery of a carbide precipitate which is possibly in its paraequilibrium state due to distinct solute segregation at the interface. The alloyed carbide and CRPs provide constituent elements for each other and make the coprecipitation thermodynamically favourable. Meanwhile, austenite reversion occurs to form fresh secondary martensite (FSM) zone where is rich in Cu and pertinent Ni and Mn atoms, which gives rise to a different distributional morphology of CRPs with large size and high density. In addition, conventional tempering at 500 °C leads to the formation of nanoscale Cu-rich clusters in α-Fe matrix. As a consequence, three populations of CRPs are hierarchically formed around carbide precipitate, at FSM zone and in α-Fe matrix. The formation of different precipitated features can be turned by controlling diffusion pathways of related solute atoms and further to tailor mechanical properties via proper multistage heat treatments.

  13. The Study on Weldability of Boron Steel and Hot-Stamped Steel by Using Laser Heat Source (Ⅲ) - Comparison on Laser Weldability of Boron Steel and Hot -Stamped Steel-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, So Young; Kim, Jong Do [Korea Maritime and Ocean University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Su [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    This study was conducted to compare the laser weldability of boron steel and hot-stamped steel. In general, boron steel is used in the hot-stamping process. Hot-stamping is a method for simultaneously forming and cooling boron steel in a press die after heating it to the austenitizing temperature. Hot-stamped steel has a strength of 1500 MPa or more. Thus, in this study, the laser weldability of boron steel and that of hot-stamped steel were investigated and compared. A continuous wave disk laser was used to produce butt and lap joints. In the butt welding, the critical cooling speed at which full penetration was obtained in the hot-stamped steel was lower than that of boron steel. In the lap welding, the joint widths were similar regardless of the welding speed when full penetration was obtained.

  14. The Study on Weldability of Boron Steel and Hot-Stamped Steel by Using Laser Heat Source (Ⅲ) - Comparison on Laser Weldability of Boron Steel and Hot -Stamped Steel-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, So Young; Kim, Jong Do; Kim, Jong Su

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to compare the laser weldability of boron steel and hot-stamped steel. In general, boron steel is used in the hot-stamping process. Hot-stamping is a method for simultaneously forming and cooling boron steel in a press die after heating it to the austenitizing temperature. Hot-stamped steel has a strength of 1500 MPa or more. Thus, in this study, the laser weldability of boron steel and that of hot-stamped steel were investigated and compared. A continuous wave disk laser was used to produce butt and lap joints. In the butt welding, the critical cooling speed at which full penetration was obtained in the hot-stamped steel was lower than that of boron steel. In the lap welding, the joint widths were similar regardless of the welding speed when full penetration was obtained

  15. Hardening and stress relaxation during repeated heating of 15Kh2MFA and 15Kh2NMFA steels welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubchenko, A.S.; Suslova, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    Results of investigation of temperature-time conditions of hardening of welded joints of 15Kh2MFA and 15Kh2NMFA steels and their relaxation resistance, effect of metal structure of imitated heat affected zone (HAZ) on intensity of precipitation hardening at repeated heating are presented as well as the results of the process of relaxation of residual stresses at welded joints samples heating carried out by automatic welding under the flux with the use of adding materials and technology of manufacturing of vessels of WWER-440 and WWER-1000 reactors. Peculiarities of the hardening at repeated heating of the HAZ metal imitated at these steels. Precipitation hardening of overheated 15Kh2MFA steel is connected with precipitations at repeated heating of carbides of the M 7 C 3 , M 3 C and VC type. Stress relaxation in welded joints runs more intensively at the initial stage of repeated heating, i.e. during the same period of the process of dispersed carbide precipitations

  16. Heat treated 9 Cr-1 Mo steel material for high temperature application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Alman, David; Dogan, Omer; Holcomb, Gordon; Cowen, Christopher

    2012-08-21

    The invention relates to a composition and heat treatment for a high-temperature, titanium alloyed, 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibiting improved creep strength and oxidation resistance at service temperatures up to 650.degree. C. The novel combination of composition and heat treatment produces a heat treated material containing both large primary titanium carbides and small secondary titanium carbides. The primary titanium carbides contribute to creep strength while the secondary titanium carbides act to maintain a higher level of chromium in the finished steel for increased oxidation resistance, and strengthen the steel by impeding the movement of dislocations through the crystal structure. The heat treated material provides improved performance at comparable cost to commonly used high-temperature steels such as ASTM P91 and ASTM P92, and requires heat treatment consisting solely of austenization, rapid cooling, tempering, and final cooling, avoiding the need for any hot-working in the austenite temperature range.

  17. Steel heat treating: mathematical modelling and numerical simulation of a problem arising in the automotive industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Manuel Diaz Moreno

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe a mathematical model for the industrial heating and cooling processes of a steel workpiece representing the steering rack of an automobile. The goal of steel heat treating is to provide a hardened surface on critical parts of the workpiece while keeping the rest soft and ductile in order to reduce fatigue. The high hardness is due to the phase transformation of steel accompanying the rapid cooling. This work takes into account both heating-cooling stage and viscoplastic model. Once the general mathematical formulation is derived, we can perform some numerical simulations.

  18. Effect of Heat Input on Microstructure and Hardness Distribution of Laser Welded Si-Al TRIP-Type Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Grajcar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is concerned with issues related to laser welding of Si-Al type TRIP steels with Nb and Ti microadditions. The tests of laser welding of thermomechanically rolled sheet sections were carried out using keyhole welding and a solid-state laser. The tests carried out for various values of heat input were followed by macro- and microscopic metallographic investigations as well as by microhardness measurements of welded areas. A detailed microstructural analysis was carried out in the penetration area and in various areas of the heat affected zone (HAZ. Special attention was paid to the influence of cooling conditions on the stabilisation of retained austenite, the most characteristic structural component of TRIP steels. The tests made it possible to determine the maximum value of heat input preventing the excessive grain growth in HAZ and to identify the areas of the greatest hardness reaching 520 HV0.1.

  19. Phase change predictions for liquid fuel in contact with steel structure using the heat conduction equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brear, D.J. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1998-01-01

    When liquid fuel makes contact with steel structure the liquid can freeze as a crust and the structure can melt at the surface. The melting and freezing processes that occur can influence the mode of fuel freezing and hence fuel relocation. Furthermore the temperature gradients established in the fuel and steel phases determine the rate at which heat is transferred from fuel to steel. In this memo the 1-D transient heat conduction equations are applied to the case of initially liquid UO{sub 2} brought into contact with solid steel using up-to-date materials properties. The solutions predict criteria for fuel crust formation and steel melting and provide a simple algorithm to determine the interface temperature when one or both of the materials is undergoing phase change. The predicted steel melting criterion is compared with available experimental results. (author)

  20. Phase change predictions for liquid fuel in contact with steel structure using the heat conduction equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brear, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    When liquid fuel makes contact with steel structure the liquid can freeze as a crust and the structure can melt at the surface. The melting and freezing processes that occur can influence the mode of fuel freezing and hence fuel relocation. Furthermore the temperature gradients established in the fuel and steel phases determine the rate at which heat is transferred from fuel to steel. In this memo the 1-D transient heat conduction equations are applied to the case of initially liquid UO 2 brought into contact with solid steel using up-to-date materials properties. The solutions predict criteria for fuel crust formation and steel melting and provide a simple algorithm to determine the interface temperature when one or both of the materials is undergoing phase change. The predicted steel melting criterion is compared with available experimental results. (author)

  1. Heat treatment giving a stable high temperature micro-structure in cast austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Donald L.; Lemkey, Franklin D.

    1988-01-01

    A novel micro-structure developed in a cast austenitic stainless steel alloy and a heat treatment thereof are disclosed. The alloy is based on a multicomponent Fe-Cr-Mn-Mo-Si-Nb-C system consisting of an austenitic iron solid solution (.gamma.) matrix reinforced by finely dispersed carbide phases and a heat treatment to produce the micro-structure. The heat treatment includes a prebraze heat treatment followed by a three stage braze cycle heat treatment.

  2. Prediction of deformations of steel plate by artificial neural network in forming process with induction heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Truong Thinh; Yang, Young Soo; Bae, Kang Yul; Choi, Sung Nam

    2009-01-01

    To control a heat source easily in the forming process of steel plate with heating, the electro-magnetic induction process has been used as a substitute of the flame heating process. However, only few studies have analyzed the deformation of a workpiece in the induction heating process by using a mathematical model. This is mainly due to the difficulty of modeling the heat flux from the inductor traveling on the conductive plate during the induction process. In this study, the heat flux distribution over a steel plate during the induction process is first analyzed by a numerical method with the assumption that the process is in a quasi-stationary state around the inductor and also that the heat flux itself greatly depends on the temperature of the workpiece. With the heat flux, heat flow and thermo-mechanical analyses on the plate to obtain deformations during the heating process are then performed with a commercial FEM program for 34 combinations of heating parameters. An artificial neural network is proposed to build a simplified relationship between deformations and heating parameters that can be easily utilized to predict deformations of steel plate with a wide range of heating parameters in the heating process. After its architecture is optimized, the artificial neural network is trained with the deformations obtained from the FEM analyses as outputs and the related heating parameters as inputs. The predicted outputs from the neural network are compared with those of the experiments and the numerical results. They are in good agreement

  3. Effect of heat input on the microstructure and mechanical properties of gas tungsten arc welded AISI 304 stainless steel joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Subodh; Shahi, A.S.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Welding procedure is established for welding 6 mm thick AISI 304 using GTAW process. → Mechanical properties of the weld joints are influenced strongly by the heat input. → Highest tensile strength of 657.32 MPa is achieved by joints using low heat input. → Welding parameters affect heat input and hence microstructure of weld joints. → Extent of grain coarsening in the HAZ increases with increase in the heat input. -- Abstract: Influence of heat input on the microstructure and mechanical properties of gas tungsten arc welded 304 stainless steel (SS) joints was studied. Three heat input combinations designated as low heat (2.563 kJ/mm), medium heat (2.784 kJ/mm) and high heat (3.017 kJ/mm) were selected from the operating window of the gas tungsten arc welding process (GTAW) and weld joints made using these combinations were subjected to microstructural evaluations and tensile testing so as to analyze the effect of thermal arc energy on the microstructure and mechanical properties of these joints. The results of this investigation indicate that the joints made using low heat input exhibited higher ultimate tensile strength (UTS) than those welded with medium and high heat input. Significant grain coarsening was observed in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of all the joints and it was found that the extent of grain coarsening in the heat affected zone increased with increase in the heat input. For the joints investigated in this study it was also found that average dendrite length and inter-dendritic spacing in the weld zone increases with increase in the heat input which is the main reason for the observable changes in the tensile properties of the weld joints welded with different arc energy inputs.

  4. Experimental study and calculation of boiling heat transfer on steel plates during runout table operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Z.D.; Fraser, D.; Samarasekera, I.V.

    2002-01-01

    Within a hot strip steel mill, red hot steel is hot rolled into a long continuous slab that is led onto what is called the runout table. Temperatures of the steel at the beginning of this table are around 900 o C. Above and below the runout table are banks of water jets, sprays or water curtains that rapidly cool the steel slab. The heat transfer process itself may be considered one of the most complicated in the industrial world. The cooling process that occurs on the runout table is crucial and governs the final mechanical properties and flatness of a steel strip. However, very limited data of industrial conditions has been available and that which is available is poorly understood. To study heat transfer during runout table cooling, an industrial scale pilot runout table facility was constructed at the University of British Columbia (UBC). This paper describes the experimental details, data acquisition and data handling techniques for steel plates during water jet impingement cooling by one circular water jet from industrial headers. The effect of cooling water temperature and initial steel plate temperature as well as varying water jet diameters on heat transfer was systematically investigated. A two-dimensional finite element scheme based inverse heat conduction model was developed to calculate surface heat transfer coefficients along the impinging surface. Heat flux curves at the stagnation area were obtained for selected tests. A quantitative relationship between adjustable processing parameters and heat transfer coefficients along the impinging surface during runout table operation is discussed. The results of the study were used to upgrade an extensive process model developed at UBC. The model ties in the cooling rate and hence two dimensional temperature gradients to the resulting microstructure and final mechanical properties of the steel. This process model is widely used by major steel industries in Canada and the United States. (author)

  5. Preliminary study on the forgeability and heat treatment response of niobium - containing tool steels materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cescon, T.; Papaleo, R.

    1981-01-01

    The forgeability and microstructure of tool steels materials based on the M-2 composition, where W and V were partially replaced by Nb, were examined. The optimum heat-treating conditions were established. The poor response to heat treatment of some of the alloys studied indicated the need of increasing the C content of the steels when Nb is used as a substitute for W and V. (Author) [pt

  6. Electron Beam Welding of Duplex Steels with using Heat Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Ladislav; Vrtochová, Tatiana; Ulrich, Koloman

    2010-01-01

    This contribution presents characteristics, metallurgy and weldability of duplex steels with using concentrated energy source. The first part of the article describes metallurgy of duplex steels and the influence of nitrogen on their solidification. The second part focuses on weldability of duplex steels with using electron beam aimed on acceptable structure and corrosion resistance performed by multiple runs of defocused beam over the penetration weld.

  7. Study of secondary recrystallization in grain-oriented steel treated under dynamical heat treatment conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Stoyka

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study was made to investigate secondary recrystallization in grain-oriented steels annealed at short time temperature exposures with application of dynamical heating. The investigated GO steels for experiments were taken from one industrial line after final cold rolling reduction and subsequent box annealing. It was shown that application of short time heat treatment conditions could lead to complete abnormal grain growth in the investigated GO steel. The texture and microstructure obtained in the laboratory treated material is similar to that observed in the same GO steel taken after industrial final box-annealing. However, some “parasitic” grains were observed in the secondary recrystallized matrix of the laboratory treated GO steel. These “parasitic” grains possess the unwanted from magnetic properties point of view {111} orientation components.

  8. Effect of heat input on the microstructure, residual stresses and corrosion resistance of 304L austenitic stainless steel weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unnikrishnan, Rahul, E-mail: rahulunnikrishnannair@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India); Idury, K.S.N. Satish, E-mail: satishidury@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India); Ismail, T.P., E-mail: tpisma@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India); Bhadauria, Alok, E-mail: alokbhadauria1@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India); Shekhawat, S.K., E-mail: satishshekhawat@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay (IITB), Powai, Mumbai 400076, Maharashtra (India); Khatirkar, Rajesh K., E-mail: rajesh.khatirkar@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India); Sapate, Sanjay G., E-mail: sgsapate@yahoo.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India)

    2014-07-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used in high performance pressure vessels, nuclear, chemical, process and medical industry due to their very good corrosion resistance and superior mechanical properties. However, austenitic stainless steels are prone to sensitization when subjected to higher temperatures (673 K to 1173 K) during the manufacturing process (e.g. welding) and/or certain applications (e.g. pressure vessels). During sensitization, chromium in the matrix precipitates out as carbides and intermetallic compounds (sigma, chi and Laves phases) decreasing the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. In the present investigation, 304L austenitic stainless steel was subjected to different heat inputs by shielded metal arc welding process using a standard 308L electrode. The microstructural developments were characterized by using optical microscopy and electron backscattered diffraction, while the residual stresses were measured by X-ray diffraction using the sin{sup 2}ψ method. It was observed that even at the highest heat input, shielded metal arc welding process does not result in significant precipitation of carbides or intermetallic phases. The ferrite content and grain size increased with increase in heat input. The grain size variation in the fusion zone/heat affected zone was not effectively captured by optical microscopy. This study shows that electron backscattered diffraction is necessary to bring out changes in the grain size quantitatively in the fusion zone/heat affected zone as it can consider twin boundaries as a part of grain in the calculation of grain size. The residual stresses were compressive in nature for the lowest heat input, while they were tensile at the highest heat input near the weld bead. The significant feature of the welded region and the base metal was the presence of a very strong texture. The texture in the heat affected zone was almost random. - Highlights: • Effect of heat input on microstructure, residual

  9. Effect of intercritical heat treatment on mechanical properties of reinforcing steel bars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abro, M.I.; Memon, R.A.; Soomro, I.A.; Aftab, U.

    2017-01-01

    Intercritical heat treatments attempts were made to enhance the mechanical properties of reinforcing steel bars milled from scrap metal. For this, two grades of steel bars were obtained from different steel mills and their mechanical properties that include hardness, ultimate tensile strength, and percent elongation before and after intercritical heat treatment were determined. Results indicated that 25.5 and 17.6%, improvements in UTS (Ultimate Tensile Strength) and 18.8 and 14.3% improvement in percent elongation in two grades of reinforcing steel samples containing 0.17 and 0.24% carbon respectively was achieved while heating at 750 degree C for 2h. Appreciable improvement in the mechanical properties was noted due to birth of sufficient quantity of martensite along with ferrite. (author)

  10. Fouling of roughened stainless steel surfaces during convective heat transfer to aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herz, A.; Malayeri, M.R.; Mueller-Steinhagen, H.

    2008-01-01

    The deterioration of heat transfer performance due to fouling is the prime cause for higher energy consumption and inefficiency in many industrial heat exchangers such as those in power plants, refineries, food and dairy industries. Fouling is also a very complex process in which many geometrical, physical and operating parameters are involved with poorly understood interaction. Among them, the surface roughness is an important surface characteristic that would greatly influence crystallisation fouling mechanisms and hence deposition morphology and stickability to the surface. In this work, the effect of the surface roughness of AISI 304 BA stainless steel surfaces on fouling of an aqueous solution with inverse solubility behaviour has been investigated under convective heat transfer. Several experiments have been performed on roughened surfaces ranging from 0.18 to 1.55 μm for different bulk concentrations and heat fluxes. The EDTA titration method was used to measure the concentration of the calcium sulphate salt in order to maintain it at constant value during each fouling run. Experimental results show that the heat transfer coefficient of very rough surfaces (1.55 μm) decreases more rapidly than that of 0.54 μm. Several facts contribute to this behaviour notably (1) increased of primary heterogeneous nucleation rate on the surfaces; (2) reduction of local shear stress in the valleys and (3) reduced removal rate of the crystals from the surfaces where the roughness elements protrude out of the viscous sub-layer. The results also show linear and proportional variation of the fouling rate and heat flux within the range of operating conditions. In addition, the deposition process in terms of fouling rate could only be affected at lower surface contact angles. Such results would particularly be of interest for new surface treatment technologies which aim at altering the surface texture

  11. Effects of heat input on pitting corrosion in super duplex stainless steel weld metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yong taek; Shin, Hak soo; Lee, Hae woo

    2012-12-01

    Due to the difference in reheating effects depending on the heat input of subsequent weld passes, the microstructure of the weld metal varies between acicular type austenite and a mixture of polygonal type and grain boundary mixed austenite. These microstructural changes may affect the corrosion properties of duplex stainless steel welds. This result indicates that the pitting resistance of the weld can be strongly influenced by the morphology of the secondary austenite phase. In particular, the ferrite phase adjacent to the acicular type austenite phase shows a lower Pitting Resistance Equivalent (PRE) value of 25.3, due to its lower chromium and molybdenum contents, whereas the secondary austenite phase maintains a higher PRE value of more than 38. Therefore, it can be inferred that the pitting corrosion is mainly due to the formation of ferrite phase with a much lower PRE value.

  12. Effect of heat treatment on corrosion behavior of duplex stainless steel in orthodontic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabea Hammood, Ali; Faraj Noor, Ahmed; Talib Alkhafagy, Mohammed

    2017-12-01

    Heat treatment is necessary for duplex stainless steel (DSS) to remove or dissolve intermetallic phases, to remove segregation and to relieve any residual thermal stress in DSS, which may be formed during production processes. In the present study, the corrosion resistance of a DSS in artificial saliva was studied by potentiodynamic measurements. The microstructure was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM),x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Vickers hardness (HV). The properties were tested in as-received and in thermally treated conditions (800-900 °C, 2-8 min). The research aims to evaluate the capability of DSS for orthodontic applications, in order to substitute the austenitic grades. The results indicate that the corrosion resistance is mainly affected by the ferrite/austenite ratio. The best result was obtained with a treatment at 900 °C for 2 min.

  13. Chemical heat treatment of low alloyed maraging steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinov, L S; Korotich, I K [Zhdanovskij Metallurgicheskij Inst. (Ukrainian SSR)

    1979-09-01

    The investigation concerned the nitriding, cementation, chromizing, borating of economically alloyed maraging grade 04Kh2N5MFYu steel. The investigated methods of chemothermal treatment were found to considerably increase the hardness of the surface layer of the maraging steel. The high tempering of the grade 04Kh2N5MFYu cemented and hardened steel was found to produce secondary hardening. On chromizing, the diffusion layer is an alloyed ferrite which strengthens because of the dispersion hardening on ageing. The formation of the plastic low-carbon martensite at relatively small cooling rates greatly decreases the tendency of the boride layer to cracking.

  14. Heat exchange performance of stainless steel and carbon foams modified with carbon nano fibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuzovskaya, I.; Pacheco Benito, Sergio; Chinthaginjala, J.K.; Reed, C.P.; Lefferts, Leonardus; van der Meer, Theodorus H.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanofibers (CNF), with fishbone and parallel wall structures, were grown by catalytic chemical vapor deposition on the surface of carbon foam and stainless steel foam, in order to improve their heat exchange performance. Enhancement in heat transfer efficiency between 30% and 75% was achieved

  15. Study on some experimental conditions that affect corrosion of some structural steel materials using in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang Nhuan; Nguyen Thi Kim Dung; Hoang Xuan Thi; Nguyen Thi Thuc Phuong; Ngo Xuan Hung; Nguyen Thanh Chung; Tran Xuan Vinh; Hoang Van Duc; Hoang Thi Tuyen; Nguyen Duc Thang

    2017-01-01

    The corrosion cracking of stainless steels is an important degradation phenomenon not only in nuclear reactors but also in the other industrial factories. In this work, experimental research of mechanical properties and electro-chemical processes to degradation of carbon steel and SS304 was carried out. Hardness values, ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, elongation values and impact energy which are typical for material mechanical properties were measured. When changing heat treatment conditions, the differences of mechanical properties were not really significant. In electro-chemical experiments, the OCP results of C45 steel and 304 Stainless Steel in Cl - environment took initial assessment of corrosion process. The corrosion process of C45 was accelerated over Cl - concentration. In the case of 304 Stainless Steel, Cl - ions did not significantly affect corrosion process, only slowed down the formation of the chromium oxide layer on the SS304 surface. In the last section, experiments were conducted to get a procedure on the determination of 10 B/ 11 B isotope ratio in water samples by isotope dilution – inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. (author)

  16. Heat Treatment of Cr- and Cr-V ledeburitic tool steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Jurči

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cr- and Cr-V ledeburitic cold work tool steels belong to the most important tool materials for large series manufacturing. To enable high production stability, the tools must be heat treated before use. This overview paper brings a comprehensive study on the heat treatment of these materials, starting from the soft annealing and finishing with the tempering. Also, it describes the impact of any step of the heat treatment on the most important structural and mechanical characteristics, like the hardness, the toughness and the wear resistance. The widely used AIS D2- steel (conventionally manufactured and Vanadis 6 (PM are used as examples in most cases.

  17. Numerical model to predict microstructure of the heat treated of steel elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Domański

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In work the presented numerical models of tool steel hardening processes take into account thermal phenomena and phase transformations. Numerical algorithm of thermal phenomena was based on the Finite Elements Methods of the heat transfer equations. In the model of phase transformations, in simulations heating process continuous heating (CHT was applied, whereas in cooling process continuous cooling (CCT of the steel at issue. The phase fraction transformed (austenite during heating and fractions during cooling of ferrite, pearlite or bainite are determined by Johnson-Mehl-Avrami formulas. The nescent fraction of martensite is determined by Koistinen and Marburger formula or modified Koistinen and Marburger formula. In the simulations of hardening was subject the fang lathe of cone (axisymmetrical object made of tool steel.

  18. Heat treatments in a conventional steel to reproduce the microstructure of a nuclear grade steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosalio G, M.

    2014-01-01

    The ferritic steels used in the manufacture of pressurized vessels of Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) suffer degradation in their mechanical properties due to damage caused by the neutron fluxes of high energy bigger to a Mega electron volt (E> 1 MeV) generated in the reactor core. The materials with which the pressurized vessels of nuclear reactors cooled by light water are built correspond to low alloy ferritic steels. The effect of neutron irradiation on these steels is manifested as an increase in hardness, mechanical strength, with the consequent decrease in ductility, fracture toughness and an increase in temperature of ductile-brittle transition. The life of a BWR is 40 years, its design must be considered sufficient margin of safety because pressure forces experienced during operation, maintenance and testing of postulated accident conditions. It is necessary that under these conditions the vessel to behave ductile and likely to propagate a fracture is minimized. The vessels of light water nuclear reactors have a bainite microstructure. Specifically, the reactor vessels of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde (Veracruz, Mexico) are made of a steel Astm A-533, Grade B Class 1. At present they are carrying out some welding tests for the construction of a model of a BWR, however, to use nuclear grade steel such as Astm A-533 to carry out some of the welding tests, is very expensive; perform these in a conventional material provides basic information. Although the microstructure present in the conventional material does not correspond exactly to the degree of nuclear material, it can take of reference. Therefore, it is proposed to conduct a pilot study to establish the thermal treatment that reproduces the microstructure of nuclear grade steel, in conventional steel. The resulting properties of the conventional steel samples will be compared to a JRQ steel, that is a steel Astm A-533, Grade B Class 1, provided by IAEA. (Author)

  19. Effect of heat treatment on pitting corrosion of austenitic Cr-Ni-Mo steels in sodium chloride solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefec, R.; Franz, F.; Holecek, A.

    1979-01-01

    The pitting corrosion resistance of Cr17Ni12Mo2,5 type steel under potentiostatic polarization in a sodium chloride solution is adversely affected by previous annealing. The data obtained were systematically dependent on annealing temperature, time and surface roughness. The corrosion current, the number of pits or the mean area of pit opening and the corrosion rate within the pits were increased by previous annealing at 550 to 750 0 C for 1-100 hrs. The highest corrosion rate estimated corresponded to heat treatments provoking severe sensitization to intergranular corrosion. The paercentage area of corrosion pit openings and the estimated pit penetration rates were several times higher for as-machined than for polished surfaces. It can be assumed that pitting corrosion is little affected by the carbon content and that molybdenum depletion of grain-boundary zones is responsible for the reduced pitting resistance of annealed steels. (orig./HP) [de

  20. Influence of Heat Treatments on the Corrosion Resistance of Medium -Carbon Steel using Sulfuric Spring Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikhlas Basheer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion is one of the important problems that may be occur to the parts of machinery and equipment after manufactured and when used as a result of exposure to corrosive media. Plain-carbon steel is considered as one of the most common minerals used in industrial applications. Some of heat treatments can have direct effect on the corrosion rate of steel by building up galvanic corrosion cells between its microscopic phases. Therefore, to adopt one of kinds of the plain-carbon steel and the most commonly used in industry to be study subject, that is medium carbon steel and took samples of this steel has been treated thermally in three methods which the normalising, annealing, and hardening .The corrosive media used in the research is Sulfuric Spring, it contains many chemical compounds to show its influence on the corrosion of steel. The weight loss method is used to determine corrosion rate and to compare between the results obtained, show that the greatest corrosion resistance of the annealed steel and the corrosion resistance of the hardened steel is the lowest while the corrosion  resistance of the normalised steel is in-between them.         Calcium carbonate was formed on the metal surface which acts as an isolating layer which decrease corrosion rate with time

  1. Evaluation of carbon diffusion in heat treatment of H13 tool steel under different atmospheric conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Ramezani, Maziar; Pasang, Timotius; Chen, Zhan; Neitzert, Thomas; Au, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Although the cost of the heat treatment process is only a minor portion of the total production cost, it is arguably the most important and crucial stage on the determination of material quality. In the study of the carbon diffusion in H13 steel during austenitization, a series of heat treatment experiments had been conducted under different atmospheric conditions and length of treatment. Four austenitization atmospheric conditions were studied, i.e., heat treatment without atmospheric contro...

  2. Effects of heat treatment on mechanical properties of h13 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guanghua, Yan; Xinmin, Huang; Yanqing, Wang; Xingguo, Qin; Ming, Yang; Zuoming, Chu; Kang, Jin

    2010-12-01

    Heat treatment on the mechanical properties of H13 hot working die steel for die casting is discussed. The H13 steel for die casting was treated by different temperatures of vacuum quenching, tempering, and secondary tempering to investigate its mechanical properties. Strength, plasticity, hardness, and impact toughness of the H13 hot working die steel for die casting were measured. Microstructure, grain size, and carbide particle size after heat treatment have a great impact on the mechanical properties of H13 hot working die steel for die casting. The microstructure of the H13 was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by a metallographic microscope. It is found that H13 exhibits excellent mechanical properties after vacuum quenching at 1050°C and twice tempering at 600°C.

  3. Effect of Heat Treatment on Microstructure and Hardness of Grade 91 Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triratna Shrestha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Grade 91 steel (modified 9Cr-1Mo steel is considered a prospective material for the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant for application in reactor pressure vessels at temperatures of up to 650 °C. In this study, heat treatment of Grade 91 steel was performed by normalizing and tempering the steel at various temperatures for different periods of time. Optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy in conjunction with microhardness profiles and calorimetric plots were used to understand the microstructural evolution including precipitate structures and were correlated with mechanical behavior of the steel. Thermo-Calc™ calculations were used to support the experimental work. Furthermore, carbon isopleth and temperature dependencies of the volume fraction of different precipitates were constructed.

  4. Welding metallurgy of SA508 Cl II heat affected zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberry, P.J.; Lambert, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    A weld thermal simulation technique has been used to investigate the metallurgical response of SA508 class II material during welding. Dynamic Ac 1 and Ac 3 data, grain growth kinetics and continuous cooling transformation diagrams have been measured. The heat affected zone structure, grain size and precipitate distribution are described in terms of the weld thermal cycle experienced and compared with a weld heat affected zone. The as-welded hardness and tempering response of a range of possible heat affected zone structures has been established. The tempering effects of various weld thermal cycles are calculated from isothermal tempering data. The likely tempering effects during welding are estimated and compared with the tempering of actual welds during welding and in subsequent conventional post weld heat treatment. 16 figures, 6 tables

  5. REM effect on nonmetallic inclusion composition and heat resistance in an austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farafonov, V.K.; Shtejnberg, M.M.; Kikhtin, M.V.; Cheremnykh, V.P.; Vojnov, V.V.

    1979-01-01

    Studies were made to elucidate the effect of rare earths (lanthanum, neodymium, praseodymium, cerium) on the composition of non-metallic inclusions and heat resistance of an austenitic chromium-nickel steel. Common sulfide and oxide inclusions are shown to be substituted by rare earth sulfide and oxide inclusions at RE metal content in the steel up to 0.1%. Further increase of RE metal content results in increasing non-metallic inclusions containing RE metals, phosphorus and non-ferrous impurities. Creep rate changes insignificantly at RE metal content up to 0.1%, and then it sharply grows with the quantity of non-metallic inclusions in the steel

  6. Optimizing Heat Treatment Process of Fe-13Cr-3Mo-3Ni Martensitic Stainless of Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, M. S.; Prifiharni, S.; Mabruri, E.

    2017-05-01

    The Fe-13Cr-3Mo-3Ni stainless steels are modified into martensitic stainless steels for steam turbine blades application. The working temperature of steam turbine was around 600 - 700 °C. The improvement properties of turbine blade material is necessary to maintain steam turbine work. The previous research revealed that it has corrosion resistance of Fe-13Cr-3Mo-3Ni which is better than 13Cr stainless steels in the chloride environment. In this work, the effect of heat treatment on microstructure and hardness of Fe-13Cr-3Mo-3Ni stainless steels has been studied. The steel was prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging. The steels were austenitized at 1000, 1050, and 1100 °C for 1 hour and were tempered at 600, 650, and 700 °C for 1 hour. The steels were then subjected to metallographic observation and hardness test of Rockwell C. The optimal heat treatment of Fe-13Cr-3Mo-3Ni was carried out austenitized in 1050 °C and tempered in 600 - 700 °C.

  7. The efficacy of radiant heat controls on workers' heat stress around the blast furnace of a steel industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giahi, Omid; Darvishi, Ebrahim; Aliabadi, Mohsen; Khoubi, Jamshid

    2015-01-01

    Workers' exposure to excessive heat in molten industries is mainly due to radiant heat from hot sources. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of radiant heat controls on workers heat stress around a typical blast furnace. Two main interventions were applied for reducing radiant heat around the blast furnace of a steel industry located in western Iran. These included using a heat absorbing system in the furnace body and installing reflective aluminum barrier in the main workstation. Heat stress indexes were measured before and after each intervention using the digital WBGT-meter. The results showed MRT and WBGT indexes decreased by 20 °C and 3.9 °C, respectively after using heat absorbing system and also decreased by 18.6 °C and 2.5 °C, respectively after installing a reflective barrier. These indexes decrease by 26.5 °C and 5.2 °C, respectively due to the simultaneous application of the two interventions which were statistically significant (p steel industries.

  8. The effect of welding line heat-affected-zone on the formability of tube hydroforming process

    Science.gov (United States)

    ChiuHuang, Cheng-Kai; Hsu, Cheng-En; Lee, Ping-Kun

    2016-08-01

    Tube hydroforming has been used as a lightweight design approach to reduce CO2 emission for the automotive industry. For the high strength steel tube, the strength and quality of the welding line is very important for a successful tube hydroforming process. This paper aims to investigate the effect of the welding line's strength and the width of the heat-affected zone on the tube thinning during the hydroforming process. The simulation results show that both factors play an important role on the thickness distribution during the tube expansion.

  9. The effect of welding line heat-affected-zone on the formability of tube hydroforming process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ChiuHuang, Cheng-Kai; Hsu, Cheng-En; Lee, Ping-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Tube hydroforming has been used as a lightweight design approach to reduce CO_2 emission for the automotive industry. For the high strength steel tube, the strength and quality of the welding line is very important for a successful tube hydroforming process. This paper aims to investigate the effect of the welding line's strength and the width of the heat-affected zone on the tube thinning during the hydroforming process. The simulation results show that both factors play an important role on the thickness distribution during the tube expansion. (paper)

  10. Effect of Microstructure on the Wear Behavior of Heat Treated SS-304 Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kumar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sliding wear characteristics of some heat treated SS-304 stainless steel against EN-8 steel in dry condition have been studied in the present experimental work. Samples of SS-304 stainless steel have been heated in a muffle furnace in desired temperature and allowed to dwell for two hours. The heated specimen are then cooled in different media namely inside the furnace, open air, cutting grade oil (grade 44 and water at room temperature to obtain different grades of heat treatment. Microstructures and corresponding micro hardness of the samples have been measured along with Feritscopic studies. Wear characteristics have been studied in a multi tribo-tester (Ducom in dry sliding condition against EN-8 steel roller. Speed, load on job and duration of test run have been considered as the experimental parameters. The wear of the samples have been obtained directly from ‘Winducom 2006’ software. Mass loss of the samples before and after operation has also been considered as the measure of wear in the present study. All the samples have been slid against EN-8 steel roller with fixed experimental parameters. The data have been plotted, compared and analyzed. Effect of microstructures as well as micro hardness on the wear behavior has been studied and concluded accordingly.

  11. Electrochemical corrosion response of a low carbon heat treated steel in a NaCl solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osorio, W.R.; Peixoto, L.C.; Garcia, L.R.; Garcia, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, State University of Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2009-10-15

    Dual-phase (DP) steels are produced from a specific heat treatment procedure and have recently emerged as a potential class of engineering materials for a number of structural and automobile applications. Such steels have high strength-to-weight ratio and reasonable formability. The present study aims to investigate the effects of four different and conventional heat treatments (i.e., hot rolling, normalizing, annealing, and intercritical annealing) on the resulting microstructural patterns and on the electrochemical corrosion behavior. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and Tafel plots were carried out on heat treated steel samples in a 0.5 M NaCl solution at 25 C with neutral pH. An equivalent circuit analysis was also used to provide quantitative support for the discussions. The normalizing and the annealing heat treatments have provided the highest and the lowest corrosion resistances, respectively. The intercritical annealing and as-received (hot rolled) low carbon steel samples have shown similar corrosion behavior. Although a deleterious effect on the corrosion resistance has been verified for DP steel due to the residual stress from the martensite formation, it combines good mechanical properties with intermediate electrochemical corrosion resistance. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  12. intercritical heat treatments effects on low carbon steels quenched

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR B. A. EZEKOYE

    Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nigeria, Nsukka. 2. E-mail: benjamin.ezekoye@unn.edu.ng; bezekoye@yahoo.com. ABSTRACT. Six low carbon steels containing carbon in the range 0.13-0.18wt%C were studied after intercritical quenching, intercritical quenching with low temperature tempering, ...

  13. Effect of heat treatment on workability of Cr-Ni-Mo steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barcal, J.; Macek, K.

    1988-01-01

    The workability was studied of the new development generation of hardenable martensite Cr-Ni-Mo steels of the 10-10-2 and 6-11-3 types whose application is envisaged in future in nuclear engineering. Attention is paid to identification of inclusions and the phase analysis ofthe structure with respect to heat treatment and steel type. Face milling was used in the test of workability. In addition, tensile strength and impact bending strength testing was performed. The results showed that steel of the 6-11-3 type in the quenched condition was best workable. However, this steel showed a significant reduction in workability when in the hardened condition. Reduced workability can also be presumed for type 10-10-2 steel in the hardened condition when life is considered. Microstructure changes leading to softening of steel by aging had a favourable effect on workability, especially in steels of the 10-10-2 type. Hardened steels of the 6-11-3 type are recommended to be re-quenched. (Z.M.). 7 figs., 3 tabs., 9 refs

  14. Numerical Analysis on Heat Flux Distribution through the Steel Liner of the Ex-vessel Core Catcher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Se Hong; Choi, Choeng Ryul [ELSOLTEC, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung Jo; Lee, Kyu Bok [KEPCO, Gimcheon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Do Hyun [KHNP-CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In order to prevent material failure of steel container of the core catcher system due to high temperatures, heat flux through the steel liner wall must be kept below the critical heat flux (CHF), and vapor dry-out of the cooling channel must be avoided. In this study, CFD methodology has been developed to simulate the heat flux distribution in the core catcher system, involving following physical phenomena: natural convection in the corium pool, boiling heat transfer and solidification/melting of the corium. A CFD methodology has been developed to simulate the thermal/hydraulic phenomena in the core catcher system, and a numerical analysis has been carried out to estimate the heat flux through the steel liner of the core catcher. High heat flux values are formed at the free surface of the corium pool. However, the heat flux through the steel liner is maintained below the critical heat flux.

  15. Effect of normalization heat treatment on creep and tensile properties of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panneer Selvi, S.; Sakthivel, T.; Parameswaran, P.; Laha, K.

    2016-01-01

    Creep and tensile properties have been investigated on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel subjected to single and double normalization heat treatments. Optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopic investigation revealed the presence of refined prior austenite grain size and fine M 23 C 6 precipitates in the double normalized steel compared to the steel subjected to single normalization heat treatment. Increased creep strain and significant reduction in creep rupture life were observed with the double normalized steel in comparison with single normalized steel. Increased tensile ductility coupled with marginal decrease in tensile strength at higher test temperature was observed with double normalized steel compared to single normalized steel. It has been attributed to the presence of refined prior austenite grain size and coarsening of Nb rich MX precipitates in double normalized steel. (author)

  16. Influence of heat input on weld bead geometry using duplex stainless steel wire electrode on low alloy steel specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit Mondal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gas metal arc welding cladding becomes a popular surfacing technique in many modern industries as it enhances effectively corrosion resistance property and wear resistance property of structural members. Quality of weld cladding may be enhanced by controlling process parameters. If bead formation is found acceptable, cladding is also expected to be good. Weld bead characteristics are often assessed by bead geometry, and it is mainly influenced by heat input. In this paper, duplex stainless steel E2209 T01 is deposited on E250 low alloy steel specimens with 100% CO2 gas as shielding medium with different heats. Weld bead width, height of reinforcement and depth of penetration are measured. Regression analysis is done on the basis of experimental data. Results reveal that within the range of bead-on-plate welding experiments done, parameters of welding geometry are on the whole linearly related with heat input. A condition corresponding to 0.744 kJ/mm heat input is recommended to be used for weld cladding in practice.

  17. Detrimental Cr-rich Phases Precipitation on SAF 2205 Duplex Stainless Steels Welds After Heat Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argelia Fabiola Miranda Pérez

    Full Text Available Abstract The austeno-ferritic Stainless Steels are commonly employed in various applications requiring structural performances with enhanced corrosion resistance. Their characteristics can be worsened if the material is exposed to thermal cycles, since the high-temperature decomposition of ferrite causes the formation of detrimental secondary phases. The Submerged Arc Welding (SAW process is currently adopted for joining DSS owing to its relatively simple execution, cost savings, and using molten slag and granular flux from protecting the seam of atmospheric gases. However, since it produces high contents of δ-ferrite in the heat affected zone and low content of γ-austenite in the weld, high-Ni filler materials must be employed, to avoid excessive ferritization of the joint. The present work is aimed to study the effect of 3 and 6 hours isothermal heat treatments at 850°C and 900°C in a SAF 2205 DSS welded joint in terms of phases precipitation. The results showed the presence of σ-phase at any time-temperature combination, precipitating at the δ/γ interphases and often accompanied by the presence of χ-phase. However, certain differences in secondary phases amounts were revealed among the different zones constituting the joint, ascribable both to peculiar elements partitioning and to the different morphology pertaining to each microstructure.

  18. Simulation of Distortion and Residual Stress Development During Heat Treatment of Steel Castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckermann, Christoph; Carlson, Kent

    2011-07-22

    Heat treatment and associated processing, such as quenching, are critical during high strength steel casting production. These processes must be managed closely to prevent thermal and residual stresses that may result in distortion, cracking (particularly after machining), re-work, and weld repair. The risk of casting distortion limits aggressive quenching that can be beneficial to the process and yield an improved outcome. As a result of these distortions, adjustments must be made to the casting or pattern design, or tie bars must be added. Straightening castings after heat treatments can be both time-consuming and expensive. Residual stresses may reduce a casting's overall service performance, possibly resulting in catastrophic failure. Stress relieving may help, but expends additional energy in the process. Casting software is very limited in predicting distortions during heat treatment, so corrective measures most often involve a tedious trial-and-error procedure. An extensive review of existing heat treatment residual stress and distortion modeling revealed that it is vital to predict the phase transformations and microstructure of the steel along with the thermal stress development during heat treatment. After reviewing the state-of-the-art in heat treatment residual stress and distortion modeling, an existing commercial code was selected because of its advanced capabilities in predicting phase transformations, the evolving microstructure and related properties along with thermal stress development during heat treatment. However, this software was developed for small parts created from forgings or machined stock, and not for steel castings. Therefore, its predictive capabilities for heat treatment of steel castings were investigated. Available experimental steel casting heat treatment data was determined to be of insufficient detail and breadth, and so new heat treatment experiments were designed and performed, casting and heat treating modified versions

  19. Occupational Heat Stress Impacts on Health and Productivity in a Steel Industry in Southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Manikandan; Ramalingam, Paramesh; Perumal, Kumaravel; Kamalakannan, Latha Perumal; Chinnadurai, Jeremiah; Shanmugam, Rekha; Srinivasan, Krishnan; Venugopal, Vidhya

    2017-03-01

    Workers laboring in steel industries in tropical settings with high ambient temperatures are subjected to thermally stressful environments that can create well-known risks of heat-related illnesses and limit workers' productivity. A cross-sectional study undertaken in a steel industry in a city nicknamed "Steel City" in Southern India assessed thermal stress by wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) and level of dehydration from urine color and urine specific gravity. A structured questionnaire captured self-reported heat-related health symptoms of workers. Some 90% WBGT measurements were higher than recommended threshold limit values (27.2-41.7°C) for heavy and moderate workloads and radiational heat from processes were very high in blooming-mill/coke-oven (67.6°C globe temperature). Widespread heat-related health concerns were prevalent among workers, including excessive sweating, fatigue, and tiredness reported by 50% workers. Productivity loss was significantly reported high in workers with direct heat exposures compared to those with indirect heat exposures (χ 2  = 26.1258, degrees of freedom = 1, p  industries enhancing welfare facilities and designing control interventions, further physiological studies with a seasonal approach and interventional studies are needed to strengthen evidence for developing comprehensive policies to protect workers employed in high heat industries.

  20. Creep behaviour of heat resistant steels. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloos, K.H.; Granacher, J.; Oehl, M.

    1993-01-01

    Creep data scatter bands of steels 2.25 Cr-1 Mo and 12 Cr-1 Mo-0.3 V were evaluated with the aid of model functions based on time temperature parameters. From the times to reach given strain values, mean isostrain curves in the stress time diagramme were calculated and therefrom, mean creep curves were derived. On this basis, creep equations were established, which include primary-, secondary- and tertiary-creep and are valid in the main range of application of each steel. Further, mean stress strain curves from hot tensile tests were used to describe the initial plastic strain in the creep equations. The values calculated with the established creep equations agreed relatively well with the correspondent original scatter band values from the creep tests. (orig.) [de

  1. Oxidation protection of austenite steels by heat-resisting glass-and-enamel coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobzhanidze, V.N.; Korchagin, V.S.

    1977-01-01

    The use of glass-enamel coatings for corrosion protection of austenitic steels during heat treatment has been investigated. When working out the composition of the protective coating, the method of mathematical planning of experiments has been used. It is shown that the coating under investigation can best be used in heat treatment of items with a prolonged time of heating to 1050 deg C (18-20 hr). The savings resulting from the introduction of the heat-resistant glass-enamel coating exceed 30000 roubles

  2. Study of the distribution of alloying elements between the phases of a heat treated steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, N.; Greday, T.

    1977-01-01

    The behavior of some low-alloy steels during industrial heat treatments is systematically studied. Firstly, the influence of the chemical analysis of the steel, the shape and size of carbides on the kinetics of the dissolution of these carbides at high temperature is pointed out in the case of steels with a relatively simple chemical analysis. Secondly, the effect of tempering treatments on the mechanical properties and characteristic parameters of the microstructure is studied in the case of three low-alloy steels. Bainitic microstructure appears to be the less disturbed one after a tempering treatment. Against, martensitic microstructures undergo an important softening and the mechanical properties of the pearlite lie as a very low level whatever their heat treatment. Peculiar conditions of tempering promotes a fine precipitation and its combined secondary hardening. These conditions are related to both chemical analysis and initial microstructure of the steel. Besides, some chemical identifications were performed in the scanning electron microscope on alloyed carbides precipitated in the steel during very long time tempering treatments

  3. Fatigue crack growth retardation in spot heated mild steel sheet

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A fatigue crack can be effectively retarded by heating a spot near the crack tip under nil remote stress condition. The subcritical spot heating at a proper position modifies the crack growth behaviour in a way, more or less, similar to specimen subjected to overload spike. It is observed that the extent of crack growth retardation ...

  4. Influence of heating temperature on bainite transformation proceeding in chromium-nickel-molybdenum steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaletin, Yu.M.; Kaletin, A.Yu.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to investigate the effect of heating and cooling from austenization temperature on development of bainite transformation in 37KhN3MFA and 18Kh2N4MA structural alloyed steels. The metallographical analysis of specimens has revealed that first crystals of bainite under slow heating up to 770-790 deg C appear at the temperature of about 500 deg C and at 475 deg C there has been much bainite over the whole cross section of the specimen. It is revealed that an increase of heating temperature and cooling rate replace the starting point of bainite transformation upwards. The strongest displacement of the point Bsub(S) into hogh-temperature range takes place after heating steel with the initial bainite structure in intercritical temperature range

  5. Martensitic transformation and residual stresses after thermomechanical treatment of heat treatable steel 42CrMo4 (SAE 4140)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weise, A. [Technische Univ. Chemnitz-Zwickau, Chemnitz (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Maschinenbau und Verfahrenstechnik; Fritsche, G. [Technische Univ. Chemnitz-Zwickau, Chemnitz (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Maschinenbau und Verfahrenstechnik

    1996-01-01

    The influence of thermomechanical deformation on the residual stresses caused by quenching in bar shaped specimens of heat treatable steel 42CrMo4 has been investigated using a mechanical method for determining the distribution of residual stresses of the first kind. The results obtained show that the residual stress distribution after quenching is affected by the strengthening and softening of the austenite as a result of deformation and recrystallization and the modified transformation behaviour in martensite stage. An attempt is made to discuss qualitatively the influence of these changes on the generation of residual stresses as compared to results obtained after conventional hardening. (orig.).

  6. Martensitic transformation and residual stresses after thermomechanical treatment of heat treatable steel 42CrMo4 (SAE 4140)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weise, A.; Fritsche, G.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of thermomechanical deformation on the residual stresses caused by quenching in bar shaped specimens of heat treatable steel 42CrMo4 has been investigated using a mechanical method for determining the distribution of residual stresses of the first kind. The results obtained show that the residual stress distribution after quenching is affected by the strengthening and softening of the austenite as a result of deformation and recrystallization and the modified transformation behaviour in martensite stage. An attempt is made to discuss qualitatively the influence of these changes on the generation of residual stresses as compared to results obtained after conventional hardening. (orig.)

  7. Alloying and heat treatment optimization of Fe/Cr/C steels for improved mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarikaya, M.

    1979-06-01

    The effects of alloying elements and heat treatments on the microstructural changes and strength-toughness properties were investigated in optimization of vacuum melted Fe/Cr/C base steels. The structure of the steels in the as-quenched conditions consisted of highly dislocated autotempered lath martensite (strong phase) and thin continuous interlath films of retained austenite (tough phase). It has been emphasized again that the mechanical properties of the steels are sensitive to the amount and the stability of retained austenite. To increase the stability of retained austenite in the as-quenched condition 2 w/o Mn or 2 w/o Ni was added to the base steel, viz., Fe/3Cr/0.3C. Partial replacement of Cr by about 0.5 w/o Mo did not alter the beneficial microstructure

  8. Effect of post-weld heat treatment and neutron irradiation on a dissimilar-metal joint between F82H steel and 316L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Haiying, E-mail: haigirl1983@gmail.com [SOKENDAI - The Graduated University for Advanced Studies, Toki (Japan); Nagasaka, Takuya [SOKENDAI - The Graduated University for Advanced Studies, Toki (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki (Japan); Kometani, Nobuyuki [Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Muroga, Takeo [SOKENDAI - The Graduated University for Advanced Studies, Toki (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki (Japan); Guan, Wenhai; Nogami, Shuhei; Yabuuchi, Kiyohiro; Iwata, Takuya; Hasegawa, Akira [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Yamazaki, Masanori [International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University (Japan); Kano, Sho; Satoh, Yuhki; Abe, Hiroaki [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Tanigawa, Hiroyasu [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Significant hardening after neutron irradiation at 300 °C for 0.1 dpa was found in the fine-grain HAZ of F82H for the dissimilar-metal joint between F82H and 316L. • The possible hardening mechanism was explained from the viewpoint of carbon behavior. • However, the significant hardening did not degrade the impact property significantly. - Abstract: A dissimilar-metal joint between F82H steel and 316L stainless steel was fabricated by using electron beam welding (EBW). By microstructural analysis and hardness test, the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of F82H was classified into interlayer area, fine-grain area, and coarse-carbide area. Post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) was applied to control the hardness of HAZ. After PWHT at 680 °C for 1 h, neutron irradiation at 300 °C with a dose of 0.1 dpa was carried out for the joint in Belgian Reactor II (BR-II). Compared to the base metals (BMs) and weld metal (WM), significant irradiation hardening up to 450HV was found in the fine-grain HAZ of F82H. However, the impact property of F82H-HAZ specimens, which was machined with the root of the V-notch at HAZ of F82H, was not deteriorated obviously in spite of the significant irradiation hardening.

  9. An Experimental Investigation on Hardness and Microstructure of Heat Treated EN 9 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Palash; Kundu, Arnab; Mondal, Dhiraj

    2017-08-01

    In the modern engineering world, extensive research has led to the development of some special grades of steel, often suited for enhanced functions. EN 9 steel is one such grade, having major applications in power plants, automobile and aerospace industry. Different heat treatment processes are employed to achieve high hardness and high wear resistance, but machinability subsequently decreases. Existing literature is not sufficient to achieve a balance between hardness and machinability. The aim of this experimental work is to determine the hardness values and observe microstructural changes in EN9 steel, when it is subjected to annealing, normalizing and quenching. Finally, the effects of tempering after each of these heat treatments on hardness and microstructure have also been shown. It is seen that the tempering after normalizing the specimen achieved satisfactory results. The microstructure was also observed to be consisting of fine grains.

  10. Preliminary study on high temperature heat exchanger for nuclear steel making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakada, T; Ohtomo, A; Yamada, R; Suzuki, K; Narita, Y [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1975-05-01

    Both in the high temperature heat exchanger and in the steam reformer, there remain several technical problems to be solved before nuclear steel making is actualized. The loop for use with basic studies of those problems was planned by the Iron and Steel Institute of Japan (ISIJ), and its actual design, construction and co-ordination of tests were undertaken by IHI on behalf of ISIJ. The primary coolant used in the loop was helium having a pressure of approx. 12 kg/cm/sup 2/g and a temperature of approx. 1100/sup 0/C at the inlet of the high temperature heat exchanger, i.e., the test section. Steam, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide were used as secondary coolants. Of the technical problems regarding the high temperature heat exchanger for nuclear steel making, which were selected and studied using the loop, the following items are discussed: (1) heat exchange performance using helium and steam; (2) hydrogen permeation of heat resisting alloys; (3) creep and carburization of heat resisting alloys; amd (4) hydrogen absorption performance of the titanium sponge.

  11. Evaluation of the Sensitization of 316L Stainless Steels After the Post Weld Heat Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Junho; Jang, Changheui [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    It was observed that the PWSCC growth rate of alloy 182 was markedly decreased after PWHT. However, the PWHT of components made of stainless steels (SSs) would be limited because of the concerns about sensitization when they are exposed to temperature range of 500 to 800 .deg. C. Also, the sensitization of austenitic stainless steels could increase the susceptibility to intergrannular stress corrosion cracking. Therefore, the effect of PWHT on the sensitization behaviors of 316L SSs having predominant austenitic structure with small amount of ferrite was investigated to assess the applicability of PWHT to dissimilar weld area with austenitic stainless steels. The sensitization behaviors of two heats of 316L SSs with small amount of ferrite were investigated after heat treatment at 600, 650 and 700 .deg. C. Grain boundary sensitization was not observed in 316L SSs after the heat treatment at 600, 650 and 700 .deg. C up to 30 h. The increase in degree of sensitization (DOS) was caused by reduction of corrosion resistance in ferrite phase due to formation of chromium carbide and intermatallic phases during heat treatment. The DOS value of 316L SSs depended on the ferrite morphology. The stringer type of ferrite (316L-heat A) showed relatively higher DOS in comparison with 316L containing blocky type of ferrite (316L-heat B). It could be due to sufficient supplement of chromium in larger size of ferrite phase.

  12. Evaluation of the Sensitization of 316L Stainless Steels After the Post Weld Heat Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Junho; Jang, Changheui; Lee, Kyoung Soo

    2014-01-01

    It was observed that the PWSCC growth rate of alloy 182 was markedly decreased after PWHT. However, the PWHT of components made of stainless steels (SSs) would be limited because of the concerns about sensitization when they are exposed to temperature range of 500 to 800 .deg. C. Also, the sensitization of austenitic stainless steels could increase the susceptibility to intergrannular stress corrosion cracking. Therefore, the effect of PWHT on the sensitization behaviors of 316L SSs having predominant austenitic structure with small amount of ferrite was investigated to assess the applicability of PWHT to dissimilar weld area with austenitic stainless steels. The sensitization behaviors of two heats of 316L SSs with small amount of ferrite were investigated after heat treatment at 600, 650 and 700 .deg. C. Grain boundary sensitization was not observed in 316L SSs after the heat treatment at 600, 650 and 700 .deg. C up to 30 h. The increase in degree of sensitization (DOS) was caused by reduction of corrosion resistance in ferrite phase due to formation of chromium carbide and intermatallic phases during heat treatment. The DOS value of 316L SSs depended on the ferrite morphology. The stringer type of ferrite (316L-heat A) showed relatively higher DOS in comparison with 316L containing blocky type of ferrite (316L-heat B). It could be due to sufficient supplement of chromium in larger size of ferrite phase

  13. Strain-tempering of low carbon martensite steel wire by rapid heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torisaka, Yasunori; Kihara, Junji

    1978-01-01

    In the production of prestressed concrete steel wires, a series of the cold drawing-patenting process are performed to improve the strength. In order to reduce cyclic process, the low carbon martensite steel wire which can be produced only by the process of hot rolling and direct quench has been investigated as strain-tempering material. When strain-tempering is performed on the low carbon martensite steel wire, stress relaxation (Re%) increases and mechanical properties such as total elongation, reduction of area, ultimate tensile strength and proof stress decrease remarkably by annealing. In order to shorten the heating time, the authors performed on the steel wire the strain-tempering with a heating time of 1.0 s using direct electrical resistance heating and examined the effects of rapid heating on the stress relaxation and the mechanical properties. Stress relaxation decreases without impairment of the mechanical properties up to a strain-tempering temperature of 573 K. Re(%) after 10.8 ks is 0% at the testing temperature 301 K, 0.49% at 363 K and 1.39% at 433 K. (auth.)

  14. Heat treatment temperature influence on ASTM A890 GR 6A super duplex stainless steel microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Marcelo; Casteletti, Luiz Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Duplex and super duplex stainless steels are ferrous alloys with up to 26% chromium, 8% nickel, 5% molybdenum and 0.3% nitrogen, which are largely used in applications in media containing ions from the halogen family, mainly the chloride ion (Cl - ). The emergence of this material aimed at substituting Copper-Nickel alloys (Cupro-Nickel) that despite presenting good corrosion resistance, has mechanical properties quite inferior to steel properties. The metallurgy of duplex and super duplex stainless steel is complex due to high sensitiveness to sigma phase precipitation that becomes apparent, due to the temperatures they are exposed on cooling from solidification as well as from heat treatment processes. The objective of this study was to verify the influence of heat treating temperatures on the microstructure and hardness of ASTM A890/A890M Gr 6A super duplex stainless steel type. Microstructure control is of extreme importance for castings, as the chemical composition and cooling during solidification inevitably provide conditions for precipitation of sigma phase. Higher hardness in these materials is directly associated to high sigma phase concentration in the microstructure, precipitated in the ferrite/austenite interface. While heat treatment temperature during solution treatment increases, the sigma phase content in the microstructure decreases and consequently, the material hardness diminishes. When the sigma phase was completely dissolved by the heat treatment, the material hardness was influenced only due to ferrite and austenite contents in the microstructure

  15. Laser heat treatment of steel cutting blades for agricultural uses; Tratamiento termico con laser de cuchillas de acero para uso agricola

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muniz, G.; Conde, A.; Fernandez, B. J.; Varela, R.; Garcia, I.; Damborenea, J. de

    2003-07-01

    The present paper focuses on the laser surface treatment of mild steels with different %wt of carbon to be used as cutting blades in agricultural applications. The results are discussed in function of the metallographic study, hardness profiles, wear resistance and corrosion testing. Special attention is paid to the results of the results obtained with the experimental steel with carbon 0.33 %wt because it is a new promising materials specifically developed to be applied in such agricultural uses. Metallographic studies showed three well defined regions: the laser treated zone, where solid state phase transformation occurs, the heat affected zone (HAZ) with partial transformations and finally the bulk metal with the original microstructure. Surface hardness was in all cases higher than the base steel in a depth range 600 {mu}m. Wear resistance is notably improved with laser heat treatment while no detrimental effects were induced in their specific corrosion resistance. (Author) 16 refs.

  16. Environmentally assisted cracking of non-sensitized stainless steels - possible affecting phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrnsten, Ulla; Haenninen, Hannu

    2006-09-01

    Intergranular, environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) has been observed, not only in sensitized austenitic stainless steels, but also in non-sensitized stainless steels. This type of cracking has so far been connected to cold-worked stainless steels and it has been reported to occur in the oxidising environments, but it may also be a potential degradation mode in non-oxidising environments (i.e., both in BWR and PWR conditions). Localisation of plastic deformation and the interactions between oxidation and strain localisation are most probably playing the key role in cracking of cold-worked stainless steels. In this paper, the possible affecting phenomena are reviewed with the main emphasis on dynamic strain ageing. However, also environmentally enhanced creep, dynamic recovery, microstructures of the cold-worked austenitic stainless steels and relaxation are briefly discussed. Mechanistic understanding of the effects of these main factors affecting intergranular stress corrosion cracking of cold-worked, non-sensitized austenitic stainless steels is important, especially as the trend in the NDE inspection strategy is moving towards risk informed inspection. (authors)

  17. Effect of heating and deformation conditions on the depth of surface defects in alloyed steel rolling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malygin, R.Z.; Karyakin, B.P.; Grosman, A.B.; Simovskikh, V.N.; Storozhev, V.I.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of heating and deformation conditions on the depth change of artificial defects in the 50 KhFA alloyed steel rolling on the 850 blooming and 450 section mill was studied. Quite a definite regularity in the arrangement of defects (cracks and hairlines) along the circumference of the round steel bar and obvious relation with the defect distribution on the bloom faces are established. Oxidation is shown to diminish defect depth while ingot and billet heating especially on the faces under direct firing. Blooms should be placed in the furnace with 90 deg canting in relation to the faces position while ingot heating. Round rolling must be performed with one or several 45 deg strip cantings. The defect depth for the ingots to be rolled without chipping is set up

  18. Preliminary study on high temperature heat exchanger for nuclear steel making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Y [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan); Ikegami, H

    1975-03-01

    In the high temperature heat exchanger as well as the steam reformer, several technical problems should be solved before realizing a nuclear plant complex for iron and steel making. Research has been carried out on heat exchanger between helium and steam, hydrogen permeation through super alloys, hydrogen removal using a titanium sponge, and creep and carburization performance of super alloys. The primary coolant used is helium having a pressure of approximately 12 kg/cm/sup 2/G and a temperature of approximately 1100/sup 0/C measured at the inlet of the high temperature heat exchanger, i.e., the test section. Steam, hydrogen and carbon monoxide are used as secondary coolants.

  19. Survey of the effect of heat-to-heat variations upon the fatigue-crack propagation behavior of types 304 and 316 stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, L.A.

    1975-05-01

    The fatigue-crack growth behavior of four heats of annealed Type 304 stainless steel and three heats of annealed Type 316 stainless steel were studied at elevated temperature using the techniques of linear-elastic fracture mechanics. It is estimated that a factor of 1.5 applied above and below the mean line would provide upper and lower bounds that would account for heat-to-heat variations. In addition, the three heats of Type 316 represented three different melt practices: air-melt, vacuum-arc-remelt, and double-vacuum-melt processes. No effect on fatigue-crack growth behavior was noted due to melt practice. (U.S.)

  20. Microstructural evolution of 316L stainless steels with yttrium addition after mechanical milling and heat treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotan, Hasan, E-mail: hasankotan@gmail.com

    2015-10-28

    Nanocrystalline 316L stainless steels with yttrium addition were prepared by mechanical milling at cryogenic temperature and subjected to annealing treatments at various temperatures up to 1200 °C. The dependence of hardness on the microstructure was utilized to study the mechanical changes in the steels occurring during annealing. The microstructural evolution of the as-milled and annealed steels was characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), focused ion beam microscopy (FIB) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. The results have revealed that austenite in as-received powder partially transformed to martensite phase during mechanical milling whereas the annealing induced reverse transformation of martensite-to-austenite. Furthermore, while the austenite-to-martensite phase ratio increased with increasing annealing temperature, the equilibrium structure was not achieved after three hours heat treatments up to 1200 °C resulting in a dual-phased steels with around 10% martensite. The grain size of 316L steel was 19 nm after mechanical milling and remained around 116 nm at 1100 °C with yttrium addition as opposed to micron size grains of plain 316L steel at the same annealing temperature. Such microstructural features facilitate the use of these materials at elevated temperatures, as well as the development of scalable processing routes into a dense nanocrystalline compact.

  1. Influence of the chemical composition, heat and surface treatment in the biofouling of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarro, M. I.; Aleman, O.; Moreno, D. A.; Roso, M.; Ranninger, C.

    2004-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to analyse the biofouling processes in the kinds of stainless steels used normally in industry (UNS S30400, UNS S30403 and UNS S31600), with different surface treatments after grinding and polishing. The study was developed using two microscopy techniques. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM was used to evaluate the microorganisms distribution in the materials, and Epi fluorescence Microscopy was used to evaluate the viability of cells in the biofilm. The results revealed the influence of the material, heat treatment, surface treatment and roughness in the biofouling processes in the stainless steel assays. (Author) 33 refs

  2. Characterization by transmission electron microscopy of a JRQ steel subjected to different heat treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno G, N.

    2014-01-01

    In this work a study was conducted on the steel Astm A-533, Grade B, Class 1 of reference JRQ, for the purpose of carrying out a study by transmission electron microscopy on the size and distribution of precipitates in steel samples JRQ previously subjected to heat treatments. This because the reactor vessels of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, are made of a steel Astm A-533 Grade B, Class 1. It is known that the neutron radiation causes damage primarily embrittlement in materials that are exposed to it. However, observable damage through mechanical tests result from microstructural defects and atomic, induced by the neutron radiation. In previous studies hardening by precipitation of a JRQ steel (provided by the IAEA) was induced by heat treatments, finding that the conditions of heat treatment that reproduce the hardness and stress mechanical properties of a steel Astm A-533, Grade B, Class 1 irradiated for 8 years to a fluence of 3.5 x 10 17 neutrons/cm 2 and to a temperature of 290 grades C are achieved with annealing treatments at 550 grades C. In the studied samples it was found that the more hardening phase both the heat treatments as the neutron radiation, is the bainite, being the ferrite practically unchanged. Which it gave the tone to believe that the ferrite is the phase that provides at level macro the mechanical properties in stress, since in the irradiated samples such properties remained unchanged with respect to the non-irradiated material, however changes were observed in material ductility, which may be attributable to the change of hardness in the bainite, which opens a possibility for modeling the micromechanical behavior of this material. (Author)

  3. Numerical analysis of thermal deformation in laser beam heating of a steel plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chao; Kim, Yong-Rae; Kim, Jae-Woong [Yeungnam University, Kyongsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    Line heating is a widely used process for plate forming or thermal straightening. Flame heating and induction heating are the traditional heating processes used by industry for line heating. However, these two heating processes are ineffective when used on small steel plates. Thus, the laser beam heating with various power profiles were carried out in this study. A comparison of numerical simulation results and experimental results found a significant difference in the thermal deformation when apply a different power profile of laser beam heating. The one-sinusoid power profile produced largest thermal deformation in this study. The laser beam heating process was simulated by established a combined heat source model, and simulated results were compared with experimental results to confirm the model’s accuracy. The mechanism of thermal deformation was investigated and the effects of model parameters were studied intensively with the finite element method. Thermal deformation was found to have a significant relationship with the amount of central zone plastic deformation. Scientists and engineers could use this study’s verified model to select appropriate parameters in laser beam heating process. Moreover, by using the developed laser beam model, the analysis of welding residual stress or hardness could also be investigated from a power profile point of view.

  4. Qualification of stainless steel for OTEC heat exchanger tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaQue, F.L.

    1979-01-01

    The history of the AL-6X alloy is reviewed and its credentials as a candidate for use as tubing in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Heat Exchangers are examined. Qualification is based on results of accelerated tests using ferric chloride for resistance to crevice corrosion and pitting, long-time crevice corrosion and pitting tests in natural sea water and anticipated resistance to attack by ammonia and mixtures of ammonia and sea water. Since the alloy has no natural resistance to fouling by marine organisms, it must be able to accomodate action to prevent fouling by chlorination or to remove it by mechanical cleaning techniques or appropriate chemical cleaning methods. The satisfactory behavior indicated by the various accelerated and long-time corrosion tests has been confirmed by excellent performance of several million feet of tubing in condensers in coastal power plants. Early evaluation tests demonstrated the need for proper heat treatment to avoid the presence of a sigma phase, which promoted severe pitting of some, but not all, specimens in tests in natural sea water. The available data qualify the AL-6X alloy as being a satisfactory alternate to titanium for tubes in OTEC heat exchangers.

  5. Heat treatment evaluation of steel ASTM A-131 grade A by X-Ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira Junior, Francisco; Feio, Luciana Gaspar; Costa, Ednelson Silva; Rodrigues, Lino Alberto Soares; Braga, Eduardo Magalhaes, E-mail: juniorferrer93@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Pará (UFPA), Belém, PA (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: This study evaluates the residual stress of naval steel ASTM A-131 grade A before and after heat treatment. Residual stresses were determined by the technique of X-ray diffraction (XRD). Before heat treatment the residual stress measurements were made at 36 (thirty six) points distributed in a specimen with dimensions of 400 mm long, 200 mm wide and 95 mm thick, then the plate under analysis was brought to the oven for the implementation of heat treatment. To check the performance of the heat treatment, the plate was again subjected to XRD measurements of the same points previously measured in order to compare the residual stresses. As result, there was a reduction of residual stresses with the application of heat treatment. References: [1] COLPAERT, H. Metalografia dos Produtos Siderurgicos Comuns. 4 Edição. Editora Blucher. Saõ Paulo, SP, 2008. [2] HILL, R. Princípios de Metalurgia Física, 1992. (author)

  6. Role of heat tint on pitting corrosion of 304 austenitic stainless steel in chloride environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elshawesh, F.; Elhoud, A. [Petroleum Research Center, P. O. Box 6431, Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya)

    2004-07-01

    The effect of simulated heat tint produced by air oxidation at a wide range of temperatures 200, 400, 600, 800 and 1050 deg. C on pitting potential of 304 austenitic stainless steel was studied in environment of different chloride concentration. It was found that the heat tint effect depends on the heating temperature. The most effective heat tint was that produced at the high temperature up to 1050 deg. C and hence less pitting potential and low corrosion resistance. In order to improve the surface pitting corrosion resistance, acid pickling of hydrochloric acid was applied at different time and temperatures of 15 and 60 min, room temperature and 60 deg. C, respectively. Improvement in pitting potential was achieved as the pickling time and temperature increase. This is can be attributed to the removal of depleted chromium oxide film produced during the heat tint. (authors)

  7. Influence of Heat Treatment on Mercury Cavitation Resistance of Surface Hardened 316LN Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Hsu, Julia [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

    2010-11-01

    The cavitation-erosion resistance of carburized 316LN stainless steel was significantly degraded but not destroyed by heat treatment in the temperature range 500-800 C. The heat treatments caused rejection of some carbon from the carburized layer into an amorphous film that formed on each specimen surface. Further, the heat treatments encouraged carbide precipitation and reduced hardness within the carburized layer, but the overall change did not reduce surface hardness fully to the level of untreated material. Heat treatments as short as 10 min at 650 C substantially reduced cavitation-erosion resistance in mercury, while heat treatments at 500 and 800 C were found to be somewhat less detrimental. Overall, the results suggest that modest thermal excursions perhaps the result of a weld made at some distance to the carburized material or a brief stress relief treatment will not render the hardened layer completely ineffective but should be avoided to the greatest extent possible.

  8. Effects of Heat Input on Microstructure, Corrosion and Mechanical Characteristics of Welded Austenitic and Duplex Stainless Steels: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghusoon Ridha Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of input heat of different welding processes on the microstructure, corrosion, and mechanical characteristics of welded duplex stainless steel (DSS are reviewed. Austenitic stainless steel (ASS is welded using low-heat inputs. However, owing to differences in the physical metallurgy between ASS and DSS, low-heat inputs should be avoided for DSS. This review highlights the differences in solidification mode and transformation characteristics between ASS and DSS with regard to the heat input in welding processes. Specifically, many studies about the effects of heat energy input in welding process on the pitting corrosion, intergranular stress, stresscorrosion cracking, and mechanical properties of weldments of DSS are reviewed.

  9. Thermal Effects That Arise upon Different Heat Treatments in Austenitic Steels Alloyed with Titanium and Phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbuzov, V. L.; Berger, I. F.; Bobrovskii, V. I.; Voronin, V. I.; Danilov, S. E.; Kazantsev, V. A.; Kataev, N. V.; Sagaradze, V. V.

    2018-04-01

    Structural and microstructural changes that arise in the course of the heat treatment of Cr-Ni-Mo austenitic stainless steels with different concentrations of titanium and phosphorus have been studied. It has been found that the alloying with phosphorus decreases the lattice parameter of these steels. The phosphorus contribution to this effect is 0.015 ± 0.002 Å/at %. Aging at a temperature of 670 K for about 20 h leads to the precipitation of dispersed needle-like particles, which are most likely to be iron phosphides. In the temperature range of 700-800 K, in austenitic steels, the atomic separation of the solid solution occurs, the intensity of which decreases upon alloying with titanium or phosphorus at concentrations of 1.0 and 0.1 wt %, respectively. At higher temperatures (about 950 K), the formed precipitates of the Ni3Ti (γ') phase increase in size to 7-10 nm.

  10. Acoustic Emission Methodology to Evaluate the Fracture Toughness in Heat Treated AISI D2 Tool Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafavi, Sajad; Fotouhi, Mohamad; Motasemi, Abed; Ahmadi, Mehdi; Sindi, Cevat Teymuri

    2012-10-01

    In this article, fracture toughness behavior of tool steel was investigated using Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring. Fracture toughness ( K IC) values of a specific tool steel was determined by applying various approaches based on conventional AE parameters, such as Acoustic Emission Cumulative Count (AECC), Acoustic Emission Energy Rate (AEER), and the combination of mechanical characteristics and AE information called sentry function. The critical fracture toughness values during crack propagation were achieved by means of relationship between the integral of the sentry function and cumulative fracture toughness (KICUM). Specimens were selected from AISI D2 cold-work tool steel and were heat treated at four different tempering conditions (300, 450, 525, and 575 °C). The results achieved through AE approaches were then compared with a methodology proposed by compact specimen testing according to ASTM standard E399. It was concluded that AE information was an efficient method to investigate fracture characteristics.

  11. The Effect of Heat Treatments and Coatings on the Outgassing Rate of Stainless Steel Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamum, Md Abdullah A. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Elmustafa, Abdelmageed A, [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Stutzman, Marcy L. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Adderley, Philip A. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Poelker, Matthew [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-03-01

    The outgassing rates of four nominally identical 304L stainless steel vacuum chambers were measured to determine the effect of chamber coatings and heat treatments. One chamber was coated with titanium nitride (TiN) and one with amorphous silicon (a-Si) immediately following fabrication. One chamber remained uncoated throughout, and the last chamber was first tested without any coating, and then coated with a-Si following a series of heat treatments. The outgassing rate of each chamber was measured at room temperatures between 15 and 30 deg C following bakes at temperatures between 90 and 400 deg C. Measurements for bare steel showed a significant reduction in the outgassing rate by more than a factor of 20 after a 400 deg C heat treatment (3.5 x 10{sup 12} TorrL s{sup -1}cm{sup -2} prior to heat treatment, reduced to 1.7 x 10{ sup -13} TorrL s{sup -1}cm{sup -2} following heat treatment). The chambers that were coated with a-Si showed minimal change in outgassing rates with heat treatment, though an outgassing rate reduced by heat treatments prior to a-Si coating was successfully preserved throughout a series of bakes. The TiN coated chamber exhibited remarkably low outgassing rates, up to four orders of magnitude lower than the uncoated stainless steel. An evaluation of coating composition suggests the presence of elemental titanium which could provide pumping and lead to an artificially low outgassing rate. The outgassing results are discussed in terms of diffusion-limited versus recombination-limited processes.

  12. Prediction of long-term precipitate evolution in austenitic heat-resistant steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Jae-Hyeok; Jung, Woo-Sang; Cho, Young Whan [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Materials/Devices Div.; Kozeschnik, Ernst [Vienna Univ. of Technology (Austria). Inst. of Materials Science and Technology

    2010-07-01

    Numerical prediction of the long-term precipitate evolution in five different austenitic heat-resistant stainless steels, NF709, Super304H, Sanicro25, CF8C-PLUS and HTUPS has been carried out. MX and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} are predicted to remain as major precipitates during long-term aging in these steels. The addition of 3 wt% Cu produces very fine Cu-rich precipitates during aging in Super304H and Sanicro25. It is found that the amount of Z phase start to increase remarkably between 1,000 and 10,000 hours of aging at the expense of MX precipitates in the steels containing a high nitrogen content. However, the growth rate of Z phase is relatively slow and its average size reaches at most a few tens of nanometers after 100,000 hours of aging at 700 C, compared with 9-12% Cr ferritic/martensitic heat-resistant steels. The predicted precipitation sequence and precipitate size during aging are in general agreement with experimental observations. (orig.)

  13. EVALUATION OF PRECIPITATION HARDENING HEAT TREATMENT OF PH 17-7 STAINLESS STEEL SPRING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Babakoohi Ashrafi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the influence of heat treatment on PH17-7 stainless steel spring was evaluated. Precipitation hardening phenomenon of  PH 17-7 steel was evaluated in three stages. First, the spring constant changes with time and temperature was evaluated. Second, the spring constant changes with respect to its original length at constant temperature and time with blocking (spring length after compression, 18 and 21 mm were investigated.  And finally, the spring heat treatment at 480 °C for 80 min and then holding at 230 °C in oil bath for 60 min without blocking were investigated. The results showed that the use of 18 mm block have large spring constant than 21 mm block. The optimal conditions (480°C for 80 min for this spring to reaching maximum spring constant were determined.

  14. Analytical Study of Common Rigid Steel Connections under the Effect of Heat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohola Rahnavard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important members of steel structure’s connection region is beam-to-column connection. Rigid connection in steel moment frame has special role in the behavior of these structures and the fire resistance of these connections can be important. In this paper the behaviors of three common types of rigid connections in Iran under the effect of heat were studied by the use of numerical finite element methods through ABAQUS software. The models were verified by the use of an experimental model through elastic and plastic amplitudes up to collapse and during numerical results, and the effect of large deformation in the nonlinear region has also been considered. The results show that the connection with the end plate had a better performance against heat than other connections. Also reduced stiffness and lateral buckling in this connection were less than other connections.

  15. Effect of Cr Contents and Heat Treating on Reverted Austenite in Maraging Steel Weldments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S. W.; Lee, H. W.

    2018-05-01

    By conducting flux cored arc welding (FCAW) on maraging steels with Cr contents of 1.4 and 5.2 wt%, this study observed the effects of Cr content and heat treating on reverted austenite formation in welded maraging steel. Aging treatment was carried out at the temperatures of 450, 480 and 530 °C for 3 h in each condition. As the aging temperature increased, reverted austenite was formed along the interdendritic and intercellular grain boundaries, and the proportion of reverted austenite increased with increasing Cr addition. The aging process led to the segregation of Ti and Mo along the interdendritic and intercellular grain boundaries. Some of the welded specimens were subjected to solution heat treatment at 820 and 1250 °C for 1 h after welding, resulting in a decrease in reverted austenite fraction.

  16. Comparison of hardenability calculation methods of the heat-treatable constructional steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrzanski, L.A.; Sitek, W. [Division of Tool Materials and Computer Techniques in Metal Science, Silesian Technical University, Gliwice (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    Evaluation has been made of the consistency of calculation of the hardenability curves of the selected heat-treatable alloyed constructional steels with the experimental data. The study has been conducted basing on the analysis of present state of knowledge on hardenability calculation employing the neural network methods. Several calculation examples and comparison of the consistency of calculation methods employed are included. (author). 35 refs, 2 figs, 3 tabs.

  17. Influenced prior loading on the creep fatigue damage accumulation of heat resistant steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloos, K.H.; Granacher, J.; Scholz, A.

    1990-01-01

    On two heat resistant power plant steels the influence of prior strain cycling on the creep rupture behaviour and the influence of prior creep loading on the strain cycling behaviour is investigated. These influences concern the number of cycles to failure and the rupture time being the reference values of the generalized damage accumulation rule and they are used for a creep fatigue analysis of the results of long term service-type strain cycling tests. (orig.) [de

  18. Effect of heat treatment on microstructure and hardness of Eurofer 97, Eurofer ODS and T92 steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Z.; Faulkner, R.G.; Riddle, N.; Martino, F.D.; Yang, K.

    2009-01-01

    Eurofer ODS steel is a potential candidate for fusion reactor application due to its excellent swelling resistance, low thermal expansion coefficient and high temperature properties. One of the main issues is that high fluence neutron irradiation induces a significant increase of ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) at temperatures below 400 deg. C which restricts its application. The aim of this study is to explore the methods to lower the initial DBTT of Eurofer ODS steel by heat treatment optimization. Two heats of Eurofer ODS steels with different C contents are heat-treated at different normalizing temperatures, cooling rates and tempering conditions, and are compared with Eurofer 97 and T92 steels heat-treated with similar conditions. The microstructure is characterized by optical microscopy, FEG-TEM and OIM-EBSD techniques. The effect of normalization, cooling rate and temper on grain size, precipitation, grain boundary misorientation and hardness are investigated. The influences of these properties on DBTT are discussed.

  19. Heat treatment effect on the properties of the EhP767 maraging steel welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taver, E.I.; Piskarev, M.N.; Yushchenko, K.A.; Pustovit, A.I.; Anisimova, M.S.

    1977-01-01

    Heat treatment effect on properties of welded joints of maraging 03Kh13N4K13M3T (EhP767) steel with yield strength over 150 kgs/mm 2 has been investigated. It is shown, that change in impact strength of aged joints at - 196 deg C depends on the amount of residual austenite and grain size. To stabilize 20-40 % residual austenite heat treatment regimes have been developed. Recommended are quenching at 1030-1050 deg C, sub-zero treatment and aging at 520 deg C for 16 hrs

  20. Optimization of Composition and Heat Treating of Die Steels for Extended Lifetime; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David Schwam; John F, Wallace; Quanyou Zhou

    2002-01-01

    An ''average'' die casting die costs fifty thousand dollars. A die used in making die cast aluminum engine blocks can cost well over one million dollars. These costs provide a strong incentive for extension of die life. While vacuum quenched Premium Grade H13 dies have become the most widely used in the United States, tool makers and die casters are constantly searching for new steels and heat treating procedures to extend die life. This project was undertaken to investigate the effects of composition and heat treating on die life and optimize these parameters

  1. Calculation of α/γ equilibria in SA508 grade 3 steels for intercritical heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B.J.; Kim, H.D.; Hong, J.H.

    1998-01-01

    An attempt has been made to suggest an optimum temperature for intercritical heat treatment of an SA508 grade 3 steel for nuclear pressure vessels, based on thermodynamic calculation of the α/γ phase equilibria. A thermodynamic database constructed for the Fe-Mn-Ni-Mo-Cr-Si-V-Al-C-N ten-component system and an empirical criterion that the amount of reformed austenite should be around 40 pct were used for thermodynamic calculation and derivation of the optimum heat-treatment temperature, respectively. The calculated optimum temperature, 720 C, was in good agreement with an experimentally determined temperature of 725 C obtained through an independent experimental investigation of the same steel. The agreement between the calculated and measured fraction of reformed austenite during the intercritical heat treatment was also confirmed. Based on the agreement between calculation and experiment, it could be concluded that thermodynamic calculations can be successfully applied to the materials and/or process design as an additive tool to the already established technology, and that the currently constructed thermodynamic database for steel systems shows an accuracy that makes such applications possible

  2. Preliminary heat treatment of 4KhM2Fch die steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonidov, V.M.; Berezkin, Y.A.; Nikitenko, E.V.

    1986-01-01

    To improve the machinability and preparation of the structure for hardening, die steels are given a preliminary treatment which provides a reduction in hardness as a result of separation in the structure of the carbide and ferrite phases, coagulation of the carbides, and acquisition by them of a granular form and also the obtaining of fine grains and a uniform distribution of the structural constituents. The microstructure was evaluated after etching in 4% nital on an MIM-8M microscope. The 4KhM2Fch steel was given a preliminary heat treatment of normalize and anneal. It was concluded that for 4KhM2Fch steel a preliminary heat treatment of normalizing from 950 0 C with a hold of 1.5-2 h, annealing at 750-760 0 C with a hold of 2-3 h, cooling to the isothermal temperature of 670-680 0 C with a hold of 3-4 h, and further air cooling is recommended. The structure after such a heat is granular pearlite with a rating 1-2 and a hardness of 220-250 HB

  3. Assessment of Heat Stress Index, and evaluation of theirvalidity in Mobarakeh Steel Association's Mobarakeh Steel Association's

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Sadeghi Aliabadi

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Existence of heat in industries is considered as a serious problem. Someindexes have been invited to evaluate the rate of heat loud on worker. These indexes have beenused & comprised in different researches. This research validity of some of these indexes wasevaluated.Method: In purpose of evaluation of indexes and environmental factor ordinary and CataTermometer, WBCT Meter instrument and Humidity Meter was used. As a first step Molding unitdivided into 15 stations, and in the second step parameters measurement was begone . After thatthe obtained figures was used in special equation to calculate heat stress indexes.Mouth, skin, and core body temperature of 90 healthy and adopted male worker was recorded.Then the obtained result was analysed by Spss, and mean, standard deviation and correlationcoficient was ealeutated for each of them.Results: At first mean, minimum, maximum and standard deviation was calculated forenvironmental parameter and indexes.At the second step the relationship between personalfactors (mouth, skin and core body temperature and parameters and environmental indexes. (Airtemperature, radiation temperature, air velocity and relative humidity was assessed.The result showed no significance relationship between personal factor and heat stressor. Factor(p>5% only purse index had significance relationship (p=0/005, and the others indexes did notshowed significance relationship.Conclusion: In this research the relationship between purse and all variables was significance.Therefore this index considered as a first valid index in this research.WBGTindex shows the most relationship after the purse index in comparison with other indexes.Because of the other indexes's no significance relationship, so pours had a good validity in thisresearch.

  4. Heat input effect on the microstructural transformation and mechanical properties in GTAW welds of a 409L ferritic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado, J. A.; Ambriz, R. R.; Cuenca-Alvarez, R.; Alatorre, N.; Curiel, F. F.

    2016-10-01

    Welds without filler metal and welds using a conventional austenitic stainless steel filler metal (ER308L) were performed to join a ferritic stainless steel with Gas Tungsten Arc Welding process (GTAW). Welding parameters were adjusted to obtain three different heat input values. Microstructure reveals the presence of coarse ferritic matrix and martensite laths in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ). Dilution between filler and base metal was correlated with the presence of austenite, martensite and ferrite in the weld metal. Weld thermal cycles were measured to correlate the microstructural transformation in the HAZ. Microhardness measurements (maps and profiles) allow to identify the different zones of the welded joints (weld metal, HAZ, and base metal). Comparing the base metal with the weld metal and the HAZ, a hardness increment (∼172 HV{sub 0}.5 to ∼350 HV{sub 0}.5 and ∼310 HV{sub 0}.5, respectively) was observed, which has been attributed to the martensite formation. Tensile strength of the welded joints without filler metal increased moderately with respect to base metal. In contrast, ductility was approximately 25% higher than base metal, which provided a toughness improvement of the welded joints. (Author)

  5. Prediction of residual stresses in the heat affected zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taleb, L.; Petit, S.; Jullien, J.F.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper the behavior of a disc made up of carbon manganese steel and subjected to an axisymmetric heating in its middle zone is considered. The applied thermal cycle generates localized metallurgical solid-solid phase transformations. Contrary to the study performed some years ago, the present work is concerned with relatively thick discs that lead to variable behavior according to axial direction. Experimentally, temperature and axial displacement of the face below have continuously been measured during tests. At the end of tests, the nature and the proportions of the final phases as well as residual stresses on both faces of the discs has also been assessed. These experimental results have been compared to numerical simulations using the finite element code ASTER, developed by EDF (Electricity of France), ASTER enables us to take into account the main mechanical consequences of phase transformations. From the obtained results it can be pointed out the significant importance to take into account the transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) phenomenon for better estimation of residual stresses. (authors)

  6. Effect of Welding Heat Input on the Microstructure and Toughness in Simulated CGHAZ of 800 MPa-Grade Steel for Hydropower Penstocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingfeng Ding

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available To determine the appropriate welding heat input for simulated coarse grained heat affected zone (CGHAZ of 800 MPa-grade steel used in hydropower penstocks, the microstructural evolution, hardness, and 50% fraction appearance transition temperature (50% FATT were investigated. The results indicated that when the cooling rate (heat input is reduced (increased, the impact toughness at −20 °C and hardness of the simulated CGHAZ decreased. When the heat input increased from 18 to 81 kJ/cm, the 50% FATT increased from −80 °C to −11 °C. At 18 kJ/cm, the microstructures consisted of lath bainite and granular bainite, but lath bainite decreased with increasing heat input. The increase in the 50% FATT was attributed mainly to an increase in the austenite grain size and effective grain size, and a decrease in lath bainite and the fraction of HAGBs (misorientation: ≥15°.

  7. Effect of melting technique on grain size and heat resistance of the 12Kh1MF steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanskaya, K.A.; Kulikova, L.V.; Butneva, N.I.

    1978-01-01

    Investigated are the 12Kh1MF steel melted in open-hearth and arc furnaces (deoxidation by aluminium in 1.0 kg/t quantity) and then subjected to electroslag melting. The size of an austenitic grain depends on the residual contents of nitrogen and aluminium in steel. The open-hearth metal subjected to electroslag melting and containing a small quantity of nitrogen (0.006%) and aluminium (0.013%) has coarse austenitic grains and higher heat resistance compared to the steel melted in an arc furnace and also sub ected to electroslag melting. The nitride analysis of steel is carried out

  8. Influence of heat treatments on thermoelectric power of pressure vessel steels: effect of microstructural evolutions of strongly segregated areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houze, M.

    2002-12-01

    Thermoelectric power measurement (TEP) is a very potential non destructive evaluation method considered to follow ageing under neutron irradiation of pressure vessel steel of nuclear reactor. Prior to these problems, the aim of this study is to establish correlations between TEP variations and microstructural evolutions of pressure vessel steels during heat treatments. Different steels, permitting to simulate heterogeneities of pressure vessel steels and to deconvoluate main metallurgical phenomenons effects were studied. This work allowed to emphasize effect on TEP of: austenitizing and cooling conditions and therefore of microstructure, metallurgical transformations during tempering (recovery, precipitation of alloying elements), and particularly molybdenum precipitation associated to secondary hardening, residual austenite amount or partial austenitizing. (author)

  9. Factors affecting stress assisted corrosion cracking of carbon steel under industrial boiler conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dong

    Failure of carbon steel boiler tubes from waterside has been reported in the utility boilers and industrial boilers for a long time. In industrial boilers, most waterside tube cracks are found near heavy attachment welds on the outer surface and are typically blunt, with multiple bulbous features indicating a discontinuous growth. These types of tube failures are typically referred to as stress assisted corrosion (SAC). For recovery boilers in the pulp and paper industry, these failures are particularly important as any water leak inside the furnace can potentially lead to smelt-water explosion. Metal properties, environmental variables, and stress conditions are the major factors influencing SAC crack initation and propagation in carbon steel boiler tubes. Slow strain rate tests (SSRT) were conducted under boiler water conditions to study the effect of temperature, oxygen level, and stress conditions on crack initation and propagation on SA-210 carbon steel samples machined out of boiler tubes. Heat treatments were also performed to develop various grain size and carbon content on carbon steel samples, and SSRTs were conducted on these samples to examine the effect of microstructure features on SAC cracking. Mechanisms of SAC crack initation and propagation were proposed and validated based on interrupted slow strain tests (ISSRT). Water chemistry guidelines are provided to prevent SAC and fracture mechanics model is developed to predict SAC failure on industrial boiler tubes.

  10. Retained Austenite in SAE 52100 Steel Post Magnetic Processing and Heat Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pappas, Nathaniel R [ORNL; Watkins, Thomas R [ORNL; Cavin, Odis Burl [ORNL; Jaramillo, Roger A [ORNL; Ludtka, Gerard Michael [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Steel is an iron-carbon alloy that contains up to 2% carbon by weight. Understanding which phases of iron and carbon form as a function of temperature and percent carbon is important in order to process/manufacture steel with desired properties. Austenite is the face center cubic (fcc) phase of iron that exists between 912 and 1394 C. When hot steel is rapidly quenched in a medium (typically oil or water), austenite transforms into martensite. The goal of the study is to determine the effect of applying a magnetic field on the amount of retained austenite present at room temperature after quenching. Samples of SAE 52100 steel were heat treated then subjected to a magnetic field of varying strength and time, while samples of SAE 1045 steel were heat treated then subjected to a magnetic field of varying strength for a fixed time while being tempered. X-ray diffraction was used to collect quantitative data corresponding to the amount of each phase present post processing. The percentage of retained austenite was then calculated using the American Society of Testing and Materials standard for determining the amount of retained austenite for randomly oriented samples and was plotted as a function of magnetic field intensity, magnetic field apply time, and magnetic field wait time after quenching to determine what relationships exist with the amount of retained austenite present. In the SAE 52100 steel samples, stronger field strengths resulted in lower percentages of retained austenite for fixed apply times. The results were inconclusive when applying a fixed magnetic field strength for varying amounts of time. When applying a magnetic field after waiting a specific amount of time after quenching, the analyses indicate that shorter wait times result in less retained austenite. The SAE 1045 results were inconclusive. The samples showed no retained austenite regardless of magnetic field strength, indicating that tempering removed the retained austenite. It is apparent

  11. Failure Mechanism of a Stellite Coating on Heat-Resistant Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Zhao, Haixing; Wang, Huang; Li, Yuyan; Liu, Xia; He, Guo

    2017-09-01

    The Stellite 21 coating on the heat-resistant steel X12CrMoWVNbN10-1-1 (so-called COSTE) used in a steam turbine valve was found to be fatigue broken after service at around 873 K (600 °C) for about 8 years. In order to investigate the failure mechanism, a fresh Stellite 21 coating was also prepared on the same COSTE steel substrate by using the similar deposition parameters for comparison. It was found that the Stellite 21 coating was significantly diluted by the steel, resulting in a thin Fe-rich layer in the coating close to the fusion line. Such high Fe concentration together with the incessant Fe diffusion from the steel substrate to the coating during the service condition (about 873 K (600 °C) for long time) induced the eutectoid decomposition of the fcc α-Co(Fe,Cr,Mo) solid solution, forming an irregular eutectoid microstructure that was composed of the primitive cubic α'-FeCo(Cr,Mo) phase and the tetragonal σ-CrCo(Fe,Mo) phase. The brittle nature of such α'/ σ eutectoid microstructure contributed to the fatigue fracture of the Stellite 21 coating, resulting in an intergranular rupture mode.

  12. Effect of irrigation and stainless steel drills on dental implant bed heat generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullon, B; Bueno, E F; Herrero, M; Fernandez-Palacin, A; Rios, J V; Bullon, P; Gil, F J

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study is assessing the influence of the use of different drill types and external irrigation on heat generation in the bone. In-vitro study to compare two different sequences for implant-bed preparation by means of two stainless steels: precipitation-hardening stainless steel (AISI 420B) (K drills), and martensitic stainless steel (AISI 440) (S drills). Besides, the drilled sequences were realized without irrigation, and with external irrigation by means of normal saline solution at room temperature. The study was realized on bovine ribs using: K without irrigation (KSI) and with irrigation (KCI) and S without irrigation (SSI) and with irrigation (SCI) with five drills for each system. Each drill was used 100 times. Bone temperature was measured with a thermocouple immediately after drilled. Average bone temperature with irrigation was for K drills 17.58±3.32 °C and for S drills 16.66±1.30 °C. Average bone temperature without irrigation was for K drills 23.58±2.94 °C and for S drills 19.41±2.27 °C. Statistically significant differences were found between K without irrigation versus S with irrigation and K with irrigation (pstainless steel AISI 420B presents better mechanical properties and corrosion resistance than AISI440.

  13. Heat treatment of long term serviced Cr – Mo cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Golanski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of research on the influence of heat treatment on the structure and properties of L20HM cast steel after long term operation at elevated temperature. Investigated cast steel was taken out from an outer frame of a steam turbine serviced for 167 424 hours at the temp. of 535 oC and pressure 12.75 MPa. In post-operating condition the investigated cast steel was characterized by mechanical properties below the required minimum and by high brittleness. Performed research on the influence of austenitizing parameters has revealed that the range of austenitizing temperatures for the examined cast steel: Ac3 + 30 ÷ 60 oC ensures obtaining of a fine austenite grain, homogeneous in size. It has been proved that tempering of bainititc – ferritic structure above 680 ÷ 690 oC causes an increase of impact energy along with a decrease of mechanical properties below the required minimum. Moreover, it has been noticed that applying of under-annealing instead of tempering, after full-annealing, guarantees the required impact energy of KV > 27J, with the mechanical properties similar to those after service.

  14. Long-term behaviour of heat-resistant steels and high-temperature materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 10 lectures with the following subjects: On the effect of thermal pretreatment on the structure and creep behaviour of the alloy 800 H (V. Guttmann, J. Timm); Material properties of heat resistant ferritic and austenitic steels after cold forming (W. Bendick, H. Weber); Investigations for judging the working behaviour of components made of alloy 800 and alloy 617 under creep stress (H.J. Penkalla, F. Schubert); Creep behaviour of gas turbine materials in hot gas (K.H. Kloos et al.); Effect of small cold forming on the creep beahviour of gas turbine blades made of Nimonic 90 (K.H. Keienburg et al.); Investigations on creep fatigue alternating load strength of nickel alloys (G. Raule); Change of structure, creep fatigue behaviour and life of X20 Cr Mo V 12 1 (by G. Eggeler et al.); Investigations on thermal fatigue behaviour (K.H. Mayer et al.); Creep behaviour of similar welds of the steels 13 Cr Mo 4 4, 14 MoV 6 3, 10 Cr Mo 910 and GS-17 Cr Mo V 5 11 (K. Niel et al.); Determining the creep crack behaviour of heat resistant steels with samples of different geometry (K. Maile, R. Tscheuschner). (orig.,/MM) [de

  15. Mechanical properties of dissimilar friction welded steel bars in relation to post weld heat treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Yu Sik; Kim, Seon Jin [Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-04-15

    Dissimilar friction welding were produced using 15(mm) diameter solid bar in chrome molybedenum steel(KS SCM440) to carbon steel(KS S45C) to investigate their mechanical properties. The main friction welding parameters were selected to endure good quality welds on the basis of visual examination, tensile tests, Vickers hardness surveys of the bond of area and H.A.Z and microstructure investigations. The specimens were tested as-welded and Post-Weld Heat Treated(PWHT). The tensile strength of the friction welded steel bars was increased up to 100% of the S45C base metal under the condition of all heating time. Optimal welding conditions were n=2,000(rpm), P{sub 1}=60(MPa), P{sub 2}=100(MPa), t{sub 1}=4(s), t{sub 2}=5(s) when the total upset length is 5.4 and 5.7(mm), respectively. The peak of hardness distribution of the friction welded joints can be eliminated by PWHT. Two different kinds of materials are strongly mixed to show a well-combined structure of macro-particles without any molten material and particle growth or any defects.

  16. Heat Treatment Optimization and Properties Correlation for H11-Type Hot-Work Tool Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgornik, B.; Puš, G.; Žužek, B.; Leskovšek, V.; Godec, M.

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the effect of vacuum-heat-treatment process parameters on the material properties and their correlations for low-Si-content AISI H11-type hot-work tool steel using a single Circumferentially Notched and fatigue Pre-cracked Tensile Bar (CNPTB) test specimen. The work was also focused on the potential of the proposed approach for designing advanced tempering diagrams and optimizing the vacuum heat treatment and design of forming tools. The results show that the CNPTB specimen allows a simultaneous determination and correlation of multiple properties for hot-work tool steels, with the compression and bending strength both increasing with hardness, and the strain-hardening exponent and bending strain increasing with the fracture toughness. On the other hand, the best machinability and surface quality of the hardened hot-work tool steel are obtained for hardness values between 46 and 50 HRC and a fracture toughness below 60 MPa√m.

  17. Heat transfer and fluid flow during laser spot welding of 304 stainless steel

    CERN Document Server

    He, X; Debroy, T

    2003-01-01

    The evolution of temperature and velocity fields during laser spot welding of 304 stainless steel was studied using a transient, heat transfer and fluid flow model based on the solution of the equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy in the weld pool. The weld pool geometry, weld thermal cycles and various solidification parameters were calculated. The fusion zone geometry, calculated from the transient heat transfer and fluid flow model, was in good agreement with the corresponding experimentally measured values for various welding conditions. Dimensional analysis was used to understand the importance of heat transfer by conduction and convection and the roles of various driving forces for convection in the weld pool. During solidification, the mushy zone grew at a rapid rate and the maximum size of the mushy zone was reached when the pure liquid region vanished. The solidification rate of the mushy zone/liquid interface was shown to increase while the temperature gradient in the liquid zone at...

  18. Factors affecting the grain growth of austenite in low alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, J.D.; Storer, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of steels is linked to the metallurgical transformations which occur during manufacture. Clearly then the optimization of a fabrication procedure must be based on fundamental relationships linking specific thermal treatments with transformation behaviour. Optimized manufacture of thick-section, multipass welds is therefore particularly complex since the thermal cycles associated with fusion welding result in the formation of heterogeneous microstructures. Moreover, these transformations will take place under rapid heating and cooling conditions so that standard data based on equilibrium behaviour may not be directly relevant. The present study is part of an integrated research programme aimed at establishing the basic microstructural relationships required to optimize the manufacture and performance of weldments. Work to date demonstrates that utilization of a computer controlled Gleeble simulation system allows a wider range of heating and cooling rates to be applied than is possible with traditional heat treatment techniques. Additional advantages of this system include precise control of time at peak temperature and uniform temperatures within a defined work zone. Results presented for a CrMoV creep resistant low alloy steel indicate that grain growth behaviour in the range 955-1390 C can be related to the time at peak temperature. The effect of this transformation behaviour on weldment behaviour is discussed. (orig.)

  19. Effect of heat-treatment on the hardness and mechanical properties of Boron Alloyed Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    bin Khiyon Mohammad Raffik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In an automotive industry, hot stamped, die quenched structural components have been widely used to provide extra protection against crash intrusion. Boron alloyed steel exhibit limited ductility, but it also promotes improvement in impact performance. This study analyzed the effect of cooling rate on the hardness and energy absorption. Self-quenched specimens were heated to 850°C and cooled in air of room temperature, water at room temperature and cold water. Vickers hardness test and tensile test was then carried out to analyze the effect of different quenching rate. Self-quenched specimens were compared to the properties of the die-quenched specimens obtained from commercial automobile body. Result shows that boron steel with the highest cooling rate has the highest value of hardness but low in strength.

  20. Structure and strength of carbide-steel cermet and their changes during heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dariel, M.P.; Frage, N.R.; Kaputkina, L.M.; Kaputkin, D.M.; Sverdlova, N.R.

    2004-01-01

    Both homogeneous and 'graded' materials were produced by pressing and sintering of titanium carbide TiC x (0.7 x takes place during the joining. If the titanium carbide is carbon deficient that the carbon goes from the steel binder to TiC x , and this redistribution intensity with the x decreases. So-named graded cermets were produced on controlled distribution of TiC x with different x. An additional flow of carbon from C-rich to C-poor TiC x layers was obtained in these cermets. These changes both in the steel and TiC x compositions result in changes in such processes as austenitization, carbide dissolution and precipitation, and martensitic transformation. Both general strength of the material and the gradient of properties in graded cermets can be increased using kinetic factors of element redistribution and structure changes resulted from the heat treatment. (author)

  1. Heat treatment effect on structure and properties of 16GNMA steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakhovskaya, M.B.; Nadtsyna, L.V.; Efimov, A.M.; Guseva, N.V.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of heating for hot deformation test and of subsequent tempering on the structure, strength and ductility properties of the 16 GNMA sttel used for fabricating pressure vessels has been investigated. It has been found that in the 850-1200 deg C temperature range abrupt umps in the grain growth at 1050 and 1200 deg C occur. In case of tempering in the 500-630 deg C range the yield strength increases while the ultimate resistance to fracture decreases. At 700 deg C the ductility and toughness drop while the fracture becomes totally crystalline. The 16 GNMA steel structure following normalizing and tempering presents a mixture of ferrite and granular bainite. Steel aging at the operation temperature (450 deg C) leads to its strengthening without embrittlement

  2. Microstructural Characterization Of Laser Heat Treated AISI 4140 Steel With Improved Fatigue Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh M.C.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of surface heat treatment using laser radiation on the fatigue strength and corresponding microstructural evolution of AISI 4140 alloy steel was investigated in this research. The AISI 4140 alloy steel was radiated by a diode laser to give surface temperatures in the range between 600 and 800°C, and subsequently underwent vibration peening. The fatigue behavior of surface-treated specimens was examined using a giga-cycle ultrasonic fatigue test, and it was compared with that of non-treated and only-peened specimens. Fatigue fractured surfaces and microstructural evolution with respect to the laser treatment temperatures were investigated using an optical microscope. Hardness distribution was measured using Vickers micro-hardness. Higher laser temperature resulted in higher fatigue strength, attributed to the phase transformation.

  3. Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorev, N.N.; Astafiev, A.A.; Loboda, A.S.; Savukov, V.P.; Runov, A.E.; Belov, V.A.; Sobolev, J.V.; Sobolev, V.V.; Pavlov, N.M.; Paton, B.E.

    1977-01-01

    Steels also containing Al, N and arsenic, are suitable for the construction of large components for high-power nuclear reactors due to their good mechanical properties such as good through-hardening, sufficiently low brittleness conversion temperature and slight displacement of the latter with neutron irradiation. Defined steels and their properties are described. (IHOE) [de

  4. Thermal creep and stress-affected precipitation of 20% cold-worked 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puigh, R.J.; Lovell, A.J.; Garner, F.A.

    1984-01-01

    Measurements of the thermal creep of 20% cold-worked 316 stainless steel have been performed for temperatures from 593 to 760 0 C, stress levels as high as 138 MPa and exposure times as long as 15,000 hours. The creep strains exhibit a complex behavior arising from the combined action of true creep and stress-affected precipitation of intermetallic phases. The latter process is suspected to be altered by neutron irradiation. (orig.)

  5. Effects of Induction Heat Bending Process on Microstructure and Corrosion Properties of ASME SA312 Gr.TP304 Stainless Steel Pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Nam In; Kim, Young Sik; Kim, Kyung Soo; Chang, Hyun Young; Park, Heung Bae; Sung, Gi Ho; Sung, Gi Ho

    2015-01-01

    The usage of bending products recently have increased since many industries such as automobile, aerospace, shipbuilding, and chemical plants need the application of pipings. Bending process is one of the inevitable steps to fabricate the facilities. Induction heat bending is composed of compressive bending process by local heating and cooling. This work focused on the effect of induction heat bending process on the properties of ASME SA312 Gr. TP304 stainless steel pipes. Tests were performed for base metal and bended area including extrados, intrados, crown up, and down parts. Microstructure was analyzed using an optical microscope and SEM. In order to determine intergranular corrosion resistance, Double Loop Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation (DL-EPR) test and ASTM A262 practice A and C tests were done. Every specimen revealed non-metallic inclusion free under the criteria of 1.5i of the standard and the induction heat bending process did not affect the non-metallic inclusion in the alloys. Also, all the bended specimens had finer grain size than ASTM grain size number 5 corresponding to the grain sizes of the base metal and thus the grain size of the pipe bended by induction heat bending process is acceptable. Hardness of transition start, bend, and transition end areas of ASME SA312 TP304 stainless steel was a little higher than that of base metal. Intergranular corrosion behavior was determined by ASTM A262 practice A and C and DL-EPR test, and respectively step structure, corrosion rate under 0.3 mm/y, and Degree of Sensitization (DOS) of 0.001 - 0.075 % were obtained. That is, the induction heat bending process didn't affect the intergranular corrosion behavior of ASME SA312 TP304 stainless steel

  6. Microstructural response to heat affected zone cracking of prewelding heat-treated Inconel 939 superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, M.A., E-mail: mgonzalez@comimsa.com.mx [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica (FIME-UANL), Av. Universidad s/n. Ciudad Universitaria, C.P.66451 San Nicolas de los Garza, N.L. (Mexico); Martinez, D.I., E-mail: dorairma@yahoo.com [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica (FIME-UANL), Av. Universidad s/n. Ciudad Universitaria, C.P.66451 San Nicolas de los Garza, N.L. (Mexico); Perez, A., E-mail: betinperez@hotmail.com [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica (FIME-UANL), Av. Universidad s/n. Ciudad Universitaria, C.P.66451 San Nicolas de los Garza, N.L. (Mexico); Guajardo, H., E-mail: hguajardo@frisa.com [FRISA Aerospace, S.A. de C.V., Valentin G. Rivero No. 200, Col. Los Trevino, C.P. 66150, Santa Caterina N.L. (Mexico); Garza, A., E-mail: agarza@comimsa.com [Corporacion Mexicana de Investigacion en Materiales S.A. de C.V. (COMIMSA), Ciencia y Tecnologia No.790, Saltillo 400, C.P. 25295 Saltillo Coah. (Mexico)

    2011-12-15

    The microstructural response to cracking in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a nickel-based IN 939 superalloy after prewelding heat treatments (PWHT) was investigated. The PWHT specimens showed two different microstructures: 1) spherical ordered {gamma} Prime precipitates (357-442 nm), with blocky MC and discreet M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides dispersed within the coarse dendrites and in the interdendritic regions; and 2) ordered {gamma} Prime precipitates in 'ogdoadically' diced cube shapes and coarse MC carbides within the dendrites and in the interdendritic regions. After being tungsten inert gas welded (TIG) applying low heat input, welding speed and using a more ductile filler alloy, specimens with microstructures consisting of spherical {gamma} Prime precipitate particles and dispersed discreet MC carbides along the grain boundaries, displayed a considerably improved weldability due to a strong reduction of the intergranular HAZ cracking associated with the liquation microfissuring phenomena. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Homogeneous microstructures of {gamma} Prime spheroids and discreet MC carbides of Ni base superalloys through preweld heat treatments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {gamma} Prime spheroids and discreet MC carbides reduce the intergranular HAZ liquation and microfissuring of Nickel base superalloys. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructure {gamma} Prime spheroids and discreet blocky type MC carbides, capable to relax the stress generated during weld cooling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low welding heat input welding speeds and ductile filler alloys reduce the HAZ cracking susceptibility.

  7. Effect of Heat Treatment on the Structure and Properties of Die Steel 70Kh3G2FTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krylova, S. E.; Kletsova, O. A.; Gryzunov, V. I.; Fot, A. P.; Tavtilov, I. Sh.

    2018-01-01

    The effect of heat treatment parameters on the properties and structural and phase composition of a promising die steel 70Kh3G2FTR for hot deformation is studied. The temperature-and-stress state of a hammer die under a heat treatment is simulated.

  8. Estimation of respiratory heat flows in prediction of heat strain among Taiwanese steel workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wang-Yi; Juang, Yow-Jer; Hsieh, Jung-Yu; Tsai, Perng-Jy; Chen, Chen-Peng

    2017-01-01

    International Organization for Standardization 7933 standard provides evaluation of required sweat rate (RSR) and predicted heat strain (PHS). This study examined and validated the approximations in these models estimating respiratory heat flows (RHFs) via convection (C res ) and evaporation (E res ) for application to Taiwanese foundry workers. The influence of change in RHF approximation to the validity of heat strain prediction in these models was also evaluated. The metabolic energy consumption and physiological quantities of these workers performing at different workloads under elevated wet-bulb globe temperature (30.3 ± 2.5 °C) were measured on-site and used in the calculation of RHFs and indices of heat strain. As the results show, the RSR model overestimated the C res for Taiwanese workers by approximately 3 % and underestimated the E res by 8 %. The C res approximation in the PHS model closely predicted the convective RHF, while the E res approximation over-predicted by 11 %. Linear regressions provided better fit in C res approximation (R 2  = 0.96) than in E res approximation (R 2  ≤ 0.85) in both models. The predicted C res deviated increasingly from the observed value when the WBGT reached 35 °C. The deviations of RHFs observed for the workers from those predicted using the RSR or PHS models did not significantly alter the heat loss via the skin, as the RHFs were in general of a level less than 5 % of the metabolic heat consumption. Validation of these approximations considering thermo-physiological responses of local workers is necessary for application in scenarios of significant heat exposure.

  9. Influence of fuel composition on the non-oxidizing heating of steel in a waste gas atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minkler, W [LOI Industrieofenanlagen G.m.b.H., Essen (Germany, F.R.)

    1979-04-01

    On the basis of a number of graphs and data on theoretical combustion temperatures and the difference between the heating value of the fuel and the waste gas in respect of 1 m/sup 3/ of waste gas, the author demonstrates the influence of fuel composition on the non-oxidizing heating of steel in a waste gas atmosphere derived from five different fuels. A rotary-hearth furnace is described for the non-oxidizing heating of pressings from plain carbon and alloy steel.

  10. Effects of heat treatment conditions on microstructure and mechanical properties of AISI 420 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheuer, C.J.; Fraga, R.A.; Cardoso, R.P.; Brunatto, S.F. [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica. Grupo de Tecnologia de Fabricacao Assistida por Plasma e Metalurgia do Po

    2014-07-01

    The cycle control of heat treatments, on the quenching and tempering operation of AISI 420 stainless steel, is essential for improved material performance. The adequate choice of heat treatment parameters, can lead an optimization on its mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Thus, this paper aims to investigate the effects of quenchants medium, and austenitizing and tempering temperatures, on the microstructure and mechanical properties of AISI 420 steel. Different heat treatments cycles were studied: 1) samples were austenitized at 1050°C and water, oil and air quenched; 2) samples were austenitized at range temperatures of 950-1050°C and oil quenched; and 3) as-quenched samples were tempering at range temperatures of 400-500°C. Treated samples were characterized by optical microscopy, X-ray diffractometry and hardness measurements. The samples hardness increases with increasing cooling rate (water > oil > air quenched). Water quenched samples presented crack after cooling to room temperature. Samples hardness also increases with austenitizing temperature increasing, and decreases with increasing tempering temperature. (author)

  11. Experimental investigation of heat transfer of R134a in pool boiling on stainless steel and aluminum tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wengler, C.; Addy, J.; Luke, A.

    2018-03-01

    Due to high energy demand required for chemical processes, refrigeration and process industries the increase of efficiency and performance of thermal systems especially evaporators is indispensable. One of the possibilities to meet this purpose are investigations in enhancement of the heat transfer in nucleate boiling where high heat fluxes at low superheat are transferred. In the present work, the heat transfer in pool boiling is investigated with pure R134a over wide ranges of reduced pressures and heat fluxes. The heating materials of the test tubes are aluminum and stainless steel. The influence of the thermal conductivity on the heat transfer coefficients is analysed by the surface roughness of sandblasted surfaces. The heat transfer coefficient increases with increasing thermal conductivity, surface roughness and reduced pressures. The experimental results show a small degradation of the heat transfer coefficients between the two heating materials aluminum and stainless steel. In correlation with the VDI Heat Atlas, the experimental results are matching well with the predictions but do not accurately consider the stainless steel material reference properties.

  12. Strong tough low-carbon bainite structural steels exposed to heat treatment and mechanical working

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauprecht, W.; Imgrund, H.; Coldren, P.

    1975-01-01

    A review of results of studying the mechanical properties and structure of extremely strong construction low-pearlite and pearlite-free steels subjected to thermomechanical processing (TMP) is presented. The development of TMP of low-pearlite and pearlite-free steels has led to creation of steel of the following composition: 0.06% of C; 1.8% of Mn; 0.3% of Mo; 0.05-0.09% of Nb. Depending on the kind of TMP the most important parameters of which are the temperature of the termination of rolling and the total deformation below 900 deg C, transformation in these steels occurs partially or completely in the intermediate domain. The increased density of dislocations of beinite structure affects substantially the increase in the yield limit. High degrees of squeezing at temperatures below 870 deg C promote formation of ferrite nuclei. The laboratory rolling demonstrates that by selecting the conditions of TMP one can control the mechanical properties of a steel. The sheets of 13 mm thick allow to obtain the guaranteed values of the yield limit of 70 kgf/mm 2 the transition temperature T 50 = -25 deg C, whereas after rolling under different conditions the low-temperature limit of cold shortness is - 125 deg C, and the yield limit - 45 kgf/mm 2 . As followed from the estimate of numerous industrial experiments, with sheets 20 mm thick in hot-rolled state one can obtain the yield limit no less than 50 kgf/mm 2 . On rolling mills that make possible to produce large deformation at low temperature these values can be increased. For instance, with sheets 30 mm thick one can obtain the yield limit of 56 kgf/mm 2 and the transition temperature of - 60 deg C. The dependence of the yield limit on the holding time in steel tempering is given. The steel possesses a considerable reserve of the increase of strength due to dispersion hardening, which after tempering at 600-625 deg C constitutes 8-12 kgf/mm 2 . Because of low carbon content, this steel is characterized by good

  13. Heat stress affects male reproduction in a parasitoid wasp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh Manh; Bressac, Christophe; Chevrier, Claude

    2013-03-01

    In insects, reproductive success and survival are affected by temperature. Reproduction is more sensitive than other physiological traits. While the effects of heat stress on females are well known, the effects on males are less clear. Hymenopteran parasitoids are valuable for studying the consequences of heat stress on male reproduction. In these species, through arrhenotoquous parthenogenesis, the sex ratio of the offspring is directly dependent on the sperm stock acquired by females during copulation. In the lab, heat temperature treatments (32-44°C) were applied for 3 days in the pupal stage of Anisopteromalus calandrae males, and development was completed at 30°C. Three different effects were observed depending on the temperature: mortality above 42°C, sterility of emerging males at 40°C, and sub-fertility at 38°C. This sub-fertility is characterized by a dramatic decrease in male sperm supplies, of up to 7% compared to control males. In the course of ageing, the sperm stock of sub-fertile males increases but never reaches the level of control males. Survival was significantly higher in control (30°C) males than those treated at 38°C. Male mating ability was similar whatever the treatment (control and 38°C), but females mated with 38°C-treated males stored 100 times less sperm on average than those mated with control males. The offspring sex ratio of females mated with 38°C-treated males was strongly male biased. The physiological mechanisms are as yet unknown. The relationship between temperature, sperm stock and sex ratio should be taken into account in the management of parasitoids for integrated pest management. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Precipitation behavior in a nitride-strengthened martensitic heat resistant steel during hot deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfeng Zhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The stress relaxation curves for three different hot deformation processes in the temperature range of 750–1000 °C were studied to develop an understanding of the precipitation behavior in a nitride-strengthened martensitic heat resistant steel (Zhang et al., Mater. Sci. Eng. A, 2015 [1]. This data article provides supporting data and detailed information on how to accurately analysis the stress relaxation data. The statistical analysis of the stress peak curves, including the number of peaks, the intensity of the peaks and the integral value of the pumps, was carried out. Meanwhile, the XRD energy spectrum data was also calculated in terms of lattice distortion.

  15. Microstructural evolution during creep deformation of an 11CrMoVNb ferritic heat resistant steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyu-Ho; Park, Dae-Bum [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Materials and Devices Div.; Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Materials Science; Kwun, S.I. [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Materials Science; Suh, Jin-Yoo; Jung, Woo-Sang [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Materials and Devices Div.

    2010-07-01

    The effect of creep deformation on the microstructural development of an 11CrMoVNb ferritic heat resistant steel during high temperature creep test is investigated. Coarsening behavior of the precipitates, M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and MX, and growth behavior of martensite laths of crept specimens are carefully observed from both gage and grip parts of the specimens in order to discuss the effect of deformation. Particle coarsening and martensite lath widening are pronounced in the gage part due to the creep deformation. (orig.)

  16. Resistance to corrosion fatigue fracture in heat resistant steels and their welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timofeev, B.T.; Fedorova, V.A.; Zvezdin, Yu.I.; Vajner, L.A.; Filatov, V.M.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental data on cyclic crack resistance of heat-resistant steels and their welded joints employed for production of the reactor bodies are for the first time generalized and systematized. The formula is suggested accounting for surface and inner defects to calculate the fatigue crack growth in the process of operation. This formula for surface defects regards also the effect of the corrosion factor. Mechanisms of the reactor water effect on the fatigue crack growth rate are considered as well as a combined effect of radiation and corrosive medium on this characteristic

  17. VARIATION OF SUBSTRUCTURES OF PEARLITIC HEAT RESISTANT STEEL AFTER HIGH TEMPERATURE AGING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.C.Yang; K.Chen; H.X.Feng; H.Wang

    2004-01-01

    The observations of dislocations, substructures and other microstructural details were conducted mainly by means of transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) for 12Cr1Mo V pearlitic heat-resistant steel. It is shown that during the high temperature long-term aging, the disordered and jumbled phasetransformed dislocations caused by normalized cooling are recovered and rearranged into cell substructures, and then the dislocation density is reduced gradually. Finally a low density linear dislocation configuration and a stabler dislocation network are formed and ferritic grains grow considerably.

  18. Study on creep behavior of Grade 91 heat-resistant steel using theta projection method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Facai; Tang, Xiaoying

    2017-10-01

    Creep behavior of Grade 91 heat-resistant steel used for steam cooler was characterized using the theta projection method. Creep tests were conducted at the temperature of 923K under the stress ranging from 100-150MPa. Based on the creep curve results, four theta parameters were established using a nonlinear least square fitting method. Four theta parameters showed a good linearity as a function of stress. The predicted curves coincided well with the experimental data and creep curves were also modeled to the low stress level of 60MPa.

  19. Intergranular Corrosion Behavior of 304LN Stainless Steel Heat Treated at 623 K (350 °C)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Raghuvir; Kumar, Mukesh; Ghosh, Mainak; Das, Gautam; Singh, P. K.; Chattoraj, I.

    2013-01-01

    Low temperature sensitization of 304LN stainless steel from the two pipes, differing slightly in chemical composition, has been investigated; specimens were aged at 623 K (350 °C) for 20,000 hours and evaluated for intergranular corrosion and degree of sensitization. The base and heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the 304LN-1 appear resistant to sensitization, while 304LN-2 revealed a "dual" type microstructure at the transverse section and HAZ. The microstructure at 5.0-mm distance from the fusion line indicates qualitatively less sensitization as compared to that at 2.0 mm. The 304LN-2 base alloy shows overall lower degree of sensitization values as compared to the 304LN-1. A similar trend of degree of sensitization was observed in the HAZ where it was higher in the 304LN-1 as compared to the 304LN-2. The weld zone of both the stainless steels suffered from cracking during ASTM A262 practice E, while the parent metals and HAZs did not show such fissures. A mottled image within the ferrite lamella showed spinodal decomposition. The practice E test and transmission electron microscopy results indicate that the interdendritic regions may suffer from failure due to carbide precipitation and due to the evolution of brittle phase from spinodal decomposition.

  20. Assessment of Effectiveness of Cool Coat in Reducing Heat Strain among Workers in Steel Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parameswarappa, S B; Narayana, J

    2017-01-01

    A research study was conducted to assess the effectiveness of cool coat in reducing heat strain among workers exposed to heat in a steel plant located in south India. The study consists of assessing heat strain of workers exposed to heat in a steel plant by measuring physiological reactions of workers such as pulse rate and core body temperature with and without cool coat. The coal coat taken for this study was procured from M/s Yamuna Industries, Noida. Out of 140 employees exposed to heat hazard, 101 employees were examined in this study. Study was done in important production units in steel plant having heat hazard. Workers were interviewed and examined and information regarding thermal comfort was collected. First, the heat strain was assessed when the workers were not using cool coats. The air temperature was measured at all hot zone workplaces and found in the range of 34 0 C to 39.4 0 C (Mean: 36.54 0 C & S.D: 1.54). Physiological response such as core body temperature, pulse rate and blood pressure of workers exposed to heat hazard were measured before & after work to know the heat strain sustained by workers when they were working. Maximum core body temperature after work was found to be 39.3 0 C (Mean; 38.52 & S.D; 0.7). Maximum pulse rate of workers after work was found to be 120 beats/minute (Mean; 94.96 beats/minute, S.D: 13.11). The study indicate core body temperature of workers was found more than the permissible exposure limit prescribed by ACGIH, indicating the heat strain sustained by workers is significant, whereas the pulse rate and blood pressure was found normal & not exceeded the limits. Second, with cool coat, the heat strain was assessed among 10 workers selected from the 101 employees. Core body temperature was measured before and soon after work, The core body temperature recorded soon after work was in the range of 35.5 - 37.20C (Mean 36.36, SD= 0.52), indicating a drop in the core body temperature. In this study, a core body

  1. Effect of acicular ferrite formation on grain refinement in the coarse-grained region of heat-affected zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, X.L.; Wei, R.; Wu, K.M.

    2010-01-01

    The microstructure of acicular ferrite and its formation for the grain refinement of coarse-grained region of heat-affected zone of high strength low-alloy bainite steels were studied using three-dimensional reconstruction technique. Crystallographic grain size was analyzed by means of electron backscatter diffraction. It was revealed that the microstructure in the coarse-grained region of the heat-affected zone consisted of predominantly bainite packets and a small proportion of acicular ferrite. Acicular ferrite was of lath or plate-like rather than needle or rod-like morphology. Tempering of the coarse-grained region of heat-affected zone showed that the acicular ferrite was more stable than the bainite, indicating that the acicular ferrite was formed prior to bainite. The acicular ferrite laths or plates divided the prior austenite grains into smaller and separate regions, and confining the bainite transformed at lower temperatures in the smaller regions and hence leading to the grain refinement in the coarse-grained region of the heat-affected zone.

  2. Effect of acicular ferrite formation on grain refinement in the coarse-grained region of heat-affected zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, X.L.; Wei, R. [Institute of Advanced Steels and Welding Technology, Hubei Provincial Key Laboratory for Systems Science on Metallurgical Processing, Key Laboratory for Ferrous Metallurgy and Resources Utilization of Ministry of Education, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Wu, K.M., E-mail: wukaiming@wust.edu.cn [Institute of Advanced Steels and Welding Technology, Hubei Provincial Key Laboratory for Systems Science on Metallurgical Processing, Key Laboratory for Ferrous Metallurgy and Resources Utilization of Ministry of Education, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China)

    2010-07-15

    The microstructure of acicular ferrite and its formation for the grain refinement of coarse-grained region of heat-affected zone of high strength low-alloy bainite steels were studied using three-dimensional reconstruction technique. Crystallographic grain size was analyzed by means of electron backscatter diffraction. It was revealed that the microstructure in the coarse-grained region of the heat-affected zone consisted of predominantly bainite packets and a small proportion of acicular ferrite. Acicular ferrite was of lath or plate-like rather than needle or rod-like morphology. Tempering of the coarse-grained region of heat-affected zone showed that the acicular ferrite was more stable than the bainite, indicating that the acicular ferrite was formed prior to bainite. The acicular ferrite laths or plates divided the prior austenite grains into smaller and separate regions, and confining the bainite transformed at lower temperatures in the smaller regions and hence leading to the grain refinement in the coarse-grained region of the heat-affected zone.

  3. The Effect of Heat Treatment on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Cast Bainitic Steel Used for Frogs in Railway Crossovers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parzych S.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the effect of heat treatment on a microstructure and mechanical properties of a selected cast steel assigned as a material used for frogs in railway crossovers. Materials used nowadays in the railway industry for frogs e.g. Hadfield cast steel (GX120Mn13 or wrougth pearlitic steel (eg. R260 do not fulfil all exploitation requirements indicated in the UIC (International Union of Railways Decision No. 1692/96 in terms of train speed that should be reached on railways. One of the possible solution is using a cast steel with bainitic or bainitic-martensitic microstructure that allows to gain high strength properties the ultimate tensile strength (UTS of 1400 MPa, the tensile yield strength (TYS of 900 MPa and the hardness of up to 400 BHN. The tested material is considered as an alternative to Hadfield cast steel that is currently used for railway frogs.

  4. Influence of two different heat treatment procedures on mechanical and fracture properties of 65 Si 7 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustaic, D.; Cajner, F.

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with the results of investigations of two different heat treatment procedures and their influence on some mechanical properties as well as on the magnitude of some fracture mechanics parameters for a particular type of steel. The experimental investigations were performed on the specimens made of 65Si7 steel. The processes occurring by tempering of two different microstructures of the steel, i. e. martensite and lower bainite were investigated. An advantage of austempering over hardening and tempering is in obtaining the bainite microstructure. Steel of bainite microstructure has a greater toughness, ductility, contraction, fatigue strength and a better fracture toughness than a tempered martensite of the same type of steel. A bainite microstructure also gives a better resistance to thermal fatigue in comparison with martensite microstructure. The above mentioned improved values of mechanical properties refer to the untempered state of bainite. (author)

  5. INFLUENCE OF HEAT TREATMENT ON THE MICROSTRUCTURE AND TOUGHNESS OF BÖHLER M333 ISOPLAST STEEL

    OpenAIRE

    Perko, J.; Redl, C.; Leitner, H.

    2009-01-01

    In this work the through hardenability and the influence of the heat treatment parameters (austenitizingtemperature, cooling parameter ? and tempering temperature) on the microstructure and the achievabletoughness level of Böhler M333 ISOPLAST are investigated. The results are compared to the standardizedtool steel grade DIN 1.2083. The investigations showed that the cooling parameter ? has a strong influenceon the impact toughness of M333 ISOPLAST plastic mould steel. The toughness is reduce...

  6. Laws of alloyed cementite particles nucleation during heat-resistant steels carburizing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Semenov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers a problem analyzing a nucleation of cementite type carbides in carburized heat-resistant steels for the turbofan engines gear wheels.The verification of previously hypothesized mechanism of dislocation nucleation particles chromium-alloyed cementite during process of carburizing was accepted as an objective of the work.As a methodological basis of this paper were accepted the numerical experiments based on the kinetic theory of nucleation, as well as on the known results of experimental studies.According to the kinetic theory of nucleation, a new phase in the solid solutions take place in the defects of the crystal structure of the metal such as inter-grain boundaries and dislocations clusters. A principle feature of the inter-grain boundary mechanism of nucleation is formation of carbide lattice. It is of great practical interest because the cementite lattice drops mechanical properties of hardened parts.According to the experimental studies, the average chromium concentration in the alloyed cementite twice exceeds its Cr content in the heat-resistant steels. Furthermore, the areas of abnormally high (more than ten times in comparison with the average content chromium concentration in cementite have been experimentally revealed.Numerical experiments have revealed that the nucleation of cementite particles alloyed with chromium (chromium concentration of 3% or more occurs, mainly, by the dislocation mechanism on the concentration fluctuations of the alloying element. According to calculations, an obligatory prerequisite to start an active nucleation process of new phase in the solid solution is a local increase of the chromium concentration up to 40%.Despite the lack of physical prerequisites for the formation of chromium precipitates, this phenomenon is explained by a strong chemical affinity of chromium and carbon, causing diffusion of chromium atoms in the region of the carbon atoms clusters. The formation of carbon

  7. Influence of Austempering Heat Treatment on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Medium Carbon High Silicon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaksha, P. A.; Ravishankar, K. S.

    2017-08-01

    In the present investigation, the influence of austempering heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of medium carbon high silicon steel was evaluated. The test specimens were machined from the as-received steel and were first austenitised at 900 °C for 45 minutes, followed by austempering heat treatment in salt bath at various temperatures 300 °C, 350 °C and 400 °C for a fixed duration of two hours, after that those specimens were air-cooled to room temperature. The characterization studies were carried out using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and x-ray diffractometer (XRD) and then correlated to the hardness and tensile properties. Results indicate that, the specimens austempered at lower temperature i.e. at 300 °C, which offered high hardness, tensile strength and lower ductility (1857 MPa and 13.3 %) due to the presence of acicular bainite i.e. lower bainite and also some martensite in the microstructure. At 350 °C, reduction in the tensile strength and hardness was observed, but comparatively higher ductility, which was favored by the presence of bainite laths i.e. upper bainitic structure along with higher retained austenite content. Finally at 400 °C, reduction in both ductility and tensile strength was observed, which is due to the precipitation of carbides between the banite laths, however good strain hardening response was observed at austempering temperatures of 350 °C and 400 °C.

  8. Microstructural characterisation of vacuum sintered T42 powder metallurgy high-speed steel after heat treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trabadelo, V.; Gimenez, S.; Iturriza, I.

    2009-01-01

    High-speed steel powders (T42 grade) have been uniaxially cold-pressed and vacuum sintered to full density. Subsequently, the material was heat treated following an austenitising + quenching + multitempering route or alternatively austenitising + isothermal annealing. The isothermal annealing route was designed in order to attain a hardness value of ∼50 Rockwell C (HRC) (adequate for structural applications) while the multitempering parameters were selected to obtain this value and also the maximum hardening of the material (∼66 HRC). Microstructural characterisation has been carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The microstructure consists of a ferrous (martensitic or ferritic) matrix with a distribution of second phase particles corresponding to nanometric and submicrometric secondary carbides precipitated during heat treatment together with primary carbides. The identification of those secondary precipitates (mainly M 3 C, M 6 C and M 23 C 6 carbides) has allowed understanding the microstructural evolution of T42 high-speed steel under different processing conditions

  9. The influence of heating rate on reheat-cracking in a commercial 2 1/4Cr1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hippsley, C.A.

    1983-03-01

    The effects of elevated heating rate on stress-relief cracking in a commercial 2 1/4 Cr1Mo steel have been investigated. A SEN bend-specimen stress-relaxation test was used to assess reheat cracking susceptibility and fracture mechanisms for an initial post-weld heating rate of 1000 Kh - 1 . Two factors controlling the influence of heating rate on the final severity of cracking were identified, i.e. the rate of stress-relaxation with respect to temperature, and the time available for crack-growth. The factors were found to counteract each other, but in the case of commercial 2 1/4 Cr1Mo steel, the crack-growth factor outweighed the relaxation factor, resulting in a reduction in the propensity to stress-relief cracking at the elevated heating rate. However, by reference to the results of a separate investigation concerning A508/2 MnMoNiCr steel it was demonstrated that the balance between these two factors may be reversed in other alloy systems, with the consequence that reheat cracking is exacerbated by increasing the initial heating rate. A computer model was addressed to the stress-relaxation test conditions using data from the commercial 2 1/4 Cr1Mo steel. The model predictions exhibited reasonable agreement with experimental test results for both 100 Kh - 1 and 1000 Kh - 1 heating rates. (author)

  10. Effect of heat input on heat affected zone cracking in laser welded ATI Allvac 718Plus superalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idowu, O.A.; Ojo, O.A.; Chaturvedi, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    The heat affected zones (HAZs) of low and high heat input laser welds of a newly developed superalloy, ATI Allvac 718Plus, were studied. Low heat input welds suffered significant HAZ grain boundary liquation cracking, while no cracking was observed in spite of a more extensive HAZ intergranular liquation in the higher heat input welds. Combination of lower welding stresses generated during cooling, and relaxation of these stresses by thick intergranular liquid were suggested to be the factors that contributed to the absence of cracking in the high heat input welds. Further, healing of some of the HAZ cracks in lower heat input welds by fusion zone interdendritic liquid occurred through liquid backfilling

  11. Fast in situ X-ray diffraction phase and stress analysis during complete heat treatment cycles of steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, A. da S.; Hirsch, T.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents results obtained with a method for time and temperature resolved analysis of changes in phase composition and stresses/residual stresses during complete heat treatment cycles of steel, including quenching. Sample temperatures of up to 930 deg. C could be reached with a specially designed furnace, where fast cooling of the samples was realized by gas quenching. Measurements for phase and stress analysis could be performed with an acquisition rate of at least one value every 3 s. Results concerning residual stress relaxation during heating, and stress/residual stress development during quenching are presented and discussed for AISI E52100 ball bearing steel. The observed stress development during quenching followed the expected transformation behavior with some deviations that could be explained through the effects of surface decarburization. The system developed proved to be a suitable tool for characterizing phase and stress changes that occur during heat treatment of steels, as a function of time and temperature

  12. A study on the effect of solution heat treatment on the corrosion resistance of super duplex stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jee Yong; Park, Yong Soo; Kim, Soon Tae

    2001-01-01

    High temperature solution heat treatment(typically higher than 1100 .deg. C) is known generally to reduces the resistance to localized corrosion on super duplex stainless. This is attributed to the formation of zone depleted of alloying elements. In this study, the corrosion properties were investigated on super duplex stainless steels with various solution heat treatments. The corrosion resistance of these steels was evaluated in terms of critical pitting temperature and cyclic potentiodynamic polarization test. Chemical composition of the austenite and ferrite phases were analyzed by SEM-EDS. The following results were obtained. (1) By conducting furnace cooling, critical pitting temperature and repassivation potential increased. (2) By omitting furnace cooling, solution heat treatment produced Cr and Mo depleted zone in the phase boundary. (3) During furnace cooling, Cr and Mo rediffused through the phase boundary. This increased the corrosion resistance of super duplex stainless steels

  13. Hardness survey of cold-worked and heat-treated JBK-75 stainless steel alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, R.J.; Lucas, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    The alloy JBK-75, an age-hardenable austenitic stainless steel, is similar to commercial A-286, but has certain chemistry modifications to improve weldability and hydrogen compatibility. The principal changes are an increase in nickel and a decrease in manganese with lower limits on carbon, phosphorus, sulfur, silicon, and boron. In this study, the effects of solutionizing time and temperature, quench rate, cold working, and the effects of cold working on precipitation kinetics were examined. Findings show that the solutionizing temperature has a moderate effect on the as-quenched hardness, while times greater than that required for solutionizing do not significantly affect hardness. Quench rate was found to have a small effect on as-quenched hardness, however, hardness gradients did not develop in small bars. It was found that JBK-75 can be significantly strengthened by cold working. Cold working alone produced hardness increases from Rockwell-A 49 to R/sub A/ 68. A recovery-related hardness change was noted on heat treating at 300 and 400 0 C for both as-quenched and as-worked JBK-75. Significant age-hardening was observed at temperatures as low as 500 0 C for as-worked metal. Aging at 600 0 C resulted in maximum hardness in the 75 percent worked sample at about 6 hours (R/sub A/ 73.5) while the 50 percent worked sample was near maximum hardness (R/sub A 72.5) after seven days. THE 25 and 0 percent worked samples were considerably underaged after seven days. Similar type kinetic data were obtained for worked and nonworked metal at 650, 700, 800, 850, 900, 1000, and 1100 0 C for times from 10 minutes to 10,000 minutes (6.7 days). The overall purpose of the hardness survey was to better define the effects of cold work on the stress-relieving range, coherent precipitation range, incoherent precipitation range, recrystallization range, solutionizing range, and grain-growth range

  14. Effect of prolonged isothermal heat treatment on the mechanical behavior of advanced NANOBAIN steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avishan, Behzad

    2017-09-01

    The microstructural evolution and consequent changes in strength and ductility of advanced NANOBAIN steel during prolonged isothermal heat-treatment stages were investigated. The microstructure and mechanical properties of nanostructured bainite were not expected to be influenced by extending the heat-treatment time beyond the optimum value because of the autotempering phenomenon and high tempering resistance. However, experimental results indicated that the microstructure was thermodynamically unstable and that prolonged austempering resulted in carbon depletion from high-carbon retained austenite and carbide precipitations. Therefore, austenite became thermally less stable and partially transformed into martensite during cooling to room temperature. Prolonged austempering did not lead to the typical tempering sequence of bainite, and the sizes of the microstructural constituents were independent of the extended heat-treatment times. This independence, in turn, resulted in almost constant ultimate tensile strength values. However, microstructural variations enhanced the yield strength and the hardness of the material at extended isothermal heat-treatment stages. Finally, although microstructural changes decreased the total elongation and impact toughness, considerable combinations of mechanical properties could still be achieved.

  15. Heat-treated stainless steel felt as scalable anode material for bioelectrochemical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kun; Soeriyadi, Alexander H; Feng, Huajun; Prévoteau, Antonin; Patil, Sunil A; Gooding, J Justin; Rabaey, Korneel

    2015-11-01

    This work reports a simple and scalable method to convert stainless steel (SS) felt into an effective anode for bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) by means of heat treatment. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry elucidated that the heat treatment generated an iron oxide rich layer on the SS felt surface. The iron oxide layer dramatically enhanced the electroactive biofilm formation on SS felt surface in BESs. Consequently, the sustained current densities achieved on the treated electrodes (1 cm(2)) were around 1.5±0.13 mA/cm(2), which was seven times higher than the untreated electrodes (0.22±0.04 mA/cm(2)). To test the scalability of this material, the heat-treated SS felt was scaled up to 150 cm(2) and similar current density (1.5 mA/cm(2)) was achieved on the larger electrode. The low cost, straightforwardness of the treatment, high conductivity and high bioelectrocatalytic performance make heat-treated SS felt a scalable anodic material for BESs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Computerized property prediction and process planning in heat treatment of steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gergely, M. (Steel Advisory Centre for Industrial Technologies (SACIT), Budapest (Hungary)); Somogyi, S. (Steel Advisory Centre for Industrial Technologies (SACIT), Budapest (Hungary)); Kohlheb, R. (Steel Advisory Centre for Industrial Technologies (SACIT), Budapest (Hungary))

    1994-01-01

    Recent years have seen widespread interest in the establishment of prediction methods, based on phenomenological description and computer simulation of transformation processes during heat treatment, and in the introduction of software for technological planning. The steady development of this approach is aimed at meeting the requirement of metallurgists, design engineers dealing with material selection and dimensioning, and technologists planning heat treatment processes. Research in this field of computer simulation has been concentrated so far on two main areas of interest: . Modelling of transformation processes and the prediction of microstructures and/or properties, . Developing program packages to help solve concrete tasks such as material selection, on-line process control and monitoring, and the design of heat-treating operations. During the last two decades in the field of heat treatment, various mathematical models with different accuracy and complexity have been developed. In this paper, an attempt is made to outline some important results in computer simulation and computerized property prediction without aiming at completeness. The topic is restricted to quenched and tempered, and case-hardened steels. (orig.)

  17. Applications of thermal energy storage to process heat and waste heat recovery in the iron and steel industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katter, L. B.; Peterson, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    The system identified operates from the primary arc furnace evacuation system as a heat source. Energy from the fume stream is stored as sensible energy in a solid medium (packed bed). A steam-driven turbine is arranged to generate power for peak shaving. A parametric design approach is presented since the overall system design, at optimum payback is strongly dependent upon the nature of the electric pricing structure. The scope of the project was limited to consideration of available technology so that industry-wide application could be achieved by 1985. A search of the literature, coupled with interviews with representatives of major steel producers, served as the means whereby the techniques and technologies indicated for the specific site are extrapolated to the industry as a whole and to the 1985 time frame. The conclusion of the study is that by 1985, a national yearly savings of 1.9 million barrels of oil could be realized through recovery of waste heat from primary arc furnace fume gases on an industry-wide basis. Economic studies indicate that the proposed system has a plant payback time of approximately 5 years.

  18. Bedding material affects mechanical thresholds, heat thresholds and texture preference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehring, Francie; O’Hara, Crystal L.; Stucky, Cheryl L.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been known that the bedding type animals are housed on can affect breeding behavior and cage environment. Yet little is known about its effects on evoked behavior responses or non-reflexive behaviors. C57BL/6 mice were housed for two weeks on one of five bedding types: Aspen Sani Chips® (standard bedding for our institute), ALPHA-Dri®, Cellu-Dri™, Pure-o’Cel™ or TEK-Fresh. Mice housed on Aspen exhibited the lowest (most sensitive) mechanical thresholds while those on TEK-Fresh exhibited 3-fold higher thresholds. While bedding type had no effect on responses to punctate or dynamic light touch stimuli, TEK-Fresh housed animals exhibited greater responsiveness in a noxious needle assay, than those housed on the other bedding types. Heat sensitivity was also affected by bedding as animals housed on Aspen exhibited the shortest (most sensitive) latencies to withdrawal whereas those housed on TEK-Fresh had the longest (least sensitive) latencies to response. Slight differences between bedding types were also seen in a moderate cold temperature preference assay. A modified tactile conditioned place preference chamber assay revealed that animals preferred TEK-Fresh to Aspen bedding. Bedding type had no effect in a non-reflexive wheel running assay. In both acute (two day) and chronic (5 week) inflammation induced by injection of Complete Freund’s Adjuvant in the hindpaw, mechanical thresholds were reduced in all groups regardless of bedding type, but TEK-Fresh and Pure-o’Cel™ groups exhibited a greater dynamic range between controls and inflamed cohorts than Aspen housed mice. PMID:26456764

  19. Simple Heat Treatment for Production of Hot-Dip Galvanized Dual Phase Steel Using Si-Al Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Equihua-Guillén, F.; García-Lara, A. M.; Muñíz-Valdes, C. R.; Ortíz-Cuellar, J. C.; Camporredondo-Saucedo, J. E.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents relevant metallurgical considerations to produce galvanized dual phase steels from low cost aluminum-silicon steels which are produced by continuous strip processing. Two steels with different contents of Si and Al were austenized in the two-phase field ferrite + austenite (α + γ) in a fast manner to obtain dual phase steels, suitable for hot-dip galvanizing process, under typical parameters of continuous annealing processing line. Tensile dual phase properties were obtained from specimens cooled from temperature below Ar3, held during 3 min, intermediate cooling at temperature above Ar1 and quenching in Zn bath at 465 °C. The results have shown typical microstructure and tensile properties of galvanized dual phase steels. Finally, the synergistic effect of aluminum, silicon, and residual chromium on martensite start temperature ( M s), critical cooling rate ( C R), volume fraction of martensite, and tensile properties has been studied.

  20. Effects of heat treatment condition on the mechanical properties and weldability of 10Cr-1Mo-VNbN cast steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shon, Dae Young; Bang, Kook Soo; Lee, Kyong Woon; Chi, Byung Ha

    2003-01-01

    Mechanical properties and weldability such as HAZ hardness, cold cracking susceptibility and hot ductility of two differently heat treated 10Cr-1Mo-VNbN cast steels were measured and compared. Because of high hardenability of the cast steel, as-annealed cast steel showed martensitic microstructure and thus had higher hardness than annealed-normalized-tempered cast steel which had tempered martensite. Because the welding electrode used resulted in a high hardness weld metal, both cast steels showed same weld metal cold cracking susceptibility even though the as-annealed cast steel had higher HAZ hardness than the annealed-normalized-tempered cast steel. Both cast steels had excellent hot ductility in high temperature range, indicating no risk of grain boundary liquation cracking in the HAZ. However, the as-annealed cast steel showed an inferior ductility in the intermediate temperature range of 1000∼1150 .deg. C because of larger unrecrystallized grain size

  1. Perspectives of using Q&P-heat treatment process for improving complex of mechanical properties of steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Василь Георгійович Єфременко

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article provides an overview of foreign publications on the influence of modes Q&P (quenching and partitioning heat treatment on mechanical and operational properties of structural steels with different carbon content. The mechanism of structure formation in Q&P-treated steels is analyzed, it is shown that Q&P-treatment results in formation of a microstructure containing tempered martensite, lower bainite (polygonal ferrite with an increased amount of residual austenite which provides TRIP-effect when loaded. The values of strength and plastic properties, achieved in the low-carbon, medium-and high-carbon steel as a result of Q&P-processing are presented. The effect of alloying elements (Mn, Si, Al, Cr, Mo, Nb etc. on the properties of the Q&P-steels is described. It is shown the crucial role of silicon and aluminum in formation of residual austenite and carbides-free bainite. The parameters of Q&P-processing, determining the amount of residual austenite and its ability to deformation martensite transformation during deformation are analyzed. The classification of types Q&P-treatment, depending on the additional operations of heat treatment such as preliminary hardening, heating in the intercritical temperature range, tempering for dispersed carbides precipitation, is given. The prospects of Q&P-processing to produce relatively inexpensive high strength steels are described

  2. Microstructure and mechanical properties of hard zone in friction stir welded X80 pipeline steel relative to different heat input

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydin, Hakan, E-mail: hakanay@uludag.edu.tr [Engineering and Architecture Faculty, Mechanical Engineering Department, Uludag University, 16059 Gorukle-Bursa (Turkey); Nelson, Tracy W. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Brigham Young University, 435 CTB, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the microstructure and mechanical properties of the hard zone in friction stir welded X80 pipeline steel at different heat inputs. Microstructural analysis of the welds was carried out using optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and microhardness. Heat input during friction stir welding process had a significant influence on the microstructure and mechanical properties in the hard zone along the advancing side of the weld nugget. Based on the results, the linear relationships between heat input and post-weld microstructures and mechanical properties in the hard zone of friction stir welded X80 steels were established. It can be concluded that with decrease in heat input the bainitic structure in the hard zone becomes finer and so hard zone strength increases.

  3. Effect of heat treatment on microstructure, mechanical properties and erosion resistance of cast 23-8-N nitronic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Avnish; Sharma, Ashok; Goel, S.K.

    2015-01-01

    Effects of heat treatment on microstructure, mechanical properties and erosion behavior of cast 23-8-N nitronic steel were studied. A series of heat treatments were carried out in the temperature range of 1180–1240 °C to observe the effect on microstructure. Optimum heat treatment cycle was obtained at 1220 °C for holding time of 150 min, which leads to dissolution of carbides, formation of equiaxed grains and twins. Heat treatment has shown improvement in tensile strength, toughness, impact strength and work hardening capacity, however at the cost of marginal reduction in hardness and yield strength. This resulted in improvement of erosion resistance of cast 23-8-N nitronic steel. The microstructures, fractured surfaces and phases were studied by optical microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis respectively

  4. Microstructure and mechanical properties of hard zone in friction stir welded X80 pipeline steel relative to different heat input

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydin, Hakan; Nelson, Tracy W.

    2013-01-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the microstructure and mechanical properties of the hard zone in friction stir welded X80 pipeline steel at different heat inputs. Microstructural analysis of the welds was carried out using optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and microhardness. Heat input during friction stir welding process had a significant influence on the microstructure and mechanical properties in the hard zone along the advancing side of the weld nugget. Based on the results, the linear relationships between heat input and post-weld microstructures and mechanical properties in the hard zone of friction stir welded X80 steels were established. It can be concluded that with decrease in heat input the bainitic structure in the hard zone becomes finer and so hard zone strength increases

  5. Application of an energy efficient casting ladle heating system used in the manufacture of stainless steel; Einsatz einer energieeffizienten Pfannenaufheizstation bei der Herstellung von Edelstahl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poeschl, Markus [Edelstahlwerke Schmees GmbH, Langenfeld (Germany); Lodde, Marcus [Effizienz-Agentur NRW, Duisburg (Germany). prisma Consult GmbH

    2011-06-15

    In the melting area, the company has been using four conventional burners to heat the ladles. The existing flame burners heat the upside down ladles from below and consume massive amount of energy. Heat radiation and all of the waste gas are released into the facility. The material around the ladles is therefore heavily affected. The company has now installed a new energy efficient casting ladle heating system with a new kind of porous burner which heats the transport ladles without exposing them to an open flame. The combustion heat is channeled to specially adapted steel pipes via infrared radiation and convection flow. By doing this, the heat is directly transferred to the ladles and can be controlled in a more balanced manner. The company now saves around 61,400 m{sup 3}/a of natural gas, approx. 60 % of the energy required for the ladle heating and, as a result, 113.8 tonnes of CO{sub 2}-equivalent. The life span of the ladles can be increased by a factor of 2 due to the reduced exposure of the fire resistant materials. The resulting waste gas is collected and the waste heat will be reused in the facility in the future (facility heating 2011). Due to reduction in cleaning and carrying time of the ladles, Fr. Schmees expects an increase in productivity of the complete process. The heat radiation from the ladles has been reduced by 75 % which has led to a reduction of breakdowns. In addition, the noise level has sunk from 78.7 dB to 67.4 db. (orig.)

  6. Influence of pre-heating on the surface modification of powder-metallurgy processed cold-work tool steel during laser surface melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Šturm, Roman, E-mail: roman.sturm@fs.uni-lj.si [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Aškerčeva 6, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Štefanikova, Maria [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Aškerčeva 6, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Steiner Petrovič, Darja [Institute of Metals and Technology, Lepi pot 11, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2015-01-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Heat-treatment protocol for laser surface melting of cold-work tool steel is proposed. • The laser melted steel surface is hardened, and morphologically modified. • The pre-heating of substrate creates a crack-and pore-free steel surface. • The optimum pre-heating temperature is determined to be 350 °C. • Using pre-heating the quantity of retained austenite is reduced. - Abstract: In this study we determine the optimal parameters for surface modification using the laser surface melting of powder-metallurgy processed, vanadium-rich, cold-work tool steel. A combination of steel pre-heating, laser surface melting and a subsequent heat treatment creates a hardened and morphologically modified surface of the selected high-alloy tool steel. The pre-heating of the steel prior to the laser surface melting ensures a crack- and pore-free modified surface. Using a pre-heating temperature of 350 °C, the extremely fine microstructure, which typically evolves during the laser-melting, became slightly coarser and the volume fraction of retained austenite was reduced. In the laser-melted layer the highest values of microhardness were achieved in the specimens where a subsequent heat treatment at 550 °C was applied. The performed thermodynamic calculations were able to provide a very valuable assessment of the liquidus temperature and, especially, a prediction of the chemical composition as well as the precipitation and dissolution sequence for the carbides.

  7. Determination of bearing steel heat treatment with the use of the acoustic emission method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Z. Wozniak

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A study on the control of an extremely important stage of the martensitic-bainitic austempering and obtaining the M-B structure in the 100CrMnSi6-4 steel with the use of the acoustic emission (AE has been undertaken. In order to enrich retained austenite with carbon, steels are austempered at appropriately low temperatures. A martensitic transformation, resulting from diffusionless and displacive transformation is associated with significant AE signs. The strain energy produced during growth due to the shape change is reduced by plastic deformation. Predominant source of (AE is the movement of dislocations in order to relieve internal stresses.The heat treatment was performed in a modern, purpose-constructed device which simultaneously records acoustic emission effects. The signals were recorded with the use of an AE analyzer 20–800 kHz, and they were received by means of a broadband piezoelectric transducer with the use of a specialist card with a sampling frequency of 1200 kHz. The results regarding a correlation of austempering temperature and the maximum number of AE events and dilatometric results have been presented. This parameter can be used for precise Ms temperature estimation. Basing on microstructural investigations, it has been found that previously formed martensite with midrib morphology also accelerates the bainitic transformation.

  8. Determination of bearing steel heat treatment with the use of the acoustic emission method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.Z. Woźniak

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A study on the control of an extremely important stage of the martensitic-bainitic austempering and obtaining the M-B structure in the 100CrMnSi6-4 steel with the use of the acoustic emission (AE has been undertaken. In order to enrich retained austenite with carbon,steels are austempered at appropriately low temperatures. A martensitic transformation, resulting from diffusionless and displacive transformation is associated with significant AE signs. The strain energy produced during growth due to the shape change is reduced by plastic deformation. Predominant source of (AE is the movement of dislocations in order to relieve internal stresses.The heat treatment was performed in a modern, purpose-constructed device which simultaneously records acoustic emission effects. The signals were recorded with the use of an AE analyzer 20–800 kHz, and they were received by means of a broadband piezoelectric transducer with the use of a specialist card with a sampling frequency of 1200 kHz. The results regarding a correlation of austempering temperature and the maximum number of AE events and dilatometric results have been presented. This parameter can be used for precise Ms temperatureestimation. Basing on microstructural investigations, it has been found that previously formed martensite with midrib morphology alsoaccelerates the bainitic transformation.

  9. Corrosion Behavior of Pipeline Carbon Steel under Different Iron Oxide Deposits in the District Heating System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Sang Kim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of pipeline steel covered by iron oxides (α-FeOOH; Fe3O4 and Fe2O3 was investigated in simulated district heating water. In potentiodynamic polarization tests; the corrosion rate of pipeline steel is increased under the iron oxide but the increaseing rate is different due to the differnet chemical reactions of the covered iron oxides. Pitting corrosion was only observed on the α-FeOOH-covered specimen; which is caused by the crevice corrosion under the α-FeOOH. From Mott-Schottky and X-ray diffraction results; the surface reaction and oxide layer were dependent on the kind of iron oxides. The iron oxides deposit increases the failure risk of the pipeline and localized corrosion can be occurred under the α-FeOOH-covered region of the pipeline. Thus, prevention methods for the iron oxide deposit in the district pipeline system such as filtering or periodic chemical cleaning are needed.

  10. Creep-rupture correlations for type 304 stainless steel heat 9T2796

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swindeman, R.W.

    1975-01-01

    Creep-rupture data are presented for a reference heat of type 304 stainless steel tested at temperatures between 482 and 816 0 C (900-1500 0 F) and for times to 10,000 hr. The ability of several popular time-temperature parameters to correlate the rupture data is examined, and it shows that the Orr-Sherby-Dorn parameter provides a slightly better fit to the data than the Larson-Miller, Manson-Haferd, and Manson-Succop parameters. An alternative model is developed, based on the Barrett-Ardell-Sherby parameter, which makes use of modulus-compensated true stresses. These stresses are approximated on the basis of the strain about halfway through the test. Although the parameter does not fit the data quite as well as the Orr-Sherby-Dorn parameter, the activation energy associated with the parameter approaches the value expected for solute element diffusion in stainless steel. In the very high-stress region the master curve generated by the parameter is used to examine the interface between the results of tensile tests, described in terms of the Voce equation, and the creep-rupture tests. The tensile data can be correlated with the Barrett-Ardel-Sherby parameter when the tensile testing conditions are such that rupture is initiated by grain boundary failures

  11. The new coke oven battery heating control system at Rautaruukki Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmu, P.; Swanljung, J. [Rautaruukki Steel, Raahe (Finland)

    1998-07-01

    The heating control system of the coke oven batteries has been developed strongly during the existence of the coke oven plant. The first step of the heating control was a statistical model which had a good monitoring system. This was enough in those days due to bigger problems elsewhere. The second generation heating control system is designed for irregular coke oven battery operation. Coke production in Rautaruukki Steel is based on one coke-oven plant consisting of two batteries and a by-product plant. The whole coke production is cooled by three dry quenching units. The first coke-oven battery was taken into operation in October 1987 and the second in November 1992. Originally the plant was mainly designed and equipped by Ukrainian Giprokoks except Finnish CDQ-boilers, German ammonia recovery process and electric and automation designed by Rautaruukki. Before building of the second coke oven battery, there was a huge amount of development and modification work to do, to ensure the proper function of the coke production. For example all electronic and hydraulic systems of the Russian supplier were replaced by systems designed by Rautaruukki's own personnel. When the coke production capacity was doubled, the only design by Gibrokoks related to the battery and one additional dry quenching chamber. The expansion project itself was managed and executed by Rautaruukki. The expansion project consisted of: the second battery, third CDQ-unit, Desulphurization and Benzol plants for the by-product plant and upgrading of automation system. Battery and CDQ chamber refractory materials were Russian origin and all other main equipment were purchased by Rautaruukki from western and domestic manufacturers based on the operation difficulties and experience of coke oven battery No. 1. These modification practices made a good basis for later development in the field of coke oven battery automation. The hierarchy of the coke oven battery automation at Rautaruukki Steel consist

  12. Effect of Various Heat Treatment Processes on Fatigue Behavior of Tool Steel for Cold Forging Die

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, S. U.; Kim, S. S.; Lee, Y. S.; Kwon, Y. N.; Lee, J. H.

    Effects of various heat treatment processes, including "Q/T (quenching and tempering)", "Q/CT/T (Quenching, cryogenic treatment and tempering)", "Q/T (quenching and tempering) + Ti-nitriding" and "Q/CT/T (Cryogenic treatment and tempering) + Ti-nitriding", on S-N fatigue behavior of AISI D2 tool steel were investigated. The optical micrographs and Vicker's hardness values at near surface and core area were examined for each specimen. Uniaxial fatigue tests were performed by using an electro-magnetic resonance fatigue testing machine at a frequency of 80 Hz and an R ratio of -1. The overall resistance to fatigue tends to decrease significantly with Ti-nitriding treatment compared to those for the general Q/T and Q/CT/T specimens. The reduced resistance to fatigue with Ti-nitriding is discussed based on the microstructural and fractographic analyses.

  13. Behavior of Eurofer97 reduced activation martensitic steel upon heating and continuous cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danon, A.; Alamo, A.

    2002-01-01

    The phase transformation behavior of the Eurofer97 steel (Fe9Cr1WVTa) has been investigated. The transformation temperatures upon heating and cooling were determined by dilatometry for different rates in the range 0.0028-100 deg. C/s. The prior austenitic grain size of Eurofer97, measured as a function of the austenitization temperature, does not change appreciably up to 1050 deg. C and then increases with increasing austenite temperature from 1050 up to 1200 deg. C. Continuous cooling transformation diagrams were determined for the austenitization temperatures of 980, 1060 and 1140 deg. C. They show a well-known form with two main phase fields, martensite and ferrite. Values of the critical cooling rates and ferrite start temperatures depend on the austenitization temperature. After thermal cycles samples were further characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and thermoelectric power measurements

  14. Transformation of deformation martensite into austenite in stainless steels at various heating rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gojkhenberg, Yu.N.; Shtejnberg, M.M.

    1978-01-01

    Under isothermal conditions and with continuous preheating at defferent rates, the inverse transformation of deformation martensite that is obtained through reductions to small, medium and great degrees, has been studied. It has been established that depending on the preheat rate, the temperature of the end α → ν of rebuilding varies according to a curve having a maximum. The ascending branch of that curve is connected with the diffusion-controlled shear transformation, whereas the descending branch with the transition to the martensite reaction of austenite formation. As the deformation degree increases, the temperature of the end of the inverse transformation decreases. As a result, recrystallization of austenite proceeds only after completing α → ν transition, when heating the steels deformed to the medium degree at rates of at least 25 deg/sec and after high reductions at rates of at least 0.8 deg/sec

  15. Evaluating the effectiveness of heat-resistant cast steel filtration from the results of structure examinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asłanowicz M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Filtration guarantees castings characterised by high quality and free from any non-metallic inclusions, which are formed at the stage of melting and pouring of liquid metal. This article discusses the problem of the effectiveness of filtration process taking as an example heat-resistant cast steel poured into ceramic moulds. In investigations, foamed zircon filters made by FerroTerm Sp. z o.o. The effectiveness of filtration was described and examined using the results of metallographic examinations, including macro- and micro-structure examinations of metal and of cast metal/ceramic filter interface, and measurements of the content of non-metallic inclusions. The methods of investigations were presented, the obtained results were described, and relevant conclusions were drawn, all of them unmistakably indicating a very beneficial effect that filtration has on molten metal quality. Łódź, Poland, were used.

  16. TEM characterization of microstructure evolution of 12%Cr heat resistant steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas, D.; Prat, O.; Sauthoff, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Duesseldorf (Germany); Garcia, J. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Kaysser-Pyzalla, A.R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Bochum Univ. (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    A detailed characterization of the microstructure evolution of 12%Cr heat resistant steels at different creep times (100 MPa / 650 C / 8000 h) were carried out by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The results of the microstructure analysis are correlated with the mechanical properties in order to investigate the influence of different precipitates (especially M{sub 23}C{sub 6}) on the creep strength of the alloys. Precipitation of Laves phase and Z-phase was observed after several hours creep time. Very few Z-phase of the type Cr(V,Ta)N nucleating from existing (V,Ta)(C,N) was observed. Both alloys show growth and coarsening of Laves phase, meanwhile the MX carbonitrides present a very slow growth and coarsening rate. Alloys containing Laves phase, MX and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitates show best creep properties. (orig.)

  17. Cleanliness of Ti-bearing Al-killed ultra-low-carbon steel during different heating processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jian-long; Bao, Yan-ping; Wang, Min

    2017-12-01

    During the production of Ti-bearing Al-killed ultra-low-carbon (ULC) steel, two different heating processes were used when the converter tapping temperature or the molten steel temperature in the Ruhrstahl-Heraeus (RH) process was low: heating by Al addition during the RH decarburization process and final deoxidation at the end of the RH decarburization process (process-I), and increasing the oxygen content at the end of RH decarburization, heating and final deoxidation by one-time Al addition (process-II). Temperature increases of 10°C by different processes were studied; the results showed that the two heating processes could achieve the same heating effect. The T.[O] content in the slab and the refining process was better controlled by process-I than by process-II. Statistical analysis of inclusions showed that the numbers of inclusions in the slab obtained by process-I were substantially less than those in the slab obtained by process-II. For process-I, the Al2O3 inclusions produced by Al added to induce heating were substantially removed at the end of decarburization. The amounts of inclusions were substantially greater for process-II than for process-I at different refining stages because of the higher dissolved oxygen concentration in process-II. Industrial test results showed that process-I was more beneficial for improving the cleanliness of molten steel.

  18. Influence of heat treatment on microstructure and properties of bainitic cast steel used for frogs in railway crossovers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Tasak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with influence of heat treatment on microstructure and properties of sample cast assigned as a material used for frogs in railway crossover. Materials used in railway industry for frogs (manganese cast steel and forged pearlitic steel do not fulfil strict conditions of exploitation of railway. One of the solutions is using cast steel with bainitic or bainite-martensite microstructure, what allows to gain high resistance properties (Rm = 1400 MPa, Rp0,2 = 900 MPa, hardness to 400 HBW. The cooling rates of rail type UIC60 shows that it is possible to reach the bainitic microstructure in cast of frog. The microstructure of lower banite should have an advantageous influence on cracking resistance. In order to set the parameters of heat treatment, the critical temperatures were determined by dilatometric methods determined. This heat treatment consisted of normalizing that prepared it to the farther process of resistance welding. Moreover, the CCT diagram of proposed bainitic cast steel was prepared. The exams were done that can be used to evaluate the influence of heat treatment on microstructure and properties of the sample cast.

  19. Residual stresses evolution in hardening, cold drawn or shot-peening carbon steel as a function of the heating temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vannes, A.-B.; Parisot, Alain; Fougeres, Roger; Theolier, Maurice

    1977-01-01

    Residual stress variations are studied in hardening, cold-drawn, shot-peening carbon steel samples as a function of heating temperature or the tempering one. For temperatures between 100 0 C and 250 0 C, a relative maximum is observed for the mean level of the residual stresses. These results are explained on the basis of two antagonistic mechanisms: restoration and ageing [fr

  20. In situ post-weld heat treatment on martensitic stainless steel turbine runners using a robotic induction heating process to control temperature distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreault, E.; Hazel, B.; Côté, J.; Godin, S.

    2014-03-01

    A new robotic heat treatment process is developed. Using this solution it is now possible to perform local heat treatment on large steel components. Crack, cavitation and erosion repairs on turbine blades and Pelton buckets are among the applications of this technique. The proof of concept is made on a 13Cr-4Ni stainless steel designated "CA6NM". This alloy is widely used in the power industry for modern system components. Given the very tight temperature tolerance (600 to 630 °C) for post-weld heat treatment on this alloy, 13Cr-4Ni stainless steel is very well suited for demonstrating the possibilities of this process. To achieve heat treatment requirements, an induction heating system is mounted on a compact manipulator named "Scompi". This robot moves a pancake coil in order to control the temperature distribution. A simulator using thermal finite element analysis is first used for path planning. A feedback loop adjusts parameters in function of environmental conditions.

  1. In situ post-weld heat treatment on martensitic stainless steel turbine runners using a robotic induction heating process to control temperature distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudreault, E; Hazel, B; Côté, J; Godin, S

    2014-01-01

    A new robotic heat treatment process is developed. Using this solution it is now possible to perform local heat treatment on large steel components. Crack, cavitation and erosion repairs on turbine blades and Pelton buckets are among the applications of this technique. The proof of concept is made on a 13Cr-4Ni stainless steel designated C A6NM . This alloy is widely used in the power industry for modern system components. Given the very tight temperature tolerance (600 to 630 °C) for post-weld heat treatment on this alloy, 13Cr-4Ni stainless steel is very well suited for demonstrating the possibilities of this process. To achieve heat treatment requirements, an induction heating system is mounted on a compact manipulator named S compi . This robot moves a pancake coil in order to control the temperature distribution. A simulator using thermal finite element analysis is first used for path planning. A feedback loop adjusts parameters in function of environmental conditions

  2. Some factors affecting radiative heat transport in PWR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, A.N.

    1989-04-01

    This report discusses radiative heat transport in Pressurized Water Reactor cores, using simple models to illustrate basic features of the transport process. Heat transport by conduction and convection is ignored in order to focus attention on the restrictions on radiative heat transport imposed by the geometry of the heat emitting and absorbing structures. The importance of the spacing of the emitting and absorbing structures is emphasised. Steady state temperature distributions are found for models of cores which are uniformly heated by fission product decay. In all of the models, a steady state temperature distribution can only be obtained if the central core temperature is in excess of the melting point of UO 2 . It has recently been reported that the MIMAS computer code, which takes into account radiative heat transport, has been used to model the heat-up of the Three Mile Island-2 reactor core, and the computations indicate that the core could not have reached the melting point of UO 2 at any time or any place. We discuss this result in the light of the calculations presented in this paper. It appears that the predicted stabilisation of the core temperatures at ∼ 2200 0 C may be a consequence of the artificially large spacing between the radial rings employed in the MIMAS code, rather than a result of physical significance. (author)

  3. Evolution of A-Type Macrosegregation in Large Size Steel Ingot After Multistep Forging and Heat Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucif, Abdelhalim; Ben Fredj, Emna; Harris, Nathan; Shahriari, Davood; Jahazi, Mohammad; Lapierre-Boire, Louis-Philippe

    2018-06-01

    A-type macrosegregation refers to the channel chemical heterogeneities that can be formed during solidification in large size steel ingots. In this research, a combination of experiment and simulation was used to study the influence of open die forging parameters on the evolution of A-type macrosegregation patterns during a multistep forging of a 40 metric ton (MT) cast, high-strength steel ingot. Macrosegregation patterns were determined experimentally by macroetch along the longitudinal axis of the forged and heat-treated ingot. Mass spectroscopy, on more than 900 samples, was used to determine the chemical composition map of the entire longitudinal sectioned surface. FORGE NxT 1.1 finite element modeling code was used to predict the effect of forging sequences on the morphology evolution of A-type macrosegregation patterns. For this purpose, grain flow variables were defined and implemented in a large scale finite element modeling code to describe oriented grains and A-type segregation patterns. Examination of the A-type macrosegregation showed four to five parallel continuous channels located nearly symmetrical to the axis of the forged ingot. In some regions, the A-type patterns became curved or obtained a wavy form in contrast to their straight shape in the as-cast state. Mass spectrometry analysis of the main alloying elements (C, Mn, Ni, Cr, Mo, Cu, P, and S) revealed that carbon, manganese, and chromium were the most segregated alloying elements in A-type macrosegregation patterns. The observed differences were analyzed using thermodynamic calculations, which indicated that changes in the chemical composition of the liquid metal can affect the primary solidification mode and the segregation intensity of the alloying elements. Finite element modeling simulation results showed very good agreement with the experimental observations, thereby allowing for the quantification of the influence of temperature and deformation on the evolution of the shape of the

  4. Fracture toughness of the IEA heat of F82H ferritic/martensitic stainless steel as a function of loading mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Huaxin; Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Labs., Richland, WA (United States); Hirth, J.P. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Mode I and mixed-mode I/III fracture toughness tests were performed for the IEA heat of the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic stainless steel F82H at ambient temperature in order to provide comparison with previous measurements on a small heat given a different heat treatment. The results showed that heat to heat variations and heat treatment had negligible consequences on Mode I fracture toughness, but behavior during mixed-mode testing showed unexpected instabilities.

  5. Study of 13Cr-4Ni-(Mo (F6NM Steel Grade Heat Treatment for Maximum Hardness Control in Industrial Heats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo De Sanctis

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The standard NACE MR0175 (ISO 15156 requires a maximum hardness value of 23 HRC for 13Cr-4Ni-(Mo steel grade for sour service, requiring a double tempering heat treatment at temperature in the range 648–691 °C for the first tempering and 593–621 °C for the second tempering. Difficulties in limiting alloy hardness after the tempering of forged mechanical components (F6NM are often faced. Variables affecting the thermal behavior of 13Cr-4Ni-(Mo during single and double tempering treatments have been studied by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM observations, X-ray diffraction measurements, dilatometry, and thermo-mechanical simulations. It has been found that relatively low Ac1 temperatures in this alloy induce the formation of austenite phase above 600 °C during tempering, and that the formed, reverted austenite tends to be unstable upon cooling, thus contributing to the increase of final hardness via transformation to virgin martensite. Therefore, it is necessary to increase the Ac1 temperature as much as possible to allow the tempering of martensite at the temperature range required by NACE without the detrimental formation of virgin martensite upon final cooling. Attempts to do so have been carried out by reducing both carbon (<0.02% C and nitrogen (<100 ppm levels. Results obtained herein show final hardness below NACE limits without an unacceptable loss of mechanical strength.

  6. Numerical estimation of phase transformations in solid state during Yb:YAG laser heating of steel sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubiak, Marcin, E-mail: kubiak@imipkm.pcz.pl; Piekarska, Wiesława; Domański, Tomasz; Saternus, Zbigniew [Institute of Mechanics and Machine Design Foundations, Częstochowa University of Technology, Dąbrowskiego 73, 42-200 Częstochowa (Poland); Stano, Sebastian [Welding Technologies Department, Welding Institute, Błogosławionego Czesława 16-18, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland)

    2015-03-10

    This work concerns the numerical modeling of heat transfer and phase transformations in solid state occurring during the Yb:YAG laser beam heating process. The temperature field is obtained by the numerical solution into transient heat transfer equation with convective term. The laser beam heat source model is developed using the Kriging interpolation method with experimental measurements of Yb:YAG laser beam profile taken into account. Phase transformations are calculated on the basis of Johnson - Mehl - Avrami (JMA) and Koistinen - Marburger (KM) kinetics models as well as continuous heating transformation (CHT) and continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagrams for S355 steel. On the basis of developed numerical algorithms 3D computer simulations are performed in order to predict temperature history and phase transformations in Yb:YAG laser heating process.

  7. Variables affecting energy efficiency and CO2 emissions in the steel industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siitonen, Sari; Tuomaala, Mari; Ahtila, Pekka

    2010-01-01

    Specific energy consumption (SEC) is an energy efficiency indicator widely used in industry for measuring the energy efficiency of different processes. In this paper, the development of energy efficiency and CO 2 emissions of steelmaking is studied by analysing the energy data from a case mill. First, the specific energy consumption figures were calculated using different system boundaries, such as the process level, mill level and mill site level. Then, an energy efficiency index was developed to evaluate the development of the energy efficiency at the mill site. The effects of different production conditions on specific energy consumption and specific CO 2 emissions were studied by PLS analysis. As theory expects, the production rate of crude steel and the utilisation of recycled steel were shown to affect the development of energy efficiency at the mill site. This study shows that clearly defined system boundaries help to clarify the role of on-site energy conversion and make a difference between the final energy consumption and primary energy consumption of an industrial plant with its own energy production.

  8. Factors Affecting Optimal Surface Roughness of AISI 4140 Steel in Turning Operation Using Taguchi Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novareza, O.; Sulistiyarini, D. H.; Wiradmoko, R.

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents the result of using Taguchi method in turning process of medium carbon steel of AISI 4140. The primary concern is to find the optimal surface roughness after turning process. The taguchi method is used to get a combination of factors and factor levels in order to get the optimum surface roughness level. Four important factors with three levels were used in experiment based on Taguchi method. A number of 27 experiments were carried out during the research and analysed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) method. The result of surface finish was determined in Ra type surface roughness. The depth of cut was found to be the most important factors for reducing the surface roughness of AISI 4140 steel. On the contrary, the other important factors i.e. spindle speed and rake side angle of the tool were proven to be less factors that affecting the surface finish. It is interesting to see the effect of coolant composition that gained the second important factors to reduce the roughness. It may need further research to explain this result.

  9. Occupational Heat Stress Impacts on Health and Productivity in a Steel Industry in Southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manikandan Krishnamurthy

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: Preliminary evidence shows that high heat exposures and heavy workload adversely affect the workers’ health and reduce their work capacities. Health and productivity risks in developing tropical country work settings can be further aggravated by the predicted temperature rise due to climate change, without appropriate interventions. Apart from industries enhancing welfare facilities and designing control interventions, further physiological studies with a seasonal approach and interventional studies are needed to strengthen evidence for developing comprehensive policies to protect workers employed in high heat industries.

  10. A Study on the Low Temperature Brittleness by Cyclic Cooling-Heating of Low Carbon Hot Rolled Steel Plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyo Bok

    1979-01-01

    The ductile-brittle transition phenomenon of low carbon steel has been investigated using the standard Charpy V-notch specimen. Dry ice and acetone were used as refrigerants. Notched specimens were cut from the hot rolled plate produced at POSCO for the Olsen impact test. The effect of cyclic cooling and heating of 0.14% carbon steel on the embrittlement was extensively examined. The ductile-brittle transition temperature was found to be approximately-30 .deg. C. The transition temperature was gradually increased as the number of cooling-heating cycles increased. On a typical V-notch fracture surface it was found that the ductile fracture surface showed a thick and fibrous structure, while the brittle fracture surface a small and light grain with irregular disposition. As expected, the transition temperature was also increased as the carbon content of steel increased. Compared with the case of 0.14% carbon steel, the transition temperature of 0.17% carbon steel was found to be increased about 12 .deg. C

  11. Development of Next Generation Heating System for Scale Free Steel Reheating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Arvind C. Thekdi

    2011-01-27

    The work carried out under this project includes development and design of components, controls, and economic modeling tools that would enable the steel industry to reduce energy intensity through reduction of scale formation during the steel reheating process. Application of scale free reheating offers savings in energy used for production of steel that is lost as scale, and increase in product yield for the global steel industry. The technology can be applied to a new furnace application as well as retrofit design for conversion of existing steel reheating furnaces. The development work has resulted in the knowledge base that will enable the steel industry and steel forging industry us to reheat steel with 75% to 95% reduction in scale formation and associated energy savings during the reheating process. Scale reduction also results in additional energy savings associated with higher yield from reheat furnaces. Energy used for steel production ranges from 9 MM Btu/ton to 16.6 MM Btu/ton or the industry average of approximately 13 MM Btu/ton. Hence, reduction in scale at reheating stage would represent a substantial energy reduction for the steel industry. Potential energy savings for the US steel industry could be in excess of 25 Trillion Btu/year when the technology is applied to all reheating processes. The development work has resulted in new design of reheating process and the required burners and control systems that would allow use of this technology for steel reheating in steel as well as steel forging industries.

  12. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Inconel 625 Alloy on Low Carbon Steel by Heat Treatment after Overlay Welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seungpil; Jang, Jaeho; Kim, Jungsoo; Kim, Byung Jun; Sohn, Keun Yong; Nam, Dae-Geun

    2016-01-01

    Overlay welding technique is one of methods used to improve metal mechanical properties such as strength, toughness and corrosion resistance. Generally, Inconel 625 alloy is used for overlay welding layer on low carbon steels for economic consideration. However, the method produces some problems in the microstructure of the cast structure and some defects, caused by the elevated temperatures of the overlay process. To resolve these problems, heat treatments are required. In this study, Inconel 625 alloy was welded on a low carbon steel by the overlay welding process to investigate the resulting microstructure and mechanical properties. A double heat treatment was performed to improve the mechanical properties of the welding and substrate layers. It was found that Inconel 625 alloy had an austenite microstructure after the first heat treatment, but the low carbon steel had a ferrite-pearlite microstructure after the second heat treatment. After the double heat treatment, the sample showed the optimum hardness because of grain refinement and homogenization of the microstructure.

  13. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Inconel 625 Alloy on Low Carbon Steel by Heat Treatment after Overlay Welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seungpil; Jang, Jaeho; Kim, Jungsoo; Kim, Byung Jun; Sohn, Keun Yong; Nam, Dae-Geun [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Overlay welding technique is one of methods used to improve metal mechanical properties such as strength, toughness and corrosion resistance. Generally, Inconel 625 alloy is used for overlay welding layer on low carbon steels for economic consideration. However, the method produces some problems in the microstructure of the cast structure and some defects, caused by the elevated temperatures of the overlay process. To resolve these problems, heat treatments are required. In this study, Inconel 625 alloy was welded on a low carbon steel by the overlay welding process to investigate the resulting microstructure and mechanical properties. A double heat treatment was performed to improve the mechanical properties of the welding and substrate layers. It was found that Inconel 625 alloy had an austenite microstructure after the first heat treatment, but the low carbon steel had a ferrite-pearlite microstructure after the second heat treatment. After the double heat treatment, the sample showed the optimum hardness because of grain refinement and homogenization of the microstructure.

  14. Combined Effect of Heating Rate and Microalloying Elements on Recrystallization During Annealing of Dual-Phase Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellavoine, Marion; Dumont, Myriam; Drillet, Josée; Hébert, Véronique; Maugis, Philippe

    2018-05-01

    Adjusting ferrite recrystallization kinetics during annealing is a way to control the final microstructure and thus the mechanical properties of advanced cold-rolled high-strength steels. Two strategies are commonly used for this purpose: adjusting heating rates and/or adding microalloying elements. The present work investigates the effect of heating rate and microalloying elements Ti, Nb, and Mo on recrystallization kinetics during annealing in various cold-rolled Dual-Phase steel grades. The use of combined experimental and modeling approaches allows a deeper understanding of the separate influence of heating rate and the addition of microalloying elements. The comparative effect of Ti, Nb, and Mo as solute elements and as precipitates on ferrite recrystallization is also clarified. It is shown that solute drag has the largest delaying effect on recrystallization in the present case and that the order of solute drag effectiveness of microalloying elements is Nb > Mo > Ti.

  15. Acoustoelastic evaluation of welding and heat treatment stress relieving of pressure vessel steel for Angra 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, Bruno C. de, E-mail: bruno.cesar@nuclep.gov.br [Nuclebras Equipamentos Pesados S.A (NUCLEP), Itaguai, RJ (Brazil); Bittencourt, Marcelo de S.Q., E-mail: bruno.cesar@nuclep.gov.br, E-mail: bittenc@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Currently the knowledge of non-destructive techniques allows to evaluate the stresses on components and mechanical structures, aiming at physical security, preservation of the environment and avoid financial losses associated with the construction and operation of industrial plants. The search for new techniques, especially applied in the nuclear industry to assess status more accurately, voltage safety and to ensure structural integrity, for example, core components of the primary circuit, such as the reactor pressure vessel and steam generator has become of great importance within the community of non-destructive testing .This paper aims to contribute to the non-destructive technique development in order to ensure the structural integrity of nuclear components. One acoustoelastic evaluation of steel 20 MnMoNi 55, used in pressure vessels of nuclear power plants were performed. The acoustic birefringence technique was use to evaluate the acoustoelastic behavior of the test material in the as received condition, after welding and after the stress relief heat treatment. The constant acoustoelastic material was obtained by an uniaxial loading test. It was found a slight anisotropy in the material as received. After welding, a marked variation of acoustic birefringence in the region near the weld bead was observed. The heat treatment indicated a new change of acoustic birefringence. Obtaining the acoustoelastic constant allowed the evaluation of stress in the different conditions of the weld and treated material. (author)

  16. Acoustoelastic evaluation of welding and heat treatment stress relieving of pressure vessel steel for Angra 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, Bruno C. de; Bittencourt, Marcelo de S.Q.

    2015-01-01

    Currently the knowledge of non-destructive techniques allows to evaluate the stresses on components and mechanical structures, aiming at physical security, preservation of the environment and avoid financial losses associated with the construction and operation of industrial plants. The search for new techniques, especially applied in the nuclear industry to assess status more accurately, voltage safety and to ensure structural integrity, for example, core components of the primary circuit, such as the reactor pressure vessel and steam generator has become of great importance within the community of non-destructive testing .This paper aims to contribute to the non-destructive technique development in order to ensure the structural integrity of nuclear components. One acoustoelastic evaluation of steel 20 MnMoNi 55, used in pressure vessels of nuclear power plants were performed. The acoustic birefringence technique was use to evaluate the acoustoelastic behavior of the test material in the as received condition, after welding and after the stress relief heat treatment. The constant acoustoelastic material was obtained by an uniaxial loading test. It was found a slight anisotropy in the material as received. After welding, a marked variation of acoustic birefringence in the region near the weld bead was observed. The heat treatment indicated a new change of acoustic birefringence. Obtaining the acoustoelastic constant allowed the evaluation of stress in the different conditions of the weld and treated material. (author)

  17. Substructures developed during creep and cyclic tests of type 304 stainless steel (heat 9T2796)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swindeman, R.W.; Bhargava, R.K.; Sikka, V.K.; Moteff, J.

    1977-09-01

    Substructures developed in tested specimens of a reference heat of type 304 stainless steel (heat 9T2796) are examined. Data include dislocation densities, cell and subgrain sizes, and carbide precipitate sizes. Testing conditions range for temperatures from 482 to 649 0 C, for stresses from 28 to 241 MPa, and for times from 4 to 15,000 hr. As expected, it is observed that temperature, stress, and time have strong influences on substructure. The change in the dislocation density is too small to measure for conditions which produce less than 1 percent monotonic strain. No cells form, and the major alteration of substructure is the precipitation of M 23 C 6 carbides on grain boundaries, on twin boundaries, and on some dislocations. At stresses ranging from 69 to 172 MPa and at temperatures ranging from 482 to 593 0 C, the dislocation density increases with increasing stress and is generally higher than expected from studies made at higher temperatures. Dislocations are arranged in fine networks stabilized by carbides. At stresses above 172 MPa and temperatures to 649 0 C, the dislocation density is too great to measure. Cells develop which are finer in size than cells developed at similar stresses but at higher temperatures. Dislocation densities and cell sizes for cyclic specimens are comparable to data for creep-tested specimens. On the basis of the observed substructures, recommendations are made regarding further studies which would assist in the development of constitutive equations for high-temperature inelastic analysis of reactor components

  18. The Effect of Two-Step Heat Treatment Parameters on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of 42SiMn Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila Kučerová

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Medium-carbon steel 42SiMn (0.4C-0.6Mn-2Si-0.03Nb was used for a two-step heat treatment consisting of a soaking hold and an annealing hold at bainite transformation temperature. Various heating temperatures, cooling rates, and bainitic hold temperatures were applied to the steel to obtain microstructures typical for TRIP (Transformation Induced Plasticity steels. TRIP steels utilize the positive effects of a multiphase microstructure with retained austenite, creating a good combination of strength and total elongation and an excellent deep-drawing ability. Typical microstructures consist of ferrite, bainite, and 10–15% of retained austenite. In this work, tensile strengths in the region of 887–1063 MPa were achieved with total elongation A5mm of 26–47%, and the final microstructures contained 4–16% of retained austenite. The most suitable microstructure and the best combination of high strength and total elongation were achieved for the processing with intercritical heating temperature of 850 °C and cooling at 30 °C/s to the bainitic hold of 400 °C. Very fine pearlite persisted in the microstructures, even after applying a cooling rate of 50 °C/s, however these small areas with extremely fine laths did not prevent the retention of up to 16% of retained austenite, and high total elongation A5mm above 40% was still reached for these microstructures.

  19. Precipitation of carbides in Cr – Mo – V cast steel after service and regenerative heat treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Golański

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of research on precipitation processes in chromium – molybdenum – vanadium cast steel. Theexamined material was the following cast steel grade: L21HMF and G17CrMoV5 – 10 (L17HMF after long-term operation at elevatedtemperatures and after regenerative heat treatment. Identification of precipitates was performed by means of the transmission electronmicroscope using carbon extraction replicas and thin foils. On the basis of identifications it has been proved that in the structure ofinvestigated cast steel grades, degraded by long-term operation, there are a few sorts of carbides with diverse stability, such as: M3C; M2C, M23C6, MC, M7C3. Moreover, the occurrence of compound complexes of precipitates – the so called “H-carbides” – has been revealed. Heat treatment of the examined cast steels contributed to changes in morphology and precipitation type. Whilst in the bainitic structure, obtained through heat treatment, only the occurrence of carbide types, such as: M3C; M23C6 and MC has been noticed.

  20. Determination of tungsten in high-alloy steels and heat resisting alloys by isotope dilution-spark source mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Morimasa; Yamada, Kei; Okochi, Haruno; Hirose, Fumio

    1983-01-01

    Tungsten in high-alloy steels and heat-resisting alloys was determined by isotope dilution method combined with spark source mass spectrometry by using 183 W enriched tungsten. The spike solution was prepared by fusing tungsten trioxide in sodium carbonate. A high-alloy steel sample was dissolved in the mixture of sulfuric acid and phosphoric acid together with the spike solution; a sample of heat resisting alloy was similarly dissolved in the mixture of hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, sulfuric acid, and phosphoric acid. The solution was evaporated to give dense white fumes. Tungsten was separated from the residue by a conventional cinchonine salt-precipitation method. The salt was ignited, and the residue was mixed with graphite powder and pressed into electrodes. The isotope 183 W and 184 W were measured. The method was applied to the determination of tungsten in JSS and NBS standard high-alloy steels and JAERI standard nickel- and NBS standard cobalt-base heat resisting alloys containing more than 0.05% tungsten. The results were obtained with satisfactory precision and accuracy. However, the results obtained for JSS standard high- speed steels containing molybdenum tended to be significantly lower than the certified values. (author)

  1. Heat Transfer Modeling of an Annular On-Line Spray Water Cooling Process for Electric-Resistance-Welded Steel Pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zejun; Han, Huiquan; Ren, Wei; Huang, Guangjie

    2015-01-01

    On-line spray water cooling (OSWC) of electric-resistance-welded (ERW) steel pipes can replace the conventional off-line heat treatment process and become an important and critical procedure. The OSWC process improves production efficiency, decreases costs, and enhances the mechanical properties of ERW steel pipe, especially the impact properties of the weld joint. In this paper, an annular OSWC process is investigated based on an experimental simulation platform that can obtain precise real-time measurements of the temperature of the pipe, the water pressure and flux, etc. The effects of the modes of annular spray water cooling and related cooling parameters on the mechanical properties of the pipe are investigated. The temperature evolutions of the inner and outer walls of the pipe are measured during the spray water cooling process, and the uniformity of mechanical properties along the circumferential and longitudinal directions is investigated. A heat transfer coefficient model of spray water cooling is developed based on measured temperature data in conjunction with simulation using the finite element method. Industrial tests prove the validity of the heat transfer model of a steel pipe undergoing spray water cooling. The research results can provide a basis for the industrial application of the OSWC process in the production of ERW steel pipes.

  2. Integration of coal gasification and waste heat recovery from high temperature steel slags: an emerging strategy to emission reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongqi; Sridhar, Seetharaman; Liu, Lili; Wang, Xidong; Zhang, Zuotai

    2015-01-01

    With the continuous urbanization and industrialization in the world, energy saving and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction have been serious issues to be addressed, for which heat recovery from traditional energy-intensive industries makes up a significant strategy. Here we report a novel approach to extract the waste heat and iron from high temperature steel slags (1450–1650 oC) produced in the steel industry, i.e., integration of coal gasification and steel slag treatment. Both the thermodynamics and kinetics of the pertinent reactions were identified. It was clarified that the kinetic mechanism for gasification varied from A2 model to A4 model (Avrami-Erofeev) in the presence of slags. Most importantly, the steel slags acted not only as good heat carriers but also as effective catalysts where the apparent activation energy for char gasification got remarkably reduced from 95.7 kJ/mol to 12.1 kJ/mol (A2 model). Furthermore, the FeO in the slags was found to be oxidized into Fe3O4, with an extra energy release, which offered a potential for magnetic separation. Moreover, based on the present research results, an emerging concept, composed of multiple industrial sectors, was proposed, which could serve as an important route to deal with the severe environmental problems in modern society. PMID:26558350

  3. Heat Transfer Modeling of an Annular On-Line Spray Water Cooling Process for Electric-Resistance-Welded Steel Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zejun; Han, Huiquan; Ren, Wei; Huang, Guangjie

    2015-01-01

    On-line spray water cooling (OSWC) of electric-resistance-welded (ERW) steel pipes can replace the conventional off-line heat treatment process and become an important and critical procedure. The OSWC process improves production efficiency, decreases costs, and enhances the mechanical properties of ERW steel pipe, especially the impact properties of the weld joint. In this paper, an annular OSWC process is investigated based on an experimental simulation platform that can obtain precise real-time measurements of the temperature of the pipe, the water pressure and flux, etc. The effects of the modes of annular spray water cooling and related cooling parameters on the mechanical properties of the pipe are investigated. The temperature evolutions of the inner and outer walls of the pipe are measured during the spray water cooling process, and the uniformity of mechanical properties along the circumferential and longitudinal directions is investigated. A heat transfer coefficient model of spray water cooling is developed based on measured temperature data in conjunction with simulation using the finite element method. Industrial tests prove the validity of the heat transfer model of a steel pipe undergoing spray water cooling. The research results can provide a basis for the industrial application of the OSWC process in the production of ERW steel pipes. PMID:26201073

  4. Effect of heat input on dilution and heat affected zone in submerged ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Proper management of heat input in weld- ing is important .... total nugget area, heat transfer boundary length, and nugget parameter. 3. ... Predominant parameters that had greater influence on welding quality were identified as wire feed rate ...

  5. Study of thermal stress in heat affected zones during welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devaux, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    The importance of applications of welding in the nuclear industry leads to the study of the main problem concerning metal welding: sensibility to cracking. The development of computation methods allows the numerical simulation of welding effects. Due to the complexity of this problem, it is divided in three steps: thermal, metallurgical and mechanical calculus. Interactions between the 3 steps are examined. Mathematical models necessary to get residual stress (i.e. stress remaining when welding is completed and structure at ambient temperature) are described. Then parameters for metallurgical structure determination are given and compared to experiments. A508 and A533 type steels of primary coolant circuit of PWR reactors are taken as examples and the numerical simulation of a test is presented [fr

  6. Heat resistance of Fe-Al intermetallics in the context of selected heat-resistant and hihg-temperature creep resistant steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Baranowski

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Results are hereby presented of heat-resistance tests of two Fe3Al and FeAl intermetallic phase-based alloys in the context of St41k-typeboiler steel and 50H21G9N4 high-temperature creep resistant steel. It has been ascertained that heat resistance of the 50H21G9N4 steeland of the Fe3Al and FeAl intermetallic phase-based alloys significantly exceeds that of the boiler steel tested in the air atmosphere and the atmosphere of a flue gas with CO, CO2, SiO2 content alike. Improvement of these properties depends of exposure conditions. The largest differences have been observed when the tests were carried out in temperature 1023 K and in the flue gas atmosphere. The differences have been more and more noticeable as the exposition duration extended. A tendency has been also recorded of smaller mass decrements of the Fe3Al and FeAl intermetallic phase-based alloys as compared to the 50H21G9N4 steel.

  7. Heat treatment, microstructure and mechanical properties of a C–Mn–Al–P hot dip galvanizing TRIP steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Wei [School of Material and Metallurgy, Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology, Baotou 014010 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Bayan Obo multimetallic resource comprehensive utilization Key lab, Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology, Baotou 014010 (China); Hedström, Peter [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Li, Yan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Bayan Obo multimetallic resource comprehensive utilization Key lab, Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology, Baotou 014010 (China)

    2016-09-30

    Heat treatments of a hot dip galvanizing TRIP (Transformation induced plasticity) steel with chemical composition 0.20C-1.50Mn-1.2Al-0.07P(mass%) were performed in a Gleeble 3500 laboratory equipment. The heat treatment process parameters were varied to investigate the effect of intercritical annealing temperature as well as isothermal bainitic transformation (IBT) temperature and time, on the microstructure and the mechanical properties. The microstructure was investigated using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction, while mechanical properties were evaluated by tensile testing. Furthermore, to generate a better understanding of the phase transformations during heat treatment, dilatometry trials were conducted. The desired microstructure containing ferrite, bainite, retained austenite and martensite was obtained after the heat treatments. It was further found that the IBT is critical in determining the mechanical properties of the steel, since it controls the fraction of bainite. With increasing bainite fraction, the fraction of retained austenite increases while the fraction of martensite decreases. The mechanical properties of the steel are excellent with a tensile strength above 780 MPa (expect in one case) and elongation above 22%.

  8. Heat treatment, microstructure and mechanical properties of a C–Mn–Al–P hot dip galvanizing TRIP steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Wei; Hedström, Peter; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Heat treatments of a hot dip galvanizing TRIP (Transformation induced plasticity) steel with chemical composition 0.20C-1.50Mn-1.2Al-0.07P(mass%) were performed in a Gleeble 3500 laboratory equipment. The heat treatment process parameters were varied to investigate the effect of intercritical annealing temperature as well as isothermal bainitic transformation (IBT) temperature and time, on the microstructure and the mechanical properties. The microstructure was investigated using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction, while mechanical properties were evaluated by tensile testing. Furthermore, to generate a better understanding of the phase transformations during heat treatment, dilatometry trials were conducted. The desired microstructure containing ferrite, bainite, retained austenite and martensite was obtained after the heat treatments. It was further found that the IBT is critical in determining the mechanical properties of the steel, since it controls the fraction of bainite. With increasing bainite fraction, the fraction of retained austenite increases while the fraction of martensite decreases. The mechanical properties of the steel are excellent with a tensile strength above 780 MPa (expect in one case) and elongation above 22%.

  9. Modified heat treatment for lower temperature improvement of the mechanical properties of two ultrahigh strength low alloy steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Yoshiyuki; Okabayashi, Kunio

    1985-01-01

    In the previous papers, a new heat treatment for improving the lower temperature mechanical propertise of the ultrahigh strength low alloy steels was suggested by the authors which produces a mixed structure of 25 vol pct lower bainite and 75 vol pct martensite through isothermal transformation at 593 K for a short time followed by water quenching (after austenitization at 1133 K). In this paper, two commercial Japanese ultrahigh strength steels, 0.40 pct C-Ni-Cr-Mo (AISI 4340 type) and 0.40 pct C-Cr-Mo (AISI 4140 type), have been studied to determine the effect of the modified heat treatment, coupled above new heat treatment with γ ⇆ α' repctitive heat treatment, on the mechanical properties from ambient temperature (287 K) to 123 K. The results obtained for various test temperatures have been compared with those for the new heat treatment reported previously and the conventional 1133 K direct water quenching treatment. The incorporation of intermediate four cyclic γ ⇆ α' repctitive heat treatment steps (after the initial austenitization at 1133 K and oil quenching) into the new heat treatment reported previously, as compared with the conventional 1133 K direct water quenching treatment, significantly improved 0.2 pct proof stress as well as notch toughness of the 0.40 pct C-Ni-Cr-Mo ultrahigh strength steel at similar fracture ductility levels from 287 to 123 K. Also, this heat treatment, as compared with the conventional 1133 K direct water quenching treatment, significantly improved both 0.2 pct proof stress and notch toughness of the 0.40 pct C-Cr-Mo ultrahigh strength steel with increased fracture ductility at 203 K and above. The microstructure consists of mixed areas of ultrafine grained martensite, within which is the refined blocky, highly dislocated structure, and the second phase lower bainite (about 15 vol pct), which appears in acicular form and partitions prior austenite grains. This newly developed heat treatment makes it possible to modify

  10. Microstructural engineering applied to the controlled cooling of steel wire rod: Part I. Experimental design and heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, P. C.; Hawbolt, E. B.; Brimacombe, J. K.

    1991-11-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a mathematical model which incorporates heat flow, phase transformation kinetics, and property-structure-composition relationships to predict the mechanical properties of steel rod being control cooled under industrial conditions. Thus, the principles of microstructural engineering have been brought to bear on this interdisciplinary problem by combining computer modeling with laboratory measurements of heat flow, austenite decomposition kinetics, microstructure and mechanical properties, and industrial trials to determine heat transfer and obtain rod samples under known conditions. Owing to the length and diversity of the study, it is reported in three parts,[8191]the first of which is concerned with the heat flow measurements. A relatively simple and reliable technique, involving a preheated steel rod instrumented with a thermocouple secured at its centerline, has been devised to determine the cooling rate in different regions of the moving bed of rod loops on an operating Stelmor line. The measured thermal response of the rod has been analyzed by two transient conduction models (lumped and distributed parameter, respectively) to yield overall heat-transfer coefficients for radiation and convection. The adequacy of the technique has been checked by cooling instrumented rods under well-defined, air crossflow conditions in the laboratory and comparing measured heat-transfer coefficients to values predicted from well-established equations. The industrial thermal measurements have permitted the characterization of a coefficient to account for radiative interaction among adjacent rod loops near the edge and at the center of the bed.

  11. The heat treatment effect on the structural changes and properties of high-nitrogen chromium steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinov, V.M.; Elistratov, A.A.; Kolesnikov, A.G.; Rakhshtadt, A.G.; Plokhikh, A.I.; Morozova, E.I.; Kostina, M.V.

    2000-01-01

    The structural transformations in the steels with 0.4-1.3 %N and 15-24 %Cr content, originating by thermal treatment, are studied. The dependences of the phase composition of the high-chromium steels (18 %Cr) on the nitrogen content are established. The ratio of the unchanged austenite increases and the martensite quantity decreases correspondingly with growth of the nitrogen concentration from 0.4 up to 1.2 %. The effect of strengthening the steels with the initial martensite structure as well as austenite and martensite steels is observed in the process of steels tempering due to the hardening on the account of the martensite dispersion hardening [ru

  12. Additive Manufacturing of 17-4 PH Stainless Steel: Post-processing Heat Treatment to Achieve Uniform Reproducible Microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheruvathur, Sudha; Lass, Eric A.; Campbell, Carelyn E.

    2016-03-01

    17-4 precipitation hardenable (PH) stainless steel is a useful material when a combination of high strength and good corrosion resistance up to about 315°C is required. In the wrought form, this steel has a fully martensitic structure that can be strengthened by precipitation of fine Cu-rich face-centered cubic phase upon aging. When fabricated via additive manufacturing (AM), specifically laser powder-bed fusion, 17-4 PH steel exhibits a dendritic structure containing a substantial fraction of nearly 50% of retained austenite along with body centered cubic/martensite and fine niobium carbides preferentially aligned along interdendritic boundaries. The effect of post-build thermal processing on the material microstructure is studied in comparison to that of conventionally produced wrought 17-4 PH with the intention of creating a more uniform, fully martensitic microstructure. The recommended stress relief heat treatment currently employed in industry for post-processing of AM 17-4 PH steel is found to have little effect on the as-built dendritic microstructure. It is found that, by implementing the recommended homogenization heat treatment regimen of Aerospace Materials Specification 5355 for CB7Cu-1, a casting alloy analog to 17-4 PH, the dendritic solidification structure is eliminated, resulting in a microstructure containing about 90% martensite with 10% retained austenite.

  13. Influence of Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of 13 Wt Pct Cr-Type Martensitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Si-Yuan; Yao, Ke-Fu; Chen, Yun-Bo; Wang, Miao-Hui; Ge, Xue-Yuan

    2015-12-01

    The effect of heat treatment on the microstructure and the electrochemical properties of a typical corrosion-resistant plastic mold steel in Cl--containing solution were studied in this research. Through X-ray diffraction patterns, SEM and TEM analysis, it was found that the sequence of the precipitates in the steels tempered at 573 K, 773 K, and 923 K (300 °C, 500 °C, and 650 °C) was θ-M3C carbides, nano-sized Cr-rich M23C6 carbides, and micro/submicron-sized Cr-rich M23C6 carbides, respectively. The results of the electrochemical experiments showed that the pitting potential of the as-quenched martensitic stainless steels increased with the austenitizing temperature. However, the corrosion resistance of the steels would decreased after tempering, especially when tempered at 773 K (500 °C), no passivation regime could be found in the polarization curve of the MSSs and no effective passive film could be formed on the steels in Cl--containing environments. The present results suggested that the temperature around 773 K (500 °C) should be avoided for tempering process of MSS used as plastic molds.

  14. Laser pulse heating of steel mixing with WC particles in a irradiated region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuja, S. Z.; Yilbas, B. S.; Ali, H.; Karatas, C.

    2016-12-01

    Laser pulse heating of steel mixing with tungsten carbide (WC) particles is carried out. Temperature field in the irradiated region is simulated in line with the experimental conditions. In the analysis, a laser pulse parameter is introduced, which defines the laser pulse intensity distribution at the irradiated surface. The influence of the laser parameter on the melt pool size and the maximum temperature increase in the irradiated region is examined. Surface temperature predictions are compared with the experimental data. In addition, the distribution of WC particles and their re-locations in the treated layer, due to combination of the natural convection and Marangoni currents, are predicted. The findings are compared to the experimental data. It is found that surface temperature predictions agree well with the experimental data. The dislocated WC particles form a streamlining in the near region of the melt pool wall, which agree with the experimental findings. The Gaussian distribution of the laser pulse intensity results in the maximum peak temperature and the maximum flow velocity inside the melt pool. In this case, the melt pool depth becomes the largest as compared to those corresponding to other laser pulse intensity distributions at the irradiated surface.

  15. Numerical simulation of flow and heat transfer of continous cast steel slab under traveling magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong Haijun

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A unified numerical model for simulating solidification transport phenomena (STP of steel slab in electromagnetic continuous casting (EMCC process was developed. In order to solve the multi-physics fields coupled problem conveniently, the complicated bidirectional coupled process between EM and STP was simplified as a unidirectional one, and a FEM/FVM-combined numerical simulation technique was adopted. The traveling magnetic fields (TMFs applied to the EMCC process were calculated using the ANSYS11.0 software, and then the EM-data output by ANSYS were converted to FVM-format using a data-format conversion program developed previously. Thereafter, the governing equations were solved using a pressure-based Direct-SIMPLE algorithm. The simulation results of the STP in CC-process show that, due to the influences of Lorentz force and Joule heat, the two strong circulating flows and the temperature field can be obviously damped and changed once TMF with one pair of poles (1-POPs or 2-POPs is applied, which would accordingly improve the quality of casting. It was found in the present research that the integrated actions of 2-POPs TMF are superior to 1-POPs. All the computations indicate that the present numerical model of EM-STP as well as the FEM/FVM-combined technique is successful.

  16. Modeling of electric and heat processes in spot resistance welding of cross-wire steel bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iatcheva, Ilona; Darzhanova, Denitsa; Manilova, Marina

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this work is the modeling of coupled electric and heat processes in a system for spot resistance welding of cross-wire reinforced steel bars. The real system geometry, dependences of material properties on the temperature, and changes of contact resistance and released power during the welding process have been taken into account in the study. The 3D analysis of the coupled AC electric and transient thermal field distributions is carried out using the finite element method. The novel feature is that the processes are modeled for several successive time stages, corresponding to the change of contact area, related contact resistance, and reduction of the released power, occurring simultaneously with the creation of contact between the workpieces. The values of contact resistance and power changes have been determined on the basis of preliminary experimental and theoretical investigations. The obtained results present the electric and temperature field distributions in the system. Special attention has been paid to the temperature evolution at specified observation points and lines in the contact area. The obtained information could be useful for clarification of the complicated nature of interrelated electric, thermal, mechanical, and physicochemical welding processes. Adequate modeling is also an opportunity for proper control and improvement of the system.

  17. The influence of heat treatment and process parameters optimization on hardness and corrosion properties of laser alloyed X12CrNiMo steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Popoola, API

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Martensitic stainless steels are used in the production of steam turbine blades but their application is limited due to low hardness and poor corrosion resistance. Laser surface alloying and heat treatment of X12CrNiMo Martensitic stainless steel...

  18. Effects of Water Jet on Heat-Affected Concretes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sitek, Libor; Bodnárová, L.; Válek, J.; Zeleňák, Michal; Klich, Jiří; Foldyna, Josef; Novotný, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 1 (2013), s. 1036-1044 E-ISSN 1877-7058 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP104/12/1988; TA ČR(CZ) TA01010948 Program:GA Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : concrete * heating * repair of structures * fireproof concrete s * surface layers Subject RIV: JN - Civil Engineering http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1877705813008643

  19. The influence of high heat input and inclusions control for rare earth on welding in low alloy high strength steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Rensheng; Mu, Shukun; Liu, Jingang; Li, Zhanjun

    2017-09-01

    In the current paper, it is analyzed for the influence of high heat input and inclusions control for rare earth on welding in low alloy high strength steel. It is observed for the structure for different heat input of the coarse-grained area. It is finest for the coarse grain with the high heat input of 200 kJ / cm and the coarse grain area with 400 kJ / cm is the largest. The performance with the heat input of 200 kJ / cm for -20 °C V-shaped notch oscillatory power is better than the heat input of 400 kJ / cm. The grain structure is the ferrite and bainite for different holding time. The grain structure for 5s holding time has a grain size of 82.9 μm with heat input of 200 kJ/cm and grain size of 97.9 μm for 10s holding time. For the inclusions for HSLA steel with adding rare earth, they are Al2O3-CaS inclusions in the Al2O3-CaS-CaO ternary phase diagram. At the same time, it can not be found for low melting calcium aluminate inclusions compared to the inclusions for the HSLA steel without rare earth. Most of the size for the inclusions is between 1 ~ 10μm. The overall grain structure is smaller and the welding performance is more excellent for adding rare earth.

  20. The Mathematical Model of Hydrodynamics and Heat and Mass Transfer at Formation of Steel Ingots and Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondarenko V.I.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The generic mathematical model and computational algorithm considering hydrodynamics, heat and mass transfer processes during casting and forming steel ingots and castings are offered. Usage domains for turbulent, convective and non-convective models are determined depending on ingot geometry and thermal overheating of the poured melt. The expert system is developed, enabling to choose a mathematical model depending on the physical statement of a problem.

  1. 9-12% Cr heat resistant steels. Alloy design, TEM characterisation of microstructure evolution and creep response at 650 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas Jara, David

    2011-03-21

    This work was carried out aiming to design and characterise 9-12% Cr steels with tailormade microstructures for applications in fossil fuel fired power plants. The investigations concentrated in the design and characterisation of heat resistant steels for applications in high oxidising atmospheres (12% Cr) and 9% Cr alloys for components such as rotors (P91). ThermoCalc calculations showed to be a reliable tool for alloy development. The modeling also provided valuable information for the adjustment of the processing parameters (austenisation and tempering temperatures). Two 12% Cr heat resistant steels with a fine dispersion of nano precipitates were designed and produced supported by thermodynamic modeling (ThermoCalc). A detailed characterisation of the microstructure evolution at different creep times (100 MPa / 650 C / 8000 h) was carried out by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The results of the microstructure analysis were correlated with the mechanical properties in order to investigate the influence of different precipitates (especially M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides) on the creep strength of the alloys. Precipitation of Laves phase and Z-phase was observed after several hundred hours creep time. Very few Z-phase of the type Cr(V,Ta)N nucleating from existing (V,Ta)(C,N) was observed. Both alloys show growth and coarsening of Laves phase, meanwhile the MX carbonitrides present a very slow growth and coarsening rate. Alloys containing Laves phase, MX and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitates show best creep properties. The influence of hot-deformation and tempering temperature on the microstructure evolution on one of the designed 12% Cr alloys was studied during short-term creep at 80-250 MPa and 650 C. Quantitative determination of dislocation density and sub-grain size in the initial microstructure and after creep was investigated by STEM combined with the high-angle annular dark-field detector (HAADF). A correlation between microstructure

  2. 9-12% Cr heat resistant steels. Alloy design, TEM characterisation of microstructure evolution and creep response at 650 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas Jara, David

    2011-01-01

    This work was carried out aiming to design and characterise 9-12% Cr steels with tailormade microstructures for applications in fossil fuel fired power plants. The investigations concentrated in the design and characterisation of heat resistant steels for applications in high oxidising atmospheres (12% Cr) and 9% Cr alloys for components such as rotors (P91). ThermoCalc calculations showed to be a reliable tool for alloy development. The modeling also provided valuable information for the adjustment of the processing parameters (austenisation and tempering temperatures). Two 12% Cr heat resistant steels with a fine dispersion of nano precipitates were designed and produced supported by thermodynamic modeling (ThermoCalc). A detailed characterisation of the microstructure evolution at different creep times (100 MPa / 650 C / 8000 h) was carried out by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The results of the microstructure analysis were correlated with the mechanical properties in order to investigate the influence of different precipitates (especially M 23 C 6 carbides) on the creep strength of the alloys. Precipitation of Laves phase and Z-phase was observed after several hundred hours creep time. Very few Z-phase of the type Cr(V,Ta)N nucleating from existing (V,Ta)(C,N) was observed. Both alloys show growth and coarsening of Laves phase, meanwhile the MX carbonitrides present a very slow growth and coarsening rate. Alloys containing Laves phase, MX and M 23 C 6 precipitates show best creep properties. The influence of hot-deformation and tempering temperature on the microstructure evolution on one of the designed 12% Cr alloys was studied during short-term creep at 80-250 MPa and 650 C. Quantitative determination of dislocation density and sub-grain size in the initial microstructure and after creep was investigated by STEM combined with the high-angle annular dark-field detector (HAADF). A correlation between microstructure evolution and creep

  3. Extraction residue analysis on F82H-BA07 heat and other reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasaka, Takuya; Hishinuma, Yoshimitsu; Muroga, Takeo; Li, Yanfen; Watanabe, Hideo; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Sakasegawa, Hideo; Ando, Masami

    2011-01-01

    Extraction residue analysis was conducted on reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels, such as F82H-BA07 heat, F82H-IEA heat, JLF-1 JOYO heat and CLAM steel. M 23 C 6 type precipitates, TaC precipitates and Fe 2 W Laves phase were identified in the present analyses. M 23 C 6 precipitates were coarsened in F82H-BA07 compared with the other steels at as-normalized and tempered (NT) condition. TaC precipitate formation was enhanced in JLF-1 and CLAM compared with F82H-BA07 and F82H-IEA at as-NT condition. Laves phase were detected in F82H-IEA after aging above 550 o C, where solid solution W was significantly decreased. F82H-IEA exhibited hardening after aging at 400 and 500 o C for 100 khr, whereas softening at 600 and 650 o C. This behavior is similar to JLF-1 and CLAM, and can be understood by precipitation of TaC and Laves phase.

  4. Improvement of impact toughness by modified hot working and heat treatment in 13%Cr martensitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivatsa, Kulkarni, E-mail: srivatsa.kulkarni@kcssl.com; Srinivas, Perla; Balachandran, G.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2016-11-20

    Improvement of the general mechanical properties and in particular sub-zero impact toughness in a 0.2%C-13%Cr martensitic stainless steel has been explored by varying the hot deformation and heat treatment conditions. The deformation conditions include hot rolling an ingot in one case and cogging the ingot to a semis followed by hot rolling in another case. The bars made from both routes were subjected to a single hardening heat treatment at 980 °C and 1040 °C oil quenched and a double hardening heat treatment at 1040 °C followed by 980 °C oil quenched. The hardened steels were subjected to a standard two stage tempering at 710 °C followed by 680 °C. The impact toughness was found to be doubled in the cogged and rolled steel in double hardened condition. Other processing conditions show varying impact toughness levels. The toughness observed was correlated to the grain size and the carbide distribution in the matrix and the fractography features.

  5. Dissolution of alpha-prime precipitates in thermally embrittled S2205-duplex steels during reversion-heat treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Shamanth

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Duplex stainless steels offer an attractive combination of strength, corrosion resistance and cost. In annealed condition duplex steels will be in thermodynamically metastable condition but when they are subjected to intermediate homologous temperature of ∼475 °C and below significant embrittlement occurs, which is one of the key material degradation properties that limits its upper service temperature in many applications. Hence the present study is aimed to study the effect of reversion heat treatment and its time on mechanical properties of the thermally embrittled steel. The results showed that 60 min reversion heat treated samples were able to recover the mechanical properties which were very close to annealed properties because when the embrittled samples were reversion heat treated at an elevated temperature of 550 °C which is above the (α + α′ miscibility gap, the ferritic phase was homogenized again. In other words, Fe-rich α and Cr-rich α′ prime precipitates which were formed during ageing become thermodynamically unstable and dissolve inside the ferritic phase.

  6. High Heating Rates Affect Greatly the Inactivation Rate of Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas, Juan-Pablo; Aznar, Arantxa; Esnoz, Arturo; Fernández, Pablo S.; Iguaz, Asunción; Periago, Paula M.; Palop, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Heat resistance of microorganisms can be affected by different influencing factors. Although, the effect of heating rates has been scarcely explored by the scientific community, recent researches have unraveled its important effect on the thermal resistance of different species of vegetative bacteria. Typically heating rates described in the literature ranged from 1 to 20°C/min but the impact of much higher heating rates is unclear. The aim of this research was to explore the effect of different heating rates, such as those currently achieved in the heat exchangers used in the food industry, on the heat resistance of Escherichia coli. A pilot plant tubular heat exchanger and a thermoresistometer Mastia were used for this purpose. Results showed that fast heating rates had a deep impact on the thermal resistance of E. coli. Heating rates between 20 and 50°C/min were achieved in the heat exchanger, which were much slower than those around 20°C/s achieved in the thermoresistometer. In all cases, these high heating rates led to higher inactivation than expected: in the heat exchanger, for all the experiments performed, when the observed inactivation had reached about seven log cycles, the predictions estimated about 1 log cycle of inactivation; in the thermoresistometer these differences between observed and predicted values were even more than 10 times higher, from 4.07 log cycles observed to 0.34 predicted at a flow rate of 70 mL/min and a maximum heating rate of 14.7°C/s. A quantification of the impact of the heating rates on the level of inactivation achieved was established. These results point out the important effect that the heating rate has on the thermal resistance of E. coli, with high heating rates resulting in an additional sensitization to heat and therefore an effective food safety strategy in terms of food processing. PMID:27563300

  7. Simultaneously estimation for surface heat fluxes of steel slab in a reheating furnace based on DMC predictive control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yanhao; Wang, Guangjun; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The predictive control theory is utilized for the research of a simultaneous estimation of heat fluxes through the upper, side and lower surface of a steel slab in a walking beam type rolling steel reheating furnace. An inverse algorithm based on dynamic matrix control (DMC) is established. That is, each surface heat flux of a slab is simultaneously estimated through rolling optimization on the basis of temperature measurements in selected points of its interior by utilizing step response function as predictive model of a slab's temperature. The reliability of the DMC results is enhanced without prior assuming specific functions of heat fluxes over a period of future time. The inverse algorithm proposed a respective regularization to effectively improve the stability of the estimated results by considering obvious strength differences between the upper as well as lower and side surface heat fluxes of the slab. - Highlights: • The predictive control theory is adopted. • An inversion scheme based on DMC is established. • Upper, side and lower surface heat fluxes of slab are estimated based DMC. • A respective regularization is proposed to improve the stability of results

  8. Heat Transfer to Supercritical Water in Gaseous State or Affected by Mixed Convection in Vertical Tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pis'menny, E.N.; Razumovskiy, V.G.; Maevskiy, E.M.; Koloskov, A.E.; Pioro, I.L.

    2006-01-01

    The results on heat transfer to supercritical water heated above the pseudo-critical temperature or affected by mixed convection flowing upward and downward in vertical tubes of 6.28-mm and 9.50-mm inside diameter are presented. Supercritical water heat-transfer data were obtained at a pressure of 23.5 MPa, mass flux within the range from 250 to 2200 kg/(m 2 s), inlet temperature from 100 to 415 deg. C and heat flux up to 3.2 MW/m 2 . Temperature regimes of the tubes cooled with supercritical water in a gaseous state (i.e., supercritical water at temperatures beyond the pseudo-critical temperature) were stable and easily reproducible within a wide range of mass and heat fluxes. An analysis of the heat-transfer data for upward and downward flows enabled to determine a range of Gr/Re 2 values corresponding to the maximum effect of free convection on the heat transfer. It was shown that: 1) the heat transfer coefficient at the downward flow of water can be higher by about 50% compared to that of the upward flow; and 2) the deteriorated heat-transfer regime is affected with the flow direction, i.e., at the same operating conditions, the deteriorated heat transfer may be delayed at the downward flow compared to that at the upward flow. These heat-transfer data are applicable as the reference dataset for future comparison with bundle data. (authors)

  9. Performance of an effectively integrated biomass multi-stage gasification system and a steel industry heat treatment furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunarathne, Duleeka Sandamali; Mellin, Pelle; Yang, Weihong; Pettersson, Magnus; Ljunggren, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Multi-stage biomass gasification is integrated with steel heat treatment furnace. • Fossil fuel derived CO_2 emission is eliminated by replacing natural gas with syngas. • The integrated system uses waste heat from the furnace for biomass gasification. • Up to 13% increment of the gasifier system energy efficiency is observed. • Fuel switching results in 10% lower flue gas loss and improved furnace efficiency. - Abstract: The challenges of replacing fossil fuel with renewable energy in steel industry furnaces include not only reducing CO_2 emissions but also increasing the system energy efficiency. In this work, a multi-stage gasification system is chosen for the integration with a heat treatment furnace in the steel powder industry to recover different rank/temperature waste heat back to the biomass gasification system, resulting higher system energy efficiency. A system model based on Aspen Plus was developed for the proposed integrated system considering all steps, including biomass drying, pyrolysis, gasification and the combustion of syngas in the furnace. Both low temperature (up to 400 °C) and high temperature (up to 700 °C) heat recovery possibilities were analysed in terms of energy efficiency by optimizing the biomass pretreatment temperature. The required process conditions of the furnace can be achieved by using syngas. No major changes to the furnace, combustion technology or flue gas handling system are necessary for this fuel switching. Only a slight revamp of the burner system and a new waste heat recovery system from the flue gases are required. Both the furnace efficiency and gasifier system efficiency are improved by integration with the waste heat recovery. The heat recovery from the hot furnace flue gas for biomass drying and steam superheating is the most promising option from an energy efficiency point of view. This option recovers two thirds of the available waste heat, according to the pinch analysis performed

  10. Heat treatment and effects of Cr and Ni in low alloy steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Materials and Metallurgical Engineering Department, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology. (BUET) ... The use of plain carbon steels frequently neces- sitates water ... temperatures higher than upper critical temperature.

  11. FACTORS AFFECTING HEAT TOLERANCE IN CROSSBRED CATTLE IN CENTRAL BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concepta Margaret McManus

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the adaptation traits in common crosses of crossbred dairy cattle in central Brazil. Twenty animals of each of three genetic groups were used: zebu (Bos indicus, Simmental x Zebu (SZ and Holstein x Zebu (HZ. The test measured variations in rectal temperature (RT, respiration rate (RR and heart rate (HR of animals in the shade and after exposure to the sun, as well as mean daily milk production throughout the lactation period. The procedure was repeated three times. There were significant interactions between test group and genetic group for the traits investigated and the correlations among traits were low. The RR of the crossbred groups may be controlling body temperature in such a way as not to cause an increase in RT. Milk production influenced RR in crossbred cows exposed to the sun, confirming their poorer adaptation in comparison with zebu cows. We observed that the adaptation can be measured in terms of production within the same genetic group. In conclusion, the crosses with European breeds produced more milk than zebu, although they were influenced by heat/solar radiation.

  12. Carbon deposition on 20/25/Nb steel using an electrically heated AGR fuel pin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, A.; Campion, P.

    1980-01-01

    The radiolysis of carbon dioxide in gas-cooled reactors leads to the production of active species capable of reacting with the graphite moderator to form carbon monoxide with a resultant gradual loss of moderator. In the early days of gas-cooled reactor design, the intention was to allow the carbon monoxide concentration to increase and use this reaction product to inhibit the initial radiolysis of the carbon dioxide. Exploratory irradiation experiments using 4 to 7% carbon monoxide revealed that low density deposits ranging in colour from light grey through brown to black were found in the temperature range 470 to 600 K. In view of the fact that this type of deposition could adversely affect heat transfer processes in both fuel channels and heat exchangers, together with the fact that carbon monoxide was not sufficiently powerful as a graphite oxidation inhibitor, methane was selected as the primary inhibitor for the AGR series of power stations. This paper describes some carbon deposition experiments using an electrically heated 'dummy fuel element' linked to a recirculating carbon dioxide irradiation loop in which carbon monoxide concentration, methane concentration, fuel pin temperature and the chemical nature of the fuel pin surface were varied. (author)

  13. Experimental modeling of weld thermal cycle of the heat affected zone (HAZ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kulhánek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Contribution deals with experimental modeling of quick thermal cycles of metal specimens. In the introduction of contribution will be presented measured graphs of thermal cycle of heat affected zone (HAZ of weld. Next will be presented experimental simulation of measured thermal cycle on the standard specimens, useable for material testing. This approach makes possible to create material structures of heat affected zone of weld, big enough for standard material testing.

  14. Development and Demonstration of a High Efficiency, Rapid Heating, Low NOx Alternative to Conventional Heating of Round Steel Shapes, Steel Substrate (Strip) and Coil Box Transfer Bars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurek, Harry; Wagner, John

    2010-01-25

    Direct Flame Impingement involves the use of an array of very high-velocity flame jets impinging on a work piece to rapidly heat the work piece. The predominant mode of heat transfer is convection. Because of the locally high rate of heat transfer at the surface of the work piece, the refractory walls and exhaust gases of a DFI furnace are significantly cooler than in conventional radiant heating furnaces, resulting in high thermal efficiency and low NOx emissions. A DFI furnace is composed of a successive arrangement of heating modules through or by which the work piece is conveyed, and can be configured for square, round, flat, and curved metal shapes (e.g., billets, tubes, flat bars, and coiled bars) in single- or multi-stranded applications.

  15. Velocities and mechanisms of AISI 304 steel corrosion in heated acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, B.M.; Guedes, C.D.

    1984-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of stainless steel on H 2 SO 4 at temperature higher than 60 0 C is studied. The weight loss technique and the analysis of the different components in solution are used. A proposition is made about the reason for the loss of resistance to corrosion of the stainless steel at this high temperature. (C.L.B.) [pt

  16. Effect of heat treatment and rotor steels composition on hydrogen solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A.I.; Samojlenko, L.V.; Gorovaya, O.N.; Najdovskij, A.G.; Bilik, I.; Kret, Ya.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of equilibrium hydrogen adsorption in samples of 27KhN3MFA and 25Kh2NMFA steels were conducted. Carbide inclusions and doping additions, typical for rotor steels, don't produce noticeable effect on hydrogen solubility in

  17. Modeling the effect of creep deterioration on magnetic properties in heat-resistant steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S.Z.; Tu, S.T., E-mail: sttu@ecust.edu.cn

    2014-11-15

    Abstracts: The hysteresis parameters of the Jiles–Atherton model are modified to elucidate the variation of magnetic properties with creep deterioration based on a consideration of the effect of pinning of magnetic domain walls on the grain boundaries, dislocations as well as precipitates in short-term creep process. Experiments are carried out to evaluate the magnetic hysteresis curves of 10CrMo910 specimens with controlled levels of creep-induced damage. An intelligent optimization algorithm is used to determine the hysteresis parameters of Jiles–Atherton model. The microstructure parameters of the crept specimens are determined by a quantitative metallographic analysis. The modified model is applied to correlate the experimental data of both 10CrMo910 and 410 stainless steel creep specimens. The calculated results are in good agreement with the measured data of the hysteresis parameters. - Highlights: • The hysteresis parameters in the Jiles–Atherton model are modified to account for the effect of creep deterioration. • Magnetic properties are greatly affected by the precipitation and dislocations during creep. • Good consistency is obtained between the experimental and theoretical results of hysteresis parameters.

  18. Influence of Heat Treatment on Content of the Carbide Phases in the Microstructure of High-Speed Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaworski J.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of investigations of the effect of heat treatment temperature on the content of the carbide phase of HS3-1-2 and HS6-5-2 low-alloy high-speed steel. Analysis of the phase composition of carbides is carried out using the diffraction method. It is determined that with increasing austenitising temperature, the intensification of dissolution of M6C carbide increases. As a result, an increase in the grain size of the austenite and the amount of retained austenite causes a significant reduction in the hardness of hardened steel HS3-1-2 to be observed. The results of diffraction investigations showed that M7C3 carbides containing mainly Cr and Fe carbides and M6C carbides containing mainly Mo and W carbides are dissolved during austenitisation. During austenitisation of HS3-1-2 steel, the silicon is transferred from the matrix to carbides, thus replacing carbide-forming elements. An increase in a degree of tempering leads to intensification of carbide separation and this process reduce the grindability of tested steels.

  19. Integration of Heat Treatment with Shot Peening of 17-4 Stainless Steel Fabricated by Direct Metal Laser Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlMangour, Bandar; Yang, Jenn-Ming

    2017-11-01

    Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) is a promising powder-based additive manufacturing process for fabrication of near-net-shape parts. However, the typically poor fatigue performance of DMLS parts must be addressed for use in demanding industrial applications. Post-treatment can be applied to enhance the performance of such components. Earlier attempts at inducing grain refinement through severe plastic deformation of part surfaces using shot peening improved the physical and mechanical properties of metals without chemical alteration. However, heat treatment can modify the surface-hardening effects attained by shot peening. Hence, we examined the feasibility of applying shot peening combined with heat treatment to improve the performance of DMLS-fabricated 17-4 stainless steel parts through microstructural evolution studies and hardness measurements. Compared to a specimen treated only by shot peening, the sample exposed to additional heat treatment showed increased hardness due to aging of the dominant phase.

  20. Effects of heat treatment influencing factors on microstructure and mechanical properties of a low-carbon martensitic stainless bearing steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shaohong; Yuan, Xiaohong; Jiang, Wen; Sun, Hudai; Li, Jun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Zhao, Kunyu, E-mail: zhaokunyu.kmust@gmail.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Yang, Maosheng [Department of Structural Materials, Central Iron and Steel Research Institute, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2014-05-01

    The effects of different heat treatment parameters and cryogenic treatment (−75 °C) on microstructural changes and mechanical properties of a low-carbon martensitic stainless bearing steel were investigated. These analyses were performed via the optical microscope (OM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The obtained results showed that the execution of cryogenic treatment on quenched and tempered bearing steel increases hardness, tensile strength and decreases toughness with the increment of cryogenic treatment and tempering cycles. This paper also showed that the cryogenic cycle's treatment incorporating tempering can refine the martensite laths resulting in improvement of tensile strength. In addition, cryogenic treatment further reduces the retained austenite content but it cannot make retained austenite transform into martensite completely even tempering at high temperature.

  1. Effects of heat treatment influencing factors on microstructure and mechanical properties of a low-carbon martensitic stainless bearing steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shaohong; Yuan, Xiaohong; Jiang, Wen; Sun, Hudai; Li, Jun; Zhao, Kunyu; Yang, Maosheng

    2014-01-01

    The effects of different heat treatment parameters and cryogenic treatment (−75 °C) on microstructural changes and mechanical properties of a low-carbon martensitic stainless bearing steel were investigated. These analyses were performed via the optical microscope (OM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The obtained results showed that the execution of cryogenic treatment on quenched and tempered bearing steel increases hardness, tensile strength and decreases toughness with the increment of cryogenic treatment and tempering cycles. This paper also showed that the cryogenic cycle's treatment incorporating tempering can refine the martensite laths resulting in improvement of tensile strength. In addition, cryogenic treatment further reduces the retained austenite content but it cannot make retained austenite transform into martensite completely even tempering at high temperature

  2. Physical and numerical modelling of heat treatment the precipitation-hardening complex-phase steel (CP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Koczurkiewicz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of physical and numerical modeling of the processes of thermo- plastic treatment of an experimental complex-phase (CP steel. Numerical tests were carried out using a commercial software program, ThermoCalc. Based on the obtained test results, the austenitization temperature was established. Physical modeling was performed using a DIL 805A/D dilatometer and the Gleeble 3800 system. The characteristic temperatures of the steel and the primary austenite grain size were determined. The test pieces were also subjected to metallographic examinations and Vickers hardness tests. The obtained results served for building an actual CCT diagram for the steel tested.

  3. On change of vanadium carbide state during 20Kh3MVF steel heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gitgarts, M.I.; Maksimenko, V.N.

    1975-01-01

    The Xray diffraction study of vanadium carbide MC has been made in the steel-20KH3MVF quenched from 970 and 1040 deg and tempered at 660 deg for 210 hrs. It has been found that the constant of the MC crystal lattice regularly varies with the temperature of isothermal hold-up. In the steel tempered after quenching two vanadium carbides of different content could co-exist simultaneously: carbide formed in the quenching process and carbide formed during tempering. The discovered effect of the temperature dependence of the MC content is, evidently, inherent also to other steels containing vanadium

  4. Damage and fatigue crack growth of Eurofer steel first wall mock-up under cyclic heat flux loads. Part 2: Finite element analysis of damage evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Jeong-Ha

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The surface heat flux load of 3.5 MW/m 2 produced substantial stresses and inelastic strains in the heat-loaded surface region, especially at the notch root. • The notch root exhibited a typical notch effect such as stress concentration and localized inelastic yield leading to a preferred damage development. • The predicted damage evolution feature agrees well with the experimental observation. • The smooth surface also experiences considerable stresses and inelastic strains. However, the stress intensity and the amount of inelastic deformation are not high enough to cause any serious damage. • The level of maximum inelastic strain is higher at the notch root than at the smooth surface. On the other hand, the amplitude of inelastic strain variation is comparable at both positions. • The amount of inelastic deformation is significantly affected by the length of pulse duration time indicating the important role of creep. - Abstract: In the preceding companion article (part 1), the experimental results of the high-heat-flux (3.5 MW/m 2 ) fatigue tests of a Eurofer bare steel first wall mock-up was presented. The aim was to investigate the damage evolution and crack initiation feature. The mock-up used there was a simplified model having only basic and generic structural feature of an actively cooled steel FW component for DEMO reactor. In that study, it was found that microscopic damage was formed at the notch root already in the early stage of the fatigue loading. On the contrary, the heat-loaded smooth surface exhibited no damage up to 800 load cycles. In this paper, the high-heat-flux fatigue behavior is investigated with a finite element analysis to provide a theoretical interpretation. The thermal fatigue test was simulated using the coupled damage-viscoplastic constitutive model developed by Aktaa. The stresses, inelastic deformation and damage evolution at the notch groove and at the smooth surface are compared. The different damage

  5. Increasing the brittle fracture resistance in manual arc welding and heat treatment of type 12KhM steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tikhonov, V.P.; Bychenkova, G.A.; Gordeev, Y.V.; Ilyuhov, C.V.

    1984-01-01

    The extensive application of heat-resisting steels is delayed by their poor weldability. Optimum technology has been developed for manual arc welding and heat treatment of structures of type 12KhM steels resulting in high cracking resistance. Trials were conducted to evaluate the efficiency of removing the structural stresses in tempering the structures. On the basis of the experimental results, it may be assumed that the toughness properties of the welded joints produced by manual arc welding can be improved by optimizing the alloying system of the weld metal, with the parent metal treated in the optimum heat treatment conditions. The aim of subsequent investigations was to assess the properties of the weld metal made with vanadium-free electrodes. It was found that the impact toughness increased two to three times; the mean hardness and the maximum hardness were both less than 220. The reduction in hardness and increase of the toughness properties of the metal are caused by the lower degree of hardening of the bulk of the grain and, consequently, by the lower concentration of plastic strain at the grain boundaries

  6. Effect of heat treatment on mechanical properties and microstructure of selective laser melting 316L stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamariah, M. S. I. N.; Harun, W. S. W.; Khalil, N. Z.; Ahmad, F.; Ismail, M. H.; Sharif, S.

    2017-10-01

    Selective Laser Melting (SLM) has been one of the preferred Additive Manufacturing process to fabricate parts due to its merits in terms of design freedom, lower material waste and faster production when compare to the conventional manufacturing processes. However, due to the thermal gradient experienced during the process, the parts are exposed to the residual stress that leads to parts distortion. This work presents the effect of heat treatments on the micro-hardness of 316L stainless steel parts. In current study, SLM has been employed to fabricate 316L stainless steel compacts. Different heat treatments of 650°C, 950°C, and 1100°C for 2 hours were applied on the compacts. Hardness test were performed on the as-built and heat-treated compacts. The relationship between the microstructures and micro-hardness were discussed in this paper. The results revealed that the micro-hardness of the as-built compacts is between 209.0 and 212.2 HV, which is much higher than the heattreated compacts.

  7. HAZ microstructure in joints made of X13CrMoCoVNbNB9-2-1 (PB2 steel welded with and without post-weld heat treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Łomozik

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of research butt welded joints made of X13CrMoCoVNbNB9-2-1 steel. The joints were welded with post-weld heat treatment PWHT and without PWHT, using the temper bead technique TBT. After welding the joint welded with PWHT underwent stress-relief annealing at 770 °C for 3 hours. The scope of structural tests included the microstructural examination of the coarse-grained heat affected zone (HAZ areas of the joints, the comparison of the morphology of these areas and the determination of carbide precipitate types of the coarse grain heat affected zone (CGHAZ of the joints welded with and without PWHT.

  8. Microstructural evolution of aged heat-resistant cast steel following strain controlled fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golański, Grzegorz; Zielińska-Lipiec, Anna; Mroziński, Stanisław; Kolan, Cezary

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the results of research on the microstructure of high-chromium martensitic GX12CrMoVNbN9-1 (GP91) cast steel after the isothermal ageing process and fatigue process. The fatigue process was performed at room temperature and elevated temperature (600 °C), with the value of total strain amplitude ε ac amounting to 0.25% and 0.60%. Microstructural tests of GP91 cast steel were carried out by means of high-resolution transmission electron microscope. Quantitative study performed by means of TEM included the characteristics of changes in the dislocation substructure and morphology of M 23 C 6 carbides. Performed research has shown that the microstructure of the examined cast steel after ageing is characterized by partly remaining lath microstructure with numerous precipitations of the MX and M 23 C 6 type, as well as the Laves phase. It has been shown that the fatigue test at room temperature contributes to the process of dislocation strengthening of the examined cast steel. The increase of fatigue test temperature influences the degree of increase in the matrix softening. The degree of softening of the cast steel microstructure at elevated temperature depends also on the value of strain amplitude ε ac . The softening process of the examined cast steel was connected with the decrease of dislocation density and increase of subgrains

  9. Resistance of heat resisting steels and alloys to thermal and mechanical low-cycle fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulyakov, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    Carried out is a comparative evalUation of resistance of different materials to thermocyclic deformation and fracture on the base of the experimental data on thermal and mechanical low-cycle fatigUe. Considered are peculiarities of thermal fatigue resistance depending on strength and ductility of the material. It is shown, that in the range of the cycle small numbers before the fracture preference is given to the high-ductility cyclically strengthening austenitic steels of 18Cr-10Ni type with slight relation of yield strength to the σsub(0.2)/σsub(B) tensile strength Highly alloyed strength chromium-nickel steels, as well as cyclically destrengthening perlitic and ferritic steels with stronger σsub(0.2)/σsub(B) relation as compared with simple austenitic steels turn to be more long-lived in the range of the cycle great numbers berore fracture. Perlitic steels are stated to have the lowest parameter values of the K crack growth intensity under the similar limiting conditions of the experiment, while steels and alloys with austenite structure-higher values of the K parameter

  10. Effect of heat treatment on the impact properties of a 12Cr-1Mo-V-W steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, B.A.; Wilcox, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the effects of austenitization and tempering treatments on the strength and impact properties of a 12Cr-1Mo-V-W steel. Data are reported for austenitization temperatures covering the range 900 to 1250 0 C and tempering treatments of 600 to 800 0 C. A 50 0 C improvement in the ductile brittle transition temperature is achieved through heat treatment. This is found to result from elimination of delta ferrite and associated carbides at the delta ferrite-matrix interface. 17 figures

  11. Structure of a Wear-Resistant Medium-Carbon Steel After Hot Deformation in Hammer Dies and Heat Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyazyuk, T. V.; Petrov, S. N.; Ryabov, V. V.; Khlusova, E. I.

    2018-01-01

    The structure of model specimens and articles fabricated from medium-carbon high-strength steels is studied for developing modes of forming of working members of tilling machines with cutting edges thinned without the expensive operation of electromachining. The effect of the temperature of heating of billets on the grain size of austenite is determined. The kinetics of recrystallization is studied in the temperature, rate and strain ranges typical for hot forming. A quantitative crystallographic analysis of the microstructure is performed by the EBSD technique. The degrees of distortion of the crystal lattices of structural components and the mean sizes of martensite blocks are determined.

  12. Effect of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on Creep Rupture Properties of Grade 91 Steel Heavy Section Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Leijun

    2012-11-02

    This project will conduct a systematic metallurgical study on the effect of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) on the creep rupture properties of P91 heavy section welds. The objective is to develop a technical guide for selecting PWHT parameters, and to predict expected creep-rupture life based on the selection of heat treatment parameters. The project consists of four interdependent tasks: Experimentally and numerically characterize the temperature fields of typical post-weld heat treatment procedures for various weld and joint configurations to be used in Gen IV systems. Characterize the microstructure of various regions, including the weld fusion zone, coarse-grain heat-affected zone, and fine-grain heat affected zone, in the welds that underwent the various welding and PWHT thermal histories. Conduct creep and creep-rupture testing of coupons extracted from actual and physically simulated welds. Establish the relationship among PWHT parameters, thermal histories, microstructure, creep, and creep-rupture properties.

  13. High-strength structural steels; their properties, and the problems encountered during the welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uwer, D.

    1978-01-01

    High-strength structural steels, manufacture, properties. Requirements to be met by the welded joints of high-strength structural steels. Influence of the welding conditions on the mechanical properties in the heat-affected zone. Cold-cracking behaviour of welded joints. Economic efficiency of high-strength structural steels. Applications. (orig.) [de

  14. Prolonged self-paced exercise in the heat - environmental factors affecting performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junge, Nicklas; Jørgensen, Rasmus; Flouris, Andreas D

    2016-01-01

    ) was on average reduced by 15% in the 14 studies that fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Ambient temperature per se was a poor predictor of the integrated environmental heat stress and 2 of the prevailing heat stress indices (WBGT and UTCI) failed to predict the environmental influence on performance. The weighing......In this review we examine how self-paced performance is affected by environmental heat stress factors during cycling time trial performance as well as considering the effects of exercise mode and heat acclimatization. Mean power output during prolonged cycling time trials in the heat (≥30°C...... of wind speed appears to be too low for predicting the effect for cycling in trained acclimatized subjects, where performance may be maintained in outdoor time trials at ambient temperatures as high as 36°C (36°C UTCI; 28°C WBGT). Power output during indoor trials may also be maintained with temperatures...

  15. Evaluation of factors affecting the edge formability of two hot rolled multiphase steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Monideepa; Tiwari, Sumit; Bhattacharya, Basudev

    2018-02-01

    In this study, the effect of various factors on the hole expansion ratio and hence on the edge formability of two hot rolled multiphase steels, one with a ferrite-martensite microstructure and the other with a ferrite-bainite microstructure, was investigated through systematic microstructural and mechanical characterization. The study revealed that the microstructure of the steels, which determines their strain hardening capacity and fracture resistance, is the principal factor controlling edge formability. The influence of other factors such as tensile strength, ductility, anisotropy, and thickness, though present, are secondary. A critical evaluation of the available empirical models for hole expansion ratio prediction is also presented.

  16. AE Characteristics affecting the Notch Effect of the Cold Steel SKD11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Eung Kyo; Kim, Ki Choong; Kwon, Dong Ho; Kim, Jae Yeor [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-11-15

    Acoustic Emission is not only expected as a non-destructive evaluation technique in practice but also noted as a new powerful means of evaluation of materials. AE occurs with plastic deformation and propagation of crack, and this patterns of occurrence of AE vary with materials. AE which comes from propagation of crack depends oil the shapes and properties of materials. Like this AE has characteristic of material. The present work is an attempt to evaluate characteristics of carbon steel (SM55C) and Die steel(SKD11) by means of dynamic response of AE method

  17. Effect of welding heat input on microstructures and toughness in simulated CGHAZ of V–N high strength steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jun, E-mail: hujunral@163.com [The State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Du, Lin-Xiu [The State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Wang, Jian-Jun [Institute of Materials Research, School of Material and Metallurgy, Northeastern university, Shenyang 110819 (China); Gao, Cai-Ru [The State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2013-08-10

    For the purpose of obtaining the appropriate heat input in the simulated weld CGHAZ of the hot-rolled V–N microalloyed high strength S-lean steel, the microstructural evolution, hardness, and toughness subjected to four different heat inputs were investigated. The results indicate that the hardness decreases with increase in the heat input, while the toughness first increases and then decreases. Moderate heat input is optimum, and the microstructure is fine polygonal ferrite, granular bainite, and acicular ferrite with dispersive nano-scale V(C,N) precipitates. The hardness is well-matched with that of the base metal. Moreover, the occurrence of energy dissipating micromechanisms (ductile dimples, tear ridges) contributes to the maximum total impact energy. The detrimental effect of the free N atoms on the toughness can be partly remedied by optimizing the microstructural type, fraction, morphologies, and crystallographic characteristics. The potency of V(C,N) precipitates on intragranular ferrite nucleation without MnS assistance under different heat inputs was discussed.

  18. Influence of heat treatment on hardness and kinetics of growth of intermetallic compound interlayer in titanium-steel composite material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shmorgun, V.G.; Slaustin, O.V.; Trykov, Yu.P.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of heat treatment conditions on microhardness and diffusion interlayer thickness is studied for composite material of titanium VT1-O + steel 08kp + titanium VT1-O. Heat treatments are carried out at temperatures of 800-1000 deg C and holding at heat for 3 h in a vacuum furnace (1 x 10 -4 mmHg) as well as in an electric furnace with coating a dual protective layer. It is stated that the hardness and the thickness of the interlayer are higher after heat treatment in an ordinary electric furnaces as compared to vacuum heating. all other things being equal. Annealed in electric furnace specimens are water quenched from temperatures of 600-950 deg C. It is shown that the hardness of the interlayer increases sharply when hardening from 650 deg C comparing with annealed specimens (from 4.5-5.2 to 7-9 GPa). The quenching from 700 and 800 deg C results in an interlayer hardness decrease down to 4.8-5.4 and 3.1-3 GPa respectively. A quenching temperature increase up to 800-900 deg C is accompanied by a monotonic enhancement of hardness from 3.5-4.8 up to 5.1-6.8 GPa [ru

  19. The Effect of Ultrafast Heating on Cold-Rolled Low Carbon Steel: Formation and Decomposition of Austenite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Manuel Castro Cerda

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of heating rate on the formation and decomposition of austenite was investigated on cold-rolled low carbon steel. Experiments were performed at two heating rates, 150 °C/s and 1500 °C/s, respectively. The microstructures were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD. Experimental evidence of nucleation of austenite in α/θ, as well as in α/α boundaries is analyzed from the thermodynamic point of view. The increase in the heating rates from 150 °C/s to 1500 °C/s has an impact on the morphology of austenite in the intercritical range. The effect of heating rate on the austenite formation mechanism is analyzed combining thermodynamic calculations and experimental data. The results provide indirect evidence of a transition in the mechanism of austenite formation, from carbon diffusion control to interface control mode. The resulting microstructure after the application of ultrafast heating rates is complex and consists of a mixture of ferrite with different morphologies, undissolved cementite, martensite, and retained austenite.

  20. A mechanism for corrosion product deposition on the carbon steel piping in the residual heat removal system of BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizawa, Motohiro; Chiba, Yoshinori; Hosokawa, Hideyuki; Ohsumi, Katsumi; Uchida, Shunsuke; Ishizawa, Noboru

    2002-01-01

    The dose rate of the residual heat removal (RHR) piping has been considered to be caused by accumulation of insoluble (crud) radioactive corrosion products on carbon steel surfaces. Soft shutdown procedures (i.e., plant shutdown with moderate coolant temperature reduction rate) used to be applied to reduce crud radioactivity release from the fuel surface, but these are no longer used because of the need for shorter plant shutdown times. In order to apply other suitable countermeasures to reduce RHR dose rate, assessment of plant data, experiments on deposition of crud and ion species on carbon steel, and mass balance evaluation of radioactive corrosion products based on plant and laboratory data were carried out and the following findings were made. (1) Deposits of ion species on carbon steel surfaces of the RHR piping was much more numerous than for crud. (2) Ion species accumulation behavior on RHR piping, which is temperature dependent, can be evaluated with the calculation model used for the dehydration reaction of corrosion products generated during the wet lay-up period. (3) Deposition amounts could be reduced to 1/2.5 when the starting RHR system operation temperature was lowered from 155degC to 120degC. (author)

  1. Role of steel slags on biomass/carbon dioxide gasification integrated with recovery of high temperature heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongqi; Liu, Qianyi; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Zuotai; Wang, Xidong

    2017-01-01

    Disposal of biomass in the agriculture and steel slags in the steel industry provides a significant solution toward sustainability in China. Herein these two sectors were creatively combined as a novel method, i.e., biomass/CO 2 gasification using waste heat from hot slags where the influence of chemical compositions of steel slags, characterized as iron oxide content and basicity, on gasification thermodynamics, was systemically reported for the first time. Both the target gases of CO, H 2 and CH 4 and the polluted gases of NH 3 , NO and NO 2 were considered. It was first found that an increasing iron content and slag basicity continuously improved the CO yield at 600-1000°C and 800-1000°C, respectively; while the effect on polluted gas releases was limited. Moreover, the solid wastes after gasification could be utilized to provide nutrients and improve the soil in the agriculture, starting from which an integrated modern system was proposed herein. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of weld metal chemistry and heat input on the structure and properties of duplex stainless steel welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muthupandi, V.; Bala Srinivasan, P.; Seshadri, S.K.; Sundaresan, S

    2003-10-15

    The excellent combination of strength and corrosion resistance in duplex stainless steels (DSS) is due to their strict composition control and microstructural balance. The ferrite-austenite ratio is often upset in DSS weld metals owing to the rapid cooling rates associated with welding. To achieve the desired ferrite-austenite balance and hence properties, either the weld metal composition and/or the heat input is controlled. In the current work, a low heat input process viz., EBW and another commonly employed process, gas tungsten-arc welding have been employed for welding of DSS with and without nickel enhancement. Results show that (i) chemical composition has got a greater influence on the ferrite-austenite ratio than the cooling rate, (ii) and even EBW which is considered an immature process in welding of DSS, can be employed provided means of filler addition could be devised.

  3. Effect of temperature and heat fluxes on the corrosion's damage nature for mild and stainless steels in neutral chloride solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaluzhina, S.A. [Voronezh State University, University Sq.1, 394006 Voronezh (Russian Federation); Malygin, A.V. [JSC Voronezhsynthezkauchuk, Leninsky Av. 2, 394014 Voronezh (Russian Federation); Vigdorovitch, V.V. [Derzhavin State University, International St. 33, 392622 Tambov (Russian Federation)

    2004-07-01

    The detail research of the corrosion-electrochemical behavior of two types steels - mild steel (0.1%C) and stainless steel 12FeCr18Ni10Ti in series chloride solutions under elevated temperature and heat flux on interface has been carried out in the present work using the special plant and the complex electrochemical and microscopic methods. The comparative data has shown that the temperature increase is stimulating as the active alloy's corrosion (mild steel), so the passive alloy's corrosion (12FeCr18Ni10Ti).However at the last case the temperature effect is being higher because the thermal de-passivation of the stainless steel which undergoes pit corrosion under t > 50 deg C. The heat-transfer role in the studied systems is ambiguous. The corrosion rate of heat-transferring electrode from mild steel exceeds the thermo-equilibrium with solution electrode's corrosion rate because of intensification of the oxygen reduction cathodic process. The opposite effect has been established for steel 12FeCr18Ni10Ti where the oxygen flux's strengthening from cold solution to the heated surface transfers the alloy to the most stable passive state and increases its resistance to general and local corrosion. The experimental results demonstrates that the thermal condition's influence on the nature and corrosion intensity of the investigated steels is being commensurable by effect's degree with their composition and showing strictly individually. (authors)

  4. Effect of heat treatment, with and without mechanical work, on the tensile and creep behaviour at 6000C of austenitic stainless steel stabilised with titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padilha, A.F.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of various heat treatments, with and without mechanical work, on the microstructure and the tensile and creep behaviour at 600 0 C of the titanium stabilised austenitic stainless steel DIN 1.4970, as well as the effects of aging temperature, pre-strain and small boron additions on the creep behaviour of these steels are discussed. The most probable mechanism is suggested. (Author) [pt

  5. The Wear Characteristics of Heat Treated Manganese Phosphate Coating Applied to AlSi D2 Steel with Oil Lubricant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesan Alankaram

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Today, in the area of material design conversion coatings play an important role in the applications where temperature, corrosion, oxidation and wear come in to play. Wear of metals occurs when relative motion between counter-surfaces takes place, leading to physical or chemical destruction of the original top layers. In this study, the tribological behaviour of heat treated Manganese phosphate coatings on AISI D2 steel with oil lubricant was investigated. The Surface morphology of manganese phosphate coatings was examined by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX .The wear tests were performed in a pin on disk apparatus as per ASTM G-99 Standard. The wear resistance of the coated steel was evaluated through pin on disc test using a sliding velocity of 3.0m/s under Constant loads of 40 N and 100 N with in controlled condition of temperature and humidity. The Coefficient of friction and wear rate were evaluated. Wear pattern of Manganese phosphate coated pins with oil lubricant, Heat treated Manganese phosphate coated pins with oil lubricant were captured using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. The results of the wear test established that the heat treated manganese phosphate coating with oil lubricant exhibited the lowest average coefficient of friction and the lowest wear loss up to 6583 m sliding distance under 40 N load and 3000 m sliding distance even under 100 N load respectively. The Wear volume and temperature rise in heat treated Manganese Phosphate coated pins with oil lubricant is lesser than the Manganese Phosphate coated pins with oil lubricant

  6. Wood variables affecting the friction coefficient of spruce pine on steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truett J. Lemoine; Charles W. McMillin; Floyd G. Manwiller

    1970-01-01

    Wood of spruce pine, Pinus glabra Walk., was factorially segregated by moisture content (0, 10, and 18 percent), specific gravity (less than 0.45 and more than 0.45), and extractive content (unextracted and extractive-freE), and the kinetic coefficient of friction on steel (having surface roughness of 9 microinches RMS) determined for tangential...

  7. Experimental studies of parameters affecting the heat generation in friction stir welding process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijajlović Miroslav M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat generation is a complex process of transformation of a specific type of energy into heat. During friction stir welding, one part of mechanical energy delivered to the welding tool is consumed in the welding process, another is used for deformational processes etc., and the rest of the energy is transformed into heat. The analytical procedure for the estimation of heat generated during friction stir welding is very complex because it includes a significant number of variables and parameters, and many of them cannot be fully mathematically explained. Because of that, the analytical model for the estimation of heat generated during friction stir welding defines variables and parameters that dominantly affect heat generation. These parameters are numerous and some of them, e. g. loads, friction coefficient, torque, temperature, are estimated experimentally. Due to the complex geometry of the friction stir welding process and requirements of the measuring equipment, adequate measuring configurations and specific constructional solutions that provide adequate measuring positions are necessary. This paper gives an overview of the process of heat generation during friction stir welding, the most influencing parameters on heat generation, constructional solutions for the measuring equipment needed for these experimental researches and examples of measured values.

  8. Damage and fatigue crack growth of Eurofer steel first wall mock-up under cyclic heat flux loads. Part 1: Electron beam irradiation tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, J.H., E-mail: you@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Euratom Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Höschen, T. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Euratom Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Pintsuk, G. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, IEK2, Euratom Association, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    Highlights: • Clear evidence of microscopic damage and crack formation at the notch root in the early stage of the fatigue loading (50–100 load cycles). • Propagation of fatigue crack at the notch root in the course of subsequent cyclic heat-flux loading followed by saturation after roughly 600 load cycles. • No sign of damage on the notch-free surface up to 800 load cycles. • No obvious effect of the pulse time duration on the crack extension. • Slight change in the grain microstructure due to the formation of sub-grain boundaries by plastic deformation. - Abstract: Recently, the idea of bare steel first wall (FW) is drawing attention, where the surface of the steel is to be directly exposed to high heat flux loads. Hence, the thermo-mechanical impacts on the bare steel FW will be different from those of the tungsten-coated one. There are several previous works on the thermal fatigue tests of bare steel FW made of austenitic steel with regard to the ITER application. In the case of reduced-activation steel Eurofer97, a candidate structural material for the DEMO FW, there is no report on high heat flux tests yet. The aim of the present study is to investigate the thermal fatigue behavior of the Eurofer-based bare steel FW under cyclic heat flux loads relevant to DEMO operation. To this end, we conducted a series of electron beam irradiation tests with heat flux load of 3.5 MW/m{sup 2} on water-cooled mock-ups with an engraved thin notch on the surface. It was found that the notch root region exhibited a marked development of damage and fatigue cracks whereas the notch-free surface manifested no sign of crack formation up to 800 load cycles. Results of extensive microscopic investigation are reported.

  9. Influence of heat treatment on microstructure and properties of GX12CrMoVNbN9-1 cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Golański

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of research on the influence of multistage heat treatment on microstructure and properties of high-chromiummartensitic GX12CrMoVNbN9 – 1 (GP91 steel. The material under investigation were samples taken out from a test coupon. Heattreatment of GP91 cast steel was performed at the parameters of temperature and time typical of treatment for multi-ton steel casts. The research has proved that in the as-received condition (as-cast state GP91 cast steel was characterized by a coarse grain, martensitic microstructure which provided the required standard mechanical properties. The heat treatment of GP91 cast steel contributed to obtainment of a fine grain microstructure of high tempered martensite with numerous precipitations of carbides of diverse size. The GP91 cast steel structure received through heat treatment made it possible to obtain high plastic properties, particularly impact strength, maintaining strength properties on the level of the required minimum.

  10. The development of RFT technique for carbon steel tubes in balance-of-plant heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Soo; Kim, Han Jong; Moon, Yong Sick; Kim, Jae Dong; Kim, Wang Bae; Nam, Min Woo

    2005-01-01

    The NDT method of carbon steel tubes is applied RFT technique. As other NDT methods, It is surprising that RFT has been rapidly developed over the past decade. These improvements have resulted in multi-frequency system, dual driver probes and development of analysis technique. Also these improvements give some profit to power plants as well as general industry. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to improve the reliability of RFT technique for carbon steel tubes. To uplift RFT technique, probes, calibration standards and specimen was developed.

  11. An investigation into the effects of conventional heat treatments on mechanical characteristics of new hot working tool steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fares, M. L.; Athmani, M.; Khelfaoui, Y.; Khettache, A.

    2012-02-01

    The effects of conventional heat treatments, i.e. quenching and tempering, on the mechanical characteristics of non standard hot work tool steel, close to either AISI-H11/H13 are investigated. The major elemental composition differences are in carbon, silicon and vanadium. The objective of the carried heat treatments is to obtain an efficient tool performance in terms of hardness, wear resistance and mechanical strength. Experimental results allow an explanation of the surface properties depending mainly on both chemical composition and optimised preheating parameters. After austenitizing at 1050 °C for 15 min, the as-quenched steel in oil bath exhibited the fully martensitic structure (without bainite) connected to a small fraction of retained austenite and complex carbides mainly of M23C6 type. Twice tempering at 500 °C and 600 °C resulted in initiating the precipitation processes and the secondary hardness effect. As a result, carbide content amounted to 3% while the retained austenite content decreased to 0%. Accordingly, the required mechanical properties in terms of hardness and wear are fulfilled and are adequately favourable in handling both shocks and pressures for the expected tool life. Induced microstructures are revealed using optical and scanning electron microscopes. Phase compositions are assessed by means of X-ray diffraction technique while mechanical characteristics are investigated based on hardness and abrasive wear standard tests.

  12. Effect of heat-treatment on toughness and strength properties of C-Mn steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd bin Harun; Goh Kian Seong; Jasmin binti Baba

    1991-01-01

    The strength and toughness of the heat-treated and tempered C-Mn are studied. Two types of heat-treatment have been carried out with the specimens in an argon gas. The variation in the fracture surfaces of the heat-treated and tempered specimens with impact test temperature is discussed also

  13. Effect of heat treatment of toughness and strength properties of C-Mn steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad bin Harun; Goh Kian Seong; Yasmin binti Baba

    1989-01-01

    The strength and toughness of the heat-treated and tempered C-Mn are studied. Two type of heat-treatments have been carried out with the specimens in an argon gas. The variation in the fracture surfaces of the heat-treated and tempered specimens with impact test temperatures also is discussed. (author)

  14. Heat treatment for improvement in lower temperature mechanical properties of 0.40 pct C-Cr-Mo ultrahigh strength steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Yoshiyuki; Okabayashi, Kunio

    1983-11-01

    In the previous paper, it was reported that isothermal heat treatment of a commercial Japanese 0.40 pct C-Ni-Cr-Mo ultrahigh strength steel (AISI 4340 type) at 593 K for a short time followed by water quenching, in which a mixed structure of 25 vol pct lower bainite and 75 vol pct martensite is produced, results in the improvement of low temperature mechanical properties (287 to 123 K). The purpose of this paper is to study whether above new heat treatment will still be effective in commercial practice for improving low temperature mechanical properties of the ultrahigh strength steel when applied to a commercial Japanese 0.40 pct C-Cr-Mo ultrahigh strength steel which is economical because it lacks the expensive nickel component (AISI 4140 type). At and above 203 K this new heat treatment, as compared with the conventional 1133 K direct water quenching treatment, significantly improved the strength, tensile ductility, and notch toughness of the 0.40 pct C-Cr-Mo ultrahigh strength steel. At and above 203 K the new heat treatment also produced superior fracture ductility and notch toughness results at similar strength levels as compared to those obtained by using γ α' repetitive heat treatment for the same steel. However, the new heat treatment remarkably decreased fracture ductility and notch toughness of the 0.40 pct C-Cr-Mo ultrahigh strength steel below 203 K, and thus no significant improvement in the mechanical properties was noticeable as compared with the properties produced by the conventional 1133 K direct water quenching treatment and the γ α' repetitive heat treatment. This contrasts with the fact that the new heat treatment, as compared with the conventional 1133 K direct water quenching treatment and the γ α' repetitive heat treatment, dramatically improved the notch toughness of the 0.40 pct C-Ni-Cr-Mo ultrahigh strength steel, providing a better combination of strength and ductility throughout the 287 to 123 K temperature range. The difference

  15. Effect of laser heat treatment on intergranular corrosion of austenitic stainless steel; Austenite kei stainless ko no ryukai fushoku kanjusei ni oyobosu laser netsushori no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osawa, M.; Yoneyama, T. [Tokyo Denki University, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Isshiki, Y. [Tokyo Metropolitan Industrial Technology Center, Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-03-15

    The laser heat treatment of SUS304 steel was studied to lower the intergranular corrosion sensitivity of austenitic stainless steel. By the short-time heating around 923K, the SUS304 steel is sensitized to the intergranular corrosion with the deposition of Cr carbide into the granular field of crystals. To recover it, it is necessary to solidly dissolve, and simultaneously, quickly cool the Cr carbide above 1273K. For such solution heat treatment, CO2 laser beams were used with the treatment condition that the power and beam diameter were 800 to 1200W and 0.3 to 0.64cm, respectively. Regardless of both power density and beam diameter, the desensitization was observed at heating temperatures above 1323K. As a result of calculation by simulation, the solid dissolution of Cr carbide and recovery of Cr`s depletion zone in the granular field of crystals took place in a very short time at heating temperatures above 1323K. It agreed well with the experimental result. The laser beams are effective in the solution heat treatment of stainless steel. 14 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Developmental acclimation to low or high humidity conditions affect starvation and heat resistance of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkash, Ravi; Ranga, Poonam; Aggarwal, Dau Dayal

    2014-09-01

    Several Drosophila species originating from tropical humid localities are more resistant to starvation and heat stress than populations from high latitudes but mechanistic bases of such physiological changes are largely unknown. In order to test whether humidity levels affect starvation and heat resistance, we investigated developmental acclimation effects of low to high humidity conditions on the storage and utilization of energy resources, body mass, starvation survival, heat knockdown and heat survival of D. melanogaster. Isofemale lines reared under higher humidity (85% RH) stored significantly higher level of lipids and showed greater starvation survival hours but smaller in body size. In contrast, lines reared at low humidity evidenced reduced levels of body lipids and starvation resistance. Starvation resistance and lipid storage level were higher in females than males. However, the rate of utilization of lipids under starvation stress was lower for lines reared under higher humidity. Adult flies of lines reared at 65% RH and acclimated under high or low humidity condition for 200 hours also showed changes in resistance to starvation and heat but such effects were significantly lower as compared with developmental acclimation. Isofemale lines reared under higher humidity showed greater heat knockdown time and heat-shock survival. These laboratory observations on developmental and adult acclimation effects of low versus high humidity conditions have helped in explaining seasonal changes in resistance to starvation and heat of the wild-caught flies of D. melanogaster. Thus, we may suggest that wet versus drier conditions significantly affect starvation and heat resistance of D. melanogaster. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Hardness of 17Cr-0.17N-0.43C-1.7 Mo Martensitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, S. Chenna; Gangwar, Narendra Kumar; Jha, Abhay K.; Pant, Bhanu; George, Koshy M.

    2015-04-01

    The microstructure and hardness of a nitrogen-containing martensitic stainless steel were investigated as a function of heat treatment using optical microscopy, electron microscopy, amount of retained austenite, and hardness measurement. The steel was subjected to three heat treatments: hardening, cryo treatment, and tempering. The hardness of the steel in different heat-treated conditions ranged within 446-620 HV. The constituents of microstructure in hardened condition were lath martensite, retained austenite, M23C6, M7C3, MC carbides, and M(C,N) carbonitrides. Upon tempering at 500 °C, two new phases have precipitated: fine spherical Mo2C carbides and needle-shaped Cr2N particles.

  18. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction (E-SMARRT): Optimization of Heat Treatments on Stainless Steel Castings for Improved Corrosion Resistance and Mechanical Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John N. DuPont; Jeffrey D. Farren; Andrew W. Stockdale; Brett M. Leister

    2012-06-30

    It is commonly believed that high alloy steel castings have inferior corrosion resistance to their wrought counterparts as a result of the increased amount of microsegregation remaining in the as-cast structure. Homogenization and dissolution heat treatments are often utilized to reduce or eliminate the residual microsegregation and dissolve the secondary phases. Detailed electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and light optical microscopy (LOM) were utilized to correlate the amount of homogenization and dissolution present after various thermal treatments with calculated values and with the resultant corrosion resistance of the alloys.The influence of heat treatment time and temperature on the homogenization and dissolution kinetics were investigated using stainless steel alloys CN3MN and CK3MCuN. The influence of heat treatment time and temperature on the impact toughness and corrosion reistance of cast stainless steel alloys CF-3, CF-3M, CF-8, and CF-8M was also investigated.

  19. Influence of steel-making process and heat-treatment temperature on the fatigue and fracture properties of pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, S. K.; Na, E. G.; Baek, T. H.; Won, S. Y.; Park, S. J.; Lee, S. W.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, high strength pressure vessel steels having the same chemical compositions were manufactured by the two different steel-making processes, such as Vacuum Degassing(VD) and Electro-Slag Remelting(ESR) methods. After the steel-making process, they were normalized at 955 deg. C, quenched at 843 .deg. C, and finally tempered at 550 .deg. C or 450 deg. C, resulting in tempered martensitic microstructures with different yielding strengths depending on the tempering conditions. Low-Cycle Fatigue(LCF) tests, Fatigue Crack Growth Rate(FCGR) tests, and fracture toughness tests were performed to investigate the fatigue and fracture behaviors of the pressure vessel steels. In contrast to very similar monotonic, LCF, and FCGR behaviors between VD and ESR steels, a quite difference was noticed in the fracture toughness. Fracture toughness of ESR steel was higher than that of VD steel, being attributed to the removal of impurities in steel-making process

  20. Are adult life history traits in oriental fruit moth affected by a mild pupal heat stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jincheng; Cheng, Xiongbin; Hoffmann, Ary A; Zhang, Bo; Ma, Chun-Sen

    2017-10-01

    Thermal stress at one life stage can affect fitness at a later stage in ectotherms with complex life cycles. Most relevant studies have focused on extreme stress levels, but here we also show substantial fitness effects in a moth when pupae are exposed to a relatively mild and sublethal heat stress. We consider the impact of a 35°C heat stress of 2h in three geographically separate populations of the oriental fruit moth (OFM, Grapholita molesta) from northern, middle and southern China. Heat stress negatively affected fecundity but increased adult heat resistance and adult longevity. Fitness effects were mostly consistent across populations but there were also some population differences. In the Shenyang population from northern China, there was a hormetic effect of heat on female longevity not evident in the other populations. Adults from all populations had higher LT 50 s due to heat stress after pupal exposure to the sublethal stress. These results highlight that the pupal stage is a particularly sensitive window for development and they have implications for seasonal adaptation in uncertain environments as well as changes in pest dynamics under climate warming. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A Simple Experiment To Measure the Content of Oxygen in the Air Using Heated Steel Wool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Francisco; Rivera, Rodrigo; Nunez, Cesar

    2011-01-01

    The typical experiment to measure the oxygen content in the atmosphere uses the rusting of steel wool inside a closed volume of air. Two key aspects of this experiment that make possible a successful measurement of the content of oxygen in the air are the use of a closed atmosphere and the use of a chemical reaction that involves the oxidation of…

  2. Creep strength and microstructural evolution of 9-12% Cr heat resistant steels during creep exposure at 600 C and 650 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendez Martin, Francisca [Graz Univ. of Technology (Austria). Inst. for Materials Science and Welding; Panait, Clara Gabriela [MINES ParisTech, UMR CNRS, Evry (France). Centre des Materiaux; V et M France CEV, Aulnoye-Aymeries (France); Bendick, Walter [Salzgitter Mannesmann Forschung GmbH (SZMF), Duisburg (DE)] (and others)

    2010-07-01

    9-12% Cr heat resistant steels are used for applications at high temperatures and pressures in steam power plants. 12% Cr steels show higher creep strength and higher corrosion resistance compared to 9% Cr steels for short term creep exposure. However, the higher creep strength of 12 %Cr steels drops increasingly after 10,000-20,000 h of creep. This is probably due to a microstructural instability such as the precipitation of new phases (e.g. Laves phases and Z-phases), the growth of the precipitates and the recovery of the matrix. 9% Cr and 12% Cr tempered martensitic steels that have been creep tested for times up to 50,000 h at 600 C and 650 C were investigated using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) on extractive replicas and thin foils together with Backscatter Scanning Electron Microscopy (BSE-SEM) to better understand the different creep behaviour of the two different steels. A significant precipitation of Laves phase and low amounts of Z-phase was observed in the 9% Cr steels after long-term creep exposure. The size distribution of Laves phases was measured by image analysis of SEM-BSE images. In the 12% Cr steel two new phases were identified, Laves phase and Z-phase after almost 30,000 h of creep test. The quantification of the different precipitated phases was studied. (orig.)

  3. A Correlation between the Ultimate Shear Stress and the Thickness Affected by Intermetallic Compounds in Friction Stir Welding of Dissimilar Aluminum Alloy–Stainless Steel Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent Picot

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, Friction Stir Welding (FSW was applied to join a stainless steel 316L and an aluminum alloy 5083. Ranges of rotation and translation speeds of the tool were used to obtain welding samples with different heat input coefficients. Depending on the process parameters, the heat generated by FSW creates thin layers of Al-rich InterMetallic Compound (IMC mainly composed of FeAl3, identified by energy dispersive spectrometry. Traces of Fe2Al5 were also depicted in some samples by X-ray diffraction analysis and transmission electron microscopy. Monotonous tensile tests performed on the weld joint show the existence of a maximum mechanical resistance for a judicious choice of rotation and translation speeds. It can be linked to an affected zone of average thickness of 15 µm which encompass the presence of IMC and the chaotic mixing caused by plastic deformation in this area. A thickness of less than 15 µm is not sufficient to ensure a good mechanical resistance of the joint. For a thickness higher than 15 µm, IMC layers become more brittle and less adhesive due to high residual stresses which induces numerous cracks after cooling. This leads to a progressive decrease of the ultimate shear stress supported by the bond.

  4. Effect of Heat Treatment Process on Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of a 9% Ni Steel for Large LNG Storage Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J. M.; Li, H.; Yang, F.; Chi, Q.; Ji, L. K.; Feng, Y. R.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, two different heat treatment processes of a 9% Ni steel for large liquefied natural gas storage tanks were performed in an industrial heating furnace. The former was a special heat treatment process consisting of quenching and intercritical quenching and tempering (Q-IQ-T). The latter was a heat treatment process only consisting of quenching and tempering. Mechanical properties were measured by tensile testing and charpy impact testing, and the microstructure was analyzed by optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. The results showed that outstanding mechanical properties were obtained from the Q-IQ-T process in comparison with the Q-T process, and a cryogenic toughness with charpy impact energy value of 201 J was achieved at 77 K. Microstructure analysis revealed that samples of the Q-IQ-T process had about 9.8% of austenite in needle-like martensite, while samples of the Q-T process only had about 0.9% of austenite retained in tempered martensite.

  5. Carbide Precipitation in 2.25 Cr-1 Mo Bainitic Steel: Effect of Heating and Isothermal Tempering Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dépinoy, Sylvain; Toffolon-Masclet, Caroline; Urvoy, Stéphane; Roubaud, Justine; Marini, Bernard; Roch, François; Kozeschnik, Ernst; Gourgues-Lorenzon, Anne-Françoise

    2017-05-01

    The effect of the tempering heat treatment, including heating prior to the isothermal step, on carbide precipitation has been determined in a 2.25 Cr-1 Mo bainitic steel for thick-walled applications. The carbides were identified using their amount of metallic elements, morphology, nucleation sites, and diffraction patterns. The evolution of carbide phase fraction, morphology, and composition was investigated using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, as well as thermodynamic calculations. Upon heating, retained austenite into the as-quenched material decomposes into ferrite and cementite. M7C3 carbides then nucleate at the interface between the cementite and the matrix, triggering the dissolution of cementite. M2C carbides precipitate separately within the bainitic laths during slow heating. M23C6 carbides precipitate at the interfaces (lath boundaries or prior austenite grain boundaries) and grow by attracting nearby chromium atoms, which results in the dissolution of M7C3 and, depending on the temperature, coarsening, or dissolution of M2C carbides, respectively.

  6. Influence of heat input in electron beam process on microstructure and properties of duplex stainless steel welded interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Jing, Hongyang; Xu, Lianyong; Han, Yongdian; Zhao, Lei; Lv, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Jianyang

    2018-03-01

    The influence of heat input in electron beam (EB) process on microstructure, mechanical properties, and pitting corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel (DSS) welded interface was investigated. The rapid cooling in EB welding resulted in insufficient austenite formation. The austenite mainly consisted of grain boundary austenite and intragranular austenite, and there was abundant Cr2N precipitation in the ferrite. The Ni, Mo, and Si segregation indicated that the dendritic solidification was primarily ferrite in the weld. The weld exhibited higher hardness, lower toughness, and poorer pitting corrosion resistance than the base metal. The impact fractures of the welds were dominated by the transgranular cleavage failure of the ferrite. The ferrite was selectively attacked because of its lower pitting resistance equivalent number than that of austenite. The Cr2N precipitation accelerated the pitting corrosion. In summary, the optimised heat input slightly increased the austenite content, reduced the segregation degree and ferrite texture intensity, decreased the hardness, and improved the toughness and pitting corrosion resistance. However, the effects were limited. Furthermore, optimising the heat input could not suppress the Cr2N precipitation. Taking into full consideration the microstructure and properties, a heat input of 0.46 kJ/mm is recommended for the EB welding of DSS.

  7. Metallurgical and Corrosion Characterization of POST Weld Heat Treated Duplex Stainless Steel (uns S31803) Joints by Friction Welding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif M., Mohammed; Shrikrishna, Kulkarni Anup; Sathiya, P.

    2016-02-01

    The present study focuses on the metallurgical and corrosion characterization of post weld heat treated duplex stainless steel joints. After friction welding, it was confirmed that there is an increase in ferrite content at weld interface due to dynamic recrystallization. This caused the weldments prone to pitting corrosion attack. Hence the post weld heat treatments were performed at three temperatures 1080∘C, 1150∘C and 1200∘C with 15min of aging time. This was followed by water and oil quenching. The volume fraction of ferrite to austenite ratio was balanced and highest pit nucleation resistance were achieved after PWHT at 1080∘C followed by water quench and at 1150∘C followed by oil quench. This had happened exactly at parameter set containing heating pressure (HP):40 heating time (HT):4 upsetting pressure (UP):80 upsetting time (UP):2 (experiment no. 5). Dual phase presence and absence of precipitates were conformed through TEM which follow Kurdjumov-Sachs relationship. PREN of ferrite was decreasing with increase in temperature and that of austenite increased. The equilibrium temperature for water quenching was around 1100∘C and that for oil quenching was around 1140∘C. The pit depths were found to be in the range of 100nm and width of 1.5-2μm.

  8. Effect of Heat Input During Disk Laser Bead-On-Plate Welding of Thermomechanically Rolled Steel on Penetration Characteristics and Porosity Formation in the Weld Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisiecki A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a detailed analysis of the influence of heat input during laser bead-on-plate welding of 5.0 mm thick plates of S700MC steel by modern Disk laser on the mechanism of steel penetration, shape and depth of penetration, and also on tendency to weld porosity formation. Based on the investigations performed in a wide range of laser welding parameters the relationship between laser power and welding speed, thus heat input, required for full penetration was determined. Additionally the relationship between the laser welding parameters and weld quality was determined.

  9. A review on heat sink for thermo-electric power generation: Classifications and parameters affecting performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elghool, Ali; Basrawi, Firdaus; Ibrahim, Thamir Khalil; Habib, Khairul; Ibrahim, Hassan; Idris, Daing Mohamad Nafiz Daing

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Coupling a thermoelectric power generation (TEG) to a heat sink is presented. • Review the classifications and parameters affecting performance of the TEG with heat sink. • Discuss different mathematical models of the heat sinks. • The passive heat sinks are most appropriate because of the inherent efficiency of TEG. • Medium temperature range below 300 °C is found to be most suitable for HPHS. - Abstract: In recent years, there have been growing interests in key areas related to global warming resulting from environmental emissions, and the diminishing sources of fossil fuel. The increased interest has led to significant research efforts towards finding novel technologies in clean energy production. Consequently, the merits of a thermo-electric generator (TEG) have promised a revival of alternative means of producing green energy. It is, however, impractical to account for the cost of thermal energy input to the TEG which is in the form of final waste heat. This is because the technology presents critical limitations in determining its cost efficiency nor its economic disadvantages. This paper reviews the principles of thermo-electric power production, as well the materials use, performance achieved, and application areas. The paper also takes a particular deliberation on TEG heat sinks geometries and categories. The review emphasizes more on the TEG performance while considering a number of heat sink parameters related to its performance.

  10. On high temperature strength of carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichinose, Hiroyuki; Tamura, Manabu; Kanero, Takahiro; Ihara, Yoshihito

    1977-01-01

    In the steels for high temperature use, the oxidation resistance is regarded as important, but carbon steels show enough oxidation resistance to be used continuously at the temperature up to 500 deg. C if the strength is left out of consideration, and up to 450 deg. C even when the strength is taken into account. Moreover, the production is easy, the workability and weldability are good, and the price is cheap in carbon steels as compared with alloy steels. In the boilers for large thermal power stations, 0.15-0.30% C steels are used for reheater tubes, main feed water tubes, steam headers, wall water tubes, economizer tubes, bypass pipings and others, and they account for 70% of all steel materials used for the boilers of 350 MW class and 30% in 1000 MW class. The JIS standard for the carbon steels for high temperature use and the related standards in foreign countries are shown. The high temperature strength of carbon steels changes according to the trace elements, melting and heat treatment as well as the main compositions of C, Si and Mn. Al and N affect the high temperature strength largely. The characteristics of carbon steels after the heating for hours, the factors controlling the microstructure and high temperature strength, and the measures to improve the high temperature strength of carbon steels are explained. (Kako, I.)

  11. Effects of Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Low-Carbon Steel with Magnesium-Based Inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Feng, Pei-Hsien; Pan, Yan-Chi; Hwang, Weng-Sing; Su, Yen-Hao; Lu, Muh-Jung

    2016-10-01

    The effects of heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Mg-containing (7 ppm), low-carbon commercial steel (SS400) were investigated. Twenty different heat treatment paths were performed using a Gleeble 1500 thermomechanical simulator. It was observed by using an optical microscope that as the cooling rate increased and holding temperature decreased, the volume fractions of pearlite, Widmanstätten ferrite, and grain boundary allotriomorphs ferrite fell, whereas that of acicular ferrite (AF) increased. Quantifying the fractions of AF and other phases by using electron backscatter diffraction shows that the heat treatment path with a cooling rate of 20 K/s and holding temperature of 723 K (450 °C) induced the highest volume fraction (44 pct) of AF. As such, the toughness of the sample was increased 12.4 times compared with that observed in the sample containing 4 pct AF. Typical inclusions were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results showed that the magnesium-based complex inclusions could act as nucleation sites of AF. Inclusions with a size of about 5 μm can serve as heterogeneous nucleation sites for AF. Mg-containing SS400 steel also has excellent hot-ductility in the temperature range of 973 K to 1273 K (700 °C to 1000 °C), and the minimum percentage reduction in area (R.A pct) value of around 63 pct at 1073 K (800 °C).

  12. Ten days of repeated local forearm heating does not affect cutaneous vascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Michael A; Brunt, Vienna E; Jensen, Krista Nicole; Lorenzo, Santiago; Minson, Christopher T

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether 10 days of repeated local heating could induce peripheral adaptations in the cutaneous vasculature and to investigate potential mechanisms of adaptation. We also assessed maximal forearm blood flow to determine whether repeated local heating affects maximal dilator capacity. Before and after 10 days of heat training consisting of 1-h exposures of the forearm to 42°C water or 32°C water (control) in the contralateral arm (randomized and counterbalanced), we assessed hyperemia to rapid local heating of the skin ( n = 14 recreationally active young subjects). In addition, sequential doses of acetylcholine (ACh, 1 and 10 mM) were infused in a subset of subjects ( n = 7) via microdialysis to study potential nonthermal microvascular adaptations following 10 days of repeated forearm heat training. Skin blood flow was assessed using laser-Doppler flowmetry, and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as laser-Doppler red blood cell flux divided by mean arterial pressure. Maximal cutaneous vasodilation was achieved by heating the arm in a water-spray device for 45 min and assessed using venous occlusion plethysmography. Forearm vascular conductance (FVC) was calculated as forearm blood flow divided by mean arterial pressure. Repeated forearm heating did not increase plateau percent maximal CVC (CVC max ) responses to local heating (89 ± 3 vs. 89 ± 2% CVC max , P = 0.19), 1 mM ACh (43 ± 9 vs. 53 ± 7% CVC max , P = 0.76), or 10 mM ACh (61 ± 9 vs. 85 ± 7% CVC max , P = 0.37, by 2-way repeated-measures ANOVA). There was a main effect of time at 10 mM ACh ( P = 0.03). Maximal FVC remained unchanged (0.12 ± 0.02 vs. 0.14 ± 0.02 FVC, P = 0.30). No differences were observed in the control arm. Ten days of repeated forearm heating in recreationally active young adults did not improve the microvascular responsiveness to ACh or local heating. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We show for the first time that 10 days of repeated

  13. Alloying effect on the structure and properties of austenitic heat-resistant steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levitin, V.V.; Grabovskij, V.Ya.; Korostelev, V.F.; Ryvkin, Yu.A.

    1978-01-01

    Investigated have been mechanical properties at test temperatures of 20-95O deg C, wear resistance, softening at thermomechanical cycling and microstructure of cast austenitic chromium-nickel steels (13%Cr + 35%Ni), produced by electroslag remelting with variations in Ti, Mo, Nb and W contents. Regression equations for relationship of the investigated characteristics to alloying element content have been obtained. Titanium, molybdenum and niobium increasing hardness and strength limit at room and high temperatures promote a decrease in ductility. Tungsten increases strength properties, wear resistance and thermal stability of the steels without negative effect on the impact strength. The impact strength decrease with an increase in alloying is due to brittle precipitations along the boundaries of as-cast grains, containing Ti, Mo, Nb and Si

  14. Protein Molecular Structures, Protein SubFractions, and Protein Availability Affected by Heat Processing: A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, P.

    2007-01-01

    The utilization and availability of protein depended on the types of protein and their specific susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis (inhibitory activities) in the gastrointestine and was highly associated with protein molecular structures. Studying internal protein structure and protein subfraction profiles leaded to an understanding of the components that make up a whole protein. An understanding of the molecular structure of the whole protein was often vital to understanding its digestive behavior and nutritive value in animals. In this review, recently obtained information on protein molecular structural effects of heat processing was reviewed, in relation to protein characteristics affecting digestive behavior and nutrient utilization and availability. The emphasis of this review was on (1) using the newly advanced synchrotron technology (S-FTIR) as a novel approach to reveal protein molecular chemistry affected by heat processing within intact plant tissues; (2) revealing the effects of heat processing on the profile changes of protein subfractions associated with digestive behaviors and kinetics manipulated by heat processing; (3) prediction of the changes of protein availability and supply after heat processing, using the advanced DVE/OEB and NRC-2001 models, and (4) obtaining information on optimal processing conditions of protein as intestinal protein source to achieve target values for potential high net absorbable protein in the small intestine. The information described in this article may give better insight in the mechanisms involved and the intrinsic protein molecular structural changes occurring upon processing.

  15. Initial Stage of Oxidation of Iron and Steels Heated at High Temperatures Ambient

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adamaszek, K.; Kučera, Jaroslav

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2001), s. 419-423 ISSN 1335-1532. [International Symposium on Metallography /11./. Stará Lesná, 25.04.2001-27.04.2001] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/01/0379; GA ČR GA106/01/0382 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : iron * steels * oxidation Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy

  16. Effect of heat treatment and plastic deformation on the structure and the mechanical properties of nitrogen-bearing 04N9Kh2A steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinov, V. M.; Bannykh, O. A.; Lukin, E. I.; Kostina, M. V.; Blinov, E. V.

    2014-11-01

    The effect of the conditions of heat treatment and plastic deformation on the structure and the mechanical properties of low-carbon martensitic nickel steel (9 wt % Ni) with an overequilibrium nitrogen content is studied. The limiting strain to failure of 04N9Kh2A steel is found to be 40% at a rolling temperature of 20°C and 80% at a rolling temperature of 900°C. Significant strengthening of the steel (σ0.2 = 1089 MPa) is obtained after rolling at a reduction of 40% at 20°C. The start and final temperatures of the α → γ transformation on heating and those of the γ → α transformation on cooling are determined by dilatometry. The specific features of the formation of the steel structure have been revealed as functions of the annealing and tempering temperatures. Electron-microscopic studies show that, after quenching from 850°C and tempering at 600°C for 1 h, the structure contains packet martensite with thin interlayers of retained austenite between martensite crystals. The strength of the nitrogen-bearing 04N9Kh2A steel after quenching from 850 and 900°C, cooling in water, and subsequent tempering at 500°C for 1 h is significantly higher than that of carboncontaining 0H9 steel used in cryogenic engineering.

  17. The effect of double steps heat treatment on the microstructure of nanostructure bainitic medium carbon steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foughani, Milad; Kolahi, Alireza; Palizdar, Yahya

    2018-01-01

    Nowadays, Nano structure bainitic steel have attracted attention mostly because of its special mechanical properties such as high tensile strength, hardness, appropriate toughness and low manufacturing cost. The main concern for the mass production of this type of steels is prolong austempering process which increases the production costs as well as time. In this research, in order to accelerate the bainitic transformation and decrease the production time, a medium carbon steel has been prepared and two steps austempering process was employed to prevent the bainite laths thickening. The Samples were austenetized at 1000°C for 15 min and were kept in the salt bath between 1 - 12 hours at 290°C in one step and between 1 - 12 hours at the temperature range of 250°C - 300°C in two steps bainite transformation. The obtained micro structures were studied by the optical and scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and the mechanical properties were investigated by using tensile and hardness tests. The results show that the two steps austempering process and lower carbon concentration lead to lower austempering time as well as the formation of more stable retained austenite and nanostructured bainite lath which results in higher mechanical properties.

  18. Study of heat treatment parameters for large-scale hydraulic steel gate track

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-zhou Cao

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to enhance external hardness and strength, a large-scale hydraulic gate track should go through heat treatment. The current design method of hydraulic gate wheels and tracks is based on Hertz contact linear elastic theory, and does not take into account the changes in mechanical properties of materials caused by heat treatment. In this study, the heat treatment parameters were designed and analyzed according to the bearing mechanisms of the wheel and track. The quenching process of the track was simulated by the ANSYS program, and the temperature variation, residual stress, and deformation were obtained and analyzed. The metallurgical structure field after heat treatment was predicted by the method based on time-temperature-transformation (TTT curves. The results show that the analysis method and designed track heat treatment process are feasible, and can provide a reference for practical projects.

  19. Combination of helical ferritic-steel inserts and flux-tube-expansion divertor for the heat control in tokamak DEMO reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizuka, T.; Tokunaga, S.; Hoshino, K.; Shimizu, K.; Asakura, N.

    2015-01-01

    Edge localized modes (ELMs) in the H-mode operation of tokamak reactors may be suppressed/mitigated by the resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP), but RMP coils are considered incompatible with DEMO reactors under the strong neutron flux. We propose an innovative concept of the RMP without installing coils but inserting ferritic steels of the helical configuration. Helically perturbed field is naturally formed in the axisymmetric toroidal field through the helical ferritic steel inserts (FSIs). When ELMs are avoided, large stationary heat load on divertor plates can be reduced by adopting a flux-tube-expansion (FTE) divertor like an X divertor. Separatrix shape and divertor-plate inclination are similar to those of a simple long-leg divertor configuration. Combination of the helical FSIs and the FTE divertor is a suitable method for the heat control to avoid transient ELM heat pulse and to reduce stationary divertor heat load in a tokamak DEMO reactor

  20. Stress proteins in lymphocytes: Membrane stabilization does not affect the heat shock response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, C.S.; Repasky, E.A.; Subjeck, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Temperatures which have been used to induce heat shock proteins (hsps) have been at the upper physiologic limit or well above this limit. In addition, little attention has been given to the effects of physiologic heat exposures on hsp induction in lymphocytes. The author examined temperatures between 39 0 C and 41 0 C on protein synthesis in the following lymphoid cell lines and cells: BDK, EL-4, JM, DO.11, and in dispersed lymph nodes and thymic tissues. In these studies, 39.5 0 appears to be the threshold for hsp induction (as distinguished by gel electrophoresis). At this temperature the induction of the major hsps at 70 and 89 kDa are observed. Hsp 89 appears to be the most strongly induced in all cells examined. In JM cells, a human cell line, heat shock also induces hsp 68, the non-constitutive hsp at this size. These temperatures do not depress normal levels of protein synthesis. When stearic acid or cholesterol was added to lymphocyte cultures prior to heating (which stabilize membranes), hsp induction appears to occur in a manner indistinguishable from cells heated in normal media. This suggests that membrane fluidity (as influenced by these agents) does not affect or depress the heat shock response in these cells. Finally, the authors observed that 2-deoxyglucose and other inducers of glucose regulated proteins in fibroblasts also induce the major glucose regulated proteins in lymphocytes

  1. Heat-affected-zone toughness in heavy wall pipe: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyck, K.; Glover, A.G.; Varo, D.B.

    1988-02-01

    The objective of this program has been to determine the significance of low toughness regions on the service performance of heat-affected zones in heavy wall pipe materials. The low temperature HAZ toughness of welds in microalloyed and quenched and tempered materials at two heat inputs was established, a test technique to produce fatigue cracks in the HAZ was developed, and four full scale fracture tests were completed at /minus/49/degree/F. Publication available from the American Gas Association Order Processing Department, 1515 Wilson Boulevard, Arlington, Virginia 22209-2470 (703/841-8558). 17 refs. (JL)

  2. Research on Heat Source Model and Weld Profile for Fiber Laser Welding of A304 Stainless Steel Thin Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peizhi Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A heat source model is the key issue for laser welding simulation. The Gaussian heat source model is not suitable to match the actual laser weld profile accurately. Furthermore, fiber lasers are widely recognized to result in good-quality laser beam output, a narrower weld zone, less distortion, and high process efficiency, compared with other types of lasers (such as CO2, Nd : YAG, and diode lasers. At present, there are few heat source models for fiber laser welding. Most of researchers evaluate the weld profile only by the bead width and depth of penetration, which is not suitable for the laser keyhole welding nail-like profile. This paper reports an experimental study and FEA simulation of fiber laser butt welding on 1 mm thick A304 stainless steel. A new heat source model (cylindrical and cylindrical is established to match the actual weld profile using Marc and Fortran software. Four bead geometry parameters (penetration depth, bead width, waist width, and depth of the waist are used to compare between the experimental and simulation results. The results show that the heat source model of cylindrical and cylindrical can match the actual shape of the fiber laser welding feasibly. The error range of the penetration depth, bead width, waist width, and depth of the waist between experimental and simulation results is about 4.1 ± 1.6%, 2.9 ± 2.0%, 13.6 ± 7.4/%, and 18.3 ± 8.0%, respectively. In addition, it is found that the depth of penetration is more sensitive to laser power rather than bead width, waist width, and depth of the waist. Welding speed has a similar influence on the depth of penetration, weld width, waist width, and depth of the waist.

  3. Failure of Stainless Steel Welds Due to Microstructural Damage Prevented by In Situ Metallography

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez,Juan Manuel Salgado; Alvarado,María Inés; Hernandez,Hector Vergara; Quiroz,José Trinidad Perez; Olmos,Luis

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In stainless steels, microstructural damage is caused by precipitation of chromium carbides or sigma phase. These microconstituents are detrimental in stainless steel welds because they lead to weld decay. Nevertheless, they are prone to appear in the heat affected zone (HAZ) microstructure of stainless steel welds. This is particularly important for repairs of industrial components made of austenitic stainless steel. Non-destructive metallography can be applied in welding repairs of...

  4. Tribological changes on SS304 stainless steel induced by nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation with and without auxiliary heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello, C.B.; Ueda, M.; Lepienski, C.M.; Reuther, H.

    2009-01-01

    In order to achieve quite thick treated layers with reasonable thickness uniformity in SS304 steel, the plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) process was run in high-temperature, up to 350 deg. C, to induce high thermal diffusion but avoid the white layer formation. In these experiments, we heated the sample-holder with a shielded resistive wire properly wound around it and subjected the SS samples to nitrogen glow discharge PIII with relatively low voltages (10 kV) in different temperatures. We also treated the SS samples by the traditional PIII method, slowly increasing the high voltage pulse intensities, until 14 kV at the end of processing, reaching temperatures of up to 350 deg. C. These modes of treatments were compared with respect to nitrogen implantation profiles, X-ray diffraction, tribology and mechanical properties. X-ray diffraction results indicated a much higher efficiency of auxiliary heated PIII mode compared to the ordinary PIII. Very prominent γ N peaks were observed for the first mode, indicating large concentration of nitrogen in thick layers, confirmed by the nitrogen profiles measured by GDOS and AES. Improved mechanical and tribological properties were obtained for SS304 samples treated by the PIII with auxiliary heating, more than for ordinary PIII. Hardness was enhanced by up to 2.77 times, as seen by nanoindentation tests.

  5. Dry sliding wear behaviour of heat treated iron based powder metallurgy steels with 0.3% Graphite + 2% Ni additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tekeli, S.; Gueral, A.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the effect of various heat treatments on the microstructure and dry sliding wear behaviour of iron based powder metallurgy (PM) steels, atomized iron powder was mixed with 0.3% graphite + 2% Ni. The mixed powders were cold pressed at 700 MPa and sintered at 1200 deg. C for 30 min under pure Ar gas atmosphere. One of the sintered specimens was quenched from 890 deg. C and then tempered at 200 deg. C for 1 h. The other sintered specimens were annealed at different intercritical heat treatment temperatures of 728 and 790 deg. C and water quenched. Through this intercritical annealing heat treatment, the specimens with various ferrite + martensite volume fractions were produced. Wear tests were carried out on the quenched + tempered and intercritically annealed specimens under dry sliding conditions using a pin-on-disk type machine at constant load and speed and the results were compared in terms of microstructure, hardness and wear strength. It was seen that hardness and wear strength in intercritically annealed specimens were higher than that of quenched + tempered specimen

  6. Creep-fatigue life prediction for different heats of Type 304 stainless steel by linear-damage rule, strain-range partitioning method, and damage-rate approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiya, P.S.

    1978-07-01

    The creep-fatigue life results for five different heats of Type 304 stainless steel at 593 0 C (1100 0 F), generated under push-pull conditions in the axial strain-control mode, are presented. The life predictions for the various heats based on the linear-damage rule, strain-range partitioning method, and damage-rate approach are discussed. The appropriate material properties required for computation of fatigue life are also included

  7. Submerged Arc Stainless Steel Strip Cladding—Effect of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on Thermal Fatigue Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, I. C.; Chou, C. P.; Tseng, C. F.; Lee, I. K.

    2009-03-01

    Two types of martensitic stainless steel strips, PFB-132 and PFB-131S, were deposited on SS41 carbon steel substrate by a three-pass submerged arc cladding process. The effects of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) on thermal fatigue resistance and hardness were evaluated by thermal fatigue and hardness testing, respectively. The weld metal microstructure was investigated by utilizing optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results showed that, by increasing the PWHT temperature, hardness decreased but there was a simultaneous improvement in weldment thermal fatigue resistance. During tempering, carbide, such as (Fe, Cr)23C6, precipitated in the weld metals and molybdenum appeared to promote (Fe, Cr, Mo)23C6 formation. The precipitates of (Fe, Cr, Mo)23C6 revealed a face-centered cubic (FCC) structure with fine grains distributed in the microstructure, thereby effectively increasing thermal fatigue resistance. However, by adding nickel, the AC1 temperature decreased, causing a negative effect on thermal fatigue resistance.

  8. Effect of heat treatment and cleanness of ultra low carbon bainitic (ULCB) steel on its impact toughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lis, A.K.

    1998-01-01

    The small variations in sulphur and carbon concentrations can have a major influence on the impact transition temperature (ITT) of ultra low carbon HSLA-100 steel which has been quenched in water and tempered (WQ and T). Since the average carbon concentration is very low thus sensitivity of ITT to heat treatment parameters depends also on the yield strength increase due to precipitation effect of ε C u phase. The regression analysis has been used to establish equations taking into account those parameters. The properties of a mixed microstructure formed from partially austenitic regions have been also considered. The fine austenitic grains transform into more desirable fine bainitic ferrite phases with lower hardness values and higher toughness. On the other hand, if cooling rate is sufficiently large, then the carbon enriched austenite transforms partially into hard martensite and some of remaining untransformed austenite being retained to ambient temperature. Because hard martensite islands are located in much softer surroundings consisting of tempered ferrite, they do not cause a general reduction in impact toughness tests. Due to further grain refinement of microstructure the measured toughness on Charpy V specimens can be very high at low temperatures. The very detrimental effect of sulphur in ULCB steel has been confirmed by presented results. (author)

  9. Influence of cerium, zirconium and boron on the oxidation resistance of heat-resistant steels in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gala, A.; Schendler, W.

    1981-01-01

    Isothermal and cyclic oxidation experiments were carried out in air to investigate the influence of the minor elements such as Cerium, Zirkonium and Boron on the oxidation resistance of heat resistant ferritic and austenitic steels like X10Cr18, X10CrAl18 and X15CrNiSi2012. In the case of cyclicexperiments samples were exposed at constant temperatures for 100 h and then cooled to R.T. This cycle was repeated 10 times. The corrosion was determined as weight change and was continuously measured by a thermo-balance. The distribution of the alloying elements on the phase boundary scale/steel was examined by Scanning-Electron-Microscope. Addition of small amounts of Ce (0.3 wt-% max.) could reduce the oxidation rate in the case of isothermal and cyclic conditions. Zirkonium concentrations below 0.1 wt-% could have a beneficial effect, but at higher concentrations the oxidation rate increases with increasing amounts of Zr. Small Boron concentrations of 0.02 wt-% lead to catastrophic oxidation at temperatures above 1000 0 C. (orig.) [de

  10. New developments in the fabrication of fine-grained structural steels; practical applications in welding engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uwer, D.

    1986-01-01

    The paper briefly demonstrates the development of weldable construction steels in the FRG exemplified by the development of steel grade St 37 to StE 960. Improvements of steel quality, especially weldability, is expected from the ladle metallurgy process, thermomechanical rolling, intensive cooling after rolling and direct annealing by using rolling heat. Positive effects were achieved above all in lamellar tearing strength, cold cracking behaviour and in the heat-affected zone. (DG) [de

  11. First results of saturation curve measurements of heat-resistant steel using GEANT4 and MCNP5 codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang, Duc-Tam; Tran, Thien-Thanh; Le, Bao-Tran; Vo, Hoang-Nguyen; Chau, Van-Tao; Tran, Kim-Tuyet; Huynh, Dinh-Chuong

    2015-01-01

    A gamma backscattering technique is applied to calculate the saturation curve and the effective mass attenuation coefficient of material. A NaI(Tl) detector collimated by collimator of large diameter is modeled by Monte Carlo technique using both MCNP5 and GEANT4 codes. The result shows a good agreement in response function of the scattering spectra for the two codes. Based on such spectra, the saturation curve of heat-resistant steel is determined. The results represent a strong confirmation that it is appropriate to use the detector collimator of large diameter to obtain the scattering spectra and this work is also the basis of experimental set-up for determining the thickness of material. (author)

  12. Mechanical Properties Analysis of 4340 Steel Specimen Heat Treated in Oven and Quenching in Three Different Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakir, Rachid; Barka, Noureddine; Brousseau, Jean

    2018-03-01

    This paper proposes a statistical approach to analyze the mechanical properties of a standard test specimen, of cylindrical geometry and in steel 4340, with a diameter of 6 mm, heat-treated and quenched in three different fluids. Samples were evaluated in standard tensile test to access their characteristic quantities: hardness, modulus of elasticity, yield strength, tensile strength and ultimate deformation. The proposed approach is gradually being built (a) by a presentation of the experimental device, (b) a presentation of the experimental plan and the results of the mechanical tests, (c) anova analysis of variance and a representation of the output responses using the RSM response surface method, and (d) an analysis of the results and discussion. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed approach leads to a precise and reliable model capable of predicting the variation of mechanical properties, depending on the tempering temperature, the tempering time and the cooling capacity of the quenching medium.

  13. Optimized chemical composition, working and heat treatment condition for resistance to irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking of cold worked 316 and high-chromium austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, Toshio; Iwamura, Toshihiko; Fujimoto, Koji; Ajiki, Kazuhide

    2000-01-01

    The authors have reported that the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in baffle former bolts made of austenitic stainless steels for PWR after long-term operation is caused by irradiation-induced grain boundary segregation. The resistance to PWSCC of simulated austenitic stainless steels whose chemical compositions are simulated to the grain boundary chemical composition of 316 stainless steel after irradiation increased with decrease of the silicon content, increases of the chromium content, and precipitation of M 23 C 6 carbides at the grain boundaries. In order to develop resistance to irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in austenitic stainless steels, optimized chemical compositions and heat treatment conditions for 316CW and high-chromium austenitic stainless steels for PWR baffle former bolts were investigated. For 316CW stainless steel, ultra-low-impurities and high-chromium content are beneficial. About 20% cold working before aging and after solution treatment has also been recommended to recover sensitization and make M 23 C 6 carbides coherent with the matrix at the grain boundaries. Heating at 700 to 725degC for 20 to 50 h was selected as a suitable aging procedure. Cold working of 5 to 10% after aging produced the required mechanical properties. The optimized composition of the high-chromium austenitic stainless steel contents 30% chromium, 30% nickel, and ultra-low impurity levels. This composition also reduces the difference between its thermal expansion coefficient and that of 304 stainless steel for baffle plates. Aging at 700 to 725degC for longer than 40 h and cold working of 10 to 15% after aging were selected to meet mechanical property specifications. (author)

  14. Effect of post-weld heat treatment and electrolytic plasma processing on tungsten inert gas welded AISI 4140 alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewan, Mohammad W.; Liang, Jiandong; Wahab, M.A.; Okeil, Ayman M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The effects of PWHT and EPP were explored on TIG welded AISI4140 alloy steel. • All welded samples were checked with PAUT and ensured defect-free before testing. • Residual stresses, hardness, and tensile properties were measured experimentally. • PWHT resulted higher ductility but lower tensile strength for grain refinement. • EPP-treated samples showed higher tensile strength but lower ductility. - Abstract: Post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) is commonly adopted on welded joints and structures to relieve post-weld residual stresses; and restore the mechanical properties and structural integrity. An electrolytic plasma process (EPP) has been developed to improve corrosion behavior and wear resistance of structural materials; and can be employed in other applications and surface modifications aspects. In this study the effects of PWHT and EPP on the residual stresses, micro-hardness, microstructures, and uniaxial tensile properties are explored on tungsten inert gas (TIG) welded AISI-4140 alloys steel with SAE-4130 chromium–molybdenum alloy welding filler rod. For rational comparison all of the welded samples are checked with nondestructive Phased Array Ultrasonic Testing (PAUT) and to ensure defect-free samples before testing. Residual stresses are assessed with ultrasonic testing at different distances from weld center line. PWHT resulted in relief of tensile residual stress due to grain refinement. As a consequence higher ductility but lower strength existed in PWHT samples. In comparison, EPP-treated samples revealed lower residual stresses, but no significant variation on the grain refinement. Consequently, EPP-treated specimens exhibited higher tensile strength but lower ductility and toughness for the martensitic formation due to the rapid heating and quenching effects. EPP was also applied on PWHT samples, but which did not reveal any substantial effect on the tensile properties after PWHT at 650 °C. Finally the microstructures and

  15. One-stage or multi-stage creep fatigue behaviour of heat-resistant steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloos, K.H.; Granacher, J.; Scholz, A.

    1994-01-01

    For one stage realistic long term alternating strain tests on two forged steels with the duration of tests up to an order of magnitude of 45,000 hours, the generalised damage accumulation rule, using an optimised evaluation process dealing with pre-stress effects leads to a relative creep fatigue service life of one. A replacement description by the modified service life share rule is indicated for the long term area. First results from realistic three step tests are classified in the scatter band of single stage stress, where there are only slight differences from different cycle counting processes. (orig.) [de

  16. Microstructural characterization of IF steel after severe plastic deformation via ARB and subsequent heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, F.C.; Abrantes, A.L.A.; Lins, J.F.C.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the microstructural evolution of a titanium stabilized IF steel deformed to warm through the ARB process for 5 consecutive cycles and then annealing at 600 deg C for 1 h. The material was characterized with the aid of the techniques of scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction (Electron Backscatter Diffraction - EBSD). An intense process of microstructural refinement was observed in the deformed material and the phenomenon of dynamic recovery was predominant. It can be concluded that the annealing of severely deformed material was not sufficient for a complete recrystallization of the microstructure. (author)

  17. [Affect regularity of medicinal species and heating time on flavonoids contents in Epimedium cut crude drug].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, E; Chen, Ling-ling; Jia, Xiao-bin; Qian, Qian; Cui, Li

    2012-09-01

    To study the affect regularity of medicinal species and heating time on flavonoids contents in Epimedium cut crude drug. Setting processing temperature at 170 degrees C, 39 batches Epimedium cut crude drug of different species were heated for 0, 5, 10 minutes. The contents of epimedin A, B, C, icariin, Baohuoside I in different species of Epimedium were determined by HPLC. The variance analysis was used to study the effect of medicinal species and heating time on the contents change of five major flavonoids. The contents of Epimedin A, B, C were significantly impacted by medicinal species (P time (P time and species (P > 0.05). The medicinal species and heat processed time are two important influence factors on the flavonoids contents in Epimedium. The contents of Epimedin A, C are abundant in Epimedium pubescens, and the contents of Epimedin B, Baohuoside I are higher in Epimedium brevicornu. After heating, the contents of Epimedin A, B, C are decreased, and icariin, Baohuoside I are increased. This study provides scientific evidences for variety certification, optimizing processing technology, exploring processing mechanism and clinical rational administration.

  18. Time-temperature characteristics of the various heat-affected zones in HT-9 weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foulds, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    Temperatures at different distances from the fusion boundary were measured during GTA weld depositing MTS-4 filler wire on 9.52-mm (3/8 in.) thick HT-9 plate. Peak temperature measurements indicate each of the heat-affected regions to be austenitized. An exponential expression has been used to describe the cooling curves as a function of peak temperature (or distance) from the fusion boundary

  19. Thermal and microstructural modelling in weld heat-affected zones: microstructural development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribera, J.M.; Prado, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    After having analysed in Part 2 of this work the thermal effects caused by a welding process, a metallurgical model which uses those results is proposed to predict the hardness and the microstructure resulting in weld heat affected zones. This model simulates the decomposition of austenite to its various products: martensite, bainite, pearlite and ferrite. Thus, it allows one to optimize welding process parameters to achieve the best microstructure possible. (Author) 5 refs

  20. Changes in the state of heat-resistant steel induced by repeated hot deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubimova, Lyudmila L.; Fisenko, Roman N.; Tashlykov, Alexander A.; Tabakaev, Roman B.

    2018-01-01

    This work deals with the problems of structural regeneration by thermal restoration treatment (TRT). These include the lack of a structural sign showing that TRT is possible, a consensus on TRT modes, the data on the necessary relaxation depth of residual stresses, or criteria of structural restoration. Performing a TRT without solving these problems may deteriorate the properties of steel or even accelerate its destruction. With this in view, the purpose of this work is to determine experimentally how the residual stress state changes under thermal and mechanical loads in order to specify the signs of the restoration of structure and structural stability. The object of this research is unused 12Cr1MoV steel that has been aged naturally for 13 years. Using X-ray dosimetry with X-ray spectral analysis, we study the distribution of internal residual stresses of the first kind during the repeated hot deformation. After repeated thermal deformation, the sample under study transforms from a viscoelastic Maxwell material into a Kelvin-Voigt material, which facilitates structural stabilization. A sign of this is the relaxation limit increase, prevention of continuous decay of an α-solid solution of iron and restoration of the lattice parameter.

  1. Effects of Induction Heat Bending and Heat Treatment on the Boric Acid Corrosion of Low Alloy Steel Pipe for Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki-Tae; Kim, Young-Sik [Andong National University, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hyun-Young; Park, Heung-Bae [KEPCO EandC, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Gi-Ho; Shin, Min-Chul [Sungil SIM Co. Ltd, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    In many plants, including nuclear power plants, pipelines are composed of numerous fittings such as elbows. When plants use these fittings, welding points need to be increased, and the number of inspections also then increases. As an alternative to welding, the pipe bending process forms bent pipe by applying strain at low or high temperatures. This work investigates how heat treatment affects on the boric acid corrosion of ASME SA335 Gr. P22 caused by the induction heat bending process. Microstructure analysis and immersion corrosion tests were performed. It was shown that every area of the induction heat bent pipe exhibited a high corrosion rate in the boric acid corrosion test. This behavior was due to the enrichment of phosphorous in the ferrite phase, which occurred during the induction heat bending process. This caused the ferrite phase to act as a corrosion initiation site. However, when re-heat treatment was applied after the bending process, it enhanced corrosion resistance. It was proved that this resistance was closely related to the degree of the phosphorus segregation in the ferrite phase.

  2. Effect of heat treatments and minor elements on caustic stress corrosion cracking of type 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Kazuo; Kowaka, Masamichi

    1983-01-01

    The effect of heat treatments and minor elements (C, S, P, N) on caustic stress corrosion cracking of Type 304 stainless steel in boiling 34% NaOH solution at 393 K was studied. The results obtained as follows: (1) Susceptibility to IGSCC (intergranular stress corrosion cracking) in NaOH solution was increased with the intergranular precipitation of chromium carbides by the sensitizing heat treatments, but was not completely consistent with the susceptibility to IGC (intergranular corrosion) by Strauss test in H 2 SO 4 + CuSO 4 solution. (2) SCC in NaOH solution took place in three potential ranges of about -100 to +150 mV (vs SCE), -600 to -300 mV and -1100 to -900 mV. Transglanular cracking predominantly occurred in the first region and intergranular cracking occurred in the latter two regions. IGC occurred in the potential range of about -400 to 0 mV. No IGC was observed at corrosion potential. (3) Among minor elements carbon and sulfur had a detrimental effect on SCC, but no effect of phosphorus and nitrogen was almost observed on SCC in NaOH solution. (author)

  3. Theoretical and experimental study of the rule for heat transfer coefficient in hot stamping of high strength steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Xianhong; Hao, Xin; Yang, Kun; Zhong, Yaoyao

    2013-01-01

    Heat transfer is a crucial aspect for hot stamping process, the fully austenitized boron steel blank with temperature about 900°C is transferred to the tool, then formed rapidly and quenched in the cooled tool. The desired fully martensitic transformation will happen only if the cooling rate exceeds a critical value approximately 27 K/s. During such process, the heat transfer coefficient (abbreviated as HTC) between the tool and blank plays a decisive role for the variation of the blank temperature. In this work, a theoretical formula based on the joint-roughness model is presented to describe the law of HTC, which relies on the roughness, hardness, and other material parameters of the tool and blank. Moreover, a non-contact temperature measuring system based on the infrared thermal camera is built to catch the temperature change course, and then the HTC value is derived through the inverse analysis. Based on the theoretical and experimental results, the change rule of HTC especially its dependence on the process pressure will be discussed in detail

  4. Effect of Heat Treatment on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Laser Additively Manufactured AISI H13 Tool Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, ChangJun; Yan, Kai; Qin, Lanlan; Zhang, Min; Wang, Xiaonan; Zou, Tao; Hu, Zengrong

    2017-11-01

    The effect of heat treatment on microstructure and mechanical properties (microhardness, wear resistance and impact toughness) of laser additively manufactured AISI H13 tool steel was systemically investigated. To understand the variation of microstructure and mechanical properties under different heat treatments, the as-deposited samples were treated at 350, 450, 550, 600 and 650 °C/2 h, respectively. Microstructure and phase transformation were investigated through optical microscopy, scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope. The mechanical properties were characterized by nanoindentation tests, Charpy tests and high-temperature wear tests. The microstructure of as-deposited samples consisted of martensite, ultrafine carbides and retained austenite. After the tempering treatment, the martensite was converted into tempered martensite and some fine alloy carbides which precipitated in the matrix. When treated at 550 °C, the greatest hardness and nanohardness were 600 HV0.3 and 6119.4 MPa due to many needle-like carbides precipitation. The value of hardness increased firstly and then decreased when increasing the temperature. When tempered temperatures exceeded 550 °C, the carbides became coarse, and martensitic matrix recrystallized at the temperature of 650 °C. The least impact energy was 6.0 J at a temperature of 550 °C. Samples tempered at 550 °C had larger wear volume loss than that of others. Wear resistances of all samples under atmospheric condition at 400 °C showed an oxidation mechanism.

  5. Thermal transport properties of helium, helium--air mixtures, water, and tubing steel used in the CACHE program to compute HTGR auxiliary heat exchanger performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallackson, J.R.

    1976-02-01

    A description is presented of the thermal transport properties of the materials involved in digital computer calculations of heat transfer rates by the core auxiliary heat exchangers in large HTGR nuclear steam supply systems. These materials are pure helium, mixtures of helium with common gases having molecular weights in the range of 28 to 32, alloy steel tubing, and water. For use in programmed computations the viscosity, thermal conductivity, and specific heat are represented primarily by equations augmented by curves and tabulations. Materials supporting the development and selection of the property equations are included

  6. Failures by stress corrosion of electrical heating accessories, instrument leads and thermoelements of chromium nickel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, M.

    1982-01-01

    Measurement and control devices are being increasingly used for process control, monitoring and the safety of chemical plants. Pressure, temperature, through-put, moisture, composition and the like are continuously measured at many positions of the system. The supervision of the measuring equipment and hence the necessary exchanging ability of the devices during operation means good access to the plant. An extensive system of pipelines between the measuring equipment and the product lines to be supervised is the result. Common austenite 18 10 CrNi steel pipes of 12 mm diameter and 1 mm wall thickness are used for assembling and corrosion reasons in these pulse instrument leads. The failure of several instrument leads in a large scale plant at the beginning of the frost period interfers with the control. It was therefore necessary to find the exact cause; this is described in the present work. (orig.) [de

  7. Different types of stainless steel used in equipment in meat plants do not affect the initial microbial transfer, including pathogens, from pork skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larivière-Gauthier, Guillaume; Quessy, Sylvain; Fournaise, Sylvain; Letellier, Ann; Fravalo, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    This study describes and measures the impact of different compositions and finishes of stainless steel used in equipment in the meat industry on the transfer of natural flora and selected pathogens from artificially contaminated pork skin. It is known that the adhesion to surfaces of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella, 2 pathogens frequently found in contaminated pork meat, depends on the nature and roughness of the surface. Our results show no statistically significant differences in microbial transfer regardless of the types of stainless steel considered, with the highest measured transfer difference being 0.18 log colony-forming units (CFUs)/800 cm(2). Moreover, no differences in total microbial community were observed after transfer on the 5 types of stainless steel using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). It was concluded that the different characteristics of the stainless steel tested did not affect the initial bacterial transfer in this study.

  8. Experimental determination of heat transfer coefficients in roll bite and air cooling for computer simulations of 1100 MPa carbon steel rolling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinonen, Olli; Ilmola, Joonas; Seppälä, Oskari; Pohjonen, Aarne; Paavola, Jussi; Koskenniska, Sami; Larkiola, Jari

    2018-05-01

    In modeling of hot rolling pass schedules the heat transfer phenomena have to be known. Radiation to ambient, between rolls and a steel slab as well as heat transfer in contacts must be considered to achieve accurate temperature distribution and thereby accurate material behavior in simulations. Additional heat is generated by friction between the slab and the work roll and by plastic deformation. These phenomena must be taken into account when the effective heat transfer coefficient is determined from experimental data. In this paper we determine the effective heat transfer coefficient at the contact interface and emissivity factor of slab surface for 1100MPa strength carbon steel for hot rolling simulations. Experimental pilot rolling test were carried out and slab temperatures gathered right below the interface and at the mid thickness of the slab. Emissivity factor tests were carried out in the same manner but without rolling. Experimental data is utilized to derive contact heat transfer coefficient at the interface and emissivity factor of slab surface. Pilot rolling test is reproduced in FE-analysis to further refine the heat transfer coefficient and emissivity factor. Material mechanical properties at rolling temperatures were determined by Gleeble™ thermo-mechanical simulator and IDS thermodynamic-kinetic-empirical software.

  9. Properties of simulated welded joints of Cr-Mo steel following heat treatment in intercritical temperature range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabun, L.B.; Vornovitskij, I.N.; Lukicheva, S.V.; Melamed, S.Eh.

    1975-01-01

    The parameters are determined of the welded joints heat treatment which permit to shorten the holp-up period due to the accelerating the process of the weld-stress release and the diffusion of carbon and alloying elements resulting in the equilibration of the weld metal chemical composition. The properties of an imitated welded joint of the 15KHM steel have been studied after various modes of heat treatment. The critical points are 740 and 875 deg C. The mechanical properties determination and the study of the strain hardening process are carried out with a high-temperature metallography plant. The modes of a low-temperature tempering and incomplete annealing are investigated within an intercritical range at temperatures of 750 to 780 deg C and a hold-up periods of to five minutes with a consecutive cooling in air or with the furnace respectively. The results of the studies have shown that with the decrease in the heat treatment temperature the strength, plasticity and also hardness of the welded joint zones prove to be to the standard of a sample treated conforming to the high tempering mode. In case of an incomplete annealing (770 to 780 deg C) the strength of the welded joint is maintained to the standard of the strength obtained at the high tempering, and the relative elongation value increases considerably at all the hold-up periods investigated. The strain-hardening process for the low-temperature normalizing and high tempering proceeds approximately equally. The fracture occurs at the deformation of 30 to 35% in microvolume, the relative elongation in that case being 12 to 13%

  10. Microstructural Characterization of Thermomechanical and Heat-Affected Zones of an Inertia Friction Welded Astroloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluwasegun, K. M.; Olawale, J. O.; Ige, O. O.; Shittu, M. D.; Adeleke, A. A.; Malomo, B. O.

    2014-08-01

    The behaviour of γ' phase to thermal and mechanical effects during rapid heating of Astroloy, a powder metallurgy nickel-based superalloy has been investigated. The thermo-mechanical-affected zone (TMAZ) and heat-affected zone (HAZ) microstructures of an inertia friction welded (IFW) Astroloy were simulated using a Gleeble thermo-mechanical simulation system. Detailed microstructural examination of the simulated TMAZ and HAZ and those present in actual IFW specimens showed that γ' particles persisted during rapid heating up to a temperature where the formation of liquid is thermodynamically favored and subsequently re-solidified eutectically. The result obtained showed that forging during the thermo-mechanical simulation significantly enhanced resistance to weld liquation cracking of the alloy. This is attributable to strain-induced rapid isothermal dissolution of the constitutional liquation products within 150 μm from the center of the forged sample. This was not observed in purely thermally simulated samples. The microstructure within the TMAZ of the as-welded alloy is similar to the microstructure in the forged Gleeble specimens.

  11. Certain peculiarities of structural inheritance in phase recrystallization of steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhamedov, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    The structural inheritance in phase recrystallization of previously overheated to various temperatures industrially melted 40Kh steel and of Armco-iron has been investigated. The steels have been heated to 100O, 11O0, 1200 and 1260 deg C and cooled in the air, and in some instances, hardened (quenched) in water. The physical broadening of X-ray lines points to a nonmonotonous variation of fine structure parameters as a function of the temperature and the heating time. The inheritance effect of fine structure defects affects the steel properties obtained in a final heat treatment. The structural inheritance effect has an important bearing upon the wear resistance of steel. A purpose-oriented use of the structural inheritance effect can enhance service properties of steel parts

  12. Analysis of the influence of the multipass welding, welding preheat and welding post heat treatments on the behaviour of GMAW joints of HARDOX 400 microalloyed steel; Influencia de la tecnica de soldaduramultipasada y de los tratamientos termicos de precalentamiento y post-soldadura en el comportamiento de uniones GMAW de un acero microaleado HARDOX 400

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, A.; Miguel, V.; Coello, J.; Navarro, A.; Calatayud, A.; Manjabacas, M. C.

    2011-07-01

    The microalloyed steels may be supplied in a hardened state. In these cases, the weldability can be improved by pre-heat and/or post-heat welding treatments. In this paper, the effect of those treatments and the influence of multipass welding on GMAW joints behavior are analyzed for a Hardox 400 microalloyed steel. The microstructure evaluation of the different heat affected zones of the steel has been made and the mechanical properties of those zones are obtained for different conditions as it has been mentioned. The obtained results indicate that preheating the steel leads to a beneficial action that consists on the distance increasing from the bead to the zone in which the hardness is lowest. The post heat treatment strengthens that zone and improves the joint plasticity. This benefit is higher if the joint has been made with preheating. Multipass welding has not been found to have any advantage if it is compared to a single welding pass. (Author) 18 refs.

  13. The Effects of One and Double Heat Treatment Cycles on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of a Ferritic-Bainitic Dual Phase Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piri, Reza; Ghasemi, Behrooz; Yousefpour, Mardali

    2018-03-01

    In this study, samples with ferritic-bainitic dual phase structures consisting of 62 pct bainite were obtained from the AISI 4140 steel by applying one and double heat treatment cycles. Microstructural investigations by electron and optical microscopy indicated that the sample heat treated through double cycle benefited from finer ferrite and bainite grains. Additionally, results obtained from mechanical tests implied that the double-cycle heat-treated sample not only has a higher tensile strength as well as ultimate strength but also benefits from a higher ductility along with a higher impact energy than the one-cycle heat-treated sample. Moreover, fractography results showed that the type of fracture in both samples is a combination of the brittle and the ductile fracture. Besides, the ratio of the ductile fracture is higher for the double-cycle heat-treated sample than for the one-cycle sample, due to the lower aggregation of sulfur at grain boundaries.

  14. Thermally activated formation of martensite in Fe-C alloys and Fe-17%Cr-C stainless steels during heating from boiling nitrogen temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2016-01-01

    The thermally activated austenite-to-martensite transformation was investigated by magnetometry in three Fe-C alloys and in two 17%Cr stainless steels. After quenching to room temperature, samples were immersed in boiling nitrogen and martensite formation was followed during subsequent (re......)heating to room temperature. Different tests were performed applying heating rates from 0.5 K/min to 10 K/min. An additional test consisted in fast (re)heating the samples by immersion in water. Thermally activated martensite formation was demonstrated for all investigated materials by a heating rate......-dependent transformation curve. Moreover, magnetometry showed that the heating rate had an influence on the fraction of martensite formed during sub-zero Celsius treatment. The activation energy for thermally activated martensite formation was quantified in the range 11‒21 kJ/mol by a Kissinger-like method....

  15. Residual stress measurement in worked and heat treated steel by X-ray diffractometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, V.K.; Godaba, V.S.

    2008-01-01

    Investigations were made for residual stress measurement by X-ray diffractometry in the 1.14% C, 0.46% Mn, 0.16% Si, 0.11% S and 0.04% P steel samples subjected to inhomogeneous plastic deformation (cold upsetting in the range 7.7-21%), thermal gradient (quenching from 630 deg. C) and phase transformation (quenching from 850 deg. C), respectively. The results indicated that compressive residual stress at the surface increased in the samples with increasing deformation acquiring values in the range, -269.5 MPa to -374.7 MPa. In the samples quenched from 630 deg. C, the thermal stresses acquired increasing values in the range -83.9 MPa (compressive) to -188.1 MPa (compressive) with increased cooling rate. In the samples quenched from 850 deg. C, volume increase on account of austenite to martensite phase transformation ultimately dominated the thermal contraction resulting in residual stress at the surface from -329.3 MPa (compressive) to +61.7 MPa (tensile)

  16. Impingement heat flux by dispersed molten metal fuel on a horizontal stainless steel structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabor, J.D.; Purviance, R.T.; Aeschlimann, R.W.; Spencer, B.W.

    1989-01-01

    Although the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) possesses inherent safety features, an assessment of the consequences of melting of the metal fuel is necessary for risk analysis. As part of this effort an experimental study was conducted to determine the depths of sodium at 600 C required for pour streams of various molten uranium alloys (U, U-5 wt % Zr, U-10 wt % Zr, and U-10 wt % Fe) to break up and solidify. The quenched particulate material, which was in the shape of filaments and sheets, formed coolable beds because of the high void-age (∼0.9) and large particle size (∼10 mm). In a test with a 0.15-m sodium depth, the fragments from a pure uranium pour stream did not completely solidify but formed an agglomerated mass which did not fuse to the base plate. However, the agglomerated fragments of U-10 wt % Fe eutectic fused to the stainless steel base plate. An analysis of the temperature response of a 25-mm thick base plate was made by volume averaging the properties of the sodium and metal phases and assuming two semi-infinite solids coming into contact. Good agreement was obtained with the data during the initial 5 to 10 s of the contact period. 16 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  17. The Effects of Shielded Metal Arc Welding (Smaw) Welding On The Mechanical Characteristics With Heating Treatment inn S45c Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munawar; Abbas, Hammada; Yusran Aminy, Ahmad

    2018-02-01

    Steel material has been used mainly for making tooling, automotive components, other household needs, power generators to frame buildings and bridges. This study aimed (1) to analyze the mechanical Characteristics of S45C steel with and without heating treatments, and (2) to analyze the temperature of heating treatment which could result in the maximal strength of S45C steel after the welding process. The research was conducted in the laboratory of mechanical engineering study program, Departement of mechanical Engineering, Christian university of indonesia paulus, makassar. The method used materials, instruments, and the dimensions determination of specimen based on the proposed testing standard, Next, was to determine the mechanical caracteristics of the S45C steel wich had been welded and heated.The tensile specimens, the hardness specimen, the impact specimen, and microstructures of which,each of the 3 specimens was the specimens was the specimen without treatment, the spesimen with the welding wthout heating and the specimen of 150°C, 250° C, 300° C. The research results indicated that the treatment process of 150°C, 250°C and 300°C produced the changes of mechanic charateristics with the tensile strength of 42 kgf/mm2 when the temperature had reached 300°C, but at the temperature 300°C, the its toughness would decrease to Hi = 0.836 j/m2 and its hardness would increase to 40.83 at the temperature of 300°C. The value of the maximum strengs was reached at the heating temperature of 300°C for the tensile strength and the hardness, while at the temperature of 300°C its impact value would decrease.

  18. Influence of Tool Rotational Speed and Post-Weld Heat Treatments on Friction Stir Welded Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manugula, Vijaya L.; Rajulapati, Koteswararao V.; Reddy, G. Madhusudhan; Mythili, R.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.

    2017-08-01

    The effects of tool rotational speed (200 and 700 rpm) on evolving microstructure during friction stir welding (FSW) of a reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel (RAFMS) in the stir zone (SZ), thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ), and heat-affected zone (HAZ) have been explored in detail. The influence of post-weld direct tempering (PWDT: 1033 K (760 °C)/ 90 minutes + air cooling) and post-weld normalizing and tempering (PWNT: 1253 K (980 °C)/30 minutes + air cooling + tempering 1033 K (760 °C)/90 minutes + air cooling) treatments on microstructure and mechanical properties has also been assessed. The base metal (BM) microstructure was tempered martensite comprising Cr-rich M23C6 on prior austenite grain and lath boundaries with intra-lath precipitation of V- and Ta-rich MC precipitates. The tool rotational speed exerted profound influence on evolving microstructure in SZ, TMAZ, and HAZ in the as-welded and post-weld heat-treated states. Very high proportion of prior austenitic grains and martensite lath boundaries in SZ and TMAZ in the as-welded state showed lack of strengthening precipitates, though very high hardness was recorded in SZ irrespective of the tool speed. Very fine-needle-like Fe3C precipitates were found at both the rotational speeds in SZ. The Fe3C was dissolved and fresh precipitation of strengthening precipitates occurred on both prior austenite grain and sub-grain boundaries in SZ during PWNT and PWDT. The post-weld direct tempering caused coarsening and coalescence of strengthening precipitates, in both matrix and grain boundary regions of TMAZ and HAZ, which led to inhomogeneous distribution of hardness across the weld joint. The PWNT heat treatment has shown fresh precipitation of M23C6 on lath and grain boundaries and very fine V-rich MC precipitates in the intragranular regions, which is very much similar to that prevailed in BM prior to FSW. Both the PWDT and PWNT treatments caused considerable reduction in the hardness of SZ

  19. Evaluation of rolling contact fatigue of induction heated 13Cr-2Ni-2Mo Stainless steel bar with Si3N4-ball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadoiwa, Ariyasu; Mizobe, Koshiro; Kida, Katsuyuki

    2018-03-01

    13Cr % martensitic stainless steels were used in various industry, because they have excellent corrosion resistance and high hardness among other stainless steels. They are also expected as a bearing material, however, the research on rolling contact fatigue (RCF) is not enough. In this study, 13Cr-2Ni-2Mo stainless steels were quenched by induction heating and their RCF lives were evaluated. A Si3N4-ball was used in order to apply higher stress (Pmax = 5.6 GPa) than our previous tests (Pmax=5.3 GPa), in a single-ball RCF testing machine. It was found that the basic life (L10) was 2.20×106 cycles and Median life (L50) was 6.04×106 cycles. In addition, Weibull modulus became higher than the previous tests.

  20. Assessment of weld heat-affected zones in a reactor vessel material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marston, T.U.; Server, W.

    1978-01-01

    The mechanical properties of weld heat-affected zones (HAZ's) associated with the heavy section, nuclear quality weldments are evaluated and found to be superior to those of the parent base material. The nil ductility transition temperature (NDTT), Charpy impact and static and dynamic fracture toughness properties of a HAZ associated with a submerged arc weld and one associated with a manual metal arc weld are directly compared with those of the parent base material. It is concluded that the stigma normally associated with HAZ is not justified for this grade and quality of material and weld procedure

  1. Effect of Water Cooling on the Performances of Friction Stir Welding Heat-Affected Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H. J.; Liu, H. J.; Yu, L.

    2012-07-01

    The heat-affected zone (HAZ) is generally the intrinsic weakest location of the normal friction stir welded precipitate hardened aluminum alloys. In order to improve the mechanical properties of the HAZ by controlling the temperature level, underwater friction stir welding (FSW) of an Al-Cu aluminum alloy was conducted in the present study. The results indicate that the hardness of the HAZ can be improved through underwater FSW. Microstructural analysis reveals that the hardness improvement is attributed to the lowering of precipitate coarsening level and the narrowing of precipitate free zone, which are essentially induced by the variations of welding thermal cycles under the cooling effect of water.

  2. Mathematical Analysis of the Solidification Behavior of Plain Steel Based on Solute- and Heat-Transfer Equations in the Liquid-Solid Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Toshio; Takeshita, Kunimasa; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2018-04-01

    An analytical approximate solution to non-linear solute- and heat-transfer equations in the unsteady-state mushy zone of Fe-C plain steel has been obtained, assuming a linear relationship between the solid fraction and the temperature of the mushy zone. The heat transfer equations for both the solid and liquid zone along with the boundary conditions have been linked with the equations to solve the whole equations. The model predictions ( e.g., the solidification constants and the effective partition ratio) agree with the generally accepted values and with a separately performed numerical analysis. The solidus temperature predicted by the model is in the intermediate range of the reported formulas. The model and Neuman's solution are consistent in the low carbon range. A conventional numerical heat analysis ( i.e., an equivalent specific heat method using the solidus temperature predicted by the model) is consistent with the model predictions for Fe-C plain steels. The model presented herein simplifies the computations to solve the solute- and heat-transfer simultaneous equations while searching for a solidus temperature as a part of the solution. Thus, this model can reduce the complexity of analyses considering the heat- and solute-transfer phenomena in the mushy zone.

  3. Characterization of Duplex steel Uranus 76N during deformation and heat treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecomte-Beckers, J.; Carton, M. [ASMA Department - Sector, Special Metallic Materials, University of Liege, Chemin des Chevreuils 1, 4000 Liege 1 (Belgium); Moureaux, P.; Habraken, A.M. [M and S Department - Sector, Mechanic of Solids and Material, University of Liege, Chemin des Chevreuils 1, 4000 Liege 1 (Belgium)

    2006-12-15

    Duplex Uranus 76N is characterized by metallography, thermal and mechanical analysis. The investigation shows that the microstructure of such a Duplex strongly depends on the cooling conditions determining the quantity of austenite formed in the ferrite matrix. Numerical simulations of 76N behavior during the rolling process and service life require the knowledge of the recrystallization state during rolling steps at high temperature, thermal parameters such as dilatation, density, specific heat, thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity and mechanical constitutive laws. These material parameters are determined and presented in this study. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Design of heat treatments for 9-12%Cr steels to optimise creep resistance for power plant applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, P.F.; Sachadel, U.A.; Clarke, P.D. [Tata Steel Europe, Rotherham (United Kingdom). Swinden Technology Centre; CRD and T, IJmuiden (Netherlands)

    2010-07-01

    Optimisation of the creep rupture properties of Steel 92 (9%Cr, 0.5%Mo, 2%W) by modification of heat treatment and C:N ratio has been studied. It was shown that a higher austenization temperature and double tempering at lower temperature can significantly extend creep life of the standard composition. The increase in austenization temperature from 1060 C and double tempering at 660 C/3h instead of single tempering at 780 C/2h resulted in the increase of stress rupture life from 1,734 to 6,179h at 650 C/110MPa. Even greater improvement in creep life was achieved by the combination of the modified heat treatment and decreased C:N ratio. In this case the creep life was extended to 10,255 h at 650 C/110MPa. A further increase in austenitization temperature to 1200 C for the decreased C:N ratio variant extended the rupture life to 17,118h. Initial results indicate that this modified heat treatment schedule does not result in notch brittle behaviour and most of the improvement in creep strength remains after a simulated post weld heat treatment at 740 C. The stress rupture programme is continuing and at 600 C test durations are approaching 60,000h. To explain the effect on rupture life thermodynamic calculations, microscopic investigations and a literature study were performed. Electron metallography investigations revealed that the lower tempering temperature resulted in a finer distribution of nano-size particles. Calculations show that increasing the austenitization temperature gave more dissolved B, N, C, Nb and V. The lower C:N ratio resulted in a higher atomic fraction of N in nano-size particles on subsequent tempering. Dissolved B should stabilize M{sub 23}M{sub 6} and dissolved N, C, Nv, and V should allow precipitation of a higher volume fraction of nano-size carbo-nitrides during tempering. Literature data suggest that lower tempering temperatures could also change their type from MX to M{sub 2}X. (orig.)

  5. A study on heat-flow analysis of friction stir welding on a rotation affected zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Sung Wook; Jang, Beom Seon; Kim, Jae Woong

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, as interest in environmental protection and energy conservation rose, technological development for lightweight efficiency of transport equipment, such as aircrafts, railcars, automobiles and vessels, have been briskly proceeding. This has led to an expansion of the application of lightweight alloys such as aluminum and magnesium. For the welding of these lightweight alloys, friction stir welding has been in development by many researchers. Heat-flow analysis of friction stir welding is one such research. The flow and energy equation is solved using the computational fluid dynamic commercial program 'Fluent'. In this study, a rotation affected zone concept is imposed. The rotation affected zone is a constant volume. In this volume, flow is rotated the same as the tool rotation speed and so plastic dissipation occurs. Through this simulation, the temperature distribution results are calculated and the simulation results are compared with the experimental results.

  6. Evaluation of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel for liquid lithium containment. II. Effects of post-weld heat treatment and niobium content. Annual report, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, T.L.; Edwards, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    The lithium corrosion resistance of the regular grade of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel can be vastly improved with a proper postweld heat treatment, but even greater improvements are needed. Results indicate that if weldments were tempered sufficiently long at 760C to remove all Mo/sub 2/C from the microstructure, even greater resistance to attack by low nitrogen lithium could be achieved. Corrosion tests should eventually be performed on regular grade 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel weldments which have been given a long-term (> 25 h) post-weld temper at 760C. Lithium corrosion resistance of regular grade 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel may also be improved by employing a quench and temper heat treatment. Quenched microstructures have more homogenous distribution of carbides than isothermally annealed microstructures, and if properly tempered, should provide excellent lithium corrosion resistance. Furthermore, the toughness of such a lower bainite microstructure should be better than that of the ferrite-bainitic microstructure created by an isothermal anneal. Numerous parameters, all potentially deleterious to the lithium corrosion resistance of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel, remain to be investigated; two such variables are velocity effects and lead content in the lithium.

  7. Evaluation of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel for liquid lithium containment. II. Effects of post-weld heat treatment and niobium content. Annual report, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, T.L.; Edwards, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    The lithium corrosion resistance of the regular grade of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel can be vastly improved with a proper postweld heat treatment, but even greater improvements are needed. Results indicate that if weldments were tempered sufficiently long at 760C to remove all Mo 2 C from the microstructure, even greater resistance to attack by low nitrogen lithium could be achieved. Corrosion tests should eventually be performed on regular grade 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel weldments which have been given a long-term (> 25 h) post-weld temper at 760C. Lithium corrosion resistance of regular grade 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel may also be improved by employing a quench and temper heat treatment. Quenched microstructures have more homogenous distribution of carbides than isothermally annealed microstructures, and if properly tempered, should provide excellent lithium corrosion resistance. Furthermore, the toughness of such a lower bainite microstructure should be better than that of the ferrite-bainitic microstructure created by an isothermal anneal. Numerous parameters, all potentially deleterious to the lithium corrosion resistance of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel, remain to be investigated; two such variables are velocity effects and lead content in the lithium

  8. Microstructure and properties of the heat-resistant chromium steel P91; Gefuege und Eigenschaften des warmfesten Chromstahls P91

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohlar, Stefanie

    2017-07-01

    The heat-resistant chromium steel X10CrMoVNb9-1 specified as P91 is based on its good properties at high temperatures and high mechanical Stresses as a potential material for use as reactor pressure vessel material in fourth generation nuclear reactors. Subject of this work was the characterization of the microstructure and mechanical properties of this material. For this purpose it was metallographically examined and technically important characteristic values were determined. Different etching methods and imaging techniques were used, with the method of oxalic acid etching newly applied to this material providing meaningful results. Tensile tests, hardness tests and notched bar impact tests provided mechanical-technological characteristics. The fracture mechanical behavior was determined by means of fracture mechanics tests on bending and compact tensile tests. The main focus was on the investigation of the applicability of the evaluation methods described in standards ASTM 1921 and ASTM 1820 for low alloy steels. The investigations showed that the P91 is expected to have a homogeneous martensitic structure consisting of annealed martensite with embedded carbides and carbonitrides. The location and size of the found carbides could be represented by the process of oxalic acid etching newly applied to this material. The mechanical-technological tests showed a good strength and toughness behavior typical for tempered steel. The application of the linear-elastic fracture mechanics and the yielding fracture mechanics made it possible to determine a reference temperature according to ASTM 1921-08a, but also showed that the evaluation methods and geometries described for this high-alloy steel in ASTM 1820-08 do not lead to valid material characteristics. In order to determine the suitability of this material for nuclear applications, the irradiation and creep behavior of the P91 should be characterized more precisely in further investigations. [German] Der als P91

  9. Investigation of the effect of heat treatment on the structure of the cold-rolled ferrite stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. Л. Грешта

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The work presents the estimation of a factor, namely, the solid solution super saturation by carbon and nitrogen on crystalline nature of high-chromium ferrite (HCF in defining the inhibition mechanism of recrystallization processes in ferritic stainless steel. The essence of the study was to conduct an additional heat treatment of hot (h/r tackle for the following modes: annealing 800 ° C - 4 hours, tempering with temperatures of 900, 1000, 1100 ° C after exposure to 1 min/mm. It is established that the determining factor that influences the amount of the carbide phase in c/r sheet is prior treatment of h/r tackle. A definite connection between the volume fraction of the secondary phase and the degree of cold deformation was observed. In the structure of cold-rolled sheet the same pattern with respect to the degree of implementation processes allocation of excess phases is maintained as in hot-rolled, after appropriate heat treatment. The smallest amount of the secondary phase structure was observed in the letter after hardening from 1100 °C - 1 min/mm. The reason is the thermodynamic state of HCF, to which at 1100 °C all the excess carbon and nitrogen must exist in solid solution. Thus, it is found that according to the present analysis of structural changes it should be noted that the best option of thermal prior treatment of h/r tackle is the annealing at 800 °C – 4 hours

  10. Thermal Aging Effects on Heat Affected Zone of Alloy 600 in Dissimilar Metal Weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Jun Hyuk; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Yoo, Seung Chang; Kim, Ji Hyun [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Dissimilar metal weld (DMW), consists of Alloy 600, Alloy 182, and A508 Gr.3, is now being widely used as the reactor pressure vessel penetration nozzle and the steam generator tubing material for pressurized water reactors (PWR) because of its mechanical property, thermal expansion coefficient, and corrosion resistance. The heat affected zone (HAZ) on Alloy 600 which is formed by welding process is critical to crack. According to G.A. Young et al. crack growth rates (CGR) in the Alloy 600 HAZ were about 30 times faster than those in the Alloy 600 base metal tested under the same conditions [3]. And according to Z.P. Lu et al. CGR in the Alloy 600 HAZ can be more than 20 times higher than that in its base metal. To predict the life time of components, there is a model which can calculate the effective degradation years (EDYs) of the material as a function of operating temperature. This study was conducted to investigate how thermal aging affects the hardness of dissimilar metal weld from the fusion boundary to Alloy 600 base metal and the residual strain at Alloy 600 heat affected zone. Following conclusions can be drawn from this study. The hardness, measured by Vickers hardness tester, peaked near the fusion boundary between Alloy 182 and Alloy 600, and it decreases as the picked point goes to Alloy 600 base metal. Even though the formation of precipitate such as Cr carbide, thermal aging doesn't affect the value and the tendency of hardness because of reduced residual stress. According to kernel average misorientation mapping, residual strain decreases when the material thermally aged. And finally, in 30 years simulated specimen, the high residual strain almost disappears. Therefore, the influence of residual strain on primary water stress corrosion cracking can be diminished when the material undergoes thermal aging.

  11. Effect of Morphological Differences on the Cold Formability of an Isothermally Heat-Treated Advanced High-Strength Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weißensteiner, Irmgard; Suppan, Clemens; Hebesberger, Thomas; Winkelhofer, Florian; Clemens, Helmut; Maier-Kiener, Verena

    2018-04-01

    Steel sheets of Fe-0.2C-2Mn-0.2Si-0.03Ti-0.003B (m%) for the automotive industry were isothermally heat-treated, comprising austenitizing and subsequent isothermal annealing at temperatures between 300°C and 500°C. As a consequence, microstructures ranging from granular bainite over lower bainite to auto-tempered and untempered martensite were obtained. In tensile, hole expansion and bending tests, the performances in different forming conditions were compared and the changes of microstructure and texture were studied by complementary electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses. Samples with granular bainitic microstructures exhibited high total elongations but lower hole expansion ratios; in subsequent EBSD and texture analyses, evidence for inhomogeneous deformation was found. In contrast, the lath-like bainitic/martensitic microstructure showed higher strength and lower elongation to fracture. This results in a reduced bendability, but also in a high tolerance against damage induced by the shearing of edges, and, thus, allows homogeneous deformation to higher strains in the hole expansion test.

  12. Precipitation behavior and martensite lath coarsening during tempering of T/P92 ferritic heat-resistant steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lin-qing; Zhang, Dan-tian; Liu, Yong-chang; Ning, Bao-qun; Qiao, Zhi-xia; Yan, Ze-sheng; Li, Hui-jun

    2014-05-01

    Tempering is an important process for T/P92 ferritic heat-resistant steel from the viewpoint of microstructure control, as it facilitates the formation of final tempered martensite under serving conditions. In this study, we have gained deeper insights on the mechanism underlying the microstructural evolution during tempering treatment, including the precipitation of carbides and the coarsening of martensite laths, as systematically analyzed by optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The chemical composition of the precipitates was analyzed using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Results indicate the formation of M3C (cementite) precipitates under normalized conditions. However, they tend to dissolve within a short time of tempering, owing to their low thermal stability. This phenomenon was substantiated by X-ray diffraction analysis. Besides, we could observe the precipitation of fine carbonitrides (MX) along the dislocations. The mechanism of carbon diffusion controlled growth of M23C6 can be expressed by the Zener's equation. The movement of Y-junctions was determined to be the fundamental mechanism underlying the martensite lath coarsening process. Vickers hardness was estimated to determine their mechanical properties. Based on the comprehensive analysis of both the micro-structural evolution and hardness variation, the process of tempering can be separated into three steps.

  13. Magnetic evaluation of the external surface in cast heat-resistant steel tubes with different aging states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, Mónica P.; Silveira, Rosa M.; Pacheco, Clara J.; Bruno, Antonio C.; Araujo, Jefferson F. D. F.; Eckstein, Carlos B.; Nogueira, Laudemiro; de Almeida, Luiz H.; Rebello, João M. A.; Pereira, Gabriela R.

    2018-06-01

    Heat-resistant austenitic stainless steels have become the principal alloys for use in steam reformer tubes in the petrochemical industry due to its mechanical properties. These tubes are typically exposed to severe operational conditions leading to microstructural transformations such as the aging phenomenon. The combination of high temperatures and moderate stresses causes creep damages, being necessary to monitor its structural condition by non-destructive techniques. The tube external wall is also subjected to oxidizing atmospheres, favoring the formation of an external surface, composed by an oxide scale and a chromium depleted zone. This external surface is usually not taken into account in the tube evaluation, which can lead to erroneous estimations of the service life of these components. In order to observe the magnetic influence of this layer, two samples, exposed to different operational temperatures, were characterized by non-destructive eddy current testing (ECT), scanning DC-susceptometer and magnetic force microscopy (MFM). It was found that the external surface thickness influences directly in the magnetic response of the samples.

  14. Factors determining the stainless steel decontamination efficiency for the steam generator heat exchanger tubes at NPPs with the WWERs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamenskij, A.N.; Balaban-Irmenin, Yu.V.

    1983-01-01

    To raise the efficiency of the redox method and decrease the amount of radioactive wastes, a possibility of improving the decontamination process for NPP heat exchanger tubes made of stainless steel is studied. In the home practice the redox method of equipment decontamination is carried out as a multi-cycle process. In each cycle the surface is treated first with a permanganate alkaline solution ther with an oxalic acid solution, with a condensate washing-at between the treatments. Using samples cut out of the steam generator pipelines of the first and third power units of the Novovoronezh NPP the effect of the oXalic acid concentration, as well as washout time and conditions on the decontamination factor are studied. On the basis of analysis of the obtained data a conclusion is drawn that using oxalic acid of low concentrations and increasing its concentrations from cycle to cycle maximum decontamination factor values can be obtained at a minimum salt content in radioactive wastes

  15. Working parameters affecting earth-air heat exchanger (EAHE) system performance for passive cooling: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darius, D.; Misaran, M. S.; Rahman, Md. M.; Ismail, M. A.; Amaludin, A.

    2017-07-01

    The study on the effect of the working parameters such as pipe material, pipe length, pipe diameter, depth of burial of the pipe, air flow rate and different types of soils on the thermal performance of earth-air heat exchanger (EAHE) systems is very crucial to ensure that thermal comfort can be achieved. In the past decade, researchers have performed studies to develop numerical models for analysis of EAHE systems. Until recently, two-dimensional models replaced the numerical models in the 1990s and in recent times, more advanced analysis using three-dimensional models, specifically the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation in the analysis of EAHE system. This paper reviews previous models used to analyse the EAHE system and working parameters that affects the earth-air heat exchanger (EAHE) thermal performance as of February 2017. Recent findings on the parameters affecting EAHE performance are also presented and discussed. As a conclusion, with the advent of CFD methods, investigational work have geared up to modelling and simulation work as it saves time and cost. Comprehension of the EAHE working parameters and its effect on system performance is largely established. However, the study on type of soil and its characteristics on the performance of EAHEs systems are surprisingly barren. Therefore, future studies should focus on the effect of soil characteristics such as moisture content, density of soil, and type of soil on the thermal performance of EAHEs system.

  16. Cast Steels for Creep-Resistant Parts Used in Heat Treatment Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drotlew A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Creep-resistant parts of heat treatment furnaces are in most cases made from high-alloyed chromium-nickel and nickel-chromium iron alloys, both cast and wrought. This paper presents the types of casting alloys used for this particular purpose, since the majority of furnace components are made by the casting process. Standards were cited which give symbols of alloy grades used in technical specifications by the domestic industry. It has been indicated that castings made currently are based on a wider spectrum of the creep-resistant alloy grades than the number of alloys covered by the standards. Alloy grades recommended by the technical literature for individual parts of the furnace equipment were given. The recommendations reflect both the type of the technological process used and the technical tasks performed by individual parts of the furnace equipment. Comments were also made on the role of individual alloying elements in shaping the performance properties of castings.

  17. Installation method for the steel container and vessel of the nuclear heating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Liying; Guo Jilin; Liu Wei

    2000-01-01

    The Nuclear Heating Reactor (NHR) has the advantages of inherent safety and better economics, integrated arrangement, full power natural circulation and dual vessel structure. However, the large thin container presents a new and difficult problem. The characteristics of the dual vessel installation method are analyzed with system engineering theory. Since there is no foreign or domestic experience, a new method was developed for the dual vessel installation for the 5 MW NHR. The result shows that the installation method is safe and reliable. The research on the dual vessel installation method has important significance for the design, manufacture and installation of the NHR dual vessel, as well as the industrialization and standardization of the NHR

  18. Cast Steels for Creep-resistant Parts Used in Heat Treatment Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Drotlew

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Creep-resistant parts of heat treatment furnaces are in most cases made from high-alloyed chromium-nickel and nickel-chromium ironalloys, both cast and wrought. This paper presents the types of casting alloys used for this particular purpose, since the majority of furnace components are made by the casting process. Standards were cited which give symbols of alloy grades used in technical specifications by the domestic industry. It has been indicated that castings made currently are based on a wider spectrum of the creep-resistant alloy grades than the number of alloys covered by the standards. Alloy grades recommended by the technical literature for individual parts of the furnace equipment were given. The recommendations reflect both the type of the technological process used and the technical tasks performed by individual parts of the furnace equipment. Comments were also made on the role of individual alloying elements in shaping the performance properties of castings.

  19. The effect of clustering on the mobility of dislocations during aging in Nb-microalloyed strip cast steels: In situ heating TEM observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrestha, Sachin L.; Xie, Kelvin Y.; Ringer, Simon P.; Carpenter, Kristin R.; Smith, David R.; Killmore, Chris R.; Cairney, Julie M.

    2013-01-01

    Cluster-strengthened Nb-microalloyed strip cast steels are of interest as clustering during aging leads to an enhancement in strength without compromising ductility, resulting in desirable mechanical properties. However, the precise strengthening mechanism is not well understood. Using in situ heating transmission electron microscopy, clustering was found to impede the movement of dislocations during aging. The attractive combination of ductility and strength was attributed to the effects of recovery and the restricted movement of dislocations through clustering

  20. Various bio-mechanical factors affecting heat generation during osteotomy preparation: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Chirag J; Shah, Darshana N; Sutaria, Foram B

    2018-01-01

    As implant site preparation and bone are critical precursors to primary healing, thermal and mechanical damage to the bone must be minimized during the preparation of the implant site. Moreover, excessively traumatic surgery can adversely affect the maturation of bone tissue at the bone/implant interface and consequently diminish the predictability of osseointegration. So, this study was carried out to evaluate the various biological and mechanical factors responsible for heat generation during osteotomy site preparation to reduce the same for successful osseointegration of dental implants. A broad search of the dental literature in PubMed added by manual search was performed for articles published between 1992 and December 2015. Various bio-mechanical factors related to dental implant osteotomy preparation such as dental implant drill designs/material/wear, drilling methods, type of irrigation, and bone quality were reviewed. Titles and abstracts were screened and articles which fulfilled the inclusion criteria were selected for a full-text reading. The initial database search yielded 123 titles, of which 59 titles were discarded after reading the titles and abstracts, 30 articles were again excluded based on inclusion and exclusion criteria, and finally 34 articles were selected for data extraction. Many biological and mechanical factors responsible for heat generation were found. Literatures of this review study have indicated that there are various bio-mechanical reasons, which affect the temperature rise during osteotomy and suggest that the amount of heat generation is a multifactorial in nature and it should be minimized for better primary healing of the implant site.

  1. Effect of smelting method on the austenite grain size and properties of heat-resisting pearlitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakhovskaya, M.B.; Khusainova, N.A.; Davlyatova, L.N.

    1975-01-01

    Influence of smelting method on austenite grain size and properties of refractory perlite steel were studied. An opportunity was found to increase the steel refractoriness without deteriorating its other properties. The steel 12Kh1MF of electric or common open-hearth smelting was used. The dependence of kinetics of austenite grain growth on the smelting method was studied in the temperature range 950 deg - 1200 deg C with 1 hour exposure. The grain size of austenite in steel is supposedly determined by aluminium nitrides and vanadium carbides. In tests of normalized (kept for 20 minutes at 950-980 deg C) and tempered (kept for 3 hours at 730 deg C) transverse (tangential) pipe cross-section samples the electric steel had higher impact viscosity than the open-hearth metal. At working temperatures (540 deg -580 deg C) the difference in viscosity has its minimum. Viscosity of both steels 12Kh1MF begins to sharply decrease from 20 deg C. However, electric steel has rather high viscosity even at - 40 deg C, while the open-hearth one becomes brittle as early as at - 20 deg C. Long-term strength tests at 580 deg C under stresses 10-14 kG/mm 2 show that the coarse-grain steel is more refractory, i.e. time till fracture of open-hearth steel samples is twice as long as that of electric steel samples

  2. Effect of smelting method on the austenite grain size and properties of heat-resisting pearlitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakhovskaya, M B; Khusainova, N A; Davlyatova, L N [Vsesoyuznyj Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Teplotekhnicheskij Inst., Moscow (USSR)

    1975-12-01

    Influence of smelting method on austenite grain size and properties of refractory perlite steel were studied. An opportunity was found to increase the steel refractoriness without deteriorating its other properties. The steel 12Kh1MF of electric or common open-hearth smelting was used. The dependence of kinetics of austenite grain growth on the smelting method was studied in the temperature range 950 deg - 1200 deg C with 1 hour exposure. The grain size of austenite in steel is supposedly determined by aluminium nitrides and vanadium carbides. In tests of normalized (kept for 20 minutes at 950-980 deg C) and tempered (kept for 3 hours at 730 deg C) transverse (tangential) pipe cross-section samples the electric steel had higher impact viscosity than the open-hearth metal. At working temperatures (540 deg -580 deg C) the difference in viscosity has its minimum. Viscosity of both steels 12Kh1MF begins to sharply decrease from 20 deg C. However, electric steel has rather high viscosity even at /sup -/40 deg C, while the open-hearth one becomes brittle as early as at /sup -/20 deg C. Long-term strength tests at 580 deg C under stresses 10-14 kG/mm/sup 2/ show that the coarse-grain steel is more refractory, i.e. time till fracture of open-hearth steel samples is twice as long as that of electric steel samples.

  3. Optimum performance analysis of an irreversible Diesel heat engine affected by variable heat capacities of working fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yingru; Chen, Jincan

    2007-01-01

    An irreversible cycle model of the Diesel heat engine is established in which the temperature dependent heat capacities of the working fluid, the irreversibilities resulting from non-isentropic compression and expansion processes and heat leak losses through the cylinder wall are taken into account. The adiabatic equation of ideal gases with temperature dependent heat capacity is strictly deduced without using the additional approximation condition in the relevant literature and is used to analyze the performance of the Diesel heat engine. Expressions for the work output and efficiency of the cycle are derived by introducing the pressure ratio and the compression and expansion efficiencies. The performance characteristic curves of the Diesel heat engine are presented for a set of given parameters. The optimum criteria of some important parameters such as the work output, efficiency, pressure ratio and temperatures of the working fluid are obtained. Moreover, the influence of the compression and expansion efficiencies, variable heat capacities, heat leak and other parameters on the performance of the cycle is discussed in detail. The results obtained may provide a theoretical basis for both optimal design and operation of real Diesel heat engines

  4. Creep and long-term strength of heat-resistant steels with different structures with the account taken of the type of stress deviator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giginyak, F.F.; Dragunov, Yu.G.; Mozharovskaya, T.N.; Titov, V.F.

    1993-01-01

    The results of the experimental investigations into creep and long-term strength of heat-resistant steels 15Kh2MFA and 15Kh2NMFA in the initial state and after heat-treatment simulating the metal irradiation embrittlement at the end of the product service date under static loading at the complex stress state and at high temperatures are presented. The experimentally substantiated equations of state describing creep and long-term stability of materials taking into account the type of the stress state are derived. (author)

  5. Effects of applying an external magnetic field during the deep cryogenic heat treatment on the corrosion resistance and wear behavior of 1.2080 tool steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhbarizadeh, Amin; Amini, Kamran; Javadpour, Sirus

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Deep cryogenic increases the carbide percentage and make a more homogenous distribution. ► Deep cryogenic improve the wear resistance and corrosion behavior of 1.2080 tool steel. ► Applying the magnetic field weaker the carbide distribution and decreases the carbides percentage. ► Magnetized samples showed weaker corrosion and wear behavior. -- Abstract: This work concerns with the effect of applying an external magnetic field on the corrosion behavior, wear resistance and microstructure of 1.2080 (D2) tool steel during the deep cryogenic heat treatment. These analyses were performed via scanning electron microscope (SEM), optical microscope (OM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ay diffraction (XRD) to study the microstructure, a pin-on-disk wear testing machine to study the wear behavior, and linear sweep voltammetry to study the corrosion behavior of the samples. It was shown that the deep cryogenic heat treatment eliminates retained austenite and makes a more uniform carbide distribution with higher percentage. It was also observed that the deep cryogenic heat treatment improves the wear behavior and corrosion resistance of 1.2080 tool steel. In comparison between the magnetized and non-magnetized samples, the carbide percentage decreases and the carbide distribution weakened in the magnetized samples; subsequently, the wear behavior and corrosion resistance attenuated compared in the magnetized samples.

  6. Influence of stress relieve heat treatment on fatigue crack propagation in structural steel resistant to atmospheric corrosion welded joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Geraldo de Paula; Villela, Jefferson Jose; Rabello, Emerson Giovani [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mails: gpm@cdtn.br; jjv@cdtn.br; egr@cdtn.br; Cimini Junior, Carlos Alberto[Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica]. E-mail: cimini@demet.ufmg.br; Godefroid, Leonardo Barbosa [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Metalurgia]. E-mails: leonardo@demet.em.ufop.br

    2007-07-01

    In this work, the influence of stress relieve heat treatment (SRHT) on the fatigue crack propagation in USI-SAC 50 structural welded joints at the heat affected zone (HAZ) region was studied. Hardness measurements before and after the SRHT were made and crack propagation tests in specimens as welded (AW) and in specimens that were submitted to SRHT, which were accomplished. A reduction in hardness at the regions of HAZ and melted zone (MZ) after the SRHT were observed. It were also verified that the crack propagation rates (da/dN) versus DK on the specimens AW presented regions of retardation on the crack propagation rate, and in the specimens that were submitted to SRHT the crack propagation rate were homogeneous. (author)

  7. Analytical description of the effects of melting practice and heat treatment on the creep properties of a 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booker, M.K.

    1977-01-01

    2 1 / 4 Cr-1 Mo steel is used worldwide as an elevated-temperature structural material, particularly in steam generation systems. Since this material is often used at service temperatures up to 600 0 C, successful design requires a consideration of its creep properties. Unfortunately, the development of an analytical description of the creep behavior of 2 1 / 4 Cr-1 Mo steel is complicated by two phenomena. First, the creep strength of this material is quite sensitive to heat treatment. Second, this material tends to exhibit nonclassical creep under some conditions. In addition, especially in nuclear applications, the material used may be air-melted, vacuum-arc remelted (VAR), or electroslag remelted (ESR). Available creep data from air-melted, VAR, and ESR material have been analyzed. Heat treatments included both annealed and isothermally annealed, with and without a subsequent ''postweld'' heat treatment. It has been found that the elevated-temperature ultimate tensile strength (UTS) is a useful indicator of creep strength for a given heat of material regardless of melting practice or heat treatment. Meanwhile, the nonclassical creep behavior has been attributed to a change in creep mechanism which has been mathematically modeled

  8. Improved performance of brazed plate heat exchangers made of stainless steel type EN 1.4401 (UNS S31600) when using a iron-based braze filler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoedin, P. [Alfa Laval Materials, Lund (Sweden)

    2004-07-01

    The mechanical properties of brazed plate heat exchangers, made of stainless steel plates type EN 1.4401, brazed with a new iron-based braze filler ''AlfaNova'', have been evaluated. The results were compared with heat exchangers brazed with a copper (pure copper) and a nickel-based (MBF 51) braze filler. Their resistance against pressure- and temperature fatigue, which are important for the lifetime of a heat exchanger, and the burst pressure, which is important for pressure vessel approvals, were tested and evaluated. It was found that the pressure fatigue resistance was extraordinary good for the heat exchangers brazed the iron-based filler and its temperature fatigue resistance was better than those brazed with nickel-based braze filler and slightly lower than those brazed with copper. The highest burst pressures were achieved for the copper brazed units followed by the iron-brazed units and rearmost the nickel-brazed units. (orig.)

  9. Effect of preliminary heat treatment on phase transformations and properties of the Kh15N5D2T (VNS-2) steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madyanov, S.A.; Voronenko, B.I.; Makhnev, E.S.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that preliminary heat treatment has a significant effect on the α→γ transformation kinetics, the quantity of residual austenite, the grain size and mechanical properties of the Kh15N5D2T steel after final heat treatment. The preliminary heat treatment regimes leading to the increase of the quantity of residual austenite and to grain refining increase the work of crack propagation in the finally strengthened state. The optimum properties were obtained after threefold preliminary tempering for 1h at 650 deg C. An approximately constant relation of α- and γ-phases (approximately 50%) is observed at 625 deg C irrespective of the investigated regimes of preliminary heat treatment

  10. Thermodynamic optimization opportunities for the recovery and utilization of residual energy and heat in China's iron and steel industry: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Lingen; Yang, Bo; Shen, Xun; Xie, Zhihui; Sun, Fengrui

    2015-01-01

    Analyses and optimizations of material flows and energy flows in iron and steel industry in the world are introduced in this paper. It is found that the recovery and utilization of residual energy and heat (RUREH) plays an important role for energy saving and CO 2 emission reduction no matter what method is used. Although the energy cascade utilization principle is carried out, the efficiency of RUREH in China's iron and steel industry (CISI) is only about 30%–50%, while the international advanced level is higher than 90%, such as USA, Japan, Sweden, etc. An important reason for the low efficiency of RUREH in CISI is that someone ignores the thermodynamic optimization opportunities for the energy recovery or utilization equipment, such as electricity production via waste heat boiler, sintering ore sensible heat recovery, heat transfer through heat exchangers, etc. A case study of hot blast stove flue gas sensible heat recovery and utilization is presented to illustrate the viewpoint above. The results show that before the heat conductance distribution optimization, the system can realize energy saving 76.2 kgce/h, profit 68.9 yuan/h, and CO 2 emission reduction 187.2 kg/h. While after the heat conductance distribution optimization, the system can realize energy saving 88.8 kgce/h, profit 92.5 yuan/h, and CO 2 emission reduction 218.2 kg/h, which are, respectively, improved by 16.5%, 34.2% and 16.5% than those before optimization. Thermodynamic optimization from the single equipment to the whole system of RUREH is a vital part in the future energy conservation work in CISI. - Highlights: • Material flows and energy flows in iron and steel industry are introduced. • Recovery and utilization of residual energy and heat plays an important role. • A case study of hot blast stove flue gas sensible heat recovery is presented. • Thermodynamic optimization for the system is performed. • Energy saving, profit, and CO 2 emission reduction improvements

  11. Tool steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højerslev, C.

    2001-01-01

    On designing a tool steel, its composition and heat treatment parameters are chosen to provide a hardened and tempered martensitic matrix in which carbides are evenly distributed. In this condition the matrix has an optimum combination of hardness andtoughness, the primary carbides provide...... resistance against abrasive wear and secondary carbides (if any) increase the resistance against plastic deformation. Tool steels are alloyed with carbide forming elements (Typically: vanadium, tungsten, molybdenumand chromium) furthermore some steel types contains cobalt. Addition of alloying elements...... serves primarily two purpose (i) to improve the hardenabillity and (ii) to provide harder and thermally more stable carbides than cementite. Assuming proper heattreatment, the properties of a tool steel depends on the which alloying elements are added and their respective concentrations....

  12. Effect of Continuous Galvanizing Heat Treatments on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of High Al-Low Si Transformation Induced Plasticity Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellhouse, E. M.; McDermid, J. R.

    2010-02-01

    Heat treatments were performed using an isothermal bainitic transformation (IBT) temperature compatible with continuous hot-dip galvanizing on two high Al-low Si transformation induced plasticity (TRIP)-assisted steels. Both steels had 0.2 wt pct C and 1.5 wt pct Mn; one had 1.5 wt pct Al and the other had 1 wt pct Al and 0.5 wt pct Si. Two different intercritical annealing (IA) temperatures were used, resulting in intercritical microstructures of 50 pct ferrite (α)-50 pct austenite (γ) and 65 pct α-35 pct γ. Using the IBT temperature of 465 °C, five IBT times were tested: 4, 30, 60, 90, and 120 seconds. Increasing the IBT time resulted in a decrease in the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and an increase in the uniform elongation, yield strength, and yield point elongation. The uniform elongation was higher when using the 50 pct α-50 pct γ IA temperature when compared to the 65 pct α-35 pct γ IA temperature. The best combinations of strength and ductility and their corresponding heat treatments were as follows: a tensile strength of 895 MPa and uniform elongation of 0.26 for the 1.5 pct Al TRIP steel at the 50 pct γ IA temperature and 90-second IBT time; a tensile strength of 880 MPa and uniform elongation of 0.27 for the 1.5 pct Al TRIP steel at the 50 pct γ IA temperature and 120-second IBT time; and a tensile strength of 1009 MPa and uniform elongation of 0.22 for the 1 pct Al-0.5 pct Si TRIP steel at the 50 pct γ IA temperature and 120-second IBT time.

  13. Effect of rare earth element yttrium addition on microstructures and properties of a 21Cr-11Ni austenitic heat-resistant stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Lei; Ma, Xiaocong; Wang, Longmei; Ye, Xiaoning

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Applications of Y in 21Cr-11Ni austenitic heat-resistant stainless steel. → Sensible characteristics of microstructure and properties have been observed. → Y has been found be effective in improving hot ductility of 21Cr-11Ni steel. → Inhibitory effect of Y on S segregation to the grain boundary has been observed. -- Abstract: In this comparative study, the microstructure and the mechanical properties of a 21Cr-11Ni austenitic heat-resistant stainless steel with and without addition of rare earth (RE) element yttrium have been investigated. The results show that a number of fine spherical yttrium-rich oxide particles are not uniformly distributed in the matrix of steel with yttrium; instead, they are aligned along the rolling direction. The grains surrounding the alignment are nearly one order of magnitude smaller than those farther away from the alignment. The approximate calculation results indirectly show that the grain refinement may be mainly attributed to the stimulation for nucleation of recrystallization rather than to pinning by particles. Furthermore, the alignment has resulted in significant loss in transverse impact toughness and tensile elongation at room temperature. There is a trough in the hot ductility-temperature curve, which is located between 973 and 1173 K. The ductility trough of steel with yttrium becomes shallow within a certain temperature range, especially around 1073 K, indicating that improvement on hot ductility is achieved by yttrium addition. The results may be attributed to the increase of grain boundary cohesion indicated by the effective improvement on intergranular failure tendency, and the inhibitory effect of yttrium on sulfur segregation to grain boundaries is believed to be an important cause.

  14. Ground-water heat pumps: an examination of hydrogeologic, environmental, legal, and economic factors affecting their use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armitage, D M; Bacon, D J; Massey-Norton, J T; Miller, J D

    1980-11-12

    Groundwater is attractive as a potential low-temperature energy source in residential space-conditioning applications. When used in conjuncton with a heat pump, ground water can serve as both a heat source (for heating) and a heat sink (for cooling). Major hydrogeologic aspects that affect system use include groundwater temperature and availability at shallow depths as these factors influence operational efficiency. Ground-water quality is considered as it affects the performance and life-expectancy of the water-side heat exchanger. Environmental impacts related to groundwater heat pump system use are most influenced by water use and disposal methods. In general, recharge to the subsurface (usually via injection wells) is recommended. Legal restrictions on system use are often stricter at the municipal and county levels than at state and Federal levels. Although Federal regulations currently exist, the agencies are not equipped to regulate individual, domestic installations. Computer smulations indicate that under a variety of climatologic conditions, groundwater heat pumps use less energy than conventional heating and cooling equipment. Life-cycle cost comparisons with conventional equipment depend on alternative system choices and well cost options included in the groundwater heat pump system.

  15. Sensitivities Affecting Heat and Urban Heat Island Effect on Local Scale Projected to Neighborhood Scale in Baltimore, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, C.; Zaitchik, B. F.; Scott, A.

    2015-12-01

    Urban regions are often impacted more by heat than adjacent rural areas, which is a phenomenon known as the urban heat island (UHI) effect. Urban areas are also highly heterogeneous and notoriously difficult to monitor using standard meteorological protocols—the hottest microclimates within a city often occur in locations that lack open, representative installation sites that are an adequate distance from buildings and direct heat sources. To investigate the challenges of monitoring urban heat, this study examines the sensitivity of temperature and humidity sensors currently used in a Baltimore UHI monitoring network to differences in sun exposure, material on which the data collecting instrument is attached, and land cover class of the vicinity. Sensitivity to sun exposure and attachment site can be interpreted as sources of uncertainty for urban heat monitoring, while sensitivity to land cover may reflect a true source of local temperature and humidity variability. In this study, we present results from a test deployment designed to assess the sensitivity of heat measurements to each of these three factors. We then apply these results to interpret measurements taken across the entire Baltimore UHI monitoring network. These results can then be used to improve heat measurements and more accurately represent and quantify the UHI effect on a broader scale, such as in neighborhoods or urban centers.

  16. Autolytic degradation of skipjack tuna during heating as affected by initial quality and processing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, Nicola J; Amato, Penny M; Giesbrecht, Francis; Lanier, Tyre C

    2012-02-01

    Several factors were studied as affecting protein degradation and texture of skipjack tuna muscle following ambient pressure thermal processing (precooking). These included degree of mushy tuna syndrome (MTS) evidenced in the raw meat, raw meat pH, abusive thawing/holding, and precooking temperature/time. Slurries and intact pieces from frozen skipjack tuna, either tempered for 2 h or thawed and held at 25 °C for 22 h (abusive treatment) were heated at temperatures ranging from 40 to 80 °C for up to 2 h, and also at 90 °C for 1 h, with or without prior adjustment of pH to 5 or 7 to favor cathepsin or calpain activity, respectively. Proteolysis of precooked samples was monitored by Lowry assay and SDS-PAGE; cooked texture of intact meat was measured using a Kramer shear press and by sensory profile analysis. Proteolysis maximally occurred in slurries of skipjack tuna muscle that had been abusively stored (22 h at 25 °C) and adjusted to pH 5 prior to heating at 55 °C. Intact pieces of tuna abusively thawed/held for 22 h with subsequent heating at 55 °C also evidenced the most proteolysis and were the least firm in texture. Raw fish that evidenced higher severity of MTS when raw displayed higher levels of proteolysis prior to cooking, which were further increased after cooking at 55 °C. The kinetic data presented here can be used to optimize processing conditions for skipjack tuna canning to minimize textural degradation and optimize quality. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  17. Rapid heating tensile tests of high-energy-rate-forged 316L stainless steel containing internal helium from radioactive decay of absorbed tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosley, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    316L stainless steel is a candidate material for construction of equipment that will be exposed to tritium. This austenitic stainless steel is frequently used in the high-energy-rate-forged (HERF) metallurgical condition to take advantage of increased strength produced by cold work introduced by this process. Proper design of tritium-handling equipment will require an understanding of how helium-3, the product of radioactive decay of tritium, affects mechanical properties. This report describes results of elevated-temperature tensile testing of HERF 316L stainless steel specimens containing helium concentrations of 171 (calculated) atomic parts per million (appm). Results are compared with those reported previously for specimens containing 0 and 94 (measured) appm helium

  18. Heat and Moisture Transport and Storage Parameters of Bricks Affected by the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kočí, Václav; Čáchová, Monika; Koňáková, Dana; Vejmelková, Eva; Jerman, Miloš; Keppert, Martin; Maděra, Jiří; Černý, Robert

    2018-05-01

    The effect of external environment on heat and moisture transport and storage properties of the traditional fired clay brick, sand-lime brick and highly perforated ceramic block commonly used in the Czech Republic and on their hygrothermal performance in building envelopes is analyzed by a combination of experimental and computational techniques. The experimental measurements of thermal, hygric and basic physical parameters are carried out in the reference state and after a 3-year exposure of the bricks to real climatic conditions of the city of Prague. The obtained results showed that after 3 years of weathering the porosity of the analyzed bricks increased up to five percentage points which led to an increase in liquid and gaseous moisture transport parameters and a decrease in thermal conductivity. Computational modeling of hygrothermal performance of building envelopes made of the studied bricks was done using both reference and weather-affected data. The simulated results indicated an improvement in the annual energy balances and a decrease in the time-of-wetness functions as a result of the use of data obtained after the 3-year exposure to the environment. The effects of weathering on both heat and moisture transport and storage parameters of the analyzed bricks and on their hygrothermal performance were found significant despite the occurrence of warm winters in the time period of 2012-2015 when the brick specimens were exposed to the environment.

  19. Primary water stress corrosion cracking resistance of alloy 690 heat affected zones of butt welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, L.; Calonne, O.; Toloczko, M.B.; Bruemmer, S.M.; Massoud, J.P.; Lemaire, E.; Gerard, R.; Somville, F.; Richnau, A.; Lagerstrom, J.

    2015-01-01

    A wide V-groove butt weld was fabricated from Alloy 690 plates using Alloy 152 filler material, maximum allowable heat input, and very stiff strong-backs. Alloy 690 heat affected zones (HAZ) was characterized in terms of microstructure and plastic strains induced by weld shrinkage. Crack initiation tests were carried out in pure hydrogenated steam at 400 C. degrees for 4000 h. Crack growth rate tests were performed in simulated PWR primary water at a temperature of 360 C. degrees. A maximum plastic strain around 5% was measured in the vicinity of the fusion line, which decreased almost linearly with the distance from the fusion line. Crack initiation tests on Alloy 690 HAZ specimens as well as on 30% cold-rolled Alloy 690 specimens were performed in pure hydrogenated steam at 400 C. degrees (partial pressure of hydrogen = 0.7 bar) for a total of 4000 h using cylindrical notched tensile specimens, reverse U-bends and flat micro-tensile specimens. No crack initiation was detected. Stress corrosion propagation rates revealed extremely low SCC (Stress Corrosion Cracking) growth rates both in the base metal and in the HAZ region whose magnitudes are of no engineering significance. Overall, the results indicated limited plastic strain induced by weld shrinkage in butt weld HAZ, and to no particular susceptibility of primary water stress corrosion cracking. (authors)

  20. Liquation Cracking in the Heat-Affected Zone of IN738 Superalloy Weld

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Cheng Chen

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The main scope of this study investigated the occurrence of liquation cracking in the heat-affected zone (HAZ of IN738 superalloy weld, IN738 is widely used in gas turbine blades in land-based power plants. Microstructural examinations showed considerable amounts of γ’ uniformly precipitated in the γ matrix. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA maps showed the γ-γ’ colonies were rich in Al and Ti, but lean in other alloy elements. Moreover, the metal carbides (MC, fine borides (M3B2 and M5B3, η-Ni3Ti, σ (Cr-Co and lamellar Ni7Zr2 intermetallic compounds could be found at the interdendritic boundaries. The fracture morphologies and the corresponding EPMA maps confirmed that the liquation cracking in the HAZ of the IN738 superalloy weld resulted from the presence of complex microconstituents at the interdendritic boundaries.

<