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Sample records for steel core shroud

  1. Seismic core shroud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puri, A.; Mullooly, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    A core shroud is provided, comprising: a coolant boundary, following the shape of the core boundary, for channeling the coolant through the fuel assemblies; a cylindrical band positioned inside the core barrel and surrounding the coolant boundary; and support members extending from the coolant boundary to the band, for transferring load from the coolant boundary to the band. The shroud may be assembled in parts using automated welding techniques, and it may be adjusted to fit the reactor core easily

  2. Core shroud corner joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Forsyth, David R.

    2013-09-10

    A core shroud is provided, which includes a number of planar members, a number of unitary corners, and a number of subassemblies each comprising a combination of the planar members and the unitary corners. Each unitary corner comprises a unitary extrusion including a first planar portion and a second planar portion disposed perpendicularly with respect to the first planar portion. At least one of the subassemblies comprises a plurality of the unitary corners disposed side-by-side in an alternating opposing relationship. A plurality of the subassemblies can be combined to form a quarter perimeter segment of the core shroud. Four quarter perimeter segments join together to form the core shroud.

  3. Assessment of the fracture toughness of irradiated stainless steel for BWR core shrouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, R.G.; Gamble, R.M.

    2002-01-01

    Data from previously performed experiments were collected and evaluated to determine the relationship between fracture toughness and neutron fluence for conditions representative of BWR core shrouds. This relationship together with EPFM (elastic-plastic fracture mechanics) analysis methods similar to those in Appendix K of Section XI of the ASME Code were used to compute margin against failure as a function of neutron fluence for postulated cracks in BWR core shrouds. The results indicate that EPFM analyses can be used for flaw evaluation of core shrouds at fluence levels less than 3.10 21 n/cm 2 (E > 1 MeV). At fluence levels equal to or greater than 3.10 21 n/cm 2 , LEFM (linear-elastic fracture mechanics) analyses should be used with K Ic = 55 MPa-(m) 0.5 . (authors)

  4. Latest SCC Issues of core shroud and recirculation piping in Japanese BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, Yuichi; Sakashita, Akihiro; Fukuda, Toshihiko; Yamashita, Hironobu; Futami, Tsuneo

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports that a high incidence of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) cracks have been found in the core Shroud and PLR piping of several Japanese BWR plants. The results of investigations show the cracks to be of SCC type in 316L stainless steel and with different characteristics from the type in 304 stainless steel. The cracks on the shroud surface were mainly verified near the shroud ring weld line and core region weld line, and the crack shape could be classified into two types: one type was circumferential cracking in the shroud ring, and the other was isolated occurrences of radial cracking in the core region. The structural integrity of those shrouds with cracks was evaluated under a conservative assumption and confirmed to be adequate. A relatively large error was identified in measuring the crack depth in the PLR piping. (author)

  5. Changing the core shroud support in Oskarshamn 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graae, Tapani

    1995-01-01

    Oskarshamn 1 is now being prepared for restart after a repair and upgrade outage which has lasted for over two years. The modernisation programme, called Fenix, included the repair of the core shroud following the discovery of weld cracking in it, a problem that has plagued BWRs throughout the world. At Oskarshamn 1 it was decided to replace the shroud support. (author)

  6. Structural assessment of TAPS core shroud under accident loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhasin, Vivek; Kushwaha, H.S.; Mahajan, S.C.; Kakodkar, A.

    1996-09-01

    Over the last few years, the Core Shroud of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) operating in foreign countries, have developed cracks at weld locations. As a first step for assessment of structural safety of Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS) core shroud, its detailed stress analysis was done for postulated accident loads. This report is concerned with structural assessment of core shroud, of BWR at TAPS, subjected to loads resulting from main steam line break (MSLB), recirculation line break (RLB) and safe shut down earthquake. The stress analysis was done for core shroud in healthy condition and without any crack since, visual examination conducted till now, do not indicate presence of any flaw. Dynamic structural analysis for MSLB and RLB events was done using dynamic load factor (DLF) method. The complete core shroud and its associated components were modelled and analysed using 3D plate/shell elements. Since, the components of core shroud are submerged in water, hence, hydrodynamic added mass was also considered for evaluation of natural frequencies. It was concluded that from structural point of view, adequate safety margin is available under all the accident loads. Nonlinear analysis was done to evaluate buckling/collapse load. The collapse/buckling load have sufficient margin against the allowable limits. The displacements are low hence, the insertion of control rod may not be affected. (author)

  7. Experimental determination of residual stress by neutron diffraction in a boiling water reactor core shroud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payzant, A.; Spooner, S.; Zhu, Xiaojing; Hubbard, C.R.

    1996-01-01

    Residual strains in a 51 mm (2-inch) thick 304L stainless steel plate have been measured by neutron diffraction and interpreted in terms of residual stress. The plate, measuring (300 mm) in area, was removed from a 6m (20-ft.) diameter unirradiated boiling water reactor core shroud, and included a multiple-pass horizontal weld which joined two of the cylindrical shells which comprise the core shroud. Residual stress mapping was undertaken in the heat affected zone, concentrating on the outside half of the plate thickness. Variations in residual stresses with location appeared consistent with trends expected from finite element calculations, considering that a large fraction of the residual hoop stress was released upon removal of the plate from the core shroud cylinder

  8. Using NJOY99 and MCNP4B2 to Estimate the Radiation Damage Displacements per Atom per Second in Steel Within the Boiling Water Reactor Core Shroud and Vessel Wall from Reactor-Grade Mixed-Oxide/Uranium Oxide Fuel for the Nuclear Power Plant at Laguna Verde, Veracruz, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vickers, Lisa

    2003-01-01

    The government of Mexico has expressed interest in utilizing the Laguna Verde boiling water reactor (BWR) nuclear power plant for the disposition of reprocessed spent uranium oxide (UOX) fuel in the form of reactor-grade mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel. MOX fuel would replace spent UOX fuel as a fraction in the core from 18 to 30% depending on the fuel loading cycle. MOX fuel is expected to increase the neutron fluence, flux, fuel centerline temperature, reactor core pressure, and yield higher energy neutrons.There is concern that a core with a fraction of MOX fuel (i.e., increased 239 Pu wt%) would increase the radiation damage displacements per atom per second (dpa-s -1 ) in steel within the core shroud and vessel wall as compared to only conventional, enriched UOX fuel in the core. The evaluation of radiation damage within the core shroud and vessel wall is a concern because of the potentially adverse affect to personnel and public safety, environment, and operating life of the reactor.The primary uniqueness of this paper is the computation of radiation damage (dpa-s -1 ) using NJOY99-processed cross sections for steel within the core shroud and vessel wall. Specifically, the unique radiation damage results are several orders of magnitude greater than results of previous works. In addition, the conclusion of this paper was that the addition of the maximum fraction of one-third MOX fuel to the LV1 BWR core did significantly increase the radiation damage in steel within the core shroud and vessel wall such that without mitigation of radiation damage by periodic thermal annealing or reduction in operating parameters such as neutron fluence, core temperature, and pressure, it posed a potentially adverse affect to the personnel and public safety, environment, and operating life of the reactor

  9. Comparison of hot ductility and stress corrosion cracking sensitivity of heat affected zone among type 304, type 316 and type 347 austenitic stainless steels for BWR core shroud and recirculation line piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Yoshihiko; Kayano, Rinzo; Azuma, Tukasa; Tanaka, Yasuhiko; Ishio, Kotaro; Sasaki, Tomo; Suzuki, Komei

    2005-01-01

    The present paper proposes the weld structure shroud made by the integrated type forging. The proposed structure can minimize the occurrence of SCC in the joint weld portion in the shroud. Furthermore, based on the measurement on EPR (Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation) ratio of simulated HAZ (Heat Affected Zone) which was made by giving double thermal cycles and plastic deformation to the material, the requirement of carbon content of less than 0.04 % is proposed for type 316 steel. The requirement proposed is the same restriction as that of KTA regel

  10. Status report: Intergranular stress corrosion cracking of BWR core shrouds and other internal components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    On July 25, 1994, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued Generic Letter (GL) 94-03 to obtain information needed to assess compliance with regulatory requirements regarding the structural integrity of core shrouds in domestic boiling water reactors (BWRs). This report begins with a brief description of the safety significance of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) as it relates to the design and function of BWR core shrouds and other internal components. It then presents a brief history of shroud cracking events both in the US and abroad, followed by an indepth summary of the industry actions to address the issue of IGSCC in BWR core shrouds and other internal components. This report summarizes the staff's basis for issuing GL 94-03, as well as the staff's assessment of plant-specific responses to GL 94-03. The staff is continually evaluating the licensee inspection programs and the results from examinations of BWR core shrouds and other internal components. This report is representative of submittals to and evaluations by the staff as of September 30, 1995. An update of this report will be issued at a later date

  11. Last experiences on ID BWR shroud inspection and the new developments to examine the below core plate areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, R.; Gonzalez, E.; Willke, A.; Yague, L. [TECNATOM SA, Madrid (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    In recent years, the owners of BWR type nuclear power plants have had to address new inspection requirements relating to the core shroud inside the reactor vessel, the aim of which is to contain the fuel assemblies and provide support for the structures located in the upper part of the reactor. The shroud consists of a cylinder measuring some 40-50 mm in thickness, manufactured from various sections of AISI-304 stainless steel and INCONEL, joined by vertical and circumferential welds. The appearance of unstable cracks in these welds would directly affect the structural integrity of the component and the safety of the plant. As regards access to the core shroud and to the surface to be examined, two alternatives might be considered: inspection from outside the component, moving along the so-called annulus between the reactor vessel wall and the component (OD inspection), or from the interior (ID inspection). With a view to addressing this problem, Tecnatom has in recent years launched several projects, grouped under the generic name TEIDE, in order to develop scanners and NDT techniques achieving the maximum inspection coverage of this component. The decision was taken to perform ID inspections, mainly because this type of scanners were not available at that time, and which provide the 4 following advantages. 1) Maximum inspected weld length. This avoids interference with the jet pumps and the systems present in the annulus and affecting OD inspections. Besides, the repairs performed on in-service core shrouds in all cases imply the addition of new fixed elements on their outer surface, since the fuel assembly space must be left free. 2) Reduction of inspection times and of unforeseen events: maintenance of planning schedules, reduction of personnel doses, reduced critical path time. 3) High inspection accuracy and repeatability. 4) Simplification of equipment positioning work (similar to the installation of fuel assemblies). As regards inspection techniques, the

  12. Repairing method and apparatus for weld portion of reactor core shroud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujimura, Hiroshi; Tamai, Yasukata; Kurosawa, Koichi (Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)); Toyota, Seiichi; Kikuchi, Toshikazu.

    1993-12-07

    A method of repairing a weld portion in a cylindrical reactor core shroud comprises a first step of inspecting a weld portion by an ultrasonic flow testing device from the surface of the reactor core shroud, a second step of applying repairing fabrication for cracked portion if it is discovered by the test and a third step of applying a surface modification to the fabricated portion after the repairing fabrication. As a result, repairing fabrication for the crack caused by stress corrosion crack or the like is enabled and reoccurrence of the stress corrosion crack in the repair fabrication portion can be prevented. Operator's exposure dose is minimized by shielding with reactor water or shielding plate. In a case of using the shielding plate, welding and surface improvement can be practiced in atmospheric air instead of water-submerged welding. Water does not intrude from the outside of the shroud and occurrence of penetration crack can be coped with. Further, it is possible to reduce cost and save labors for parts exchange by using the parts in common, to improve the operation efficiency. (N.H.).

  13. Repairing method and apparatus for weld portion of reactor core shroud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimura, Hiroshi; Tamai, Yasukata; Kurosawa, Koichi; Toyota, Seiichi; Kikuchi, Toshikazu.

    1993-01-01

    A method of repairing a weld portion in a cylindrical reactor core shroud comprises a first step of inspecting a weld portion by an ultrasonic flow testing device from the surface of the reactor core shroud, a second step of applying repairing fabrication for cracked portion if it is discovered by the test and a third step of applying a surface modification to the fabricated portion after the repairing fabrication. As a result, repairing fabrication for the crack caused by stress corrosion crack or the like is enabled and reoccurrence of the stress corrosion crack in the repair fabrication portion can be prevented. Operator's exposure dose is minimized by shielding with reactor water or shielding plate. In a case of using the shielding plate, welding and surface improvement can be practiced in atmospheric air instead of water-submerged welding. Water does not intrude from the outside of the shroud and occurrence of penetration crack can be coped with. Further, it is possible to reduce cost and save labors for parts exchange by using the parts in common, to improve the operation efficiency. (N.H.)

  14. Radiation control in the core shroud replacement project of Fukushima-Daiichi NPS Unit no.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokubun, Yasunori; Haraguchi, Kazuyuki; Yoshizawa, Yuji; Yamada, Yasuo

    2000-01-01

    In Fukushima-Daiichi NPS Unit no.2, the core shroud replacement was made following that of Unit no.3. This project involves replacement of wide-ranging equipment, with the project extending over a long period of time. This was expected to increase the dose equivalent of workers. Accordingly, various measures to lower the dose equivalent were planned and implemented. We outline radiation controls implemented during the project period. The shroud replacement project was a preventive maintenance project which consisted of replacing the core shroud and other internals with those less susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. Problems related to radiation control during the replacement project of Unit no.3 the year before last were summarized. We studied, planned, and implemented measures to be reflected in the project for Unit no.2. This was done to lower the dose equivalent as much as possible while paying due attention to safety and economy. For radiation control during the project for Unit no.2, experiments with Unit no.3 were fully exploited and any effective measures taken at that time were adopted in this project. Problems pointed out after that project with Unit no.3 resulted in new or improved measures being taken with Unit no.2. Measures taken over from the project with Unit no.3; a. Daily analysis of difference between expected and actual dose equivalents b. Dose reduction measures, chemical decontamination, temporary shield, flushing, etc.; New or improved measures; a. Dose reduction measures: Mechanical removal of radiation sources, strengthening of shield, etc.; b. Automatic remote control system; c. Use of new protective devices. With measures implemented as described above, the dose equivalent during shroud replacement of Unit no.2 was reduced by about 30% when compared with that (11.5 persons · Sv) in the case of Unit no.3. Implemented radiation controls will be checked and reviewed in future for reflection in projects with other units. (author)

  15. ''Last experiences on ID BWR shroud inspection and the new developments to examine the below core plate areas''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, R.; Willke, A.; Gonzalez, E.; Yague, L

    2001-07-01

    In recent years, the owners of BWR type nuclear power plants have had to address new inspection requirements relating to the core shroud inside the reactor vessel, the aim of which is to contain the fuel assemblies and provide support for the structures located in the upper part of the reactor. The shroud consists of a cylinder measuring some 40-50 mm in thickness, manufactured from various sections of AISI-304 stainless steel and INCONEL, joined by vertical and circumferential welds. The appearance of unstable cracks in these welds would directly affect the structural integrity of the component and the safety of the plant. As regards access to the core shroud and to the surface to be examined, two alternatives might be considered: inspection from outside the component, moving along the so-called annulus between the reactor vessel wall and the component (OD inspection), or from the interior (ID inspection). With a view to addressing this problem, Tecnatom has in recent years launched several projects, grouped under the generic name TEIDE, in order to develop scanners and NDT techniques achieving the maximum inspection coverage of this component. As regards inspection techniques, the decision was taken to carry out acquisition simultaneously using both ultrasonics (UT) and eddy currents (ET). (author)

  16. Comparison of design margin for core shroud in between design and construction code and fitness-for-service code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dozaki, Koji

    2007-01-01

    Structural design methods for core shroud of BWR are specified in JSME Design and Construction Code, like ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Sec. III, as a part of core support structure. Design margins are defined according to combination of the structural design method selected and service limit considered. Basically, those margins in JSME Code were determined after ASME Sec. III. Designers can select so-called twice-slope method for core shroud design among those design methods. On the other hand, flaw evaluation rules have been established for core shroud in JSME Fitness-for-Service Code. Twice-slope method is also adopted for fracture evaluation in that code even when the core shroud contains a flaw. Design margin was determined as structural factors separately from Design and Construction Code. As a natural consequence, there is a difference in those design margins between the two codes. In this paper, it is shown that the design margin in Fitness-for-Service Code is conservative by experimental evidences. Comparison of design margins between the two codes is discussed. (author)

  17. Determination of the neutron fluence in the welding of the 'Core shroud' of the BWR reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucatero, M.A.; Xolocostli M, J.V.; Gomez T, A.M.; Palacios H, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    With the purpose of defining the inspection frequency, in function of the embrittlement of the materials that compose the welding of the 'Core Shroud' or encircling of the core of a BWR type reactor, is necessary to know the neutron fluence received for this welding. In the work the calculated values of neutron fluence accumulated maxim (E > 1 MeV) during the first 8 operation cycles of the reactor are presented. The calculations were carried out according to the NRC Regulatory Guide 1.190, making use of the DORT code, which solves the transport equation in discreet ordinate in two dimensions (xy, rΘ, and rz). The results in 3D were obtained applying the Synthesis method according to the guide before mentioned. Results are presented for the horizontal welding H3, H4, and H5, showing the corresponding curves to the fluence accumulated to the cycle 8 and a projection for the cycle 14 is presented. (Author)

  18. Determination of the neutron fluence in the welding of the 'Core shroud' of the BWR reactor core; Determinacion de la fluencia neutronica en las soldaduras del 'core shroud' del nucleo de un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucatero, M A; Xolocostli M, J V; Gomez T, A M; Palacios H, J C [ININ, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de mexico (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    With the purpose of defining the inspection frequency, in function of the embrittlement of the materials that compose the welding of the 'Core Shroud' or encircling of the core of a BWR type reactor, is necessary to know the neutron fluence received for this welding. In the work the calculated values of neutron fluence accumulated maxim (E > 1 MeV) during the first 8 operation cycles of the reactor are presented. The calculations were carried out according to the NRC Regulatory Guide 1.190, making use of the DORT code, which solves the transport equation in discreet ordinate in two dimensions (xy, r{theta}, and rz). The results in 3D were obtained applying the Synthesis method according to the guide before mentioned. Results are presented for the horizontal welding H3, H4, and H5, showing the corresponding curves to the fluence accumulated to the cycle 8 and a projection for the cycle 14 is presented. (Author)

  19. Impact forces on a core shroud of an excited PWR fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collard, B.; Vallory, J. [CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2001-07-01

    Seismic excitation of PWR internals may induce large motions of the fuel assemblies (FA). This could result in impact between assemblies or between assemblies and core shroud. Forces generated during these shocks are often the basis for the maximum design loads of the spacer grids and fuel rods. An experimental program has been conducted at the French Nuclear Reactor Directorate (CEA) to measure the impact forces of a reduced scale FA on the test section under different environmental conditions. Within the framework of the tests presented, the effect of the FA environment (air, stagnant water, water under flow) on the maximum impact forces measured at grid levels and on the energy dissipated during the shock is examined. A 'fluid cushioning' effect (dissipative) between the grids and the wall is sought. Experimental results show that the axial flow has a great influence on the impact forces. The greater the axial flow velocity is, the lower the impact forces are. The tests of impact of an assembly on a wall were analyzed compared to the tests carried out without impact. This analysis related on the measured forces of impact and the variation of the measured/computed total energy of the system. The whole of these tests in air and water shows that the 'fluid cushioning' effect required exists but is not significant. Thus the presence of water does not decrease the forces of impact, and does not amplify the quantity of energy dissipated during the shock. The fact that the 'fluid cushioning' effect is weak compared to more analytical tests probably comes from our 'not perfect' or 'realistic' conditions of tests which involve an angle between the grid and the wall at the shock moment.

  20. Impact forces on a core shroud of an excited PWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collard, B.; Vallory, J.

    2001-01-01

    Seismic excitation of PWR internals may induce large motions of the fuel assemblies (FA). This could result in impact between assemblies or between assemblies and core shroud. Forces generated during these shocks are often the basis for the maximum design loads of the spacer grids and fuel rods. An experimental program has been conducted at the French Nuclear Reactor Directorate (CEA) to measure the impact forces of a reduced scale FA on the test section under different environmental conditions. Within the framework of the tests presented, the effect of the FA environment (air, stagnant water, water under flow) on the maximum impact forces measured at grid levels and on the energy dissipated during the shock is examined. A 'fluid cushioning' effect (dissipative) between the grids and the wall is sought. Experimental results show that the axial flow has a great influence on the impact forces. The greater the axial flow velocity is, the lower the impact forces are. The tests of impact of an assembly on a wall were analyzed compared to the tests carried out without impact. This analysis related on the measured forces of impact and the variation of the measured/computed total energy of the system. The whole of these tests in air and water shows that the 'fluid cushioning' effect required exists but is not significant. Thus the presence of water does not decrease the forces of impact, and does not amplify the quantity of energy dissipated during the shock. The fact that the 'fluid cushioning' effect is weak compared to more analytical tests probably comes from our 'not perfect' or 'realistic' conditions of tests which involve an angle between the grid and the wall at the shock moment

  1. Aerodynamic effect of a honeycomb rotor tip shroud on a 50.8-centimeter-tip-diameter core turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, T. P.; Whitney, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    A 50.8-cm-tip-diameter turbine equipped with a rotor tip shroud of hexagonal cell (or honeycomb) cross section has been tested in warm air (416 K) for a range of shroud coolant to primary flow rates. Test results were also obtained for the same turbine operated with a solid shroud for comparison. The results showed that the combined effect of the honeycomb shroud and the coolant flow was to cause a reduction of 2.8 points in efficiency at design speed, pressure ratio, and coolant flow rate. With the coolant system inactivated, the honeycomb shroud caused a decrease in efficiency of 2.3 points. These results and those obtained from a small reference turbine indicate that the dominant factor governing honeycomb tip shroud loss is the ratio of honeycomb depth to blade span. The loss results of the two shrouds could be correlated on this basis. The same honeycomb and coolant effects are expected to occur for the hot (2200 K) version of this turbine.

  2. Optimisation of the core shroud bypass flow in the nuclear power plant Unterweser. Part 2: hardware implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ploeger, M.; Weissmueller, W.; Strobel, R.

    2001-01-01

    As result of the thermohydraulic analysis a modification of the upper core shroud former plate was identified. The goal was to machine 36 holes with a diameter of 56 mm into the plate. Among different methods of machining the EDM technique was selected. EDM means ''electric discharge machining''. This method contained some advantages. First, most of the equipment was available and the erodiation tools had to be optimised only. Secondly, EDM does not produce any metal chips which could probably reach the primary circuit. Tests were made using two types of erodiation electrodes. One type like a tube machined a circular groove into the 30 mm thick plate leaving two ligaments of solid material at the bottom of the groove. These were cut out in a second step. The EDM tool for cutting out is shown. The structure of the groove making tool looks quite similar. It differs in the kind of electrode only. Handling the EDM tools in the test facility is ALSO shown. (author)

  3. BWRVIP-123, Revision 1NP: BWR Vessel and Internals Project Removal and Analysis of Material Samples from Core Shroud and Top Guide at Susquehanna Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, D.; Haertel, T.; Lindberg, J.; Oliver, B.; Greenwood, L.

    2005-01-01

    Fast and thermal fluence were determined by a laboratory analysis of the samples. Fluence in the upper regions of the shroud (between the H1 and H2 welds) was substantially lower than that in the belt line region (near the H4 weld). Fluence in the top guide was significantly higher than fluence on the core shroud. As expected, helium concentrations were highest in regions where fluence was highest. Estimates of the initial boron concentration were similar to measurements made on materials removed from other reactors. A technical justification evaluated the acceptability of the sampling process with respect to structural consequences of material removal and to increased cracking susceptibility due to the as-left condition. It was determined that the sampling process was acceptable on both counts

  4. The influence of substrate temperature and spraying distance on the properties of plasma sprayed tungsten and steel coatings deposited in a shrouding chamber

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějíček, Jiří; Vilémová, Monika; Nevrlá, Barbara; Kocmanová, Lenka; Veverka, Jakub; Halasová, Martina; Hadraba, Hynek

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 318, May (2017), s. 217-223 ISSN 0257-8972. [International Meeting on Thermal Spraying (RIPT)/7./. Limoges, 09.12.2015-11.12.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 633053 - EUROfusion Institutional support: RVO:61389021 ; RVO:68081723 Keywords : Tungsten * Steel * Atmospheric plasma spraying * Shrouding * Substrate temperature * Fusion reactor materials * Plasma facing components Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials; JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials (UFM-A) OBOR OECD: Coating and films; Coating and films (UFM-A) Impact factor: 2.589, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ article /pii/S0257897216310520

  5. Reactor shroud joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballas, G.J.; Fife, A.B.; Ganz, I.

    1998-01-01

    A shroud for a nuclear reactor is described. In one embodiment, the shroud includes first and second shroud sections, and each shroud section includes a substantially cylindrical main body having a first end and a second end. With respect to each shroud section, a flange is located at the main body first end, and the flange has a plurality of bolt openings therein and a plurality of scalloped regions. The first shroud section is welded to the second shroud section, and at least some of the bolt openings in the first shroud section flange align with respective bolt openings in the second shroud section flange. In the event that the onset of inter-granular stress corrosion cracking is ever detected in the weld between the shroud section, bolts are inserted through bolt openings in the first shroud section flange and through aligned bolt openings the second shroud section flange. Each bolt, in one embodiment, has a shank section and first and second threaded end sections. Nuts are threadedly engaged to the threaded end sections and tightened against the respective flanges. 4 figs

  6. Repairing method for shroud in reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Yusuke.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of repairing a shroud disposed in a pressure vessel of a BWR type reactor. Namely, a baffle plate is disposed on the outer surface of the lower portion of the shroud supported by a shroud support of the pressure vessel. The baffle plate is connected with a lug for securing a shroud head bolt disposed on the outer surface of an upper portion of the shroud by reinforcing members. With such a constitution, when crackings are caused in the shroud, the development of the crackings can be prevented without losing the function of securing the shroud head bolt. Further, if a material having thermal expansion coefficient lower than that of austenite stainless steel is used for the material of the reinforcing member, clamping load to be applied upon attaching the auxiliary member can be reduced. As a result, operation for the attachment is facilitated. (I.S.)

  7. Determination of the neutron fluence in the welding of the 'Core shroud' of the BWR reactor core; Determinacion de la fluencia neutronica en las soldaduras del 'core shroud' del nucleo de un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucatero, M.A.; Xolocostli M, J.V.; Gomez T, A.M.; Palacios H, J.C. [ININ, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: mal@nuclear.inin.mx

    2006-07-01

    With the purpose of defining the inspection frequency, in function of the embrittlement of the materials that compose the welding of the 'Core Shroud' or encircling of the core of a BWR type reactor, is necessary to know the neutron fluence received for this welding. In the work the calculated values of neutron fluence accumulated maxim (E > 1 MeV) during the first 8 operation cycles of the reactor are presented. The calculations were carried out according to the NRC Regulatory Guide 1.190, making use of the DORT code, which solves the transport equation in discreet ordinate in two dimensions (xy, r{theta}, and rz). The results in 3D were obtained applying the Synthesis method according to the guide before mentioned. Results are presented for the horizontal welding H3, H4, and H5, showing the corresponding curves to the fluence accumulated to the cycle 8 and a projection for the cycle 14 is presented. (Author)

  8. Installation technology of reactor internals on shroud replacement work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyano, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    Since the replacement of large welded reactor internals much as a core shroud did not have a precedent in the world, quite a few technologies had to be developed. Especially for the installation of new core shroud, jet pumps, core plate and top guide, the accurate weld and fit-up techniques for large structures was required to secure their integrity. The vessel shielding system was utilized to reduce general area dose rate such that all replacement work. For jet pump installation, automatic remote welding machines were used for high radiation area. As for the core shroud, shroud support weld prep machining tool with high accuracy, jacking system to support fit-up, new weld machine for small work space and low heat input weld joint were developed. Shroud replacement work in Fukushima Dai-ichi NPS Unit 3 (1F-3) with application of these development techniques, was successfully accomplished. The technology is applied for 1F-2 replacement work also. (author)

  9. Use of stainless steel as structural materials in reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teodoro, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are used as structural materials in reactor cores, due to their good mechanical properties at working temperatures and high generalized corrosion resistance in aqueous medium. The objective of this paper is to compare several 300 series austenitic stainless steels related to mechanical properties, localized corrosion resistance (SCC and intergranular) and content of delta ferrite. (author)

  10. Effect of Shrouding Gas Temperature on Characteristics of a Supersonic Jet Flow Field with a Shrouding Laval Nozzle Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fuhai; Sun, Dongbai; Zhu, Rong; Li, Yilin

    2018-05-01

    Coherent jet technology was been widely used in the electric arc furnace steelmaking process to protect the kinetic energy of supersonic oxygen jets and achieve a better mixing effect. For this technology, the total temperature distribution of the shrouding jet has a great impact on the velocity of the main oxygen jet. In this article, a supersonic shrouding nozzle using a preheating shrouding jet is proposed to increase the shrouding jet velocity. Both numerical simulation and experimental studies were carried out to analyze its effect on the axial velocity, total temperature and turbulence kinetic energy profiles of the main oxygen jet. Based on these results, it was found that a significant amount of kinetic energy was removed from the main oxygen jet when it passed though the shock wave using a high-temperature shrouding jet, which made the average axial velocity of the coherent jet lower than for a conventional jet in the potential core region. However, the supersonic shrouding nozzle and preheating technology employed for this nozzle design significantly improved the shrouding gas velocity, forming a low-density gas zone at the exit of the main oxygen jet and prolonging the velocity potential core length.

  11. Ceramic gas turbine shroud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jun; Green, Kevin E.

    2014-07-22

    An example gas turbine engine shroud includes a first annular ceramic wall having an inner side for resisting high temperature turbine engine gasses and an outer side with a plurality of radial slots. A second annular metallic wall is positioned radially outwardly of and enclosing the first annular ceramic wall and has a plurality of tabs in communication with the slot of the first annular ceramic wall. The tabs of the second annular metallic wall and slots of the first annular ceramic wall are in communication such that the first annular ceramic wall and second annular metallic wall are affixed.

  12. Shroud cutting techniques and collection systems for secondary radioactivity release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoi, H.; Watanabe, A.; Uetake, N.; Shimura, T.; Omote, T.; Adachi, H.; Murakami, S.; Kobayashi, H.; Gotoh, M.

    2001-01-01

    Replacement of in-core shroud has been conducted as part of the preventive maintenance program in Tsuruga-1. The EDM (electric discharged machining) and plasma cutting methods were applied to in-core shroud cutting and secondary cutting in the DSP (dryer/separator pool), respectively. The cutting systems were improved in order to decrease radioactive secondary products. 1) Fundamental EDM cutting tests: fundamental EDM cutting tests were carried out in order to study secondary products. It could be presumed that volatile Co-carbonyl compound was generated by using a carbon electrode. The Ag/W electrode was effective as EDM electrode for in-core shroud cutting to prevent generation of Co-carbonyl compound and to decrease the total amount of secondary products. 2) In-core shroud cutting in RPV (reactor pressure vessel): EDM cutting system with the Ag/W electrode and collection system could keep a good environment during in-core shroud cutting in Tsuruga-1. Activity concentration was lower value than limitation of mask charge level, 4E-6 Bq/cm 3 , even near the water surface. 3) Secondary plasma cutting in DSP: the secondary cutting work was successful in the point of reduction of working period and radiation exposure. The amount of radiation exposure was reduced to 60% of the planned value, because of adequate decontamination of the working environment and reduction of number of torch maintenance tasks by improvements of the underwater cutting device

  13. Shroud brushing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamaki, Kazuo; Takabayashi, Jun-ichi.

    1996-01-01

    A roller screw is assembled at an axial center of the inside of a device main body. A nut is assembled to the axial center of the roller screw secured so as not to be rotated, and a base is integrally connected to the nut. An air cylinder is pivoted to the base by a pin, and an arm is disposed to a piston rod of the air cylinder. The top end of the arm is secured to a motor case, and a brush is rotated by an electric motor in the motor case. The device main body is suspended into the reactor pressure vessel of a BWR type reactor, and seated on the upper surface of a fuel support metal fitting. The roller screw is rotated to move vertically the arm by way of the nut and the base. The device main body is rotated to rotate the arm. The arm is extended and then the electric motor is driven to rotate the brush thereby polishing the inner surface of the shroud. (I.N.)

  14. Shroud brushing device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamaki, Kazuo; Takabayashi, Jun-ichi

    1996-07-12

    A roller screw is assembled at an axial center of the inside of a device main body. A nut is assembled to the axial center of the roller screw secured so as not to be rotated, and a base is integrally connected to the nut. An air cylinder is pivoted to the base by a pin, and an arm is disposed to a piston rod of the air cylinder. The top end of the arm is secured to a motor case, and a brush is rotated by an electric motor in the motor case. The device main body is suspended into the reactor pressure vessel of a BWR type reactor, and seated on the upper surface of a fuel support metal fitting. The roller screw is rotated to move vertically the arm by way of the nut and the base. The device main body is rotated to rotate the arm. The arm is extended and then the electric motor is driven to rotate the brush thereby polishing the inner surface of the shroud. (I.N.)

  15. Airfoil nozzle and shroud assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, J.E.; Norton, P.F.

    1997-06-03

    An airfoil and nozzle assembly are disclosed including an outer shroud having a plurality of vane members attached to an inner surface and having a cantilevered end. The assembly further includes a inner shroud being formed by a plurality of segments. Each of the segments having a first end and a second end and having a recess positioned in each of the ends. The cantilevered end of the vane member being positioned in the recess. The airfoil and nozzle assembly being made from a material having a lower rate of thermal expansion than that of the components to which the airfoil and nozzle assembly is attached. 5 figs.

  16. Regimes of Micro-bubble Formation Using Gas Injection into Ladle Shroud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sheng; Cao, Xiangkun; Zou, Zongshu

    2018-06-01

    Gas injection into a ladle shroud is a practical approach to produce micro-bubbles in tundishes, to promote inclusion removal from liquid steel. A semi-empirical model was established to characterize the bubble formation considering the effect of shearing action combined with the non-fully bubble break-up by turbulence. The model shows a good accuracy in predicting the size of bubbles formed in complex flow within the ladle shroud.

  17. Tensile property improvement of TWIP-cored three-layer steel sheets fabricated by hot-roll-bonding with low-carbon steel or interstitial-free steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaeyeong; Kim, Jung-Su; Kang, Minju; Sohn, Seok Su; Cho, Won Tae; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Sunghak

    2017-01-01

    TWIP-cored three-layer steel sheets were newly fabricated by hot rolling of TWIP steel sheet surrounded by low-carbon (LC) or interstitial-free (IF) steel sheets. TWIP/LC or TWIP/IF interfaces were well bonded without pores or voids, while a few pearlites were thinly formed along the interfaces. The strengths and elongation of the TWIP-cored sheets increased as the volume fraction of TWIP-cored region increased, and were also well matched with the ones calculated by a rule of mixtures based on volume fraction or force fraction. According to digital image correlation and electron back-scatter diffraction analyses, very high strain hardening effect in the initial deformation stage and active twin formation in the interfacial region beneficially affected the overall homogeneous deformation in the TWIP-cored sheets without any yield point phenomenon occurring in the LC sheet and serrations occurring in the TWIP sheet, respectively. These TWIP-cored sheets can cover a wide range of yield strength, tensile strength, and ductility levels, e.g., 320~498 MPa, 545~878 MPa, and 48~54%, respectively, by controlling the volume fraction of TWIP-cored region, and thus present new applications to multi-functional automotive steel sheets requiring excellent properties.

  18. Dome style heavy wall steel casting manufactured by metallic core mould system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Shiro; Saeki, Keiji; Hirose, Yutaka; Takebayashi, Kazunari; Kawasaki, Masatoshi

    1986-01-01

    Semi-spherical thick walled steel castings are one of the main products of Nippon Chutanko K.K., but there have been the problems of internal defects peculiar to large thick walled steel castings, and the various improvements have been carried out so far for the manufacturing method, but still some of those remains. Based on the anxiety about the reliability of large steel castings, the conversion to forging has been studied. For the purpose of thoroughly improving the internal quality of thick walled steel castings to compete with forgings, on the basis of the operating experience of chills, the development of the casting techniques changing cores completely to metallic cores has been advanced. After the preliminary experiment using models, a semi-spherical thick walled steel casting mentioned before was manufactured by this metallic core casting method for trial, and the detailed investigation was carried out. As the result, the excellent internal quality was confirmed, accordingly at present, the production is made by this method. The form, dimensions and specification of the semi-spherical thick walled steel castings, the conventional casting plan, the metallic core casting plan, the design of metallic cores, molding and casting, and the examination of the castings made for trial are reported. (Kako, I.)

  19. Effect of shroud material on the spherical aberration in electromagnetic focusing lens used in electron beam welding machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Srijit Kumar; Gupta, Sachin; Kandaswamy, E.

    2015-01-01

    Beam Power density on the target (typically 10"5 -10"6 W/cm"2 ) plays a major role in attaining good weld quality in electron beam welding. Spherical aberration in the electromagnetic focusing lenses places a limitation in attaining the required power density on the target. Conventionally, iron or low carbon steel core are being used as a shroud material in the electromagnetic lenses. The practical difficulty faced in the long term performance of these lenses has initiated a systematic study for various shroud materials and the effect on spherical aberration limited spot size. The particle trajectories were simulated with different magnetic materials, using commercial software. The spherical aberration was found to be the lowest in the air core lens. The possibility of using an aircore electromagnetic focusing lens in electron beam machines is discussed in this paper. The beam power density is limited by various factors such as spherical aberration, space charge aberrations, gun alignment and power source parameters. (author)

  20. Degradation of austenitic stainless steel (SS) light water ractor (LWR) core internals due to neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Appajosula S., E-mail: Appajosula.Rao@nrc.gov

    2014-04-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are extensively being used in the fabrication of light water reactor (LWR) core internal components. It is because these steels have relatively high ductility, fracture toughness and moderate strength. However, the LWR internal components exposure to neutron irradiation over an extended period of plant operation degrades the materials mechanical properties such as the fracture toughness. This paper summarizes some of the results of the existing open literature data on irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of 316 CW steels that have been published by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), industry, academia, and other research agencies.

  1. The effects of stainless steel radial reflector on core reactivity for small modular reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jung Kil, E-mail: jkkang@email.kings.ac.kr; Hah, Chang Joo, E-mail: changhah@kings.ac.kr [KINGS, 658-91, Haemaji-ro, Seosaeng-myeon, Ulju-gun, Ulsan, 689-882 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sung Ju, E-mail: sungju@knfc.co.kr; Seong, Ki Bong, E-mail: kbseong@knfc.co.kr [KNFC, Daedeok-daero 989beon-gil, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-22

    Commercial PWR core is surrounded by a radial reflector, which consists of a baffle and water. Radial reflector is designed to reflect neutron back into the core region to improve the neutron efficiency of the reactor and to protect the reactor vessels from the embrittling effects caused by irradiation during power operation. Reflector also helps to flatten the neutron flux and power distributions in the reactor core. The conceptual nuclear design for boron-free small modular reactor (SMR) under development in Korea requires to have the cycle length of 4∼5 years, rated power of 180 MWth and enrichment less than 5 w/o. The aim of this paper is to analyze the effects of stainless steel radial reflector on the performance of the SMR using UO{sub 2} fuels. Three types of reflectors such as water, water/stainless steel 304 mixture and stainless steel 304 are selected to investigate the effect on core reactivity. Additionally, the thickness of stainless steel and double layer reflector type are also investigated. CASMO-4/SIMULATE-3 code system is used for this analysis. The results of analysis show that single layer stainless steel reflector is the most efficient reflector.

  2. Electrolytic reduction runs of 0.6 kg scale-simulated oxide fuel in a Li2O-LiCl molten salt using metal anode shrouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun-Young; Lee, Jeong; Heo, Dong Hyun; Lee, Sang Kwon; Jeon, Min Ku; Hong, Sun Seok; Kim, Sung-Wook; Kang, Hyun Woo; Jeon, Sang-Chae; Hur, Jin-Mok

    2017-06-01

    Ten electrolytic reduction or oxide reduction (OR) runs of a 0.6 kg scale-simulated oxide fuel in a Li2O-LiCl molten salt at 650 °C were conducted using metal anode shrouds. During this procedure, an anode shroud surrounds a platinum anode and discharges hot oxygen gas from the salt to outside of the OR apparatus, thereby preventing corrosion of the apparatus. In this study, a number of anode shrouds made of various metals were tested. Each metallic anode shroud consisted of a lower porous shroud for the salt phase and an upper nonporous shroud for the gas phase. A stainless steel (STS) wire mesh with five-ply layer was a material commonly used for the lower porous shroud for the OR runs. The metals tested for the upper nonporous shroud in the different OR runs are STS, nickel, and platinum- or silver-lined nickel. The lower porous shroud showed no significant damage during two consecutive OR runs, but exhibited signs of damage from three or more runs due to thermal stress. The upper nonporous shrouds made up of either platinum- or silver-lined nickel showed excellent corrosion resistance to hot oxygen gas while STS or nickel without any platinum or silver lining exhibited poor corrosion resistance.

  3. Reduction of core loss in non-oriented (NO) electrical steel by electroless-plated magnetic coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chivavibul, Pornthep; Enoki, Manabu; Konda, Shigeru; Inada, Yasushi; Tomizawa, Tamotsu; Toda, Akira

    2011-01-01

    An important issue in development of electrical steels for core-laminated products is to reduce core loss to improve energy conversion efficiency. This is usually obtained by tailoring the composition, microstructure, and texture of electrical steels themselves. A new technique to reduce core loss in electrical steel has been investigated. This technique involves electroless plating of magnetic thin coating onto the surface of electrical steel. The material system was electroless Ni-Co-P coatings with different thicknesses (1, 5, and 10 μm) deposited onto the surface of commercially available Fe-3% Si electrical steel. Characterization of deposited Ni-Co-P coating was carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrometer. The deposited Ni-Co-P coatings were amorphous and composed of 56-59% Ni, 32-35% Co, and 8-10% P by mass. The effect of coatings on core loss of the electrical steel was determined using single sheet test. A core loss reduction of 4% maximum was achieved with the Ni-Co-P coating of 1 μm thickness at 400 Hz and 0.3 T. - Research Highlights: → New approach to reduce core loss of electrical steel by magnetic coating. → Ni-Co-P coating influences core loss of NO electrical steel. → Core loss increases in RD direction but reduces in TD direction.

  4. Hollow-Core FRP–Concrete–Steel Bridge Columns under Torsional Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujith Anumolu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the behavior of hollow-core fiber-reinforced polymer–concrete–steel (HC-FCS columns under cyclic torsional loading combined with constant axial load. The HC-FCS consists of an outer fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP tube and an inner steel tube, with a concrete shell sandwiched between the two tubes. The FRP tube was stopped at the surface of the footing, and provided confinement to the concrete shell from the outer direction. The steel tube was embedded into the footing to a length of 1.8 times the diameter of the steel tube. The longitudinal and transversal reinforcements of the column were provided by the steel tube only. A large-scale HC-FCS column with a diameter of 24 in. (610 mm and applied load height of 96 in. (2438 mm with an aspect ratio of four was investigated during this study. The study revealed that the torsional behavior of the HC-FCS column mainly depended on the stiffness of the steel tube and the interactions among the column components (concrete shell, steel tube, and FRP tube. A brief comparison of torsional behavior was made between the conventional reinforced concrete columns and the HC-FCS column. The comparison illustrated that both column types showed high initial stiffness under torsional loading. However, the HC-FCS column maintained the torsion strength until a high twist angle, while the conventional reinforced concrete column did not.

  5. Storage rack for fuel cell receiving shrouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollon, L.

    1978-01-01

    Disclosed is a rack for receiving a multiplicity of vertical tubular shrouds or tubes for storing spent nuclear fuel cells. The rack comprises a plurality of horizontally reticulated frames interconnected by tension rods and spacing tubes surrounding the rods

  6. Electrolytic reduction runs of 0.6 kg scale-simulated oxide fuel in a Li{sub 2}O-LiCl molten salt using metal anode shrouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Eun-Young, E-mail: eychoi@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong; Heo, Dong Hyun; Lee, Sang Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Min Ku [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Quantum Energy Chemical Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Gajeong-ro 217, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34113 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sun Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung-Wook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Quantum Energy Chemical Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Gajeong-ro 217, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34113 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hyun Woo; Jeon, Sang-Chae; Hur, Jin-Mok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Ten electrolytic reduction or oxide reduction (OR) runs of a 0.6 kg scale-simulated oxide fuel in a Li{sub 2}O-LiCl molten salt at 650 °C were conducted using metal anode shrouds. During this procedure, an anode shroud surrounds a platinum anode and discharges hot oxygen gas from the salt to outside of the OR apparatus, thereby preventing corrosion of the apparatus. In this study, a number of anode shrouds made of various metals were tested. Each metallic anode shroud consisted of a lower porous shroud for the salt phase and an upper nonporous shroud for the gas phase. A stainless steel (STS) wire mesh with five-ply layer was a material commonly used for the lower porous shroud for the OR runs. The metals tested for the upper nonporous shroud in the different OR runs are STS, nickel, and platinum- or silver-lined nickel. The lower porous shroud showed no significant damage during two consecutive OR runs, but exhibited signs of damage from three or more runs due to thermal stress. The upper nonporous shrouds made up of either platinum- or silver-lined nickel showed excellent corrosion resistance to hot oxygen gas while STS or nickel without any platinum or silver lining exhibited poor corrosion resistance. - Highlights: •Electrolytic reduction runs of a 0.6 kg scale-simulated oxide fuel in a Li{sub 2}O-LiCl molten salt at 650 °C were conducted using metal anode shrouds. •Each metallic anode shroud consisted of a lower porous shroud for the salt phase and an upper nonporous shroud for the gas phase. •The upper nonporous shrouds made up of noble metal-lined nickel showed excellent corrosion resistance to hot oxygen gas.

  7. Prediction of high frequency core loss for electrical steel using the data provided by manufacturer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Rakesh [National Institute of Technology Meghalaya, Shillong (India); Dalal, Ankit; Kumar, Praveen [Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Assam (India)

    2016-07-15

    This paper describes a technique to determine the core loss data, at high frequencies, using the loss data provided by the lamination manufacturer. Steinmetz equation is used in this proposed method to determine core loss at high frequency. This Steinmetz equation consists of static hysteresis and eddy current loss. The presented technique considers the coefficients of Steinmetz equation as variable with frequency and peak magnetic flux density. The high frequency core loss data, predicted using this model is compared with the catalogue data given by manufacturer and very good accuracy has been obtained for a wide range of frequency. - Highlights: • A curve fitting algorithm is proposed to predict core loss at high frequency. • The loss data given by the steel manufacturers are used in curve fitting algorithm. • The algorithm is tested on nine different material’s data set given by the manufacturer.

  8. Prediction of high frequency core loss for electrical steel using the data provided by manufacturer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Rakesh; Dalal, Ankit; Kumar, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a technique to determine the core loss data, at high frequencies, using the loss data provided by the lamination manufacturer. Steinmetz equation is used in this proposed method to determine core loss at high frequency. This Steinmetz equation consists of static hysteresis and eddy current loss. The presented technique considers the coefficients of Steinmetz equation as variable with frequency and peak magnetic flux density. The high frequency core loss data, predicted using this model is compared with the catalogue data given by manufacturer and very good accuracy has been obtained for a wide range of frequency. - Highlights: • A curve fitting algorithm is proposed to predict core loss at high frequency. • The loss data given by the steel manufacturers are used in curve fitting algorithm. • The algorithm is tested on nine different material’s data set given by the manufacturer.

  9. Numerical Analysis on Heat Flux Distribution through the Steel Liner of the Ex-vessel Core Catcher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Se Hong; Choi, Choeng Ryul [ELSOLTEC, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung Jo; Lee, Kyu Bok [KEPCO, Gimcheon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Do Hyun [KHNP-CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In order to prevent material failure of steel container of the core catcher system due to high temperatures, heat flux through the steel liner wall must be kept below the critical heat flux (CHF), and vapor dry-out of the cooling channel must be avoided. In this study, CFD methodology has been developed to simulate the heat flux distribution in the core catcher system, involving following physical phenomena: natural convection in the corium pool, boiling heat transfer and solidification/melting of the corium. A CFD methodology has been developed to simulate the thermal/hydraulic phenomena in the core catcher system, and a numerical analysis has been carried out to estimate the heat flux through the steel liner of the core catcher. High heat flux values are formed at the free surface of the corium pool. However, the heat flux through the steel liner is maintained below the critical heat flux.

  10. The Shroud of Turin: Relic or icon?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dale, W.S.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Shroud of Turin, a linen cloth on which appear the imprints of the front and back of a crucified man, can be historically traced to ca. 1354 A.D. Many believe it to be a true relic of the Passion of Christ. Many others regard it as a fake. This paper suggests a third alternative, that it is an icon dating from the 11th century. If future scientific tests, of which radiocarbon dating will be the most important, support this theory, the Shroud of Turin may well be recognized as one of the masterpieces of Christian art. (orig.)

  11. Compressor ported shroud for foil bearing cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elpern, David G [Los Angeles, CA; McCabe, Niall [Torrance, CA; Gee, Mark [South Pasadena, CA

    2011-08-02

    A compressor ported shroud takes compressed air from the shroud of the compressor before it is completely compressed and delivers it to foil bearings. The compressed air has a lower pressure and temperature than compressed outlet air. The lower temperature of the air means that less air needs to be bled off from the compressor to cool the foil bearings. This increases the overall system efficiency due to the reduced mass flow requirements of the lower temperature air. By taking the air at a lower pressure, less work is lost compressing the bearing cooling air.

  12. Effect of non-metallic precipitates and grain size on core loss of non-oriented electrical silicon steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiayi; Ren, Qiang; Luo, Yan; Zhang, Lifeng

    2018-04-01

    In the current study, the number density and size of non-metallic precipitates and the size of grains on the core loss of the 50W800 non-oriented electrical silicon steel sheets were investigated. The number density and size of precipitates and grains were statistically analyzed using an automatic scanning electron microscope (ASPEX) and an optical microscope. Hypothesis models were established to reveal the physical feature for the function of grain size and precipitates on the core loss of the steel. Most precipitates in the steel were AlN particles smaller than 1 μm so that were detrimental to the core loss of the steel. These finer AlN particles distributed on the surface of the steel sheet. The relationship between the number density of precipitates (x in number/mm2 steel area) and the core loss (P1.5/50 in W/kg) was regressed as P1.5/50 = 4.150 + 0.002 x. The average grain size was approximately 25-35 μm. The relationship between the core loss and grain size (d in μm) was P1.5/50 = 3.851 + 20.001 d-1 + 60.000 d-2.

  13. Design and Analysis of Horizontal Axial Flow Motor Shroud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiming; Shen, Yu

    2018-01-01

    The wind turbine diffuser can increase the wind energy utilization coefficient of the wind turbine, and the addition of the shroud to the horizontal axis wind turbine also plays a role of accelerating the flow of the condensate. First, the structure of the shroud was designed and then modeled in gambit. The fluent software was used to establish the mathematical model for simulation. The length of the shroud and the opening angle of the shroud are analyzed to determine the best shape of the shroud. Then compared the efficiency with or without the shroud, through the simulation and the experiment of the water tank, it is confirmed that the horizontal axis of the shroud can improve the hydrodynamic performance.

  14. Experimental results of core-concrete interactions using molten steel with zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copus, E.R.; Blose, R.E.; Brockmann, J.E.; Gomez, R.D.; Lucero, D.A.

    1990-07-01

    Four inductively sustained experiments, QT-D, QT-E, SURC-3, and SURC-3A, were performed in order to investigate the additional effects of zirconium metal oxidation on core debris-concrete interactions using molten stainless steel as the core debris simulant. The QT-D experiment ablated 18 cm of concrete axially during 50 minutes of interaction on limestone-common sand concrete using a 10 kg charge of 304 stainless steel to which 2 kg of zirconium metal was added subsequent to the onset of erosion. The QT-E experiment ablated 10 cm of limestone-common sand concrete axially and 10 cm radially during 35 minutes of sustained interaction using 50 kg of stainless steel and 10 kg of zirconium. The SURC-3 experiment had a 45 kg charge of stainless steel to which 1.1 kg of zirconium was subsequently added. SURC-3 axially eroded 33 cm of limestone concrete during two hours of interaction. The fourth experiment, SURC-3A, eroded 25 cm of limestone concrete axially and 9 cm radially during 90 minutes of sustained interaction. It utilized 40 kg of stainless steel and 2.2 kg of added zirconium as the charge material. All four experiments showed in a large increase in erosion rate, gas production, and aerosol release following the addition of Zr metal to the melt. In the SURC-3 and SURC-3A tests the measured erosion rates increased from 14 cm/hr to 27 cm/hr, gas release increased from 50 slpm to 100 slpm, and aerosol release increased from .02 q/sec to .04 q/sec. The effluent gas was composed of 80% CO, 10% CO 2 , and 2% H 2 before Zr addition and 92% CO, 4% CO 2 , 4% H 2 during the Zr interactions which lasted 10--20 minutes. Addition measurements indicated that the melt pool temperature ranged from 1600 degree C--1800 degree and that the aerosols produced were comprised primarily of Te and Fe oxides. 21 refs., 120 figs., 51 tabs

  15. Experimental results of core-concrete interactions using molten steel with zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copus, E.R.; Blose, R.E.; Brockmann, J.E.; Gomez, R.D.; Lucero, D.A. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1990-07-01

    Four inductively sustained experiments, QT-D, QT-E, SURC-3, and SURC-3A, were performed in order to investigate the additional effects of zirconium metal oxidation on core debris-concrete interactions using molten stainless steel as the core debris simulant. The QT-D experiment ablated 18 cm of concrete axially during 50 minutes of interaction on limestone-common sand concrete using a 10 kg charge of 304 stainless steel to which 2 kg of zirconium metal was added subsequent to the onset of erosion. The QT-E experiment ablated 10 cm of limestone-common sand concrete axially and 10 cm radially during 35 minutes of sustained interaction using 50 kg of stainless steel and 10 kg of zirconium. The SURC-3 experiment had a 45 kg charge of stainless steel to which 1.1 kg of zirconium was subsequently added. SURC-3 axially eroded 33 cm of limestone concrete during two hours of interaction. The fourth experiment, SURC-3A, eroded 25 cm of limestone concrete axially and 9 cm radially during 90 minutes of sustained interaction. It utilized 40 kg of stainless steel and 2.2 kg of added zirconium as the charge material. All four experiments showed in a large increase in erosion rate, gas production, and aerosol release following the addition of Zr metal to the melt. In the SURC-3 and SURC-3A tests the measured erosion rates increased from 14 cm/hr to 27 cm/hr, gas release increased from 50 slpm to 100 slpm, and aerosol release increased from .02 q/sec to .04 q/sec. The effluent gas was composed of 80% CO, 10% CO{sub 2}, and 2% H{sub 2} before Zr addition and 92% CO, 4% CO{sub 2}, 4% H{sub 2} during the Zr interactions which lasted 10--20 minutes. Addition measurements indicated that the melt pool temperature ranged from 1600{degree}C--1800{degree} and that the aerosols produced were comprised primarily of Te and Fe oxides. 21 refs., 120 figs., 51 tabs.

  16. A DETERMINATION OF THE FLUX DENSITY IN CORE OF DISTRIBUTION TRANSFORMERS, WHAT BUILT WITH THE COMMON USING OF GRAIN AND NON GRAIN ORIENTED MAGNETIC STEELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Pentegov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The development of calculation method to determinate the flux densities in different parts of the magnetic cores of distribution transformers, what built from different types magnetic steel (mixed core. Methodology. The method is based on the scientific positions of Theoretical Electrical Engineering – the theory of the electromagnetic field in nonlinear mediums to determine the distribution of magnetic flux in mixed core of transformer, what are using different types of steel what have the different magnetic properties. Results. The developed method gives possible to make calculation of the flux density and influence of skin effect in different parts of the magnetic cores of distribution transformer, where are used mix of grain oriented (GO and non grain oriented (NGO steels. Was determinate the general basic conditions for the calculation of flux density in the laminations from grain and non grain oriented steels of the magnetic core: the strength of magnetic field for the laminations of particular part of mixed core is the same; the sum of the magnetic fluxes in GO and NGO steels in particular part of mixed core is equal with the designed magnetic flux in this part of mixed core. Discover, the magnetic flux in mixed core of the transformer has specific distribution between magnetic steels. The flux density is higher in laminations from GO steel and smaller in laminations from the NGO steel. That is happened because for magnetic flux is easier pass through laminations from GO steel, what has better magnetic conductance than laminations from NGO steel. Originality. The common using of different types of magnetic steels in cores for distribution transformers gives possibility to make design of transformer with low level of no load losses, high efficiency and with optimal cost. Practical value. The determination of the flux density in different parts of magnetic core with GO and NGO steels gives possibility make accurate calculation of

  17. Assessment of void swelling in austenitic stainless steel PWR core internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.

    2006-01-01

    As many pressurized water reactors (PWRs) age and life extension of the aged plants is considered, void swelling behavior of austenitic stainless steel (SS) core internals has become the subject of increasing attention. In this report, the available database on void swelling and density change of austenitic SSs was critically reviewed. Irradiation conditions, test procedures, and microstructural characteristics were carefully examined, and key factors that are important to determine the relevance of the database to PWR conditions were evaluated. Most swelling data were obtained from steels irradiated in fast breeder reactors at temperatures >385 C and at dose rates that are orders of magnitude higher than PWR dose rates. Even for a given irradiation temperature and given steel, the integral effects of dose and dose rate on void swelling should not be separated. It is incorrect to extrapolate swelling data on the basis of 'progressive compounded multiplication' of separate effects of factors such as dose, dose rate, temperature, steel composition, and fabrication procedure. Therefore, the fast reactor data should not be extrapolated to determine credible void swelling behavior for PWR end-of-life (EOL) or life-extension conditions. Although the void swelling data extracted from fast reactor studies is extensive and conclusive, only limited amounts of swelling data and information have been obtained on microstructural characteristics from discharged PWR internals or steels irradiated at temperatures and at dose rates comparable to those of a PWR. Based on this relatively small amount of information, swelling in thin-walled tubes and baffle bolts in a PWR is not considered a concern. As additional data and relevant research becomes available, the newer results should be integrated with existing data, and the worthiness of this conclusion should continue to be scrutinized. PWR baffle reentrant corners are the most likely location to experience high swelling rates, and

  18. Reaction- and melting behaviour of LWR-core components UO2, Zircaloy and steel during the meltdown period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, P.

    1976-07-01

    The reaction behaviour of the UO 2 , Zircaloy-4 and austenitic steel core components was investigated as a function of temperature (till melting temperatures) under inert and oxidizing conditions. Component concentrations varied between that of Corium-A (65 wt.% UO 2 , 18% Zry, 17% steel) and that of Corium-E (35 wt.% UO 2 , 10% Zry, 55% steel). In addition, Zircaloy and stainless steel were used with different degrees of oxidation. The paper describes systematically the phases that arise during heating and melting. The integral composition of the melts and the qualitative as well as quantitative analysis of the phases present in solidified corium are given. In some cases melting points have been determined. The reaction and melting behaviour of the corium specimens strongly depends on the concentration and on the degree of oxidation of the core components. First liquid phases are formed at the Zry-steel interface at about 1,350 0 C. The maximum temperatures of about 2,500 0 C for the complete melting of the corium-specimens are well below the UO 2 melting point. Depending on the steel content and/or degree of oxidation of Zry and steel, a homogeneous metallic or oxide melt or two immiscible melts - one oxide and the other metallic - are obtained. During the melting experiments performed under inert gas conditions the chemical composition of the molten specimens generally change by evaporation losses of single elements, especially of uranium, zirconium and oxygen. The total weight losses go up to 30%; under oxidizing conditions they are substantially smaller due to the occurrence of different phases. In air or water vapor, the occurrence of the phases and the melting behaviour of the core components are strongly influenced by the oxidation rate and the oxygen supply to the surface of the melt. In the case of the hypothetical core melting accident, a heterogeneous melt (oxide and metallic) is probable after the meltdown period. (orig./RW) [de

  19. Orthogonal decomposition of core loss along rolling and transverse directions of non-grain oriented silicon steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuezhi Wan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Rotational core loss of the silicon steel laminations are measured under elliptical rotating excitation. The core loss decomposition model is very important in magnetic core design, in which the decomposition coefficients are calculated through the measurement data. By using the transformation of trigonometric function, the elliptical rotational magnetic flux can be decomposed into two parts along two directions. It is assumed that the rotating core loss is the sum of alternating core losses along rolling and transverse directions. The magnetic strength vector H of non-grain oriented (NGO silicon steel 35WW270 along rolling and transverse directions is measured by a novel designed 3-D magnetic properties tester. Alternating core loss along the rolling, transverse directions and rotating core loss in the xoy-plane of this specimen in different frequencies such as 50 Hz, 100 Hz, and 200 Hz. Experimental results show that the core loss model is more accurate and useful to predict the total core loss.

  20. Thin grain oriented electrical steel for PWM voltages fed magnetic cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Belgrand

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on performances of high permeability grain oriented electrical steel when used in association with power electronic switching devices. Loss measurement results obtained from the Epstein test, using sinusoidal or various PWM voltages in medium frequency range, show that for both studied thicknesses (HGO 0.23mm and HGO 0.18mm, comparing performances at a fixed induction level between the various situations may not be the most convenient method. The effect of magnetic domain refinement has been investigated. After having shown the interest of lowering the thickness, an alternative way of looking at losses is proposed that may help to design the magnetic core when it comes to the matter of reducing size in considering frequency and magnetization levels.

  1. Aerothermal optimization of partially shrouded axial turbines[Dissertation 17138

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porreca, L.

    2007-07-01

    This work presents the results of an aerodynamic and thermal study of three different shrouded axial turbine configurations (turbomachinery). The blade geometry of the turbine stages and the tip clearances of the test cases under investigation are identical although the shroud design is different. The first test case (RRD) is representative of a full shroud geometry while the second (CPS) and third (EPS) test cases adopt different partial shroud arrangements. In the EPS case, a shroud platform is added to cover the blade throat. Partial shrouds are sometimes used in industrial application in order to benefit from the aerodynamic advantage of shrouded configuration as well as reducing thermal load and mechanical stress on the blade root. However, the optimal compromise between mechanical issues and aerodynamic performances is still an open issue due to the resulting highly 3-dimensional unsteady flow field, difficulty of achieve an optimal cooling and severe heat load on the shroud sealing fins. An experimental investigation is carried out in order to quantify the effect of the shroud geometry on the aerodynamic performances and to study the resultant flow field in all test cases. The analysis has been conducted in an experimental low-speed axial turbine facility at the Turbomachinery Laboratory at ETH Zurich. Steady and fast response aerodynamic probe technology (FRAP) has been used to characterize the flow field. Moreover, a stereoscopic PIV technique has been design and applied in this experimental facility for the first time. The flow field analysis shows that the effect of the shroud geometry is significant from 60% blade height span to the tip. Tip leakage vortex in the first rotor is originated in the partial shroud test cases while the full shroud case present only a weak indigenous tip passage vortex. Secondary flows development in the following second stator resulted to be greatly affected by the leakage/main flow interaction of the first rotor. The

  2. Irradiation performance of 9--12 Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steels and their potential for in-core application in LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1993-08-01

    Ferritic-martensitic stainless steels exhibit radiation stability and stress corrosion resistance that make them attractive replacement materials for austenitic stainless steels for in-core applications. Recent radiation studies have demonstrated that 9% Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steel had less than a 30C shift in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) following irradiation at 365C to a dose of 14 dpa. These steels also exhibit very low swelling rates, a result of the microstructural stability of these alloys during radiation. The 9 to 12% Cr alloys to also exhibit excellent corrosion and stress corrosion resistance in out-of-core applications. Demonstration of the applicability of ferritic/martensitic stainless steels for in-core LWR application will require verification of the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking behavior, measurement of DBTT following irradiation at 288C, and corrosion rates measurements for in-core water chemistry

  3. Optimization of power generation from shrouded wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foote, Tudor; Agarwal, Ramesh [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Washington University in St. Louis (United States)

    2013-07-01

    In past several years, several studies have shown that the shrouded wind turbines can generate greater power compared to bare turbines. The objective of this study is to determine the potential of shrouded wind turbines for increased power generation by conducting numerical simulations. An analytical/computational study is performed by employing the well-known commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software FLUENT. An actuator disc model is used to model the turbine. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and a two equation realizable {kappa}-{epsilon} model are employed in the calculations. The power coefficient Cp and generated power are calculated for a large number of cases for horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT) of various diameters and wind speeds for both bare and shrouded turbines. The design of the shroud is optimized by employing a single objective genetic algorithm; the objective being the maximization of the power coefficient Cp. It was found that the shroud indeed increases the Cp beyond the Betz’s limit significantly and as a result the generated power; this effect is consistent with that found in the recent literature that the shrouded wind-turbines can generate greater power than the bare turbines. The optimized shape of the shroud or diffuser further increases the generated power and Cp.

  4. Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorev, N.N.; Astafiev, A.A.; Loboda, A.S.; Savukov, V.P.; Runov, A.E.; Belov, V.A.; Sobolev, J.V.; Sobolev, V.V.; Pavlov, N.M.; Paton, B.E.

    1977-01-01

    Steels also containing Al, N and arsenic, are suitable for the construction of large components for high-power nuclear reactors due to their good mechanical properties such as good through-hardening, sufficiently low brittleness conversion temperature and slight displacement of the latter with neutron irradiation. Defined steels and their properties are described. (IHOE) [de

  5. Research on the development strategy of Pingdingshan iron and steel industry cluster with Wugang Company as the core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Shuai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Arouse the great potential of the industrial clusters will play a significant role in promoting the development of local WuGang company. The article takes the Pingdingshan City as the research object, who is a typical resource-based city and develops on the basis of the local resources of coal and iron ore, the core enterprise WuGang Company is a large state-owned enterprise based on the wide and thick steel plate production. Many problems also exit in the cluster innovation, company network construction, company cooperation. The article is from the perspective of steel industry cluster and cluster innovation. Firstly, the article introduces the correlation theory about the steel industry cluster and the basic development information of Pingdingshan steel industry cluster, and promotes the research purpose and meaning.The article will give the analysis to the problems from the Pingdingshan steel industry cluster and develop the reform proposals and development strategy according to the actual situation.

  6. Fluidized-bed calciner with combustion nozzle and shroud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wielang, J.A.; Palmer, W.B.; Kerr, W.B.

    1977-01-01

    A nozzle employed as a burner within a fluidized bed is coaxially enclosed within a tubular shroud that extends beyond the nozzle length into the fluidized bed. The open-ended shroud portion beyond the nozzle end provides an antechamber for mixture and combustion of atomized fuel with an oxygen-containing gas. The arrangement provides improved combustion efficiency and excludes bed particles from the high-velocity, high-temperature portions of the flame to reduce particle attrition. 4 claims, 2 figures

  7. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened steels for FBR core application. 2. Morphology improvement by martensite transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukai, Shigeharu; Nishida, Toshio; Yoshitake, Tunemitsu; Okuda, Takanari

    1998-01-01

    Previously manufactured oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel cladding tubes had inferior internal creep rupture strength in the circumferential hoop direction. This unexpected feature of ODS cladding tubes was substantially ascribed to the needle-like grain structure aligned with the forming direction. In this study, the grain morphology was controlled by using the martensite transformation in ODS martensitic steels to produce an equi-axial grain structure. A major improvement in the strength anisotropy was successfully achieved. The most effective yttria addition was about 1 mass% in improving the strength of the ODS martensitic steels. A simple addition of titanium was particularly effective in increasing the strength level of the ODS martensitic steels to that of ODS ferritic steels. (author)

  8. Cadmium verification measurements of HFIR shroud assembly 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, J.A.; Schultz, F.J.

    1994-04-01

    This report discusses radiation-based nondestructive examination methods which have been used to successfully verify the presence of cadmium in High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) spent-fuel shroud assembly number 22 (SA22). These measurements show, in part, that SA22 is certified to meet the criticality safety specifications for a proposed reconfiguration of the HFIR spent-fuel storage array. Measurement of the unique 558.6-keV gamma-ray from neutron radiative capture on cadmium provided conclusive evidence for the presence of cadmium in the outer shroud of the assembly. Cadmium verification in the center post and outer shroud was performed by measuring the degree of neutron transmission in SA22 relative to two calibration shroud assemblies. Each measurement was performed at a single location on the center post and outer shroud. These measurements do not provide information on the spatial distribution or uniformity of cadmium within an assembly. Separate measurements using analog and digital radiography were performed to (a) globally map the continuity of cadmium internal mass, and (b) locally determine the thickness of cadmium. Radiography results will be reported elsewhere. The measurements reported here should not be used to infer the thickness of cadmium in either the center post or outer shroud of an assembly

  9. Non-linear Dynamic Analysis of Steel Hollow I-core Sandwich Panel under Air Blast Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Vatani Oskouei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the non-linear dynamic response of novel steel sandwich panel with hollow I-core subjected to blast loading was studied. Special emphasis is placed on the evaluation of midpoint displacements and energy dissipation of the models. Several parameters such as boundary conditions, strain rate, mesh dependency and asymmetrical loading are considered in this study. The material and geometric non-linearities are also considered in the numerical simulation. The results obtained are compared with available experimental data to verify the developed FE model. Modeling techniques are described in detail. According to the results, sandwich panels with hollow I-core allowed more plastic deformation and energy dissipation and less midpoint displacement than conventional I-core sandwich panels and also equivalent solid plate with the same weight and material.

  10. Postirradiation examination of JOYO MK-II control rod (CRM601). Irradiation performance of shroud type absorber pin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Kosuke; Kikuchi, Shin; Katsuyama, Kozo; Nagamine, Tsuyoshi; Mitsugi, Takeshi; Uto, Manabu; Tatebe, Kazuaki; Onose, Shoji; Maruyama, Tadashi

    1998-10-01

    This paper describes the results of postirradiation examination and analysis by CORAL code for irradiation performance of CRM601 control rod, which was the 6th reloaded control rod with shroud type absorber pins for use in JOYO MK-II core. The detailed visual examination indicated that there was no cladding breach in absorber pins. However, sodium ingress from the vent tube was observed in four absorber pins among seven pins. While a remarkable oval deformation occurred in cladding tube of helium bonded absorber pins, a little or no diametral change was observed in the absorber pins in which sodium ingress took place. From metallurgical observations and the analysis by CORAL code, it was estimated that the shroud tube installed in helium bonded absorber pins were irradiated at 720degC, and those in sodium bonded absorber pins were irradiated at 420degC. It was confirmed that diametral change of cladding depended on the initial gap between shroud and cladding tube. The results of present investigation indicate that it is desirable to use the materials with low thermal expansion coefficient for shroud tubes, and that sodium bonded absorber pins were advantageous for obtaining long life control rods. (author)

  11. Bimetallic Blisks with Shrouded Turbine Blades for Gas Turbine Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Magerramova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses prospects of using blisks with shrouded blades. Increasing an engine life and efficiency as well as mass reduction can also be achieved by increasing blade numbers and decreasing disk diameter. But design engineers are faced with the problem of blade placement because of the disk size and root dimensions.The problem of increasing life and cyclic durability, vibration strength, and lightweight design of the turbine gas turbine wheels, can be solved by an elimination of blade - disk locks.The technology of manufacturing one-piece blisks by connecting the blades with the disc part using hot isostatic pressing was developed. This technology allows us to use blades with shrouds. It is necessary to increase efficiency and to improve high cycle fatigue performance of rotor blades.One of the pressing problems is to ensure the necessary position of shrouds in relation to each other in the manufacturing process as well as in the service. Numerical studies of the influence of the shroud mounting position on blade strength during operation allowed us to develop a methodology of choosing a shroud mounting position.Based on the two turbine wheels (LPT and HPT calculations advantages of blisk design with respect to the lock-based design were shown. Application of bimetallic blisks with shrouded blades resulted in a lifespan increase and weight reduction.In addition, other advantages of blisk design are as follows: possible reduction in the number of parts, elimination of leaks and fretting that take place in the blade - disk locks, exception of expensive broaching operations and disk alloy saving. The shortcoming is elimination of damping in root connection. In addition, there are no widely used repair methods.Despite these disadvantages the usage of bimetallic turbine blisks with shrouded blades is very promising.

  12. Core reilforced braided composite armour as a substitute to steel in concrete reinforcement

    OpenAIRE

    Fangueiro, Raúl; Sousa, Guilherme José Miranda de; Araújo, Mário Duarte de; Pereira, C. Gonilho; Jalali, Said

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the work that is being done at the University of Minho concerning the development of brainded rods concrete reinforcement. Several samples of core reinforced braided fabrics have been produced varying the type of braided fabric (core reinforced and hybrid), the linear density of the core reinforcing yarns and the type of braiding structure (with or without ribs). The tensile properties of braided fabrics has also been analysed. Core reinforced braided composites rods were ...

  13. Shroud leakage flow models and a multi-dimensional coupling CFD (computational fluid dynamics) method for shrouded turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Zhengping; Liu, Jingyuan; Zhang, Weihao; Wang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Multi-dimensional coupling simulation is an effective approach for evaluating the flow and aero-thermal performance of shrouded turbines, which can balance the simulation accuracy and computing cost effectively. In this paper, 1D leakage models are proposed based on classical jet theories and dynamics equations, which can be used to evaluate most of the main features of shroud leakage flow, including the mass flow rate, radial and circumferential momentum, temperature and the jet width. Then, the 1D models are expanded to 2D distributions on the interface by using a multi-dimensional scaling method. Based on the models and multi-dimensional scaling, a multi-dimensional coupling simulation method for shrouded turbines is developed, in which, some boundary source and sink are set on the interface between the shroud and the main flow passage. To verify the precision, some simulations on the design point and off design points of a 1.5 stage turbine are conducted. It is indicated that the models and methods can give predictions with sufficient accuracy for most of the flow field features and will contribute to pursue deeper understanding and better design methods of shrouded axial turbines, which are the important devices in energy engineering. - Highlights: • Free and wall attached jet theories are used to model the leakage flow in shrouds. • Leakage flow rate is modeled by virtual labyrinth number and residual-energy factor. • A scaling method is applied to 1D model to obtain 2D distributions on interfaces. • A multi-dimensional coupling CFD method for shrouded turbines is proposed. • The proposed coupling method can give accurate predictions with low computing cost.

  14. ACT Payload Shroud Structural Concept Analysis and Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewski, Bart B.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.

    2010-01-01

    Aerospace structural applications demand a weight efficient design to perform in a cost effective manner. This is particularly true for launch vehicle structures, where weight is the dominant design driver. The design process typically requires many iterations to ensure that a satisfactory minimum weight has been obtained. Although metallic structures can be weight efficient, composite structures can provide additional weight savings due to their lower density and additional design flexibility. This work presents structural analysis and weight optimization of a composite payload shroud for NASA s Ares V heavy lift vehicle. Two concepts, which were previously determined to be efficient for such a structure are evaluated: a hat stiffened/corrugated panel and a fiber reinforced foam sandwich panel. A composite structural optimization code, HyperSizer, is used to optimize the panel geometry, composite material ply orientations, and sandwich core material. HyperSizer enables an efficient evaluation of thousands of potential designs versus multiple strength and stability-based failure criteria across multiple load cases. HyperSizer sizing process uses a global finite element model to obtain element forces, which are statistically processed to arrive at panel-level design-to loads. These loads are then used to analyze each candidate panel design. A near optimum design is selected as the one with the lowest weight that also provides all positive margins of safety. The stiffness of each newly sized panel or beam component is taken into account in the subsequent finite element analysis. Iteration of analysis/optimization is performed to ensure a converged design. Sizing results for the hat stiffened panel concept and the fiber reinforced foam sandwich concept are presented.

  15. Dynamic and Static Behavior of Hollow-Core FRP-Concrete-Steel and Reinforced Concrete Bridge Columns under Vehicle Collision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar I. Abdelkarim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the difference in behavior between hollow-core fiber reinforced polymer-concrete-steel (HC-FCS columns and conventional reinforced concrete (RC columns under vehicle collision in terms of dynamic and static forces. The HC-FCS column consisted of an outer FRP tube, an inner steel tube, and a concrete shell sandwiched between the two tubes. The steel tube was hollow inside and embedded into the concrete footing with a length of 1.5 times the tube diameter while the FRP tube stopped at the top of footing. The RC column had a solid cross-section. The study was conducted through extensive finite element impact analyses using LS-DYNA software. Nine parameters were studied including the concrete material model, unconfined concrete compressive strength, material strain rate, column height-to-diameter ratio, column diameter, column top boundary condition, axial load level, vehicle velocity, and vehicle mass. Generally, the HC-FCS columns had lower dynamic forces and higher static forces than the RC columns when changing the values of the different parameters. During vehicle collision with either the RC or the HC-FCS columns, the imposed dynamic forces and their equivalent static forces were affected mainly by the vehicle velocity and vehicle mass.

  16. A shrouded aerosol sampling probe: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarland, A.R.; Ortiz, C.A.; Moore, M.E.; DeOtte, R.E. Jr.; Somasundaram, S.

    1988-08-01

    A new device has been developed for sampling aerosol particles from moving air streams--a shrouded probe. In the design reported herein, a 30 mm diameter sampling probe is located concentrically within a 105 mm diameter cylindrically-shaped shroud. The flow rate through the sampling probe is a constant value of 170 l/min. The dynamic pressure of the external air stream forces flow through the region between the shroud and the internal probe. The velocity of the main air stream, U/sub o/, is reduced in the shroud such that the velocity just upstream of the probe, U/sub s/, is 0.40 that of U/sub o/. By reducing the main air stream velocity, the aerosol losses on the internal walls of the probe inlet are considerably reduced. For a typical isokinetic probe sampling at 170 l/min in an air stream with a velocity of 14 m/s, the wall losses of 10 μm aerodynamic diameter particles are 39% of the total aspirated aerosol; whereas, the wall losses in the shrouded probe are 13%. Also, by reducing the velocity of the air stream in the shroud, anisokinetic effects can be substantially reduced. Wind tunnel experiments with 10 μm diameter particles over the range of free stream velocities of 2.0 to 14 m/s show the transmission ratio (ratio of aerosol transmitted through the probe to aerosol concentration in the free stream) to be within the range of 0.93 to 1.11. These data are for a constant flow rate of 170 l/min through the probe. 19 refs., 7 figs

  17. Ductile austenitic steel for fuel cans and core components of sodium cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, L.

    1995-01-01

    Two austenitic steel melts of a new composition have been studied after irradiation in the PFR fast neutron flux, in the BR2 reactor, and in the Harwell V.E. Cyclotron. The investigations were focussed on helium embrittlement and irradiation induced swelling. (orig.)

  18. Effect of Partial Shrouds on the Performance and Flow Field of a Low-Aspect-Ratio Axial-Flow Fan Rotor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sitaram

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The flow field at the rotor exit of a low aspect ratio axial flow fan for different tip geometries and for different flow coefficients is measured in the present study. The following configurations are tested: (1 rotor without partial shroud, designated as rotor (wos, (2 rotor with partial shroud, designated as rotor (ws, and (3 rotor with perforated (perforations in the shape of discrete circular holes partial shroud, designated as rotor (wps. From steady state measurements, the performance of rotor (wps is found to be the best. Both the rotors with partial shrouds have stalled at a higher flow coefficient compared to that of rotor (wos. From periodic flow measurements, it is concluded that the low velocity region near the tip section is considerably reduced with the use of partial shrouds with perforations. The extent of this low velocity region for both rotor (wos and rotor (wps increases with decreasing flow coefficient due to increased stage loading. This core of low momentum fluid has moved inwards of the annulus and towards the pressure side as the flow coefficient decreases. The extent of the low momentum fluid is smaller for rotor (wps than that of rotor (wos at all flow coefficients.

  19. Double-ended metal halide arc discharge lamp with electrically isolated containment shroud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzeroll, Martin M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A double-ended arc discharge lamp includes a sealed, light-transmissive outer jacket, a light-transmissive shroud mounted within the outer jacket and directly supported by the outer jacket, and an arc discharge tube mounted within the shroud. The arc tube is typically a metal halide arc discharge tube. In a preferred embodiment, the shroud includes an outwardly flared portion at each end. The outwardly flared portions space the shroud from the outer jacket and support the shroud within the outer jacket. The outwardly flared portions of the shroud can be affixed to the outer jacket by fusing. The outer jacket can be provided with inwardly extending dimples for locating the shroud with respect to the outer jacket. In another embodiment, the outer jacket includes reduced diameter portions near each end which are attached to the shroud.

  20. Stainless steel corrosion in conditions simulating WWER-1000 primary coolant. Corrosion behaviour in mixed core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnorutskij, V.S.; Petel'guzov, I.A.; Gritsina, V.M.; Zuek, V.A.; Tret'yakov, M.V.; Rud', R.A.; Svichkar', N.V.; Slabospitskaya, E.A.; Ishchenko, N.I.

    2011-01-01

    Research into corrosion kinetics of austenitic stainless steels (06Cr18Ni10Ti, 08Cr18Ni10Ti, 12Cr18Ni10Ti) in medium which corresponds to composition and parameters of WWER-1000 primary coolant with different pH values in autoclave out-pile conditions during 14000 hours is given. Surface of oxide films on stainless steels is investigated. Visual inspection of Westinghouse and TVEL fuel was carried out after 4 cycles in WWER-1000 primary water chemistry conditions at South Ukraine NPP. Westinghouse and TVEL fuel cladding materials possess high corrosion resistance. Blushing of weldments was observed. No visual corrosion defects or deposits were observed on fuel rods.

  1. Prediction of high frequency core loss for electrical steel using the data provided by manufacturer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Rakesh; Dalal, Ankit; Kumar, Praveen

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes a technique to determine the core loss data, at high frequencies, using the loss data provided by the lamination manufacturer. Steinmetz equation is used in this proposed method to determine core loss at high frequency. This Steinmetz equation consists of static hysteresis and eddy current loss. The presented technique considers the coefficients of Steinmetz equation as variable with frequency and peak magnetic flux density. The high frequency core loss data, predicted using this model is compared with the catalogue data given by manufacturer and very good accuracy has been obtained for a wide range of frequency.

  2. Detection of failed fuel rods in shrouded BWR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baero, G.; Boehm, W.; Goor, B.; Donnelly, T.

    1988-01-01

    A manipulator and an ultrasonic testing (UT) technique were developed to identify defective fuel rods in shrouded BWR fuel assemblies. The manipulator drives a UT probe axially through the bottom tie plate into the water channels between the fuel rods. The rotating UT probe locates defective fuel rods by ingressed water which attenuates the UT-signal. (author)

  3. Effect of welding process, type of electrode and electrode core diameter on the tensile property of 304L austenitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinlabi OYETUNJI

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of welding process, type of electrode and electrode core diameter on the tensile property of AISI 304L Austenitic Stainless Steel (ASS was studied. The tensile strength property of ASS welded samples was evaluated. Prepared samples of the ASS were welded under these three various variables. Tensile test was then carried out on the welded samples. It was found that the reduction in ultimate tensile strength (UTS of the butt joint samples increases with increase in core diameter of the electrode. Also, the best electrode for welding 304L ASS is 308L stainless steel-core electrode of 3.2 mm core diameter. It is recommended that the findings of this work can be applied in the chemical, food and oil industries where 304L ASS are predominantly used.

  4. Novel dispersed magnetite core-shell nanogel polymers as corrosion inhibitors for carbon steel in acidic medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atta, Ayman M.; El-Azabawy, Olfat E.; Ismail, H.S.; Hegazy, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research highlights: → Through a one-step thermal reaction, magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized, and self-assembled mixed films of modified cross-linked ionic polymer magnetite nanoparticles were prepared on iron surface. → The size distribution and shape of magnetite nanoparticles were examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). → The corrosion inhibition efficiency of carbon steel in 1 M HCl by the synthesized Fe 3 O 4 nanogel polymers has been studied using potentiodynamic polarization and EIS. → Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements were applied to study the morphology of the carbon steel surface. - Abstract: Novel core-shell preparing poly(2-acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid) (PAMPS) and copolymers with acrylic acid (AA) or acrylamide (AM) magnetic nanogels with controllable particle size produced via free aqueous polymerization at room temperature have been developed for the first time. The crosslinking polymerization was carried out in the presence of N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) as a crosslinker, N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine (TEMED) and potassium peroxydisulfate (KPS) as redox initiator system. The structure and morphology of the magnetic nanogels were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM and SEM). The effectiveness of the synthesized compounds as corrosion inhibitors for carbon steel in 1 M HCl was investigated by various electrochemical techniques such as potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results showed enhancement in inhibition efficiencies with increasing the inhibitor concentrations and temperatures. The results showed the nanogel particles act as mixed inhibitors. Adsorption of nanogel particles was found to fit the Langmuir isotherm and was chemisorption.

  5. Enhanced radiation resistance through interface modification of nano-structured steels for Gen IV in-core applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Jinsung; Kang, Suk Hoon; Kim, Min Chul

    2013-06-01

    This project is to increase radiation tolerance of candidate alloys for Gen IV core component through the optimization of grain size and grain boundary characteristics. The focus is on nanocrystalline metal alloys with a fcc crystal structure. The long-term goal is to design and develop bulk nanostructured austenitic steels with enhanced void swelling resistance and substantial ductility, and to enhance their creep resistance at elevated temperatures via grain boundary engineering. An austenitic stainless steel, HT-UPS (high temperature ultra-fine precipitates strengthened) was developed at ORNL, and is expected to show enhanced void swelling resistance through the trapping of point defects at nanometer-sized carbides. Reducing the grain size and increasing the fraction-induced point defects (due to the increased sink area of the grain boundaries), to make bubble nucleation at the boundaries less likely (by reducing the fraction of high-energy boundaries), and to improve the strength and ductility under radiation by producing a higher density of nanometer sized carbides on the boundaries

  6. Characterization of welding of AISI 304l stainless steel similar to the core encircling of a BWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gachuz M, M.E.; Palacios P, F.; Robles P, E.F.

    2003-01-01

    Plates of austenitic stainless steel AISI 304l of 0.0381 m thickness were welded by means of the SMAW process according to that recommended in the Section 9 of the ASME Code, so that it was reproduced the welding process used to assemble the encircling of the core of a BWR/5 reactor similar to that of the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric plant, there being generated the necessary documentation for the qualification of the one welding procedure and of the welder. They were characterized so much the one base metal, as the welding cord by means of metallographic techniques, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, mechanical essays and fracture mechanics. From the obtained results it highlights the presence of an area affected by the heat of up to 1.5 mm of wide and a value of fracture tenacity (J IC ) to ambient temperature for the base metal of 528 KJ/m 2 , which is diminished by the presence of the welding and by the increment in the temperature of the one essay. Also it was carried out an fractographic analysis of the fracture zone generated by the tenacity essays, what evidence a ductile fracture. The experimental values of resistance and tenacity are important for the study of the structural integrity of the encircling one of the core. (Author)

  7. Stress corrosion cracking of L-grade stainless steels in boiling water reactor (BWR) plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shunichi; Fukuda, Toshihiko; Yamashita, Hironobu

    2004-01-01

    L-grade stainless steels as 316NG, SUS316L and SUS304L have been used for the BWR reactor internals and re-circulation pipes as SCC resistant materials. However, SCC of the L-grade material components were reported recently in many Japanese BWR plants. The detail investigation of the components showed the fabrication process such as welding, machining and surface finishing strongly affected SCC occurrence. In this paper, research results of SCC of L-grade stainless steels, metallurgical investigation of core shrouds and re-circulation pipings, and features of SCC morphology were introduced. Besides, the structural integrity of components with SCC, countermeasures for SCC and future R and D planning were introduced. (author)

  8. Heat transfer and flow characteristics on a gas turbine shroud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, M; Kumada, M; Ijichi, N

    2001-05-01

    The work described in this paper is an experimental investigation of the heat transfer from the main flow to a turbine shroud surface, which may be applicable to ceramic gas turbines. Three kinds of turbine shrouds are considered with a flat surface, a taper surface and a spiral groove surface opposite to the blades in an axial flow turbine of actual turbo-charger. Heat transfer measurements were performed for the experimental conditions of a uniform heat flux or a uniform wall temperature. The effects of the inlet flow angle, rotational speed, and tip clearance on the heat transfer coefficient were clarified under on- and off-design flow conditions. The mean heat transfer coefficient was correlated to the blade Reynolds number and tip clearance, and compared with an experimental correlation and measurements of a flat surface. A comparison was also made for the measurement of static pressure distributions.

  9. Studies on the radiocarbon sample from the shroud of turin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, Raymond N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, University of California, 1961 Cumbres Patio, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States)]. E-mail: rnrogers@att.net

    2005-01-20

    In 1988, radiocarbon laboratories at Arizona, Cambridge, and Zurich determined the age of a sample from the Shroud of Turin. They reported that the date of the cloth's production lay between A.D. 1260 and 1390 with 95% confidence. This came as a surprise in view of the technology used to produce the cloth, its chemical composition, and the lack of vanillin in its lignin. The results prompted questions about the validity of the sample. Preliminary estimates of the kinetics constants for the loss of vanillin from lignin indicate a much older age for the cloth than the radiocarbon analyses. The radiocarbon sampling area is uniquely coated with a yellow-brown plant gum containing dye lakes. Pyrolysis-mass-spectrometry results from the sample area coupled with microscopic and microchemical observations prove that the radiocarbon sample was not part of the original cloth of the Shroud of Turin. The radiocarbon date was thus not valid for determining the true age of the shroud.

  10. Design and performance of a small shrouded Cretan windwheel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, P D; Probert, S D

    1982-02-01

    A Cretan-type windwheel is attractive because of its design simplicity, low cost, durability and ease of construction by semi-skilled labor from a variety of indigenous materials. Test data for a shrouded version of the ''cycle wheel'', Cretan system are presented. The use of nine loosely sheeted sails produced a maximum power output of 14 W for an air speed at entry to the rotor of 5 m s/sup -1/, corresponding to a free stream wind of less than 3.5ms/sup -1/. For this system it was found that tight (rather than loose) sails harnessed relatively little power. The presence of the shroud, which reduced tip losses, led to higher power coefficients being attainable. Two possible applications for a larger version (than tested) shrouded, Cretan type windwheel are described, namely for irrigation and land drainage in undeveloped countries and for stimulating a peristaltic pump which acts as a gravitational boost to drive solar-heated anti-freeze liquid around a low height, domestic central-heating circuit. 22 refs.

  11. Studies on the radiocarbon sample from the shroud of turin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, Raymond N.

    2005-01-01

    In 1988, radiocarbon laboratories at Arizona, Cambridge, and Zurich determined the age of a sample from the Shroud of Turin. They reported that the date of the cloth's production lay between A.D. 1260 and 1390 with 95% confidence. This came as a surprise in view of the technology used to produce the cloth, its chemical composition, and the lack of vanillin in its lignin. The results prompted questions about the validity of the sample. Preliminary estimates of the kinetics constants for the loss of vanillin from lignin indicate a much older age for the cloth than the radiocarbon analyses. The radiocarbon sampling area is uniquely coated with a yellow-brown plant gum containing dye lakes. Pyrolysis-mass-spectrometry results from the sample area coupled with microscopic and microchemical observations prove that the radiocarbon sample was not part of the original cloth of the Shroud of Turin. The radiocarbon date was thus not valid for determining the true age of the shroud

  12. Efforts for optimization of BWR core internals replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizuka, N.

    2000-01-01

    The core internal components replacement of a BWR was successfully completed at Fukushima-Daiichi Unit 3 (1F3) of the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) in 1998. The core shroud and the majority of the internal components made by type 304 stainless steel (SS) were replaced with the ones made of low carbon type 316L SS to improve Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) resistance. Although this core internals replacement project was completed, several factors combined to result in a longer-than-expected period for the outage. It was partly because the removal work of the internal components was delayed. Learning a lesson from whole experience in this project, some methods were adopted for the next replacement project at Fukushima-Daiichi Unit 2 (1F2) to shorten the outage and reduce the total radiation exposure. Those are new removal processes and new welding machine and so on. The core internals replacement work was ended at 1F2 in 1999, and both the period of outage and the total radiation exposure were the same degree as expected previous to starting of this project. This result shows that the methods adopted in this project are basically applicable for the core internals replacement work and the whole works about the BWR core internals replacement were optimized. The outline of the core internals replacement project and applied technologies at 1F3 and 1F2 are discussed in this paper. (author)

  13. Technology of Welding Joints Mixed with Duplex Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Słania J.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Results of the examinations of sample plates of mixed joints with the duplex steel were discussed. Examinations were taken on the sample plates of mixed joints of sheet plates type P355NL1 and X2CrNiMoN22-5-3 welded by the flux-cored wire DW-329A by the Kobelco company of the following category T 22 9 3 NL RC/M3 in the gas shroud M21 (Ar+18%CO2 (plate no.1, and nickel covered electrodes E Ni 6082 by the Böhler company (plate no. 2. Results of the side bend test of welded joint, transverse tensile test, stretching of the weld metal, impact strength, micro and macroscopic metallographic examinations, and measurements of the delta ferrite content were presented.

  14. Protection of Petroleum Pipeline Carbon Steel Alloys with New Modified Core-Shell Magnetite Nanogel against Corrosion in Acidic Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal A. El Mahdy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available New method was used to prepare magnetite nanoparticle based on reduction of Fe(III ions with potassium iodide to produce Fe3O4 nanoparticle. The prepared magnetite was stabilized with cross-linked polymer based on 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid (AMPS to prepare novel core-shell nanogel. In this respect, Fe3O4/poly(2-acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid (PAMPS magnetic nanogels with controllable particle size produced via free aqueous polymerization at 65°C have been developed for the first time. The polymer was crosslinked in the presence of N,N-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA as a crosslinker and potassium peroxydisulfate (KPS as redox initiator system. The structure and morphology of the magnetic nanogel were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM and SEM. The effectiveness of the synthesized compounds as corrosion inhibitors for carbon steel in 1 M HCl was investigated by various electrochemical techniques such as potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. The results showed enhancement in inhibition efficiencies with increasing the inhibitor concentrations. The results showed that the nanogel particles act as mixed inhibitors. EIS data revealed that Rct increases with increasing inhibitor concentration.

  15. Influence of Steel Reinforcement on In-Situ Stress Evaluation in Concrete Structures by the Core-Drilling Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinnis, M. J.; Pessiki, S.

    2006-01-01

    The core-drilling method is an emerging technique for evaluating in-situ stress in a concrete structure. A small hole is drilled into the structure, and the deformations in the vicinity of the hole are measured and related via elasticity theory to the stress. The method is similar to the ASTM hole-drilling strain-gauge method excepting that displacements rather than strains are the measured quantities. The technique may be considered nondestructive since the ability of the structure to perform its function is unaffected, and the hole is easily repaired. Displacement measurements in the current work are performed using 3D digital image correlation and industrial photogrammetry. The current paper addresses perturbations in the method caused by steel reinforcement within the concrete. The reinforcement is significantly stiffer than the surrounding concrete, altering the expected displacement field. A numerical investigation performed indicates an under-prediction of stress by as much as 18 percent in a heavily reinforced structure, although the effect is significantly smaller for more common amounts of reinforcement

  16. Influence of Steel Reinforcement on In-Situ Stress Evaluation in Concrete Structures by the Core-Drilling Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnis, M. J.; Pessiki, S.

    2006-03-01

    The core-drilling method is an emerging technique for evaluating in-situ stress in a concrete structure. A small hole is drilled into the structure, and the deformations in the vicinity of the hole are measured and related via elasticity theory to the stress. The method is similar to the ASTM hole-drilling strain-gauge method excepting that displacements rather than strains are the measured quantities. The technique may be considered nondestructive since the ability of the structure to perform its function is unaffected, and the hole is easily repaired. Displacement measurements in the current work are performed using 3D digital image correlation and industrial photogrammetry. The current paper addresses perturbations in the method caused by steel reinforcement within the concrete. The reinforcement is significantly stiffer than the surrounding concrete, altering the expected displacement field. A numerical investigation performed indicates an under-prediction of stress by as much as 18 percent in a heavily reinforced structure, although the effect is significantly smaller for more common amounts of reinforcement.

  17. Comparison between measured and computed magnetic flux density distribution of simulated transformer core joints assembled from grain-oriented and non-oriented electrical steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Shahrouzi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The flux distribution in an overlapped linear joint constructed in the central region of an Epstein Square was studied experimentally and results compared with those obtained using a computational magnetic field solver. High permeability grain-oriented (GO and low permeability non-oriented (NO electrical steels were compared at a nominal core flux density of 1.60 T at 50 Hz. It was found that the experimental results only agreed well at flux densities at which the reluctance of different paths of the flux are similar. Also it was revealed that the flux becomes more uniform when the working point of the electrical steel is close to the knee point of the B-H curve of the steel.

  18. Effects of Radial Reflector Composition on Core Reactivity and Peak Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Yoon; Lee, Kyung Hoon; Song, Jae Seung

    2007-10-01

    The effects of radial SA-240 alloy shroud on core reactivity and peak power are evaluated. The existence of radial SA-240 alloy shroud makes reflector water volume decrease, so the thermal absorption cross section of radial reflector is lower than without SA-240 alloy shroud case. Finally, the cycle length is increased from 788 EFPD to 845 EFPD and the peak power is decreased from 1.66 to 1.49. In the case of without SA-240 alloy shroud, a new core loading pattern search has been performed. For the guarantee of the same equivalent cycle length of with SA-240 alloy shroud case, the enrichment of U-235 should be increased from 4.22 w/o to 4.68 w/o. The nuclear key safety parameters of new core loading pattern have been calculated and recorded for the future

  19. Effects of Radial Reflector Composition on Core Reactivity and Peak Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Yoon; Lee, Kyung Hoon; Song, Jae Seung

    2007-10-15

    The effects of radial SA-240 alloy shroud on core reactivity and peak power are evaluated. The existence of radial SA-240 alloy shroud makes reflector water volume decrease, so the thermal absorption cross section of radial reflector is lower than without SA-240 alloy shroud case. Finally, the cycle length is increased from 788 EFPD to 845 EFPD and the peak power is decreased from 1.66 to 1.49. In the case of without SA-240 alloy shroud, a new core loading pattern search has been performed. For the guarantee of the same equivalent cycle length of with SA-240 alloy shroud case, the enrichment of U-235 should be increased from 4.22 w/o to 4.68 w/o. The nuclear key safety parameters of new core loading pattern have been calculated and recorded for the future.

  20. Double Fillet Welding of Carbon Steel T-Joint by Double Channel Shielding Gas Metal Arc Welding Method Using Metal Cored Wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mert T.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Low carbon steel material and T-joints are frequently used in ship building and steel constructions. Advantages such as high deposition rates, high quality and smooth weld metals and easy automation make cored wires preferable in these industries. In this study, low carbon steel materials with web and flange thicknesses of 6 mm, 8 mm and 10 mm were welded with conventional GMAW and double channel shielding gas metal arc welding (DMAG method to form double fillet T-joints using metal cored wire. The difference between these two methods were characterized by measurements of mean welding parameters, Vickers hardness profiles, weld bead and HAZ geometry of the joints and thermal camera temperature measurements. When weld bead and HAZ geometries are focused, it was seen filler metal molten area increased and base metal molten area decreased in DMAG of low carbon steel. When compared with traditional GMAW, finer and acicular structures in weld metal and more homogenous and smaller grains in HAZ are obtained with double channel shielding gas metal arc welding.

  1. Analysis, Verification, and Application of Equations and Procedures for Design of Exhaust-pipe Shrouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerbrock, Herman H.; Wcislo, Chester R.; Dexter, Howard E.

    1947-01-01

    Investigations were made to develop a simplified method for designing exhaust-pipe shrouds to provide desired or maximum cooling of exhaust installations. Analysis of heat exchange and pressure drop of an adequate exhaust-pipe shroud system requires equations for predicting design temperatures and pressure drop on cooling air side of system. Present experiments derive such equations for usual straight annular exhaust-pipe shroud systems for both parallel flow and counter flow. Equations and methods presented are believed to be applicable under certain conditions to the design of shrouds for tail pipes of jet engines.

  2. Magnetic characterization of the stator core of a high-speed motor made of an ultrathin electrical steel sheet using the magnetic property evaluation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohachiro Oka

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the application areas for electric motors have been expanding. For instance, electric motors are used in new technologies such as rovers, drones, cars, and robots. The motor used in such machinery should be small, high-powered, highly-efficient, and high-speed. In such motors, loss at high-speed rotation must be especially minimal. Eddy-current loss in the stator core is known to increase greatly during loss at high-speed rotation of the motor. To produce an efficient high-speed motor, we are developing a stator core for a motor using an ultrathin electrical steel sheet with only a small amount of eddy-current loss. Furthermore, the magnetic property evaluation for efficient, high-speed motor stator cores that use conventional commercial frequency is insufficient. Thus, we made a new high-speed magnetic property evaluation system to evaluate the magnetic properties of the efficient high-speed motor stator core. This system was composed of high-speed A/D converters, D/A converters, and a high-speed power amplifier. In experiments, the ultrathin electrical steel sheet dramatically suppressed iron loss and, in particular, eddy-current loss. In addition, a new high-speed magnetic property evaluation system accurately evaluated the magnetic properties of the efficient high-speed motor stator core.

  3. Magnetic characterization of the stator core of a high-speed motor made of an ultrathin electrical steel sheet using the magnetic property evaluation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Mohachiro; Enokizono, Masato; Mori, Yuji; Yamazaki, Kazumasa

    2018-04-01

    Recently, the application areas for electric motors have been expanding. For instance, electric motors are used in new technologies such as rovers, drones, cars, and robots. The motor used in such machinery should be small, high-powered, highly-efficient, and high-speed. In such motors, loss at high-speed rotation must be especially minimal. Eddy-current loss in the stator core is known to increase greatly during loss at high-speed rotation of the motor. To produce an efficient high-speed motor, we are developing a stator core for a motor using an ultrathin electrical steel sheet with only a small amount of eddy-current loss. Furthermore, the magnetic property evaluation for efficient, high-speed motor stator cores that use conventional commercial frequency is insufficient. Thus, we made a new high-speed magnetic property evaluation system to evaluate the magnetic properties of the efficient high-speed motor stator core. This system was composed of high-speed A/D converters, D/A converters, and a high-speed power amplifier. In experiments, the ultrathin electrical steel sheet dramatically suppressed iron loss and, in particular, eddy-current loss. In addition, a new high-speed magnetic property evaluation system accurately evaluated the magnetic properties of the efficient high-speed motor stator core.

  4. Effect of texture and grain size on magnetic flux density and core loss in non-oriented electrical steel containing 3.15% Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K.M.; Park, S.Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, 5-1, Anam-dong, Sungbuk-Gu, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Huh, M.Y., E-mail: myhuh@korea.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, 5-1, Anam-dong, Sungbuk-Gu, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J.S. [Electrical Steel Sheet Research Group, Technical Research Laboratories, POSCO, Goedong-dong, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Engler, O. [Hydro Aluminium Rolled Products GmbH, R and D Center Bonn, P.O. Box 2468, D-53014 Bonn (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    In an attempt to differentiate the impact of grain size and crystallographic texture on magnetic properties of non-oriented (NO) electrical steel sheets, samples with different grain sizes and textures were produced and analyzed regarding magnetic flux density B and core loss W. The textures of the NO electrical steel samples could be precisely quantified with the help of elliptical Gaussian distributions. In samples with identical textures, small grain sizes resulted in about 15% higher core loss W than larger grains, whereas grain size only moderately affected the magnetic flux density B. In samples having nearly the same grain size, a correlation of the magneto-crystalline anisotropic properties of B and W with texture was obtained via the anisotropy parameter A(h{sup →}). With increasing A(h{sup →}) a linear decrease of B and a linear increase of W were observed. - Highlights: • We produced electrical steel sheets having different grain size and texture. • Magnetic flux density B and core loss W were varied with grain size and texture. • Correlation of B and W with texture was established via anisotropy parameter A(h{sup →}). • With increasing A(h{sup →}) a linear decrease of B and a linear increase of W were observed. • Grain size mainly affected W with only minor impact on B.

  5. Turin workshop on radiocarbon dating the Turin Shroud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gove, H.E.

    1987-01-01

    A workshop to explore the procedures for making carbon-14 measurements on the cloth of the Shroud of Turin was held in Turin, Italy on September 29, 30 and October 1, 1986. It was sponsored by the Pontifical Academy of Sciences whose president chaired the workshop and by the Archbishop of Turin. Twenty-two people participated including representatives from seven laboratories who have indicated a willingness to carry out the measurements if a request to do so from the Vatican is forthcoming. A protocol for carrying out this task was agreed upon by the workshop delegates and has been presented to Vatican authorities. (orig.)

  6. Design of Shrouded Airborne Wind Turbine & CFD Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbreen, Faiqa; Faiqa Anbreen Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The focus is to design a shrouded airborne wind turbine, capable to generate 70 kW to propel a leisure boat. The idea of designing an airborne turbine is to take the advantage of different velocity layers in the atmosphere. The blades have been designed using NREL S826 airfoil, which has coefficient of lift CL of 1.4 at angle of attack, 6°. The value selected for CP is 0.8. The rotor diameter is 7.4 m. The balloon (shroud) has converging-diverging nozzle design, to increase the mass flow rate through the rotor. The ratio of inlet area to throat area, Ai/At is 1.31 and exit area to throat area, Ae/At is1.15. The Solidworks model has been analyzed numerically using CFD. The software used is StarCCM +. The Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes Simulation (URANS) K- ɛ model has been selected, to study the physical properties of the flow, with emphasis on the performance of the turbine. Stress analysis has been done using Nastran. From the simulations, the torque generated by the turbine is approximately 800N-m and angular velocity is 21 rad/s.

  7. User manual for SPLASH (Single Panel Lamp and Shroud Helper).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Marvin Elwood

    2006-02-01

    The radiant heat test facility develops test sets providing well-characterized thermal environments, often representing fires. Many of the components and procedures have become standardized to such an extent that the development of a specialized design tool to determine optimal configurations for radiant heat experiments was appropriate. SPLASH (Single Panel Lamp and Shroud Helper) is that tool. SPLASH is implemented as a user-friendly, Windows-based program that allows a designer to describe a test setup in terms of parameters such as number of lamps, power, position, and separation distance. This document is a user manual for that software. Any incidental descriptions of theory are only for the purpose of defining the model inputs. The theory for the underlying model is described in SAND2005-2947 (Ref. [1]). SPLASH provides a graphical user interface to define lamp panel and shroud designs parametrically, solves the resulting radiation enclosure problem for up to 2500 surfaces, and provides post-processing to facilitate understanding and documentation of analyzed designs.

  8. Medical News From Scientific Analysis of the Turin Shroud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bevilacqua M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper synthetizes a series of works recently published in reference to medical studies regarding both the physical conditions of the Man who was wrapped in the Turin Shroud (TS and the tortures to which this Man was subjected. An event that influenced the rapid course of the Passion and the cause of death of the TS Man was the fall under the weight of the cross. This Man shows, on the right side, shoulder lowering, flat hand and henophthalmos, revealing a violent blunt trauma, from behind, to neck, chest and shoulder, with the entire brachial plexus injury and muscular damage to the neck bottom with the head bent forward and turned to the left, on the cross, as he had a stiff neck. Most likely, falling the body forward, the chest trauma caused a heart and lung contusion with hemothorax. The wrists were easily nailed in the Destot space with ulnar artery cutting and partial tear of the ulnar nerve cause of the thumb retraction and its disappearance on the Shroud. The nail in the right foot was driven in the tarsal bones. The right foot was probably dislocated to the ankle. The lance penetrated in the sixth intercostal space. The likely cause of immediate death was a myocardial infarction with rupture, haemopericardium and heart tamponade of a subject with cardiac contusion. Tortures and other medical conditions have only accelerated the death.

  9. Development of high nickel austenitic steels for the application to fast reactor cores, (I). Alloy design with the aid of the d-electrons concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Yoshinori; Morinaga, Masahiko; Yukawa, Natsuo; Ukai, Shigeharu; Nomura, Shigeo; Okuda, Takanari; Harada, Makoto

    1999-01-01

    The design of high nickel austenitic steels for the core materials of the fast reactors was performed following the d-electrons concept devised on the basis of molecular orbital calculations of transition-metal based alloys. In this design two calculated parameters are mainly utilized. The one is the d-orbital energy level (Md) of alloying transition elements, and the other is the bond order (Bo) that is a measure of the covalent bond strength between atoms. Using the Md-bar - Bo-bar phase stability diagram accurate prediction become possible for the phase stability of the austenite phase and 5% swelling at 140 dpa for nickel ions. Here, Md-bar and Bo-bar are the compositional average of Md and Bo parameters, respectively. On the basis of the phase stability diagram and preliminary experiments, guidelines for the alloy design of carbo-nitrides precipitated high nickel austenitic steels were constructed. Following the guidelines several new austenitic steels were designed for the fast reactors core material. (author)

  10. Fabrication of Hadfield-Cored Multi-layer Steel Sheet by Roll-Bonding with 1.8-GPa-Strength-Grade Hot-Press-Forming Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Kwang-Geun; Kang, Chung-Yun; Park, Jaeyeong; Lee, Sunghak

    2018-05-01

    An austenitic Hadfield steel was roll-bonded with a 1.8-GPa-strength-grade martensitic hot-press-forming (HPF) steel to fabricate a multi-layer steel (MLS) sheet. Near the Hadfield/HPF interface, the carburized and decarburized layers were formed by the carbon diffusion from the Hadfield (1.2%C) to HPF (0.35%C) layers, and could be regarded as kinds of very thin multi-layers of 35 μm in thickness. The tensile test and fractographic data indicated that the MLS sheet was fractured abruptly within the elastic range by the intergranular fracture occurred in the carburized layer. This was because C was mainly segregated at prior austenite grain boundaries in the carburized layer, which weakened grain boundaries to induce the intergranular fracture. In order to solve the intergranular facture problem, the MLS sheet was tempered at 200 °C. The stress-strain curve of the tempered MLS sheet lay between those of the HPF and Hadfield sheets, and a rule of mixtures was roughly satisfied. Tensile properties of the MLS sheet were dramatically improved after the tempering, and the intergranular fracture was erased completely. In particular, the yield strength up to 1073 MPa along with the high strain hardening and excellent ductility of 32.4% were outstanding because the yield strength over 1 GPa was hardly achieved in conventional austenitic steels.

  11. Measurement of Total Condensation on a Shrouded Cryogenic Surface using a Single Quart Crystal Microbalance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haid, B.J.; Malsbury, T.N.; Gibson, C.R.; Warren, C.T.

    2008-01-01

    A single quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) is cooled to 18 K to measure condensation rates inside of a retractable ''shroud'' enclosure. The shroud is of a design intended to minimize condensate on fusion targets to be fielded at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The shroud has a double-wall construction with an inner wall that may be cooled to 75-100 K. The QCM and the shroud system were mounted in a vacuum chamber and cooled using a cryocooler. Condensation rates were measured at various vacuum levels and compositions, and with the shroud open or closed. A technique for measuring total condensate during the cooldown of the system with an accuracy of better than 1.0 x 10 -6 g/cm 2 was also demonstrated. The technique involved a separate measurement of the condensate-free crystal frequency as a function of temperature that was later applied to the measurement of interest

  12. Vertical profile, source apportionment, and toxicity of PAHs in sediment cores of a wharf near the coal-based steel refining industrial zone in Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Feng; Chen, Chiu-Wen; Ju, Yun-Ru; Dong, Cheng-Di

    2016-03-01

    Three sediment cores were collected from a wharf near a coal-based steel refining industrial zone in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Analyses for 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of the US Environmental Protection Agency priority list in the core sediment samples were conducted using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The vertical profiles of PAHs in the core sediments were assessed, possible sources and apportionment were identified, and the toxicity risk of the core sediments was determined. The results from the sediment analyses showed that total concentrations of the 16 PAHs varied from 11774 ± 4244 to 16755 ± 4593 ng/g dry weight (dw). Generally, the vertical profiles of the PAHs in the sediment cores exhibited a decreasing trend from the top to the lower levels of the S1 core and an increasing trend of PAHs from the top to the lower levels of the S2 and S3 cores. Among the core sediment samples, the five- and six-ring PAHs were predominantly in the S1 core, ranging from 42 to 54 %, whereas the composition of the PAHs in the S2 and S3 cores were distributed equally across three groups: two- and three-ring, four-ring, and five- and six-ring PAHs. The results indicated that PAH contamination at the site of the S1 core had a different source. The molecular indices and principal component analyses with multivariate linear regression were used to determine the source contributions, with the results showing that the contributions of coal, oil-related, and vehicle sources were 38.6, 35.9, and 25.5 %, respectively. A PAH toxicity assessment using the mean effect range-median quotient (m-ERM-q, 0.59-0.79), benzo[a]pyrene toxicity equivalent (TEQ(carc), 1466-1954 ng TEQ/g dw), and dioxin toxicity equivalent (TEQ(fish), 3036-4174 pg TEQ/g dw) identified the wharf as the most affected area. The results can be used for regular monitoring, and future pollution prevention and management should target the coal-based industries in this region for pollution reduction.

  13. Flexible two-ply yarn supercapacitors based on carbon nanotube/stainless steel core spun yarns decorated with Co3O4 nanoparticles and MnOx composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Fenghua; Lyu, Xiaoming; Liu, Cansen; Miao, Menghe

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Carbon nanotube/stainless steel core-sheath yarns as electrode for two-ply supercapacitor. • The yarns were decorated with Co 3 O 4 nanoparticles and MnO x composites. • Yarn electrodes deposited on Co 3 O 4 and MnO x have excellent specific capacitance. • The two-ply yarn supercapacitor based on MnO x has high energy density and power density. • The yarn supercapacitors are highly flexible and strong for wearable electronics. - Abstract: High performance two-ply yarn supercapacitors are fabricated by electrodeposition of transition metal oxide pseudocapacitive materials on carbon nanotube/stainless steel (CNT/SS) core spun yarns. The SS core incorporated in the carbon nanotube yarn has dramatically improved the conductivity of the substrate and the efficiency of electrodeposition of metal oxides on the electrodes. The SS core acts as current collector in the final two-ply yarn supercapacitors with significantly improved specific capacitance and up-scaled length of supercapacitors. Manganese oxide and cobalt oxide electrodeposited on as-spun CNT/SS yarn are compared for their electrochemical performance in two-ply yarn supercapacitors. Both supercapacitors displayed improvement in capacitance, energy and power densities, especially MnO x /CNT/SS yarn supercapacitor. The solid-state supercapacitor based on MnO x /CNT/SS composite yarn shows excellent electrochemical properties with a specific capacitance of 217.61 F/cm 3 at 0.02 V/s and an energy density of 4.84 mWh/cm 3 at a power density of 435.22 mW/cm 3 .

  14. Fluid structure interaction studies on acoustic load response of light water nuclear reactor core internals under blowdown condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses Lemuel Raj, G.; Singh, R.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Venkat Raj, V.

    1998-12-01

    Acoustic load evaluation within two phase medium and the related fluid-structure interaction analysis in case of Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCA) for light water reactor systems is an important inter-disciplinary area. The present work highlights the development of a three-dimensional finite element code FLUSHEL to analyse LOCA induced depressurization problems for Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) core barrel and Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) core shroud. With good comparison obtained between prediction made by the present code and the experimental results of HDR-PWR test problem, coupled fluid-structure interaction analysis of core shroud of Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS) is presented for recirculation line break. It is shown that the acoustic load induced stresses in the core shroud are small and downcomer acoustic cavity modes are decoupled with the shell multi-lobe modes. Thus the structural integrity of TAPS core shroud for recirculation line break induced acoustic load is demonstrated. (author)

  15. Material properties of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels for core materials of FBR. Tensile properties of sodium exposed and nickel diffused materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Shoichi; Yoshida, Eiichi

    2002-12-01

    An oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel is candidate for a long-life core materials of future FBR, because of good swelling resistance and high creep strength. In this study, tensile tests were carried out the long-term extrapolation of sodium environmental effects on the mechanical properties of ODS steels. The tested heats of materials are M93, M11 and F95. The specimens were pre-exposed to sodium for 1,000 and 3,000 hours under non-stress conditions. The pre-exposure to sodium was conducted using a sodium test loop constituted by austenitic steels. For the conditions of sodium exposure test, the sodium temperature was 650 and 700degC, the oxygen concentration in sodium was about 1 ppm and sodium flow rate on the surface of specimen was less than 1x10 -4 m/seconds (nearly static). Further the specimen with the nickel diffused was prepared, which is simulate to nickel diffusing through sodium from the surface of structural stainless steels. The main results obtained were as follows; (1) The tensile strength and the fracture elongation after sodium exposure (maximum 3,000 hours) were same as that of as-received materials. If was considered that the sodium environmental effect is negligible under the condition of this study. (2) Tensile properties of nickel diffused specimens were slightly lower than that of the as-received specimens, but it remains equal to that of thermal aging specimens. (3) The change in microstructure such as a degraded layer was observed on the surface of nickel diffused specimen. In the region of the degraded layer, phase transformations from the α-phase to the γ-phase were recognized. But, the microscopic oxide particles were observed same as that of α-phase base metal. (author)

  16. Control of the flow in the annular region of a shrouded cylinder with splitter plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozkan Gokturk Memduh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the flow control with a splitter plate was studied considering the annular region of a shrouded cylinder. The effect of splitter plate angle, α which was defined according to the cylinder centreline is investigated experimentally in deep water using Particle image Velocimetry (PIV technique and flow visualization by dye injection method. The range of splitter plate angle was selected within 60°≤ α ≤180° with an increment of 30°. The porosity of the shroud which is a perforated cylinder was selected as β=0.7 in order to have larger fluid entrainment through the cylinder. The results were compared with the no-plate case and showed that the splitter plate located in the annular region of shrouded cylinders is effective on reducing the turbulence levels just behind the cylinder base, as well as the near wake of the perforated shroud.

  17. Control of the flow in the annular region of a shrouded cylinder with splitter plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Gokturk Memduh; Durhasan, Tahir; Pinar, Engin; Yenicun, Arda; Akilli, Huseyin; Sahin, Besir

    In the present study, the flow control with a splitter plate was studied considering the annular region of a shrouded cylinder. The effect of splitter plate angle, α which was defined according to the cylinder centreline is investigated experimentally in deep water using Particle image Velocimetry (PIV) technique and flow visualization by dye injection method. The range of splitter plate angle was selected within 60°≤ α ≤180° with an increment of 30°. The porosity of the shroud which is a perforated cylinder was selected as β=0.7 in order to have larger fluid entrainment through the cylinder. The results were compared with the no-plate case and showed that the splitter plate located in the annular region of shrouded cylinders is effective on reducing the turbulence levels just behind the cylinder base, as well as the near wake of the perforated shroud.

  18. Computational Study on the Effect of Shroud Shape on the Efficiency of the Gas Turbine Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanas'ev, I. V.; Granovskii, A. V.

    2018-03-01

    The last stages of powerful power gas turbines play an important role in the development of power and efficiency of the whole unit as well as in the distribution of the flow parameters behind the last stage, which determines the efficient operation of the exhaust diffusers. Therefore, much attention is paid to improving the efficiency of the last stages of gas turbines as well as the distribution of flow parameters. Since the long blades of the last stages of multistage high-power gas turbines could fall into the resonance frequency range in the course of operation, which results in the destruction of the blades, damping wires or damping bolts are used for turning out of resonance frequencies. However, these damping elements cause additional energy losses leading to a reduction in the efficiency of the stage. To minimize these losses, dampening shrouds are used instead of wires and bolts at the periphery of the working blades. However, because of the strength problems, designers have to use, instead of the most efficient full shrouds, partial shrouds that do not provide for significantly reducing the losses in the tip clearance between the blade and the turbine housing. In this paper, a computational study is performed concerning an effect that the design of the shroud of the turbine-working blade exerted on the flow structure in the vicinity of the shroud and on the efficiency of the stage as a whole. The analysis of the flow structure has shown that a significant part of the losses under using the shrouds is associated with the formation of vortex zones in the cavities on the turbine housing before the shrouds, between the ribs of the shrouds, and in the cavities at the outlet behind the shrouds. All the investigated variants of a partial shrouding are inferior in efficiency to the stages with shrouds that completely cover the tip section of the working blade. The stage with a unshrouded working blade was most efficient at the values of the relative tip clearance

  19. NK-1 Removable Cryogenic Shroud (A Study of the Bimba Pneumatic Cylinder)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, K.; Stefanescu, D.

    2003-01-01

    The Mark 1 Cryostat requires a cryogenic shroud that must be retracted immediately before firing the NIF laser. This paper evaluates a pneumatic cylinder that has been chosen to open and close the shroud. After a variety of motion control and vacuum compatibility experiments, we concluded that the Bimba feedback control cylinder may be used to retract the shroud with certain modifications to its control system and additional rod seals. The Mark I Cryostat is a system that allows fielding of a wide range of targets on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The purpose is to have a system with the capability of controlling the target temperature between ∼10 and 300 K. While in the Target Chamber, a shroud must cover the cooled targets. This shroud allows the cold target to be shielded from condensable residual gasses in the target chamber. The removable shroud may be cooled to 80 K to provide a radiant shield for the target from the room temperature target chamber. The shroud must remain over the target until approximately one second before shot time, and then retract on command, without inducing vibration into the target. An actuation system design, which removes the shroud, is constrained by the size limitations of the MK-1, the need to build from low-activation materials, the need to operate in a vacuum, and the need for high reliability. The scheme for retracting the shroud that they investigated was a pressurized air cylinder. The pneumatic cylinder tested in our experiments was built by the Bimba Manufacturing Company. We thought it would be suitable for shroud retraction because its manufacturer claimed that its motion was smooth, highly accurate, controllable and the appropriate size for our needs. The pneumatic cylinder moves a piston by changing the gas pressure in the two sections of the cylinder on either side of the piston. The cylinder also uses the piston as a voltage potentiometer to determine the current position of the piston. This voltage is then

  20. Transfiguring the Dead: The Iconography, Commemorative Use, and Materiality of Mummy Shrouds from Roman Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Jimenez, Lissette Marie

    2014-01-01

    The mummy shrouds, often overlooked or dissected into dichotomous parts because of their Hellenistic and Egyptian hybrid pictorial nature, provide unparalleled insight into religious and social facets of life and death in Roman Egypt. Moving beyond the aesthetic properties of these objects and focusing on the symbolic and material functions of the iconography on the shrouds enables a fuller understanding of individual and collective social aspirations of the inhabitants of Roman Egypt. When v...

  1. Use of the gapped bead-on-plate test to investigate hydrogen induced cracking of flux cored arc welds of a quenched and tempered steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Liang; Dunne, Druce; Davidson, Len

    2014-01-01

    Gapped bead-on-plate (G-BOP) testing of flux cored arc welds was conducted to assess the susceptibility to hydrogen induced cold cracking (HICC) of weld metal deposited on a high strength quenched and tempered steel. For preheat temperatures higher than 40°C, no weld metal cracking was observed using a shielding gas consisting of argon with 20% carbon dioxide. In contrast, the no-crack condition was not achieved for a shielding gas consisting of argon-5% carbon dioxide for preheat temperatures lower than 100°C. This extraordinary difference in weld metal HICC resistance indicates that, in general, the shielding gas mixture can exert a major influence on weld metal transverse cold cracking behaviour

  2. Small angle neutron scattering study of nano sized microstructure in Fe-Cr ODS steels for gen IV in-core applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Young-Soo; Mao, Xiadong; Jang, Jinsung

    2013-11-01

    The nano-sized microstructures in Fe-Cr oxide dispersion strengthened steel for Gen IV in-core applications were studied using small angle neutron scattering. The oxide dispersion strengthened steel was manufactured through hot isostatic pressing with various chemical compositions and fabrication conditions. Small angle neutron scattering experiments were performed using a 40 m small angle neutron scattering instrument at HANARO. Nano sized microstructures, namely, yttrium oxides and Cr-oxides were quantitatively analyzed by small angle neutron scattering. The yttrium oxides and Cr-oxides were also observed by transmission electron microscopy. The microstructural analysis results from small angle neutron scattering were compared with those obtained by transmission electron microscopy. The effects of the chemical compositions and fabrication conditions on the microstructure were investigated in relation to the quantitative microstructural analysis results obtained by small angle neutron scattering. The volume fraction of Y-oxide increases after fabrication, and this result is considered to be due to the formation of non-stochiometric Y-Ti-oxides.

  3. Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Matrix Composites for Shrouds and Combustor Liners of Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra; Jill Jonkowski; Joseph Mavec; Paul Bakke; Debbie Haught; Merrill Smith

    2011-01-07

    This report covers work performed under the Advanced Materials for Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines (AMAIGT) program by GE Global Research and its collaborators from 2000 through 2010. A first stage shroud for a 7FA-class gas turbine engine utilizing HiPerComp{reg_sign}* ceramic matrix composite (CMC) material was developed. The design, fabrication, rig testing and engine testing of this shroud system are described. Through two field engine tests, the latter of which is still in progress at a Jacksonville Electric Authority generating station, the robustness of the CMC material and the shroud system in general were demonstrated, with shrouds having accumulated nearly 7,000 hours of field engine testing at the conclusion of the program. During the latter test the engine performance benefits from utilizing CMC shrouds were verified. Similar development of a CMC combustor liner design for a 7FA-class engine is also described. The feasibility of using the HiPerComp{reg_sign} CMC material for combustor liner applications was demonstrated in a Solar Turbines Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine (CSGT) engine test where the liner performed without incident for 12,822 hours. The deposition processes for applying environmental barrier coatings to the CMC components were also developed, and the performance of the coatings in the rig and engine tests is described.

  4. Molecular exploration of the first-century Tomb of the Shroud in Akeldama, Jerusalem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carney D Matheson

    Full Text Available The Tomb of the Shroud is a first-century C.E. tomb discovered in Akeldama, Jerusalem, Israel that had been illegally entered and looted. The investigation of this tomb by an interdisciplinary team of researchers began in 2000. More than twenty stone ossuaries for collecting human bones were found, along with textiles from a burial shroud, hair and skeletal remains. The research presented here focuses on genetic analysis of the bioarchaeological remains from the tomb using mitochondrial DNA to examine familial relationships of the individuals within the tomb and molecular screening for the presence of disease. There are three mitochondrial haplotypes shared between a number of the remains analyzed suggesting a possible family tomb. There were two pathogens genetically detected within the collection of osteological samples, these were Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae. The Tomb of the Shroud is one of very few examples of a preserved shrouded human burial and the only example of a plaster sealed loculus with remains genetically confirmed to have belonged to a shrouded male individual that suffered from tuberculosis and leprosy dating to the first-century C.E. This is the earliest case of leprosy with a confirmed date in which M. leprae DNA was detected.

  5. Molecular Exploration of the First-Century Tomb of the Shroud in Akeldama, Jerusalem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Carney D.; Vernon, Kim K.; Lahti, Arlene; Fratpietro, Renee; Spigelman, Mark; Gibson, Shimon; Greenblatt, Charles L.; Donoghue, Helen D.

    2009-01-01

    The Tomb of the Shroud is a first-century C.E. tomb discovered in Akeldama, Jerusalem, Israel that had been illegally entered and looted. The investigation of this tomb by an interdisciplinary team of researchers began in 2000. More than twenty stone ossuaries for collecting human bones were found, along with textiles from a burial shroud, hair and skeletal remains. The research presented here focuses on genetic analysis of the bioarchaeological remains from the tomb using mitochondrial DNA to examine familial relationships of the individuals within the tomb and molecular screening for the presence of disease. There are three mitochondrial haplotypes shared between a number of the remains analyzed suggesting a possible family tomb. There were two pathogens genetically detected within the collection of osteological samples, these were Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae. The Tomb of the Shroud is one of very few examples of a preserved shrouded human burial and the only example of a plaster sealed loculus with remains genetically confirmed to have belonged to a shrouded male individual that suffered from tuberculosis and leprosy dating to the first-century C.E. This is the earliest case of leprosy with a confirmed date in which M. leprae DNA was detected. PMID:20016819

  6. Design of a Helium Vapor Shroud for Liquid Hydrogen Fueling of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavender, K.; Evans, C.; Haney, J.; Leachman, J.

    2017-12-01

    Filling a vehicular liquid hydrogen fuel tank presents the potential for flammable mixtures due to oxygen concentration from liquid air condensation. Current liquid hydrogen tank designs utilize insulating paradigms such as aerogel/fiberglass materials, vacuum jackets, or inert gas purge systems to keep the outer surface from reaching the condensation temperature of air. This work examines the heat transfer at the refuelling connection of the tank to identify potential areas of condensation, as well as the surface temperature gradient. A shrouded inert gas purge was designed to minimize vehicle weight and refuelling time. The design of a shrouded inert gas purge system is presented to displace air preventing air condensation. The design investigates 3D printed materials for an inert gas shroud, as well as low-temperature sealing designs. Shroud designs and temperature profiles were measured and tested by running liquid nitrogen through the filling manifold. Materials for the inert gas shroud are discussed and experimental results are compared to analytical model predictions. Suggestions for future design improvements are made.

  7. Characteristic Evaluation of a Shrouded Propeller Mechanism for a Magnetic Actuated Microrobot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Fu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Medical microrobots have been widely used in clinical applications, particularly the spiral type locomotion mechanism, which was recently considered one of the main self-propelling mechanisms for the next medical microrobot to perform tasks such as capsule endoscopy and drug delivery. However, limits in clinical applications still exist. The spiral action of the microrobot while being used for diagnosis may lead to pain or even damage to the intestinal wall due to the exposed mechanisms. Therefore, a new locomotive mechanism, named the shrouded propeller mechanism, was proposed to achieve a high level of medical safety as well as effective propulsive performance in our study. The shrouded propeller mechanism consists of a bare spiral propeller and a non-rotating nozzle. To obtain a high effective propulsive performance, two types of screw grooves with different shapes including the cylindrical screw groove and the rectangular screw groove with different parameters were analyzed using the shrouded model. Two types of magnetic actuated microrobots with different driving modes, the electromagnetic (three-pole rotor actuated microrobot and the permanent magnet (O-ring type magnet actuated microrobot were designed to evaluate the performance of the electromagnetic actuation system. Based on experimental results, the propulsive force of the proposed magnetic actuated microrobot with a shrouded propeller was larger than the magnetic actuated microrobot with a bare spiral propeller under the same parameters. Additionally, the shrouded propeller mechanism as an actuator can be used for other medical microrobots for flexible locomotion.

  8. Influence of localized plasticity on Stress Corrosion Cracking of austenitic stainless steel. Application to IASCC of internals reactor core vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cisse, Sarata

    2012-01-01

    The surface conditions of the 316L screw connecting vessel internals of the primary circuit of PWR (pressurized water reactor) corresponds to a grinding condition. These screws are affected by the IASCC (Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking). Initiation of cracking depends on the surface condition but also on the external oxidation and interactions of oxide layer with the deformation bands. The first objective of this study is to point the influence of surface condition on the growth kinetic of oxide layer, and the surface reactivity of 304, 316 stainless steel grade exposed to PWR primary water at 340 C. The second objective is to determine influence of strain localization on the SCC of austenitic stainless steels in PWR primary water. Indeed, the microstructure of irradiated 304, 316 grades correspond to a localized deformation in deformation bands free of radiation defects. In order to reproduce that microstructure without conducting irradiations, low cycle fatigue tests at controlled stain amplitude are implemented for the model material of the study (A286 austenitic stainless steel hardened by the precipitation of phase γ'Ni3(Ti, Al)). During the mechanical cycling (after the first hardening cycles), the precipitates are dissolved in slip bands leading to the localization of the deformation. Once the right experimental conditions in low cycle fatigue obtained (for localized microstructure), interactions oxidation / deformation bands are studied by oxidizing pre deformed samples containing deformation bands and non deformed samples. The tensile tests at a slow strain rate of 8 x 10 -8 /s are also carried out on pre deformed samples and undeformed samples. The results showed that surface treatment induces microstructural modifications of the metal just under the oxide layer, leading to slower growth kinetics of the oxide layer. However, surface treatment accelerates development of oxides penetrations in metal under the oxide layer. As example, for

  9. CFD study of leakage flows in shroud cavities of a compressor impeller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatova, K.

    2017-08-01

    The flow character in a gap between shroud disc of an impeller and a stator surface (shroud cavity) influences disc friction loss, labyrinth seal loss (parasitic losses) and thrust force. Flow calculations inside the shroud cavity of a model of centrifugal compressor stage and its labyrinth seal in a range of flow rates and axial width and radial gap are presented. The results are presented in terms of non-dimensional coefficients of flow, disc friction and seal leakage losses coefficients and pressure coefficient. The distributions meridional and tangential flow velocities correspond to the continuity and equilibrium equations - flow radial circulation exists in wide cavity and is absent in narrow cavities. The radial pressure distributions as measured and calculated are not fully comparable. The possible reason is that CFD-calculated leakage coefficient is less than calculated by A.Stodola formula. The influence of a cavity width on the losses and the thrust force requires a balanced design.

  10. LOFT drag-disc turbine tansducer shroud and cover weld analysis and evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinell, J.S.

    1978-01-01

    The results are presented of stress analysis and evaluation of the drag-disc turbine transducer (DTT) shroud and cover welds used in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility. The analysis concerns LOFT DTTs currently installed and/or planned for use in future experiments by LOFT Experimental Measurements Branch personnel. Thermal/hydraulic conditions for Experiments L1-5 and L2-4 (for all nuclear tests) were used to predict the loads experienced by the various shroud and cover welds. The results of this analysis include minimum fatigue life for all subject welds, and Applied Mechanics Branch recommendations for improving the structural integrity of critically stressed welds

  11. Experimental and Numerical Study of the Effect of Gas-Shrouded Plasma Spraying on Cathode Coating of Alkaline Electrolysis Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, T.; Reißner, R.; Schiller, G.; Ansar, A.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this work is to improve the performance of electrodes prepared via atmospheric plasma spray by means of gas shrouding which is expected to apparently reduce the oxygen content of the plasma plume and subsequently improve the coating quality. Electrodes with dual-layer coating for alkaline water electrolysis were deposited on Ni-coated perforated substrates. Microstructure and morphology were studied by SEM. Element content was measured by EDS. Enthalpy probe was employed for measuring plasma temperature and velocity as well as the gas composition. For verifying and better understanding the shrouding effect numerical calculation was carried out according to the experimental settings. Electrochemical test was carried out to validate the shrouding effect. The results showed slight protecting effect of gas shrouding on plasma plume and the final coating. Over the dual-layer section, the measured oxygen fraction was 3.46 and 3.15% for the case without gas shrouding and with gas shrouding, respectively. With gas shrouding the coating exhibited similar element contents as the coating sprayed by VPS, while no obvious improvement was observed in the microstructure or the morphology. Evident electrochemical improvement was nevertheless achieved that with gas shrouding the electrode exhibited similar performance as that of the VPS-sprayed electrode.

  12. ATHENA model for 4 x 350 MW(t) HTGR plant side-by-side steel vessel prismatic core concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosek, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    ATHENA is a computer code being developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory under US Department of Energy support. The code will provide advanced best-estimate predictive capability for a wide spectrum of applications. The code has capability for modeling independent hydrodynamic systems which can currently include water, helium, Freon-II, idealgas, lithium, or lithium-lead as fluids. ATHENA was modified to allow point reactor kinetics evaluations for two nuclear reactor cores. Capability for specifying gas circulators was added and representative homologous curves were added for a helium circulator. A full system model was developed for a High Temperature Gas Reactor modular concept with a full secondary system model. The code capability to model the complete system was demonstrated and a representative transient for a circulator coastdown without reactor scram was modeled and evaluated to the point of flow stagnation

  13. Assessment of low-order theories for analysis and design of shrouded wind turbines using CFD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aranake, Aniket C; Lakshminarayan, Vinod K; Duraisamy, Karthik

    2014-01-01

    The use of a shroud around the rotor of a wind turbine has been known to augment the airflow through the rotor plane and hence result in improved performance. This work uses Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to assess the validity of several simple theories which attempt to extend Betz theory to shrouded turbines. Two CFD models are employed and compared to predictions of previously published models. The first makes use of a fixed pressure-drop actuator disk, while the second incorporates the twist and chord distribution of the turbine blade as well as an airfoil polar using a technique much like the classical blade element momentum (BEM) method. Calculations are performed for a sweep of turbine loadings using the fixed pressure-drop model and a sweep of tip speed ratios using the BEM model for both an open and shrouded turbine. Power is computed using a control volume approach for the fixed pressure-drop model and by integrating tangential forces for the BEM model. Information including mass flow ratio, power coefficient ratio, axial induction, and shroud force is extracted from the solution fields and compared against the predictions of low-order theories. Finally, the blade element model is used to redesign the turbine twist distribution to achieve greater performance across a range of tip speed ratios

  14. Effect of Relative Movement between the Shroud and Blade on Tip Leakage Flow Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochun Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available An experimental and numerical investigation into the tip leakage flow of a turbine rotor is carried out using a particle image velocimetry (PIV system and the commercial software ANSYS CFX 14.0. The specimen used in this work is a typical GE-E3 model with a new squealer tip design. The experimental data are used to create a turbulence model and numerical strategy. Through the validated turbulence model and numerical strategy, simulations are carried out to compare the characteristics of the tip leakage flow in three cases: (1 the blade is rotating, but the shroud is stationary, which is the real status of turbine rotor operation; (2 the blade is stationary, but the shroud moves, to simulate their relative movement; (3 the blade is stationary, and the shroud is also stationary, this is a simplified case, but has been widely used in the experiments on rotor tip leakage flow. Detailed analysis of the flow phenomena shows that the second case is a reasonable alternative approach to simulate the real state. However, the flow patterns in the third case exhibit some evident differences from the real status. These differences are caused by the inaccurate viscous force arising from the stationary blade and shroud. In this work, a modification method for the experiments conducted in the third case is firstly proposed, which is realized through adding an imaginary roughness at the shroud wall to be close to the real viscous effect, and to thereby reduce the deviation of the experiment from the real case. According to the results calculated by ANSYS CFX, the flow structure in the modification case is very close to the real status. Besides, this modification case is an easy and cheap way to simulate the real tip leakage flow.

  15. Surface characterization and wear behaviour of laser surface melted AISI 316L stainless steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kumar, A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study concerns an in depth investigation of the influence of laser surface melting of AISI 316L stainless steel using Ar and N2 as shrouding atmosphere. Laser surface melting has been carried out using a 5 kW continuous wave (CW) fibre...

  16. Numerical Investigation of the Interaction between Mainstream and Tip Shroud Leakage Flow in a 2-Stage Low Pressure Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Wei; Liu, Huoxing

    2014-06-01

    The pressing demand for future advanced gas turbine requires to identify the losses in a turbine and to understand the physical mechanisms producing them. In low pressure turbines with shrouded blades, a large portion of these losses is generated by tip shroud leakage flow and associated interaction. For this reason, shroud leakage losses are generally grouped into the losses of leakage flow itself and the losses caused by the interaction between leakage flow and mainstream. In order to evaluate the influence of shroud leakage flow and related losses on turbine performance, computational investigations for a 2-stage low pressure turbine is presented and discussed in this paper. Three dimensional steady multistage calculations using mixing plane approach were performed including detailed tip shroud geometry. Results showed that turbines with shrouded blades have an obvious advantage over unshrouded ones in terms of aerodynamic performance. A loss mechanism breakdown analysis demonstrated that the leakage loss is the main contributor in the first stage while mixing loss dominates in the second stage. Due to the blade-to-blade pressure gradient, both inlet and exit cavity present non-uniform leakage injection and extraction. The flow in the exit cavity is filled with cavity vortex, leakage jet attached to the cavity wall and recirculation zone induced by main flow ingestion. Furthermore, radial gap and exit cavity size of tip shroud have a major effect on the yaw angle near the tip region in the main flow. Therefore, a full calculation of shroud leakage flow is necessary in turbine performance analysis and the shroud geometric features need to be considered during turbine design process.

  17. Specification for corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel bare and composite metal cored and stranded arc welding electrodes and welding rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    This specification prescribes requirements for corrosion or heat resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel electrodes and welding rods. These electrodes and welding rods are normally used for arc welding and include those alloy steels designated as corrosion or heat-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steels, in which chromium exceeds 4.0 percent and nickel does not exceed 50.0 percent

  18. Monitoring of chromium and nickel in biological fluids of stainless steel welders using the flux-cored-wire (FCW) welding method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stridsklev, Inger Cecilie; Schaller, Karl-Heinz; Langård, Sverre

    2004-11-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the exposure to chromium (Cr) and nickel (Ni) in flux-cored wire (FCW) welders welding on stainless steel (SS). Seven FCW welders were monitored for 3 days to 1 workweek, measuring Cr and Ni in air, blood, and urine. The welders were questioned about exposure to Cr and Ni during their whole working careers, with emphasis on the week of monitoring, about the use of personal protective equipment and their smoking habits. The air concentrations were mean 200 microg/m(3) (range 2.4-2,744) for total Cr, 11.3 microg/m(3) (416.7) for Ni during the workdays for the five welders who were monitored with air measurements. The levels of Cr and Ni in biological fluids varied between different workplaces. For Cr in whole blood, plasma, and erythrocytes, the mean levels after work were 1.25 (<0.4-8.3) and 1.68 (<0.2-8.0) and 0.9 (<0.4-7.2) microg/l, respectively. For Ni most of the measurements in whole blood and plasma were below the detection limits, the mean levels after work being 0.84 (<0.8-3.3) and 0.57 microg/l (<0.4-1.7), respectively. Mean levels for Cr and Ni in the urine after work were 3.96 (0.34-40.7) and 2.50 (0.56-5.0) microg/g creatinine, respectively. Correlations between the Cr(VI) levels measured in air and the levels of total Cr in the measured biological fluids were found. The results seem to support the view that monitoring of Cr in the urine may be versatile for indirect monitoring of the Cr(VI) air level in FCW welders. The results seem to suggest that external and internal exposure to Cr and Ni in FCW welders welding SS is low in general.

  19. Metallurgy of gas turbine blades with integral shroud and its influence on blades performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazur, Z.; Marino, C.; Kubiak, J.

    1999-01-01

    The influence of the microstructure of the gas turbine blades with integral shroud on the blades performance is presented. The analysis of the solidification process of the gas turbine blades during conventionally casting process (equiaxed grains) with all elements which has influence on the mode of its solidification and variation of the microstructure is carried out. Also, the evaluation of the failure of the gas turbine blade is present. A detailed analysis of the blade tip shroud microstructure (presence of the equiaxed and columnar grains) and its influence on the failure initiation and propagation is carried out. Finally, conclusions and some necessary improvements of the blades casting process to prevent blades failures are presented. (Author) 2 refs

  20. Detailed Aerodynamic Analysis of a Shrouded Tail Rotor Using an Unstructured Mesh Flow Solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Dong; Kwon, Oh Joon

    The detailed aerodynamics of a shrouded tail rotor in hover has been numerically studied using a parallel inviscid flow solver on unstructured meshes. The numerical method is based on a cell-centered finite-volume discretization and an implicit Gauss-Seidel time integration. The calculation was made for a single blade by imposing a periodic boundary condition between adjacent rotor blades. The grid periodicity was also imposed at the periodic boundary planes to avoid numerical inaccuracy resulting from solution interpolation. The results were compared with available experimental data and those from a disk vortex theory for validation. It was found that realistic three-dimensional modeling is important for the prediction of detailed aerodynamics of shrouded rotors including the tip clearance gap flow.

  1. Effects of Stator Shroud Injection on the Aerodynamic Performance of a Single-Stage Transonic Axial Compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinh, Cong-Truong; Ma, Sang-Bum; Kim, Kwang Yong

    2017-01-01

    In this study, stator shroud injection in a single-stage transonic axial compressor is proposed. A parametric study of the effect of stator shroud injection on aerodynamic performances was conducted using the three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The curvature, length, width, and circumferential angle of the stator shroud injector and the air injection mass flow rate were selected as the test parameters. The results of the parametric study show that the aerodynamic performances of the single-stage transonic axial compressor were improved by stator shroud injection. The aerodynamic performances were the most sensitive to the injection mass flow rate. Further, the total pressure ratio and adiabatic efficiency were the maximum when the ratio of circumferential angle was 10%.

  2. Effects of Stator Shroud Injection on the Aerodynamic Performance of a Single-Stage Transonic Axial Compressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, Cong-Truong; Ma, Sang-Bum; Kim, Kwang Yong [Inha Univ., Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    In this study, stator shroud injection in a single-stage transonic axial compressor is proposed. A parametric study of the effect of stator shroud injection on aerodynamic performances was conducted using the three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The curvature, length, width, and circumferential angle of the stator shroud injector and the air injection mass flow rate were selected as the test parameters. The results of the parametric study show that the aerodynamic performances of the single-stage transonic axial compressor were improved by stator shroud injection. The aerodynamic performances were the most sensitive to the injection mass flow rate. Further, the total pressure ratio and adiabatic efficiency were the maximum when the ratio of circumferential angle was 10%.

  3. Theory and experimental validation of SPLASH (Single Panel Lamp and Shroud Helper).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Marvin Elwood; Porter, Jason M.

    2005-06-01

    The radiant heat test facility develops test sets providing well-characterized thermal environments, often representing fires. Many of the components and procedures have become standardized to such an extent that the development of a specialized design tool was appropriate. SPLASH (Single Panel Lamp and Shroud Helper) is that tool. SPLASH is implemented as a user-friendly program that allows a designer to describe a test setup in terms of parameters such as lamp number, power, position, and separation distance. Thermal radiation is the dominant mechanism of heat transfer and the SPLASH model solves a radiation enclosure problem to estimate temperature distributions in a shroud providing the boundary condition of interest. Irradiance distribution on a specified viewing plane is also estimated. This document provides the theoretical development for the underlying model. A series of tests were conducted to characterize SPLASH's ability to analyze lamp and shroud systems. The comparison suggests that SPLASH succeeds as a design tool. Simplifications made to keep the model tractable are demonstrated to result in estimates that are only approximately as uncertain as many of the properties and characteristics of the operating environment.

  4. Shrouds of the Night Masks of the Milky Way and Our Awesome New View of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Block, David L

    2009-01-01

    The Milky Way has captivated the mind of multitudes ever since the beginning of time. Particularly striking are its apparent dusty gaping voids. With the advent of near-infrared technology, astronomers have discovered an awesome new view of its structure, and of the structure of other galaxies around us. Galaxies are encased within shrouds of the night: shrouds or veils of cosmic dust, which have given us a totally incomplete picture of what our majestic Universe actually looks like. Shrouds of the Night features some of the most remarkable early photographic work of masters such as Isaac Roberts and Edward Barnard, before presenting to the reader the unmasked (dust penetrated) view of our cosmos, using some of the world’s largest ground and space-based telescopes. "Galaxies are the 'ecosystems' of the cosmos – vast assemblages in which gas and dust are recycled through successive generations of stars. The authors of this beautiful book describe our ever-sharpening view of the Milky Way, the galaxy that i...

  5. Mechanical properties of API X80 steel pipe joints welded by Flux Core Arc Weld Process; Propriedades mecanicas de juntas de tubos de aco API X80 soldadas com arame tubulares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordonez, Robert E. Cooper; Silva, Jose Hilton F.; Trevisan, Roseana E. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica. Dept. de Engenharia de Fabricacao

    2003-07-01

    Flux Core Arc Welding processes (FCAW) are beginning to be applied in pipeline welds, however, very limited experimental data regarding mechanical properties of pipeline weld joints with these processes are available in the literature. In this paper, the effects of preheat temperature and type of FCAW on mechanical properties (microhardness and tensile strength) of API X80 weld joint steel are presented. FCAW processes with gas protection and self-shielded were used. Multipasses welding were applied in 30'' diameter and 0,625'' thickness tubes. Influence factors were: FCAW type and preheat temperature. Acceptance criteria of welded joints were evaluated by API 1104 standard for tensile strength test and ASTM E384-99 for microhardness test. The results obtained showed that FCAW type and preheat temperature have no influence on mechanical properties of API X80 joint steel. (author)

  6. Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of moulded assemblies of tape-wound cut cores of grain-oriented silicon-steel for the LHC beam dumping system

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    This document concerns the award of a contract for the supply of moulded assemblies of tape-wound cut cores of grain-oriented silicon-steel for the three different types of fast pulsed magnets for the beam dumping system of the LHC. Following a market survey carried out among 14 firms in four Member States and six firms in two non-Member States, a call for tenders (IT-2674/SL/LHC) was sent on 26 January 2001 to one firm in one Member State. By the closing date, CERN had received a tender from the firm. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with TELMAG MAGNETIC COMPONENTS (UK), the only bidder, for the supply of 2885 moulded assemblies of tape-wound cut cores of grain-oriented silicon-steel, of three different types, for a total amount of 2 414 664 euros (3 692 147 Swiss francs), not subject to revision, with options for 560 additional moulded core assemblies of three different types, for an additional amount of 468 496 euros (716 355 Swiss francs), not subject to revision,...

  7. Applying a Numerical Model of the Continuous Steel Casting Process to Control the Length of the Liquid Core in the Strand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miłkowska-Piszczek K.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents development and the application of a numerical model of the continuous steel casting process to optimise the strand solidification area. The design of the numerical model of the steel continuous casting process was presented and which was developed based on the actual dimensions of the slab continuous casting machine in ArcelorMittal Poland Unit in Kraków. The S235 steel grade and the cast strand format of 220×1280 mm were selected for the tests. Three strand casting speeds were analysed: 0.6, 0.8 and 1 m min-1. An algorithm was presented, allowing the calculation of the heat transfer coefficient values for the secondary cooling zone. In order to verify the results of numerical simulations, additional temperature measurements of the strand surface within the secondary cooling chamber were made. The ProCAST software was used to construct the numerical model of continuous casting of steel.

  8. Behaviour of steel pipe exposed to fouling by heavy oil during core-annular flow; Comportamento de tubo de aco exposto a sujeira de oleo pesado durante escoamento nucleo-anular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Adriana; Bannwart, Antonio C. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica. Dept. de Engenharia de Petroleo

    2004-07-01

    The use of water-assisted technologies such as core-annular flow to the pipelines of viscous oils has been proposed as an attractive alternative for production and transportation of heavy crudes in both onshore and offshore scenarios. Usually, core-annular flow can be created by injecting a relatively small water flow rate laterally in the pipe, so as to form a thin water annulus surrounding the viscous oil, which is pumped through the center. The reduction in friction losses obtained thanks to lubrication by water is significant, since the pressure drop in a steady state core flow becomes comparable to water flow only. For a complete assessment of core flow technology, however, unwanted effects associated with possible oil adhesion onto the pipe wall should be investigated, since these may cause severe fouling of the wall and pressure drop increase. It has been observed that oil adhesion on metallic surfaces may occur for certain types of crude and oilphilic pipe materials. In this work we present results of pressure drop monitoring during 35 hour-operation of a heavy oil-water core annular flow in a 26.08 mm. i.d. horizontal steel pipe. The oil used is described in terms of its main components and the results of static wet ability tests are also presented for comparison (author)

  9. Seeing Inscriptions on the Shroud of Turin: The Role of Psychological Influences in the Perception of Writing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy R Jordan

    Full Text Available The Shroud of Turin (hereafter the Shroud is one of the most widely known and widely studied artifacts in existence, with enormous historical and religious significance. For years, the Shroud has inspired worldwide interest in images on its fabric which appear to be of the body and face of a man executed in a manner consistent with crucifixion, and many believe that these images were formed in the Shroud's fibers during the Resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth. But, more recently, other reports have suggested that the Shroud also contains evidence of inscriptions, and these reports have been used to add crucial support to the view that the Shroud is the burial cloth of Jesus. Unfortunately, these reports of inscriptions are based on marks that are barely visible on the Shroud, even when images are enhanced, and the actual existence of writing on the Shroud is still a matter of considerable debate. Here we discuss previous evidence concerning the psychological processes involved generally in the perception of writing, and especially when letters and words are indistinct. We then report two experiments in which the influence of religious context on perception of inscriptions was addressed specifically, using an image of woven fabric (modern linen containing no writing and with no religious provenance. This image was viewed in two different contexts: in the Religious Context, participants were informed that the image was of a linen artifact that was important to the Christian faith whereas, in the non-religious Neutral Context, participants were informed that the image was of a simple piece of linen. Both groups were told that the image may contain faint words and were asked to report any words they could see. All participants detected words on the image, and indicated that these words were visible and were able to trace on the image the words they detected. In each experiment, more religious words were detected in the Religious Context condition than

  10. Seeing Inscriptions on the Shroud of Turin: The Role of Psychological Influences in the Perception of Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Timothy R; Sheen, Mercedes; Abedipour, Lily; Paterson, Kevin B

    2015-01-01

    The Shroud of Turin (hereafter the Shroud) is one of the most widely known and widely studied artifacts in existence, with enormous historical and religious significance. For years, the Shroud has inspired worldwide interest in images on its fabric which appear to be of the body and face of a man executed in a manner consistent with crucifixion, and many believe that these images were formed in the Shroud's fibers during the Resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth. But, more recently, other reports have suggested that the Shroud also contains evidence of inscriptions, and these reports have been used to add crucial support to the view that the Shroud is the burial cloth of Jesus. Unfortunately, these reports of inscriptions are based on marks that are barely visible on the Shroud, even when images are enhanced, and the actual existence of writing on the Shroud is still a matter of considerable debate. Here we discuss previous evidence concerning the psychological processes involved generally in the perception of writing, and especially when letters and words are indistinct. We then report two experiments in which the influence of religious context on perception of inscriptions was addressed specifically, using an image of woven fabric (modern linen) containing no writing and with no religious provenance. This image was viewed in two different contexts: in the Religious Context, participants were informed that the image was of a linen artifact that was important to the Christian faith whereas, in the non-religious Neutral Context, participants were informed that the image was of a simple piece of linen. Both groups were told that the image may contain faint words and were asked to report any words they could see. All participants detected words on the image, and indicated that these words were visible and were able to trace on the image the words they detected. In each experiment, more religious words were detected in the Religious Context condition than in the Neutral

  11. Effects of Hydrocarbon-Based Grease on Rapid Prototype Material Used for Grease Retention Shrouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrajsek, Andrew J.; Valco, Daniel J.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Effects of hydrocarbon-based greases on specific rapid prototype (RP) materials used to fabricate grease retention shrouds (GRS) were explored in this study. Grease retention shrouds are being considered as a way to maintain adequate grease lubrication at the gear mesh in a prototype research transmission system. Due to their design and manufacturing flexibility, rapid prototype materials were chosen for the grease retention shrouds. In order to gain a better understanding of the short and long term effects grease pose on RP materials, research was conducted on the interaction of hydrocarbon-based grease with RP materials. The materials used in this study were durable polyamide (nylon), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), and WaterClear 10120. Testing was conducted using Mobilgrease 28 and Syn-Tech 3913G grease (gear coupling grease). These greases were selected due to their regular use with mechanical components. To investigate the effect that grease has on RP materials, the following methods were used to obtain qualitative and quantitative data: Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), interference profilometer measurements, digital camera imaging, physical shape measurement, and visual observations. To record the changes in the RP materials due to contact with the grease, data was taken before and after the grease application. Results showed that the WaterClear 10120 RP material provided the best resistance to grease penetration as compared to nylon and ABS RP materials. The manufacturing process, and thus resulting surface conditions of the RP material, played a key role in the grease penetration properties and resilience of these materials.

  12. PIV Measurements of Flows around the Wind Turbines with a Flanged-Diffuser Shroud

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazuhiko Toshimitsu; Koutarou Nishikawa; Wataru Haruki; Shinichi Oono; Manabu Takao; Yuji Ohya

    2008-01-01

    The wind turbines with a flanged-diffuser shroud -so called "wind lens turbine"- are developed as one of high performance wind turbines by Ohya et al. In order to investigate the flow characteristics and flow acceleration, the paper presents the flow velocity measurements of a long-type and a compact-type wind turbines with a flanged-diffuser shroud by particle image velocimetry. In the case of the long type wind turbine, the velocity vec-tors of the inner flow field of the diffuser for turbine blades rotating and no blades rotating are presented at Rey-nolds number, 0.9x105. Furthermore the flow fields between with and without rotating are compared. Through the PIV measurement results, one can realize that the turbine blades rotating affects as suppress the disturbance and the flow separation near the inner wall of the diffuser. The time average velocity vectors are made on the av-erage of the instantaneous velocity data. There are two large vortices in downstream region of the diffuser. One vortex behind the flange acts as suck in wind to the diffuser and raise the inlet flow velocity. Another large vortex appears in downstream. It might be act as blockage vortex of main flow. The large blockage vortex is not clear in the instantaneous velocity vectors, however it exists clearly in the time average flow field. The flow field around the wind turbine with a compact-type flanged-diffuser shroud is also investigated. The flow pattern behind the flange of the compact-type turbine is the same as the long-type one. It means that the effect of flow acceleration is caused by the unsteady vortices behind the flange. The comparison with CFD and PIV results of meridional time-average streamlines after the compact-type diffuser is also presented.

  13. Phase-Averaged Method Applied to Periodic Flow Between Shrouded Corotating Disks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen-Chun Wu

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the coherent flow fields between corotating disks in a cylindrical enclosure. By using two laser velocimeters and a phase-averaged technique, the vortical structures of the flow could be reconstructed and their dynamic behavior was observed. The experimental results reveal clearly that the flow field between the disks is composed of three distinct regions: an inner region near the hub, an outer region, and a shroud boundary layer region. The outer region is distinguished by the presence of large vortical structures. The number of vortical structures corresponds to the normalized frequency of the flow.

  14. Material properties of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels for core materials of FBR. Mechanical strength properties of sodium exposed and Nickel diffused materials. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Shoichi; Yoshida, Eiichi

    2004-02-01

    An oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel have excellent resistance to swelling and superior creep strength, they are expected to be used as a long-life cladding material in future advanced fast reactor. In this study, sodium environmental effects on the ODS steel developed by JNC were clarified through tensile test after sodium exposure for maximum 10,000hrs and creep-rupture test in sodium at elevated temperature. The exposure to sodium was conducted using a sodium test loop constituted by austenitic steels. For the conditions of sodium exposure test, the sodium temperatures were 923 K and 973 K, the oxygen concentration in sodium was below 2ppm and sodium flow rate on the surface of specimen was less than 1x10 -4 m/s. Further the specimen with the nickel diffused was prepared, which is simulate to nickel diffusing through sodium from the surface of structural stainless steels. The main results obtained were as follows; (1) The results showed excellent sodium-resistance up to a high temperature of about 973 K in stagnant sodium conditions, and its considered that the effects of sodium environment of tensile properties were negligible. In case of stagnant sodium condition, creep-rupture strength in sodium was equal to the in argon gas, and no sodium environmental effect was observed. The same is true for the creep-rupture ductility. (2) The tensile properties of nickel diffused test specimens at high temperatures simulating microstructure change were equal to that of the thermal aging process specimens. These tensile tests suggest that sodium environmental effects can be ignored. However, the effect of nickel diffusion on creep strength are not clear at present and experimental investigation are being conducted. (3) The coefficient of nickel diffusion in the ODS steel can be estimated based on the results of nickel concentration measurement. This value is larger than that of the diffusion coefficient for typical α-Fe steel at temperature below 973 K

  15. Evaluation of initiation behavior of stress corrosion cracking for type 316L stainless steel in high temperature water. Behavior of crack initiation and effects of distribution of plastic strain on crack initiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Yasufumi; Miyahara, Yuichi; Kako, Kenji; Sato, Masaru

    2011-01-01

    It is known that the initiation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in components such as the reactor core shroud and primary loop re-circulation piping made of L-grade stainless steel is affected by the properties of surface work hardened layer. Therefore, it is important to clarify the effect of the hardened layer on SCC initiation behavior. In this study, creviced bent beam (CBB) test using specimens made of Type 316L stainless steel with controlled distribution of surface work hardened layer was conducted in a simulated BWR environment in order to evaluate the effect of the controlled layer on SCC initiation behavior. The results obtained are as follows; (1) Micro intergranular SCC of low carbon stainless steel was initiated in 50 hours. (2) In this SCC test, it was found that only micro cracks whose depths were smaller than 50 μm were observed until 250 hours and cracks whose depths were larger than 50 μm were observed after 500 hours. (3) SCC was initiated preferentially on the region with high plastic strain gradient in the specimen with controlled distribution of work hardened layer. (author)

  16. Ductile austenitic steel for fuel cans and core components of sodium cooled reactors; Ein duktiler austenitischer Stahl fuer Huellrohre und Kernkomponenten natriumgekuehlter Brueter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, L.

    1995-08-01

    Two austenitic steel melts of a new composition have been studied after irradiation in the PFR fast neutron flux, in the BR2 reactor, and in the Harwell V.E. Cyclotron. The investigations were focussed on helium embrittlement and irradiation induced swelling. (orig.)

  17. Effects of Contextual Information on Seeing Pareidolic Religious Inscriptions on an Artifact: Implications for the Shroud of Turin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheen, Mercedes; Jordan, Timothy R

    2015-12-01

    Several reports suggest that images of the Shroud of Turin contain faint religious inscriptions that support the view that the Shroud has special religious significance. Against this background, we investigated effects of contextual information on detecting religious inscriptions using an image of plain modern linen with no religious provenance and containing no writing. The image was viewed in three contexts: In the Neutral Context, participants were told that the image was of a simple piece of linen; in the Religious Context, participants were told that the image was of an important religious artifact; and in the Religious Context + Options condition, participants were also given plausible word options. Very few words were detected in the Neutral Context, significantly more in the Religious Context, and most in the Religious Context+Options condition. Some implications of these findings for reports of inscriptions in the context-laden conditions surrounding the Shroud of Turin are discussed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Argon Shrouded Plasma Spraying of Tantalum over Titanium for Corrosion Protection in Fluorinated Nitric Acid Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetrivendan, E.; Jayaraj, J.; Ningshen, S.; Mallika, C.; Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2018-02-01

    Argon shrouded plasma spraying (ASPS) was used to deposit a Ta coating on commercially pure Ti (CP-Ti) under inert argon, for dissolver vessel application in the aqueous spent fuels reprocessing plant with high plutonium content. Oxidation during plasma spraying was minimized by shrouding argon system. Porosity and oxide content were controlled by optimizing the spraying parameters, to obtain a uniform and dense Ta coating. The Ta particle temperature and velocity were optimized by judiciously controlling the spray parameters, using a spray diagnostic charge-coupled device camera. The corrosion resistance of the Ta coatings developed by ASPS was investigated by electrochemical studies in 11.5 M HNO3 and 11.5 M HNO3 + 0.05 M NaF. Similarly, the durability of the ASPS Ta coating/substrate was evaluated as per ASTM A262 Practice-C test in boiling nitric acid and fluorinated nitric acid for 240 h. The ASPS Ta coating exhibited higher corrosion resistance than the CP-Ti substrate, as evident from electrochemical studies, and low corrosion rate with excellent coating stability in boiling nitric, and fluorinated nitric acid. The results of the present study revealed that tantalum coating by ASPS is a promising strategy for improving the corrosion resistance in the highly corrosive reprocessing environment.

  19. Evaluation of neutron irradiation effect on SCC crack growth behaviour of austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-08-15

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used as structural materials alloy in reactor pressure vessel internal components because of their high strength, ductility and fracture toughness. However, exposure due to neutron irradiation results in changes in microstructure, mechanical properties and microchemistry of the material. Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) caused by the effect of neutron irradiation during long term operation in high temperature water environments in nuclear power plants is considered to take the form of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) and the critical fluence level has been reported to be about 5x10{sup 24}n/m{sup 2} (E>1MeV) for Type 304 SS in BWR environment. JNES had been conducting IASCC project during from JFY 2000 to JFY 2008, and prepared an engineering database on IASCC. However, the data of crack growth rate (CGR) below the critical fluence level are not sufficient. Therefore, evaluation of neutron irradiation effect project (ENI) was initiated to obtain the CGR data below the critical fluence level, and prepare the SCC growth rate diagram for life time evaluation of core shroud. Test specimens have been irradiated in the OECD/Halden reactor, and the post irradiation experiments (PIE) have been conducting during from JFY 2011 to JFY 2013, finally the modified IASCC guide will be prepared in JFY 2013. (author)

  20. Application of high efficiency and reliable 3D-designed integral shrouded blades to nuclear turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Eiichiro; Ohyama, Hiroharu; Tashiro, Hikaru; Sugitani, Toshiro; Kurosawa, Masaru

    1998-01-01

    Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. has recently developed new blades for nuclear turbines, in order to achieve higher efficiency and higher reliability. The 3D aerodynamic design for 41 inch and 46 inch blades, their one piece structural design (integral-shrouded blades: ISB), and the verification test results using a model steam turbine are described in this paper. The predicted efficiency and lower vibratory stress have been verified. Based on these 60Hz ISB, 50Hz ISB series are under development using 'the law of similarity' without changing their thermodynamic performance and mechanical stress levels. Our 3D-designed reaction blades which are used for the high pressure and low pressure upstream stages, are also briefly mentioned. (author)

  1. Commonalities between the Shroud of Turin and the Sudarium of Oviedo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermosilla Alfonso Sánchez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1989 EDICES (Spanish Sindonology Research Centre Team started researching about the Sudarium of Oviedo, developing the pioneer research started in the sixties by Monsignor Giulio Ricci, who was a member of the Papal Curia and President of the “Roman Centre of Sindonology”aaRicci, G. L'Uomo Della Sindone é Gesú, 2a Edición, 1969., furthermore, he was a scholar of the Gospel of Saint John, the reading of chapter 20, Bible verses 4-8: “4 They were running together, but the other disciple ran faster than Peter and was the first to arrive at the tomb.5 Bending down to take a look, he saw the linen cloths lying there, but he didn't go in.6 Following him, Simon Peter entered the tomb and saw the linen cloths lying there.7 He also saw the face cloth that had been on Jesus' head. It wasn't with the other clothes but was folded up in its own place.8Then the other disciple, the one who arrived at the tomb first, also went inside. He saw and believed.” This made him look for a second funerary linen used to wrap the corpse of Jesus of Nazareth. This seek led him to the Sudarium of Oviedo. The similarity of the shape of the stains and its size with the Shroud of Turin made him think that he had really found the relic which Saint Joan mentions. From the Forensic Anthropology and Forensic Medicine point of view, all the information discovered by the scientific research is compatible with the hypothesis that the Shroud of Turin and the Sudarium of Oviedo covered the corpse of the same person.

  2. Aircraft Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-19

    component usage. PH 13-8Mo is a precipitation-hardenable martensitic stainless steel combining excellent corrosion resistance with strength. Custom 465 is...a martensitic , age-hardenable stainless steel capable of about 1,724 MPa (250 ksi) UTS when peak-aged (H900 condition). Especially, this steel can...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Five high strength steels (4340, 300M, AerMet 100, Ferrium S53, and Hy-Tuf) and four stainless steels (High Nitrogen, 13

  3. Studies on antimony absorption on Carbon steel (CS) and magnetite coated CS at high temperature to investigate the problem of out of core Sb activity in PHWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keny, S.J.; Gokhale, B.K.; Kumbhar, A.G.; Bera, Santanu; Velmurugan, S.

    2014-01-01

    Sb from PHT (primary heat transfer) pump bearings of PHWRs (Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors) goes to the reactor core and gets activated to 121 Sb and 123 Sb. Subsequently, it deposits on out of core surface resulting in radiation exposure to station personnel's apparent high decontamination factors. Sb, thus deposited can't be impassivated by normal decontamination process. Earlier studies indicates lattice substitution of Sb +3 for Fe +2 in magnetite at low doping levels (≤5%). This process, at reactor conditions is yet to be well understood. To formulate an adequate decontamination formulation and methodology and for having insight at Sb deposition mechanism under rector conditions studies are performed

  4. THE DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGY OF THE CORE THERMO-MECHANICALLY HARDENED REINFORC-ING STEEL OF GRADE A700HW OF DIE-ROLLED SECTION NO 12, 14, 16 PRODUCTION ACCORDING TO REQUIREMENT OF FINNISH STANDARDS SFST1216 IN CONDITIONS OF SMALL-SECTION MILL 320 OF RUP «BMZ»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Rusalenko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of technology of the core thermomechanically hardened reinforcing steel of grade А700HW of die-rolled section No 12, 14, 16 production according to requirement of Finnish standards SFST1216 in conditions of small-section mill 320 of RUP «BMZ» is given.

  5. Characterization of welding of AISI 304l stainless steel similar to the core encircling of a BWR reactor; Caracterizacion de soldaduras de acero inoxidable AISI 304L similares a las de la envolvente del nucleo de un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gachuz M, M.E.; Palacios P, F.; Robles P, E.F. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    Plates of austenitic stainless steel AISI 304l of 0.0381 m thickness were welded by means of the SMAW process according to that recommended in the Section 9 of the ASME Code, so that it was reproduced the welding process used to assemble the encircling of the core of a BWR/5 reactor similar to that of the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric plant, there being generated the necessary documentation for the qualification of the one welding procedure and of the welder. They were characterized so much the one base metal, as the welding cord by means of metallographic techniques, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, mechanical essays and fracture mechanics. From the obtained results it highlights the presence of an area affected by the heat of up to 1.5 mm of wide and a value of fracture tenacity (J{sub IC}) to ambient temperature for the base metal of 528 KJ/m{sup 2}, which is diminished by the presence of the welding and by the increment in the temperature of the one essay. Also it was carried out an fractographic analysis of the fracture zone generated by the tenacity essays, what evidence a ductile fracture. The experimental values of resistance and tenacity are important for the study of the structural integrity of the encircling one of the core. (Author)

  6. Steel making

    CERN Document Server

    Chakrabarti, A K

    2014-01-01

    "Steel Making" is designed to give students a strong grounding in the theory and state-of-the-art practice of production of steels. This book is primarily focused to meet the needs of undergraduate metallurgical students and candidates for associate membership examinations of professional bodies (AMIIM, AMIE). Besides, for all engineering professionals working in steel plants who need to understand the basic principles of steel making, the text provides a sound introduction to the subject.Beginning with a brief introduction to the historical perspective and current status of steel making together with the reasons for obsolescence of Bessemer converter and open hearth processes, the book moves on to: elaborate the physiochemical principles involved in steel making; explain the operational principles and practices of the modern processes of primary steel making (LD converter, Q-BOP process, and electric furnace process); provide a summary of the developments in secondary refining of steels; discuss principles a...

  7. Seismic analysis for shroud facility in-pile tube and saturated temperature capsules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iimura, Koichi; Yamaura, Takayuki; Ogawa, Mitsuhiro

    2009-07-01

    At Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), the plan of repairing and refurbishing Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) has progressed in order to restart JMTR operation in the fiscal 2011. As a part of effective use of JMTR, the neutron irradiation tests of LWR fuels and materials has been planned in order to study their soundness. By using Oarai Shroud Facility (OSF-1) and Fuel Irradiation Facility with the He-3 gas control system for power lamping test using Boiling Water Capsules (BOCA Irradiation Facility), the irradiation tests with power ramping will be carried out to study the soundness of fuel under LWR Transient condition. OSF-1 is the irradiation facility of shroud type that can insert and eject the capsule under reactor operation, and is composed of 'In-pile Tube', 'Cooling system' and 'Capsule exchange system'. BOCA Irradiation Facility is the facility which simulates irradiation environment of LWR, and is composed of 'Boiling water Capsule', 'Capsule control system' and 'Power control system by He-3'. By using Saturated temperature Capsules and the water environment control system, the material irradiation tests under the water chemistry condition of LWR will be carried out to clarify the mechanism of IASCC. In JMTR, these facilities are in service at the present. However, the detailed design for renewal or remodeling was carried out based on the new design condition in order to be correspondent to the irradiation test plan after restart JMTR operation. In this seismic analysis of the detailed design, each equipment classification and operating state were arranged with 'Japanese technical standards of the structure on nuclear facility for test research' and 'Technical guidelines for seismic design of nuclear power plants on current, and then, stress calculation and evaluation were carried out by FEM piping analysis code 'SAP' and structure analysis code 'ABAQUS'. About the stress of the seismic force, it was proven

  8. Strength-limited magnetic field intensity of toroidal magnet systems fabricated or the base of layer-by-layer shrouded solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litvinnko, Yu.A.

    1982-01-01

    The possibilities, as to the ultimate magnetic field strength, of tokamak magnet systems made on the base of layer-by-laeyer shrouded coils are considered numerically. The toroidal magnet system is considered which consists of N skewe, layer-by-layer shrouded, equistrong coils in the ideal torus approximation. The dependences of the ragnetic field strength on the internal- and external torus radii, pulse duration and aspect ratio for copper coils shrouded with fiberglass are calculated as an example. The analysis of the obtained results shows that using of the layer-by-layer shrouding scheme for toroidal solenoid coils leads to a considerable growth of the ultimate magnetic field strengths in a wide duration range. For example, the limiting field strength along the toroidal solenoid axis of the considered type inside the ''FT'' installation toroidal solenoid at equivalent field pulse duration of approximately 0.3 s reaches H 0 =1.3zx10 7 A/m

  9. Numerical and experimental analysis of a darrieus-type cross flow water turbine in bare and shrouded configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roa, A M; Aumelas, V; MaItre, T; Pellone, C

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the results of the analysis of a Darrieus-type cross flow water turbine in bare and shrouded configurations. Numerical results are compared to experimental data and differences found in values are also highlighted. The benefit of the introduction of a channelling device, which generates an efficiency increment factor varying from 2 to 5, depending on the configuration, is discussed.

  10. Investigation of flow in axial turbine stage without shroud-seal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Straka Petr

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with investigation of the influence of the radial gaps on the efficiency of the axial turbine stage. The investigation was carried out for the axial stage of the low-power turbine with the drum-type rotor without the shroud. In this configuration the flow through the radial gap under the hub-end of the stator blades and above the tip-end of the rotor blades leads to generation of the strong secondary flows, which decrease the efficiency of the stage. This problem was studied by experiment as well as by numerical modelling. The experiment was performed on the test rig equipped with the water brake dynamometer, torque meter and rotatable stator together with the linear probe manipulator. Numerical modelling was carried out for both the steady flow using the ”mixing plane” interface and the unsteady flow using the ”sliding mesh” interface between the stator and rotor wheels. The influence of the radial gap was studied in two configuration a positive and b negative overlapping of the tip-ends of the rotor blades. The efficiency of the axial stage in dependence on the expansion ratio, velocity ratio and the configuration as well as the details of the flow fields are presented in this paper.

  11. Comments on the analysis interpretation by Rogers and Latendresse regarding samples coming from the Shroud of Turin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bella, Marco [Department of Chemistry, Sapienza University of Roma, P.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy); Garlaschelli, Luigi [Department of Chemistry, University of Pavia, Via Taramelli 10, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Samperi, Roberto, E-mail: Marco.Bella@uniroma1.it [Department of Chemistry, Sapienza University of Roma, P.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2016-05-20

    Highlights: • A paper by R. Rogers supported the presence of an “invisible mending” on the Turin Shroud. • We have shown that no mass spectrometry evidence supports this pseudoscientific theory. • M. Latendresse commented on our work, but wrongly assigned a key spectrum. • The two samples underwent different treatments, making them non-comparable. • No evidence of any kind (chemical or instrumental) supports this pseudoscientific theory. - Abstract: The presence of a “invisible mending” has been proposed as an explanation for medieval radiocarbon dating measurements made on the Shroud of Turin. Here we show that the chemical analysis which was to support this theory is not consistent, and no scientific data confirm these speculations. Specifically, the samples of the Shroud image fibers underwent a different cleaning procedure with regards to those allegedly belonging to the medieval mending. There is no reliable indication of the supposedly diagnostic compounds (e.g. gum Arabic, pentoses). The only detectable difference between the samples is the presence of a compound with an aliphatic chain which cannot be identified more in detail, e.g. as sebum.

  12. Computational study of the effects of shroud geometric variation on turbine performance in a 1.5-stage high-loaded turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Wei; Liu, Huoxing

    2013-10-01

    Generally speaking, main flow path of gas turbine is assumed to be perfect for standard 3D computation. But in real engine, the turbine annulus geometry is not completely smooth for the presence of the shroud and associated cavity near the end wall. Besides, shroud leakage flow is one of the dominant sources of secondary flow in turbomachinery, which not only causes a deterioration of useful work but also a penalty on turbine efficiency. It has been found that neglect shroud leakage flow makes the computed velocity profiles and loss distribution significantly different to those measured. Even so, the influence of shroud leakage flow is seldom taken into consideration during the routine of turbine design due to insufficient understanding of its impact on end wall flows and turbine performance. In order to evaluate the impact of tip shroud geometry on turbine performance, a 3D computational investigation for 1.5-stage turbine with shrouded blades was performed in this paper. The following geometry parameters were varied respectively: Inlet cavity length and exit cavity length

  13. Navier-Stokes analysis of an oxidizer turbine blade with tip clearance with and without a mini-shroud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tony; Dejong, Frederik J.

    1993-01-01

    The Gas Generator Oxidizer Turbine (GGOT) Blade is being analyzed by various investigators under the NASA MSFC-sponsored Turbine Stage Technology Team design effort. The present work concentrates on the tip clearance region flow and associated losses; however, flow details for the passage region are also obtained in the simulations. The present calculations simulate the rotor blade row in a rotating reference frame with the appropriate coriolis and centrifugal acceleration term included in the momentum equations. The upstream computational boundary is located about one axial chord from the blade leading edge. The boundary conditions at this location have been determined by Pratt & Whitney using an Euler analysis without the vanes to obtain approximately the same flow profiles at the rotor as were obtained with the Euler stage analysis including the vanes. Inflow boundary layer profiles are then constructed assuming the skin friction coefficient at both the hub and the casing. The downstream computational boundary is located about one axial chord from the blade trailing edge, and the circumferentially averaged static pressure at this location was also obtained from the P&W Euler analysis. Results obtained for the 3-D baseline GGOT geometry at the full scale design Reynolds number show a region of high loss in the region near the casing. Particle traces in the near tip region show vortical flow behavior of the fluid which passes through the clearance region and exits at the downstream edge of the gap. In an effort to reduce clearance flow losses, the mini-shroud concept was proposed by the Pratt & Whitney design team. Calculations were performed on the GGO geometry with the mini-shroud. Results of these calculations indicate that the mini-shroud does not significantly affect the flow in the passage region, and although the tip clearance flow is different, the mini-shroud does not seem to prevent the above-mentioned vortical flow behavior. Since both flow distortion

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF CORES FOR MINI MOTORS FROM LAMINATED SHEETS OF ELECTRIC STEEL ABNT (Brazilian Association of Technical Standards 35F 420M WITH THERMAL TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halston Mozetic

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this paper were to study the thermal treatment of Fe-Si sheet, as well as the sheet cutting concerning the topology of a mini stepper motor and mini motor simulation using finite element software. The research consisted of the execution of an "Inductive Reheating" thermal treatment of Iron Silicon sheets, NM71-2000/35F 420M with GNO (Grain Non Oriented, and 0.35mm width. The new technique has the benefit of minimizing magnetic losses produced by the cut on the edge of electric sheets. To carry out the process, the system includes a furnace, an induction coil, and a power supply that, when activated in a controlled way, causes relevant changes to the crystalline structure of the material. Related to the cut of the sheets, the topology of a three phase mini stepper motor was considered. The sheets were initially cut using the geometry of the rotor and stator cores. Firstly, a die cutting process was used and later a wire electroerosion cutting process was employed, which provided parts with excellent finishing. Finally, the mini motor was simulated using the finite element software FEMM 4.2 in order to analyze the airgap flow and torque development of the axis end, in comparison to a solid block of the same material (Fe-Si

  15. Analysis of the thermal hydraulics and core degradation behavior in the PHEBUS-FPT1 test train with impact/SAMPSON code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terada, Masafumi; Ikeda, Takashi; Nakahara, Katsuhiko; Shirakawa, Noriyuki; Horie, Hideki; Katsuragi, Kazuyuki; Yamagishi, Makoto; Ito, Takahiro

    2003-01-01

    As one of the verification studies of SAMPSON code, PHEBUS-FPT1, which is authorized as the International Standard Problem-46, was analyzed about the in-core phenomena with four modules, the molten core relocation analysis (MCRA) module, the fuel rod heat up analysis (FRHA) module, the fission product release analysis (FPRA) module, and the analysis control module (ACM) of SAMPSON. This paper describes the analysis of thermal hydraulics and core degradation behavior in the test train. Two-dimensional version of MCRA models the whole structure of the test train in the cylindrical system, including the fuel bundle and the shroud. FRHA models eighteen irradiated fuel rods, two fresh fuel rods, and one control rod in the center of the bundle. FRHA evaluates the transient behavior of fuel rods and releases failed fuel components to MCRA. MCRA evaluates the fluid dynamics of steam and debris considering the thermal and fluid mechanical interaction between them, and at the same time the thermal interaction between gas/debris and shroud material. By the phase change model of MCRA, molten debris forms debris pool and a part of them possibly freezes on fuel rods or shroud surface, then forms crust. This combination of modules of SAMPSON was proved to be capable for modeling the PHEBUS-FPT1 in-core phenomena sufficiently. The analysis has shown sufficient agreement with test results regarding to steam flow rates at the outlet, reproducing its reduction due to hydrogen generation, steam and shroud temperature, and debris relocation behavior. (author)

  16. Influence of the Operational Wear of the Stator Parts of Shroud Seals on the Economic Efficiency of the Steam Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyuk, A. G.; Dmitriev, S. S.; Petrunin, B. N.; Gusev, A. A.

    2018-01-01

    During the operation of steam turbines under transient conditions, due to different thermal expansion of the stator and rotor parts in the radial and axial directions, the clearances fixed in the course of assembling the seals of the flow path change, which causes rubbing in the seals and the wear of the latter. This inevitably increases the leakages through the seals. A particularly large difference in the relative axial and radial displacements of the rotor and stator parts is observed during the turbine start-ups when the difference in their temperature expansion is maximal. Upon the turbine stops, the turbine shafting runs down freely, as a rule, passing through all critical speeds at which the amplitude of the shafting oscillations reach their peak values, which also leads to seizures in the seals and their wear and tear. The seizures in the seals may also be a consequence of the eccentricity between the rotor and stator caused by the thermal strain of the stator, incorrect choice of the clearances, floating-up of the rotor in the bearing, and many other factors. Recently, standard shroud labyrinth seals are being replaced in the steam turbines by seals with honeycomb stator inserts, the design of which allows the ridges to cut into the honeycomb surface without damaging the former, which allows fixing a radial clearance in the seals of 0.5 mm. On the honeycomb surface where the ridges touch it, grooves are cut through. The wear of the shroud seals reduces the efficiency of the steam turbines during the operation to the greatest degree. However, by the present there have been no exact quantitative data available on the change in the leakage through the worn-out honeycomb seals. The paper presents the results of comparative experimental studies on the flow and power characteristics of seal models with smooth and honeycomb stator parts for various degrees of their wear. The studies showed that the leakages through the worn-out stator parts of the honeycomb seals

  17. STEFINS: a steel freezing integral simulation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, M.V.

    1980-09-01

    STEFINS (STEel Freezing INtegral Simulation) is a computer program for the calculation of the rate of solidification of molten steel on solid steel. Such computations arize when investigating core melt accidents in fast reactors. In principle this problem involves a coupled two-dimensional thermal and hydraulic approach. However, by physically reasonable assumptions a decoupled approach has been developed. The transient solidification of molten steel on a cold wall is solved in the direction normal to the molten steel flow and independent from the solution for the molten steel temperature and Nusselt number along the direction of flow. The solutions to the applicable energy equations have been programmed in cylindrical and slab geometries. Internal gamma heating of steel is included

  18. PWR degraded core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gittus, J.H.

    1982-04-01

    A review is presented of the various phenomena involved in degraded core accidents and the ensuing transport of fission products from the fuel to the primary circuit and the containment. The dominant accident sequences found in the PWR risk studies published to date are briefly described. Then chapters deal with the following topics: the condition and behaviour of water reactor fuel during normal operation and at the commencement of degraded core accidents; the generation of hydrogen from the Zircaloy-steam and the steel-steam reactions; the way in which the core deforms and finally melts following loss of coolant; debris relocation analysis; containment integrity; fission product behaviour during a degraded core accident. (U.K.)

  19. Spraying of metallic powders by hybrid gas/water torch and the effects of inert gas shrouding

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kavka, Tetyana; Matějíček, Jiří; Ctibor, Pavel; Hrabovský, Milan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 21, 3-4 (2012), s. 695-705 ISSN 1059-9630 R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI2/702; GA MPO FR-TI2/561 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : copper * tungsten * hybrid water-gas torch * plasma facing materials * plasma spraying * gas shroud Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.481, year: 2012 http://www.springerlink.com/content/j07t3222hnv87882/fulltext.pdf

  20. Diffusion Couple Alloying of Refractory Metals in Austenitic and Ferritic/Martensitic Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    stainless steel and ferritic/ martensitic steel can vary from structural and support components in the reactor core to reactor fuel...of ferritic/ martensitic steels compared to type 316 stainless steel after irradiation in Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at 420 ºC to ~80dpa (From...ferritic martensitic steel at Sandia National Laboratories. The 316 stainless steel had a certified composition of:

  1. Reduction in degree of absorber-cladding mechanical interaction by shroud tube in control rods for the fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donomae, Takako; Katsuyama, Kozo; Tachi, Yoshiaki; Maeda, Koji; Yamamoto, Masaya; Soga, Tomonori

    2011-01-01

    Research and development of a long-life control rod for fast reactors is being conducted at Joyo. One of the challenges in developing a long-life control rod is the restraint of absorber-cladding mechanical interaction (ACMI). First, a helium-bonding rod was selected as a control rod for the experimental fast reactor Joyo, which is the first liquid metal fast reactor in Japan. Its lifetime was limited by ACMI, which is induced by the swelling and relocation of B 4 C pellets. To restrain ACMI, a shroud tube was inserted into the gap between the B 4 C pellets and the cladding tube. However, once B 4 C pellets cracked and broke into small fragments, relocation occurred. After this, the narrow gap closed immediately as the degree of B 4 C pellet swelling increased. To solve this problem, the gap was widened during design, and sodium was selected as the bonding material instead of helium to restrain the increase in pellet temperature. Irradiation testing of the modified sodium-bonding control rod confirmed that ACMI would be restrained by the shroud tube regardless of the occurrence of B 4 C pellet relocation. As a result of these improvements, the estimated lifetime of the control rod at Joyo was doubled. In this paper, the results of postirradiation examination are reported. (author)

  2. The Role of Spraying Parameters and Inert Gas Shrouding in Hybrid Water-Argon Plasma Spraying of Tungsten and Copper for Nuclear Fusion Applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějíček, Jiří; Kavka, Tetyana; Bertolissi, Gabriele; Ctibor, Pavel; Vilémová, Monika; Mušálek, Radek; Nevrlá, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 5 (2013), s. 744-755 ISSN 1059-9630 R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI2/702; GA TA ČR TA01010300 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : plasma spraying * tungsten * copper * inert gas shrouding * water-argon plasma torch * gas shroud * hybrid plasma torch * influence of spray parameters * nuclear fusion * oxidation Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 1.491, year: 2013 http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2Fs11666-013-9895-x.pdf

  3. Tool steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højerslev, C.

    2001-01-01

    On designing a tool steel, its composition and heat treatment parameters are chosen to provide a hardened and tempered martensitic matrix in which carbides are evenly distributed. In this condition the matrix has an optimum combination of hardness andtoughness, the primary carbides provide...... resistance against abrasive wear and secondary carbides (if any) increase the resistance against plastic deformation. Tool steels are alloyed with carbide forming elements (Typically: vanadium, tungsten, molybdenumand chromium) furthermore some steel types contains cobalt. Addition of alloying elements...... serves primarily two purpose (i) to improve the hardenabillity and (ii) to provide harder and thermally more stable carbides than cementite. Assuming proper heattreatment, the properties of a tool steel depends on the which alloying elements are added and their respective concentrations....

  4. Recriticality analyses for CAPRA cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maschek, W.; Thiem, D.

    1995-01-01

    The first scoping calculation performed show that the energetics levels from recriticalities in CAPRA cores are in the same range as in conventional cores. However, considerable uncertainties exist and further analyses are necessary. Additional investigations are performed for the separation scenarios of fuel/steel/inert and matrix material as a large influence of these processes on possible ramp rates and kinetics parameters was detected in the calculations. (orig./HP)

  5. Recriticality analyses for CAPRA cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maschek, W.; Thiem, D.

    1995-08-01

    The first scoping calculation performed show that the energetics levels from recriticalities in CAPRA cores are in the same range as in conventional cores. However, considerable uncertainties exist and further analyses are necessary. Additional investigations are performed for the separation scenarios of fuel/steel/inert and matrix material as a large influence of these processes on possible ramp rates and kinetics parameters was detected in the calculations. (orig./HP)

  6. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in a...

  7. Forced response of turbomachinery part span shrouds-linked blading; Reponse forcee des aubages de turbomachines liaisonnes par nageoires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravoux, J.

    2003-06-15

    This work treats of the design of blading systems fitted with part span shrouds (snubber) for turbo-machineries. The first chapter makes a status of the existing calculation techniques for blading systems. The second chapter presents the experimental system developed for the study, the different implementations of its exploitation and its potentialities. The third chapter presents the numerical and experimental results linked with a linear approach: this approach allows the validation of the experimental system and the adjustment of numerical models. The fourth chapter sets up and validates the numerical and experimental tools and techniques linked with the exhaustive exploitation of the system. Finally, a synthesis of the main results is presented with their perspectives for future works. (J.S.)

  8. Application to nuclear turbines of high-efficiency and reliable 3D-designed integral shrouded blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Eiichiro; Ohyama, Hiroharu; Tashiro, Hikaru; Sugitani, Toshio; Kurosawa, Masaru

    1999-01-01

    Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI) has recently developed new blades for nuclear turbines, in order to achieve higher efficiency and higher reliability. The three-dimensional aerodynamic design for 41-inch and 46-inch blades, their one piece structural design (integral shrouded blades: ISB), and the verification test results using a model steam turbine are described in this paper. The predicted efficiency and lower vibratory stress have been verified. On the basis of these 60 Hz ISB, 50 Hz ISB series are under development using 'the law of similarity' without changing their thermodynamic performance and mechanical stress levels. Our 3D-designed reaction blades which are used for the high pressure and low pressure upstream stages, are also briefly mentioned. (author)

  9. A pc program for the fast assessment of long-arc shrouds and continuous-tie arrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, S.M.; Lam. T.C.T.; Redding, M.L.; Ortolano, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that a computer program LARC (Long-arc Axial Response Calculation) has been successfully developed to achieve the fast assessment for the effectiveness of a proposed long-arc shroud or continuous-tie arrangement, with respect to the axial modes of vibration. The program allows designers/analysts to conveniently perform modal as well as forced harmonic response calculations for various proposed blade group arrangements. Comparisons between responses for different group lengths will indicate the susceptibility of each grouping to strong dynamic response. LARC is a PC-based program with a user-friendly interface and graphic display. Natural frequencies are calculated by an eigenvalue extraction technique. Resonant response, obtained in term s of the axial displacement at the blade tip, will provide analysts with the information necessary to evaluate the potential success of the proposed configuration. Test case results from LARC compare well against results from BLADE

  10. Steel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.E.; Stiegler, J.O.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Leitnaker, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    The invention deals with a fuel element for fast breeder reactors. It consits essentially of a uranium oxide, nitride, or carbide or a mixture of these fuels with a plutonium or thorium oxide, nitride, or carbide. The fuel elements are coated with an austenitic stainless steel alloy. Inside the fuel elements, vacancies or small cavities are produced by neutron effects which causes the steel coating to swell. According to the invention, swelling is prevented by a modification of type 304, 316, 321, or 12 K 72HV commercial steels. They consist mainly of Fe, Cr, and Ni in a ratio determined by a temary diagram. They may also contain 1.8 to 2.3% by weight of Mo and a fraction of Si (0.7 to 2% by weight) and Ti(0.10 to 0.5% by weight) to prevent cavity formation. They are structurally modified by cold working. (IHOE) [de

  11. Hegelian Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Poul F.

    2015-01-01

    Even in our globalized world the notion of national economies remain incredibly strong, just as a considerable part of the literature on transnational governance and globalization continue to rely on a zero-sum perspective concerning the relationship between the national and the transnational. De...... of the European steel industry....

  12. Plasticity and fracture modeling of three-layer steel composite Tribond® 1200 for crash simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eller, Tom; Ramaker, Kenny; Greve, Lars; Andres, M.T.; Hazrati Marangalou, Javad; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.

    2017-01-01

    A constitutive model is presented for the three-layer steel composite Tribond® 1200. Tribond® is a hot forming steel which consists of three layers: a high strength steel core between two outer layers of ductile low strength steel. The model is designed to provide an accurate prediction of the

  13. The Nitrocarburising Response of Low Temperature Bainite Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Fabijanic

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The nitrocarburising response of low transformation temperature ultrafine and nanoscale bainitic steel was investigated and compared with martensite and pearlite from the same steel composition. It was found that the retained austenite content of the bainitic steel dictated the core hardness after nitrocarburising. The refined bainitic structure showed improvements in the nitriding depth and hardness of the nitrocarburised layer, compared to coarser grained martensitic and pearlitic structures, possibly due to the fine structure and the distribution of nitride forming elements.

  14. Fragmentation of armor piercing steel projectiles upon oblique perforation of steel plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aizik F.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a constitutive strength and failure model for a steel core of a14.5 mm API projectile was developed. Dynamic response of a projectile steel core was described by the Johnson-Cook constitutive model combined with principal tensile stress spall model. In order to obtain the parameters required for numerical description of projectile core material behavior, a series of planar impact experiments was done. The parameters of the Johnson-Cook constitutive model were extracted by matching simulated and experimental velocity profiles of planar impact. A series of oblique ballistic experiments with x-ray monitoring was carried out to study the effect of obliquity angle and armor steel plate thickness on shattering behavior of the 14.5 mm API projectile. According to analysis of x-ray images the fragmentation level increases with both steel plate thickness and angle of inclination. The numerical modeling of the ballistic experiments was done using commercial finite element code, LS-DYNA. Dynamic response of high hardness (HH armor steel was described using a modified Johnson-Cook strength and failure model. A series of simulations with various values of maximal principal tensile stress was run in order to capture the overall fracture behavior of the projectile’s core. Reasonable agreement between simulated and x-ray failure pattern of projectile core has been observed.

  15. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2008-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  16. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2010-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  17. Loss characteristics of FLTD magnetic cores under fast pulsed voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiguo; Sun Fengju; Qiu Aici; Jiang Xiaofeng; Liang Tianxue; Yin Jiahui; Liu Peng; Wei Hao; Zhang Pengfei; Zhang Zhong

    2012-01-01

    The test platform has been developed to generate exciting pulsed voltages with the rise time less than 30 ns. The loss characteristics of cores of 25 μm 2605TCA Metglas and 50 μm DG6 electrical steel were then studied. A characteristic parameter, the gradient of the voltage pulse applied per unit core area, is proposed to describe the exciting condition applied on magnetic cores. The loss of the DG6 core is about 4 times that of the 2605TCA core. Most loss of the DG6 core, about 75%, is due to eddy current. For the 2605TCA core, the percentage is about 28%. (authors)

  18. Core lifter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlov, N G; Edel' man, Ya A

    1981-02-15

    A core lifter is suggested which contains a housing, core-clamping elements installed in the housing depressions in the form of semirings with projections on the outer surface restricting the rotation of the semirings in the housing depressions. In order to improve the strength and reliability of the core lifter, the semirings have a variable transverse section formed from the outside by the surface of the rotation body of the inner arc of the semiring aroung the rotation axis and from the inner a cylindrical surface which is concentric to the outer arc of the semiring. The core-clamping elements made in this manner have the possibility of freely rotating in the housing depressions under their own weight and from contact with the core sample. These semirings do not have weakened sections, have sufficient strength, are inserted into the limited ring section of the housing of the core lifter without reduction in its through opening and this improve the reliability of the core lifter in operation.

  19. Comparison of the performance of concrete-filled steel tubular and hollow steel diagrid buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Minu Ann; S, Sajith A.; Nagarajan, Praveen

    2018-03-01

    In the recent construction scenario, diagrid structures are becoming a popular high-rise building structural system. Diagrid structures consist of diagonals in the perimeter and an interior core. The corner and interior vertical columns are not required due to the structural efficiency of diagrid structural systems. Steel and concrete are commonly used material for diagrid. An alternate material for diagrid is concrete-filled steel tube (CFST). CFST incorporates the advantages of both steel and concrete. In CFST, the inward buckling of the steel tube is effectively prevented by the filled concrete. The compressive strength of concrete increases due to the tri-axial state of stress in concrete induced by the steel tube. The longitudinal as well as lateral reinforcement to the concrete core is also provided by the steel tube. This paper compares the performance of CFST and steel diagrid buildings using linear static analysis. For this purpose, a 12 storey and 36 storey building are analysed using finite element method and CFST diagrid building is found to perform better.

  20. Corrosion resistant steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubchenko, A.S.; Borisov, V.P.; Latyshev, V.B.

    1980-01-01

    Corrosion resistant steel for production of sheets and tubes containing C, Mn, Cr, Si, Fe is suggested. It is alloyed with vanadium and cerium for improving tensile properties and ductility. The steel can be melted by a conventional method in electric-arc or induction furnaces. The mentioned steel is intended to be used as a substitute for nickel-bearing austenitic steels

  1. Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azekura, Kazuo; Kurihara, Kunitoshi.

    1992-01-01

    In a BWR type reactor, a great number of pipes (spectral shift pipes) are disposed in the reactor core. Moderators having a small moderating cross section (heavy water) are circulated in the spectral shift pipes to suppress the excess reactivity while increasing the conversion ratio at an initial stage of the operation cycle. After the intermediate stage of the operation cycle in which the reactor core reactivity is lowered, reactivity is increased by circulating moderators having a great moderating cross section (light water) to extend the taken up burnup degree. Further, neutron absorbers such as boron are mixed to the moderator in the spectral shift pipe to control the concentration thereof. With such a constitution, control rods and driving mechanisms are no more necessary, to simplify the structure of the reactor core. This can increase the fuel conversion ratio and control great excess reactivity. Accordingly, a nuclear reactor core of high conversion and high burnup degree can be attained. (I.N.)

  2. Ice Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past temperature, precipitation, atmospheric trace gases, and other aspects of climate and environment derived from ice cores drilled on glaciers and ice...

  3. Surveillance test of the JMTR core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Takashi; Amezawa, Hiroo; Tobita, Kenji

    1986-02-01

    Surveillance test for the core components of Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) was started in 1966, and completed in 1985 without one capsule. Most of capsules in the program, except one beryllium specimens, were removed from the core, and carred out the post-irradiation tests at the JMTR Hot Laboratory. The data is applied to review of JMTR core components management plan. JMTR surveillance test was carried out with several kind of materials of JMTR core components, Berylium as the reflector, Hafnium as the neutron absorber of control rod, 17-4PH stainless steel as a roller spring of the control rod, and 304 stainless steel as the grid plate. Results are described in this report. (author)

  4. Problems in steel industry for power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolbenko, E.T.; Kryanin, I.R.

    1979-01-01

    The main problems of steel industry in power engineering are considered. The effect of charge materials upon steel quality is analyzed. Radical dicision of the problem is the ensurance of power engineering plants with high quality original charge materials, which are quite pure according to impurities such as: iron melted from metallized charge or prereduced pellets. The usage of such materials considerably improves the complex of technological and service properties and structure of large responsible products: vessels of the reactor core, especially large shafts and others. For the most responsible power engineering dies it is necessary to smelt steel of 150-200 tons and above. The main direction of steel melting industry is quality steel melting in large 150-200 tons arc furnaces which are equipped with magnetic stirrer installations. It is marked that the branch of power engineering is equipped with unique installations of out-of-furnace steel refining. It is shown that further increase in the metal quality is possible when vacuum and electroslag technique of melting is used. It permits to reduce considerably the amount of sulphur, gases, nonmetallic inclusions, to increase the metal density, to remove zonal segregation in large steel ingots. The main problem in the field of usage of material, produced by new melting methods is the expansion of the product nomenclature and the development of technical conditions, reflecting the increase in material properties as a result of new technique application. Importance of development and introduction of new automation and testing methods in metallurgical processes is marked

  5. Plasma nitriding of steels

    CERN Document Server

    Aghajani, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the effect of plasma nitriding on the properties of steels. Parameters of different grades of steels are considered, such as structural and constructional steels, stainless steels and tools steels. The reader will find within the text an introduction to nitriding treatment, the basis of plasma and its roll in nitriding. The authors also address the advantages and disadvantages of plasma nitriding in comparison with other nitriding methods. .

  6. Heterogenous treatment of water gaps and control rods in core calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindahl, S.Oe.

    1984-08-01

    The conventional fuel assembly homogenization process introduces errors in the gross power distribution of the order of 10%. A method to mitigate the homogenization error is proposed. The gaps in between the fuel pin domains, containing water, control rod blades, fuel channel shroud, etc, are described by their transmission and reflection properties while the fuel pin regions are represented by conventional, homogenized cross sections. A nodal equation, incorporating the gap transmission and reflection functions, is set up in a general form. By numerical testing on 2D core problems it is shown that the explicit gap treatment is capable of reducing the homogenization error by an order of magnitude. (author)

  7. Development of a New core/reflector model for coarse-mesh nodal methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogosbekyan, Leonid; Cho, Jin Young; Kim, Young Il; Kim, Young Jin; Joo, Hyung Kuk; Chang, Moon Hee.

    1997-10-01

    This work presents two approaches for reflector simulation in coarse-mesh nodal methods. The first approach is called Interface Matrix Technique (IMT), which simulates the baffle as a banishingly thin layer having the property of reflection and transmission. We applied this technique within the frame of AFEN (Analytic Function Expansion Nodal) method, and developed the AFEN-IM (Interface Matrix) method. AFEN-IM method shows 1.24% and 0.42 % in maximum and RMS (Root Mean Square) assemblywise power error for ZION-1 benchmark problem. The second approach is L-shaped reflector homogenization method. This method is based on the integral response conservation along the L-shaped core-reflector interface. The reference reflector response is calculated from 2-dimensional spectral calculation and the response of the homogenized reflector is derived from the one-node 2-dimensional AFEN problem solution. This method shows 5 times better accuracy than the 1-dimensional homogenization technique in the assemblywise power. Also, the concept of shroud/reflector homogenization for hexagonal core have been developed. The 1-dimensional spectral calculation was used for the determination of 2 group cross sections. The essence of homogenization concept consists in the calculation of equivalent shroud width, which preserve albedo for the fast neutrons in 2-dimensional reflector. This method shows a relative error less than 0.42% in assemblywise power and a difference of 9x10 -5 in multiplication factor for full-core model. (author). 9 refs., 3 tabs., 28 figs

  8. Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Tetsuaki; Nomura, Teiji; Tokunaga, Kensuke; Okuda, Shin-ichi

    1990-01-01

    Fuel assemblies in the portions where the gradient of fast neutron fluxes between two opposing faces of a channel box is great are kept loaded at the outermost peripheral position of the reactor core also in the second operation cycle in the order to prevent interference between a control rod and the channel box due to bending deformation of the channel box. Further, the fuel assemblies in the second row from the outer most periphery in the first operation cycle are also kept loaded at the second row in the second operation cycle. Since the gradient of the fast neutrons in the reactor core is especially great at the outer circumference of the reactor core, the channel box at the outer circumference is bent such that the surface facing to the center of the reactor core is convexed and the channel box in the second row is also bent to the identical direction, the insertion of the control rod is not interfered. Further, if the positions for the fuels at the outermost periphery and the fuels in the second row are not altered in the second operation cycle, the gaps are not reduced to prevent the interference between the control rod and the channel box. (N.H.)

  9. Apparatus for controlling molten core debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, M.P.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Heylmun, N.F.

    1972-01-01

    Disclosed is an apparatus for containing, cooling, diluting, dispersing and maintaining subcritical the molten core debris assumed to melt through the bottom of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel in the unlikely event of a core meltdown. The apparatus is basically a sacrificial bed system which includes an inverted conical funnel, a core debris receptacle including a spherical dome, a spherically layered bed of primarily magnesia bricks, a cooling system of zig-zag piping in graphite blocks about and below the bed and a cylindrical liner surrounding the graphite blocks including a steel shell surrounded by firebrick. Tantalum absorber rods are used in the receptacle and bed. 9 claims, 22 figures

  10. Heat treatments in a conventional steel to reproduce the microstructure of a nuclear grade steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosalio G, M.

    2014-01-01

    The ferritic steels used in the manufacture of pressurized vessels of Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) suffer degradation in their mechanical properties due to damage caused by the neutron fluxes of high energy bigger to a Mega electron volt (E> 1 MeV) generated in the reactor core. The materials with which the pressurized vessels of nuclear reactors cooled by light water are built correspond to low alloy ferritic steels. The effect of neutron irradiation on these steels is manifested as an increase in hardness, mechanical strength, with the consequent decrease in ductility, fracture toughness and an increase in temperature of ductile-brittle transition. The life of a BWR is 40 years, its design must be considered sufficient margin of safety because pressure forces experienced during operation, maintenance and testing of postulated accident conditions. It is necessary that under these conditions the vessel to behave ductile and likely to propagate a fracture is minimized. The vessels of light water nuclear reactors have a bainite microstructure. Specifically, the reactor vessels of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde (Veracruz, Mexico) are made of a steel Astm A-533, Grade B Class 1. At present they are carrying out some welding tests for the construction of a model of a BWR, however, to use nuclear grade steel such as Astm A-533 to carry out some of the welding tests, is very expensive; perform these in a conventional material provides basic information. Although the microstructure present in the conventional material does not correspond exactly to the degree of nuclear material, it can take of reference. Therefore, it is proposed to conduct a pilot study to establish the thermal treatment that reproduces the microstructure of nuclear grade steel, in conventional steel. The resulting properties of the conventional steel samples will be compared to a JRQ steel, that is a steel Astm A-533, Grade B Class 1, provided by IAEA. (Author)

  11. Analysis on the Ampacity-Testing Feasibility of Steel-Armour Three-Core Cable by Feeding One-phase Curren%以单相电流测试三芯钢带铠装电缆载流量的可行性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵继光; 牛海清; 张群峰; 游勇; 张尧; 李光明

    2014-01-01

    配电电缆一般为三芯钢带铠装结构,加载于三相导体的交流电流在磁性材料的钢带铠装层将产生工频磁场,由此产生铠装损耗;若三相导体加载三相对称电流,铠装层的合成磁场较小(甚至为零),其铠装损耗较小;若三相导体加载单相电流,铠装层磁场较大,其损耗较大。在开展三芯电缆载流量试验时,由于电源容量限制,拟加载单相电流,可能会对载流量的试验结果产生影响。为研究三芯钢带铠装电缆通以三相和单相电流的铠装损耗,及其对载流量试验结果的影响,本文研究了三芯电缆钢带铠装损耗的计算方法;在试验场开展了加载单相电流的直埋单根三芯电缆载流量试验,定量计算了加载单相电流时的三芯电缆的铠装损耗;分析了加载单相电流时铠装损耗对载流量试验影响的程度。研究表明,三芯铠装电缆加载单相电流时的铠装损耗不可忽略,但对载流量的影响不大,且偏保守。%Distribution three-core cable is usually with steel armour.When AC current is applied to the cable, there is a magnetic field in its armour and then steel armour loss.If the current is three-phase symmetry, the magnetic field of armour is small and its loss is ig-norable; If cable is feed with a single phase current, its magnetic field is big and its armour loss cannot be ignored.For restrict of power capacity, the rating experiments of 10kV cable with cluster laying are intended to apply a single-phase current, which bring in the steel armour loss and may decrease the experiment result.To research the armour loss and its effect on the rating of three-core ca-ble with single-phase current applied, the calculation method of armour loss is research here;the current rating experiment is carried out, its steel armour loss is calculated; and the current ratings applied with single-phase current is compared with that applied with three

  12. Methods of forging steel

    OpenAIRE

    Pečoler, Primož

    2014-01-01

    The following work presents processes of steel forming, challenges when forging steel, forming machines suitable for forging and which choice of machine is most suitable for forging. We can separate steel forming to free forging and drop forging. Free forging can be divided to hand forging and machine forging. The correct choice of furnaces is also very important. We must reach correct temperature in the furnace for raw steel to melt with less scalings. In diploma I mentioned some machine...

  13. Prospects of structural steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannykh, O.A.

    2012-01-01

    The current state of world steel production is considered as well as the development strategy of metallurgy industry in the Russian Federation through to 2020. The main factors determining the conservation of steel as perspective material for industry are given: energy expenses on production, the well-proven recirculation technology, the capability of changing steel properties in wide range, temperature range of operation. The conclusion is made that in the immediate future steel will not lose its importance [ru

  14. There is no mass spectrometry evidence that the C14 sample from the Shroud of Turin comes from a “medieval invisible mending”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bella, Marco, E-mail: Marco.Bella@uniroma1.it [Department of Chemistry, Sapienza University of Roma, P.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy); Garlaschelli, Luigi [Department of Chemistry, University of Pavia, Via Taramelli 10, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Samperi, Roberto [Department of Chemistry, Sapienza University of Roma, P.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2015-10-10

    Highlights: • This editorial regards a paper published on Thermochimica Acta, 425 (2005) 189. • The author hypothesized a “medieval invisible mending” on the Shroud of Turin. • There is no evidence of such a “medieval invisible mending”. • The two mass spectra presented differ only by the presence of a contaminant. • When the peaks due to the contaminant are removed, the two mass spectra look alike. - Abstract: This is an editorial regarding a paper published on Thermochimica Acta (R.N. Rogers, Thermochimca Acta, 425 (2005) 189–194). A close-up analysis of the pyrolysis-mass spectra reported in the original paper reveals that the differences found between the samples coming from different parts of the Shroud are just due to the presence of a contaminant with a long aliphatic chain. Except for the presence of the contaminant, the two pyrolysis-mass spectra look alike rather than different. Therefore, the pseudoscientific theory stating that the C14 sample might come from a “medieval invisible mending” remains unsupported by evidences.

  15. The influence of core materials and mix on the performance of a 100 kVA three phase transformer core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snell, David E-mail: dave.snell@cogent-power.com; Coombs, Alan

    2003-01-01

    Various grades of grain-oriented electrical steel, and the effect of mixing domain refined and non-domain refined materials in the same three phase transformer core have been assessed using a developed computer-based test system. Ball unit domain refined material and non-domain refined material can be successfully mixed in the same core, without degrading performance.

  16. Trends in steel technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Dual phase steels, composite products, and microalloyed steels are making inroads in the automotive industry applications for bumpers, automotive parts, bodies, mechanical parts, suspension and steering equipment and truck bumpers. New steels are also used to support solar mirrors and cells, in corrosive environments in the oil and gas industry, fusion reactors, and pressure vessels in nuclear power plants

  17. Capacitive short circuit detection in transformer core laminations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Carl A.; Duchesne, Stephane; Roger, Daniel; Vincent, Jean-Noel

    2008-01-01

    A capacitive measurement procedure is proposed that serves to detect burr-induced short circuits in transformer core laminations. The tests are conducted on stacks of transformer steel sheets as used for transformer core production and yield a short-circuit probability indicative of the additional eddy current losses to be expected. Applied during the assembly of transformer cores, the measurements can help to decide whether the burr treatment process is working efficiently or has to be readjusted

  18. Weldability of Stainless Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saida, Kazuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    It gives an outline of metallographic properties of welding zone of stainless steels, generation and mechanisms of welding crack and decreasing of corrosion resistance of welding zone. It consists of seven chapters such as introduction, some kinds of stainless steels and properties, metallographic properties of welding zone, weld crack, toughness of welding zone, corrosion resistance and summary. The solidification modes of stainless steels, each solidification mode on the cross section of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy phase diagram, each solidification mode of weld stainless steels metal by electron beam welding, segregation state of alloy elements at each solidification mode, Schaeffler diagram, Delong diagram, effects of (P + S) mass content in % and Cr/Ni equivalent on solidification cracking of weld stainless steels metal, solidification crack susceptibility of weld high purity stainless steels metal, effects of trace impurity elements on solidification crack susceptibility of weld high purity stainless steels metal, ductile fracture susceptibility of weld austenitic stainless steels metal, effects of H2 and ferrite content on generation of crack of weld 25Cr-5N duplex stainless steels, effects of O and N content on toughness of weld SUS 447J1 metals, effect of ferrite content on aging toughness of weld austenitic stainless steel metal, corrosion morphology of welding zone of stainless steels, generation mechanism of knife line attack phenomenon, and corrosion potential of some kinds of metals in seawater at room temperature are illustrated. (S.Y.)

  19. The steel scrap age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauliuk, Stefan; Milford, Rachel L; Müller, Daniel B; Allwood, Julian M

    2013-04-02

    Steel production accounts for 25% of industrial carbon emissions. Long-term forecasts of steel demand and scrap supply are needed to develop strategies for how the steel industry could respond to industrialization and urbanization in the developing world while simultaneously reducing its environmental impact, and in particular, its carbon footprint. We developed a dynamic stock model to estimate future final demand for steel and the available scrap for 10 world regions. Based on evidence from developed countries, we assumed that per capita in-use stocks will saturate eventually. We determined the response of the entire steel cycle to stock saturation, in particular the future split between primary and secondary steel production. During the 21st century, steel demand may peak in the developed world, China, the Middle East, Latin America, and India. As China completes its industrialization, global primary steel production may peak between 2020 and 2030 and decline thereafter. We developed a capacity model to show how extensive trade of finished steel could prolong the lifetime of the Chinese steelmaking assets. Secondary steel production will more than double by 2050, and it may surpass primary production between 2050 and 2060: the late 21st century can become the steel scrap age.

  20. Recent development of non-oriented electrical steel sheet for automobile electrical devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Yoshihiko; Kohno, Masaaki; Honda, Atsuhito

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes non-oriented electrical steel sheet for automobile motors and reactors. Electrical steel sheets for energy efficient motors show high magnetic flux density and low iron loss. They are suitable for HEV traction motors and EPS motors. A thin-gauge electrical steel sheet and a gradient Si steel sheet show low iron loss in the high-frequency range. Therefore, the efficiency of high-frequency devices can be greatly improved. Since a 6.5% Si steel sheet possesses low iron loss and zero magnetostriction, it contributes to reduce the core loss and audible noise of high-frequency reactors

  1. Core BPEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallwyl, Tim; Højsgaard, Espen

    The Web Services Business Process Execution Language (WS-BPEL) is a language for expressing business process behaviour based on web services. The language is intentionally not minimal but provides a rich set of constructs, allows omission of constructs by relying on defaults, and supports language......, does not allow omissions, and does not contain ignorable elements. We do so by identifying syntactic sugar, including default values, and ignorable elements in WS-BPEL. The analysis results in a translation from the full language to the core subset. Thus, we reduce the effort needed for working...

  2. 单相电流对三芯钢带铠装电缆载流量试验结果影响程度的研究%Effect of Single-phase Current on the Current-carrying Capacity of Three-core Steel Armoured Cable

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛海清; 张群峰; 游勇; 赵继光; 张尧

    2014-01-01

    采用剥掉铠装层通以单相电流模拟三芯钢带铠装电缆通以三相电流,将敷设于电缆沟中的完整电缆段和剥掉铠装层电缆段串联加载不同的电流进行载流量试验,对比研究了两者的温度;根据电磁场理论,计算了载流量试验中的铠装损耗。按照IEC载流量计算标准,研究了铠装损耗对载流量影响的程度。研究表明,三芯铠装电缆加载单相电流时的铠装损耗不可忽略,但对载流量的影响不超过4%,且偏保守。%The current-carrying capacity of three-core cable with and without steel armour layed in cable trench was tested through applying different single-phase current, and their temperature was compared. The loss induced by armour of the test cable was calculated according to electromagnetic field theory. The effect of loss induced by armour on the current-carrying capacity was studied according to IEC standard of current-carrying capacity. The results show that the loss induced by armour of the three-core cable can’t be neglected when applying single-phase current, and the current-carrying capacity decreases by about 4%, which is acceptable.

  3. Creep-rupture, steam oxidation and recovery behaviours upon dynamic transients up to 1300 C of cold-worked 304 stainless steel tubes dedicated to nuclear core fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portier, L.; Brachet, J.C.; Vandenberghe, V.; Guilbert, T.; Lezaud-Chaillioux, V.; Bernard, C.; Rabeau, V.

    2011-01-01

    An ambitious mechanical tests program was conducted on the fuel rod cladding of the CABRI facility between 2004 and 2009 to re-evaluate the cladding tubes materials behaviour. As an offspring of this major scientific investment several conclusions of interest could be drawn on the 304 stainless steel material. In particular, the specific behaviour of the materials during hypothetical and extreme 'dry-out' conditions was investigated. In such a scenario, the cladding tube materials should experience a very brief incursion at high temperatures, in a steam environment, up to 1300 C, before cladding rewetting. Some of the measurements performed in the range of interest for the safety case were on purpose developed beyond the conservatively safe domain. Some of the results obtained for these non-conventional heating rates, pressures and temperature ranges will be presented. First in order to assess the high temperature creep-rupture material behaviour under internal pressure upon dynamic transient conditions, tests have been performed on cold-worked 304 stainless cladding tubes in a steam environment, for heating rates up to 100 C*s -1 and pressure ramp rates up to 10 bar*s -1 thanks to the use of the EDGAR facility. Other tests performed at a given pressure allowed us to check the steady-state secondary creep rate of the materials in the 1100-1200 C temperature range. It was also possible to determine the rupture strength value and the failure mode as a function of the thermal and pressure loading history applied. It is worth noticing that, for very specific conditions, a surprising pure intergranular brittle failure mode of the clad has been observed. Secondly, in order to check the materials oxidation resistance of the materials, two-side steam oxidation tests have been performed at 1300 C, using the DEZIROX facility. It was shown that, thanks to the use of Ring Compression tests, the 304 cladding tube keeps significant ductility for oxidation times up to at least

  4. Corrosion of carbon steel and low-alloy steel in diluted seawater containing hydrazine under gamma-rays irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Junichi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Tsukada, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Seawater was injected into reactor cores of Units 1, 2, and 3 in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station as an urgent coolant. It is considered that the injected seawater causes corrosion of steels of the reactor pressure vessel and primary containment vessel. To investigate the effects of gamma-rays irradiation on weight loss in carbon steel and low-alloy steel, corrosion tests were performed in diluted seawater at 50°C under gamma-rays irradiation. Specimens were irradiated with dose rates of 4.4 kGy/h and 0.2 kGy/h. To evaluate the effects of hydrazine (N 2 H 4 ) on the reduction of oxygen and hydrogen peroxide, N 2 H 4 was added to the diluted seawater. In the diluted seawater without N 2 H 4 , weight loss in the steels irradiated with 0.2 kGy/h was similar to that in the unirradiated steels, and weight loss in the steels irradiated with 4.4 kGy/h increased to approximate 1.7 times of those in the unirradiated steels. Weight loss in the steels irradiated in the diluted seawater containing N 2 H 4 was similar to that in the diluted seawater without N 2 H 4 . When N 2 was introduced into the gas phase in the flasks during gamma-rays irradiation, weight loss in the steels decreased. (author)

  5. Research to sustain cases for Magnox-reactor steel pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, W.J.

    1997-01-01

    Britain's Magnox Electric plc owns and operates six power stations, each of which has twin gas-cooled reactors of the Magnox-fuel type. The older group of four power stations has steel pressure-circuits. The reactor cores are housed within spherical, steel vessels. This article describes some of the research which is undertaken to sustain the safety cases for these steel vessels which have now been in operation for just over 30 years. (author) 2 figs., 4 refs

  6. Steel: Price and Policy Issues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cooney, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Steel prices remain at historically elevated levels. The rapid growth of steel production and demand in China is widely considered as a major cause of the increases in both steel prices and the prices of steelmaking inputs...

  7. Effects of irradiation on the fracture behavior of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Stiegler, J.O.; Holmes, J.J.

    1977-01-01

    Fracture in irradiated materials occurs by mechanisms which occur in unirradiated materials in addition to mechanisms related to irradiation phenomena. The paper examines radiation effects in austenitic stainless steels for use as core structural materials in fast breeder reactors

  8. Use of Nitrocarburizing for Strengthening Threaded Joints of Drill Pipes from Medium-Carbon Alloy Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priymak, E. Yu.; Stepanchukova, A. V.; Yakovleva, I. L.; Tereshchenko, N. A.

    2015-05-01

    Nitrocarburizing is tested at the Drill Equipment Plant for reinforcing threaded joints of drill pipes for units with retrievable core receiver (RCR). The effect of the nitrocarburizing on the mechanical properties of steels of different alloying systems is considered. Steels for the production of threaded joints of drill pipes are recommended.

  9. Liquid metal reactor core material HT9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. H.; Kuk, I. H.; Ryu, W. S. and others

    1998-03-01

    A state-of-the art is surveyed on the liquid metal reactor core materials HT9. The purpose of this report is to give an insight for choosing and developing the materials to be applied to the KAERI prototype liquid metal reactor which is planned for the year of 2010. In-core stability of cladding materials is important to the extension of fuel burnup. Austenitic stainless steel (AISI 316) has been used as core material in the early LMR due to the good mechanical properties at high temperatures, but it has been found to show a poor swelling resistance. So many efforts have been made to solve this problem that HT9 have been developed. HT9 is 12Cr-1MoVW steel. The microstructure of HT9 consisted of tempered martensite with dispersed carbide. HT9 has superior irradiation swelling resistance as other BCC metals, and good sodium compatibility. HT9 has also a good irradiation creep properties below 500 dg C, but irradiation creep properties are degraded above 500 dg C. Researches are currently in progress to modify the HT9 in order to improve the irradiation creep properties above 500 dg C. New design studies for decreasing the core temperature below 500 dg C are needed to use HT9 as a core material. On the contrary, decrease of the thermal efficiency may occur due to lower-down of the operation temperature. (author). 51 refs., 6 tabs., 19 figs

  10. High temperature creep strength of Advanced Radiation Resistant Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Sanghoon; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Austenitic stainless steel may be one of the candidates because of good strength and corrosion resistance at the high temperatures, however irradiation swelling well occurred to 120dpa at high temperatures and this leads the decrease of the mechanical properties and dimensional stability. Compared to this, ferritic/martensitic steel is a good solution because of excellent thermal conductivity and good swelling resistance. Unfortunately, the available temperature range of ferritic/martensitic steel is limited up to 650 .deg. C. ODS steel is the most promising structural material because of excellent creep and irradiation resistance by uniformly distributed nano-oxide particles with a high density which is extremely stable at the high temperature in ferritic/martensitic matrix. In this study, high temperature strength of advanced radiation resistance ODS steel was investigated for the core structural material of next generation nuclear systems. ODS martensitic steel was designed to have high homogeneity, productivity and reproducibility. Mechanical alloying, hot isostactic pressing and hot rolling processes were employed to fabricate the ODS steels, and creep rupture test as well as tensile test were examined to investigate the behavior at high temperatures. ODS steels were fabricated by a mechanical alloying and hot consolidation processes. Mechanical properties at high temperatures were investigated. The creep resistance of advanced radiation resistant ODS steels was more superior than those of ferritic/ martensitic steel, austenitic stainless steel and even a conventional ODS steel.

  11. The reactor vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilous, W.; Hajewska, E.; Szteke, W.; Przyborska, M.; Wasiak, J.; Wieczorkowski, M.

    2005-01-01

    In the paper the fundamental steels using in the construction of pressure vessel water reactor are discussed. The properties of these steels as well as the influence of neutron irradiation on its degradation in the time of exploitation are also done. (authors)

  12. Steel Industry Wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtke, N. W.; Averill, D. W.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastes from steel industry, covering publications of 1976-77. This review covers: (1) coke production; (2) iron and steel production; (3) rolling operations; and (4) surface treatment. A list of 133 references is also presented. (NM)

  13. Side core lifter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelman, Ya A

    1982-01-01

    A side core lifter is proposed which contains a housing with guide slits and a removable core lifter with side projections on the support section connected to the core receiver. In order to preserve the structure of the rock in the core sample by means of guaranteeing rectilinear movement of the core lifter in the rock, the support and core receiver sections are hinged. The device is equipped with a spring for angular shift in the core-reception part.

  14. Proceedings of the international conference on irradiation behaviour of metallic materials for fast reactor core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, J.; Dupouy, J.M.

    Radiation effects on metals or alloys used in fast reactor core components are examined in the papers presented at this conference, the accent being put on swelling and irradiation creep of steels and nickel alloys

  15. Aspects of unconventional cores for large sodium cooled power reactors; evaluation of a literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefhaber, E.

    1978-10-01

    The report gives an overview of a literature study on the application of unconventional cores for sodium cooled fast reactors. Different types of unconventional cores (heterogeneous cores, pancake cores, moderated cores and others) are compared with conventional cores, which are characterized by a cylindrical geometry with two or three fissile zones surrounded by an axial and a radial blanket. The main parameters of interest in this comparison are the neutronic parameters sodium void and Doppler effect, the breeding properties and the steel damage. Consequences for the core safety and the overall plant design are also mentioned

  16. Effect of metallurgical factors on the magnetic properties of non-oriented electrical steels under PWM excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, T.; Yashiki, H.; Takada, S.; Sasaki, T.

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic properties of non-oriented electrical steel sheets under PWM voltage excitation as well as those under sinusoidal excitation have been investigated from a metallurgical point of view. The core loss under PWM excitation is slightly larger than that under sinusoidal excitation. The induction dependence of the core loss difference between the two excitation conditions changes by changing Si content and grain size. The higher the induction, the larger the core loss difference of 0.2% Si steel with small grains. In the case of higher Si steels and 0.2% Si steel with large grain sizes, however, the core loss difference at inductions over 1.3 T decreases with increasing induction. At low induction levels the core loss difference has little relationship to the grain size. On the other hand, at high induction levels this difference decreases with increasing grain size. ((orig.))

  17. Study of 316 stainless steel swelling due to neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furutani, Gen; Konishi, Takao

    2000-01-01

    Large stresses will be generated in the austenitic stainless steel core internals of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) if excessive swelling occurs after long periods of operation. As a result, deformation or stress corrosion cracking (SCC) could occur in the core internals. However, data on the swelling of irradiated austenitic stainless steel in actual PWRs is limited. In this study, mechanical tests, measurement of produced helium amount and analysis using transmission electron microscopes were carried out on a cold-worked (CW) 316 stainless steel flux thimble tube irradiated up to approximately 35 dpa in a Japanese PWR. The swelling was evaluated to be approximately 0.02%. This level of swelling was much lower than the swelling of the more than several percent that has been observed in fast breeder reactors. (author)

  18. Material physical properties of 11Cr-ferritic/martensitic steel (PNC-FMS) wrapper tube materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Yasuhide; Kaito, Takeji; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Tanno, Takashi; Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Koyama, Shinichi

    2012-09-01

    It is necessary to develop core materials for fast reactors in order to achieve high-burnup. Ferritic steels are expected to be good candidate core materials to achieve this objective because of their excellent void swelling resistance. Therefore, oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel and 11Cr-ferritic/martensitic steel (PNC-FMS) have been respectively developed for cladding and wrapper tube materials in Japan Atomic Energy Agency. In this study, various physical properties of PNC-FMS wrapper materials were measured and equations and future standard measurement technique of physical properties for the design and evaluation were conducted. (author)

  19. Relationship between 0.2% proof stress and Vickers hardness of work-hardened low carbon austenitic stainless steel, 316SS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Saburo

    2004-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) occurs in shrouds and piping made of low carbon austenitic stainless steels at nuclear power plants. A work-hardened layer is considered to be one of the probable causes for this occurrence. The maximum Vickers hardness measured at the work-hardened layer is 400 HV. It is important to determine the yield strength and tensile strength of the work-hardened layer in the investigation on the causes of SCC. However, the tensile specimen cannot be obtained since the thickness of the work-hardened layer is as mall as several hundred μm, therefore, it is useful if we can estimate these strengths from its Vickers hardness. Consequently, we investigated the relationships between Vickers hardness versus yield strength and tensile strength using the results obtained on various steels in a series of Fatigue Data Sheets published by the National Institute for Materials Science and results newly obtained on a parent material and rolled materials (reduction of area: 10 - 50%, maximum hardness: 350 HV) for a low carbon stainless steel. The results showed that (1) the relationship between the 0.2% proof stress and the Vickers hardness can be described by a single straight line regardless of strength, structure, and rolling ratio, however, (2) the tensile strength is not correlated with the Vickers hardness, and the austenitic stainless steel in particular shows characteristics different from those of other steels. (author)

  20. Damascus steel ledeburite class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhanov, D. A.; Arkhangelsky, L. B.; Plotnikova, N. V.

    2017-02-01

    Discovered that some of blades Damascus steel has an unusual nature of origin of the excess cementite, which different from the redundant phases of secondary cementite, cementite of ledeburite and primary cementite in iron-carbon alloys. It is revealed that the morphological features of separate particles of cementite in Damascus steels lies in the abnormal size of excess carbides having the shape of irregular prisms. Considered three hypotheses for the formation of excess cementite in the form of faceted prismatic of excess carbides. The first hypothesis is based on thermal fission of cementite of a few isolated grains. The second hypothesis is based on the process of fragmentation cementite during deformation to the separate the pieces. The third hypothesis is based on the transformation of metastable cementite in the stable of angular eutectic carbide. It is shown that the angular carbides are formed within the original metastable colony ledeburite, so they are called “eutectic carbide”. It is established that high-purity white cast iron is converted into of Damascus steel during isothermal soaking at the annealing. It was revealed that some of blades Damascus steel ledeburite class do not contain in its microstructure of crushed ledeburite. It is shown that the pattern of carbide heterogeneity of Damascus steel consists entirely of angular eutectic carbides. Believe that Damascus steel refers to non-heat-resistant steel of ledeburite class, which have similar structural characteristics with semi-heat-resistant die steel or heat-resistant high speed steel, differing from them only in the nature of excess carbide phase.

  1. Tribological and microstructural characteristics of ion-nitrided steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvins, T.

    1983-01-01

    Three steels AISI 4140, AISI 4340 and AISI 304 stainless steel were ion nitrided in a plasma consisting of a 75:25 mixture of H2:N2, sometimes with a trace of CH4. Their surface topography was characterized by SEM and two distinct compound phases were identified: the gamma and the epsilon. The core-case hardness profiles were also established. The low Cr alloy steels have an extended diffusion zone in contrast to the 3034 stainless steels which have a sharp interface. The depth of ion-nitriding is increased as the Cr content is decreased. Friction tests reveal that the gamma surface phase has a lower coefficient of friction than the epsilon phase. The lowest coefficient of friction is achieved when both the rider and the specimen surface are ion nitrided. Previously announced in STAR as N83-24635

  2. Elevated-Temperature Ferritic and Martensitic Steels and Their Application to Future Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, RL

    2005-01-31

    In the 1970s, high-chromium (9-12% Cr) ferritic/martensitic steels became candidates for elevated-temperature applications in the core of fast reactors. Steels developed for conventional power plants, such as Sandvik HT9, a nominally Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.25V-0.2C steel (composition in wt %), were considered in the United States, Europe, and Japan. Now, a new generation of fission reactors is in the planning stage, and ferritic, bainitic, and martensitic steels are again candidates for in-core and out-of-core applications. Since the 1970s, advances have been made in developing steels with 2-12% Cr for conventional power plants that are significant improvements over steels originally considered. This paper will review the development of the new steels to illustrate the advantages they offer for the new reactor concepts. Elevated-temperature mechanical properties will be emphasized. Effects of alloying additions on long-time thermal exposure with and without stress (creep) will be examined. Information on neutron radiation effects will be discussed as it applies to ferritic and martensitic steels.

  3. Animal MRI Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Animal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Core develops and optimizes MRI methods for cardiovascular imaging of mice and rats. The Core provides imaging expertise,...

  4. Experimental Studies of Radiation and Plasma Effects behind the Incident Shock in LENS XX, and the Unsteady Flow Characteristics associated with Free Flight Shroud and Stage Separation and Mode Switching in LENS II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Characteristics associated with “Free Flight” Shroud and Stage Separation and Mode Switching in LENS II Michael S. Holden, PhD CUBRC , Inc. 4455 Genesee...ADDRESS(ES) CUBRC , Inc. 4455 Genesee Street Buffalo, NY 14225, USA 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND...switching and inlet-starting validation • Validation to CFD community ( CUBRC /UM) Figure 32: Numerical Simulation of the Unsteady Flow Dynamics during

  5. Structural amorphous steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Z.P.; Liu, C.T.; Porter, W.D.; Thompson, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    Recent advancement in bulk metallic glasses, whose properties are usually superior to their crystalline counterparts, has stimulated great interest in fabricating bulk amorphous steels. While a great deal of effort has been devoted to this field, the fabrication of structural amorphous steels with large cross sections has remained an alchemist's dream because of the limited glass-forming ability (GFA) of these materials. Here we report the discovery of structural amorphous steels that can be cast into glasses with large cross-section sizes using conventional drop-casting methods. These new steels showed interesting physical, magnetic, and mechanical properties, along with high thermal stability. The underlying mechanisms for the superior GFA of these materials are discussed

  6. Performance Steel Castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    system components to be built. Figure la shows the machine design . PSC-2012 Page 94 Glue Application Sheet Transfer Feed Elevator Figure la...Department of Defense such as cleats, ejection chutes , control arms, muzzle brakes, mortar components, clevises, tow bar clamps, ammo conveyor elements...Foundry and the members of Steel Founders’ Society of America. Abstract Weapon system designers and builders need advanced steel casting technology

  7. Life after Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Bobby Curran grew up in a working-class neighborhood in Baltimore, finished high school, and followed his grandfather's steel-toed bootprints straight to Sparrows Point, a 3,000-acre sprawl of industry on the Chesapeake Bay. College was not part of the plan. A gritty but well-paying job at the RG Steel plant was Mr. Curran's ticket to a secure…

  8. Core Characteristics Deterioration due to Plastic Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaido, Chikara; Arai, Satoshi

    This paper discusses the effect of plastic deformation at core manufacturing on the characteristics of cores where non-oriented electrical steel sheets are used as core material. Exciting field and iron loss increase proportionally to plastic deformation in the case of rPeddy currents increase because plastic deformations of crystalline grains are distributed and then the flux distribution is induced. In the case of rP>20, the deterioration tend to saturate, and the increases in magnetic field and iron loss are 1000 to 1500A/m and 2 to 4W/kg. They are related to grain size, and high grade with larger grain may have lager field increase and smaller iron loss increase. Anomalous eddy current losses scarcely increase in this region. In actual motors, the plastic deformation affects iron loss increase although exciting current increases a little.

  9. LMFBR design and its evolution. (2) Core design of LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uto, Nariaki; Mizuno, Tomoyasu

    2003-01-01

    Sodium-cooled core design studies are performed. MOX fuel core with axial blanket partial elimination subassembly due to safety consideration is studied. This type of core with high internal conversion ratio possesses capability of achieving 26 months of operation cycle length and 100 GWd/t of burnup averaged over core and blanket, which are superior characteristics in view of reducing cost of power generation. Metal fuel core is also studied, and its higher breeding capability reveals a potential of better core performance such as longer operation cycle length for the same level of electricity generation, though core outlet temperature is limited to lower level due to steel cladding-metal fuel compatibility concerns. Another metal fuel core concept using single Pu enrichment and two radial regions with individual fuel pin diameters achieves 550degC of core outlet temperature identical to that of MOX fuel core, keeping operation cycle length comparable with that of MOX fuel core. This series of study results show that sodium-cooled MOX and metal fuel cores have a high flexibility in satisfying various needs including fuel cycle cost and breeding capability, depending on the stage of introducing commercialized fast reactor cycle system. (author)

  10. Carburizing treatment of low alloy steels: Effect of technological parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benarioua, Younes

    2018-05-01

    The surface areas of the parts subjected to mechanical loads influence to a great extent the resistance to wear and fatigue. In majority of cases, producing of a hard superficial layer on a tough substrate is conducive to an increased resistance to mechanical wear and fatigue. Cementation treatment of low alloy steels which bonds superficial martensitic layer of high hardness and lateral compressive to a core of lower hardness and greater toughness is an example of a good solution of the problem. The high hardness of the martensitic layer is due to an increased concentration of interstitial carbon atoms in the austenite before quenching. The lower hardness of the core after quenching is due to the presence of ferrite and pearlite components which appear if the cooling rate after austenitization becomes lower than the critical on. The objective of the present study was to obtain a cemented surface layer on low alloy steel by means of pack carburizing treatment. Different steel grades, austenitization temperatures as well as different soaking times were used as parameters of the pack carburizing treatment. During this treatment, carbon atoms from the pack powder diffuse toward the steels surface and form compounds of iron carbides. The effect of carburizing parameters on the transformation rate of low carbon surface layer of the low alloy steel to the cemented one was investigated by several analytical techniques.

  11. Core Hunter 3: flexible core subset selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Beukelaer, Herman; Davenport, Guy F; Fack, Veerle

    2018-05-31

    Core collections provide genebank curators and plant breeders a way to reduce size of their collections and populations, while minimizing impact on genetic diversity and allele frequency. Many methods have been proposed to generate core collections, often using distance metrics to quantify the similarity of two accessions, based on genetic marker data or phenotypic traits. Core Hunter is a multi-purpose core subset selection tool that uses local search algorithms to generate subsets relying on one or more metrics, including several distance metrics and allelic richness. In version 3 of Core Hunter (CH3) we have incorporated two new, improved methods for summarizing distances to quantify diversity or representativeness of the core collection. A comparison of CH3 and Core Hunter 2 (CH2) showed that these new metrics can be effectively optimized with less complex algorithms, as compared to those used in CH2. CH3 is more effective at maximizing the improved diversity metric than CH2, still ensures a high average and minimum distance, and is faster for large datasets. Using CH3, a simple stochastic hill-climber is able to find highly diverse core collections, and the more advanced parallel tempering algorithm further increases the quality of the core and further reduces variability across independent samples. We also evaluate the ability of CH3 to simultaneously maximize diversity, and either representativeness or allelic richness, and compare the results with those of the GDOpt and SimEli methods. CH3 can sample equally representative cores as GDOpt, which was specifically designed for this purpose, and is able to construct cores that are simultaneously more diverse, and either are more representative or have higher allelic richness, than those obtained by SimEli. In version 3, Core Hunter has been updated to include two new core subset selection metrics that construct cores for representativeness or diversity, with improved performance. It combines and outperforms the

  12. 75 FR 18153 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products from the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [C-580-818] Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products from the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary Results of... countervailing duty order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products (CORE) from Korea. See Countervailing...

  13. 77 FR 16810 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [C-580-818] Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary Results of... Register the countervailing duty order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products (CORE) from Korea...

  14. 76 FR 20954 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [C-580-818] Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary Results of... Register the countervailing duty order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products (CORE) from Korea...

  15. 75 FR 55745 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-14

    ... Products covered by this order are certain corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products from Korea. These... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [C-580-818] Corrosion-Resistant Carbon... review of the countervailing duty (CVD) order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products (CORE...

  16. 78 FR 55241 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-10

    ... merchandise covered by this Order \\2\\ is certain corrosion- resistant carbon steel flat products from Korea... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [C-580-818] Corrosion-Resistant Carbon... the countervailing duty (CVD) order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products (CORE) from the...

  17. 77 FR 27438 - Certain Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Korea: Final Results of Expedited...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [C-580-818] Certain Corrosion-Resistant... order on certain corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products (``CORE'') from the Republic of Korea.... Scope of the Order The merchandise covered by the order includes flat-rolled carbon steel products, of...

  18. 77 FR 25141 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and South Korea: Extension of Time...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    ...-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and South Korea: Extension of Time Limits for Preliminary...) orders on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products (CORE) from Germany and South Korea (Korea... from Germany and South Korea: Adequacy Redetermination Memorandum,'' (April 20, 2012). The preliminary...

  19. Doppler coefficient measurements in Zebra Core 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, A.R.; Wheeler, R.C.

    1965-11-01

    Measurements using a central hot loop in Zebra Core 5 are described. Results are given for the Doppler coefficients found in a number of assemblies with PuO 2 and 16% PuO 2 /84% depleted UO 2 pins, loaded with different combinations of steel, sodium or void pins. The mixed oxide results are in general about 20% more negative than was calculated using the FD2 data set, but agreement is good if the plutonium contributions in the calculations are omitted. The small positive Doppler coefficient calculated for Pu239 was not observed, and two measurements indicated instead a small negative effect. The Doppler effect in the mixed oxide systems was found to vary approximately as 1/T. The results from the empty loop and non-fissile assemblies indicate either a small negative Doppler effect in steel or alternatively the presence of an unexplained expansion effect. (author)

  20. Clean steels for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1995-03-01

    Fusion energy production has an inherent advantage over fission: a fuel supply with reduced long term radioactivity. One of the leading candidate materials for structural applications in a fusion reactor is a tungsten stabilized 9% chromium Martensitic steel. This alloy class is being considered because it offers the opportunity to maintain that advantage in the reactor structure as well as provide good high temperature strength and radiation induced swelling and embrittlement resistance. However, calculations indicate that to obtain acceptable radioactivity levels within 500 years after service, clean steel will be required because the niobium impurity levels must be kept below about 2 appm and nickel, molybdenum, nitrogen, copper, and aluminum must be intentionally restricted. International efforts are addressing the problems of clean steel production. Recently, a 5,000 kg heat was vacuum induction melted in Japan using high purity commercial raw materials giving niobium levels less than 0.7 appm. This paper reviews the need for reduced long term radioactivity, defines the advantageous properties of the tungsten stabilized Martensitic steel class, and describes the international efforts to produce acceptable clean steels

  1. Steel fiber reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baloch, S.U.

    2005-01-01

    Steel-Fiber Reinforced Concrete is constructed by adding short fibers of small cross-sectional size .to the fresh concrete. These fibers reinforce the concrete in all directions, as they are randomly oriented. The improved mechanical properties of concrete include ductility, impact-resistance, compressive, tensile and flexural strength and abrasion-resistance. These uniqlte properties of the fiber- reinforcement can be exploited to great advantage in concrete structural members containing both conventional bar-reinforcement and steel fibers. The improvements in mechanical properties of cementitious materials resulting from steel-fiber reinforcement depend on the type, geometry, volume fraction and material-properties of fibers, the matrix mix proportions and the fiber-matrix interfacial bond characteristics. Effects of steel fibers on the mechanical properties of concrete have been investigated in this paper through a comprehensive testing-programme, by varying the fiber volume fraction and the aspect-ratio (Lid) of fibers. Significant improvements are observed in compressive, tensile, flexural strength and impact-resistance of concrete, accompanied by marked improvement in ductility. optimum fiber-volume fraction and aspect-ratio of steel fibers is identified. Test results are analyzed in details and relevant conclusions drawn. The research is finally concluded with future research needs. (author)

  2. Molten core debris-sodium interactions: M-Series experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowa, E.S.; Gabor, J.D.; Pavlik, J.R.; Cassulo, J.C.; Cook, C.J.; Baker, L. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Five new kilogram-scale experiments have been carried out. Four of the experiments simulated the situation where molten core debris flows from a breached reactor vessel into a dry reactor cavity and is followed by a flow of sodium (Ex-vessel case) and one experiment simulated the flow of core debris into an existing pool of sodium (In-vessel case). The core debris was closely simulated by a thermite reaction which produced a molten mixture of UO 2 , ZrO 2 , and stainless steel. There was efficient fragmentation of the debris in all experiments with no explosive interactions observed

  3. k-core covers and the core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Rodriguez, E.; Borm, Peter; Estevez-Fernandez, A.; Fiestras-Janeiro, G.; Mosquera, M.A.

    This paper extends the notion of individual minimal rights for a transferable utility game (TU-game) to coalitional minimal rights using minimal balanced families of a specific type, thus defining a corresponding minimal rights game. It is shown that the core of a TU-game coincides with the core of

  4. TMI-2 core damage: a summary of present knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, D.E.; Mason, R.E.; Meininger, R.D.; Franz, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    Extensive fuel damage (oxidation and fragmentation) has occurred and the top approx. 1.5 m of the center portion of the TMI-2 core has relocated. The fuel fragmentation extends outward to slightly beyond one-half the core radius in the direction examined by the CCTV camera. While the radial extent of core fragmentation in other directions was not directly observed, control and spider drop data and in-core instrument data suggest that the core void is roughly symmetrical, although there are a few indications of severe fuel damage extending to the core periphery. The core material fragmented into a broad range of particle sizes, extending down to a few microns. APSR movement data, the observation of damaged fuel assemblies hanging unsupported from the bottom of the reactor upper plenum structure, and the observation of once-molten stainless steel immediately above the active core indicate high temperatures (up to at least 1720 K) extended to the very top of the core. The relative lack of damage to the underside of the plenum structure implies a sharp temperature demarcation at the core/plenum interface. Filter debris and leadscrew deposit analyses indicate extensive high temperature core materials interaction, melting of the Ag-In-Cd control material, and transport of particulate control material to the plenum and out of the vessel

  5. Mechanical properties of welded joints of duplex steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawiak, M.; Nowacki, J.

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents the study results of mechanical properties of duplex steels UNS S31803 welded joints as well as duplex and NV A36 steels welded joints. They have ben welded by FCAW method in CO 2 using FCW 2205-H flux-cored wire. The joints have been subjected: tensile tests, impact tests, bending tests, hardness tests and metallographic investigations. The influence of welding parameters and mechanical properties of the joints was appreciated. The welding method assured high tensile strength of the joints (approximately 770 MPa) and high impact strength of the welds (approximately 770 J). All samples were broken outside of welds. (author)

  6. Neutron irradiation effects in pressure vessel steels and weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ianko, L [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria). Div. of Nuclear Power; Davies, L M

    1994-12-31

    This paper deals with the effects of neutron irradiation on the steel and welds used for the pressure vessels which house the reactor cores in light water reactors: irradiation effects on mechanical properties and the shift in ductile-brittle transition temperature, importance of the knowledge of the neutron fluence and of the monitoring and surveillance programmes; empirical and mechanistic modelling of irradiation effects and the necessity of data extension to new operational limits; consequences on the manufacturing and structural design of materials and structures; mitigation of irradiation effects by annealing; international activities and programmes in the field of neutron irradiation effects on PV steels and welds. 37 refs., 22 figs.

  7. Microstructure and embrittlement of VVER 440 reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennion, A.

    1999-03-01

    27 VVER 440 pressurised water reactors operate in former Soviet Union and in Eastern Europe. The pressure vessel, is made of Cr-Mo-V steel. It contains a circumferential arc weld in front of the nuclear core. This weld undergoes a high neutron flux and contains large amounts of copper and phosphorus, elements well known for their embrittlement potency under irradiation. The embrittlement kinetic of the steel is accelerated, reducing the lifetime of the reactor. In order to get informations on the microstructure and mechanical properties of these steels, base metals, HAZ, and weld metals have been characterized. The high amount of phosphorus in weld metals promotes the reverse temper embrittlement that occurs during post-weld heat treatment. The radiation damage structure has been identified by small angle neutron scattering, atomic probe, and transmission electron microscopy. Nanometer-sized clusters of solute atoms, rich in copper with almost the same characteristics as in western pressure vessels steels, and an evolution of the size distribution of vanadium carbides, which are present on dislocation structure, are observed. These defects disappear during post-irradiation tempering. As in western steels, the embrittlement is due to both hardening and reduction of interphase cohesion. The radiation damage specificity of VVER steels arises from their high amount of phosphorus and from their significant density of fine vanadium carbides. (author)

  8. Magnetic properties and recrystallization texture of phosphorus-added non-oriented electrical steel sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, I.; Yashiki, H.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of phosphorus on magnetic properties and recrystallization texture has been investigated in non-oriented electrical steel sheets to develop low core loss and high permeability core materials. Specimens with different phosphorus contents were cold-rolled to various thicknesses, i.e. with various cold-rolling reductions, and annealed for recrystallization and grain growth. Although magnetic induction of the steel with low phosphorus content dramatically dropped with reducing thickness, i.e. with increasing in cold-rolling reduction, that of the steel with high phosphorus content only slightly decreased. The most effective way to reduce core loss was to reduce thickness of electrical steel sheets. Therefore, phosphorus-added thin gauge non-oriented electrical steel sheets have achieved low core loss and high permeability. The typical magnetic properties of phosphorus-added non-oriented electrical steel sheets 0.27mm in sheet thickness were 16.6W/kg in W 10/400 and 1.73T in B 50 . These excellent magnetic properties were due to the recrystallization texture control. {111} component in recrystallization texture was suppressed by the phosphorus segregation at initial grain boundaries. Accordingly, phosphorus would greatly contribute to the improvement of magnetic properties

  9. Thermochemical surface engineering of steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thermochemical Surface Engineering of Steels provides a comprehensive scientific overview of the principles and different techniques involved in thermochemical surface engineering, including thermodynamics, kinetics principles, process technologies and techniques for enhanced performance of steels...

  10. Cold formability of steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafond, G.; Leclerq, G.; Moliexe, F.; Namdar, R.; Roesch, L.; Sanz, G.

    1977-01-01

    This work was essentially aimed to the study of the following three questions. Is it possible to assess the cold formability of steels using simple material properties as criteria. What values of mechanical properties can one expect to reach in cold formed parts. Are there simple ways of characterizing the speroidization treatments carried out on steels before cold forming operations. The present report describes the results obtained during this investigation. It is logically divided into three separate parts. Experimental study of cold formability in wire drawing. Influence of metallurgical variables on mechanical properties of high carbon cold drawn wires. Contribution to the study of characterization methods of cold forming steels subjected to a spheroidization heat treatment

  11. National steel tries wheeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudak, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    In 1989, National Steel felt the need to take the next step to make its Detroit-based division, Great Lakes Steel, more competitive in the world flat-rolled steel market. In 1988, Great Lakes Steel started flowing natural gas through the first fully litigated bypass (Competitive Sourcing Option) of a local distribution company. In 1989, the second connection with the new supply route for gas transportation, Panhandle Eastern had started flowing and the LDC, Michigan Consolidated Gas Co. (MichCon) had pulled out their piping previously serving the plants. Since we had been able to structure a fully reliable supply route, storage and balancing program for gas in the face of such strong opposition by the LDC, the author felt it was time to attack the next singularly sourced major commodity, electricity. Electricity, at this major integrated steel plant, represented approximately 7% of plant cost yearly. Yet being monopolized, Great Lakes Division (GLD) could not multiple source this commodity like it does with its other 93% of costs, except for labor (25% of the 93%). Multiple sourcing is done to bring competitive pressure to suppliers and to diversify supplies and protect plant operation in the event of failure by one supplier. This paper describes National Steel's strategy to reduce the cost of power, at the minimum of capital costs, the most expedient way possible, that does not sacrifice any major long-term potential cost improvements. The results show that competitively priced power is available across the mid-west, at prices well below many state regulated electric utilities, for at least 5 to 15 years, but with major obstacles in obtaining transmission access

  12. Volatilization from PCA steel alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagrman, D.L.; Smolik, G.R.; McCarthy, K.A.; Petti, D.A.

    1996-08-01

    The mobilizations of key components from Primary Candidate Alloy (PCA) steel alloy have been measured with laboratory-scale experiments. The experiments indicate most of the mobilization from PCA steel is due to oxide formation and spalling but that the spalled particles are large enough to settle rapidly. Based on the experiments, models for the volatization of iron, manganese, and cobalt from PCA steel in steam and molybdenum from PCA steel in air have been derived.

  13. Fatigue damage of steel components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fæster, Søren; Zhang, Xiaodan; Huang, Xiaoxu

    2014-01-01

    Railway rails and the inner ring in roller bearings in wind turbines are both experiencing steel-to-steel contact in small areas with huge loads resulting in extremely high stresses in the base materials......Railway rails and the inner ring in roller bearings in wind turbines are both experiencing steel-to-steel contact in small areas with huge loads resulting in extremely high stresses in the base materials...

  14. Thermally Stable Nanocrystalline Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulme-Smith, Christopher Neil; Ooi, Shgh Woei; Bhadeshia, Harshad K. D. H.

    2017-10-01

    Two novel nanocrystalline steels were designed to withstand elevated temperatures without catastrophic microstructural changes. In the most successful alloy, a large quantity of nickel was added to stabilize austenite and allow a reduction in the carbon content. A 50 kg cast of the novel alloy was produced and used to verify the formation of nanocrystalline bainite. Synchrotron X-ray diffractometry using in situ heating showed that austenite was able to survive more than 1 hour at 773 K (500 °C) and subsequent cooling to ambient temperature. This is the first reported nanocrystalline steel with high-temperature capability.

  15. Joining uranium to steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, M.A.

    1976-05-01

    A method has been devised which will allow the joining of uranium to steel by fusion welding through the use of an intermediate material. Uranium-0.5 titanium was joined to AISI 304L stainless steel by using a vanadium insert. Also, a method is now available for selecting possible filler metals when two entirely dissimilar metals need to be joined. This method allows a quantitative ranking to be made of the possible filler metals and thus the most likely candidate can be selected

  16. Nitrogen-alloyed martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berns, H.

    1988-01-01

    A report is presented on initial results with pressure-nitrided martensitic steels. In heat-resistant steels, thermal stability and toughness are raised by nitrogen. In cold work steel, there is a more favourable corrosion behaviour. (orig./MM) [de

  17. Reactor core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvennoinen, P.

    1976-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: concepts of reactor physics; neutron diffusion; core heat transfer; reactivity; reactor operation; variables of core management; computer code modules; alternative reactor concepts; methods of optimization; general system aspects. (U.K.)

  18. Nuclear reactor core catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor core catcher is described for containing debris resulting from an accident causing core meltdown and which incorporates a method of cooling the debris by the circulation of a liquid coolant. (U.K.)

  19. Microbial-Influenced Corrosion of Corten Steel Compared with Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel in Oily Wastewater by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Hamidreza; Alavi, Seyed Abolhasan; Fotovat, Meysam

    2015-07-01

    The microbial corrosion behavior of three important steels (carbon steel, stainless steel, and Corten steel) was investigated in semi petroleum medium. This work was done in modified nutrient broth (2 g nutrient broth in 1 L oily wastewater) in the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and mixed culture (as a biotic media) and an abiotic medium for 2 weeks. The behavior of corrosion was analyzed by spectrophotometric and electrochemical methods and at the end was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the degree of corrosion of Corten steel in mixed culture, unlike carbon steel and stainless steel, is less than P. aeruginosa inoculated medium because some bacteria affect Corten steel less than other steels. According to the experiments, carbon steel had less resistance than Corten steel and stainless steel. Furthermore, biofilm inhibits separated particles of those steels to spread to the medium; in other words, particles get trapped between biofilm and steel.

  20. Measurement of in-core and recirculation system response to hydrogen water chemistry at Nine Mile Point 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Head, R.A.; Indig, M.E.; Andresen, P.L.

    1991-03-01

    The value of hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) as a mitigation technique for out-of-core piping systems susceptible to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) is well established. However, certain reactor internal components exposed to high levels of radiation are susceptible to a cracking mechanism referred to as irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). Some of the components potentially affected by IASCC include the top guide, SRM/IRM housings, the core shroud, and control blades. Fortunately, laboratory data indicate that IASCC can be controlled by altering the coolant environment. Hot cell tests performed at GE's Vallecitos Nuclear Center (VNC) on highly irradiated material produced a fracture surface with 99% IGSCC under normal BWR water chemistry. However, under HWC conditions, only ductile failure occurred. With this background, a program was established to determine the chemistry and oxidizing potential of the core bypass coolant at Nine Mile Point-1 (NMP-1) under normal and HWC conditions. The objective of the program was to assess whether HWC could sufficiently modify the core bypass environment to mitigate IASCC. Results showed that with the addition of hydrogen to the feedwater, core bypass dissolved oxygen decreased very rapidly, compared to the recirculation water, indicating very efficient recombination of hydrogen and oxygen in the non-boiling core bypass region. Since low concentrations of dissolved oxygen have been shown to eliminate IASCC, these results are encouraging. 8 figs., 1 tab

  1. Core Values | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Core Values Core Values NREL's core values are rooted in a safe and supportive work environment guide our everyday actions and efforts: Safe and supportive work environment Respect for the rights physical and social environment Integrity Maintain the highest standard of ethics, honesty, and integrity

  2. Sidewall coring shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelman, Ya A; Konstantinov, L P; Martyshin, A N

    1966-12-12

    A sidewall coring shell consists of a housing and a detachable core catcher. The core lifter is provided with projections, the ends of which are situated in another plane, along the longitudinal axis of the lifter. The chamber has corresponding projections.

  3. Guns, Germs and Steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 1. Guns, Germs and Steel - A Short History of Everybody for the Last 13,000 years. Suri Venkatachalam. Book Review Volume 6 Issue 1 January 2001 pp 84-88. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  4. Underwater welding of steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibarra, S.; Olson, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    A fundamental basis to understand the behavior of wet underwater welding of steel is introduced. Both the pyrometallurgical and physical metallurgy concepts are discussed. Modifications of welding consumables and practice are suggested. This chapter promotes further contributions of meatllurgical research to improve and promote wet underwater welding. (orig.)

  5. Japan steel mill perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murase, K. [Kobe Steel Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    The international and Japan's steel industry, the coking coal market, and Japan's expectations from Canada's coal industry are discussed. Japan's steel mills are operating at full capacity. Crude steel production for the first half of 2004 was 55.8 million tons. The steel mills are profitable, but costs are high, and there are difficulties with procuring raw materials. Japan is trying to enhance the quality of coke, in order to achieve higher productivity in the production of pig iron. Economic growth is rising disproportionately in the BRICs (Brazil, Russia, India, and China), with a large increase in coking coal demand from China. On the supply side, there are several projects underway in Australia and Canada to increase production. These include new developments by Elk Valley Coal Corporation, Grande Cache Coal, Western Canadian Coal, and Northern Energy and Mining in Canada. The Elga Mine in the far eastern part of Russia is under development. But the market is expected to remain tight for some time. Japan envisions Canadian coal producers will provide a stable coal supply, expansion of production and infrastructure capabilities, and stabilization of price. 16 slides/overheads are included.

  6. On choice of tempered steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govorov, A.A.; Pan'shin, I.F.; Rakhmanov, V.I.

    1978-01-01

    For the purpose of developing a graphical method for choosing structural steels, a change in the propagation work of a crack and in the critical temperature of brittleness of 40, 40Kh, 40KhN, and 40KhNM steels, was examined depending on the hardness after hardening and tempering. A diagram enabling to choose the grade of steel for making an article of known dimensions according to the preset values of its mechanical properties has been plotted. The developed selection scheme takes into account the hardenability of steels and the influence of the hardness after thermal treatment on the cold-shortness of steel

  7. Core-concrete molten pool dynamics and interfacial heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, A.S.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical models are derived for the heat transfer from molten oxide pools to an underlying concrete surface and from molten steel pools to a general concrete containment. To accomplish this, two separate effects models are first developed, one emphasizing the vigorous agitation of the molten pool by gases evolving from the concrete and the other considering the insulating effect of a slag layer produced by concrete melting. The resulting algebraic expressions, combined into a general core-concrete heat transfer representation, are shown to provide very good agreement with experiments involving molten steel pours into concrete crucibles

  8. Experiments on performance of the multi-layered in-vessel core catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, K.H.; Kim, S.B.; Park, R.J.; Cheung, F.B.; Suh, K.Y.; Rempe, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    LAVA-GAP experiments are in progress to investigate the performance of the in-vessel core catcher using alumina melt as a corium simulant. The hemispherical in-vessel core catcher made of carbon steel was installed inside the lower head vessel with a uniform gap of 10 mm. Until now, two types of the in-vessel core catcher were used in this study. The first one is a single layered in-vessel core catcher without an internal coating of the LAVA-GAP-2 test, and the other one is a two layered in-vessel core catcher with a 0.5 mm-thick ZrO 2 internal coating of the LAVA-GAP-3 test. Current LAVA-GAP experimental results indicate that an internally coated in-vessel core catcher has better thermal performance compared with an uncoated in-vessel core catcher. Metallurgical inspections on the test specimens of the LAVA-GAP-3 test have been performed to examine the performance of the coating material and the base carbon steel. Although the base carbon steel had experienced a severe thermal attack to the extent that the microstructures were changed and re-crystallization occurred, the carbon steel showed stable and pure chemical compositions without any oxidation and interaction with the coating layer. In terms of the material aspects, these metallurgical inspection results suggest that the ZrO 2 coating performed well. (authors)

  9. Ultra-high temperature tensile properties of ODS steel claddings under severe accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Y., E-mail: yano.yasuhide@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002, Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan); Tanno, T.; Oka, H.; Ohtsuka, S.; Inoue, T.; Kato, S.; Furukawa, T.; Uwaba, T.; Kaito, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002, Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan); Ukai, S.; Oono, N. [Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N13, W-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-8628 (Japan); Kimura, A. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Hayashi, S. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Torimaru, T. [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co., Ltd., 2163, Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1313 (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    Ultra-high temperature ring tensile tests were performed to investigate the tensile behavior of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel claddings and wrapper materials under severe accident conditions with temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1400 °C which is close to the melting point of core materials. The experimental results showed that the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings was highest in the core materials at ultra-high temperatures of 900–1200 °C, but there was significant degradation in the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings above 1200 °C. This degradation was attributed to grain boundary sliding deformation with γ/δ transformation, which is associated with reduced ductility. By contrast, the tensile strength of recrystallized 12Cr-ODS and FeCrAl-ODS steel claddings retained its high value above 1200 °C, unlike the other tested materials.

  10. Ultra-high temperature tensile properties of ODS steel claddings under severe accident conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Y.; Tanno, T.; Oka, H.; Ohtsuka, S.; Inoue, T.; Kato, S.; Furukawa, T.; Uwaba, T.; Kaito, T.; Ukai, S.; Oono, N.; Kimura, A.; Hayashi, S.; Torimaru, T.

    2017-04-01

    Ultra-high temperature ring tensile tests were performed to investigate the tensile behavior of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel claddings and wrapper materials under severe accident conditions with temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1400 °C which is close to the melting point of core materials. The experimental results showed that the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings was highest in the core materials at ultra-high temperatures of 900-1200 °C, but there was significant degradation in the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings above 1200 °C. This degradation was attributed to grain boundary sliding deformation with γ/δ transformation, which is associated with reduced ductility. By contrast, the tensile strength of recrystallized 12Cr-ODS and FeCrAl-ODS steel claddings retained its high value above 1200 °C, unlike the other tested materials.

  11. Modeling steel deformation in the semi-solid state

    CERN Document Server

    Hojny, Marcin

    2017-01-01

    This book addresses selected aspects of steel-deformation modelling, both at very high temperatures and under the conditions in which the liquid and the solid phases coexist. Steel-deformation modelling with its simultaneous solidification is particularly difficult due to its specificity and complexity. With regard to industrial applications and the development of new, integrated continuous casting and rolling processes, the issues related to modelling are becoming increasingly important. Since the numerous industrial tests that are necessary when traditional methods are used to design the process of continuous casting immediately followed by rolling are expensive, new modelling concepts have been sought. Comprehensive tests were applied to solve problems related to the deformation of steel with a semi-solid core. Physical tests using specialist laboratory instruments (Gleeble 3800thermo-mechanical simulator, NANOTOM 180 N computer tomography, Zwick Z250 testing equipment, 3D blue-light scanning systems), and...

  12. Precipitation behaviors of X70 acicular ferrite pipeline steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Yu; Yi Sun; Qixiang Chen; Haitao Jiang; Lihong Zhang

    2006-01-01

    The morphology, structure, and chemical composition of precipitates in the final microstructure of Nb-V-Ti microalloyed X70 acicular ferrite pipeline steel were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Precipitates observed by TEM can be classified into two groups. The large precipitates are complex compounds that comprise square-shaped TiN precipitate as core with fine Nb-containing precipitate nucleated on pre-existing TiN precipitate as caps on one or more faces at high temperature. In contrast, the fine and spherical Nb carbides and/or carbonitrides precipitate heterogeneously on dislocations and sub-boundaries at low temperature. From the analysis in terms of thermodynamics, EDS and chemical composition of the steel, NbC precipitation is considered to be the predominant precipitation behavior in the tested steel under the processing conditions of this research.

  13. Austin: austenitic steel irradiation E 145-02 Irradiation Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genet, F.; Konrad, J.

    1987-01-01

    Safety measures for nuclear reactors require that the energy which might be liberated in a reactor core during an accident should be contained within the reactor pressure vessel, even after very long irradiation periods. Hence the need to know the mechanical properties at high deformation velocity of structure materials that have received irradiation damage due to their utilization. The stainless steels used in the structures of reactors undergo damage by both thermal and fast neutrons, causing important changes in the mechanical properties of these materials. Various austenitic steels available as structural materials were irradiated or are under irradiation in various reactors in order to study the evolution of the mechanical properties at high deformation velocity as a function of the irradiation damage rate. The experiment called AUSTIN (AUstenitic STeel IrradiatioN) 02 was performed by the JRC Petten Establishment on behalf of Ispra in support of the reactor safety programme

  14. Challenges in Special Steel Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, G.

    2018-02-01

    Special bar quality [SBQ] is a long steel product where an assured quality is delivered by the steel mill to its customer. The bars have enhanced tolerance to higher stress application and it is demanded for specialised component making. The SBQ bars are sought for component making processing units such as closed die hot forging, hot extrusion, cold forging, machining, heat treatment, welding operations. The final component quality of the secondary processing units depends on the quality maintained at the steel maker end along with quality maintained at the fabricator end. Thus, quality control is ensured at every unit process stages. The various market segments catered to by SBQ steel segment is ever growing and is reviewed. Steel mills need adequate infrastructure and technological capability to make these higher quality steels. Some of the critical stages of processing SBQ and the critical quality maintenance parameters at the steel mill in the manufacture has been brought out.

  15. Core losses of an inverter-fed permanent magnet synchronous motor with an amorphous stator core under no-load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Denis

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an interior permanent magnet synchronous motor (IPMSM with a stator core made of amorphous magnetic material (AMM is presented. The IPMSM is driven by a voltage source three-phase inverter with classical pulse width modulation (PWM control. The core losses under no-load condition are measured by experiment and compared to an equivalent IPMSM with a stator core made of NO steel. Under these conditions, the core losses are influenced by the stator, rotor and magnet shapes but also by the PWM carrier signal that implies a high frequency harmonic in the magnetic flux density. It is demonstrated that the AMM can reduce the core losses by about 56 %.

  16. Rotary core drills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1967-11-30

    The design of a rotary core drill is described. Primary consideration is given to the following component parts of the drill: the inner and outer tube, the core bit, an adapter, and the core lifter. The adapter has the form of a downward-converging sleeve and is mounted to the lower end of the inner tube. The lifter, extending from the adapter, is split along each side so that it can be held open to permit movement of a core. It is possible to grip a core by allowing the lifter to assume a closed position.

  17. Heat Treatment and Properties of Iron and Steel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Digges, Thomas

    1966-01-01

    .... Chemical compositions, heat treatments, and some properties and uses are presented for structural steels, tool steels, stainless and heat-resisting steels, precipitation-hardenable stainless steels...

  18. Hydrogen induced cold cracking studies on armour grade high strength, quenched and tempered steel weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magudeeswaran, G.; Balasubramanian, V. [Centre for Materials Joining Research (CEMAJOR), Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Annamalai University, Annamalai Nagar 608 002, Tamil Nadu (India); Madhusudhan Reddy, G. [Metal Joining Section, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory (DMRL), Kanchanbagh (P.O.) Hyderabad 560 058 Andhra Pradesh (India)

    2008-04-15

    Quenched and tempered (Q and T) steels are prone to hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) in the heat affected zone after welding. The use of austenitic stainless steel (ASS) consumables to weld the above steel was the only available remedy because of higher solubility for hydrogen in austenitic phase. The use of stainless steel consumables for a non-stainless steel base metal is not economical. Hence, alternate consumables for welding Q and T steels and their vulnerability to HIC need to be explored. Recent studies proved that low hydrogen ferritic (LHF) steel consumables can be used to weld Q and T steels, which can give very low hydrogen levels in the weld deposits. In this investigation an attempt has been made to study the influence of welding consumables and welding processes on hydrogen induced cold cracking of armour grade Q and T steel welds by implant testing. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and flux cored arc welding (FCAW) processes were used for making welds using ASS and LHF welding consumables. ASS welds made using FCAW process offered a higher resistance to HIC than all other welds considered in this investigation. (author)

  19. Study on the Hot Extrusion Process of Advanced Radiation Resistant Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steel Tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Byoungkwon; Noh, Sanghoon; Kim, Kibaik; Kang, Suk Hoon; Chun, Youngbum; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Ferritic/martensitic steel has a better thermal conductivity and swelling resistance than austenitic stainless steel. Unfortunately, the available temperature range of ferritic/martensitic steel is limited at up to 650 .deg. C. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels have been developed as the most prospective core structural materials for next generation nuclear systems because of their excellent high strength and irradiation resistance. The material performances of this new alloy are attributed to the existence of uniformly distributed nano-oxide particles with a high density, which is extremely stable at high temperature in a ferritic/martensitic matrix. This microstructure can be very attractive in achieving superior mechanical properties at high temperatures, and thus, these favorable microstructures should be obtained through the controls of the fabrication process parameters during the mechanical alloying and hot consolidation procedures. In this study, a hot extrusion process for advanced radiation resistant ODS steel tube was investigated. ODS martensitic steel was designed to have high homogeneity, productivity, and reproducibility. Mechanical alloying and hot consolidation processes were employed to fabricate the ODS steels. A microstructure observation and creep rupture test were examined to investigate the effects of the optimized fabrication conditions. Advanced radiation resistant ODS steel has been designed to have homogeneity, productivity, and reproducibility. For these characteristics, modified mechanical alloying and hot consolidation processes were developed. Microstructure observation revealed that the ODS steel has uniformly distributed fine-grain nano-oxide particles. The fabrication process for the tubing is also being propelled in earnest.

  20. Study on the Hot Extrusion Process of Advanced Radiation Resistant Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steel Tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byoungkwon; Noh, Sanghoon; Kim, Kibaik; Kang, Suk Hoon; Chun, Youngbum; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steel has a better thermal conductivity and swelling resistance than austenitic stainless steel. Unfortunately, the available temperature range of ferritic/martensitic steel is limited at up to 650 .deg. C. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels have been developed as the most prospective core structural materials for next generation nuclear systems because of their excellent high strength and irradiation resistance. The material performances of this new alloy are attributed to the existence of uniformly distributed nano-oxide particles with a high density, which is extremely stable at high temperature in a ferritic/martensitic matrix. This microstructure can be very attractive in achieving superior mechanical properties at high temperatures, and thus, these favorable microstructures should be obtained through the controls of the fabrication process parameters during the mechanical alloying and hot consolidation procedures. In this study, a hot extrusion process for advanced radiation resistant ODS steel tube was investigated. ODS martensitic steel was designed to have high homogeneity, productivity, and reproducibility. Mechanical alloying and hot consolidation processes were employed to fabricate the ODS steels. A microstructure observation and creep rupture test were examined to investigate the effects of the optimized fabrication conditions. Advanced radiation resistant ODS steel has been designed to have homogeneity, productivity, and reproducibility. For these characteristics, modified mechanical alloying and hot consolidation processes were developed. Microstructure observation revealed that the ODS steel has uniformly distributed fine-grain nano-oxide particles. The fabrication process for the tubing is also being propelled in earnest

  1. Core design aspects of SNR 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehmann, U.K.

    1987-01-01

    The paper describes in its first part the main characteristics of the core of the SNR 2 fast breeder reactor which is being planned within the European collaboration on fast breeder reactors. In the second part some core design aspects are discussed. The fuel element management with an inwards shuffling after each cycle is illustrated which offers advantages with respect to linear rating, steel damage and average discharge burnup. For this management, the full three-dimensional power and burnup history has been calculated and some typical results are presented. The shutdown requirements and the capabilities of the two shutdown systems of SNR 2 are discussed. The necessity for a reliable surveillance of the power distribution is demonstrated by the pronounced power tilts in case of the unintentional withdrawal of an absorber rod. Finally, a short review of the main nuclear design methods and their validation with help of the evaluation of experiments in zero power facilities and power reactors is given

  2. Effect of magnetic properties of non-oriented electrical steel on torque characteristics of interior-permanent-magnet synchronous motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimura, Hiroshi [Corporate Research and Development Laboratories, Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd., 1-8 Fuso-cho, Amagasaki 660-0891 (Japan)], E-mail: fujimura-hrs@sumitomometals.co.jp; Nitomi, Hirokatsu; Yashiki, Hiroyoshi [Corporate Research and Development Laboratories, Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd., 1-8 Fuso-cho, Amagasaki 660-0891 (Japan)

    2008-10-15

    The torque characteristics of interior-permanent-magnet synchronous motor (IPMSM), in which core materials were our conventional non-oriented electrical steel 35SX250 and our developed steels 35SXH, 27SXH with high permeability, were measured by a pulse wave modulation (PWM) inverter control. The torque characteristics of the motor with developed steels were superior to that of conventional steel. The advantage of developed steels was remarkable in the high-toque region. Experimental torque separation using current phase control showed that reluctance torque was strongly affected by the magnetic properties of core materials. And we did magnetic field analysis of the motors by finite element method (FEM). The flux density in the teeth of the stator core was higher in the high permeability steels than that in the conventional steel under the same current condition. The developed steels are expected to be suited to the stator material of IPMSM used as drive motors for electric vehicles and compressor motors for air conditioner.

  3. Effect of magnetic properties of non-oriented electrical steel on torque characteristics of interior-permanent-magnet synchronous motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, Hiroshi; Nitomi, Hirokatsu; Yashiki, Hiroyoshi

    2008-01-01

    The torque characteristics of interior-permanent-magnet synchronous motor (IPMSM), in which core materials were our conventional non-oriented electrical steel 35SX250 and our developed steels 35SXH, 27SXH with high permeability, were measured by a pulse wave modulation (PWM) inverter control. The torque characteristics of the motor with developed steels were superior to that of conventional steel. The advantage of developed steels was remarkable in the high-toque region. Experimental torque separation using current phase control showed that reluctance torque was strongly affected by the magnetic properties of core materials. And we did magnetic field analysis of the motors by finite element method (FEM). The flux density in the teeth of the stator core was higher in the high permeability steels than that in the conventional steel under the same current condition. The developed steels are expected to be suited to the stator material of IPMSM used as drive motors for electric vehicles and compressor motors for air conditioner

  4. Effect of welding processes and consumables on fatigue crack growth behaviour of armour grade quenched and tempered steel joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Magudeeswaran

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Quenched and Tempered (Q&T steels are widely used in the construction of military vehicles due to its high strength to weight ratio and high hardness. These steels are prone to hydrogen induced cracking (HIC in the heat affected zone (HAZ after welding. The use of austenitic stainless steel (ASS consumables to weld the above steel was the only available remedy because of higher solubility for hydrogen in austenitic phase. The use of stainless steel consumables for a non-stainless steel base metal is not economical. Hence, alternate consumables for welding Q&T steels and their vulnerability to HIC need to be explored. Recent studies proved that low hydrogen ferritic steel (LHF consumables can be used to weld Q&T steels, which can give very low hydrogen levels in the weld deposits. The use of ASS and LHF consumables will lead to distinct microstructures in their respective welds. This microstructural heterogeneity will have a drastic influence in the fatigue crack growth resistance of armour grade Q&T steel welds. Hence, in this investigation an attempt has been made to study the influence of welding consumables and welding processes on fatigue crack growth behaviour of armour grade Q&T Steel joints. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW and Flux cored arc welding (FCAW were used for fabrication of joints using ASS and LHF consumables. The joints fabricated by SMAW process using LHF consumable exhibited superior fatigue crack growth resistance than all other joints.

  5. Feasibility analysis of modified AL-6XN steel for structure component application in supercritical water-cooled reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinggang LI; Qingzhi YAN; Rong MA; Haoqiang WANG; Changchun GE

    2009-01-01

    Modified AL-6XN austenite steel was patterned after AL-6XN superaustenitic stainless steel by introducing microalloy elements such as zirconium and titanium in order to adapt to recrystallizing thermo-mechanical treatment and further improve crevice corrosion resistance. Modified AL-6XN exhibited comparable tensile strength, and superior plasticity and impact toughness to commercial AL-6XN steel. The effects of aging behavior on corrosion resistance and impact toughness were measured to evaluate the qualification of modified AL-6XN steel as an in-core component and cladding material in a supercritical water-cooled reactor. Attention should be paid to degradation in corrosion resistance and impact toughness after aging for 50 hours when modified AL-6XN steel is considered as one of the candidate materials for in-core components and cladding tubes in supercritical water-cooled reactors.

  6. Material property changes of stainless steels under PWR irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuya, Koji; Nishioka, Hiromasa; Fujii, Katsuhiko; Kamaya, Masayuki; Miura, Terumitsu; Torimaru, Tadahiko

    2009-01-01

    Structural integrity of core structural materials is one of the key issues for long and safe operation of pressurized water reactors. The stainless steel components are exposed to neutron irradiation and high-temperature water, which cause significant property changes and irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in some cases. Understanding of irradiation induced material property changes is essential to predict integrity of core components. In the present study, microstructure and microchemistry, mechanical properties, and IASCC behavior were examined in 316 stainless steels irradiated to 1 - 73 dpa in a PWR. Dose-dependent changes of dislocation loops and cavities, grain boundary segregation, tensile properties and fracture mode, deformation behavior, and their interrelation were discussed. Tensile properties and deformation behavior were well coincident with microstructural changes. IASCC susceptibility under slow strain rate tensile tests, IASCC initiation under constant load tests in simulated PWR primary water, and their relationship to material changes were discussed. (author)

  7. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate

  8. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened 9Cr ferritic-martensitic steel clad tube for fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laha, K.; Saroja, S.; Mathew, M.D.; Jayakumar, T.; Vijay, R.; Venugopal Reddy, A.; Lakshminarayana, B.; Kapoor, Komal; Jha, S.K.; Tonpe, S.S.

    2012-01-01

    One of the key issues in the economical operation of FBR is to achieve high burn-up of fuel (200-250 GWd/t) which considerably reduces the fuel cycle cost. This imposes stringent requirements of void swelling resistance upto 200 dpa for the core structural materials. Presently used alloy 09 (a modified austenitic stainless steel, 15Cr-15Ni-Ti) for PFBR has void swelling limit less than 150 dpa. Because of the inherent void swelling resistance, 9-12Cr steels ferritic/martensitic steels are qualified for irradiation upto 200 dpa but their low creep strength at temperatures above 600 deg C restricts their application as a clad material. Oxide dispersion strengthening is found to be promising means of extending the creep resistance of ferritic/martensitic steels beyond 650 deg C without sacrificing the inherent advantages of high thermal conductivity and low swelling of ferritic steels

  9. Solid state alloying by plasma nitriding and diffusion annealing treatment for austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinedo, C.E.; Vatavuk, J.; Oliveira, S.D. de; Tschiptschin, A.P.

    1999-01-01

    Nitrogen has been added to stainless steels to improve mechanical strength and corrosion resistance. High nitrogen steel production is limited by high gas pressure requirements and low nitrogen solubility in the melt. One way to overcome this limitation is the addition of nitrogen in solid state because of its higher solubility in austenite. However, gas and salt bath nitriding have been done at temperatures around 550 C, where nitrogen solubility in the steel is still very low. High temperature nitriding has been, thus proposed to increase nitrogen contents in the steel but the presence of oxide layers on top of the steel is a barrier to nitrogen intake. In this paper a modified plasma nitriding process is proposed. The first step of this process is a hydrogen plasma sputtering for oxide removal, exposing active steel surface improving nitrogen pickup. This is followed by a nitriding step where high nitrogen contents are introduced in the outermost layer of the steel. Diffusion annealing is then performed in order to allow nitrogen diffusion into the core. AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel was plasma nitrided and diffusion annealed at 1423K, for 6 hours, with 0.2 MPa nitrogen pressure. The nitrided steel presented ∝60 μm outermost compact layer of (Fe,Cr) 3 N and (Fe,Cr) 4 N with 11 wt.% N measured by surface depth profiling chemical analysis - GDS system. During the annealing treatment the nitride layer was dissolved and nitrogen diffused to the core of the sample leaving more even nitrogen distribution into the steel. Using this technique one-millimetre thick sample were obtained having high nitrogen content and uniform distribution through the thickness. (orig.)

  10. Steel for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorev, N.N.; Astafiev, A.A.; Loboda, A.S.

    1978-01-01

    A steel contains, in percent by weight, the following constituents: carbon from 0.13 to 0.18, silicon from 0.17 to 0.37, manganese from 0.30 to 0.60, chromium from 1.7 to 2.4, nickel from 1.0 to 1.5, molybdenum from 0.5 to 0.7, vanadium from 0.05 to 0.12, aluminium from 0.01 to 0.035, nitrogen from 0.05 to 0.012, copper from 0.11 to 0.20, arsenic from 0.0035 to 0.0055, iron and impurities, the balance. This steel is preferable for use in the manufacture of nuclear reactors. 1 table

  11. Advances in stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldev Raj; Jayakumar, T.; Saibaba, Saroja; Sivaprasad, P.V.; Shankar, P.

    2010-01-01

    This book covers a broad spectrum of topics spanning the entire life cycle of stainless steel-from alloy design and characterization to engineering design, fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, quality assurance of components, in-service performance assessment, life prediction and finally failure analysis of materials and components. The contents provide useful feedback for further developments aimed at effective utilization of this class of materials. The book comprises articles that bring out contemporary developments in stainless steels and is thematically classified into the following sections. 1. Component design, modelling and structural integrity, 2. Manufacturing technology, 3. Property evaluation, 4. Alloy development and applications, 5. NDE methods, 6. Corrosion and surface modification. The book commences with articles on component design and structural integrity, thus opening up the areas of challenge for researchers and academia. The articles in the book relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  12. Steel containment buckling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, J.G.; Fly, G.W.; Baker, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    The Steel Containment Buckling program is in its fourth phase of work directed at the evaluation of the effects of the structural failure mode of steel containments when the membrane stresses are compressive. The structural failure mode for this state of stress is instability or buckling. The program to date has investigated: (1) the effect on overall buckling capacity of the ASME area replacement method for reinforcing around circular penetrations; (2) a set of benchmark experiments on ring-stiffened shells having reinforced and framed penetrations; (3) large and small scale experiments on knuckle region buckling from internal pressure and post-buckling behavior to failure for vessel heads having torispherical geometries; and (4) buckling under time-dependent loadings (dynamic buckling). The first two investigations are complete, the knuckle buckling experimental efforts are complete with data analysis and reporting in progress, and the dynamic buckling experimental and analytical work is in progress

  13. Steel containment buckling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, T.A.; Baker, W.E.

    1986-01-01

    Two aspects of buckling of a free-standing nuclear steel containment building were investigated in a combined experimental and analytical program. In the first part of the study, the response of a scale model of a containment building to dynamic base excitation is investigated. A simple harmonic signal was used for preliminary studies followed by experiments with scaled earthquake signals as the excitation source. The experiments and accompanying analyses indicate that the scale model response to earthquake-type excitations is very complex and that current analytical methods may require a dynamic capacity reduction factor to be incorporated. The second part of the study quantified the effects of framing at large penetrations on the static buckling capacity of scale model containments. Results show little effect from the framing for the scale models constructed from the polycarbonate, Lexan. However, additional studies with a model constructed of the prototypic steel material are suggested

  14. Optimisation of welding procedures for duplex and superduplex stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westin, Elin M.

    2014-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are increasingly being replaced by duplex grades that can offer similar corrosion resistance with far higher strength. This increased strength makes it possible to reduce material consumption whilst also decreasing transport and construction costs. Although established welding methods used for austenitic steels can be used for duplex steels, modification of the procedures can lead to improved results. This paper reviews the welding of duplex stainless steel and examines precautions that may be required. The advantages and disadvantages of different welding methods are highlighted and some high productivity solutions are presented. The application of a more efficient process with a high deposition rate (e.g. flux- cored arc welding) can decrease labour costs. Further close control of heat input and interpass temperature can result in more favourable microstructures and final properties. Although welding adversely affects the corrosion resistance of austenitic and duplex stainless steels, particularly the pitting resistance, relative to the parent material, this problem can be minimised by proper backing gas protection and subsequent pickling.

  15. Corrosion resistance of stainless steel pipes in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoegren, L.; Camitz, G. [Swerea KIMAB AB, Box 55970, SE-102 16 Stockholm (Sweden); Peultier, J.; Jacques, S.; Baudu, V.; Barrau, F.; Chareyre, B. [Industeel and ArcelorMittal R and D, 56 rue Clemenceau, BP19, FR-71201 le Creusot, Cedex (France); Bergquist, A. [Outokumpu Stainless AB, P.O. Box 74, SE-774 22 Avesta (Sweden); Pourbaix, A.; Carpentiers, P. [Belgian Centre for Corrosion Study, Avenue des Petits-Champs 4A, BE 1410 Waterloo (Belgium)

    2011-04-15

    To be able to give safe recommendations concerning the choice of suitable stainless steel grades for pipelines to be buried in various soil environments, a large research programme, including field exposures of test specimens buried in soil in Sweden and in France, has been performed. Resistance against external corrosion of austenitic, super austenitic, lean duplex, duplex and super duplex steel grades in soil has been investigated by laboratory tests and field exposures. The grades included have been screened according to their critical pitting-corrosion temperature and according to their time-to-re-passivation after the passive layer has been destroyed locally by scratching. The field exposures programme, being the core of the investigation, uses large specimens: 2 m pipes and plates, of different grades. The exposure has been performed to reveal effects of aeration cells, deposits or confined areas, welds and burial depth. Additionally, investigations of the tendency of stainless steel to corrode under the influence of alternating current (AC) have been performed, both in the laboratory and in the field. Recommendations for use of stainless steels under different soil conditions are given based on experimental results and on operating experiences of existing stainless steel pipelines in soil. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Steel skin - SMC laminate structures for lightweight automotive manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quagliato, Luca; Jang, Changsoon; Murugesan, Mohanraj; Kim, Naksoo

    2017-09-01

    In the present research work an innovative material, made of steel skin and sheet molding compound core, is presented and is aimed to be utilized for the production of automotive body frames. For a precise description of the laminate structure, the material properties of all the components, including the adhesive utilized as an interlayer, have been carried out, along with the simple tension test of the composite material. The result have shown that the proposed laminate structure has a specific yield strength 114% higher than 6061 T6 aluminum, 34% higher than 7075 T6 aluminum, 186% higher than AISI 304 stainless steel (30HRC) and 42% than SK5 high-strength steel (52HRC), showing its reliability and convenience for the realization of automotive components. After calibrating the material properties of the laminate structure, and utilizing as reference the simple tension results of the laminate structure, the derived material properties have been utilized for the simulation of the mechanical behavior of an automotive B-pillar. The results have been compared with those of a standard B-pillar made of steel, showing that the MS-SMC laminate structure manifests load and impact carry capacity comparable with those of high strength steel, while granting, at least, an 11% weight reduction.

  17. Effect of metallurgical factors on the bulk magnetic properties of non-oriented electrical steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Pampa, E-mail: pampaghosh@gmail.com [Department of Mining and Materials Engineering, McGill University, 3610 University Street, Montreal, Que., Canada H3A 0C5 (Canada); Chromik, Richard R., E-mail: richard.chromik@mcgill.ca [Department of Mining and Materials Engineering, McGill University, 3610 University Street, Montreal, Que., Canada H3A 0C5 (Canada); Knight, Andrew M. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alta., Canada T6G 2V4 (Canada); Wakade, Shekhar G. [GM Powertrain, General Motors Company, 823 Joslyn Avenue, Building B, 4AJ35, Pontiac, MI 48340-2920 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Non-oriented electrical steel (NOES) is one of the most common material used in electrical motors. Core loss and permeability are the most important properties that the motor manufacturers look for. Both these properties are structure sensitive and depend on several metallurgical factors; such as chemistry, grain size, crystallographic texture, cleanliness and stress states in non-oriented electrical steels. It has been observed in this course of the study that the grain size and Si content of NOES are the primary controlling factors to core loss, especially at higher frequencies. On the contrary, crystallographic texture plays an important role at lower frequencies. At higher frequency, core loss increases with increasing grain size and decreasing Si content of the steels. Small difference in grain size (∼50 μm) at lower frequency range has little influence on the magnetic properties but has significant adverse effect as frequency reaches high enough. - Highlights: • Magnetic properties of a set of electrical steels were measured. • Crystallographic texture, chemistry and grain size were studied for their effects on core loss and permeability. • Structure–magnetic property relationships were identified for the electrical steels.

  18. Reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van De Velde, J.; Fabry, A.; Van Walle, E.; Chaouuadi, R.

    1998-01-01

    Research and development activities related to reactor pressure vessel steels during 1997 are reported. The objectives of activities of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN in this domain are: (1) to develop enhanced surveillance concepts by applying micromechanics and fracture-toughness tests to small specimens, and by performing damage modelling and microstructure characterization; (2) to demonstrate a methodology on a broad database; (3) to achieve regulatory acceptance and industrial use

  19. Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Velde, J.; Fabry, A.; Van Walle, E.; Chaoudi, R

    1998-07-01

    SCK-CEN's R and D programme on Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Steels in performed in support of the RVP integrity assessment. Its main objectives are: (1) to develop enhanced surveillance concepts by applying micromechanics and fracture-toughness tests to small specimens, and by performing damage modelling and microstructure characterization; (2) to demonstrate the applied methodology on a broad database; (3) to achieve regulatory acceptance and industrial use. Progress and achievements in 1999 are reported.

  20. Steele Richardson Olszewski syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayashree S Gokhale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson′s disease and its plus syndromes are an important cause of morbidity in the geriatric age group. Its plus syndromes show a myriad of clinical features characterized by progressive symptoms. Here we present a 65-year-old woman with progressive "Parkinsonian-like features," i.e., mask-like face, slowness of all movements and tendency to fall, and difficulty in eye movements, leading to the diagnosis of Steele Richardson Olszewski Syndrome or progressive supranuclear palsy.

  1. Steels and welding nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessa, M.; Milella, P.P.

    1987-01-01

    This ENEA Data-Base regards mechanical properties, chemical composition and heat treatments of nuclear pressure vessel materials: type A533-B, A302-B, A508 steel plates and forgings, submerged arc welds and HAZ before and after nuclear irradiation. Irradiation experiments were generally performed in high flux material test reactors. Data were collected from international available literature about water nuclear reactors pressure vessel materials embrittlement

  2. Survey of melt interactions with core retention material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    A survey of the interactions of up to 220 kg stainless steel melts at 1973 0 K with the candidate core retention materials borax, firebrick, high alumina cement, and magnesia is described. Data collected for the interactions include rates of material erosion, aerosol generation, gas evolution, and upward heat flux. Borax acts as an ablative solid that rapidly quenches the melt. Firebrick is ablated by the steel melt at a rate of 8.2 x 10 -6 m/s. High alumina cement is found to be an attractive melt retention material especially if it can be used in the unhydrated form. Magnesia is also found to be an attractive material though it can be eroded by the molten oxides of steel

  3. Contaminated Mexican steel incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This report documents the circumstances contributing to the inadvertent melting of cobalt 60 (Co-60) contaminated scrap metal in two Mexican steel foundries and the subsequent distribution of contaminated steel products into the United States. The report addresses mainly those actions taken by US Federal and state agencies to protect the US population from radiation risks associated with the incident. Mexico had much more serious radiation exposure and contamination problems to manage. The United States Government maintained a standing offer to provide technical and medical assistance to the Mexican Government. The report covers the tracing of the source to its origin, response actions to recover radioactive steel in the United States, and return of the contaminated materials to Mexico. The incident resulted in significant radiation exposures within Mexico, but no known significant exposure within the United States. Response to the incident required the combined efforts of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Department of Energy, Department of Transportation, Department of State, and US Customs Service (Department of Treasury) personnel at the Federal level and representatives of all 50 State Radiation Control Programs and, in some instances, local and county government personnel. The response also required a diplomatic interface with the Mexican Government and cooperation of numerous commercial establishments and members of the general public. The report describes the factual information associated with the event and may serve as information for subsequent recommendations and actions by the NRC. 8 figures

  4. 78 FR 59652 - Certain Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-580-816] Certain Corrosion-Resistant... corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products (``CORE'') from the Republic of Korea (``Korea''), pursuant... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on CORE from Korea covering the period of review (``POR'') of...

  5. Evaluation of stator core loss of high speed motor by using thermography camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takeru; Enokizono, Masato

    2018-04-01

    In order to design a high-efficiency motor, the iron loss that is generated in the motor should be reduced. The iron loss of the motor is generated in a stator core that is produced with an electrical steel sheet. The iron loss characteristics of the stator core and the electrical steel sheet are agreed due to a building factor. To evaluate the iron loss of the motor, the iron loss of the stator core should be measured more accurately. Thus, we proposed the method of the iron loss evaluation of the stator core by using a stator model core. This stator model core has been applied to the surface mounted permanent magnet (PM) motors without windings. By rotate the permanent magnet rotor, the rotating magnetic field is generated in the stator core like a motor under driving. To evaluate the iron loss of the stator model core, the iron loss of the stator core can be evaluated. Also, the iron loss can be calculated by a temperature gradient. When the temperature gradient is measured by using thermography camera, the iron loss of entire stator core can be evaluated as the iron loss distribution. In this paper, the usefulness of the iron loss evaluation method by using the stator model core is shown by the simulation with FEM and the heat measurement with thermography camera.

  6. The core paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, G. C.; Higgins, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rebuttal of suggestions from various critics attempting to provide an escape from the seeming paradox originated by Higgins and Kennedy's (1971) proposed possibility that the liquid in the outer core was thermally stably stratified and that this stratification might prove a powerful inhibitor to circulation of the outer core fluid of the kind postulated for the generation of the earth's magnetic field. These suggestions are examined and shown to provide no reasonable escape from the core paradox.

  7. Fracture Mechanisms in Steel Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stradomski Z.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The investigations were inspired with the problem of cracking of steel castings during the production process. A single mechanism of decohesion - the intergranular one - occurs in the case of hot cracking, while a variety of structural factors is decisive for hot cracking initiation, depending on chemical composition of the cast steel. The low-carbon and low-alloyed steel castings crack due to the presence of the type II sulphides, the cause of cracking of the high-carbon tool cast steels is the net of secondary cementite and/or ledeburite precipitated along the boundaries of solidified grains. Also the brittle phosphor and carbide eutectics precipitated in the final stage solidification are responsible for cracking of castings made of Hadfield steel. The examination of mechanical properties at 1050°C revealed low or very low strength of high-carbon cast steels.

  8. Nuclear reactor core flow baffling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berringer, R.T.

    1979-01-01

    A flow baffling arrangement is disclosed for the core of a nuclear reactor. A plurality of core formers are aligned with the grids of the core fuel assemblies such that the high pressure drop areas in the core are at the same elevations as the high pressure drop areas about the core periphery. The arrangement minimizes core bypass flow, maintains cooling of the structure surrounding the core, and allows the utilization of alternative beneficial components such as neutron reflectors positioned near the core

  9. 221-U Facility concrete and reinforcing steel evaluations specification for the canyon disposition initiative (CDI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, J.T.

    1998-01-01

    This describes a test program to establish the in-situ material properties of the reinforced concrete in Building 221-U for comparison to the original design specifications. Field sampling and laboratory testing of concrete and reinforcing steel structural materials in Building 221-U for design verification will be undertaken. Forty seven samples are to be taken from radiologically clean exterior walls of the canyon. Laboratory testing program includes unconfined compressive strength of concrete cores, tensile strength of reinforcing steel, and petrographic examinations of concrete cores taken from walls below existing grade

  10. Sediment Core Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides instrumentation and expertise for physical and geoacoustic characterization of marine sediments.DESCRIPTION: The multisensor core logger measures...

  11. Hydrogen effects in stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen on stainless steels have been reviewed and are summarized in this paper. Discussion covers hydrogen solution and transport in stainless steels as well as the effects of hydrogen on deformation and fracture under various loading conditions. Damage is caused also by helium that arises from decay of the hydrogen isotope tritium. Austenitic, ferritic, martensite, and precipitation-hardenable stainless steels are included in the discussion. 200 references

  12. Experiments on MCCI with oxide and steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foit, J.J.; Fischer, M.; Journeau, Ch.; Langrock, G.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Study of the influence of reinforcement in the concrete on the erosion behaviour. • Prototypic heating of both melt phases (oxide/metal) was achieved. • In contrast to a concrete without rebars, an almost isotropic erosion was obtained. • Tests with UO 2 -containing melt showed a fast oxidation of the stainless steel melt. • Distribution of the metal phase in the oxide melt depends on the heating power. - Abstract: Recently performed experimental programmes at the French VULCANO and the German MOCKA and SICOPS facilities aimed at the further elucidation of various phenomena of molten core-concrete interaction (MCCI). Questions on these phenomena arose during the scientific discussion of MCCI in the last years. The large-scale MOCKA (KIT, Karlsruhe) experiments study the interaction of a simulant oxide (Al 2 O 3 , ZrO 2, CaO) and metal melt (Fe) with concrete. To allow for a long-term interaction, internal heating was provided by alternating additions of alumino-thermite and Zr metal to the upper oxide layer of the stratified melt. Since the heat generated by the thermite reaction and the exothermal oxidation reaction of Zr is mainly deposited in the oxide phase, prototypic heating of both melt phases is achieved. Recent tests in the MOCKA (KIT, Germany) program are focused on assessing the influence of a typical 6 wt.% reinforcement in the concrete on the erosion behaviour. The experiments were performed in siliceous concrete crucibles with an inner diameter of 25 cm and a height of 1.3 m. In these experiments, the overall downward erosion by the metal melt was of the same order as the sideward one. In addition, the lateral erosion in the overlaid oxide melt region was about the same as in the metal melt region. Experiments with prototypic UO 2 -containing melts have been conducted in parallel in the VULCANO (CEA, Cadarache) and SICOPS (AREVA, Erlangen) facilities. In VULCANO a plasma arc furnace melts the oxide corium while three 1-L steel

  13. Can Psychiatric Rehabilitation Be Core to CORE?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olney, Marjorie F.; Gill, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, we seek to determine whether psychiatric rehabilitation principles and practices have been more fully incorporated into the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) standards, the extent to which they are covered in four rehabilitation counseling "foundations" textbooks, and how they are reflected in the…

  14. Core disruptive accident and recriticality analysis with FX2-POOL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramson, P.B.

    1976-01-01

    The current state of development of FX2-POOL, a two-dimensional hydrodynamic, thermodynamic and neutronic scoping model for Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accident analysis is described. Checkout comparisons to VENUS for prompt burst conditions were good. Use of FX2-POOL to examine the importance of fuel to steel heat transfer during a prompt burst indicates that heat transfer plays no important role on that time scale. Scoping studies of material thermohydrodynamics for about 20 to 30 milliseconds following the prompt burst indicate that heat transfer is important on the time scale necessary for the CDA bubble to grow to the size of the original core. Preliminary results are presented for energetics of boiling fuel steel pools which are forced recritical by local surface pressurization

  15. Apparatus For Laminating Segmented Core For Electric Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Robert Anthony; Stabel, Gerald R

    2003-06-17

    A segmented core for an electric machine includes segments stamped from coated electric steel. The segments each have a first end, a second end, and winding openings. A predetermined number of segments are placed end-to-end to form layers. The layers are stacked such that each of the layers is staggered from adjacent layers by a predetermined rotation angle. The winding openings of each of the layers are in vertical alignment with the winding openings of the adjacent layers. The stack of layers is secured to form the segmented core.

  16. PWR core design calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trkov, A.; Ravnik, M.; Zeleznik, N.

    1992-01-01

    Functional description of the programme package Cord-2 for PWR core design calculations is presented. Programme package is briefly described. Use of the package and calculational procedures for typical core design problems are treated. Comparison of main results with experimental values is presented as part of the verification process. (author) [sl

  17. Milled Die Steel Surface Roughness Correlation with Steel Sheet Friction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berglund, J.; Brown, C.A.; Rosén, B.-G.

    2010-01-01

    This work investigates correlations between the surface topography ofmilled steel dies and friction with steel sheet. Several die surfaces were prepared by milling. Friction was measured in bending under tension testing. Linear regression coefficients (R2) between the friction and texture...

  18. Replaceable LMFBR core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, E.A.; Cunningham, G.W.

    1976-01-01

    Much progress has been made in understanding material and component performance in the high temperature, fast neutron environment of the LMFBR. Current data have provided strong assurance that the initial core component lifetime objectives of FFTF and CRBR can be met. At the same time, this knowledge translates directly into the need for improved core designs that utilize improved materials and advanced fuels required to meet objectives of low doubling times and extended core component lifetimes. An industrial base for the manufacture of quality core components has been developed in the US, and all procurements for the first two core equivalents for FFTF will be completed this year. However, the problem of fabricating recycled plutonium while dramatically reducing fabrication costs, minimizing personnel exposure, and protecting public health and safety must be addressed

  19. Lunar Core and Tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.; Ratcliff, J. T.

    2004-01-01

    Variations in rotation and orientation of the Moon are sensitive to solid-body tidal dissipation, dissipation due to relative motion at the fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, and tidal Love number k2 [1,2]. There is weaker sensitivity to flattening of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) [2,3,4] and fluid core moment of inertia [1]. Accurate Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) measurements of the distance from observatories on the Earth to four retroreflector arrays on the Moon are sensitive to lunar rotation and orientation variations and tidal displacements. Past solutions using the LLR data have given results for dissipation due to solid-body tides and fluid core [1] plus Love number [1-5]. Detection of CMB flattening, which in the past has been marginal but improving [3,4,5], now seems significant. Direct detection of the core moment has not yet been achieved.

  20. Internal core tightener

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynsvold, G.V.; Snyder, H.J. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    An internal core tightener is disclosed which is a linear actuated (vertical actuation motion) expanding device utilizing a minimum of moving parts to perform the lateral tightening function. The key features are: (1) large contact areas to transmit loads during reactor operation; (2) actuation cam surfaces loaded only during clamping and unclamping operation; (3) separation of the parts and internal operation involved in the holding function from those involved in the actuation function; and (4) preloaded pads with compliant travel at each face of the hexagonal assembly at the two clamping planes to accommodate thermal expansion and irradiation induced swelling. The latter feature enables use of a ''fixed'' outer core boundary, and thus eliminates the uncertainty in gross core dimensions, and potential for rapid core reactivity changes as a result of core dimensional change. 5 claims, 12 drawing figures

  1. The Influence of Swirl Brakes and a Tip Discharge Orifice on the Rotordynamic Forces Generated by Discharge-to-Suction Leakage Flows in Shrouded Centrifugal Pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivo, Joseph M.; Acosta, A. J.; Brennen, C. E.; Caughey, T. K.

    1993-01-01

    Recent experiments conducted in the Rotor Force Test Facility at the California Institute of Technology have examined the effects of a tip leakage restriction and swirl brakes on the rotordynamic forces due to leakage flows on an impeller undergoing a prescribed circular whirl. The experiments simulate the leakage flow conditions and geometry of the Alternate Turbopump Design (ATD) of the Space Shuttle High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump and are critical to evaluating the pump's rotordynamic instability problems. Previous experimental and analytical results have shown that discharge-to-suction leakage flows in the annulus of a shrouded centrifugal pump contribute substantially to the fluid induced rotordynamic forces. Also, previous experiments have shown that leakage inlet (pump discharge) swirl can increase the cross-coupled stiffness coefficient and hence increase the range of positive whirl for which the tangential force is destabilizing. In recent experimental work, the present authors demonstrated that when the swirl velocity within the leakage path is reduced by the introduction of ribs or swirl brakes, then a substantial decrease in both the destabilizing normal and tangential forces could be achieved. Motivation for the present research is that previous experiments have shown that restrictions such as wear rings or orifices at pump inlets affect the leakage forces. Recent pump designs such as the Space Shuttle Alternate Turbopump Design (ATD) utilize tip orifices at discharge for the purpose of establishing axial thrust balance. The ATD has experienced rotordynamic instability problems and one may surmise that these tip discharge orifices may also have an important effect on the normal and tangential forces in the plane of impeller rotation. The present study determines if such tip leakage restrictions contribute to undesirable rotordynamic forces. Additional motivation for the present study is that the widening of the leakage path annular clearance and the

  2. Steels for nuclear power. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohusova, O.; Brumovsky, M.; Cukr, B.; Hatle, Z.; Protiva, K.; Stefec, R.; Urban, A.; Zidek, M.

    1976-01-01

    The principles are listed of nuclear reactor operation and the reactors are classified by neutron energy, fuel and moderator designs, purpose and type of moderator. The trend and the development of light-water reactor applications are described. The fundamental operating parameters of the WWER type reactors are indicated. The effect is discussed of neutron radiation on reactor structural materials. The characteristics are described of steel corrosion due to the contact of the steel with steam or sodium in the primary coolant circuit. The reasons for stress corrosion are given and the effects of radiation on corrosion are listed. The requirements and criteria are given for the choice of low-alloy steel for the manufacture of pressure vessels, volume compensators, steam generators, cooling conduits and containment. A survey is given of most frequently used steels for pressure vessels and of the mechanical and structural properties thereof. The basic requirements for the properties of steel used in the primary coolant circuit are as follows: sufficient strength in operating temperature, toughness, good weldability, resistance to corrosion and low brittleness following neutron irradiation. The materials are listed used for the components of light-water and breeder reactors. The production of corrosion-resistant steels is discussed with a view to raw materials, technology, steel-making processes, melting processes, induction furnace steel-making, and to selected special problems of the chemical composition of steels. The effects are mainly discussed of lead, bismuth and tin as well as of some other elements on hot working of high-alloy steels and on their structure. The problems of corrosion-resistant steel welding and of pressure vessel cladding are summed up. Also discussed is the question of the concept and safeguards of the safety of nuclear installation operation and a list is presented of most commonly used nondestructive materials testing methods. The current

  3. Study on core flow distribution of the reference core design Mark-III of experimental multi-purpose VHTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Sadao; Arai, Taketoshi; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Hirano, Mitsumasa

    1977-01-01

    Concerning the coolant flow distribution between fuel channels and other flow paths in the core, designated as Reference Core Mark-III of the Multi-purpose Experimental Very High Temperature Reactor, thermal analysis has been made of the control rods and other steel structures around the core to find the coolant flow rates (bypass flow) necessary to cool them to their safe operating temperatures. Calculations showed that adequate cooling could be achieved in the Mark-III Core by the bypass flow of 8% of the total reactor coolant flow, 4% each for the control-rod channels and for other structures. The thermal and coolant flow design bases, including the assumption of a 10% bypass flow, were thus confirmed to first approximation. (auth.)

  4. Steel designers' handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Gorenc, Branko; Tinyou, Ron

    2012-01-01

    The Revised 7th Edition of Steel Designers' Handbook is an invaluable tool for all practising structural, civil and mechanical engineers as well as engineering students at university and TAFE in Australia and New Zealand. It has been prepared in response to changes in the design Standard AS 4100, the structural Design Actions Standards, AS /ANZ 1170, other processing Standards such as welding and coatings, updated research as well as feedback from users. This edition is based on Australian Standard (AS) 4100: 1998 and subsequent amendments. The worked numerical examples in the book have been e

  5. The industrial ecology of steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Considine, Timothy J.; Jablonowski, Christopher; Considine, Donita M.M.; Rao, Prasad G.

    2001-03-26

    This study performs an integrated assessment of new technology adoption in the steel industry. New coke, iron, and steel production technologies are discussed, and their economic and environmental characteristics are compared. Based upon detailed plant level data on cost and physical input-output relations by process, this study develops a simple mathematical optimization model of steel process choice. This model is then expanded to a life cycle context, accounting for environmental emissions generated during the production and transportation of energy and material inputs into steelmaking. This life-cycle optimization model provides a basis for evaluating the environmental impacts of existing and new iron and steel technologies. Five different plant configurations are examined, from conventional integrated steel production to completely scrap-based operations. Two cost criteria are used to evaluate technology choice: private and social cost, with the latter including the environmental damages associated with emissions. While scrap-based technologies clearly generate lower emissions in mass terms, their emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides are significantly higher. Using conventional damage cost estimates reported in the literature suggests that the social costs associated with scrap-based steel production are slightly higher than with integrated steel production. This suggests that adopting a life-cycle viewpoint can substantially affect environmental assessment of new technologies. Finally, this study also examines the impacts of carbon taxes on steel production costs and technology choice.

  6. Stainless steels low temperature nitriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, T.; Darbeida, A.; Von Stebut, J.; Michel, H.; Lebrun, J.P.; Hertz, D.

    1995-01-01

    Nitrogen ions implantation of 316L stainless steel leads to monophasic diffusion layers, which are constituted of a solid solution (γ N ) fcc, metastable, nitrogen sur-saturated, and without order. This article shows that for 316L stainless steels,these layers improve the tribological properties without degradation of the corrosion resistance. (A.B.). 13 refs. 6 figs

  7. Metadynamic recrystallization in C steels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    EN24 and EN2 steels, a drop from 4000 s to 6 s for similar temperature rise was observed. Metadynamic ... carbon–manganese or silicon–manganese steels, but stops after a reduction at ... growth by strain-induced grain boundary migration;.

  8. Mechanics in Steels through Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tirumalasetty, G.K.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the study consolidated in this thesis is to understand the mechanics in steels using microscopy. In particular, the mechanical response of Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels is correlated with their microstructures. Chapter 1 introduces the current state of the art of TRIP

  9. A Tale of Wootz Steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    manufacture of steel in south India by a crucible process at ... indicates that the production of wootz steel was almost on an industrial scale in ... in an Age of Design marked by ... The Russian Anasoff also studied the process of manufacturing.

  10. Irradiation creep in ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandermeulen, W.; Bremaecker, A. de; Burbure, S. de; Huet, J.J.; Asbroeck, P. van

    Pressurized and non-pressurized capsules of several ferritic steels have been irradiated in Rapsodie between 400 and 500 0 C up to 3.7 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E>0.1 MeV). Results of the diameter measurements are presented and show that the total in-pile deformation is lower than for austenitic steels

  11. Steel structures for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    In the guide the requirements concerning design and fabrication of steel structures for nuclear facilities and documents to be submitted to the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) are presented. Furthermore, regulations concerning inspection of steel structures during construction of nuclear facilities and during their operation are set forth

  12. Steel septum magnets for the LHC beam injection and extraction

    CERN Document Server

    Bidon, S; Guinand, M; Gyr, Marcel; Sassowsky, M; Weisse, E; Weterings, W; Abramov, A; Ivanenko, A I; Kolatcheva, E; Lapyguina, O; Ludmirsky, E; Mishina, N; Podlesny, P; Riabov, A; Tyurin, N

    2002-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be a superconducting accelerator and collider to be installed in the existing underground LEP ring tunnel at CERN. It will provide proton-proton collisions with a centre of mass energy of 14 TeV. The proton beams coming from the SPS will be injected into the LHC at 450 GeV by vertically deflecting kicker magnets and horizontally deflecting steel septum magnets (MSI). The proton beams will be dumped from the LHC with the help of two extraction systems comprising horizontally deflecting kicker magnets and vertically deflecting steel septum magnets (MSD). The MSI and MSD septa are laminated iron-dominated magnets using an all welded construction. The yokes are constructed from two different half cores, called coil core and septum core. The septum cores comprise circular holes for the circulating beams. This avoids the need for careful alignment of the usually wedge-shaped septum blades used in classical Lambertson magnets. The MSI and MSD septum magnets were designed and buil...

  13. Earth's inner core: Innermost inner core or hemispherical variations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lythgoe, K. H.; Deuss, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412396610; Rudge, J. F.; Neufeld, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of Earth's deep inner core has important implications for core evolution, since it is thought to be related to the early stages of core formation. Previous studies have suggested that there exists an innermost inner core with distinct anisotropy relative to the rest of the inner core.

  14. Dependence of Core and Extended Flux on Core Dominance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Based on two extragalactic radio source samples, the core dominance parameter is calculated, and the correlations between the core/extended flux density and core dominance parameter are investi- gated. When the core dominance parameter is lower than unity, it is linearly correlated with the core flux density, ...

  15. Korrelasjon mellom core styrke, core stabilitet og utholdende styrke i core

    OpenAIRE

    Berg-Olsen, Andrea Marie; Fugelsøy, Eivor; Maurstad, Ann-Louise

    2010-01-01

    Formålet med studien var å se hvilke korrelasjon det er mellom core styrke, core stabilitet og utholdende styrke i core. Testingen bestod av tre hoveddeler hvor vi testet core styrke, core stabilitet og utholdende styrke i core. Innenfor core styrke og utholdende styrke i core ble tre ulike tester utført. Ved måling av core stabilitet ble det gjennomført kun en test. I core styrke ble isometrisk abdominal fleksjon, isometrisk rygg ekstensjon og isometrisk lateral fleksjon testet. Sit-ups p...

  16. Windscale pile core surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, R.F.; Mathews, R.F.

    1996-01-01

    The two Windscale Piles were closed down, defueled as far as possible and mothballed for thirty years following a fire in the core of Pile 1 in 1957 resulting from the spontaneous release of stored Wigner energy in the graphite moderator. Decommissioning of the reactors commenced in 1987 and has reached the stage where the condition of both cores needs to be determined. To this end, non-intrusive and intrusive surveys and sampling of the cores have been planned and partly implemented. The objectives for each Pile differ slightly. The location and quantity of fuel remaining in the damaged core of Pile 1 needed to be established, whereas the removal of all fuel from Pile 2 needed to be confirmed. In Pile 1, the possible existence of a void in the core is to be explored and in Pile 2, the level of Wigner energy remaining required to be quantified. Levels of radioactivity in both cores needed to be measured. The planning of the surveys is described including strategy, design, safety case preparation and the remote handling and viewing equipment required to carry out the inspection, sampling and monitoring work. The results from the completed non-intrusive survey of Pile 2 are summarised. They confirm that the core is empty and the graphite is in good condition. The survey of Pile 1 has just started. (UK)

  17. Steels from materials science to structural engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Sha, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Steels and computer-based modelling are fast growing fields in materials science as well as structural engineering, demonstrated by the large amount of recent literature. Steels: From Materials Science to Structural Engineering combines steels research and model development, including the application of modelling techniques in steels.  The latest research includes structural engineering modelling, and novel, prototype alloy steels such as heat-resistant steel, nitride-strengthened ferritic/martensitic steel and low nickel maraging steel.  Researchers studying steels will find the topics vital to their work.  Materials experts will be able to learn about steels used in structural engineering as well as modelling and apply this increasingly important technique in their steel materials research and development. 

  18. Comparison of Magnetic Characteristics of Powder Magnetic Core and Evaluation of Motor Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Yuji; Ito, Motoya; Masaki, Ryozo; Yamazaki, Katsuyuki; Asaka, Kazuo; Ishihara, Chio; Ohiwa, Syoji

    A magnetic characteristic measurement, a motor characteristic forecast, and an experimental evaluation of various powder magnetic cores were performed aiming at a fixed quantity grasp when the powder magnetic core was applied to the motor core as the magnetic material. The manufacturing conditions were changed, and magnetic characteristic compares a direct current magnetization characteristic and an iron disadvantageous characteristic with the silicon steel board for a different powder magnetic core. Therefore, though some permeabilities are low, characteristics almost equal to those of a silicon steel board were obtained in the maximum saturation magnetic induction, which confirms that the powder magnetic core in disadvantageous iron in a certain frequency domain, and to confirm disadvantageous iron lowers. Moreover, it has been shown to obtain characteristics almost equal to the silicon steel board when compared in terms of motor efficiency, though some disadvantageous iron increases since the effect when applying to the motor is verified the silicon steel board and the comparison evaluation for the surface type permanent magnet motor.

  19. Performance of single wire earth return transformers with amorphous alloy core in a rural electric energy distribution system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedito Antonio Luciano

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper are presented some considerations about the performance of single wire earth return amorphous alloy core transformers in comparison with conventional silicon steel sheets cores transformers used in rural electric energy distribution network. It has been recognized that amorphous metal core transformers improve electrical power distribution efficiency by reducing transformer core losses. This reduction is due to some electromagnetic properties of the amorphous alloys such as: high magnetic permeability, high resistivity, and low coercivity. Experimental results obtained with some single-phase, 60 Hz, 5 kVA amorphous core transformers installed in a rural area electric distribution system in Northern Brazil have been confirming their superior performance in comparison to identical nominal rated transformers built with conventional silicon steel cores, particularly with regard to the excitation power and to the no-load losses.

  20. IGCSE core mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Wall, Terry

    2013-01-01

    Give your core level students the support and framework they require to get their best grades with this book dedicated to the core level content of the revised syllabus and written specifically to ensure a more appropriate pace. This title has been written for Core content of the revised Cambridge IGCSE Mathematics (0580) syllabus for first teaching from 2013. ? Gives students the practice they require to deepen their understanding through plenty of practice questions. ? Consolidates learning with unique digital resources on the CD, included free with every book. We are working with Cambridge

  1. Nanoprecipitation in bearing steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrow, A.T.W.; Rivera-Diaz-del-Castillo, P.E.J.

    2011-01-01

    θ-phase is the main hardening species in bearing steels and appears in both martensitically and bainitically hardened microstructures. This work presents a survey of the microstrucural features accompanying nanoprecipitation in bearing steels. Nanoprecipitate structures formed in 1C-1.5Cr wt.% with additions of Cr, Mn, Mo, Si and Ni are studied. The work is combined with thermodynamic calculations and neural networks to predict the expected matrix composition, and whether this will transform martensitically or bainitically. Martensite tetragonality, composition and the amount of retained austenite are related to hardness and the type of nanoprecipitate structures in martensitic grades. The θ-phase volume fraction, the duration of the bainite to austenite transformation and the amount of retained austenite are related to hardness and a detailed quantitative description of the precipitate nanostructures. Such description includes compositional studies using energy-dispersive spectroscopy, which shows that nanoprecipitate formation takes place under paraequilibrium. Special attention is devoted to a novel two-step bainite tempering process which shows maximum hardness; we prove that this is the most effective process for incorporating solute into the precipitates, which are finer than those resulting from one-step banitic transformation processes.

  2. Coolant compatibility studies. The effect of irradiation on tensile properties and stress corrosion cracking sensitivity of martensitic steels. MANET 4 - complementary studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nystrand, A.C.

    1994-02-01

    Tensile and stress corrosion cracking tests have been carried out on MANET-type (1.4914 and FV448) and reduced activation (LA12TaLC) high-chromium martensitic steels. The materials had previously been exposed up to 5000 h at ∼275 degrees C in the core, above the core and remote from the core of a high pressure water loop in the Studsvik R2 reactor. After the mechanical testing the materials were examined visually and metallographically. The steel samples exposed in the core section showed large increases in tensile yield strengths when tested at 250 degrees C. However, the magnitude of the radiation hardening was considerably smaller in the reduced activation steel compared to the commercial steels; this observation is consistent with published data on other high-chromium martensitic steels and is associated with the lower chromium content of the LA12TaLC steel (8.9%) compared with those of the commercial steels (10.6 and 11.3%). Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) was not detected in any of the stressed steel samples after autoclave testing for times up to 1500 h at 250 degrees C in air-saturated high purity water. This apparent resistance to IASCC may be due to the high chromium martensitic steels not being sensitized by the irradiation in a comparable manner to that shown by the austenitic steels. However, additional studies are required to clarify some of the existing uncertainties with respect to IASCC of these martensitic steels

  3. Connections: Superplasticity, Damascus Steels, Laminated Steels, and Carbon Dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsworth, Jeffrey

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a description is given of the connections that evolved from the initial development of a family of superplastic plain carbon steels that came to be known as Ultra-High Carbon Steels (UHCS). It was observed that their very high carbon contents were similar, if not identical, to those of Damascus steels. There followed a series of attempts to rediscover how the famous patterns found on Damascus steels blades were formed. At the same time, in order to improve the toughness at room temperature of the newly-developed UHCS, laminated composites were made of alternating layers of UHCS and mild steel (and subsequently other steels and other metals). This led to a study of ancient laminated composites, the motives for their manufacture, and the plausibility of some of the claims relating to the number of layers in the final blades. One apparently ancient laminated composite, recovered in 1837 from the great pyramid of Giza which was constructed in about 2750 B.C., stimulated a carbon dating study of ancient steels. The modern interest in "Bladesmithing" has connections back to many of these ancient weapons.

  4. Heterogeneous gas core reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, N.J.; Dugan, E.T.

    1983-01-01

    A heterogeneous gas core nuclear reactor is disclosed comprising a core barrel provided interiorly with an array of moderator-containing tubes and being otherwise filled with a fissile and/or fertile gaseous fuel medium. The fuel medium may be flowed through the chamber and through an external circuit in which heat is extracted. The moderator may be a fluid which is flowed through the tubes and through an external circuit in which heat is extracted. The moderator may be a solid which may be cooled by a fluid flowing within the tubes and through an external heat extraction circuit. The core barrel is surrounded by moderator/coolant material. Fissionable blanket material may be disposed inwardly or outwardly of the core barrel

  5. iPSC Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSC) Core was created in 2011 to accelerate stem cell research in the NHLBI by providing investigators consultation, technical...

  6. Core Flight Software

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The AES Core Flight Software (CFS) project purpose is to analyze applicability, and evolve and extend the reusability of the CFS system originally developed by...

  7. Restraint system for core elements of a reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Class, G.

    1975-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor, a core element bundle formed of a plurality of side-by-side arranged core elements is surrounded by restraining elements that exert a radially inwardly directly restraining force generating friction forces between the core elements in a restraining plane that is transverse to the core element axes. The adjoining core elements are in rolling contact with one another in the restraining plane by virtue of rolling-type bearing elements supported in the core elements. (Official Gazette)

  8. Heterogeneous gas core reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, K.I.

    1977-01-01

    Preliminary investigations of a heterogeneous gas core reactor (HGCR) concept suggest that this potential power reactor offers distinct advantages over other existing or conceptual reactor power plants. One of the most favorable features of the HGCR is the flexibility of the power producing system which allows it to be efficiently designed to conform to a desired optimum condition without major conceptual changes. The arrangement of bundles of moderator/coolant channels in a fissionable gas or mixture of gases makes a truly heterogeneous nuclear reactor core. It is this full heterogeneity for a gas-fueled reactor core which accounts for the novelty of the heterogeneous gas core reactor concept and leads to noted significant advantages over previous gas core systems with respect to neutron and fuel economy, power density, and heat transfer characteristics. The purpose of this work is to provide an insight into the design, operating characteristics, and safety of a heterogeneous gas core reactor system. The studies consist mainly of neutronic, energetic and kinetic analyses of the power producing and conversion systems as a preliminary assessment of the heterogeneous gas core reactor concept and basic design. The results of the conducted research indicate a high potential for the heterogeneous gas core reactor system as an electrical power generating unit (either large or small), with an overall efficiency as high as 40 to 45%. The HGCR system is found to be stable and safe, under the conditions imposed upon the analyses conducted in this work, due to the inherent safety of ann expanding gaseous fuel and the intrinsic feedback effects of the gas and water coolant

  9. Development of cutting technique of reactor core internals by CO laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, G.; Beppu, S.; Matsumoto, O.; Sakamoto, N.; Onozawa, T.; Sugihara, M.; Miya, K.

    1995-01-01

    The CO laser is superior in the absorption characteristic to materials to the CO 2 laser due to its shorter wavelength. In consideration of this characteristic Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation is studying this applicability sponsored by the Ministry of International Trade Industry of Japan to cutting of reactor core internals of commercial nuclear power plant. In decommissioning of reactor core internals it is necessary to cut stainless steel plates of 305 mm thick. The authors cut stainless steel plates of up to 310mm thick in air and those of up to 150 mm thick underwater with a 20kW class laser. Further, models simulating key structural elements of PWR core internals were cut and secondary products to clarify the applicability of the CO laser cutting to reactor core internals were evaluated. (author)

  10. FBR type reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamiya, Tadashi; Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Fujimura, Koji; Murakami, Tomoko.

    1995-01-01

    Neutron reflectors are disposed at the periphery of a reactor core fuel region and a blanket region, and a neutron shielding region is disposed at the periphery of them. The neutron reflector has a hollow duct structure having a sealed upper portion, a lower portion opened to cooling water, in which a gas and coolants separately sealed in the inside thereof. A driving pressure of a primary recycling pump is lowered upon reduction of coolant flow rate, then the liquid level of coolants in the neutron reflector is lowered due to imbalance between the driving pressure and a gas pressure, so that coolants having an effect as a reflector are eliminated from the outer circumference of the reactor core. Therefore, the amount of neutrons leaking from the reactor core is increased, and negative reactivity is charged to the reactor core. The negative reactivity of the neutron reflector is made greater than a power compensation reactivity. Since this enables reactor scram by using an inherent performance of the reactor core, the reactor core safety of an LMFBR-type reactor can be improved. (I.N.)

  11. The earths innermost core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanda, J.N.

    1989-01-01

    A new earth model is advanced with a solid innermost core at the centre of the Earth where elements heavier than iron, over and above what can be retained in solution in the iron core, are collected. The innermost core is separated from the solid iron-nickel core by a shell of liquid copper. The innermost core has a natural vibration measured on the earth's surface as the long period 26 seconds microseisms. The earth was formed initially as a liquid sphere with a relatively thin solid crust above the Byerly discontinuity. The trace elements that entered the innermost core amounted to only 0.925 ppm of the molten mass. Gravitational differentiation must have led to the separation of an explosive thickness of pure 235 U causing a fission explosion that could expel beyond the Roche limit a crustal scab which would form the centre piece of the moon. A reservoir of helium floats on the liquid copper. A small proportion of helium-3, a relic of the ancient fission explosion present there will spell the exciting magnetic field. The field is stable for thousands of years because of the presence of large quantity of helium-4 which accounts for most of the gaseous collisions that will not disturb the atomic spin of helium-3 atoms. This field is prone to sudden reversals after long periods of stability. (author). 14 refs

  12. Occupational Profiles in the European Steel Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Hans-Werner; And Others

    The steel industry in Europe has faced great changes, with resulting layoffs and restructuring. Now that the most basic changes seem to be over, it has become evident that the remaining steel industry requires more highly trained workers than was the case previously. Although steel maintenance employees were always highly skilled, steel production…

  13. Development of martensitic steels for high neutron damage applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1998-01-01

    Martensitic stainless steels have been developed for both in-core applications in advanced liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR) and for first wall and structural materials applications for commercial fusion reactors. It can now be shown that these steels can be expected to maintain properties to levels as high as 175 or 200 dpa, respectively. The 12Cr-1Mo-0.5W-0.2C alloy HT-9 has been extensively tested for LMFBR applications and shown to resist radiation damage, providing a creep and swelling resistant alternative to austenitic steels. Degradation of fracture toughness and Charpy impact properties have been observed, but properties are sufficient to provide reliable service. In comparison, alloys with lower chromium contents are found to decarburize in contact with liquid sodium and are therefore not recommended. Tungsten stabilized martensitic stainless steels have appropriate properties for fusion applications. Radioactivity levels are being less than 500 years after service, radiation damage resistance is excellent, including impact properties, and swelling is modest. This report describes the history of the development effort. (author)

  14. Development of martensitic steels for high neutron damage applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelles, D. S.

    1996-12-01

    Martensitic stainless steels have been developed for both in-core applications in advanced liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR) and for first wall and structural materials applications for commercial fusion reactors. It can now be shown that these steels can be expected to maintain properties to levels as high as 175 or 200 dpa, respectively. The 12Cr1Mo0.5W0.2C alloy HT-9 has been extensively tested for LMFBR applications and shown to resist radiation damage, providing a creep and swelling resistant alternative to austenitic steels. Degradation of fracture toughness and Charpy impact properties have been observed, but properties are sufficient to provide reliable service. In comparison, alloys with lower chromium contents are found to decarburize in contact with liquid sodium and are therefore not recommended. Tungsten stabilized martensitic stainless steels have appropriate properties for fusion applications. Radioactivity levels are benign less than 500 years after service, radiation damage resistance is excellent, including impact properties, and swelling is modest. This report describes the history of the development effort.

  15. Behavior of stainless steels in pressurized water reactor primary circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Féron, D.; Herms, E.; Tanguy, B.

    2012-01-01

    Stainless steels are widely used in primary circuits of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Operating experience with the various grades of stainless steels over several decades of years has generally been excellent. Nevertheless, stress corrosion failures have been reported in few cases. Two main factors contributing to SCC susceptibility enhancement are investigated in this study: cold work and irradiation. Irradiation is involved in the stress corrosion cracking and corrosion of in-core reactor components in PWR environment. Irradiated assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a complex and multi-physics phenomenon for which a predictive modeling able to describe initiation and/or propagation is not yet achieved. Experimentally, development of initiation smart tests and of in situ instrumentation, also in nuclear reactors, is an important axis in order to gain a better understanding of IASCC kinetics. A strong susceptibility for SCC of heavily cold worked austenitic stainless steels is evidenced in hydrogenated primary water typical of PWRs. It is shown that for a given cold-working procedure, SCC susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels materials increases with increasing cold-work. Results have shown also strong influences of the cold work on the oxide layer composition and of the maximum stress on the time to fracture.

  16. Electrochemical Performance of Low-Carbon Steel in Alkaline Model Solutions Containing Hybrid Aggregates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.; Hu, J.; De Wit, J.H.W.; Boshkov, N.; Radeva, T.; Milkova, V.; Van Breugel, K.

    2010-01-01

    This work reports on the electrochemical performance of low-carbon steel electrodes in model alkaline solutions in the presence of 4.9.10-4 g/l hybrid aggregates i.e. cement extract, containing PDADMAC (poly (diallyl, dimethyl ammonium chloride) / PAA (Poly (acrylic acid)/ PDADMAC over a CaO core.

  17. Strategy of Cooling Parameters Selection in the Continuous Casting of Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falkus J.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a strategy of the cooling parameters selection in the process of continuous steel casting. Industrial tests were performed at a slab casting machine at the Arcelor Mittal Poland Unit in Krakow. The tests covered 55 heats for 7 various steel grades. Based on the existing casting technology a numerical model of the continuous steel casting process was formulated. The numerical calculations were performed for three casting speeds - 0.6, 0.8 and 1 m min-1. An algorithm was presented that allows us to compute the values of the heat transfer coefficients for the secondary cooling zone. The correctness of the cooling parameter strategy was evaluated by inspecting the shell thickness, the length of the liquid core and the strand surface temperature. The ProCAST software package was used to construct the numerical model of continuous casting of steel.

  18. Application of noise analysis to investigate core degradation process during PHEBUS-FPT1 test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguma, Ritsuo

    1997-01-01

    Noise analysis has been performed for measurement data obtained during PHEBUS-FPT1 test. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the applicability of the noise analysis to the following problems: To get more knowledge about the physical processes going on during severe core conditions; To better understand the core melting process; To establish appropriate on-line shut-down data. Results of the study indicate that the noise analysis is quite promising as a tool for investigating physical processes during the experiment. Compared with conventional approach of evaluating the signal's mean value behaviour, the noise analysis can provide additional, more detailed information: It was found that the neutron flux signal is subjected to additional reactivity perturbations in conjunction with fuel melting and relocation. This can easily be detected by applying noise analysis for the neutron flux signal. It has been demonstrated that the method developed in the present study can provide more accurate estimates of the onset of fuel relocation than using temperature signals from thermocouples in the thermal shroud. Moreover, the result suggests a potential of the present method for tracking the whole process of relocation. The result of the data analysis suggests a possibility of sensor diagnostics which may be important for confirming the quality and reliability of the recorded data. Based on the results achieved it is believed that the combined use of noise analysis and thermocouple signals will provide reliable shut-down criteria for the experiment. 8 refs

  19. Methods of making bainitic steel materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakas, Michael Paul; Chu, Henry Shiu-Hung; Zagula, Thomas Andrew; Langhorst, Benjamin Robert

    2018-01-16

    Methods of making bainitic steels may involve austenitizing a quantity of steel by exposing the quantity of steel to a first temperature. A composition of the quantity of steel may be configured to impede formation of non-bainite ferrite, pearlite, and Widmanstatten ferrite. The quantity of steel may be heat-treated to form bainite by exposing the quantity of steel to a second, lower temperature. The second, lower temperature may be stabilized by exposing the quantity of steel to the second, lower temperature in the presence of a thermal ballast.

  20. Stahlschüssel key to steel

    CERN Document Server

    Wegst, W S

    2016-01-01

    The Key to Steel (Stahlschlüssel/Stahlschluessel) cross reference book will help you to decode / decipher steel designations and find equivalent materials worldwide. The 2016 edition includes more than 70,000 standard designations and trade names from approximately 300 steelmakers and suppliers. Presentation is trilingual: English, French, and German. Materials covered include structural steels, tool steels, valve steels, high temperature steels and alloys, stainless and heat-resisting steels, and more. Standards and designations from 25 countries are cross-referenced.

  1. Advanced steel reheat furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyeda, D.; Sheldon, M.; Koppang, R. [Energy and Environmental Research Corp., Irvine, CA (United States); Lanyi, M.; Li, X.; Eleazer, B. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Energy and Environmental Research Corp. (EER) under a contract from the Department of Energy is pursuing the development and demonstration of an Advanced Steel Reheating Furnace. This paper reports the results of Phase 1, Research, which has evaluated an advanced furnace concept incorporating two proven and commercialized technologies previously applied to other high temperature combustion applications: EER`s gas reburn technology (GR) for post combustion NOx control; and Air Product`s oxy-fuel enrichment air (OEA) for improved flame heat transfer in the heating zones of the furnace. The combined technologies feature greater production throughput with associated furnace efficiency improvements; lowered NOx emissions; and better control over the furnace atmosphere, whether oxidizing or reducing, leading to better control over surface finish.

  2. Stainless steel decontamination manipulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Three, large-volume coverage manipulator systems were designed and built for the Defense Water Processing Facility at the Savannah River Laboratory. These stainless steel systems will be used for high-pressure spray decontamination of waste containers and large process equipment modules. Each system has a manipulator arm, folding boom, and vertical drive and guide structure. Handling capacity is 45 kg, horizontal reach is 4.6 m with a 180-deg swing motion, and the vertical travel is 6 m. The system is remotely removable and replaceable in modules using an overhead crane and an impact wrench. The manipulator arm has seven motions: Shoulder rotation and pivot, elbow pivot, wrist pivot and rotation, and grip open-close. All motions are variable speed and are slip-clutch protected to prevent overloading from external forces (collisions)

  3. Steel containment buckling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, T.A.; Baker, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    Two aspects of buckling of a free-standing nuclear containment building were investigated in a combined experimental and analytical program. In the first part of the study, the response of a scale model of a containment building to dynamic base excitation is investigated. A simple harmonic signal was used for preliminary studies followed by experiments with scaled earthquake signals as the excitation source. The experiments and accompanying analyses indicate that the scale model response to earthquake-type excitations is very complex and that current analytical methods may require that a dynamic capacity reduction factor be incorporated. The second part of the study quantified the effects of framing at large penetrations on the static buckling capacity of scale model containments. Results show little effect from the framing for the scale models constructed from the polycarbonate, Lexan. However, additional studies with a model constructed of the prototypic steel material are recommended. (orig.)

  4. Cold-formed steel design

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Wei-Wen

    2010-01-01

    The definitive text in the field, thoroughly updated and expanded Hailed by professionals around the world as the definitive text on the subject, Cold-Formed Steel Design is an indispensable resource for all who design for and work with cold-formed steel. No other book provides such exhaustive coverage of both the theory and practice of cold-formed steel construction. Updated and expanded to reflect all the important developments that have occurred in the field over the past decade, this Fourth Edition of the classic text provides you with more of the detailed, up-to-the-minute techni

  5. Micropurity in stainless steel making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motloch, Z.

    1981-01-01

    New technologies were developed by the Vitkovice research institutes in response to high requirements for the quality of high-alloy steels for nuclear power, viz., duplex technology with double vacuum degassing at the DH unit and oxidation vacuum degassing using the VAKUVIT equipment. The steel produced shows low contents of impurities and high micropurity. A study was conducted into changes in carbon content and the formation of titanium nitrides and carbonitrides in austenitic steels during their production, and optimum technological parameters were found for eliminating their formation in forgings. (author)

  6. Steel fiber replacement of mild steel in prestressed concrete beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    In traditional prestressed concrete beams, longitudinal prestressed tendons serve to resist bending moment and : transverse mild steel bars (or stirrups) are used to carry shear forces. However, traditional prestressed concrete I-beams : exhibit earl...

  7. Steel fiber replacement of mild steel in prestressed concrete beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    In traditional prestressed concrete beams, longitudinal prestressed tendons serve to resist bending moment and transverse mild : steel bars (or stirrups) are used to carry shear forces. However, traditional prestressed concrete I-beams exhibit early-...

  8. [The Steel factor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres-Cortés, J R

    1997-01-01

    Mice bearing mutations at either of two loci, dominant White spotting(W) or Steel(Sl), exhibit development defects in hematopoietic, melanocytic and germ cells. Genetics studies have shown that the SI locus encodes the Steel factor (SF), which is the ligand for the tyrosine kinase receptor c-kit, the product of the W locus. SF is synthesized in membrane-bound form and can be processed to produce a soluble form. Cell-cell interaction is important in the production of normal blood cells in vivo and in vitro and in the cellular expansion of leukemic cells. We discuss here how SF decreases the requirements in cell interaction for blast colony formation in acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) and the presence of membrane-bound SF possibly contributes to the density-dependent growth of the AML blasts. We explain that SF is mainly a survival factor for hematopoietic cells, of little proliferative effect, which maintains CD34+ hematopoietic cells in an undifferentiated state. These properties would potentially allow the maintenance of hematopoietic cells in culture for the purpose of marrow purging or gene therapy. The activation of the c-kit signal transduction pathway may play a significant role in the development of many types of non-hematological malignancies by disrupting normal cell-cell interactions and allowing the growth of cancer cell populations. In summary, the properties of the SF indicate it has a role for survival signals during the process of normal differentiation, AML proliferation and in the maintenance of many c-kit+ tumors.

  9. 2169 steel waveform experiments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furnish, Michael David; Alexander, C. Scott; Reinhart, William Dodd; Brown, Justin L.

    2012-11-01

    In support of LLNL efforts to develop multiscale models of a variety of materials, we have performed a set of eight gas gun impact experiments on 2169 steel (21% Cr, 6% Ni, 9% Mn, balance predominantly Fe). These experiments provided carefully controlled shock, reshock and release velocimetry data, with initial shock stresses ranging from 10 to 50 GPa (particle velocities from 0.25 to 1.05 km/s). Both windowed and free-surface measurements were included in this experiment set to increase the utility of the data set, as were samples ranging in thickness from 1 to 5 mm. Target physical phenomena included the elastic/plastic transition (Hugoniot elastic limit), the Hugoniot, any phase transition phenomena, and the release path (windowed and free-surface). The Hugoniot was found to be nearly linear, with no indications of the Fe phase transition. Releases were non-hysteretic, and relatively consistent between 3- and 5-mmthick samples (the 3 mm samples giving slightly lower wavespeeds on release). Reshock tests with explosively welded impactors produced clean results; those with glue bonds showed transient releases prior to the arrival of the reshock, reducing their usefulness for deriving strength information. The free-surface samples, which were steps on a single piece of steel, showed lower wavespeeds for thin (1 mm) samples than for thicker (2 or 4 mm) samples. A configuration used for the last three shots allows release information to be determined from these free surface samples. The sample strength appears to increase with stress from ~1 GPa to ~ 3 GPa over this range, consistent with other recent work but about 40% above the Steinberg model.

  10. Test report for core drilling ignitability testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witwer, K.S.

    1996-01-01

    Testing was carried out with the cooperation of Westinghouse Hanford Company and the United States Bureau of Mines at the Pittsburgh Research Center in Pennsylvania under the Memorandum of Agreement 14- 09-0050-3666. Several core drilling equipment items, specifically those which can come in contact with flammable gasses while drilling into some waste tanks, were tested under conditions similar to actual field sampling conditions. Rotary drilling against steel and rock as well as drop testing of several different pieces of equipment in a flammable gas environment were the specific items addressed. The test items completed either caused no ignition of the gas mixture, or, after having hardware changes or drilling parameters modified, produced no ignition in repeat testing

  11. Core test reactor shield cooling system analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, E.M.; Elliott, R.D.

    1971-01-01

    System requirements for cooling the shield within the vacuum vessel for the core test reactor are analyzed. The total heat to be removed by the coolant system is less than 22,700 Btu/hr, with an additional 4600 Btu/hr to be removed by the 2-inch thick steel plate below the shield. The maximum temperature of the concrete in the shield can be kept below 200 0 F if the shield plug walls are kept below 160 0 F. The walls of the two ''donut'' shaped shield segments, which are cooled by the water from the shield and vessel cooling system, should operate below 95 0 F. The walls of the center plug, which are cooled with nitrogen, should operate below 100 0 F. (U.S.)

  12. An Investigation of the Mechanical Properties of a Weldment of 7% Nickel Alloy Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Yeol Park

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, the demand for natural gas has steadily increased for the prevention of environmental pollution. For this reason, many liquefied natural gas (LNG carriers have been manufactured. Since one of the most important issues in the design of LNG carriers is to guarantee structural safety, the use of low-temperature materials is increasing. Among commonly employed low-temperature materials, nickel steel has many benefits such as good strength and outstanding corrosion resistance. Accordingly, nickel steels are one of the most commonly used low-temperature steels for LNG storage tanks. However, the study of fracture toughness with various welding consumables of 7% nickel alloy steel is insufficient for ensuring the structural safety of LNG storage tanks. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate fracture toughness of several different weldments for 7% nickel alloy steels. The weldment of 7% nickel alloy steel was fabricated by tungsten inert gas (TIG, flux cored arc welding (FCAW, and gas metal arc welding (GMAW. In order to assess the material performance of the weldments at low temperature, fracture toughness such as crack tip opening displacement (CTOD and the absorbed impact energy of weldments were compared with those of 9% nickel steel weldments.

  13. Effects of welding on toughness of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, W. S.; Kim, S. H.; Yoon, J. H.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear energy is being seriously considered to meet the increasing demand for a world-wide energy supply without environmental effects. Generation IV reactors are being developed to produce a reliable energy safely and with an economic benefit. Since these new reactors require an elevated temperature, ferritic/martensitic steels are attracting attention as candidate materials for the reactor vessel of a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) and the cladding of a sodium fast reactor (SFR,) due to their high strength and thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion, and good resistance to corrosion. in recent years, new ferritic/martensitic steels have been developed for ultra supercritical fossil power plants. Advanced technologies for a steel fabrication have improved the elevated temperature properties of ferritic/martensitic steels to make them comparable with austenitic stainless steels. The microstructural stability of the pressure vessel, cladding and core structural materials of the VHTR and SCWR is very important. Welding process affects the microstructure and residual stress, so the toughness of ferritic/martensitic steels decreases in general. In this paper; Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel is welded by SMAW with V-groove, and the effects of welding on tensile and impact properties are evaluated. The upper self energy of the weldment was only 57% of that of the base metal, and the DBTT T 41J and T 68J index temperatures of the weldment were higher than those of the base metal by 17 deg. C, 38 deg. C and 37 deg. C, respectively. (authors)

  14. 54Mn release from LMFBR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polley, M.V.

    1976-10-01

    The inventory of 54 Mn per unit exposed area of stainless steel in LMFBR cores may be calculated using a formula originally derived at HEDL. This treats the simultaneous production by activation and release by corrosion and diffusion of 54 Mn and assumes that the concentration at the steel surface is zero. The inventory per unit exposed area is calculated as a function of temperature and is compared with that calculated simply by assuming stoichiometric corrosion. An effective diffusion coefficient is used in the calculations which include contributions from both lattice and grain boundary diffusion. A general relationship is derived for the effective diffusion coefficient and it is shown how values may be obtained using the Levine-MacCallum and the Fisher theories of grain boundary diffusion. Values of the lattice diffusion coefficient were obtained by analysing data obtained from sodium loop experiments. The effect on the inventory due to the possible formation of a ferrite layers on the exposed surface is discussed and it is also shown how the inventory over several fuel cycles may be calculated. (U.K.)

  15. Modeling of melt retention in EU-APR1400 ex-vessel core catcher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granovsky, V. S.; Sulatsky, A. A.; Khabensky, V. B.; Sulatskaya, M. B. [Alexandrov Research Inst. of Technology NITI, Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation); Gusarov, V. V.; Almyashev, V. I.; Komlev, A. A. [Saint Petersburg State Technological Univ. SPbSTU, St.Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bechta, S. [KTH, Stockholm (Sweden); Kim, Y. S. [KHNP, 1312 Gil 70, Yuseongdaero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, R. J.; Kim, H. Y.; Song, J. H. [KAERI, 989 Gil 111, Daedeokdaero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01

    A core catcher is adopted in the EU-APR1400 reactor design for management and mitigation of severe accidents with reactor core melting. The core catcher concept incorporates a number of engineering solutions used in the catcher designs of European EPR and Russian WER-1000 reactors, such as thin-layer corium spreading for better cooling, retention of the melt in a water-cooled steel vessel, and use of sacrificial material (SM) to control the melt properties. SM is one of the key elements of the catcher design and its performance is critical for melt retention efficiency. This SM consists of oxide components, but the core catcher also includes sacrificial steel which reacts with the metal melt of the molten corium to reduce its temperature. The paper describes the required properties of SM. The melt retention capability of the core catcher can be confirmed by modeling the heat fluxes to the catcher vessel to show that it will not fail. The fulfillment of this requirement is demonstrated on the example of LBLOCA severe accident. Thermal and physicochemical interactions between the oxide and metal melts, interactions of the melts with SM, sacrificial steel and vessel, core catcher external cooling by water and release of non-condensable gases are modeled. (authors)

  16. Reactor core control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Hiroki

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a reactor core control device, in which switching from a manual operation to an automatic operation, and the control for the parameter of an automatic operation device are facilitated. Namely, the hysteresis of the control for the operation parameter by an manual operation input means is stored. The hysteresis of the control for the operation parameter is collected. The state of the reactor core simulated by an operation control to which the collected operation parameters are manually inputted is determined as an input of the reactor core state to the automatic input means. The record of operation upon manual operation is stored as a hysteresis of control for the operation parameter, but the hysteresis information is not only the result of manual operation of the operation parameter. This is results of operation conducted by a skilled operator who judge the state of the reactor core to be optimum. Accordingly, it involves information relevant to the reactor core state. Then, it is considered that the optimum automatic operation is not deviated greatly from the manual operation. (I.S.)

  17. A theoretical analysis of the response of an air-cored eddy current coil for remote oxide thickness measurements on reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.

    1979-10-01

    It is shown how the impedance of an air-cored eddy current coil in close proximity to an oxidised steel component may be calculated. Representative values were selected for the oxide thickness, lift off, operating frequency, conductivities and permeabilities of the oxide coating and steel base. The values of these parameters in the calculations were allowed to vary between suitable limits to quantify the effect of each one on coil impedance. The results of the calculations are used to determine the most suitable conditions for the measurement of oxide thickness on steel components using an air-cored eddy current probe. (author)

  18. The PWR cores management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barral, J.C.; Rippert, D.; Johner, J.

    2000-01-01

    During the meeting of the 25 january 2000, organized by the SFEN, scientists and plant operators in the domain of the PWR debated on the PWR cores management. The five first papers propose general and economic information on the PWR and also the fast neutron reactors chains in the electric power market: statistics on the electric power industry, nuclear plant unit management, the ITER project and the future of the thermonuclear fusion, the treasurer's and chairman's reports. A second part offers more technical papers concerning the PWR cores management: performance and optimization, in service load planning, the cores management in the other countries, impacts on the research and development programs. (A.L.B.)

  19. Molten core retention assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampe, R.F.

    1976-01-01

    Molten fuel produced in a core overheating accident is caught by a molten core retention assembly consisting of a horizontal baffle plate having a plurality of openings therein, heat exchange tubes having flow holes near the top thereof mounted in the openings, and a cylindrical imperforate baffle attached to the plate and surrounding the tubes. The baffle assembly is supported from the core support plate of the reactor by a plurality of hanger rods which are welded to radial beams passing under the baffle plate and intermittently welded thereto. Preferably the upper end of the cylindrical baffle terminates in an outwardly facing lip to which are welded a plurality of bearings having slots therein adapted to accept the hanger rods

  20. Core status computing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To calculate power distribution, flow rate and the like in the reactor core with high accuracy in a BWR type reactor. Constitution: Total flow rate signals, traverse incore probe (TIP) signals as the neutron detector signals, thermal power signals and pressure signals are inputted into a process computer, where the power distribution and the flow rate distribution in the reactor core are calculated. A function generator connected to the process computer calculates the absolute flow rate passing through optional fuel assemblies using, as variables, flow rate signals from the introduction part for fuel assembly flow rate signals, data signals from the introduction part for the geometrical configuration data at the flow rate measuring site of fuel assemblies, total flow rate signals for the reactor core and the signals from the process computer. Numerical values thus obtained are given to the process computer as correction signals to perform correction for the experimental data. (Moriyama, K.)

  1. Austenitic stainless steel weld inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mech, S.J.; Emmons, J.S.; Michaels, T.E.

    1978-01-01

    Analytical techniques applied to ultrasonic waveforms obtained from inspection of austenitic stainless steel welds are described. Experimental results obtained from a variety of geometric and defect reflectors are presented. Specifically, frequency analyses parameters, such as simple moments of the power spectrum, cross-correlation techniques, and adaptive learning network analysis, all represent improvements over conventional time domain analysis of ultrasonic waveforms. Results for each of these methods are presented, and the overall inspection difficulties of austenitic stainless steel welds are discussed

  2. High-strength maraging steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grachev, S.V.; Shejn, A.S.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of data on technological and operation properties of maraging steels on Fe-Cr-Ni, Fe-Ni, Fe-Cr-Co-Mo bases is given. Their advantages and drawbacks are pointed out. The scheme of strengthening heat treatment is considered. The fields of the most effective application of maraging steels for instance, for products operating under conditions of low-cycle and shock cyclic loading are mentioned

  3. Steel refining possibilities in LF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitru, M. G.; Ioana, A.; Constantin, N.; Ciobanu, F.; Pollifroni, M.

    2018-01-01

    This article presents the main possibilities for steel refining in Ladle Furnace (LF). These, are presented: steelmaking stages, steel refining through argon bottom stirring, online control of the bottom stirring, bottom stirring diagram during LF treatment of a heat, porous plug influence over the argon stirring, bottom stirring porous plug, analysis of porous plugs disposal on ladle bottom surface, bottom stirring simulation with ANSYS, bottom stirring simulation with Autodesk CFD.

  4. MICROALLOYED STEELS FOR THE AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debanshu Bhattacharya

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Two major drivers for the use of newer steels in the automotive industry are fuel efficiency and increased safety performance. Fuel efficiency is mainly a function of weight of steel parts, which in turn, is controlled by gauge and design. Safety is determined by the energy absorbing capacity of the steel used to make the part. All of these factors are incentives for the U.S. automakers to use both Highly Formable and Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS to replace the conventional steels used to manufacture automotive parts in the past. AHSS is a general term used to describe various families of steels. The most common AHSS is the dual-phase steel that consists of a ferrite-martensite microstructure. These steels are characterized by high strength, good ductility, low tensile to yield strength ratio and high bake hardenability. Another class of AHSS is the complex-phase or multi-phase steel which has a complex microstructure consisting of various phase constituents and a high yield to tensile strength ratio. Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP steels is another class of AHSS steels finding interest among the U.S. automakers. These steels consist of a ferrite-bainite microstructure with significant amount of retained austenite phase and show the highest combination of strength and elongation, so far, among the AHSS in use. High level of energy absorbing capacity combined with a sustained level of high n value up to the limit of uniform elongation as well as high bake hardenability make these steels particularly attractive for safety critical parts and parts needing complex forming. A relatively new class of AHSS is the Quenching and Partitioning (Q&P steels. These steels seem to offer higher ductility than the dual-phase steels of similar strengths or similar ductility as the TRIP steels at higher strengths. Finally, martensitic steels with very high strengths are also in use for certain parts. The most recent initiative in the area of AHSS

  5. Estimates of durability of TMI-2 core debris canisters and cask liners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Lund, A.L.; Pednekar, S.P.

    1994-04-01

    Core debris from the Three Mile Island-2 (TMI-2) reactor is currently stored in stainless steel canisters. The need to maintain the integrity of the TMI-2 core debris containers through the period of extended storage and possibly into disposal prompted this assessment. In the assessment, corrosion-induced degradation was estimated for two materials: type 304L stainless steel (SS) canisters that contain the core debris, and type 1020 carbon steel (CS) liners in the concrete casks planned for containing the canisters from 2000 AD until the TMI-2 core debris is placed in a repository. Three environments were considered: air-saturated water (with 2 ppM Cl - ) at 20 degree C, and air at 20 degree C with two relative humidities (RHs), 10 and 40%. Corrosion mechanisms assessed included general corrosion (failure criterion: 50% loss of wall thickness) and localized attack (failure criterion: through-wall pinhole penetration). Estimation of carbon steel corrosion after 50 y also was requested

  6. Analysis of Low Dose Irradiation Damages in Structural Ferritic/Martensitic Steels by Proton Irradiation and Nanoindentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waseem, Owais A.; Ryu, Ho Jin; Park, Byong Guk; Jeong, Jong Ryul; Maeng, Cheol Soo; Lee, Myoung Goo

    2016-01-01

    As a result, ferritic-martensitic steels find applications in the in-core and out-of-core components which include ducts, piping, pressure vessel and cladding, etc. Due to ferromagnetism of F/M steel, it has been successfully employed in solenoid type fuel injector. Although the irradiation induced degradation in ferritic martensitic steels is lower as compare to (i) reduced activation steels, (ii) austenitic steels and (iii) martensitic steels, F/M steels are still prone to irradiation induced hardening and void swelling. The irradiation behavior may become more sophisticated due to transmutation and production of helium and hydrogen. The ductile to brittle transition temperature of F/M steels is also expected to increase due to irradiation. These irradiation induced degradations may deteriorate the integrity of F/M components. As a result of these investigations, it has found that the F/M steels experience no irradiation hardening above 400 .deg. C, but below this temperature, up to 350 .deg. C, weak hardening is observed. The irradiation hardening becomes more pronounced below 300 .deg. C. Moreover, the irradiation hardening has also found dependent upon radiation damage. The hardening was found increasing with increasing dose. Due to pronounced irradiation hardening below 300 .deg. C and increasing radiation damage with increasing dose (even at low dpa), it is required to investigate the post irradiation mechanical properties of F/M steel, in order to confirm its usefulness in structural and magnetic components which experience lifetime doses as low as 1x10"-"5 dpa.

  7. Analysis of Low Dose Irradiation Damages in Structural Ferritic/Martensitic Steels by Proton Irradiation and Nanoindentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waseem, Owais A.; Ryu, Ho Jin; Park, Byong Guk [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jong Ryul [Chungnam University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Maeng, Cheol Soo; Lee, Myoung Goo [KEPCO, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    As a result, ferritic-martensitic steels find applications in the in-core and out-of-core components which include ducts, piping, pressure vessel and cladding, etc. Due to ferromagnetism of F/M steel, it has been successfully employed in solenoid type fuel injector. Although the irradiation induced degradation in ferritic martensitic steels is lower as compare to (i) reduced activation steels, (ii) austenitic steels and (iii) martensitic steels, F/M steels are still prone to irradiation induced hardening and void swelling. The irradiation behavior may become more sophisticated due to transmutation and production of helium and hydrogen. The ductile to brittle transition temperature of F/M steels is also expected to increase due to irradiation. These irradiation induced degradations may deteriorate the integrity of F/M components. As a result of these investigations, it has found that the F/M steels experience no irradiation hardening above 400 .deg. C, but below this temperature, up to 350 .deg. C, weak hardening is observed. The irradiation hardening becomes more pronounced below 300 .deg. C. Moreover, the irradiation hardening has also found dependent upon radiation damage. The hardening was found increasing with increasing dose. Due to pronounced irradiation hardening below 300 .deg. C and increasing radiation damage with increasing dose (even at low dpa), it is required to investigate the post irradiation mechanical properties of F/M steel, in order to confirm its usefulness in structural and magnetic components which experience lifetime doses as low as 1x10{sup -5} dpa.

  8. Importance of punching and workability in non-oriented electrical steel sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosaki, Yousuke; Mogi, Hisashi; Fujii, Hiroyasu; Kubota, Takeshi; Shiozaki, Morio

    2008-01-01

    In order to reduce energy loss in motors, the use of high-efficiency non-oriented electrical steel sheets and an optimal motor core design are important. It is also crucial to minimize the deterioration of magnetic properties during the motor core manufacturing process. Accordingly, this report evaluates the effects of cutting and clamping methods on the deterioration factors of motor cores. Magnetic properties are largely influenced by both cutting and clamping methods. While it is difficult to avoid cutting and clamping altogether, it is necessary to adopt suitable production conditions and minimize the deterioration involved

  9. TMI-2 core examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbins, R.R.; MacDonald, P.E.; Owen, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    The examination of the damaged core at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor is structured to address the following safety issues: fission product release, transport, and deposition; core coolability; containment integrity; and recriticality during severe accidents; as well as zircaloy cladding ballooning and oxidation during so-called design basis accidents. The numbers of TMI-2 components or samples to be examined, the priority of each examination, the safety issue addressed by each examination, the principal examination techniques to be employed, and the data to be obtained and the principal uses of the data are discussed in this paper

  10. Superconducting tin core fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homa, Daniel; Liang, Yongxuan; Hill, Cary; Kaur, Gurbinder; Pickrell, Gary

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrated superconductivity in a fiber with a tin core and fused silica cladding. The fibers were fabricated via a modified melt-draw technique and maintained core diameters ranging from 50-300 microns and overall diameters of 125-800 microns. Superconductivity of this fiber design was validated via the traditional four-probe test method in a bath of liquid helium at temperatures on the order of 3.8 K. The synthesis route and fiber design are perquisites to ongoing research dedicated all-fiber optoelectronics and the relationships between superconductivity and the material structures, as well as corresponding fabrication techniques. (orig.)

  11. LMFBR core design analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, M.; Yang, J.C.; Yoh, K.C.; Suk, S.D.; Soh, D.S.; Kim, Y.M.

    1980-01-01

    The design parameters of a commercial-scale fast breeder reactor which is currently under construction by regeneration of these data is preliminary analyzed. The analysis of nuclear and thermal characteristics as well as safety features of this reactor is emphasized. And the evaluation of the initial core mentioned in the system description is carried out in the areas of its kinetics and control system, and, at the same time, the flow distribution of sodium and temperature distribution of the initial FBR core system are calculated. (KAERI INIS Section)

  12. Nuclear core catchers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, M.P.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Heylmun, N.F.

    1976-01-01

    A receptacle is described for taking the molten fragments of a nuclear reactor during a reactor core fusion accident. The receptacle is placed under the reactor. It includes at least one receptacle for the reactor core fragments, with a dome shaped part to distribute the molten fragments and at least one outside layer of alumina bricks around the dome. The characteristic of this receptacle is that the outer layer of bricks contains neutron poison rods which pass through the bricks and protrude in relation to them [fr

  13. Organizing Core Tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Karen

    has remained much the same within the last 10 years. However, how the core task has been organized has changed considerable under the influence of various “organizing devices”. The paper focusses on how organizing devices such as risk assessment, output-focus, effect orientation, and treatment...... projects influence the organization of core tasks within the tax administration. The paper shows that the organizational transformations based on the use of these devices have had consequences both for the overall collection of revenue and for the employees’ feeling of “making a difference”. All in all...

  14. GREEN CORE HOUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NECULAI Oana

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Green Core House is a construction concept with low environmental impact, having as main central element a greenhouse. The greenhouse has the innovative role to use the biomass energy provided by plants to save energy. Although it is the central piece, the greenhouse is not the most innovative part of the Green Core House, but the whole building ensemble because it integrates many other sustainable systems as "waste purification systems", "transparent photovoltaic panels" or "double skin façades".

  15. PWR core design calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trkov, A; Ravnik, M; Zeleznik, N [Inst. Jozef Stefan, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    1992-07-01

    Functional description of the programme package Cord-2 for PWR core design calculations is presented. Programme package is briefly described. Use of the package and calculational procedures for typical core design problems are treated. Comparison of main results with experimental values is presented as part of the verification process. (author) [Slovenian] Opisali smo programski paket CORD-2, ki se uporablja pri projektnih izracunih sredice pri upravljanju tlacnovodnega reaktorja. Prikazana je uporaba paketa in racunskih postopkov za tipicne probleme, ki nastopajo pri projektiranju sredice. Primerjava glavnih rezultatov z eksperimentalnimi vrednostmi je predstavljena kot del preveritvenega procesa. (author)

  16. Joint European contribution to phases 1 and 2 of the BN600 hybrid reactor benchmark core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimpault, Gerald; Newton, Tim; Smith, Peter

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the ERANOS code developed within the European cooperation on fast reactors. Reference scheme and ERANOS code validation are included. The method for BN-600 reactor core analysis and the results of phases 1 and two are presented. They include effective multiplication factors, fuel Doppler constants; steel Doppler constants; sodium density coefficient; steel density coefficients; fuel density coefficient; absorber density coefficient; axial and radial expansion coefficients; dynamic parameters; power distribution; beta and neutron life time; reaction rate distribution

  17. Design and analysis of a toroidal tester for the measurement of core losses under axial compressive stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alatawneh, Natheer; Rahman, Tanvir; Lowther, David A.; Chromik, Richard

    2017-06-01

    Electric machine cores are subjected to mechanical stresses due to manufacturing processes. These stresses include radial, circumferential and axial components that may have significant influences on the magnetic properties of the electrical steel and hence, on the output and efficiencies of electrical machines. Previously, most studies of iron losses due to mechanical stress have considered only radial and circumferential components. In this work, an improved toroidal tester has been designed and developed to measure the core losses and the magnetic properties of electrical steel under a compressive axial stress. The shape of the toroidal ring has been verified using 3D stress analysis. Also, 3D electromagnetic simulations show a uniform flux density distribution in the specimen with a variation of 0.03 T and a maximum average induction level of 1.5 T. The developed design has been prototyped, and measurements were carried out using a steel sample of grade 35WW300. Measurements show that applying small mechanical stresses normal to the sample thickness rises the delivered core losses, then the losses decrease continuously as the stress increases. However, the drop in core losses at high stresses does not go lower than the free-stress condition. Physical explanations for the observed trend of core losses as a function of stress are provided based on core loss separation to the hysteresis and eddy current loss components. The experimental results show that the effect of axial compressive stress on magnetic properties of electrical steel at high level of inductions becomes less pronounced.

  18. Maximum stellar iron core mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An analytical method of estimating the mass of a stellar iron core, just prior to core collapse, is described in this paper. The method employed depends, in part, upon an estimate of the true relativistic mass increase experienced by electrons within a highly compressed iron core, just prior to core collapse, and is significantly ...

  19. Method of reducing the hazard which may occur as a consequence of a reactor core meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donne, M.D.; Dorner, S.; Schumacher, G.

    1978-01-01

    The core melt resulting from a meltdown accident of a GFB, LWR or LMFRR is collected by a core catcher from graphite placed below the core. The core melt is penetrating step by step into a borate store in the collecting vessel and is dissolving in it. Therefore the borate at the same time will absorb the decay heat. In order to remove the solidified and cooled down melted mass water is applied eliminating the borate. The remaining oxide state of the powdery core is sucked off again from the core catcher together with the water. The borate store (e.g. alkali borate) itself consists of separate layers with shaped parts, the coverings of which are made of steel, iron, cast iron, nickel, iron or nickel alloys, ceramic material or glass. (DG) [de

  20. Method of reducing the hazard which may occur as a consequence of a reactor core meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donne, M.D.; Dorner, S.; Schumacher, G.

    1985-01-01

    The core melt resulting from a meltdown accident of a GFB, LWR or LMFRR is collected by a core catcher from graphite placed below the core. The core melt is penetrating step by step into a borate store in the collecting vessel and is dissolving in it. Therefore the borate at the same time will absorb the decay heat. In order to remove the solidified and cooled down melted mass water is applied eliminating the borate. The remaining oxide states of the powdery core is sucked off again from the core catcher together with the water. The borate store (e.g. alkali borate) itself consists of separate layers with shaped parts, the coverings of which are made of steel, iron, cast iron, nickel, iron or nickel alloys, ceramic material or glass. (orig./PW)

  1. Sintered powder cores of high Bs and low coreloss Fe84.3Si4B8P3Cu0.7 nano-crystalline alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nano-crystalline Fe-rich Fe84.3Si4B8P3Cu0.7 alloy ribbon with saturation magnetic flux density (Bs close to Si-steel exhibits much lower core loss (Wt than Si-Steels. Low glass forming ability of this alloy limits fabrication of magnetic cores only to stack/wound types. Here, we report on fabrication, structural, thermal and magnetic properties of bulk Fe84.3Si4B8P3Cu0.7 cores. Partially crystallized ribbons (obtained after salt-bath annealing treatment were crushed into powdered form (by ball milling, and were compacted to high-density (∼88% bulk cores by spark plasma sintering (SPS. Nano-crystalline structure (consisting of α-Fe grain in remaining amorphous matrix similar to wound ribbon cores is preserved in the compacted cores. At 50 Hz, cores sintered at Ts = 680 K show Wt 1 kHz. A trade-off between porosity and electrical resistivity is necessary to get low Wt at higher f. In the f range of ∼1 to 100 kHz, we have shown that the cores mixed with SiO2 exhibit much lower Wt than Fe-powder cores, non-oriented Si-steel sheets and commercially available sintered cores. We believe our core material is very promising to make power electronics/electrical devices much more energy-efficient.

  2. Development of IN-RAFM steel and fabrication technologies for Indian TBM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, S.K., E-mail: shaju@igcar.gov.in [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Laha, K.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Jayakumar, T. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Rajendrakumar, E. [TBM Division, Institute of Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2016-11-01

    that processing parameters have a major role in ensuring consistency in the property of the steel. Accordingly, processing map for this steel has been generated from compression tests conducted at various strain rates and temperature. Safe processing zone of temperature and strain rate has been identified from this map. During technology development for electron beam (EB) welding of IN-RAFM steel, it is found that ductile brittle transformation temperature (DBTT) for the weld metal is higher than that of the base metal and this is attributed to high W content in the steel and consequent formation of delta-ferrite in the weld metal. A welding procedure that produces weld metal with DBTT comparable to that of the base metal has been developed. IN-RAFM filler wires with matching composition to that of the base metal have been produced for TIG and NG-TIG (narrow gap-TIG) welds and the qualification of this consumable is in progress. For fabrication of TBM first wall, which is ‘C’ shaped plate with internal channels, hot isostatic pressing (HIP) of grooved plates which are pre-bent and assembled with ceramic core to produce channel is being adopted. Curved ceramic core and procedure to join this with straight core have already been developed and production of channel plate is in progress. Further, fabrication of three mock up ceramic breeder cassettes each using EB, laser and TIG welding techniques respectively has also been initiated. Fabrication of these mock ups is expected to help in finalizing the fabrication procedures for the actual breeder cassettes to be used in Indian TBM. Details of these developments in material, data generation and fabrication of mock ups of different components of TBM towards realization of the Indian TBM are being presented in this paper.

  3. Properties of hot rolled steels for enamelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilovski, Dragica; Gavrilovski, Milorad

    2003-01-01

    The results of an investigation of the structure and properties of experimental produced hot rolled steels suitable for enamelling are presented in the paper. Hot rolled steels for enamelling represent a special group of the steels for conventional enamelling. Their quality has to be adapted to the method and conditions of enamelling. Therefore, these steels should meet some specific requirements. In addition to usual investigation of the chemical composition and mechanical properties, microstructure and quality of the steel surface also were investigated. The basic aim was to examine steels capability for enamelling, i. e. steels resistance to the fish scales phenomena, by trial enamelling, as well as quality of the steel - enamel contact surface, to evaluate the binding. Also, the changes of the mechanical properties, especially the yield point, during thermal treatment, as a very specific requirement, were investigated, by simplified method. Good results were obtained confirming the steels capability for enamelling. (Original)

  4. Nuclear core baffling apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, F.W. Jr.; Silverblatt, B.L.; Knight, C.B.; Berringer, R.T.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus for baffling the flow of reactor coolant fluid into and about the core of a nuclear reactor is described. The apparatus includes a plurality of longitudinally aligned baffle plates with mating surfaces that allow longitudinal growth with temperature increases while alleviating both leakage through the aligned plates and stresses on the components supporting the plates

  5. The Uncommon Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohler, Jason

    2013-01-01

    This author contends that the United States neglects creativity in its education system. To see this, he states, one may look at the Common Core State Standards. If one searches the English Language Arts and Literacy standards for the words "creative," "innovative," and "original"--and any associated terms, one will…

  6. Utah's New Mathematics Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utah State Office of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Utah has adopted more rigorous mathematics standards known as the Utah Mathematics Core Standards. They are the foundation of the mathematics curriculum for the State of Utah. The standards include the skills and understanding students need to succeed in college and careers. They include rigorous content and application of knowledge and reflect…

  7. Some Core Contested Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomsky, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Core concepts of language are highly contested. In some cases this is legitimate: real empirical and conceptual issues arise. In other cases, it seems that controversies are based on misunderstanding. A number of crucial cases are reviewed, and an approach to language is outlined that appears to have strong conceptual and empirical motivation, and…

  8. Reactor core structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashinakagawa, Emiko; Sato, Kanemitsu.

    1992-01-01

    Taking notice on the fact that Fe based alloys and Ni based alloys are corrosion resistant in a special atmosphere of a nuclear reactor, Fe or Ni based alloys are applied to reactor core structural components such as fuel cladding tubes, fuel channels, spacers, etc. On the other hand, the neutron absorption cross section of zirconium is 0.18 barn while that of iron is 2.52 barn and that of nickel is 4.6 barn, which amounts to 14 to 25 times compared with that of zirconium. Accordingly, if the reactor core structural components are constituted by the Fe or Ni based alloys, neutron economy is lowered. Since it is desirable that neutrons contribute to uranium fission with least absorption to the reactor core structural components, the reactor core structural components are constituted with the Fe or Ni based alloys of good corrosion resistance only at a portion in contact with reactor water, that is, at a surface portion, while the main body is constituted with zircalloy in the present invention. Accordingly, corrosion resistnace can be kept while keeping small neutron absorption cross section. (T.M.)

  9. Investigation of EAS cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaulov S.B.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of nuclear-electromagnetic cascade models in air in the late forties have shown informational content of the study of cores of extensive air showers (EAS. These investigations were the main goal in different experiments which were carried out over many years by a variety of methods. Outcomes of such investigations obtained in the HADRON experiment using an X-ray emulsion chamber (XREC as a core detector are considered. The Ne spectrum of EAS associated with γ-ray families, spectra of γ-rays (hadrons in EAS cores and the Ne dependence of the muon number, ⟨Nμ⟩, in EAS with γ-ray families are obtained for the first time at energies of 1015–1017 eV with this method. A number of new effects were observed, namely, an abnormal scaling violation in hadron spectra which are fundamentally different from model predictions, an excess of muon number in EAS associated with γ-ray families, and the penetrating component in EAS cores. It is supposed that the abnormal behavior of γ-ray spectra and Ne dependence of the muon number are explained by the emergence of a penetrating component in the 1st PCR spectrum ‘knee’ range. Nuclear and astrophysical explanations of the origin of the penetrating component are discussed. The necessity of considering the contribution of a single close cosmic-ray source to explain the PCR spectrum in the knee range is noted.

  10. Plutonium cores of zenith

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barclay, F R; Cameron, I R; Drageset, A; Freemantle, R G; Wilson, D J

    1965-03-15

    The report describes a series of experiments carried out with plutonium fuel in the heated zero power reactor ZENITH, with the aim of testing current theoretical methods, with particular reference to excess reactivity, temperature coefficients, differential spectrum and reaction rate distributions. Two cores of widely different fissile/moderator atom ratios were loaded in order to test the theory under significantly varied spectrum conditions.

  11. Core damage risk indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szikszai, T.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to show a method for the fast recalculation of the PSA. To avoid the information loose, it is necessary to simplify the PSA models, or at least reorganize them. The method, introduced in this document, require that preparation, so we try to show, how to do that. This document is an introduction. This is the starting point of the work related to the development of the risk indicators. In the future, with the application of this method, we are going to show an everyday use of the PSA results to produce the indicators of the core damage risk. There are two different indicators of the plant safety performance, related to the core damage risk. The first is the core damage frequency indicator (CDFI), and the second is the core damage probability indicator (CDPI). Of course, we cannot describe all of the possible ways to use these indicators, rather we will try to introduce the requirements to establish such an indicator system and the calculation process

  12. Core calculations of JMTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, Yoshiharu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    In material testing reactors like the JMTR (Japan Material Testing Reactor) of 50 MW in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the neutron flux and neutron energy spectra of irradiated samples show complex distributions. It is necessary to assess the neutron flux and neutron energy spectra of an irradiation field by carrying out the nuclear calculation of the core for every operation cycle. In order to advance core calculation, in the JMTR, the application of MCNP to the assessment of core reactivity and neutron flux and spectra has been investigated. In this study, in order to reduce the time for calculation and variance, the comparison of the results of the calculations by the use of K code and fixed source and the use of Weight Window were investigated. As to the calculation method, the modeling of the total JMTR core, the conditions for calculation and the adopted variance reduction technique are explained. The results of calculation are shown. Significant difference was not observed in the results of neutron flux calculations according to the difference of the modeling of fuel region in the calculations by K code and fixed source. The method of assessing the results of neutron flux calculation is described. (K.I.)

  13. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Ken.

    1989-01-01

    In PWR type reactors, a cooling water spray portion of emergency core cooling pipelines incorporated into pipelines on high temperature side is protruded to the inside of an upper plenum. Upon rupture of primary pipelines, pressure in a pressure vessel is abruptly reduced to generate a great amount of steams in the reactor core, which are discharged at a high flow rate into the primary pipelines on high temperature side. However, since the inside of the upper plenum has a larger area and the steam flow is slow, as compared with that of the pipelines on the high temperature side, ECCS water can surely be supplied into the reactor core to promote the re-flooding of the reactor core and effectively cool the reactor. Since the nuclear reactor can effectively be cooled to enable the promotion of pressure reduction and effective supply of coolants during the period of pressure reduction upon LOCA, the capacity of the pressure accumulation vessel can be decreased. Further, the re-flooding time for the reactor is shortened to provide an effect contributing to the improvement of the safety and the reduction of the cost. (N.H.)

  14. On the processing, microstructure, mechanical and wear properties of cermet/stainless steel layer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farid, Akhtar; Guo Shiju

    2007-01-01

    This study deals with layer composites of carbide reinforcements and stainless steel prepared successfully by powder technology. The layer material consisted of two layers. The top layer consisted of reinforcements (TiC and NbC) and 465 stainless steel as the binder material for the carbides. The bottom layer was entirely of binder material (465 stainless steel). The microstructure of the composite was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The microstructural study revealed that the top layer (TiC-NbC/465 stainless steel) showed the typical core-rim microstructure of conventional steel bonded cermets and the bottom layer showed the structure of sintered steel. An intermediate layer was found with a gradient microstructure, having a higher carbide content towards the cermet layer and lower carbide content towards the stainless steel layer. The bending strength of the layered material measured in the direction perpendicular to the layer alignment was remarkably high. The variation of strength as a function of the thickness of the bottom layer revealed that the character of the material changed from the cermet, to a layer composite and then towards metallic materials. The wear resistance of the top layer was studied against high speed steel. The wear mechanisms were discussed by means of microscopical observations on the worn surfaces. The wear was severe at higher wear loads and lower TiC content. Microploughing of the stainless steel matrix was found to be the dominant wear mechanism. Heavy microploughing and rapid removal of material from the wear surface was observed at high wear load. The fracture morphologies of the top, bottom and intermediate layers are reported

  15. Inflation targeting and core inflation

    OpenAIRE

    Julie Smith

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the interaction of core inflation and inflation targeting as a monetary policy regime. Interest in core inflation has grown because of inflation targeting. Core inflation is defined in numerous ways giving rise to many potential measures; this paper defines core inflation as the best forecaster of inflation. A cross-country study finds before the start of inflation targeting, but not after, core inflation differs between non-inflation targeters and inflation targeters. Thr...

  16. Interpretation of the results of the CORA-33 dry core BWR test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, L.J.; Hagen, S.

    1993-01-01

    All BWR degraded core experiments performed prior to CORA-33 were conducted under ''wet'' core degradation conditions for which water remains within the core and continuous steaming feeds metal/steam oxidation reactions on the in-core metallic surfaces. However, one dominant set of accident scenarios would occur with reduced metal oxidation under ''dry'' core degradation conditions and, prior to CORA-33, this set had been neglected experimentally. The CORA-33 experiment was designed specifically to address this dominant set of BWR ''dry'' core severe accident scenarios and to partially resolve phenomenological uncertainties concerning the behavior of relocating metallic melts draining into the lower regions of a ''dry'' BWR core. CORA-33 was conducted on October 1, 1992, in the CORA tests facility at KfK. Review of the CORA-33 data indicates that the test objectives were achieved; that is, core degradation occurred at a core heatup rate and a test section axial temperature profile that are prototypic of full-core nuclear power plant (NPP) simulations at ''dry'' core conditions. Simulations of the CORA-33 test at ORNL have required modification of existing control blade/canister materials interaction models to include the eutectic melting of the stainless steel/Zircaloy interaction products and the heat of mixing of stainless steel and Zircaloy. The timing and location of canister failure and melt intrusion into the fuel assembly appear to be adequately simulated by the ORNL models. This paper will present the results of the posttest analyses carried out at ORNL based upon the experimental data and the posttest examination of the test bundle at KfK. The implications of these results with respect to degraded core modeling and the associated safety issues are also discussed

  17. CORE annual report 2006; CORE Jahresbericht 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gut, A

    2007-04-15

    This annual report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) summarises the activities of the Swiss Federal Commission on Energy Research CORE in 2006. The six main areas of work during the period 2004 - 2007 are examined, including a review of the SFOE's energy research programme, a road-map for the way towards the realisation of a 2000-watt society, the formulation of an energy research concept for 2008 - 2011, international co-operation, the dissemination of information and the assessment of existing and new instruments. International activities and Switzerland's involvement in energy research within the framework of the International Energy Agency IEA are discussed. New and existing projects are listed and the work done at the Competence Centre for Energy and Mobility noted. The Swiss Technology Award 2007 is presented. Information supplied to interested bodies to help improve knowledge on research work being done and to help make discussions on future energy supply more objective is discussed.

  18. High temperature oxidation behavior of ODS steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaito, T.; Narita, T.; Ukai, S.; Matsuda, Y.

    2004-08-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are being developing for application as advanced fast reactor cladding and fusion blanket materials, in order to allow increased operation temperature. Oxidation testing of ODS steel was conducted under a controlled dry air atmosphere to evaluate the high temperature oxidation behavior. This showed that 9Cr-ODS martensitic steels and 12Cr-ODS ferritic steels have superior high temperature oxidation resistance compared to 11 mass% Cr PNC-FMS and 17 mass% Cr ferritic stainless steel. This high temperature resistance is attributed to earlier formation of the protective α-Cr 2O 3 on the outer surface of ODS steels.

  19. Review on Cold-Formed Steel Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Cher Siang; Mohammad, Shahrin; Md Tahir, Mahmood; Shek, Poi Ngian

    2014-01-01

    The concept of cold-formed light steel framing construction has been widespread after understanding its structural characteristics with massive research works over the years. Connection serves as one of the important elements for light steel framing in order to achieve its structural stability. Compared to hot-rolled steel sections, cold-formed steel connections perform dissimilarity due to the thin-walled behaviour. This paper aims to review current researches on cold-formed steel connections, particularly for screw connections, storage rack connections, welded connections, and bolted connections. The performance of these connections in the design of cold-formed steel structures is discussed. PMID:24688448

  20. Core/coil assembly for use in superconducting magnets and method for assembling the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassner, David A.

    1979-01-01

    A core/coil assembly for use in a superconducting magnet of the focusing or bending type used in syncronous particle accelerators comprising a coil assembly contained within an axial bore of the stacked, washer type, carbon steel laminations which comprise the magnet core assembly, and forming an interference fit with said laminations at the operating temperature of said magnet. Also a method for making such core/coil assemblies comprising the steps of cooling the coil assembly to cryogenic temperatures and drawing it rapidly upwards into the bore of said stacked laminations.

  1. Investigation of Forming Performance of Laminated Steel Sheets Using Finite Element Analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wenning; Sun Xin; Ruokolainen, Robert; Gayden Xiaohong

    2007-01-01

    Laminated steel sheets have been used in automotive structures for reducing in-cabin noise. However, due to the marked difference in material properties of the different laminated layers, integrating laminated steel parts into the manufacturing processes can be challenging. Especially, the behavior of laminated sheets during forming processes is very different from that of monolithic steel sheets. During the deep-draw forming process, large shear deformation and corresponding high interfacial stress may initiate and propagate interfacial cracks between the core polymer and the metal skin, hence degrading the performance of the laminated sheets. In this paper, the formability of the laminated steel sheets is investigated by means of numerical analysis. The goal of this work is to gain insight into the relationship between the individual properties of the laminated sheet layers and the corresponding formability of the laminated sheet as a whole, eventually leading to reliable design and successful forming process development of such materials. Finite element analyses of laminate sheet forming are presented. Effects of polymer core thickness and viscoelastic properties of the polymer core, as well as punching velocity, are also investigated

  2. Effects of DC bias on magnetic performance of high grades grain-oriented silicon steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Guang; Cheng, Ling [Global Energy Interconnection Research Institute, State Key Laboratory of Advanced Transmission Technology,Beijing 102211 (China); Lu, Licheng [State Grid Corporation of China, Beijing 100031 (China); Yang, Fuyao; Chen, Xin [Global Energy Interconnection Research Institute, State Key Laboratory of Advanced Transmission Technology,Beijing 102211 (China); Zhu, Chengzhi [State Grid Zhejiang Electric Power Company, Hangzhou 310007 (China)

    2017-03-15

    When high voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission adopting mono-polar ground return operation mode or unbalanced bipolar operation mode, the invasion of DC current into neutral point of alternating current (AC) transformer will cause core saturation, temperature increasing, and vibration acceleration. Based on the MPG-200D soft magnetic measurement system, the influence of DC bias on magnetic performance of 0.23 mm and 0.27 mm series (P{sub 1.7}=0.70–1.05 W/kg, B{sub 8}>1.89 T) grain-oriented (GO) silicon steels under condition of AC / DC hybrid excitation were systematically realized in this paper. For the high magnetic induction GO steels (core losses are the same), greater thickness can lead to stronger ability of resisting DC bias, and the reasons for it were analyzed. Finally, the magnetostriction and A-weighted magnetostriction velocity level of GO steel under DC biased magnetization were researched. - Highlights: • Magnetic properties of 0.23 mm and 0.27 mm series (P{sub 1.7}=0.70–1.05 W/kg, B{sub 8}>1.89 T) grain-oriented (GO) silicon steels under condition of AC / DC hybrid excitation were systematically analyzed. • Influence of DC biased magnetization on core loss, magnetostriction, and A-weighted magnetostriction velocity level of GO steel were researched. • Greater thickness and relatively lower magnetic induction (B{sub 8}>1.89 T yet) of GO steel can lead to stronger ability of resisting DC bias, and the reasons for it were analyzed.

  3. Ice cores and palaeoclimate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krogh Andersen, K.; Ditlevsen, P.; Steffensen, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Ice cores from Greenland give testimony of a highly variable climate during the last glacial period. Dramatic climate warmings of 15 to 25 deg. C for the annual average temperature in less than a human lifetime have been documented. Several questions arise: Why is the Holocene so stable? Is climatic instability only a property of glacial periods? What is the mechanism behind the sudden climate changes? Are the increased temperatures in the past century man-made? And what happens in the future? The ice core community tries to attack some of these problems. The NGRIP ice core currently being drilled is analysed in very high detail, allowing for a very precise dating of climate events. It will be possible to study some of the fast changes on a year by year basis and from this we expect to find clues to the sequence of events during rapid changes. New techniques are hoped to allow for detection of annual layers as far back as 100,000 years and thus a much improved time scale over past climate changes. It is also hoped to find ice from the Eemian period. If the Eemian layers confirm the GRIP sequence, the Eemian was actually climatically unstable just as the glacial period. This would mean that the stability of the Holocene is unique. It would also mean, that if human made global warming indeed occurs, we could jeopardize the Holocene stability and create an unstable 'Eemian situation' which ultimately could start an ice age. Currenlty mankind is changing the composition of the atmosphere. Ice cores document significant increases in greenhouse gases, and due to increased emissions of sulfuric and nitric acid from fossil fuel burning, combustion engines and agriculture, modern Greenland snow is 3 - 5 times more acidic than pre-industrial snow (Mayewski et al., 1986). However, the magnitude and abruptness of the temperature changes of the past century do not exceed the magnitude of natural variability. It is from the ice core perspective thus not possible to attribute the

  4. Notch aspects of RSP steel microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Černý

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For a rather long time, basic research projects have been focused on examinations of mechanical properties for Rapid Solidification Powder (RSP steels. These state-of-art steels are commonly known as “powdered steels“. In fact, they combine distinctive attributes of conventional steel alloys with unusual resistance of construction material manufactured by so called “pseudo-powdered” metallurgy.Choice of suitable materials for experimental verification was carried out based on characteristic application of so called “modern steel”. First, groups of stainless and tool steel types (steel grades ČSN 17 and 19 were selected. These provided representative specimens for the actual comparison experiment. For stainless steel type, two steel types were chosen: hardenable X47Cr14 (ČSN 17 029 stainless steel and non-hardenable X2CrNiMo18-14-3 (ČSN 17 350 steel. They are suitable e.g. for surgical tools and replacements (respectively. For tooling materials, C80U (ČSN 19 152 carbon steel and American D2 highly-alloyed steel (ČSN “equivalent” being 19 572 steel were chosen for the project. Finally, the M390 Böhler steel was chosen as representative of powdered (atomized steels. The goal of this paper is to discuss structural aspects of modern stainless and tool steel types and to compare them against the steel made by the RSP method. Based on the paper's results, impact of powdered steel structural characteristics on the resistance to crack initiation shall be evaluated.

  5. Anodized Steel Electrodes for Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagu, Jagdeep S; Wijayantha, K G Upul; Bohm, Mallika; Bohm, Siva; Kumar Rout, Tapan

    2016-03-09

    Steel was anodized in 10 M NaOH to enhance its surface texture and internal surface area for application as an electrode in supercapacitors. A mechanism was proposed for the anodization process. Field-emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEGSEM) studies of anodized steel revealed that it contains a highly porous sponge like structure ideal for supercapacitor electrodes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements showed that the surface of the anodized steel was Fe2O3, whereas X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements indicated that the bulk remained as metallic Fe. The supercapacitor performance of the anodized steel was tested in 1 M NaOH and a capacitance of 18 mF cm(-2) was obtained. Cyclic voltammetry measurements showed that there was a large psueudocapacitive contribution which was due to oxidation of Fe to Fe(OH)2 and then further oxidation to FeOOH, and the respective reduction of these species back to metallic Fe. These redox processes were found to be remarkably reversible as the electrode showed no loss in capacitance after 10000 cycles. The results demonstrate that anodization of steel is a suitable method to produce high-surface-area electrodes for supercapacitors with excellent cycling lifetime.

  6. Corrosion of steel in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preece, C.M.

    1982-10-01

    A comparative study has been made of those properties of Massiv and Standard cements which are considered to determine their ability to protect steel reinforcement from corroding. Saturated Massiv cement has a higher evaporabel water content, but a significantly finer pore structure than has saturated Standard cement. This fine structure resulted in an electrical resistivity ten times higher and chloride diffusivity ten times lower than those of Standard cement. Electrochemical measurements have shown that the passive current density of steel in Massiv mortar is higher than that of steel in Standard mortar, but the higher current should lead to a more rapid decrease in potential to a level at which neither chloride attack of hydrogen evolution will occur. Whereas steel in Standard mortar was found to be highly susceptible to crevice corrosion, no such attack has been observed in Massiv mortar. Moreover, the initiation of chloride induced corrosion and the subsequent rates of corrosion were both lower in Massiv mortar than in Standard mortar. Thus, it may be predicted that Massiv cement would provide greater protection for steel reinforcement in underground structures exposed to chloride containing ground water than would Standard cement. (author)

  7. Oxidation effect on steel corrosion and thermal loads during corium melt in-vessel retention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granovsky, V.S.; Khabensky, V.B.; Krushinov, E.V.; Vitol, S.A.; Sulatsky, A.A.; Almjashev, V.I. [Alexandrov Scientific-Research Technology Institute (NITI), Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation); Bechta, S.V. [KTH, Stockholm (Sweden); Gusarov, V.V. [SPb State Technology University (SPbGTU), St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Barrachin, M. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), St Paul lez Durance (France); Bottomley, P.D., E-mail: paul.bottomley@ec.europa.eu [EC-Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Karlsruhe (Germany); Fischer, M. [AREVA GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Piluso, P. [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), Cadarache, St Paul lez Durance (France)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The METCOR facility simulates vessel steel corrosion in contact with corium. • Steel corrosion rates in UO{sub 2+x}–ZrO{sub 2}–FeO{sub y} coria accelerate above 1050 K. • However corrosion rates can also be limited by melt O{sub 2} supply. • The impact of this on in-vessel retention (IVR) strategy is discussed. - Abstract: During a severe accident with core meltdown, the in-vessel molten core retention is challenged by the vessel steel ablation due to thermal and physicochemical interaction of melt with steel. In accidents with oxidizing atmosphere above the melt surface, a low melting point UO{sub 2+x}–ZrO{sub 2}–FeO{sub y} corium pool can form. In this case ablation of the RPV steel interacting with the molten corium is a corrosion process. Experiments carried out within the International Scientific and Technology Center's (ISTC) METCOR Project have shown that the corrosion rate can vary and depends on both surface temperature of the RPV steel and oxygen potential of the melt. If the oxygen potential is low, the corrosion rate is controlled by the solid phase diffusion of Fe ions in the corrosion layer. At high oxygen potential and steel surface layer temperature of 1050 °C and higher, the corrosion rate intensifies because of corrosion layer liquefaction and liquid phase diffusion of Fe ions. The paper analyzes conditions under which corrosion intensification occurs and can impact on in-vessel melt retention (IVR)

  8. Optimum injection pressure of a cavitating jet on introduction of compressive residual stress into stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soyama, Hitoshi; Nagasaka, Kazuya; Takakuwa, Osamu; Naito, Akima

    2011-01-01

    In order to mitigate stress corrosion cracking of components used for nuclear power plants, introduction of compressive residual stress into sub-surface of the components is an effective maintenance method. The introduction of compressive residual stress using cavitation impact generated by injecting a high speed water jet into water was proposed. Water jet peening is now applying to reduce stress corrosion cracking of shrouds in the nuclear power plants. However, accidental troubles such as dropping off the components and cutting of the pipes by the jet occurred at the maintenance. In order to peen by the jet without damage, optimum injection pressure of the jet should be revealed. In the case of 'cavitation peening', cavitation is generated by injecting the high speed water jet into water. As working pressure at the cavitation peening is the pressure at cavitation bubble collapse, the injection pressure of the jet is not main parameter. The cavitation impact is increasing with the scale of the jet, i.e., scaling effect of the cavitation. It was revealed that the large scale jet at low injection pressure can introduce compressive residual stress into stainless steel comparing with the small scale jet at high injection pressure. As expected, a water jet at high injection pressure might make damage of the components. Namely, in order to avoid damage of the components, the jet at the low injection pressure will be suit for the introduction of compressive residual stress. In the present paper, in order to make clear optimum injection pressure of the cavitating jet for the introduction of compressive residual stress without damage, the residual stress of stainless steel treated by the jet at various injection pressure was measured by using an X-ray diffraction method. The injection pressure of the jet p 1 was varied from 5 MPa to 300 MPa. The diameter of the nozzle throat of the jet d was varied from 0.35 mm to 2.0 mm. The residual stress changing with depth was

  9. Design and analysis of reactor containment of steel-concrete composite laminated shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, K.; Isobata, O.; Kawamata, S.

    1977-01-01

    A new scheme of containment consisting of steel-concrete laminated shell is being developed. In the main part of a cylindrical vessel, the shell consists of two layers of thin steel plates located at the inner and outer surfaces, and a layer of concrete core into which both the steel plates are anchored. Because of the compressive and shearing resistance of the concrete core, the layers behave as a composite solid shell. Membrane forces are shared by steel plates and partly by concrete core. Bending moment is effectively resisted by the section with extreme layers of steel. Therefore, both surfaces can be designed as extremely thin plates: the inner plate, which is a load carrying members as well as a liner, can be welded without the laborious process of stress-relieving, and various jointing methods can be applied to the outer plate which is free from the need for leak tightness. The capability of the composite layers of behaving as a unified solid shell section depends largely on the shearing rigidity of the concrete core. However, as its resisting capacity to transverse shearing force is comparatively low, a device for reducing the shearing stress at the junction to the base mat is needed. In the new scheme, this part of the cylindrical shell is divided into multiple layers of the same kind of composite shell. This device makes the stiffness of the bottom of the cylindrical shell to lateral movement minimum while maintaining the proper resistance to membrane forces. The analysis shows that the transverse shearing stress can be reduced to less than 1√n of the ordinary case by dividing the thickness of the shell into n layers which are able to slip against each other at the contact surface. In order to validate the feasibility and safety of this new design, the results of analysis on the basis of up-to-date design loads are presented

  10. Fuel-steel mixing and radial mesh effects in power excursion simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, X.-N.; Rineiski, A.; Gabrielli, F.; Andriolo, L.; Vezzoni, B.; Li, R.; Maschek, W.; Kiefhaber, E.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Fuel-steel mixing and radial mesh effects are significant on power excursion. • The earliest power peak is reduced and retarded by these two effects. • Unprotected loss of coolant transients in ESFR core are calculated. - Abstract: This paper deals with SIMMER-III once-through simulations of the earliest power excursion initiated by an unprotected loss of flow (ULOF) in the Working Horse design of the European Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor (ESFR). Since the sodium void effect is strictly positive in this core and dominant in the transient, a power excursion is initiated by sodium boiling in the ULOF case. Two major effects, namely (1) reactivity effects due to fuel-steel mixing after melting and (2) the radial mesh size, which were not considered originally in SIMMER simulations for ESFR, are studied. The first effect concerns the reactivity difference between the heterogeneous fuel/clad/wrapper configuration and the homogeneous mixture of steel and fuel. The full core homogenization (due to melting) effect is −2 $, though a smaller effect takes place in case of partial core melting. The second effect is due to the SIMMER sub-assembly (SA) coarse mesh treatment, where a simultaneous sodium boiling onset in all SAs belonging to one ring leads to an overestimated reactivity ramp. For investigating the influence of fuel/steel mixing effects, a lumped “homogenization” reactivity feedback has been introduced, being proportional to the molten steel mass. For improving the coarse mesh treatment, we employ finer radial meshes to take the subchannel effects into account, where the side and interior channels have different coolant velocities and temperatures. The simulation results show that these two effects have significant impacts on the earliest power excursion after the sodium boiling.

  11. Emergency core cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzaki, Kiyoshi; Inoue, Akihiro.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To improve core cooling effect by making the operation region for a plurality of water injection pumps more broader. Constitution: An emergency reactor core cooling device actuated upon failure of recycling pipe ways is adapted to be fed with cooling water through a thermal sleeve by way of a plurality of water injection pump from pool water in a condensate storage tank and a pressure suppression chamber as water feed source. Exhaust pipes and suction pipes of each of the pumps are connected by way of switching valves and the valves are switched so that the pumps are set to a series operation if the pressure in the pressure vessel is high and the pumps are set to a parallel operation if the pressure in the pressure vessel is low. (Furukawa, Y.)

  12. Birefringent hollow core fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, John

    2007-01-01

    Hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF), fabricated according to a nominally non-birefringent design, shows a degree of un-controlled birefringence or polarization mode dispersion far in excess of conventional non polarization maintaining fibers. This can degrade the output pulse in many...... applications, and places emphasis on the development of polarization maintaining (PM) HC-PCF. The polarization cross-coupling characteristics of PM HC-PCF are very different from those of conventional PM fibers. The former fibers have the advantage of suffering far less from stress-field fluctuations...... and an increased overlap between the polarization modes at the glass interfaces. The interplay between these effects leads to a wavelength for optimum polarization maintenance, lambda(PM), which is detuned from the wavelength of highest birefringence. By a suitable fiber design involving antiresonance of the core...

  13. Plasma core reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latham, T.S.; Rodgers, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations are being conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of fissioning uranium plasma core reactors and to characterize space and terrestrial applications for such reactors. Uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) fuel is injected into core cavities and confined away from the surface by argon buffer gas injected tangentially from the peripheral walls. Power, in the form of thermal radiation emitted from the high-temperature nuclear fuel, is transmitted through fused-silica transparent walls to working fluids which flow in axial channels embedded in segments of the cavity walls. Radiant heat transfer calculations were performed for a six-cavity reactor configuration; each cavity is approximately 1 m in diameter by 4.35 m in length. Axial working fluid channels are located along a fraction of each cavity peripheral wall

  14. Reactor core cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Masahiro.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To safely and effectively cool down the reactor core after it has been shut down but is still hot due to after-heat. Constitution: Since the coolant extraction nozzle is situated at a location higher than the coolant injection nozzle, the coolant sprayed from the nozzle, is free from sucking immediately from the extraction nozzle and is therefore used effectively to cool the reactor core. As all the portions from the top to the bottom of the reactor are cooled simultaneously, the efficiency of the reactor cooling process is increased. Since the coolant extraction nozzle can be installed at a point considerably higher than the coolant injection nozzle, the distance from the coolant surface to the point of the coolant extraction nozzle can be made large, preventing cavitation near the coolant extraction nozzle. Therefore, without increasing the capacity of the heat exchanger, the reactor can be cooled down after a shutdown safely and efficiently. (Kawakami, Y.)

  15. Potential high fluence response of pressure vessel internals constructed from austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Greenwood, L.R.; Harrod, D.L.

    1993-08-01

    Many of the in-core components in pressurized water reactors are constructed of austenitic stainless steels. The potential behavior of these components can be predicted using data on similar steels irradiated at much higher displacement rates in liquid-metal reactors or water-cooled mixed-spectrum reactors. Consideration of the differences between the pressurized water environment and that of the other reactors leads to the conclusion that significant amounts of void swelling, irradiation creep, and embrittlement will occur in some components, and that the level of damage per atomic displacement may be larger in the pressurized water environment

  16. Some core contested concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomsky, Noam

    2015-02-01

    Core concepts of language are highly contested. In some cases this is legitimate: real empirical and conceptual issues arise. In other cases, it seems that controversies are based on misunderstanding. A number of crucial cases are reviewed, and an approach to language is outlined that appears to have strong conceptual and empirical motivation, and to lead to conclusions about a number of significant issues that differ from some conventional beliefs.

  17. Schumpeter's core works revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Esben Sloth

    2012-01-01

    This paper organises Schumpeter’s core books in three groups: the programmatic duology,the evolutionaryeconomic duology,and the socioeconomic synthesis. By analysing these groups and their interconnections from the viewpoint of modern evolutionaryeconomics,the paper summarises resolved problems a...... and points at remaining challenges. Its analyses are based on distinctions between microevolution and macroevolution, between economic evolution and socioeconomic coevolution, and between Schumpeter’s three major evolutionary models (called Mark I, Mark II and Mark III)....

  18. BN-600 hybrid core benchmark analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.I.; Stanculescu, A.; Finck, P.; Hill, R.N.; Grimm, K.N.

    2003-01-01

    Benchmark analyses for the hybrid BN-600 reactor that contains three uranium enrichment zones and one plutonium zone in the core, have been performed within the frame of an IAEA sponsored Coordinated Research Project. The results for several relevant reactivity parameters obtained by the participants with their own state-of-the-art basic data and codes, were compared in terms of calculational uncertainty, and their effects on the ULOF transient behavior of the hybrid BN-600 core were evaluated. The comparison of the diffusion and transport results obtained for the homogeneous representation generally shows good agreement for most parameters between the RZ and HEX-Z models. The burnup effect and the heterogeneity effect on most reactivity parameters also show good agreement for the HEX-Z diffusion and transport theory results. A large difference noticed for the sodium and steel density coefficients is mainly due to differences in the spatial coefficient predictions for non fuelled regions. The burnup reactivity loss was evaluated to be 0.025 (4.3 $) within ∼ 5.0% standard deviation. The heterogeneity effect on most reactivity coefficients was estimated to be small. The heterogeneity treatment reduced the control rod worth by 2.3%. The heterogeneity effect on the k-eff and control rod worth appeared to differ strongly depending on the heterogeneity treatment method. A substantial spread noticed for several reactivity coefficients did not give a significant impact on the transient behavior prediction. This result is attributable to compensating effects between several reactivity effects and the specific design of the partially MOX fuelled hybrid core. (author)

  19. BWR type reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatemichi, Shin-ichiro.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate the variation in the power distribution of a BWR type reactor core in the axial direction even if the flow rate is increased or decreased by providing a difference in the void coefficient between the upper part and the lower parts of the reactor core, and increasing the void coefficient at the lower part of the reactor core. Constitution: The void coefficient of the lower region from the center to the lower part along the axial direction of a nuclear fuel assembly is increased to decrease the dependence on the flow rate of the axial power distribution of the nuclear fuel assembly. That is, a water/fuel ratio is varied, the water in non-boiled region is increased or the neutron spectrum is varied so as to vary the void coefficient. In order to exemplify it, the rate of the internal pellets of the fuel rod of the nuclear fuel assembly or the shape of the channel box is varied. Accordingly, the power does not considerably vary even if the flow rate is altered since the power is varied in the power operation. (Yoshihara, H.)

  20. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Masaki.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To actuate an automatic pressure down system (ADS) and a low pressure emergency core cooling system (ECCS) upon water level reduction of a nuclear reactor other than loss of coolant accidents (LOCA). Constitution: ADS in a BWR type reactor is disposed for reducing the pressure in a reactor container thereby enabling coolant injection from a low pressure ECCS upon LOCA. That is, ADS has been actuated by AND signal for a reactor water level low signal and a dry well pressure high signal. In the present invention, ADS can be actuated further also by AND signal of the reactor water level low signal, the high pressure ECCS and not-operation signal of reactor isolation cooling system. In such an emergency core cooling system thus constituted, ADS operates in the same manner as usual upon LOCA and, further, ADS is operated also upon loss of feedwater accident in the reactor pressure vessel in the case where there is a necessity for actuating the low pressure ECCS, although other high pressure ECCS and reactor isolation cooling system are not operated. Accordingly, it is possible to improve the reliability upon reactor core accident and mitigate the operator burden. (Horiuchi, T.)

  1. Modification of Grange-Kiefer Approach for Determination of Hardenability in Eutectoid Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sushanthi, Neethi; Maity, Joydeep

    2014-12-01

    In this research work, an independent mathematical modeling approach has been adopted for determination of the hardenability of steels. In this model, at first, cooling curves were generated by solving transient heat transfer equation through discretization with pure explicit finite difference scheme coupled with MATLAB-based programming considering variable thermo-physical properties of 1080 steel. Thereafter, a new fundamental approach is proposed for obtaining CCT noses as a function of volume fraction transformed through modification of Grange-Kiefer approach. The cooling curves were solved against 50 pct transformation nose of CCT diagram in order to predict hardening behavior of 1080 steel in terms of hardenability parameters (Grossmann critical diameter, D C; and ideal critical diameter, D I) and the variation of the unhardened core diameter ( D u) to diameter of steel bar ( D) ratio with diameter of the steel bar ( D). The experiments were also performed to ascertain actual D C value of 1080 steel for still water quenching. The D C value obtained by the developed model was found to match the experimental D C value with only 3 pct deviation. Therefore, the model developed in the present work can be used for direct determination of D I, D C and D u without resorting to any rigorous experimentation.

  2. Mechanical Performance of Ferritic Martensitic Steels for High Dose Applications in Advanced Nuclear Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderoglu, Osman; Byun, Thak Sang; Toloczko, Mychailo; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    Ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels are considered for core applications and pressure vessels in Generation IV reactors as well as first walls and blankets for fusion reactors. There are significant scientific data on testing and industrial experience in making this class of alloys worldwide. This experience makes F/M steels an attractive candidate. In this article, tensile behavior, fracture toughness and impact property, and creep behavior of the F/M steels under neutron irradiations to high doses with a focus on high Cr content (8 to 12) are reviewed. Tensile properties are very sensitive to irradiation temperature. Increase in yield and tensile strength (hardening) is accompanied with a loss of ductility and starts at very low doses under irradiation. The degradation of mechanical properties is most pronounced at martensitic steels exhibit a high fracture toughness after irradiation at all temperatures even below 673 K (400 °C), except when tested at room temperature after irradiations below 673 K (400 °C), which shows a significant reduction in fracture toughness. Creep studies showed that for the range of expected stresses in a reactor environment, the stress exponent is expected to be approximately one and the steady state creep rate in the absence of swelling is usually better than austenitic stainless steels both in terms of the creep rate and the temperature sensitivity of creep. In short, F/M steels show excellent promise for high dose applications in nuclear reactors.

  3. TiC-Maraging stainless steel composite: microstructure, mechanical and wear properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akhtar Farid; GUO Shiju; FENG Peizhong; Khadijah Ali Shah; Syed Javid Askari

    2006-01-01

    Particulate TiC reinforced 17-4PH and 465 maraging stainless steel matrix composites were processed by conventional powder metallurgy (P/M). TiC-maraging stainless steel composites with theoretical density >97% were produced using conventional P/M. The microstructure, and mechanical and wear properties of the composites were evaluated. The microstructure of the composites consisted of (core-rim structure) spherical and semi-spherical TiC particles depending on the wettability of the matrix with TiC particles. In TiC-maraging stainless steel composites, 465 stainless steel binder phase showed good wettability with TiC particles. Some microcracks appeared in the composites, indicating the presence of tensile stresses in the composites produced during sintering. The typical properties, hardness, and bend strength were reported for the composites. After heat treatment and aging, an increase in hardness was observed. The increase in hardness was attributed to the aging reaction in maraging stainless steel. The specific wear behavior of the composites strongly depends on the content of TiC particles and their interparticle spacing, and on the heat treatment of the maraging stainless steel.

  4. Ductility of high chromium stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretyat'ko, V.N.; Kazantsev, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    Aimed to optimize the hot working conditions for high chromium stainless steels the experiments were carried in the temperature range of 800-1300 deg C using hot torsion tests and cylindrical specimens of ferritic and ferritic-martensitic steels 08Kh13, 12Kh13, 20Kh13, 30Kh13 and 40Kh13. Testing results showed that steel plasticity varies in a wide range depending on carbon content. Steels of lesser carbon concentration (08Kh13 and 12Kh13) exhibit a sharp increase in plasticity with a temperature rise, especially in the interval of 1200-1250 deg C. Steels 20Kh13 and 30Kh13 display insignificant plasticity increasing, whereas plastic properties of steel 40Kh13 increase noticeably in the range of 1000-1300 deg C. It is shown that optimal hot working conditions for specific steel must be selected with account of steel phase composition at high temperatures

  5. Financial Management: Emergency Steel Loan Guarantee Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    In a February 1, 2001 letter, you expressed concerns about repayments of federally guaranteed loans by borrowers under the Emergency Steel Loan Guarantee Program and the effect of the program on the U.S. steel industry...

  6. Dynamic response of single hexagonal LMFBR core subassembly wrappers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ash, J. E.; Marciniak, T. J.; (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1977-07-01

    To analyze the dynamic structural response of the LMFBR core subassembly hexagonal wrappers to postulated local energy releases and the sensitivity of the response to variations in both the pressure loading and the material properties of the stainless steel, a finite-element computer code STRAW has been developed. A series of experiments was performed to study the effects of variations in material properties. The amount of coldworking to which the Type 316 stainless steel is subjected has a strong influence upon the ductility and the elastic yield point. The usual fabrication process produced a nominally 20% coldworking with a yield point of about 680 MPa. By designing a special set of dies for the drawing process, a very low ductility hexcan was produced for which the yield point was raised to 820 MPa. Conversely, the yield point was lowered to 170 MPa by a solution annealing process producing a highly ductile test hexcan. A metallurgical study was conducted to find a representative brittle simulant material for the irradiated end-of-life steel properties. An aging treatment for Type 446 stainless steel was developed which reproduced the expected tensile-flow behavior of the in-pile subassembly. Further study is underway to investigate the fracture properties of the simulant material. The pressure pulses were generated by the controlled expansion of high-pressure detonation poducts from low-density explosives detonated inside a vented steel cannister. The orifice configuration of the cannister and the charge mixture ratio were designed to produce two specified pulse shapes. A charge containing 37,7 g PETN mixed with 35 wt % inert, hollow-glass microballoons developed a pressure pulse peak of 9.5 MPa at 1.0 ms. Increasing the PETN to 41 g resulted in a 14.6 MPa peak pressure, and increasing the explosive concentration to 90 wt % in the mixture increased the burning rate and the pulse risetime, so that the peak occurred at 0.6 ms.

  7. Optimum design of steel structures

    CERN Document Server

    Farkas, József

    2013-01-01

    This book helps designers and manufacturers to select and develop the most suitable and competitive steel structures, which are safe, fit for production and economic. An optimum design system is used to find the best characteristics of structural models, which guarantee the fulfilment of design and fabrication requirements and minimize the cost function. Realistic numerical models are used as main components of industrial steel structures. Chapter 1 containts some experiences with the optimum design of steel structures Chapter 2 treats some newer mathematical optimization methods. Chapter 3 gives formulae for fabrication times and costs. Chapters 4 deals with beams and columns. Summarizes the Eurocode rules for design. Chapter 5 deals with the design of tubular trusses. Chapter 6 gives the design of frame structures and fire-resistant design rules for a frame. In Chapters 7 some minimum cost design problems of stiffened and cellular plates and shells are worked out for cases of different stiffenings and loads...

  8. Functionally Graded Mo sintered steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Cisneros-Belmonte

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Functionally graded materials (FGM, the multi-materials, strive to satisfy the numerous requirements demanded of parts in a given combination of compositions and microstructures. The required material compatibility lead the manufacturing process and the achieving of an interface, not always diffuse. Powder metallurgy is one of the techniques used in manufacturing functionally graded materials, in particular the compaction matrix of the possible techniques for forming these materials. In this paper, a process of forming a functionally graded steel based on the use of a high molybdenum steel with cooper and other steel with copper, without molybdenum, is proposed with the aim of concentrating this element to the surface of the workpiece, increasing the mechanical strength. The study is completed with the evaluation of physical properties (density and porosity distribution, mechanical properties (hardness, tensile strength and elongation and microstructural analysis by optical and scanning electron microscopy.

  9. Chemical decontamination of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onuma, Tsutomu; Akimoto, Hidetoshi

    1991-01-01

    The present invention concerns a method for chemical decontamination of radioactive metal waste materials contaminated with radioactive materials on the surface, generated in radioactive materials-handling facilities. The invention is comprised of a method of chemical decontamination of stainless steel, characterized by comprising a first process of immersing a stainless steel-based metal waste material contaminated by radioactive materials on the surface in a sulfuric acid solution and second process of immersing in an aqueous solution of sulfuric acid and oxidizing metal salt, in which a portion of the surface of the stainless steel to be decontaminated is polished mechanically to expose a portion of the base material before the above first and second processes. 1 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Corrosion of carbon steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, B.

    1988-09-01

    This report assesses the factors which cause preferential attack to occur in carbon steel fusion welds. It was concluded that the main factors were: the inclusion content of the weld metal, the potential of the weld metal being less noble than that of the parent, and the presence of low-temperature transformation products in the heat-affected zone of the weld. These factors should be minimized or eliminated as appropriate so that the corrosion allowances determined for carbon steel waste drums is also adequate for the welds. An experimental/theoretical approach is recommended to evaluate the relative corrosion resistance of welds prepared from BS 4360 grade 43A steel to that of the parent material. (author)

  11. Boron Steel: An Alternative for Costlier Nickel and Molybdenum Alloyed Steel for Transmission Gears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Verma

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Case Carburized (CC low carbon steels containing Ni, Cr and Mo alloying elements are widely used for transmission gears in automobile, as it possesses desired mechanical properties. In order to cut cost and save scarce materials like Ni and Mo for strategic applications, steel alloyed with Boron has been developed, which gives properties comparable to Ni-Cr-Mo alloyed steel. In the process of steel development, care was taken to ensure precipitation of boron which results in precipitation hardening. The characterization of the developed boron steel had exhibited properties comparable to Ni-Cr-Mo alloyed steel and superior to conventional boron steel.

  12. ESF GROUND SUPPORT - STRUCTURAL STEEL ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Misiak

    1996-06-26

    The purpose and objective of this analysis are to expand the level of detail and confirm member sizes for steel sets included in the Ground Support Design Analysis, Reference 5.20. This analysis also provides bounding values and details and defines critical design attributes for alternative configurations of the steel set. One possible configuration for the steel set is presented. This analysis covers the steel set design for the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) entire Main Loop 25-foot diameter tunnel.

  13. Corrosion behaviour of laser clad stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damborenea, J.J. de; Weerasinghe, V.M.; West, D.R.F.

    1993-01-01

    The present paper is focussed in the study of the properties of a clad layer of stainless steel on a mild steel. By blowing powder of the alloy into a melt pool generated by a laser of 2 KW, an homogeneous layer of 316 stainless steel can be obtained. Structure, composition and corrosion behaviour are similar to those of a stainless steel in as-received condition. (Author)

  14. Modern steels for light automobiles (review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, A. K.

    1994-10-01

    The article considers the directions of work at VAZ together with metallurgists of the CIS for creating highly efficient economically-alloyed and microalloyed steels; highly ductile forged steels with improved corrosion resistance coated with zinc and with good stamping, welding, and painting capacity. Steels are created for petrol tanks with aluminum-zinc coatings instead of lead, and new heat and corrosion-resistant steels are developed for automobile exhaust gas systems.

  15. Inclusion control in high-performance steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holappa, L.E.K.; Helle, A.S.

    1995-01-01

    Progress of clean steel production, fundamentals of oxide and sulphide inclusions as well as inclusion morphology in normal and calcium treated steels are described. Effects of cleanliness and inclusion control on steel properties are discussed. In many damaging constructional and engineering applications the nonmetallic inclusions have a quite decisive role in steel performance. An example of combination of good mechanical properties and superior machinability by applying inclusion control is presented. (author)

  16. Boron steel. I Part. Preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaraiz Franco, E.; Esteban Hernandez, J. A.

    1960-01-01

    With the advent of the first nuclear reactors arise the need for control rods and shielding duties for some types of radiations. One of the materials used for this purpose has been the high boron steel. This paper describes the melting and casting procedures employed for the production, at laboratory scale, of steels with Boron content ranging from 1 to 4 per cent, as well as the metallographic and X-Ray techniques used for the identification of the present phases. The electrolytic technique employed for the isolation of the Fe 2 B phase and its subsequent X-Ray identification has proved to be satisfactory. (Author) 11 refs

  17. Plating on stainless steel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dini, J.W.; Johnson, H.R.

    1981-01-01

    Quantitative adhesion data are presented for a variety of electroplated stainless steel type alloys. Results show that excellent adhesion can be obtained by using a Wood's nickel strike or a sulfamate nickel strike prior to final plating. Specimens plated after Wood's nickel striking failed in the deposit rather than at the interface between the substrate and the coating. Flyer plate quantitative tests showed that use of anodic treatment in sulfuric acid prior to Wood's nickel striking even further improved adhesion. In contrast activation of stainless steels by immersion or cathodic treatment in hydrochloric acid resulted in very reduced bond strengths with failure always occurring at the interface between the coating and substrate

  18. Steeling and Resilience in Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, Donalyn

    2014-01-01

    Steel is an incredibly strong alloy of iron and carbon. Due to its incredible strength and durability, this resilient material is commonly used for constructing buildings. The transitive verb "steeling" is defined in Miriam-Webster dictionary as "to fill with resolution or determination, as in, she 'steeled herself to face the…

  19. A model for TRIP steel constitutive behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Menari, G

    2011-01-01

    A constitutive model is developed for TRIP steel. This is a steel which contains three or four different phases in its microstructure. One of the phases in TRIP steels is metastable austenite (Retained Austenite) which transforms to martensite upon deformation. The accompanying transformation strain

  20. Microstructural Development during Welding of TRIP steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amirthalingam, M.

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) are promising solutions for the production of lighter automobiles which reduce fuel consumption and increase passenger safety by improving crash-worthiness. Transformation Induced Plasticity Steel (TRIP) are part of the advanced high strength steels which

  1. Analysis of interlocking performances on non-oriented electrical steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Hsiang; Liu, Lee-Cheng

    2018-05-01

    In order to reduce energy loss in motor, applications of high-efficiency non-oriented electrical steel sheets and optimal laminating process are both important elements. The motor core loss deterioration is influenced by a number of factors, such as flux distribution, stress and strain, space harmonics, temperature, and short circuits between lamination. In conventional clamping method, steel sheets are laminated via interlocking or welding in general manner. The measured energy loss by welding was much larger than that by interlocking. Therefore, interlocking is well known and usually employed with benefit of easy conducting. The protuberance shapes affected the fastening strength. Generally, the intensity of rectangular type is stronger than the circular counterparts. However, the circular interlocking has better magnetic characteristics. To clarify the method effectiveness, interlocking performances regarding fastened strength and magnetic deterioration by lamination were investigated. The key parameters of protuberance shape and forming depth were designed. Precisely manufacturing operation was applied to avoid interlocking failure. Magnetic properties largely influenced by clamping method are crucial to minimizing the magnetic deterioration during laminating procedure. Several experiments for various processing conditions were undertaken, and the quantification results showed the rectangular interlocking had better fastened strength but worsened iron loss comparing with the circular arrangement. To acquire the comprehensive mechanical and electrical identities for electrical steel lamination, deliberate producing conditions regarding minimizing the magnetic deterioration should be adopted prudently.

  2. Studies of fragileness in steels of vessels of BWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles, E.F.; Balcazar, M.; Alpizar, A.M.; Calderon, B.E.

    2003-01-01

    The structural materials with those that are manufactured the pressure vessels of the BWR reactors, suffer degradation in its mechanical properties mainly to the damage taken place by the fast neutrons (E > 1 MeV) coming from the reactor core. Its are experimentally studied those mechanisms of neutron damage in this material type, by means of the irradiation of steel vessel in experimental reactors to age them quickly. Alternatively it is simulated the neutron damage by means of irradiation of steel with heavy ions. In this work those are shown first results of the damage induced by irradiation from a similar steel to the vessel of a BWR reactor. The irradiation was carried out with fast neutrons (E > 1 MeV, fluence of 1.45 x 10 18 n/cm 2 ) in the TRIGA MARK lll reactor and separately with Ni +3 ions in a Tandetrom accelerator, E = 4.8 MeV and range of the ionic flow of 0.1 to 53 iones/A 2 . (Author)

  3. How to arrest a core meltdown accident (doing nothing)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, Jorge H.

    2000-01-01

    In the eventual situation of a severe accident in a nuclear reactor, the molten core is able to relocate inside the pressure vessel. This may lead to the vessel failure, due to the thermal attack of the molten core (at approximation of 3000K) on the vessel steel wall. The vessel failure implies the failure of a very important barrier that contains the radioactive materials generated during the reactor operation, with a significant risk of producing high radiation doses both on operators and on the public. It is expected, for the new generation of nuclear reactors, that these will be required to withstand (by design) a core melt down accident, without the need for an immediate evacuation of the surrounding population. In this line, the use of a totally passive system is postulated, which fulfills the objective of containing the molten core inside the pressure vessel, at low temperature (approximation 1200K) precluding its failure. The conceptual design of a passive in-vessel core catcher is presented in this paper, built up of zinc, and designed for the CAREM-25 nuclear power plant. (author)

  4. performance of steel slag performance of steel slag as fine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    Suitability of using steel slag (SS) as substitute for sand in concrete was ... The strength of SS concrete increased with increase in proporti. 10 mm. .... additives used. All other oxides ..... low lime coal fly ash in foamed concrete”, Fuel, Vol. 84,.

  5. Teaching Steel Connections Using an Interactive Virtual Steel Sculpture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moaveni, Saeed; Chou, Karen C.

    2015-01-01

    Steel connections play important roles in the integrity of a structure, and many structural failures are attributed to connection failures. Connections are the glue that holds a structure together. The failures of the Hartford Coliseum in 1977, the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Kansas City in 1980, and the I-35W Bridge in Minneapolis in 2007 are all…

  6. Physical characterization of steel and stainless steel metal powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavilla, A.O.; Lucchesi, C.G.; Sandin, O.O.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology has been developed for the physical characterization of steel powders (obtained by atomization) for later sintering and for the construction of porous sheets and filtrating tubes, capable of operating at temperatures between 600 deg C and 800 deg C in corrosive atmospheres. This methodology was based on the equipment and methods used for the physical characterization of uranium oxide powders. (Author) [es

  7. Chemical and X-ray diffraction analysis on selected samples from the TMI-2 reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleykamp, H.; Pejsa, R.

    1991-05-01

    Selected samples from different positions of the damaged TMI-2 reactor core were investigated by X-ray microanalysis and X-ray diffraction. The measurements yield the following resolidified phases after cooling: Cd and In depleted Ag absorber material, intermetallic Zr-steel compounds, fully oxidized Zircaloy, UO 2 -ZrO 2 solid solutions and their decomposed phases, and Fe-Al-Cr-Zr spinels. The composition of the phases and their lattice parameters as well as the eutectic and monotectic character can serve as indicators of local temperatures of the core. The reaction sequences are estimated from the heterogeneous equilibria of these phases. The main conclusions are: (1) Liquefaction onset is locally possible by Inconel-Zircaloy and steel-Zircaloy reactions of spacers and absorber guide tubes at 930deg C. However, increased rates of dissolution occur above 1200deg C. (2) UO 2 dissolution in the Inconel-steel-Zircaloy melt starts at 1300deg C with increased rates above 1900deg C. (3) Fuel temperatures in the core centre are increased above 2550deg C, liquid (U,Zr)O 2 is generated. (4) Square UO 2 particles are reprecipitated from the Incoloy-steel-Zircaloy-UO 2 melt during cooling, the remaining metallic melt is oxygen poor; two types of intermetallic phases are formed. (5) Oxidized Fe and Zr and Al 2 O 3 from burnable absorber react to spinels which form a low melting eutectic with the fuel at 1500deg C. The spinel acts as lubricant for fuel transport to the lower reactor plenum above 1500deg C. (6) Ruthenium (Ru-106) is dissolved in the steel phase, antimony (Sb-125) in the α-Ag absorber during liquefaction. (7) Oxidation of the Zircaloy-steel phases takes place mainly in the reflood stage 3 of the accident scenario. (orig.) [de

  8. Some comments about the situation of the Steel Industry in the Arab Countries (Arab Steel Summit)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haidar, Y.; Astier, J.

    2009-01-01

    The Arab Steel Summit, that convened in Abu Dhabi in April, gave us another opportunity to review the situation of the Arab Iron and Steel Industry, with regard to the present World economic context. We will address: - the World situation of steel production, focusing on the Arab Countries; - the related situation of steel consumption; - the steel trade, including imports, exports and prices; - the consequences for technology and economy. (authors)

  9. Modification of Alumina and Spinel Inclusions by Calcium in Liquid Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Neerav

    2011-12-01

    Steel Cleanliness plays a crucial role in determining steel properties such as toughness, ductility, formability, corrosion resistance and surface quality. The production of clean steel often involves the elimination or chemical and morphological modification of oxide and sulfide inclusions. Along with deteriorating the steel properties, solid inclusions can affect steel castability through nozzle clogging. Nozzle clogging occurs when solid inclusions accumulate in the caster pouring system such as the ladle shroud or submerged entry nozzle (SEN). Thus, it is important to understand how to achieve desired inclusion characteristics (shape, size and chemistry) through the steelmaking process. Among the various practices adopted in industries to counteract the effect of solid inclusions, modification of solid inclusions to liquid or partially liquid state through calcium treatment is one of the methods. Calcium can be used because it has a strong ability to form oxides and sulfides. In Al-killed steels, the most common inclusions are alumina (Al2O3) inclusions, which are solid at steelmaking temperatures. On calcium treatment, solid alumina inclusions are converted to calcium aluminates, which have liquidus temperatures lower than steelmaking temperature (1600°C) [14]. It has been found that alumina inclusions may contain some MgO and such inclusions are termed alumina magnesia spinels (Al2O3.xMgO) [18]. These spinels are more stable than alumina and it has been suggested that they might be more difficult to modify [18]. But, some authors have proposed that MgO can actually help in the liquefaction of inclusions, and have demonstrated successful modification of spinels by Ca treatment [20, 21]. In the present research, the mechanism of transformation of alumina and spinel inclusions upon calcium treatment was studied by characterizing transient evolution of inclusions. A vacuum induction was used for melting, making additions (Al, Al-Mg and CaSi2) and sampling. The

  10. Molten salt reactors: reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    In this critical analysis of the MSBR I project are examined the problems concerning the reactor core. Advantages of breeding depend essentially upon solutions to technological problems like continuous reprocessing or graphite behavior under neutron irradiation. Graphite deformation, moderator unloading, control rods and core instrumentation require more studies. Neutronics of the core, influence of core geometry and salt composition, fuel evolution, and thermohydraulics are reviewed [fr

  11. WNP-2 core model upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golightly, C.E.; Ravindranath, T.K.; Belblidia, L.A.; O'Farrell, D.; Andersen, P.S.

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes the core model upgrade of the WNP-2 training simulator and the reasons for the upgrade. The core model as well as the interface with the rest of the simulator are briefly described . The paper also describes the procedure that will be used by WNP-2 to update the simulator core data after future core reloads. Results from the fully integrated simulator are presented. (author)

  12. On-line core monitoring with CORE MASTER / PRESTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindahl, S.O.; Borresen, S.; Ovrum, S.

    1986-01-01

    Advanced calculational tools are instrumental in improving reactor plant capacity factors and fuel utilization. The computer code package CORE MASTER is an integrated system designed to achieve this objective. The system covers all main activities in the area of in-core fuel management for boiling water reactors; design, operation support, and on-line core monitoring. CORE MASTER operates on a common data base, which defines the reactor and documents the operating history of the core and of all fuel bundles ever used

  13. Hollow-Core Fiber Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Lin (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor); Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Huang, Shouhua (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Hollow-core capillary discharge lamps on the millimeter or sub-millimeter scale are provided. The hollow-core capillary discharge lamps achieve an increased light intensity ratio between 194 millimeters (useful) and 254 millimeters (useless) light than conventional lamps. The capillary discharge lamps may include a cone to increase light output. Hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) may also be used.

  14. Dual-core Itanium Processor

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Intel’s first dual-core Itanium processor, code-named "Montecito" is a major release of Intel's Itanium 2 Processor Family, which implements the Intel Itanium architecture on a dual-core processor with two cores per die (integrated circuit). Itanium 2 is much more powerful than its predecessor. It has lower power consumption and thermal dissipation.

  15. Maximum stellar iron core mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    60, No. 3. — journal of. March 2003 physics pp. 415–422. Maximum stellar iron core mass. F W GIACOBBE. Chicago Research Center/American Air Liquide ... iron core compression due to the weight of non-ferrous matter overlying the iron cores within large .... thermal equilibrium velocities will tend to be non-relativistic.

  16. Core TuLiP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Czenko, M.R.; Etalle, Sandro

    2007-01-01

    We propose CoreTuLiP - the core of a trust management language based on Logic Programming. CoreTuLiP is based on a subset of moded logic programming, but enjoys the features of TM languages such as RT; in particular clauses are issued by different authorities and stored in a distributed manner. We

  17. Study of the core compaction effects and its monitoring in sodium cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zylbersztejn, F.

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: • On calculation of reactivity impacts of core compaction/flowering: → Upper bound of the reactivity coefficients for each type of deformation; → Uniform compaction model: significant reactivity impact; Circular symmetric model: small reactivity impact. • On the visibility of these phenomena by the neutron detectors: → The direct monitoring of the core compaction by neutron detector in the BCC is not possible. (the identification that the reactivity perturbations observed are due to variation of the core geometry). Perspectives of solutions: → Improved core design: reducing the effects. → Physical improvements: Steel resistance to deformations (irradiation, flexion); Direct devices: core constraint (prevents deformations). → Additional calculations: Considering more localized deformations; Advanced monitoring with neutron noise (in progress)

  18. Face/core mixed mode debond fracture toughness characterization using the modified TSD test method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berggreen, Christian; Quispitupa, Amilcar; Costache, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    The modified tilted sandwich debond (TSD) test method is used to examine face/core debond fracture toughness of sandwich specimens with glass/polyester face sheets and PVC H45 and H100 foam cores over a large range of mode-mixities. The modification was achieved by reinforcing the loaded face sheet....... The fracture process was inspected visually during and after testing. For specimens with H45 core the crack propagated in the core. For specimens with an H100 core, the crack propagated between the resin-rich layer and the face sheet. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub...... with a steel bar, and fracture testing of the test specimens was conducted over a range of tilt angles. The fracture toughness exhibited mode-mixity phase angle dependence, especially for mode II dominated loadings; although, the fracture toughness remained quite constant for mode I dominated crack loadings...

  19. Design and test of the borosilicate glass burnable poison rod for Qinshan nuclear power plant core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Jinhua; Sun Hanhong

    1988-08-01

    Material for the burnable poison of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant core is GG-17 borosilicate glass. The chemical composition and physico-chemical properties of GG-17 is very close to Pyrex-7740 glass used by Westinghouse. It is expected from the results of the experiments that the borosilicate glass burnable poison rod can be successfully used in Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant due to good physical, mechanical, corrosion-resistant and irradiaton properties for both GG-17 glass and cold-worked stainless steel cladding. Change of material for burnable poison from boron-bearing stainless steel to borosilicate glass will bring about much more economic benefit to Qinshan Naclear Power Plant

  20. Automated Core Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yoko; Aiyoshi, Eitaro

    2005-01-01

    Multistate searching methods are a subfield of distributed artificial intelligence that aims to provide both principles for construction of complex systems involving multiple states and mechanisms for coordination of independent agents' actions. This paper proposes a multistate searching algorithm with reinforcement learning for the automatic core design of a boiling water reactor. The characteristics of this algorithm are that the coupling structure and the coupling operation suitable for the assigned problem are assumed and an optimal solution is obtained by mutual interference in multistate transitions using multiagents. Calculations in an actual plant confirmed that the proposed algorithm increased the convergence ability of the optimization process