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Sample records for steel containment vessel

  1. Biaxial Loading Tests for steel containment vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyagawa, T. [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Wright, D.J.; Arai, S.

    1999-07-01

    The Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) has conducted a 1/10 scale of the steel containment vessel (SCV) test for the understanding of ultimate structural behavior beyond the design pressure condition. Biaxial Loading Tests were supporting tests for the 1/10 scale SCV model to evaluate the method of estimating failure conditions of thin steel plates under biaxial loading conditions. The tentative material models of SGV480 and SPV490 were obtained. And the behavior of SGV480 and SPV490 thin steel plates under biaxial loading conditions could be well simulated by FE-Analyses with the tentative material models and Mises constitutive law. This paper describes the results and the evaluations of these tests. (author)

  2. Biaxial Loading Tests for steel containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyagawa, T.; Wright, D.J.; Arai, S.

    1999-01-01

    The Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) has conducted a 1/10 scale of the steel containment vessel (SCV) test for the understanding of ultimate structural behavior beyond the design pressure condition. Biaxial Loading Tests were supporting tests for the 1/10 scale SCV model to evaluate the method of estimating failure conditions of thin steel plates under biaxial loading conditions. The tentative material models of SGV480 and SPV490 were obtained. And the behavior of SGV480 and SPV490 thin steel plates under biaxial loading conditions could be well simulated by FE-Analyses with the tentative material models and Mises constitutive law. This paper describes the results and the evaluations of these tests. (author)

  3. Results of steel containment vessel model test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luk, V.K.; Ludwigsen, J.S.; Hessheimer, M.F.; Komine, Kuniaki; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Costello, J.F.

    1998-05-01

    A series of static overpressurization tests of scale models of nuclear containment structures is being conducted by Sandia National Laboratories for the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation of Japan and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Two tests are being conducted: (1) a test of a model of a steel containment vessel (SCV) and (2) a test of a model of a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV). This paper summarizes the conduct of the high pressure pneumatic test of the SCV model and the results of that test. Results of this test are summarized and are compared with pretest predictions performed by the sponsoring organizations and others who participated in a blind pretest prediction effort. Questions raised by this comparison are identified and plans for posttest analysis are discussed

  4. Testing of a steel containment vessel model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luk, V.K.; Hessheimer, M.F.; Matsumoto, T.; Komine, K.; Costello, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    A mixed-scale containment vessel model, with 1:10 in containment geometry and 1:4 in shell thickness, was fabricated to represent an improved, boiling water reactor (BWR) Mark II containment vessel. A contact structure, installed over the model and separated at a nominally uniform distance from it, provided a simplified representation of a reactor shield building in the actual plant. This paper describes the pretest preparations and the conduct of the high pressure test of the model performed on December 11-12, 1996. 4 refs., 2 figs

  5. Application of high strength steel to nuclear reactor containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susukida, H.; Sato, M.; Takano, G.; Uebayashi, T.; Yoshida, K.

    1976-01-01

    Nuclear reactor containment vessels are becoming larger in size with the increase in the power generating capacity of nuclear power plants. For example, a containment vessel for a PWR power plant with an output of 1,000 MWe becomes an extremely large one if it is made of the conventional JIS SGV 49 (ASTM A 516 Gr. 70) steel plates less than 38 mm in thickness. In order to design the steel containment vessel within the conventional dimensional range, therefore, it is necessary to use a high strength steel having a higher tensile strength than SGV 49 steel, good weldability and a higher fracture toughness and moreover, possessing satisfactory properties without undergoing post-weld heat treatment. The authors conducted a series of verification tests on high strength steel developed by modifying the ASTM A 543 Grade B Class 1 steel with a view to adopting it as a material for the nuclear reactor containment vessels. As the result of evaluation of the test results from various angles, we confirmed that the high strength steel is quite suitable for the manufacture of nuclear reactor containment vessels. (auth.)

  6. Preliminary results of steel containment vessel model test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, T.; Komine, K.; Arai, S.

    1997-01-01

    A high pressure test of a mixed-scaled model (1:10 in geometry and 1:4 in shell thickness) of a steel containment vessel (SCV), representing an improved boiling water reactor (BWR) Mark II containment, was conducted on December 11-12, 1996 at Sandia National Laboratories. This paper describes the preliminary results of the high pressure test. In addition, the preliminary post-test measurement data and the preliminary comparison of test data with pretest analysis predictions are also presented

  7. Nuclear reactors sited deep underground in steel containment vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourque, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Although nuclear power plants are certainly very safe, they are not perceived as safe by the general populace. Also, there are concerns about overland transport of spent fuel rods and other irradiated components. It is hereby proposed that the nuclear components of nuclear power plants be placed in deep underground steel vessels with secondary coolant fed from them to turbines at or near the surface. All irradiated components, including spent fuel, would remain in the chamber indefinitely. This general concept was suggested by the late Edward Teller, generated some activity 20-25 years ago and appears to be recently reviving in interest. Previous work dealt with issues of geologic stability of underground, possibly reinforced, caverns. This paper presents another approach that makes siting independent of geology by placing the reactor components in a robust steel vessel capable of resisting full overburden pressure as well as pressures resulting from accident scenarios. Structural analysis of the two vessel concepts and approximate estimated costs are presented. This work clears the way for the extensive discussions required to evaluate the advantages of this concept. (author)

  8. Analyses of a steel containment vessel with an outer contact structure under severe internal overpressurization conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, V.L.

    1994-01-01

    Many Mark-I and Mark-II BWR plants are designed with a steel vessel as the primary containment. Typically, the steel containment vessel (SCV) is enclosed within a reinforced concrete shield building with only a small gap (74-90 mm) separating the two structures. This paper describes finite element analyses performed to evaluate the effects of contact and friction between a steel containment vessel and an outer contact structure when the containment vessel is subjected to large internal pressures. These computations were motivated by a joint program on containment integrity involving the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and Sandia National Laboratories for testing model containments. Under severe accident loading conditions, the steel containment vessel in a typical Mark-I or Mark-II plant may deform under internal pressurization such that it contacts the inner surface of a shield building wall. (Thermal expansion from increasing accident temperatures would also close the gap between the SCV and the shield building, but temperature effects are not considered in these analyses.) The amount and location of contact and the pressure at which it occurs all affect how the combined structure behaves. A preliminary finite element model has been developed to analyze a model of a typical steel containment vessel con-ling into contact with an outer structure. Both the steel containment vessel and the outer contact structure were modelled with axisymmetric shell finite elements. Of particular interest are the influence that the contact structure has on deformation and potential failure modes of the containment vessel. Furthermore, the coefficient of friction between the two structures was varied to study its effects on the behavior of the containment vessel and on the uplift loads transmitted to the contact structure. These analyses show that the material properties of an outer contact structure and the amount

  9. Analyses of a steel containment vessel with an outer contact structure under severe internal overpressurization conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, V.L.

    1993-01-01

    Many Mark-I and Mark-II BWR plants are designed with a steel vessel as the primary containment. Typically, the steel containment vessel (SCV) is enclosed within a reinforced concrete shield building with only a small gap (50--90mm) separating the two structures. This paper describes finite element analyses performed to evaluate the effects of contact and friction between a steel containment vessel and an outer contact structure when the containment vessel is subjected to large internal pressures. These computations were motivated by a joint program on containment integrity involving the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and Sandia National Laboratories for testing model containments

  10. Development of improved SGV480 steel plate for containment vessel in PWR plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Norioki [Advanced Nuclear Equipment Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan); Morikage, Yasushi; Okayama, Yutaka; Higashikubo, Tomohiro

    2001-01-01

    When a nuclear containment vessel made of steel plate at PWR plants in Japan is produced, SGV480 steel plate made by annealing method according to JIS G3118 is usually used in main. And, when thickness of welding portion of the vessel is larger than 38 mm, as heat treatment after welding is regulated to carry out according to the ministerial ordinance, it is difficult in actual to carry out the heat treatment of the actual welded portions. In a leading plant, approval of welding using a special method without heat treatment less than 47.25 mm of SGV480 carbon steel plate for JIS G3118 middle and ordinary pressure vessel was carried out to supply it for actual use. And, it is required for protection of welding fracture to carry out pre-heat treatment before welding. Because of increasing plate thickness requiring for lower temperature and more seismic resistance in construction condition, in order to produce a containment vessel without heat treatment after welding, more toughness is required for using material and welded portion. Therefore, a new SGV480 steel plate was developed by using TMCP method of modern steel manufacturing technology, to establish lower carbon equivalence and finer texture with upgrading of both toughness and weldability, without heat treatment after welding and pre-heat treatment before welding, at the Shin-Nippon Steel Co, Ltd. and Kawasaki Steel, Co. Ltd., respectively. (G.K.)

  11. Applicability of JIS SPV 50 steel to primary containment vessels of nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, K.; Ishikawa, K.; Satoh, M.; Soya, I.

    1980-01-01

    The fracture toughness of JIS SPV 50 steel and its weldment has been examined in order to verify the applicability of these materials to primary containment vessels of nuclear power stations. Test results were evaluated using elastic plastic fracture mechanics through the COD and the J integral concepts for non ductile fracture initiation characteristics. Linear fracture mechanics was employed for propagation arrest characteristics. Results showed that the materials tested here have a sufficient fracture toughness to prevent nonductile fracture and that this steel is a suitable material for use in construction of primary containment vessels of nuclear power stations. (author)

  12. Ultimate limit states of steel containment vessel under earthquake loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Hiroshi; Yuhara, Tetsuo; Shimizu, Seiichi; Hayashi, Kazutoshi; Takahashi, Tadao.

    1986-01-01

    The limit state induced by buckling of cylindrical steel structures under earthquake loadings was investigated from the standpoint of energy concept. A number of the buckling test of cylindrical steel shell structures has been made, which showed that they have a stable load-displacement relation and adequate deformation capacities beyond the buckling. The authors are proposing that the energy input imparted by strong earthquakes to buckled structures and the deformation capacity in post-buckling are suitable indices for seismic resistance of the cylindrical steel shell structures because the buckling does not cause the structure immediately to collapse in the case of such repeated loading as earthquake motions. The purpose of this study is to investigate the energy input to buckled cylindrical steel structures with an increase in the intensity of earthquake motions. A series of nonlinear dynamic analyses were performed under various types of earthquake records by using a hysteresis loop, including buckling, which was derived from the buckling tests. The limit state could be defined as the state in which the deformation of and the energy input into buckled structures increase divergently when the intensity of the earthquake excitation exceeds a certain value. The results obtained in this paper are intended to be adopted to the limit state in the post-buckling region to evaluate the margin of safety against the buckling resistance of cylindrical steel structures under strong earthquake loadings. (author)

  13. Applicability of JIS SPV 50 steel to primary containment vessel of nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Kunihiro; Ishikawa, Koji; Sakai, Keiichi; Onozuka, Masakazu; Sato, Makoto.

    1979-01-01

    The space within reactor containment vessels must be expanded in order to improve the reliability of nuclear power plants, accordingly the adoption of large reactor containment vessels is investigated. SGV 42 and 49 steels in JIS G 3118 have been used for containment vessels so far, but stress relief annealing is required when the thickness exceeds 38 mm. The time has come when the use of thicker conventional plates without stress relieving or the use of high strength steel must be examined in detail. In this study, the tests of confirming material properties were carried out on SPV 50 in JIS G 3115, Steels for pressure vessels, aiming at the method of fabrication without stress relieving. The highest and lowest temperatures in use were set at 171 deg and -8 deg C, respectively. The chemical composition and the mechanical properties of the plates tested, the method of welding, the results of tensile test on the parent metal and the welds, the required lowest preheating temperature, the fracture toughness at low temperature and the brittle fracture causing test are reported. The parent metal and the welded joints of SPV 50 have the properties suitable to reactor containment vessels, namely the sufficient fracture toughness to guarantee the prevention of unstable fracture when the method of welding without stress relieving is adopted. (Kako, I.)

  14. Heissdampfreaktor (HDR) steel-containment-vessel and floodwater-storage-tank structural-dynamics tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arendts, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    Inertance (vibration) testing of two significant vessels at the Heissdampfreaktor (HDR) facility, located near Kahl, West Germany, was recently completed. Transfer functions were obtained for determination of the modal properties (frequencies, mode shapes and damping) of the vessels using two different test methods for comparative purposes. One of the vessels tested was the steel containment vessel (SCV). The SCV is approximately 180 feet high and 65 feet in diameter with a 1.2-inch wall thickness. The other vessel, called the floodwater storage tank (FWST), is a vertically standing vessel approximately 40 feet high and 10 feet in diameter with a 1/2-inch wall thickness. The FWST support skirt is square (in plan views) with its corners intersecting the ellipsoidal bottom head near the knuckle region

  15. A three-dimensional rupture analysis of steel liners anchored to concrete pressure and containment vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangash, Y.

    1987-01-01

    Steel liners or plates are anchored to concrete pressure and containment vessels for nuclear and offshore facilities. Due to extreme loading conditions a liner may buckle due to the pull-out or shearing of anchors from the base metal and concrete. Under certain conditions attributed to loadings, liner metal deterioration and cracking of concrete behind the liner, the liner may fail by rupture. This paper presents a three-dimensional analysis of steel-concrete elements, using finite elements analysis in which a provision is made for liner instability, anchor strength and stiffness, concrete cracking and finally liner rupture. The analysis is tested first on an octagonal slab with and without an anchored steel liner. It is then extended to concrete pressure and containment vessels. The analytical results obtained are compared well with those available from the experimental tests and other sources. (author)

  16. Ultimate Pressure Capacity of Prestressed Concrete Containment Vessels with Steel Fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahm, Dae Gi; Choun, Young Sun; Choi, In Kil [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    The ultimate pressure capacity (UPC) of the prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) is very important since the PCCV are final protection to prevent the massive leakage of a radioactive contaminant caused by the severe accident of nuclear power plants (NPPs). The tensile behavior of a concrete is an important factor which influence to the UPC of PCCVs. Hence, nowadays, it is interested that the application of the steel fiber to the PCCVs since that the concrete with steel fiber shows an improved performance in the tensile behavior compared to reinforced concrete (RC). In this study, we performed the UPC analysis of PCCVs with steel fibers corresponding to the different volume ratio of fibers to verify the effectiveness of steel fibers on PCCVs

  17. Containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbirohowski-Koscia, K.F.; Roberts, A.C.

    1980-01-01

    A concrete containment vessel for nuclear reactors is disclosed that is spherical and that has prestressing tendons disposed in first, second and third sets, the tendons of each set being all substantially concentric and centred around a respective one of the three orthogonal axes of the sphere; the tendons of the first set being anchored at each end at a first anchor rib running around a circumference of the vessel, the tendons of the second set being anchored at each end at a second anchor rib running around a circumference of the sphere and disposed at 90 0 to the first rib, and the tendons of the third set being anchored some to the first rib and the remainder to the second rib. (author)

  18. Round Robin Posttest analysis of a 1/10-scale Steel Containment Vessel Model Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komine, Kuniaki; Konno, Mutsuo

    1999-01-01

    NUPEC and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) have been jointly sponsoring 'Structural Behavior Test' at Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) in Cooperative Containment Research Program'. As one of the test, a test of a mixed scaled SCV model with 1/10 in the geometry and 1/4 in the shell thickness. Round Robin analyses of a 1/10-scale Steel Containment Vessel (SCV) Model Test were carried out to obtain an adequate analytical method among seven organizations belonged to five countries in the world. As one of sponsor, Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) filled the important role of a posttest analysis of SCV model. This paper describes NUPEC's analytical results in the round robin posttest analysis. (author)

  19. Round Robin Posttest analysis of a 1/10-scale Steel Containment Vessel Model Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komine, Kuniaki [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Konno, Mutsuo

    1999-07-01

    NUPEC and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) have been jointly sponsoring 'Structural Behavior Test' at Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) in Cooperative Containment Research Program'. As one of the test, a test of a mixed scaled SCV model with 1/10 in the geometry and 1/4 in the shell thickness. Round Robin analyses of a 1/10-scale Steel Containment Vessel (SCV) Model Test were carried out to obtain an adequate analytical method among seven organizations belonged to five countries in the world. As one of sponsor, Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) filled the important role of a posttest analysis of SCV model. This paper describes NUPEC's analytical results in the round robin posttest analysis. (author)

  20. The reactor vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilous, W.; Hajewska, E.; Szteke, W.; Przyborska, M.; Wasiak, J.; Wieczorkowski, M.

    2005-01-01

    In the paper the fundamental steels using in the construction of pressure vessel water reactor are discussed. The properties of these steels as well as the influence of neutron irradiation on its degradation in the time of exploitation are also done. (authors)

  1. Installation method for the steel container and vessel of the nuclear heating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Liying; Guo Jilin; Liu Wei

    2000-01-01

    The Nuclear Heating Reactor (NHR) has the advantages of inherent safety and better economics, integrated arrangement, full power natural circulation and dual vessel structure. However, the large thin container presents a new and difficult problem. The characteristics of the dual vessel installation method are analyzed with system engineering theory. Since there is no foreign or domestic experience, a new method was developed for the dual vessel installation for the 5 MW NHR. The result shows that the installation method is safe and reliable. The research on the dual vessel installation method has important significance for the design, manufacture and installation of the NHR dual vessel, as well as the industrialization and standardization of the NHR

  2. Creep deformation and crack growth in a low alloy steel welded pressure vessel containing defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, M.C.

    1982-01-01

    A full-size pressure vessel was tested for effects of welding residual stresses on creep deformation and crack growth. The vessel, based on 1/2 Cr 1/2 Mo 1/4 V main steam pipe, contained four 2CrMo manual metal arc welds, two in the as-welded condition and two stress-relieved. All the welds contained pre-existing defects machined in the heat affected zones. Testing was carried out at two internal steam pressures, 250 and 350 bar, and 565 0 C. Cracked and uncracked areas of the vessel were monitored continuously. Results are presented for the continuous creep deformation observed in both the hoop and axial directions of the welds throughout the 11,400 h of testing, as well as the intermittent strain data obtained during inspections. Crack growth observations are described based on nondestructive examination. The residual stresses measured are also given for both the as-welded and stress relieved weldments. Results obtained are discussed in terms of the effects of welding residual stress on the hoop and axial deformations observed in the welds. Similarly, the effects of residual stress on creep crack growth are considered together with compositional and microstructural implications. 9 figures, 5 tables

  3. Containment vessel stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harstead, G.A.; Morris, N.F.; Unsal, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    The stability analysis for a steel containment shell is presented herein. The containment is a freestanding shell consisting of a vertical cylinder with a hemispherical dome. It is stiffened by large ring stiffeners and relatively small longitudinal stiffeners. The containment vessel is subjected to both static and dynamic loads which can cause buckling. These loads must be combined prior to their use in a stability analysis. The buckling loads were computed with the aid of the ASME Code case N-284 used in conjunction with general purpose computer codes and in-house programs. The equations contained in the Code case were used to compute the knockdown factors due to shell imperfections. After these knockdown factors were applied to the critical stress states determined by freezing the maximum dynamic stresses and combining them with other static stresses, a linear bifurcation analysis was carried out with the aid of the BOSOR4 program. Since the containment shell contained large penetrations, the Code case had to be supplemented by a local buckling analysis of the shell area surrounding the largest penetration. This analysis was carried out with the aid of the NASTRAN program. Although the factor of safety against buckling obtained in this analysis was satisfactory, it is claimed that the use of the Code case knockdown factors are unduly conservative when applied to the analysis of buckling around penetrations. (orig.)

  4. Reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van De Velde, J.; Fabry, A.; Van Walle, E.; Chaouuadi, R.

    1998-01-01

    Research and development activities related to reactor pressure vessel steels during 1997 are reported. The objectives of activities of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN in this domain are: (1) to develop enhanced surveillance concepts by applying micromechanics and fracture-toughness tests to small specimens, and by performing damage modelling and microstructure characterization; (2) to demonstrate a methodology on a broad database; (3) to achieve regulatory acceptance and industrial use

  5. Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Velde, J.; Fabry, A.; Van Walle, E.; Chaoudi, R

    1998-07-01

    SCK-CEN's R and D programme on Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Steels in performed in support of the RVP integrity assessment. Its main objectives are: (1) to develop enhanced surveillance concepts by applying micromechanics and fracture-toughness tests to small specimens, and by performing damage modelling and microstructure characterization; (2) to demonstrate the applied methodology on a broad database; (3) to achieve regulatory acceptance and industrial use. Progress and achievements in 1999 are reported.

  6. A generic approach for steel containment vessel success criteria for severe accident loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sammataro, R.F.; Solonick, W.R.; Edwards, N.W.

    1993-01-01

    Safety has been defined as the foremost design criterion for the Heavy Water New Production Reactor (NPR-HWR) by the U.S. DOE, Office of New Production Reactors (NP). The DOE-NP issued the Deterministic Severe Accident Criteria (DSAC) concept to guide the design of the NPR-HWR containment for resistance to severe accidents. The DSAC concept provides for a generic approach for containment vessel success criteria to predict the threshold of containment failure under severe accident loads. This concept consists of two parts: (1) Problem Statements and (2) Success Criteria. The paper is limited to a discussion of a success criteria. These criteria define acceptable containment response measures and limits for each problem statement. The criteria are based on the 'best estimate' of failure with no conservatism. Rather, conservatism, if required, is to be provided in the problem statements prepared by the designer and/or the regulatory authorities. The success criteria are presented on a multi-tiered basis for static pressure and temperature loadings, dynamic loadings, and missiles that may impact the containment. Within the static pressure and temperature loadings and the dynamic loadings, the criteria are separated into elastic analysis success criteria and inelastic analysis success criteria. Each of these areas, in turn, defines limits on either the stress or strain measures as well as on measures for buckling and displacements. The rationale upon which these criteria are based is contained in referenced documents. Rigorous validation of the criteria by comparison with results from analytical or experimental programs and application of the criteria to a containment design remain as future tasks. (orig./HP)

  7. Containment vessel drain system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Scott G.

    2018-01-30

    A system for draining a containment vessel may include a drain inlet located in a lower portion of the containment vessel. The containment vessel may be at least partially filled with a liquid, and the drain inlet may be located below a surface of the liquid. The system may further comprise an inlet located in an upper portion of the containment vessel. The inlet may be configured to insert pressurized gas into the containment vessel to form a pressurized region above the surface of the liquid, and the pressurized region may operate to apply a surface pressure that forces the liquid into the drain inlet. Additionally, a fluid separation device may be operatively connected to the drain inlet. The fluid separation device may be configured to separate the liquid from the pressurized gas that enters the drain inlet after the surface of the liquid falls below the drain inlet.

  8. Steel containment buckling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, J.G.; Fly, G.W.; Baker, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    The Steel Containment Buckling program is in its fourth phase of work directed at the evaluation of the effects of the structural failure mode of steel containments when the membrane stresses are compressive. The structural failure mode for this state of stress is instability or buckling. The program to date has investigated: (1) the effect on overall buckling capacity of the ASME area replacement method for reinforcing around circular penetrations; (2) a set of benchmark experiments on ring-stiffened shells having reinforced and framed penetrations; (3) large and small scale experiments on knuckle region buckling from internal pressure and post-buckling behavior to failure for vessel heads having torispherical geometries; and (4) buckling under time-dependent loadings (dynamic buckling). The first two investigations are complete, the knuckle buckling experimental efforts are complete with data analysis and reporting in progress, and the dynamic buckling experimental and analytical work is in progress

  9. Radioactive liquid containing vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurada, Tetsuo; Kawamura, Hironobu.

    1993-01-01

    Cooling jackets are coiled around the outer circumference of a container vessel, and the outer circumference thereof is covered with a surrounding plate. A liquid of good conductivity (for example, water) is filled between the cooling jackets and the surrounding plate. A radioactive liquid is supplied to the container vessel passing through a supply pipe and discharged passing through a discharge pipe. Cooling water at high pressure is passed through the cooling water jackets in order to remove the heat generated from the radioactive liquid. Since cooling water at high pressure is thus passed through the coiled pipes, the wall thickness of the container vessel and the cooling water jackets can be reduced, thereby enabling to reduce the cost. Further, even if the radioactive liquid is leaked, there is no worry of contaminating cooling water, to prevent contamination. (I.N.)

  10. Internal Friction of Pressure Vessel Steel Embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Ouytsel, K.

    2001-01-01

    The contribution consists of an abstract of a PhD thesis. The thesis contains a literature study, a description of the construction details of a new inverted torsion pendulum. This device was designed to investigate pressure-vessel steels at high amplitudes (10 -4 to 10 -2 ) and over a wide temperature range (90-700K) at approximately 1 Hz in the irradiated condition. Results of measurements on a variety of reactor pressure vessel steels by means of the torsion penduli are reported and interpreted

  11. Mobile nuclear reactor containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, R.E.; Spurrier, F.R.; Jones, A.R.

    1978-01-01

    A containment vessel for use in mobile nuclear reactor installations is described. The containment vessel completely surrounds the entire primary system, and is located as close to the reactor primary system components as is possible in order to minimize weight. In addition to being designed to withstand a specified internal pressure, the containment vessel is also designed to maintain integrity as a containment vessel in case of a possible collision accident

  12. Development of PWR pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druce, S.; Edwards, B.

    1982-01-01

    Requirements to be met by vessel steels for pressurized water reactors are analyzed. Chemicat composition of low-alloyed steels, mechanical properties of sheets and forgings made of these steels and changes in the composition and properties over the wall thickness of the reactor vessel are presented. Problems of the vessel manufacturing including welding and heat treatment processes of sheets and forgings are considered. Special attention is paid to steel embrittlement during vessel fabrication and operation (radiation embrittlement, thermal embrittlement). The role of non-metal inclusions and their effect on anisotropy of fracture toughness is discussed. Possible developments of vessel steels and procedures for producing reactor vessels are reviewed

  13. Development of PWR pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druce, S.; Edwards, B.

    1982-01-01

    Requirements to be met by vessel steels for pressurized water reactors are analyzed. Chemicat composition of low-alloyed steels, mechanical properties of sheets and forgings made of these steels and changes in the composition and properties over the wall thickness of the reactor vessel are presented. Problems of the vessel manufacturing including welding and heat treatment processes of sheets and forgings are considered. Special attention is paid to steel embrittlement during vessel fabrication and operation (radiation embrittlement, thermal embrittlement). The role of non-metal inclusions and their effect on anisotropy of fracture toughness is discussed. Possible developments of vessel steels and procedures for producing reactor vessels are reviewed.

  14. Reactor containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochiai, Kanehiro; Hayagumo, Sunao; Morikawa, Matsuo.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To safety and simplify the structure in a reactor containment vessel. Constitution: Steam flow channels with steam jetting ports communicating to coolants are provided between a communication channel and coolants in a pressure suppression chamber. Upon loss of coolant accidents, pressure in a dry well will increase, then force downwards water in an annulus portion and further flow out the water through steam jetting ports into a suppression pool. Thus, the steam flow channel is filled with steams or airs present in the dry well, which are released through the steam jetting ports into the pressure suppression chamber. Even though water is violently vibrated owing to the upward movement of air bubbles and condensation of steam bubbles, the annular portion and the steam jetting ports are filled with steams or the like, direct dynamic loads onto the structures such as communication channels can be avoided. (J.P.N.)

  15. Conceptual design for Japan Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor. (4) Developmental study of steel plate reinforced concrete containment vessel for JSFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoya, Takusaburo; Negishi, Kazuo; Satoh, Kenichiro; Somaki, Takahiro; Matsuo, Ippei; Shimizu, Katsusuke

    2009-01-01

    An innovative containment vessel, namely Steel plate reinforced Concrete Containment Vessel (SCCV) is developed for Japan Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR). Reducing plant construction cost is one of the most important issues for commercialization of fast reactors. This study investigated construction issues including the building structure and the construction method as well as design issues in terms of the applicability of SCCV to fast reactors. An experimental study including loading and/or heating tests has been carried out to investigate the fundamental structural features, which would be provided to develop methodology to evaluate the feasibility of SCCV under the severe conditions. In this paper, the test plan is described as well as the first test results. (author)

  16. Metallurgy of steels for PWR pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kepka, M.; Mocek, J.; Barackova, L.

    1980-01-01

    A survey and the chemical compositions are presented of reactor pressure vessel steels. The metallurgy is described of steel making for pressure vessels in Japan and the USSR. Both acidic and alkaline open-hearth steel is used for the manufacture of ingots. The leading world manufacturers of forging ingots for pressure vessels, however, exclusively use electric steel. Vacuum casting techniques are exclusively used. Experience is shown gained with the introduction of the manufacture of forging ingots for pressure vessels at SKODA, Plzen. The metallurgical procedure was tested utilizing alkaline open hearths, electric arc furnaces and facilities for vacuum casting of steel. Pure charge raw materials should be used for securing high steel purity. Prior to forging pressure vessel rings, not only should sufficiently big bottoms and heads be removed but also the ingot middle part should be scrapped showing higher contents of impurities and nonhomogeneous structure. (B.S.)

  17. Metallurgy of steels for PWR pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kepka, M; Mocek, J; Barackova, L [Skoda, Plzen (Czechoslovakia)

    1980-09-01

    A survey and the chemical compositions are presented of reactor pressure vessel steels. The metallurgy is described of steel making for pressure vessels in Japan and the USSR. Both acidic and alkaline open-hearth steel is used for the manufacture of ingots. The leading world manufacturers of forging ingots for pressure vessels, however, exclusively use electric steel. Vacuum casting techniques are exclusively used. Experience is shown gained with the introduction of the manufacture of forging ingots for pressure vessels at SKODA, Plzen. The metallurgical procedure was tested utilizing alkaline open hearths, electric arc furnaces and facilities for vacuum casting of steel. Pure charge raw materials should be used for securing high steel purity. Prior to forging pressure vessel rings, not only should sufficiently big bottoms and heads be removed but also the ingot middle part should be scrapped showing higher contents of impurities and nonhomogeneous structure.

  18. Proof testing of an explosion containment vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esparza, E.D. [Esparza (Edward D.), San Antonio, TX (United States); Stacy, H.; Wackerle, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-10-01

    A steel containment vessel was fabricated and proof tested for use by the Los Alamos National Laboratory at their M-9 facility. The HY-100 steel vessel was designed to provide total containment for high explosives tests up to 22 lb (10 kg) of TNT equivalent. The vessel was fabricated from an 11.5-ft diameter cylindrical shell, 1.5 in thick, and 2:1 elliptical ends, 2 in thick. Prior to delivery and acceptance, three types of tests were required for proof testing the vessel: a hydrostatic pressure test, air leak tests, and two full design charge explosion tests. The hydrostatic pressure test provided an initial static check on the capacity of the vessel and functioning of the strain instrumentation. The pneumatic air leak tests were performed before, in between, and after the explosion tests. After three smaller preliminary charge tests, the full design charge weight explosion tests demonstrated that no yielding occurred in the vessel at its rated capacity. The blast pressures generated by the explosions and the dynamic response of the vessel were measured and recorded with 33 strain channels, 4 blast pressure channels, 2 gas pressure channels, and 3 displacement channels. This paper presents an overview of the test program, a short summary of the methodology used to predict the design blast loads, a brief description of the transducer locations and measurement systems, some of the hydrostatic test strain and stress results, examples of the explosion pressure and dynamic strain data, and some comparisons of the measured data with the design loads and stresses on the vessel.

  19. Steel containment buckling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, T.A.; Baker, W.E.

    1986-01-01

    Two aspects of buckling of a free-standing nuclear steel containment building were investigated in a combined experimental and analytical program. In the first part of the study, the response of a scale model of a containment building to dynamic base excitation is investigated. A simple harmonic signal was used for preliminary studies followed by experiments with scaled earthquake signals as the excitation source. The experiments and accompanying analyses indicate that the scale model response to earthquake-type excitations is very complex and that current analytical methods may require a dynamic capacity reduction factor to be incorporated. The second part of the study quantified the effects of framing at large penetrations on the static buckling capacity of scale model containments. Results show little effect from the framing for the scale models constructed from the polycarbonate, Lexan. However, additional studies with a model constructed of the prototypic steel material are suggested

  20. Long term integrity of reactor pressure vessel and primary containment vessel after the severe accidents in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. Leaching property of spent oxide fuel segment and corrosion property of a carbon steel under artificial seawater immersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-06-01

    Primary containment vessel (PCV), reactor pressure vessel and pedestal in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear power station units 1 through 3 have been exposed to severe thermal, chemical and mechanical conditions due to core meltdown events and seawater injections for emergent core cooling. These components will be immersed in diluted seawater with dissolved fission products under irradiation until the end of debris removal. Fresh water injected into the cores contacts with debris to cool, dissolves or erodes their constituents, mixed with retained water, and becomes 'accumulated water' with radioactive nuclides. We have focused the leaching of fission products into the accumulated water under lower temperature (323 K). FUGEN spent oxide fuel segments were immersed to determine the leaching factor of fission product and actinide elements. Since PCV made from carbon steel is one of the most important boundaries to prevent from fission products release, corrosion behavior has been paid attention to evaluate their integrity. Carbon steel specimens were immersion- and electrochemical-tested in diluted seawater with simulants of the accumulated water at 323 K in order to evaluate the effect of fission products in particular cesium and radiation. (author)

  1. Buckling of steel containment shells. Task 1b. Buckling of Washington Public Power Supply Systems' plant No. 2 containment vessel. Final report, 25 August 1980-30 September 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meller, E.; Bushnell, D.

    1982-12-01

    Static buckling analyses of the steel containment vessel of the Washington Public Power Supply Systems' (WPPSS) plant No. 2 were conducted with use of several computer programs developed at the Lockheed Missiles and Space Company (LMSC). These analyses were conducted as part of Task 1, Evaluation of Two Steel Containment Designs. The report is divided into two main sections. The first gives results from analyses of the containment as if it were axisymmetric (computerized models with use of BOSOR4, BOSOR5, and PANDA), and the second gives results from a STAGSC-1 model in which the largest penetration is included. Good agreement is obtained from analyses with BOSOR5 and STAGSC-1 for a case in which both of these computer programs were applied to the same configuration and loading. It is important to include nonlinear material behavior (plasticity) in the computerized models for collapse. Predictions of collapse from STAGSC-1 indicate that the largest penetration of the WPPSS-2 containment vessel is reinforced such that there is no decrease in load carrying capability below that indicated from models in which this penetration is neglected

  2. Stowing the Right Containers on Container Vessels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rune Møller

    2014-01-01

    ’s largest container vessels using standard mathematical programming techniques and off-the-shelf solvers. The presentation will provide basic insight into the domain, with pointers to further information that enable you to join in this promising new path of operations research and business....

  3. Irradiation embrittlement of pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.; Vacek, M.

    1975-01-01

    A Standard Research Programme on Irradiation Embrittlement of Pressure Vessel Steels was approved by the Coordinating Meeting on the 12th May 1972 at the Working Group on Engineering Aspects of Irradiation Embrittlement of Pressure Vessel Steels. This Working Group was set up by the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna. Seven countries with their research institutes agreed on doing irradiation experiments according to the approved programme on steel A533 B from the U.S. HSST Programme. The Czechoslovak contribution covering tensile and impact testing of non-irradiated steel and steel irradiated at 280degC to 1.3 x 10 23 n/m 2 (E above 1 MeV) is presented in this report. As an additional part the same set of experiments was carried out on two additional steels - A 542 and A 543, made in SKODA Works for comparison of their irradiation embrittlement and hardening with A533 B steel. (author)

  4. Molten material-containing vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akagawa, Katsuhiko

    1998-01-01

    The molten material-containing vessel of the present invention comprises a vessel main body having an entrance opened at the upper end, a lid for closing the entrance, an outer tube having an upper end disposed at the lower surface of the lid, extended downwardly and having an closed lower end and an inner tube disposed coaxially with the outer tube. When a molten material is charged from the entrance to the inside of the vessel main body of the molten material-containing vessel and the entrance is closed by the lid, the outer tube and the inner tube are buried in the molten material in the vessel main body, accordingly, a fluid having its temperature elevated by absorption of the heat of the molten material rises along the inner circumferential surface of the outer tube, abuts against the lower surface of the lid and cooled by exchanging heat with the lid and forms a circulating flow. Since the heat in the molten material is continuously absorbed by the fluid, transferred to the lid and released from the lid to the atmospheric air, heat releasing efficiency can be improved compared with conventional cases. (N.H.)

  5. Modeling irradiation embrittlement in reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odette, G.R.

    1998-01-01

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. In chapter 10, numerical modeling of irradiation embrittlement in reactor vessel steels are introduced. Physically-based models are developed and their role in advancing the state-of-the-art of predicting irradiation embrittlement of RPV steels is stressed

  6. Microstructural evolution in neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    English, C.A.; Phythian, W.J.

    1998-01-01

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. The microstructural evolution in neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels is described. The damage mechanisms are elaborated and techniques for examining the microstructure are suggested. The importance of the initial damage event is analysed, and the microstructural evolution in RPV steels is examined

  7. Containment vessel design and practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangash, Y.

    1983-01-01

    The state of the art of analysis and design of the concrete containment vessels required for BWR and PWR is reviewed. A step-by-step critical appraisal of the existing work is given. Elastic, inelastic and cracking conditions under extreme loads are fully discussed. Problems associated with these structures are highlighted. A three-dimensional finite element analysis is included to cater for service, overload and dynamic cracking of such structures. Missile impact and seismic effects are included in this work. The second analysis is known as the limit state analysis, which is given to design such vessels for any kind of load. (U.K.)

  8. Steel containment buckling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, T.A.; Baker, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    Two aspects of buckling of a free-standing nuclear containment building were investigated in a combined experimental and analytical program. In the first part of the study, the response of a scale model of a containment building to dynamic base excitation is investigated. A simple harmonic signal was used for preliminary studies followed by experiments with scaled earthquake signals as the excitation source. The experiments and accompanying analyses indicate that the scale model response to earthquake-type excitations is very complex and that current analytical methods may require that a dynamic capacity reduction factor be incorporated. The second part of the study quantified the effects of framing at large penetrations on the static buckling capacity of scale model containments. Results show little effect from the framing for the scale models constructed from the polycarbonate, Lexan. However, additional studies with a model constructed of the prototypic steel material are recommended. (orig.)

  9. Instrumentation and testing of a prestressed concrete containment vessel model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hessheimer, M.F.; Pace, D.W.; Klamerus, E.W.

    1997-01-01

    Static overpressurization tests of two scale models of nuclear containment structures - a steel containment vessel (SCV) representative of an improved, boiling water reactor (BWR) Mark II design and a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) for pressurized water reactors (PWR) - are being conducted by Sandia National Laboratories for the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation of Japan and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This paper discusses plans for instrumentation and testing of the PCCV model. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Reactor Structural Materials: Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaouadi, R.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's R and D programme on Rector Pressure Vessel (RPV) Steels are:(1) to complete the fracture toughness data bank of various reactor pressure vessel steels by using precracked Charpy specimens that were tested statically as well as dynamically; (2) to implement the enhanced surveillance approach in a user-friendly software; (3) to improve the existing reconstitution technology by reducing the input energy (short cycle welding) and modifying the stud geometry. Progress and achievements in 1999 are reported

  11. Thermal embrittlement of reactor vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corwin, W.R.; Nanstad, R.K.; Alexander, D.J.; Stoller, R.E.; Wang, J.A.; Odette, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    As a result of observations of possible thermal embrittlement from recent studies with welds removed from retired steam generators of the Palisades Nuclear Plant (PNP), an assessment was made of thermal aging of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels under nominal reactor operating conditions. Discussions are presented on (1) data from the literature regarding relatively low-temperature thermal embrittlement of RPV steels; (2)relevant data from the US power reactor-embrittlement data base (PR-EDB); and (3)potential mechanisms of thermal embrittlement in low-alloy steels

  12. Niobium Application, Metallurgy and Global Trends in Pressure Vessel Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansto, Steven G.

    Niobium-containing high strength steel materials have been developed for a variety of pressure vessel applications. Through the application of these Nb-bearing steels in demanding applications, the designer and end user experience improved toughness at low temperature, excellent fatigue resistance and fracture toughness and excellent weldability. These enhancements provide structural engineers the opportunity to further improve the pressure vessel design and performance. The Nb-microalloy alloy designs also result in reduced operational production cost at the steel operation, thereby embracing the value-added attribute Nb provides to both the producer and the end user throughout the supply chain. For example, through the adoption of these Nb-containing structural materials, several design-manufacturing companies are considering improved designs which offer improved manufacturability, lower overall cost and better life cycle performance.

  13. Mark III Containment vessel/annulus concrete design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, P.S.; Moussa, M.M.

    1981-01-01

    Recently, engineers have been considering the significant dynamic impact of safety/relief valve (S/RV) discharge loads on the containment structures, safety equipment, and piping systems in BWR type reactors. For a plant in the construction stage, extensive modifications will be made to qualify these new loads. The lower portion of the containment vessel serves as a suppression pool pressure boundary and is designed to sustain the effects of postulated loss of coolant accidents, seismic occurrences, S/RV discharge loads, and other effects. Extremely high spectral peak accelerations of the free-standing steel containment vessel can be obtained during the air dearing process of the S/RV discharge. Parametric studies indicated that a substantial reduction in response can be obtained by increasing the stiffness of the steel containment vessel in the lover area. A concrete backing configuration in the suppression pool area of Mark III Containment is proposed in this paper. A composite action is assumed between the steel containment vessel shell and the concrete section. The system is physically separated from the shield building. This approach warrants an early erection of the shield building and a late installation of piping systems in the containment vessel suppression pool area. Finite element analyses are performed by using ASHSD2 and EASE2 computer codes. The results of the analyses have shown the proposed stress criteria are satisfied. The approach pressented is justified to be a workable system for a new plant design. (orig./HP)

  14. Radiation embrittlement of Spanish nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bros, J.; Ballesteros, A.; Lopez, A.

    1993-01-01

    Commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) nuclear power plants contain a series of pressure vessel steel surveillance capsules as the principal means of monitoring radiation effects on the pressure vessel. Changes in fracture toughness are more severe in surveillance capsules than in reactor vessel materials because of their proximity of the reactor core. Therefore, it is possible to predict changes in fracture toughness of the reactor vessel materials. This paper describes the status of the reactor vessel surveillance program relating to Spanish nuclear power plants. To date, twelve capsules have been removed and analyzed from seven of the nine Spanish reactors in operation. The results obtained from the analysis of these capsules are compared with the predictions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guide 1.99, Rev. 2, by means of measured and expected increase of the nil-ductility transition reference temperature (RT NDT ). The comparison is made considering the different variables normally included in the studies of radiation response of reactor pressure vessel materials, such as copper content of steel, level of neutron fluence above 1 MeV, base metal or weld metal, and so forth. The surveillance data have been used for determining the adjusted reference temperatures and upper shelf energies at any time. The results have shown that the seven pressure vessels are in excellent condition to continue operating with safety against brittle fracture beyond the design life, without the need to recuperate the degraded properties of the materials by annealing of the vessel

  15. Manufacturing method for radioactive material containing vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamino, Yoshikazu; Nishioka, Eiji; Toyota, Michinori.

    1997-01-01

    A containing vessel for radioactive materials (for example, spent fuels) comprises an inner cylinder made of stainless steel having a space for containing radioactive materials at the inside and an outer cylinder made of stainless steel disposed at the outer side of the inner cylinder. Lead homogenization is applied to a space between the inner and the outer cylinders to deposit a lead layer. Then, molten lead heated to a predetermined temperature is cast into the space between the inner and the outer cylinders. A valve is opened to discharge the molten lead in the space from a molten lead discharge pipe, and heated molten lead is injected from a molten lead supply pipe. Then, the discharge of the molten lead and the injection of the molten lead are stopped, and the lead in the space is coagulated. With such procedures, gaps are not formed between the lead of the homogenized portion and the lead of cast portion even when the thickness of the inner and the outer cylinders is great. (I.N.)

  16. Microstructure and embrittlement of VVER 440 reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennion, A.

    1999-03-01

    27 VVER 440 pressurised water reactors operate in former Soviet Union and in Eastern Europe. The pressure vessel, is made of Cr-Mo-V steel. It contains a circumferential arc weld in front of the nuclear core. This weld undergoes a high neutron flux and contains large amounts of copper and phosphorus, elements well known for their embrittlement potency under irradiation. The embrittlement kinetic of the steel is accelerated, reducing the lifetime of the reactor. In order to get informations on the microstructure and mechanical properties of these steels, base metals, HAZ, and weld metals have been characterized. The high amount of phosphorus in weld metals promotes the reverse temper embrittlement that occurs during post-weld heat treatment. The radiation damage structure has been identified by small angle neutron scattering, atomic probe, and transmission electron microscopy. Nanometer-sized clusters of solute atoms, rich in copper with almost the same characteristics as in western pressure vessels steels, and an evolution of the size distribution of vanadium carbides, which are present on dislocation structure, are observed. These defects disappear during post-irradiation tempering. As in western steels, the embrittlement is due to both hardening and reduction of interphase cohesion. The radiation damage specificity of VVER steels arises from their high amount of phosphorus and from their significant density of fine vanadium carbides. (author)

  17. Integrity of Magnox reactor steel pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flewitt, P.E.J.; Williams, G.H.; Wright, M.B.

    1992-01-01

    The background to the safety assessment of the steel reactor pressure vessels for Magnox power stations is reviewed. The evolved philosophy adopted for the 1991 safety cases prepared for the continued operation of four Magnox power stations operated by Nuclear Electric plc is described, together with different aspects of the multi-legged integrity argument. The main revisions to the materials mechanical property data are addressed together with the assessment methodology adopted and their implications for the overall integrity argument formulated for the continued safe operation of these reactor pressure vessels. (author)

  18. Concrete containment vessels (CCV) for nuclear power plants, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibe, Yukimi; Kitajima, Masatake

    1977-01-01

    Containment vessels (CV) and the construction of concrete containment vessels (CCV) for nuclear power plants are described generally, and their use and techniques in foreign countries are illustrated, in connection with the introduction of CCV to Japanese nuclear power plants. The introduction deals with the construction plan of Japanese nuclear power plants, and with the difficulties in the steel CV for large scale construction. The investigations, tests and researches are not yet sufficient. The prompt establishment of safety supported by technical criteria, analytical methods and experiments is desired. The second part deals with the consideration for aseismatic design, construction, function and characteristics of CCV. The classification and currently employed CCV, which is mainly reinforced concrete containment vessels (RCCV), are described, and the typical CCV employed for BWR is illustrated. Further, the typical arrangement of reinforcing steels at the cylindrical portion and the dome portion of RCCV is illustrated. The third part deals with the present state of CCV abroad. A prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) of Turkey Point power plant is illustrated as a typical example of CCV. The tests reported in the international meeting for the design, construction and operation of concrete pressure vessels and concrete containment vessels at York University in England in 1975 are reviewed. Typical examples of the design conditions, the size and form, and the construction procedure for PCCV and RCCV abroad are reviewed. (Iwakiri, K.)

  19. BWR steel containment corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, C.P.; Bagchi, G.

    1996-04-01

    The report describes regulatory actions taken after corrosion was discovered in the drywell at the Oyster Creek Plant and in the torus at the Nine Mile Point 1 Plant. The report describes the causes of corrosion, requirements for monitoring corrosion, and measures to mitigate the corrosive environment for the two plants. The report describes the issuances of generic letters and information notices either to collect information to determine whether the problem is generic or to alert the licensees of similar plants about the existence of such a problem. Implementation of measures to enhance the containment performance under severe accident conditions is discussed. A study by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) of the performance of a degraded containment under severe accident conditions is summarized. The details of the BNL study are in the appendix to the report.

  20. Pressure Vessel Steel Research: Belgian Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Walle, E.; Fabry, A.; Ait Abderrahim, H.; Chaouadi, R.; D'hondt, P.; Puzzolante, J.L.; Van de Velde, J.; Van Ransbeeck, T.; Gerard, R.

    1994-03-01

    A review of the Belgian research activities on Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels (RPVS) and on related Neutron Dosimetry Aspects is presented. Born out of the surveillance programmes of the Belgian nuclear power plants, this research has lead to the development of material saving techniques, like reconstitution and miniaturization, and to improved neutron dosimetry techniques. A physically- justified RPVS fracture toughness indexation methodology, supported by micro-mechanistic modelling, is based on the elaborate use of the instrumented Charpy impact signal. Computational tools for neutron dosimetry allow to reduce the uncertainties on surveillance capsule fluences significantly

  1. Pressure Vessel Steel Research: Belgian Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Walle, E; Fabry, A; Ait Abderrahim, H; Chaouadi, R; D` hondt, P; Puzzolante, J L; Van de Velde, J; Van Ransbeeck, T [Centre d` Etude de l` Energie Nucleaire, Mol (Belgium); Gerard, R [TRACTEBEL, Brussels (Belgium)

    1994-03-01

    A review of the Belgian research activities on Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels (RPVS) and on related Neutron Dosimetry Aspects is presented. Born out of the surveillance programmes of the Belgian nuclear power plants, this research has lead to the development of material saving techniques, like reconstitution and miniaturization, and to improved neutron dosimetry techniques. A physically- justified RPVS fracture toughness indexation methodology, supported by micro-mechanistic modelling, is based on the elaborate use of the instrumented Charpy impact signal. Computational tools for neutron dosimetry allow to reduce the uncertainties on surveillance capsule fluences significantly.

  2. Corrosion of steel tendons used in prestressed concrete pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griess, J.C.; Naus, D.J.

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the corrosion behavior of a high strength steel (ASTM A416-74 grade 270), typical of those used as tensioning tendons in prestressed concrete pressure vessels, in several corrosive environments and to demonstrate the protection afforded by coating the steel with either of two commercial petroleum-base greases or Portland Cement grout. In addition, the few reported incidents of prestressing steel failures in concrete pressure vessels used for containment of nuclear reactors are reviewed. The susceptibility of the steel to stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen embrittlement and its general corrosion rate were determined in several salt solutions. Wires coated with the greases and grout were soaked for long periods in the same solutions and changes in their mechanical properties were subsequently determined. All three coatings appeared to give essentially complete protection but small flaws in the grease coatings were detrimental; flaws or cracks less than 1 mm wide in the grout were without effect

  3. Method of burying vessel containing radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Yoshihito.

    1989-01-01

    A float having an inert gas sealed therein is attached to a tightly closed vessel containing radioactive wastes. The vessel is inserted and kept in a small hole for burying the tightly closed vessel in an excavated shaft in rocks such as of granite or rock salts, while filling bentonite as shielding material therearound. In this case, the float is so adjusted that the apparent specific gravity is made equal or nearer between the tightly closed vessel and the bentonite, so that the rightly closed vessel does not sink and cause direct contact with the rocks even if bentonite flows due to earthquakes, etc. This can prevent radioactivity contamination through water in the rocks. (S.K.)

  4. Containment vessel construction for nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulzer, H.D.; Coletti, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear containment vessel houses an inner reactor housing structure whose outer wall is closely spaced from the inner wall of the containment vessel. The inner reactor housing structure is divided by an intermediate floor providing an upper chamber for housing the reactor and associated steam generators and a lower chamber directly therebeneath containing a pressure suppression pool. Communication between the upper chamber and the pressure suppression pool is established by conduits extending through the intermediate floor which terminate beneath the level of the pressure suppression pool and by inlet openings in the reactor housing wall beneath the level of the pressure suppression pool which communicate with the annulus formed between the outer wall of the reactor housing structure and the inner wall of the containment vessel. (Official Gazette)

  5. Safety of steel vessel Magnox pressure circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokoe, T.Y.; Bolton, C.J.; Heffer, P.J.H.

    1991-01-01

    The maintenance of pressure circuit integrity is fundamental to nuclear safety at the steel vessel Magnox stations. To confirm continued pressure circuit integrity the CEGB, as part of the Long Term Safety Review, has carried out extensive assessment and inspection in recent years. The assessment methods and inspection techniques employed are based on the most modern available. Reactor pressure vessel integrity is confirmed by a combination of arguments including safety factors inferred from the successful pre-service overpressure test, leak-before-break analysis and probabilistic assessment. In the case of other parts of the pressure circuits that are more accessible, comprising the boiler shells and interconnecting gas duct work, in-service inspection is a major element of the safety substantiation. The assessment and inspection techniques and the materials property data have been underpinned for many years by extensive research and development programmes and in-reactor monitoring of representative samples has also been undertaken. The paper summarises the work carried out to demonstrate the long term integrity of the Magnox pressure circuits and provides examples of the results obtained. (author)

  6. Storage vessel for radiation contaminated container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakatani, Tadatsugu.

    1996-01-01

    In a storage vessel of the present invention, a plurality of radiation contaminated material containing bodies are vertically stacked in a cell chamber. Then, the storage vessel comprises a containing tube for containing a plurality of the containing bodies, cooling coils wound around the containing tube, a cooling medium circulating system connected to the cooling coils and circulating cooling medium, and a heat exchanger interposed to the cooling medium circulating system for removing heat of the cooling medium. Heat of the radioactive material containing bodies is transferred to cooling air and cooling coils by way of the container tube, thereby cooling the containing bodies. By the operation of circulating pumps in a cooling medium circulation system, the cooling medium circulates through a circulation channel comprising a cooling medium transfer pipes, cooling medium branching tubes, cooling coils and the heat exchanger, then heat of the cooling medium is transferred to a heat utilizing system by way of the heat exchanger to attain effective utilization of the heat. In this case, heat can be taken out stably even when the storage amount fluctuates and heat releasing amount is reduced, and improvement of heat transfer promotes the cooling of the containing bodies, which enables minimization of the size of the storage vessel. (T.M.)

  7. Evaluation of buckling on containment metallic vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silveira, Renato Campos da; Mattar Neto, Miguel

    2000-01-01

    The buckling analysis represents one of the most important aspects of the structural projects of nuclear power plants containment metallic vessels and in this work the Case N-284-1 ASME Code is used for evaluation of those structures submitted to this failure mode. From the stress analysis, performed by using finite element method on discrete structures with shell elements, the procedure of the Code Case are applied to the evaluation of the containment metallic vessel of the Angra 2 nuclear power plant submitted to the own weight, seismic loads and uplift in case of accident. A study of pressure vessel reinforced by rings submit ed to the external pressure. Conclusions and commentaries are established based on the obtained results

  8. Topic 1. Steels for light water reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.; Brynda, J.; Kepka, M.; Barackova, L.; Vacek, M.; Havel, S.; Cukr, B.; Protiva, K.; Petrman, I.; Tvrdy, M.; Hyspecka, L.; Mazanec, K.; Kupca, L.; Brezina, M.

    1980-01-01

    Part 1 of the Proceedings consists of papers on the criteria for the selection and comparison of the properties of steel for pressure vessels and on the metallurgy of the said steels, the selection of suitable material for internal tubing systems, the manufacture of high-alloy steels for WWER components, the mechanical and metallurgical properties of steel 22K for WWER 440 pressure components, and of steel 10MnNi2Mo for the WWER primary coolant circuit, and the metallographic assessment of steel 0Kh18N10T. (J.P.)

  9. Corrosion of vessel steel during its interaction with molten corium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechta, S.V.; Khabensky, V.B.; Vitol, S.A.; Krushinov, E.V.; Granovsky, V.S.; Lopukh, D.B.; Gusarov, V.V.; Martinov, A.P.; Martinov, V.V.; Fieg, G.; Tromm, W.; Bottomley, D.; Tuomisto, H.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is concerned with corrosion of a cooled vessel steel structure interacting with molten corium in air and neutral (nitrogen) atmospheres during an in-vessel retention scenario. The data on corrosion kinetics at different temperatures on the heated steel surface, heat flux densities and oxygen potential in the system are presented. The post-test physico-chemical and metallographic analyses of melt samples and the corium-specimen ingot have clarified certain mechanisms of steel corrosion taking place during the in-vessel melt interaction

  10. Storage vessel for containing radiation contaminated material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Kazuya.

    1995-01-01

    A container pipe and an outer pipe are coaxially assembled integrally in a state where securing spacers are disposed between the container pipe and the outer pipe, and an annular flow channel is formed around the container pipe. Radiation contaminated material-containing body (glass solidified package) is contained in the container pipe. The container pipe and the outer pipe in an integrated state are suspended from a ceiling plug of a cell chamber of a storage vessel, and supporting devices are assembled between the pipes and a support structure. A shear/lug mechanism is used for the supporting devices. The combination of the shear/lug allows radial and vertical movement but restrict horizontal movement of the outer tube. The supporting devices are assembled while visually recognizing the state of the shear/lug mechanism between the outer pipe and the support mechanism. Accordingly, operationability upon assembling the container pipe and the outer pipe is improved. (I.N.)

  11. Fast Generation of Container Vessel Stowage Plans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pacino, Dario

    that the vessel is stable and seaworthy, and at the same time arrange the cargo such that the time at port is minimized. Moreover, stowage coordinators only have a limited amount of time to produce the plan. This thesis addresses the question of whether it is possible to automatically generate stowage plans...... test instances provided by a major liner shipping company. Improvements to the modeling of vessel stability and an analysis of its accuracy together with an analysis of the computational complexity of the container stowage problem are also included in the thesis, resulting in an overall in...

  12. Experimental studies of oxidic molten corium-vessel steel interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechta, S.V.; Khabensky, V.B.; Vitol, S.A.; Krushinov, E.V.; Lopukh, D.B.; Petrov, Yu.B.; Petchenkov, A.Yu.; Kulagin, I.V.; Granovsky, V.S.; Kovtunova, S.V.; Martinov, V.V.; Gusarov, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    The experimental results of molten corium-steel specimen interaction with molten corium on the 'Rasplav-2' test facility are presented. In the experiments, cooled vessel steel specimens positioned on the molten pool bottom and uncooled ones lowered into the molten pool were tested. Interaction processes were studied for different corium compositions, melt superheating and in alternative (inert and air) overlying atmosphere. Hypotheses were put forward explaining the observed phenomena and interaction mechanisms. The studies presented in the paper were aimed at the detection of different corium-steel interaction mechanisms. Therefore certain identified phenomena are more typical of the ex-vessel localization conditions than of the in-vessel corium retention. Primarily, this can be referred to the phenomena of low-temperature molten corium-vessel steel interaction in oxidizing atmosphere

  13. Experimental studies of oxidic molten corium-vessel steel interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechta, S.V. E-mail: niti-npc@sbor.net; Khabensky, V.B.; Vitol, S.A.; Krushinov, E.V.; Lopukh, D.B.; Petrov, Yu.B.; Petchenkov, A.Yu.; Kulagin, I.V.; Granovsky, V.S.; Kovtunova, S.V.; Martinov, V.V.; Gusarov, V.V

    2001-12-01

    The experimental results of molten corium-steel specimen interaction with molten corium on the 'Rasplav-2' test facility are presented. In the experiments, cooled vessel steel specimens positioned on the molten pool bottom and uncooled ones lowered into the molten pool were tested. Interaction processes were studied for different corium compositions, melt superheating and in alternative (inert and air) overlying atmosphere. Hypotheses were put forward explaining the observed phenomena and interaction mechanisms. The studies presented in the paper were aimed at the detection of different corium-steel interaction mechanisms. Therefore certain identified phenomena are more typical of the ex-vessel localization conditions than of the in-vessel corium retention. Primarily, this can be referred to the phenomena of low-temperature molten corium-vessel steel interaction in oxidizing atmosphere.

  14. Low temperature radiation embrittlement for reactor vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginding, I.A.; Chirkina, L.A.

    1978-01-01

    General conceptions of cold brittleness of bcc metals are in a review. Considered are experimental data and theoretical representations about the effect of irradiation conditions, chemical composition, phase and structural constitutions, grain size, mechanical and thermomechanical treatments on low-temperature irradiation embrittlement of reactor vessel steels. Presented are the methods for increasing radiation stability of metals (carbon and Cr-Mo steels) used in manufacturing reactor vessels

  15. East/west steels for reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, M.; Kryukov, A.; Nikolaev, Y.; English, C.

    1997-01-01

    The report consist of three parts dealing with comparison of the irradiation behaviour of 'Eastern' and 'Western' steels, mechanisms of irradiation embrittlement and the role of compositional variations on the irradiation sensitivity of pressure vessels. Nickel, copper and phosphorus are the elements rendering the most essential influence on behaviour of pressure vessel steels under irradiation and subsequent thermal annealing. For WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels in which nickel content does nor exceed 0.3% the main affecting factors are phosphorous and copper. For WWER-1000 RPV welds in which nickel content generally exceed 1.5% the role of nickel in radiation embrittlement is decisive. In 'Western' type steels main influencing elements are nickel and copper. The secondary role of phosphorus in radiation embrittlement of 'Western' steels is caused by lower relative content compared to 'Eastern' steels. The process of how copper, phosphorus and nickel contents affect the irradiation sensitivity of both types of steel seem to be similar. Some distinctions between the observed radiation effects is apparently caused by differences in the irradiation conditions and ratios of the contents of above mentioned elements in both types of steel. For 'Eastern' RPV steels the dependence of the recovery degree of irradiated steels due to postirradiation thermal annealing id obviously dependent on phosphorus contents and the influence of nickel contents on this process is detectable

  16. Dynamic fracture characterization of a pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, W.; Boehme, W.; Klemm, W.; Memhard, D.; Winkler, S.

    1991-01-01

    Dynamic events are characterized by time and space-dependent stress and strain fields caused by wave or inertia effect. The dynamic effect at cracks may be originated from the rapid loading rate or impact loading of a structure containing a stationary crack or the time-dependent stress and strain fields of a propagating or arresting crack itself. Dynamic effects complicate the analysis of crack tip stress and strain fields, and usually considerable experimental effort and numerical technique are required. High loading rate influences the deformation and yield behavior and also the fracture toughness of materials. In order to know the propagation and arrest behavior of cracks, a heat of a German reactor pressure vessel steel was investigated, and the dynamic J-resistance curves were evaluated with large three-point bending specimens by impact loading, moreover, the crack propagation energy at large crack extension was determined with wide tension plates. The material tested was a ferritic pressure vessel steel, ASTM A 508 Cl 2. The dynamic J-resistance curves and numerical simulation and fractographic examination, and crack propagation energy are reported. (K.I.)

  17. Containment vessel for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanari, Sh.; Horiuchi, T.; Sugisaki, T.; Tominaga, K.

    1985-01-01

    A containment vessel for a nuclear reactor having a dry well for mounting therein a pressure vessel for containing the nuclear reactor, a pressure suppressing chamber having a pool of coolant therein, and a vent pipe device for releasing therethrough into the pool of coolant within the pressure suppressing chamber steam which will be produced as a result of the occurrence of an accident and escape into the dry well. The vent pipe device includes a plurality of vent pipe members inserted in the pool of coolant within the pressure suppressing chamber and each having at least one exhaust port opening in the coolant. The vent pipe members are divided into a plurality of groups in such a manner that the vent pipe members of different groups differ from one another in the length of submerged portions of the vent pipe members interposed between the liquid of the coolant within the pressure suppressing chamber and the exhaust ports of the vent pipe members

  18. Containing method for spent fuel and spent fuel containing vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, Hiromichi; Hanada, Yoshine.

    1996-01-01

    Upon containing spent fuels, a metal vessel main body and a support spacer having fuel containing holes are provided. The support spacer is disposed in the inside of the metal vessel main body, and spent fuel assemblies are loaded in the fuel containing holes. Then, a lid is welded at the opening of the metal vessel main body to provide a sealing state. In this state, heat released from the spent fuel assemblies is transferred to the wall of the metal vessel main body via the support spacer. Since the support spacer has a greater heat conductivity than gases, heat of the spent fuel assemblies tends to be released to the outside, thereby capable of removing heat of the spent fuel assemblies effectively. In addition, since the surfaces of the spent fuel assemblies are in contact with the inner surface of the fuel containing holes of the support spacer, impact-resistance and earthquake-resistance are ensured, and radiation from the spent fuel assemblies is decayed by passing through the layer of the support spacer. (T.M.)

  19. Development of prestressed concrete containment vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuji, Hideo; Kuniyoshi, Mutsumu; Nagata, Kaoru

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of evaluations for the selection of the structural and prestressing system type to be employed for the first domestic Prestressed Concrete Containment Vessel (PCCV) in Japan. This paper also discusses characteristic features in the design of the liner plate system provided on the PCCV inner surface to assure its leak-tight integrity. Prestressed concrete containment vessels so far constructed in foreign countries are to a considerable extent of different structural types, depending on differences in dome shapes, prestressing systems and number of buttresses. These differences are caused not only by differences in design philosophy and construction practices, but also by difference in the level of technology of the times when the individual containment vessels are being constructed. In the investigation reported herein, the most suitable types of PCCV and Prestressing Systems were determined as the results of an overall comparative evaluation of data and information obtained from PCCV's so far constructed from the design, construction and cost aspects, taking into consideration the seismic criteria, available technology, construction practices, regulations and technical standards in Japan. The function of the liner plate system requires the liner to have enough deformability so that the liner deformation can be consistent with the PCCV concrete deformation. Therefore, in the design of the liner plate system a method for evaluating liner deformability was employed, instead of the stress evaluation method which is widely used in the design of ordinary structures. (author)

  20. Problems in development of pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahon, C.Y.

    1980-01-01

    The tendency of steels to intercrystalline fracture at low stresses is the main factor, limiting fracture resistance of steels in agressive media at conventional and elevated temperatures. The reasons for the phenomenon are analyzed. In particular, the role of grain boundary segregations of non-metallic impurities is pointed out. The ways of the problem solving both at the expense of corresponding microstructure control and by means of selection of the steel chemical composition are considered

  1. Nitrogen-containing steels and thermomechanical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaputkina, L.; Prokoshkina, V.G.; Svyazhin, G.

    2004-01-01

    The strengthening of nitrogen-containing corrosion-resistant steels resulting from alloying and thermomechanical treatment have been investigated using X-ray diffraction analysis, light microscopy, hardness measurements and tensile testing. Combined data have been obtained for nitrogen interaction with alloying elements , peculiarities of deformed structure and short-range of nitrogen-containing steels of various structural classes. The higher nitrogen and total alloying element contents, the higher deformation strengthening. Prospects of use the steels with not high nitrogen content and methods of their thermomechanical strengthening are shown. High temperature thermomechanical treatment (HTMT) is very effective for obtaining high and thermally stable constructional strength of nitrogen-containing steels of all classes. The HTMT is most effective if used in a combination with dispersion hardening for aging steels or in the case of mechanically unstable austenitic steels. (author)

  2. Instrumentation of a prestressed concrete containment vessel model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hessheimer, M.F.; Rightley, M.J.; Matsumoto, T.

    1995-01-01

    A series of static overpressurization tests of scale models of nuclear containment structures is being conducted by Sandia National Laboratories for the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation of Japan and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. At present, two tests are being planned: a test of a model of a steel containment vessel (SCV) that is representative of an improved, boiling water reactor (BWR) Mark II design; and a test of a model of a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV). This paper discusses plans and the results of a preliminary investigation of the instrumentation of the PCCV model. The instrumentation suite for this model will consist of approximately 2000 channels of data to record displacements, strains in the reinforcing steel, prestressing tendons, concrete, steel liner and liner anchors, as well as pressure and temperature. The instrumentation is being designed to monitor the response of the model during prestressing operations, during Structural Integrity and Integrated Leak Rate testing, and during test to failure of the model. Particular emphasis has been placed on instrumentation of the prestressing system in order to understand the behavior of the prestressing strands at design and beyond design pressure levels. Current plans are to place load cells at both ends of one third of the tendons in addition to placing strain measurement devices along the length of selected tendons. Strain measurements will be made using conventional bonded foil resistance gages and a wire resistance gage, known as a open-quotes Tensmegclose quotes reg-sign gage, specifically designed for use with seven-wire strand. The results of preliminary tests of both types of gages, in the laboratory and in a simulated model configuration, are reported and plans for instrumentation of the model are discussed

  3. Dynamic testing of MFTF containment-vessel structural system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, H.J.; McCallen, D.B.; Eli, M.W.

    1982-01-01

    Dynamic (modal) testing was performed on the Magnetic Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) containment vessel. The seismic design of this vessel was heavily dependent upon the value of structural damping used in the analysis. Typically for welded steel vessels, a value of 2 to 3% of critical is used. However, due to the large mass of the vessel and magnet supported inside, we felt that the interaction between the structure and its foundation would be enhanced. This would result in a larger value of damping because vibrational energy in the structure would be transferred through the foundation into the surrounding soil. The dynamic test performed on this structure (with the magnet in place) confirmed this later theory and resulted in damping values of approximately 4 to 5% for the whole body modes. This report presents a brief description of dynamic testing emphasizing the specific test procedure used on the MFTF-A system. It also presents an interpretation of the damping mechanisms observed (material and geometric) based upon the spatial characteristics of the modal parameters

  4. Limit analysis and design of containment vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Save, M.

    1984-01-01

    In the introduction, the theory of plastic analysis of shells is briefly recalled. Minimum-volume design for assigned load factor at plastic collapse is then considered and optimality criteria are derived for plates and shells of continuously varying or piecewise-constant thickness. In the first part, containers made of metal are examined. Analytical and numerical limit analysis solutions and corresponding experimental results are considered for various types of vessels, including intersecting shells. Attention is given to experimental post-yield behavior. Some tests up to fracture are discussed. New theoretical and experimental results of limit analysis of stiffened cylindrical vessels are presented, in which reinforcing rings are treated as discrete structural element (no smearing out) and due account is taken of their strong curvature. Cases of collapse by instability under internal pressure are pointed out. Minimum-volume design of circular plates and cylindrical shells is then formulated and various examples are presented of sandwich and solid metal structures. Containers of piecewise-constant thickness are given particular attention. Available experimental evidence on minimum-volume design of plates and shells is reviewed and commented upon. The second part deals with reinforced concrete vessels. Cylindrical containers are studied, from both points of view of limit analysis and of limit design with minimum volume of reinforcement. The practical use of the latter solutions is discussed. A third part reviews other loading cases (including cyclic and impact loads) and gives indications on corresponding theories, formulations and solution methods. The last part is devoted to a discussion of the limitations of the methods presented, within the frame of the 'limit states' design philosophy, which is first briefly recalled. Considerations on further research in the field conclude the paper. (orig.)

  5. Seismic analysis of a containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo, E.M.; Jospin, R.J.; Loula, A.F.D.

    1987-01-01

    A seismic analysis of a nuclear power plant containment vessel is presented. Usual loads in this kind of analysis like SSE, DBE and SSB loadings are considered. With the response spectra, previously obtained, for the above mentioned loadings one uses the response spectrum techniques in order to obtain estimatives for the maximum values of the stresses. Some considerations about the problem and the approcah used herein, are initially described. Next, the analysed structure geometry and some results, compared with those obtained by using computer code ANSYS are shown. (Author) [pt

  6. Irradiation embrittlement of reactor vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bros, J.

    2000-01-01

    From the historical decision of closing the Yankee Rowe NPP because of the uncertainties on the level of reactor pressure vessel neutron embrittlement, this paper reviews the technical-scientist bases of the degradation phenomena, and refers to the evolution of reactor pressure vessel radiation surveillance programs. (Author)

  7. Failure internal pressure of spherical steel containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Sarmiento, G.

    1985-01-01

    An application of the British CEGB's R6 Failure Assessment Approach to the determination of failure internal pressure of nuclear power plant spherical steel containments is presented. The presence of hypothetical cracks both in the base metal and in the welding material of the containment, with geometrical idealizations according to the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (Section XI), was taken into account in order to analyze the sensitivity of the failure assessment with the values of the material fracture properties. Calculations of the elastoplastic collapse load have been performed by means of the Finite Element System SAMCEF. The clean axisymmetric shell (neglecting the influence of nozzles and minor irregularities) and two major penetrations (personnel and emergency locks) have been taken separately into account. Large-strain elastoplastic behaviour of the material was considered in the Code, using lower bounds of true stress-true strain relations obtained by testing a collection of tensile specimens. Assuming the presence of cracks in non-perturbed regions, the reserve factor for test pressure and the failure internal pressure have been determined as a function of the flaw depth. (orig.)

  8. Neutron irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, L.E.

    1975-01-01

    The reliability of nuclear power plants depends on the proper functioning of complex components over the whole life on the plant. Particular concern for reliability is directed to the primary pressure boundary. This report focuses on the portion of the primary system exposed to and significantly affected by neutron radiation. Experimental evidence from research programmes and from reactor surveillance programmes has indicated radiation embrittlement of a magnitude sufficient to raise doubts about reactor pressure vessel integrity. The crucial nature of the primary vessel function heightens the need to be alert to this problem, to which, fortunately, there are positive aspects: for example, steels have been developed which are relatively immune to radiation embrittlement. Further, awareness of such embrittlement has led to designs which can accomodate this factor. The nature of nuclear reactors, of the steels used in their construction, and of the procedures for interpreting embrittlement and minimizing the effects are reviewed with reference to the reactors that are expected to play a major role in electric power production from now to about the turn of the century. The report is intended as a manual or guidebook; the aim has been to make each chapter or major sub-division sufficiently comprehensive and self-contained for it to be understood and read independently of the rest of the book. At the same time, it is hoped that the whole is unified enough to make a complete reading useful and interesting to the several classes of reader that are involved with only specific aspects of the topic

  9. Hydrogen induced plastic damage in pressure vessel steel of 2.25Cr-1Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, G.W.; Song, Y.J.

    1995-01-01

    2.25Cr-1Mo steel is generally employed as a hydrogenation reaction vessel material used at elevated temperature and in a hydrogen containing environment. During service of the reaction vessel, a large number of hydrogen atoms would enter its wall. When the reaction vessel is shutdown and the temperature reduces to about ambient temperature, the hydrogen atoms remaining in the wall would induce plastic damage in the steel. The mechanism of hydrogen induced plastic damage is different for various materials with different microstructures. Investigations have demonstrated that the hydrogen induced plastic damage in carbide annealed carbon steels is caused by hydrogen accelerating the initiating and growing of microvoids from the carbide particles. However, SEM examination on the fracture surface of hydrogen charged tensile specimen of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel show that a large number of fisheyes appear on the fracture surface. This indicates that hydrogen induced plastic damage in 2.25Cr-1Mo steel is related to the occurrence of fisheye cracks during plastic deformation. By means of micro-fracture mechanics to analyze fisheye crack occurrence from the first generation microvoid, the mechanism of hydrogen induced plastic damage in the pressure vessel steel is investigated

  10. Corrosion of vessel steel during its interaction with molten corium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechta, S.V.; Khabensky, V.B.; Vitol, S.A.; Krushinov, E.V.; Granovsky, V.S.; Lopukh, D.B.; Gusarov, V.V.; Martinov, A.P.; Martinov, V.V.; Fieg, G.; Tromm, W.; Bottomley, D.; Tuomisto, H.

    2006-01-01

    An experimental examination of the cooled vessel steel corrosion during the interaction with molten corium is presented. The experiments have been conducted on 'Rasplav-2' test facility and followed up with physico-chemical and metallographic analyses of melt samples and corium-specimen ingots. The results discussed in the first part of the paper have revealed specific corrosion mechanisms for air and inert atmosphere above the melt. Models have been proposed based on this information and approximate curves constructed for the estimation of the corrosion rate or corrosion depth of vessel steel in conditions simulated by the experiments

  11. Corrosion of vessel steel during its interaction with molten corium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechta, S.V. [Scientific Research Technological Institute (NITI), Sosnovy Bor of Leningrad Oblast 188540 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: bechta@sbor.spb.su; Khabensky, V.B. [Scientific Research Technological Institute (NITI), Sosnovy Bor of Leningrad Oblast 188540 (Russian Federation); Vitol, S.A. [Scientific Research Technological Institute (NITI), Sosnovy Bor of Leningrad Oblast 188540 (Russian Federation); Krushinov, E.V. [Scientific Research Technological Institute (NITI), Sosnovy Bor of Leningrad Oblast 188540 (Russian Federation); Granovsky, V.S. [Scientific Research Technological Institute (NITI), Sosnovy Bor of Leningrad Oblast 188540 (Russian Federation); Lopukh, D.B. [SPb Electrotechnical University (SpbGETU), Professor Popov str., b.5/3, 197376 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Gusarov, V.V. [Institute of Silicate Chemistry of Russian Academy of Science (ISC of RAS), Odoevsky str., b. 24/2, 199155 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Martinov, A.P. [SPb Electrotechnical University (SpbGETU), Professor Popov str., b.5/3, 197376 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Martinov, V.V. [Scientific Research Technological Institute (NITI), Sosnovy Bor of Leningrad Oblast 188540 (Russian Federation); Fieg, G. [Forshungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK), Institut fur Neutronenphysik and Reaktortechnik, Postfach 3640, D-78021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Tromm, W. [Forshungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK), Institut fur Neutronenphysik and Reaktortechnik, Postfach 3640, D-78021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bottomley, D. [Europaeische Kommission, General Direktion GFS, Institut fuer Transurane (ITU), Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Tuomisto, H. [Fortum Engineering Ltd. 00048 FORTUM, Rajatorpantie 8, Vantaa (Finland)

    2006-07-15

    An experimental examination of the cooled vessel steel corrosion during the interaction with molten corium is presented. The experiments have been conducted on 'Rasplav-2' test facility and followed up with physico-chemical and metallographic analyses of melt samples and corium-specimen ingots. The results discussed in the first part of the paper have revealed specific corrosion mechanisms for air and inert atmosphere above the melt. Models have been proposed based on this information and approximate curves constructed for the estimation of the corrosion rate or corrosion depth of vessel steel in conditions simulated by the experiments.

  12. Variability of mechanical properties of nuclear pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrequin, P.; Soulat, P.

    1980-01-01

    Causes of variability of mechanical properties nuclear pressure vessel steels are reviewed and discussed. The effects of product shape and size, processing history and heat treatment are investigated. Some quantitative informations are given on the scatter of mechanical properties of typical pressure vessel components. The necessity of using recommended or standardized properties for comparing mechanical properties before and after irradiation in pin pointed. (orig.) [de

  13. Welding the AT-400A Containment Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandon, E.

    1998-11-01

    Early in 1994, the Department of Energy assigned Sandia National Laboratories the responsibility for designing and providing the welding system for the girth weld for the AT-400A containment vessel. (The AT-400A container is employed for the shipment and long-term storage of the nuclear weapon pits being returned from the nation's nuclear arsenal.) Mason Hanger Corporation's Pantex Plant was chosen to be the production facility. The project was successfully completed by providing and implementing a turnkey welding system and qualified welding procedure at the Pantex Plant. The welding system was transferred to Pantex and a pilot lot of 20 AT-400A containers with W48 pits was welded in August 1997. This document is intended to bring together the AT-400A welding system and product (girth weld) requirements and the activities conducted to meet those requirements. This document alone is not a complete compilation of the welding development activities but is meant to be a summary to be used with the applicable references.

  14. Corrosion fatigue of pressure vessel steels in PWR environments--influence of steel sulfur content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, P.M.; Druce, S.G.; Truswell, A.E.

    1984-01-01

    Large effects of simulated light water reactor environments at 288 C on fatigue crack growth in low alloy pressure vessel steels are observed only when specific mechanical, metallurgical, and electrochemical conditions are satisfied simultaneously. In this paper, the relative importance of three key variables--steel impurity content, water chemistry, and flow rate--and their interaction with loading rate or strain rate are examined. In particular, the results of a systematic examination of the influence of a steel's sulfur content are described

  15. Containment performance evaluation of prestressed concrete containment vessels with fiber reinforcement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choun, Young Sun; Park, Hyung Kui [Integrated Safety Assessment Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Fibers in concrete resist the growth of cracks and enhance the postcracking behavior of structures. The addition of fibers into a conventional reinforced concrete can improve the structural and functional performance of safety-related concrete structures in nuclear power plants. The influence of fibers on the ultimate internal pressure capacity of a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) was investigated through a comparison of the ultimate pressure capacities between conventional and fiber-reinforced PCCVs. Steel and polyamide fibers were used. The tension behaviors of conventional concrete and fiber-reinforced concrete specimens were investigated through uniaxial tension tests and their tension-stiffening models were obtained. For a PCCV reinforced with 1% volume hooked-end steel fiber, the ultimate pressure capacity increased by approximately 12% in comparison with that for a conventional PCCV. For a PCCV reinforced with 1.5% volume polyamide fiber, an increase of approximately 3% was estimated for the ultimate pressure capacity. The ultimate pressure capacity can be greatly improved by introducing steel and polyamide fibers in a conventional reinforced concrete. Steel fibers are more effective at enhancing the containment performance of a PCCV than polyamide fibers. The fiber reinforcement was shown to be more effective at a high pressure loading and a low prestress level.

  16. Containment performance evaluation of prestressed concrete containment vessels with fiber reinforcement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choun, Young Sun; Park, Hyung Kui

    2015-01-01

    Fibers in concrete resist the growth of cracks and enhance the postcracking behavior of structures. The addition of fibers into a conventional reinforced concrete can improve the structural and functional performance of safety-related concrete structures in nuclear power plants. The influence of fibers on the ultimate internal pressure capacity of a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) was investigated through a comparison of the ultimate pressure capacities between conventional and fiber-reinforced PCCVs. Steel and polyamide fibers were used. The tension behaviors of conventional concrete and fiber-reinforced concrete specimens were investigated through uniaxial tension tests and their tension-stiffening models were obtained. For a PCCV reinforced with 1% volume hooked-end steel fiber, the ultimate pressure capacity increased by approximately 12% in comparison with that for a conventional PCCV. For a PCCV reinforced with 1.5% volume polyamide fiber, an increase of approximately 3% was estimated for the ultimate pressure capacity. The ultimate pressure capacity can be greatly improved by introducing steel and polyamide fibers in a conventional reinforced concrete. Steel fibers are more effective at enhancing the containment performance of a PCCV than polyamide fibers. The fiber reinforcement was shown to be more effective at a high pressure loading and a low prestress level

  17. Behavior of cracked concrete nuclear containment vessels during earthquakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gergely, P.; Stanton, J.F.; White, R.N.

    1975-01-01

    When pressure builds up in a reinforced concrete nuclear containment shell, its cylindrical wall cracks vertically and horizontally at intervals of about five feet. If an earthquake occurs simultaneously with this pressurization, inertia forces are transmitted across the horizontal crack planes. The forces and deformations must be small enough to maintain the integrity of the steel liner. A typical containment shell has a radius of about 65 ft. and a wall thickness of about 4 ft. It is heavily reinforced with vertical, horizontal, and sometimes diagonal bars. A steel shell of about 3 / 8 in. thickness is attached to the concrete with anchors. The seismic shear forces are transmitted across the horizontal cracks by interface shear transfer (combination of shear friction and aggregate interlocking), by dowel action of the bars, and by diagonal bars if they are used. One important question in the design of such vessels is whether the diagonal bars are necessary. In the experimental portion of the current investigation several types of tests were conducted to study the load-slip characteristics of interface shear transfer under high intensity cyclic loading. In some cases external bars provided the clamping action of reinforcement, in more recent tests large diameter embedded bars were used. This presentation summarizes the analytical part of the investigation. A representative load-slip curve has been used in the analyses to assess the intensity of the stresses and deformations, and to study the importance of the variables as an aid in planning future tests

  18. Development of PIE techniques for irradiated LWR pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Masahiro; Kizaki, Minoru; Sukegawa, Tomohide

    1999-01-01

    For the evaluation of safety and integrity of light water reactors (LWRs), various post irradiation examinations (PIEs) of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels and fuel claddings have been carried out in the Research Hot Laboratory (RHL). In recent years, the instrumented Charpy impact testing machine was remodeled aiming at the improvement of accuracy and reliability. By this remodeling, absorbed energy and other useful information on impact properties can be delivered from the force-displacement curve for the evaluation of neutron irradiation embrittlement behavior of LWR-RPV steels at one-time striking. In addition, two advanced PIE technologies are now under development. One is the remote machining of mechanical test pieces from actual irradiated pressure vessel steels. The other is development of low-cycle and high-cycle fatigue test technology in order to clarify the post-irradiation fatigue characteristics of structural and fuel cladding materials. (author)

  19. Fracture toughness of irradiated and recovered vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perosanz, F.; Lapena, J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the fracture toughness measurements carried out on three vessel steels in an irradiated condition and after a post-irradiation recovery treatment. A statistical approach and the fracture parameters corresponding to two theoretical models of the fracture tests are used for evaluating toughness. Test results show that the neutron fluence gradually transforms the fracture behaviour of the vessel steels from ductile to brittle and seriously reduces their fracture toughness. The effectiveness of the recovery treatment, as evaluated from the toughness measurements, is confirmed, although the efficiency is not the same for the steels and depends on the evaluation parameter except in the case of almost complete recovery. The recovery effect increases with the received neutron fluence if the toughness values after treatment are compared with those in the irradiated condition rather than those in the as received condition. (orig.)

  20. Microstructural evolution in reactor pressure vessel steel under neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, Katsumi; Fukuya, Koji [Institute of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Seika, Kyoto (Japan)

    2000-09-01

    Understanding microstructural changes in reactor pressure vessel steels is important in order to evaluate radiation-induced embrittlement, one of the major aging phenomena affecting the extension of plant life. In this study, actual surveillance test specimens and samples of rector vessel low-alloy steel (A533B steel) irradiated in a research reactor were examined using state-of-the-art techniques to clarify the neutron flux effect on the microstructural changes. These techniques included small angle neutron scattering and atom probes. Microstructural changes which are considered to be the main factors affecting embrittlement, including the production of copper-rich precipitates and the segregation of impurity elements, were confirmed by the results of the study. In addition, the mechanical properties were predicted based on the obtained quantitative data such as the diameters of precipitates. Consequently, the hardening due to irradiation was almost simulated. (author)

  1. Low Temperature Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The embrittlement trend curve development project for HFIR reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels was carried out with three major tasks. Which are (1) data collection to match that used in HFIR steel embrittlement trend published in 1994 Journal Nuclear Material by Remec et. al, (2) new embrittlement data of A212B steel that are not included in earlier HFIR RPV trend curve, and (3) the adjustment of nil-ductility-transition temperature (NDTT) shift data with the consideration of the irradiation temperature effect. An updated HFIR RPV steel embrittlement trend curve was developed, as described below. NDTT( C) = 23.85 log(x) + 203.3 log (x) + 434.7, with 2- uncertainty of 34.6 C, where parameter x is referred to total dpa. The developed update HFIR RPV embrittlement trend curve has higher embrittlement rate compared to that of the trend curve developed in 1994.

  2. Manufacturing method for radioactive material containing vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishioka, Hideharu; Matsushita, Kazuo; Toyota, Michinori.

    1997-01-01

    Lead homogenization is applied on the inner surface of a space formed between an inner cylinder and an outer cylinder, and a molten lead heated to about 400 to 500degC is cast into a space formed between the inner cylinder and the outer cylinder in a state where the inner and the outer cylinders are heated to from 200 to 300degC. The space formed between the inner cylinder and the outer cylinder is heated to and kept at 330degC or higher for at least 2minutes after the casting of the molten lead, and then it is cooled. Thus, lowering of density of the molten lead due to excess elevation of temperature or dropping of the lead at the homogenization portion by heating the inner and the outer cylinders to an excessively high temperature are not caused. In addition, formation of gaps in the boundary between the inner cylinder and the outer cylinder or between the lead of the homogenized portion and that of the cast portion due to the melting of the lead of the homogenized portion in the space is prevented reliably thereby capable of forming a satisfactory shielding member. Then, even when the thickness of the inner cylinder and the outer cylinder is large, radioactive material containing vessel excellent in heat releasing property and radiation shielding property can be manufactured. (N.H.)

  3. Heavy Section Steel Technology Program. Part II. Intermediate vessel testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitman, G.D.

    1975-01-01

    The testing of the intermediate pressure vessels is a major activity under the Heavy Section Steel Technology Program. A primary objective of these tests is to develop or verify methods of fracture prediction, through the testing of selected structures and materials, in order that a valid basis can be established for evaluating the serviceability and safety of light-water reactor pressure vessels. These vessel tests were planned with sufficiently specific objectives that substantial quantitative weight could be given to the results. Each set of testing conditions was chosen so as to provide specific data by which analytical methods of predicting flaw growth, and in some cases crack arrest, could be evaluated. Every practical effort was made to assure that results would be relevant to some aspect of real reactor pressure vessel performance through careful control of material properties, selection of test temperatures, and design of prepared flaws. 5 references

  4. Magnetic and electrical properties of ITER vacuum vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mergia, K.; Apostolopoulos, G.; Gjoka, M.; Niarchos, D.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Ferritic steel AISI 430 is a candidate material for the lTER vacuum vessel which will be used to limit the ripple in the toroidal magnetic field. The magnetic and electrical properties and their temperature dependence in the temperature range 300 - 900 K of AISI 430 ferritic stainless steels are presented. The temperature variation of the coercive field, remanence and saturation magnetization as well as electrical resistivity and the effect of annealing on these properties is discussed. (authors)

  5. Neutron irradiation effects in pressure vessel steels and weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ianko, L [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria). Div. of Nuclear Power; Davies, L M

    1994-12-31

    This paper deals with the effects of neutron irradiation on the steel and welds used for the pressure vessels which house the reactor cores in light water reactors: irradiation effects on mechanical properties and the shift in ductile-brittle transition temperature, importance of the knowledge of the neutron fluence and of the monitoring and surveillance programmes; empirical and mechanistic modelling of irradiation effects and the necessity of data extension to new operational limits; consequences on the manufacturing and structural design of materials and structures; mitigation of irradiation effects by annealing; international activities and programmes in the field of neutron irradiation effects on PV steels and welds. 37 refs., 22 figs.

  6. Models and Algorithms for Container Vessel Stowage Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delgado-Ortegon, Alberto

    .g., selection of vessels to buy that satisfy specific demands), through to operational decisions (e.g., selection of containers that optimize revenue, and stowing those containers into a vessel). This thesis addresses the question of whether it is possible to formulate stowage optimization models...... container of those to be loaded in a port should be placed in a vessel, i.e., to generate stowage plans. This thesis explores two different approaches to solve this problem, both follow a 2-phase decomposition that assigns containers to vessel sections in the first phase, i.e., master planning...

  7. EDS V25 containment vessel explosive qualification test report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudolphi, John Joseph

    2012-04-01

    The V25 containment vessel was procured by the Project Manager, Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel (PMNSCM) as a replacement vessel for use on the P2 Explosive Destruction Systems. It is the first EDS vessel to be fabricated under Code Case 2564 of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which provides rules for the design of impulsively loaded vessels. The explosive rating for the vessel based on the Code Case is nine (9) pounds TNT-equivalent for up to 637 detonations. This limit is an increase from the 4.8 pounds TNT-equivalency rating for previous vessels. This report describes the explosive qualification tests that were performed in the vessel as part of the process for qualifying the vessel for explosive use. The tests consisted of a 11.25 pound TNT equivalent bare charge detonation followed by a 9 pound TNT equivalent detonation.

  8. Study on the application of 50 mm thick welded joints without PWHT for containment vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Nozomu; Sakai, Yoshiyuki; Hayashi, Kazutoshi; Higashikubo, Tomohiro (Mitsubishi Heavy Industries. Ltd., Kobe Shipyard and Machinery Works (Japan)); Iida, Kunihiro (Shibaura Inst. of Tech., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo (Japan)); Satou, Masanobu (Mitsubishi Heavy Industries. Ltd., Tkasago Research and Development Center (Japan))

    1992-01-01

    In order to investigate the propriety of the use of 50 mm thick SGV480 carbon steel which is equivalent to ASTM A516 Gr. 70 without post weld heat treatment for containment vessels, the authors have certified the basic properties of base metal and welded joints of 50 mm thick SGV480 steel plates. The results showed that fracture thoughness of welded joints is high without PWHT and the steel is safe enough without PWHT against embrittlement fracture under the operating conditions. (orig.).

  9. Study on the application of 50 mm thick welded joints without PWHT for containment vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Nozomu; Sakai, Yoshiyuki; Hayashi, Kazutoshi; Higashikubo, Tomohiro; Iida, Kunihiro; Satou, Masanobu

    1992-01-01

    In order to investigate the propriety of the use of 50 mm thick SGV480 carbon steel which is equivalent to ASTM A516 Gr. 70 without post weld heat treatment for containment vessels, the authors have certified the basic properties of base metal and welded joints of 50 mm thick SGV480 steel plates. The results showed that fracture thoughness of welded joints is high without PWHT and the steel is safe enough without PWHT against embrittlement fracture under the operating conditions. (orig.)

  10. Radiation embrittlement of WWER 440 pressure vessel steel and of some improved steels by western producers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koutsky, J.; Vacek, M.; Stoces, B.; Pav, T.; Otruba, J.; Novosad, P.; Brumovsky, M.

    1982-01-01

    The resistance was studied of Cr-Mo-V type steel 15Kh2MFA to radiation embrittlement at an irradiation temperature of around 288 degC. Studied was the steel used for the manufacture of the pressure vessel of the Paks nuclear reactor in Hungary. The obtained results of radiation embrittlement and hardening of steel 15Kh2MFA were compared with similar values of Mn-Ni-Mo type steels A 533-B and A 508 manufactured by leading western manufacturers within the international research programme coordinated by the IAEA. It was found that the resistance of steel 15Kh2MFA to radiation embrittlement is comparable with steels A 533-B and A 508 by western manufacturers. (author)

  11. Sealing method and sealing device for radioactive waste containing vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwatari, Koji; Otsuki, Akira

    1998-01-01

    A radioactive waste-containing body is hoisted down into a strong-material vessel opened upwardly, and a strong-material lid is hoisted down to the opening of the strong-material-vessel and welded. The strong material vessel is hoisted up and loaded on a corrosion resistant-material bottom plate placed horizontally. A corrosion resistant-material vessel having one opening end and having a corrosion resistant-material flange on the other end and previously agreed with the strong material-vessel main body is hoisted up by a hoisting device having an inserting device so that the opening of the corrosion resistant vessel is directed downwardly. The corrosion resistant vessel is press-fitted to the outside of the strong material-vessel by the inserting device while being heated by a preheater to shrink. Subsequently, the lower end of the corrosion resistant-material vessel and the corrosion resistant-material bottom plate are welded to constitute a corrosion resistant-material vessel. Then, the radioactive waste containing body can be sealed in a sealing vessel comprising the strong-material vessel and the corrosion resistant-material vessel. (N.H.)

  12. Pressure vessel steels: influence of chemical composition on irradiation sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghoniem, M.M.; Hammad, F.H.

    1998-01-01

    Neutron irradiation of the steels used in the construction of the nuclear reactor pressure vessels can lead to the embrittlement of these materials, increasing the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature and decreasing the fracture energy, which can limit the plant life. The knowledge of irradiation embrittlement and the means for minimizing such degradation is therefore important in the field of assuring the safety of the nuclear power plants. Irradiation embrittlement is quite a complex process. It involves many variables. The most important of these are irradiation temperature, neutron fluence (neutron dose), neutron flux (neutron dose rate), and chemical composition of the irradiated material. This paper is concerned with the effect of chemical composition, the role of residual and alloying elements in the irradiation embrittlement of nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels in light water reactors. It presents a critical review for the published work in this field through the last 25 years

  13. Corrosion of carbon steel and low-alloy steel in diluted seawater containing hydrazine under gamma-rays irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Junichi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Tsukada, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Seawater was injected into reactor cores of Units 1, 2, and 3 in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station as an urgent coolant. It is considered that the injected seawater causes corrosion of steels of the reactor pressure vessel and primary containment vessel. To investigate the effects of gamma-rays irradiation on weight loss in carbon steel and low-alloy steel, corrosion tests were performed in diluted seawater at 50°C under gamma-rays irradiation. Specimens were irradiated with dose rates of 4.4 kGy/h and 0.2 kGy/h. To evaluate the effects of hydrazine (N 2 H 4 ) on the reduction of oxygen and hydrogen peroxide, N 2 H 4 was added to the diluted seawater. In the diluted seawater without N 2 H 4 , weight loss in the steels irradiated with 0.2 kGy/h was similar to that in the unirradiated steels, and weight loss in the steels irradiated with 4.4 kGy/h increased to approximate 1.7 times of those in the unirradiated steels. Weight loss in the steels irradiated in the diluted seawater containing N 2 H 4 was similar to that in the diluted seawater without N 2 H 4 . When N 2 was introduced into the gas phase in the flasks during gamma-rays irradiation, weight loss in the steels decreased. (author)

  14. Studies of fragileness in steels of vessels of BWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles, E.F.; Balcazar, M.; Alpizar, A.M.; Calderon, B.E.

    2003-01-01

    The structural materials with those that are manufactured the pressure vessels of the BWR reactors, suffer degradation in its mechanical properties mainly to the damage taken place by the fast neutrons (E > 1 MeV) coming from the reactor core. Its are experimentally studied those mechanisms of neutron damage in this material type, by means of the irradiation of steel vessel in experimental reactors to age them quickly. Alternatively it is simulated the neutron damage by means of irradiation of steel with heavy ions. In this work those are shown first results of the damage induced by irradiation from a similar steel to the vessel of a BWR reactor. The irradiation was carried out with fast neutrons (E > 1 MeV, fluence of 1.45 x 10 18 n/cm 2 ) in the TRIGA MARK lll reactor and separately with Ni +3 ions in a Tandetrom accelerator, E = 4.8 MeV and range of the ionic flow of 0.1 to 53 iones/A 2 . (Author)

  15. Apparent embrittlement saturation and radiation mechanisms of reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pachur, D.

    1981-01-01

    The irradiation and annealing results of three different reactor pressure vessel steels are reported. Steel A, a basic material according to ASTM A-533 B having 0.15 percent vanadium; and Steel C contained 3.2 percent nickel. The steels were irradiated at 150, 300, and 400 degree C with neutron fluxes of 6 multiplied by 10 11 and 3 multiplied by 10 13 neutrons (n)/cm 2 /s. An apparent saturation-in-irradiation effect was found within certain neutron fluence ranges. During the annealing, various recovery processes occur in different temperature ranges. These are characterized by various activation energies. The individual processes were determined by the different time dependencies at various temperatures. Two causes for the apparent saturation were discovered from the behavior of the annealing curves

  16. Deflagration in stainless steel storage containers containing plutonium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinschmidt, P.D.

    1996-02-01

    Detonation of hydrogen and oxygen in stainless steel storage containers produces maximum pressures of 68.5 psia and 426.7 psia. The cylinders contain 3,000 g of PuO 2 with 0.05 wt% and 0.5 wt% water respectively. The hydrogen and oxygen are produced by the alpha decomposition of the water. Work was performed for the Savannah River Site

  17. Corrosion fatigue of pressure vessel steels in PWR environments--influence of steel sulfur content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, P.M.; Druce, S.G.; Truswell, A.E.

    1984-07-01

    Large effects of simulated light water reactor environments at 288 C on fatigue crack growth in low alloy pressure vessel steels are observed only when specific mechanical, metallurgical, and electrochemical conditions are satisfied simultaneously. In this paper, the relative importance of three key variables--steel impurity content, water chemistry, and flow rate--and their interaction with loading rate or strain rate are examined. In particular, the results of a systematic examination of the influence of a steel's sulfur content are described.

  18. Melting technique for vanadium containing steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grishanov, M P; Gutovskij, I B; Vakhrushev, A S

    1980-04-28

    To descrease cost price of high-quality vanadium steels a method of their melting in open-hearth furnaces with acid lining using slag-metal fraction of vanadium, which is loaded in the content of 2.1-4.7% of melting mass, is suggested. Introduction of slag-metal fraction of vanadium ensures the formation of slag with composition that guarantees the necessary content of vanadium in steel and does not require introduction of expensive vanadium-containing ferroalloys into the melt.

  19. Neutron Damage in Steels Containing Small Amounts of Boron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, H P

    1961-05-15

    Certain low alloy steels contain small amounts (0.003 to 0.007 w/o) of boron which element contributes to the development of the air hardening properties of these steels. Such steels appear attractive for reactor pressure vessel construction but the question arises whether they will, due to the (n,{alpha}) reaction in boron, be more susceptible to neutron radiation damage than other steels which do not contain boron. We have attempted to estimate the importance of damage arising through boron fission relative to that caused by fast neutrons by assuming that the two sources of damage will be proportional to the numbers of displaced atoms produced in the two processes when no annealing or re combination of defects occurs. Within the approximations used we conclude that in a neutron spectrum which may be represented by an equivalent thermal flux {phi}{sub t} and an equivalent fast flux at 1 MeV of {phi}{sub f}, then D, the ratio of damage to boron fission to that caused by fast neutrons, is D = 4.5 x 10{sup -2} {phi}{sub t}/{phi}{sub f} (for 0. 003 w/o B). For the conditions at the inside of the reactor tank to R3 this would imply D = 1.2 x 10{sup -2} , i.e. if the R3 tank were built with a steel containing 0.003 w/o B then damage due to boron fission would be only {approx} 1 % of that caused by fast neutrons. Further problems with such steels as here discussed are the probability of embrittlement due to the introduction of boron fission fragments lithium and helium and the possibility of a radiation enhanced diffusion of boron which might lead to accentuated slow strain rate embrittlement. We argue that none of these problems should arise. It is concluded that a constructional steel containing 0.003 to 0.007 w/o B should not on this account be more susceptible to radiation damage than other non boron containing steels.

  20. Float level switch for a nuclear power plant containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.G.

    1993-01-01

    This invention is a float level switch used to sense rise or drop in water level in a containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during a loss of coolant accident. The essential components of the device are a guide tube, a reed switch inside the guide tube, a float containing a magnetic portion that activates a reed switch, and metal-sheathed, ceramic-insulated conductors connecting the reed switch to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. Special materials and special sealing techniques prevent failure of components and allow the float level switch to be connected to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. 1 figures

  1. Float level switch for a nuclear power plant containment vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, James G.

    1993-01-01

    This invention is a float level switch used to sense rise or drop in water level in a containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during a loss of coolant accident. The essential components of the device are a guide tube, a reed switch inside the guide tube, a float containing a magnetic portion that activates a reed switch, and metal-sheathed, ceramic-insulated conductors connecting the reed switch to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. Special materials and special sealing techniques prevent failure of components and allow the float level switch to be connected to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel.

  2. 46 CFR 42.09-30 - Additional survey requirements for steel-hull vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional survey requirements for steel-hull vessels...-30 Additional survey requirements for steel-hull vessels. (a) In addition to the requirements in § 42...) When the vessel is in drydock, the hull plating, etc., shall be examined. (c) The holds, 'tween decks...

  3. Residual stresses in a weldment of pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gott, K.E.

    1978-01-01

    A study was made of the distribution of residual stresses around a typical weld from a light water reactor pressure vessel by an X-ray double-exposure camera technique. So that the magnitude, sign, and distribution of the residual stresses were as similar as possible to those found in practice, a wide, full-thickness specimen of A533B Cl 1 steel containing a submerged-arc weld was stress-relief annealed. To obtain a three-dimensional distribution of the stresses the specimen was examined at different levels through the thickness. Following the removal of material by milling, the specimen surface was electropolished to free it from cold work. Corrections have been made to take into account specimen relaxation. To completely define the original stress system it is desirable also to measure the change in curvature on removing a layer of material. Unless this is done assumptions must be made which complicate the calculations unnecessarily. This became apparent after the experimental work was completed. In the centre of the plate the methods of correction which can be used are sensitive to errors in the measurements. The corrected results show that the dominant residual stress is perpendicular to the weld. It is positive at the surfaces and negative in the centre of the plate. The maximum value can reach the yield stress. The residual stresses in the weld metal can locally vary considerably: from 100 to 350N/mm 2 over a distance of 5mm. Such large variations have been found to coincide with the heat-affected zones of the individual weld runs. (author)

  4. Simplified dynamic buckling assessment of steel containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrar, C.R.; Duffey, T.A.; Renick, D.H.

    1993-01-01

    A simplified, three-degree-of-freedom analytical procedure for performing a response spectrum buckling analysis of a thin containment shell is developed. Two numerical examples with R/t values which bound many existing steel containments are used to illustrate the procedure. The role of damping on incipient buckling acceleration level is evaluated for a regulatory seismic spectrum using the two numerical examples. The zero-period acceleration level that causes incipient buckling in either of the two containments increases 31% when damping is increased from 1% to 4% of critical. Comparisons with finite element results on incipient buckling levels are favorable

  5. Creep of A508/533 Pressure Vessel Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Wright

    2014-08-01

    ABSTRACT Evaluation of potential Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels has been carried out as part of the pre-conceptual Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design studies. These design studies have generally focused on American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code status of the steels, temperature limits, and allowable stresses. Initially, three candidate materials were identified by this process: conventional light water reactor (LWR) RPV steels A508 and A533, 2¼Cr-1Mo in the annealed condition, and Grade 91 steel. The low strength of 2¼Cr-1Mo at elevated temperature has eliminated this steel from serious consideration as the VHTR RPV candidate material. Discussions with the very few vendors that can potentially produce large forgings for nuclear pressure vessels indicate a strong preference for conventional LWR steels. This preference is based in part on extensive experience with forging these steels for nuclear components. It is also based on the inability to cast large ingots of the Grade 91 steel due to segregation during ingot solidification, thus restricting the possible mass of forging components and increasing the amount of welding required for completion of the RPV. Grade 91 steel is also prone to weld cracking and must be post-weld heat treated to ensure adequate high-temperature strength. There are also questions about the ability to produce, and very importantly, verify the through thickness properties of thick sections of Grade 91 material. The availability of large components, ease of fabrication, and nuclear service experience with the A508 and A533 steels strongly favor their use in the RPV for the VHTR. Lowering the gas outlet temperature for the VHTR to 750°C from 950 to 1000°C, proposed in early concept studies, further strengthens the justification for this material selection. This steel is allowed in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for nuclear service up to 371°C (700°F); certain excursions above that temperature are

  6. Seismic transient analysis of a containment vessel with penetrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlke, H.J.; Weiner, E.O.

    1979-12-01

    A linear transient analysis of the FFTF containment vessel was conducted with STAGS to justify the load levels used for the seismic qualification testing of the heating and ventiliation valve operators. The modeling consists of a thin axisymmetric shell for the containment vessel with four penetrations characterized by linear and rotational inertias as well as attachment characteristics to the shell. Motions considered are horizontal, rocking and vertical input to the base, and the solution is carried out by direct integration. Results show that the test levels and the approximate analyses considered are conservative. Response spectra for some containment vessel penetrations applicable to the model are presented

  7. Reliability analysis of steel-containment strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greimann, L.G.; Fanous, F.; Wold-Tinsae, A.; Ketalaar, D.; Lin, T.; Bluhm, D.

    1982-06-01

    A best estimate and uncertainty assessment of the resistance of the St. Lucie, Cherokee, Perry, WPPSS and Browns Ferry containment vessels was performed. The Monte Carlo simulation technique and second moment approach were compared as a means of calculating the probability distribution of the containment resistance. A uniform static internal pressure was used and strain ductility was taken as the failure criterion. Approximate methods were developed and calibrated with finite element analysis. Both approximate and finite element analyses were performed on the axisymmetric containment structure. An uncertainty assessment of the containment strength was then performed by the second moment reliability method. Based upon the approximate methods, the cumulative distribution for the resistance of each of the five containments (shell modes only) is presented

  8. Study on the application of thickened welds without post weld heat treatment for containment vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, T.; Fukaya, T.; Sato, M.; Takano, G.

    1978-01-01

    As material for containment vessels, SGV49 steel plates are mainly used. However, those used for this purpose are limited in thickness to smaller than 38 mm. This is because the present standard requires welds thicker than 38 mm to be subjected to post weld heat treatment but operation on the site is practically difficult. In the case of 3-loop containment vessels of pressurized water type reactors, use of 38 mm SGV49 brings an increase in their height and this is disadvantageous from a seismic viewpoint. Therefore, use of 45 mm-thick steel material has become necessary in order to increase design internal pressure and reduce the height of the vessels. To investigate the propriety of the use of 45 mm-thick SGV49 for this purpose without post weld heat treatment we investigated the basic performances of base metal and welded joints. We also conducted large-scale embrittlement fracture tests (CT test, deep notch test, wide plate tensile test and ESSO test) in order to examine whether welds not subjected to post weld heat treatment are safe against embrittlement fracture under the operating conditions of the vessels. The results proved that the welds of SGV49 steel plates are safe enough under the operating conditions. (author)

  9. Effect of radiation damage on operating safety of steel pressure vessels of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacek, M.; Havel, S.; Stoces, B.; Brumovsky, M.

    1980-01-01

    The effects are assessed of the environment upon mechanical properties of steel used generally for pressure vessels of light water nuclear reactors. Changes caused by radiation affect the reliability of vessels. Deterioration of steel properties is mainly due to neutron radiation. The article deals with factors bearing upon damage and with methods allowing to evaluate the reliability of vessels and predict their service life. Operating reliability of vessels is very unfavourably affected by planned and accidental reactor transients. (author)

  10. Three dimensional non-linear cracking analysis of prestressed concrete containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Obaid, Y.F.

    2001-01-01

    The paper gives full development of three-dimensional cracking matrices. These matrices are simulated in three-dimensional non-linear finite element analysis adopted for concrete containment vessels. The analysis includes a combination of conventional steel, the steel line r and prestressing tendons and the anisotropic stress-relations for concrete and concrete aggregate interlocking. The analysis is then extended and is linked to cracking analysis within the global finite element program OBAID. The analytical results compare well with those available from a model test. (author)

  11. System for cooling the containment vessel of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costes, Didier.

    1982-01-01

    The invention concerns a post-accidental cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. This system includes in series a turbine fed by the moist air contained in the vessel, a condenser in which the air is dried and cooled, a compressor actuated by the turbine and a cooling exchanger. The cold water flowing through the condenser and in the exchanger is taken from a tank outside the vessel and injected by a pump actuated by the turbine. The application is for nuclear reactors under pressure [fr

  12. Fuel containing vessel for transporting nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, Hiroyasu; Shimizu, Fukuzo; Tanaka, Nobuyuki.

    1996-01-01

    A shock absorbing mechanism is disposed on an inner bottom of a vessel main body. The shock absorbing mechanism comprises a shock absorbing member disposed on the upper surface of a bottom wall, an annular metal plate disposed on the upper surface of the shock absorbing member and an annular spacer disposed on the upper surface of the metal plate. The shock absorbing member is made of a material such as of wood, lead, metal honeycomb or a metal mesh, which plastically deforms when applied with load higher than a predetermined level, and is formed in a square block-like form covering the upper surface of the bottom wall. The spacer is made of a thin soft material such as tetrafluoroethylene, and is formed in such a shape as capable of preventing direct contact of the lower end of the cylindrical member in a lower tie plate of nuclear fuels with the metal portion. This can ensure integrity of nuclear fuels even when they fall from a high place upon an assumed dropping accident. (I.N.)

  13. Commissioning of the steel containment and its related components of the Loviisa II. nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuominen, J.; Pietikaeinen, L.; Kutramoinen, H.

    1982-01-01

    The outer concrete wall of the containment building serves as a protective system for the components in side. It contains the hermetically sealed steel pressure vessel for retaining the release of radioactive contamination in an accident situation. During a loss-of-coolant accident the pressure is reduced in two steps. The various testing procedures of the containment locks, their main-tenance and repair, the pressure and tightness tests of the steel containment and the preliminary operational tests of the other components of the containment system has been presented. (R.P.)

  14. Neutron irradiation effects in reactor pressure vessel steels and weldments. Working document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-10-01

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. A separate abstract was prepared for the introduction and for each of the eleven chapters, which are: 1. Reactor Pressure Vessel Design, 2. Reactor Pressure Materials, 3. WWER Pressure Vessels, 4. Determination of Mechanical Properties, 5. Neutron Exposure, 6. Methodology of Irradiation Experiments, 7. Effect of Irradiation on Mechanical Properties, 8. Mechanisms of Irradiation Embrittlement, 9. Modelling of Irradiation Damage, 10. Annealing of Irradiation Damage, 11. Safety Assessment using Surveillance Programmes and Data Bases

  15. Method of detecting water leakage in radioactive waste containing vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishioka, Hitoshi; Takao, Yoshiaki; Hayakawa, Kiyoshige.

    1989-01-01

    Lower level radioactive wastes formed upon operation of nuclear facilities are processed by underground storage. In this case, a plurality of drum cans packed with radioactive wastes are contained in a vessel and a water soluble dye material is placed at the inside of the vessel. The method of placing the water soluble dye material at the inside of the vessel includes a method of coating the material on the inner surface of the vessel and a method of mixing the material in sands to be filled between each of the drum cans. Then, leakage of water soluble dye material is detected when water intruding from the outside into the vessel is again leached out of the vessel, to detect the water leakage from the inside of the vessel. In this way, it is possible to find a water-invaded vessel before corrosion of the drum can by water intruded into the vessel and leakage of nuclides in the drum can. Accordingly, it is possible to apply treatment such as repair before occurrence of accident and can maintain the safety of radioactive water processing facilities. (I.S.)

  16. Residual stresses in weld-clad reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertram, W.

    1975-01-01

    Cladding of low alloy nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel with austenitic stainless steel introduces in heavy section components high residual stresses which may cause microcrack formation in stress relief heat treatment. In this investigation an attempt is made to contribute to the solution of the stress relief cracking problem by determining quantitatively the magnitude and distribution of the residual stresses after cladding and after subsequent stress relief heat treatment. The distribution of residual stresses was determined on the basis of a combined experimental-mathematical procedure. Heavy section plate specimens of low alloy steel as base material were given an austenitic monolayer-cladding using the techniques of strip electrode and plasma hot wire cladding, respectively. A number of plates was stress relief heat treated. Starting from the cladded surface the thickness of the plates was reduced by subsequent removal of layers of material. The elastic strain reaction to the removal of each layer was measured by strain gauges. From the data obtained the biaxial residual stress distribution was computed as a function of thickness using relations which are derived for this particular case. In summary, lower residual stresses are caused by reduced thickness of the components. As the heat input, is decreased at identical base material thickness, the residual stresses are lowered also. The height of the tensile residual stress peak, however, remains approximataly constant. In stress relief annealed condition the residual stresses in the cladding are in tension; in the base material the residual stresses are negligibly small

  17. Effect of heterogeneities on the thermoelectric power of pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonet, L.

    2006-12-01

    In service working conditions, the vessel of the Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) undergoes an ageing due to irradiation. In order to follow the evolution of the mechanical characteristics of the steel in service, EDF launched a surveillance program which consists to carry out mechanical tests on samples aged in reactor. However, the results of these tests have the disadvantage to be affected by the presence of heterogeneities within the steel. Indeed, because of its manufacturing process, the steel contains segregated areas. Thus, EDF launched Thermoelectric Power Measurements (TEP) on the resilience samples of the surveillance program, to complete the mechanical tests and to help with their interpretation. However, these measurements are today difficult to analyse because they include at the same time the effect of the irradiation and the effect of the metallurgical heterogeneities. The aim of this work consisted in evaluating the effect of the heterogeneities on the TEP of the non-irradiated vessel steel. For that, a numerical model was developed which allows to calculate the TEP of a composite structure. We have shown that the model is pertinent to highlight the effect of the heterogeneities on the TEP of the vessel steel, which is considered like a 'matrix'/'segregation' composite. The model allowed us to put emphasis on the influence of different parameters on the TEP measurement. We have thus showed that the measurements conditions have an important effect on the obtained TEP value (influence of the applied pressure, the position of the sample on the device, the site of the metallurgical heterogeneities,...). (author)

  18. Probabilistic Assessment of the Design and Safety of HSLA-100 Steel Confinement Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.M. Dolin

    2003-03-03

    This probabilistic approach for assessing the design and safety of the HSLA-100 steel confinement vessel used for a DynEx test involved the probability of failure for several scenarios, in which a fragment may penetrate the vessel. The samples involve vessel thicknesses of 1 inch, 2 inches, and 5.25 inches--the combined thicknesses of the 2 inch containment vessel and the 3.25 inch safety vessel. Two simulation approaches were used for each scenario to assess the probability of failure. The Likelihood of Occurrence method simultaneously models all likely fragment events of a test, for which the net probability of failure is the sum of all the fragment events. The Stochastic Sampling method determines the probability of a fragment perforation on the basis of a logical model and takes the overall probability that an experiment results in failure as the maximum probability for any fragment event. With margin and safety assessments taken into account, it was concluded that the one and two inch thicknesses by themselves are inadequate for containing a DynEx test. The 5.25 inch thickness was determined to be safe by the Likelihood of Occurrence method and nearly adequate by the Stochastic Sampling simulation.

  19. Microstructural characterization of atom clusters in irradiated pressure vessel steels and model alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auger, P.; Pareige, P.; Akamatsu, M.; Van Duysen, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    In order to characterize the microstructural evolution of iron solid solution under irradiation, two pressure vessel steels irradiated in service conditions, and, for comparison, low copper model alloys irradiated with neutrons and electrons, have been studied through small angle neutron scattering and atom probe experiments. In Fe-Cu model alloys, copper clusters are formed containing uncertain proportions of iron. In the low copper industrial steels, the feature is more complex; solute atoms such as Ni, Mn and Si, sometimes associated with Cu, segregate as ''clouds'' more or less condensed in the iron solid solution. These silicides, or at least Si, Ni, Mn association, may facilitate the copper segregation although the initial iron matrix contains a low copper concentration. (authors). 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Microstructural characterization of atom clusters in irradiated pressure vessel steels and model alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auger, P; Pareige, P [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France); Akamatsu, M; Van Duysen, J C [Electricite de France (EDF), 77 - Ecuelles (France)

    1994-12-31

    In order to characterize the microstructural evolution of iron solid solution under irradiation, two pressure vessel steels irradiated in service conditions, and, for comparison, low copper model alloys irradiated with neutrons and electrons, have been studied through small angle neutron scattering and atom probe experiments. In Fe-Cu model alloys, copper clusters are formed containing uncertain proportions of iron. In the low copper industrial steels, the feature is more complex; solute atoms such as Ni, Mn and Si, sometimes associated with Cu, segregate as ``clouds`` more or less condensed in the iron solid solution. These silicides, or at least Si, Ni, Mn association, may facilitate the copper segregation although the initial iron matrix contains a low copper concentration. (authors). 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Characterization of atom clusters in irradiated pressure vessel steels and model alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auger, P.; Pareige, P.; Akamatsu, M.; Van Duysen, J.C.

    1993-12-01

    In order to characterize the microstructural evolution of the iron solid solution under irradiation, two pressure vessel steels irradiated in service conditions and, for comparison, low copper model alloys irradiated with neutrons and electrons have been studied. The characterization has been carried out mainly thanks to small angle neutron scattering and atom probe experiments. Both techniques lead to the conclusion that clusters develop with irradiations. In Fe-Cu model alloys, copper clusters are formed containing uncertain proportions of iron. In the low copper industrial steels, the feature is more complex. Solute atoms like Ni, Mn and Si, sometimes associated with Cu, segregate as ''clouds'' more or less condensed in the iron solid solution. These silicides, or at least Si, Ni, Mn association, may facilitate the copper segregation although the initial iron matrix contains a low copper concentration. (authors). 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Elements of thought on corium containment strategy in reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    As accidents with core fusion are taken into account for the design of third-generation nuclear reactors, this brief document presents the corium containment strategy for a reactor vessel, its limitations, as well as research programs undertaken by the IRSN in this field. The report describes the controlled management of a severe accident, the major objective being to minimise releases in the environment, that which requires to maintain the reactor containment enclosure tightness. Practical actions are briefly indicated. Key points indicating the feasibility of a strategy of containment in vessel are discussed. The impact of reactor power on the robustness of an approach with containment in vessel is also discussed. An overview of technological evolutions and contributions of researches made by the IRSN is finally proposed

  3. Proving Test on the Reliability for Reactor Containment Vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takumi, K.; Nonaka, A.

    1988-01-01

    NUPEC (Nuclear Power Engineering Test Center) has started an eight-year project of Proving Test on the Reliability for Reactor Containment Vessel since June 1987. The objective of this project is to confirm the integrity of containment vessels under severe accident conditions. This paper shows the outline of this project. The test Items are (1) Hydrogen mixing and distribution test, (2) Hydrogen burning test, (3) Iodine trapping characteristics test, and (4) Structural behavior test. Based on the test results, computer codes are verified and as the results of analysis and evaluation by the computer codes, containment integrity is to be confirmed

  4. Effect of aging on properties of pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druce, S.G.; Gage, G.; Jordan, G.

    1986-04-01

    Manganese-molybdenum-nickel steels are used in nuclear pressure vessels operating at temperatures up to 350/sup 0/C. The effects of thermal ageing in the temperature range 300-550/sup 0/C for durations up to 2 x 10/sup 4/ h have been studied in conventionally quenched and tempered and simulated heat-affected-zone (HAZ) microstructural conditions. Quantitative fractography and Auger spectroscopy have been used to relate changes in mechanical properties with changes in fracture mode and grain boundary chemistry. Aging increases the ductile-brittle transition temperature by an amount dependent on material, prior heat treatment, aging temperature and time. Embrittlement is associated with segregation of phosphorus to grain boundaries and is modelled using McLean's approach to equilibrium segregation.

  5. Special closures for steel drum shipping containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonzon, L.L.; Otts, J.V.

    1976-01-01

    The objective of this program was to develop special lid closures for typical, steel drum, radioactive material shipping containers. Previous experience and testing had shown that the existing container was adequate to withstand the required environmental tests for certification, but that the lid and closure were just marginally effective. Specifically, the lid closure failed to consistently maintain a tight seal between the container and the lid after drop tests, thus causing the package contents to be vulnerable in the subsequent fire test. Recognizing the deficiency, the United States Energy Research and Development Administration requested the development of new closure(s) which would: (1) be as strong and resistant to a drop as the bottom of the container; (2) have minimal economic impact on the overall container cost; (3) maximize the use of existing container designs; (4) consider crush loads; and (5) result in less dependence on personnel and loading procedures. Several techniques were evaluated and found to be more effective than the standard closure mechanism. Of these, three new closure techniques were designed, fabricated, and proven to be structurally adequate to provide containment when a 454-kg drum was drop tested from 9.14-m onto an unyielding surface. The three designs were: (1) a 152-mm long lid extension or skirt welded to the standard drum lid, (2) a separate inner lid, with 152-mm long skirt and (3) C-clamps used at the container-lid interface. Based upon structural integrity, economic impact, and minimal design change, the lid extension is the recommended special closure

  6. Design and analysis of reactor containment of steel-concrete composite laminated shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, K.

    1977-01-01

    Reinforced and prestressed concrete containments for reactors have been developed in order to avoid the difficulties of welding of steel containments encountered as their capacities have become large: growing thickness of steel shells gave rise to the requirement of stress relief at the construction sites. However, these concrete vessels also seem to face another difficulty: the lack of shearing resistance capacity. In order to improve the shearing resistance capacity of the containment vessel, while avoiding the difficulty of welding, a new scheme of containment consisting of steel-concrete laminated shell is being developed. In the main part of a cylindrical vessel, the shell consists of two layers of thin steel plates located at the inner and outer surfaces, and a layer of concrete core into which both the steel plates are anchored. In order to validate the feasibility and safety of this new design, the results of analysis on the basis of up-to-date design loads are presented. The results of model tests in 1:30 scale are also reported. (Auth.)

  7. Seismic proving test of PWR reactor containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, H.; Yoshikawa, T.; Tokumaru, Y.

    1987-01-01

    The seismic reliability proving tests of nuclear power plant facilities are carried out by Nuclear Power Engineering Test Center (NUPEC), using the large-scale, high-performance vibration of Tadotsu Engineering Laboratory, and sponsored by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI). In 1982, the seismic reliability proving test of PWR containment vessel started using the test component of reduced scale 1/3.7 and the test component proved to have structural soundness against earthquakes. Subsequently, the detailed analysis and evaluation of these test results were carried out, and the analysis methods for evaluating strength against earthquakes were established. Whereupon, the seismic analysis and evaluation on the actual containment vessel were performed by these analysis methods, and the safety and reliability of the PWR reactor containment vessel were confirmed

  8. Research to sustain cases for Magnox-reactor steel pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, W.J.

    1997-01-01

    Britain's Magnox Electric plc owns and operates six power stations, each of which has twin gas-cooled reactors of the Magnox-fuel type. The older group of four power stations has steel pressure-circuits. The reactor cores are housed within spherical, steel vessels. This article describes some of the research which is undertaken to sustain the safety cases for these steel vessels which have now been in operation for just over 30 years. (author) 2 figs., 4 refs

  9. Shallow-crack toughness results for reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theiss, T.J.; Shum, D.K.M.; Rolfe, S.T.

    1992-01-01

    The Heavy Section Steel Technology Program (HSST) is investigating the influence of flaw depth on the fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel. To complete this investigation, techniques were developed to determine the fracture toughness from shallow-crack specimens. A total of 38 deep and shallow-crack tests have been performed on beam specimens about 100 mm deep loaded in 3-point bending. Two crack depths (a ∼ 50 and 9 mm) and three beam thicknesses (B ∼ 50, 100, and 150 mm) have been tested. Techniques were developed to estimate the toughness in terms of both the J-integral and crack-tip opening displacement (CTOD). Analytical J-integral results were consistent with experimental J-integral results, confirming the validity of the J-estimation schemes used and the effect of flaw depth on fracture toughness. Test results indicate a significant increase in the fracture toughness associated with the shallow flaw specimens in the lower transition region compared to the deep-crack fracture toughness. There is, however, little or no difference in toughness on the lower shelf where linear-elastic conditions exist for specimens with either deep or shallow flaws. The increase in shallow-flaw toughness compared with deep-flaw results appears to be well characterized by a temperature shift of 35 degree C

  10. Capacity of Prestressed Concrete Containment Vessels with Prestressing Loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SMITH, JEFFREY A.

    2001-01-01

    Reduced prestressing and degradation of prestressing tendons in concrete containment vessels were investigated using finite element analysis of a typical prestressed containment vessel. The containment was analyzed during a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) with varying levels of prestress loss and with reduced tendon area. It was found that when selected hoop prestressing tendons were completely removed (as if broken) or when the area of selected hoop tendons was reduced, there was a significant impact on the ultimate capacity of the containment vessel. However, when selected hoop prestressing tendons remained, but with complete loss of prestressing, the predicted ultimate capacity was not significantly affected for this specific loss of coolant accident. Concrete cracking occurred at much lower levels for all cases. For cases where selected vertical tendons were analyzed with reduced prestressing or degradation of the tendons, there also was not a significant impact on the ultimate load carrying capacity for the specific accident analyzed. For other loading scenarios (such as seismic loading) the loss of hoop prestressing with the tendons remaining could be more significant on the ultimate capacity of the containment vessel than found for the accident analyzed. A combination of loss of prestressing and degradation of the vertical tendons could also be more critical during other loading scenarios

  11. Strain-based failure criteria for steel containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanous, F.; Greimann, L.F.

    1989-01-01

    The Containment Integrity Division of the Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) has been conducting a program to evaluate the performance of containment buildings with internal pressure. Sandia has suggested that in the absence of leakage past penetrations, containment buildings will fail by rupturing after large plastic strains are developed up to ultimate strain of the material. This paper represents a portion of work conducted at Ames Laboratory for Sandia, the objective of which was to identify fabrication details that may affect the performance of a containment building. Construction drawings for nine steel containment buildings were surveyed, and several significant strain concentration regions were identified by using recommendations from Sandia and Section NE-3217 of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. These following regions were identified as: eccentricities in stiffener patterns around penetrations, eccentricities in containment shell middle surface, flat plate covers used on spare penetrations, containment base connection details, and containment heads. Examples of each of these regions were analyzed by the finite-element method, by simplified equations or both. In the case of middle surface eccentricities, the strains were found to be self-limiting. Even though flat plates have primary strains, they are typically designed so as not to control. Bolts in the base connection have primary strains and may control. The circumferential compressive strains introduced at the knuckle during buckling of the containment head grow as the pressure increases, but are somewhat restricted by the meridional tension. Finally, three analysis techniques and their associated failure criteria for the analysis of containment strength are introduced. (orig.)

  12. Lessons Learned From Developing Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Embrittlement Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL

    2010-08-01

    Materials behaviors caused by neutron irradiation under fission and/or fusion environments can be little understood without practical examination. Easily accessible material information system with large material database using effective computers is necessary for design of nuclear materials and analyses or simulations of the phenomena. The developed Embrittlement Data Base (EDB) at ORNL is this comprehensive collection of data. EDB database contains power reactor pressure vessel surveillance data, the material test reactor data, foreign reactor data (through bilateral agreements authorized by NRC), and the fracture toughness data. The lessons learned from building EDB program and the associated database management activity regarding Material Database Design Methodology, Architecture and the Embedded QA Protocol are described in this report. The development of IAEA International Database on Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials (IDRPVM) and the comparison of EDB database and IAEA IDRPVM database are provided in the report. The recommended database QA protocol and database infrastructure are also stated in the report.

  13. Pressurization of Containment Vessels from Plutonium Oxide Contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hensel, S.

    2012-01-01

    Transportation and storage of plutonium oxide is typically done using a convenience container to hold the oxide powder which is then placed inside a containment vessel. Intermediate containers which act as uncredited confinement barriers may also be used. The containment vessel is subject to an internal pressure due to several sources including; (1) plutonium oxide provides a heat source which raises the temperature of the gas space, (2) helium generation due to alpha decay of the plutonium, (3) hydrogen generation due to radiolysis of the water which has been adsorbed onto the plutonium oxide, and (4) degradation of plastic bags which may be used to bag out the convenience can from a glove box. The contributions of these sources are evaluated in a reasonably conservative manner.

  14. Aseismic safety analysis of a prestressed concrete containment vessel for CPR1000 nuclear power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ping; Wang, Qingkang; Kong, Xianjing

    2017-01-01

    The containment vessel of a nuclear power plant is the last barrier to prevent nuclear reactor radiation. Aseismic safety analysis is the key to appropriate containment vessel design. A prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) model with a semi-infinite elastic foundation and practical arrangement of tendons has been established to analyze the aseismic ability of the CPR1000 PCCV structure under seismic loads and internal pressure. A method to model the prestressing tendon and its interaction with concrete was proposed and the axial force of the prestressing tendons showed that the simulation was reasonable and accurate. The numerical results show that for the concrete structure, the location of the cylinder wall bottom around the equipment hatch and near the ring beam are critical locations with large principal stress. The concrete cracks occurred at the bottom of the PCCV cylinder wall under the peak earthquake motion of 0.50 g, however the PCCV was still basically in an elastic state. Furthermore, the concrete cracks occurred around the equipment hatch under the design internal pressure of 0.4MPa, but the steel liner was still in the elastic stage and its leak-proof function soundness was verified. The results provide the basis for analysis and design of containment vessels.

  15. Irradiation Effects in Fortiweld Steel Containing Different Boron Isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grounes, M.

    1967-07-01

    Tensile specimens and miniature impact specimens of the low alloyed pressure vessel steel Fortiweld have been irradiated at 265 deg C in R2 to two neutron doses, 6.5 x 10 18 n/cm 2 (> 1 MeV) and 4 x 10 19 n/cm 2 (thermal) and also 9.0 x 10 18 n/cm 2 (> 1 MeV) and 6 x 10 19 n/cm 2 (thermal). Material from three laboratory melts, in which the boron consisted of 10 B, 11 B and natural boron respectively, were investigated. The results both of tensile tests and impact tests with miniature impact specimens show that the 10 B-alloyed material was changed more and the 11 B-alloyed material was changed less than the material containing natural boron. At the higher neutron dose the increase in yield strength (0.2 % offset yield strength) was 11 kg/mm in the 10 B containing material compared to 5 kg/mm in the 11 B-containing material. The decrease in total elongation was 5 and 0 percentage units respectively. The transition temperature was increased 190 deg C at the higher neutron dose in the 10 B-alloyed material, 40 deg C in the 11 B-alloyed material and 80 deg C in the material containing natural boron

  16. Irradiation Effects in Fortiweld Steel Containing Different Boron Isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grounes, M

    1967-07-15

    Tensile specimens and miniature impact specimens of the low alloyed pressure vessel steel Fortiweld have been irradiated at 265 deg C in R2 to two neutron doses, 6.5 x 10{sup 18} n/cm{sup 2} (> 1 MeV) and 4 x 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2} (thermal) and also 9.0 x 10{sup 18} n/cm{sup 2} (> 1 MeV) and 6 x 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2} (thermal). Material from three laboratory melts, in which the boron consisted of {sup 10}B, {sup 11}B and natural boron respectively, were investigated. The results both of tensile tests and impact tests with miniature impact specimens show that the {sup 10}B-alloyed material was changed more and the {sup 11}B-alloyed material was changed less than the material containing natural boron. At the higher neutron dose the increase in yield strength (0.2 % offset yield strength) was 11 kg/mm in the {sup 10}B containing material compared to 5 kg/mm in the {sup 11}B-containing material. The decrease in total elongation was 5 and 0 percentage units respectively. The transition temperature was increased 190 deg C at the higher neutron dose in the {sup 10}B-alloyed material, 40 deg C in the {sup 11}B-alloyed material and 80 deg C in the material containing natural boron.

  17. Corrosion aspects of steel radioactive waste containers in cementitious materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, Nick

    2012-01-01

    Nick Smart from Serco, UK, gave an overview of the effects of cementitious materials on the corrosion of steel during storage and disposal of various low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes. Steel containers are often used as an overpack for the containment of radioactive wastes and are routinely stored in an open atmosphere. Since this is an aerobic and typically humid environment, the steel containers can start to corrode whilst in storage. Steel containers often come into contact with cementitious materials (e.g. grout encapsulants, backfill). An extensive account of different steel container designs and of steel corrosion mechanisms was provided. Steel corrosion rates under conditions buffered by cementitious materials have been evaluated experimentally. The main conclusion was that the cementitious environment generally facilitates the passivation of steel materials. Several general and localised corrosion mechanisms need to be considered when evaluating the performance of steel containers in cementitious environments, and environmental thresholds can be defined and used with this aim. In addition, the consequences of the generation of gaseous hydrogen by the corrosion of carbon steel under anoxic conditions must be taken into account. Discussion of the paper included: Is crevice corrosion really significant in cementitious systems? Crevice corrosion is unlikely in the cementitious backfill considered because it will tend to neutralise any acidic conditions in the crevice. What is the role of microbially-induced corrosion (MIC) in cementitious systems? Microbes are likely to be present in a disposal facility but their effect on corrosion is uncertain

  18. Radioactivity concentration measuring device for radiation waste containing vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Tetsuo.

    1994-01-01

    The device of the present invention can precisely and accurately measure a radioactive concentration of radioactive wastes irrespective of the radioactivity concentration distribution. Namely, a Ge detector having a collimator and a plurality of radiation detectors are placed at the outside of the radioactive waste containing vessel in such a way that it can rotate and move vertically relative to the vessel. The plurality of radiation detectors detect radiation coefficient signals at an assumed segment unit of a predetermined length in vertical direction and for every predetermined angle unit in the rotational direction. A weight measuring device determines the weight of the vessel. A computer calculates an average density of radioactivity for the region filled with radioactivity based on the determined net weight and radiation coefficient signals assuming that the volume of the radioactivity is constant. In addition, the computer calculates the amount of radioactivity in the assumed segment by conducting γ -ray absorption compensation calculation for the material in the vessel. Each of the amount of radioactivity is integrated to determine the amount of radioactivity in the vessel. (I.S.)

  19. Microscopic examination of crack growth in a pressure vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isacsson, M.; Narstroem, T. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-01-01

    A fairly systematic microscopic study concerning ductile and ductile-brittle crack growth in the A508B pressure vessel steel has been performed. The main method of investigation was to subject fracture mechanics specimens (sub-sized three point bend specimens) to predetermined load levels corresponding to different amounts of ductile crack extension. The specimens were then cut perpendicularly to the plane of the crack and the area in front of the crack was examined in a SEM. The object of these examinations was to determine if newly encountered computational results could be correlated to crack extension characteristics and to study whether the mechanism of ductile growth was of the void growth type or of the fast shear mechanism. This is important for further numerical modelling of the process. Both the original material and a specially heat treated piece were investigated. The heat treatment was performed in order to raise the transition temperature to about 60 deg C with the object to provide a more convenient testing situation. Charpy V tests were performed for the specially heat treated material to obtain the temperature dependence of the toughness. This was also studied by performing fracture toughness determination on the same type of specimens as were used for the microscopic study. The heat treatment used fulfilled the above purpose and the microscopic studies provide a good understanding of the micro mechanisms operating in the ductile fracture process for this material. 19 refs, 8 figs, 3 tabs.

  20. Microscopic examination of crack growth in a pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isacsson, M.; Narstroem, T.

    1997-01-01

    A fairly systematic microscopic study concerning ductile and ductile-brittle crack growth in the A508B pressure vessel steel has been performed. The main method of investigation was to subject fracture mechanics specimens (sub-sized three point bend specimens) to predetermined load levels corresponding to different amounts of ductile crack extension. The specimens were then cut perpendicularly to the plane of the crack and the area in front of the crack was examined in a SEM. The object of these examinations was to determine if newly encountered computational results could be correlated to crack extension characteristics and to study whether the mechanism of ductile growth was of the void growth type or of the fast shear mechanism. This is important for further numerical modelling of the process. Both the original material and a specially heat treated piece were investigated. The heat treatment was performed in order to raise the transition temperature to about 60 deg C with the object to provide a more convenient testing situation. Charpy V tests were performed for the specially heat treated material to obtain the temperature dependence of the toughness. This was also studied by performing fracture toughness determination on the same type of specimens as were used for the microscopic study. The heat treatment used fulfilled the above purpose and the microscopic studies provide a good understanding of the micro mechanisms operating in the ductile fracture process for this material

  1. Kinetics of annealing of irradiated surveillance pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, D.J.; Wechsler, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    Indentation hardness measurements as a function of annealing were made on broken halves of Charpy impact surveillance samples. The samples had been irradiated in commercial power reactors to a neutron fluence of approximately 1 x 10 18 neutrons per cm 2 , E > 1 MeV, at a temperature of about 300 0 C (570 0 F). Results are reported for the weld metal, which showed greater radiation hardening than the base plate or heat-affected zone material. Isochronal and isothermal anneals were conducted on the irradiated surveillance samples and on unirradiated control samples. No hardness changes upon annealing occurred for the control samples. The recovery in hardness for the irradiated samples took place mostly between 400 and 500 0 C. Based on the Meechan-Brinkman method of analysis, the activation energy for annealing was found to be 0.60 +- 0.06 eV. According to computer simulation calculations of Beeler, the activation energy for migration of vacancies in alpha iron is about 0.67 eV. Therefore, the results of this preliminary study appear to be consistent with a mechanism of annealing of radiation damage in pressure vessel steels based on the migration of radiation-produced lattice vacancies

  2. Current Status of Development of High Nickel Low Alloy Steels for Commercial Reactor Pressure Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Chul; Lee, B. S.; Park, S. G.; Lee, K. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    SA508 Gr.3 Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steels have been used for nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels up to now. Currently, the design goal of nuclear power plant is focusing at larger capacity and longer lifetime. Requirements of much bigger pressure vessels may cause critical problems in the manufacturing stage as well as for the welding stage. Application of higher strength steel may be required to overcome the technical problems. It is known that a higher strength and fracture toughness of low alloy steels such as SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel could be achieved by increasing the Ni and Cr contents. Therefore, SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel is very attractive as eligible RPV steel for the next generation PWR systems. In this report, we propose the possibility of SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel for an application of next generation commercial RPV, based on the literature research result about development history of the RPV steels and SA508 specification. In addition, we have surveyed the research result of HSLA(High Strength Low Alloy steel), which has similar chemical compositions with SA508 Gr.4N, to understand the problems and the way of improvement of SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel. And also, we have investigated eastern RPV steel(WWER-1000), which has higher Ni contents compared to western RPV steel.

  3. Overview of research trends and problems on Cr-Mo low alloy steels for pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Byung Ha; Kim, Jeong Tae

    2000-01-01

    Cr-Mo low alloy steels have been used for a long time for pressure vessel due to its excellent corrosion resistance, high temperature strength and toughness. The paper reviewed the latest trends on material development and some problems on Cr-Mo low alloy steel for pressure vessel, such as elevated temperature strength, hardenability, synergetic effect between temper and hydrogen embrittlement, hydrogen attack and hydrogen induced disbonding of overlay weld-cladding

  4. Method of detecting leakage in nuclear reactor containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koba, Akitoshi; Goto, Seiichiro.

    1974-01-01

    Object: To permit accurate and prompt detection of leakage of a radioactive substance. Structure: The rate of change of such factors as radiation dose, temperature and pressure in the containment vessel, and each detected rate of change is compared with a reference value. The running cycle of the condensed drain exhausting pump in a drain collecting tank within a predetermined period is detected, and it is also compared with a reference value. These comparisons determine the absence or presence of leakage. (Kamimura, M.)

  5. Estimation of residual stresses in reactor pressure vessel steel specimens clad by stainless steel strip electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimmoeller, H.A.; Ruge, J.L.

    1978-01-01

    The equations to determine a two-dimensional state of residual stress in flat laminated plates are well known from an earlier work by one of the authors. The derivation of these equations leads to a linear, inhomogeneous system of Volterra's integral equations of the second kind. To ascertain the unknown residual stresses from these equations it is necessary to cut down the thickness of the test plate layer by layer. This results in two-dimensional deformation reactions in the rest of the test plate, which can be measured, e.g. by a strain gauge rosette applied to the opposite side of the plate. The above-mentioned stress analysis has been transferred to 86mm thick reactor pressure vessel steel specimens (Type 22NiMoCr 37, DIN-No. 1.6751, similar to ASTM A508, Class 2) double-run clad by austenitic stainless steel strip electrodes (first layer 24/13 Cr-Ni steel, second layer 21/10 Cr-Ni steel). The overall dimensions of the clad specimens investigated amounted to 200 x 200 x (86+4.5+4.5)mm. At the surface of the austenitic cladding there is a two-dimensional tensile normal stress state of about 200N/mm 2 parallel, and about 300N/mm 2 transverse, to the welding direction. The maximum tensile stress was 8mm below the interface (fusion line, material transition) in the parent material. The stress distributions of the specimens investigated, determined on the basis of the above-mentioned combined experimental mathematical procedure, are presented graphically for the as-welded (as-delivered) and annealed (600 0 C/12hr) conditions. (author)

  6. The electrogas and electroslag multipass high speed welding of nuclear pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichhorn, F.; Hirsch, P.; Langenbahn, H.W.; Wubbels, B.

    1978-01-01

    High-speed electroslag and electrogas welding of 15 Mn Ni63 steel plates to achieve high strength and toughness joints for reactor pressure vessels are described. Mechanical testing of overheating-resistant, brittle fracture resistant low alloy steels is discussed. (UK)

  7. Irradiation effects in low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steels (Heavy-Section Steel Technology program series 4 and 5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGowan, J.J.; Nanstad, R.K.; Thoms, K.R.; Menke, B.H.

    1985-01-01

    This report presents studies on the irradiation effects in low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steels. The Fourth Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Irradiation Series, almost completed, was aimed at elastic-plastic and fully plastic fracture toughness of low-copper weldments (''current practice welds''). A typical nuclear pressure vessel plate steel was included for statistical purposes. The Fifth HSST Irradiation Series, now in progress, is aimed at determining the shape of the K/sub IR/ curve after significant radiation-induced shift of the transition temperatures. This series includes irradiated test specimens of thicknesses up to 100 mm and weldment compositions typical of early nuclear power reactor pressure vessel welds. 27 refs., 22 figs

  8. Evaluation of seismic shear capacity of prestressed concrete containment vessels with fiber reinforcement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choun, Young Sun; Park, Jun Hee [Integrated Safety Assessment Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Fibers have been used in cement mixture to improve its toughness, ductility, and tensile strength, and to enhance the cracking and deformation characteristics of concrete structural members. The addition of fibers into conventional reinforced concrete can enhance the structural and functional performances of safety-related concrete structures in nuclear power plants. The effects of steel and polyamide fibers on the shear resisting capacity of a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) were investigated in this study. For a comparative evaluation between the shear performances of structural walls constructed with conventional concrete, steel fiber reinforced concrete, and polyamide fiber reinforced concrete, cyclic tests for wall specimens were conducted and hysteretic models were derived. The shear resisting capacity of a PCCV constructed with fiber reinforced concrete can be improved considerably. When steel fiber reinforced concrete contains hooked steel fibers in a volume fraction of 1.0%, the maximum lateral displacement of a PCCV can be improved by > 50%, in comparison with that of a conventional PCCV. When polyamide fiber reinforced concrete contains polyamide fibers in a volume fraction of 1.5%, the maximum lateral displacement of a PCCV can be enhanced by ∼40%. In particular, the energy dissipation capacity in a fiber reinforced PCCV can be enhanced by > 200%. The addition of fibers into conventional concrete increases the ductility and energy dissipation of wall structures significantly. Fibers can be effectively used to improve the structural performance of a PCCV subjected to strong ground motions. Steel fibers are more effective in enhancing the shear performance of a PCCV than polyamide fibers.

  9. Evaluation of seismic shear capacity of prestressed concrete containment vessels with fiber reinforcement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choun, Young Sun; Park, Jun Hee

    2015-01-01

    Fibers have been used in cement mixture to improve its toughness, ductility, and tensile strength, and to enhance the cracking and deformation characteristics of concrete structural members. The addition of fibers into conventional reinforced concrete can enhance the structural and functional performances of safety-related concrete structures in nuclear power plants. The effects of steel and polyamide fibers on the shear resisting capacity of a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) were investigated in this study. For a comparative evaluation between the shear performances of structural walls constructed with conventional concrete, steel fiber reinforced concrete, and polyamide fiber reinforced concrete, cyclic tests for wall specimens were conducted and hysteretic models were derived. The shear resisting capacity of a PCCV constructed with fiber reinforced concrete can be improved considerably. When steel fiber reinforced concrete contains hooked steel fibers in a volume fraction of 1.0%, the maximum lateral displacement of a PCCV can be improved by > 50%, in comparison with that of a conventional PCCV. When polyamide fiber reinforced concrete contains polyamide fibers in a volume fraction of 1.5%, the maximum lateral displacement of a PCCV can be enhanced by ∼40%. In particular, the energy dissipation capacity in a fiber reinforced PCCV can be enhanced by > 200%. The addition of fibers into conventional concrete increases the ductility and energy dissipation of wall structures significantly. Fibers can be effectively used to improve the structural performance of a PCCV subjected to strong ground motions. Steel fibers are more effective in enhancing the shear performance of a PCCV than polyamide fibers

  10. Corrosion of radioactive waste containers, case of a container made of low allow steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bataillon, C.; Musy, C.; Roy, M.

    2001-01-01

    The following topics were dealt with: radioactive waste concept ANDRA, low alloy steel (XC38) container corrosion under representative storage conditions, corrosion rate and passivation effects, micrographic investigations

  11. Mechanical properties of reactor pressure vessel steels studied by static and dynamic torsion tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munier, A.; Maamouri, M.; Schaller, R.; Mercier, O.

    1993-01-01

    Internal friction measurements and torsional plastic deformation tests have been performed in reactor pressure vessel steels (unirradiated, irradiated and irradiated/annealed specimens). The results of these experiments have been interpreted with help of transmission electron microscopy observations (conventional and in situ). It is shown how the interactions between screw dislocations and obstacles (Peierls valleys, impurities and precipitates) could explain the low temperature hardening and the irradiation embrittlement of ferritic steels. In addition, it appears that the nondestructive internal friction technique could be used advantageously to follow the evolution of the material properties under irradiation, as for instance the irradiation embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel steels. (orig.)

  12. Predictability of steel containment response near failure track 3 - structural integrity, dynamic behavior, and seismic design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costello, J.F.; Ludwigsen, J.S.; Luk, V.K.; Hessheimer, M.F.

    2000-01-01

    The Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation of Japan and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, are co-sponsoring and jointly funding a Cooperative Containment Research Program at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA. As a part of this program, a steel containment vessel model and contact structure assembly was tested to failure with over pressurization at Sandia on December 11--12, 1996. The steel containment vessel model was a mixed-scale model (1:10 in geometry and 1:4 in shell thickness) of a steel containment for an improved Mark-II Boiling Water Reactor plant in Japan. The contact structure, which is a thick, bell-shaped steel shell separated at a nominally uniform distance from the model, provides a simplified representation of features of the concrete reactor shield building in the actual plant. The objective of the internal pressurization test was to provide measurement data of the structural response of the model up to its failure in order to validate analytical modeling, to find its pressure capacity, and to observe the failure model and mechanisms

  13. VVER vessel steel corrosion at interaction with molten corium in oxidizing atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechta, S.V. [Alexandrov Research Institute of Technologies (NITI), Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation)], E-mail: bechta@sbor.spb.su; Granovsky, V.S.; Khabensky, V.B.; Krushinov, E.V.; Vitol, S.A.; Sulatsky, A.A. [Alexandrov Research Institute of Technologies (NITI), Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation); Gusarov, V.V.; Almiashev, V.I. [Institute of Silicate Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences (ISCh RAS), St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Lopukh, D.B. [SPb State Electrotechnical University (SPbGETU), St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bottomley, D. [EUROPAISCHE KOMMISSION, Joint Research Centre Institut fuer Transurane (ITU), Karlsruhe (Germany); Fischer, M. [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Piluso, P. [CEA/DEN/DSNI, Saclay (France); Miassoedov, A.; Tromm, W. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany); Altstadt, E. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf (FZR), Dresden (Germany); Fichot, F. [IRSN/DPAM/SEMCA, St. Paul lez Durance (France); Kymalainen, O. [FORTUM Nuclear Services Ltd., Espoo (Finland)

    2009-06-15

    The long-term in-vessel corium retention (IVR) in the lower head bears a risk of the vessel wall deterioration caused by steel corrosion. The ISTC METCOR Project has studied physicochemical impact of prototypic coria having different compositions in air and steam and has generated valuable experimental data on vessel steel corrosion. It is found that the corrosion rate is sensitive to corium composition, but the composition of oxidizing above-melt atmosphere (air, steam) has practically no influence on it. A model of the corrosion process that integrates the experimental data, is proposed and used for development of correlations.

  14. VVER vessel steel corrosion at interaction with molten corium in oxidizing atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechta, S.V.; Granovsky, V.S.; Khabensky, V.B.; Krushinov, E.V.; Vitol, S.A.; Sulatsky, A.A.; Gusarov, V.V.; Almiashev, V.I.; Lopukh, D.B.; Bottomley, D.; Fischer, M.; Piluso, P.; Miassoedov, A.; Tromm, W.; Altstadt, E.; Fichot, F.; Kymalainen, O.

    2009-01-01

    The long-term in-vessel corium retention (IVR) in the lower head bears a risk of the vessel wall deterioration caused by steel corrosion. The ISTC METCOR Project has studied physicochemical impact of prototypic coria having different compositions in air and steam and has generated valuable experimental data on vessel steel corrosion. It is found that the corrosion rate is sensitive to corium composition, but the composition of oxidizing above-melt atmosphere (air, steam) has practically no influence on it. A model of the corrosion process that integrates the experimental data, is proposed and used for development of correlations.

  15. Engineering Performance of High Strength Concrete Containing Steel Fibre Reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Azree Othuman Mydin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The development and utilization of the high strength concrete in the construction industry have been increasing rapidly. Fiber reinforced concrete is introduced to overcome the weakness of the conventional concrete because concrete normally can crack under a low tensile force and it is known to be brittle. Steel fibre is proved to be the popular and best combination in the high strength concrete to result the best in the mechanical and durability properties of high strength concrete with consideration of curing time, steel fibre geometry, concrete grade and else more. The incorporation of steel fibre in the mortar mixture is known as steel fibre reinforced concrete have the potential to produce improvement in the workability, strength, ductility and the deformation of high strength concrete. Besides that, steel fibre also increases the tensile strength of concrete and improves the mechanical properties of the steel fibre reinforced concrete. The range for any high strength concrete is between 60MPa-100MPa. Steel fibre reinforced concrete which contains straight fibres has poorer physical properties than that containing hooked end stainless steel fibre due to the length and the hooked steel fibre provide a better effective aspects ratio. Normally, steel fibre tensile strength is in the range of 1100MPa-1700MPa. Addition of less steel fibre volumes in the range of 0.5% to 1.0% can produce better increase in the flexural fatigue strength. The strength can be increased with addition of steel fibre up to certain percentage. This paper will review and present some basic properties of steel fibre reinforced concrete such as mechanical, workability and durability properties.

  16. Evolution of precipitation in reactor pressure vessel steel welds under neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindgren, Kristina, E-mail: kristina.lindgren@chalmers.se [Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden); Boåsen, Magnus [Department of Solid Mechanics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Stiller, Krystyna [Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden); Efsing, Pål [Department of Solid Mechanics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Vattenfall Ringhals AB, SE-430 22 Väröbacka (Sweden); Thuvander, Mattias [Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden)

    2017-05-15

    Reactor pressure vessel steel welds are affected by irradiation during operation. The irradiation results in nanometre cluster formation, which in turn affects the mechanical properties of the material, e.g. the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature is shifted to higher levels. In this study, cluster formation is characterised in high Ni (1.58%) low Cu (0.04%) steel welds identical to Ringhals R4 welds, using atom probe tomography in both surveillance material and in material irradiated at accelerated dose rates. Clusters containing mainly Ni and Mn, but also some Si and Cu were observed in all of the irradiated materials. Their evolution did not change drastically during irradiation; the clusters grew and new clusters were nucleated. Hence, both the cluster number density and the average size increased with irradiation time. Some flux effects were observed when comparing the high flux material and the surveillance material. The surveillance material has a lower cluster number density, but larger clusters. The resulting impact on the mechanical properties of these two effects cancel out, resulting in a measured hardness that seems to be on the same trend as the high flux material. The dispersed barrier hardening model with an obstacle strength factor of 0.15 was found to reproduce the increase in hardness. In the investigated high flux materials, the clusters' Cu content was higher. - Highlights: •Clustering in a low Cu, high Ni reactor pressure vessel steel weld is studied. •The clusters nucleate and grow during irradiation, and consist of Ni, Mn, Si, and Cu. •High flux neutron irradiated material is compared to surveillance material. •High flux was found to result in smaller clusters with a larger number density. •Hardness follows the same dependence on fluence, independent of flux.

  17. Capacity assessment of concrete containment vessels subjected to aircraft impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andonov, Anton; Kostov, Marin; Iliev, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • An approach to assess the containment capacity to aircraft impact via fragility curves is proposed. • Momentum over Area was defined as most suitable reference parameter to describe the aircraft load. • The effect of the impact induced damages on the containment pressure capacity has been studied. • The studied containment shows no reduction of the pressure capacity for the investigated scenarios. • The effectiveness of innovative protective structure against aircraft impact has been evaluated. - Abstract: The paper describes the procedure and the results from the assessment of the vulnerability of a generic pre-stressed containment structure subjected to a large commercial aircraft impact. Impacts of Boeing 737, Boeing 767 and Boeing 747 have been considered. The containment vulnerability is expressed by fragility curves based on the results of a number of nonlinear dynamic analyses. Three reference parameters have been considered as impact intensity measure in the fragility curve definition: peak impact force (PIF), peak impact pressure (PIP) and Momentum over Area (MoA). Conclusions on the most suitable reference parameter as well on the vulnerability of such containment vessels are drawn. The influence of the aircraft impact induced damages on the containment ultimate pressure capacity is also assessed and some preliminary conclusions on this are drawn. The paper also addresses a conceptual design of a protective structure able to decrease the containment vulnerability and provide a preliminary assessment of the applicability of such concept.

  18. Capacity assessment of concrete containment vessels subjected to aircraft impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andonov, Anton, E-mail: anton.andonov@mottmac.com; Kostov, Marin; Iliev, Alexander

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • An approach to assess the containment capacity to aircraft impact via fragility curves is proposed. • Momentum over Area was defined as most suitable reference parameter to describe the aircraft load. • The effect of the impact induced damages on the containment pressure capacity has been studied. • The studied containment shows no reduction of the pressure capacity for the investigated scenarios. • The effectiveness of innovative protective structure against aircraft impact has been evaluated. - Abstract: The paper describes the procedure and the results from the assessment of the vulnerability of a generic pre-stressed containment structure subjected to a large commercial aircraft impact. Impacts of Boeing 737, Boeing 767 and Boeing 747 have been considered. The containment vulnerability is expressed by fragility curves based on the results of a number of nonlinear dynamic analyses. Three reference parameters have been considered as impact intensity measure in the fragility curve definition: peak impact force (PIF), peak impact pressure (PIP) and Momentum over Area (MoA). Conclusions on the most suitable reference parameter as well on the vulnerability of such containment vessels are drawn. The influence of the aircraft impact induced damages on the containment ultimate pressure capacity is also assessed and some preliminary conclusions on this are drawn. The paper also addresses a conceptual design of a protective structure able to decrease the containment vulnerability and provide a preliminary assessment of the applicability of such concept.

  19. Radioactive material-containing vessel and method of manufacturing the same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, Hiroshi; Wada, Katsuyoshi; Ota, Shigeo; Nishioka, Eiji; Okuno, Michinori.

    1995-01-01

    In a vessel for containing radioactive materials having an outer wall with a structure of interposing a lead layer, as a shielding material between inner and outer cylinders made of steel plates, the inner cylinder and the lead layer are in close contact by way of a thin layer of a lead/tin type soldering material and to such an extent that the boundary layer is not detected by supersonic inspection. In addition, flux is coated to the steel plate, which forms the inner cylinder, on the surface being in contact with the lead layer, then a thin layer of the soldering material such as lead or tin is formed, to cast the lead between the inner and the outer cylinders. Then, since the inner cylinder and the lead layer are thermally joined tightly, heat generated at the inside can effectively be released to the outside, so that it is effective as a high-performance cask for transporting a large amount of radioactive materials such as spent nuclear fuels having high temperature afterheat. In addition, a containing vessel with good contact between the inner cylinder and the lead can be manufactured at a low cost only applying a simple primer treatment on the surface of the inner cylinder in addition to an existent lead casting method. (N.H.)

  20. Applicability of newly developed 610MPa class heavy thickness high strength steel to boiler pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katayama, Norihiko; Kaihara, Shoichiro; Ishii, Jun [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Corp., Yokohama (Japan); Kajigaya, Ichiro [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Totsuka, Takehiro; Miyazaki, Takashi [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Corp., Aioi (Japan)

    1995-11-01

    Construction of a 350 MW Class PFBC (Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion) boiler plant is under planning in Japan. Design temperature and pressure of the vessel are maximum 350 C and 1.69 MPa, respectively. As the plate thickness of the vessel exceeds over 100 mm, high strength steel plate of good weldability and less susceptible to reheat cracking was required and developed. The steel was aimed to satisfy the tensile strength over 610 MPa at 350 C after postweld heat treatment (PWHT), with good notch toughness. The authors investigated the welding performances of the newly developed steel by using 150 mm-thick plate welded by pulsed-MAG and SAW methods. It was confirmed that the newly developed steel and its welds possess sufficient strength and toughness after PWHT, and applicable to the actual pressure vessel.

  1. Air and gas cleaning methods for reactor containment vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverman, L.

    1963-11-15

    In this paper, a survey is made of the existing and some proposed new methods for the control and purification of air and gases which might be released from a reactor contained or confined for protection of the health and safety of the public from potential accidents. The difference between confinement and containment concepts must be considered. The problems involved and the need for decontamination, site selection, exclusion area, population density, distance, etc., have been discussed elsewhere. We propose to discuss here the safety measures necessary to control the release of radioactive materials to the environment. This requires special systems which must function effectively to minimize loss of fission products such as halogens and particulates. These can penetrate the confinement filters or the containment vessel to a limited extent even after cleaning.

  2. Fatigue crack propagation in neutron-irradiated ferritic pressure-vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, L.A.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a number of experiments dealing with fatigue crack propagation in irradiated reactor pressure-vessel steels are reviewed. The steels included ASTM alloys A302B, A533B, A508-2, and A543, as well as weldments in A543 steel. Fluences and irradiation conditions were generally typical of those experienced by most power reactors. In general, the effect of neutron irradiation on the fatigue crack propagation behavior of these steels was neither significantly beneficial nor significantly detrimental

  3. Integrated leak rate test results of JOYO reactor containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, M.; Endo, J.

    1982-02-01

    Integrated leak rate tests of JOYO after the reactor coolant system had been filled with sodium have been performed two times since 1978 (February 1978 and December 1979). The tests were conducted with the in-containment sodium systems, primary argon cover gas system and air conditioning systems operating. Both the absolute pressure method and the reference chamber method were employed during the test. The results of both tests confirmed the functioning of the containment vessel, and leak rate limits were satisfied. In Addition, the adequancy of the test instrumentation system and the test method was demonstrated. Finally the plant conditions required to maintain reasonable accuracy for the leak rate testing of LMFBR were established. In this paper, the test conditions and the test results are described. (author)

  4. Analysis of the micro-structural damages by neutronic irradiation of the steel of reactor vessels of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. Characterization of the design steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moranchel y Rodriguez, M.; Garcia B, A.; Longoria G, L. C.

    2010-09-01

    The vessel of a nuclear reactor is one of the safety barriers more important in the design, construction and operation of the reactor. If the vessel results affected to the grade of to have fracture and/or cracks it is very probable the conclusion of their useful life in order to guarantee the nuclear safety and the radiological protection of the exposure occupational personnel, of the public and the environment avoiding the exposition to radioactive sources. The materials of the vessel of a nuclear reactor are exposed continually to the neutronic irradiation that generates the same nuclear reactor. The neutrons that impact to the vessel have the sufficient energy to penetrate certain depth in function of the energy of the incident neutron until reaching the repose or to be absorbed by some nucleus. In the course of their penetration, the neutrons interact with the nuclei, atoms, molecules and with the same crystalline nets of the vessel material producing vacuums, interstitial, precipitate and segregations among other defects that can modify the mechanical properties of the steel. The steel A533-B is the material with which is manufactured the vessel of the nuclear reactors of nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, is an alloy that, among other components, it contains atoms of Ni that if they are segregated by the neutrons impact this would favor to the cracking of the same vessel. This work is part of an investigation to analyze the micro-structural damages of the reactor vessels of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde due to the neutronic irradiation which is exposed in a continuous way. We will show the characterization of the design steel of the vessel, what offers a comprehension about their chemical composition, the superficial topography and the crystalline nets of the steel A533-B. It will also allow analyze the existence of precipitates, segregates, the type of crystalline net and the distances inter-plains of the design steel of the vessel. (Author)

  5. Development and application of free pretreatment container steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Liu, Y.; Han, B.; Wei, B.; Wang, S. Z.

    2017-12-01

    Due to economic and environmental advantages pre-treatment containers have good big development prospects, which can avoid shot blasting processes, and decrease the noise and dust pollution. By analyzing requirements of the container steel surface quality, target oxide scale structure of free pretreatment container steel has been determined. Trial process was carried out, and test results showed that the oxide scale achieved the desired objects, oxide scale with outer thin Fe3O4 layer and inner eutectoid α-Fe+Fe3O4. Salt spray test, second adhesion test, and modeling performance basically corroborated the container feasibility.

  6. Product consistency testing of three reference glasses in stainless steel and perfluoroalkoxy resin vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, K.M.; Smith, G.L.; Marschman, S.C.

    1995-03-01

    Because of their chemical durability, silicate glasses have been proposed and researched since the mid-1950s as a medium for incorporating high-level radioactive waste (HLW) generated from processing of nuclear materials. A number of different waste forms were evaluated and ranked in the early 1980s; durability (leach resistance) was the highest weighted factor. Borosilicate glass was rated the best waste form available for incorporation of HLW. Four different types of vessels and three different glasses were used to study the possible effect of vessel composition on durability test results from the Production Consistency Test (PCT). The vessels were 45-m 304 stainless steel vessels, 150-m 304 L stainless steel vessels, and 60-m perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) fluoropolymer resin vessels. The three glasses were the Environmental Assessment glass manufactured by Corning Incorporated and supplied by Westinghouse Savannah River company, and West Valley Nuclear Services reference glasses 5 and 6, manufactured and supplied by Catholic University of America. Within experimental error, no differences were found in durability test results using the 3 different glasses in the 304L stainless steel or PFA fluoropolymer resin vessels over the seven-day test period

  7. Radiation embrittlement of WWER-1000 reactor vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaeva, A.V.; Nikolaev, Yu.A.; Kevorkyan, Yu.R.

    2001-01-01

    Results obtained on the blank samples of materials of the WWER-1000 vessels irradiated by low density neutron flux are discussed. Chemical composition of the materials is characterized by the low content of the impurities (copper and phosphorus) and high content of nickel. Dependence of the radiation embrittlement of the WWER-1000 vessel materials on metallurgic variables and damage dose is treated. The research showed that nickel largely enhanced the radiation embrittlement. New dependences for determination of the radiation embrittlement real rate of the WWER-1000 vessel materials and its conservative estimation were developed [ru

  8. Joining dissimilar stainless steels for pressure vessel components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Sun; Huai-Yue Han

    1994-01-01

    A series of studies was carried out to examine the weldability and properties of dissimilar steel joints between martensitic and austenitic stainless steels - F6NM (OCrl3Ni4Mo) and AISI 347, respectively. The weldability tests included weld thermal simulation of the martensitic steel for investigating the influence of weld thermal cycles and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) on the mechanical properties of the heat-affected zone (HAZ); implant testing for examining the tendency for cold cracking of martensitic steel; rigid restraint testing for determining hot crack susceptibility of the multi-pass dissimilar steel joints. The joints were subjected to various mechanical tests including a tensile test, bending test and impact test at various temperatures, as well as slow strain-rate test for examining the stress corrosion cracking tendency in the simulated environment of a primary circuit of a PWR. Based on the weldability tests, a welding procedure - tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding for root passes with HNiCrMo-2B wire followed by manual metal arc (MMA) welding using coated electrode ENiCrFe-3B - was developed and a PWHT at 600 deg C/2h was recommended. Furthermore, the welding of tube/tube joints between these dissimilar steels is described. (21 refs., 11 figs., 14 tabs.)

  9. Study of radiation damage of steels for light water pressure vessels at UJV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacek, N.; Stoces, B.

    1980-01-01

    Preoperational determination of radiation resistance of pressure vessel steels is performed at accelerated neutron exposure in a test or materials research reactor. The results obtained at accelerated and operating exposure are not fully identical and surveillance bodies are therefore used manufactured from the pressure vessel material. Currently, the following steels are used for the manufacture of light water reactor pressure vessels: Mn-Mo-Ni (ASTM-A533-B, ASTM-A508), Cr-Mo-V (15Kh2M1FA). At UJV Rez, for irradiation Chanca-M probes imported from France are used featuring electric temperature control. Almost identical radiation embrittlement was measured for all three steels after irradiation with a neutron fluence of 3x10 23 n.m -2 at a temperature of 290 degC. (H.S.)

  10. R and D Developments. Research Programs on Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Vessel Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Briceno, D.; Lapena, J.; Serrano, M.; Perosanz, F.

    2000-01-01

    Irradiation embrittlement of pressure vessel steels is a degradation mechanism time dependent that can lead to operational restrictions with adverse effects in the efficiency and life of a plant. For the last year, several research programs have been devoted to study thye evaluation of neutronic radiation effect on mechanical properties of pressure vessel steels. However, at the present, there is a growing interest on the development of new methodologies to optimize the surveillance program information, and the understanding of the irradiation damage mechanism. This paper give an overview of international research programs, and on the R+D activities carried out by the Structural Materials Project on irradiation embrittlement on pressure vessel steels. (Author)

  11. Fracture toughness behavior and its analysis on nuclear pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwadate, Tadao; Tanaka, Yasuhiko; Ono, Shin-ichi; Tsukada, Hisashi [Japan Steel Works Ltd., Muroran, Hokkaido. Muroran Plant

    1983-02-01

    A drop weight J sub(Id) testing machine has been developed successfully, by which the multiple specimen J resistance curve test technique can be applied to measure the fracture toughness. In this study, the use of a small size round compact tension (RCT) specimen for measuring the fracture toughness J sub(Ic) or J sub(Id) of the nuclear pressure vessel steels is recommended and confirmed for the surveillance tests. The static and dynamic fracture toughness of ASTM A508 C 1.2, A508 C 1.3 and A533 Gr.B C 1.1 steels in the wide range of temperature including the upper shelf have been measured and their behavior has been analysed. The fracture toughness behavior under various strain rates and in a wide temperature range can be explained by the behavior of stretched zone formation preceding the crack initiation. The scatter of K sub(J) values in the transition range is caused by the amount of crack extension contained in the specimens. In this paper, the method to obtain the fracture toughness equivalent to the K sub(Ic) from the K sub(J) value is also presented.

  12. Oxidation effect on steel corrosion and thermal loads during corium melt in-vessel retention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granovsky, V.S.; Khabensky, V.B.; Krushinov, E.V.; Vitol, S.A.; Sulatsky, A.A.; Almjashev, V.I. [Alexandrov Scientific-Research Technology Institute (NITI), Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation); Bechta, S.V. [KTH, Stockholm (Sweden); Gusarov, V.V. [SPb State Technology University (SPbGTU), St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Barrachin, M. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), St Paul lez Durance (France); Bottomley, P.D., E-mail: paul.bottomley@ec.europa.eu [EC-Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Karlsruhe (Germany); Fischer, M. [AREVA GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Piluso, P. [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), Cadarache, St Paul lez Durance (France)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The METCOR facility simulates vessel steel corrosion in contact with corium. • Steel corrosion rates in UO{sub 2+x}–ZrO{sub 2}–FeO{sub y} coria accelerate above 1050 K. • However corrosion rates can also be limited by melt O{sub 2} supply. • The impact of this on in-vessel retention (IVR) strategy is discussed. - Abstract: During a severe accident with core meltdown, the in-vessel molten core retention is challenged by the vessel steel ablation due to thermal and physicochemical interaction of melt with steel. In accidents with oxidizing atmosphere above the melt surface, a low melting point UO{sub 2+x}–ZrO{sub 2}–FeO{sub y} corium pool can form. In this case ablation of the RPV steel interacting with the molten corium is a corrosion process. Experiments carried out within the International Scientific and Technology Center's (ISTC) METCOR Project have shown that the corrosion rate can vary and depends on both surface temperature of the RPV steel and oxygen potential of the melt. If the oxygen potential is low, the corrosion rate is controlled by the solid phase diffusion of Fe ions in the corrosion layer. At high oxygen potential and steel surface layer temperature of 1050 °C and higher, the corrosion rate intensifies because of corrosion layer liquefaction and liquid phase diffusion of Fe ions. The paper analyzes conditions under which corrosion intensification occurs and can impact on in-vessel melt retention (IVR)

  13. Impact limiter design for a lightweight tritium hydride vessel transport container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, D.C.; Longcope, D.B.; Neilsen, M.K.

    1995-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has designed an impact-limiting system for a small, lightweight radioactive material shipping container. The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) is developing this Type B package for the shipment of tritium, replacing the outdated LP-50 shipping container. Regulatory accident resistance requirements for Type B packages, including this new tritium package, are specified in 10 CFR 71 (NRC 1983). The regulatory requirements include a 9-meter free drop onto an unyielding target, a 1-meter drop onto a mild steel punch, and a 30-minute 800 degrees C fire test. Impact limiters are used to protect the package in the free-drop accident condition in any impact orientation without hindering the package's resistance to the thermal accident condition. The overall design of the new package is based on a modular concept using separate thermal shielding and impact mitigating components in an attempt to simplify the design, analysis, test, and certification process. Performance requirements for the tritium package's limiting system are based on preliminary estimates provided by WSRC. The current tritium hydride vessel (THV) to be transported has relatively delicate valving assemblies and should not experience acceleration levels greater than approximately 200 g's. A thermal overpack and outer stainless steel shell, to be designed by WSRC, will form the inner boundary of the impact-limiting system (see Figure 1). The mass of the package, including cargo, inner container, thermal overpack, and outer stainless steel shell (not including impact limiters) should be approximately 68 kg. Consistent with the modular design philosophy, the combined thermal overpack and containment system should be considered essentially rigid, with the impact limiters incurring all deformation

  14. Containment vessel bottom head transport and lifting technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Donghong; Tian Shiyong; Hu Dequan; Xiao Hongtao

    2013-01-01

    The challengeable transport and lifting techniques and high safety assurance measures are needed for the onsite construction of the AP1000 containment vessel bottom head (CVBH), which is a large component with heavy weight, big size, high center of gravity, and easy to deformation. During transport, the infra structural road foundation is heavily loaded with big turning radius, and the requirement for synchronization of transport vehicles is strict. During lifting, the crane lifting capacities are high, requirement for the lifting and rigging tools is strict, nuclear island being put into place is difficult, and the crane operating foundation is heavily loaded. The transport and lifting techniques and safety assurance measures for CVBH are elaborated in detail, so as to provide a reference for the follow-up transport and lifting of large components of nuclear island. (authors)

  15. Review on experiments relating to primary containment vessel failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Okada, Hidetoshi; Uchida, Sunsuke; Naitoh, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Experiments regarding failures of primary containment vessels (PCVs) are reviewed and remained issues to be investigated in the future are discussed. Experiments are categorized as those relating to criteria of PCV failures and to FP releases through breaches on PCV boundaries. In the experiments categorized as those relating to criteria of PCV failures, experiments with full-scale, scale models, and compounds used for sealing are surveyed. Experiments relating to an amount of radioactive fission products (FPs) trapped at breaches on PCV boundaries are also reviewed. As remained issues to be investigated in the future, two items are pointed out: Evaluating degradation behavior of PCV boundaries exposed to temperature and pressure from the failure onset criteria to far above them, and evaluating an amount of FPs trapped at breaches on PCV boundaries. (author)

  16. Ductile fracture of cylindrical vessels containing a large flaw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, F.; Irwin, G. R.; Ratwani, M.

    1976-01-01

    The fracture process in pressurized cylindrical vessels containing a relatively large flaw is considered. The flaw is assumed to be a part-through or through meridional crack. The flaw geometry, the yield behavior of the material, and the internal pressure are assumed to be such that in the neighborhood of the flaw the cylinder wall undergoes large-scale plastic deformations. Thus, the problem falls outside the range of applicability of conventional brittle fracture theories. To study the problem, plasticity considerations are introduced into the shell theory through the assumptions of fully-yielded net ligaments using a plastic strip model. Then a ductile fracture criterion is developed which is based on the concept of net ligament plastic instability. A limited verification is attempted by comparing the theoretical predictions with some existing experimental results.

  17. Effect of stress relief parameters on the mechanical properties of pressure vessel steels and weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canonico, D.A.; Stelzman, W.J.

    1976-01-01

    Post weld heat treatments of thick-section A533B steel for nuclear pressure vessels are discussed with reference to the ASME code. The discussion is in the form of a lecture and summarized by noting that the ASME code, in particular Section III, Division 1, imposes a post weld heat treatment requirement on pressure vessels fabricated from low alloy high strength steels. The Code permits a holding temperature range, the high side of which could result in poorer toughness properties. Long times in excess of 100 hours and/or high temperatures, 649 0 C can result in an increase in the NDT and a decrease in the upper shelf energy

  18. Experimental Study of Interactions Between Sub-oxidized Corium and Reactor Vessel Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechta, S.V.; Khabensky, V.B.; Granovsky, V.S.; Krushinov, E.V.; Vitol, S.A.; Gusarov, V.V.; Almiashev, V.I.; Lopukh, D.B.; Tromm, W.; Miassoedov, A.; Bottomley, D.; Fischer, M.; Piluso, P.; Altstadt, E.; Willschutz, H.G.; Fichoti, F.

    2006-01-01

    One of the critical factors in the analysis of in-vessel melt retention is the vessel strength. It is, in particular, sensitive to the thickness of intact vessel wall, which, in its turn, depends on the thermal conditions and physicochemical interactions with corium. Physicochemical interaction of prototypic UO 2 -ZrO 2 -Zr corium melt and VVER vessel steel was examined during the 2. Phase of the ISTC METCOR Project. Rasplav-3 test facility was used for conducting four tests, in which the Zr oxidation degree and interaction front temperature were varied; in one of the tests, stainless steel was added to the melt. Direct experimental measurements and post-test analyses were used for determining corrosion kinetics and maximum corrosion depth (i.e. the physicochemical impact of corium on the cooled vessel steel specimens), as well as the steel temperature conditions during the interaction, and finally the structure and composition of crystallized ingots, including the interaction zone. The minimum temperature on the interaction front boundary, which determined its final position and maximum corrosion depth was ∼ 1090 deg. C. An empirical correlation for calculation of corrosion kinetics has been derived. (authors)

  19. Characterization of four prestressed concrete reactor vessel liner steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanstad, R.K.

    1980-12-01

    A program of fracture toughness testing and analysis is being performed with PCRV steels for HTGRs. This report focuses on background information for the base materials and results of characterization testing, such as tensile and impact properties, chemical composition, and microstructural examination. The steels tested were an SA-508 class 1 forging, two plates of SA-537 class 1, and one plate of SA-537 class 2. Tensile requirements in effect at the time of procurement are met by all four steels. However, the SA-537 class 2 plate would not meet the minimum requirement for yield strength. Drop-weight and Charpy impact tests verified that the RT/sub NDT/ is equal to the NDT for each steel. Charpy impact energies at the NDT range from 40 J (30 ft-lb) for one heat of SA-537 class 1 to 100 J (74 ft-lb) for the SA-537 class 2 plate; upper-shelf energies range from 170 to 310 J (125 to 228 ft-lb) for the same two steels, respectively. The onset of upper-shelf energy occurred at temperatures ranging from 0 to 50 0 C

  20. Ultrasonic stress evaluation through thickness of a stainless steel pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javadi, Yashar; Pirzaman, Hamed Salimi; Raeisi, Mohammadreza Hadizadeh; Najafabadi, Mehdi Ahmadi

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates ultrasonic method in stress measurement through thickness of a pressure vessel. Longitudinal critically refracted (L CR ) waves are employed to measure the welding residual stresses in a vessel constructed from austenitic stainless steel 304L. The acoustoelastic constant is measured through a hydro test to keep the pressure vessel intact. Hoop and axial residual stresses are evaluated by using different frequency range of ultrasonic transducers. The welding processes of vessel shell and caps are simulated by a 3D finite element (FE) model which is validated by hole-drilling method. The residual stresses calculated by FE simulation are then compared with those obtained from the ultrasonic measurement while a good agreement is observed. It is demonstrated that the residual stresses through thickness of the stainless steel pressure vessel can be evaluated by combining FE and L CR method (known as FEL CR method). - Highlights: • The main goal is ultrasonic evaluation of through thickness stresses. • Welding processes of a stainless steel pressure vessel are modelled by FE. • The hole-drilling method is used to validate the FE results. • Residual stresses are measured by four different series of ultrasonic transducers. • The comparison between ultrasonic and FE results show an acceptable agreement

  1. Acoustic emission test on a 25mm thick mild steel pressure vessel with inserted defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentley, P.G.; Dawson, D.G.; Hanley, D.J.; Kirby, N.

    1976-12-01

    Acoustic emission measurements have been taken on an experimental mild steel vessel with 4 inserted defects ranging in severity up to 90% of through thickness. The vessel was subjected to a series of pressure excursions of increasing magnitude until failure occurred by extension of the largest inserted defect through the vessel wall. No acoustic emission was detected throughout any part of the tests which would indicate the presence of such serious defects or of impending failure. Measurements of acoustic emission from metallurgical specimens are included and the results of post test inspection using conventional NDT and metallographic techniques are reported. (author)

  2. Pressure vessels for reactors made from structural steel with limited tensile strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machatti, H.

    1973-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessel is prestressed in several directions with prestressing elements fabricated of steel with a high yielding point. This design allows a substantial reduction of wall thickness or an increase of the inner diameter at equal wall thickness. The prestress of the prestressing elements is designed to achieve a maximum stress release of the vessel walls at normal operating conditions and to fully utilize the maximum load of the vessel walls. For safety reasons the cross section of the prestressing elements is constructed in a way that strain is always 20 % lower the yield point. (P.K.)

  3. Influence of heat treatments on thermoelectric power of pressure vessel steels: effect of microstructural evolutions of strongly segregated areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houze, M.

    2002-12-01

    Thermoelectric power measurement (TEP) is a very potential non destructive evaluation method considered to follow ageing under neutron irradiation of pressure vessel steel of nuclear reactor. Prior to these problems, the aim of this study is to establish correlations between TEP variations and microstructural evolutions of pressure vessel steels during heat treatments. Different steels, permitting to simulate heterogeneities of pressure vessel steels and to deconvoluate main metallurgical phenomenons effects were studied. This work allowed to emphasize effect on TEP of: austenitizing and cooling conditions and therefore of microstructure, metallurgical transformations during tempering (recovery, precipitation of alloying elements), and particularly molybdenum precipitation associated to secondary hardening, residual austenite amount or partial austenitizing. (author)

  4. Accelerated corrosion of stainless steel in thiocyanate-containing solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pistorius, P Chris; Li, Wen

    2012-09-19

    It is known that reduced sulfur compounds (such as thiocyanate and thiosulfate) can accelerate active corrosion of austenitic stainless steel in acid solutions, but before we started this project the mechanism of acceleration was largely unclear. This work combined electrochemical measurements and analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS), which provided a comprehensive understanding of the catalytic effect of reduced sulfur species on the active corrosion of stainless steel. Both the behavior of the pure elements and the steel were studied and the work focused on the interaction between the pure elements of the steel, which is the least understood area. Upon completion of this work, several aspects are now much clearer. The main results from this work can be summarized as follows: The presence of low concentrations (around 0.1 mM) of thiocyanate or tetrathionate in dilute sulfuric acid greatly accelerates the anodic dissolution of chromium and nickel, but has an even stronger effect on stainless steels (iron-chromium-nickel alloys). Electrochemical measurements and surface analyses are in agreement with the suggestion that accelerated dissolution really results from suppressed passivation. Even well below the passivation potential, the electrochemical signature of passivation is evident in the electrode impedance; the electrode impedance shows clearly that this pre-passivation is suppressed in the presence of thiocyanate. For the stainless steels, remarkable changes in the morphology of the corroded metal surface and in the surface concentration of chromium support the suggestion that pre-passivation of stainless steels is suppressed because dissolution of chromium is accelerated. Surface analysis confirmed that adsorbed sulfur / sulfide forms on the metal surfaces upon exposure to solutions containing thiocyanate or thiosulfate. For pure nickel, and steels containing nickel (and residual copper), bulk sulfide

  5. Corrosion resistance of chromium-nickel steel containing rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asatiani, G.N.; Mandzhgaladze, S.N.; Tavadze, L.F.; Chuvatina, S.N.; Saginadze, D.I.

    1983-01-01

    Effect of additional out-of-furnace treatment with complex alloy (foundry alloy) calcite-silicon-magnesium-rare earth metal on corrosion resistance of the 03Kh18N20M3D3C3B steel has been studied. It is shown that introduction of low additions of rare earths improves its corrosion resistance improves its corrosion resistance in agressive media (in 70% - sulfuric acid) in the range of transition from active to passive state. Effect of additional introduction of rare earth metals is not considerable, if potential of steel corrosion is in the range of stable passive state (32% - sulfuric acid). Additional out-of-furnace treatment with complex foundry alloy, containing rare earth metals, provides a possibility to use a steel with a lower content of Cr, Ni, Mo, than in conventional acid-resistant steels in highly agressive media

  6. Stress analysis of LOFT containment vessel attachments for the mainsteam and feedwater piping support structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finicle, D.P.

    1977-01-01

    The LOFT Containment Vessel attachments for the Mainsteam and Feedwater Piping Support Structures have been analyzed for operating and faulted loading conditions. This report contains the analysis of the connections to the containment vessel for the most current design and loading. Also contained in this report is the analysis of the piping supports

  7. Study of cladding toughness in a pressure vessel steel water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soulat, P.; Al Mundheri, M.

    1984-12-01

    Toughness of cladding and pressure vessel steel were determined at different temperatures in order to appreciate the participation of cladding resistance against crack propagation. The toughness of cladding is comparable with typical results on austenitic welds. The test on covered CT specimens shows the possibility of having a relatively good prevision of the behaviour of a coated structure

  8. Positron annihilation and Moessbauer studies of neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brauer, G.; Matz, W.; Liszkay, L.; Molnar, B.

    1990-11-01

    Positron annihilation (lifetime, Doppler broadening) and Moessbauer studies on unirradiated, neutron irradiated and neutron irradiated plus annealed reactor pressure vessel steels (Soviet type 15Kh2NMFA) are presented. The role of microstructural properties and the formation of irradiation-induced precipitates is discussed. (orig.) [de

  9. Reliability-based condition assessment of steel containment and liners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellingwood, B.; Bhattacharya, B.; Zheng, R.

    1996-11-01

    Steel containments and liners in nuclear power plants may be exposed to aggressive environments that may cause their strength and stiffness to decrease during the plant service life. Among the factors recognized as having the potential to cause structural deterioration are uniform, pitting or crevice corrosion; fatigue, including crack initiation and propagation to fracture; elevated temperature; and irradiation. The evaluation of steel containments and liners for continued service must provide assurance that they are able to withstand future extreme loads during the service period with a level of reliability that is sufficient for public safety. Rational methodologies to provide such assurances can be developed using modern structural reliability analysis principles that take uncertainties in loading, strength, and degradation resulting from environmental factors into account. The research described in this report is in support of the Steel Containments and Liners Program being conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The research demonstrates the feasibility of using reliability analysis as a tool for performing condition assessments and service life predictions of steel containments and liners. Mathematical models that describe time-dependent changes in steel due to aggressive environmental factors are identified, and statistical data supporting the use of these models in time-dependent reliability analysis are summarized. The analysis of steel containment fragility is described, and simple illustrations of the impact on reliability of structural degradation are provided. The role of nondestructive evaluation in time-dependent reliability analysis, both in terms of defect detection and sizing, is examined. A Markov model provides a tool for accounting for time-dependent changes in damage condition of a structural component or system. 151 refs

  10. Influence of steel-making process and heat-treatment temperature on the fatigue and fracture properties of pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, S. K.; Na, E. G.; Baek, T. H.; Won, S. Y.; Park, S. J.; Lee, S. W.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, high strength pressure vessel steels having the same chemical compositions were manufactured by the two different steel-making processes, such as Vacuum Degassing(VD) and Electro-Slag Remelting(ESR) methods. After the steel-making process, they were normalized at 955 deg. C, quenched at 843 .deg. C, and finally tempered at 550 .deg. C or 450 deg. C, resulting in tempered martensitic microstructures with different yielding strengths depending on the tempering conditions. Low-Cycle Fatigue(LCF) tests, Fatigue Crack Growth Rate(FCGR) tests, and fracture toughness tests were performed to investigate the fatigue and fracture behaviors of the pressure vessel steels. In contrast to very similar monotonic, LCF, and FCGR behaviors between VD and ESR steels, a quite difference was noticed in the fracture toughness. Fracture toughness of ESR steel was higher than that of VD steel, being attributed to the removal of impurities in steel-making process

  11. austenitic steel corrosion by oxygen-containing liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivollier, Matthieu

    2017-01-01

    France is planning to construct the 4. generation of nuclear reactors. They will use liquid sodium as heat transfer fluid and will be made of 316L(N) austenitic steel as structural materials. To guarantee optimal operation on the long term, the behavior of this steel must be verified. This is why corrosion phenomena of 316L(N) steel by liquid sodium have to be well-understood. Literature points out that several corrosion phenomena are possible. Dissolved oxygen in sodium definitely influences each of the corrosion phenomenon. Therefore, the austenitic steel corrosion in oxygen-containing sodium is proposed in this study. Thermodynamics data point out that sodium chromite formation on 316L(N) steel is possible in sodium containing roughly 10 μg.g -1 of oxygen for temperature lower than 650 C (reactor operating conditions).The experimental study shows that sodium chromite is formed at 650 C in the sodium containing 200 μg.g -1 of oxygen. At the same concentration and at 550 C, sodium chromite is clearly observed only for long immersion time (≥ 5000 h). Results at 450 C are more difficult to interpret. Furthermore, the steel is depleted in chromium in all cases.The results suggest the sodium chromite is dissolved in the sodium at the same time it is formed. Modelling of sodium chromite formation - approached by chromium diffusion in steel (in grain and grain boundaries -, and dissolution - assessed by transport in liquid metal - show that simultaneous formation and dissolution of sodium chromite is a possible mechanism able to explain our results. (author) [fr

  12. Large inelastic deformation analysis of steel pressure vessels at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikonen, K.

    2001-01-01

    This publication describes the calculation methodology developed for a large inelastic deformation analysis of pressure vessels at high temperature. Continuum mechanical formulation related to a large deformation analysis is presented. Application of the constitutive equations is simplified when the evolution of stress and deformation state of an infinitesimal material element is considered in the directions of principal strains determined by the deformation during a finite time increment. A quantitative modelling of time dependent inelastic deformation is applied for reactor pressure vessel steels. Experimental data of uniaxial tensile, relaxation and creep tests performed at different laboratories for reactor pressure vessel steels are investigated and processed. An inelastic deformation rate model of strain hardening type is adopted. The model simulates well the axial tensile, relaxation and creep tests from room temperature to high temperature with only a few fitting parameters. The measurement data refined for the inelastic deformation rate model show useful information about inelastic deformation phenomena of reactor pressure vessel steels over a wide temperature range. The methodology and calculation process are validated by comparing the calculated results with measurements from experiments on small scale pressure vessels. A reasonably good agreement, when taking several uncertainties into account, is obtained between the measured and calculated results concerning deformation rate and failure location. (orig.)

  13. Critical cleavage fracture stress characterization of A508 nuclear pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Sujun; Jin, Huijin; Sun, Yanbin; Cao, Luowei

    2014-01-01

    The critical cleavage fracture stress of SA508 Gr.4N and SA508 Gr.3 low alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels was studied through the combination of experiments and finite element method (FEM) analysis. The results showed that the value of the local cleavage fracture stress, σ F , of SA508 Gr.4N steel was significantly higher than that of SA508 Gr.3 steel. Detailed microstructural analysis was carried out using FEGSEM which revealed much smaller grains, finer and more homogenous carbide particles formed in SA508 Gr.4N steel. Compared with the SA508 Gr.3 steel currently used in the nuclear industry, the SA508 Gr.4N steel possesses higher strength and notch toughness as well as improved cleavage fracture behavior, and is considered a better candidate RPV steel for the next generation nuclear reactors. - Highlights: • Critical cleavage fracture stress was calculated through experiments and FEM. • Effects of both grain and carbide particle sizes on σ F were discussed. • The SA508 Gr.4N steel is a better candidate for the next generation nuclear reactors

  14. The design, fabrication, and testing of WETF high-quality, long-term-storage, secondary containment vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, Kane J.

    2000-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory's Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) requires secondary containment vessels to store primary tritium containment vessels. The primary containment vessel provides the first boundary for tritium containment. The primary containment vessel is stored within a secondary containment vessel that provides the secondary boundary for tritium containment. WETF requires high-quality, long-term-storage, secondary tritium containment vessels that fit within a Mound-designed calorimeter. In order to qualify the WETF high-quality, long-term-storage, secondary containment vessels for use at WETF, steps have been taken to ensure the appropriate design, adequate testing, quality in fabrication, and acceptable documentation

  15. Irradiation effects in strain aged pressure vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grounes, M; Myers, H P

    1962-02-15

    Tensile specimens, Charpy-V notch and subsize impact specimens of an aluminium killed carbon manganese steel, have been irradiated at 160 - 190 deg C in the reactor G1. The total neutron dose received was 2.4 x 10{sup 18} n/cm{sup 2} (> 1 MeV). Specimens were prepared from normalized plate and from strain aged material from the same plate. It was found that the changes in brittle ductile transition temperature due to neutron irradiation and those due to strain ageing must be considered additive.

  16. Leakage detecting method and device for water tight vessel of wet-type container apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yoshimi.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of and a device for detecting leakage of a water tight vessel of a wet-type container apparatus for containing a reactor pressure vessel while immersing it water in a reactor container. Namely, in the wet-type container apparatus, the periphery of the pressure vessel is coated with a heat insulation material and the periphery of the heat insulation material is coated with a water tight vessel. The water tight vessel is immersed under water in the reactor container. As a method of detecting leakage of the wet-type container apparatus, gases mixed with helium are supplied into the water tight vessel at a pressure higher than the inner pressure of the reactor container at a lowest position of the reactor pressure vessel. A water level in the reactor container is determined so as to form a space at the top portion of the inside of the reactor container. The helium at the top portion is detected to monitor the leakage of the water tight vessel. With such procedures, even if the water tight vessel is ruptured at any position, helium mixed to the gases is released to water in the reactor container and rise up to the top space and detected by a helium leakage detection device. (I.S.)

  17. Electrode for welding steel for WWER-1000 reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakatos, L.

    Of two types of electrodes, ie., with an alloyed core and with an unalloyed core, an electrode was chosen consisting of a basic coat and an unalloyed core. Fluctuations are shown of shear strength, tensile strenght and contraction with the welding mode and annealing temperature. It was found that pre-heating to 250 and 350 degC, respectively, was most suitable for welding a pressure vessel manufactured from material designated SKODA A3/II. Annealing aimed at removing stress was chosen at 650 to 700 degC. (H.S.)

  18. Advance of investigation of irradiation embrittlement mechanism of nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels. History and future of irradiation embrittlement researches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishino, Shiori

    2007-01-01

    The nuclear reactor pressure vessel is the most important component of LWR plants required to be safe. This paper describes contents of the title consisting of four chapters. The first chapter states the general theory of irradiation effects, irradiation embrittlement and decreasing of toughness, and some kinds of pressure vessel steels. The second chapter explains history of irradiation embrittlement investigations and the advance of research methods for experiments and calculation. The third chapter contains information of inner structure of irradiated materials and development of prediction equations, recent information of embrittlement mechanism and mechanism guided prediction method, USA model and Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) model. The fourth chapter states recent problems from viewpoints of experimental and analytical approaches. Comparison of standards of LWR pressure vessel steels between Japan and USA, relation between the density of number of cluster and the copper content, effect of flux on clustering of copper atoms, and CRIEPI's way of approaching the prediction method are illustrated. (S.Y.)

  19. Assessment of environmentally assisted cracking in PWR pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tice, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    There is a possibility that extension of pre-existing flaws in the reactor pressure vessel of a pressurised water reactor (PWR) may occur by environmentally assisted cracking, in particular by corrosion fatigue under cyclic transient loading. Crack growth predictions have usually been carried out using cyclic crack growth rate (da/dN) versus stress intensity range (δK) curves, such as those given in Section XI, Appendix A of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. However, the inherent time dependent nature of environmental cracking processes renders such an approach unrealistic. The present paper describes the development of an alternative time based assessment methodology. Illustrative calculations of expected crack growth of assumed defects made using the cyclic (ASME XIA) and time-based approaches are compared. The results illustrate that crack growth predicted by the time-based approach can be greater or less than that calculated by the traditional method. For a PWR operated with good control of water chemistry, actual crack growth rates are expected to be well below those predicted by the ASME code. (Author)

  20. Analysis code for pressure in reactor containment vessel of ATR. CONPOL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-08-01

    For the evaluation of the pressure and temperature in containment vessels in the events which are classified in the abnormal change of pressure, atmosphere and others in reactor containment vessels in accident among the safety evaluation events of the ATR, the analysis code for the pressure in reactor containment vessels CONPOL is used. In this report, the functions of the analysis code and the analysis model are shown. By using this analysis code, the rise of the pressure and temperature in a containment vessel is evaluated when loss of coolant accident occurs, and high temperature, high pressure coolant flows into it. This code possesses the functions of computing blow-down quantity and heat dissipation from reactor cooling facility, steam condensing heat transfer to containment vessel walls, and the cooling effect by containment vessel spray system. As for the analysis techniques, the models of reactor cooling system, containment vessel and steam discharge pool, and the computation models for the pressure and temperature in containment vessels, wall surface temperature, condensing heat transfer, spray condensation and blow-down are explained. The experimental analysis of the evaluation of the pressure and temperature in containment vessels at the time of loss of coolant accident is reported. (K.I.)

  1. APFIM investigation of clustering in neutron-irradiated Fe-Cu alloys and pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auger, P.; Pareige, P.; Blavette, D.

    1996-01-01

    Pressure vessel steels used in PWRs are known to be prone to hardening and embrittlement under neutron irradiation. The changes in mechanical properties are commonly supposed to result from the formation of point defects, dislocation loops, voids and copper-rich precipitates. However, the real nature of the irradiation induced damage, in these particularly low copper steels (>0,1 wt%), has not been clearly identify yet. A new experimental work has been carried out thanks to atom probe and field ion microscopy (APFIM) facilities and, more particularly with a new generation of atom probe recently developed, namely the tomographic atom probe (TAP), in order to improve: the understanding of the complex behavior of copper precipitation which occurs when low-alloyed Fe-Cu model alloys are irradiated with neutrons; the microstructural characterization of the pressure vessel steel of the CHOOZ A reactor under various fluences (French Surveillance Programme). The investigations clearly reveal the precipitation of copper-rich clusters in irradiated Fe-Cu alloys while more complicated Si, Ni, Mn and Cu-solute 'clouds' were observed to develop in the low-copper ferritic solid solution of the pressure vessel steel. (authors)

  2. Correlation between radiation damage and magnetic properties in reactor vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kempf, R.A., E-mail: kempf@cnea.gov.ar [División Caracterización, GCCN, CAC-CNEA (Argentina); Sacanell, J. [Departamento Física de la Materia Condensada, GIyA, CAC-CNEA, CONICET (Argentina); Milano, J. [División Resonancias Magnéticas, CAB-CNEA, CONICET (Argentina); Guerra Méndez, N. [Departamento Física de la Materia Condensada, GIyA, CAC-CNEA, CONICET (Argentina); Winkler, E.; Butera, A. [División Resonancias Magnéticas, CAB-CNEA, CONICET (Argentina); Troiani, H. [División Física de Metales, CAB-CNEA and Instituto Balseiro (UNCU), CONICET (Argentina); Saleta, M.E. [División Resonancias Magnéticas, CAB-CNEA, CONICET (Argentina); Fortis, A.M. [Departamento Estructura y Comportamiento. Gerencia Materiales-GAEN, CAC-CNEA (Argentina)

    2014-02-01

    Since reactor pressure vessel steels are ferromagnetic, provide a convenient means to monitor changes in the mechanical properties of the material upon irradiation with high energy particles, by measuring their magnetic properties. Here, we discuss the correlation between mechanical and magnetic properties and microstructure, by studying the flux effect on the nuclear pressure vessel steel used in reactors currently under construction in Argentina. Charpy-V notched specimens of this steel were irradiated in the RA1 experimental reactor at 275 °C with two lead factors (LFs), 93 and 183. The magnetic properties were studied by means of DC magnetometry and ferromagnetic resonance. The results show that the coercive field and magnetic anisotropy spatial distribution are sensitive to the LF and can be explained by taking into account the evolution of the microstructure with this parameter. The saturation magnetization shows a dominant dependence on the accumulated damage. Consequently, the mentioned techniques are suitable to estimate the degradation of the reactor vessel steel.

  3. Assessment of environmentally assisted cracking in PWR pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tice, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    1) Since environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) is a time dependent process, assessment should be based on time rather than cycle dependent parameters. Thus an a/sub e/ vs a/sub i/ (or strain rate) basis for assessment should be used in preference to da/dN vs ΔK. 2) The threshold strain rate or velocity for the onset of EAC is controlled by material and environmental factors (e.g. steel sulphur content and water chemistry), and possibly by mechanical loading factors such as R ratio and load interaction effects. Above the threshold, crack growth rates are usually unacceptably rapid. 3) Sample calculations show that predicted crack growth rates using a time based model can be below or above those calculated using ASME XI depending on the value of the EAC threshold velocity but that for normal PWR operating conditions rates are likely to be below those predicted by the ASME code

  4. Evaluation of temperature distribution in a containment vessel during operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utanohara, Yoichi; Murase, Michio; Yanagi, Chihiro; Masui, Akihiro; Inomata, Ryo; Kamiya, Yuji

    2012-01-01

    For safety analysis of the containment vessel (CV) in a nuclear power plant, the average temperature of the gas phase in the CV during operation is used as an initial condition. An actual CV, however, has a temperature distribution, which makes the estimation of the average temperature difficult. Numerical simulation seems to be useful for the average temperature estimation, but it has several difficulties such as predictions of temperature distribution in a large and closed space that has several compartments, and modeling the heat generating components and the convection-diffusion of heat by ventilation air-conditioning systems. The main purpose of this study was to simulate the temperature distribution and evaluate the average temperature in the CV of a three-loop pressurized water reactor (PWR) during the reactor operation. The simulation considered the heat generation of equipment, flow due to the ventilation and air conditioning systems, heat loss to the CV exterior, and the solar heat. The predicted temperature distribution was significantly affected by the flow. Particularly, openings, which became flow paths, affected the temperature distribution. The temperature increased with a rise in height within the CV and the flow field seemed to transform from forced convection to natural convection. The volume-averaged temperature was different between gas and solid (concrete, CV wall) phases as well as between heights. The total volume-averaged temperature of the CV was nearly equal to the average gas phase temperature. It was found to be easy to evaluate the effect of openings on the temperature distribution and estimate the average temperature in CV by numerical simulation. (author)

  5. Seismic analysis of a reinforced concrete containment vessel model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randy, James J.; Cherry, Jeffery L.; Rashid, Yusef R.; Chokshi, Nilesh

    2000-01-01

    Pre-and post-test analytical predictions of the dynamic behavior of a 1:10 scale model Reinforced Concrete Containment Vessel are presented. This model, designed and constructed by the Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., was subjected to seismic simulation tests using the high-performance shaking table at the Tadotsu Engineering Laboratory in Japan. A group of tests representing design-level and beyond-design-level ground motions were first conducted to verify design safety margins. These were followed by a series of tests in which progressively larger base motions were applied until structural failure was induced. The analysis was performed by ANATECH Corp. and Sandia National Laboratories for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, employing state-of-the-art finite-element software specifically developed for concrete structures. Three-dimensional time-history analyses were performed, first as pre-test blind predictions to evaluate the general capabilities of the analytical methods, and second as post-test validation of the methods and interpretation of the test result. The input data consisted of acceleration time histories for the horizontal, vertical and rotational (rocking) components, as measured by accelerometers mounted on the structure's basemat. The response data consisted of acceleration and displacement records for various points on the structure, as well as time-history records of strain gages mounted on the reinforcement. This paper reports on work in progress and presents pre-test predictions and post-test comparisons to measured data for tests simulating maximum design basis and extreme design basis earthquakes. The pre-test analyses predict the failure earthquake of the test structure to have an energy level in the range of four to five times the energy level of the safe shutdown earthquake. The post-test calculations completed so far show good agreement with measured data

  6. Cast-iron containers out of low radioactive steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deipenau, H.; Seidler, M.

    1990-01-01

    Low-level radioactive solid waste from the decommissioning of nuclear installations, if transported and disposed of in large containers, may cause less cutting work and therefore less radiation exposure of the work-force. The use of steel waste from decommissioning for manufacturing large transport and/or disposal containers is a promising route for recycling that waste and for saving storage volume and new resources. It has been demonstrated that it is possible to cast transport and disposal containers for radioactive wastes by using carbon steel waste originating from nuclear installations. A prototype has fulfilled all conditions to reach the qualification as a type A package according to the IAEA Regulations for Safe Transport of Radioactive Material as well as the preliminary conditions of the final repository Konrad

  7. Microstructure and embrittlement of VVER 440 reactor pressure vessel steels; Microstructure et fragilisation des aciers de cuve des reacteurs nucleaires VVER 440

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennion, A

    1999-03-15

    27 VVER 440 pressurised water reactors operate in former Soviet Union and in Eastern Europe. The pressure vessel, is made of Cr-Mo-V steel. It contains a circumferential arc weld in front of the nuclear core. This weld undergoes a high neutron flux and contains large amounts of copper and phosphorus, elements well known for their embrittlement potency under irradiation. The embrittlement kinetic of the steel is accelerated, reducing the lifetime of the reactor. In order to get informations on the microstructure and mechanical properties of these steels, base metals, HAZ, and weld metals have been characterized. The high amount of phosphorus in weld metals promotes the reverse temper embrittlement that occurs during post-weld heat treatment. The radiation damage structure has been identified by small angle neutron scattering, atomic probe, and transmission electron microscopy. Nanometer-sized clusters of solute atoms, rich in copper with almost the same characteristics as in western pressure vessels steels, and an evolution of the size distribution of vanadium carbides, which are present on dislocation structure, are observed. These defects disappear during post-irradiation tempering. As in western steels, the embrittlement is due to both hardening and reduction of interphase cohesion. The radiation damage specificity of VVER steels arises from their high amount of phosphorus and from their significant density of fine vanadium carbides. (author)

  8. Survey of postirradiation heat treatment as a means to mitigate radiation embrittlement of reactor vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    Nuclear-radiation service typically produces a progressive reduction in the notch ductility of low-alloy steels. The reduction is manifested by a decrease in Charpy-V (Csub(v)) upper-shelf energy level and by an elevation in temperature of the ductile-to-brittle transition. Post irradiation heat treatment (annealing) is being investigated as a method for the reversal of these detrimental radiation effects for reactor-vessel steels. This study was undertaken to analyze factors which could affect annealing response, report data available to qualify suspected influences on annealing, and summarize experimental results generated for many commercially produced reactor materials and companion materials produced in the laboratory

  9. Hydrogen attack of pressure-vessel steel. Progress report, April 1, 1980-March 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shewmon, P.G.

    1980-12-01

    The nucleation and growth of methane bubbles in the hydrogen attack of pressure vessel steel has been shown to obey models developed to describe the growth of bubbles limiting the creep ductility of metals. This has been done through studies of the effect of prior deformation on bubble nucleation as well as the effect of methane pressure (stress) and temperature on growth kinetics. A comprehensive model of the factors limiting growth has been developed. Its application to the hydrogen attack of a 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel leads to several interesting predictions

  10. Electron-microscopic investigation of a pressure vessel steel after neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klaar, H.J.

    1975-01-01

    As an introduction, changes in the mechanical properties of pressure vessel steels on neutron irradiation and the causes of radiation embrittlement are discussed. After this, the author describes his own experiments with steel of the composition 0.19% C; 3.88% Ni; 1.57% Cr; 0.51% Mo; 0.2% V. Samples of this material were irradiated in-pile at 300 0 C with various neutron doses. To study the influence of neutron dose, irradiation temperature, and heat treatment on the mechanical properties, tensile tests, notched bar impact bending tests, hardness tests and structural analyses were carried out. The findings are reported. (GSC) [de

  11. Evaluation of defects induced by neutron radiation in reactor pressure vessels steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Jimenez, J.

    1978-01-01

    We have developed a method for calculating the production of neutron induced defects (depleted zone and crowdions) in ferritic pressure vessel steels for different neutron spectra. They have been analysed both the recoil primary atoms produced by elastic and inelastic collisions with fast neutrons and the ones produced by gamma-ray emission by thermal neutron absorption. Theoretical modelling of increasing in the ductile-brittle transition temperature of ferritic steels has been correlated with experimental data at irradiation temperature up to 400 degree centigree (Author) 15 refs

  12. Relationships between Charpy impact shelf energies and upper shelf Ksub(IC) values for reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witt, F.J.

    1983-01-01

    Charpy shelf data and lower bound estimates of Ksub(IC) shelf data for the same steels and test temperatures are given. Included are some typical reactor pressure vessel steels as well as some less tough or degraded steels. The data were evaluated with shelf estimates of Ksub(IC) up to and exceeding 550 MPa√m. It is shown that the high shelf fracture toughness representative of tough reactor pressure vessel steels may be obtained from a knowledge of the Charpy shelf energies. The toughness transition may be obtained either by testing small fracture toughness specimens or by Charpy energy indexing. (U.K.)

  13. Updated embrittlement trend curve for reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, M.; Santos, C.; Eason, E.; Wright, J.; Odette, G.R.

    2003-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessels of commercial nuclear power plants are subject to embrittlement due to exposure to high energy neutrons from the core. Irradiation embrittlement of RPV belt-line materials is currently evaluated using US Regulatory Guide 1.99 Revision 2 (RG 1.99 Rev 2), which presents methods for estimating the Charpy transition temperature shift (ΔT30) at 30 ft-lb (41 J) and the drop in Charpy upper shelf energy (ΔUSE). A more recent embrittlement model, based on a broader database and more recent research results, is presented in NUREG/CR-6551. The objective of this paper is to describe the most recent update to the embrittlement model in NUREG/CR-6551, based upon additional data and increased understanding of embrittlement mechanisms. The updated ΔT30 and USE models include fluence, copper, nickel, phosphorous content, and product form; the ΔT30 model also includes coolant temperature, irradiation time (or flux), and a long-time term. The models were developed using multi-variable surface fitting techniques, understanding of the ΔT30 mechanisms, and engineering judgment. The updated ΔT30 model reduces scatter significantly relative to RG 1.99 Rev 2 on the currently available database for plates, forgings, and welds. This updated embrittlement trend curve will form the basis of revision 3 to Regulatory Guide 1.99. (author)

  14. Embrittlement recovery due to annealing of reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eason, E.D.; Wright, J.E.; Nelson, E.E.; Odette, G.R.; Mader, E.V.

    1998-01-01

    The irradiation embrittlement of nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPV) can be reduced by thermal annealing at temperatures higher than the normal operating conditions. The objective of this work was to analyze the pertinent data and develop quantitative models for estimating the recovery in 41 J (30 ft-lb) Charpy transition temperature (TT) and Charpy upper shelf energy (USE) due to annealing. An analysis data base was developed, reviewed for completeness and accuracy, and documented as part of this work. Models were developed based on a combination of statistical techniques, including pattern recognition and transformation analysis, and the current understanding of the mechanisms governing embrittlement and recovery. The quality of models fitted in this project was evaluated by considering both the Charpy annealing data used for fitting and a surrogate hardness data base. This work demonstrates that microhardness recovery is a good surrogate for shift recovery and that there is a high level of consistency between the observed annealing trends and fundamental models of embrittlement and recovery processes. (orig.)

  15. Regulatory aspects of radiation embrittlement of reactor vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, P.N.

    1979-01-01

    One purpose of this conference, is to re-examine the conventional wisdom about neutron radiation embrittlement and the methods used to counteract embrittlement in reactor vessels. Perhaps, there have been sufficient advances in fracture mechanics, core physics, dosimetry, and physical metallurgy to permit a forward step in the quantitative treatment of the subject. Certainly this would be consistent with the position of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (the NRC) in general. ''There has been a continued evolution toward increased specificity.'' This statement appeared in the response prepared by the staff to a request from the Commission to explain how the staff decides to apply a new requirement and to whom, i.e., to back-fit or forward-fit-only or whatever. Pressure for increased specificity, i.e., for fleshing out general design criteria, comes from ''technical surprises'' in the form of operating experiences or from research information, and from attempts to improve our confidence in the safety of plants, especially new plants. Our goal is to have anticipated and evaluated all possible modes of failure with sufficient quantitativeness that the probability of failure can be estimated with some accuracy. Failing this, regulators demand large margins of safety to cover our ignorance

  16. Aging of steel containments and liners in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.; Norris, W.E.

    1998-02-01

    Aging of the containment pressure boundary in light water reactor plants is being addressed to understand the significant factors relating occurrence of corrosion efficacy of inspection and structural capacity reduction of steel containments and liners of concrete containments. and to make recommendations on use of risk models in regulatory decisions. Current regulatory in-service inspection requirements are reviewed and a summary of containment related degradation experience is presented. Current and emerging nondestructive examination techniques and a degradation assessment methodology for characterizing and quantifying the amount of damage present are described. Quantitative tools for condition assessment of aging structures using time dependent structural reliability analysis methods are summarized. Such methods provide a framework for addressing the uncertainties attendant to aging in the decision process. Results of this research provide a means for establishing current and estimating future structural capacity margins of containments, and to address the significance of incidences of reported containment degradation

  17. Magnetic Barkhausen noise and magneto acoustic emission in pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neyra Astudillo, Miriam Rocío; López Pumarega, María Isabel; Núñez, Nicolás Marcelo; Pochettino, Alberto; Ruzzante, José

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic Barkhausen Noise (MBN) and Magneto Acoustic Emission (MAE) were studied in A508 Class II forged steel used for pressure vessels in nuclear power stations. The magnetic experimental determinations were completed with a macro graphic study of sulfides and the texture analysis of the material. The analysis of these results allows us to determine connections between the magnetic anisotropy, texture and microstructure of the material. Results clearly suggest that the plastic flow direction is different from the forging direction indicated by the material supplier - Highlights: • MBN and MAE studied in nuclear power pressure vessel steel. • Comparison with macro graphic study of sulfides and texture analysis of the material. • Connections with magnetic anisotropy, texture and microstructure of material. • Plastic flow direction different from the forging direction indicated.

  18. Magnetic Barkhausen noise and magneto acoustic emission in pressure vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neyra Astudillo, Miriam Rocío, E-mail: neyra@cnea.gov.ar [IT Sabato, Universidad Nacional de San Martín, UNSAM, Av. General Paz 1499, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad Tecnológica Nacional UTN, Regional Delta, Buenos Aires (Argentina); López Pumarega, María Isabel, E-mail: lopezpum@cnea.gov.ar [Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, CNEA, Av. General Paz 1499, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Núñez, Nicolás Marcelo, E-mail: nnunez@cnea.gov.ar [Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, CNEA, Av. General Paz 1499, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Pochettino, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.poch@gmail.com [Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, CNEA, Av. General Paz 1499, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Investigación e Ingeniería Ambiental (3iA), Campus Miguelete, UNSAM, Av. 25 de Mayo y Francia, 1650 San Martín Argentina (Argentina); Ruzzante, José, E-mail: ruzzante@gmail.com [Universidad Tecnológica Nacional UTN, Regional Delta, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad Nacional de Tres de Febrero UNTREF, Caseros, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad Nacional de Chilecito, UNdeC, La Rioja (Argentina)

    2017-03-15

    Magnetic Barkhausen Noise (MBN) and Magneto Acoustic Emission (MAE) were studied in A508 Class II forged steel used for pressure vessels in nuclear power stations. The magnetic experimental determinations were completed with a macro graphic study of sulfides and the texture analysis of the material. The analysis of these results allows us to determine connections between the magnetic anisotropy, texture and microstructure of the material. Results clearly suggest that the plastic flow direction is different from the forging direction indicated by the material supplier - Highlights: • MBN and MAE studied in nuclear power pressure vessel steel. • Comparison with macro graphic study of sulfides and texture analysis of the material. • Connections with magnetic anisotropy, texture and microstructure of material. • Plastic flow direction different from the forging direction indicated.

  19. Investigation of irradiation embrittlement and annealing behaviour of JRQ pressure vessel steel by instrumented impact tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valo, M; Rintamaa, R; Nevalainen, M; Wallin, K; Torronen, K [Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Tipping, P [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1994-12-31

    Seven series of A533-B type pressure vessel steel specimens irradiated as well as irradiated - annealed - re-irradiated to different fast neutron fluences (up to 5.10{sup 19}/cm{sup 2}) have been tested with a new type of instrumented impact test machine. The radiation embrittlement and the effect of the intermediate annealing was assessed by using the ductile and cleavage fracture initiation toughness. Although the ductile fracture initiation toughness exhibited scatter, the transition temperature shift corresponding to the dynamic cleavage fracture initiation agreed well with the 41 J Charpy-V shift. The results indicate that annealing is beneficial in restoring mechanical properties in an irradiated nuclear pressure vessel steel. (authors). 8 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Investigation of neutron irradiated reactor vessel steels using post-irradiation annealing techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakata, Hayato; Fukuya, Koji [Institute of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Mihama, Fukui (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    The matrix damage is known to be a major factor that contributes to embrittlement and hardening of irradiated reactor vessel steels, and is assumed to be composed of the point defect clusters. However field emission gun scanning transmission electron microscopy (FEGSTEM) and atom probe (AP) could not detect any evidence of the matrix damage. In this study, post irradiation annealing experiments combining positron annihilation lineshape analysis (PALA) and hardness experiments were applied to an actual surveillance test specimen and a sample of reactor vessel steel irradiated in a material test reactor (MTR), in order to investigate the matrix damage recovery behavior and its contribution to hardening. It was confirmed that higher fluence increased the hardness and the volume fraction of open volume defects and that higher flux decreased the thermal stability of matrix damage and the effect on hardening. The contribution of matrix damage to hardening could be estimated to be below 30%. (author)

  1. Embrittlement recovery due to annealing of reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eason, E.D.; Wright, J.E.; Nelson, E.E.; Odette, G.R.; Mader, E.V.

    1996-01-01

    Embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) can be reduced by thermal annealing at temperatures higher than the normal operating conditions. Although such an annealing process has not been applied to any commercial plants in the United States, one US Army reactor, the BR3 plant in Belgium, and several plants in eastern Europe have been successfully annealed. All available Charpy annealing data were collected and analyzed in this project to develop quantitative models for estimating the recovery in 30 ft-lb (41 J) Charpy transition temperature and Charpy upper shelf energy over a range of potential annealing conditions. Pattern recognition, transformation analysis, residual studies, and the current understanding of the mechanisms involved in the annealing process were used to guide the selection of the most sensitive variables and correlating parameters and to determine the optimal functional forms for fitting the data. The resulting models were fitted by nonlinear least squares. The use of advanced tools, the larger data base now available, and insight from surrogate hardness data produced improved models for quantitative evaluation of the effects of annealing. The quality of models fitted in this project was evaluated by considering both the Charpy annealing data used for fitting and the surrogate hardness data base. The standard errors of the resulting recovery models relative to calibration data are comparable to the uncertainty in unirradiated Charpy data. This work also demonstrates that microhardness recovery is a good surrogate for transition temperature shift recovery and that there is a high level of consistency between the observed annealing trends and fundamental models of embrittlement and recovery processes

  2. Reactor pressure vessel steels ASTM A533B and A508 Cl.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelli, R.; Kemppainen, M.; Toerroenen, K.

    1979-11-01

    This report presents the tensile test results of steels ASTM A533B and A508 Cl.2 obtained in connection with a programme initiated to gather and create information needed for the assessment of the structural integrity of the reactor pressure vessels. The tensile properties were studied between -196 and 300 degC varying austenitizing and tempering temperatures and having two different carbon contents for the heats of A533B. (author)

  3. Reactor pressure vessel steels[1997 Scientific Report of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van De Velde, J.; Fabry, A.; Van Walle, E.; Chaouuadi, R.

    1998-07-01

    Research and development activities related to reactor pressure vessel steels during 1997 are reported. The objectives of activities of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN in this domain are: (1) to develop enhanced surveillance concepts by applying micromechanics and fracture-toughness tests to small specimens, and by performing damage modelling and microstructure characterization; (2) to demonstrate a methodology on a broad database; (3) to achieve regulatory acceptance and industrial use.

  4. Study on prediction model of irradiation embrittlement for reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Rongshan; Xu Chaoliang; Huang Ping; Liu Xiangbing; Ren Ai; Chen Jun; Li Chengliang

    2014-01-01

    The study on prediction model of irradiation embrittlement for reactor pres- sure vessel (RPV) steel is an important method for long term operation. According to the deep analysis of the previous prediction models developed worldwide, the drawbacks of these models were given and a new irradiation embrittlement prediction model PMIE-2012 was developed. A corresponding reliability assessment was carried out by irradiation surveillance data. The assessment results show that the PMIE-2012 have a high reliability and accuracy on irradiation embrittlement prediction. (authors)

  5. Fracture toughness and crack growth resistance of pressure vessel plate and weld metal steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskovic, R.

    1988-01-01

    Compact tension specimens were used to measure the initiation fracture toughness and crack growth resistance of pressure vessel steel plates and submerged arc weld metal. Plate test specimens were manufactured from four different casts of steel comprising: aluminium killed C-Mn-Mo-Cu and C-Mn steel and two silicon killed C-Mn steels. Unionmelt No. 2 weld metal test specimens were extracted from welds of double V butt geometry having either the C-Mn-Mo-Cu steel (three weld joints) or one particular silicon killed C-Mn steel (two weld joints) as parent plate. A multiple specimen test technique was used to obtain crack growth data which were analysed by simple linear regression to determine the crack growth resistance lines and to derive the initiation fracture toughness values for each test temperature. These regression lines were highly scattered with respect to temperature and it was very difficult to determine precisely the temperature dependence of the initiation fracture toughness and crack growth resistance. The data were re-analysed, using a multiple linear regression method, to obtain a relationship between the materials' crack growth resistance and toughness, and the principal independent variables (temperature, crack growth, weld joint code and strain ageing). (author)

  6. Measured Prestress Loss of over 20-Year-Old Prestressed Concrete Containment Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahm, Dae Gi; Choun, Young Sun; Choi, In Kil [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Most nuclear reactors, both in Korea and worldwide, are enclosed by a prestressed concrete containment vessels(PCCVs). The containment wall is approximately 1 m thick and is prestressed in two directions by large prestressing tendons. The main purpose of the containment is to maintain the structural integrity of the containment in the event of a major internal accident. The main accidental scenario, which the containment is designed to withstand, is a so-called loss of coolant accident (LOCA). A LOCA is initiated by a pipe rupture in the cooling system, discharging hot steam into the containment. The escape of steam increases both the temperature and pressure inside the containment. The increased internal pressure arising from a LOCA is referred to as the design pressure. The prestressing system is designed to counterbalance the tensile forces arising from the design pressure. The status of the containment is gradually changed due to environmental factors and by alterations in the micro structure of the material. The prestress will be reduced due to shrinkage and creep in the concrete and relaxation in the tendons. The corrosion protection of tendons are for Korean containments arranged in two different ways, either by cement grouting (bonded tendons) or e.g. by grease injection (unbonded tendons). The major advantage using unbonded tendons is the possibilities of assessing their status (e.g. prestress losses or corrosion damages) which is not possible using bonded tendons. Both bonded and unbonded tendons are used worldwide. For example in the U.S. almost all tendons are unbonded, whereas in France almost all tendons are bonded. For Korean reactor containments with unbonded tendons (14 containments) the tendon force is monitored at regular in-service inspections. The power plant Wolsung in Korea has bonded tendons and several prestressed concrete beams were constructed with the single purpose to follow up the prestress losses. The remaining tendon forces in some

  7. Measured Prestress Loss of over 20-Year-Old Prestressed Concrete Containment Vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahm, Dae Gi; Choun, Young Sun; Choi, In Kil

    2010-01-01

    Most nuclear reactors, both in Korea and worldwide, are enclosed by a prestressed concrete containment vessels(PCCVs). The containment wall is approximately 1 m thick and is prestressed in two directions by large prestressing tendons. The main purpose of the containment is to maintain the structural integrity of the containment in the event of a major internal accident. The main accidental scenario, which the containment is designed to withstand, is a so-called loss of coolant accident (LOCA). A LOCA is initiated by a pipe rupture in the cooling system, discharging hot steam into the containment. The escape of steam increases both the temperature and pressure inside the containment. The increased internal pressure arising from a LOCA is referred to as the design pressure. The prestressing system is designed to counterbalance the tensile forces arising from the design pressure. The status of the containment is gradually changed due to environmental factors and by alterations in the micro structure of the material. The prestress will be reduced due to shrinkage and creep in the concrete and relaxation in the tendons. The corrosion protection of tendons are for Korean containments arranged in two different ways, either by cement grouting (bonded tendons) or e.g. by grease injection (unbonded tendons). The major advantage using unbonded tendons is the possibilities of assessing their status (e.g. prestress losses or corrosion damages) which is not possible using bonded tendons. Both bonded and unbonded tendons are used worldwide. For example in the U.S. almost all tendons are unbonded, whereas in France almost all tendons are bonded. For Korean reactor containments with unbonded tendons (14 containments) the tendon force is monitored at regular in-service inspections. The power plant Wolsung in Korea has bonded tendons and several prestressed concrete beams were constructed with the single purpose to follow up the prestress losses. The remaining tendon forces in some

  8. Parametric model to estimate containment loads following an ex-vessel steam spike

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, R.; Hernandez, J.; Huerta, A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the use of a relatively simple parametric model to estimate containment loads following an ex-vessel steam spike. The study was motivated because several PSAs have identified containment loads accompanying reactor vessel failures as a major contributor to early containment failure. The paper includes a detailed description of the simple but physically sound parametric model which was adopted to estimate containment loads following a steam spike into the reactor cavity. (author)

  9. Stress corrosion cracking studies on ferritic low alloy pressure vessel steel - water chemistry and modelling aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tipping, P.; Ineichen, U.; Cripps, R.

    1994-01-01

    The susceptibility of low alloy ferritic pressure vessel steels (A533-B type) to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) degradation has been examined using various BWR type coolant chemistries. Fatigue pre-cracked wedge-loaded double cantilever beams and also constantly loaded 25 mm thick compact tension specimens have shown classical SCC attack. The influence of parameters such as dissolved oxygen content, water impurity level and conductivity, material chemical composition (sulphur content) and stress intensity level are discussed. The relevance of SCC as a life-limiting degradation mechanism for low alloy ferritic nuclear power plant PV steel is examined. Some parameters, thought to be relevant for modelling SCC processes in low alloy steels in simulated BWR-type coolant, are discussed. 8 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  10. Low cycle fatigue behavior of a ferritic reactor pressure vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Apu, E-mail: asarkar@barc.gov.in; Kumawat, Bhupendra K.; Chakravartty, J.K.

    2015-07-15

    The cyclic stress–strain response and the low cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of 20MnMoNi55 pressure vessel steel were studied. Tensile strength and LCF properties were examined at room temperature (RT) using specimens cut from rolling direction of a rolled block. The fully reversed strain-controlled LCF tests were conducted at a constant total strain rate with different axial strain amplitude levels. The cyclic strain–stress relationships and the strain–life relationships were obtained through the test results, and related LCF parameters of the steel were calculated. The studied steel exhibits cyclic softening behavior. Furthermore, analysis of stabilized hysteresis loops showed that the steel exhibits non-Masing behavior. Complementary scanning electron microscopy examinations were also carried out on fracture surfaces to reveal dominant damage mechanisms during crack initiation, propagation and fracture. Multiple crack initiation sites were observed on the fracture surface. The investigated LCF behavior can provide reference for pressure vessel life assessment and fracture mechanisms analysis.

  11. Isothermal and thermal–mechanical fatigue of VVER-440 reactor pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fekete, Balazs, E-mail: fekete.mm.bme@gmail.com [College of Dunaujvaros, Tancsics 1A, Dunaujvaros H-2400 (Hungary); Department of Applied Mechanics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Muegyetem 5, Budapest H-1111 (Hungary); Trampus, Peter [College of Dunaujvaros, Tancsics 1A, Dunaujvaros H-2400 (Hungary)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • We aimed to determine the thermomechanical behaviour of VVER reactor steels. • Material tests were developed and performed on GLEEBLE 3800 physical simulator. • Coffin–Manson curves and parameters were derived. • High accuracy of the strain energy based evaluation was found. • The observed dislocation evolution correlates with the mechanical behaviour. - Abstract: The fatigue life of the structural materials 15Ch2MFA (CrMoV-alloyed ferritic steel) and 08Ch18N10T (CrNi-alloyed austenitic steel) of VVER-440 reactor pressure vessel under completely reserved total strain controlled low cycle fatigue tests were investigated. An advanced test facility was developed for GLEEBLE-3800 physical simulator which was able to perform thermomechanical fatigue experiments under in-service conditions of VVER nuclear reactors. The low cycle fatigue results were evaluated with the plastic strain based Coffin–Manson law, and plastic strain energy based model as well. It was shown that both methods are able to predict the fatigue life of reactor pressure vessel steels accurately. Interrupted fatigue tests were also carried out to investigate the kinetic of the fatigue evolution of the materials. On these samples microstructural evaluation by TEM was performed. The investigated low cycle fatigue behavior can provide reference for remaining life assessment and lifetime extension analysis.

  12. Neutron irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steel 20 MnMoNi55 weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghoneim, M.M.

    1987-05-01

    The effect of neutron irradiation on the mechanical and fracture properties of an 'improved' 20 MnMoNi 55 Pressure Vessel Steel (PVS) weld was investigated. In addition to very low residual element content, especially Cu (0.035 wt.%), and relatively higher Ni content (0.9 wt.%), this steel has higher strength (30% more) than the steels used currently in nuclear reactor pressure vessels. The material was irradiated to 3.5x10 19 and 7x10 19 n/cm 2 (E > 1 Mev) at 290 0 C and 2.5x10 19 n/cm 2 (E > 1 MeV) at 160 0 C in FRJ-1 and FRJ-2 research reactors at KFA, Juelich, F.R.G. Test methods used in the evaluation included instrumented impact testing of standard and precracked Charpy specimens, tensile, and fracture toughness testing. Instrumented impact testing provided load and energy vs. time (deflection) data in addition to energy absorption data. The results indicated that the investigated high strength improved steel is more resistant to irradiation induced embrittlement than conventional PVSs. (orig./IHOE)

  13. The irradiation embrittlement of two pressure vessel steels -Contribution of local approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soulat, P; Marini, B [CEA Centre d` Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Service de Recherches Metallurgiques Appliquees; Miannay, D; Horowitz, H [CEA Centre d` Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire; Schill, R [CEA Centre d` Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. de Mecanique et de Technologie

    1994-12-31

    Within the IAEA Coordinated Research Programme on ``Optimizing the Reactor Pressure Vessel Surveillance Programmes and their Analyses``, the French participation has been focused on the contribution of the local approach to the determination of the sensitivity to radiation embrittlement of two different pressure vessel steels: a low sensitive French forging steel (FFA) and a high sensitive ``monitor`` Japanese plate steel (JRQ) were irradiated to a fluence of 3.10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2} at 290 C. The irradiation embrittlement of the two steels measured by the shift of Charpy V transition curves is in good agreement with the estimated shifts given by theoretical prediction. The fracture toughness properties were examined at low temperature with brittle fracture, and at service temperature (290 C), with ductile tearing. The values of K{sub 1C} or K{sub JC} for the brittle fracture and J{sub 1C} for the ductile fracture are compared to predictions established using the local approach of cleavage fracture (Weibull analysis) and the critical rate of void growth respectively. 8 refs., 14 figs., 10 tabs.

  14. Acoustic emission during the elastic-plastic deformation of low alloy reactor pressure vessel steels. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, J.; Goddard, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements of the acoustic emission behaviour of A533B and C-Mn low alloy reactor pressure vessel steels subjected to uniaxial tensile deformation are described. The effects on the emission activity of the rolling plane orientation and the carbide morphology were examined. Detailed discussions are given of the stress dependence of the emission activity below yield and of its recovery by annealing at the stress relief temperature. It is shown that the dominant emission source is the same in both steels and is associated with inclusions, such as MnS, elongated by the rolling process, the carbide morphology being relatively unimportant. A criterion for the occurrence of an emission is obtained which is directly analogous to the general criterion for yielding. It is also shown that a large fraction, at least, of the emission activity arises from a recoverable process such as localized yielding around inclusions or limited inclusion decohesion and not from inclusion fracture. Low activity in C-Mn steel taken from reactor pressure vessels, previously attributed to spheroidization of carbides, is shown to be due to the limited acoustic recovery of these relatively high sulphur content steels when annealed at the stress relief temperature. It is concluded that the limited amplitudes of these emissions during deformation severely restrict their potential application in practice. (Auth.)

  15. Containers, particularly prestressed concrete pressure vessels for nuclear reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoening, J.; Schwiers, H.G.; Mitterbacher, P.

    1986-01-01

    Pressure and temperature changes act on the liner, which cause differential expansion between the liner and the prestressed concrete. So that there will be no overload or damage to the liner, its anchoring or the concrete structure, cutouts are provided in the concrete at deflection positions of the steel cladding, connections and penetrations. These cut-outs are filled with inserts made of elastic or plastic material. (DG) [de

  16. Thermo-mechanical behaviour during encapsulation of glass in a steel vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakhodchi, S.; Smith, D.J.; Thomas, B.G.

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative numerical simulations and qualitative evaluations are conducted to elucidate thermo-mechanical behaviour during pouring and solidification of molten glass into a stainless-steel cylindrical container. Residual stress and structural integrity in this casting/vitrification process is important because it can be used for long-term storage of high-level nuclear wastes. The predicted temperature and stress distributions in the glass and container agree well with previous measurements of the temperature histories and residual stresses. Three different thermal-stress models are developed using the finite-element method and compared. Two simple slice models were developed based on the generalized plane strain assumption as well as a detailed two-dimensional axi-symmetric model that adds elements according to the stages of pouring glass into the stainless steel container. The results reveal that mechanical interaction between the glass and the wall of the stainless steel container generates residual tensile stresses that approach the yield strength of the steel. Together, these results reveal important insights into the mechanism of stress generation in the process, the structural integrity of the product, and accuracy of the modelling-tool predictions. - Highlights: • Source of residual stresses in glass and stainless steel containers (canisters) is discussed. • Final residual stresses in both glass and container is quantified. • Simple models presented for simulation of complicated casting process. • Comparison between detailed and simple FE modeling.

  17. Application of small specimens to fracture mechanics characterization of irradiated pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, M.A.; Wallin, K.; McCabe, D.E.

    1996-01-01

    In this study, precracked Charpy V-notch (PCVN) specimens were used to characterize the fracture toughness of unirradiated and irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels in the transition region by means of three-point static bending. Fracture toughness at cleavage instability was calculated in terms of elastic-plastic K Jc values. A statistical size correction based upon weakest-link theory was performed. The concept of a master curve was applied to analyze fracture toughness properties. Initially, size-corrected PCVN data from A 533 grade B steel, designated HSST Plate O2, were used to position the master curve and a 5% tolerance bound for K Jc data. By converting PCVN data to IT compact specimen equivalent K Jc data, the same master curve and 5% tolerance bound curve were plotted against the Electric Power Research Institute valid linear-elastic K Jc database and the ASME lower bound K Ic curve. Comparison shows that the master curve positioned by testing several PCVN specimens describes very well the massive fracture toughness database of large specimens. These results give strong support to the validity of K Jc with respect to K Ic in general and to the applicability of PCVN specimens to measure fracture toughness of reactor vessel steels in particular. Finally, irradiated PCVN specimens of other materials were tested, and the results are compared to compact specimen data. The current results show that PCVNs demonstrate very good capacity for fracture toughness characterization of reactor pressure vessel steels. It provides an opportunity for direct measurement of fracture toughness of irradiated materials by means of precracking and testing Charpy specimens from surveillance capsules. However, size limits based on constraint theory restrict the operational test temperature range for K Jc data from PCVN specimens. 13 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  18. Nondestructive characterization of embrittlement in reactor pressure vessel steels -- A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHenry, H.I.; Alers, G.A.

    1998-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission recently initiated a study by NIST to assess the feasibility of using physical-property measurements for evaluating radiation embrittlement in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Ultrasonic and magnetic measurements provide the most promising approaches for nondestructive characterization of RPV steels because elastic waves and magnetic fields can sense the microstructural changes that embrittle materials. The microstructural changes of particular interest are copper precipitation hardening, which is the likely cause of radiation embrittlement in RPV steels, and the loss of dislocation mobility that is an attribute of the ductile-to-brittle transition. Measurements were made on a 1% copper steel, ASTM grade A710, in the annealed, peak-aged and overaged conditions, and on an RPV steel, ASTM grade A533B. Nonlinear ultrasonic and micromagnetic techniques were the most promising measures of precipitation hardening. Ultrasonic velocity measurements and the magnetic properties associated with hysteresis-loop measurements were not particularly sensitive to either precipitation hardening or the ductile-to-brittle transition. Measurements of internal friction using trapped ultrasonic resonance modes detected energy losses due to the motion of pinned dislocations; however, the ultrasonic attenuation associated with these measurements was small compared to the attenuation caused by beam spreading that would occur in conventional ultrasonic testing of RPVs

  19. Quantitative determination of impurities contained in the pressure vessel of the Garigliano reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peselli, M.

    1984-01-01

    For dismantling the vessel of the Garigliano power plant, an element of fundamental importance is the evaluation of the γ activity induced in structural materials by neutron activation. With this knowledge, the most adequate cutting techniques, protection system, transport devices and final disposal can be chosen, in order to reduce the risk to both workers and population, taking into account the economical point of views. In this report, the model used for the activity estimation and the obtained results, showing good agreement with some experimental data, are described. The task was performed in the following steps: - measurements of the vessel steel composition, - evaluation of neutron flux affecting the vessel, - evaluation of the activity due to neutron flux, - data inventory from activity measurement performed on in core irradiated vessel specimens, - comparison between measurement and calculation data

  20. Energy release and its containment within thin-walled, backed vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambers, D.I.

    1983-01-01

    The problem adressed is the containment of a sudden release of energy of a magnitude up to 4 x 10 11 joules in a reusable vessel. The design process began by formulating dynamic models for both the input to such a vessel and the vessel itself and using these models to generate a general response. Modifications to the input and a more specific response are discussed. Computer codes used in calculations are described and listed

  1. Long-term irradiation effects on reactor-pressure vessel steels. Investigations on the nanometer scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Arne

    2017-06-01

    The exposure of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels to neutron irradiation gives rise to irradiation-enhanced diffusion, a rearrangement of solute atoms and, consequently, a degradation of the mechanical properties. The increasing age of existing nuclear power plants raises new questions specific to long-term operation. Two of them are addressed in this thesis: flux effects and the late-blooming effect. Can low-flux irradiations up to a given fluence be reproduced by more rapid high-flux irradiations up to the same fluence? Can the irradiation response of RPV steels be extrapolated to higher fluences or are there unexpected ''late-blooming'' effects. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), atom-probe tomography (APT) and Vickers-hardness testing were applied. A novel Monte-Carlo based fitting algorithm for SANS data was implemented in order to derive statistically reliable characteristics of irradiation-induced solute-atom clusters. APT was applied in selected cases to gain additional information on the composition and the shape of clusters. Vickers hardness testing was performed on the SANS samples to link the nanometer-scale changes to irradiation hardening. The investigations on flux effects show that clusters forming upon high-flux irradiation are smaller and tend to have a higher number density compared to low-flux irradiations at a given neutron fluence. The measured flux dependence of the cluster-size distribution is consistent with the framework of deterministic growth (but not with coarsening) in combination with radiation-enhanced diffusion. Since the two effects on cluster-size and volume fraction partly cancel each other out, no significant effect on the hardening is observed. The investigations of a possible late-blooming effect indicate that the very existence (yes or no) of such an effect depends on the irradiation conditions. Irradiations at lower fluxes and a lower temperature (255 C) give rise to a significant increase of the

  2. Effects of nickel on irradiation embrittlement of light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-06-01

    This TECDOC was developed under the IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) entitled Effects of Nickel on Irradiation Embrittlement of Light Water Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Steels. This CRP is the sixth in a series of CRPs to determine the influence of the mechanism and quantify the influence of nickel content on the deterioration of irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels of the Ni-Cr-Mo-V or Mn-Ni-Cr-Mo types. The scientific scope of the programme includes procurement of materials, determination of mechanical properties, irradiation and testing of specimens in power and/or test reactors, and microstructural characterization. Eleven institutes from eight different countries and the European Union participated in this CRP and six institutes conducted the irradiation experiments of the CRP materials. In addition to the irradiation and testing of those materials, irradiation experiments of various national steels were also conducted. Moreover, some institutes performed microstructural investigations of both the CRP materials and national steels. This TECDOC presents and discusses all the results obtained and the analyses performed under the CRP. The results analysed are clear in showing the significantly higher radiation sensitivity of high nickel weld metal (1.7 wt%) compared with the lower nickel base metal (1.2 wt%). These results are supported by other similar results in the literature for both WWER-1000 RPV materials, pressurized water reactor (PWR) type materials, and model alloys. Regardless of the increased sensitivity of WWER-1000 high nickel weld metal (1.7 wt%), the transition temperature shift for the WWER-1000 RPV design fluence is still below the curve predicted by the Russian code (standard for strength calculations of components and piping in NPPs - PNAE G 7-002-86). For higher fluence, no data were available and the results should not be extrapolated. Although manganese content was not incorporated directly in this CRP

  3. Using An Adapter To Perform The Chalfant-Style Containment Vessel Periodic Maintenance Leak Rate Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loftin, B.; Abramczyk, G.; Trapp, D.

    2011-01-01

    Recently the Packaging Technology and Pressurized Systems (PT and PS) organization at the Savannah River National Laboratory was asked to develop an adapter for performing the leak-rate test of a Chalfant-style containment vessel. The PT and PS organization collaborated with designers at the Department of Energy's Pantex Plant to develop the adapter currently in use for performing the leak-rate testing on the containment vessels. This paper will give the history of leak-rate testing of the Chalfant-style containment vessels, discuss the design concept for the adapter, give an overview of the design, and will present results of the testing done using the adapter.

  4. Application of the ASME code in designing containment vessels for packages used to transport radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raske, D.T.; Wang, Z.

    1992-01-01

    The primary concern governing the design of shipping packages containing radioactive materials is public safety during transport. When these shipments are within the regulatory jurisdiction of the US Department of Energy, the recommended design criterion for the primary containment vessel is either Section III or Section VIII, Division 1, of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, depending on the activity of the contents. The objective of this paper is to discuss the design of a prototypic containment vessel representative of a packaging for the transport of high-level radioactive material

  5. Isothermal and thermal-mechanical fatigue of VVER-440 reactor pressure vessel steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, Balazs; Trampus, Peter

    2015-09-01

    The fatigue life of the structural materials 15Ch2MFA (CrMoV-alloyed ferritic steel) and 08Ch18N10T (CrNi-alloyed austenitic steel) of VVER-440 reactor pressure vessel under completely reserved total strain controlled low cycle fatigue tests were investigated. An advanced test facility was developed for GLEEBLE-3800 physical simulator which was able to perform thermomechanical fatigue experiments under in-service conditions of VVER nuclear reactors. The low cycle fatigue results were evaluated with the plastic strain based Coffin-Manson law, and plastic strain energy based model as well. It was shown that both methods are able to predict the fatigue life of reactor pressure vessel steels accurately. Interrupted fatigue tests were also carried out to investigate the kinetic of the fatigue evolution of the materials. On these samples microstructural evaluation by TEM was performed. The investigated low cycle fatigue behavior can provide reference for remaining life assessment and lifetime extension analysis.

  6. The measured contribution of whipping and springing on the fatigue and extreme loading of container vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storhaug, Gaute

    2014-12-01

    Whipping/springing research started in the 50'ies. In the 60'ies inland water vessels design rules became stricter due to whipping/springing. The research during the 70-90'ies may be regarded as academic. In 2000 a large ore carrier was strengthened due to severe cracking from North Atlantic operation, and whipping/springing contributed to half of the fatigue damage. Measurement campaigns on blunt and slender vessels were initiated. A few blunt ships were designed to account for whipping/springing. Based on the measurements, the focus shifted from fatigue to extreme loading. In 2005 model tests of a 4,400 TEU container vessel included extreme whipping scenarios. In 2007 the 4400 TEU vessel MSC Napoli broke in two under similar conditions. In 2009 model tests of an 8,600 TEU container vessel container vessel included extreme whipping scenarios. In 2013 the 8,100 TEU vessel MOL COMFORT broke in two under similar conditions. Several classification societies have published voluntary guidelines, which have been used to include whipping/springing in the design of several container vessels. This paper covers results from model tests and full scale measurements used as background for the DNV Legacy guideline. Uncertainties are discussed and recommendations are given in order to obtain useful data. Whipping/springing is no longer academic.

  7. Design and analysis of reactor containment of steel-concrete composite laminated shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, K.; Isobata, O.; Kawamata, S.

    1977-01-01

    A new scheme of containment consisting of steel-concrete laminated shell is being developed. In the main part of a cylindrical vessel, the shell consists of two layers of thin steel plates located at the inner and outer surfaces, and a layer of concrete core into which both the steel plates are anchored. Because of the compressive and shearing resistance of the concrete core, the layers behave as a composite solid shell. Membrane forces are shared by steel plates and partly by concrete core. Bending moment is effectively resisted by the section with extreme layers of steel. Therefore, both surfaces can be designed as extremely thin plates: the inner plate, which is a load carrying members as well as a liner, can be welded without the laborious process of stress-relieving, and various jointing methods can be applied to the outer plate which is free from the need for leak tightness. The capability of the composite layers of behaving as a unified solid shell section depends largely on the shearing rigidity of the concrete core. However, as its resisting capacity to transverse shearing force is comparatively low, a device for reducing the shearing stress at the junction to the base mat is needed. In the new scheme, this part of the cylindrical shell is divided into multiple layers of the same kind of composite shell. This device makes the stiffness of the bottom of the cylindrical shell to lateral movement minimum while maintaining the proper resistance to membrane forces. The analysis shows that the transverse shearing stress can be reduced to less than 1√n of the ordinary case by dividing the thickness of the shell into n layers which are able to slip against each other at the contact surface. In order to validate the feasibility and safety of this new design, the results of analysis on the basis of up-to-date design loads are presented

  8. Piping systems, containment pre-stressing and steel ventilation chimney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuessi, U.

    1996-01-01

    Units 5 and 6 of NPP Kozloduy have been designed initially for seismic levels which are considered too low today. In the frame of an IAEA Coordinated Research Programme, a Swiss team has been commissioned by Natsionalna Elektricheska Kompania, Sofia, to analyse the relevant piping system, the containment prestressing and the steel ventilation chimney and to recommend upgrade measures for adequate seismic capacity where applicable. Seismic input had been specified by and agreed upon earlier by IAEA experts. The necessary investigations have been performed in 1995 and discussed with internationally recognized experts. The main results may be summarized as follows: Upgrades are necessary at different piping sy ports (additional snubbers or viscous dampers). These fixes can be done easily at low cost. The containment prestressing tendons are adequately designed for the specified load combinations. However, unfavourable construction features endanger the reliability. It is therefore strongly recommended to replace the tendons stepwise and to upgrade the existing monitoring system. Finally, the steel ventilation chimney may not withstand a seismic event, however the containment and diesel generator building will not be destroyed at possible impact by the chimney. On the other hand the roof of the main building has to be reinforced partially. It is recommended to continue the project for 1996 and 1997 to implement the upgrade measures mentioned above, to analyse the remaining piping systems and to consolidate all results obtained by different research groups of the IAEA programme with respect to piping systems including components and tanks

  9. Influence of crack depth on the fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theiss, T.J.; Bryson, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    The Heavy Section Steel Technology Program (HSST) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is investigating the influence of flaw depth on the fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel. Recently, it has been shown that, in notched beam testing, shallow cracks tend to exhibit an elevated toughness as a result of a loss of constraint at the crack tip. The loss of constraint takes place when interaction occurs between the elastic-plastic crack-tip stress field and the specimen surface nearest the crack tip. An increased shallow-crack fracture toughness is of interest to the nuclear industry because probabilistic fracture-mechanics evaluations show that shallow flaws play a dominant role in the probability of vessel failure during postulated pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) events. Tests have been performed on beam specimens loaded in 3-point bending using unirradiated reactor pressure vessel material (A533 B). Testing has been conducted using specimens with a constant beam depth (W = 94 mm) and within the lower transition region of the toughness curve for A533 B. Test results indicate a significantly higher fracture toughness associated with the shallow flaw specimens compared to the fracture toughness determined using deep-crack (a/W = 0.5) specimens. Test data also show little influence of thickness on the fracture toughness for the current test temperature (-60 degree C). 21 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Safety margin evaluation of pre-stressed concrete nuclear containment vessel model with BARC code ULCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basha, S.M.; Patnaik, R.; Ramanujam, S.; Singh, R.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Venkat Raj, V.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Ultimate load capacity assessment of nuclear containments has been a thrust research area for Indian pressurised heavy water reactor (PHWR) power programme. For containment safety assessment of Indian PHWRs a finite element code ULCA was developed at BARC, Trombay. This code has been extensively benchmarked with experimental results and for prediction of safety margins of Indian PHWRs. The present paper highlights the analysis results for prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) tested at Sandia National Labs, USA in a round robin analysis activity co-sponsored by Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), Japan and the U.S Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Three levels of failure pressure predictions namely the upper bound, the most probable and the lower bound (all with 90% confidence) were made as per the requirements of the round robin analysis activity. The most likely failure pressure is predicted to be in the range of 2.95 Pd to 3.15 Pd (Pd = design pressure of 0.39 MPa for the PCCV model) depending on the type of liners used in the construction of the PCCV model. The lower bound value of the ultimate pressure of 2.80 Pd and the upper bound of the ultimate pressure of 3.45 Pd are also predicted from the analysis. These limiting values depend on the assumptions of the analysis for simulating the concrete tendon interaction and the strain hardening characteristics of the steel members. The experimental test has been recently concluded at Sandia Laboratory and the peak pressure reached during the test is 3.3 Pd that is enveloped by our upper bound prediction of 3.45 Pd and is close to the predicted most likely pressure of 3.15 Pd

  11. The flow effect in the irradiation embrittlement in pressure vessel steels of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kempf, Rodolfo A.; Cativa Tolosa, Sebastian; Fortis, Ana M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the advances in the study of the mechanical behavior of the Reactor Pressure Vessel steels under accelerate irradiations. The objective is to study the effect of lead factors on the interpretation of the mechanisms that induced the embrittlement of the RPV, like those of the reactors Atucha II and CAREM. It is described a device designed to irradiate Charpy specimens with V notch of SA-508 type 3 steel at power reactor temperature, installed in the RA-1 reactor. It is presented also an automatic digital image processing technique for partitioning Charpy fracture surface into regions with a clear physical meaning and appropriate for the work in hot cells. The aim is to obtain the fracture behavior of irradiated specimens with different lead factors in the range of high fluencies and to know the dependence with the composition of the alloy and with the diffusion of other alloy elements. (author)

  12. Characterisation of creep cavitation damage in a stainless steel pressure vessel using small angle neutron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Bouchard, P J; Treimer, W

    2002-01-01

    Grain-boundary cavitation is the dominant failure mode associated with initiation of reheat cracking, which has been widely observed in austenitic stainless steel pressure vessels operating at temperatures within the creep range (>450 C). Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments at the LLB PAXE instrument (Saclay) and the V12 double-crystal diffractometer of the HMI-BENSC facility (Berlin) are used to characterise cavitation damage (in the size range R=10-2000 nm) in a variety of creep specimens extracted from ex-service plant. Factors that affect the evolution of cavities and the cavity-size distribution are discussed. The results demonstrate that SANS techniques have the potential to quantify the development of creep damage in type-316H stainless steel, and thereby link microstructural damage with ductility-exhaustion models of reheat cracking. (orig.)

  13. Re-austenitisation of chromium-bearing pressure vessel steels during the weld thermal cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunne, Druce; Li, Huijun; Jones, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Steels with chromium contents between 0.5 and 12 wt% are commonly used for fabrication of creep resistant pressure vessels (PV) for the power generation industry. Most of these steels are susceptible to Type IV creep failure in the intercritical and/ or grain refined regions of the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the parent metal. The re-austenitisation process plays a central role in establishing the transformed microstructures and the creep resistance of the various sub-zones of the HAZ. The high alloy content and the presence of alloy-rich carbides in the as-supplied parent plate can significantly retard the kinetics of transformation to austenite, resulting in both incomplete austenitisation and inhomogeneous austenite. Overlapping weld thermal cycles in multi-pass welds add further complexity to the progressive development of microstructure over the course of the welding process. In order to clarify structural evolution, thermal simulation has been used to study the effects of successive thermal cycles on the structures and properties of the HAZ of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel. The results showed that, before post-weld heat treatment (PWHT), the HAZ microstructures and properties, particularly in doubly reheated sub-zones, were highly heterogeneous and differed markedly from those of the base steel. It is concluded that close control of the thermal cycle by pre-heat, weld heat input and post-heat is necessary to obtain a heat affected zone with microstructures and properties compatible with those of the base plate.

  14. Evolution of manganese–nickel–silicon-dominated phases in highly irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, Peter B.; Yamamoto, Takuya; Miller, Brandon; Milot, Tim; Cole, James; Wu, Yuan; Odette, G. Robert

    2014-01-01

    Formation of a high density of Mn–Ni–Si nanoscale precipitates in irradiated Cu-free and Cu-bearing reactor pressure vessel steels could lead to severe unexpected embrittlement. Models long ago predicted that these precipitates, which are not treated in current embrittlement prediction models, would emerge only at high fluence. However, the mechanisms and variables that control Mn–Ni–Si precipitate formation, and their detailed characteristics, have not been well understood. High flux irradiations of six steels with systematic variations in Cu and Ni contents were carried out at ∼295 °C to high and very high neutron fluences of ∼1.3 × 10 20 and ∼1.1 × 10 21 n cm −2 . Atom probe tomography shows that significant mole fractions of Mn–Ni–Si-dominated precipitates form in the Cu-bearing steels at ∼1.3 × 10 20 n cm −2 , while they are only beginning to develop in Cu-free steels. However, large mole fractions of these precipitates, far in excess of those found in previous studies, are observed at 1.1 × 10 21 n cm −2 at all Cu contents. At the highest fluence, the precipitate mole fractions primarily depend on the alloy Ni, rather than Cu, content. The Mn–Ni–Si precipitates lead to very large increases in measured hardness, corresponding to yield strength elevations of up to almost 700 MPa

  15. Lower Length Scale Model Development for Embrittlement of Reactor Presure Vessel Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schwen, Daniel [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Chakraborty, Pritam [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bai, Xianming [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report summarizes the lower-length-scale effort during FY 2016 in developing mesoscale capabilities for microstructure evolution, plasticity and fracture in reactor pressure vessel steels. During operation, reactor pressure vessels are subject to hardening and embrittlement caused by irradiation induced defect accumulation and irradiation enhanced solute precipitation. Both defect production and solute precipitation start from the atomic scale, and manifest their eventual effects as degradation in engineering scale properties. To predict the property degradation, multiscale modeling and simulation are needed to deal with the microstructure evolution, and to link the microstructure feature to material properties. In this report, the development of mesoscale capabilities for defect accumulation and solute precipitation are summarized. A crystal plasticity model to capture defect-dislocation interaction and a damage model for cleavage micro-crack propagation is also provided.

  16. Effects of temperature on corrosion fatigue crack growth of pressure vessel steels in PWR coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tice, D.R.; Bramwell, I.L.; Fairbrother, H.; Worswick, D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results concerning crack propagation rates in A508-III pressure vessel steel (medium sulphur content) exposed to PWR primary water at temperatures between 130 and 290 C. The results indicate that the greatest increase in corrosion fatigue crack growth rate occurs at temperatures in the range 150 to 200 C. Under these conditions, there was a marked change in the appearance of the fracture surface, with extensive micro-branching of the crack front and occasional bifurcation of the whole crack path. In contrast, at 290 C, the fracture surface is smoother, similar to that due to inert fatigue. The implication of these observations for assessment of the pressure vessel integrity, is examined. 14 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Creep crack growth in a reactor pressure vessel steel at 360 deg C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rui Wu; Seitisleam, F.; Sandstroem, R. [Swedish Institute for Metals Research, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1998-12-31

    Plain creep (PC) and creep crack growth (CCG) tests at 360 deg C and post metallography were carried out on a low alloy reactor pressure vessel steel (ASTM A508 class 2) with different microstructures. Lives for the CCG tests were shorter than those for the PC tests and this is more pronounced for simulated heat affected zone microstructure than for the parent metal at longer lives. For the CCG tests, after initiation, the cracks grew constantly and intergranularly before they accelerated to approach rupture. The creep crack growth rate is well described by C*. The relations between reference stress, failure time and steady crack growth rate are presented for the CCG tests. It is demonstrated that the failure stress due to CCG is considerably lower than the yield stress at 360 deg C. Consequently, the CCG will control the static strength of a reactor vessel. (orig.) 17 refs.

  18. Guide to the periodic inspection of nuclear reactor steel pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    This Guide is intended to provide general information and guidance to reactor owners or operators, inspection authorities, certifying authorities or regulatory bodies who are responsible for establishing inspection procedures for specific reactors or reactor types, and for the preparation of national codes or standards. The recommendations of the Guide apply primarily to water-cooled steel reactor vessels which are at a sufficiently early stage of design so that recommendations to provide accessibility for inspection can be incorporated into the early stages of design and inspection planning. However, much of the contents of the Guide are also applicable in part to vessels for other reactor types, such as gas-cooled, pressure-tube, or liquid-metal-cooled reactors, and also to some existing water-cooled reactors and reactors which are in advanced stage of design or construction. 46 refs, figs, 1 tab

  19. Creep crack growth in a reactor pressure vessel steel at 360 deg C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Rui; Seitisleam, F; Sandstroem, R [Swedish Institute for Metals Research, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1999-12-31

    Plain creep (PC) and creep crack growth (CCG) tests at 360 deg C and post metallography were carried out on a low alloy reactor pressure vessel steel (ASTM A508 class 2) with different microstructures. Lives for the CCG tests were shorter than those for the PC tests and this is more pronounced for simulated heat affected zone microstructure than for the parent metal at longer lives. For the CCG tests, after initiation, the cracks grew constantly and intergranularly before they accelerated to approach rupture. The creep crack growth rate is well described by C*. The relations between reference stress, failure time and steady crack growth rate are presented for the CCG tests. It is demonstrated that the failure stress due to CCG is considerably lower than the yield stress at 360 deg C. Consequently, the CCG will control the static strength of a reactor vessel. (orig.) 17 refs.

  20. Underwater cutting of stainless steel plate and pipe for dismantling reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamasaki, M.; Tateiwa, F.; Kanatani, F.; Yamashita, S.

    1982-01-01

    A consumable electrode water jet cutting technique is described. Satisfactory underwater cutting of 80mm stainless steel plate using a current of 2000A and at a water depth of 200mm has been demonstrated. The electrical requirements for this arc welding method applied to cutting were found to be approximately one third those required for conventional plasma arc cutting for the same thickness plate. An application of this technique might be found in the dismantling of atomic reactor pressure vessels, and parts of commercial atomic reactors. (author)

  1. Temperature dependence of the fracture toughness and the cleavage fracture strength of a pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotilainen, H.

    1980-01-01

    A new model for the temperature dependence of the fracture toughness has been sought. It is based on the yielding processes at the crack tip, which are thought to be competitive with fracture. Using this method a good correlation between measured and calculated values of fracture toughness has been found for a Cr-Mo-V pressure vessel steel as well as for A533B. It has been thought that the application of this method can reduce the number of surveillance specimens in nuclear reactors. A method for the determination of the cleavage fracture strength has been proposed. 28 refs

  2. Progress in Investigation of WWER-440 Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel by Gamma and Moessbauer Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hascik, J.; Slugen, V.; Lipka, J.; Hinca, R.; Toth, I.; Groene, R.; Uvacik, P.; Kupca, L.

    1998-01-01

    Gamma spectroscopic analyse and first experimental results of original irradiated reactor pressure vessel surveillance specimens are discussed in. In 1994, the new ''Extended Surveillance Specimen Program for nuclear Reactor Material Study'' was started in collaboration with the nuclear power plants (NPP) V-2 Bohunice (Slovakia). The first batch of MS samples (after 1 year, which is equivalent to 5 years of loading RPV-steel) was measured and interpreted using the new four components approach with the aim to observe microstructural changes due to thermal and neutron treatment resulting from operating conditions in NPP. The systematic changes in the relative areas of Moessbauer spectra components were observed. (author)

  3. Strain ageing of nuclear pressure vessel steels A533B and A508 cl.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelli, R.; Toerroenen, K.

    1978-04-01

    The susceptibility of the reactor pressure vessel steels A533B and A508 cl.2 to strain ageing has been studied using conventional tensile and impact testing of prestrained and aged specimens. The results show a modest susceptibility, seen as an increase in yield strength and Charpy V transition temperatures. The effect of varying alloying additions within the range of normal production was not observed, but the initial mechanical properties clearly affect the strain ageing. The lower the initial yield strength, the higher increase in strength and the lower increase in transition temperature is observed. (author)

  4. Revision of the fracture models in steels for nuclear pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darwish, F A.I. [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencia dos Materiais e Metalurgia

    1981-01-01

    The variation of toughness with the temperature of steels used in the fabrication of nuclear pressure vessels is presented and discuted by mathematical models aiming to reach a critical value of stress or deformation at the moment of the fracture. The mathematical model considered are compatible with the fracture micromechanisms in action and they are capable of foreseeing the variations in the toughness from the mechanical properties evaluated in the tension test. The neutron irradiation effects in the toughness as well as in the variation of this toughness with the operating temperature are still described.

  5. Atom probe study of the microstructural evolution induced by irradiation in Fe-Cu ferritic alloys and pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pareige, P.

    1996-04-01

    Pressure vessel steels used in pressurized water reactors are low alloyed ferritic steels. They may be prone to hardening and embrittlement under neutron irradiation. The changes in mechanical properties are generally supposed to result from the formation of point defects, dislocation loops, voids and/or copper rich clusters. However, the real nature of the irradiation induced-damage in these steels has not been clearly identified yet. In order to improve our vision of this damage, we have characterized the microstructure of several steels and model alloys irradiated with electrons and neutrons. The study was performed with conventional and tomographic atom probes. The well known importance of the effects of copper upon pressure vessel steel embrittlement has led us to study Fe-Cu binary alloys. We have considered chemical aging as well as aging under electron and neutron irradiations. The resulting effects depend on whether electron or neutron irradiations ar used for thus. We carried out both kinds of irradiation concurrently so as to compare their effects. We have more particularly considered alloys with a low copper supersaturation representative of that met with the French vessel alloys (0.1% Cu). Then, we have examined steels used on French nuclear reactor pressure vessels. To characterize the microstructure of CHOOZ A steel and its evolution when exposed to neutrons, we have studied samples from the reactor surveillance program. The results achieved, especially the characterization of neutron-induced defects have been compared with those for another steel from the surveillance program of Dampierre 2. All the experiment results obtained on model and industrial steels have allowed us to consider an explanation of the way how the defects appear and grow, and to propose reasons for their influence upon steel embrittlement. (author). 3 appends

  6. Use of miniature and standard specimens to evaluate effects of irradiation temperature on pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haggag, F.M.; Nanstad, R.K.; Byrne, S.T.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation on the steel reactor vessel for the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) are being investigated, primarily because the operating temperatures are low [121 to 210 degrees C (250--410 degrees F)] compared to those for commercial light-water reactors (LWRs) [∼288 degrees C (550 degrees F)]. The need for design data on the reference temperature shift necessitated the irradiation at different temperatures of A 533 grade B class 1 plate. A 508 class 3 forging, and welds used for the vessel shell, vessel closure head, the vessel flange. This paper presents results from the first four irradiation capsules of this program. The four capsules were irradiated in the University of Buffalo Reactor to an effective fast fluence of 1 x10 18 neutron/cm 2 [0.68 x 10 18 neutron/cm 2 (>1 MeV)] at temperatures of 288, 204, 163, and 121 degrees C (550, 400, 325, and 250 degrees F), respectively. The yield and ultimate strengths of both steel plate materials of the MHTGR Program increased with decreasing irradiation temperature. Similarly, the 41-J Charpy V-notch (CVN) transition temperature shift increased with decreasing irradiation temperature (in agreement with the increase in yield strength). The miniature tensile and automated ball indentation (ABI) test results (yield strength and flow properties) were in good agreement with those from standard tensile specimens. The miniature tensile and ABI test results were also used in a model that utilizes the changes in yield strength to estimate the CVN ductile-to-brittle transition temperature shift due to irradiation. The model predictions were compared with CVN test results obtained here and in earlier work. 5 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs

  7. Corrosion of steel tendons in concrete pressure vessels: review of recent literature and experimental investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griess, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    The fundamentals of localized corrosion are briefly discussed, and the literature concerning corrosion of carbon steel in aqueous environments, in particular the stress-corrosion cracking of carbon steels, is reviewed. The behavior of high strength steels in specific environments, including concrete and organic substances, is also summarized. The available information indicates that the corrosion of steels in correctly formulated concrete is minimal. Even appreciable concentrations of chloride, sulfate, sulfide, and nitrate salts can be tolerated in the concrete or grout without detrimental effects. Adherence to established standards in the preparation and application of grouts in tendon-bearing conduits should guarantee very long tendon lifetimes. Little is reported about the behavior of tendons in proprietary organic greases or waxes, but very good corrosion resistance is expected if the organic material remains intact. Stress-corrosion cracking tests performed with AISI 1080 steel tendon wires, using the constant-strain-rate method, produced results expected from data in the literature. Cracking was observed only in neutral or acid solutions containing hydrogen sulfide, in ammonium nitrate solutions, and possibly in a dilute solution of sodium bisulfite. General corrosion tests in water and in dilute solutions of sodium nitrate, chloride, or sulfate showed that oxygen was an important factor; corrosion was substantially greater when oxygen had free access to the solution than when access to oxygen was restricted. In the tests with oxygen the heaviest attack on the steel tendons was at the waterline of the solution

  8. Dynamic Properties of Container Vessel with Low Metacentric Height

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanke, M.; Jensen, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    between roll and lateral motions. This was changed with the construction of a unique four degrees of freedom roll planar motion mechanism (RPMM) at the Danish Maritime Institute. The paper presents complete nonlinear models for a container ship obtained with this facility. Model scale predictions...

  9. Containment liner plate anchors and steel embedments test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang-Lo, P.L.; Johnson, T.E.; Pfeifer, B.W.

    1977-01-01

    This paper summarizes test data on shear load and deformation capabilities for liner plate line anchors and structural steel embedments in reinforced and prestressed concrete nuclear containments. Reinforced and prestressed nuclear containments designed and constructed in the United States are lined with a minimum of 0.64 cm steel plate. The liner plates are anchored by the use of either studs or structural members (line anchors) which usually run in the vertical direction. This paper will only address line anchors. Static load versus displacement test data is necessary to assure that the design is adequate for the maximum loads. The test program for the liner anchors had the following major objectives: determine load versus displacement data for a variety of anchors considering structural tees and small beams with different weld configurations, from the preceding tests, determine which anchors would lead to an economical and extremely safe design and test these anchors for cyclic loads resulting from thermal fluctuations. Various concrete embeds in the containment and other structures are subjected to loads such as pipe rupture which results in shear. Since many of the loads are transient by nature, it is necessary to know the load-displacement relationship so that the energy absorption can be determined. The test program for the embeds had the following objectives: determine load-displacement relationship for various size anchors from 6.5 cm 2 to 26 cm 2 with maximum capacities of approximately 650 kN; determine the effect of various anchor width-to-thickness ratios for the same shear area

  10. Models for ductile crack initiation and tearing resistance under mode 1 loading in pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, M.R.

    1988-06-01

    Micromechanistic models are presented which aim to predict plane strain ductile initiation toughness, tearing resistance and notched bar fracture strains in pressure vessel steels under monotonically increasing tensile (mode 1) loading. The models for initiation toughness and tearing resistance recognize that ductile fracture proceeds by the growth and linkage of voids with the crack-tip. The models are shown to predict the trend of initiation toughness with inclusion spacing/size ratio and can bound the available experimental data. The model for crack growth can reproduce the tearing resistance of a pressure vessel steel up to and just beyond crack growth initiation. The fracture strains of notched bars pulled in tension are shown to correspond to the achievement of a critical volume fraction of voids. This criterion is combined with the true stress - true strain history of a material point ahead of a blunting crack-tip to predict the initiation toughness. An attempt was made to predict the fracture strains of notched tensile bars by adopting a model which predicts the onset of a shear localization phenomenon. Fracture strains of the correct order are computed only if a ''secondary'' void nucleation event at carbide precipitates is taken into account. (author)

  11. On flux effects in a low alloy steel from a Swedish reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boåsen, Magnus, E-mail: boasen@kth.se [Department of Solid Mechanics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Efsing, Pål [Department of Solid Mechanics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Ehrnstén, Ulla [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd, PO Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland)

    2017-02-15

    This study aims to investigate the presence of Unstable Matrix Defects in irradiated pressure vessel steel from weldments of the Swedish PWR Ringhals 4 (R4). Hardness tests have been performed on low flux (surveillance material) and high flux (Halden reactor) irradiated material samples in combination with heat treatments at temperatures of 330, 360 and 390 °C in order to reveal eventual recovery of any hardening features induced by irradiation. The experiments carried out in this study could not reveal any hardness recovery related to Unstable Matrix Defects at relevant temperatures. However, a difference in hardness recovery was found between the low and the high flux samples at heat treatments at higher temperatures than expected for the annihilation of Unstable Matrix Defects–the observed recovery is here attributed to differences of the solute clusters formed by the high and low flux irradiations. - Highlights: • Hardness testing is combined with post irradiation annealing at 330, 360 and 390 °C. • Unstable matrix defects is studied in a reactor pressure vessel steel. • Comparison between surveillance material and accelerated irradiation. • No evidence of unstable matrix defects, i.e. not present in studied material. • Difference in hardness recovery between irradiation conditions found at 390 °C.

  12. Failure prediction of low-carbon steel pressure vessel and cylindrical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, K.D.; Wang, W.

    1987-01-01

    The failure loads predicted by failure assessment methods (namely the net-section stress criterion; the EPRI engineering approach for elastic-plastic analysis; the CEGB failure assessment route; the modified R6 curve by Milne for strain hardening; and the failure assessment curve based on J estimation by Ainsworth) have been compared with burst test results on externally, axially sharp notched pressure vessel and open-ended cylinder models made from typical low-carbon steel St45 seamless tube which has a transverse true stress-strain curve of straight-line and parabola type and a high value of ultimate strength to yield. It was concluded from the comparison that whilst the net-section stress criterion and the CEGB route did not give conservative predictions, Milne's modified curve did give a conservative and good prediction; Ainsworth's curve gave a fairly conservative prediction; and EPRI solutions also could conditionally give a good prediction but the conditions are still somewhat uncertain. It is suggested that Milne's modified R6 curve is used in failure assessment of low-carbon steel pressure vessels. (author)

  13. Gigacycle fatigue behaviour of austenitic stainless steels used for mercury target vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naoe, Takashi; Xiong, Zhihong; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    A mercury enclosure vessel for the pulsed spallation neutron source manufactured from a type 316L austenitic stainless steel, a so-called target vessel, suffers the cyclic loading caused by the proton beam induced pressure waves. A design criteria of the JSNS target vessel which is defined based on the irradiation damage is 2500 h at 1 MW with a repetition rate of 25 Hz, that is, the target vessel suffers approximately 10 9 cyclic loading while in operation. Furthermore, strain rate of the beam window of the target vessel reaches 50 s −1 at the maximum, which is much higher than that of the conventional fatigue. Gigacycle fatigue strength up to 10 9 cycles for solution annealed 316L (SA) and cold-worked 316L (CW) were investigated through the ultrasonic fatigue tests. Fatigue tests were performed under room temperature and 250 °C which is the maximum temperature evaluated at the beam window in order to investigate the effect of temperature on fatigue strength of SA and CW 316L. The results showed that the fatigue strength at 250 °C is clearly reduced in comparison with room temperature, regardless of cold work level. In addition, residual strength and microhardness of the fatigue tested specimen were measured to investigate the change in mechanical properties by cyclic loading. Cyclic hardening was observed in both the SA and CW 316L, and cyclic softening was observed in the initial stage of cyclic loading in CW 316L. Furthermore, abrupt temperature rising just before fatigue failure was observed regardless of testing conditions.

  14. Specific problems concerning aircraft impact on nuclear containment vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuzier, J.P.; Cheyrezy, M.H.; Dufour, C.J.

    1977-01-01

    Due to the high population density, in Belgium PWR power plants are designed against aircraft impacts (BOEING 707 crashing at 360 km per hour and STARFIGHTER F 104 G crashing at 540 km per hour). A double wall is used for the containment shield. The lack of relevant data and specifications for such a loading on the non-prestressed external wall led the authors to determine the suitable safety criteria, the most appropriate materials to be used and the corresponding limit state design through dynamic and plastic analysis. (Auth.)

  15. A remote inspection system for use inside reactor containment vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Toshihiko; Kashiwai, Jun-ichi; Yamamoto, Ikuo; Fukada, Koichi; Yamanaka, Yoshinobu.

    1985-01-01

    The harsh environment in the reactor-containment vesels of pressurized-water reactor nuclear-power plants precludes the possibility of direct circuit inspection; a remote-inspection system is essential. A robot for performing this task must not only be able to withstand the harsh conditions but must also be small and maneuverable enough to function effectively within complex and confined spaces. The article describes a monorail-type remote-inspection robot developed by Mitsubishi Electric to meet these needs, which is now under trial production and testing. (author)

  16. Strength analyses of containment steel liner at the plasticity instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klyashchitskij, V.I.; Golyakov, V.I.; Kostylev, V.I.; Margolin, B.Z.

    2003-01-01

    The steel liner of NPP containment plays the important role of a leak-tight contour preventing the possible releases of radioactive substances beyond the boundaries of the reactor building. However, so far in many cases an assessment of strain-stress state of the liner having initial imperfections of the shape was made with approximate methods. A new methodology for the analysis of the liner at the plasticity instability was developed at Atomenergoproekt institute in cooperation with specialists from other agencies. The methodology is based on code 'Termit'. Assessment of the critical strain was made taking into account possible presence of one or two defects: construction undercut or crack-like defect in a weld. On the base of the real structure analyses under any combinations of quasi-static loads the algorithm was developed for the computation of the liner. (author)

  17. Embrittlement and annealing of reactor pressure vessel steels: comparison of BR3 surveillance and vessel plates to the surrogate plates representative of the Yankee Rowe vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabry, A.; Chaouadi, T.; Puzzolante, J.L.; Van de Velde, J. [Centre de l``Etude de l``Energie Nucleaire, Mol (Belgium); Biemiller, E.C. [Yankee Atomic Electric Company, Bolton (United States); Rossinski, S.T.; Carter, R.G. [Electric Power Research Institute, Charlotte (United States)

    1996-07-01

    The sister pressure vessels at the BR3 and Rowe Yankee PWR plants were operated at a lower-than-usual temperature (260 degrees Celsius) and their plates were austenitized at higher-than-usual temperature (970 degrees Celsius). A heat tratemement leading to a coarser microstructure than typical for the fine grain plates that are considered in development of USNRC Regulatory guide 1.99. This material displayed outlier behaviour charackterized by a 41J CVN-shift significantly larger than predicted by Regulatory Guide 1.99. Because lower radiation temperature and nickell alloying are generally considered detrimental to irradiation sensitivity, there was a major concern that the nickel-modified lower Rowe plate and the nickel-modified BR3 plate may become too embrittled to satisfy the toughness requirements enbodied in the PTS screening criterion. This paper compares three complementary studies undertaken to clarify these uncertainties: 1) the accelerated irradiation and test program launched in 1990 by Yankee Atomic Electric Company using typical vessel plate materials containing 0.24% copper at two nickel levels: YA1, 0.63% (A533-B) and YA9, 0.19% (A302-B). These were heat-treated to produce the coarse and fine grain microstructures representative of the Yankee/BR3 and the Regulatory Guide plates, respectively, 2) the BR3 surveillance and vessel testing program: this vessel was wet-annealed in 1984, relicensed for operation till the plant shutdown in 1987, ANCL was trepanned in early 1995, 3) the accelerated irradiations in the Belgian BR2 test reactor of the Yankee coarse grain plates YA1 and YA9 together with BR3 vessel specimens extracted at nozzle elevation, a location with negligible radiation exposure. It is shown that the PTS screening criterion was never attained by the BR3 and Rowe plates, and that the BR3 vessel anneal was neither necessary nor sufficient. Finally, the sensitivity of embrittlement, annealing and post-annealing reembrittlement to irradiation

  18. Embrittlement and annealing of reactor pressure vessel steels: comparison of BR3 surveillance and vessel plates to the surrogate plates representative of the Yankee Rowe vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabry, A.; Chaouadi, T.; Puzzolante, J.L.; Van de Velde, J.; Biemiller, E.C.; Rossinski, S.T.; Carter, R.G.

    1996-07-01

    The sister pressure vessels at the BR3 and Rowe Yankee PWR plants were operated at a lower-than-usual temperature (260 degrees Celsius) and their plates were austenitized at higher-than-usual temperature (970 degrees Celsius). A heat tratemement leading to a coarser microstructure than typical for the fine grain plates that are considered in development of USNRC Regulatory guide 1.99. This material displayed outlier behaviour charackterized by a 41J CVN-shift significantly larger than predicted by Regulatory Guide 1.99. Because lower radiation temperature and nickell alloying are generally considered detrimental to irradiation sensitivity, there was a major concern that the nickel-modified lower Rowe plate and the nickel-modified BR3 plate may become too embrittled to satisfy the toughness requirements enbodied in the PTS screening criterion. This paper compares three complementary studies undertaken to clarify these uncertainties: 1) the accelerated irradiation and test program launched in 1990 by Yankee Atomic Electric Company using typical vessel plate materials containing 0.24% copper at two nickel levels: YA1, 0.63% (A533-B) and YA9, 0.19% (A302-B). These were heat-treated to produce the coarse and fine grain microstructures representative of the Yankee/BR3 and the Regulatory Guide plates, respectively, 2) the BR3 surveillance and vessel testing program: this vessel was wet-annealed in 1984, relicensed for operation till the plant shutdown in 1987, ANCL was trepanned in early 1995, 3) the accelerated irradiations in the Belgian BR2 test reactor of the Yankee coarse grain plates YA1 and YA9 together with BR3 vessel specimens extracted at nozzle elevation, a location with negligible radiation exposure. It is shown that the PTS screening criterion was never attained by the BR3 and Rowe plates, and that the BR3 vessel anneal was neither necessary nor sufficient. Finally, the sensitivity of embrittlement, annealing and post-annealing reembrittlement to irradiation

  19. Irradiation, Annealing, and Reirradiation Effects on American and Russian Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernobaeva, A.A.; Korolev, Y.N.; Nanstad, R.K.; Nikolaev, Y.A.; Sokolov, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is to thermally anneal them to restore the toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. Even though a postirradiation anneal may be deemed successful, a critical aspect of continued RPV operation is the rate of embrittlement upon reirradiation. There are insufficient data available to allow for verification of available models of reirradiation embrittlement or for the development of a reliable predictive methodology. This is especially true in the case of fracture toughness data. Under the U.S.-Russia Joint Coordinating Committee for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety (JCCCNRS), Working Group 3 on Radiation Embrittlement, Structural Integrity, and Life Extension of Reactor Vessels and Supports agreed to conduct a comparative study of annealing and reirradiation effects on RPV steels. The Working Group agreed that each side would irradiate, anneal, reirradiate (if feasible ), and test two materials of the other. Charpy V-notch (CVN) and tensile specimens were included. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducted such a program (irradiation and annealing, including static fracture toughness) with two weld metals representative of VVER-440 and VVER-1000 RPVs, while the Russian Research Center-Kurchatov Institute (RRC-KI) conducted a program (irradiation, annealing, reirradiation, and reannealing) with Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program Plate 02 and Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program Weld 73W. The results for each material from each laboratory are compared with those from the other laboratory. The ORNL experiments with the VVER welds included irradiation to about 1 x 10 19 n/cm 2 (>1 MeV), while the RRC-KI experiments with the U.S. materials included irradiations from about 2 to 18 x 10 19 n/cm 2 (>l MeV). In both cases, irradiations were conducted at ∼290 C and annealing treatments were conducted at ∼454 C. The ORNL and RRC

  20. Modeling of irradiation embrittlement and annealing/recovery in pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lott, R.G.; Freyer, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    The results of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) annealing studies are interpreted in light of the current understanding of radiation embrittlement phenomena in RPV steels. An extensive RPV irradiation embrittlement and annealing database has been compiled and the data reveal that the majority of annealing studies completed to date have employed test reactor irradiated weldments. Although test reactor and power reactor irradiations result in similar embrittlement trends, subtle differences between these two damage states can become important in the interpretation of annealing results. Microstructural studies of irradiated steels suggest that there are several different irradiation-induced microstructural features that contribute to embrittlement. The amount of annealing recovery and the post-anneal re-embrittlement behavior of a steel are determined by the annealing response of these microstructural defects. The active embrittlement mechanisms are determined largely by the irradiation temperature and the material composition. Interpretation and thorough understanding of annealing results require a model that considers the underlying physical mechanisms of embrittlement. This paper presents a framework for the construction of a physically based mechanistic model of irradiation embrittlement and annealing behavior

  1. Characterization of matrix damage in ion-irradiated reactor vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Katsuhiko; Fukuya, Koji

    2004-01-01

    Exact nature of the matrix damage, that is one of radiation-induced nano-scale microstructural features causing radiation embrittlement of reactor vessel, in irradiated commercial steels has not been clarified yet by direct characterization using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We designed a new preparation method of TEM observation samples and applied it to the direct TEM observation of the matrix damage in the commercial steel samples irradiated by ions. The simulation irradiation was carried out by 3 MeV Ni 2+ ion to a dose of 1 dpa at 290degC. Thin foil specimens for TEM observation were prepared using the modified focused ion beam method. A weak-beam TEM study was carried out for the observation of matrix damage in the samples. Results of this first detailed observation of the matrix damage in the irradiated commercial steel show that it is consisted of small dislocation loops. The observed and analyzed dislocation loops have Burgers vectors b = a , and a mean image size and the number density are 2.5 nm and about 1 x 10 22 m -3 , respectively. In this experiment, all of the observed dislocation loops were too small to determine the vacancy or interstitial nature of the dislocation loops directly. Although it is an indirect method, post-irradiation annealing was used to infer the loop nature. Most of dislocation loops were stable after the annealing at 400degC for 30 min. This result suggests that their nature is interstitial. (author)

  2. Stress corrosion cracking studies of reactor pressure vessel steels. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Der Sluys, W.A.

    1996-10-01

    The objective of this project was to perform a critical review of the information available in open literature on stress corrosion cracking of reactor pressure vessel materials in simulated light-water-reactor (LWR) conditions, develop a test procedure for conducting stress corrosion crack growth experiments in simulated LWR environments, and conduct a test program in an effort to duplicate some of the data available from the literature. The authors concluded that stress corrosion crack growth has been observed in pressure vessel steels under laboratory test conditions. The composition of the water in most cases where growth was observed is outside of the composition specified for operating conditions. Crack growth was observed in the experiments performed in this program, and it was intermittent. The cracking would start and stop for no apparent reason. In most instances, it would not restart without the change of some external variable. In a few instances, it restarted on its own. Crack growth rates as high as 3.6 x 10 -9 m/sec were observed in pressure vessel steels in high-purity water with 8 ppm oxygen. These high crack growth rates were observed for extremely short bursts in crack extension. They could not be sustained for crack growth extensions greater than a few tenths of a millimeter. From the results of this project it appears highly unlikely that stress corrosion cracking will be observed in operating nuclear plants where the coolant composition is maintained within water chemistry guidelines. However, more work is needed to better define the contaminations that cause crack growth. The crack growth rates are so high and the threshold values for crack nucleation are so low that the conditions causing them need to be well defined and avoided

  3. Corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steel containing Ti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Sueng Ok; Choe, Han Cheol; Kim, Kwan Hyu

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steel containing Ti has been studied by using electrochemical techniques. The samples containing Ti from 0.1 to 1.0 wt% were solutionized at 1050 .deg. C for 1hr and then sensitized at 650 .deg. C for 5hr under argon atmosphere. Microstructure and phase analysis of the samples after heat treatment and corrosion tests were carried out by using XRD. TEM, SEM and optical microscope. The amount of δ-ferrite and TiC precipitates in matrix increased as the Ti content increased. In the sensitized samples, Cr 23 C 6 precipitates were observed at γ/δ interface. Degree Of Sensitization(DOS) was lower than 1.0 in all of the solutionized samples and the sensitized samples of Ti content above 0.4% wt% whereas the sensitized samples of Ti content lower than 0.4 wt% showed DOS higher than 1.0. Intergranular attack appeared mainly at grain boundaries in the sensitized sample containing 0.1 wt% Ti and at the γ/δ interface of the higher Ti content. In the latter, however, the attack was not so severe. Pitting potential(E pit ) and repassivation potential(E rep ) of the solutionized and sensitized samples were increased with increasing Ti content. The number and size of the pits decreased with increasing Ti content in the sensitized samples. The pits nucleated at Cr 23 C 6 site and the γ/δ interface

  4. Application of electron beam welding to large size pressure vessels made of thick low alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuri, S.; Yamamoto, M.; Aoki, S.; Kimura, M.; Nayama, M.; Takano, G.

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe the results of studies for application of the electron beam welding to the large size pressure vessels made of thick low alloy steel (ASME A533 Gr.B cl.2 and A533 Gr.A cl.1). Two major problems for applying the EBW, the poor toughness of weld metal and the equipment to weld huge pressure vessels are focused on. For the first problem, the effects of Ni content of weld metal, welding conditions and post weld heat treatment are investigated. For the second problem, an applicability of the local vacuum EBW to a large size pressure vessel made of thick plate is qualified by the construction of a 120 mm thick, 2350 mm outside diameter cylindrical model. The model was electron beam welded using local vacuum chamber and the performance of the weld joint is investigated. Based on these results, the electron beam welding has been applied to the production of a steam generator for a PWR. (author). 3 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs

  5. Fatigue of non-welded pressure vessels made of high strength steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauscher, F.

    2003-01-01

    When using high strength steels for pressure vessels, cyclic fatigue requirements may become decisive for the design. Within a European research project, two typical non-welded types of vessels--gas cylinders as used for gas transportation and hydraulic accumulators with screwed in ends--were investigated. The results of the fatigue analyses and of the testing of these vessels are described here. Special attention is drawn to the evaluation of the stresses in the threads used for threaded in flat ends and rings, because the usual formulae for bolted connections cannot be used. In the case of sharp notches and of threads, the experiments showed that the fatigue calculation gave conservative results. The unexpected failure of the gas cylinders in the cylindrical part and at the onset of the end showed that the fatigue analyses according to prEN13445-3 clause 18 is non-conservative for these surfaces without mechanical preparation, and need special consideration. Based on the investigations, a stress concentration factor for small fabrication notches and a new surface finish factor is proposed

  6. Fatigue of non-welded pressure vessels made of high strength steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauscher, F

    2003-03-01

    When using high strength steels for pressure vessels, cyclic fatigue requirements may become decisive for the design. Within a European research project, two typical non-welded types of vessels--gas cylinders as used for gas transportation and hydraulic accumulators with screwed in ends--were investigated. The results of the fatigue analyses and of the testing of these vessels are described here. Special attention is drawn to the evaluation of the stresses in the threads used for threaded in flat ends and rings, because the usual formulae for bolted connections cannot be used. In the case of sharp notches and of threads, the experiments showed that the fatigue calculation gave conservative results. The unexpected failure of the gas cylinders in the cylindrical part and at the onset of the end showed that the fatigue analyses according to prEN13445-3 clause 18 is non-conservative for these surfaces without mechanical preparation, and need special consideration. Based on the investigations, a stress concentration factor for small fabrication notches and a new surface finish factor is proposed.

  7. Stress corrosion cracking of nuclear reactor pressure vessel and piping steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speidel, M.O.; Magdowski, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents an extensive investigation of stress corrosion cracking of nuclear reactor pressure vessel and piping steels exposed to hot water. Experimental fracture mechanics results are compared with data from the literature and other laboratories. Thus a comprehensive overview of the present knowledge concerning stress corrosion crack growth rates is provided. Several sets of data confirm that 'fast' stress corrosion cracks with growth rates between 10 -8 and 10 -7 m/s and threshold stress intensities around 20 MN m -3/2 can occur under certain conditions. However, it appears possible that specific environmental, mechanical and metallurgical conditions which may prevail in reactors can result in significantly lower stress corrosion crack growth rates. The presently known stress corrosion crack growth rate versus stress intensity curves are discussed with emphasis on their usefulness in establishing safety margins against stress corrosion cracking of components in service. Further substantial research efforts would be helpful to provide a data base which permits well founded predictions as to how stress corrosion cracking in pressure vessels and piping can be reliably excluded or tolerated. It is emphasized, however, that the nucleation of stress corrosion cracks (as opposed to their growth) is difficult and may contribute substantially to the stress corrosion free service behaviour of the overwhelming majority of pressure vessels and pipes. (author)

  8. Effects of irradiation at lower temperature on the microstructure of Cr-Mo-V-alloyed reactor pressure vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosse, M; Boehmert, J; Gilles, R [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin GmbH (Germany)

    1998-10-01

    The microstructural damage process due to neutron irradiation [1] proceeds in two stages: - formation of displacement cascades - evolution of the microstructure by defect reactions. Continuing our systematic investigation about the microstructural changes of Russian reactor pressure vessel steel due to neutron irradiation the microstructure of two laboratory heats of the VVER 440-type reactor pressure vessel steel after irradiation at 60 C was studied by small angle neutron scattering (SANS). 60 C-irradiation differently changes the irradiation-induced microstructure in comparison with irradiation at reactor operation temperature and can, thus, provide new insights into the mechanisms of the irradiation damage. (orig.)

  9. Stability of ferritic steel to higher doses: Survey of reactor pressure vessel steel data and comparison with candidate materials for future nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blagoeva, D.T.; Debarberis, L.; Jong, M.; Pierick, P. ten

    2014-01-01

    This paper is illustrating the potential of the well-known low alloyed clean steels, extensively used for the current light water Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPV) steels, for a likely use as a structural material also for the new generation nuclear systems. This option would provide, especially for large components, affordable, easily accessible and a technically more convenient solution in terms of manufacturing and joining techniques. A comprehensive comparison between several sets of surveillance and research data available for a number of RPV clean steels for doses up to 1.5 dpa, and up to 12 dpa for 9%Cr steels, is carried out in order to evaluate radiation stability of the currently used RPV clean steels even at higher doses. Based on the numerous data available, positive preliminary conclusions are drawn regarding the eventual use of clean RPV steels for the massive structural components of the new reactor systems. - Highlights: • Common embrittlement trend between RPV and advanced steels till intermediate doses. • For doses >1.5 dpa, damage rate saturation tendency is observed for RPV steels. • RPV steels might be conveniently utilised also outside their foreseen dose range

  10. Safety analysis of nuclear containment vessels subjected to strong earthquakes and subsequent tsunamis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Lin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear power plants under expansion and under construction in China are mostly located in coastal areas, which means they are at risk of suffering strong earthquakes and subsequent tsunamis. This paper presents a safety analysis for a new reinforced concrete containment vessel in such events. A finite element method-based model was built, verified, and first used to understand the seismic performance of the containment vessel under earthquakes with increased intensities. Then, the model was used to assess the safety performance of the containment vessel subject to an earthquake with peak ground acceleration (PGA of 0.56g and subsequent tsunamis with increased inundation depths, similar to the 2011 Great East earthquake and tsunami in Japan. Results indicated that the containment vessel reached Limit State I (concrete cracking and Limit State II (concrete crushing when the PGAs were in a range of 0.8–1.1g and 1.2–1.7g, respectively. The containment vessel reached Limit State I with a tsunami inundation depth of 10 m after suffering an earthquake with a PGA of 0.56g. A site-specific hazard assessment was conducted to consider the likelihood of tsunami sources.

  11. Safety analysis of nuclear containment vessels subjected to strong earthquakes and subsequent tsunamis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Feng; Li, Hong Zhi [Dept. Structural Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai (China)

    2017-08-15

    Nuclear power plants under expansion and under construction in China are mostly located in coastal areas, which means they are at risk of suffering strong earthquakes and subsequent tsunamis. This paper presents a safety analysis for a new reinforced concrete containment vessel in such events. A finite element method-based model was built, verified, and first used to understand the seismic performance of the containment vessel under earthquakes with increased intensities. Then, the model was used to assess the safety performance of the containment vessel subject to an earthquake with peak ground acceleration (PGA) of 0.56g and subsequent tsunamis with increased inundation depths, similar to the 2011 Great East earthquake and tsunami in Japan. Results indicated that the containment vessel reached Limit State I (concrete cracking) and Limit State II (concrete crushing) when the PGAs were in a range of 0.8–1.1g and 1.2–1.7g, respectively. The containment vessel reached Limit State I with a tsunami inundation depth of 10 m after suffering an earthquake with a PGA of 0.56g. A site-specific hazard assessment was conducted to consider the likelihood of tsunami sources.

  12. Analysis of the micro-structural damages by neutronic irradiation of the steel of reactor vessels of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. Characterization of the design steel; Analisis de los danos micro-estructurales por irradiacion neutronica del acero de la vasija de los reactores de la Central Nuclear de Laguna Verde. Caracterizacion del acero de diseno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moranchel y Rodriguez, M.; Garcia B, A. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Departamento de Fisica, Av. Luis Enrique Erro s/n, Unidad Profesional Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Col. Lindavista, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Longoria G, L. C., E-mail: mmoranchel@ipn.m [ININ, Direccion de Investigacion Cientifica, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-09-15

    The vessel of a nuclear reactor is one of the safety barriers more important in the design, construction and operation of the reactor. If the vessel results affected to the grade of to have fracture and/or cracks it is very probable the conclusion of their useful life in order to guarantee the nuclear safety and the radiological protection of the exposure occupational personnel, of the public and the environment avoiding the exposition to radioactive sources. The materials of the vessel of a nuclear reactor are exposed continually to the neutronic irradiation that generates the same nuclear reactor. The neutrons that impact to the vessel have the sufficient energy to penetrate certain depth in function of the energy of the incident neutron until reaching the repose or to be absorbed by some nucleus. In the course of their penetration, the neutrons interact with the nuclei, atoms, molecules and with the same crystalline nets of the vessel material producing vacuums, interstitial, precipitate and segregations among other defects that can modify the mechanical properties of the steel. The steel A533-B is the material with which is manufactured the vessel of the nuclear reactors of nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, is an alloy that, among other components, it contains atoms of Ni that if they are segregated by the neutrons impact this would favor to the cracking of the same vessel. This work is part of an investigation to analyze the micro-structural damages of the reactor vessels of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde due to the neutronic irradiation which is exposed in a continuous way. We will show the characterization of the design steel of the vessel, what offers a comprehension about their chemical composition, the superficial topography and the crystalline nets of the steel A533-B. It will also allow analyze the existence of precipitates, segregates, the type of crystalline net and the distances inter-plains of the design steel of the vessel. (Author)

  13. Material properties for reactor pressure vessels and containment shells under dynamic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albertini, C.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of high strain rate, dynamic biaxial loading and deformation mode (tension, shear) on the mechanical properties of AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel in as-received and pre-damaged (creep, LCF) conditions are reported. This research was conducted to assess the performances of the containment shell of fast breeder reactors. The results of this research have been utilized to prepare similar investigations for SA 537 Class 1 ferritic steel used for the containment shell of LWR. The first results of these investigations are reported. A programme to study the mechanical properties of plain concrete with real size aggregate at high strain rate is described. (orig.)

  14. A Constraint Programming Model for Fast Optimal Stowage of Container Vessel Bays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delgado-Ortegon, Alberto; Jensen, Rune Møller; Janstrup, Kira

    2012-01-01

    Container vessel stowage planning is a hard combinatorial optimization problem with both high economic and environmental impact. We have developed an approach that often is able to generate near-optimal plans for large container vessels within a few minutes. It decomposes the problem into a master...... planning phase that distributes the containers to bay sections and a slot planning phase that assigns containers of each bay section to slots. In this paper, we focus on the slot planning phase of this approach and present a constraint programming and integer programming model for stowing a set...... of containers in a single bay section. This so-called slot planning problem is NP-hard and often involves stowing several hundred containers. Using state-of-the-art constraint solvers and modeling techniques, however, we were able to solve 90% of 236 real instances from our industrial collaborator to optimality...

  15. Numerical studies of large penetrations and closures for containment vessels subjected to loadings beyond the design basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulak, R.F.; Hsieh, B.J.; Kennedy, J.M.; Ash, J.E.; McLennan, G.A.

    1984-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the macro-deformations of the sealing surfaces (gasketed junctures) of a PWR steel containment vessel's equipment hatch and a BWR Mk II containment vessel head have been performed. Results for the equipment hatch juncture indicate that the rotations of the hatch cover and penetration sleeve must be accounted for when performing leakage analysis because they can effect the compression of the gasket even though the gasket is in a pressure-seated configuration. Results from a leakage analysis indicated that excessive leakage can occur if the surface roughness is high and/or the compression set is high. Results for the Mk II head show that both the temperature and pressure loadings must be taken into account to obtain realistic responses. The temperature difference between the flanges and bolts has the important net effect of keeping the gasketed juncture closed, that is in metal-to-metal contact. Due to the high accident temperature, the gasket itself was found to achieve 100% compression set and thus could not perform its sealing function within the juncture

  16. Characteristics of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel for Reactor Pressure Vessel of Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Ho; Ryu, W. S.; Han, Chang Hee; Yoon, J. H.; Chang, Jong Hwa

    2004-11-15

    Many researches and developments have been progressed for the construction of VHTR by 2020 in Korea. Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel has been receiving attention for the application to the reactor pressure vessel material of VHTR. We collected and analyzed the research data for modified 9Cr-1Mo steel in order to understand the characteristics of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. The modified 9Cr-1Mo steel is a modified alloy system similar to conventional 9Cr-1Mo grade ferritic steel. Modifications include additions of vanadium, niobium, and nitrogen, as well as lower carbon content. In this report, we summarized the change of microstructure and mechanical properties after tempering, thermal aging, and irradiation. Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel has high strength and thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion, and good resistance to corrosion. But the irradiation embrittlement behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel should be evaluated and the evaluation methodology also should be developed. At the same time, the characteristics of weldment which is the weak part in pressure vessel should be evaluated.

  17. Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorev, N.N.; Astafiev, A.A.; Loboda, A.S.; Savukov, V.P.; Runov, A.E.; Belov, V.A.; Sobolev, J.V.; Sobolev, V.V.; Pavlov, N.M.; Paton, B.E.

    1977-01-01

    Steels also containing Al, N and arsenic, are suitable for the construction of large components for high-power nuclear reactors due to their good mechanical properties such as good through-hardening, sufficiently low brittleness conversion temperature and slight displacement of the latter with neutron irradiation. Defined steels and their properties are described. (IHOE) [de

  18. Scenario based optimization of a container vessel with respect to its projected operating conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Wagner

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the scenario based optimization of the bulbous bow of the KRISO Container Ship (KCS is presented. The optimization of the parametrically modeled vessel is based on a statistically developed operational profile generated from noon-to-noon reports of a comparable 3600 TEU container vessel and specific development functions representing the growth of global economy during the vessels service time. In order to consider uncertainties, statistical fluctuations are added. An analysis of these data lead to a number of most probable upcoming operating conditions (OC the vessel will stay in the future. According to their respective likeliness an objective function for the evaluation of the optimal design variant of the vessel is derived and implemented within the parametrical optimization workbench FRIENDSHIP Framework. In the following this evaluation is done with respect to vessel's calculated effective power based on the usage of potential flow code. The evaluation shows, that the usage of scenarios within the optimization process has a strong influence on the hull form.

  19. Scenario based optimization of a container vessel with respect to its projected operating conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Jonas; Binkowski, Eva; Bronsart, Robert

    2014-06-01

    In this paper the scenario based optimization of the bulbous bow of the KRISO Container Ship (KCS) is presented. The optimization of the parametrically modeled vessel is based on a statistically developed operational profile generated from noon-to-noon reports of a comparable 3600 TEU container vessel and specific development functions representing the growth of global economy during the vessels service time. In order to consider uncertainties, statistical fluctuations are added. An analysis of these data lead to a number of most probable upcoming operating conditions (OC) the vessel will stay in the future. According to their respective likeliness an objective function for the evaluation of the optimal design variant of the vessel is derived and implemented within the parametrical optimization workbench FRIENDSHIP Framework. In the following this evaluation is done with respect to vessel's calculated effective power based on the usage of potential flow code. The evaluation shows, that the usage of scenarios within the optimization process has a strong influence on the hull form.

  20. Minimizing Lid Overstows in Master Stowage Plans for Container Vessels is NP-Complete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ajspur, Mai Lise; Jensen, Rune Møller; Guilbert, Nicolas

    Container vessel stowage is a particularly hard combinatorial problem within the shipping industry. The currently most successful approaches decompose the problem hierarchically and first generate a master plan that handle highlevel constraints and objectives such as balance and stress moments...... that it is an NP -complete problem to generate master plans that minimize the number of these lid overstows. Since any efficient approach to container vessel stowage most likely must include a master plan, the implication of this result is that future research must focus and developing good heuristics...

  1. BBRV post-tensioning systems as applied to reactor containments and prestressed concrete pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorpe, W.; Speck, F.E.

    1976-01-01

    Nuclear containments and pressure vessels can be post-tensioned by using two basically different methods: tendons and winding. The fundamental differences between the two concepts are shown by introductory examples. A discussion of tendon units, usually lying in the range 4000 to 10,000 kN, is followed by a detailed presentation of the BBRV winding system. After giving a short comment to factors influencing the choice of a post-tensioning system the authors discuss specific aspects of some application groups: cable layout with containments and pressure vessels, conditions for a wrapped design, corrosion protection. (author)

  2. Tantalum-containing Z-phase in 12%Cr martensitic steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson; Hald, John

    2009-01-01

    Z-phases in tantalum-containing 12%Cr steels have been investigated. In 12%Cr steel without any Nb or V, the formation of CrTaN Z-phases was observed. In 12%Cr steel which also contained V, the Ta entered Z-phase as a minor element, Cr(V,Ta)N. The crystal structure of Cr(V,Ta)N seems to be identi......Z-phases in tantalum-containing 12%Cr steels have been investigated. In 12%Cr steel without any Nb or V, the formation of CrTaN Z-phases was observed. In 12%Cr steel which also contained V, the Ta entered Z-phase as a minor element, Cr(V,Ta)N. The crystal structure of Cr(V,Ta)N seems...

  3. Irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels: Considerations for thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, M.G.; Freyer, P.D.; Mager, T.R.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, an overview of the irradiation embrittlement phenomenon is presented from a structure-properties viewpoint. Effects of irradiation conditions on embrittlement are first reviewed: irradiation temperature, fluence, flux, and steel or alloy composition. Then, the techniques for identifying/characterizing the irradiation-induced microstructural features are described: TEM/STEM (electron microscopy), small angle neutron scattering, atom probe field-ion microscopy, positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. Mechanisms of hardening and embrittlement generally consist of a ''precipitation-type'' and a ''damage-type'' component and the potential of annealing treatments for restoring the most of the original pressure vessel material toughness is examined; its conditions and mechanisms involved are discussed. Feasibility and economic evaluation of annealing costs is also carried out. 90 refs., 4 figs

  4. The IAEA data base ageing of reactor pressure vessel steels and welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillemot, F.; Ianko, L.; Davies, L.M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes one aspect of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) data base, that is to do with the ageing of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels and welds. It describes the background and the need for and the benefits deriving from such an international data base encompassing a greater number of sources than currently incorporated in existing international and national data bases. The paper describes the organization of this data base and the controls necessary for data acquisition and control. The current state of progress is described. Membership of and participation in this project is given and data access is also described. The technical features of the data base are described in terms of the structure of the data base and the hardware and software. New features are proposed such as the inclusion of measured curve data and metallographic data. Technical aspects of data evaluation are also included. (author). 1 ref., 6 figs

  5. Characterization of phosphorus segregation in neutron-irradiated Russian pressure vessel steel weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.K.; Jayaram, R.; Russell, K.F.

    1995-01-01

    An atom probe field ion microscopy characterization of three Russian pressure vessel steels has been performed. Field ion micrographs of several lath boundaries have indicated that they are decorated with a semicontinuous film of discrete brightly-imaging precipitates that were identified as molybdenum carbonitrides. In addition, extremely high phosphorus levels were measured at the lath boundaries. The phosphorus was found to be confined to an extremely narrow region indicative of monolayer type segregation. The phosphorus coverage determined from the atom probe results of the unirradiated materials agree with predictions based on McLean's equilibrium model of grain boundary segregation. The boundary phosphorus coverage of a neutron-irradiated weld material was significantly higher than in the unirradiated material. Ultrafine darkly-imaging copper- and phosphorus-enriched precipitates were also observed in the matrix of the neutron-irradiated material. (orig.)

  6. Long-term ageing effects in reactor pressure vessel steels investigated by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterling, Maik; Anwand, Wolfgang; Wagner, Andreas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiation Physics, Dresden (Germany); Bergner, Frank; Ulbricht, Andreas; Wagner, Arne [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Neutron irradiation of reactor pressure vessel steels leads to the formation of nano-sized defects which can deteriorate the material. An understanding of the microstructural evolution of the material is important for making reliable security assessments about possible future long-term operation of nuclear power plants. So-called late-blooming phases are formed after long-term irradiation and lead to considerable material ageing effects. Encouraging factors for the formation of these phases are a low Cu-content, moderate to high contents of Mn and Ni, low irradiation temperatures and different neutron fluxes. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy which is ideally suited for the detection and characterization of these irradiation-induced defects was applied for different selected materials which fulfill these conditions in order to investigate the occurrence and behavior of these phases.

  7. Irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels: Considerations for thermal annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, M G; Freyer, P D; Mager, T R

    1994-12-31

    In this paper, an overview of the irradiation embrittlement phenomenon is presented from a structure-properties viewpoint. Effects of irradiation conditions on embrittlement are first reviewed: irradiation temperature, fluence, flux, and steel or alloy composition. Then, the techniques for identifying/characterizing the irradiation-induced microstructural features are described: TEM/STEM (electron microscopy), small angle neutron scattering, atom probe field-ion microscopy, positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. Mechanisms of hardening and embrittlement generally consist of a ``precipitation-type`` and a ``damage-type`` component and the potential of annealing treatments for restoring the most of the original pressure vessel material toughness is examined; its conditions and mechanisms involved are discussed. Feasibility and economic evaluation of annealing costs is also carried out. 90 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Warm pre-stress experiments on highly irradiated reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landron, C.; Ait-Bachir, M.; Moinereau, D.; Molinie, E.; Garbay, E.

    2015-01-01

    In the aim to justify in-service integrity of reactor pressure vessel beyond 40 years, experimental warm pre-stress (WPS) tests were performed on irradiated materials representative of RPV steels corresponding to 40 operating years. Different types of WPS loading path have been considered to cover typical postulated accidental transients. These results confirmed the beneficial effect of WPS on the cleavage fracture resistance of the irradiated materials. No fracture occurred during the cooling phase of the loading path and the fracture toughness values are higher than that measured with conventional isothermal tests. The analyses of the experiments, conducted using either simplified engineering models or more refined fracture models based on local approach to cleavage fracture, are in agreement with the experimental results. (authors)

  9. Microstructural parameters and yielding in a quenched and tempered Cr-Mo-V pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toerroenen, Kari

    1979-01-01

    In this work the plastic deformation behaviour of a Cr-Mo-V pressure vessel steel is studied at ambient and low temperatures. To produce a wide range of microstructures, different austenitizing, quenching and tempering treatments are performed. The microstructures, including grain and dislocation structures as well as carbides, are evaluated. A qualitative model is proposed for the martensitic and bainitic transformations explaining the morphology and crystallography of the transformation products. Based on microstructural observations of undeformed and deformed materials, as well as the tensile test results, the role of various obstacles to dislocation motion in plastic deformation is evaluated. Finally the strength increment, its temperature dependence and the effect due to combinations of various obstacles are analyzed. The results are intended to serve as basis for further fracture behaviour analyses. (author)

  10. The metrological problems of irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vodenicharov, S.; Kamenova, Ts.

    1993-01-01

    Neutron irradiation of reactor pressure vessel steels increases the T k -values of transition temperature from ductile to brittle fracture. This effect is very important in emergency situations, when the water cooling injection in the reactor results in high thermal gradients. In such cases there is a risk from the appearance of a brittle fracture with catastrophic crack propagation speed at relatively low stresses. That is why the T k -value determination is very important for the safe operation of the reactor systems. Some advanced experimental methods for T k -testing and control have been discussed in the present article and the standards of different countries have been compared. The methods applying subsize specimens and welding-restored specimens have been reviewed. (author)

  11. The failure behavior of duplex 316 L steel-TA6V titanium alloy spherical pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miannay, D.

    1980-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare the experimental residual stresses of spherical vessels made of TA6V alloy which exhibits plasticity before failure in toughness testing and cracked with several configurations, with stresses estimated according to the afore mentioned theories. An internal austenitic 316 L steel is used to prevent 'leak before break' [fr

  12. On the transition of short cracks into long fatigue cracks in reactor pressure vessel steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Rajwinder

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Short fatigue cracks, having dimension less than 1 mm, propagate at much faster rates (da/dN even at lower stress intensity factor range (da/dN as compared to the threshold stress intensity factor range obtained from long fatigue crack growth studies. These short cracks originate at the sub-grain level and some of them ultimately transit into critical long cracks over time. Therefore, designing the components subjected to fatigue loading merely on the long crack growth data and neglecting the short crack growth behavior can overestimate the component’s life. This aspect of short fatigue cracks become even more critical for materials used for safety critical applications such as reactor pressure vessel (RPV steel in nuclear plants. In this work, the transition behaviour of short fatigue crack gowth into long fatigue crack is studied in SA508 Grade 3 Class I low alloy steel used in RPVs. In-situ characterization of initiation, propagation and transition of short fatigue cracks is performed using fatigue stage for Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM in addition to digital microscopes fitted over a servo-hydraulic fatigue machine and correlated with the microtructural information obtained using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD. SA508 steel having an upper bainitic microstructure have several microstructural interfaces such as phase and grain boundaries that play a significant role in controlling the short fatigue crack propagation. Specially designed and prepared short fatigue specimens (eletro-polished with varying initial crack lengths of the order of tens of microns are used in this study. The transition of such short initial cracks into long cracks is then tracked to give detailed insight into the role of each phase and phase/grain boundary with an objective of establishing Kitagawa-Takahashi diagram for the given RPV steel. The behavior of the transited long cracks is then compared with the crack propagation behavior obtained using

  13. Interaction between molten corium UO2+x-ZrO2-FeOy and VVER vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechta, S. V.; Granovsky, V. S.; Khabensky, V. B.; Krushinov, E. V.; Vitol, S. A.; Sulatsky, A. A.; Gusarov, V. V.; Almiashev, V. I.; Lopukh, D. B.; Bottomley, D.; Fischer, M.; Piluso, P.; Miassoedov, A.; Tromm, W.; Altstadt, E.; Fichot, F.; Kymalainen, O.

    2010-01-01

    In case of in-vessel corium retention during a severe accident in a light water reactor, weakening of the vessel wall and deterioration of the vessel steel properties can be caused both by the melting of the steel and by its physicochemical interaction with corium. The interaction behavior has been studied in medium-scale experiments with prototypic corium. The experiments yielded data for the steel corrosion rate during interaction with UO 2+x -ZrO 2 -FeO y melt in air and steam at different steel surface temperatures and heat fluxes from the corium to the steel. It has been observed that the corrosion rates in air and steam atmosphere are almost the same. Further, if the temperature at the interface increases beyond a certain level, corrosion intensifies. This is explained by the formation of liquid phases in the interaction Zone. The available experimental data have been used to develop a correlation for the corrosion rate as a function of temperature and heat flux. (authors)

  14. Evaluation of neutron irradiation embrittlement in the Korean reactor pressure vessel steels (Final Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, J. H.; Lee, B. S.; Chi, S. H.; Kim, J. H.; Oh, Y. J.; Yoon, J. H.; Kwon, S. C.; Park, D. G.; Kang, Y. H.; Choo, K. N.; Oh, J. M.; Park, S. J.; Kim, B. K.; Shin, Y. T.; Cho, M. S.; Sohn, J. M.; Kim, D. S.; Choo, Y. S.; Ahn, S. B.; Oh, W. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2001-05-01

    Reactor pressure vessel materials, which were produced by a domestic company, Doosan Heavy Industries and construction Co., Ltd., have been evaluated using the neutron irradiation facility HANARO. For this evaluation, instrumented capsules were used for neutron irradiation of various kinds of specimens made of different heats of steels, which are VCD(Y4), VCD+Al(U4), Si+Al(Y5), U4 weld metal, and U4 HAZ, respectively. The fast neutron fluence levels ranged 1 to 5 (x10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2}, E>1MeV) depending on the specimens and the irradiation temperature was controlled within 290{+-}10 deg C. The test results showed that, in the ranking of the material properties of the base metals, both before and after neutron irradiation, Y5 is the best, U4 the next and Y4 the last. Y4 showed a substantial change by neutron irradiation as well as the properties was worse than others in the unirradiated state. However, Y5, which showed the best properties in unirradiated state, was also the best in the resistance for irradiation embrittlement and one can hardly detect the property change after irradiation. The weldment showed a reasonably good resistance to irradiation embrittlement while the unirradiated properties were worse than base metals. The RPV steels are all expected to meet the screening criteria of the USNRC codes and regulations during the end of plant life. 39 refs., 42 figs., 27 tabs. (Author)

  15. Stereofractographic investigation of static start and dynamic jump of a fatigue crack in pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanenko, V.A.; Shtukaturova, A.S.; Yasnij, P.V.; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Problem Prochnosti)

    1983-01-01

    Results of investigaytion have been discussed ipto the effect of certain temperature-force factors on regularities in the formation of stretch zones during the crack initiation static and transition zones at crack jumps in the process of cyclic loading. The 15Kh2NMFA pressure vessel steel has been investigated. The steel fracture toughnesKub(Ic) has been determined testing s the specimens for excentric stretching or a bending through an angle. It has been shown that transition zones in a front of fatique cracks at the jump beginning and end are formed through the shift mechanism owing to the material separation along the maximum failure zone contour, i.e. along the plastic zone contour in a crack vertex. This is the mait difference of regularities in the formation of the transition zones during fatique crack jumps from stretching zones formed through the break-away mechanism of crack vertex bluntness during its static move. It is noted that a final conclusion on the mechanism of transition zone formation during fartique crack jumps allows one to perform systematic investigation into the plastic zone configuration in a fatique crack verteX and stereofractographic measurement of two identically conjugate jump surfaces on opposite fractures of the same samples

  16. Micromechanisms of ductile stable crack growth in nuclear pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belcher, W.P.A.; Druce, S.G.

    1981-10-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the relationship between the micromechanisms of ductile crack growth, the microstructural constituent phases present in nuclear pressure vessel steel, and the observed fracture behavior as determined by impact and fracture mechanics tests. Results from a microstructural and mechanical property comparison of an A508 Class 3 pressurized water reactor nozzle forging cutout and a 150-mm-thick A533B Class 1 plate are reported. The variation of upper-shelf toughness between the two steels and its orientation sensitivity are discussed on the basis of inclusion and precipitate distributions. Inclusion clusters in A533B, deformed to elongated disks in the rolling plane, have a profound effect on short transverse fracture properties. Data derived using the multi-specimen J-integral method to characterize the initiation of ductile crack extension and resistance to stable crack growth are compared with equivalent Charpy results. Results of the J /SUB R/ -curve analyses indicate (1) that the A533B short transverse crack growth resistance is approximately half that observed from transverse and longitudinal specimen orientations, and (2) that the A508 initiation toughness and resistance to stable crack growth are insensitive to position through the forging wall, and are higher than exhibited by A533B at any orientation in the midthickness position.

  17. Effects of thermal annealing and reirradiation on toughness of reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanstad, R.K.; Iskander, S.K.; Sokolov, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on reactor pressure vessels (RPV) is to thermally anneal them to restore the toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. This paper summarizes recent experimental results from work performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the annealing response, or open-quotes recovery,close quotes of several irradiated RPV steels; it also includes recent results from both ORNL and the Russian Research Center-Kurchatov Institute (RRC-KI) on a cooperative program of irradiation, annealing and reirradiation of both U.S. and Russian RPV steels. The cooperative program was conducted under the auspices of Working Group 3, U.S./Russia Joint Coordinating Committee for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety (JCCCNRS). The materials investigated are an RPV plate and various submerged-arc welds, with tensile, Charpy impact toughness, and fracture toughness results variously determined. Experimental results are compared with applicable prediction guidelines, while observed differences in annealing responses and reirradiation rates are discussed

  18. Effects of thermal annealing and reirradiation on toughness of reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanstad, R.K.; Iskander, S.K.; Sokolov, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on reactor pressure vessels (RPV) is to thermally anneal them to restore the toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. This paper summarizes recent experimental results from work performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the annealing response, or open-quotes recovery,close quotes of several irradiated RPV steels; it also includes recent results from both ORNL and the Russian Research Center-Kurchatov Institute (RRC-KI) on a cooperative program of irradiation, annealing and reirradiation of both U.S. and Russian RPV steels. The cooperative program was conducted under the auspices of Working Group 3, U.S./Russia Joint Coordinating Committee for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety (JCCCNRS). The materials investigated are an RPV plate and various submerged-arc welds, with tensile, Charpy impact toughness, and fracture toughness results variously determined. Experimental results are compared with applicable prediction guidelines, while observed differences in annealing responses and reirradiation rates are discussed

  19. Microstructure and mechanical characteristics of a laser welded joint in SA508 nuclear pressure vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Wei, E-mail: wei.guo-2@manchester.ac.uk [Laser Processing Research Centre, School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, University of Manchester, Sackville Street, Manchester, M13 9 PL (United Kingdom); Dong, Shiyun [Laser Processing Research Centre, School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, University of Manchester, Sackville Street, Manchester, M13 9 PL (United Kingdom); Institute of Laser Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Guo, Wei; Francis, John A.; Li, Lin [Laser Processing Research Centre, School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, University of Manchester, Sackville Street, Manchester, M13 9 PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-11

    SA508 steels are typically used in civil nuclear reactors for critical components such as the reactor pressure vessel. Nuclear components are commonly joined using arc welding processes, but with design lives for prospective new build projects exceeding 60 years, new welding technologies are being sought. In this exploratory study, for the first time, autogenous laser welding was carried out on 6 mm thick SA508 Cl.3 steel sheets using a 16 kW fiber laser system operating at a power of 4 kW. The microstructure and mechanical properties (including microhardness, tensile strength, elongation, and Charpy impact toughness) were characterized and the microstructures were compared with those produced through arc welding. A three-dimensional transient model based on a moving volumetric heat source model was also developed to simulate the laser welding thermal cycles in order to estimate the cooling rates included by the process. Preliminary results suggest that the laser welding process can produce welds that are free of macroscopic defects, while the strength and toughness of the laser welded joint in this study matched the values that were obtained for the parent material in the as-welded condition.

  20. An internal-friction study of reactor-pressure-vessel steel embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouytsel, K. van; Fabry, A.; Batist, R. de; Schaller, R.

    1997-01-01

    Within an enhanced commercial surveillance strategy, the nuclear-research institute SCK.CEN in Mol, Belgium is investigating, by means of internal friction, the microstructural processes responsible for embrittlement of pressure-vessel steels. The experiments were carried out using a torsion pendulum at the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne in Switzerland. Amplitude-independent internal-friction experiments teach us that neutron irradiation induces defects which interact with mobile dislocations. Thermal ageing of JRQ and Doel-IV steel does not cause major embrittlement effects. Amplitude-dependent internal-friction experiments allow us to determine a critical amplitude which corresponds to the yield stress of the material as obtained from static tensile tests. The results also correspond to a three-component model for the yield strength taking into account both hardening and non-hardening embrittlement. Investigations of Doel-I-II weld material in different conditions reveal that embrittlement due to irradiation or thermal ageing can be interpreted in terms of a fine interplay between long- and short-range phenomena. (author)

  1. Nanostructure evolution of neutron-irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels: Revised Object kinetic Monte Carlo model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiapetto, M., E-mail: mchiapet@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Unité Matériaux Et Transformations (UMET), UMR 8207, Université de Lille 1, ENSCL, F-59600 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Messina, L. [DEN-Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Physique, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Roslagstullsbacken 21, SE-114 21 Stockholm (Sweden); Becquart, C.S. [Unité Matériaux Et Transformations (UMET), UMR 8207, Université de Lille 1, ENSCL, F-59600 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Olsson, P. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Roslagstullsbacken 21, SE-114 21 Stockholm (Sweden); Malerba, L. [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2017-02-15

    This work presents a revised set of parameters to be used in an Object kinetic Monte Carlo model to simulate the microstructure evolution under neutron irradiation of reactor pressure vessel steels at the operational temperature of light water reactors (∼300 °C). Within a “grey-alloy” approach, a more physical description than in a previous work is used to translate the effect of Mn and Ni solute atoms on the defect cluster diffusivity reduction. The slowing down of self-interstitial clusters, due to the interaction between solutes and crowdions in Fe is now parameterized using binding energies from the latest DFT calculations and the solute concentration in the matrix from atom-probe experiments. The mobility of vacancy clusters in the presence of Mn and Ni solute atoms was also modified on the basis of recent DFT results, thereby removing some previous approximations. The same set of parameters was seen to predict the correct microstructure evolution for two different types of alloys, under very different irradiation conditions: an Fe-C-MnNi model alloy, neutron irradiated at a relatively high flux, and a high-Mn, high-Ni RPV steel from the Swedish Ringhals reactor surveillance program. In both cases, the predicted self-interstitial loop density matches the experimental solute cluster density, further corroborating the surmise that the MnNi-rich nanofeatures form by solute enrichment of immobilized small interstitial loops, which are invisible to the electron microscope.

  2. Pre-test analysis results of a PWR steel lined pre-stressed concrete containment model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basha, S.M.; Ghosh, Barnali; Patnaik, R.; Ramanujam, S.; Singh, R.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Venkat Raj, V.

    2000-02-01

    Pre-stressed concrete nuclear containment serves as the ultimate barrier against the release of radioactivity to the environment. This ultimate barrier must be checked for its ultimate load carrying capacity. BARC participated in a Round Robin analysis activity which is co-sponsored by Sandia National Laboratory, USA and Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation Japan for the pre-test prediction of a 1:4 size Pre-stressed Concrete Containment Vessel. In house finite element code ULCA was used to make the test predictions of displacements and strains at the standard output locations. The present report focuses on the important landmarks of the pre-test results, in sequential terms of first crack appearance, loss of pre-stress, first through thickness crack, rebar and liner yielding and finally liner tearing at the ultimate load. Global and local failure modes of the containment have been obtained from the analysis. Finally sensitivity of the numerical results with respect to different types of liners and different constitutive models in terms of bond strength between concrete and steel and tension-stiffening parameters are examined. The report highlights the important features which could be observed during the test and guidelines are given for improving the prediction in the post test computation after the test data is available. (author)

  3. Effect of Macrosegregation on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of a Pressure-Vessel Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Guanghua; Han, Lizhan; Li, Chuanwei; Luo, Xiaomeng; Gu, Jianfeng

    2017-07-01

    Macrosegregation refers to the chemical segregation, which occurs quite commonly in the large forgings such as nuclear reactor pressure vessel. This work assesses the effect of macrosegregation and homogenization treatment on the mechanical properties of a pressure-vessel steel (SA508 Gr.3). It was found that the primary reason for the inhomogeneity of the microstructure was the segregation of Mn, Mo, and Ni. Martensite, and coarse upper bainite with M-A (martensite-austenite) islands have been obtained, respectively, in the positive and negative segregation zone during a simulated quenching process. During tempering, the carbon-rich M-A islands decomposed into a mixture of ferrite and numerous carbides which deteriorated the toughness of the material. The segregation has been substantially minimized by a homogenizing treatment. The results indicate that the material homogenized has a higher impact toughness than the material with segregation, due to the reduction in M-A island in the negative segregation zone. It can be concluded that the microstructure and mechanical properties have been improved remarkably by means of homogenization treatment.

  4. Acoustoelastic evaluation of welding and heat treatment stress relieving of pressure vessel steel for Angra 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, Bruno C. de, E-mail: bruno.cesar@nuclep.gov.br [Nuclebras Equipamentos Pesados S.A (NUCLEP), Itaguai, RJ (Brazil); Bittencourt, Marcelo de S.Q., E-mail: bruno.cesar@nuclep.gov.br, E-mail: bittenc@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Currently the knowledge of non-destructive techniques allows to evaluate the stresses on components and mechanical structures, aiming at physical security, preservation of the environment and avoid financial losses associated with the construction and operation of industrial plants. The search for new techniques, especially applied in the nuclear industry to assess status more accurately, voltage safety and to ensure structural integrity, for example, core components of the primary circuit, such as the reactor pressure vessel and steam generator has become of great importance within the community of non-destructive testing .This paper aims to contribute to the non-destructive technique development in order to ensure the structural integrity of nuclear components. One acoustoelastic evaluation of steel 20 MnMoNi 55, used in pressure vessels of nuclear power plants were performed. The acoustic birefringence technique was use to evaluate the acoustoelastic behavior of the test material in the as received condition, after welding and after the stress relief heat treatment. The constant acoustoelastic material was obtained by an uniaxial loading test. It was found a slight anisotropy in the material as received. After welding, a marked variation of acoustic birefringence in the region near the weld bead was observed. The heat treatment indicated a new change of acoustic birefringence. Obtaining the acoustoelastic constant allowed the evaluation of stress in the different conditions of the weld and treated material. (author)

  5. Acoustoelastic evaluation of welding and heat treatment stress relieving of pressure vessel steel for Angra 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, Bruno C. de; Bittencourt, Marcelo de S.Q.

    2015-01-01

    Currently the knowledge of non-destructive techniques allows to evaluate the stresses on components and mechanical structures, aiming at physical security, preservation of the environment and avoid financial losses associated with the construction and operation of industrial plants. The search for new techniques, especially applied in the nuclear industry to assess status more accurately, voltage safety and to ensure structural integrity, for example, core components of the primary circuit, such as the reactor pressure vessel and steam generator has become of great importance within the community of non-destructive testing .This paper aims to contribute to the non-destructive technique development in order to ensure the structural integrity of nuclear components. One acoustoelastic evaluation of steel 20 MnMoNi 55, used in pressure vessels of nuclear power plants were performed. The acoustic birefringence technique was use to evaluate the acoustoelastic behavior of the test material in the as received condition, after welding and after the stress relief heat treatment. The constant acoustoelastic material was obtained by an uniaxial loading test. It was found a slight anisotropy in the material as received. After welding, a marked variation of acoustic birefringence in the region near the weld bead was observed. The heat treatment indicated a new change of acoustic birefringence. Obtaining the acoustoelastic constant allowed the evaluation of stress in the different conditions of the weld and treated material. (author)

  6. Radiation damage characterization in reactor pressure vessel steels with nonlinear ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matlack, K. H.; Kim, J.-Y.; Wall, J. J.; Qu, J.; Jacobs, L. J.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear generation currently accounts for roughly 20% of the US baseload power generation. Yet, many US nuclear plants are entering their first period of life extension and older plants are currently undergoing assessment of technical basis to operate beyond 60 years. This means that critical components, such as the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), will be exposed to higher levels of radiation than they were originally intended to withstand. Radiation damage in reactor pressure vessel steels causes microstructural changes such as vacancy clusters, precipitates, dislocations, and interstitial loops that leave the material in an embrittled state. The development of a nondestructive evaluation technique to characterize the effect of radiation exposure on the properties of the RPV would allow estimation of the remaining integrity of the RPV with time. Recent research has shown that nonlinear ultrasound is sensitive to radiation damage. The physical effect monitored by nonlinear ultrasonic techniques is the generation of higher harmonic frequencies in an initially monochromatic ultrasonic wave, arising from the interaction of the ultrasonic wave with microstructural features such as dislocations, precipitates, and their combinations. Current findings relating the measured acoustic nonlinearity parameter to increasing levels of neutron fluence for different representative RPV materials are presented

  7. Radiation damage characterization in reactor pressure vessel steels with nonlinear ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlack, K. H.; Kim, J.-Y.; Wall, J. J.; Qu, J.; Jacobs, L. J.

    2014-02-01

    Nuclear generation currently accounts for roughly 20% of the US baseload power generation. Yet, many US nuclear plants are entering their first period of life extension and older plants are currently undergoing assessment of technical basis to operate beyond 60 years. This means that critical components, such as the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), will be exposed to higher levels of radiation than they were originally intended to withstand. Radiation damage in reactor pressure vessel steels causes microstructural changes such as vacancy clusters, precipitates, dislocations, and interstitial loops that leave the material in an embrittled state. The development of a nondestructive evaluation technique to characterize the effect of radiation exposure on the properties of the RPV would allow estimation of the remaining integrity of the RPV with time. Recent research has shown that nonlinear ultrasound is sensitive to radiation damage. The physical effect monitored by nonlinear ultrasonic techniques is the generation of higher harmonic frequencies in an initially monochromatic ultrasonic wave, arising from the interaction of the ultrasonic wave with microstructural features such as dislocations, precipitates, and their combinations. Current findings relating the measured acoustic nonlinearity parameter to increasing levels of neutron fluence for different representative RPV materials are presented.

  8. The non-destructive examination of reactor pressure vessel steels by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highton, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    The rapid radiation hardening of copper bearing reactor pressure vessel steels has been linked with microvoids that are associated with copper based complexes in the metal lattice. These microvoids are active in the sense that their size appears to be related to the temperature of irradiation, which thus determines their influence on dislocation mobility. These sites appear to grow by vacancy condensation which causes a reduction in the local lattice energy. Thus prolonged exposure to PWR temperatures, even in the absence of a neutron flux, may also cause embrittlement. It has been found that these sites, which represent a local negative charge, act as traps to positrons. The size of each site dictates its positron trapping potential. As the trapping potential increases so too does the probability that the positrons will annihilate with low momentum conduction electrons. The momentum of the annihilating electrons will determine the degree of Doppler broadening of the 511 keV annihilation gamma peak. Thus careful analysis of this peak can yield useful information on the degree of embrittlement caused by these active defect complexes. In this way positron annihilation offers a powerful non-destructive alternative to current methods of assessing the integrity of nuclear reactor pressure vessels. (author)

  9. Biaxial loading effects on fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAfee, W.J.; Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W. Jr.; Pennell, W.E.

    1995-03-01

    The preliminary phases of a program to develop and evaluate fracture methodologies for assessing crack-tip constraint effects on fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels have been completed by the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program. Objectives were to investigate effect of biaxial loading on fracture toughness, quantify this effect through existing stress-based, dual-parameter, fracture-toughness correlations, or propose and verify alternate correlations. A cruciform beam specimen with 2-D, shallow, through-thickness flaw and a special loading fixture was designed and fabricated. Tests were performed using biaxial loading ratios of 0:1 (uniaxial), 0.6:1, and 1:1 (equi-biaxial). Critical fracture-toughness values were calculated for each test. Biaxial loading of 0.6:1 resulted in a reduction in the lower bound fracture toughness of ∼12% as compared to that from the uniaxial tests. The biaxial loading of 1:1 yielded two subsets of toughness values; one agreed well with the uniaxial data, while one was reduced by ∼43% when compared to the uniaxial data. Results were evaluated using J-Q theory and Dodds-Anderson (D-A) micromechanical scaling model. The D-A model predicted no biaxial effect, while the J-Q method gave inconclusive results. When applied to the 1:1 biaxial data, these constraint methodologies failed to predict the observed reduction in fracture toughness obtained in one experiment. A strain-based constraint methodology that considers the relationship between applied biaxial load, the plastic zone width in the crack plane, and fracture toughness was formulated and applied successfully to the data. Evaluation of this dual-parameter strain-based model led to the conclusion that it has the capability of representing fracture behavior of RPV steels in the transition region, including the effects of out-of-plane loading on fracture toughness. This report is designated as HSST Report No. 150

  10. Irradiation induced tensile property change of SA 508 Cl.3 reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Se-Hwan; Hong, Jun-Hwa; Kuk, Il-Hiun

    1998-01-01

    Irradiation induced tensile property change of four kinds of reactor pressure vessel steels manufactured by different steel refining process was compared based on the differences in the unirradiated and irradiated microstructure. Microvickers hardness, indentation, and miniature tensile specimen tests were conducted for mechanical property measurement and optical microscope (OM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) were used for microstructural characterization. Specimens were 2 irradiated to a neutron fluence of 2.7x10 19 n/cm 2 (E ≥ 1 MeV) at 288 deg. C. Investigation on the unirradiated microstructures showed largely a same microstructure in that tempered acicular bainite and ferrite with bainitic phase prevailing in the unirradiated condition. Band-shaped segregations were also clearly observed except a kind of materials. A large difference in the unirradiated microstructure appeared in the grain size and carbide microstructure. Of carbide microstructures, noticeable differences were observed in the size and distribution of cementite, and bainitic lath microstructures. No noticeable changes were observed in the optical and thin film TEM microstructures after irradiation. Complicated microstructural. state of heat treated bainitic low alloy microstructure prevents easy quantification of microstructural changes due to irradiation. Apparent differences, however, were observed in the results of mechanical testing. Results of tensile testing and hardness measurement show that a steel refined by vacuum carbon deoxidation(VCD) method exhibits the highest radiation hardening behavior. Some of mechanical testing results on irradiated materials were possible to understand based on the initial microstructure, but further investigations using a wide array of sophisticated tools (for example, SANS, APFIM) are required to understand and characterize irradiation induced defects that are responsible for irradiation hardening behavior but are not revealed by

  11. Irradiation induced tensile property change of SA 508 Cl. 3 reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Se Hwan; Hong, Jun Hwa; Kuk, Il Hiun

    1998-01-01

    Irradiation induced tensile property change of four kinds of reactor pressure vessel steels manufactured by different steel refining process was compared based on the differences in the miniature tensile specimen tests were conducted for mechanical property measurement and optical microscope (OM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) were used for microstructural characterization. Specimens were irradiated to a neutron fluence of 2.7 x 10 19 n/cm 2 (E ≥ 1 MeV) at 288 deg C. Investigation on the unirradiated microstructures showed largely a same microstructure in that tempered acicular bainite and ferrite with bainitic phase prevailing in the unirradiated condition. Ban-shaped segregations were also clearly observed except a kind of materials. A large difference in the unirradiated microstructure appeared in the grain size and carbide microstructure. Of carbide microstructures, noticeable differences were observed in the size and distribution of cementite, and bainitic lath microstructures. No noticeable changes were observed in the optical and thin film TEM microstructures after irradiation. Complicated microstructural state of heat treated bainitic low alloy microstructure prevents easy quantification of microstructural changes due to irradiation. Apparent differences, however, were observed in the results of mechanical testing. Results of tensile testing and hardness measurement show that a steel refined by vacuum carbon deoxidation (VCD) method exhibits the highest radiation hardening behavior. Some of mechanical testing results on irradiated materials were possible to understand based on the initial microstructure, but further investigations using a wide array of sophisticated tools (for example, SANS, APFIM) are required to understand and characterize irradiation induced defects that are responsible for irradiation hardening behavior but are not revealed by conventional TEM. (author)

  12. Investigation of the pitting corrosion of low carbon steel containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mughabghab, S.F.; Sullivan, T.M.

    1988-01-01

    The present study was undertaken because the prediction of the degradation rate of low carbon steel contains over long time frames is one of the crucial elements in the development of a source term model for low-level shallow land burial. The principal data base considered is that of the NBS corrosion measurements of ferrous materials buried in the ground for periods of up to 18 years. In this investigation, the maximum penetration in mils, hm, due to pitting corrosion was found to conform closely to the relation h m = kt n where it is the exposure time of the sample in years, κ is the pitting parameter in mil/(years) n , and n > O is a parameter related to the aeration property of the soil. The central objective of the present investigation is the determination of the dependence of the pitting parameters κ and n on the soil properties. The result of a detailed linear correlation analysis of κ on one hand, the pH value and the resistivity of the soil on the other hand revealed that κ is principally influenced by the pH value of the soil. The resistivity of the soil is found to play a minor role

  13. Fracture toughness determination of the pressure vessel steel A508 Cl 2 between 100 and 350 degree C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, S.

    1980-09-01

    The fracture toughness of the pressure vessel steel A508 was determined in the temperature range 100 - 350 degree C. The J-integral method with crack growth resistance curves, the so-called R-curves, was used. The results show that the steel does not have an 'upper-shelf' and the fracture toughness, K sub (JC), decreases with increasing temperature to a minimum around 300 degree C and an increase above it. These results are compared to those obtained previously on an other pressure vessel steel A533B which has essentially the same temperature dependence. The results were also analysed using the Tearing modulus, T. The conclusion iw that the crack growth resistance and the crack initiation resistance (K sub (JC)) show a significant decrease around the operating temperatures as compared to 100 degree C. (author)

  14. The influence of fire exposure on austenitic stainless steel for pressure vessel fitness-for-service assessment: Experimental research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Shu, Wenhua; Zuo, Yantian

    2017-04-01

    The austenitic stainless steels are widely applied to pressure vessel manufacturing. The fire accident risk exists in almost all the industrial chemical plants. It is necessary to make safety evaluation on the chemical equipment including pressure vessels after fire. Therefore, the present research was conducted on the influences of fire exposure testing under different thermal conditions on the mechanical performance evolution of S30408 austenitic stainless steel for pressure vessel equipment. The metallurgical analysis described typical appearances in micro-structure observed in the material suffered by fire exposure. Moreover, the quantitative degradation of mechanical properties was investigated. The material thermal degradation mechanism and fitness-for-service assessment process of fire damage were further discussed.

  15. A photoelastic study of the effects of an impulsive seismic wave on a nuclear containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, C.P.

    1981-01-01

    A dynamic photoelastic study of the progressive movement of a dilatational P-wave into a model of a nuclear containment vessel,is studied. The reflections at the dome abutments are observed and the strong flexural wave that deforms the dome itself is studied with photoelasticity and with dynamic strain gage procedures. (E.G.) [pt

  16. Scenario based optimization of a container vessel with respect to its projected operating conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Jonas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the scenario based optimization of the bulbous bow of the KRISO Container Ship (KCS is presented. The optimization of the parametrically modeled vessel is based on a statistically developed operational profile generated from noon-to-noon reports of a comparable 3600 TEU container vessel and specific development functions representing the growth of global economy during the vessels service time. In order to consider uncertainties, statistical fluctuations are added. An analysis of these data lead to a number of most probable upcoming operating conditions (OC the vessel will stay in the future. According to their respective likeliness an objective function for the evaluation of the optimal design variant of the vessel is derived and implemented within the parametrical optimization workbench FRIENDSHIP Framework. In the following this evaluation is done with respect to vessel’s calculated effective power based on the usage of potential flow code. The evaluation shows, that the usage of scenarios within the optimization process has a strong influence on the hull form.

  17. Heavy section steel technology program technical report No. 38. Fracture toughness characterization of HSST intermediate pressure vessel material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mager, T.R.; Yanichko, S.E.; Singer, L.R.

    1974-12-01

    The primary objective of the Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program is to develop pertinent fracture technology to demonstrate the structural reliability of present and contemplated water-cooled nuclear reactor pressure vessels. In order to demonstrate the ability to predict failure of large, heavy-walled pressure vessels under service type loading conditions, the fracture toughness properties of the vessel's materials must be characterized. The sampling procedure and test results are presented for vessel material supplied by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory that were used to characterize the fracture toughness of the HSST Intermediate Test Vessels. The metallurgical condition and heat treatment of the test material was representative of the vessel simulated service test condition. Test specimen locations and orientations were selected by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and are representative of flaw orientations incorporated in the test vessels. The fracture toughness is documented for the materials from each of the eight HSST Intermediate Pressure Vessels tested to date. 7 references. (U.S.)

  18. Experimental study of the effect of neutron radiation on pressurised water reactor vessel steel resilience - First part

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdeau, Jean-Jacques

    1969-12-01

    After having outlined the importance of the embrittlement of vessel steels by neutrons during the exploitation of pressurised water reactors, the author reports a set of tests which aimed at determining the effect of neutron irradiation on vessel steel resilience for operated, under construction or projected pressurized water reactors. He also tries to highlight the influence of irradiation temperature and of initial thermal treatments, and to look for a restoration thermal treatment of neutron-induced damages which could be applied to the considered vessels. Tests were performed on V Charpy resilience samples. Some samples have been irradiated by the Pile Department of the Grenoble CEN and then broken by the Laboratory of very high activity, whereas other samples have been irradiated in a prototype vessel and broken by a Cadarache department. The author presents characteristics of the studied steels (chemical compositions, thermal treatments), describes sample irradiation conditions, and the method of assessment of the transition temperature after irradiation, presents experimental results, discusses their interpretation, and presents future tests to be performed [fr

  19. Mouse lung contains endothelial progenitors with high capacity to form blood and lymphatic vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barleon Bernhard

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postnatal endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs have been successfully isolated from whole bone marrow, blood and the walls of conduit vessels. They can, therefore, be classified into circulating and resident progenitor cells. The differentiation capacity of resident lung endothelial progenitor cells from mouse has not been evaluated. Results In an attempt to isolate differentiated mature endothelial cells from mouse lung we found that the lung contains EPCs with a high vasculogenic capacity and capability of de novo vasculogenesis for blood and lymph vessels. Mouse lung microvascular endothelial cells (MLMVECs were isolated by selection of CD31+ cells. Whereas the majority of the CD31+ cells did not divide, some scattered cells started to proliferate giving rise to large colonies (> 3000 cells/colony. These highly dividing cells possess the capacity to integrate into various types of vessels including blood and lymph vessels unveiling the existence of local microvascular endothelial progenitor cells (LMEPCs in adult mouse lung. EPCs could be amplified > passage 30 and still expressed panendothelial markers as well as the progenitor cell antigens, but not antigens for immune cells and hematopoietic stem cells. A high percentage of these cells are also positive for Lyve1, Prox1, podoplanin and VEGFR-3 indicating that a considerabe fraction of the cells are committed to develop lymphatic endothelium. Clonogenic highly proliferating cells from limiting dilution assays were also bipotent. Combined in vitro and in vivo spheroid and matrigel assays revealed that these EPCs exhibit vasculogenic capacity by forming functional blood and lymph vessels. Conclusion The lung contains large numbers of EPCs that display commitment for both types of vessels, suggesting that lung blood and lymphatic endothelial cells are derived from a single progenitor cell.

  20. Studies on the welding of heavy-section ASTM A542 Cl. 1 steel for large-sized pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Shigeki; Aota, Toshiichi; Kasahara, Masayuki

    1977-01-01

    ASTM A 542, Cl. 1 steel was developed and standardized recently, and is excellent in the high temperature strength and toughness as compared with conventionally used A 387, Grade 22 steel, accordingly the application to large pressure vessels is planned. This steel is a low alloy steel, and in case of large thickness, the possibility of cracking in the welded part is large. Also many times of annealing are required for the prevention of welding cracking, the relieving of residual stress, and the softening of hardened portion, but the possibility of cracking during stress-relieving annealing is large. In this study, Tekken type cracking test was carried out by coated electrode welding, and restricted cracking test was carried out by submerged arc welding of the A 542, Cl. 1 steel and A 387, Grade 22 steel, thus the welding cracking property was investigated, and the optimal welding conditions were selected. Also the test of cracking during the stress-relieving annealing of both steels was carried out, and the method of preventing the cracking was studied. The optimal conditions of stress-relieving annealing were selected, and the mechanism of the cracking was clarified. The mechanical properties of the joints welded and stress-relieved under the selected conditions were confirmed. (Kako, I.)

  1. The prediction of failure of welded steel plates for pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulvin, T.F.; Terry, P.; Webster, S.E.

    1980-01-01

    The avoidance of brittle fracture in pressure vessels and other welded steel fabrications is a matter of considerable importance. The application of fracture mechanics to this problem has led to the evolution of a philosophy which, among other things, permits estimation of tolerable crack sizes so that practical working limits can be set on inspection procedures and on material and welded joint toughness levels. The use of small-scale fracture mechanics tests, particularly crack opening displacement (COD) tests, to make the necessary material and/or joint property assessments is now commonplace. A number of possible analytical techniques have been considered. Initially, the COD data have been used with the Burdekin-Dawes design curve approach taking into account all the possible stress conditions and, it can be demonstrated, that consistently safe predictions of allowable flaw sizes can be made. Also considered, is the fracture analysis diagram approach of Harrison, Loosemore, and Milne in which a combination of fracture toughness data and mechanical property data is used to assess the probability of failure. Similarly the approach defined by Irvine and Quirk which makes use of mechanical property data without resorting to fracture mechanics and finally, a simple approach using uniaxial tensile property data only has also been examined. Comparisons have been made between these four approaches using, initially, the body of data referring to fracture tests on a single material with various defect sizes and aspect ratios, etc. and latterly, to the specific cases in the body of data on high strength steels. The results are discussed. (author)

  2. Flux effect on neutron irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels irradiated to high fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soneda, N.; Dohi, K.; Nishida, K.; Nomoto, A.; Iwasaki, M.; Tsuno, S.; Akiyama, T.; Watanabe, S.; Ohta, T.

    2011-01-01

    Neutron irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is of great concern for the long term operation of light water reactors. In particular, the embrittlement of the RPV steels of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) at very high fluences beyond 6*10 19 n/cm 2 , E > 1 MeV, needs to be understood in more depth because materials irradiated in material test reactors (MTRs) to such high fluences show larger shifts than predicted by current embrittlement correlation equations available worldwide. The primary difference between the irradiation conditions of MTRs and surveillance capsules is the neutron flux. The neutron flux of MTR is typically more than one order of magnitude higher than that of surveillance capsule, but it is not necessarily clear if this difference in neutron flux causes difference in mechanical properties of RPV. In this paper, we perform direct comparison, in terms of mechanical property and microstructure, between the materials irradiated in surveillance capsules and MTRs to clarify the effect of flux at very high fluences and fluxes. We irradiate the archive materials of some of the commercial reactors in Japan in the MTR, LVR-15, of NRI Rez, Czech Republic. Charpy impact test results of the MTR-irradiated materials are compared with the data from surveillance tests. The comparison of the results of microstructural analyses by means of atom probe tomography is also described to demonstrate the similarity / differences in surveillance and MTR-irradiated materials in terms of solute atom behavior. It appears that high Cu material irradiated in a MTR presents larger shifts than those of surveillance data, while low Cu materials present similar embrittlement. The microstructural changes caused by MTR irradiation and surveillance irradiation are clearly different

  3. Critical experiments, measurements, and analyses to establish a crack arrest methodology for nuclear pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, G.T.

    1977-01-01

    Substantial progress was made in three important areas: crack propagation and arrest theory, two-dimensional dynamic crack propagation analyses, and a laboratory test method for the material property data base. The major findings were as follows: Measurements of run-arrest events lent support to the dynamic, energy conservation theory of crack arrest. A two-dimensional, dynamic, finite-difference analysis, including inertia forces and thermal gradients, was developed. The analysis was successfully applied to run-arrest events in DCB (double-cantilever-beam) and SEN (single-edge notched) test pieces. A simplified procedure for measuring K/sub D/ and K/sub Im/ values with ordinary and duplex DCB specimens was demonstrated. The procedure employs a dynamic analysis of the crack length at arrest and requires no special instrumentation. The new method was applied to ''duplex'' specimens to measure the large K/sub D/ values displayed by A533B steel above the nil-ductility temperature. K/sub D/ crack velocity curves and K/sub Im/ values of two heats of A533B steel and the corresponding values for the plane strain fracture toughness associated with static initiation (K/sub Ic/), dynamic initiation (K/sub Id/), and the static stress intensity at crack arrest (K/sub Ia/) were measured. Possible relations among these toughness indices are identified. During the past year the principal investigators of the participating groups reached agreement on a crack arrest theory appropriate for the pressure vessel problem. 7 figures

  4. Empirical correlation between mechanical and physical parameters of irradiated pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tipping, P.; Solt, G.; Waeber, W.

    1991-02-01

    Neutron irradiation embrittlement of nuclear reactor pressure vessel (PV) steels is one of the best known ageing factors of nuclear power plants. If the safety limits set by the regulators for the PV steel are not satisfied any more, and other measures are too expensive for the economics of the plant, this embrittlement could lead to the closure of the plant. Despite this, the fundamental mechanisms of neutron embrittlement are not yet fully understood, and usually only empirical mathematical models exist to asses neutron fluence effects on embrittlement, as given by the Charpy test for example. In this report, results of a systematic study of a French forging (1.2 MD 07 B), irradiated to several fluences will be reported. Mechanical property measurements (Charpy tensile and Vickers microhardness), and physical property measurements (small angle neutron scattering - SANS), have been done on specimens having the same irradiation or irradiation-annealing-reirradiation treatment histories. Empirical correlations have been established between the temperature shift and the decrease in the upper shelf energy as measured on Charpy specimens and tensile stresses and hardness increases on the one hand, and the size of the copper-rich precipitates formed by the irradiation on the other hand. The effect of copper (as an impurity element) in enhancing the degradation of mechanical properties has been demonstrated; the SANS measurements have shown that the size and amount of precipitates are important. The correlations represent the first step in an effort to develop a description of neutron irradiation induced embrittlement which is based on physical models. (author) 6 figs., 27 refs

  5. Effects of thermal ageing on toughness properties of pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todeschini, P.; Churier-Bossennec, H.; Massoud, J.P.; Frund, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessel of pressurized water reactors operates at temperatures up to 325 C. degrees. The compositions and microstructures of its constitutive steel are optimized to obtain good initial toughness values and to minimize the effects of thermal ageing during service life. Intergranular segregation of embrittling elements like phosphorus is the main thermal ageing mechanism which might affect the long term toughness properties of low copper steels, despite the low diffusivity of phosphorus at the temperatures of interest. For long term operation, these effects are taken into account by prediction formulae which have been developed in the eighties and are included in the RCC-M and RSE-M codes. The presented study aims at validating these prediction formulae by exposures at moderately increased temperatures, up to 350 C. degrees, relatively to service conditions. The investigated materials are representative forgings and their welds, taking into account envelope phosphorus concentrations relatively to the French fleet. Predicted and measured embrittlement for base and weld metals are low and consistent together for the lowest phosphorus levels. The predicted effect of phosphorus content seems to be overestimated. The single coarse grain structure has been studied on one forging and shows a susceptibility to ageing similar to the fine grain one. The various heat affected zone microstructures studied with the plate having a phosphorus content of 0.017 % (fusion line, fine grains, inter-critical coarse grains) have given quite contrasted results. Inter-critical coarse grains notch positions show the lowest shifts. Code predictions are bounding the results of all considered heat affected zone microstructures with substantial margin. The increased susceptibility of heat affected zone compared to base metal seems globally overestimated

  6. Preliminary calculation with code CONTEMPT-LT for spray cooling tests with JAERI model containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Mitsugu

    1978-01-01

    LWR plants have a containment spray system to reduce the escape of radioactive material to the environment in a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) by washing out fission products, especially radioiodine, and condensing the steam to lower the pressure. For carrying out the containment spray tests, pressure and temperature behaviour of the JAERI Model Containment Vessel in spray cooling has been calculated with computer program CONTEMPT-LT. The following could be studied quantitatively: (1) pressure and temperature raise rates for steam addition rate and (2) pressure fall rate for spray flow rate and spray heat transfer efficiency. (auth.)

  7. Martensitic/ferritic steels as container materials for liquid mercury target of ESS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Y.

    1996-01-01

    In the previous report, the suitability of steels as the ESS liquid mercury target container material was discussed on the basis of the existing database on conventional austenitic and martensitic/ferritic steels, especially on their representatives, solution annealed 316 stainless steel (SA 316) and Sandvik HT-9 martensitic steel (HT-9). Compared to solution annealed austenitic stainless steels, martensitic/ferritic steels have superior properties in terms of strength, thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, mercury corrosion resistance, void swelling and irradiation creep resistance. The main limitation for conventional martensitic/ferritic steels (CMFS) is embrittlement after low temperature (≤380 degrees C) irradiation. The ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) can increase as much as 250 to 300 degrees C and the upper-shelf energy (USE), at the same time, reduce more than 50%. This makes the application temperature range of CMFS is likely between 300 degrees C to 500 degrees C. For the present target design concept, the temperature at the container will be likely controlled in a temperature range between 180 degrees C to 330 degrees C. Hence, CMFS seem to be difficult to apply. However, solution annealed austenitic stainless steels are also difficult to apply as the maximum stress level at the container will be higher than the design stress. The solution to the problem is very likely to use advanced low-activation martensitic/ferritic steels (LAMS) developed by the fusion materials community though the present database on the materials is still very limited

  8. Corrosion of pipe steel in CO2 containing impurities and possible solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, X.; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Spruijt, M.P.N.; Borys, M.

    2013-01-01

    CO2 flue gases acquired from different sources contain a significant amount of impurities and water, which are corrosive to the pipeline steel. To design the pipelines for large scale of CO2 flue gas transport, the corrosion of pipeline steels has to be investigated in the realistic conditions. In

  9. Applicability of the fracture toughness master curve to irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, M.A.; McCabe, D.E.; Alexander, D.J.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1997-01-01

    The current methodology for determination of fracture toughness of irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is based on the upward temperature shift of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) K Ic curve from either measurement of Charpy impact surveillance specimens or predictive calculations based on a database of Charpy impact tests from RPV surveillance programs. Currently, the provisions for determination of the upward temperature shift of the curve due to irradiation are based on the Charpy V-notch (CVN) 41-J shift, and the shape of the fracture toughness curve is assumed to not change as a consequence or irradiation. The ASME curve is a function of test temperature (T) normalized to a reference nit-ductility temperature, RT NDT , namely, T-RT NDT . That curve was constructed as the lower boundary to the available K Ic database and, therefore, does not consider probability matters. Moreover, to achieve valid fracture toughness data in the temperature range where the rate of fracture toughness increase with temperature is rapidly increasing, very large test specimens were needed to maintain plain-strain, linear-elastic conditions. Such large specimens are impractical for fracture toughness testing of each RPV steel, but the evolution of elastic-plastic fracture mechanics has led to the use of relatively small test specimens to achieve acceptable cleavage fracture toughness measurements, K Jc , in the transition temperature range. Accompanying this evolution is the employment of the Weibull distribution function to model the scatter of fracture toughness values in the transition range. Thus, a probabilistic-based bound for a given data population can be made. Further, it has been demonstrated by Wallin that the probabilistic-based estimates of median fracture toughness of ferritic steels tend to form transition curves of the same shape, the so-called ''master curve'', normalized to one common specimen size, namely the 1T [i.e., 1.0-in

  10. Device for protecting the containment vessel dome of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allain, A.; Filloleau, E.; Mulot, P.

    1976-01-01

    A device is disclosed for protecting the dome of a nuclear reactor containment vessel against the upward displacement of the concrete shield slab of said reactor and the resultant effects of tilting of an equipment unit mounted on the shield slab at the periphery of said slab, wherein said device comprises: (1) means for separating the equipment unit into two sections consisting of an upper section and a lower section, said lower section being rigidly fixed to said shield slab and said means being actuated by the upward displacement of said slab, (2) a system for vertical rectilinear guiding of said upper section within the containment vessel, and (3) rigid mechanical components which provide a coupling between the aforesaid upper and lower sections of the equipment unit and exert on said upper section under the action of the tilting motion of said lower section a thrust which causes the upward displacement of said upper section

  11. Device for removing hydrogen gas from the safety containment vessel of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiefel, M.

    1983-01-01

    The safe processing of all concentrations of gas mixtures should be possible with such a device using a thermal recombiner of compact construction. A recombiner consisting of a metal case and diverter sheets situated in it is heated by induction. The incoming pipe for the gas mixture enriched with hydrogen and the outgoing pipe for the gas mixture with low hydrogen content are connected together by a three way valve. The third connection to the safety valve takes the larger port of the gas mixture with low hydrogen content back to the safety containment vessel. Sufficient amount of the gas mixture with low hydrogen content is taken via the three way valve to the safety containment vessel to ensure that the hydrogen content of the gas mixture taken to the recombiner remains below the 4% by volume limit. (orig./PW)

  12. On the composition and structure of nanoprecipitates in irradiated pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odette, G.R.; Liu, C.L.; Wirth, B.D.

    1997-01-01

    Nanoscale Cu rich precipitates (CRPs) are widely believed to be the dominant hardening feature resulting in severe embrittlement in irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. However, this view has recently been challenged by interpretations of atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM) measurements that describe the dominant nanofeatures as dilute solute atmospheres (DSAs). The practical impact of these differing views is very significant. This work compares and contrasts the CRP versus DSA descriptions to a wide variety of pertinent data. Mechanical property trends as well as small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and field emission scanning transmission electron microscopy (FEGSTEM) measurements support the presence of CRPs. CRPs are also consistent with the fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic laws. However, standard theory cannot provide the atomic level resolution needed to fully understand the nanofeatures. Therefore, a new Lattice Monte Carlo (LMC) atomistic method is used to simulate the complex chemical structures of the CRPs. The LMC method unifies the SANS/FEGSTEM and APFIM data within a well founded physical framework

  13. The response of pressure vessel steel specimens on drop weight loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, S.; Kalthoff, J.F.; Gerscha, A.

    1979-01-01

    Load records obtained in instrumented impact tests in general are disturbed by inertia effects. The influence of mechanical damping provisions on these disturbing inertia effects is investigated. Precracked bend specimens are dynamically loaded in a drop weight testing system. The specimens of size 620 mm x 150 mm (25 mm or 50 mm thick) were machined from the pressure vessel steel 22 NiMoCr 37 which was heat treated to achieve a specially hardened condition. The tests were performed at two different low temperatures. The impact velocity was about 4 m/s. As it is usual in instrumented impact testing, the load at the tup of the impining striker is recorded as a function of time during the impact process. In addition the specimen is instrumented by a strain gage close to the crack tip in order to directly measure the stress intensification. Experiments were performed under pure and damped impact conditions. Damping was achieved by utilizing a soft aluminum plate between the striker and the specimen. (orig.)

  14. Postirradiation recovery of a reactor pressure vessel steel investigated by positron annihilation and microhardness measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pareja, R.; Diego, N. De; Cruz, R.M. de la; Del Rio, J.

    1993-01-01

    Positron lifetime and microhardness measurements have been performed on untreated, thermal-aged, neutron-irradiated, and postirradiation-annealed samples of reactor pressure vessel steels with the purpose of investigating the mechanisms of irradiation-induced hardening and recovery of the mechanical properties in these materials. The positron lifetime experiments have not revealed any evidence of the formation of a significant concentration of voids or vacancy clusters in samples irradiated at ∼290 C with fluences ≤2.71 x 10 23 n/m 2 (E>1 MeV), but they suggest a dislocation annealing induced by the irradiation. Isochronal annealing experiments with neutron-irradiated samples show a simultaneous recovery in their positron lifetime and microhardness at ∼340 C. From the microhardness measurements, the yield strength of the irradiated material has been estimated. The results appear to be consistent with a model of hardening due to irradiation-induced dissolution of precipitates with formation of small metastable precipitates after postirradiation aging and recovery induced by the disappearance of these metastable precipitates

  15. Appropriate welding conditions of temper bead weld repair for SQV2A pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, R.; Matsuda, F.; Brziak, P.; Lomozik, M.

    2004-01-01

    Temper bead welding technique is one of the most important repair welding methods for large structures for which it is difficult to perform the specified post weld heat treatment. In this study, appropriate temper bead welding conditions to improve the characteristics of heat affected zone (HAZ) are studied using pressure vessel steel SQV2A corresponding to ASTM A533 Type B Class 1. Thermal/mechanical simulator is employed to give specimens welding thermal cycles from single to quadruple cycle. Charpy absorbed energy and hardness of simulated CGHAZ by first cycle were degraded as compared with base metal. Improvability of these degradations by subsequent cycles is discussed and appropriate temper bead thermal cycles are clarified. When the peak temperature lower than Ac1 and near Ac1 in the second thermal cycle is applied to CGAHZ by first thermal cycle, the characteristics of CGHAZ improve enough. When the other peak temperatures (that is, higher than Ac1) in the second thermal cycle are applied to the CGHAZ, third or more thermal cycle temper bead process should be applied to improve the properties. Appropriate weld condition ranges are selected based on the above results. The validity of the selected ranges is verified by the temper bead welding test. (orig.)

  16. The elevated temperature and thermal shock fracture toughnesses of nuclear pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Kazumi; Kobayashi, Hideo; Nakazawa, Hajime; Nara, Atsushi.

    1979-01-01

    Thermal shock experiments were conducted on nuclear pressure vessel steel A533 Grade B Class 1. Elastic-plastic fracture toughness tests were carried out within the same high temperature range of the thermal shock experiment and the relation between stretched zone width, SZW and J-integral was clarified. An elastic-plastic thermal shock fracture toughness value. J sub(tsc) was evaluated from a critical value of stretched zone width, SZW sub(tsc) at the initiation of thermal shock fracture by using the relation between SZW and J. The J sub(tsc) value was compared with elastic-plastic fracture toughness values, J sub( ic), and the difference between the J sub(tsc) and J sub( ic) values was discussed. The results obtained are summarized as follows; (1) The relation between SZW and J before the initiation of stable crack growth in fracture toughness test at a high temperature can be expressed by the following equation regardless of test temperature, SZW = 95(J/E), where E is Young's modulus. (2) Elevated temperature fracture toughness values ranging from room temperature to 400 0 C are nearly constant regardless of test temperature. It is confirmed that upper shelf fracture toughness exists. (3) Thermal shock fracture toughness is smaller than elevated temperature fracture toughness within the same high temperature range of thermal shock experiment. (author)

  17. Experimental study of the structural behavior of the reinforced concrete containment vessel beyond design pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyamada, O.; Saito, H.; Muramatsu, Y.; Hasegawa, T.; Tanaka, N.

    1990-01-01

    The first Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) including a reinforced concrete containment vessel (RCCV) is scheduled to be constructed in the 1990s, in Japan. As the RCCV is new to Japan, we performed a trial design, several series of fundamental experiments and partial/total model experiments. This paper presents a summary of the 'TOP SLAB EXPERIMENT' carried out as one of partial model experiments, in which the structural behavior of the RCCV was examined under internal pressure. (orig.)

  18. Design criteria for the structural analysis of shipping cask containment vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    10 CFR Part 71, Sections 71.35 and 71.36, require that packages used to transport radioactive materials meet specified normal and hypothetical accident conditions. Acceptable design criteria are presented for use in the structural analysis of the containment vessels of Type B packages used to transport irradiated nuclear fuel. Alternative design criteria meeting the structural requirements of 10 CFR Part 71, Section 71.35 and 71.36, may also be used

  19. Battery and fuel cell electrodes containing stainless steel charging additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerbrod, David; Gibney, Ann

    1984-01-01

    An electrode for use in electrochemical energy cells is made, comprising a hydrophilic layer and a hydrophobic layer, where the hydrophilic layer comprises a hydrophilic composite which includes: (i) carbon particles; (ii) stainless steel particles; (iii) a nonwetting agent; and (iv) a catalyst, where at least one current collector contacts said composite.

  20. A review on nickel-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talha, Mohd; Behera, C K; Sinha, O P

    2013-10-01

    The field of biomaterials has become a vital area, as these materials can enhance the quality and longevity of human life. Metallic materials are often used as biomaterials to replace structural components of the human body. Stainless steels, cobalt-chromium alloys, commercially pure titanium and its alloys are typical metallic biomaterials that are being used for implant devices. Stainless steels have been widely used as biomaterials because of their very low cost as compared to other metallic materials, good mechanical and corrosion resistant properties and adequate biocompatibility. However, the adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the human body have promoted the development of "nickel-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels" for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also much improves steel properties. Here we review the harmful effects associated with nickel and emphatically the advantages of nitrogen in stainless steel, as well as the development of nickel-free nitrogen containing stainless steels for medical applications. By combining the benefits of stable austenitic structure, high strength, better corrosion and wear resistance and superior biocompatibility in comparison to the currently used austenitic stainless steel (e.g. 316L), the newly developed nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel is a reliable substitute for the conventionally used medical stainless steels. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Studies of fragileness in steels of vessels of BWR reactors; Estudios de fragilizacion en aceros de vasija de reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, E.F.; Balcazar, M.; Alpizar, A.M.; Calderon, B.E. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The structural materials with those that are manufactured the pressure vessels of the BWR reactors, suffer degradation in its mechanical properties mainly to the damage taken place by the fast neutrons (E > 1 MeV) coming from the reactor core. Its are experimentally studied those mechanisms of neutron damage in this material type, by means of the irradiation of steel vessel in experimental reactors to age them quickly. Alternatively it is simulated the neutron damage by means of irradiation of steel with heavy ions. In this work those are shown first results of the damage induced by irradiation from a similar steel to the vessel of a BWR reactor. The irradiation was carried out with fast neutrons (E > 1 MeV, fluence of 1.45 x 10{sup 18} n/cm{sup 2}) in the TRIGA MARK lll reactor and separately with Ni{sup +3} ions in a Tandetrom accelerator, E = 4.8 MeV and range of the ionic flow of 0.1 to 53 iones/A{sup 2}. (Author)

  2. Comparison of SA508 Gr.3 and SA508 Gr.4N Low Alloy Steels for Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Chul; Lee, B. S

    2009-12-15

    The microstructural characteristics and mechanical properties of SA508 Gr.3 Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steel and SA508 Gr.4N Ni-Mo-Cr low alloy steel were investigated. The differences in the stable phases between these two low alloy steels were evaluated by means of a thermodynamic calculation using ThermoCalc. They were then compared to microstructural features and correlated with mechanical properties. Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steel shows the upper bainite structure which has the coarse cementite in the lath boundaries. However, Ni-Mo-Cr low alloy steel shows the mixture of lower bainite and tempered martensite structure that homogeneously precipitates the small carbides such as M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and M{sub 7}C{sub 3} due to an increase of hardenability and Cr addition. In the mechanical properties, Ni-Mo-Cr low alloy steel has higher strength and toughness than Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steel. Ni and Cr additions increase the strength by solid solution hardening. Besides, microstructural changes from upper bainite to tempered martensite improve the strength of the low alloy steel by grain refining effect. And the changes in the precipitation behavior by Cr addition improve the ductile-brittle transition behavior along with a toughening effect of Ni addition.

  3. Reactor pressure vessel design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foehl, J.

    1998-01-01

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. In chapter 2, the general principles of reactor pressure vessel design are elaborated. Crack and fracture initiation and propagation are treated in some detail

  4. Device for the simultaneous operation of the closing valve of a vessel and the closing valve of a transport container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tellier, Claude; Surriray, Michel.

    1982-01-01

    This device includes mechanisms for unlatching the closing valve of the vessel and securing it to the closing valve of the transport container and other mechanisms for vertically raising the assembly of valves, pivoting it and bringing it into a vertical position in a bulge provided in the bottom of the transport container. For example the first containment is a nuclear reactor vessel and the transport container is used for carrying an item from the vessel to an external area (for instance, a defective pump to the repair area) and for the return transport operation [fr

  5. Fabrication and mechanical test data for the four 6-inch-thick intermediate test vessels made from steel plate for the Heavy Section Steel Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childress, C.E.

    1976-01-01

    The HSST Program has among its goals the objective of demonstrating the capability to predict safe behavior of thick-walled pressure vessels containing flaws of known dimensions under frangible, transitional, and tough loading regimes. To accomplish these objectives the program is conducting a series of tests involving 6-in.-thick pressure vessels which will serve as test specimens for assisting in the characterization of failure under these loading conditions. Among the vessels a number of parameters, such as weld type, weld location, flaw size and shape, and test temperature and pressure, will be selectively varied to show that a rationale exists for dealing with the varied stress and metallurgical states which normally exist in commercial nuclear reactor vessels. Each vessel will serve as a go, no-go determination of critical flaw size for a specific set of test parameters. Item 4 of the previous issues in this series covers the fabrication details of the first six 6-in.-thick test vessels, which were fabricated from ASTM A-508 Cl 2 forging materials. This report covers the fabrication details of four additional 6-in.-thick intermediate test vessels having shell courses fabricated from ASTM A-533 Gr B Cl 1 plate. The remaining components were made from forgings. Essentially this report is a continuation of ORNL-TM-4351; it describes the manufacturing details of the individual parts and their ultimate assembly into finished vessels. Details concerning chemical composition and mechanical and nondestructive test data are presented

  6. Plan on test to failure of a prestressed concrete containment vessel model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takumi, K.; Nonaka, A.; Umeki, K.; Nagata, K.; Soejima, M.; Yamaura, Y.; Costello, J.F.; Riesemann, W.A. von.; Parks, M.B.; Horschel, D.S.

    1992-01-01

    A summary of the plans to test a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) model to failure is provided in this paper. The test will be conducted as a part of a joint research program between the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The containment model will be a scaled representation of a PCCV for a pressurized water reactor (PWR). During the test, the model will be slowly pressurized internally until failure of the containment pressure boundary occurs. The objectives of the test are to measure the failure pressure, to observe the mode of failure, and to record the containment structural response up to failure. Pre- and posttest analyses will be conducted to forecast and evaluate the test results. Based on these results, a validated method for evaluating the structural behavior of an actual PWR PCCV will be developed. The concepts to design the PCCV model are also described in the paper

  7. Evaluation of the a.c. potential drop method to determine J-crack resistance curves for a pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, G.P.

    1989-01-01

    An evaluation has been carried out of the a.c. potential drop technique for determining J-crack growth resistance curves for a pressure vessel steel. The technique involves passing an alternating current through the specimen and relating the changes in the potential drop across the crack mouth to changes in crack length occuring during the test. The factors investigated were the current and voltage probe positions, the a.c. frequency and the test temperature. In addition, by altering the heat treatment of the material, J-crack resistance curves were obtained under both contained and non-contained yielding conditions. In all situations, accurate J-R curves could be determined. (author)

  8. Evaluation charts of thermal stresses in cylindrical vessels induced by thermal stratification of contained fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuhashi, Ichiro; Kawasaki, Nobuchika; Kasahara, Naoto

    2008-01-01

    Temperature and thermal stress in cylindrical vessels were analysed for the thermal stratification of contained fluid. Two kinds of temperature analysis results were obtained such as the exact temperature solution of eigenfunction series and the simple approximate one by the temperature profile method. Furthermore, thermal stress shell solutions were obtained for the simple approximate temperatures. Through comparison with FEM analyses, these solutions were proved to be adequate. The simple temperature solution is described by one parameter that is the temperature decay coefficient. The thermal stress shell solutions are described by two parameters. One is the ratio between the temperature decay coefficient and the load decay coefficient. Another is the nondimensional width of stratification. These solutions are so described by few parameters that those are suitable for the simplified thermal stress evaluation charts. These charts enable quick and accurate thermal stress evaluations of cylindrical vessel of this problem compared with conventional methods. (author)

  9. Evaluation charts of thermal stresses in cylindrical vessels induced by thermal stratification of contained fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuhashi, Ichiro; Kawasaki, Nobuchika; Kasahara, Naoto

    2007-01-01

    Temperature and thermal stress in cylindrical vessels were analysed for the thermal stratification of contained fluid. Two kinds of temperature analysis results were obtained such as the exact temperature solution of eigen-function series and the simple approximate one by the temperature profile method. Furthermore, shell solutions of thermal stress were obtained for the simple approximate temperatures. Through comparison with FEM analyses, these solutions were proved to be adequate. The simple temperature solution is described by one parameter that is the temperature decay factor. The shell solutions of thermal stress are described by two parameters. One is the ratio between the temperature decay factor and the local decay factor. Another is the non-dimensional width of stratification. These solution are so described by few parameters that those are suitable for the simplified thermal stress evaluation charts. These charts enable quick and accurate thermal stress evaluations of cylindrical vessel of this problem compared with conventional methods. (author)

  10. A simple evaluation of containment integrity against ex-vessel steam explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiura, Hiroshi

    2000-01-01

    The guideline for consideration to severe accidents on containment design for next-generation LWR was published in 1999. In order to verify the validity of future containment designs, we have developed a method of assessing for the containment integrity against ex-vessel steam explosion. First, we conducted a simple evaluation on an Advanced PWR. The strength of the reactor cavity wall was assumed to be equivalent to the total strain energy which would accumulate by the time one reinforcing bar element would first reach the failure strain in FEM analyses. As a result, the strength was evaluated to be about 72 MJ. The explosion energy was assumed to be a function of the mass of the dropping melted core and the conversion ratio. Assuming the conversion ratio of 1%, it was estimated that the explosion energy would amount to about 1 MJ if the melt mass corresponds to the break of one instrumentation guide tube penetration, and about 40 MJ if the mass corresponds to the simultaneous break of all penetrations. Therefore, it is expected that the explosion energy would be less than the wall strength; thus, the containment integrity would be maintained even if an ex-vessel steam explosion were to occur. (author)

  11. Assessment of models predicting irradiation effects on tensile properties of reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineau, L.; Landron, C.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an analysis of tensile data acquired as part of the French Reactor Vessel Surveillance Program (RVSP) is produced. This program contains amongst other mechanical tests, tensile tests at 20 and 300 C degrees on non irradiated base metals and at 300 C degrees only on irradiated materials. It shows that irradiation leads to an increase in the yield strength and a decrease in the strain hardening. The exploitation of tensile results has permitted to express a relationship between yield strength increase measured and fluence value, as well as between strain hardening decrease and yield strength evolution. The use of these relations in the aim at predicting evolution of tensile properties with irradiation has then permitted to propose a methodology to model entire stress-strain curves of irradiated base metal only based on the non irradiated stress-strain curve. These predictions were successfully compared with an experimental standard case. (authors)

  12. Development of ultrasonic testing technique with the large transducer to inspect the containment vessel plates of nuclear power plant embedded in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Hitoshi; Kurozumi, Yasuo; Kaneshima, Yoshiari

    2004-01-01

    The containment vessel plates embedded in concrete on Pressurized Water Reactors are inaccessible to inspect directly. Therefore, it is advisable to prepare inspection technology to detect existence and a location of corrosion on the embedded plates indirectly. In order to establish ultrasonic testing technique to be able to inspect the containment vessel plates embedded in concrete widely at the accessible point, experiments to detect artificial hollows simulating corrosion on a surface of a carbon steel plate mock-up covered with concrete simulating the embedded containment vessel plates were carried out with newly made ultrasonic transducers. We made newly low frequency (0.3 MHz and 0.5 MHz) surface shear horizontal (SH) wave transducers combined with three large active elements, which were equivalent to a 120mm width element. As a result of the experiments, the surface SH transducers could detect clearly the echo from the hollows with a depth of 9.5 mm and 19 mm at a distance of 1500mm from the transducers on the surface of the mock-up covered with concrete. Therefore, we evaluate that it is possible to detect the defects such as corrosion on the plates embedded in concrete with the newly made low frequency surface SH transducers with large elements. (author)

  13. Effect of tempering temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a reactor pressure vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, C.W.; Han, L.Z.; Luo, X.M.; Liu, Q.D.; Gu, J.F., E-mail: gujf@sjtu.edu.cn

    2016-08-15

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel were investigated after tempering at different temperatures ranging from 580 to 700 °C for 5 h. With increasing tempering temperature, the impact toughness, which is qualified by Charpy V-notch total absorbed energy, initially increases from 142 to 252 J, and then decreases to 47 J, with a maximum value at 650 °C, while the ultimate tensile strength varies in exactly the opposite direction. Comparing the microstructure and fracture surfaces of different specimens, the variations in toughness and strength with the tempering temperature were generally attributed to the softening of the bainitic ferrite, the agminated Fe{sub 3}C carbides that resulted from decomposition of martensite/austenite (M/A) constituents, the precipitation of Mo{sub 2}C carbides, and the newly formed M/A constituents at the grain boundaries. Finally, the correlation between the impact toughness and the volume fraction of the M/A constituents was established, and the fracture mechanisms for the different tempering conditions are explained. - Highlights: • The dependence of the deterioration of impact toughness on tempering temperature has been analysed. • The instrumented Charpy V-notch impact test has been employed to study the fracture mechanism. • The influence of M/A constituents on different fracture mechanisms based on the hinge model has been demonstrated. • A correlation between the mechanical properties and the amount of M/A constituents has been established.

  14. Proof, interpretation and evaluation of radiation-induced microstructural changes in WWER reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehmert, J.; Gokhman, A.; Grosse, M.; Ulbricht, A.

    2003-06-01

    Neutron embrittlement is a special issue for the VVER-type reactors. One of the fundamentals for a reliable assessment of the current material state is knowledge of the causes and mechanisms of neutron embrittlement. The aim of the project is to understand and to quantify the microstructural appearances due to neutron radiation in VVER-type reactor pressure vessel steels. The material base is a broad variation of irradiation probes taken from the irradiation programme Rheinsberg, surveillance programmes of Russian, Ukrainian or Hungarian NPPs or irradiation experiments with mockup-alloys. The microstructure was investigated by different methods. The small angle neutron scattering (SANS) proved to be the most suitable method. A procedure was developed to determine mean diameter, size distribution and volume fraction of irradiation-induced microstructure from SANS experiments in a reliable and comparable manner. With this method microstructural parameters were systematically determined and the main factors of influence were identified. Apart from the neutron fluence the volume fraction of radiation defects mainly changes with the copper or nickel content whereas phosphorus is hardly relevant. Annealing remedies the radiation-induced microstructural appearances. The ratio between nuclear and magnetic neutron scattering provides information on the type of radiation defects. This leads to the conclusion that the material composition changes the radiation defects. The change occurs gradually rather than abruptly. The radiation defects detected by SANS correlate with the radiation hardening and embrittlement. Generally, the results suggest a bimodal mechanism due to radiation-enhanced and radiation-induced defect evolution. A kinetic model on base of the rate theory approach was established. (orig.)

  15. Comparison of Corrosion Behavior of Low-Alloy Steel Containing Copper and Antimony with 409L Stainless Steel for a Flue Gas Desulfurization System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sun-Ah; Shin, Su-Bin; Kim, Jung-Gu [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    The corrosion behavior of low alloy steel containing Cu, Sb and 409L stainless steel was investigated for application in the low-temperature section of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. The electrochemical properties were evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization testing and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 16.9 vol% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 0.35 vol% HCl at 60 ℃. The inclusions in these steels ere identified by electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA). The corrosion products of the steels were analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The corrosion rate of the low alloy steel containing Cu, Sb was about 100 times lower than that of 409L stainless steel. For stainless steel without passivation, active corrosion behavior was shown. In contrast, in the low alloy steel, the Cu, Sb compounds accumulated on the surface improved the corrosion resistance by suppressing the anodic dissolution reaction.

  16. Prediction and Monitoring Systems of Creep-Fracture Behavior of 9Cr-1Mo Steels for Reactor Pressure Vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potirniche, Gabriel; Barlow, Fred D.; Charit, Indrajit; Rink, Karl

    2013-01-01

    A recent workshop on next-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) topics underscored the need for research studies on the creep fracture behavior of two materials under consideration for reactor pressure vessel (RPV) applications: 9Cr-1Mo and SA-5XX steels. This research project will provide a fundamental understanding of creep fracture behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel welds for through modeling and experimentation and will recommend a design for an RPV structural health monitoring system. Following are the specific objectives of this research project: Characterize metallurgical degradation in welded modified 9Cr-1Mo steel resulting from aging processes and creep service conditions; Perform creep tests and characterize the mechanisms of creep fracture process; Quantify how the microstructure degradation controls the creep strength of welded steel specimens; Perform finite element (FE) simulations using polycrystal plasticity to understand how grain texture affects the creep fracture properties of welds; Develop a microstructure-based creep fracture model to estimate RPVs service life; Manufacture small, prototypic, cylindrical pressure vessels, subject them to degradation by aging, and measure their leak rates; Simulate damage evolution in creep specimens by FE analyses; Develop a model that correlates gas leak rates from welded pressure vessels with the amount of microstructural damage; Perform large-scale FE simulations with a realistic microstructure to evaluate RPV performance at elevated temperatures and creep strength; Develop a fracture model for the structural integrity of RPVs subjected to creep loads; and Develop a plan for a non-destructive structural health monitoring technique and damage detection device for RPVs.

  17. Prediction and Monitoring Systems of Creep-Fracture Behavior of 9Cr-1Mo Steels for Teactor Pressure Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potirniche, Gabriel [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Barlow, Fred D. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Charit, Indrajit [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Rink, Karl [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States)

    2013-11-26

    A recent workshop on next-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) topics underscored the need for research studies on the creep fracture behavior of two materials under consideration for reactor pressure vessel (RPV) applications: 9Cr-1Mo and SA-5XX steels. This research project will provide a fundamental understanding of creep fracture behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel welds for through modeling and experimentation and will recommend a design for an RPV structural health monitoring system. Following are the specific objectives of this research project: Characterize metallurgical degradation in welded modified 9Cr-1Mo steel resulting from aging processes and creep service conditions; Perform creep tests and characterize the mechanisms of creep fracture process; Quantify how the microstructure degradation controls the creep strength of welded steel specimens; Perform finite element (FE) simulations using polycrystal plasticity to understand how grain texture affects the creep fracture properties of welds; Develop a microstructure-based creep fracture model to estimate RPVs service life; Manufacture small, prototypic, cylindrical pressure vessels, subject them to degradation by aging, and measure their leak rates; Simulate damage evolution in creep specimens by FE analyses; Develop a model that correlates gas leak rates from welded pressure vessels with the amount of microstructural damage; Perform large-scale FE simulations with a realistic microstructure to evaluate RPV performance at elevated temperatures and creep strength; Develop a fracture model for the structural integrity of RPVs subjected to creep loads; and Develop a plan for a non-destructive structural health monitoring technique and damage detection device for RPVs.

  18. Stress-relieving annealing of Cr-Mo steel for high temperature pressure vessels and the quality change in use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makioka, Minoru; Hirano, Hiromichi

    1976-01-01

    The securing of good mechanical properties is difficult in thick plates for large pressure vessels because cooling rate is insufficient and time is prolonged in heat treatment. Cr-Mo steel plates are usually used in the state of improved notch toughness though somewhat reduced strength by normalizing or accelerated cooling and tempering. If the time for heat treatment is prolonged, the embrittlement occurs. The effects of temperature, holding time, and cooling rate in stress-relieving treatment on the mechanical properties of 1-1/4Cr - 1/2Mo, 2-1/4Cr - 1Mo, 3Cr - 1Mo, and 5Cr - 1/2Mo steels were investigated. The tensile strength lowered almost linearly as the hollomon-Jaffe parameter of heat treatment condition increased in all the steels. The transition temperature shifted continuously to high temperature side in 1-1/4Cr - 1/2Mo steel, but the notch toughness was improved up to certain values and then the tendency turning to brittleness was shown in the other steels, as the H-J parameter increased. When the holding time became longer, the transition temperature shifted to higher temperature side, but the cooling rate showed no effect. The condition for stress relieving treatment must be selected so that the ferrite bands observed in welded metal do not arise. The embrittlement at the operation temperature of 400 - 450 0 C for a long time is evaluated by the comparison with that by stepped cooling method. (Kako, I.)

  19. Experimental investigation of the influence of Mo contained in stainless steel on Cs chemisorption behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Lemma, F.G.; Nakajima, K., E-mail: nakajima.kunihisa@jaea.go.jp; Yamashita, S.; Osaka, M., E-mail: ohsaka.masahiko@jaea.go.jp

    2017-02-15

    Chemisorption phenomena can affect fission products (FP) retention in a nuclear reactor vessel during a severe accident (SA). Detailed information on the FP chemisorbed deposits, especially for Cs, are important for a rational decommissioning of the reactor following a SA, as for the Fukushima Daiichi Power Station. Moreover the retention of Cs will influence the source term assessment and thus improved models for this phenomenon are needed in SA codes. This paper describes the influence on Cs chemisorption of molybdenum contained in stainless steel (SS) type 316. In our experiments it was observed that Cs-Mo deposits (CsFe(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3}, Cs{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}) were formed together with CsFeSiO{sub 4}, which is the predominant compound formed by chemisorption. The Cs-Mo deposits were found to revaporize from the SS sample at 1000 °C, and thus could contribute to the source term. On the other hand, CsFeSiO{sub 4} will be probably retained in the reactor during a SA due to its stability. - Highlights: • The influence of Mo contained in SS on CsOH chemisorption was investigated. • Cs chemisorbed deposits were submitted to revaporization tests. • CsFeSiO{sub 4} was the main chemisorbed compound and stable at high temperature. • Cs{sub 2}MoO{sub 4} and Cs{sub 4}Fe(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3} were the Cs-Mo deposited phases detected. • Cs-Mo deposits re-vaporization can contribute to the accident late stage release.

  20. DHCVIM - a direct heating containment vessel interactions module: applications to Sandia National Laboratories Surtsey experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginsberg, T.; Tutu, N.K.

    1987-01-01

    Direct containment heating is the mechanism of severe nuclear reactor accident containment loading that results from transfer of thermal and chemical energy from high-temperature, finely divided, molten core material to the containment atmosphere. The direct heating containment vessel interactions module (DHCVIM) has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory to model the mechanisms of containment loading resulting from the direct heating accident sequence. The calculational procedure is being used at present to model the Sandia National Laboratories one-tenth-scale Surtsey direct containment heating experiments. The objective of the code is to provide a test bed for detailed modeling of various aspects of the thermal, chemical, and hydrodynamic interactions that are expected to occur in three regions of a containment building: reactor cavity, intermediate subcompartments, and containment dome. Major emphasis is placed on the description of reactor cavity dynamics. This paper summarizes the modeling principles that are incorporated in DHCVIM and presents a prediction of the Surtsey Test DCH-2 that was made prior to execution of the experiment

  1. Insights into the behavior of LWR steel containment buildings during severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauss, D.B.; Horschel, D.S.; Blejwas, T.E.

    1987-01-01

    Investigations into the performance of steel containment subject to pressure and temperature greater than their design basis loads are discussed. The timing, mechanism, and location of a containment failure, i.e., release of radioactive materials, have an important impact on the consequences of a severe accident. We review the results of experiments on steel containment models pressurized to failure, on aged and unaged seals subjected to elevated temperature and pressure, and on electrical penetration assemblies tested for leakage. Based on the results, the important features and details of analytical methods that can be used to predict containment performance are identified. Finally, we speculate on the performance of steel containments in severe accident conditions. (orig.)

  2. Influence of localized plasticity on Stress Corrosion Cracking of austenitic stainless steel. Application to IASCC of internals reactor core vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cisse, Sarata

    2012-01-01

    The surface conditions of the 316L screw connecting vessel internals of the primary circuit of PWR (pressurized water reactor) corresponds to a grinding condition. These screws are affected by the IASCC (Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking). Initiation of cracking depends on the surface condition but also on the external oxidation and interactions of oxide layer with the deformation bands. The first objective of this study is to point the influence of surface condition on the growth kinetic of oxide layer, and the surface reactivity of 304, 316 stainless steel grade exposed to PWR primary water at 340 C. The second objective is to determine influence of strain localization on the SCC of austenitic stainless steels in PWR primary water. Indeed, the microstructure of irradiated 304, 316 grades correspond to a localized deformation in deformation bands free of radiation defects. In order to reproduce that microstructure without conducting irradiations, low cycle fatigue tests at controlled stain amplitude are implemented for the model material of the study (A286 austenitic stainless steel hardened by the precipitation of phase γ'Ni3(Ti, Al)). During the mechanical cycling (after the first hardening cycles), the precipitates are dissolved in slip bands leading to the localization of the deformation. Once the right experimental conditions in low cycle fatigue obtained (for localized microstructure), interactions oxidation / deformation bands are studied by oxidizing pre deformed samples containing deformation bands and non deformed samples. The tensile tests at a slow strain rate of 8 x 10 -8 /s are also carried out on pre deformed samples and undeformed samples. The results showed that surface treatment induces microstructural modifications of the metal just under the oxide layer, leading to slower growth kinetics of the oxide layer. However, surface treatment accelerates development of oxides penetrations in metal under the oxide layer. As example, for

  3. Preliminary analysis of a 1:4 scale prestressed concrete containment vessel model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dameron, R.A.; Rashid, Y.R.; Luk, V.K.; Hessheimer, M.F.

    1997-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is conducting a research program to investigate the integrity of nuclear containment structures. As part of the program Sandia will construct an instrumented 1:4 scale model of a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) for pressurized water reactors (PWR), which will be pressure tested up to its ultimate capacity. One of the key program objectives is to develop validated methods to predict the structural performance of containment vessels when subjected to beyond design basis loadings. Analytical prediction of structural performance requires a stepwise, systematic approach that addresses all potential failure modes. The analysis effort includes two and three-dimensional nonlinear finite element analyses of the PCCV test model to evaluate its structural performance under very high internal pressurization. Such analyses have been performed using the nonlinear concrete constitutive model, ANACAP-U, in conjunction with the ABAQUS general purpose finite element code. The analysis effort is carried out in three phases: preliminary analysis; pretest prediction; and post-test data interpretation and analysis evaluation. The preliminary analysis phase serves to provide instrumentation support and identify candidate failure modes. The associated tasks include the preliminary prediction of failure pressure and probable failure locations and the development of models to be used in the detailed failure analyses. This paper describes the modeling approaches and some of the results obtained in the first phase of the analysis effort

  4. Assessment of Ultimate Load Capacity for Pre-Stressed Concrete Containment Vessel Model of PWR Design With BARC Code ULCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basha, S.M.; Singh, R.K.; Patnaik, R.; Ramanujam, S.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Venkat Raj, V.

    2002-01-01

    Ultimate load capacity assessment of nuclear containments has been a thrust research area for Indian Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) power programme. For containment safety assessment of Indian PHWRs a finite element code ULCA was developed at BARC, Trombay. This code has been extensively benchmarked with experimental results. The present paper highlights the analysis results for Prestressed Concrete Containment Vessel (PCCV) tested at Sandia National Labs, USA in a Round Robin analysis activity co-sponsored by Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), Japan and the U.S Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Three levels of failure pressure predictions namely the upper bound, the most probable and the lower bound (all with 90% confidence) were made as per the requirements of the round robin analysis activity. The most likely failure pressure is predicted to be in the range of 2.95 Pd to 3.15 Pd (Pd= design pressure of 0.39 MPa for the PCCV model) depending on the type of liners used in the construction of the PCCV model. The lower bound value of the ultimate pressure of 2.80 Pd and the upper bound of the ultimate pressure of 3.45 Pd are also predicted from the analysis. These limiting values depend on the assumptions of the analysis for simulating the concrete-tendon interaction and the strain hardening characteristics of the steel members. The experimental test has been recently concluded at Sandia Laboratory and the peak pressure reached during the test is 3.3 Pd that is enveloped by our upper bound prediction of 3.45 Pd and is close to the predicted most likely pressure of 3.15 Pd. (authors)

  5. Numerical simulation of a Charpy test and correlation of fracture toughness with fracture energy. Vessel steel and duplex stainless steel of the primary loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breban, P; Eripret, C.

    1995-01-01

    The analysis methods used to evaluate the harmlessness of defects in the components of the primary coolant circuit of pressurized water reactor are based on the knowledge of the failure properties of concerned materials. The toughness is used to be measured through tests performed on normalized samples. But in some cases, especially for the vessel steel submitted to irradiation effects or for cast components in duplex stainless steel sensitive to thermal ageing, these measurements are not available on the material aged in operation. Therefore, fracture resistance has been evaluated through Charpy tests. Toughness is thus obtained on the basis of an empirical correlation. To improve these predictions, a modeling of the Charpy test in the framework of the local approach to fracture has been performed, for both materials. For the vessel steel, a complete evaluation of toughness has been achieved on the basis of a bidimensional viscoplastic modeling under large strain assumptions and a post-treatment with a Weibull model (cleavage fracture). The main hypothesis (partition between plain stress and plain strain areas in the bidimensional modeling) was corrected after a three dimensional calculations with the finite element program Code-Aster. The fracture analysis put into evidence that damage considerations like cavity nucleation and growth have to be introduced in the model in order to improve the description of physical phenomena. Two ways of progress have been suggested and are in course of being investigated, one in the framework of local approach to failure, the other with the help of micro-macro relationship. With regard to the duplex steel, the description of a Charpy (U) test allowed to clearly discriminate between crack initiation and propagation phases. A modeling through an equivalent homogenous material with a damage law based on a modified Gurson potential enables to describe quantitatively both phases of fracture. It clearly appears that a reliable

  6. Hull Girder Fatigue Damage Estimations of a Large Container Vessel by Spectral Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ingrid Marie Vincent; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with fatigue damage estimation from the analysis of full-scale stress measurements in the hull of a large container vessel (9,400 TEU) covering several months of operation. For onboard decision support and hull monitoring sys-tems, there is a need for a fast reliable method...... for esti-mation of fatigue damage in the ship hull. The objective of the study is to investigate whether the higher frequency contributions from the hydroelastic responses (springing and whipping) can satisfactory be included in the fatigue damage estimation by only a few parameters derived from the stress...

  7. Pretest round robin analysis of 1:4-scale prestressed concrete containment vessel model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hessheimer, M.F.; Luk, V.K.; Klamerus, E.W.; Shibata, S.; Mitsugi, S.; Costello, J.F.

    2001-01-01

    The work reported herein represents, arguably, the state of the art in the numerical simulation of the response of a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) model to pressure loads up to failure. A significant expenditure of time and money on the part of the sponsors, contractors, and Round Robin participants was required to meet the objectives. While it is difficult to summarize the results of this extraordinary effort in a few paragraphs, the following observations are offered for the reader's consideration: almost half the participants used ABAQUS as the primary computational tool for performing the pretest analyses. The other participants used a variety of codes, most of which were developed ''in house''. (author)

  8. Corrosion of steel drums containing cemented ion-exchange resins as intermediate level nuclear waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffó, G. S.; Farina, S. B.; Schulz, F. M.

    2013-07-01

    Exhausted ion-exchange resins used in nuclear reactors are immobilized by cementation before being stored. They are contained in steel drums that may undergo internal corrosion depending on the presence of certain contaminants. The objective of this work is to evaluate the corrosion susceptibility of steel drums in contact with cemented ion-exchange resins with different aggressive species. The corrosion potential and the corrosion rate of the steel, and the electrical resistivity of the matrix were monitored for 900 days. Results show that the cementation of ion-exchange resins seems not to pose special risks regarding the corrosion of the steel drums. The corrosion rate of the steel in contact with cemented ion-exchange resins in the absence of contaminants or in the presence of 2.3 wt.% sulphate content remains low (less than 0.1 μm/year) during the whole period of the study (900 days). The presence of chloride ions increases the corrosion rate of the steel at the beginning of the exposure but, after 1 year, the corrosion rate drops abruptly reaching a value close to 0.1 μm/year. This is probably due to the lack of water to sustain the corrosion process. When applying the results obtained in the present work to estimate the corrosion depth of the steel drums containing the cemented radioactive waste after a period of 300 years, it is found that in the most unfavourable case (high chloride contamination), the corrosion penetration will be considerably lower than the thickness of the wall of the steel drums. Cementation of ion-exchange resins does not seem to pose special risks regarding the corrosion of the steel drums that contained them; even in the case the matrix is highly contaminated with chloride ions.

  9. Measurement of the yield and tensile strengths of neutron-irradiated and post-irradiation recovered vessel steels with notched specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valiente, A.

    1996-01-01

    Tensile circumferentially notched bars are examined as test specimens for measuring the yield and tensile strengths of nuclear pressure vessel steels under several conditions of irradiation and temperature that a vessel can experience during its service life, including recovery post-irradiation treatment. For all the vessel steels, notch geometries and conditions explored, it has been found that notched specimens fail by plastic collapse, and simple formulae have been derived that allow the yield and tensile strengths to be determined from the yielding and plastic collapse load of a notched specimen. Values measured in this way show good agreement with those measured by the standard tensile test method. (orig.)

  10. Study of cast and thermo-mechanically strengthened chromium-nickel nitrogen-containing steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokoshkina, V.G.; Kaputkina, L.M.; Svyazhin, A.G.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of nitrogen on the structure and strength of corrosion-resistant chromium-nickel steels after thermal and thermomechanical treatment is studied. The 06Kh15N7AD and 07Kh15N7DAMB steels alloying by nitrogen was accomplished through the basic composition steels remelting in the molecular nitrogen atmosphere under the pressure of 0.1-2.5 MPa. The 02Kh15N5DAF and 05Kh15N5DAM steels ingots were obtained through melting in a plasma furnace under the nitrogen pressure of 0.4MPA. The high-temperature thermomechanical treatment (HTMT) was performed by rolling with preliminary blanks heating up to 1050 deg C and the rolling end temperature not below 950 deg C. It is shown, that the HTMT of the nitrogen-containing steels makes it possible to obtain strength characteristics by 1.5 times exceeding the properties of traditionally applicable corrosion-resistant steels, whereby sufficiently high plasticity of the nitrogen-containing steel is retained [ru

  11. The procurement and testing of the stainless steel in-vessel panels of the Wendelstein 7-X Stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peacock, A., E-mail: alan.peacock@ipp.mpg.de [European Commission c/o Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 85748 Garching (Germany); Girlinger, A. [MAN Diesel and Turbo SE D-94469 Deggendorf (Germany); Vorkoeper, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Boscary, J.; Greuner, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 85748 Garching (Germany); Hurd, F. [European Commission c/o Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 85748 Garching (Germany); Mendelevitch, B.; Pirsch, H.; Stadler, R.; Zangl, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    320 In-vessel water cooled stainless steel panels, poloidal closure plates and pumping gap panels, covering an area of approximately 100 m{sup 2}, are used in Wendelstein7-X to protect the plasma vessel. The panels are manufactured at Deggendorf, Germany by MAN Diesel and Turbo SE. The panels consist of a laser welded sandwich of stainless steel plates together with a labyrinth of cooling channels and have a complicated geometry to fit the plasma vessel of Wendelstein 7-X. The hydraulic and mechanical stability requirements whilst maintaining the tight tolerances for the shape of the components are very demanding. The panels are designed to operate at up to an average heat load of 100 kW/m{sup 2} and a maximum heat load of 200 kW/m{sup 2} with a water velocity of approximately 2 m s{sup -1}. High heat flux testing of an un-cooled panel at a time averaged load of 200 kW/m{sup 2} for 10 s were successfully performed to support the start up phase of Wendelstein 7-X operation. Extensive testing both during manufacture and after delivery to IPP-Garching demonstrates the suitability of the delivered panels for their purpose.

  12. The procurement and testing of the stainless steel in-vessel panels of the Wendelstein 7-X Stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peacock, A.; Girlinger, A.; Vorkoeper, A.; Boscary, J.; Greuner, H.; Hurd, F.; Mendelevitch, B.; Pirsch, H.; Stadler, R.; Zangl, G.

    2011-01-01

    320 In-vessel water cooled stainless steel panels, poloidal closure plates and pumping gap panels, covering an area of approximately 100 m 2 , are used in Wendelstein7-X to protect the plasma vessel. The panels are manufactured at Deggendorf, Germany by MAN Diesel and Turbo SE. The panels consist of a laser welded sandwich of stainless steel plates together with a labyrinth of cooling channels and have a complicated geometry to fit the plasma vessel of Wendelstein 7-X. The hydraulic and mechanical stability requirements whilst maintaining the tight tolerances for the shape of the components are very demanding. The panels are designed to operate at up to an average heat load of 100 kW/m 2 and a maximum heat load of 200 kW/m 2 with a water velocity of approximately 2 m s -1 . High heat flux testing of an un-cooled panel at a time averaged load of 200 kW/m 2 for 10 s were successfully performed to support the start up phase of Wendelstein 7-X operation. Extensive testing both during manufacture and after delivery to IPP-Garching demonstrates the suitability of the delivered panels for their purpose.

  13. Stress Corrosion Cracking of an Austenitic Stainless Steel in Nitrite-Containing Chloride Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Singh Raman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the susceptibility of 316L stainless steel to stress corrosion cracking (SCC in a nitrite-containing chloride solution. Slow strain rate testing (SSRT in 30 wt. % MgCl2 solution established SCC susceptibility, as evidenced by post-SSRT fractography. Addition of nitrite to the chloride solution, which is reported to have inhibitive influence on corrosion of stainless steels, was found to increase SCC susceptibility. The susceptibility was also found to increase with nitrite concentration. This behaviour is explained on the basis of the passivation and pitting characteristics of 316L steel in chloride solution.

  14. A study of the effects of penetration framing on steel containment buckling capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, W.E.; Butler, T.A.

    1987-05-01

    Polycarbonate cylinders modeling steel containment structures were tested to study the effects of different framing designs around large penetrations on the static buckling capacity of containments. Two of the four models had equipment hatch penetrations and two had personnel airlock penetrations. Both types of models were tested with axial and shear loads as framing was incrementally added. Results indicate that, for the models constructed of polycarbonate, buckling is influenced minimally with added framing. Numerical results support the experimental results. Extrapolation of the results to containment constructed under field conditions with prototypic steel materials is discussed and further testing is recommended

  15. Protecting against failure by brittle fracture in ferritic steel shipping containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, M.W.; Langland, R.T.

    1983-01-01

    The possible use of ferritic steels for the containment structure of shipping casks has motivated the development of criteria for assuring the integrity of these casks under both normal and hypothetical accident conditions specified in Part 71 of the Code of Federal Regulations. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulation Guide 7.6 provides design criteria for preventing ductile failure steel shipping containers. The research described in this paper deals with criteria for preventing brittle fracture of ferritic steel shipping containers. Initially guidelines were developed for ferritic steel up to four inches thick (I). This was followed by an investigation of various criteria that might be used for monolithic thick walled casks greater than four inches thick (2). Three categories of safety are identified in the design of shipping containers. Category I, the highest level of safety, is appropriate for containment systems for spent nuclear fuel and high level waste transport packaging. In Category I, containers are designed to the highest level of safety and brittle fracture is essentially not possible. Categories II and III represent levels of safety commensurate with the consequences of release of lower levels of radioactivity. In these latter categories, consideration of factors contributing to brittle fracture, good engineering practice, and careful selection of material make brittle fracture unlikely under environmental conditions encountered during shipping. This paper will deal primarily with Category I containers. The guidelines for Category II and III containers are fully described elsewhere. 5 references, 10 figures, 3 tables

  16. Numerical Analysis on Heat Flux Distribution through the Steel Liner of the Ex-vessel Core Catcher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Se Hong; Choi, Choeng Ryul [ELSOLTEC, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung Jo; Lee, Kyu Bok [KEPCO, Gimcheon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Do Hyun [KHNP-CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In order to prevent material failure of steel container of the core catcher system due to high temperatures, heat flux through the steel liner wall must be kept below the critical heat flux (CHF), and vapor dry-out of the cooling channel must be avoided. In this study, CFD methodology has been developed to simulate the heat flux distribution in the core catcher system, involving following physical phenomena: natural convection in the corium pool, boiling heat transfer and solidification/melting of the corium. A CFD methodology has been developed to simulate the thermal/hydraulic phenomena in the core catcher system, and a numerical analysis has been carried out to estimate the heat flux through the steel liner of the core catcher. High heat flux values are formed at the free surface of the corium pool. However, the heat flux through the steel liner is maintained below the critical heat flux.

  17. Analysis and application of prestressed concrete reactor vessels for LMFBR containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchertas, A.H.; Fistedis, S.H.; Bazant, Z.P.; Belytschko, T.B.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical model of a prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) for LMFBR and the associated finite element computer code, involving an explicit time integration procedure, is described. The model is axisymmetric and includes simulations of the tensile cracking of concrete, the reinforcement, and a prestressing capability. The tensile cracking of concrete and the steel reinforcement are both modeled as continuously distributed within the finite element. The stresses in the reinforcement and concrete are computed separately and combined to give an overall stress state of the composite material. Attention is given to the fact that cracks do not form instantaneously, but develop gradually. Thus, after crack initiation the normal stress is reduced to zero gradually as a function of time. Residual shear resistance of cracks due to aggregate interlock is also taken into account. Prestressing of the PCRV is modeled by special structural members which represent an averaged prestressing layer equivalent to an axisymmetric shell. The internal prestressing members are superimposed over the reinforced concrete body of the PCRV; they are permitted to stretch and slide in a predetermined path, simulating the actual tendons. The validity of the code is examined by comparison with experimental data. (Auth.)

  18. Criterion of cleavage crack propagation and arrest in a nuclear PWR vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bousquet, Amaury

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this PhD thesis is to understand physical mechanisms of cleavage crack propagation and arrest in the 16MND5 PWR vessel steel and to propose a robust predicting model based on a brittle fracture experimental campaign of finely instrumented laboratory specimens associated with numerical computations. First, experiments were carried out on thin CT25 specimens at five temperatures (-150 C, -125 C, -100 C, -7 C, -50 C). Two kinds of crack path, straight or branching path, have been observed. To characterize crack propagation and to measure crack speed, a high-speed framing camera system was used, combined with the development of an experimental protocol which allowed to observe CT surface without icing inside the thermal chamber and on the specimen. The framing camera (520 000 fps) has allowed to have a very accurate estimation of crack speed on the complete ligament of CT (∼ 25 mm). Besides, to analyse experiments and to study the impact of viscosity on the mechanical response around the crack tip, the elastic-viscoplastic behavior of the ferritic steel has been studied up to a strain rate of 104 s -1 for the tested temperatures.The extended Finite Element Method (X-FEM) was used in CAST3M FE software to model crack propagation. Numerical computations combine a local non linear dynamic approach with a RKR type fracture stress criterion to a characteristic distance. The work carried out has confirmed the form of the criterion proposed by Prabel at -125 C, and has identified the dependencies of the criterion on temperature and strain rate. From numerical analyzes in 2D and 3D, a multi-temperature fracture stress criterion, increasing function of the strain rate, was proposed. Predictive modeling were used to confirm the identified criterion on two specimen geometries (CT and compressive ring) in mode I at different temperatures. SEM observations and 3D analyzes made with optical microscope showed that the fracture mechanism was the cleavage associated

  19. Inelastic Cyclic Deformation Behaviors of Type 316H Stainless Steel for Reactor Pressure Vessel of Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor at Elevated Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Ji-Hyun; Hong, Seokmin; Koo, Gyeong-Hoi; Lee, Bong-Sang; Kim, Young-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Type 316H stainless steel is a primary candidate material for a reactor pressure vessel of a sodium-cooled fast (SFR) reactor which is under development in Korea. The reactor pressure vessel for a SFR is subjected to inelastic deformation induced by cyclic thermal stress. Fully reversed cyclic testing and ratcheting testing at elevated temperatures were performed to characterize the inelastic cyclic deformation behaviors of Type 316H stainless steel at the SFR operating temperature. It was found that cyclic hardening of Type 316H stainless steel was enhanced, and the accumulation of ratcheting deformation of Type 316H stainless steel was retarded at around the SFR operating temperature. The results of the tensile testing and the microstructural investigation for dislocated structures after the inelastic deformation testing showed that dynamic strain aging affected the inelastic cyclic deformation behavior of Type 316 stainless steel at around the SFR operating temperature.

  20. Application of the master curve approach to fracture mechanics characterisation of reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viehrig, Hans-Werner; Zurbuchen, Conrad; Kalkhof, Dietmar

    2010-06-01

    The paper presents results of a research project founded by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Inspectorate concerning the application of the Master Curve approach in nuclear reactor pressure vessels integrity assessment. The main focus is put on the applicability of pre-cracked 0.4T-SE(B) specimens with short cracks, the verification of transferability of MC reference temperatures T 0 from 0.4T thick specimens to larger specimens, ascertaining the influence of the specimen type and the test temperature on T 0 , investigation of the applicability of specimens with electroerosive notches for the fracture toughness testing, and the quantification of the loading rate and specimen type on T 0 . The test material is a forged ring of steel 22 NiMoCr 3-7 of the uncommissioned German pressurized water reactor Biblis C. SE(B) specimens with different overall sizes (specimen thickness B=0.4T, 0.8T, 1.6T, 3T, fatigue pre-cracked to a/W=0.5 and 20% side-grooved) have comparable T 0 . T 0 varies within the 1σ scatter band. The testing of C(T) specimens results in higher T 0 compared to SE(B) specimens. It can be stated that except for the lowest test temperature allowed by ASTM E1921-09a, the T 0 values evaluated with specimens tested at different test temperatures are consistent. The testing in the temperature range of T 0 ± 20 K is recommended because it gave the highest accuracy. Specimens with a/W=0.3 and a/W=0.5 crack length ratios yield comparable T 0 . The T 0 of EDM notched specimens lie 41 K up to 54 K below the T 0 of fatigue pre-cracked specimens. A significant influence of the loading rate on the MC T 0 was observed. The HSK AN 425 test procedure is a suitable method to evaluate dynamic MC tests. The reference temperature T 0 is eligible to define a reference temperature RT To for the ASME-KIC reference curve as recommended in the ASME Code Case N-629. An additional margin has to be defined for the specific type of transient to be considered in the RPV integrity assessment

  1. RPV-1: A Virtual Test Reactor to simulate irradiation effects in light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jumel, Stephanie; Van-Duysen, Jean Claude

    2005-01-01

    Many key components in commercial nuclear reactors are subject to neutron irradiation which modifies their mechanical properties. So far, the prediction of the in-service behavior and the lifetime of these components has required irradiations in so-called 'Experimental Test Reactors'. This predominantly empirical approach can now be supplemented by the development of physically based computer tools to simulate irradiation effects numerically. The devising of such tools, also called Virtual Test Reactors (VTRs), started in the framework of the REVE Project (REactor for Virtual Experiments). This project is a joint effort among Europe, the United States and Japan aimed at building VTRs able to simulate irradiation effects in pressure vessel steels and internal structures of LWRs. The European team has already built a first VTR, called RPV-1, devised for pressure vessel steels. Its inputs and outputs are similar to those of experimental irradiation programs carried out to assess the in-service behavior of reactor pressure vessels. RPV-1 is made of five codes and two databases which are linked up so as to receive, treat and/or convey data. A user friendly Python interface eases the running of the simulations and the visualization of the results. RPV-1 is sensitive to its inputs (neutron spectrum, temperature, ...) and provides results in conformity with experimental ones. The iterative improvement of RPV-1 has been started by the comparison of simulation results with the database of the IVAR experimental program led by the University of California Santa Barbara. These first successes led 40 European organizations to start developing RPV-2, an advanced version of RPV-1, as well as INTERN-1, a VTR devised to simulate irradiation effects in stainless steels, in a large effort (the PERFECT project) supported by the European Commission in the framework of the 6th Framework Program

  2. A phenomenological method of mechanical properties definition of reactor pressure vessels (RPV) steels VVER according to the ball indentation diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakirov, M. B.; Potapov, V.V.; Massoud, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    This work presents specimen-free methods of a standard uniaxial tension diagram construction and RPV (reactor pressure vessel) steels VVER strength properties definition out of a continuous ball indentation diagram. A similarity phenomenon of uniaxial tension strain curves at a hardening area and an area of a ball indentation constitutes the ground of the methods. The methods are developed on the basis of the uniform graphic representation of elasto-plastic strain processes by indentation and tension and with the reception of the unified yield curve at a hardening area. The calculation results on the phenomenological method conducted for a wide range of RPV steels conditions of nuclear reactors have shown a good precision as far as strain curves construction by the uniaxial tension out of the elasto-plastic indentation diagram is concerned. (authors)

  3. Study on the welding continuous cooling transformation and weldability of SA508Gr4 steel for nuclear pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Qingwei; Ma, Yonglin; Xing, Shuqing; Chen, Zhongyi

    2017-01-01

    SA508Gr4 is a newly developed high-strength steel for nuclear reactor pressure vessels. Its welding characteristics remain largely unexplored. In this work, the simulated heat affected zone continuous cooling transformation (SH-CCT) diagram of SA508Gr4 steel was constructed and the high-temperature cooling phase compositions and the properties of the heat affected zone (HAZ) were characterized using dilatometry and microscopic tests. The results show that the phase transformation in the HAZ was divided into bainite and martensite transformation stages. When 4.6 ≤ t_8_/_5 (the HAZ cooling time from 800 C to 500 C) ≤ 15 s, lath-shaped martensite was fully developed, resulting in extensive hardening and cold cracking in the HAZ, while the cooling time required to form the bainite completely exceeds 1 200 s. Thus, to improve weld quality, preheating to 196 C or higher is recommended.

  4. Study on the welding continuous cooling transformation and weldability of SA508Gr4 steel for nuclear pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Qingwei; Ma, Yonglin; Xing, Shuqing; Chen, Zhongyi [Inner Mongolia Univ. of Science and Technology, Baotou (China). School of Material and Metallurgy; Kang, Xiaolan [Baotou Vocational and Technical College (China)

    2017-02-15

    SA508Gr4 is a newly developed high-strength steel for nuclear reactor pressure vessels. Its welding characteristics remain largely unexplored. In this work, the simulated heat affected zone continuous cooling transformation (SH-CCT) diagram of SA508Gr4 steel was constructed and the high-temperature cooling phase compositions and the properties of the heat affected zone (HAZ) were characterized using dilatometry and microscopic tests. The results show that the phase transformation in the HAZ was divided into bainite and martensite transformation stages. When 4.6 ≤ t{sub 8/5} (the HAZ cooling time from 800 C to 500 C) ≤ 15 s, lath-shaped martensite was fully developed, resulting in extensive hardening and cold cracking in the HAZ, while the cooling time required to form the bainite completely exceeds 1 200 s. Thus, to improve weld quality, preheating to 196 C or higher is recommended.

  5. Effect of niobium and titanium addition on the hot ductility of boron containing steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Kyung Chul; Mun, Dong Jun; Koo, Yang Mo; Lee, Jae Sang

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Addition of only Nb without Ti has little influence in the hot ductility of B steel. → Hot ductility loss of B-Nb steel is due to grain boundary precipitation of BN. → Adding a small amount of Ti improve the hot ductility of B-Nb steel. → In B-Nb-Ti steel, hot ductility improvement is related to presence of TiN particle. → Presence of TiN particles makes the BN precipitates' distribution more homogeneous. - Abstract: Hot ductility of boron containing steel (B steel) with adding Nb (0.03 wt.%) (B-Nb steel) and B-Nb steel with adding Ti (0.0079 wt.%) (B-Nb-Ti steel) was quantified using hot tensile tests. The specimens were solution-treated at 1350 deg. C and cooled at 20 deg. C s -1 to tensile test temperature (T) in the range of 750 ≤ T ≤ 1050 deg. C. After that, they were strained to failure at a strain rate of 2.5 x 10 -3 s -1 . For the B-Nb steel, severe hot ductility loss was observed at 850 ≤ T ≤ 950 deg. C, which covered the low temperature in which austenite (γ) single-phase exists, and the high temperature at which γ and ferrite (α) coexist. Ductility loss in the B-Nb steel was caused by the presence of a network of BN precipitates, rather than by Nb(C, N) precipitates at the γ grain boundaries. In contrast, hot ductility of the B-Nb-Ti steel was remarkably improved at 850 ≤ T ≤ 950 deg. C. In the B-Nb-Ti steel, BN precipitates preferentially on TiN particles, resulting in increased BN precipitation in the γ grain interior and a decrease in the network of BN precipitates at the γ grain boundaries. These changes reduce strain localization at the γ grain boundaries and therefore increase the hot ductility of the steel.

  6. Significance of fluid-structure interaction phenomena for containment response to ex-vessel steam explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almstroem, H.; Sundel, T. [National Defence Research Establishment, Stockholm (Sweden); Frid, W.; Engelbrektson, A.

    1998-01-01

    When studying the structural response of a containment building to ex-vessel steam explosion loads, a two-step procedure is often used. In the first step of this procedure the structures are treated as rigid and the pressure-time history generated by the explosion at the rigid wall is calculated. In the second step the calculated pressure is applied to the structures. The obvious weakness of the two-step procedure is that it does not correspond to the real dynamic behaviour of the fluid-structure system. The purpose of this paper is to identify and evaluate the relevant fluid-structure interaction phenomena. This is achieved through direct treatment of the explosion process and the structural response. The predictions of a direct and two-step treatment are compared for a BWR Mark II containment design, consisting of two concentric walls interacting with water masses in the central and annular pools. It is shown that the two-step approach leads to unrealistic energy transfer in the containment system studied, and to significant overestimation of the deflection of the containment wall. As regards the pedestal wall, the direct method analysis shows that the flexibility of this wall affects the pressure-time history considerably. Three load types have been identified for this wall namely shock load, water blow as a result of water cavitation, and hydrodynamic load. Reloading impulse due to cavitation phenomena plays an important role as it amounts to about 40% of the total impulse load. Investigation of the generality of the cavitation phenomena in the context of ex-vessel steam explosion loads was outside the scope of this work. (author)

  7. Significance of fluid-structure interaction phenomena for containment response to ex-vessel steam explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almstroem, H.; Sundel, T. (Nat. Defence Res. Establ., Tumba (Sweden)); Frid, W. (Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, SE-10658, Stockholm (Sweden)); Engelbrektson, A. (VBB/SWECO, Box 34044, SE-10026, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1999-05-01

    When studying the structural response of a containment building to ex-vessel steam explosion loads, a two-step procedure is often used. In the first step of this procedure the structures are treated as rigid and the pressure-time history generated by the explosion, at the rigid wall, is calculated. In the second step the calculated pressure is applied to the structures. The obvious weakness of the two-step procedure is that it does not correspond to the real dynamic behaviour of the fluid-structure system. The purpose of this paper is to identify and evaluate the relevant fluid-structure interaction phenomena. This is achieved through direct treatment of the explosion process and the structural response. The predictions of a direct and two-step treatment are compared for a BWR Mark II containment design, consisting of two concentric walls interacting with water masses in the central and annular pools. It is shown that the two-step approach leads to unrealistic energy transfer in the containment system studied and to significant overestimation of the deflection of the containment wall. As regards the pedestal wall, the direct method analysis shows that the flexibility of this wall affects the pressure-time history considerably. Three load types have been identified for this wall namely shock load, water blow as a result of water cavitation, and hydrodynamic load. Reloading impulse due to cavitation phenomena plays an important role as it amounts to [approx]40% of the total impulse load. Investigation of the generality of the cavitation phenomena in the context of ex-vessel steam explosion loads was outside the scope of this work. (orig.) 5 refs.

  8. Significance of fluid-structure interaction phenomena for containment response to ex-vessel steam explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almstroem, H.; Sundel, T.; Frid, W.; Engelbrektson, A.

    1999-01-01

    When studying the structural response of a containment building to ex-vessel steam explosion loads, a two-step procedure is often used. In the first step of this procedure the structures are treated as rigid and the pressure-time history generated by the explosion, at the rigid wall, is calculated. In the second step the calculated pressure is applied to the structures. The obvious weakness of the two-step procedure is that it does not correspond to the real dynamic behaviour of the fluid-structure system. The purpose of this paper is to identify and evaluate the relevant fluid-structure interaction phenomena. This is achieved through direct treatment of the explosion process and the structural response. The predictions of a direct and two-step treatment are compared for a BWR Mark II containment design, consisting of two concentric walls interacting with water masses in the central and annular pools. It is shown that the two-step approach leads to unrealistic energy transfer in the containment system studied and to significant overestimation of the deflection of the containment wall. As regards the pedestal wall, the direct method analysis shows that the flexibility of this wall affects the pressure-time history considerably. Three load types have been identified for this wall namely shock load, water blow as a result of water cavitation, and hydrodynamic load. Reloading impulse due to cavitation phenomena plays an important role as it amounts to ∼40% of the total impulse load. Investigation of the generality of the cavitation phenomena in the context of ex-vessel steam explosion loads was outside the scope of this work. (orig.)

  9. Environmentally-Assisted Cracking of Low-Alloy Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels under Boiling Water Reactor Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, H.P.; Ritter, S

    2002-02-01

    The present report summarizes the experimental work performed by PSI on the environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC) of low-alloy steels (LAS) in the frame of the RIKORR-project during the period from January 2000 to August 2001. Within this project, the EAC crack growth behaviour of different low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels, weld filler and weld heat-affected zone materials is investigated under simulated transient and steady-state BWR/NWC power operation conditions. The EAC crack growth behaviour of different low-alloy RPV steels was characterized by slow rising load (SRL) / low-frequency corrosion fatigue (LFCF) and constant load tests with pre-cracked fracture mechanics specimens in oxygenated high-temperature water at temperatures of either 288, 250, 200 or 150 C. These tests revealed the following important interim results: Under low-flow and highly oxidizing (ECP >= 100 mV SHE) conditions, the ASME XI 'wet' reference fatigue crack growth curve could be significantly exceeded by cyclic fatigue loading at low frequencies (<0.001 Hz), at high and low load-ratios R, and by ripple loading near to DKth fatigue thresholds. The BWR VIP 60 SCC disposition lines may be significantly or slightly exceeded (even in steels with a low sulphur content) in the case of small load fluctuations at high load ratios (ripple loading) or at intermediate temperatures (200 -250 C) in RPV materials, which show a distinct susceptibility to dynamic strain ageing (DSA). (author)

  10. The restart of Belgium reactors of Doel 3 and Tihange 2. Doel 3 and Tihange 2: indications of defects in vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    In a first part, an IRSN report comments the issue of restarting some Belgium reactors after the detection of defects (due to the presence of hydrogen) in the vessel steel of reactors during the third decennial inspection by Electrabel. The report describes the procedure followed by Electrabel and the Belgium nuclear authority (AFCN) to confirm that the detected defects were not harmful. It comments the defect detection and characterisation, the origin and potential evolution of defects, the assessment of mechanical characteristics of some components, the assessment of the defect harmfulness in terms of failure risk, and additional measurements. The second part contains the AFCN report which addresses: the chronology and scientific context, the actors, the situation of other Belgium reactors, an indication of published reports and press releases

  11. Feasibility studies on design of steel containment for AHWR subjected to normal and seismic loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Rajeev; Reddy, G.R.; Vaze, K.K.; Kumar, Ajay

    2011-01-01

    Reactor Containments in nuclear power plants are the final leak tight harriers preventing release of radioactive material during the accident to the environment. It should provide containment against fission product release, passive containment cooling and should be economical. In the world various configurations have been adopted depending on the accident pressures, temperatures, leak rate requirements and radius of exclusion zones. economy, speed of construction etc. Some of the containments arc of Reinforced Cement Concrete (RCC), Prestressed Cement Concrete (PCC), RCC with the liner, PCC with the liner and Steel. The design concepts and the choice of containment depend on the country practices. The main objective of this paper is to design, analyze and characterize the effectiveness of steel containment for AHWR and compare it with other type of containments. The paper discusses the literature regarding various types of existing containments in the world. In depth study of design practice for cylinder and various types of heads have been discussed. Also discusses the finite element modeling of the containment, analysis for normal and accidental loads and the design qualification as per the ASME and IS-800 codes. In the conclusion the advantage of steel containment is highlighted with the small discussion on the newer trends of construction. (author)

  12. Two, three and four buttressed PWR containment vessels. A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufour, C.J.; Cheyrezy, M.H.; Thorsen, N.E.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to analyse the advantages and drawbacks of different arrangements of hood tendons and buttresses for a PWR containment vessel. It is shown that the solution with two buttresses and full hoop tendons (through 360 0 ) gives: acceptable secondary stresses and strains; a lower total cost of the prestressing; a shorter time schedule for prestressing operations; a smaller 'forbidden area' for the penetration lay out. This arrangement has been used for the first time (to our knowledge) in PWR containment design for the nuclear plant of DOEL III, Belgium. The comparative study has been carried out for a containment vessel with a 85 cm thick wall and an interior diameter of 42.50 m. The Guaranteed Ultimate Tensile Strength of the tendons is 9000 KN. The minimum required prestressing force is 10 300 KN per linear meter of height. The buttresses are 4.0 m long and 1.70 m thick on their vertical centerline. The following arrangements have been studied: 4 buttresses and 3/4 hoop tendons; 3 buttresses and 2/3 hoop tendons; 3 buttresses and full hoop tendons; 2 buttresses and full hoop tendons. The ovalisation and other secondary effects result mainly from three different causes: the average prestressing force is not constant around a hoop; the buttress itself constitutes a sudden thickening and creates local disturbances even under an axisymmetric loading: the anchored tendons are straight over their first 6 meters and they initiate local stress perturbations in the vicinity of the junction of the buttress and the wall. The determination of these secondary effects has been performed by a plane stress finite element analysis

  13. Development of containers sealing system like part of surveillance program of the vessel in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero C, J.; Hernandez C, R.; Fernandez T, F.; Rocamontes A, M.; Perez R, N.

    2009-10-01

    The owners of nuclear power plants should be demonstrate that the embrittlement effects by neutronic radiation do not commit the structural integrity from the pressure vessel of nuclear reactors, during conditions of routine operation and below postulate accident. For this reason, there are surveillance programs of vessels of nuclear power plants, in which are present surveillance capsules. A surveillance capsule is compound by the support, six containers for test tubes and dosimeters. The containers for test tubes are of two types: rectangular container for test tubes, Charpy V and Cylindrical Container for tension test tubes. These test tubes are subject to a same or bigger neutronic flow to that of vessel, being representative of vessel mechanical conditions. The test tubes are rehearsed to watch over the increase of embrittlement that presents the vessel. This work describes the development of welding system to seal the containers for test tubes, these should be filled with helium of ultra high purity, to a pressure of an atmosphere. In this system the welding process Gas Tungsten Arc Welding is used, a hermetic camera that allows to place the containers with three grades of freedom, a vacuum subsystem and pressure, high technology equipment's like: power source with integrated computer, arc starter of high frequency, helium flow controller, among others. Finally, the advances in the inspection system for the qualification of sealing system are mentioned, system that should measure the internal pressure of containers and the helium purity inside these. (Author)

  14. Open site tests on corrosion of carbon steel containers for radioactive waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barinov, A.S.; Ojovan, M.I.; Ojovan, N.V.; Startceva, I.V.; Chujkova, G.N.

    1999-01-01

    Testing of waste containers under open field conditions is a component part of the research program that is being carried out at SIA Radon for more than 20 years to understand the long-term behavior of radioactive waste forms and waste packages. This paper presents the preliminary results of these ongoing studies. The authors used a typical NPP operational waste, containing 137 Cs, 134 Cs, and 60 Co as the dominant radioactive constituents. Bituminized and vitrified waste samples with 30--50 wt.% waste loading were prepared. Combined effects of climatic factors on corrosion behavior of carbon steel containers were estimated using gravimetric and chemical analyses. The observations suggest that uniform corrosion of containers prevails under open field conditions. The upper limits for the lifetime of containers were derived from calculations based on the model of atmospheric steel corrosion. Estimated lifetime values range from 300 to 600 years for carbon steel containers with the wall thickness of 2 mm containing vitrified waste, and from 450 to 500 years for containers with the wall thickness of 2.5 mm that were used for bituminized waste. However, following the most conservative method, pitting corrosion may cause container integrity failure after 60 to 90 years of exposure

  15. Precipitation evolution in a Ti-free and Ti-containing stainless maraging steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schober, M.; Schnitzer, R.; Leitner, H.

    2009-01-01

    Stainless maraging steels have a Cr content higher than 12 wt% and show a excellent combination of high strength and ductility, which make them attractive for use in machinery fields and aircraft applications. The massive increase of strength during ageing treatment of maraging steels is related to a precipitation sequence of various nm-scaled intermetallic phases. The peak hardness especially in Ti-containing maraging steels can be reached after short-time ageing at temperatures around 500 o C. However, precipitation reactions in different stainless maraging steels are not fully understood, especially the evolution from clustering over growing to coarsening. In the present work a commercial maraging steel and a Ti-containing model alloy are investigated and compared to each other. The steels were isothermally heat treated at 525 o C for a range of times. Special emphasis was laid on the correlation of hardness to the formation and presence of different kinds of precipitates. The isothermal aged samples were investigated by using two advanced three-dimensional energy compensated atom probes (LEAP TM and 3DAP TM ) both in voltage mode and in laser mode. The atom probe data were correlated to standard hardness measurements. The results show that the partial substitution of Al by Ti results in a different precipitation behaviour. While the Ti-free maraging steel exhibit only one type of precipitate, the Ti-containing grade shows a change in the type of precipitates during ageing. However, this change leads to an accelerated coarsening and thus to a faster drop in hardness.

  16. Precipitation evolution in a Ti-free and Ti-containing stainless maraging steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, M; Schnitzer, R; Leitner, H

    2009-04-01

    Stainless maraging steels have a Cr content higher than 12wt% and show a excellent combination of high strength and ductility, which make them attractive for use in machinery fields and aircraft applications. The massive increase of strength during ageing treatment of maraging steels is related to a precipitation sequence of various nm-scaled intermetallic phases. The peak hardness especially in Ti-containing maraging steels can be reached after short-time ageing at temperatures around 500 degrees C. However, precipitation reactions in different stainless maraging steels are not fully understood, especially the evolution from clustering over growing to coarsening. In the present work a commercial maraging steel and a Ti-containing model alloy are investigated and compared to each other. The steels were isothermally heat treated at 525 degrees C for a range of times. Special emphasis was laid on the correlation of hardness to the formation and presence of different kinds of precipitates. The isothermal aged samples were investigated by using two advanced three-dimensional energy compensated atom probes (LEAP and 3DAP) both in voltage mode and in laser mode. The atom probe data were correlated to standard hardness measurements. The results show that the partial substitution of Al by Ti results in a different precipitation behaviour. While the Ti-free maraging steel exhibit only one type of precipitate, the Ti-containing grade shows a change in the type of precipitates during ageing. However, this change leads to an accelerated coarsening and thus to a faster drop in hardness.

  17. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiki, Tadaharu; Saba, Kazuhisa.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the earthquake resistance as well as reduce the size of a container for a nuclear reactor with no adverse effects on the decrease of impact shock to the container and shortening of construction step. Constitution: Reinforcing profile steel materials are welded longitudinally and transversely to the inner surface of a container, and inner steel plates are secured to the above profile steel materials while keeping a gap between the materials and the container. Reactor shielding wall planted to the base concrete of the container is mounted to the pressure vessel, and main steam pipeways secured by the transverse beams and led to the outside of container is connected. This can improve the rigidity earthquake strength and the safetiness against the increase in the inside pressure upon failures of the container. (Yoshino, Y.)

  18. Endurance test report of rubber sealing materials for the containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, R.; Watanabe, K.; Hanashima, K.

    2015-01-01

    In the event of a nuclear power plant accident such as a core meltdown and a cooling system failure, the containment contains radioactive materials released from the reactor pressure vessel to reduce the activity of the radioactive materials and the effects of radiation in the vicinity of the plant. Since high sealing performance and high pressure resistance are required of the containment, a silicone or EPDM rubber gasket with high heat and radiation resistance is used for the sealing of the sealing boundary of the containment. In recent years, it has been shown that a large amount of steam is released into the containment in the case of a severe accident. Consequently, radiation resistance at high temperature as well as steam resistance is required of the rubber gasket placed at the sealing boundary. However, the steam resistance of silicone rubber is not necessarily as good as that of EPDM rubber. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the sealing characteristics of rubber gaskets in such a degrading environment in a severe accident. O. Kato et al. [1] conducted a study on the degradation status of rubber gaskets and their application limits at high temperature. However, few studies have evaluated rubber gaskets in high-temperature radiation and steam environments. In this study, we degraded silicone rubber and EPDM rubber used for the containment in the high-temperature radiation and steam environments expected to occur in a severe accident and evaluated the useful life of the rubber as a sealing material by estimating the change in its performance as a sealing material from the change in permanent compressive strain in the rubber. (author)

  19. Disclosure of the oscillations in kinetics of the reactor pressure vessel steel damage at fast neutron intensity decreasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasikov, E.; Nikolaenko, V.

    2017-01-01

    Fast neutron intensity influence on reactor materials radiation damage is a critically important question in the problem of the correct use of the accelerated irradiation tests data for substantiation of the materials workability in real irradiation conditions that is low neutron intensity. Investigations of the fast neutron intensity (flux) influence on radiation damage and experimental data scattering reveal the existence of non-monotonous sections in kinetics of the reactor pressure vessels (RPV) steel damage. Discovery of the oscillations as indicator of the self-organization processes presence give reasons for new ways searching on reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel radiation stability increasing and attempt of the self-restoring metal elaboration. Revealing of the wavelike process in the form of non monotonous parts of the kinetics of radiation embrittlement testifies that periodic transformation of the structure take place. This fact actualizes the problem of more precise definition of the RPV materials radiation embrittlement mechanisms and gives reasons for search of the ways to manage the radiation stability (nanostructuring and so on to stimulate the radiation defects annihilation), development of the means for creating of more stableness self recovering smart materials.

  20. Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program intermediate-scale pressure vessel tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, R.H.; Merkle, J.G.; Smith, G.C.; Whitman, G.D.

    1977-01-01

    The tests of intermediate-size vessels with sharp flaws permitted the comparison of experimentally observed behavior with analytical predictions of the behavior of flawed pressure vessels. Fracture strains estimated by linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) were accurate in the cases in which the flaws resided in regions of high transverse restraint and the fracture toughness was sufficiently low for unstable fracture to occur prior to yielding through the vessel wall. When both of these conditions were not present, unstable fracture did occur, always preceded by stable crack growth; and the cylinders with flaws initially less than halfway through the wall attained gross yield prior to burst. Predictions of failure pressure of the vessels with flawed nozzles, based upon LEFM estimates of failure strain, were very conservative. LEFM calculations of critical load were based upon small-specimen fracture toughness test data. Whenever gross yielding preceded failure, the actual strains achieved were considerably greater than the estimated strains at failure based on LEFM. In such cases the strength of the vessel may be no longer dependent upon plane-strain fracture toughness but upon the capacity of the cracked section to carry the imposed load stably in the plastic range. Stable crack growth, which has not been predictable quantitatively, is an important factor in elastic-plastic analysis of strength. The ability of the flawed vessels to attain gross yield in unflawed sections has important qualitative implications on pressure vessel safety margins. The gross yield condition occurs in light-water-reactor pressure vessels at about 2 x design pressure. The intermediate vessel tests that demonstrated a capacity for exceeding this load confirm that the presumed margin of safety is not diminished by the presence of flaws of substantial size, provided that material properties are adequate

  1. Development of mobile manipulator for maintenance work in containment vessels of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omichi, Takeo; Nishihara, Masatoshi; Hosaka, Shigetaka; Nakayama, Junji; Sato, Masatoshi; Ishida, Michiyasu

    1985-01-01

    The teleoperation system with robot is described for in the containment vessels of nuclear power plants. We have developed a high level robot system as the practical use level. The robot is designed to execute the locomotions and manipulations required for closing and opening the valve, tightening the bolt and others. The robot consists of a locomotor with four legs and two driving wheels, an articulated manipulator with seven joints, and an ITV arm with stereo-camera. The size of the robot is small, that is about 500 mm in length, 500 mm in width, 1200 mm in height and 420 kg in weight. The robot can be operated in a hostile environment, which has a 10 6 R gamma ray dose, 70 deg C temperature, 100 % relative humidity. We have added an advanced control method in order to reduce the operator's load. Also, an interlock and a fail-safe control are installed in the robot system. (author)

  2. Parametric Study on Important Variables of Aircraft Impact to Prestressed Concrete Containment Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Sangshup; Hahm, Daegi; Choi, Inkil [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    In this paper, to find the damage parameter, it is necessary to use many analysis cases and the time reduction. Thus, this paper uses a revised version of Riera's method. Using this method, the response has been found a Prestressed Concrete Containments Vessels (PCCVs) subject to impact loading, and the results of the velocity and mass of the important parameters have been analyzed. To find the response of the PCCVs subjected to aircraft impact load, it is made that a variable forcing functions depending on the velocity and fuel in the paper. The velocity variation affects more than fuel percentage, and we expect that the severe damage of the PCCVs with the same material properties is subject to aircraft impact load (more than 200m/s and 70%)

  3. Positron annihilation spectroscopy and small angle neutron scattering characterization of nanostructural features in high-nickel model reactor pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glade, Stephen C. [Nuclear Engineering Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 (United States); Wirth, Brian D. [Nuclear Engineering Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 (United States)]. E-mail: bdwirth@nuc.berkeley.edu; Odette, G. Robert [University of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Asoka-Kumar, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2006-06-01

    Irradiation embrittlement in nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels results from the hardening by a high number density of nanometer scale features. In steels with more than {approx}0.10% Cu, the dominant features are often Cu-rich precipitates typically alloyed with Mn, Ni and Si. At low-Cu and low-to-intermediate Ni levels, so-called matrix hardening features are believed to be vacancy-solute cluster complexes, or their remnants. However, Mn-Ni-Si rich precipitates, with Mn plus Ni contents greater than Cu, can form at high alloy Ni contents and are promoted at irradiation temperatures lower than the nominal 290 deg. C. Even at very low-Cu levels, late blooming Mn-Ni-Si rich precipitates are a significant concern due to their potential to form large volume fractions of hardening features. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) and small angle neutron scattering neutron (SANS) measurements were used to characterize the fine-scale microstructure in split-melt A533B steels with varying Ni and Cu contents, irradiated at selected conditions from 270 to 310 deg. C between {approx}0.04 and 1.6 x 10{sup 23} n m{sup -2}. The objective was to assess the character, composition and magnetic properties of Cu-rich precipitates, as well as to gain insight on the matrix features. The results suggest that the irradiated very low-Cu and intermediate Ni steel contains small vacancy-Mn-Ni-Si cluster complexes, but not large, well-formed and highly enriched Mn-Ni-Si phases. The hardening features in steels containing 0.2% and 0.4% Cu, and 0.8% and 1.6% Ni are consistent with well-formed, non-magnetic Cu-Ni-Mn precipitates. The precipitate number densities and volume fractions increase, while their sizes decrease, with increasing Ni and decreasing irradiation temperature. The precipitates evolve with fluence in stages of nucleation, growth and limited coarsening.

  4. Corrosion behavior of sodium-exposed stainless steels in chloride-containing aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, P.C.S.; Grundy, B.R.; Miller, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of sodium-exposed stainless steels in chloride-containing aqueous solutions was investigated. Results showed that sodium-corroded Type 316 stainless steel (prototypic Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) fuel cladding) maintains its integrity after five months exposure in these solutions at 82 0 C and with chloride content up to 500 ppM. In contrast, sensitized and sodium mass transfer deposit-containing Type 304 stainless steel failed in the high chloride solution (500 ppM) within ten days at the same temperature. The failure was initiated by pitting and subsequently accelerated by intergranular attack. The results also show that high pH tends to reduce the susceptibility to failure while procedures commonly used for sodium removal have no significant effect on the water corrosion behavior of the test material. Based on the current results, it is concluded that water shortage is feasible for spent fuels in a LMFBR reprocessing plant

  5. A study on the irradiation embrittlement and recovery characteristics of light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Se Hwan; Hong, Jun Hwa; Lee, Bong Sang; Oh, Jong Myung; Song, Sook Hyang; Milan, Brumovsky

    1999-03-01

    The neutron irradiation embrittlement phenomenon of light water RPV steels greatly affects the life span for safe operation of a reactor. Reliable evaluation and prediction of the embrittlement of RPV steels, especially of aged reactors, are of importance to the safe operation of a reactor. In addition, the thermal recovery of embrittled RPV has been recognized as an option for life extension. This study aimed to tracer/refine available technologies for embrittlement characterization and prediction, to prepare relevant materials for several domestic RPV steels of the embrittlement and recovery, and to find out possible remedy for steel property betterment. Small specimen test techniques, magnetic measurement techniques, and the Meechan and Brinkmann's recovery curve analysis method were examined/applied as the evaluation techniques. Results revealed a high irradiation sensitivity in YG 3 RPV steel. Further extended study may be urgently needed. Both the small specimen test technique for the direct determination of fracture toughness, and the magnetic measurement technique for embrittlement evaluation appeared to be continued for the technical improvement and data base preparation. Manufacturing process relevant to the heat treatment appeared to be improved in lowering the irradiation sensitivity of the steel. Further study is needed especially in applying the present techniques to the new structural materials under new irradiation environment of advanced reactors. (author)

  6. A study on the irradiation embrittlement and recovery characteristics of light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Se Hwan; Hong, Jun Hwa; Lee, Bong Sang; Oh, Jong Myung; Song, Sook Hyang; Milan, Brumovsky [NRI Czech (Czech Republic)

    1999-03-01

    The neutron irradiation embrittlement phenomenon of light water RPV steels greatly affects the life span for safe operation of a reactor. Reliable evaluation and prediction of the embrittlement of RPV steels, especially of aged reactors, are of importance to the safe operation of a reactor. In addition, the thermal recovery of embrittled RPV has been recognized as an option for life extension. This study aimed to tracer/refine available technologies for embrittlement characterization and prediction, to prepare relevant materials for several domestic RPV steels of the embrittlement and recovery, and to find out possible remedy for steel property betterment. Small specimen test techniques, magnetic measurement techniques, and the Meechan and Brinkmann's recovery curve analysis method were examined/applied as the evaluation techniques. Results revealed a high irradiation sensitivity in YG 3 RPV steel. Further extended study may be urgently needed. Both the small specimen test technique for the direct determination of fracture toughness, and the magnetic measurement technique for embrittlement evaluation appeared to be continued for the technical improvement and data base preparation. Manufacturing process relevant to the heat treatment appeared to be improved in lowering the irradiation sensitivity of the steel. Further study is needed especially in applying the present techniques to the new structural materials under new irradiation environment of advanced reactors. (author)

  7. Corrosion of steel drums containing simulated radioactive waste of low and intermediate level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farina, S.B.; Schulz Rodríguez, F.; Duffó, G.S.

    2013-01-01

    Ion-exchange resins are frequently used during the operation of nuclear power plants and constitute radioactive waste of low and intermediate level. For the final disposal inside the repository the resins are immobilized by cementation and placed inside steel drums. The eventful contamination of the resins with aggressive species may cause corrosion problems to the drums. In order to assess the incidence of this phenomenon and to estimate the lifespan of the steel drums, in the present work, the corrosion susceptibility of steel drums in contact with cemented ion-exchange resins contaminated with different aggressive species was studied. The aggressive species studied were chloride ions (main ionic species of concern) and sulphate ions (produced during radiolysis of the cationic exchange-resins after cementation). The corrosion rate of the steel was monitored over a time period of 900 days and a chemical and morphological analysis of the corrosion products formed on the steel in each condition was performed. When applying the results obtained in the present work to estimate the corrosion depth of the drums containing the cemented radioactive waste after a period of 300 years (foreseen durability of the Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste facility in Argentina), it was found that in the most unfavourable case (high chloride contamination), the corrosion penetration will be considerably lower than the thickness of the wall of the steel drums. (author)

  8. Computational methods for fracture analysis of heavy-section steel technology (HSST) pressure vessel experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, B.R.; Bryan, R.H.; Bryson, J.W.; Merkle, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    This paper summarizes the capabilities and applications of the general-purpose and special-purpose computer programs that have been developed for use in fracture mechanics analyses of HSST pressure vessel experiments. Emphasis is placed on the OCA/USA code, which is designed for analysis of pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) conditions, and on the ORMGEN/ADINA/ORVIRT system which is used for more general analysis. Fundamental features of these programs are discussed, along with applications to pressure vessel experiments

  9. Specific Features of Structural-Phase State and Properties of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel at Elevated Irradiation Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Kuleshova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers influence of elevated irradiation temperature on structure and properties of 15Kh2NMFAA reactor pressure vessel (RPV steel. The steel is investigated after accelerated irradiation at 300°C (operating temperature of VVER-1000-type RPV and 400°C supposed to be the operating temperature of advanced RPVs. Irradiation at 300°C leads to formation of radiation-induced precipitates and radiation defects-dislocation loops, while no carbide phase transformation is observed. Irradiation at a higher temperature (400°C neither causes formation of radiation-induced precipitates nor provides formation of dislocation loops, but it does increase the number density of the main initial hardening phase—of the carbonitrides. Increase of phosphorus concentration in grain boundaries is more pronounced for irradiation at 400°C as compared to irradiation at 300°C due to influence of thermally enhanced diffusion at a higher temperature. The structural-phase changes determine the changes of mechanical properties: at both irradiation temperatures irradiation embrittlement is mainly due to the hardening mechanism with some contribution of the nonhardening one for irradiation at 400°C. Lack of formation of radiation-induced precipitates at T = 400°C provides a small ΔTK shift (17°C. The obtained results demonstrate that the investigated 15Kh2NMFAA steel may be a promising material for advanced reactors with an elevated operating temperature.

  10. Monitoring the aging of pressure vessel steels by TEP measurements: Advantages and current limitations of the method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleber, X.; Saillet, S.

    2011-01-01

    The TEP (Thermoelectric Power or Seebeck coefficient) characterizes the ability of a material to generate an electrical potential difference when the material is subjected to a heat flux. It can be defined from the Seebeck effect, which manifests itself in a circuit formed by two different metals subjected to a temperature gradient. The origin of the thermoelectric power is, as the resistivity, due to electronic phenomena occurring at the atomic scale in relation to the crystallographic structure of the material. TEP measurements are used to characterize small microstructural changes at the scale of crystal defects. The high sensitivity of TEP makes it an excellent probe able of detecting small changes in the microstructural state, including precipitation, dissolution of alloying elements, hardening and recovery after deformation. It has been shown recently that the TEP of pressure vessels steels was sensitive to irradiation, making this measurement technique a potential candidate for monitoring the aging of the pressure vessel steel. However, the first measurements on Charpy specimens of the EDF monitoring program (Pressure Vessel Surveillance Program) showed a strong negative effect of specimen geometry on the accuracy that can be achieved. In this paper we show what the origins of these inaccuracies are. From numerical simulation and finite element model, we describe the roles of the thermal contact resistance as well as the influence of the geometry of the blocks device. A model is proposed to overcome these negative effects. We also show the effect of the presence of heterogeneities in the material on the TEP measurement, and the importance of their localization. Finally, solutions are proposed to improve the device for measuring TEP on PVSP Charpy specimens. (authors)

  11. Low Temperature Gaseous Nitriding of a Stainless Steel Containing Strong Nitride Formers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    Low temperature thermochemical surface hardening of the precipitation hardening austenitic stainless steel A286 in solution treated state was investigated. A286 contains, besides high amounts of Cr, also substantial amounts of strong nitride formers as Ti, Al and V. It is shown that simultaneous...

  12. Electrochemical Performance of Low-Carbon Steel in Alkaline Model Solutions Containing Hybrid Aggregates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.; Hu, J.; De Wit, J.H.W.; Boshkov, N.; Radeva, T.; Milkova, V.; Van Breugel, K.

    2010-01-01

    This work reports on the electrochemical performance of low-carbon steel electrodes in model alkaline solutions in the presence of 4.9.10-4 g/l hybrid aggregates i.e. cement extract, containing PDADMAC (poly (diallyl, dimethyl ammonium chloride) / PAA (Poly (acrylic acid)/ PDADMAC over a CaO core.

  13. Solubility of corrosion products of plain steel in oxygen-containing water solutions at high parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martynova, O.I.; Samojlov, Yu.F.; Petrova, T.I.; Kharitonova, N.L.

    1983-01-01

    Technique for calculation of solubility of iron corrosion products in oxygen-containing aqueous solutions in the 298-573 K temperature range is presented. Solubility of corrosion products of plain steel in deeply-desalinizated water in the presence of oxygen for the such range of the temperatures is experimentally determined. Rather good convergence between calculated and experimental data is noted

  14. Influence of Steel Fibers on the Structural Performance of a Prestressed Concrete Containment Building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choun, Youngsun; Hahm, Daegi; Park, Junhee

    2013-01-01

    A large number of previous experimental investigations indicate that the use of steel fibers in conventional reinforced concrete (RC) can enhance the structural and functional performance of prestressed concrete containment buildings (PCCBs) in nuclear power plants. A prevention of through-wall cracks and an increase of the post-cracking ductility will improve the ultimate internal pressure capacity, and a high shear resistance under cyclic loadings will increase the seismic resisting capacity. In this study, the effects of steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC) on the ultimate pressure and seismic capacities of a PCCB are investigated. The effects of steel fibers on the ultimate pressure and shear resisting capacities of a PCCB are investigated. It is revealed that both of the ultimate pressure capacity and the shear resisting capacity of a PCCB can be greatly enhanced by introducing steel fibers in a conventional RC. Estimation results indicate that the ultimate pressure capacity and maximum lateral displacement of a PCCB can be improved by 16% and 64%, respectively, if a conventional RC contains hooked steel fibers in a volume fraction of 1.0%

  15. The Promotion of Liquid Phase Sintering of Boron-Containing Powder Metallurgy Steels by Adding Nickel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Ming-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Boron is a feasible alloying element for liquid phase sintering (LPS of powder metallurgy (PM steels. This study investigated the effect of nickel (Ni, which is widely used in PM steels, on the liquid phase sintering of boron-containing PM steels. The results showed that the addition of 1.8wt% Ni does not apparently modify the LPS mechanism of boron-containing PM steels. However, adding 1.8wt% Ni slightly improves the LPS densification from 0.60 g/cm3 to 0.65 g/cm3, though the green density is reduced. Thermodynamic simulation demonstrated that the presence of Ni lowers the temperature region of liquid formation, resulting in enhanced LPS densification. Moreover, original graphite powders remains in the steels sintered at 1200 ºC. These graphite powders mostly dissolve into the base iron powder when the sintering temperature is increased from 1200 ºC to 1250 ºC.

  16. Influence of Steel Fibers on the Structural Performance of a Prestressed Concrete Containment Building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choun, Youngsun; Hahm, Daegi; Park, Junhee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    A large number of previous experimental investigations indicate that the use of steel fibers in conventional reinforced concrete (RC) can enhance the structural and functional performance of prestressed concrete containment buildings (PCCBs) in nuclear power plants. A prevention of through-wall cracks and an increase of the post-cracking ductility will improve the ultimate internal pressure capacity, and a high shear resistance under cyclic loadings will increase the seismic resisting capacity. In this study, the effects of steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC) on the ultimate pressure and seismic capacities of a PCCB are investigated. The effects of steel fibers on the ultimate pressure and shear resisting capacities of a PCCB are investigated. It is revealed that both of the ultimate pressure capacity and the shear resisting capacity of a PCCB can be greatly enhanced by introducing steel fibers in a conventional RC. Estimation results indicate that the ultimate pressure capacity and maximum lateral displacement of a PCCB can be improved by 16% and 64%, respectively, if a conventional RC contains hooked steel fibers in a volume fraction of 1.0%.

  17. Corrosion Measurements in Reinforced Fly Ash Concrete Containing Steel Fibres Using Strain Gauge Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Sounthararajan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion of steel bars in concrete is a serious problem leading to phenomenal volume expansion and thereby leading to cover concrete spalling. It is well known that the reinforced concrete structures subjected to chloride attack during its service life cause these detrimental effects. The early detection of this damage potential can extend the service life of concrete. This study reports the comprehensive experimental studies conducted on the identification of corrosion mechanism in different types of reinforced concrete containing class-F fly ash and hooked steel fibres. Fly ash replaced concrete mixes were prepared with 25% and 50% fly ash containing steel fibres at 0.5%, 1.0%, and 1.5% by volume fraction. Corrosion process was investigated in an embedded steel bar (8 mm diameter reinforced in concrete by passing an impressed current in sodium chloride solution. Strain gauge attached to the rebars was monitored for electrical measurements using strain conditioner. Strain gauge readings observed during the corrosion process exhibited the volume changes of the reinforcement embedded inside the concrete. The corrosion potential of different steel fibre reinforced concrete mixes with fly ash addition showed higher resistance towards the corrosion initiation.

  18. Technology development and production of elongated shell for reactor vessel active zone of WWER-TOI project from steel 15Cr2NiMoVN class 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shklyaev, S.Eh.; Titova, T.I.; Ratushev, D.V.; Shul'gan, N.A.; Eroshkin, S.B.; Durynin, V.A.; Efimov, S.V.; Dub, V.S.; Kulikov, A.P.; Romashkin, A.N.

    2015-01-01

    Production process for the elongated shell blank of the active zone of the reactor pressure vessel made from steel 15Cr2NiMoVN Class 1 with finished sizes Dext=4.655 mm, Dint=4.240 mm, H=4.910 mm (height for heat treatment – 5.750 mm) is presented. For the first time in Russia in production site of OMZ-Special steel LLC a unique elongated shell blank of the reactor vessel active zone was made from ingot 420.0 t for WWER-TOI project fully meeting the specified requirements in terms of metallurgical quality and set of service properties [ru

  19. Formation of microcracks during stress-relief annealing of a weldment in pressure vessel steel of type A508 C1 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liljestrand, L.-G.; Oestberg, G.; Lindhagen, P.

    1978-01-01

    Crack formation in the heat-affected zones of heavy section weldments of type A 508 C1 2 pressure vessel steel during stress-relief annealing has been studied on an actual weldment and on simulated structures. Mechanical testing of the latter showed that stress relaxation of the order of magnitude occuring during stress-relief annealing can produce cracks of the same kind as occasionally found in weldments of pressure vessel steel. The primary cause is believed to be grain boundary sliding, possibly but not necessarily enhanced by impurities. (Auth.)

  20. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naruse, Yoshihiro.

    1990-01-01

    The thickness of steel shell plates in a reactor container embedded in sand cussions is monitored to recognize the corrosion of the steel shell plates. That is, the reactor pressure vessel is contained in a reactor container shell and the sand cussions are disposed on the lower outside of the reactor container shell to elastically support the shell. A pit is disposed at a position opposing to the sand cussions for measuring the thickness of the reactor container shell plates. The pit is usually closed by a closing member. In the reactor container thus constituted, the closing member can be removed upon periodical inspection to measure the thickness of the shell plates. Accordingly, the corrosion of the steel shell plates can be recognized by the change of the plate thickness. (I.S.)

  1. Ductile fracture toughness of heavy section pressure vessel steel plate. A specimen-size study of ASTM A 533 steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.A.

    1979-09-01

    The ductile fracture toughness, J/sub Ic/, of ASTM A 533, Grade B, Class 1 and ASTM A 533, heat treated to simulate irradiation, was determined for 10- to 100-mm thick compact specimens. The toughness at maximum specimen load was also measured to determine the conservatism of J/sub Ic/. The toughness of ASTM A 533, Grade B, Class 1 steel was 349 kJ/m 2 and at the equivalent upper shelf temperature, the heat treated material exhibited 87 kJ/m 2 . The maximum load fracture toughness was found to be linearly proportional to specimen size, and only specimens which failed to meet ASTM size criteria exhibited maximum load toughness less than J/sub Ic/

  2. Corrosion protection and antifouling properties of varnish-coated steel containing natural additive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd-El-Nabey Besheir Ahmed A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion protection and antifouling properties of varnish-coated steel panels containing different amounts of cannabis extracts were investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS, salt spray and immersion tests in 0.5 M NaCl solution and subjected to a field test in seawater. Analysis of the experimental data showed that the presence of cannabis extract resisted the deterioration (peeling off tendency of the varnish-coated steel panels exposed to aggressive environments. Visual inspection showed that the cannabis extract also provided good antifouling properties.

  3. Corrosion of austenitic steels and their components in vanadium-containing chloride melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, A. V.; Polovov, I. B.; Rebrin, O. I.; Lisienko, D. G.

    2014-08-01

    The corrosion of austenitic 12Kh18N10T, 10Kh17N13M2T, and 03Kh17N14M3 steels and their components (Cr, Fe, Ni, Mo) in NaCl-KCl-VCl2 melts with 5 wt % V at 750°C is studied. The rates and mechanisms of corrosion of the materials under these conditions are determined. The processes that occur during contact of the metals and steels with vanadium-containing chloride electrolytes are investigated.

  4. The processing of boron-containing stainless steels for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, A.H.; King, K.J.; Wilkinson, J.

    1991-01-01

    Stainless steels containing boron additions of up to 2 wt% are used in the nuclear power and fuel reprocessing industries during storage and transportation of spent nuclear fuel elements. The metallurgical characteristics of these steels are described, with particular reference to the manufacture, chemical homogeneity, mechanical properties and weldability of plate products. Results are presented of tests performed on welded fabrications to demonstrate their resistance to impact loading. A neutron absorption meter for simple and rapid measurement of product boron content is described. (author)

  5. Perturbation of baseline thermal stress in the Mound 9516 Shipping Package primary containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sansalone, K.H.F.

    1995-01-01

    Full-capacity loading of heat sources into the Mound 9516 Shipping Package primary containment vessel (PCV) results in temperature gradients which are symmetric, due to the axisymmetry of the package design. Concern over the change in thermal gradients (and therefore, stress) in the PCV due to sub-capacity loading led to the analytical examination of this phenomenon. The PCVs are cylindrical in shape and are loaded into the package such that they and all containment components are concentrically arranged along a common longitudinal axis. If the design full-capacity loading of the PCVs in this package assumes the axisymmetric (or more precisely, cyclicly symmetric) arrangement of its heat-producing contents, then sub-capacity loading implies that in many cases, the load arrangement could be asymmetric with respect to the longitudinal axis. It is then feasible that the departure from heat load axisymmetry could perturb the nominal thermal gradients so that thermally-induced stress within the PCV might increase to levels deemed unacceptable. This study applies Finite Element analysis (FEA) to the problem and demonstrates that no such unacceptable thermal stress increase occurs in the PCV material due to the asymmetric arrangement of contents. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  6. Eulerian finite-difference calculations of explosions in partially water-filled overstrong cylindrical containment vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, S.L.; Herrmann, W.

    1977-01-01

    Calculations, using the two-dimensional Eulerian finite-difference code CSQ, were performed for the problem of a small spherical high-explosive charge detonated in a closed heavy-walled cylindrical container partially filled with water. Data from corresponding experiments, specifically performed to validate codes used for hypothetical core disruptive accidents of liquid metal fast breeder reactors, are available in the literature. The calculations were performed specifically to test whether Eulerian methods could handle this type of problem, to determine whether water cavitation, which plays a large role in the loadings on the roof of the containment vessel, could be described adequately by an equilibrium liquid-vapor mixed phase model, and to investigate the trade-off between accuracy and cost of the calculations by using different sizes of computational meshes. Comparison of the experimental and computational data shows that the Eulerian method can handle the problem with ease, giving good predictions of wall and floor loadings. While roof loadings are qualitatively correct, peak impulse appears to be affected by numerical resolution and is underestimated somewhat

  7. Lessons Learned Following the Successful Decommissioning of a Reaction Vessel Containing Lime Sludge and Technetium-99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, P. M.; Watson, D. D.; Hylko, J. M.

    2002-01-01

    This paper documents how WESKEM, LLC utilized available source term information, integrated safety management, and associated project controls to safely decommission a reaction vessel and repackage sludge containing various Resource Conservation and Recovery Act constituents and technetium-99 (Tc-99). The decommissioning activities were segmented into five separate stages, allowing the project team to control work related decisions based on their knowledge, experience, expertise, and field observations. The information and experience gained from each previous stage and rehearsals contributed to modifying subsequent entries, further emphasizing the importance of developing hold points and incorporating lessons learned. The hold points and lessons learned, such as performing detailed personal protective equipment (PPE) inspections during sizing and repackaging operations, and using foam-type piping insulation to prevent workers from cutting or puncturing their PPE on sharp edge s or small shards generated during sizing operations, minimized direct contact with the Tc-99. To prevent the spread of contamination, the decommissioning activities were performed inside a containment enclosure connected to negative air machines. After performing over 235 individual entries totaling over 285 project hours, only one first aid was recorded during this five-stage project

  8. Effects of no stiffness inside unbonded tendon ducts on the behavior of prestressd concrete containment vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Sang Hoon; Kwak, Hyo Gyong [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Rae Young; Noh, Sang Hoon [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The numerical simulation methodologies to evaluate the structural behaviors of prestressed concrete containment vessels (PCCVs) have been substantially developed in recent decades. However, there remain several issues to be investigated more closely to narrow the gap between test results and numerical simulations. As one of those issues, the effects of no stiffness inside unbonded tendon ducts on the behavior of PCCVs are investigated in this study. Duct holes for prestressing cables' passing are provided inside the containment wall and dome in one to three directions for general PCCVs. The specific stress distribution along the periphery of the prestressing duct hole and the loss of stiffness inside the hole, especially in an unbonded tendon system, are usually neglected in the analysis of PCCVs with the assumption that the duct hole is filled with concrete. However, duct holes are not small enough to be neglected. In this study, the effects of no stiffness inside the unbonded tendon system on the behaviors of PCCVs are evaluated using both analytical and numerical approaches. From the results, the effects of no stiffness in unbonded tendons need to be considered in numerical simulations for PCCVs, especially under internal pressure loading.

  9. Effects of no stiffness inside unbonded tendon ducts on the behavior of prestressd concrete containment vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Sang Hoon; Kwak, Hyo Gyong; Jung, Rae Young; Noh, Sang Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The numerical simulation methodologies to evaluate the structural behaviors of prestressed concrete containment vessels (PCCVs) have been substantially developed in recent decades. However, there remain several issues to be investigated more closely to narrow the gap between test results and numerical simulations. As one of those issues, the effects of no stiffness inside unbonded tendon ducts on the behavior of PCCVs are investigated in this study. Duct holes for prestressing cables' passing are provided inside the containment wall and dome in one to three directions for general PCCVs. The specific stress distribution along the periphery of the prestressing duct hole and the loss of stiffness inside the hole, especially in an unbonded tendon system, are usually neglected in the analysis of PCCVs with the assumption that the duct hole is filled with concrete. However, duct holes are not small enough to be neglected. In this study, the effects of no stiffness inside the unbonded tendon system on the behaviors of PCCVs are evaluated using both analytical and numerical approaches. From the results, the effects of no stiffness in unbonded tendons need to be considered in numerical simulations for PCCVs, especially under internal pressure loading

  10. A study of the mechanisms for the irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solt, G.; Zimmermann, U.; Waeber, W.B.; Mercier, O.; Frisius, F.; Ghazi-Wakili, K.

    1987-03-01

    Irradiation damage particles were detected by small angle neutron scattering and positron annihilation techniques in two RPV steels. The particle radii were 8A and 14A prior to heat treatments for the plate and weldment, respectively; annealing leads to coarsening in the weldment, the volume fraction remains essentially constant at about 0.14%. The model of copper-rich precipitates 'diluted' by Mn atoms or, alternatively, by vacancy agglomerates is consistent with the neutron scattering data, the presence of simple voids in the weldment would contradict the positron results. Preliminary results on these steels and also on related alloys by methods 'new' in this field are reported. (author)

  11. Potential high fluence response of pressure vessel internals constructed from austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Greenwood, L.R.; Harrod, D.L.

    1993-08-01

    Many of the in-core components in pressurized water reactors are constructed of austenitic stainless steels. The potential behavior of these components can be predicted using data on similar steels irradiated at much higher displacement rates in liquid-metal reactors or water-cooled mixed-spectrum reactors. Consideration of the differences between the pressurized water environment and that of the other reactors leads to the conclusion that significant amounts of void swelling, irradiation creep, and embrittlement will occur in some components, and that the level of damage per atomic displacement may be larger in the pressurized water environment

  12. Corrosion behavior of stainless steel and zirconium in nitric acid containing highly oxidizing species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayuzumi, Masami; Fujita, Tomonari

    1994-01-01

    Corrosion behavior of 304ELC, 310Nb stainless steels and Zirconium was investigated in the simulated dissolver solution of a reprocessing plant to obtain fundamental data for life prediction. Corrosion of heat transfer surface was also investigated in nitric acid solutions containing Ce ion. The results obtained are as follows: (1) Stainless steels showed intergranular corrosion in the simulated dissolver solution. The corrosion rate increased with time and reached to a constant value after several hundred hours of immersing time. The constant corrosion rate changed depending on potential suggesting that corrosion potential dominates the corrosion process. 310Nb showed superior corrosion resistance to 304ELC. (2) Corrosion rate of stainless steels increased in the heat transfer condition. The causes of corrosion enhancement are estimated to be higher corrosion potential and higher temperature of heat transfer surface. (3) Zirconium showed perfect passivity in all the test conditions employed. (author)

  13. Characterizing the effect of carbon steel exposure in sulfide containing solutions to microbially induced corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherar, B.W.A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Power, I.M. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Keech, P.G.; Mitlin, S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Southam, G. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Shoesmith, D.W., E-mail: dwshoesm@uwo.c [Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 5B7 (Canada)

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: Compares inorganic sulfide and sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) on steel corrosion. Mackinawite was the dominant iron sulfide phase. SRBs can form nanowires, presumably grown to acquire energy. - Abstract: This article compares the electrochemical effects induced by inorganic sulfide and sulfate reducing bacteria on the corrosion of carbon steel - a subject of concern for pipelines. Biological microcosms, containing varying concentrations of bioorganic content, were studied to investigate changes to the morphology of biofilms and corrosion product deposits. Raman analysis indicated mackinawite (FeS{sub 1-x}) was the dominant iron sulfide phase grown both abiotically and biotically. A fascinating feature of biological media, void of an organic electron donor, was the formation of putative nanowires that may be grown to acquire energy from carbon steel by promoting the measured cathodic reaction.

  14. Fracture toughness of welded joints of ASTM A543 steel plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susukida, H.; Uebayashi, T.; Yoshida, K.; Ando, Y.

    1977-01-01

    Fracture toughness and weldability tests have been performed on a high strength steel which is a modification of ASTM A543 Grade B Class 1 steel, with a view to using it for nuclear reactor containment vessels. The results showed that fracture toughness of welded joints of ASTM A543 modified high strength steel is superior and the steel is suitable for manufacturing the containment vessels

  15. The mechanism of solute-enriched clusters formation in neutron-irradiated pressure vessel steels: The case of Fe-Cu model alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subbotin, A.V., E-mail: Alexey.V.Subbotin@gmail.com [Scientific and Production Complex Atomtechnoprom, Moscow 119180 (Russian Federation); Panyukov, S.V., E-mail: panyukov@lpi.ru [PN Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117924 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    Mechanism of solute-enriched clusters formation in neutron-irradiated pressure vessel steels is proposed and developed in case of Fe-Cu model alloys. The suggested solute-drag mechanism is analogous to the well-known zone-refining process. We show that the obtained results are in good agreement with available experimental data on the parameters of clusters enriched with the alloying elements. Our model explains why the formation of solute-enriched clusters does not happen in austenitic stainless steels with fcc lattice structure. It also allows to quantify the method of evaluation of neutron irradiation dose for the process of RPV steels hardening.

  16. Recent investigations and tests with the BBR winding system for circumferential prestressing of concrete vessels and containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuett, K.; Speck, F.E.

    1993-01-01

    Prestressed concrete pressure vessels for nuclear power stations need post-tensioning systems of large capacity. For the circumferential prestressing, the continuous winding of prestressing steel has several advantages when compared to the use of large numbers of single tendons. About 15 years ago Bureau BBR Ltd (Zuerich) developed the winding system SW 8500. The further development work interrupted at that time for lack of immediate applications was resumed 4 years ago by Bureau BBR together with SUSPA on the ground of new projects being evaluated

  17. Mechanosynthesis of A Ferritic ODS (Oxide Dispersion Strengthened) Steel Containing 14% Chromium and Its Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivai, A. K.; Dimyati, A.; Adi, W. A.

    2017-05-01

    One of the advanced materials for application at high temperatures which is aggressively developed in the world is ODS (Oxide Dispersion strengthened) steel. ODS ferritic steels are one of the candidate materials for future nuclear reactors in the world (Generation IV reactors) because it is able to be used in the reactor above 600 °C. ODS ferritic steels have also been developed for the interconnect material of SOFC (Solid Oxide Fuel Cell) which will be exposed to about 800 °C of temperature. The steel is strengthened by dispersing homogeneously of oxide particles (ceramic) in nano-meter sized in the matrix of the steel. Synthesis of a ferritic ODS steel by dispersion of nano-particles of yttrium oxide (yttria: Y2O3) as the dispersion particles, and containing high-chromium i.e. 14% has been conducted. Synthesis of the ODS steels was done mechanically (mechanosynthesis) using HEM (High Energy ball Milling) technique for 40 and 100 hours. The resulted samples were characterized using SEM-EDS (Scanning Electron Microscope-Energy Dispersive Spectroscope), and XRD (X-ray diffraction) to analyze the microstructure characteristics. The results showed that the crystal grains of the sample with 100 hours milling time was much smaller than the sample with 40 hours milling time, and some amount of alloy was formed during the milling process even for 40 hours milling time. Furthermore, the structure analysis revealed that some amount of iron atom substituted by a slight amount of chromium atom as a solid solution. The quantitative analysis showed that the phase mostly consisted of FeCr solid-solution with the structure was BCC (body-centered cubic).

  18. Computational methods for fracture analysis of heavy-section steel technology (HSST) pressure vessel experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, B.R.; Bryan, R.H.; Bryson, J.W.; Merkle, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    This paper summarizes the capabilities and applications of the general-purpose and special-purpose computer programs that have been developed at ORNL for use in fracture mechanics analyses of HSST pressure vessel experiments. Emphasis is placed on the OCA/USA code, which is designed for analysis of pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) conditions, and on the ORMGEN/ADINA/ORVIRT system which is used for more general analysis. Fundamental features of these programs are discussed, along wih applications to pressure vessel experiments. (orig./HP)

  19. Small specimen measurements of dynamic fracture toughness of heavy section steels for nuclear pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Y.; Iwadate, T.; Suzuki, K.

    1987-01-01

    This study presents the dynamic fracture toughness properties (KId) of 12 heats of RPV steels measured using small specimens and analysed based on the current research. The correlation between the KId test and other engineering small specimen tests such as Charpy test and drop weight test are also discussed and a method to predict the KId value is presented. (orig./HP)

  20. Irradiation Effects at 160-240 deg C in Some Swedish Pressure Vessel Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grounes, M [AB Atomenergi, Nykoeping (Sweden); Myers, H P [Chalmers Institute of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Hannerz, N E [Motala Verkstads AB, Motala (Sweden)

    1967-09-15

    Tensile specimens, Charpy impact specimens and miniature impact specimens of six steels in different conditions were irradiated to 2.8 x 10{sup 18} and 5.6 x 10{sup 18} n/cm{sup 2} (> 1 MeV) at 160-240 deg C. The steels investigated were SIS 142103, 2103/R3, NO 345, Fortiweld, Fortiweld HS and OK 54 P. There is no correlation between the increase in transition temperature and initial transition temperature. However, changes in strength and ductility can be correlated to the initial yield strength. The increases in transition temperature due to strain aging and irradiation are approximately additive. The irradiation-induced changes in 2103/R3 and Fortiweld HS steels do not vary with position in the thickness of the plate. Different tempering treatments in Fortiweld HS steel do not change the extent of irradiation effects. Normal Charpy V-notch impact specimens and miniature specimens give the same irradiation-induced increase in transition temperature.

  1. Dislocation structures in 16MND5 pressure vessel steel strained in uniaxial tension

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Obrtlík, Karel; Robertson, Ch.; Marini, B.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 342, - (2005), s. 35-41 ISSN 0022-3115 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS200410502 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : bainitic steels * dislocation structure * low temperature deformation Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 1.414, year: 2005

  2. Irradiation Effects at 160-240 deg C in Some Swedish Pressure Vessel Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grounes, M.; Myers, H.P.; Hannerz, N.E.

    1967-09-01

    Tensile specimens, Charpy impact specimens and miniature impact specimens of six steels in different conditions were irradiated to 2.8 x 10 18 and 5.6 x 10 18 n/cm 2 (> 1 MeV) at 160-240 deg C. The steels investigated were SIS 142103, 2103/R3, NO 345, Fortiweld, Fortiweld HS and OK 54 P. There is no correlation between the increase in transition temperature and initial transition temperature. However, changes in strength and ductility can be correlated to the initial yield strength. The increases in transition temperature due to strain aging and irradiation are approximately additive. The irradiation-induced changes in 2103/R3 and Fortiweld HS steels do not vary with position in the thickness of the plate. Different tempering treatments in Fortiweld HS steel do not change the extent of irradiation effects. Normal Charpy V-notch impact specimens and miniature specimens give the same irradiation-induced increase in transition temperature

  3. Neutron spectrum measurement inside containment vessel at Kori nuclear power plant unit 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, J. M.; Kim, T. W.; Kim, K. D.; Youn, C. H. [Nuclear Environment Technology Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-01

    There would be a case for the radiation worker have to work inside of the containment vessel to inspect or repair reactor facilities. In this case, the information about distribution of neutron field is needed to estimate neutron exposure dose of worker. Neutron spectra were measured by BMS(Bonner Multisphere Spectrometer) at 4 points of 6 ft and 20 ft, 2 points of 44 ft, 5 points of 70 ft in containment vessel of Kori unit 1. From the calculation, the following results were obtained. Neutron fluxes of 6 ft were between 2.623 x 10{sup 2} and 2.746 x 10{sup 4} neutron/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}sec, average neutron energies were between 9.209 x 10{sup -6} and 3.377 x 10{sup -2} MeV, equivalent doses of neutron were between 0.025 and 2.675 mSv/hr. Neutron fluxes of 20 ft were between 1.771 x 10{sup 1} and 1.682 x 10{sup 3} neutron/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}sec, average neutron energies were between 6.084 x 10{sup -6} and 2.988 x 10{sup -1} MeV, equivalent doses of neutron were between 0.004 and 0.228 mSv/hr. Neutron fluxes of 44 ft were between 3.367 x 10{sup 2} and 3.483 x 10{sup 2} neutron / cm{sup 2}{center_dot}sec, average neutron energies were between 3.962 x 10{sup -2} and 7.360 x 10{sup -2} MeV, equivalent doses of neutron were between 0.069 and 0.089 mSv/hr. Neutron fluxes of 70 ft were between 4.553 x 10{sup 3} and 1.407 x 10{sup 4} neutron/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}sec, average neutron energies were between 3.668 x 10{sup -4} and 6.764 x 10{sup -2} MeV, equivalent doses of neutron were between 0.449 and 2.660 mSv/hr.

  4. Quantitative Analysis on Carbide Precipitation in V-Ti Microalloyed TRIP Steel Containing Aluminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Shiyu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introducing fine precipitates is an important way to enhance the properties of transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP steels. In present work, two V-Ti microalloyed TRIP steels containing aluminum with different content were compared. The average size, size distribution and numbers of vanadium-titanium carbides in samples cold rolled, quenched after being held at 800°C and quenched after intercritical annealing at 800°C and being held at bainitic isothermal transformation temperature of 400°C were investigated by using the technique of carbon extraction replica, twin jet chemical polishing thinning and transmission electron microscopy. The carbides were identified to be (Ti,VC precipitates in steel A and VC in steel B respectively, precipitated mainly from ferrites grains. The average equivalent radius was 3~6nm. Comparison of the experimental results in A and B steel revealed low carbon diffusion rate caused by aluminum inhibited the coarsening of vanadium-titanium carbides. The experimental results also showed that VC carbides dissolution occurred during the intercritical annealing at 800°C.

  5. Development of high strength hot rolled low carbon copper-bearing steel containing nanometer sized carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phaniraj, M.P. [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Young-Min [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joonho [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Goo, Nam Hoon [Sheet Product Design Group, Hyundai Steel Co., North Industrial Street 1400, 343-823, DangJin 343-823 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Ik; Suh, Jin-Yoo; Jung, Woo-Sang [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Jae-Hyeok, E-mail: jhshim@kist.re.kr [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, In-Suk, E-mail: insukchoi@kist.re.kr [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-01

    A low carbon ferritic steel was alloyed with Ti, Mo and Cu with the intention of achieving greater increment in strength by multiple precipitate strengthening. The steel is hot rolled and subjected to interrupted cooling to enable precipitation of Ti–Mo carbides and copper. Thermodynamic calculations were carried out to determine equilibrium phase fractions at different temperatures. Microstructure characterization using transmission electron microscopy and composition analysis revealed that the steel contains ~5 nm size precipitates of (Ti,Mo)C. Precipitation kinetics calculations using MatCalc software showed that mainly body centered cubic copper precipitates of size < 5nm form under the cooling conditions in the present study. The steel has the high tensile strength of 853 MPa and good ductility. The yield strength increases by 420 MPa, which is more than that achieved in hot rolled low carbon ferritic steels with only copper precipitates or only carbide precipitates. The precipitation and strengthening contribution of copper and (Ti,Mo)C precipitates and their effect on the work hardening behavior is discussed.

  6. Corrosion susceptibility of steel drums to be used as containers for intermediate level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farina, S.; Schulz Rodriguez, F.; Duffo, G.

    2013-01-01

    The present work is a study of the corrosion susceptibility of steel drums in contact with cemented ion-exchange resins contaminated with different types and concentrations of aggressive species. A special type of specimen was manufactured to simulate the cemented ion-exchange resins in the drum. The evolution of the corrosion potential and the corrosion rate of the steel, as well as the electrical resistivity of the matrix were monitored over a time period of 900 days. The aggressive species studied were chloride ions (the main ionic species of concern) and sulphate ions (produced during radiolysis of the cationic exchange-resins after cementation). The work was complemented with an analysis of the corrosion products formed on the steel in each condition, as well as the morphology of the corrosion products. When applying the results obtained in the present work to estimate the corrosion depth of the steel drums containing the cemented radioactive waste after a period of 300 years (foreseen durability of the Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste facility in Argentina), it is found that in the most unfavourable case (high chloride contamination), the corrosion penetration will be considerably lower than the thickness of the wall of the steel drums. (authors)

  7. Comparative Study of Hardening Mechanisms During Aging of a 304 Stainless Steel Containing α'-Martensite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, S. W.; Kang, U. G.; Choi, J. Y.; Nam, W. J.

    2012-09-01

    Strain aging and hardening behaviors of a 304 stainless steel containing deformation-induced martensite were investigated by examining mechanical properties and microstructural evolution for different aging temperature and time. Introduced age hardening mechanisms of a cold rolled 304 stainless steel were the additional formation of α'-martensite, hardening of α'-martensite, and hardening of deformed austenite. The increased amount of α'-martensite at an aging temperature of 450 °C confirmed the additional formation of α'-martensite as a hardening mechanism in a cold rolled 304 stainless steel. Additionally, the increased hardness in both α'-martensite and austenite phases with aging temperature proved that hardening of both α'-martensite and austenite phases would be effective as hardening mechanisms in cold rolled and aged 304 stainless steels. The results suggested that among hardening mechanisms, hardening of an α'-martensite phase, including the diffusion of interstitial solute carbon atoms to dislocations and the precipitation of fine carbide particles would become a major hardening mechanism during aging of cold rolled 304 stainless steels.

  8. Rheological Characterization of Warm-Modified Asphalt Mastics Containing Electric Arc Furnace Steel Slags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pasetto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The environmental sustainability of road materials and technologies plays a key role in pavement engineering. In this sense, the use of Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA, that is, a modified asphalt concrete that can be produced and applied at lower temperature, is considered an effective solution leading to environmental and operational benefits. The environmental sustainability of WMA can be further enhanced with the inclusion of steel slag in partial substitution of natural aggregates. Nevertheless, such innovative material applied at lower temperatures containing warm additives and steel slag should be able to guarantee at least the same performance of traditional hot mix asphalts, thus assuring acceptable mechanical properties and durability. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate the rheological behaviour of bituminous mastics obtained combining a warm-modified binder and a filler (material passing to 0.063 mm coming from electric arc furnace steel slag. To evaluate the influence of both warm additive and steel slag, a plain binder and limestone filler were also used for comparison purposes. Complex modulus and permanent deformation resistance of bitumens and mastics were assessed using a dynamic shear rheometer. Experimental results showed that steel slag warm mastics assure enhanced performance demonstrating promising applicability.

  9. Hot Deformation Behavior of SA508Gr.4N Steel for Reactor Pressure Vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Zhi-qiang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The high-temperature plastic deformation and dynamic recrystallization behavior of SA508Gr.4N steel were investigated through hot deformation tests in a Gleeble1500D thermal mechanical simulator. The compression tests were performed in the temperature range of 1050-1250℃ and the strain rate range of 0.001-0.1s-1 with true strain of 0.16. The results show that from the high-temperature true stress-strain curves of the SA508Gr.4N steel, the main feature is dynamic recrystallization,and the peak stress increases with the decrease of deformation temperature or the increase of strain rate, indicating the experimental steel is temperature and strain rate sensitive material. The constitutive equation for SA508Gr.4N steel is established on the basis of the true stress-strain curves, and exhibits the characteristics of the high-temperature flow behavior quite well, while the activation energy of the steel is determined to be 383.862kJ/mol. Furthermore, an inflection point is found in the θ-σ curve, while the -dθ/dσ-σ curve shows a minimum value. The critical strain increases with increasing strain rate and decreasing deformation temperature. A linear relationship between critical strain (εc and peak strain (εp is found and could be expressed as εc/εp=0.517. The predicted model of critical strain could be described as εc=8.57×10-4Z0.148.

  10. Investigation program on PWR-steel-containment behavior under accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieg, R.; Eberle, F.; Goeller, B.; Gulden, W.; Kadlec, J.; Messemer, G.; Mueller, S.; Wolf, E.

    1983-10-01

    This report is a first documentation of the KfK/PNS activities and plans to investigate the behaviour of steel containments under accident conditions. The investigations will deal with a free standing spherical containment shell built for the latest type of a German pressurized water reactor. The diameter of the containment shell is 56 m. The minimum wall thickness is 38 mm. The material used is the ferritic steel 15MnNi63. According to the actual planning the program is concerned with four different problems which are beyond the common design and licensing practice: Containment behavior under quasi-static pressure increase up to containment failure. Containment behavior under high transient pressures. Containment oscillations due to earthquake loadings; consideration of shell imperfections. Containment buckling due to earthquake loadings. The investigation program consists of both theoretical and experimental activities including membrane tests allowing for very high plastic strains and oscillation tests with a thin-walled, high-accurate spherical shell. (orig.) [de

  11. Comparative assessment of cyclic J-R curve determination by different methods in a pressure vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, Tamshuk, E-mail: tamshuk@gmail.com [Deep Sea Technologies, National Institute of Ocean Technology, Chennai, 600100 (India); Sivaprasad, S.; Bar, H.N.; Tarafder, S. [Fatigue & Fracture Group, Materials Science and Technology Division, CSIR-National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur, 831007 (India); Bandyopadhyay, N.R. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Engineering, Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah, 711103 (India)

    2016-04-15

    Cyclic J-R behaviour of a reactor pressure vessel steel using different methods available in literature has been examined to identify the best suitable method for cyclic fracture problems. Crack opening point was determined by moving average method. The η factor was experimentally determined for cyclic loading conditions and found to be similar to that of ASTM value. Analyses showed that adopting a procedure analogous to the ASTM standard for monotonic fracture is reasonable for cyclic fracture problems, and makes the comparison to monotonic fracture results straightforward. - Highlights: • Different methods of cyclic J-R evaluation compared. • A moving average method for closure point proposed. • η factor for cyclic J experimentally validated. • Method 1 is easier, provides a lower bound and direct comparison to monotonic fracture.

  12. On the correlation between irradiation-induced microstructural features and the hardening of reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrecht, M.; Meslin, E.; Malerba, L.; Hernandez-Mayoral, M.; Bergner, F.; Pareige, P.; Radiguet, B.; Almazouzi, A.

    2010-01-01

    A correlation is attempted between microstructural observations by various complementary techniques, which have been implemented within the PERFECT project and the hardening measured by tensile tests of reactor pressure vessel steel and model alloys after irradiation to a dose of ∼7 x 10 19 n cm -2 . This is done, using the simple hardening model embodied by the Orowan equation and applying the most suitable superposition law, as suggested by a parametric study using the DUPAIR line tension code. It is found that loops are very strong obstacles to dislocation motion, but due to their low concentration, they only play a minor role in the hardening itself. For the precipitates, the contrary is found, although they are quite soft (due to their very small sizes and their coherent nature), they still play the dominant role in the hardening. Vacancy clusters are important for the formation of both loops and precipitates, but they will play almost no role in the hardening by themselves.

  13. Examination of leakage aspects through concrete - steel interfaces at and around containment penetration assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakrabarti, S.K.; Sai, A.S.R.; Basu, P.C.

    1994-01-01

    Penetration assemblies are parts required to be provided in the containment wall/dome to permit piping, mechanical devices, equipments, electrical cables, personnel movements etc. Integrity of arrangements with respect to leak tightness at or around these penetration assemblies, is of utmost importance for achieving safe functioning of containment. Considering the feasibilities in controlling leakages along different possible paths, it has been found necessary to examine in detail the leakage possibilities at concrete - steel interfaces at and around penetration assemblies. The present paper addresses this issue with respect to the important related aspects like constructional details, testing conditions, normal operating conditions, and the accidental situation associated with containment structures. (author)

  14. Structural Integrity Evaluation of Containment Vessel under Severe Accident for PGSFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seong-Hyeon; Koo, Gyeong-Hoi; Kim, Sung-Kyun

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides structural integrity evaluation results of CV of the PGSFR(Prototype Gen-IV Sodium Fast Reactor) under severe accident through transient analysis. The evaluation was carried out according to ASME B and PV Code Sec. III-Subsection NH rule. Structural integrity of CV was evaluated through transient analysis of structure in case of severe accident. Stress evaluation results for selected evaluation sections satisfy design criteria of ASME B and PV Code Sec. III Subsection NH. The transient load condition of normal operation will considered in the future work. The purpose of RVCS is to maintain the integrity of concrete structure during normal power operation. Therefore RVCS should be designed to keep the temperature of concrete surface under design limit and to minimize heat loss through CV(Containment Vessel). And in case of severe accident, the integrity of reactor structure and concrete structure should be maintained. Therefore RVCS should be designed to satisfy ASME Level D service limits. When RVCS works with breakdown of DHRS after severe accident, the temperature change of inner and outer surface of CV over time can affect structural integrity of CV. To verify the structural integrity, it is necessary to perform transient analysis of CV structure under changing temperature over time

  15. Effect of the Young modulus variability on the mechanical behaviour of a nuclear containment vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larrard, T. de, E-mail: delarrard@lmt.ens-cachan.f [LMT-ENS Cachan, CNRS/UPMC/PRES UniverSud Paris (France); Colliat, J.B.; Benboudjema, F. [LMT-ENS Cachan, CNRS/UPMC/PRES UniverSud Paris (France); Torrenti, J.M. [Universite Paris-Est, LCPC (France); Nahas, G. [IRSN/DSR/SAMS/BAGS, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2010-12-15

    This study aims at investigating the influence of the Young modulus variability on the mechanical behaviour of a nuclear containment vessel in case of a loss of cooling agent accident and under the assumption of an elastic behaviour. To achieve this investigation, the Monte-Carlo Method is carried out thanks to a middleware which encapsulates the different components (random field generation, FE simulations) and enables calculations parallelisation. The main goal is to quantify the uncertainty propagation by comparing the maximal values of outputs of interest (orthoradial stress and Mazars equivalent strain) for each realisation of the considered random field with the ones obtained from a reference calculation taking into account uniform field (equal to the expected value of the random field). The Young modulus is supposed to be accurately represented by a weakly homogeneous random field and realisations are provided through its truncated Karhunen-Loeve expansion. This study reveals that the expected value for the maximal equivalent strain in the structure is more important when considering the Young modulus spatial variability than the value obtained from a deterministic approach with a uniform Young modulus field. The influence of the correlation length is investigated too. Finally it is shown that there is no correlation between the maximal values location of equivalent strain and the ones where the Young modulus extreme values are observed for each realisation.

  16. Remote inspection system for components installed inside a primary containment vessel of a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Katsutoshi; Kawai, Katsumi; Ito, Takahiko; Hashimoto, Yuji; Tomizawa, Fumio.

    1983-01-01

    A remote operation type monitoring system was developed to always enable the watching of the condition of the main equipment installed in the containment vessels of BWRs. It comprises four inspection vehicles suspended by a monorail and pulled with trolley chain, coaxial cables for signal transmission and power supply, and control system. On the inspection vehicles, a television camera, a thermometer, a microphone and a radiation dose rate meter are installed. The performance of the system was confirmed at 60 deg C for several months. Thereafter, the field test was carried out in the Tokai No. 2 Power Station, Japan Atomic Power Co., from December, 1980, to September, 1981. By the continuous monitoring and grasp of operational condition, the preventive maintenance and the improvement of the rate of operation can be expected. Also it is desirable in view of the reduction of radiation exposure of operators. The mechanization of and the labor saving in inspection and maintenance works is necessary because skilled workers will be short. The design and the composition of the system and its tests are reported. (Kako, I.)

  17. Effects of radiation and impurities on gaseous iodine behavior in a containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Masato; Watanabe, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2000-01-01

    In order to estimate the effect of impurities and radiation on gaseous iodine behavior in containment vessel, NUPEC has improved IMPAIR-3 code developed by PSI. Several modifications on the iodine oxidation by radiolysis and the production of nitric acid, the existence of boric acid, and the reaction of silver particle with iodine were newly added in evaluating the effect of radiolysis and impurities. pH change resulting from presence of boric acid, nitric acid production by radiolysis of air, and sodium hydroxide addition by AM operation, was also considered. The code verification for pH change was performed using the RTF experimental results. Additionally, the effects of boric acid and silver impurities on gaseous iodine behavior were evaluated by the sensitivity analysis. As a result, the experimental results of iodine concentration transient under pH change were well simulated. The following results were also obtained from the sensitive analysis. The gaseous iodine behavior was not affected by the existence of boric acid. In the case of silver existence in liquid phase, the gaseous iodine concentration rapidly decreased because a large amount of iodine changed into AgI species in liquid phase. The restraint effect of silver on gaseous iodine, production was larger than that of pH change. (author)

  18. Posttest analysis of a 1:4-scale prestressed concrete containment vessel model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dameron, R.A.; Rashid, Y.R.; Hessheimer, M.F.

    2003-01-01

    The Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, co-sponsored a Cooperative Containment Research Program at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. As part of the program, a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) model was subjected to a series of overpressurization tests at SNL beginning in July 2000 and culminating in a functional failure mode or Limit State Test (LST) in September 2000 and a Structural Failure Mode Test (SFMT) in November 2001. The PCCV model, uniformly scaled at 1:4, is representative of the containment structure of an actual Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) plant (OHI-3) in Japan. The objectives of the pressurization tests were to obtain measurement of the structural response to pressure loading beyond design basis accident in order to validate analytical modeling, to find pressure capacity of the model, and to observe its failure mechanisms. This paper compares results of pretest analytical studies of the PCCV model to the PCCV high pressure test measurements and describes results of post-test analytical studies. These analyses have been performed by ANATECH Corp. under contract with Sandia National Laboratories. The post-test analysis represents the third phase of a comprehensive PCCV analysis effort. The first phase consisted of preliminary analyses to determine what finite element models would be necessary for the pretest prediction analyses, and the second phase consisted of the pretest prediction analyses. The principal objectives of the post-test analyses were: (1) to provide insights to improve the analytical methods for predicting the structural response and failure modes of a prestressed concrete containment, and (2) to evaluate by analysis any phenomena or failure mode observed during the test that had not been explicitly predicted by analysis. In addition to summarizing comparisons between measured

  19. Interaction between molten corium UO{sub 2+x}-ZrO{sub 2}-FeO{sub y} and VVER vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechta, S. V.; Granovsky, V. S.; Khabensky, V. B.; Krushinov, E. V.; Vitol, S. A.; Sulatsky, A. A. [Alexandrov Sci Res Technol Inst, Sosnovyi Bor (Russian Federation); Gusarov, V. V.; Almiashev, V. I. [Russian Acad Sci, Inst Silicate Chem, St Petersburg (Russian Federation); Lopukh, D. B. [SPb State Electrotech Univ LETI SPbGETU, St Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bottomley, D. [Joint Res Ctr, Inst Transurane, Karlsruhe (Germany); Fischer, M. [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Piluso, P. [CEA Saclay, DEN, DSNI, Saclay (France); Miassoedov, A.; Tromm, W. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Altstadt, E. [Forschungszentrum Dresden Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Fichot, F. [CEA Cadarache, SEMCA, DPAM, IRSN, St Paul Les Durance (France); Kymalainen, O. [FORTUM Nucl Serv Ltd, Espoo (Finland)

    2010-07-01

    In case of in-vessel corium retention during a severe accident in a light water reactor, weakening of the vessel wall and deterioration of the vessel steel properties can be caused both by the melting of the steel and by its physicochemical interaction with corium. The interaction behavior has been studied in medium-scale experiments with prototypic corium. The experiments yielded data for the steel corrosion rate during interaction with UO{sub 2+x}-ZrO{sub 2}-FeO{sub y} melt in air and steam at different steel surface temperatures and heat fluxes from the corium to the steel. It has been observed that the corrosion rates in air and steam atmosphere are almost the same. Further, if the temperature at the interface increases beyond a certain level, corrosion intensifies. This is explained by the formation of liquid phases in the interaction Zone. The available experimental data have been used to develop a correlation for the corrosion rate as a function of temperature and heat flux. (authors)

  20. Modeling flow stress constitutive behavior of SA508-3 steel for nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Mingyue, E-mail: mysun@imr.ac.cn [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Luhan, Hao; Shijian, Li; Dianzhong, Li; Yiyi, Li [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > A series of flow stress constitutive equations for SA508-3 steel were successfully established. > The experimental results under different conditions have validated the constitutive equations. > An industrial application of the model was present to simulate a large conical shell forging process. - Abstract: Based on the measured stress-strain curves under different temperatures and strain rates, a series of flow stress constitutive equations for SA508-3 steel were firstly established through the classical theories on work hardening and softening. The comparison between the experimental and modeling results has confirmed that the established constitutive equations can correctly describe the mechanical responses and microstructural evolutions of the steel under various hot deformation conditions. We further represented a successful industrial application of this model to simulate a forging process for a large conical shell used in a nuclear steam generator, which evidences its practical and promising perspective of our model with an aim of widely promoting the hot plasticity processing for heavy nuclear components of fission reactors.