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Sample records for stearic acid

  1. 21 CFR 184.1090 - Stearic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Stearic acid. 184.1090 Section 184.1090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1090 Stearic acid. (a) Stearic acid (C18H36O2, CAS Reg. No. 57-11-4) is a...

  2. Selective deoxygenation of stearic acid via an anhydride pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollak, S.A.W.; Bitter, W.; Haveren, van J.; Es, van D.S.

    2012-01-01

    Stearic anhydride is proposed as reactive intermediate in the hydrogen free decarbonylation and ketonization of stearic acid over Pd/Al2O3 at 523 K. This information is crucial towards developing of a selective low temperature decarbonylation process of fatty acids towards olefins.

  3. Extraction of europium (3) ions with stearic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobanov, F.I.; Gladyshchev, V.P.; Nurtaeva, A.K.; Andreeva, N.N.

    1981-01-01

    Extraction of europium (3) in nitric acid solutions with the melts of stearic acid and its mixtures with paraffin at (80+-1) deg C is studied. The constant of stearic acid dimerization in paraffin K 2 =9.6+-0.6 and the constant of stearic acid distribution in the paraffin-water system Ksub(D,HA)=(1.06+-0.07)x10sub(3) are determined. The diagram of europium ion extraction at initial concentrations of metal in the aqueous phase of 10 -4 -10 -3 mol/l is suggested. The compound extracted has the EuA 3 composition with extraction constant of lg Ksub(ex)=-7.58 [ru

  4. Stability of stearic acid monolayers on artificial sea water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brzozowska, A.M.; Duits, Michael H.G.; Mugele, Friedrich Gunther

    2012-01-01

    We studied the formation and stability of stearic acid (SA) based films on aqueous sub-phases via Langmuir trough and imaging ellipsometry experiments. The aqueous phase was based on Artificial Sea Water (ASW), a multicomponent salt solution with a total molarity of 0.53. The composition of this

  5. Adsorption properties of stearic acid onto untreated kaolinite | Sari ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The focus of the study is to investigate adsorption property and determine thermodynamic parameters for the adsorption of stearic acid onto untreated kaolinite at the temperatures of 25, 35 and 45 oC. The equilibrium adsorption isotherms were analyzed by linear Langmuir and Freundlich models. Adsorption experiments ...

  6. Effect of uncoated calcium carbonate and stearic acid coated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PBT/CaCO3 composites were prepared in a single screw extruder with particle content varying from 0–30% by weight. The influence of surface treatment of the particles, with and without stearic acid (SA), on the mechanical, thermal and structural properties was studied. The experiments included tensile tests, impact tests, ...

  7. Comparative Study of Stearic Acid/Iron-Oxide Binary and Stearic Acid/Iron-Oxide/Titanium-Oxide Ternary for Use as Energy Storage Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andiarto, Rizky; Nuryadin, Muhammad Khalish; Saleh, Rosari

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a series of stearic acid/Fe 3 O 4 , and stearic acid/Fe 3 O 4 /TiO 2 nanocomposites for thermal energy storage (TES) system were synthesized through a two-step process. Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles and Fe 3 O 4 /TiO 2 nanocomposites were first prepared using sol-gel methods and then both samples were mixed into stearic acid by dispersion technique at three different weight % ratio to stearic acid: 5%, 10% and 15% to obtain stearic acid/Fe 3 O 4 , and stearic acid/Fe 3 O 4 /TiO 2 nanocomposites. Morphologies and structural properties of the samples were characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), while thermal properties of the sample were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The XRD patterns demonstrate, that stearic acid/Fe 3 O 4 contained characteristic peaks of Fe 3 O 4 and stearic acid structures, while peaks corresponded to anatase TiO 2 structures appear in stearic acid/ Fe 3 O 4 /TiO 2 nanocomposites. From the DSC measurements, it is found that the maximum latent heat was found at samples with weight ratio of 5%. Moreover, the enhancement up to 20% of latent heat in solidifying as well as melting processes was observed. TGA measurements show high degradation temperature in the range of 246 - 251°C. The TGA results also shows that the residual mass of the sample matches the composition of Fe 3 O 4 and Fe 3 O 4 /TiO 2 which is added to the stearic acid. (paper)

  8. PSI1 is responsible for the stearic acid enrichment that is characteristic of phosphatidylinositol in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Guédard, Marina; Bessoule, Jean-Jacques; Boyer, Valérie

    2009-01-01

    complete disappearance of stearic (but not of palmitic acid) at the sn-1 position of this phospholipid. Moreover, it was found that, whereas glycerol 3-phosphate, lysophosphatidic acid and 1-acyl lysophosphatidylinositol acyltransferase activities were similar in microsomal membranes isolated from wild......-acyl-1-lysolysophosphatidylinositol acyltransferase activity was recovered, and was accompanied by a strong increase in the stearic acid content of lysophosphatidylinositol. As previously suggested for phosphatidylinositol from animal cells (which contains almost exclusively stearic acid...... as the saturated fatty acid), the results obtained in the present study demonstrate that the existence of phosphatidylinositol species containing stearic acid in yeast results from a remodeling of neo-synthesized molecules of phosphatidylinositol....

  9. Dietary stearic acid leads to a reduction of visceral adipose tissue in athymic nude mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Che Shen

    Full Text Available Stearic acid (C18:0 is a long chain dietary saturated fatty acid that has been shown to reduce metastatic tumor burden. Based on preliminary observations and the growing evidence that visceral fat is related to metastasis and decreased survival, we hypothesized that dietary stearic acid may reduce visceral fat. Athymic nude mice, which are used in models of human breast cancer metastasis, were fed a stearic acid, linoleic acid (safflower oil, or oleic acid (corn oil enriched diet or a low fat diet ad libitum. Total body weight did not differ significantly between dietary groups over the course of the experiment. However visceral fat was reduced by ∼70% in the stearic acid fed group compared to other diets. In contrast total body fat was only slightly reduced in the stearic acid diet fed mice when measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and quantitative magnetic resonance. Lean body mass was increased in the stearic acid fed group compared to all other groups by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Dietary stearic acid significantly reduced serum glucose compared to all other diets and increased monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1 compared to the low fat control. The low fat control diet had increased serum leptin compared to all other diets. To investigate possible mechanisms whereby stearic acid reduced visceral fat we used 3T3L1 fibroblasts/preadipocytes. Stearic acid had no direct effects on the process of differentiation or on the viability of mature adipocytes. However, unlike oleic acid and linoleic acid, stearic acid caused increased apoptosis (programmed cell death and cytotoxicity in preadipocytes. The apoptosis was, at least in part, due to increased caspase-3 activity and was associated with decreased cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein-2 (cIAP2 and increased Bax gene expression. In conclusion, dietary stearic acid leads to dramatically reduced visceral fat likely by causing the apoptosis of preadipocytes.

  10. Physicochemical and Mechanical Properties of Bambara Groundnut Starch Films Modified with Stearic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyeyinka, Samson A; Singh, Suren; Amonsou, Eric O

    2017-01-01

    The physicochemical and mechanical properties of biofilm prepared from bambara starch modified with varying concentrations of stearic acid (0%, 2.5%, 3.5%, 5%, 7%, and 10%) were studied. By scanning electron microscopy, bambara starch films modified with stearic acid (≥3.5%) showed a progressively rough surface compared to those with 2.5% stearic acid and the control. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra revealed a peak shift of approximately 31 cm -1 , suggesting the promotion of hydrogen bond formation between hydroxyl groups of starch and stearic acid. The addition of 2.5% stearic acid to bambara starch film reduced water vapor permeability by approximately 17%. Bambara starch films modified with higher concentration of stearic acid were more opaque and showed significantly high melting temperatures. However, mechanical properties of starch films were generally negatively affected by stearic acid. Bambara starch film may be modified with 2.5% stearic acid for improved water vapor permeability and thermal stability with minimal effect on tensile strength. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  11. Preparation and characterization of stearic acid/expanded graphite composites as thermal energy storage materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Guiyin; Li, Hui; Chen, Zhi; Liu, Xu

    2010-01-01

    Stearic acid/expanded graphite composites with different mass ratios were prepared by absorbing liquid stearic acid into the expanded graphite. In the composite materials, the stearic acid was used as the phase change material for thermal energy storage, and the expanded graphite acted as the supporting material. Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and thermal diffusivity measurement were used to determine the chemical structure, crystalline phase, microstructure and thermal diffusivity of the composites, respectively. The thermal properties and thermal stability were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis. The thermal analysis results indicated that the materials exhibited the same phase transition characteristics as the stearic acid and their latent heats were approximately the same as the values calculated based on the weight fraction of the stearic acid in the composites. The microstructural analysis results showed that the stearic acid was well absorbed in the porous network of the expanded graphite, and there was no leakage of the stearic acid from the composites even when it was in the molten state.

  12. Step Changes and Deactivation Behavior in the Continuous Decarboxylation of Stearic Acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Anders Theilgaard; Rozmysłowicz, Bartosz; Simakova, Irina L.

    2011-01-01

    Deoxygenation of dilute and concentrated stearic acid over 2% Pd/C beads was performed in a continuous reactor at 300 °C and 20 bar pressure of Ar or 5% H2/Ar. Stable operation was obtained in 5% H2 atmosphere, with 95% conversion of 10 mol % dilute stearic acid in dodecane and 12% conversion...... of pure stearic acid. Deactivation took place in H2-deficient gas atmosphere, probably as a result of the formation of unsaturated products and coking in the pore system. Transient experiments with step changes were performed: 1 h was required for the step change to be visible in liquid sampling, whereas...

  13. Gene silencing of stearoyl-ACP desaturase enhances the stearic acid content in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeger, de L.; Springer, J.; Wolbert, E.J.H.; Martens, D.E.; Eggink, G.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, stearoyl-ACP desaturase (SAD), the enzyme that converts stearic acid into oleic acid, is silenced by artificial microRNA in the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Two different constructs, which target different positions on the mRNA of stearoyl-ACP desaturase, were tested.

  14. Characterizing time-dependent contact angles for sands hydrophobized with oleic and stearic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subedi, S; Kawamoto, K; Jayarathna, L

    2012-01-01

    -frequency precipitation. A potential solution is to alter soil grain surfaces to become water repellent by mixing or coating the soil cover material with hydrophobic agents (HAs). In this study, hydrophobic CBs comprised of sands mixed with environmentally friendly HAs (oleic acid [OA] and stearic acid [SA]) were studied...

  15. Stearic acid: a possible substitute for trans fatty acids from industrial origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavella, Marcelo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Trans isomers, contained in partially hydrogenated oils, which are used in the food industry, have been questioned and nowadays trends are heading towards reducing their consumption. The food industry is facing a dilemma, since in order to remove trans fatty acids, hydrogenated fats should be eliminated and replaced by fats rich in saturated fatty acids. Scientific research has shown that saturated fatty acids have negative effects on the lipid profile and its consumption is associated with a higher cardiovascular risk. Therefore it is recommended to avoid their consumption. Nevertheless, not all fatty acids behave in the same way, with stearic acid (18:0 the exception. Stearic acid has a low level of intestinal absorption and its intake does not negatively modify the lipid profile. For this reason, it is considered a “neutral” fatty acid with regard to cardiovascular health. B-100 apolipoprotein, whose levels determine plasma VLDL and LDL concentration (triglycerides and cholesterol carriers, respectively, is not modified by diets which provide up to 7% of the energy as stearic acid. Markers of cardiovascular risk, such as activation of platelet aggregation factors or C-reactive protein levels, are not modified by diets providing stearic acid, as occurs with other saturated fatty acids. The confirmation of the “neutral” effect of stearic acid represents a perspective for the development of fats with high contents of this fatty acid to replace hydrogenated fats containing trans isomers. The present review discusses these aspects.Los isómeros trans que contienen los aceites parcialmente hidrogenados de origen industrial, han sido cuestionados y la recomendación es reducir su consumo. La industria de alimentos se enfrenta a un dilema, ya que para disminuir los isómeros trans debe reducir los aceites parcialmente hidrogenados y reemplazarlos por grasas ricas en ácidos grasos saturados. La investigación ha demostrado que los

  16. Step changes and deactivation behaviour in the continuous decarboxylation of stearic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Anders Theilgaard; Rozmyslowicz, B.; Simakova, I.

    2011-01-01

    % conversion of pure stearic acid. Deactivation took place in H-2-deficient gas atmosphere, probably as a result of the formation of unsaturated products and coking in the pore system. Transient experiments with step changes were performed: 1 h was required for the step change to be visible in liquid sampling...

  17. Salt dependent stability of stearic acid Langmuir-Blodgett films exposed to aqueous electrolytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, Naveen; Wang, Lei; Sîretanu, Igor; Duits, Michael H.G.; Mugele, Friedrich Gunther

    2013-01-01

    We use contact angle goniometry, imaging ellipsometry, and atomic force microscopy to study the stability and wettability of Langmuir–Blodgett (LB) monolayers of stearic acid on silica substrates, upon drying and exposure to aqueous solutions of varying salinity. The influences of Ca2+ and Na+ ions

  18. Stearic acid spin labels in lipid bilayers :  insight through atomistic simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stimson, L.M.; Dong, L.; Karttunen, M.E.J.; Wisniewska, A.; Dutka, M.; Róg, T.

    2007-01-01

    Spin-labeled stearic acid species are commonly used for electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies of cell membranes to investigate phase transitions, fluidity, and other physical properties. In this paper, we use large-scale molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the position and behavior

  19. Isolation and characterisation of nanoparticles from tef and maize starch modified with stearic acid

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cuthbert, WO

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles were isolated from tef and maize starch modified with added stearic acid after pasting at 90 °C for 130 min. This was followed by thermo-stable alpha-amylase hydrolysis of the paste. The resultant residues were then characterized using...

  20. Optimising Refined Bleached Deodorized Palm Stearin For Its Crude Stearic Acid Iodine Value To Provide The Stable Specification Of Blended Stearic Acid Distillate Iodine Value

    OpenAIRE

    Ritonga, Muhammad Yusuf

    2015-01-01

    On the commercial scale, the quality standard of Blended Stearic Acid Distilled (BSAD) couldn’t be achieved by normal distillation. BSAD iodine value is mostly higher than maximum quality standard (0.2 mg/100 g), with the same iodine value (0.80 g/100 g) of feed Hydrogenated Splitted RBDPS Fatty Acid or HSRBDPSFA, feed capacity 5.5 ton/hour with bottom flash distiller temperature reaching 213oC. The separation and reduction of chemical impurities (so sensitive to oxidation/temperature/heat ch...

  1. Enhancement of heat transfer for thermal energy storage application using stearic acid nanocomposite with multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, TingXian; Lee, Ju-Hyuk; Wang, RuZhu; Kang, Yong Tae

    2013-01-01

    A latent heat storage nanocomposite made of stearic acid (SA) and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) is prepared for thermal energy storage application. The thermal properties of the SA/MWCNT nanocomposite are characterized by SEM (scanning electron microscopy) and DSC (differential scanning calorimeter) analysis techniques, and the effects of different volume fractions of MWCNT on the heat transfer enhancement and thermal performance of stearic acid are investigated during the charging and discharging phases. The SEM analysis shows that the additive of MWCNT is uniformly distributed in the phase change material of stearic acid, and the DSC analysis reveals that the melting point of SA/MWCNT nanocomposite shifts to a lower temperature during the charging phase and the freezing point shifts to a higher temperature during the discharging phase when compared with the pure stearic acid. The experimental results show that the addition of MWCNT can improve the thermal conductivity of stearic acid effectively, but it also weakens the natural convection of stearic acid in liquid state. In comparison with the pure stearic acid, the charging rate can be decreased by about 50% while the discharging rate can be improved by about 91% respectively by using the SA/5.0% MWCNT nanocomposite. It appears that the MWCNT is a promising candidate for enhancing the heat transfer performance of latent heat thermal energy storage system. - Highlights: • A nanocomposite made of stearic acid and multi-walled carbon nanotube is prepared for thermal energy storage application. • Effects of multi-walled carbon nanotube on the thermal performance of the nanocomposite are investigated. • Multi-walled carbon nanotube enhances the thermal conductivity but weakens the natural convection of stearic acid. • Discharging/charging rates of stearic acid are increased/decreased by using multi-walled carbon nanotube

  2. Relationship between the concentrations of plasma phospholipid stearic acid and plasma lipoprotein lipids in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D

    2001-01-01

    This study investigated the correlation between the plasma phospholipid (PL) saturated fatty acid (SFA) concentration (as a surrogate marker of SFA intake) and plasma lipid and lipoprotein lipid concentrations in 139 healthy Australian men aged 20-55 years old with widely varying intakes of saturated fat (vegans, n=18; ovolacto vegetarians, n=43; moderate meat eaters, n=60; high meat eaters, n=18). Both the ovolacto vegetarian and vegan groups demonstrated significant decreases in plasma total cholesterol (TC), low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and triacylglycerol concentrations compared with both the high-meat-eater and moderate-meat-eater groups. Total SFA and individual SFA [palmitic acid (16:0), stearic acid (18:0) and arachidic acid (20:0)] in the plasma PL were significantly lower in both the ovolacto vegetarian and vegan groups than in both the high- and moderate-meat-eater groups, while myristic acid (14:0) was significantly lower in the vegans than in the high-meat-eaters. Bivariate analysis of the results showed that the plasma PL stearic acid concentration was strongly positively correlated with plasma TC (P<0.0001), LDL-C (P<0.0001) and triacylglycerol (P<0.0001), with r(2) values of 0.655, 0.518 and 0.43 respectively. In multiple linear regression, after controlling for potential confounding factors (such as exercise, dietary group, age, body mass index, plasma PL myristic acid, palmitic acid and arachidic acid, and dietary total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, carbohydrate and fibre intake), the plasma PL stearic acid concentration was still strongly positively correlated with plasma TC (P<0.0001) and LDL-C (P=0.006) concentrations. Based on the present data, it would seem appropriate for the population to reduce their dietary total SFA intake rather than to replace other SFA with stearic acid.

  3. Mesoporous (Ta, Nb3W7 Modified with Stearic Acid Used as Solid Acids for Esterification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Chang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesoporous solid acids Ta3W7 and Nb3W7 were prepared from TaCl5 and NbCl5 with WCl6 in the presence of stearic acid (SA via a sol-gel method, respectively. For comparison, mesoporous Ta3W7-P123 mixed oxides and mesoporous Nb3W7-P123 mixed oxides were synthesized in the same way. The catalysts were characterized through TGA, XRD, SEM, TEM, BET, and NH3-TPD. Experimental results showed that Ta3W7-SA and Nb3W7-SA exhibited several advantages such as higher activity, shorter preparation period, lower cost, stronger acid sites, and higher surface area, which had potential to be used as mesoporous heterogeneous catalysts in biodiesel production.

  4. Friction reducing behavior of stearic acid film on a textured aluminum substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Quan [School of Mechanical Engineering, Qingdao Technological University, Qingdao 266033 (China); Wan, Yong, E-mail: wanyong@qtech.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Engineering, Qingdao Technological University, Qingdao 266033 (China); Li, Yang; Yang, Shuyan [School of Mechanical Engineering, Qingdao Technological University, Qingdao 266033 (China); Yao, Wenqing [Analysis Center of Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2013-09-01

    A simple two-step process was developed to render the aluminum hydrophobicity with lower friction. The textured aluminum substrate was firstly fabricated by immersed in a sodium hydroxide solution at 100 °C for 1 h. Stearic acid film was then deposited to acquire high hydrophobicity. Scanning electron microscopy, IR spectroscopy and water contact angle measurements were used to analyze the morphological features, chemical structure and hydrophobicity of prepared samples, respectively. Moreover, the friction reducing behavior of the organic–inorganic composite film on aluminum sliding against steel was evaluated in a ball-on-plate configuration. It was found that the stearic acid film on the textured aluminum led to decreased friction with significantly extended life.

  5. Effects of butter oil blends with increased concentrations of stearic, oleic and linolenic acid on blood lipids in young adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Claus; Lund, Pia; Hølmer, Gunhild Kofoed

    1999-01-01

    : Partially replacing milk fat with rapeseed oil seems to yield amore healthy spread. Stearic acid had a HDL-C lowering effect compared to milk fat, but did not affect LDL-Csignificantly. The addition of stearic acid did not improve the plasma lipoprotein profile for young men with lowcholesterol levels....... Bconcentrations. Fatty acid composition of plasma phospholipids, plasma cholesterol ester and platelets was alsodetermined. RESULTS: Significantly (P

  6. Polytypism in n-fatty acids and low-frequency Raman spectra: Stearic acid B form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Masamichi; Kobayashi, Tohru; Itoh, Yuzo; Sato, Kiyotaka

    1984-03-01

    Single crystals of single-layered (mon) and double-layered (orth II) polytypes of stearic acid B form were obtained and their structures were investigated by the x-ray diffraction and vibrational spectroscopic methods. Two polytypes exhibited quite different Raman spectra in the frequency range from 65 to 2 cm-1. The Raman bands appeared as singlets in mon, while they split into doublets with different polarization in orth II through the interlamellar interactions between two successive layers contained in the unit cell. The frequencies of the phonon modes in orth II were found to be lower than the corresponding ones in mon, indicating that orth II (or mon) was the high-temperature (low-temperature) stable form.

  7. Ruminal microbe of biohydrogenation of trans-vaccenic acid to stearic acid in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Dan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optimization of the unsaturated fatty acid composition of ruminant milk and meat is desirable. Alteration of the milk and fatty acid profile was previously attempted by the management of ruminal microbial biohydrogenation. The aim of this study was to identify the group of ruminal trans-vaccenic acid (trans-11 C18:1, t-VA hydrogenating bacteria by combining enrichment studies in vitro. Methods The enrichment culture growing on t-VA was obtained by successive transfers in medium containing t-VA. Fatty acids were detected by gas chromatograph and changes in the microbial composition during enrichment were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE. Prominent DGGE bands of the enrichment cultures were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Results The growth of ruminal t-VA hydrogenating bacteria was monitored through the process of culture transfer according to the accumulation of stearic acid (C18:0, SA and ratio of the substrate (t-VA transformed to the product (SA. A significant part of the retrieved 16S rRNA gene sequences was most similar to those of uncultured bacteria. Bacteria corresponding to predominant DGGE bands in t-VA enrichment cultures clustered with t-VA biohydrogenated bacteria within Group B. Conclusions This study provides more insight into the pathway of biohydrogenation. It also may be important to control the production of t-VA, which has metabolic and physiological benefits, through management of ruminal biohydrogenation bacterium.

  8. Development of a Controlled Release of Salicylic Acid Loaded Stearic Acid-Oleic Acid Nanoparticles in Cream for Topical Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. O. Woo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid nanoparticles are colloidal carrier systems that have extensively been investigated for controlled drug delivery, cosmetic and pharmaceutical applications. In this work, a cost effective stearic acid-oleic acid nanoparticles (SONs with high loading of salicylic acid, was prepared by melt emulsification method combined with ultrasonication technique. The physicochemical properties, thermal analysis and encapsulation efficiency of SONs were studied. TEM micrographs revealed that incorporation of oleic acid induces the formation of elongated spherical particles. This observation is in agreement with particle size analysis which also showed that the mean particle size of SONs varied with the amount of OA in the mixture but with no effect on their zeta potential values. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis showed that the SONs prepared in this method have lower crystallinity as compared to pure stearic acid. Different amount of oleic acid incorporated gave different degree of perturbation to the crystalline matrix of SONs and hence resulted in lower degrees of crystallinity, thereby improving their encapsulation efficiencies. The optimized SON was further incorporated in cream and its in vitro release study showed a gradual release for 24 hours, denoting the incorporation of salicylic acid in solid matrix of SON and prolonging the in vitro release.

  9. Effect of stearic acid on the properties of metronidazole/methocel K4M floating matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belem Lara-Hernández

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The properties of metronidazole/Methocel K4M sustained release floating tablets have been studied varying the proportion of the lubricant, stearic acid, on formulations with and without sodium bicarbonate. The variables studied include technological properties of the tablets such as tablet hardness and ejection pressure, the drug release profile, the hydration kinetics and the floating behaviour. The presence of stearic acid and sodium bicarbonate improves the floating behaviour for more than 8 hours. The hydration volume, the tablet hardness and the ejection pressure decrease as the stearic acid content increases and the polymer content decreases. Drug dissolution increases with increasing proportions of stearic acid and decreasing proportions of the polymer in the tablets. The presence of sodium bicarbonate extends the differences in dissolution produced by stearic acid. These results are attributed to decreasing matrices coherence with an increasing quantity of stearic acid and a reducing polymer proportion. The carbon dioxide bubbles produced by sodium bicarbonate expand the matrices facilitating the dissolution, although their presence obstructs also the diffusion path through the hydrated gel layer.Estudaram-se as propriedades de comprimidos flutuantes de metronidazol/Methocel K4M de liberação controlada, variando-se a proporção do lubrificante, ácido esteárico, nas formulações com e sem bicarbonato de sódio. As variáveis estudadas incluem propriedades tecnológicas dos comprimidos, tais como dureza, pressão de ejeção, perfil de liberação do fármaco, cinética de hidratação e comportamento de flutuação. A presença de ácido esteárico e do bicarbonato de sódio melhora o comportamento de flutuação para mais de 8 horas. O volume de hidratação, a dureza e a pressão de ejeção do comprimido decrescem à medida que o conteúdo de ácido esteárico e de polímero diminui. A dissolução do fármaco aumenta com o

  10. Spontaneous transfer of stearic acids between human serum albumin and PEG:2000-grafted DPPC membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantusa, Manuela; Stirpe, Andrea; Sportelli, Luigi; Bartucci, Rosa

    2010-05-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is used to study the transfer of stearic acids between human serum albumin (HSA) and sterically stabilized liposomes (SSL) composed of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and of submicellar content of poly(ethylene glycol:2000)-dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (PEG:2000-DPPE). Protein/lipid dispersions are considered in which spin-labelled stearic acids at the 16th carbon atom along the acyl chain (16-SASL) are inserted either in the protein or in the SSL. Two component ESR spectra with different rotational mobility are obtained over a broad range of temperature and membrane composition. Indeed, superimposed to an anisotropic protein-signal, appears a more isotropic lipid-signal. Since in the samples only one matrix (protein or membranes) is spin-labelled, the other component accounts for the transfer of 16-SASL between albumin and membranes. The two components have been resolved and quantified by spectral subtractions, and the fraction, f (p) (16-SASL), of spin labels bound non-covalently to the protein has been used to monitor the transfer. It is found that it depends on the type of donor and acceptor matrix, on the physical state of the membranes and on the grafting density of the polymer-lipids. Indeed, it is favoured from SSL to HSA and the fraction of stearic acids transferred increases with temperature in both directions of transfer. Moreover, in the presence of polymer-lipids, the transfer from HSA to SSL is slightly attenuated, especially in the brush regime of the polymer-chains. Instead, the transfer from SSL to HSA is favoured by the polymer-lipids much more in the mushroom than in the brush regime.

  11. Stearic acid coating on circulating fluidized bed combustion fly ashes and its effect on the mechanical performance of polymer composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Nina [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Zhang, Ping, E-mail: pingzhang@swust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang, Sichuan 621010 (China); Song, Lixian; Kang, Ming; Lu, Zhongyuan [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang, Sichuan 621010 (China); Zheng, Rong [Sichuan Jinhe Group Co., Ltd., Mianyang 621010 (China)

    2013-08-15

    The aim of this work was to test circulating fluidized bed combustion fly ashes (CFAs) for its potential to be utilized in polymer composites manufacturing to improve its toughness. CFAs was coated by stearic acid and used in the composite of polypropylene/ethylene vinyl acetate/high density polyethylene (PP/EVA/HDPE) by molding process method. The resulting coated and uncoated CFAs were fully characterized by particle size analyzer, contact angles, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The stearic acid coated onto the surface of CFAs particles in the physical and chemical ways, and the total clad ratio reached 2.05% by measuring TGA/DTA curve. The percentage of CFAs particles focused to a narrow range 2–4 μm and the median mean size was 3.2 μm more than uncoated CFAs. The properties of hydrophobic and dispersive of CFAs particles improved and original activity was reserved after stearic acid coating. The stearic acid was verified as a coupling agent by how much effect it had on the mechanical properties. It showed the elongation at break of PP/EVA/HDPE reinforced with 15 wt% coated CFAs (c-CFAs) was 80.20% and higher than that of the uncoated. The stearic acid treatment of CFAs is a very promising approach to improve the mechanical strength due to the incorporation of stearic acid on the CFAs surface, and hence, further enhances the potential for recycling CFAs as a suitable filler material in polymer composites.

  12. Stearic acid coating on circulating fluidized bed combustion fly ashes and its effect on the mechanical performance of polymer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Nina; Zhang, Ping; Song, Lixian; Kang, Ming; Lu, Zhongyuan; Zheng, Rong

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to test circulating fluidized bed combustion fly ashes (CFAs) for its potential to be utilized in polymer composites manufacturing to improve its toughness. CFAs was coated by stearic acid and used in the composite of polypropylene/ethylene vinyl acetate/high density polyethylene (PP/EVA/HDPE) by molding process method. The resulting coated and uncoated CFAs were fully characterized by particle size analyzer, contact angles, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The stearic acid coated onto the surface of CFAs particles in the physical and chemical ways, and the total clad ratio reached 2.05% by measuring TGA/DTA curve. The percentage of CFAs particles focused to a narrow range 2–4 μm and the median mean size was 3.2 μm more than uncoated CFAs. The properties of hydrophobic and dispersive of CFAs particles improved and original activity was reserved after stearic acid coating. The stearic acid was verified as a coupling agent by how much effect it had on the mechanical properties. It showed the elongation at break of PP/EVA/HDPE reinforced with 15 wt% coated CFAs (c-CFAs) was 80.20% and higher than that of the uncoated. The stearic acid treatment of CFAs is a very promising approach to improve the mechanical strength due to the incorporation of stearic acid on the CFAs surface, and hence, further enhances the potential for recycling CFAs as a suitable filler material in polymer composites.

  13. Chemical surface modification of calcium carbonate particles with stearic acid using different treating methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Zhi [Materials Research Institute, Athlone Institute of Technology, Athlone (Ireland); Daly, Michael [Mergon International, Castlepollard, Westmeath (Ireland); Clémence, Lopez [Polytech Grenoble, Grenoble (France); Geever, Luke M.; Major, Ian; Higginbotham, Clement L. [Materials Research Institute, Athlone Institute of Technology, Athlone (Ireland); Devine, Declan M., E-mail: ddevine@ait.ie [Materials Research Institute, Athlone Institute of Technology, Athlone (Ireland)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • The effects of stearic acid treatment for CaCO{sub 3} are highly influenced by the treatment method of application. • A new stearic acid treatment method, namely, combination treatment for CaCO{sub 3} was developed. • The combination treatment was compared with two of the existing methods dry and wet method. • The negative effects of void coalescence was minimised by the utilization of the combination method. - Abstract: Calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) is often treated with stearic acid (SA) to decrease its polarity. However, the method of application of the SA treatments has a strong influence on CaCO{sub 3} thermoplastic composite’s interfacial structure and distribution. Several of papers describe the promising effects of SA surface treatment, but few compare the treatment process and its effect on the properties of the final thermoplastic composite. In the current study, we assessed a new SA treatment method, namely, complex treatment for polymer composite fabrication with HDPE. Subsequently, a comparative study was performed between the “complex” process and the other existing methods. The composites were assessed using different experiments included scanning electron microscopy (SEM), void content, density, wettability, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and tensile tests. It was observed that the “complex” surface treatment yielded composites with a significantly lower voids content and higher density compared to other surface treatments. This indicates that after the “complex” treatment process, the CaCO{sub 3} particles and HDPE matrix are more tightly packed than other methods. DSC and wettability results suggest that the “wet” and “complex” treated CaCO{sub 3} composites had a significantly higher heat of fusion and moisture resistance compared to the “dry” treated CaCO{sub 3} composites. Furthermore, “wet” and “complex” treated CaCO{sub 3} composites have a significantly higher tensile

  14. Enzymatic Synthesis and Characterization of Hydrophilic Sugar Based Polyesters and Their Modification with Stearic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Humayun Bilal

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradable and hydrophilic functional polyesters were synthesized enzymatically using xylitol or d-sorbitol together with divinyl adipate and lipase B from Candida antartica (CAL-B. The resulting polyesters had pendant OH-groups from their sugar units which were esterified to different degrees with stearic acid chloride. The structure and the degrees of polymerization of the resulting graft copolymers based on poly(xylitol adipate and poly(d-sorbitol adipate were characterized by 1H NMR spectroscopy and SEC. DSC, WAXS and SAXS measurements indicated that a phase separation between polymer backbone and stearoyl side chains occurred in the graft copolymers, and, additionally, the side chains were able to crystallize which resulted in the formation of a lamellar morphology. Additionally, nanoparticles of the graft copolymers in an aqueous environment were studied by DLS and negative stain TEM.

  15. Effects of spray-drying on w/o/w multiple emulsions prepared from a stearic acid matrix

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mlalila, N

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available , 75, and 100 mg of stearic acid, 2% and 3% w/v polyvinyl alcohol, 5% w/v lactose, and 0.2% w/v chitosan. The emulsions were immediately spray-dried based on an optimized model of inlet temperature and pump rate, and characterized for optimized...

  16. Hydrogenation Alternatives - Effects of Trans-Fatty-Acids and Stearic-Acid Versus Linoleic-Acid on Serum-Lipids and Lipoproteins in Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zock, P.L.; Katan, M.B.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of linoleic acid (cis,cis-C18:2(n-6)) and its hydrogenation products elaidic (trans-C18:1(n-9)) and stearic acid (C18:0) on serum lipoprotein levels in humans.Twenty-six men and 30 women, all nor

  17. Bactericidal activity of self-assembled palmitic and stearic fatty acid crystals on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Elena P; Nguyen, Song Ha; Guo, Yachong; Baulin, Vladimir A; Webb, Hayden K; Truong, Vi Khanh; Wandiyanto, Jason V; Garvey, Christopher J; Mahon, Peter J; Mainwaring, David E; Crawford, Russell J

    2017-09-01

    The wings of insects such as cicadas and dragonflies have been found to possess nanostructure arrays that are assembled from fatty acids. These arrays can physically interact with the bacterial cell membranes, leading to the death of the cell. Such mechanobactericidal surfaces are of significant interest, as they can kill bacteria without the need for antibacterial chemicals. Here, we report on the bactericidal effect of two of the main lipid components of the insect wing epicuticle, palmitic (C16) and stearic (C18) fatty acids. Films of these fatty acids were re-crystallised on the surface of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite. It appeared that the presence of two additional CH 2 groups in the alkyl chain resulted in the formation of different surface structures. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy showed that the palmitic acid microcrystallites were more asymmetric than those of the stearic acid, where the palmitic acid microcrystallites were observed to be an angular abutment in the scanning electron micrographs. The principal differences between the two types of long-chain saturated fatty acid crystallites were the larger density of peaks in the upper contact plane of the palmitic acid crystallites, as well as their greater proportion of asymmetrical shapes, in comparison to that of the stearic acid film. These two parameters might contribute to higher bactericidal activity on surfaces derived from palmitic acid. Both the palmitic and stearic acid crystallite surfaces displayed activity against Gram-negative, rod-shaped Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Gram-positive, spherical Staphylococcus aureus cells. These microcrystallite interfaces might be a useful tool in the fabrication of effective bactericidal nanocoatings. Nanostructured cicada and dragonfly wing surfaces have been discovered to be able physically kill bacterial cells. Here, we report on the successful fabrication of bactericidal three-dimensional structures of two main lipid

  18. Thermal Characterization of Lauric-Stearic Acid/Expanded Graphite Eutectic Mixture as Phase Change Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hua; Zhang, Peng; Meng, Zhaonan; Li, Ming

    2015-04-01

    The eutectic mixture of lauric acid (LA) and stearic acid (SA) is a desirable phase change material (PCM) due to the constant melting temperature and large latent heat. However, its poor thermal conductivity has hampered its broad utilization. In the present study, pure LA, SA and the mixtures with various mass fractions of LA-SA were used as the basic PCMs, and 10 wt% expanded graphite (EG) was added to enhance the thermal conductivities. The phase change behaviors, microstructural analysis, thermal conductivities and thermal stabilities of the mixtures of PCMs were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electronic microscope (SEM), transient plane source (TPS) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. The results show that the LA-SA binary mixture of mixture ratio of 76.3 wt%: 23.7 wt% forms an eutectic mixture, which melts at 38.99 °C and has a latent heat of 159.94 J/g. The melted fatty acids are well absorbed by the porous network of EG and they have a good thermal stability. Furthermore, poor thermal conductivities can be well enhanced by the addition of EG.

  19. Stability, occurrence and step morphology of polymorphs and polytypes of stearic acid. I. Stability and occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kiyotaka; Kobayashi, Masamichi; Morishita, Hirofumi

    1988-02-01

    The thermodynamical stability and occurrence of three different structural modifications: monoclinic and pseudo-orthorhombic polytypes of the B polymorph, called B(mon) and B(orth II) respectively, and monoclinic C polymorph, C(mon), of stearic acid have been examined. The solubility measurements, overgrowth and isothermal crystallization proved that B(orth II) and C(mon) are most stable below and above 32°C, respectively, whereas B(mon) is always metastable, turning to be more stable than C(mon) below between 23 and 24°C. It was confirmed by micro-probe Raman spectroscopy that the polytypic structure of the newly-overgrown crystal on the (001) faces of the seed crystal of B(mon) changed from the original monoclinic to pseudo-orthorhombic, B(orth II), at very small supersaturations above 23°C. This conversion was caused by the solubility difference. The occurrence experiment indicated a slight tendency that B(mon) crystallized more than B(orth II) at lower temperatures.

  20. Melting properties of some structured lipids native to high stearic acid soybean oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunn, R. O.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available A number of structured lipids native to high stearic acid soybean oil were synthesized and their physical properties were determined by pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, Mettler dropping point and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. 1,3 Distearo-2-olein (SOS, 1,3 distearo-2-linolein (SLS and1,3 distearo-2-linolenin (SlnS were synthesized from pure 1,3 diacylglycerols and the appropriate fatty acid. Pulsed NMR determinations over the temperature range 10-50 ºC showed that the symmetrical triacylglycerols (SUS: where S = stearic, U = oleic, linoleic or linolenic are high and sharply melting materials, all showing substantial amounts of solids at temperatures up to 33.3 ºC, yet are completely melted at only a few degrees higher. Mettler dropping points for SOS, SLS and SlnS were 44.1, 37.9 and 36.5 ºC respectively. The heats of fusion for the structured triacylglycerols were determined by DSC and shown to be of the order 29-32 cal/gm compared to 45 cal/gm for SSS. The heats of fusion were also calculated from Mettler dropping point determinations as admixtures with soybean oil and showed consistent agreement with the DSC data.Se sintetizaron algunos lípidos estructurados procedentes del aceite de soja con alto contenido en ácido esteárico y sus propiedades físicas se determinaron por resonancia magnética nuclear pulsada (NMR, punto de goteo Mettler y calorimetría diferencial de barrido (DSC. Se sintetizaron 1,3 diestearo-2-oleina (SOS, 1,3 diestearo-2-linoleina (SLS y 1,3 diestearo-2-linolenina (SlnS a partir de 1,3 diacilgliceroles y de los ácidos grasos adecuados puros. Las determinaciones de NMR pulsada en el rango de temperaturas 10- 50 ºC mostraron que los triacilgliceroles simétricos (SUS: donde S = esteárico, U = oleico, linoleico o linolénico funden a mayor temperatura y más bruscamente, todos presentan altos contenidos en sólidos a todas las temperaturas hasta los 33.3 ºC, estando completamente fundidos

  1. Improving the physical and moisture barrier properties of Lepidium perfoliatum seed gum biodegradable film with stearic and palmitic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedi, Samira; Koocheki, Arash; Mohebbi, Mohebbat; Zahedi, Younes

    2015-01-01

    Stearic and palmitic fatty acids (10%, 20% and 30%, W/W gum) were used to improve the barrier properties of Lepidium perfoliatum seed gum (LPSG) film. The impact of the incorporation of fatty acids into the film matrix was studied by investigating the physical, mechanical, and barrier properties of the films. Addition of stearic and palmitic fatty acids to LPSG films reduced their water vapor permeability (WVP), moisture content, water solubility and water adsorption. Increasing fatty acid concentration from 10% to 30%, reduced the elongation at break (EB). Lower values of tensile strength (TS) and elastic modulus (EM) were obtained in the presence of higher fatty acids concentrations. Incorporation of fatty acids led to production of opaque films and the opacity increased as function of fatty acids concentration. Results showed that moisture content, water solubility and WVP decreased as the chain length of fatty acid increased. Therefore, LPSG-fatty acids composite film could be used for packaging in which a low affinity toward water is needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Dielectric dispersion and thermodynamic behavior of stearic acid binary mixtures with alcohol as co-solvent using time domain reflectometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Maria Sylvester

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Dielectric permittivity and relaxation dynamics of binary and ternary mixture of stearic acid on various concentration and their thermodynamic effects are studied. The static dielectric constant (ε0, dielectric permittivity (ε′ and dielectric loss (ε′′ are found by bilinear calibration. The relaxation time (τ, dielectric strength (Δε and the excess permittivity (εE are found. The thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy (ΔH, entropy (ΔS and Gibb’s free energy (ΔG are evolved. The significant changes in dielectric parameters are due to the intramolecular and intermolecular interactions in response to the applied frequency. The permittivity spectra of stearic acid–alcohol in the frequency range of 10MHz to 30GHz have been measured using picoseconds Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR. The dielectric parameters (ε0, ε′, ε′′ are found by bilinear calibration method. Influence of temperature in intermolecular interaction and the relaxation process are also studied. The FT-IR spectral analysis reveals that the conformation of functional groups and formation for hydrogen bonding are present in both binary and ternary mixtures of stearic acid.

  3. Milk production and nutrient digestibility responses to increasing levels of stearic acid supplementation of dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerman, J P; de Souza, J; Lock, A L

    2017-04-01

    The objective of our study was to evaluate the dose-response effects of a stearic acid (C18:0)-enriched supplement on nutrient digestibility, production responses, and the maximum amount of C18:0 that can be incorporated into the milk fat of dairy cows. Multiparous Holstein cows (n = 32; 145 ± 66 d in milk) with a wide range in milk yield (30 to 70 kg/d) were blocked by milk yield and assigned to replicated 4 × 4 Latin squares. Treatments were diets supplemented with a C18:0-enriched supplement (SA; 93% C18:0) at 0, 0.80, 1.50, or 2.30% of diet dry matter (DM). Periods were 21 d with the final 5 d used for data and sample collection. Dry matter intake increased linearly as SA supplementation increased. Supplementation of SA had no effect on the yield of milk or milk components. Due to the increase in DM intake, SA linearly reduced the ratio of energy-corrected milk to DM intake. Supplementation of SA did not affect body weight. Increasing SA reduced digestibility of 16-carbon, 18-carbon, and total fatty acids (FA), with the reduction in digestibility of 18-carbon FA being approximately 30 percentage units from the 0.0 to 2.30% SA supplemented diets. Supplementation of SA linearly increased concentrations of preformed milk fatty acids (FA) but did not affect the yield of preformed milk FA. Yields of C18:0 plus cis-9 C18:1 were increased by SA supplementation; however, the increase from 0 to 2.3% SA was only 16 g/d. The concentration and yield of de novo and 16-carbon milk FA were unaffected by SA supplementation. In conclusion, increasing doses of SA decreased FA digestibility and had little effect on production parameters. Although SA increased the yield of C18:0 and cis-9 C18:1 in milk fat, it had no overall effect on milk fat yield. The lack of production responses to a C18:0-enriched fat supplement was most likely associated with the marked decrease in FA digestibility. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  4. Construction of Bifunctional Co/H-ZSM-5 Catalysts for the Hydrodeoxygenation of Stearic Acid to Diesel-range Alkanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guangjun; Zhang, Nan; Dai, Weili; Guan, Naijia; Li, Landong

    2018-04-27

    Bifunctional Co/H-ZSM-5 zeolites were prepared by surface organometallic chemistry grafting route, namely by the stoichiometric reaction between cobaltocene and the Brønsted acid sites in zeolites, and applied to the model reaction of stearic acid catalytic hydrodeoxygenation. Cobalt species existed in the form of isolated Co2+ ions at exchange positions after grafting, transformed to CoO species on the surface of zeolite and stabilized inside zeolite channels upon calcination in air, and finally reduced to metallic cobalt species of homogeneous clusters of ca. 1.5 nm by hydrogen. During this process, the Brønsted acid sites of H-ZSM-5 zeolites could be preserved with acid strength slightly reduced. The as-prepared bifunctional catalyst exhibited a ~16 times higher activity in stearic acid hydrodeoxygenation (2.11 gSAgcat-1h-1) than the reference catalyst (0.13 gSAgcat-1h-1) prepared by solid-state ion exchange, and a high C18/C17 ratio of ~24 was achieved as well. The remarkable hydrodeoxygenation performance of bifunctional Co/H-ZSM-5 could be explained from the effective synergy between the uniformed metallic cobalt clusters and the Brønsted acid sites in H-ZSM-5 zeolite. The simplified reaction network and kinetics of stearic acid hydrodeoxygenation catalyzed by the as-prepared bifunctional Co/H-ZSM-5 zeolites were also investigated. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Fabrication and characterization of stearic acid/polyaniline composite with electrical conductivity as phase change materials for thermal energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yi; Ji, Hui; Shi, Huan; Zhang, Ting; Xia, TianDong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Stearic acid/polyaniline composite PCM with electrical conductivity was fabricated. • Stearic acid acted as thermal energy storage media and doping acid. • Latent heats of SA/PANI are as high as the same type composites. • Improved electrical conductivity of capsules is 0.7042 S cm −1 . - Abstract: This paper presents the experimental investigation on the thermal properties and electrical conductivity of the new microencapsulated phase change material by entrapping of stearic acid (SA) into PANI (polyaniline) shell through self-assembly method. Experimental results reveal that PANI nuclei grew on the surface of SA, and then copied its original morphological structure and finally exhibited peony flower-like morphology. The two components have good compatibility and have no chemical reaction both in the process of fabrication and subsequent use, while hydrogen bondings between the imino groups and carboxyl groups exist. The maximum mass fraction of stearic acid loaded in SA/PANI is determined as high as 62.1 wt% without seepage of melted SA from capsules. Due to the secondary doping with carboxyl group, the composite phase change material embedded with SA exhibits improved electrical conductivity from 0.3968 S cm −1 to 0.7042 S cm −1 when compared to PANI. The phase change temperatures and latent heats of SA/PANI are measured to be 55.6 °C and 113.02 J/g for melting and, 50.8 °C and 112.58 J/g for freezing, respectively. TG analysis test revealed that the prepared SA/PANI composite PCM has high thermal durability in working temperature range. Moreover, the results of DSC, FT-IR, TG, conductivity investigation and thermal cycling test are all show that the thermal reliability and electrical conductivity of the SA/APNI have imperceptible changes. In total, the additional electrical conductivity, high heat storage potential and good thermal reliability and stability facilitated SA/PANI to be considered as a viable candidate for thermal

  6. Viability of the microencapsulation of a casein hydrolysate in lipid microparticles of cupuacu butter and stearic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Cristina Pinho

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false PT-BR X-NONE X-NONE Solid lipid microparticles produced with a mixture of cupuacu butter and stearic acid were used to microencapsulate a commercial casein hydrolysate (Hyprol 8052. The composition of the lipid matrix used for the production of the lipid microparticles was chosen according to data on the wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC of bulk lipid mixtures, which indicated that the presence of 10 % cupuacu butter was sufficient to significantly change the crystalline arrangement of pure stearic acid. Preliminary tests indicated that a minimum proportion of 4 % of surfactant (polysorbate 80 was necessary to produce empty spherical lipid particles with average diameters below 10 mm. The lipid microparticles were produced using 20 % cupuacu butter and 80 % stearic acid and then stabilized with 4 % of polysorbate 80, exhibiting an encapsulation efficiency of approximately 74 % of the casein hydrolysate. The melting temperature of the casein hydrolysate-loaded lipid microparticles was detected at 65.2 °C, demonstrating that the particles were solid at room temperature as expected and indicating that the incorporation of peptides had not affected their thermal behavior. After 25 days of storage, however, there was a release of approximately 30 % of the initial amount of encapsulated casein hydrolysate. This release was not thought to have been caused by the liberation of encapsulated casein hydrolysate. Instead, it was attributed to the possible desorption of the adsorbed peptides present on the surface of the lipid microparticles.

  7. Effects of spray-drying on w/o/w multiple emulsions prepared from a stearic acid matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mlalila N

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nichrous Mlalila,1 Hulda Swai,2 Lonji Kalombo,2 Askwar Hilonga3 1School of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Nelson Mandela African Institution of Science and Technology, Arusha, Tanzania; 2Materials Science and Manufacturing, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Pretoria, South Africa; 3Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nelson Mandela African Institution of Science and Technology, Arusha, Tanzania Abstract: The goal of this study was to explore the effects of spray-drying on w/o/w double emulsions of methyltestosterone (MT loaded in a stearic acid matrix. MT-loaded nanoparticles were formulated by a water-in-oil-in-water emulsion technique using 50, 75, and 100 mg of stearic acid, 2% and 3% w/v polyvinyl alcohol, 5% w/v lactose, and 0.2% w/v chitosan. The emulsions were immediately spray-dried based on an optimized model of inlet temperature and pump rate, and characterized for optimized responses with regard to particle size, polydispersity index, and zeta potential, for both emulsion and powder samples. Dynamic light scattering analysis shown that the nanoparticles increased in size with increasing concentrations of polyvinyl alcohol and stearic acid. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that the MT-loaded nanoparticles were spherical in shape, had a smooth surface, and were in an amorphous state, which was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry. These MT-loaded nanoparticles are a promising candidate carrier for the delivery of MT; however, further studies are needed in order to establish the stability of the system and the cargo release profile under normal conditions of use. Keywords: double emulsions, nanoparticles, pump rate, spray-drying, testosterone

  8. Study on thermal property of lauric–palmitic–stearic acid/vermiculite composite as form-stable phase change material for energy storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Zhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The form-stable composite phase change material of lauric–palmitic–stearic acid ternary eutectic mixture/vermiculite was prepared by vacuum impregnation method for thermal energy storage. The maximum mass fraction of lauric–palmitic–stearic acid ternary eutectic mixture retained in vermiculite was determined as 50 wt% without melted phase change material seepage from the composite phase change material. Fourier transformation infrared spectroscope and scanning electron microscope were used to characterize the structure and morphology of the prepared lauric–palmitic–stearic acid ternary eutectic mixture/vermiculite form-stable composite phase change material, and the results indicate that lauric–palmitic–stearic acid ternary eutectic mixture was well confined into the layer porous structure of vermiculite by physical reaction. The melting and freezing temperatures and latent heats were measured by differential scanning calorimeter as 31.4°C and 30.3°C, and 75.8 and 73.2 J/g, respectively. Thermal cycling test showed that there was no significant change in the thermal properties of lauric–palmitic–stearic acid ternary eutectic mixture/vermiculite form-stable composite phase change material after 1000 thermal cycles. Moreover, 2 wt% expanded graphite was added to improve the thermal conductivity of lauric–palmitic–stearic acid ternary eutectic mixture/vermiculite form-stable composite phase change material. All results indicated that the prepared lauric–palmitic–stearic acid ternary eutectic mixture/vermiculite form-stable composite phase change material had suitable thermal properties and good thermal reliability for the application of thermal energy storage in building energy efficiency.

  9. Digestibility of Fatty Acids in the Gastrointestinal Tract of Dairy Cows Fed with Tallow or Saturated Fats Rich in Stearic Acid or Palmitic Acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weisbjerg, Martin Riis; Hvelplund, Torben; Børsting, Christian Friis

    1992-01-01

    Fatty acid digestibility was studied with five lactating cows fed three different fat sources in a 5 × 5 latin square experiment. The treatments were 500 g of tallow, 500 or 1000 g of saturated fat rich in stearic acid (C18:0) (SARF) or 500 or 1000 g of saturated fat rich in palmitic acid (C16......:0) (PARF) per day. The total daily fatty acid intake was about 1100 g in rations with the highest fat inclusion. The fatty acid digestibilities were 76% for tallow, 74 and 64% for 500 and 1000 g SARF, respectively, and 87 and 81% for 500 and 1000 g of PARF, respectively. When compared to fatty acid...... digestibility for tallow predicted from a model based on literature values, PARF had a higher fatty acid digestibility at both fat intakes, and SARF had a lower fatty acid digestibility, especially at high fat intake....

  10. Preparation of porous monolayer film by immersing the stearic acid Langmuir-Blodgett monolayer on mica in salt solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S. [Institute of Near-Field Optics and Nano Technology, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Street No. 2 Linggong Road, Dalian 116024 (China); Li, Y.L.; Zhao, H.L.; Liang, H. [Institute of Photo-Biophysics, School of Physics and Electronic, Henan University, Jinming, Kaifeng 475004, Henan (China); Liu, B., E-mail: boliu@henu.edu.cn [Institute of Photo-Biophysics, School of Physics and Electronic, Henan University, Jinming, Kaifeng 475004, Henan (China); Pan, S., E-mail: span@dlut.edu.cn [Institute of Near-Field Optics and Nano Technology, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Street No. 2 Linggong Road, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Porous film has been prepared by immersing the stearic acid Langmuir-Blodgett monolayer on mica in salt solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mechanism relies on the electrostatic screening effect of the cations in salt solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The factors influencing the size and area of the pores were investigated. - Abstract: Porous materials have drawn attention from scientists in many fields such as life sciences, catalysis and photonics since they can be used to induce some materials growth as expected. Especially, porous Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) film is an ideal material with controlled thickness and flat surface. In this paper, stearic acid (SA), which has been extensively explored in LB film technique, is chosen as the template material with known parameters to prepare the LB film, and then the porous SA monolayer film is obtained by means of etching in salt solution. The main etching mechanism is suggested that the cations in the solution block the electrostatic interaction between the polar carboxyl group of SA and the electronegative mica surface. The influencing factors (such as concentration of salt solution, valence of cation and surface pressure) of the porous SA film are systematically studied in this work. The novel method proposed in this paper makes it convenient to prepare porous monolayer film for designed material growth or cell culture.

  11. , , , , , and Gene Expression in Single- and Co-cultured Bovine Satellite Cells and Intramuscular Preadipocytes Treated with Palmitic, Stearic, Oleic, and Linoleic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Choi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated that bovine subcutaneous preadipocytes promote adipogenic gene expression in muscle satellite cells in a co-culture system. Herein we hypothesize that saturated fatty acids would promote adipogenic/lipogenic gene expression, whereas mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids would have the opposite effect. Bovine semimembranosus satellite cells (BSC and intramuscular preadipocytes (IPA were isolated from crossbred steers and cultured with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS/Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM and 1% antibiotics during the 3-d proliferation period. After proliferation, cells were treated for 3 d with 3% horse serum/DMEM (BSC or 5% FBS/DMEM (IPA with antibiotics. Media also contained 10 μg/mL insulin and 10 μg/mL pioglitazone. Subsequently, differentiating BSC and IPA were cultured in their respective media with 40 μM palmitic, stearic, oleic, or linoleic acid for 4 d. Finally, BSC and IPA were single- or co-cultured for an additional 2 h. All fatty acid treatments increased (p = 0.001 carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 beta (CPT1β gene expression, but the increase in CPT1β gene expression was especially pronounced in IPA incubated with palmitic and stearic acid (6- to 17- fold increases. Oleic and linoleic acid decreased (p = 0.001 stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD gene expression over 80% in both BSC and IPA. Conversely, palmitic and stearic acid increased SCD gene expression three fold in co-cultured in IPA, and stearic acid increased AMPKα gene expression in single- and co-cultured BSC and IPA. Consistent with our hypothesis, saturated fatty acids, especially stearic acid, promoted adipogenic and lipogenic gene expression, whereas unsaturated fatty acids decreased expression of those genes associated with fatty acid metabolism.

  12. Preparation and characterization of dutasteride-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers coated with stearic acid-chitosan oligomer for topical delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Norhayati Mohamed; Sheikh, Khalid; Somavarapu, Satyanarayana; Taylor, Kevin M G

    2017-08-01

    Dutasteride, used for treating benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH), promotes hair growth. To enhance delivery to the hair follicles and reduce systemic effects, in this study dutasteride has been formulated for topical application, in a nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC) coated with chitosan oligomer-stearic acid (CSO-SA). CSO-SA has been successfully synthesized, as confirmed using 1 H NMR and FTIR. Formulation of dutasteride-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (DST-NLCs) was optimized using a 2 3 full factorial design. This formulation was coated with different concentrations of stearic acid-chitosan solution. Coating DST-NLCs with 5% SA-CSO increased mean size from 187.6±7.0nm to 220.1±11.9nm, and modified surface charge, with zeta potentials being -18.3±0.9mV and +25.8±1.1mV for uncoated and coated DST-NLCs respectively. Transmission electron microscopy showed all formulations comprised approximately spherical particles. DST-NLCs, coated and uncoated with CSO-SA, exhibited particle size stability over 60days, when stored at 4-8°C. However, NLCs coated with CSO (without conjugation) showed aggregation when stored at 4-8°C after 30days. The measured particle size for all formulations stored at 25°C suggested aggregation, which was greatest for DST-NLCs coated with 10% CSO-SA and 5% CSO. All nanoparticle formulations exhibited rapid release in an in vitro release study, with uncoated NLCs exhibiting the fastest release rate. Using a Franz diffusion cell, no dutasteride permeated through pig ear skin after 48h, such that it was not detected in the receptor chamber for all samples. The amount of dutasteride in the skin was significantly different (pchitosan conjugate was successfully prepared, and modified the surface charge of DST-NLCs from negative to positive. These stable, less cytotoxic, positively-charged dutasteride-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers, with stearic acid-chitosan oligomer conjugate, are appropriate for topical delivery and have

  13. Polarized Raman and Infrared Spectroscopy and ab Initio Calculation of Palmitic and Stearic Acids in the Bm and C Forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L da Silva, L F; Andrade-Filho, T; Freire, P T C; Filho, J Mendes; da Silva Filho, J G; Saraiva, G D; Moreira, S G C; de Sousa, F F

    2017-06-29

    A complete experimental study on the vibrational properties of palmitic and stearic acids crystallized in the B m and C forms, both belonging to the monoclinic system with the P2 1 /a (C 2h 5 ) space group, through polarized Raman and infrared spectroscopy, is reported in this paper. Density functional theory calculations were also performed to assign the normal modes and to help in the interpretation of the experimental data. The different polarizations were compared and their influence on the spectral profiles, in both the lattice and the internal mode regions, was discussed. In general, the Raman and infrared spectra exhibit accentuated differences among the polymorphic forms, which are associated with the different molecular modifications, defined as gauche and all-trans conformations. Insights about interaction among different groups are also furnished.

  14. Thermal properties and reliability of eutectic mixture of stearic acid-acetamide as phase change material for latent heat storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Guixiang; Han, Lipeng; Sun, Jinhe; Jia, Yongzhong

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The system of stearic acid-acetamide binary mixtures were studied as phase change material. • The eutectic mixtures featured low melting temperatures and high latent heats of fusion for latent heat storage. • Solid-liquid phase diagrams for the system were constructed. • Negligible change in stability after 500 heating/cooling cycles. - Abstract: The thermal properties and reliability of the stearic acid (SA) with acetamide (AC) binary mixture were characterized using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TG) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The phase diagrams for the SA-AC binary mixture with AC in the metastable and the stable form were constructed. The eutectic system with stable AC is 0.604 mol fraction SA, and displayed a melting temperature (T m ) of 64.55 °C and latent heat of melting (ΔH m ) of 193.87 J·g −1 . The eutectic systems with metastable AC are 0.397 and 0.604 mol fraction SA. The melting temperatures are 62.23 °C and 62.54 °C, and latent heats of fusion are 222.10 J·g −1 and 194.28 J·g −1 , respectively. Following accelerated thermal cycling tests, TG and FT-IR analysis indicate that the eutectic mixture (χ SA = 0.397) with the metastable AC has good cyclic and thermal stability. The results show that the SA-AC eutectic mixture use as phase change material (PCM) possess good prospect for low temperature thermal energy storage (TES) applications.

  15. PSI1 is responsible for the stearic acid enrichment that is characteristic of phosphatidylinositol in yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Guédard, Marina; Bessoule, Jean-Jacques; Boyer, Valérie; Ayciriex, Sophie; Velours, Gisèle; Kulik, Willem; Ejsing, Christer S.; Shevchenko, Andrej; Coulon, Denis; Lessire, René; Testet, Eric

    2009-01-01

    In yeast, both phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylserine are synthesized from cytidine diphosphate-diacylglycerol. Because, as in other eukaryotes, phosphatidylinositol contains more saturated fatty acids than phosphatidylserine (and other phospholipids), it has been hypothesized that either

  16. Facile Fabrication of a PDMS@Stearic Acid-Kaolin Coating on Lignocellulose Composites with Superhydrophobicity and Flame Retardancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Wang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The disadvantages such as swelling after absorbing water and flammability restrict the widespread applications of lignocellulose composites (LC. Herein, a facile and effective method to fabricate superhydrophobic surfaces with flame retardancy on LC has been investigated by coating polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS and stearic acid (STA modified kaolin (KL particles. The as-prepared coatings on the LC exhibited a good repellency to water (a contact angle = 156°. Owing to the excellent flame retardancy of kaolin particles, the LC coated with PDMS@STA-KL displayed a good flame retardancy during limiting oxygen index and cone calorimeter tests. After the coating treatment, the limiting oxygen index value of the LC increased to 41.0. Cone calorimetry results indicated that the ignition time of the LC coated with PDMS@STA-KL increased by 40 s compared with that of uncoated LC. Moreover, the peak heat release rate (PHRR and the total heat release (THR of LC coated with PDMS@STA-KL reduced by 18.7% and 19.2% compared with those of uncoated LC, respectively. This LC coating with improved water repellency and flame retardancy can be considered as a potential alternative to protect the lignocellulose composite.

  17. Investigation of cutaneous penetration properties of stearic acid loaded to dendritic core-multi-shell (CMS) nanocarriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohan, S B; Icken, N; Teutloff, C; Saeidpour, S; Bittl, R; Lademann, J; Fleige, E; Haag, R; Haag, S F; Meinke, M C

    2016-03-30

    Dendritic core-multi shell (CMS) particles are polymer based systems consisting of a dendritic polar polyglycerol polymer core surrounded by a two-layer shell of nonpolar C18 alkyl chains and hydrophilic polyethylene glycol. Belonging to nanotransport systems (NTS) they allow the transport and storage of molecules with different chemical characters. Their amphipihilic character CMS-NTS permits good solubility in aqueous and organic solutions. We showed by multifrequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy that spin-labeled 5-doxyl stearic acid (5DSA) can be loaded into the CMS-NTS. Furthermore, the release of 5DSA from the carrier into the stratum corneum of porcine skin was monitored ex vivo by EPR spectroscopy. Additionally, the penetration of the CMS-NTS into the skin was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy using indocarbocyanine (ICC) covalently bound to the nanocarrier. Thereby, no transport into the viable skin was observed, whereas the CMS-NTS had penetrated into the hair follicles down to a depth of 340 μm ± 82 μm. Thus, it could be shown that the combined application of fluorescence microscopy and multi-frequency EPR spectroscopy can be an efficient tool for investigating the loading of spin labeled drugs to nanocarrier systems, drug release and penetration into the skin as well as the localization of the NTS in the skin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Solar Cooker Study under Oman Conditions for Late Evening Cooking Using Stearic Acid and Acetanilide as PCM Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraj Nayak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar energy is an alternative source of nonrenewable energy in Oman. Sultanate of Oman government showed initiation into utilization of solar energy for domestic applications. Conversion of solar radiation into useful heat is the simplest application of solar energy, in which it can be used for late evening cooking. In this context, present work highlighted the design and development of solar cooker for Oman climatic conditions. The current work signifies usage of solar cooker for late evening cooking using stearic acid and acetanilide as phase change materials (PCM. Solar cooker parts are developed in-house and connected to water heating system compounded with evacuated tubes solar collector and storage tank. The circumference of cooker unit is incorporated with spiral stainless steel heat exchanger and annulus area of the pot is filled with PCM material. PCM releases heat at late evening and effective cooking up to 7:30 PM is noticed. The experimental results indicated the cooker efficiency of 30% and collector efficiency of 60–65% during the study. Overall, experiments showed satisfactory performance on the developed cooker.

  19. Cu2+ Montmorillonite K10 Clay Catalyst as a Green Catalyst for Production of Stearic Acid Methyl Ester: Optimization Using Response Surface Methodology (RSM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enas A. Almadani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Clay catalyst has received much attention to replace the homogeneous catalysts in the esterification reaction to produce fatty acid methyl ester as the source of biodiesel as it is low cost, easily available, as well as environmental friendly. However, the use of unmodified clay, in particular montmorillonite K10 (MMT K10, for the esterification of fatty acids showed that the acid conversion was less than 60% and this is not preferable to the production of biodiesel. In this study, synthesis of stearic acid methyl ester using Cu2+-MMT K10 (Cu-MMT K10 was successfully optimized via response surface methodo-logy (RSM based on 3-variable of Box-Behnken design (BB. The parameters were; reaction time (5-180 minutes, reaction temperature (80-120 oC and concentration of Cu2+ in MMT K10 (0.25-1 M. The use of RSM in optimizing the conversion of stearic acid was successfully developed as the actual experimental conversion of stearic acid was found similar to the actual values under the optimum conditions. The model equation predicted that the following conditions would generate the maximum conversion of stearic acid (87.05 %reaction time of 62 minutes, a reaction temperature of 80 oC and catalyst used is 1.0 M Cu-MMT K10. This finding can be considered as green catalytic process as it worked at moderate reaction temperature using low cost clay catalyst with a short reaction time. Copyright © 2018 BCREC Group. All rights reserved Received: 26th July 2017; Revised: 13rd January 2018; Accepted: 13rd January 2018; Available online: 22nd January 2018; Published regularly: 2nd April 2018 How to Cite: Almadani, E.A., Harun, F.W., Radzi, S.M., Muhamad, S.K. (2018. Cu2+ Montmorillonite K10 Clay Catalyst as a Green Catalyst for Production of Stearic Acid Methyl Ester: Optimization Using Response Surface Methodology (RSM. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 13 (1: 187-195 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.13.1.1397.187-195

  20. Study on performance of colloidal mixtures consisted of stearic acid and Na2HPO4.12H2O for use as phase change materials of thermal energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Zhiwei; Liu Aijie; Chen Zhifeng

    2010-01-01

    The thermal energy storage performance and phase change stability of mix phase change materials consisted of stearic acid and Na 2 PO 4 .12H 2 O are studied by means of Fourier transformation infrared spectrum analyses (FTIR) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). The specific heat capacity of mix materials is also determined experimentally. The results show that all absorption peaks of functional groups and chemical bonds of stearic acid still exist, which suggests that these crystal materials composed of stearic acid and Na 2 PO 4 .12H 2 O have good phase change stability and chemical compatibility. Thus, disadvantages caused by the subcooling of Na 2 PO 4 .H 2 O and the low specific heat capacity of stearic acid can be solved, it is speculated that complement each other on the basis of organic/inorganic characteristics in itself is carried out for these two component materials of the mixture.

  1. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of docetaxel-loaded stearic acid-modified Bletilla striata polysaccharide copolymer micelles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingxiang Guan

    Full Text Available Bletilla striata polysaccharides (BSPs have been used in pharmaceutical and biomedical industry, the aim of the present study was to explore a BSPs amphiphilic derivative to overcome its application limit as poorly water-soluble drug carriers due to water-soluble polymers. Stearic acid (SA was selected as a hydrophobic block to modify B. striata polysaccharides (SA-BSPs. Docetaxel (DTX-loaded SA-BSPs (DTX-SA-BSPs copolymer micelles were prepared and characterized. The DTX release percentage in vitro and DTX concentration in vivo was carried out by using high performance liquid chromatography. HepG2 and HeLa cells were subjected to MTT (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazonium bromide assay to evaluate the cell viability. In vitro evaluation of copolymer micelles showed higher drug encapsulation and loading capacity. The release percentage of DTX from DTX-SA-BSPs copolymer micelles and docetaxel injection was 66.93 ± 1.79% and 97.06 ± 1.56% in 2 days, respectively. The DTX-SA-BSPs copolymer micelles exhibited a sustained release of DTX. A 50% increase in growth inhibition was observed for HepG2 cells treated with DTX-SA-BSPs copolymer micelles as compared to those treated with docetaxel injection for 72 h. DTX-SA-BSPs copolymer micelles presented a similar growth inhibition effect on Hela cells. Furthermore, absolute bioavailability of DTX-SA-BSPs copolymer micelles was shown to be 1.39-fold higher than that of docetaxel injection. Therefore, SA-BSPs copolymer micelles may be used as potential biocompatible polymers for cancer chemotherapy.

  2. Effect of the distribution of saturated fatty acids in the melting and crystallization profiles of high-oleic high-stearic oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bootello, M.A.; Garces, R.; Martinez-Force, E.; Salas, J.J.

    2016-01-01

    The composition and distribution of fatty acids in triacylglycerol (TAG) molecules are commonly considered as factors that determine the physical properties of a given oil or fat. The distribution of any fatty acid in fats and oils can be described through the α coefficient of asymmetry, which can be calculated from the TAG composition and fatty acid composition of the Sn-2 position of the TAGs determined through lipase hydrolysis. High-oleic high-stearic oils and fats are considered stable and healthy, and they are good substitutes for hydrogenated vegetable oils and palm fractions in many food products, such as spreads and confectionery. Here, different high-oleic high-stearic acid oils were formulated which contained different distributions of saturated fatty acids in their TAGs, while maintaining a similar fatty acid composition. The aim of this work was to discuss the possibility of using the α coefficient to predict the physical properties of fats in function of their chemical composition and their melting and crystallization behavior as examined by differential scanning calorimetry.

  3. Effect of expanded organoclay by stearic acid to curing, mechanical and swelling properties of natural rubber nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadhan, A.; Fathurrohman, M. Irfan; Falaah, A. F.; Setyawan, N.; Soegijono, B.

    2017-07-01

    The interlayer basal spacing of organoclay (OC) could be increased with stearic acid (SA) added, thus OC changed into expanded organoclay by SA (OCSA). The effect of various loadings of OCSA on the curing, mechanical and swelling properties of natural rubber (NR) nanocomposites were studied. The natural rubber/expanded organoclay (NR/OCSA) nanocomposites were prepared by melt intercalation using a laboratory open mill. The curing characteristics of NR compounds were determined using a Moving Die Rheometer (MDR). The X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Attenuated Total Reflectance Infrared (ATR-IR) Spectroscopy and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) were used to study the dispersion of OCSA in the NR matrix. The mechanical properties of NR/OCSA nanocomposites such as tensile strength, elongation at break and hardness were determined using ISO standard and swelling of NR/OCSA nanocomposites in toluene were determined using ISO 1817. The results showed that the SA intercalated into the gallery of OC and reacted with the hydroxyl groups in OC. It was indicated with the shifting of the negative peak 1,700 to 1,723 cm-1 in the ATR-IR spectrum and increase the d-spacing of OC. The adding of various loadings of OCSA into NR could increase the torque and accelerate the curing of nanocomposites and it also could increase the mechanical and swelling properties of nanocomposites. The change in modulus at 100% elongation significantly increased with increasing the OCSA load until maximum loading at 10 phr. This trend was same with the hardness and modulus at 300% elongation. Meanwhile, the improvement of tensile strength and elongation at break was higher at 4 phr OCSA compared with the other loading. The increase of mechanical and swelling properties of NR/OCSA nanocomposites was due to intercalation/exfoliation of OCSA in NR matrix. It was revealed by appearing of the out-of-plane Si-O-(Al) stretch with peak value 1080 cm-1 in the ATR-IR spectrum and the peaks of OCSA

  4. Preparation of silver-cuprous oxide/stearic acid composite coating with superhydrophobicity on copper substrate and evaluation of its friction-reducing and anticorrosion abilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Peipei [Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Special Functional Materials, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Chen, Xinhua [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xuchang University, Xuchang 461000 (China); Yang, Guangbin; Yu, Laigui [Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Special Functional Materials, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Zhang, Pingyu, E-mail: pingyu@henu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Special Functional Materials, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China)

    2014-01-15

    A simple two-step solution immersion process was combined with surface-modification by stearic acid to prepare superhydrophobic coatings on copper substrates so as to reduce friction coefficient, increase wear resistance and improve the anticorrosion ability of copper. Briefly, cuprous oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) crystal coating with uniform and compact tetrahedron structure was firstly created by immersing copper substrate in 2 mol L{sup −1} NaOH solution. As-obtained Cu{sub 2}O coating was then immersed in 0.33 mmol L{sup −1} AgNO{sub 3} solution to incorporate silver nanoparticles, followed by modification with stearic acid (denoted as SA) coating to achieve hydrophobicity. The surface morphology and chemical composition of silver-cuprous oxide/stearic acid (denoted as Ag-Cu{sub 2}O/SA) composite coating were investigated using a scanning electron microscope and an X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS); and its phase structure was examined with an X-ray diffractometer (XRD). Moreover, the contact angle of water on as-prepared Ag-Cu{sub 2}O/SA composite coating was measured, and its friction-reducing and anticorrosion abilities were evaluated. It was found that as-prepared Ag-Cu{sub 2}O/SA composite coating has a water contact angle of as high as 152.4{sup o} and can provide effective friction-reducing, wear protection and anticorrosion protection for copper substrate, showing great potential for surface-modification of copper.

  5. Functionalities of chitosan conjugated with stearic acid and gallic acid and application of the modified chitosan in stabilizing labile aroma compounds in an oil-in-water emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tsung-Shi; Liu, Tai-Ti; Lin, I-Hwa

    2017-08-01

    The aims of this research were to conjugate chitosan (CT) with stearic acid (SA) and gallic acid (GA), and apply the modified chitosan to stabilize labile aroma compounds such as allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) and limonene in oil-in-water emulsions. Generally, the antioxidant activity of CT-SA-GA increased as the GA content in the conjugate increased. In most assays, GA had a lower IC 50 value than that of CT-SA-GA; however, CT-SA-GA exhibited better performance than GA in the Fe 2+ -chelating activity. In accelerated tests (heating or illumination) for evaluating the chemical stability of AITC and limonene during storage, CT-SA and CT-SA-GA were used to prepare AITC and limonene O/W emulsions, respectively. Tween 80 and Span 80 (T-S-80), an emulsifier mixture, were used as a control in both emulsions for comparison. The results show that CT-SA or CT-SA-GA could protect AITC or limonene from degradation or oxidation more effectively than T-S-80. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Metabolism in humans of cis-12,trans-15-octadecadienoic acid relative to palmitic, stearic, oleic and linoleic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emken, E.A.; Rohwedder, W.K.; Adlof, R.O.; Rakoff, H.; Gulley, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    Mixtures of triglycerides containing deuterium-labeled hexadecanoic acid (16:0), octadecanoic acid (18:0), cis-9-octadecenoic acid (9c-18:1), cis-9,cis-12-octadecadienoic acid (9c, 12c-18:2) and cis-12,trans-15-octadecadienoic acid (12c,15t-18:2) were fed to two young-adult males. Plasma lipid classes were isolated from samples collected periodically over 48 hr. Incorporation and turnover of the deuterium-labeled fats in plasma lipids were followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of the methyl ester derivatives. Absorption of the deuterated fats was followed by GC-MS analysis of chylomicron triglycerides isolated by ultracentrifugation. Results were the following: (i) endogenous fat contributed about 40% of the total fat incorporated into chylomicron triglycerides; (ii) elongation, desaturation and chain-shortened products from the deuterated fats were not detected; (iii) the polyunsaturated isomer 12c,15t-18:2 was metabolically more similar to saturated and 9c-18:1 fatty acids than to 9c,12c-18:2; (iv) relative incorporation of 9c,12c-18:2 into phospholipids did not increase proportionally with an increase of 9c,12c-18:2 in the mixture of deuterated fats fed; (v) absorption of 16:0, 18:0, 9c-18:1, 9c,12c-18:2 and 12c,15t-18:2 were similar; and (vi) data for the 1- and 2-acyl positions of phosphatidylcholine and for cholesteryl ester fractions reflected the known high specificity of phosphatidylcholine acyltransferase and lecithin:cholesteryl acyltransferase for 9c,12c-18:2. These results illustrate that incorporation of dietary fatty acids into human plasma lipid classes is selectively controlled and that incorporation of dietary 9c,12c-18:2 is limited

  7. Epoxy Stearic Acid, an Oxidative Product Derived from Oleic Acid, Induces Cytotoxicity, Oxidative Stress, and Apoptosis in HepG2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Cheng, Yajun; Li, Jinwei; Wang, Yuanpeng; Liu, Yuanfa

    2018-05-23

    In the present study, effects of cis-9,10-epoxy stearic acid (ESA) generated by the thermal oxidation of oleic acid on HepG2 cells, including cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and oxidative stress, were investigated. Our results revealed that ESA decreased the cell viability and induced cell death. Cell cycle analysis with propidium iodide staining showed that ESA induced cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase in HepG2 cells. Cell apoptosis analysis with annexin V and propidium iodide staining demonstrated that ESA induced HepG2 cell apoptotic events in a dose- and time-dependent manner; the apoptosis of cells after treated with 500 μM ESA for 12, 24, and 48 h was 32.16, 38.70, and 65.80%, respectively. Furthermore, ESA treatment to HepG2 cells resulted in an increase in reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde (from 0.84 ± 0.02 to 8.90 ± 0.50 nmol/mg of protein) levels and a reduction in antioxidant enzyme activity, including superoxide dismutase (from 1.34 ± 0.27 to 0.10 ± 0.007 units/mg of protein), catalase (from 100.04 ± 5.05 to 20.09 ± 3.00 units/mg of protein), and glutathione peroxidase (from 120.44 ± 7.62 to 35.84 ± 5.99 milliunits/mg of protein). These findings provide critical information on the effects of ESA on HepG2 cells, particularly cytotoxicity and oxidative stress, which is important for the evaluation of the biosafety of the oxidative product of oleic acid.

  8. Preparation and properties of palmitic-stearic acid eutectic mixture/expanded graphite composite as phase change material for energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Nan; Yuan, Yanping; Du, Yanxia; Cao, Xiaoling; Yuan, Yaguang

    2014-01-01

    A novel composite PCM (phase change material) with PA-SA (palmitic-stearic acid) eutectic mixture as PCM and EG (expanded graphite) as supporting material was prepared. The optimum absorption ratio of PA-SA/EG (Palmitic-stearic acid/expanded graphite) composite PCM was determined as PA-SA:EG = 13:1 (by mass). Scanning electron microscope and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy results show that PA-SA was uniformly distributed in the porous network structure of EG due to the physical action. Thermal property and thermal stability of the PA-SA/EG composite PCM were characterized by DSC (differential scanning calorimetry) and TGA (thermogravimetric analysis). DSC results indicated that the melting and freezing temperatures and latent heats of PA-SA/EG were measured as 53.89 °C and 54.37 °C, and 166.27 J/g and 166.13 J/g. TGA test results revealed that PA-SA/EG had a good thermal stability in working temperature range. Thermal cycling test results showed PA-SA/EG had a good thermal reliability after 720 thermal cycles. Thermal conductivity of the composite PCM was measured as 2.51 W/m K, much higher than that of PA-SA. The thermal energy storage and release rates of PA-SA/EG were also increased due to the high thermal conductivity of EG. In conclusion, the prepared PA-SA/EG composite PCM can be acted as a potential material for thermal energy storage due to the acceptable thermal properties, good thermal reliability and stability, high thermal conductivity. - Highlights: • PA-SA/EG (Palmitic-stearic acid/expanded graphite) composite PCM was prepared. • Optimum absorption ratio of PA-SA in EG was obtained as 13:1 (by mass). • Thermal conductivity and performance of PA-SA/EG have been significate improved. • PA-SA/EG has a good thermal reliability and thermal stability

  9. Phase change and heat transfer characteristics of a eutectic mixture of palmitic and stearic acids as PCM in a latent heat storage system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baran, Guelseren; Sari, Ahmet

    2003-01-01

    The phase change and heat transfer characteristics of a eutectic mixture of palmitic and stearic acids as phase change material (PCM) during the melting and solidification processes were determined experimentally in a vertical two concentric pipes energy storage system. This study deals with three important subjects. First is determination of the eutectic composition ratio of the palmitic acid (PA) and stearic acid (SA) binary system and measurement of its thermophysical properties by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Second is establishment of the phase transition characteristics of the mixture, such as the total melting and solidification temperatures and times, the heat transfer modes in the melted and solidified PCM and the effect of Reynolds and Stefan numbers as initial heat transfer fluid (HTF) conditions on the phase transition behaviors. Third is calculation of the heat transfer coefficients between the outside wall of the HTF pipe and the PCM, the heat recovery rates and heat fractions during the phase change processes of the mixture and also discussion of the effect of the inlet HTF parameters on these characteristics. The DSC results showed that the PA-SA binary system in the mixture ratio of 64.2:35.8 wt% forms a eutectic, which melts at 52.3 deg. C and has a latent heat of 181.7 J g -1 , and thus, these properties make it a suitable PCM for passive solar space heating and domestic water heating applications with respect to climate conditions. The experimental results also indicated that the eutectic mixture of PA-SA encapsulated in the annulus of concentric double pipes has good phase change and heat transfer characteristics during the melting and solidification processes, and it is an attractive candidate as a potential PCM for heat storage in latent heat thermal energy storage systems

  10. Effects of seed layers on controlling of the morphology of ZnO nanostructures and superhydrophobicity of ZnO nanostructure/stearic acid composite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Zhihua, E-mail: sdwfliu@163.com; Liu, Junqi; E, Lei; Liu, Zhifeng, E-mail: tjulzf@163.com

    2016-11-01

    Hydrophobic ZnO self-cleaning thin films with the nanobundles and nanocarpets structures fabricated on indium tin oxides (ITO) glass substrate are reported. The water contact angle of ZnO nanobundles and nanocarpets structures (79° and 67° respectively) is higher than that of unmodified ZnO nanorods. A subsequent chemical treatment with stearic acid (SA) contributed to a superhydrophobic surface with a water contact angle of 159°. Its superhydrophobic property is originated from the nanobundles or nanocarpets structures and surface energy of SA/ZnO nanobundles and SA/ZnO nanocarpets composite nanostructures. Moreover, this promising ZnO nanostructured materials show an important application in self-cleaning smart coatings. - Highlights: • PEG and CTAB are firstly introduced to modify the morphology of ZnO seed layers. • ZnO nanobundles and nanocarpets obtained from different seed layers. • Superhydrophobic surfaces obtained by chemcial treatment using SA.

  11. Synthesis, characterization and optical band gap of Pirochromite (MgCr2O4 Nanoparticles by Stearic Acid Sol-Gel Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Jafarnejad

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Pirochromite (MgCr2O4 nanoparticles were successfully prepared in this study. During synthesis of the pirochromite nanoparticles, a sol-gel was prepared by using magnesium acetate and potassium dichromate as magnesium and chromium sources and by using stearic acid as the network. Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscope (TEM, scanning electron microscope (SEM, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX were used for the elemental analysis, and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM were used in order to identify, provide a fuzzy diagnosis, and determine the size and morphology of the particles, as well as to analyze the optical and magnetic properties of the particles. The particle size of MgCr2O4 nanoparticles was observed to fall within a range of 39 nm–71 nm.

  12. Studies on morphology of Langmuir-Blodgett films of stearic acid deposited with different orientation of substrates with respect to compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, Keerti; Manjuladevi, V.; Gupta, R. K., E-mail: raj@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in [Department of physics, Birla Institute of Technology & Science, Pilani-333031, Rajasthan (India)

    2016-05-06

    The Langmuir monolayer at an air-water interface shows remarkably different surface pressure – area isotherm, when measured with the surface normal of a Wilhemly plate parallel or perpendicular to the direction of compression of the monolayer. Such difference arises due to difference in stress exerted by the monolayer on the plate in different direction. In this article, we report the effect of changing the direction of substrate normal with respect to the compression of the monolayer during Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) film deposition on the morphology of the films. The morphology of the LB film of stearic acid was studied using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The morphology of the LB films was found to be different due to difference in the stress in different directions.

  13. Development of novel fast-disintegrating tablets by direct compression using sucrose stearic acid ester as a disintegration-accelerating agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koseki, Takuma; Onishi, Hiraku; Takahashi, Yuri; Uchida, Minoru; Machida, Yoshiharu

    2008-10-01

    It was attempted to produce novel furosemide (FS) fast-disintegrating tablets by direct compression. The combination of FS, microcrystalline cellulose, croscarmellose sodium and xylitol was used as the basic formulation, and sucrose stearic acid ester (SSE) was chosen as an additional additive. The tablets with SSE were prepared by the simple addition of SSE, using a lyophilized mixture of FS and SSE or using a FS/SSE mixture obtained by evaporation of their ethanol solution. Only the tablets, produced using the FS/SSE mixture obtained by organic solvent (ethanol) evaporation, showed hardness of more than 30 N and a disintegration time of less than 20 s, which were the properties suitable for fast-disintegrating tablets. These properties were considered to result from well-mixed and fine-powdered SSE and FS.

  14. Wireless electrochemical preparation of gradient nanoclusters consisting of copper(II), stearic acid and montmorillonite on a copper wire for headspace in-tube microextraction of chlorobenzenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enteshari Najafabadi, Marzieh; Bagheri, Habib

    2017-12-26

    This work introduces a new gradient fiber coating for microextraction of chlorobenzenes. Nanoclusters of organoclay-Cu(II) on a copper wire were fabricated by wireless electrofunctionalization. The resultant gradient coatings are more robust, and thermally and mechanically stable. Wireless electrofunctionalization was carried out in a bipolar cell under a constant deposition potential and using an ethanolic electrolyte solution containing stearic acid and montmorillonite. Stearic acid acts as an inexpensive and green coating while montmorillonite acts as a modifier to impart thermal stability. The gradient morphology of the nanoclusters was investigated by scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The coated wire was placed in a hollow needle and used for headspace in-tube microextraction (HS-ITME) of chlorobenzenes (CBs). Effects of various parameters affecting synthesis and extraction were optimized. Following extraction, the needles were directly inserted into the GC injector, and the CBs (chlorobenzene, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, 1,2-dichlorobenzene, 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene, 1,2,3,4-tetrachlorobenzene) were quantified by GC-MS. The limits of detection under optimized conditions range from 0.5 to 10 ng.L -1 . The intra- and inter-day relative standard deviations (RSDs) (for n = 10, 5 respectively) using a single fiber are 6-10 and 10-15%, respectively. The fiber-to-fiber RSDs (for n = 3) is between 17 and 24%. The method was successfully applied to the extraction of CBs from real water samples, and relative recoveries are between 91 and 110%. Graphical abstract A gradient coating of organoclay-Cu nanoclusters was fabricated on a copper wire by wireless electrofunctionalization. The oxidation of copper takes place at the anodic pole (red) while dissolved oxygen in ethanol solution is reduced at the cathodic pole (blue).

  15. Effect of the distribution of saturated fatty acids in the melting and crystallization profiles of high-oleic high-stearic oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bootello, M. A.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The composition and distribution of fatty acids in triacylglycerol (TAG molecules are commonly considered as factors that determine the physical properties of a given oil or fat. The distribution of any fatty acid in fats and oils can be described through the α coefficient of asymmetry, which can be calculated from the TAG composition and fatty acid composition of the sn-2 position of the TAGs determined through lipase hydrolysis. High-oleic high-stearic oils and fats are considered stable and healthy, and they are good substitutes for hydrogenated vegetable oils and palm fractions in many food products, such as spreads and confectionery. Here, different high-oleic high-stearic acid oils were formulated which contained different distributions of saturated fatty acids in their TAGs, while maintaining a similar fatty acid composition. The aim of this work was to discuss the possibility of using the α coefficient to predict the physical properties of fats in function of their chemical composition and their melting and crystallization behavior as examined by differential scanning calorimetry.La composición y distribución de los ácidos grasos en las moléculas de triglicéridos se consideran factores determinantes en las propiedades físicas de los aceites y grasas. La distribución de ácidos grasos en un determinado aceite o grasa puede caracterizarse mediante un coeficiente de asimetría α, calculado a partir de las composiciones de triglicéridos y de ácidos grasos en la posición sn-2 de la molécula de triglicérido mediante hidrólisis con lipasa. El aceite de girasol alto oleico-alto esteárico es una grasa estable y saludable, adecuada para reemplazar a los aceites vegetales hidrogenados y fracciones de palma en muchos productos alimentarios, como grasas plásticas y grasas de confitería. En el presente trabajo, se formularon diferentes aceites alto oleico-alto esteárico con diferente distribución de los ácidos grasos saturados en

  16. Stearic acid-rich interesterified fat and trans-rich fat raise the LDL/HDL ratio and plasma glucose relative to palm olein in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karupaiah Tilakavati

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary trans-rich and interesterified fats were compared to an unmodified saturated fat for their relative impact on blood lipids and plasma glucose. Each fat had melting characteristics, plasticity and solids fat content suitable for use as hardstock in margarine and other solid fat formulations. Methods Thirty human volunteers were fed complete, whole food diets during 4 wk periods, where total fat (~31% daily energy, >70% from the test fats and fatty acid composition were tightly controlled. A crossover design was used with 3 randomly-assigned diet rotations and repeated-measures analysis. One test fat rotation was based on palm olein (POL and provided 12.0 percent of energy (%en as palmitic acid (16:0; a second contained trans-rich partially hydrogenated soybean oil (PHSO and provided 3.2 %en as trans fatty acids plus 6.5 %en as 16:0, while the third used an interesterified fat (IE and provided 12.5 %en as stearic acid (18:0. After 4 wk the plasma lipoproteins, fatty acid profile, as well as fasting glucose and insulin were assessed. In addition, after 2 wk into each period an 8 h postprandial challenge was initiated in a subset of 19 subjects who consumed a meal containing 53 g of test fat. Results After 4 wk, both PHSO and IE fats significantly elevated both the LDL/HDL ratio and fasting blood glucose, the latter almost 20% in the IE group relative to POL. Fasting 4 wk insulin was 10% lower after PHSO (p > 0.05 and 22% lower after IE (p Conclusion Both PHSO and IE fats altered the metabolism of lipoproteins and glucose relative to an unmodified saturated fat when fed to humans under identical circumstances.

  17. Stability, occurence and step morphology of polymorphs and polytypes of stearic acid. II. Mono-lamella step morphology and composite polymorphic/polytypic transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaoka, Kimio; Kobayashi, Masamichi; Okada, Masakazu; Sato, Kiyotaka

    1988-02-01

    Surface step morphology of three structural modifications of stearic acid, B(mon), B(orth II) and C(mon), was observed by replica method (TEM). The characteristic simple and interlaced patterns were observed for monoclinic and pseudo-orthorhombic polytypes, respectively. The observation on the C crystals which were transformed from B(orth II) or B(mon) enabled to detect two different modes of lattice displacement involved in composite polymorphic-polytypic transformations from B to C. B(mon) → C(mon) was found to be caused by a collective inclination of the molecules within the lamellar plane followed by the deformation of the subcell of the aliphatic chain, keeping the symmetry-axis unchanged. In contrast, B(orth II) → C(mon) occurs via an alternate rotation of the long-chain molecules in the adjacent lamellae around the c-axis of B(orth II) prototype, keeping the subcell arrangements unchanged. This means that the polytypic structure of a double-layer type was not preserved during the composite B(orth II) → C(mon) transformation. This peculiarity was discussed in terms of the interlamellar instability of a postulated double-layered polytype of the C polymorph.

  18. Enhanced Thermal Properties of Novel Latent Heat Thermal Storage Material Through Confinement of Stearic Acid in Meso-Structured Onion-Like Silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Junkai; Lv, Mengjiao; Lu, Jinshu; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Zijun; Zhang, Xiongjie; Zhu, Yingying

    2017-12-01

    Meso-structured onion-like silica (MOS), which had a highly ordered, onion-like multilayer; large surface area and pore volume; and highly curved mesopores, were synthesized as a support for stearic acid (SA) to develop a novel shape-stabilized phase change material (SA/MOS). The characterizations of SA/MOS were studied by the analysis technique of scanning electron microscope, infrared spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), and thermal gravimetry analysis (TGA). The results showed that the interaction between the SA and the MOS was physical adsorption and that the MOS had no effect on the crystal structure of the SA. The DSC results suggested that the melting and solidifying temperature of the SA/MOS were 72.7°C and 63.9°C with a melting latent heat of 108.0 J/g and a solidifying latent heat of 126.0 J/g, respectively, and the TGA results indicated that the SA/MOS had a good thermal stability. All of the results demonstrated that the SA/MOS was a promising thermal energy storage material candidate for practical applications.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of novel amphiphilic copolymer stearic acid-coupled F127 nanoparticles for nano-technology based drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qihe; Liang, Qing; Yu, Fei; Xu, Jian; Zhao, Qihua; Sun, Baiwang

    2011-12-01

    Pluronic, F127, amphiphilic block copolymers, are used for several applications, including drug delivery systems. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) of F127 is about 0.26-0.8 wt% so that the utility of F127 in nano-technology based drug delivery system is limited since the nano-sized micelles could dissociate upon dilution. Herein, stearic acid (SA) was simply coupled to F127 between the carboxyl group of SA and the hydroxyl group of F127, which formed a novel copolymer named as SA-coupled F127, with significantly lower CMC. Above the CMC 6.9 × 10(-5)wt%, SA-coupled F127 self-assembled stable nanoparticles with Zeta potential -36 mV. Doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded nanoparticles were made, with drug loading (DL) 5.7 wt% and Zeta potential -36 to -39 mV, and the nanoparticles exhibited distinct shape with the size distribution from 20 to 50 nm. DOX-loaded nanoparticles were relatively stable and exhibited DOX dependant cytotoxicity toward MCF-7 cells in vitro. These results suggest that SA-coupled F127 potentially could be applied as a nano-technology based drug delivery method. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A spectroscopic study of water-soluble pyronin B and pyronin Y in Langmuir-Blodgett films mixed with stearic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meral, Kadem; Erbil, H. Yıldırım; Onganer, Yavuz

    2011-01-01

    Mono and multilayer of water-soluble pyronin B (PyB) and pyronin Y (PyY) mixed with stearic acid (SA) have been incorporated in Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films. The surface pressure-area (π-A) isotherm studies pointed out that pure PyB and PyY are incapable of forming stable films at air-water interface and collapsed readily at low surface pressures. However, mixture of PyB or PyY with SA easily formed stable films at the air-water interface and they were easily transferred onto solid substrates. The average area per molecule of mixed films of PyB and PyY at the air-water interface was observed to decrease with increasing concentrations of PyB and PyY. The spectroscopic characteristics of PyB and PyY in chloroform, in SA containing chloroform and in LB films have also been investigated by using absorption and steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. The morphology of the LB film surfaces has been characterized by using atomic force microscopy (AFM).

  1. A spectroscopic study of water-soluble pyronin B and pyronin Y in Langmuir-Blodgett films mixed with stearic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meral, Kadem [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Atatuerk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Erbil, H. Y Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I ld Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I r Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I m [Department of Chemical Engineering, Gebze Institute of Technology, Cay Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I rova, Gebze 41400, Kocaeli (Turkey); Onganer, Yavuz, E-mail: yonganer@atauni.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Atatuerk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey)

    2011-12-01

    Mono and multilayer of water-soluble pyronin B (PyB) and pyronin Y (PyY) mixed with stearic acid (SA) have been incorporated in Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films. The surface pressure-area ({pi}-A) isotherm studies pointed out that pure PyB and PyY are incapable of forming stable films at air-water interface and collapsed readily at low surface pressures. However, mixture of PyB or PyY with SA easily formed stable films at the air-water interface and they were easily transferred onto solid substrates. The average area per molecule of mixed films of PyB and PyY at the air-water interface was observed to decrease with increasing concentrations of PyB and PyY. The spectroscopic characteristics of PyB and PyY in chloroform, in SA containing chloroform and in LB films have also been investigated by using absorption and steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. The morphology of the LB film surfaces has been characterized by using atomic force microscopy (AFM).

  2. Stearic-acid/carbon-nanotube composites with tailored shape-stabilized phase transitions and light–heat conversion for thermal energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Benxia; Nie, Shibin; Hao, Yonggan; Liu, Tongxuan; Zhu, Jinbo; Yan, Shilong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A facile preparation of shape-stabilized composite PCMs for thermal energy storage. • The composite PCMs present tunable phase change temperatures and enthalpy. • Sunlight-driven phase change for photothermal conversion and storage. - Abstract: The development of functional materials with both light–heat conversion and thermal energy storage properties is of crucial importance for efficient utilization of sunlight to meet the growing demand for sustainable energy. In this work, the shape-stabilized phase change composites were designed and prepared by integration of stearic acid (SA) and acid-treated carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs). The a-CNTs not only acted as a flexible matrix but also endowed the composites high light–heat conversion ability. The reversible phase transitions shifted from high temperatures (T m = 74 °C, T f = 57 °C) of pure SA to near room temperature (T m = ∼30 °C, T f = ∼22 °C) of SA/a-CNTs composites, probably resulting from the strong interface confinement effect. The phase change enthalpy of the SA/a-CNTs composite could also be tailored by changing the mass ratio of SA and a-CNTs. The composites containing SA of 54.2 wt.%, 67.8 wt.% and 79.5 wt.% presented the melting enthalpy of 76.3 J/g, 98.8 J/g and 111.8 J/g, respectively. Moreover, the phase transition of SA/a-CNTs composite could be driven by sunlight for the energy storage/release. Therefore, this research provides a new platform for improving solar utilization, and understanding the phase transition behaviors of organic PCMs in dimensionally confined environments as well

  3. Incorporation of nano-clay saponite layers in the organo-clay hybrid films using anionic amphiphile stearic acid by Langmuir–Blodgett technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Syed Arshad, E-mail: sa_h153@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, Tripura University, Suryamaninagar-799022 (India); Chakraborty, S.; Bhattacharjee, D. [Department of Physics, Tripura University, Suryamaninagar-799022 (India); Schoonheydt, R.A. [Centres for Surface Chemistry and Catalysis, K.U. Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 23, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2013-06-01

    In general cationic amphiphiles are used to prepare organo-clay hybrid film in Langmuir–Blodgett (LB) technique. In this present communication we demonstrated a unique technique to prepare the organo–clay hybrid films using an anionic amphiphile. The T–O–T type clay saponite was incorporated onto a floating stearic acid monolayer via a divalent cation Mg{sup 2+}. Salt MgCl{sub 2} was mixed along with the clay dispersion in the LB trough and amphiphile solution was spread onto the subphase in order to make the organo-clay hybrid films. It was observed that salt (MgCl{sub 2}) concentration on the subphase affects the organization of nano-dimensional clay platelet (saponite) in organo-clay hybrid films at air–water interface as well as in LB films. Noticeable changes in area per molecule and shape of the isotherms were observed and measured at subphases with different salt concentrations. Infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy studies reveal that only an in-plane (996 cm{sup −1}) vibration of ν (Si-O) band occurred when the salt concentration was 10 mM. However, both in-plane (996 cm{sup −1}) and out-of-plane (1063 cm{sup −1}) vibrations of the ν (Si-O) band of saponite occurred when the subphase salt concentration was 100 mM. Also the out-of-plane vibration of ν (OH) of saponite was prominent at higher salt concentration. This is because at lower salt concentration clay sheets remain flat on the surface whereas; at higher MgCl{sub 2} concentration they aggregated and form stacks of saponite layers. Also they may be slightly tilted with a very small tilt angle at higher salt concentration making a favorable condition for both in-plane and out-of-plane vibrations of ν (Si-O) in the hybrid films. Observed decrease in starting area per molecule in the pressure area isotherm measured at higher salt concentration also supports the tilting of clay layers at air–clay dispersion interface. Attentuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared

  4. Impact of the oxygen defects and the hydrogen concentration on the surface of tetragonal and monoclinic ZrO2 on the reduction rates of stearic acid on Ni/ZrO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foraita, Sebastian; Fulton, John L; Chase, Zizwe A; Vjunov, Aleksei; Xu, Pinghong; Baráth, Eszter; Camaioni, Donald M; Zhao, Chen; Lercher, Johannes A

    2015-02-02

    The role of the specific physicochemical properties of ZrO2 phases on Ni/ZrO2 has been explored with respect to the reduction of stearic acid. Conversion on pure m-ZrO2 is 1.3 times more active than on t-ZrO2 , whereas Ni/m-ZrO2 is three times more active than Ni/t-ZrO2 . Although the hydrodeoxygenation of stearic acid can be catalyzed solely by Ni, the synergistic interaction between Ni and the ZrO2 support causes the variations in the reaction rates. Adsorption of the carboxylic acid group on an oxygen vacancy of ZrO2 and the abstraction of the α-hydrogen atom with the elimination of the oxygen atom to produce a ketene is the key to enhance the overall rate. The hydrogenated intermediate 1-octadecanol is in turn decarbonylated to heptadecane with identical rates on all catalysts. Decarbonylation of 1-octadecanol is concluded to be limited by the competitive adsorption of reactants and intermediate. The substantially higher adsorption of propionic acid demonstrated by IR spectroscopy and the higher reactivity to O2 exchange reactions with the more active catalyst indicate that the higher concentration of active oxygen defects on m-ZrO2 compared to t-ZrO2 causes the higher activity of Ni/m-ZrO2 . © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. FY17-PDH-EVTest04 GodInput Impact of the Oxygen Defects1 FY17-PDH-EVTest04 Reduction Rates of Stearic AcidFY17-PDH-T04.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foraita, Sebastian; Fulton, John L; Chase, Zizwe A; Vjunov, Aleksei; Xu, Pinghong; Baráth, Eszter; Camaioni, Donald M; Zhao, Chen; Lercher, Johannes A

    2016-08-10

    Test New Article1 GodEarlyview.Publish-on-load testing.The role of the specific physicochemical properties of ZrO 2 phases on Ni/ZrO 2 has been explored with respect to the reduction of stearic acid. Conversion on pure m?ZrO 2 is 1.3 times more active than on t?ZrO 2 , whereas Ni/m?ZrO 2 is three times more active than Ni/t?ZrO 2 . Although the hydrodeoxygenation of stearic acid can be catalyzed solely by Ni, the synergistic interaction between Ni and the ZrO 2 support causes the variations in the reaction rates. Adsorption of the carboxylic acid group on an oxygen vacancy of ZrO 2 and the abstraction of the ??hydrogen atom with the elimination of the oxygen atom to produce a ketene is the key to enhance the overall rate. The hydrogenated intermediate 1?octadecanol is in turn decarbonylated to heptadecane with identical rates on all catalysts. Decarbonylation of 1?octadecanol is concluded to be limited by the competitive adsorption of reactants and intermediate. The substantially higher adsorption of propionic acid demonstrated by IR spectroscopy and the higher reactivity to O 2 exchange reactions with the more active catalyst indicate that the higher concentration of active oxygen defects on m?ZrO 2 compared to t?ZrO 2 causes the higher activity of Ni/m?ZrO 2 . © 2015 WILEY?VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Cu2+ Montmorillonite K10 Clay Catalyst as a Green Catalyst for Production of Stearic Acid Methyl Ester: Optimization Using Response Surface Methodology (RSM)

    OpenAIRE

    Enas A. Almadani; Farah W. Harun; Salina M. Radzi; Syamsul K. Muhamad

    2018-01-01

    Clay catalyst has received much attention to replace the homogeneous catalysts in the esterification reaction to produce fatty acid methyl ester as the source of biodiesel as it is low cost, easily available, as well as environmental friendly. However, the use of unmodified clay, in particular montmorillonite K10 (MMT K10), for the esterification of fatty acids showed that the acid conversion was less than 60% and this is not preferable to the production of biodiesel. In this study, synthesis...

  7. Application of Box-Behnken design for preparation of levofloxacin-loaded stearic acid solid lipid nanoparticles for ocular delivery: Optimization, in vitro release, ocular tolerance, and antibacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Mirza Salman; Ahad, Abdul; Aslam, Mohammed; Imam, Syed Sarim; Aqil, Mohd; Ali, Asgar

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop and optimize levofloxacin loaded solid lipid nanoparticles for the treatment of conjunctivitis. Box-Behnken experimental design was applied for optimization of solid lipid nanoparticles. The independent variables were stearic acid as lipid (X1), Tween 80 as surfactant (X2) and sodium deoxycholate as co-surfactant (X3) while particle size (Y1) and entrapment efficiency (Y2) were the dependent variables. Further in vitro release and antibacterial activity in vitro were also performed. The optimized formulation of levofloxacin provides particle size of 237.82 nm and showed 78.71% entrapment efficiency and achieved flux 0.2,493 μg/cm(2)/h across excised goat cornea. In vitro release study showed prolonged drug release from the optimized formulation following Korsmeyer-Peppas model. Antimicrobial study revealed that the developed formulation possesses antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli equivalent to marketed eye drops. HET-CAM test demonstrated that optimized formulation was found to be non-irritant and safe for topical ophthalmic use. Our results concluded that solid lipid nanoparticles are an efficient carrier for ocular delivery of levofloxacin and other drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Use of atomic force microscopy for imaging the initial stage of the nucleation of calcium phosphate in Langmuir-blodgett films of stearic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yuanjian; He Ping; Xu Xiudong; Li Jinghong

    2004-01-01

    The nucleation of calcium phosphate on the substrate of steatic acid Langmuir-blodgett film at the initial stage was investigated by atomic force microscopy. Nano-dots, nano-wires and nano-islands were observed in sequence for the first time, reflecting the nucleation of calcium phosphate and the molecular arrangement of carboxylic layer. The nucleation rates perpendicular and parallel to the carboxylic terminal group were estimated from the height and diameter of the calcium phosphate crystals, respectively. And this stage was distinct from the late explosive grown stage, in which the change of the morphology was not obvious. The approaches based on this discovery would lead to the development of new strategies in the controlled synthesis of inorganic nano-phases and the assembly of organized composite and ceramic materials

  9. Structural insights into the dual strategy of recognition by peptidoglycan recognition protein, PGRP-S: structure of the ternary complex of PGRP-S with lipopolysaccharide and stearic acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Sharma

    Full Text Available Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs are part of the innate immune system. The 19 kDa Short PGRP (PGRP-S is one of the four mammalian PGRPs. The concentration of PGRP-S in camel (CPGRP-S has been shown to increase considerably during mastitis. The structure of CPGRP-S consists of four protein molecules designated as A, B, C and D forming stable intermolecular contacts, A-B and C-D. The A-B and C-D interfaces are located on the opposite sides of the same monomer leading to the the formation of a linear chain with alternating A-B and C-D contacts. Two ligand binding sites, one at C-D contact and another at A-B contact have been observed. CPGRP-S binds to the components of bacterial cell wall molecules such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS, lipoteichoic acid (LTA, and peptidoglycan (PGN from both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. It also binds to fatty acids including mycolic acid of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb. Previous structural studies of binary complexes of CPGRP-S with LPS and stearic acid (SA have shown that LPS binds to CPGRP-S at C-D contact (Site-1 while SA binds to it at the A-B contact (Site-2. The binding studies using surface plasmon resonance showed that LPS and SA bound to CPGRP-S in the presence of each other. The structure determination of the ternary complex showed that LPS and SA bound to CPGRP-S at Site-1 and Site-2 respectively. LPS formed 13 hydrogen bonds and 159 van der Waals contacts (distances ≤4.2 Å while SA formed 56 van der Waals contacts. The ELISA test showed that increased levels of productions of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ due to LPS and SA decreased considerably upon the addition of CPGRP-S.

  10. Effect of the distribution of saturated fatty acids in the melting and crystallization profiles of high-oleic high-stearic oils; Efecto de la distribución de los ácidos grasos saturados en los perfiles de fusión y cristalización de los aceites alto esteárico alto oleico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bootello, M.A.; Garces, R.; Martinez-Force, E.; Salas, J.J.

    2016-07-01

    The composition and distribution of fatty acids in triacylglycerol (TAG) molecules are commonly considered as factors that determine the physical properties of a given oil or fat. The distribution of any fatty acid in fats and oils can be described through the α coefficient of asymmetry, which can be calculated from the TAG composition and fatty acid composition of the Sn-2 position of the TAGs determined through lipase hydrolysis. High-oleic high-stearic oils and fats are considered stable and healthy, and they are good substitutes for hydrogenated vegetable oils and palm fractions in many food products, such as spreads and confectionery. Here, different high-oleic high-stearic acid oils were formulated which contained different distributions of saturated fatty acids in their TAGs, while maintaining a similar fatty acid composition. The aim of this work was to discuss the possibility of using the α coefficient to predict the physical properties of fats in function of their chemical composition and their melting and crystallization behavior as examined by differential scanning calorimetry.

  11. Impregnation of 12-tungstophosphoric acid on silica - part II: effect of different solvents on the impregnation and catalytic activity in methyl esterification of stearic acid; Impregnacao do acido 12-tungstofosforico em silica - parte II: efeito de diferentes solventes na impregnacao e atividade catalitica na esterificacao metilica de acido estearico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scroccaro, Karine Isabel; Yamamoto, Carlos I., E-mail: karineisabel@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Centro Politecnico. Departamento de Engenharia Quimica; Tanobe, Valcineide O. de A.; Oliveira, Alan Antonio de [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia e Tecnologia Florestal; Wypych, Fernando [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica

    2014-04-15

    Materials obtained by the immobilization of 12-tungstophosphoric acid (PTA) on silica using the method of impregnation with excess solution in distinct solvents (aqueous HCl, methanol:H{sub 2}O, and acetonitrile) were evaluated for use as catalysts in the methyl esterification of stearic acid. Optimum conditions were established for the impregnation of 0.5 g (w/w) of PTA on amorphous silica, under stirring at 150 rpm for 24 h, using 20 mL of 0.1 mol L{sup -1} HCl as the solvent. After calcination at 200 deg C, high conversions were obtained under mild reaction conditions, resulting in high turnover numbers. The catalyst was evaluated in ten catalytic cycles of use, where the activity was reduced only slightly, attesting its stability and the possibility to apply it to industrial production of methylesters. (author)

  12. Filmes compostos de gelatina, triacetina, ácido esteárico ou capróico: efeito do pH e da adição de surfactantes sobre a funcionalidade dos filmes Composite films made with gelatin, tracetin, stearic and caproic acids: effect of pH and surfactants addition on the functionality of films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taciana Davanço

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available O desenvolvimento de biofilmes tem crescido devido à possibilidade de substituição parcial de materiais plásticos não biodegradáveis. Proteínas e polissacarídeos têm sido utilizados para a produção de filmes com boas propriedades mecânicas. Porém, filmes a partir desses materiais apresentam alta permeabilidade ao vapor de água. Uma alternativa usada para diminuir a permeabilidade ao vapor de água dos filmes é a incorporação de substâncias hidrofóbicas na composição da solução filmogênica, porém essa incorporação não ocorre de maneira homogênea. Com o objetivo de melhorar a incorporação das substâncias hidrofóbicas (ácido esteárico e ácido capróico na matriz protéica (gelatina do filme foram adicionados os surfactantes (SDS e Tween 80, que são substâncias capazes de interagir com a proteína e com o ácido graxo, tornando a matriz filmogênica menos heterogênea. O efeito do pH também foi estudado, com a finalidade de observar se este exerce influência na homogeneidade da matriz filmogênica. A adição do ácido esteárico aos filmes de gelatina foi mais eficiente na redução da permeabilidade ao vapor de água do que o ácido capróico. A adição do surfactante SDS reduziu a permeabilidade ao vapor de água dos filmes contendo ácido esteárico, ou ácido capróico. O ajuste de pH nos filmes sem adição de surfactantes também produziu matrizes mais homogêneas.The development of biofilms has grown considering the possibility of partial substitution of plastic materials which are not biodegradable. Proteins and polysaccharides have been used to produce films with good mechanical properties. However, films produced with these materials present a high permeability in water vapor. An alternative to improve the water vapor barrier of films is to incorporate hydrophobic substances (stearic and caproic fatty acids in the composition of the filmogenic solution, however this incorporation does not occur

  13. Properties of organogels of high stearic soybean oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced that food companies have to phase out the use of partially hydrogenated oils containing trans-fats by 2018. The use of high-stearic oils has been recognized as one of the ways to replace trans fats in food. Organogels also have drawn a ...

  14. Avaliação físico-química de bolo de chocolate com coberturas comestíveis à base de gelatina, ácido esteárico, amido modificado ou cera de carnaúba Physical and chemical evaluation of chocolate cake covered with gelatin, stearic acid, modified starch or "carnaúba" wax edible icing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibele Cristina Osawa

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Coberturas comestíveis biodegradáveis são uma alternativa às embalagens sintéticas, que causam preocupações ambientais. Este trabalho avaliou o efeito de diferentes tipos de coberturas sobre propriedades físico-químicas de bolo de chocolate durante a estocagem, em comparação com bolo sem cobertura (CO e bolo sem cobertura embalado em polipropileno (EMB. As seguintes coberturas foram aplicadas sobre os bolos: 10% gelatina (GE, 10% gelatina com 10% ácido esteárico (GE + AE, 18% cera de carnaúba (CE, 10% amido modificado (AM e fondant (FO. Os bolos foram avaliados durante 10 dias de estocagem. FO e EMB apresentaram menor perda de massa, enquanto todos os demais tratamentos apresentaram valores superiores a CO. GE, GE + AE e EMB apresentaram a menor redução da atividade de água, enquanto CE e CO apresentaram a maior redução. As superfícies dos bolos recobertos estavam mais duras que as de CO e EMB. Os maiores valores para dureza e mastigabilidade foram encontrados para CE e CO e os menores, para EMB, GE e GE + AE. Em relação à cor, GE + AE foi diferente dos demais tratamentos, devido à presença do ácido esteárico. Os resultados indicam que a perda de massa dos bolos pode ser atribuída também à perda de água das coberturas.Biodegradable edible icing or frosting is an alternative to synthetic packaging that causes environmental concerns. This work evaluated the effect of different types of frosting on the physical-chemical properties of chocolate cake during storage in comparison to cakes without icing or frosting (C and cakes without frosting packed in polypropylene (CP. The following frostings were applied to the cakes: 10% gelatin (GE, 10% gelatin with 10% stearic acid (GE+SA, 18% "carnaúba" wax (CW, 10% modified starch (MS, and fondant (FO. The cakes were analyzed during 10 days of storage. FO and CP presented the lowest mass loss while all other treatments presented higher values than C. GE, GE+SA, and CP presented

  15. Effect of uncoated calcium carbonate and stearic acid coated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    ties such as strength, modulus and toughness. Also it has ... Finally, the tensile and impact test specimens were prepared, by ... The thermal stability of the samples was measured by ..... does not help in binding the filler with the PBT matrix.

  16. Modulation of saturation and chain length of fatty acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of cocoa butter-like lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholm, David; Gossing, Michael; Wei, Yongjun

    2018-01-01

    Chain length and degree of saturation plays an important role for the characteristics of various products derived from fatty acids, such as fuels, cosmetics, and food additives. The seeds of Theobroma cacao are the source of cocoa butter, a natural lipid of high interest for the food and cosmetics...... as the saturated fatty acid stearic acid is typically found only in low abundance. Demand for cocoa butter is increasing, yet T. cacao can only be cultivated in some parts of the tropics. Alternative means of production of cocoa butter lipids (CBLs) are, therefore, sought after. Yeasts also store fatty acids...... industry. Cocoa butter is rich in saturated fatty acids that are stored in the form of triacylglycerides (TAGs). One of the major TAG species of cocoa butter, consisting of two stearic acid molecules and one oleic acid molecule (stearic acid-oleic acid-stearic acid, sn-SOS), is particularly rare in nature...

  17. Structure of montmorillonite cointercalated with stearic acid and octadecylamine: Modeling, diffraction, IR spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čapková, P.; Pospíšil, M.; Valášková, M.; Měřínská, D.; Trchová, Miroslava; Sedláková, Zdeňka; Weiss, Z.; Šimoník, J.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 300, č. 1 (2006), s. 264-269 ISSN 0021-9797 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/05/2548; GA ČR GP205/03/D111 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polymer-clay nanocomposite * intercalation * montmorillonite Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.233, year: 2006

  18. Unusual fatty acid substitution in lipids and lipopolysaccharides of Helicobacter pylori.

    OpenAIRE

    Geis, G; Leying, H; Suerbaum, S; Opferkuch, W

    1990-01-01

    Cellular fatty acids, phospholipid fatty acids, and lipopolysaccharide fatty acids of four strains of Helicobacter pylori were analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography. The presence of myristic acid, palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, 19-carbon cyclopropane fatty acid, beta-hydroxypalmitic acid, and beta-hydroxystearic acid was confirmed. In phospholipids, myristic acid and 19-carbon cyclopropane fatty acid were the major fatty acids. Hydroxy fatty acids and unsaturated fatt...

  19. Interference effects from coexisting fatty acids on elaidic acid separation by fractionating crystallization: A model study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jala, Ram Chandra Reddy; Guo, Zheng; Bjerring, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    A multi-stage temperature-programmed fractionating crystallization process was carried out to examine the effects of the presence of stearic acid (SA), oleic acid (OA), and linoleic acid (LA) on the separation of elaidic acid (EA). The results showed that the efficiency of fractionating...

  20. Activity of the main fatty acid components of the hexane leaf extract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The composition of hexane leaf extract of Ricinus communis was determined by gas chromatography– mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to contain four fatty acids: linolenic acid (47.76%), linoleic acid (15.28%), palmitic acid (13.01%), and stearic acid (1.73%). The insectistatic and insecticidal activities of the two major ...

  1. Convenient biosynthetic preparation of isomeric spin-labelled radioactive phosphatidic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuhne, L.; Stanacev, N.Z. (Toronto Univ., Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Clinical Biochemistry)

    1982-11-01

    A convenient method for the enzymatic preparation of sn-3-(2-/sup 3/H)phosphatidic acids carrying also 5-, 12-, or 16-nitroxide stearic acids, from sn-3-(2-/sup 3/H) glycerophosphate and isolated guinea pig liver microsomes, is described in detail. The procedure allows a simultaneous preparation of three spin-labelled sn-3-(2-/sup 3/H)phosphatidic acids of yields 3-3.5..mu..mol of each compound which is >99% pure in respect to the radioactivity and which contains 25 mol% of spin-labelled fatty acids. These phosphatidic acids were approximately equally distributed between the primary and the secondary hydroxyl when 12- or 16-nitroxide stearic acids were used or predominantly (75%) associated with the secondary hydroxyl of sn-3-(2-/sup 3/H)phosphatidic acid when 5-nitroxide stearic acid was present in the incubation mixture.

  2. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of fatty acids of buddleja asiatica by GC-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, F.; Ali, I.; Bibi, H.; Malik, A.

    2013-01-01

    To analyze the fatty acid contents of Buddleja asiatica Lour,both the non-volatile oil and fat obtained from the n-hexane soluble sub- fraction were subjected to GC/MS using BSTFA (N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl) trifloroacetamide) derivatization. The oil showed the presence of six fatty acids including palmitic acid (46.75 %), linoleic acid (37.80 %), stearic acid (10.98 %), arachidic acid, margaric acid and lignoceric acid (< 3 %) . Analysis of the fat revealed nine fatty acids including lignoceric acid (43.12 %), behenic acid (26.39 %), arachidic acid (9.29 %) and stearic acid (5.3 %). Cerotic acid, montanic acid, melissic acid and palmitic acid were found in low amounts (< 5 %) while trycosylic acid (4.83 %) was the only fatty acid with odd number of carbon atoms. The oil showed a low thermal stability. (author)

  3. Preparation, characterization and pharmacokinetics of enrofloxacin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles: influences of fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shuyu; Zhu, Luyan; Dong, Zhao; Wang, Xiaofang; Wang, Yan; Li, Xihe; Zhou, WenZhong

    2011-04-01

    Enrofloxacin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) were prepared using fatty acids (tetradecanoic acid, palmitic acid, stearic acid) as lipid matrix by hot homogenization and ultrasonication method. The effect of fatty acids on the characteristics and pharmacokinetics of the SLN were investigated. The results showed that the encapsulation efficiency and loading capacity of nanoparticles varied with fatty acids in the order of stearic acid>palmitic acid>tetradecanoic acid. Furthermore, stearic acid-SLN had larger particle size, bigger polydispersity index (PDI) and higher zeta potential compared with the other two fatty acid formulated SLN. The SLN showed sustained releases in vitro and the released enrofloxacin had the same antibacterial activity as that of the native enrofloxacin. Although in vitro release exhibited similar patterns, within 24 h the releasing rates of the three formulations were significantly different (tetradecanoic acid-SLN>palmitic acid-SLN>stearic acid-SLN). Pharmacokinetic study after a single dose of intramuscular administration to mice demonstrated that tetradecanoic acid-SLN, palmitic acid-SLN, and stearic acid-SLN increased the bioavailability by 6.79, 3.56 and 2.39 folds, and extended the mean residence time (MRT) of the drug from 10.60 h to 180.36, 46.26 and 19.09 h, respectively. These results suggest that the enrofloxacin-fatty acid SLN are promising formulations for sustained release while fatty acids had significant influences on the characteristics and performances of the SLN. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Fatty Acid And Essential Oil Compositions Of The Seed Oil Of Five ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fatty acid and essential oil compositions of the seed oil of Annona cherimola, A. muricata, A. reticulata, A. senegalensis and A. squamosa were investigated by GC and GC/MS spectra. About eleven fatty acids were identified of which oleic, gondoic, palmitic and stearic acids predominated in each sample, and others ...

  5. Effect of dietary fatty acid intake on prospective weight change in the Heidelberg cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nimptsch, Katharina; Berg-Beckhoff, Gabi; Linseisen, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between fatty acid (alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), EPA, DHA, palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic and arachidonic acids) intake and prospective weight change in the Heidelberg cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. DESIGN....... RESULTS: Stearic acid intake was linearly associated with weight gain (P acid intake, significantly so in women. In multinomial models, women in the highest tertile of ALA and stearic acid intake showed increased OR (95 % CI......) and categorised into four groups (weight loss, or =2.5 to or =7.5%/5 years). Energy-adjusted dietary fatty acid intake data were estimated from the FFQ completed at baseline. Multivariate linear regression models as well as multinomial logistic regression analyses (carbohydrate replacement models) were conducted...

  6. Effect of 6 dietary fatty acids on the postprandial lipid profile, plasma fatty acids, lipoprotein lipase, and cholesterol ester transfer activities in healthy young men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tholstrup, T.; Sandstrøm, B.; Bysted, Anette

    2001-01-01

    , plasma fatty acids, and preheparin lipoprotein lipase and cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) activities. Design: Six test fats high (approximate to 43% by wt) in stearic acid, palmitic acid, palmitic + myristic acid, oleic acid, elaidic acid (trans 18:1), and linoleic acid were produced...... to the test-fat meals were observed for plasma lipoprotein triacylglycerol and cholesterol concentrations, plasma fatty acid concentrations, and lipoprotein lipase and CETP activities (diet x time interaction: 0.001 acids stearic and palmitic acids resulted......Background: There is increasing evidence that postprandial triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins may be related to atherogenic risk. Objective: The objective was to investigate the effect of individual fatty acid intakes on postprandial plasma lipoprotein triacylglycerol and cholesterol concentrations...

  7. Characterization of free and bound fatty acids in human gallstones by capillary gas liquid chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Channa, N.A.; Khand, F.D.; Noorani, M.A.; Bhanger, M.I.

    2002-01-01

    Forty-four human gallstone samples either of pure cholesterol or cholesterol and bilirubin were randomly selected and analyzed by capillary gas liquid chromatography for the relative percentage composition of free and total fatty acids. The results showed that bound fatty acids were present in higher amounts than the free fatty acids. Amongst the bound fatty acids the percentage occurrence for palmitic acid was highest followed by stearic, oleic, linoleic and myristic acids. Fatty acids myristic, palmitic and linoleic were present in higher amounts in cholesterol gallstones, whereas stearic acid in cholesterol and bilirubin gallstones. When compared, no significant difference (p < 0.05) in the levels of free and bound fatty acids were seen in gallstones of males and females. The results suggest that bound fatty acids have a role to play in the structure of gallstones. (author)

  8. Clofibric Acid Increases the Formation of Oleic Acid in Endoplasmic Reticulum of the Liver of Rats

    OpenAIRE

    広瀬, 明彦; 山崎, 研; 坂本, 武史; 須永, 克佳; 津田, 整; 光本, 篤史; 工藤, なをみ; 川嶋, 洋一

    2011-01-01

    The effects of 2-(4-chlorophenoxy)-2-methylpropionic acid (clofibric acid) on the formation of oleic acid (18:1) from stearic acid (18:0) and utilization of the 18:1 formed for phosphatidylcholine (PC) formation in endoplasmic reticulum in the liver of rats were studied in vivo. [14C]18:0 was intravenously injected into control Wistar male rats and rats that had been fed on a diet containing 0.5% (w/w) clofibric acid for 7 days; and the distribution of radiolabeled fatty acids among subcellul...

  9. Methylated Fatty Acids from Heartwood and Bark of Pinus sylvestris, Abies alba, Picea abies, and Larix decidua: Effect of Strong Acid Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Zidan Mohamed Salem

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Methylated fatty acid (FA compounds in the heartwood and bark of some softwood species, specifically Pinus sylvestris, Abies alba, Picea abies, and Larix decidua, grown in the Czech Republic were evaluated. Strong H2SO4 was used for methylation of the lipids. The highest content of lipid was found in P. abies bark (40.132 mg/g o.d. sample, and the lowest content was in A. alba wood (11.027 mg/g o.d. sample. The highest concentration of FAs was observed in L. decidua bark. The highest percentages of FAs in wood of P. sylvestris were arachidic acid and oleic acid. In bark, the highest percentages of FAs were stearic acid, palmitic acid, and oleic acid. The FAs with the highest concentrations in A. alba wood were arachidic acid, palmitic acid, pentadecanoic acid, and margarinic, and those in bark were behenic acid, lignoceric acid, and arachidic acid. P. abies wood FAs showed arachidic acid, palmitic acid, and margarinic acid, and the bark contained lignoceric acid and arachidic acid. The FAs of L. decidua wood were arachidic acid, palmitic acid, and stearic acid, and in bark they were pentacosylic acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, lignoceric acid, arachidic acid, and behenic acid. The lack of typically dominant unsaturated fatty acids (e.g. 18:1, 18:2, compared to literature values were attributed to the application of strong acid for the hydrolysis.

  10. Molar extinction coefficients of some fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandhu, G.K.; Singh, K.; Lark, B.S.

    2002-01-01

    ) and stearic acid (C18H36O2), has been measured at the photon energies 81, 356, 511, 662, 1173 and 1332 keV. Experimental values for the molar extinction coefficient, the effective atomic number and the electron density have been derived and compared with theoretical calculations. There is good agreement......The attenuation of gamma rays in some fatty acids, viz. formic acid (CH2O2), acetic acid (C2H4O2), propionic acid (C3H6O2), butyric acid (C4H8O2), n-hexanoic acid (C6H12O2), n-caprylic acid (C8H16O2), lauric acid (C12H24O2), myristic acid (C14H28O2), palmitic acid (C16H32O2), oleic acid (C18H34O2...

  11. Preparation, characterization, and thermal properties of starch microencapsulated fatty acids as phase change materials thermal energy storage applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stable starch-oil composites can be prepared from renewable resources by excess steam jet-cooking aqueous slurries of starch and vegetable oils or other hydrophobic materials. Fatty acids such as stearic acid are promising phase change materials (PCMs) for latent heat thermal energy storage applica...

  12. Crystal network for edible oil organogels: Possibilities and limitations of the fatty acid and fatty alcohol systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaink, H.M.; Malssen, van K.; Morgado-Alves, S.; Kalnin, D.J.E.; Linden, van der E.

    2007-01-01

    The textural and structural properties of organogels made by structuring liquid oil with mixtures of stearic acid (octadecanoic acid) and stearyl alcohol (octadecanol) have been studied. Optical, rheological and X-ray diffraction measurements have been used to investigate the influence of

  13. Caveolar fatty acids and acylation of caveolin-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Cai

    Full Text Available Caveolae are cholesterol and sphingolipids rich subcellular domains on plasma membrane. Caveolae contain a variety of signaling proteins which provide platforms for signaling transduction. In addition to enriched with cholesterol and sphingolipids, caveolae also contain a variety of fatty acids. It has been well-established that acylation of protein plays a pivotal role in subcellular location including targeting to caveolae. However, the fatty acid compositions of caveolae and the type of acylation of caveolar proteins remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the fatty acids in caveolae and caveolin-1 bound fatty acids.Caveolae were isolated from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells. The caveolar fatty acids were extracted with Folch reagent, methyl esterificated with BF3, and analyzed by gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS. The caveolin-1 bound fatty acids were immunoprecipitated by anti-caveolin-1 IgG and analyzed with GC/MS.In contrast to the whole CHO cell lysate which contained a variety of fatty acids, caveolae mainly contained three types of fatty acids, 0.48 µg palmitic acid, 0.61 µg stearic acid and 0.83 µg oleic acid/caveolae preparation/5 × 10(7 cells. Unexpectedly, GC/MS analysis indicated that caveolin-1 was not acylated by myristic acid; instead, it was acylated by palmitic acid and stearic acid.Caveolae contained a special set of fatty acids, highly enriched with saturated fatty acids, and caveolin-1 was acylated by palmitic acid and stearic acid. The unique fatty acid compositions of caveolae and acylation of caveolin-1 may be important for caveolae formation and for maintaining the function of caveolae.

  14. Monolayer arrangement of fatty hydroxystearic acids on graphite: Influence of hydroxyl groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, S. [Laboratorio de Rayos-X, Centro de Investigación Tecnología e Innovación, de la Universidad de Sevilla (CITIUS), Universidad de Sevilla, Avenida Reina Mercedes, 4B. 41012, Sevilla (Spain); Benítez, J.J.; Castro, M.A. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas-Universidad de Sevilla, Avenida Américo Vespucio, 49. 41092, Sevilla (Spain); Cerrillos, C. [Servicio de Microscopía, Centro de Investigación Tecnología e Innovación, de la Universidad de Sevilla (CITIUS), Universidad de Sevilla, Avenida Reina Mercedes, 4B. 41012, Sevilla (Spain); Millán, C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas-Universidad de Sevilla, Avenida Américo Vespucio, 49. 41092, Sevilla (Spain); Alba, M.D., E-mail: alba@icmse.csic.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas-Universidad de Sevilla, Avenida Américo Vespucio, 49. 41092, Sevilla (Spain)

    2013-07-31

    Previous studies have indicated that long-chain linear carboxylic acids form commensurate packed crystalline monolayers on graphite even at temperatures above their melting point. This study examines the effect on the monolayer formation and structure of adding one or more secondary hydroxyl, functional groups to the stearic acid skeleton (namely, 12-hydroxystearic and 9,10-dihydroxystearic acid). Moreover, a comparative study of the monolayer formation on recompressed and monocrystalline graphite has been performed through X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM), respectively. The Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and XRD data were used to confirm the formation of solid monolayers and XRD data have provided a detailed structural analysis of the monolayers in good correspondence with obtained STM images. DSC and XRD have demonstrated that, in stearic acid and 12-hydroxystearic acid adsorbed onto graphite, the monolayer melted at a higher temperature than the bulk form of the carboxylic acid. However, no difference was observed between the melting point of the monolayer and the bulk form for 9,10-dihydroxystearic acid adsorbed onto graphite. STM results indicated that all acids on the surface have a rectangular p2 monolayer structure, whose lattice parameters were uniaxially commensurate on the a-axis. This structure does not correlate with the initial structure of the pure compounds after dissolving, but it is conditioned to favor a) hydrogen bond formation between the carboxylic groups and b) formation of hydrogen bonds between secondary hydroxyl groups, if spatially permissible. Therefore, the presence of hydroxyl functional groups affects the secondary structure and behavior of stearic acid in the monolayer. - Highlights: • Hydroxyl functional groups affect structure and behavior of acids in the monolayer. • Acids on the surface have a rectangular p2 monolayer structure. • Lattice parameters of acids are uniaxially

  15. Modulation of saturation and chain length of fatty acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of cocoa butter-like lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergenholm, David; Gossing, Michael; Wei, Yongjun; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2018-04-01

    Chain length and degree of saturation plays an important role for the characteristics of various products derived from fatty acids, such as fuels, cosmetics, and food additives. The seeds of Theobroma cacao are the source of cocoa butter, a natural lipid of high interest for the food and cosmetics industry. Cocoa butter is rich in saturated fatty acids that are stored in the form of triacylglycerides (TAGs). One of the major TAG species of cocoa butter, consisting of two stearic acid molecules and one oleic acid molecule (stearic acid-oleic acid-stearic acid, sn-SOS), is particularly rare in nature as the saturated fatty acid stearic acid is typically found only in low abundance. Demand for cocoa butter is increasing, yet T. cacao can only be cultivated in some parts of the tropics. Alternative means of production of cocoa butter lipids (CBLs) are, therefore, sought after. Yeasts also store fatty acids in the form of TAGs, but these are typically not rich in saturated fatty acids. To make yeast an attractive host for microbial production of CBLs, its fatty acid composition needs to be optimized. We engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains toward a modified fatty acid synthesis. Analysis of the fatty acid profile of the modified strains showed that the fatty acid content as well as the titers of saturated fatty acids and the titers of TAGs were increased. The relative content of potential CBLs in the TAG pool reached up to 22% in our engineered strains, which is a 5.8-fold increase over the wild-type. SOS content reached a level of 9.8% in our engineered strains, which is a 48-fold increase over the wild type. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Evaluation of conjugated linoleic acid and other health-related lipid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Boiled samples preserved the total beneficial lipids of CLA, PUFA, MUFA and omega 3 and 6 fatty acids more than smoked samples. The major fatty acids found in the muscle analyzed are palmitic (C16:0), stearic (C18:0) and octadecenoic (C18:1). Omega 3 fatty acids are 1.05%, 1.16% and 1.30 % for boiled, smoked and ...

  17. Development and characterization of a hydrophobic treatment for jute fibres based on zinc oxide nanoparticles and a fatty acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arfaoui, M.A. [CTT Group, Saint-Hyacinthe (Canada); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ecole de technologie supérieure, Montréal (Canada); Dolez, P.I., E-mail: pdolez@gcttg.com [CTT Group, Saint-Hyacinthe (Canada); Dubé, M.; David, É. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ecole de technologie supérieure, Montréal (Canada)

    2017-03-01

    Highlights: • A hydrophobic treatment based on zinc oxide nanoparticles and stearic acid was developed for recycled jute fibres. • The water contact angle was increased from 33° for the scoured fibre to 148° after the ZnO nanorod/stearic acid hydrothermal treatment. • The fibre thermal degradation temperature remained the same throughout the treatment at around 315 °C. • A reduction in the fibre breaking force of 32% was observed between the as-received and the ZnO nanorod/stearic acid treated fibres. - Abstract: This work aims at developing a hydrophobic treatment for jute fibres based on the grafting and growth of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods on the fibre surface. The first step consists in removing impurities from the fibre surface with a scouring treatment. In the second step, the jute fibres are coated with a layer of ZnO nanoseeds. A hydrothermal process is carried out as a third step to ensure a uniform growth of ZnO nanorods on the surface of the jute fibres. Finally, a hydrophobic treatment is performed on the ZnO nanorod-covered jute fibres using stearic acid (SA), i.e., a typical fatty acid. A large improvement in the fibre hydrophobicity was obtained without any negative effect on thermal stability and limited reduction in strength. Complementary measurements by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were also performed and revealed a hexagonal system for the ZnO nanorods.

  18. [Lipid synthesis by an acidic acid tolerant Rhodotorula glutinis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhangnan; Liu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Jian'an; Wang, Gehua

    2016-03-01

    Acetic acid, as a main by-product generated in the pretreatment process of lignocellulose hydrolysis, significantly affects cell growth and lipid synthesis of oleaginous microorganisms. Therefore, we studied the tolerance of Rhodotorula glutinis to acetic acid and its lipid synthesis from substrate containing acetic acid. In the mixed sugar medium containing 6 g/L glucose and 44 g/L xylose, and supplemented with acetic acid, the cell growth was not:inhibited when the acetic acid concentration was below 10 g/L. Compared with the control, the biomass, lipid concentration and lipid content of R. glutinis increased 21.5%, 171% and 122% respectively when acetic acid concentration was 10 g/L. Furthermore, R. glutinis could accumulate lipid with acetate as the sole carbon source. Lipid concentration and lipid yield reached 3.20 g/L and 13% respectively with the initial acetic acid concentration of 25 g/L. The lipid composition was analyzed by gas chromatograph. The main composition of lipid produced with acetic acid was palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid, including 40.9% saturated fatty acids and 59.1% unsaturated fatty acids. The lipid composition was similar to that of plant oil, indicating that lipid from oleaginous yeast R. glutinis had potential as the feedstock of biodiesel production. These results demonstrated that a certain concentration of acetic acid need not to be removed in the detoxification process when using lignocelluloses hydrolysate to produce microbial lipid by R. glutinis.

  19. Frictional response of fatty acids on steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Rashmi R; Biswas, S K

    2009-05-15

    Self-assembled monolayers of fatty acids were formed on stainless steel by room-temperature solution deposition. The acids are covalently bound to the surface as carboxylate in a bidentate manner. To explore the effect of saturation in the carbon backbone on friction in sliding tribology, we study the response of saturated stearic acid (SA) and unsaturated linoleic acid (LA) as self-assembled monolayers using lateral force microscopy and nanotribometry and when the molecules are dispersed in hexadecane, using pin-on-disc tribometry. Over a very wide range (10 MPa-2.5 GPa) of contact pressures it is consistently demonstrated that the unsaturated linoleic acid molecules yield friction which is significantly lower than that of the saturated stearic acid. It is argued, using density functional theory predictions and XPS of slid track, that when the molecular backbone of unsaturated fatty acids are tilted and pressed strongly by a probe, in tribological contact, the high charge density of the double bond region of the backbone allows coupling with the steel substrate. The interaction yields a low friction carboxylate soap film on the substrate. The saturated fatty acid does not show this effect.

  20. Genetic variability in Cynara cardunculus L. domestic and wild types for grain oil production and fatty acids composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raccuia, Salvatore Antonino; Piscioneri, Ilario; Sharma, Neeta; Melilli, Maria Grazia

    2011-01-01

    This paper aimed to study the genetic variability within different types of Cynara cardunculus L., domestic and wild types, for their grain oil amount and oil fatty acid composition. The grain oils were extracted from 8 domestic cardoons and 4 wild cardoons, by Soxhlet method, and obtained oils were characterized for palmitic, stearic, oleic and linoleic acids by gas chromatography. The oil amount, resulted on average of accessions 216 g kg -1 DM with a good range of variability (CV = 11.7%). Unsaturated acids (oleic and linoleic) predominated over saturated ones (stearic and palmitic acids), the chemical characterization of extracted oil, showed the main compound (as % of analysed fatty acids), averaged for all populations, was linoleic acid (44.5%), followed by oleic acid (42.6%), palmitic acid (9.8%) and stearic acid (3.1%). In particular referring the oleic acid wild cardoon populations showed a mean value of 289 g kg -1 oil, against a mean value of 472 g kg -1 oil showed by domestic cardoon accessions. Three of the studied domestic cardoon ('DC1', 'DC3' and 'DC7') showed values higher than 795 g kg -1 oil, while all the other accessions had concentration lower than 370 g kg -1 oil. The three types of domestic cardoon 'DC1', 'DC3' and 'DC7' showed a fatty acids profile similar to genetic modified sunflower oil, representing new genetic material that potentially could be used for high quality biodiesel production, characterised by a low Iodine Number. -- Highlights: → The grain oils from 12 cardoons were characterized for fatty acids composition. → The oil amount, resulted on average of accessions 216 g kg -1 DM. → Oleic and linoleic acids predominated over stearic and palmitic acids. → Three domestic cardoons grain oil showed high oleic acid content (795 g kg -1 oil). → This oil could be used for high quality biodiesel production, with a low IN.

  1. Microwave assisted esterification of free fatty acid over a heterogeneous catalyst for biodiesel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Wei; Yin, Ping; Liu, Xiguang; Chen, Wen; Chen, Hou; Liu, Chunping; Qu, Rongjun; Xu, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Microwave assisted esterification of stearic acid with ethanol was catalyzed by D418. • D418 exhibited remarkable catalytic performance for ethyl stearate formation. • It proved possible to prepare biodiesel rapidly and with good conversions by microwave heating. • The relative catalytic kinetics study has been conducted and modeled. - Abstract: Biodiesel fuel is gaining significant attention in recent years because of its environmental benefits and the growing interest in finding new resources and alternatives for conventional fuels. Biodiesel production from waste cooking oil with high free fatty acids usually requires esterification step to produce fatty acid methyl/ethyl ester. In the present work, the heterogeneous catalyst aminophosphonic acid resin D418 has been successfully utilized in the energy-efficient microwave-assisted esterification reaction of fatty acid ethyl ester (FAEE) from free fatty acid (FFA) stearic acid with short-chain alcohol ethanol. Under the reaction conditions of 9 wt% D418 and 11: 1 M ratio of ethanol to stearic acid at 353 K and atmospheric pressure, more than 90% conversion of the esterification was achieved in 7 h by microwave heating, while it took about 12 h by conventional heating. Moreover, the kinetics of this esterification reaction has been studied, and the relevant values of activation energy and pre-exponential factor were obtained

  2. The response of quartz crystals coated with thin fatty acid film to organic gases

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, C N; Kim, K H; Kwon, Y S

    1999-01-01

    We tried to apply a quartz crystal as a sensor by using the resonant frequency and the resistance properties of quartz crystals. Four kinds of fatty acids that have the same head groups were coated on the surfaces of the quartz crystals, and the shift of the resonant frequency and the resistance were observed based on the lengths of the tail groups. Myristic acid (C sub 1 sub 4), palmitic acid (C sub 1 sub 6), stearic acid (C sub 1 sub 8), and arachidic acid (C sub 2 sub 0) were deposited on the surfaces of quartz crystals by using the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) method. As a result, the resonant frequency change was more sensitive to high molecular-weight fatty acids than to low molecular-weight ones. We also observed the effect of temperature on stearic acid LB films, and the response properties of quartz crystals coated with stearic-acid LB films to organic gases were investigated. As a result, the sensitivity of quartz crystals to organic gases was higher for higher molecular-weight gas, and we found that quar...

  3. Analysis of embryo, cytoplasm and maternal effects on fatty acid components in soybean (Glycine max Merill.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NING Hailong; LI Wenxia; LI Wenbin

    2007-01-01

    The quality of oil determined by the constituents and proportion of fatty acid components,and the understanding of heredity of fatty acid components are of importance to breeding good quality soybean varieties.Embryo,cytoplasmic and maternal effects and genotype×environment interaction effects for quality traits of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill.] seeds were analyzed using a general genetic model for quantitative traits of seeds with parents,F1 and F2,of 20 crosses from a diallel mating design of five parents planted in the field in 2003 and 2004 in Harbin,China.The interaction effects of palmitic,stearic,and linoleic acid contents were larger than the genetic main effects,while the genetic main effects were equal to interaction effects for linolenic and oleic acid content.Among all kinds of genetic main effects,the embryo effects were the largest for palmitic,stearic,and linoleic acids,while the cytoplasm effects were the largest for oleic and linolenic acids.Among all kinds of interaction effects,the embryo interaction effects were the largest for fatty acids.The sum of additive and additive× environment effects were larger than that of dominance and dominance×environment effects for the linolenic acid content,but not for other quality traits.The general heritabilities were the main parts of heritabilities for palmitic and oleic acid contents,but the interaction was more important for stearic,linoleic,and linolenic acid contents.For the general heritability,maternal and cytoplasm heritabilities were the main components for palmitic,oleic,and linolenic acid contents.It was shown for the interaction heritabilities that the embryo interaction heritabilities were more important for oleic and linolenic acid contents,while the maternal interaction heritabilities were more important for linoleic acid content.Among selection response components,the maternal and cytoplasm general responses and/or interaction responses were more important for palmitic,stearic

  4. Fatty Acid Compositions of Six Wild Edible Mushroom Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günç Ergönül, Pelin; Akata, Ilgaz; Kalyoncu, Fatih; Ergönül, Bülent

    2013-01-01

    The fatty acids of six wild edible mushroom species (Boletus reticulatus, Flammulina velutipes var. velutipes, Lactarius salmonicolor, Pleurotus ostreatus, Polyporus squamosus, and Russula anthracina) collected from different regions from Anatolia were determined. The fatty acids were identified and quantified by gas chromatography and studied using fruit bodies. Fatty acid composition varied among species. The dominant fatty acid in fruit bodies of all mushrooms was cis-linoleic acid (18 : 2). Percentage of cis-linoleic acid in species varied from 22.39% to 65.29%. The other major fatty acids were, respectively, cis-oleic, palmitic, and stearic acids. Fatty acids analysis of the mushrooms showed that the unsaturated fatty acids were at higher concentrations than saturated fatty acids. PMID:23844377

  5. Fatty Acid Compositions of Six Wild Edible Mushroom Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelin Günç Ergönül

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The fatty acids of six wild edible mushroom species (Boletus reticulatus, Flammulina velutipes var. velutipes, Lactarius salmonicolor, Pleurotus ostreatus, Polyporus squamosus, and Russula anthracina collected from different regions from Anatolia were determined. The fatty acids were identified and quantified by gas chromatography and studied using fruit bodies. Fatty acid composition varied among species. The dominant fatty acid in fruit bodies of all mushrooms was cis-linoleic acid (18 : 2. Percentage of cis-linoleic acid in species varied from 22.39% to 65.29%. The other major fatty acids were, respectively, cis-oleic, palmitic, and stearic acids. Fatty acids analysis of the mushrooms showed that the unsaturated fatty acids were at higher concentrations than saturated fatty acids.

  6. The comparison of fatty acid and cholesterol profile on fresh and mozarella cheese made by pampangan buffalo milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizqiati, H.; Nurwantoro; Mulyani, S.

    2018-01-01

    This research aimed to investigate the composition of fatty acid and cholesterol profile of Fresh and Mozarella Cheese from Pampangan Buffalo Milk. Material of this reseach was Pampangan buffalo milk and Mozarella cheese made from buffalo milk. Fatty acids composition were analyzed by [1] method. Result showed the major saturated fatty acid found in milk and Mozzarella cheese Pampangan buffalo milk were palmitic, stearic and miristic acid while the unsaturated fatty acid was oleic acid. The total amount of fatty acid in Mozarella cheese was lower than those in Pampangan buffalo milk.

  7. Effect of dietary fatty acids on the postprandial fatty acid composition of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins in healthy male subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bysted, Anette; Holmer, G.; Lund, Pia

    2005-01-01

    interesterified test fats with equal amounts of palmitic acid ( P fat), stearic acid (S fat), trans-18: 1 isomers (T fat), oleic acid (O fat), or linoleic acid (L fat) were tested. Subjects: A total of 16 healthy, normolipidaemic males ( age 23 +/- 2 y) were recruited. Interventions: The participants ingested fat......Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of trans-18: 1 isomers compared to other fatty acids, especially saturates, on the postprandial fatty acid composition of triacylglycerols ( TAG) in chylomicrons and VLDL. Design: A randomised crossover experiment where five......-rich test meals ( 1 g fat per kg body weight) and the fatty acid profiles of chylomicron and VLDL TAG were followed for 8 h. Results: The postprandial fatty acid composition of chylomicron TAG resembled that of the ingested fats. The fatty acids in chylomicron TAG were randomly distributed among the three...

  8. Fatty acids, phenols content, and antioxidant activity in Ibervillea sonorae callus cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Estrada-Zúñiga, M.E.; Arano-Varela, H.; Buendía-González, L.; Orozco-Villafuerte, J.

    2012-01-01

    Ibervillea sonorae callus cultures were established in order to produce fatty acids (lauric, myristic, pentadecanoic, palmitic and stearic acids) and phenolic compounds. Highest callus induction (100%) was obtained in treatments containing 2.32 or 4.65 μM Kinetin (KIN) with 2.26 or 6.80 μM 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). Highest fatty acids (FA) production (48.57 mg g-1), highest total phenol content (TPC; 57.1 mg gallic acid equivalents [GAE] g-1) and highest antioxidant activity (EC...

  9. Phospholipid fatty acid analysis to monitor the co-composting process of olive oil mill wastes and organic household refuse

    OpenAIRE

    Barje , F.; Amir , S.; Winterton , Peter; Pinelli , Eric; Merlina , Georges; Cegarra , J.; Revel , Jean-Claude; Hafidi , Mohamed

    2008-01-01

    International audience; The co-composting of olive oil mill wastes and household refuse was followed for 5 months. During the thermophilic phase of composting, the aerobic heterotrophic bacteria (AHB) count, showed a significant rise with a slight regression of fungal biomass. In the same way, phospholipid fatty acids PLFAs common in bacteria, showed a significant increase of hydroxyl and branched PLFAs. The evaluation of the ratio of octadecenoic PLFAs to stearic acid (C18:1/C18:0) revealed ...

  10. Bilayers at High pH in the Fatty Acid Soap Systems and the Applications for the Formation of Foams and Emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenlong; Zhang, Heng; Zhong, Yingping; Jiang, Liwen; Xu, Mengxin; Zhu, Xionglu; Hao, Jingcheng

    2015-08-20

    In our previous work, we reported bilayers at high pH in the stearic acid/CsOH/H2O system, which was against the traditional viewpoint that fatty acid (FA) bilayers must be formed at the pKa of the fatty acid. Herein, the microstructures at high pH of several fatty acid soap systems were investigated systematically. We found that palmitic acid/KOH/H2O, palmitic acid/CsOH/H2O, stearic acid/KOH/H2O, and stearic acid/CsOH/H2O systems can form bilayers at high pH. The bilayer structure was demonstrated by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance ((2)H NMR), and molecular dynamics simulation was used to confirm the formation of bilayers. The influence of fatty acids with different chain lengths (n = 10, 12, 14, 16, and 18) and different counterions including Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Cs(+), (CH3)4N(+), (C2H5)4N(+), (C3H7)4N(+), and (C4H9)4N(+) on the formation of bilayers was discussed. The stability of foam and emulsification properties were compared between bilayers and micelles, drawing the conclusion that bilayer structures possess a much stronger ability to foam and stronger emulsification properties than micelles do.

  11. Comparative study on fatty acid composition of olive (Olea europaea L.), with emphasis on phytosterol contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Ali; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y; Kulak, Muhittin; Bindak, Recep

    2017-08-01

    The present study was designed to determine the fatty acid composition and phytosterol contents of Turkish native olive cultivars, namely Kilis Yağlık and Nizip Yağlık cv. In this context, olive fruits from 34 locations were sampled and then screened for their components in comparison. Fifteen different fatty acids were found in both olive oils. In the order of abundance, the most important ones were oleic acid (18:1) > palmitic acid (16:0) > linoleic acid (18:2) > stearic acid (18:0). Significant differences were observed in the contents of oleic acid (18:1), palmitic acid (16:0), linoleic acid (18:2) but not for stearic acid content in comparison both oils (p < 0.01). There were significant differences in terms of unsaturated fatty acids, saturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated fatty acids (p < 0.01). The seven phytosterols - cholesterol, campesterol, stigmasterol, β-sitosterol, Δ-5-avenasterol, Δ-7-stigmastenol and Δ-7-avenasterol - were studied in both oil sources. The predominant sterols were β-sitosterol, Δ5-avenasterol and campesterol in the samples analysed. However, no significant differences were found in the levels of the phytosterols between the two olive cultivars. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. An investigation into the mechanisms of drug release from taste-masking fatty acid microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Sheng; Deutsch, David; Craig, Duncan Q M

    2008-09-01

    Fatty acid microspheres based on stearic and palmitic acids are known to form effective taste masking systems, although the mechanisms by which the drug is preferentially released in the lower gastrointestinal tract are not known. The objective of the present study was to identify the mechanisms involved, with a particular view to clarify the role of acid soap formation in the dissolution process. Microspheres were prepared by a spray chilling process. Using benzoic acid as a model drug and an alkaline dissolution medium, a faster drug release was observed in the mixed fatty acid formulation (50:50 stearic:palmitic acid (w/w)) compared to the single fatty acid component systems. Thermal and powder X-ray diffraction studies indicated a greater degree of acid soap formation for the mixed formulation in alkaline media compared to the single fatty acid systems. Particle size and porosity studies indicated a modest reduction in size for the mixed systems and an increase in porosity on immersion in the dissolution medium. It is proposed that the mixed fatty acid system form a mixed crystal system which in turn facilitates interaction with the dissolution medium, thereby leading to a greater propensity for acid soap formation which in turn forms a permeable liquid crystalline phase through which the drug may diffuse. The role of dissolution of palmitic acid into the dissolution medium is also discussed as a secondary mechanism.

  13. Determination of fruit characteristics, fatty acid profile and total antioxidant capacity of Mespilus germanica L. fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hale Seçilmiş Canbay

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine fruit characteristics, fatty acid profile and total antioxidant capacitiy of first cultured Mespilus germanica L. Methods: A total of 15 fruits were taken randomly from four directions of adult trees. Then the physical and chemical properties of first cultured medlar fruit (Istanbul/Turkey were measured by using refractometer, colorimeter, spectrophotometer and gas chromatograph mass spectrometer, respectivly. Results: In the fruit studied, the results showed that palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, linolenic acid, arachidic acid and behenic acid were the most abundant fatty acids (FAs, and the main FA was palmitic acid [(35.35 ± 1.20%]. The percentage of linoleic acid and stearic acid in this fruit oil were (29.10 ± 1.70% and (8.53 ± 0.25%, respectively. As a result of the analysis, the total antioxidant capacity of medlar fruit was (1.1 ± 0.2 mmol trolox equivalents/L. Conclusions: The present study has demonstrated the concentrations of FAs and the antioxidantive capacity of first cultured Istanbul medlar fruits by using many tested methods. It is proved that in our daily life, medlar fruit plays a significant role with its nutrition and health effect.

  14. Amino acid and fatty acid compositions of Rusip from fermented Anchovy fish (Stolephorussp)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koesoemawardani, D.; Hidayati, S.; Subeki

    2018-04-01

    Rusip is a typical food of Bangka Belitung Indonesia made from fermented anchovy. This study aims to determine the properties of chemistry, microbiology, composition of amino acids and fatty acids from fermented fish spontaneously and non spontaneously. Spontaneous rusip treatment is done by anchovy fish (Stolephorussp) after cleaning and added salt 25% (w/w) and palm sugar 10% (w/w). While, non-spontaneous rusip is done by adding a culture mixture of Streptococcus, Leuconostoc, and Lactobacillus bacteria 2% (w/v). The materials are then incubated for 2 weeks. The data obtained were then performed t-test at the level of 5%. Spontaneous and non-spontaneous rusip fermentation process showed significant differences in total acid, reducing sugar, salt content, TVN, total lactic acid bacteria, total mold, and total microbial. The dominant amino acid content of spontaneous and non-spontaneous rusip are glutamic acid and aspartic acid, while the dominant fatty acids in spontaneous and non-spontaneous rusip are docosahexaenoic acid, palmitic acid, oleic acid, arachidonic acid, stearic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, palmitoleic acid, and myristic acid.

  15. Fatty Acid Methyl Esters and Solutol HS 15 Confer Neuroprotection After Focal and Global Cerebral Ischemia

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Hung Wen; Saul, Isabel; Gresia, Victoria L.; Neumann, Jake T.; Dave, Kunjan R.; Perez-Pinzon, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    We previously showed that palmitic methyl ester (PAME) and stearic acid methyl ester (SAME) are simultaneously released from the sympathetic ganglion and PAME possesses potent vasodilatory properties which may be important in cerebral ischemia. Since PAME is a potent vasodilator simultaneously released with SAME, our hypothesis was that PAME/SAME confers neuroprotection in rat models of focal/global cerebral ischemia. We also examined the neuroprotective properties of Soluto...

  16. Radiolytic products of irradiated authentic fatty acids and triacylglycerides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.-S.; Lee, Jeong-Min; Seo, Hye-Young; Kim, Jun-Hyoung; Song, Hyun-Pa; Byun, Myung-Woo; Kwon, Joong-Ho

    2004-01-01

    Radiolytic products of authentic fatty acids (palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic and linolenic acids) and triacylglycerides (tripalmitin, tristearin, triolein, trilinolein and trilinolenin) were determined. Concentrations of hydrocarbons from the saturated fatty acids were higher than the unsaturated fatty acids. Authentic fatty acids were mainly decomposed in the α-carbon position and C n-1 hydrocarbons occurred in higher than C n-2 hydrocarbons. Concentrations of 2-alkylcyclobutanones from the saturated fatty acids were lower than the unsaturated fatty acids. Concentrations of hydrocarbons from tripalmitin and tristearin were not a significant change compared with triolein, trilinolein and trilinolenin. For all triacylglycerides except triolein, C n-1 hydrocarbons were higher than C n-2 hydrocarbons. Radioproduction rates of 2-alkylcyclobutanones from tripalmitin and tristearin were higher than triolein, trilinolein and trilinolenin

  17. Effects of Fatty Acid Inclusion in a DMPC Bilayer Membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Møller, Martin S.

    2009-01-01

    Free fatty acids in biomembranes have been proposed to be a central component in several cellular control and regulatory mechanisms. To elucidate some fundamental elements underlying this, we have applied molecular dynamics simulations and experimental density measurements to study the molecular...... packing and structure of oleic acid (HOA) and stearic acid (HSA) in fluid bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). The experimental data show a small but consistent positive excess volume for fatty acid concentrations below 10 mol %. At higher concentrations the fatty acids mix ideally...... with fluid DMPC. The simulations, which were benchmarked against the densitometric data, revealed interesting differences in the structure and location of the fatty acids depending on their protonation status. Thus, the protonated (uncharged) acid is located rather deeply in the membrane with an average...

  18. Evaluation of Fatty Acid and Amino Acid Compositions in Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus Grown in Different Geographical Locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokayya Sami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Okra has different uses as a food and a remedy in traditional medicine. Since it produces many seeds, distribution of the plant is also quite easy. Although seed oil yield is low (4.7%, since the linoleic acid composition of the seed oil is quiet high (67.5%, it can still be used as a source of (UNSAT unsaturated fatty acids. In this study, samples of okra grown in four different locations were analyzed to measure fatty acid and amino acid compositions. The content of the lipid extraction ranged from 4.34% to 4.52% on a dry weight basis. Quantitatively, the main okra fatty acids were palmitic acid (29.18–43.26%, linoleic acid (32.22–43.07%, linolenic acid (6.79–12.34%, stearic acid (6.36–7.73%, oleic acid (4.31–6.98%, arachidic acid (ND–3.48%, margaric acid (1.44–2.16%, pentadecylic acid (0.63–0.92%, and myristic acid (0.21–0.49%. Aspartic acid, proline, and glutamic acids were the main amino acids in okra pods, while cysteine and tyrosine were the minor amino acids. Statistical methods revealed how the fatty acid and amino acid contents in okra may be affected by the sampling location.

  19. Composition evaluation of the tallow and meat fatty acids of the cattle and determining their atherogenesis and thrombogenesisindexes in South Khorasan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Malekaneh

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: It was found that the sum of trans and stearic fatty acids was more in tallow. The hypocholesterolemic fatty acids levels were higher in the meat in the whole province. The cattle’s meat had lower atherogenetic and thrombogenetic properties compared with the animals’ fat.The consumed cattle’s meat and fat in the province appear to have a proper condition.

  20. Cadmium Alters the Concentration of Fatty Acids in THP-1 Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszowski, Tomasz; Gutowska, Izabela; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Łukomska, Agnieszka; Drozd, Arleta; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2018-03-01

    Fatty acid composition of human immune cells influences their function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of known toxicant and immunomodulator, cadmium, at low concentrations on levels of selected fatty acids (FAs) in THP-1 macrophages. The differentiation of THP-1 monocytes into macrophages was achieved by administration of phorbol myristate acetate. Macrophages were incubated with various cadmium chloride (CdCl 2 ) solutions for 48 h at final concentrations of 5 nM, 20 nM, 200 nM, and 2 μM CdCl 2 . Fatty acids were extracted from samples according to the Folch method. The fatty acid levels were determined using gas chromatography. The following fatty acids were analyzed: long-chain saturated fatty acids (SFAs) palmitic acid and stearic acid, very long-chain saturated fatty acid (VLSFA) arachidic acid, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) palmitoleic acid, oleic acid and vaccenic acid, and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) linoleic acid and arachidonic acid. Treatment of macrophages with very low concentrations of cadmium (5-200 nM) resulted in significant reduction in the levels of arachidic, palmitoleic, oleic, vaccenic, and linoleic acids and significant increase in arachidonic acid levels (following exposure to 5 nM Cd), without significant reduction of palmitic and stearic acid levels. Treatment of macrophages with the highest tested cadmium concentration (2 μM) produced significant reduction in the levels of all examined FAs: SFAs, VLSFA, MUFAs, and PUFAs. In conclusion, cadmium at tested concentrations caused significant alterations in THP-1 macrophage fatty acid levels, disrupting their composition, which might dysregulate fatty acid/lipid metabolism thus affecting macrophage behavior and inflammatory state.

  1. Serum Paraoxonase 1 Activity Is Associated with Fatty Acid Composition of High Density Lipoprotein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Boshtam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cardioprotective effect of high density lipoprotein (HDL is, in part, dependent on its related enzyme, paraoxonase 1 (PON1. Fatty acid composition of HDL could affect its size and structure. On the other hand, PON1 activity is directly related to the structure of HDL. This study was designed to investigate the association between serum PON1 activity and fatty acid composition of HDL in healthy men. Methods. One hundred and forty healthy men participated in this research. HDL was separated by sequential ultracentrifugation, and its fatty acid composition was analyzed by gas chromatography. PON1 activity was measured spectrophotometrically using paraxon as substrate. Results. Serum PON1 activity was directly correlated with the amount of stearic acid and dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (DGLA. PON1/HDL-C was directly correlated with the amount of miristic acid, stearic acid, and DGLA and was inversely correlated with total amount of ω6 fatty acids of HDL. Conclusion. The fatty acid composition of HDL could affect the activity of its associated enzyme, PON1. As dietary fats are the major determinants of serum lipids and lipoprotein composition, consuming some special dietary fatty acids may improve the activity of PON1 and thereby have beneficial effects on health.

  2. Serum paraoxonase 1 activity is associated with fatty acid composition of high density lipoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boshtam, Maryam; Razavi, Amirnader Emami; Pourfarzam, Morteza; Ani, Mohsen; Naderi, Gholam Ali; Basati, Gholam; Mansourian, Marjan; Dinani, Narges Jafari; Asgary, Seddigheh; Abdi, Soheila

    2013-01-01

    Cardioprotective effect of high density lipoprotein (HDL) is, in part, dependent on its related enzyme, paraoxonase 1 (PON1). Fatty acid composition of HDL could affect its size and structure. On the other hand, PON1 activity is directly related to the structure of HDL. This study was designed to investigate the association between serum PON1 activity and fatty acid composition of HDL in healthy men. One hundred and forty healthy men participated in this research. HDL was separated by sequential ultracentrifugation, and its fatty acid composition was analyzed by gas chromatography. PON1 activity was measured spectrophotometrically using paraxon as substrate. Serum PON1 activity was directly correlated with the amount of stearic acid and dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (DGLA). PON1/HDL-C was directly correlated with the amount of miristic acid, stearic acid, and DGLA and was inversely correlated with total amount of ω 6 fatty acids of HDL. The fatty acid composition of HDL could affect the activity of its associated enzyme, PON1. As dietary fats are the major determinants of serum lipids and lipoprotein composition, consuming some special dietary fatty acids may improve the activity of PON1 and thereby have beneficial effects on health.

  3. Milk fat globules: fatty acid composition, size and in vivo regulation of fat liquidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmen, H; Patton, S

    1988-07-01

    Populations of large and small milk fat globules were isolated and analyzed to determine differences in fatty acid composition. Globule samples were obtained by centrifugation from milks of a herd and of individual animals produced under both pasture and barn feeding. Triacylglycerols of total globule lipids were prepared by thin layer chromatography and analyzed for fatty acid composition by gas chromatography. Using content of the acids in large globules as 100%, small globules contained fewer short-chain acids, -5.9%, less stearic acid, -22.7%, and more oleic acids, +4.6%, mean values for five trials. These differences are consistent with alternative use of short-chain acids or oleic acid converted from stearic acid to maintain liquidity at body temperature of milk fat globules and their precursors, intracellular lipid droplets. Stearyl-CoA desaturase (EC 1.14.99.5), which maintains fluidity of cellular endoplasmic reticulum membrane, is suggested to play a key role in regulating globule fat liquidity. Possible origins of differences between individual globules in fatty acid composition of their triacylglycerols are discussed.

  4. Influence of fatty acids on the binding of warfarin and phenprocoumon to human serum albumin with relation to anticoagulant therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorum, H; Honoré, B

    1996-01-01

    of palmitic, stearic, oleic or linoleic acids with energetic couplings for co-binding of one molecule of each of the fatty acids and one molecule of warfarin of 0.9, 1.1, 0.7 and 0.6 kJ mol-1, respectively. The affinity of phenprocoumon was only increased slightly on addition of palmitate with an energetic...... of warfarin but not of phenprocoumon was correlated to the increasing plasma fatty acid concentration. Anticoagulant therapy with phenprocoumon may thus be less sensitive than warfarin to changes in the fatty acid concentration of plasma. Udgivelsesdato: 1996-Aug...

  5. Fatty acids composition of Spanish black (Morus nigra L.) and white (Morus alba L.) mulberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Salcedo, Eva M; Sendra, Esther; Carbonell-Barrachina, Ángel A; Martínez, Juan José; Hernández, Francisca

    2016-01-01

    This research has determined qualitatively and quantitatively the fatty acids composition of white (Morus alba) and black (Morus nigra) fruits grown in Spain, in 2013 and 2014. Four clones of each species were studied. Fourteen fatty acids were identified and quantified in mulberry fruits. The most abundant fatty acids were linoleic (C18:2), palmitic (C16:0), oleic (C18:1), and stearic (C18:0) acids in both species. The main fatty acid in all clones was linoleic (C18:2), that ranged from 69.66% (MN2) to 78.02% (MA1) of the total fatty acid content; consequently Spanish mulberry fruits were found to be rich in linoleic acid, which is an essential fatty acid. The fatty acid composition of mulberries highlights the nutritional and health benefits of their consumption. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Modulation of salt (NaCl)-induced effects on oil composition and fatty acid profile of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) by exogenous application of salicylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noreen, Sibgha; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2010-12-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a potential endogenous plant hormone that plays an important role in plant growth and development. Since sunflower yield and its seed oil yield are adversely affected by salinity, in this study the role of SA in modulating salt (NaCl)-induced effects on various yield and oil characteristics of sunflower was investigated. For this purpose a greenhouse experiment comprising two sunflower hybrid lines (Hysun-33 and SF-187), two NaCl levels (0 and 120 mmol L(-1)) and four SA levels (0, 100, 200 and 300 mg L(-1)) was conducted. Salt stress markedly reduced yield, oil content, linoleic acid and δ-tocopherol in both sunflower lines, while it increased linolenic acid, palmitic acid, stearic acid and α- and γ-tocopherols. However, increasing levels of foliar-applied SA resulted in improved achene yield and hundred-achene weight in both lines. Foliar-applied SA caused a significant decrease in oil stearic acid and α- and γ-tocopherols in both lines under non-saline and saline conditions. Salt-induced harmful effects on achene yield and oil characteristics of sunflower could be alleviated by exogenous application of SA. High doses of SA caused a marked increase in sunflower achene oil content as well as some key fatty acids. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Changes in cholesterol content and fatty acid composition of serum lipid in irradiated rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Shigeru

    1979-01-01

    The effect of a single dose of whole body irradiation on the serum cholesterol content and fatty acid composition of serum lipids in rats was investigated. A change in the fatty acid composition of liver lipids was also observed. After 600 rad of irradiation, the cholesterol content increased, reached a maximum 3 days after irradiation, and then decreased. After irradiation, an increase in cholesterol content and a marked decrease in triglyceride content were observed, bringing about a change in the amount of total serum lipids. The fatty acid compositions of normal and irradiated rat sera were compared. The relative percentages of palmitic and oleic acids in total lipids decreased while those of stearic and arachidonic acids increased. Serum triglyceride had trace amounts of arachidonic acid and the unsaturated fatty acid component decreased after irradiation. On the other hand, unsaturated fatty acid in cholesterol ester increased after irradiation, while linoleic and arachidonic acids made up 29% and 22% in the controls and 17% and 61% after irradiation, respectively. The fatty acid composition of total liver lipids after irradiation showed a decrease in palmitic and oleic acids and an increase in stearic and arachidonic acids, the same trend as observed in serum lipid fatty acid. Liver cholesterol ester showed trace amounts of linoleic and arachidonic acids and an increase in short-chain fatty acid after irradiation. The major component of serum phospholipids was phosphatidylcholine while palmitostearyl lecithine and unsaturated fatty acid were minor components. Moreover, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine were the major components of liver phospholipids, having highly unsaturated fatty acids. The changes in fatty acid composition were similar to the changes in total phospholipids. (J.P.N.)

  8. High Fat Diet Administration during Specific Periods of Pregnancy Alters Maternal Fatty Acid Profiles in the Near-Term Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlon E. Cerf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive fat intake is a global health concern as women of childbearing age increasingly ingest high fat diets (HFDs. We therefore determined the maternal fatty acid (FA profiles in metabolic organs after HFD administration during specific periods of gestation. Rats were fed a HFD for the first (HF1, second (HF2, or third (HF3 week, or for all three weeks (HFG of gestation. Total maternal plasma non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA concentrations were monitored throughout pregnancy. At day 20 of gestation, maternal plasma, liver, adipose tissue, and placenta FA profiles were determined. In HF3 mothers, plasma myristic and stearic acid concentrations were elevated, whereas docosahexaenoic acid (DHA was reduced in both HF3 and HFG mothers. In HF3 and HFG mothers, hepatic stearic and oleic acid proportions were elevated; conversely, DHA and linoleic acid (LA proportions were reduced. In adipose tissue, myristic acid was elevated, whereas DHA and LA proportions were reduced in all mothers. Further, adipose tissue stearic acid proportions were elevated in HF2, HF3, and HFG mothers; with oleic acid increased in HF1 and HFG mothers. In HF3 and HFG mothers, placental neutral myristic acid proportions were elevated, whereas DHA was reduced. Further, placental phospholipid DHA proportions were reduced in HF3 and HFG mothers. Maintenance on a diet, high in saturated fat, but low in DHA and LA proportions, during late or throughout gestation, perpetuated reduced DHA across metabolic organs that adapt during pregnancy. Therefore a diet, with normal DHA proportions during gestation, may be important for balancing maternal FA status.

  9. Towards modelling the vibrational signatures of functionalized surfaces: carboxylic acids on H-Si(111) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giresse Tetsassi Feugmo, Conrard; Champagne, Benoît; Caudano, Yves; Cecchet, Francesca; Chabal, Yves J.; Liégeois, Vincent

    2012-03-01

    In this work, we investigate the adsorption process of two carboxylic acids (stearic and undecylenic) on a H-Si(111) surface via the calculation of structural and energy changes as well as the simulation of their IR and Raman spectra. The two molecules adsorb differently at the surface since the stearic acid simply physisorbs while the undecylenic acid undergoes a chemical reaction with the hydrogen atoms of the surface. This difference is observed in the change of geometry during the adsorption. Indeed, the chemisorption of the undecylenic acid has a bigger impact on the structure than the physisorption of the stearic acid. Consistently, the former is also characterized by a larger value of adsorption energy and a smaller value of the tilting angle with respect to the normal plane. For both the IR and Raman signatures, the spectra of both molecules adsorbed at the surface are in a first approximation the superposition of the spectra of the Si cluster and of the carboxylic acid considered individually. The main deviation from this simple observation is the peak of the stretching Si-H (ν(Si-H)) mode, which is split into two peaks upon adsorption. As expected, the splitting is bigger for the chemisorption than the physisorption. The modes corresponding to atomic displacements close to the adsorption site display a frequency upshift by a dozen wavenumbers. One can also see the disappearance of the peaks associated with the C=C double bond when the undecylenic acid chemisorbs at the surface. The Raman and IR spectra are complementary and one can observe here that the most active Raman modes are generally IR inactive. Two exceptions to this are the two ν(Si-H) modes which are active in both spectroscopies. Finally, we compare our simulated spectra with some experimental measurements and we find an overall good agreement.

  10. Towards modelling the vibrational signatures of functionalized surfaces: carboxylic acids on H-Si(111) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetsassi Feugmo, Conrard Giresse; Champagne, Benoît; Liégeois, Vincent; Caudano, Yves; Cecchet, Francesca; Chabal, Yves J

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the adsorption process of two carboxylic acids (stearic and undecylenic) on a H-Si(111) surface via the calculation of structural and energy changes as well as the simulation of their IR and Raman spectra. The two molecules adsorb differently at the surface since the stearic acid simply physisorbs while the undecylenic acid undergoes a chemical reaction with the hydrogen atoms of the surface. This difference is observed in the change of geometry during the adsorption. Indeed, the chemisorption of the undecylenic acid has a bigger impact on the structure than the physisorption of the stearic acid. Consistently, the former is also characterized by a larger value of adsorption energy and a smaller value of the tilting angle with respect to the normal plane. For both the IR and Raman signatures, the spectra of both molecules adsorbed at the surface are in a first approximation the superposition of the spectra of the Si cluster and of the carboxylic acid considered individually. The main deviation from this simple observation is the peak of the stretching Si-H (ν(Si-H)) mode, which is split into two peaks upon adsorption. As expected, the splitting is bigger for the chemisorption than the physisorption. The modes corresponding to atomic displacements close to the adsorption site display a frequency upshift by a dozen wavenumbers. One can also see the disappearance of the peaks associated with the C=C double bond when the undecylenic acid chemisorbs at the surface. The Raman and IR spectra are complementary and one can observe here that the most active Raman modes are generally IR inactive. Two exceptions to this are the two ν(Si-H) modes which are active in both spectroscopies. Finally, we compare our simulated spectra with some experimental measurements and we find an overall good agreement. (paper)

  11. A microfluidic device for the automated derivatization of free fatty acids to fatty acid methyl esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Cindy T; Roper, Michael G

    2012-02-21

    Free fatty acid (FFA) compositions are examined in feedstock for biodiesel production, as source-specific markers in soil, and because of their role in cellular signaling. However, sample preparation of FFAs for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis can be time and labor intensive. Therefore, to increase sample preparation throughput, a glass microfluidic device was developed to automate derivatization of FFAs to fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs). FFAs were delivered to one input of the device and methanolic-HCl was delivered to a second input. FAME products were produced as the reagents traversed a 29 μL reaction channel held at 55 °C. A Design of Experiment protocol was used to determine the combination of derivatization time (T(der)) and ratio of methanolic-HCl:FFA (R(der)) that maximized the derivatization efficiencies of tridecanoic acid and stearic acid to their methyl ester forms. The combination of T(der) = 0.8 min and R(der) = 4.9 that produced optimal derivatization conditions for both FFAs within a 5 min total sample preparation time was determined. This combination of T(der) and R(der) was used to derivatize 12 FFAs with a range of derivatization efficiencies from 18% to 93% with efficiencies of 61% for tridecanoic acid and 84% for stearic acid. As compared to a conventional macroscale derivatization of FFA to FAME, the microfluidic device decreased the volume of methanolic-HCl and FFA by 20- and 1300-fold, respectively. The developed microfluidic device can be used for automated preparation of FAMEs to analyze the FFA compositions of volume-limited samples.

  12. Nutritional quality evaluation of rabbit meat (Flemish Giant breed corelated with fatty acids content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Frunză

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the nutritional quality of rabbit meat (Flemish Giant breed in terms of content of fatty acids. The biological material consisted of 42 rabbits (17 females and 15 males from which were collected Longissimus dorsi, Semimembranosus and Triceps Brachii muscles immediately after slaughter. The samples were vacuum packaged, frozen at -80 0C, and immediately after thawing have been minced and freeze-dried at -110 0C (using lyophilizer CoolSafe Scanvac. The content in fatty acids was followed through NIRS methodology, using FOSS 6500 spectrophotometer, by gender. Was determined: the saturated fatty acids: C14:0 (Myristic acid, C15: 0 (Pentadecanoic acid, C16: 0 (Palmitic acid, C17: 0 (Heptadecanoic acid and C18: 0 (Stearic acid; monounsaturated fatty acids: Palmitoleic acid (C16: 1n-7, Vaccenic acid, cis-isomer of oleic acid (C18: 1n-7 and oleic acid (C18: 1n-9 and the polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω3 and ω6: C18: 2n-6 (linoleic acid, C18: 3n-3 (Linolenic acid, C20: 2n-6 (Eicosadienoic acid, C20: 3n-6 (Eicosatrienoic acid, C20: 4n-6 (arachidonic acid, C20: 5n-3 (Eicosapentaenoic acid, C22: 4n-6 (Docosatetraenoic acid, C22: 5n-3 (Docosopentaenoic acid and C22: 6n- 3 (docosahexaenoic acid. The results were statistically analyzed, including analysis of variance (ANOVA and was observed significant differences between gender.

  13. Long Chain Saturated and Unsaturated Carboxylic Acids: Filling a Large Gap of Knowledge in Their Enthalpies of Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Donald W; Zavitsas, Andreas A

    2017-01-06

    Despite their abundance in nature and their importance in biology, medicine, nutrition, and in industry, gas phase enthalpies of formation of many long chain saturated and unsaturated fatty acids and of dicarboxylic acids are either unavailable or have been estimated with large uncertainties. Available experimental values for stearic acid show a spread of 68 kJ mol -1 . This work fills the knowledge gap by obtaining reliable values by quantum theoretical calculations using G4 model chemistry. Compounds with up to 20 carbon atoms are treated. The theoretical results are in excellent agreement with well established experimental values when such values exist, and they provide a large number of previously unavailable values.

  14. Targeted association mapping demonstrating the complex molecular genetics of fatty acid formation in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying-hui; Reif, Jochen C; Ma, Yan-song; Hong, Hui-long; Liu, Zhang-xiong; Chang, Ru-zhen; Qiu, Li-juan

    2015-10-23

    The relative abundance of five dominant fatty acids (FAs) (palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic and linolenic acids) is a major factor determining seed quality in soybean. To clarify the currently poorly understood genetic architecture of FAs in soybean, targeted association analysis was conducted in 421 diverse accessions phenotyped in three environments and genotyped using 1536 pre-selected SNPs. The population of 421 soybean accessions displayed significant genetic variation for each FA. Analysis of the molecular data revealed three subpopulations, which reflected a trend depending on latitude of cultivation. A total of 37 significant (p seed quality of soybean with benefits for human health and for food processing.

  15. Esterification of Fatty Acids with Short-Chain Alcohols over Commercial Acid Clays in a Semi-Continuous Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed H. Frikha

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Production of fatty acid esters from stearic, oleic, and palmitic acids and short-chain alcohols (methanol, ethanol, propanol, and butanol for the production of biodiesel was investigated in this work. A series of montmorillonite-based clays catalysts (KSF, KSF/0, KP10, and K10 were used as acidic catalysts. The influence of the specific surface area and the acidity of the catalysts on the esterification rate were investigated. The best catalytic activities were obtained with KSF/0 catalyst. The esterification reaction has been carried out efficiently in a semi-continuous reactor at 150°C temperature higher than the boiling points of water and alcohol. The reactor used enabled the continuous removal of water and esterification with hydrated alcohol (ethanol 95% without affecting the original activity of the clay.

  16. Comparative Study of Fatty Acids Profile in Eleven Wild Mushrooms of Boletacea and Russulaceae Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrijevic, Marija V; Mitic, Violeta D; Jovanovic, Olga P; Stankov Jovanovic, Vesna P; Nikolic, Jelena S; Petrovic, Goran M; Stojanovic, Gordana S

    2018-01-01

    Eleven species of wild mushrooms which belong to Boletaceae and Russulaceae families were examined by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis for the presence of fatty acids. As far as we know, the fatty acid profiles of B. purpureus and B. rhodoxanthus were described for the first time. Twenty-six fatty acids were determined. Linoleic (19.5 - 72%), oleic (0.11 - 64%), palmitic (5.9 - 22%) and stearic acids (0.81 - 57%) were present in the highest contents. In all samples, unsaturated fatty acids dominate. Agglomerative hierarchical clustering was used to display the correlation between the fatty acids and their relationships with the mushroom species. Based on the fatty acids profile in the samples, the mushrooms can be divided into two families: Boletaceae and Russulaceae families, using cluster analysis. © 2018 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  17. Chemotaxonomic Evaluation of Species of Turkish Salvia: Fatty Acid Composition of Seed Oils. II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turgut Kılıç

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acids composition of seed oil of Salvia viridis, S. hydrangea, S. blepharochleana, S. chianantha, S. staminea, S. hypergeia,, S. cilicica, S. caespitosa, S. sclarea, S. cadmica, S. microstegia, S. pachystachys and S. verticillata were analyzed by GC/MS. The main compound were found to be as linoleic acid (18:2; 12.8 % to 52.2 %, linolenic acid (18:3; 3.2 % to 47.7 %, oleic acid (18:1; 11.3 % to 25.6 %, palmitic acid (16:0; 0.7 % to 16.8 % and stearic acid (18:0; 1.8 % to 4.8 %. A phylogenetic tree of species of Salvia were reported and compared to 18:3/18:2 ratio of the seed oils. Fatty acid composition of Salvia seed oils could be used as a chemotaxonomical marker.

  18. In vivo incorporation of labeled fatty acids in rat liver lipids after oral administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leyton, J.; Drury, P.J.; Crawford, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Striking differences were found in the compartmentalization of fatty acids into liver lipid fractions. The saturated fatty acids--lauric, myristic, palmitic and stearic--were incorporated into phosphoglycerides at faster rates with increasing chain lengths, while triglyceride incorporation was almost uniform. The degree of incorporation of the unsaturated fatty acids into phosphoglycerides (structural) compared to triglyceride (storage and energy) was the converse of their oxidation rates. The incorporation of oleic, linoleic and alpha-linolenic acids was mainly into triglyceride, whereas dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid and arachidonic acid were preferentially incorporated into phosphoglycerides. The data suggest that distribution of each fatty acid is different depending on its destination for structural or energy function

  19. Expression of a fatty acid-binding protein in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholz, H.

    1991-06-01

    The unicellular eukaryotic microorganism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, transformed with a plasmid containing a cDNA fragment encoding bovine heart fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP C ) under the control of the inducible yeast GAL10 promoter, expressed FABP during growth on galactose. The maximum level of immunoreactive FABP, identical in size and isoelectric point to native protein, was reached after approximately 16 hours of induction. In contrast, transcription of the gene was induced within half an hour. Both, protein and mRNA were unstable and degraded within 1 h after repression of transcription. Analysis of subcellular fractions showed that FABP was exclusively associated with the cytosol. FABP expressed in yeast cells was functional as was demonstrated by its capacity to bind long chain fatty acids in an in vitro assay. Growth of all transformants on galactose as the carbon source showed no phenotype at temperatures up to 37 deg C, but the growth of FABP-expressing cells at 37 deg C was significantly retarded. Among the biochemical effects of FABP expression on lipid metabolism is a marked reduction of chain elongation and desaturation of exogenously added 14 C-palmitic acid. This effect is most pronounced in triacylglycerols and phospholipids when cells grow at 30 deg C and 37 deg C, respectively. In an in vitro assay determining the desaturation of palmitoyl CoA by microsomal membranes cytosol with or without exo- or endogenous FABP showed the same stimulation of the reaction. The desaturation of exogenously added 14 C-stearic acid, the pattern of unlabelled fatty acids (saturated vs. unsaturated) and the distribution of exogenously added radioactive fatty acids (palmitic, stearic or oleic acid) among lipid classes was not significantly affected. Using high concentrations (1 mM) the uptake of fatty acids was first stimulated and then inhibited when FABP was expressed. (author)

  20. Oleic acid biosynthesis in cyanobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanDusen, W.J.; Jaworski, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    The biosynthesis of fatty acids in cyanobacteria is very similar to the well characterized system found in green plants. However, the initial desaturation of stearic acid in cyanobacteria appears to represent a significant departure from plant systems in which stearoyl-ACP is the exclusive substrate for desaturation. In Anabaena variabilis, the substrate appears to be monoglucosyldiacylglycerol, a lipid not found in plants. The authors examined five different cyanobacteria to determine if the pathway in A. variabilis was generally present in other cyanobacteria. The cyanobacteria studied were A. variabilis, Chlorogloeopsis sp., Schizothrix calcicola, Anacystis marina, and Anacystis nidulans. Each were grown in liquid culture, harvested, and examined for stearoyl-ACP desaturase activity or incubated with 14 CO 2 . None of the cyanobacteria contained any stearoyl-ACP desaturase activity in whole homogenates or 105,000g supernatants. All were capable of incorporating 14 CO 2 into monoglucosyldiacylglycerol and results from incubations of 20 min, 1 hr, 1 hr + 10 hr chase were consistent with monoglucosyldiacylglycerol serving as precursor for monogalctosyldiacylglycerol. Thus, initial evidence is consistent with oleic acid biosynthesis occurring by desaturation of stearoyl-monoglucosyldiacylglycerol in all cyanobacteria

  1. Study on fatty acids composition of lipid class in fish oil, proximate analysis and calorie value of kijar in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Aberoumand

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available 14.00 This aim of this research was to determine fatty acids and raw proximate composition and calorie value of fish Kijar in Iran. The fatty acids and proximate composition Kijar was determined. The established AOAC (Association of Official Agricultural Chemist, USA methods were followed for composition bio chemical of fish. Mean moisture, fat, protein, ash, carbohydrate contents and calorie value of raw fish were 70.81%, 5.88%, 17.80%, 3.41%, 2.1% and 132.52 kcal, respectively. Among fatty acids, palmitic acid was a major fatty acid while stearic acid was the other major constituent. Unsaturated monoenoic fatty acids (oleic and palmitoleic acids were major constituents. Important unsaturated fatty acids such as EPA and DHA, were also identified. percentage composition of fatty acids in the lipid classes of oil of Saurida undosquamis which the saturated fatty acids ranges from 58% to 72.14%. Palmitic acid is predominant and its composition ranges 38.64% to 48.98% while stearic acid ranges from 11.35% to 19.50%. Among unsaturated fatty acids, monoenoic are the major fatty acids. Oleic acid ranges from 12.15% to 27.48%. It is concluded that fish kijar found as health seafood for Iranian southern peoples form point of view of nutritional values and valuable fatty acids. Therefore it is recommended people put this fish in diet basket and it consumed three times in the week. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA

  2. Relationship between fatty acid composition and biodiesel quality for nine commercial palm oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanida Lamaisri

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is an alternative fuel consisting of alkyl esters of fatty acids from vegetable oils or animal fats. The fatty acid compositions in the oils used as feedstock can influence quality of the biodiesel. In the present study, oil content and fatty acid composition of mesocarp and kernel oil were examined from nine commercial oil palm Elaeis guineensis cultivars. Saponification number, iodine value and cetane number were calculated from palm oil fatty acid methyl ester compositions. Fruits of tenera oil palm were collected from a farmer’s plantation in Dan Makham Tia District, Kanchanaburi Province in 2009. Variation between cultivars was observed in oil content and fatty acid profile of mesocarp oil rather than kernel oil. The percentage of oil in dry mesocarp ranged from 63.8% to 74.9%. The mesocarp oil composed of 41.5 - 51.6% palmitic acid, 3.58-7.10% stearic acid, 32.8-42.5% oleic acid and 9.3-13.0% linoleic acid. Likewise saponification number, iodine value and cetane number of mesocarp oil fatty acid methyl ester showed more variation among cultivars, ranging from 196.5-198.9, 45.7-54.6 and 61.8-63.6, respectively. While those of kernel oil fatty acid methyl ester showed no different among cultivars, ranging from 229-242, 13.6-16.4 and 65.3-66.5, respectively. The cetane number of fatty acid methyl ester positively correlated with contents of myristic, palmitic and stearic acids in palm oil and saponification number of biodiesel, but negatively correlated with iodine value

  3. Effects of chronic fly ash exposure on golden hamsters: changes in lung phospholipids and their fatty acid composition as a result of inhalation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, I; Negishi, T; Kamihira, M

    1986-01-01

    Changes in lung phospholipids of golden hamsters exposed to 2 mg/mT coal fly ash for 180 days, 7 days/week, 20 hours/day were examined. In the exposed group the amount of phospholipids in lavaged lung organ increased significantly compared with the control group, but in pulmonary surfactant did not. As regards lipid composition of phospholipids in lavaged lung organ, phosphatidylcholine was slightly increased but sphingomyelin was decreased by exposure. Some significant changes in fatty acid composition of phospholipids were observed between exposed and control group. In pulmonary surfactant, palmitic acid showed no change but myristic acid and oleic acid decreased. On the other hand, in lavaged lung organ, palmitic acid increased but stearic acid and decosatetraenoic acid decreased. Arachidonic acid composition increased in both parts of lung. An increase in the proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acid in whole fatty acid of phospholipids was found in pulmonary surfactant of exposed hamsters. 24 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Characterization of cider apples on the basis of their fatty acid profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Gomis, Domingo; Mangas Alonso, Juan J; Margolles Cabrales, Inmaculada; Arias Abrodo, Pilar

    2002-02-27

    In the current study, the fatty acids composition of 30 monovarietal apple juices from six cider apple varieties belonging to two categories was analyzed. The different apple juices were obtained from three consecutive harvests (1997, 1998, and 1999). The fatty acids concentration in apple juice together with chemometric techniques such as principal components analysis (PCA), soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA), and linear discriminant analysis (LDA), allowed us to differentiate apple juices on the basis of the sweet or sharp category to which the cider apple variety belongs. Fatty acids such as the unsaturated oleic and linoleic acids, and saturated caprylic, capric, stearic, and palmitic acids were related to the sweet cider apple category, while pentadecanoic acid is related to the sharp class.

  5. Radiolabeled 9- or 10-monoiodostearic acid and 9- or 10-monoiodostearyl carnitine: Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, K.W.; Ueda, C.T.; Murray, W.J.; Augustine, S.C.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to synthesize and purify radiolabeled 9- or 10-monoiodostearyl carnitine for potential use as a perfusion and metabolic imaging agent for the heart. Oleic acid was iodinated via a free radical addition reaction of Hl across the double bond to give 9- or 10-monoiodostearic acid which in turn was esterified with carnitine. The identity of 9- or 10-monoiodostearic acid and 9-or 10-monoiodostearyl carnitine was determined using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), infrared (i.r.), ultraviolet (u.v.), and mass spectroscopy. The purity of the fatty acid and carnitine ester was established by thin layer chromatography. 9- or 10-Monoiodo[ 125 I]stearic acid and 9- or 10-monoiodo[ 125 I]stearyl carnitine were synthesized via the isotopic exchange of 125 I for cold iodine bonded to 9- or 10-monoiodostearic acid and 9- or 10-monoiodostearyl carnitine. (author)

  6. Exploitation of genetic resources for improvement of unsaturated fatty acid in sunflower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haq, U.A.; Mehmood, K.

    2008-01-01

    Twenty-five inbred lines (Cytoplasmic male sterile and 12 fertility restorer) annuus synthesized at the oilseeds research institute Faisalabad. Pakistan were analyzed on gas chromatograph for their fatty acid status. The palmitic, stearic, oleic and linoleic acid ranged form 5.62-11.02% 1.09-3.08%, 21.40-50.70% and 40.60-69.10% respectively. The saturate fatty acid may increase the cholesterol level in the blood. This deposition of cholestrol in the blood vesels is a major cause of heart attack. By screening our germplasm on the basis of fatty acid profile, we can use their inbred lines having low percentage of saturated high percentage of unsaturated fatty acids which may benefit sunflower industry through increased consumer performance for a low saturated fatty acid sunflower products. RL-58, RL-52, ORI-85 and ORI-2 are recommended for the development of commercial hybrids with quality edible oil. (author)

  7. Fatty acids profile of chia oil-loaded lipid microparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Souza

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Encapsulation of poly-unsaturated fatty acid (PUFAis an alternative to increase its stability during processing and storage. Chia (Salvia hispanica L. oil is a reliable source of both omega-3 and omega-6 and its encapsulation must be better evaluated as an effort to increase the number of foodstuffs containing PUFAs to consumers. In this work chia oil was extracted and encapsulated in stearic acid microparticles by the hot homogenization technique. UV-Vis spectroscopy coupled with Multivariate Curve Resolution with Alternating Least-Squares methodology demonstrated that no oil degradation or tocopherol loss occurred during heating. After lyophilization, the fatty acids profile of the oil-loaded microparticles was determined by gas chromatography and compared to in natura oil. Both omega-3 and omega-6 were effectively encapsulated, keeping the same omega-3:omega-6 ratio presented in the in natura oil. Calorimetric analysis confirmed that encapsulation improved the thermal stability of the chia oil.

  8. Micelles versus Ribbons: How Congeners Drive the Self-Assembly of Acidic Sophorolipid Biosurfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhasaiyan, Prabhu; Le Griel, Patrick; Roelants, Sophie; Redant, Emile; Van Bogaert, Inge N A; Prevost, Sylvain; Prasad, B L V; Baccile, Niki

    2017-03-17

    Sophorolipids (SLs), a class of microbially derived biosurfactants, are reported by different research groups to have different self-assembled structures (either micelles or giant ribbons) under the same conditions. Here we explore the reasons behind these contradictory results and attribute these differences to the role of specific congeners that are present in minute quantities. We show that a sample composed of a majority of oleic acid (C18:1) sophorolipid in the presence of only 0.5 % (or more) of congeners with stearic acid (C18:0) or linoleic acid (C18:2) results in the formation of micelles that are stable over long periods of time. Conversely, the presence of only 10 to 15 % of congeners with a stearic acid chain gives fibrillar structures instead of micelles. To study the mechanisms responsible, oleic acid SLs devoid of any other congeners were prepared. Very interestingly, this sample can self-assemble into either micelles or fibers depending on minute modifications to the self-assembly conditions. The findings are supported by light scattering, small-angle X-ray scattering, transmission electron microscopy under cryogenic conditions, high-pressure liquid chromatography, and NMR spectroscopy. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Metallic Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett films based on TTF derivatives and fatty acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuki, H.; Ishizaki, Y.; Suzuki, M.; Desbat, B.; Delhaes, P.; Giffard, M.; Imakubo, T.; Mabon, G.; Izumi, M.

    2002-01-01

    Recent progress in the metallic conducting Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films built from TTF derivative and fatty acids is reported. A simple LB method of transferring the mixed Langmuir (L) film of BEDO-TTF (BO) and stearic acid (SA) onto substrates provided metallic conducting LB films. A homogeneous L film formation on the water surface observed by Brewster angle microscope (BAM) is an essential factor for the well-ordered LB films. In the L film, the carboxylate group of fatty acid forms anion layer bringing about a spontaneous formation of mixed valence state (MVS) of BO layer. Similar spontaneous formation was also found in the molecular combination of nonoxygen-substituted donor of EDT-TTF and octadecanesulfonic acid (OS). This type of reaction would be useful for obtaining conducting LB films. For the LB films of BEDO-TTF and stearic acid, we found a negative transverse magnetoresistance at low temperature that was interpreted in the weak localization of a two-dimensional (2D) electronic system based on the well-defined conducting layer

  10. Dose- and type-dependent effects of long-chain fatty acids on adipogenesis and lipogenesis of bovine adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanting, Chen; Yang, Q Y; Ma, G L; Du, M; Harrison, J H; Block, E

    2018-02-01

    Differentiation and lipid metabolism of adipocytes have a great influence on milk performance, health, and feed efficiency of dairy cows. The effects of dietary long-chain fatty acids (FA) on adipogenesis and lipogenesis of dairy cows are often confounded by other nutritional and physiological factors in vivo. Therefore, this study used an in vitro approach to study the effect of dose and type of long-chain FA on adipogenesis and lipogenesis of bovine adipocytes. Stromal vascular cells were isolated from adipose tissue of dairy cows and induced into mature adipocytes in the presence of various long-chain FA including myristic, palmitic, stearic, oleic, or linoleic acid. When concentrations of myristic, palmitic, and oleic acids in adipogenic mediums were 150 and 200 μM, the induced mature adipocytes had greater lipid content compared with other concentrations of FA. In addition, mature adipocytes induced at 100 μM stearic acid and 300 μM linoleic acid had the greatest content of lipid than at other concentrations. High concentrations of saturated FA were more toxic for cells than the same concentration of unsaturated FA during the induction. When commitment stage was solely treated with FA, the number of differentiated mature adipocytes was greater for oleic and linoleic acids than other FA. When the maturation stage was treated with FA, the number of mature adipocytes was not affected, but the lipid content in adipocytes was affected and ranked oleic > linoleic > myristic > stearic > palmitic. In summary, this study showed that adipogenesis and lipogenesis of bovine adipocytes were differentially affected by long-chain FA, with unsaturated FA more effective than saturated FA. Copyright © 2018 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Physicochemical properties and analysis of Malaysian palm fatty acid distilled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumaah, Majd Ahmed; Yusoff, Mohamad Firdaus Mohamad; Salimon, Jumat

    2018-04-01

    Palm fatty acid distillate (PFAD) is cheap and valuable byproduct of edible oil processing industries. This study was carried out to determine the physicochemical properties of Malaysian palm fatty acid distilled (PFAD). The physicochemical properties showed that the free fatty acid (FFA %), acid value, iodine value, saponification value, unsaponifiable matter, hydroxyl value, specific gravity at 28°C, moisture content, viscosity at 40°C and colour at 28°C values were 87.04± 0.1 %, 190.6± 1 mg/g, 53.3±0.2 mg/g, 210.37±0.8 mg/g, 1.5±0.1%, 47±0.2 mg/g, 0.87 g/ml, 0.63 %, 30 cSt and yellowish respectively. Gas chromatography (GC) was used to determine the fatty acid (FA) composition in PFAD. The fatty acids were found to be comprised mostly with 48.9 % palmitic acid (C16:0), 37.4 % oleic acid (C18:1), 9.7 % linoleic acid (C18:2), 2.7 % stearic acid (C18:0) and 1.1 % myristic acid (C14:0). The analysis of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has resulted with 99.2 % of FFA, while diacylglycerol and monoacylglycerol were 0.69 and 0.062 % respectively.

  12. Prevalent fatty acids in cashew nuts obtained from conventional and organic cultivation in different stages of processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Josino Soares

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Brazil is one of the three largest producers of fruits in the world, and among those fruit trees, the cashew tree stands out due to the high nutritional and commercial value of its products. During its fruit processing, there are losses in some compounds and few studies address this issue. Over the last decade the conventional system of food production has been substituted for the organic cultivation system, which is a promising alternative source of income given the global demand for healthy food. Therefore, this research aimed to characterize and quantify the prevalent fatty acids found in cashew nuts obtained from conventional and organic cultivation during various stages of processing. The prevalent fatty acids found were palmitic, linoleic, oleic, and stearic acid. The average of these fatty acids were 6.93 ± 0.55; 16.99 ± 0.61; 67.62 ± 1.00 and 8.42 ± 0.55 g/100 g, respectively. There was no reduction in the palmitic, oleic and stearic fatty acid contents during processing. Very little difference was observed between the nuts obtained from conventional and organic cultivation, indicating that the method of cultivation used has little or no influence on the content of cashew nut fatty acids.

  13. Direct monophasic replacement of fatty acid by DMSA on SPION surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogoi, M. [Department of Physics, Tezpur University (Central University), Tezpur 784028 (India); Deb, P., E-mail: pdeb@tezu.ernet.in [Department of Physics, Tezpur University (Central University), Tezpur 784028 (India); Interface Chemistry and Surface Engineering, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, 40237 Duesseldorf (Germany); Vasan, G.; Keil, P.; Kostka, A.; Erbe, A. [Interface Chemistry and Surface Engineering, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, 40237 Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2012-10-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Monophasic replacement of fatty acid coating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ultrastable dispersion of hydrophilic SPION in a wide pH range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unaltered microstructure and property on surface modification. - Abstract: Tailoring the surface and understanding the surface characteristics is necessary for biomedical applications of superparamagnetic nanoparticles. In this paper, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) were prepared by thermal decomposition of iron nitrate in presence of stearic acid as surfactant. Due to the multilayer organization of surfactant molecules over the nanoparticle surface, the surface potential can be tuned by pH changes and hence the nanoparticles can be made dispersible in nonpolar as well as in polar solvents. We have presented a simple, facile procedure for controlled replacement of stearic acid from maghemite surface and subsequent derivatization by biocompatible dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) to obtain ultrastable hydrophilic nanoparticles with unaltered morphology, phase and properties. The surface chemistry of the functionalized SPIONs was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealing the presence of bound and unbound thiol groups and disulfides, leading to its prolonged stability in aqueous medium. The consequence of spatially selective functionalization on the stability and solubility of surface hydrophilic SPION has also been realized.

  14. Evaluation of the fatty acid composition of the seeds of Mangifera indica L. and their application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuhsien; Tokuda, Megumi; Kashiwagi, Ayaka; Henmi, Atsushi; Okada, Yoshiharu; Tachibana, Shinya; Nomura, Masato

    2015-01-01

    Mango (Mangifera indica L.), an edible fruit, is one of the main agricultural products in many tropical regions. Mango varieties differ in not only fruit shape but also aroma, which is an important characteristic. Although the fruit has many uses, the seeds are discarded as waste. Therefore, this study aimed to estimate the fatty acid content of seed oil of mangoes from different cultivation areas (Miyazaki, Japan, and Taiwan), and to evaluate their application in cosmetics. Five fatty acids were identified in the mango seed oil. Oleic acid and stearic acid were the principal components of mango seed oil obtained from Miyazaki (46.1% and 39.8%, respectively) and Taiwan (43.7% and 40.1%, respectively). As a cosmetic ingredient, mango seed oil showed good deodorizing effect on both 2-nonenal and isovaleric acid. The results indicated the potential applications of mango seed oil in the cosmetic industry.

  15. Ameliorative effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids against palmitic acid-induced insulin resistance in L6 skeletal muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawada Keisuke

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fatty acid-induced insulin resistance and impaired glucose uptake activity in muscle cells are fundamental events in the development of type 2 diabetes and hyperglycemia. There is an increasing demand for compounds including drugs and functional foods that can prevent myocellular insulin resistance. Methods In this study, we established a high-throughput assay to screen for compounds that can improve myocellular insulin resistance, which was based on a previously reported non-radioisotope 2-deoxyglucose (2DG uptake assay. Insulin-resistant muscle cells were prepared by treating rat L6 skeletal muscle cells with 750 μM palmitic acid for 14 h. Using the established assay, the impacts of several fatty acids on myocellular insulin resistance were determined. Results In normal L6 cells, treatment with saturated palmitic or stearic acid alone decreased 2DG uptake, whereas unsaturated fatty acids did not. Moreover, co-treatment with oleic acid canceled the palmitic acid-induced decrease in 2DG uptake activity. Using the developed assay with palmitic acid-induced insulin-resistant L6 cells, we determined the effects of other unsaturated fatty acids. We found that arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids improved palmitic acid-decreased 2DG uptake at lower concentrations than the other unsaturated fatty acids, including oleic acid, as 10 μM arachidonic acid showed similar effects to 750 μM oleic acid. Conclusions We have found that polyunsaturated fatty acids, in particular arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acids prevent palmitic acid-induced myocellular insulin resistance.

  16. FATTY ACID ETHYL ESTERS FROM MICROALGAE OF Scenedesmus ecornis BY ENZYMATIC AND ACID CATALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabryelle F. de Almeida

    Full Text Available Microalgae are an indispensable food source for the various growth stages of mollusks, crustaceans, and several fish species. Using a microalgae biomass present in the Amazonian ecosystem (Macapá-AP, we study extraction methods for fatty acid such as solvent extraction (magnetic stirring and/or Soxhlet and/or hydrolysis (acid and/or enzymatic catalysis followed by esterification and/or direct transesterification. Extraction of crude triacylglycerides by mechanical stirring at room temperature was more efficient than continuous reflux (Soxhlet. Subsequently, the lipid extract was subject to transesterification with ethanol and CAL-B as a biocatalyst, leading to production of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE. Additionally, FAEEs were prepared by hydrolysis of crude triacylglycerides followed by acid-mediated esterification or enzymatic catalysis (lipase. In this case, the type of catalyst did not significantly influence FAEE yields. In the lipid extract, we identified palmitic, linoleic, oleic, and stearic acids with palmitic acid being the most abundant. Our results suggest that enzymatic catalysis is a viable method for the extraction of lipids in the microalga, Scenedesmus ecornis.

  17. Manipulation of culture conditions alters lipid content and fatty acid profiles of a wide variety of known and new oleaginous yeasts species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitepu, Irnayuli R.; Sestric, Ryan; Ignatia, Laura; Levin, David; German, J. Bruce; Gillies, Laura A.; Almada, Luis A.G.; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L.

    2013-01-01

    Oleaginous yeasts have been studied for oleochemical production for over 80 years. Only a few species have been studied intensely. To expand the diversity of oleaginous yeasts available for lipid research, we surveyed a broad diversity of yeasts with indicators of oleaginicity including known oleaginous clades, and buoyancy. Sixty-nine strains representing 17 genera and 50 species were screened for lipid production. Yeasts belonged to Ascomycota families, Basidiomycota orders, and the yeast-like algal genus Prototheca. Total intracellular lipids and fatty acid composition were determined under different incubation times and nitrogen availability. Thirteen new oleaginous yeast species were discovered, representing multiple ascomycete and basidiomycete clades. Nitrogen starvation generally increased intracellular lipid content. The fatty acid profiles varied with the growth conditions regardless of taxonomic affiliation. The dominant fatty acids were oleic acid, palmitic acid, linoleic acid, and stearic acid. Yeasts and culture conditions that produced fatty acids appropriate for biodiesel were identified. PMID:23891835

  18. Manipulation of culture conditions alters lipid content and fatty acid profiles of a wide variety of known and new oleaginous yeast species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitepu, Irnayuli R; Sestric, Ryan; Ignatia, Laura; Levin, David; German, J Bruce; Gillies, Laura A; Almada, Luis A G; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L

    2013-09-01

    Oleaginous yeasts have been studied for oleochemical production for over 80 years. Only a few species have been studied intensely. To expand the diversity of oleaginous yeasts available for lipid research, we surveyed a broad diversity of yeasts with indicators of oleaginicity including known oleaginous clades, and buoyancy. Sixty-nine strains representing 17 genera and 50 species were screened for lipid production. Yeasts belonged to Ascomycota families, Basidiomycota orders, and the yeast-like algal genus Prototheca. Total intracellular lipids and fatty acid composition were determined under different incubation times and nitrogen availability. Thirteen new oleaginous yeast species were discovered, representing multiple ascomycete and basidiomycete clades. Nitrogen starvation generally increased intracellular lipid content. The fatty acid profiles varied with the growth conditions regardless of taxonomic affiliation. The dominant fatty acids were oleic acid, palmitic acid, linoleic acid, and stearic acid. Yeasts and culture conditions that produced fatty acids appropriate for biodiesel were identified. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Total Oil Content and Fatty Acid Profile of some Almond (Amygdalus Communis L. Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yildirim Adnan Nurhan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the total oil contents and fatty acid compositions of some commercial almond cultivars. The total oil contents changed significantly (p<0.05 by year in all cultivars with the exception of cultivar Ferrastar. Total oil contents were changed from 50.90% (Picantili to 62.01% (Supernova in 2008 and from 52.44% (Lauranne to 63.18% (Cristomorto in 2009. While predominant unsaturated fatty acids were oleic and linoleic acids, predominant saturated fatty acid was palmitic acid. The highest amount of oleic acid was obtained in Glorieta in both 2008 (83.35% and 2009 (72.74%. Linoleic acid content varied by year and the highest content was recorded in Picantili (26.08% in 2008 and Yaltinski (30.01% in 2009. The highest amount of palmitic acid was detected in cultivar Sonora in both years, i.e. as 7.76% in 2008 and 10.11% in 2009. The mean UFA:SFA ratio was 11.73 in 2008 but 7.59 in 2009. Principal component (PC analysis indicated that palmitic acid, palmitoleic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, arachidic acid, unsaturated fatty acid (UFA, saturated fatty acid (SFA and UFA:SFA ratio were primarily responsible for the separation on PC1

  20. Some physical and chemical properties of bitter melon (Momordica charantia L. seed and fatty acid composition of seed oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muharrem GÖLÜKÇÜ

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Edible part and leaves of bitter melon (Momordica charantia L. are used as food or medicine to control some diseases because of its antioxidant, antibacterial, anticancer, anti-hepatotoxic, antiviral, antiulcerogenic and larvicidal effects. Although fruits have considerable amount of seeds, they have not received much attention. In this study, some physical and chemical properties of the seed and also fatty acid composition of seed oil were determined. Oil content of the sample was determined by soxhlet apparatus as 26.10% in dried sample. Fatty acid composition was analyzed by GC-MS and seven fatty acids were identified and their ratios were determined in this seed oil. The main fatty acid was determined as α-eleostearic (45.60%. The other fatty acids were palmitic (3.69%, stearic (28.00%, oleic (12.45%, linoleic (8.90%, arachidic (0.71% and gadoleic acids (0.65%.

  1. Genetic Architecture and heritability of some Quantitative Characters,oil content and fatty.acid composition in safflower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragab, A.I.; Fried, W.

    1992-01-01

    The nature of gene action for some quantitative, oil content and quality characters in safflower was studied in an F 1 diallel set involving 4 parents. Both additive and dominance genetic variance were important for most traits. The magnitude of non additive gene action was higher than of additive genetic variance for all traits, except for first branch height, palmitic and stearic acids. The distribution of positive and negative alleles in the parental populations was a symmetrical for all traits except for 100-seed weight. Most of dominant genes had positive effects in plant height, oil content and oleic acid. Dominance degree was over dominance for all traits except for flowering date and first branch height which showed partial dominance. The narrow sense heritability was 75%, 82%, and 89% for stearic acid, flowering date and first branch height, whears 50 to 67% were found for seed yield/plant, plant height, and oil content. Values of less than 50% were determined for other traits. The V r-W r graphical analysis showed partial dominance for flowering date, first branch height, no. of capitula/plant, palmitic and linoleic acids. Complete dominance for 100-seed weight and over dominance for plant height, seed yield, oil content and oleic acid. 2 fig., 2 tab

  2. Inhibition of steroid 5 alpha-reductase by specific aliphatic unsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, T; Liao, S

    1992-01-01

    Human or rat microsomal 5 alpha-reductase activity, as measured by enzymic conversion of testosterone into 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone or by binding of a competitive inhibitor, [3H]17 beta-NN-diethulcarbamoyl-4-methyl-4-aza-5 alpha-androstan-3-one ([3H]4-MA) to the reductase, is inhibited by low concentrations (less than 10 microM) of certain polyunsaturated fatty acids. The relative inhibitory potencies of unsaturated fatty acids are, in decreasing order: gamma-linolenic acid greater than cis-4,7,10,13,16,19-docosahexaenoic acid = cis-6,9,12,15-octatetraenoic acid = arachidonic acid = alpha-linolenic acid greater than linoleic acid greater than palmitoleic acid greater than oleic acid greater than myristoleic acid. Other unsaturated fatty acids such as undecylenic acid, erucic acid and nervonic acid, are inactive. The methyl esters and alcohol analogues of these compounds, glycerols, phospholipids, saturated fatty acids, retinoids and carotenes were inactive even at 0.2 mM. The results of the binding assay and the enzymic assay correlated well except for elaidic acid and linolelaidic acid, the trans isomers of oleic acid and linoleic acid respectively, which were much less active than their cis isomers in the binding assay but were as potent in the enzymic assay. gamma-Linolenic acid had no effect on the activities of two other rat liver microsomal enzymes: NADH:menadione reductase and glucuronosyl transferase. gamma-Linolenic acid, the most potent inhibitor tested, decreased the Vmax. and increased Km values of substrates, NADPH and testosterone, and promoted dissociation of [3H]4-MA from the microsomal reductase. gamma-Linolenic acid, but not the corresponding saturated fatty acid (stearic acid), inhibited the 5 alpha-reductase activity, but not the 17 beta-dehydrogenase activity, of human prostate cancer cells in culture. These results suggest that unsaturated fatty acids may play an important role in regulating androgen action in target cells. PMID:1637346

  3. Fatty acid composition of ostrich (Struthio camelus abdominal adipose tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Belichovska

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acid composition of foods has a great impact on nutrition and health. Therefore, thе determination and knowledge of the fatty acid composition of food is very important for nutrition. Due to the high nutritional characteristics of ostrich meat and its products, the research determining their quality is of topical interest. The aim of the present investigation was the determination of fatty acid composition of ostrich adipose tissue. The content of fatty acids was determined according to AOAC Official Methods of Analysis and determination was performed using a gas chromatograph with a flame-ionization detector (GC-FID. The results are expressed as a percentage of the total content of fatty acids. The method was validated and whereupon the following parameters were determined: linearity, precision, recovery, limit of detection and limit of quantification. The repeatability was within of 0.99 to 2.15%, reproducibility from 2.01 to 4.57%, while recovery ranged from 94.89 to 101.03%. According to these results, this method is accurate and precise and can be used for analysis of fatty acids in foods. It was concluded that the content of saturated fatty acids (SFA accounted 34.75%, of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA 38.37%, of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA 26.88%, of total unsaturated fatty acids (UFA 65.25% and of desirable fatty acids (DFA (total unsaturated + stearic acid 70.37% of the analysed samples. The ratio polyunsaturated/saturated fatty acids accounted 0.77. The most present fatty acid is the oleic (C18:1n9c with 28.31%, followed by palmitic (C16:0 with 27.12% and linoleic (C18:2n6c acid with 25.08%. Other fatty acids are contained in significantly lower quantities.

  4. Clofibric acid increases the formation of oleic acid in endoplasmic reticulum of the liver of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Akihiko; Yamazaki, Tohru; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Sunaga, Katsuyoshi; Tsuda, Tadashi; Mitsumoto, Atsushi; Kudo, Naomi; Kawashima, Yoichi

    2011-01-01

    The effects of 2-(4-chlorophenoxy)-2-methylpropionic acid (clofibric acid) on the formation of oleic acid (18:1) from stearic acid (18:0) and utilization of the 18:1 formed for phosphatidylcholine (PC) formation in endoplasmic reticulum in the liver of rats were studied in vivo. [¹⁴C]18:0 was intravenously injected into control Wistar male rats and rats that had been fed on a diet containing 0.5% (w/w) clofibric acid for 7 days; and the distribution of radiolabeled fatty acids among subcellular organelles, microsomes, peroxisomes, and mitochondria, was estimated on the basis of correction utilizing the yields from homogenates of marker enzymes for these organelles. The radioactivity was mostly localized in microsomes and the radiolabeled fatty acids present in microsomes were significantly increased by the treatment of rats with clofibric acid. The formation of radiolabeled 18:1 in microsomes markedly increased and incorporations of the formed [¹⁴C]18:1 into PC and phosphatidylethanolamine in microsomes were augmented in response to clofibric acid. The [¹⁴C]18:1 incorporated into PC was mostly located at the C-2 position, but not the C-1 position, of PC, and the radioactivity in 18:1 at the C-2 position of PC was strikingly increased by clofibric acid. These results obtained from the in vivo experiments directly link the findings that clofibric acid treatment induces microsomal stearoyl-CoA desaturase and 1-acylglycerophosphocholine acyltransferase in the liver and the findings that the treatment with the drug elevated absolute mass and mass proportion of 18:1 at the C-2 position, but not the C-1 position, of PC in the liver together.

  5. Soybean Aphid Infestation Induces Changes in Fatty Acid Metabolism in Soybean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Kanobe

    Full Text Available The soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura is one of the most important insect pests of soybeans in the North-central region of the US. It has been hypothesized that aphids avoid effective defenses by inhibition of jasmonate-regulated plant responses. Given the role fatty acids play in jasmonate-induced plant defenses, we analyzed the fatty acid profile of soybean leaves and seeds from aphid-infested plants. Aphid infestation reduced levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids in leaves with a concomitant increase in palmitic acid. In seeds, a reduction in polyunsaturated fatty acids was associated with an increase in stearic acid and oleic acid. Soybean plants challenged with the brown stem rot fungus or with soybean cyst nematodes did not present changes in fatty acid levels in leaves or seeds, indicating that the changes induced by aphids are not a general response to pests. One of the polyunsaturated fatty acids, linolenic acid, is the precursor of jasmonate; thus, these changes in fatty acid metabolism may be examples of "metabolic hijacking" by the aphid to avoid the induction of effective defenses. Based on the changes in fatty acid levels observed in seeds and leaves, we hypothesize that aphids potentially induce interference in the fatty acid desaturation pathway, likely reducing FAD2 and FAD6 activity that leads to a reduction in polyunsaturated fatty acids. Our data support the idea that aphids block jasmonate-dependent defenses by reduction of the hormone precursor.

  6. Genotype, production system and sex effects on fatty acid composition of meat from goat kids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Mustafa; Demirel, Gulcan; Yakan, Akın; Ekiz, Bülent; Tölü, Cemil; Savaş, Türker

    2015-02-01

    Two trials were performed to assess the meat fatty acid profile of goat kids from different genotypes, production systems and sex. In the first trial, genotype effect was determined in 24 suckling male kids from Turkish Saanen, Maltese and Gokceada breeds. In the second trial, male and female Gokceada Goat kids were used to compare the effect of extensive and semi-intensive production systems on fatty acid composition of meat. Significant genotype effect was observed in the percentages of myristic acid (C14:0), palmitic acid (C16:0), oleic acid (C18:1 n-9), linolenic acid (C18:3 n-3), arachidonic acid (C20:4 n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6 n-3), despite no differences on the ratios of polyunsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acids (PUFA/SFA) and n-6/n-3 (P > 0.05). The effect of production system had also significant effects on fatty acids, but sex only influenced significantly stearic acid (C18:0), C18:1 n-9 and C18:3 n-3 fatty acids and total PUFA level and PUFA/SFA ratio. This study confirms that dairy breeds are prone to produce higher levels of unsaturated fatty acids in their muscle. Meanwhile, meat from Gokceada goat kids, which is one of the indigenous breeds in Turkey, had similar PUFA/SFA and n-6/n-3 ratios to Turkish Saanen and Maltase. © 2014 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  7. FT-IR spectrum of grape seed oil and quantum models of fatty acids triglycerides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezin, K. V.; Antonova, E. M.; Shagautdinova, I. T.; Chernavina, M. L.; Dvoretskiy, K. N.; Grechukhina, O. N.; Vasilyeva, L. M.; Rybakov, A. V.; Likhter, A. M.

    2018-04-01

    FT-IR spectra of grape seed oil and glycerol were registered in the 650-4000 cm-1 range. Molecular models of glycerol and some fatty acids that compose the oil under study - linoleic, oleic, palmitic and stearic acids - as well as their triglycerides were developed within B3LYP/6-31G(d) density functional model. A vibrating FT-IR spectrum of grape seed oil was modeled on the basis of calculated values of vibrating wave numbers and IR intensities of the fatty acids triglycerides and with regard to their percentage. Triglyceride spectral bands that were formed by glycerol linkage vibrations were revealed. It was identified that triglycerol linkage has a small impact on the structure of fatty acids and, consequently, on vibrating wave numbers. The conducted molecular modeling became a basis for theoretical interpretation on 10 experimentally observed absorption bands in FT-IR spectrum of grape seed oil.

  8. Intra-albumin migration of bound fatty acid probed by spin label ESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurachevsky, Andrey; Shimanovitch, Ekaterina; Gurachevskaya, Tatjana; Muravsky, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    Conventional ESR spectra of 16-doxyl-stearic acid bound to bovine and human serum albumin were recorded at different temperatures in order to investigate the status of spin-labeled fatty acid in the interior of the protein globule. A computer spectrum simulation of measured spectra, performed by non-linear least-squares fits, clearly showed two components corresponding to strongly and weakly immobilized fatty acid molecules. The two-component model was verified on spectra measured at different pH. Thermodynamic parameters of the spin probe exchange between two spin probe states were analyzed. It was concluded that at physiological conditions, fatty acid molecules permanently migrate in the globule interior between the specific binding sites and a space among albumin domains

  9. Fatty acid and sterol contents during tulip leaf senescence induced by methyl jasmonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Saniewski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown previously that methyl jasmonate (JA-Me applied in lanolin paste on the bottom surface of intact tulip leaves causes a rapid and intense its senescence. The aim of this work was to study the effect of JA-Me on free and bound fatty acid and sterol contents during tulip leaf senescence. The main free and bound fatty acids of tulip leaf, in decreasing order of their abundance, were linolenic, linoleic, palmitic, oleic, stearic and myristic acids. Only the content of free linolenic acid decreased after treatment with JA-Me during visible stage of senescence. ß-Sitosterol (highest concentration, campesterol, stigmasterol and cholesterol were identified in tulip leaf. Methyl jasmonate evidently increased the level of ß-sitosterol, campesterol and stigmasterol during induced senescence. It is suggested that the increase in sterol concentrations under the influence of methyl jasmonate induced changes in membrane fluidity and permeability, which may be responsible for senescence.

  10. Phospholipid sources for adrenic acid mobilization in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Comparison with arachidonic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guijas, Carlos; Astudillo, Alma M; Gil-de-Gómez, Luis; Rubio, Julio M; Balboa, María A; Balsinde, Jesús

    2012-11-01

    Cells metabolize arachidonic acid (AA) to adrenic acid (AdA) via 2-carbon elongation reactions. Like AA, AdA can be converted into multiple oxygenated metabolites, with important roles in various physiological and pathophysiological processes. However, in contrast to AA, there is virtually no information on how the cells regulate the availability of free AdA for conversion into bioactive products. We have used a comparative lipidomic approach with both gas chromatography and liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry to characterize changes in the levels of AA- and AdA-containing phospholipid species in RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cells. Incubation of the cells with AA results in an extensive conversion to AdA but both fatty acids do not compete with each other for esterification into phospholipids. AdA but not AA, shows preference for incorporation into phospholipids containing stearic acid at the sn-1 position. After stimulation of the cells with zymosan, both AA and AdA are released in large quantities, albeit AA is released to a greater extent. Finally, a variety of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol molecular species contribute to AA; however, AdA is liberated exclusively from phosphatidylcholine species. Collectively, these results identify significant differences in the cellular utilization of AA and AdA by the macrophages, suggesting non-redundant biological actions for these two fatty acids. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A fundamental approach to adhesion: Synthesis, surface analysis, thermodynamics and mechanics. [acid-base properties of titanium 6-4 surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardane, R.; Wightman, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    The acid-base properties of titanium 6-4 plates (low surface area) were investigated after three different pretreatments, namely Turco, phosphate-fluoride and Pasa-Jell. A series of indicators was used and color changes were detected using diffuse reflectance visible spectroscopy. Electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis was used to examine the indicator on the Ti 6-4 surface. Specular reflectance infra-red spectroscopy was used to study the adsorption of stearic acid from cyclohexane solutions on the Ti 6-4 surface.

  12. Fatty acid composition of the cypselae of two endemic Centaurea species (Asteraceae

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    Janaćković Peđa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The fatty acid composition of cypselae of two endemic species from Macedonia, Centaurea galicicae and C. tomorosii, is analysed for the first time, using GC/MS (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. In the cypselae of C. galicicae, 11 fatty acids were identified, palmitic (hexadecanoic acid (32.5% being the most dominant. Other fatty acids were elaidic [(E-octadec-9-enoic] acid (13.9%, stearic (octadecanoic acid (12.8% and linoleic [(9Z,12Z-9,12-octadecadienoic] acid (10.6%. Of the 11 identified fatty acids, seven were saturated fatty acids, which represented 41.5% of total fatty acids, while unsaturated fatty acids altogether constituted 58.5%. In the cypselae of C. tomorosii, five fatty acids were identified. The major fatty acid was linolelaidic [(9E,12E-octadeca- 9,12-dienoic] acid (48.8%. The second most dominant fatty acid was oleic [(9Z-octadec-9-enoic] acid (34.2%. Thus, unsaturated fatty acids were present with 83%. The other three fatty acids identified were saturated fatty acids, which represented 17% of total fatty acids. As a minor fatty acid, levulinic (4-oxopentanoic acid was determined in both C. galicicae and C. tomorosii (0.3% and 3.2%, respectively. The obtained results differ from published data on dominant fatty acids in the cypselae of other species belonging to the same section as the species investigated in the present paper (section Arenariae, subgenus Acrolophus, genus Centaurea. They also, differ from published data referable to other genera belonging to the same tribe (Cardueae. The general chemotaxonomic significance of fatty acids is discussed.

  13. Engineering of lipid prodrug-based, hyaluronic acid-decorated nanostructured lipid carriers platform for 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin combination gastric cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qu CY

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chun-Ying Qu,1,* Min Zhou,1,* Ying-wei Chen,2 Mei-mei Chen,3 Feng Shen,1 Lei-Ming Xu11Digestive Endoscopic Diagnosis and Treatment Center, Xinhua Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2Shanghai Key Laboratory of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3Digestive Department, Xinhua Hospital, School of medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workPurpose: The first-line chemotherapy treatment protocol for gastric cancer is combination chemotherapy of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU and cisplatin (CDDP. The aim of this study was to engineer prodrug-based nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC platform for codelivery of 5-FU and CDDP to enhance therapy and decrease toxicity.Methods: First, 5-FU-stearic acid lipid conjugate was synthesized by two steps. Second, 5-FU-stearic acid prodrug and CDDP were loaded in NLC. Finally, hyaluronic acid (HA was coated onto NLC surface. Average size, zeta potential, and drug loading capacity of NLC were evaluated. Human gastric cancer cell line BGC823 (BGC823 cells was used for the testing of in vitro cytotoxicity assays. In vivo antitumor activity of NLC was evaluated in mice bearing BGC823 cells model.Results: HA-coated 5-FU-stearic acid prodrug and CDDP-loaded NLC (HA-FU/C-NLC showed a synergistic effect in combination therapy and displayed the greatest antitumor activity than all of the free drugs or uncoated NLC in vitro and in vivo.Conclusion: This work reveals that HA-coated NLC could be used as a novel carrier to codeliver 5-FU and CDDP for gastric cancer therapy. HA-FU/C-NLC could be a promising targeted and combinational therapy in nanomedicine.Keywords: gastric cancer, nanostructured lipid carriers, hyaluronic acid, combination chemotherapy, lipid prodrug

  14. Immbolization of uricase enzyme in Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett films of fatty acids: possible use as a uric acid sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanon, Nathaly C M; Oliveira, Osvaldo N; Caseli, Luciano

    2012-05-01

    Preserving the enzyme structure in solid films is key for producing various bioelectronic devices, including biosensors, which has normally been performed with nanostructured films that allow for control of molecular architectures. In this paper, we investigate the adsorption of uricase onto Langmuir monolayers of stearic acid (SA), and their transfer to solid supports as Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films. Structuring of the enzyme in β-sheets was preserved in the form of 1-layer LB film, which was corroborated with a higher catalytic activity than for other uricase-containing LB film architectures where the β-sheets structuring was not preserved. The optimized architecture was also used to detect uric acid within a range covering typical concentrations in the human blood. The approach presented here not only allows for an optimized catalytic activity toward uric acid but also permits one to explain why some film architectures exhibit a superior performance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. GC-MS evaluation of fatty acid profile and lipid bioactive of partially hydrogenated cooking oil consumed in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandhroab, A.A.; Sherazi, S.T.H.; Mahesar, S.A.; Talpura, M.Y.; Bhutto, A.A.

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of fatty acid profile including trans fat and lipid bioactive (tocopherol and sterol contents) of most commonly used vanaspati ghee and cooking oil brands was made by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometer detector (GC-MSD). Among the saturated fatty acids (SFA), palmitic and stearic acid were dominant fatty acids; the mean value of SFA in ghee and oil was 44.98 and 30.83%, respectively. Mean values of monounsaturated, polyunsaturated and trans fatty acids in ghee were 47.51, 7.49 and 8.08%, and in oil 49.26, 19.90 and 0.91%, respectively. alpha-tocopherol was the major tocopherol while campesterol, stigmasterol and sitosterol were main phytosterols in terms of their quantity. (author)

  16. The effect of replacing fat with oat bran on fatty acid composition and physicochemical properties of meatballs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, İsmail; Dağlıoğlu, Orhan

    2003-10-01

    Oat bran was used as a fat substitute in the production of meatballs. The effect of oat bran addition on the fatty acid composition, trans fatty acids, total fat, some physicochemical and sensory properties of the samples was studied. Meatballs were produced with four different formulations; the addition of 5, 10, 15 and 20% oat bran. Control samples were formulated with 25% fat addition as in commercial production. The major fatty acids were cis-oleic, palmitic and stearic acid in all the meatball samples, those with oat bran added as well as the control. Meatballs containing oat bran had lower concentrations of total fat and total trans fatty acids than the control samples. Meatballs made with 20% oat bran had the highest protein, salt and ash contents, L value (lightness), b value (yellowness), and the lowest moisture content and a value (redness). There was no significant difference among the meatball samples with respect to sensory properties, and all samples had high acceptability.

  17. Composition of fatty acids in selected vegetable oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Frančáková

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant oils and fats are important and necessary components of the human nutrition. They are energy source and also contain fatty acids - compounds essential for human health. The aim of this study was to evaluate nutritional quality of selected plant oil - olive, rapeseed, pumpkin, flax and sesame; based on fatty acid composition in these oils. Fatty acids (MUFA, PUFA, SFA were analyzed chromatography using system Agilent 6890 GC, injector multimode, detector FID. The highest content of saturated fatty acids was observed in pumpkinseed oil (19.07%, the lowest content was found in rapeseed oil (7.03%, with low level of palmitic and stearic acids and high level of behenic acid (0.32% among the evaluated oils. The highest content of linoleic acid was determined in pumpkinseed (46.40% and sesame oil (40.49%; in these samples was also found lowest content of α-linolenic acid. These oils have important antioxidant properties and are not subject to oxidation. The richest source of linolenic acid was flaxseed oil which, which is therefore more difficult to preserve and process in food industry. In olive oil was confirmed that belongs to the group of oils with a predominantly monosaturated oleic acid (more than 70% and a small amount of polysaturated fatty acid. The most commonly used rapeseed oil belongs to the group of oils with the medium content of linolenic acid (8.76%; this oil also showed a high content of linoleic acid (20.24%. The group of these essentially fatty acids showed a suitable ratio ∑n3/n6 in the rapessed oil (0.44.

  18. Optimization of methanol crystallization for highly efficient separation of palmitic acid from palm fatty acid mixture using response surface methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A.W. Japir

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the current study was to develop parameters for the separation of palmitic acid (PA from a crude palm oil saturated fatty acid (SFAs mixture by using the methanol crystallization method. The conditions of methanol crystallization were optimized by the response surface methodology (RSM with the D-optimal design. The procedure of developing the solvent crystallization method was based on various different parameters. The fatty acid composition was carried out using a gas chromatography flame ionization detector (GC-FID as fatty acid methyl esters. The highest percentage of SFAs was more than 96% with the percentage yield of 87.5% under the optimal conditions of fatty acids-to-methanol ratio of 1: 20 (w/v, the crystallization temperature of -15 °C, and the crystallization time of 24 hours, respectively. The composition of separated SFAs in the solid fraction contains 96.7% of palmitic acid (C16:0 as a dominant component and 3.3% of stearic acid (C18:0. The results showed that utilizing methanol as a crystallization solvent is recommended because of its high efficiency, low cost, stability, availability, comparative ease of recovery and its ability to form needle-like crystals which have good filtering and washing characteristics.

  19. Optimization of methanol crystallization for highly efficient separation of palmitic acid from palm fatty acid mixture using response surface methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japir, A.A.W.; Salimon, J.; Derawi, D.; Yahaya, B.H.; Jamil, M.S.M.; Yusop, M.R.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to develop parameters for the separation of palmitic acid (PA) from a crude palm oil saturated fatty acid (SFAs) mixture by using the methanol crystallization method. The conditions of methanol crystallization were optimized by the response surface methodology (RSM) with the D-optimal design. The procedure of developing the solvent crystallization method was based on various different parameters. The fatty acid composition was carried out using a gas chromatography flame ionization detector (GC-FID) as fatty acid methyl esters. The highest percentage of SFAs was more than 96% with the percentage yield of 87.5% under the optimal conditions of fatty acids-to-methanol ratio of 1: 20 (w/v), the crystallization temperature of -15 °C, and the crystallization time of 24 hours, respectively. The composition of separated SFAs in the solid fraction contains 96.7% of palmitic acid (C16:0) as a dominant component and 3.3% of stearic acid (C18:0). The results showed that utilizing methanol as a crystallization solvent is recommended because of its high efficiency, low cost, stability, availability, comparative ease of recovery and its ability to form needle-like crystals which have good filtering and washing characteristics. [es

  20. Experimental study on thermal storage performance of binary mixtures of fatty acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Quanying; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Chao; Liu, Sha; Sun, Xiangyu

    2018-02-01

    We selected five kinds of fatty acids including the capric acid, stearic acid, lauric acid, palmitic acid and myristic acid and mixed them to prepare10 kinds of binary mixtures of fatty acids according to the predetermined proportion,tested the phase change temperature and latent heat of mixtures by differential scanning calorimetry(DSC). In order to find the fatty acid mixture which has suitable phase change temperature, the larger phase change latent heat and can be used for phase change wall. The results showed that the phase change temperature and latent heats of the binary mixtures of fatty acids decreased compared with the single component;The phase change temperature of the binary mixtures of fatty acids containing capric acid were lower, the range was roughly 20∼30°C,and latent heat is large,which are ideal phase change materials for phase change wall energy storage;The phase change temperature of the binary mixtures consisting of other fatty acids were still high,didn’t meet the temperature requirements of the wall energy storage.

  1. [Study on the encapsulation technique of high purity gamma-linolenic acid, part 1--saponification reaction and saponification value].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng-xia; Xue, Gang; Gao, Qiu-hua; Gao, Wei-xia; Zhang, Li-hua

    2005-03-01

    To measure the saponification value and fatty acid formation of evening primrose oil, to study the effects of pH value on production yield and fatty acid formation during the saponification reaction, and to provide rationales for the selection of raw material, the enhancement of production yield of saponification, and the encapsulation of gamma-linolenic acid with urea. To measure fatty acid's formation with gas chromatographic method and to measure the saponification value. The content of gamma-linolenic acid is 7%-10% in evening primrose oil. The content of gamma-linolenic acid is inversely correlated with that of unsaturated fatty acid. The saponification value, the amount of KOH for saponification of evening primrose oil, and the pH value for subsequent isolations of oils are determined. From the measurement of fatty acids of evening primrose oil in two different cultivation locations, the content of gamma-linolenic acid is determined to be 7%-10%, unsaturated oils account for 90%. The saponification value of evening primrose oil is between 180-200, pH value of isolated oil is 1.5-2.0 after saponification reaction. Fatty acids mainly include palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linolic acid and gamma-linolenic acid.

  2. Identification of a potential biomarker panel for the intake of the common dietary trans fat elaidic acid (trans∆9-C18:1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroager, Toke Peter; Nielsen, Lone Vendel; Bak, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    system, and the cells were maintained for seven days in serum-free medium containing 100 μM elaidic acid (trans∆9-C18:1), oleic acid (cis∆9-C18:1) or stearic acid (C18:0). The secretomes were analyzed by stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), difference in gel electrophoresis......Trans fatty acid intake has been correlated to an unfavorable plasma lipoprotein profile and an increased cardiovascular disease risk. The present study aimed to identify a plasma protein biomarker panel related to human intake of elaidic acid. The human liver cell line HepG2-SF was used as a model...

  3. Inhibition of Acetylcholinesterase and Fatty Acid Composition in Theobroma grandiflorum Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casandra Valentina Itriago

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Theobroma grandiflorum is an important fruit tree from Sterculiaceae family, native to the Brazilian Amazon, known in the region as cupuaçu. The seeds have a high fat content (24% with characteristics that resemble those of cocoa (Theobroma cacao butter with potential applications in the cosmetic, pharmaceutical and food industries. The main objective of this work was to explore the seed fats from T. grandiflorum that were analyzed for fatty acid composition by Gas Chromatography with Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID and to analyze their activity for acetylcholinesterase inhibition. Chromatographic analysis provided detection of nine fatty acids. The major fatty acids found in the species were oleic (40.0%, stearic (32.7%, arachidic (10.4% and palmitic (8.0%. The acetylcholinesterase inhibition by fats from seeds was over 40.48%. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v0i0.894 

  4. Biodegradable starch-based films containing saturated fatty acids: thermal, infrared and raman spectroscopic characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo M. Nobrega

    Full Text Available Biodegradable films of thermoplastic starch and poly (butylene adipate co-terephthalate (PBAT containing fatty acids were characterized thermally and with infrared and Raman spectroscopies. The symmetrical character of the benzene ring in PBAT provided a means to illustrate the difference between these spectroscopic techniques, because a band appeared in the Raman spectrum but not in the infrared. The thermal analysis showed three degradation stages related to fatty acids, starch and PBAT. The incorporation of saturated fatty acids with different molecular mass (caproic, lauric and stearic did not change the nature of the chemical bonds among the components in the blends of starch, PBAT and glycerol, according to the thermal analysis, infrared and Raman spectroscopies.

  5. Comparison of solutol HS 15, Cremophor EL and novel ethoxylated fatty acid surfactants as multidrug resistance modification agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, L E; Balasubramanian, M; Emanuele, R M; Clodfelter, K E; Coon, J S

    1995-08-09

    Some well-known fatty acid ester surfactants, e.g., Cremophor EL and Solutol HS 15, are modulators of multidrug resistance in vitro and in vivo. Because they are polydisperse, and their active component(s) have not been identified, the therapeutic potential of such surfactants is unclear. To better define the active components of Solutol HS 15 and to make more potent surfactant multidrug resistance modulators, highly purified C-18 fatty acids were esterified with ethylene oxide at 5-200 molar ratios. Unexpectedly, ethylene oxide esters of pure 12-hydroxy stearic acid, the major components of Solutol HS 15, displayed negligible resistance modification activity compared with Solutol HS 15 itself or to stearic and oleic acid esters synthesized under identical conditions. Since oleic acid esters appeared to have good activity, a series of these compounds was prepared to determine the optimal ethylene oxide/fatty acid ratio. The optimal ratio was found to be 20 mole ethylene oxide: I mole fatty acid, with a steep decline in activity for products made with ratios above and below the optimum. The most active oleic acid ester, designated CRL 1337, was 8.4-fold as potent as Solutol HS 15 and over 19-fold as potent as Cremophor EL in promoting rhodamine 123 accumulation in multidrug-resistant KB 8-5-11 cells in vitro. Our results show that the structure of the hydrophobic domain (fatty acid) of surfactants as well as its hydrophile-lipophile balance are critical in determining the potency of surfactants as reversing agents.

  6. The pathways for absorbtion of stearin acid and leucine in the rat small intestine after gamma-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadtochij, V.V.; Brodskij, P.A.

    1983-01-01

    Males of rats were used to study the disorders of structural-functional mechanisms of lipid absorption in late periods after coarse-fractionated gamma irradiation of abdomen (35 Gr integral dose, 7 Gr x 5 every other day, Co 60 , 2.3 Gr/min dose rate) Lipid absorption and separation was studied according to intensity of 3 H-stearic acid inclusion into ultrastructures of epitheliocyte of small intestine villus of irradiated animals. The state of protein-synthesizing epitheliocyte system was evaluated by pulse mark (fragment incubation with 3 H-lencine in vitro). The correlation between the rate of mark passing into Golgi complex and its separation into intercellular space was revealed. Lipid passing with 3 H-stearic acid through Golgi complex, granular endoplasmic net and disorder of their separation into lacunar intercellular space decelerated in late periods after irradiation. It is shown that the transport of fatty acid, avoiding the stages of esterification and triglyceride synthesis in enduplasmic net, increases in small intestine epitheliocytes during radiation effect. Mechanisms. of some phenomena are explained presumably

  7. Nitro-fatty acid pharmacokinetics in the adipose tissue compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazzari, Marco; Khoo, Nicholas K H; Woodcock, Steven R; Jorkasky, Diane K; Li, Lihua; Schopfer, Francisco J; Freeman, Bruce A

    2017-02-01

    Electrophilic nitro-FAs (NO 2 -FAs) promote adaptive and anti-inflammatory cell signaling responses as a result of an electrophilic character that supports posttranslational protein modifications. A unique pharmacokinetic profile is expected for NO 2 -FAs because of an ability to undergo reversible reactions including Michael addition with cysteine-containing proteins and esterification into complex lipids. Herein, we report via quantitative whole-body autoradiography analysis of rats gavaged with radiolabeled 10-nitro-[ 14 C]oleic acid, preferential accumulation in adipose tissue over 2 weeks. To better define the metabolism and incorporation of NO 2 -FAs and their metabolites in adipose tissue lipids, adipocyte cultures were supplemented with 10-nitro-oleic acid (10-NO 2 -OA), nitro-stearic acid, nitro-conjugated linoleic acid, and nitro-linolenic acid. Then, quantitative HPLC-MS/MS analysis was performed on adipocyte neutral and polar lipid fractions, both before and after acid hydrolysis of esterified FAs. NO 2 -FAs preferentially incorporated in monoacyl- and diacylglycerides, while reduced metabolites were highly enriched in triacylglycerides. This differential distribution profile was confirmed in vivo in the adipose tissue of NO 2 -OA-treated mice. This pattern of NO 2 -FA deposition lends new insight into the unique pharmacokinetics and pharmacologic actions that could be expected for this chemically-reactive class of endogenous signaling mediators and synthetic drug candidates. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Identification of fatty acids and fatty acid amides in human meibomian gland secretions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Kelly K; Ham, Bryan M; Nichols, Jason J; Ziegler, Corrie; Green-Church, Kari B

    2007-01-01

    The complex superficial lipid layer of the tear film functions to prevent evaporation and maintain tear stability. Although classes of lipids found in the tear film have been reported, individual lipid species are currently being studied with more sophisticated. The purpose of this work was to show the identification of fatty acids and the fatty acid amides in human meibomian gland secretions by using electrospray mass spectrometry. methods. Human meibomian gland secretions (meibum) were analyzed by electrospray quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (positive- and negative-ion mode). Accurate mass determination and collision-induced dissociation of meibum, and lipid standards were used to identify lipid species. Mass analysis of meibum in an acidic chloroform-methanol solution in positive-ion mode revealed a mass peak of m/z 282.3, which was identified as the protonated molecule of oleamide [C(18)H(35)NO+H](+). The high-resolution mass analysis of the m/z 282.2788 peak (oleamide) demonstrated a mass accuracy of 3.2 parts per million (ppm). Collision-induced dissociation of this species from meibum, compared with an oleamide standard, confirmed its identification. Myristic, palmitic, stearic, and oleic free fatty acids were identified in a similar manner, as were the other fatty acid amides (myristamide, palmitamide, stearamide, and erucamide). The findings indicate that oleamide (cis-9-octadecenamide), an endogenous fatty acid primary amide, is a predominant component of meibum when examined by electrospray mass spectrometry. The novel finding of oleamide and other members of the fatty acid amide family in the tear film could lead to additional insights into the role of fatty acid amide activity in human biological systems and may indicate a new function for this lipid class of molecules in ocular surface signaling and/or in the maintenance of the complex tear film.

  9. The Effects of Cutaneous Fatty Acids on the Growth of Pseudogymnoascus destructans, the Etiological Agent of White-Nose Syndrome (WNS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Craig L; Ingala, Melissa R; Ravenelle, Rebecca E; Dougherty-Howard, Kelsey; Wicks, Samuel O; Herzog, Carl; Rudd, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    White Nose Syndrome (WNS) greatly increases the over-winter mortality of little brown (Myotis lucifugus), Indiana (Myotis sodalis), northern (Myotis septentrionalis), and tricolored (Perimyotis subflavus) bats. It is caused by a cutaneous infection with the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd). Big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) are much more resistant to cutaneous infection with Pd, however. We thus conducted analyses of wing epidermis from hibernating E. fuscus and M. lucifugus to determine their fatty acid compositions, and laboratory Pd culture experiments at 4.0-13.4°C to determine the effects of these fatty acids on Pd growth. Our analyses revealed that the epidermis of both bat species contain the same 7 fatty acid types (14:0, 15:0, 16:0. 16:1, 18:0, 18:1, & 18:2), but the epidermis of M. lucifugus contains: a) more stearic (18:0) acid, b) less palmitoleic (16:1) acid, c) less myristic (14:0) acid, and, d) less oleic (18:1) acid than that of E. fuscus. The growth of Pd was inhibited by: a) myristic and stearic acids at 10.5-13.4°C, but not at 4.0-5.0°C, b) oleic acid at 5.0-10.6°C, c) palmitoleic acid, and, d) linoleic (18:2) acid at 5.0-10.6°C. One set of factors that enables E. fuscus to better resist cutaneous P. destructans infections (and thus WNS) therefore appears to be the relatively higher myristic, palmitoleic, and oleic acid contents of the epidermis.

  10. Synthesis and release of fatty acids by human trophoblast cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, R.A.; Haynes, E.B.

    1987-01-01

    In order to determine whether placental cells can synthesize and release fatty acids, trophoblast cells from term human placentas were established in monolayer culture. The cells continued to secrete placental lactogen and progesterone and maintained specific activities of critical enzymes of triacylglycerol and phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis for 24 to 72 hr in culture. Fatty acid was rapidly synthesized from [ 14 C]acetate and released by the cells. Palmitoleic, palmitic, and oleic acids were the major fatty acids synthesized from [ 14 C]acetate and released. Small amounts of lauric, myristic, and stearic acids were also identified. [ 14 C]acetate was also incorporated into cellular triacylglycerol, phospholipid, and cholesterol, but radiolabeled free fatty acid did not accumulate intracellularly. In a pulse-chase experiment, cellular glycerolipids were labeled with [1- 14 C]oleate; trophoblast cells then released 14 C-labeled fatty acid into the media as the cellular content of labeled phospholipid and triacylglycerol decreased without intracellular accumulation of free fatty acid. Twenty percent of the 14 C-label lost from cellular glycerolipid could not be recovered as a chloroform-extractable product, suggesting that some of the hydrolyzed fatty acid had been oxidized. These data indicate that cultured placenta trophoblast cells can release fatty acids that have either been synthesized de novo or that have been hydrolyzed from cellular glycerolipids. Trophoblast cells in monolayer culture should provide an excellent model for molecular studies of placental fatty acid metabolism and release

  11. [Fatty acids contained in 4 pejibaye palm species, Bactris gasipaes (Palmae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Piedra, M; Blanco-Metzler, A; Mora-Urpí, J

    1995-01-01

    Cooked and uncooked samples from four pejibaye palm races were analyzed to determine the moisture content, ether extract and the content of six fatty acids (C16:0 to C18:3). There was an increase in moisture and a decrease in ether extract (p < 0.05) in the cooked samples in comparison with the uncooked ones. No significant differences were found in fatty acid content between cooked and uncooked samples, but there were differences (p < 0.05) among races concerning the content of four fatty acids. Pejibaye fat is mainly mono-unsaturated (45.6%) and has a low poly-unsaturated to saturated fatty acid ratio (0.5). The fatty acid profile of uncooked pejibaye samples was: oleic acid, 32.6 to 47.8%; palmitic acid, 30.5 to 40.3%; linoleic acid, 11.2 to 21.1%; palmitoleic acid, 5.7 to 7.1%; linoleic acid, 1.5 to 5.5%; and stearic acid, 1.7 to 2.4%.

  12. Effect of fatty acids on the synthesis and secretion of apolipoprotein B by rat hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suresh Kumar, N.; Abraham, Rita; Suresh Kumar, G.; Sudhakaran, P.R.; Kurup, P.A.

    1992-01-01

    The modulation of apolipoprotein B synthesis and secretion by fatty acids in rat hepatocytes was studied. Maximum apolipoprotein B production was obtained in the case of oleic acid followed by linoleic, stearic and palmitic/linolenic acid when compared to control which was not supplemented with any fatty acids. Oleic acid was found to exert a concentration dependent increase in the secretion of [ 3 H] apolipoprotein B into the medium while that associated with the cell layer was not affected. Pulse chase experiments in the presence of oleic acid showed that it caused an increase in the secretion of apolipoprotein B into the medium. 14 C-acetate incorporation into cholesterol and cholesteryl ester associated with the cell layer and secreted very low density lipoproteins also showed an increase in the presence of oleic acid indicating an increase in cholesterogenesis. The effect of oleic acid on [ 3 H] apolipoprotein B and very low density lipoprotein secretion appeared to be mediated through cholesterol as (i)ketoconazole, an inhibitor of cholesterol synthesis caused significant reduction in the stimulatory effect of oleic acid on apolipoprotein secretion and (ii) mevinolin, another inhibitor of cholesterol synthesis also reversed the stimulatory effect of oleic acid on apolipoprotein B secretion. These results indicated that oleic acid may influence apolipoprotein B synthesis and secretion in hepatocytes probably by affecting cholesterol/cholesteryl ester formation which may be a critical component in the secretion of apolipoprotein B as lipoproteins. (author). 21 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Fatty Acid Metabolism in the Digestive Tract of Lactating Cows Fed Tallow in Increasing Amounts at Two Feed Levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weisbjerg, Martin Riis; Børsting, Christian Friis; Hvelplund, Torben

    1992-01-01

    Long-chain fatty acid metabolism in the digestive tract was studied in lactating cows fed at two levels of dry matter intake (L, 8.6 kg DM and H, 12.6 kg DM), with 0, 4 and 6% added tallow at low feed level (L0, L4 and L6), and 0, 2, 4 and 6% fat at high feed level (H0, H2, H4 and H6). Mean fatty...... in the diet. As a mean 68% of the unsaturated C18 fatty acids were hydrogenated in the rumen. Fatty acid and crude fat true digestibilities decreased with increasing fat intakes owing to a decrease in stearic acid (C18:0) digestibility....

  14. Genetic mapping of QTLs controlling fatty acids provided insights into the genetic control of fatty acid synthesis pathway in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li Wang

    Full Text Available Peanut, a high-oil crop with about 50% oil content, is either crushed for oil or used as edible products. Fatty acid composition determines the oil quality which has high relevance to consumer health, flavor, and shelf life of commercial products. In addition to the major fatty acids, oleic acid (C18:1 and linoleic acid (C18:2 accounting for about 80% of peanut oil, the six other fatty acids namely palmitic acid (C16:0, stearic acid (C18:0, arachidic acid (C20:0, gadoleic acid (C20:1, behenic acid (C22:0, and lignoceric acid (C24:0 are accounted for the rest 20%. To determine the genetic basis and to improve further understanding on effect of FAD2 genes on these fatty acids, two recombinant inbred line (RIL populations namely S-population (high oleic line 'SunOleic 97R' × low oleic line 'NC94022' and T-population (normal oleic line 'Tifrunner' × low oleic line 'GT-C20' were developed. Genetic maps with 206 and 378 marker loci for the S- and the T-population, respectively were used for quantitative trait locus (QTL analysis. As a result, a total of 164 main-effect (M-QTLs and 27 epistatic (E-QTLs QTLs associated with the minor fatty acids were identified with 0.16% to 40.56% phenotypic variation explained (PVE. Thirty four major QTLs (>10% of PVE mapped on five linkage groups and 28 clusters containing more than three QTLs were also identified. These results suggest that the major QTLs with large additive effects would play an important role in controlling composition of these minor fatty acids in addition to the oleic and linoleic acids in peanut oil. The interrelationship among these fatty acids should be considered while breeding for improved peanut genotypes with good oil quality and desired fatty acid composition.

  15. Association of SSR markers with contents of fatty acids in olive oil and genetic diversity analysis of an olive core collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipek, M; Ipek, A; Seker, M; Gul, M K

    2015-03-27

    The purpose of this research was to characterize an olive core collection using some agronomic characters and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and to determine SSR markers associated with the content of fatty acids in olive oil. SSR marker analysis demonstrated the presence of a high amount of genetic variation between the olive cultivars analyzed. A UPGMA dendrogram demonstrated that olive cultivars did not cluster on the basis of their geographic origin. Fatty acid components of olive oil in these cultivars were determined. The results also showed that there was a great amount of variation between the olive cultivars in terms of fatty acid composition. For example, oleic acid content ranged from 57.76 to 76.9% with standard deviation of 5.10%. Significant correlations between fatty acids of olive oil were observed. For instance, a very high negative correlation (-0.812) between oleic and linoleic acids was detected. A structured association analysis between the content of fatty acids in olive oil and SSR markers was performed. STRUCTURE analysis assigned olive cultivars to two gene pools (K = 2). Assignment of olive cultivars to these gene pools was not based on geographical origin. Association between fatty acid traits and SSR markers was evaluated using the general linear model of TASSEL. Significant associations were determined between five SSR markers and stearic, oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acids of olive oil. Very high associations (P < 0.001) between ssrOeUA-DCA14 and stearic acid and between GAPU71B and oleic acid indicated that these markers could be used for marker-assisted selection in olive.

  16. Fatty acid composition and quality characteristics of low-fat cooked sausages made with beef and chicken meat, tomato juice and sunflower oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Í; Simşek, O; Işıklı, M

    2002-10-01

    Low-fat (5.9-10.3% fat) cooked sausages were produced with seven different formulations. Sausages produced with total replacement of fat with sunflower oil had significantly lower oleic acid (C18:1) and higher linoleic (C18:2) and behenic (C22:0) fatty acid contents. Their ratio of TUFA/TS was 3.65 compared to 0.95-1.14 for the other sausages. Also these sausages had the lowest moisture content, highest overall palatability and were less firm. Sausages with tomato juice had the lowest pH value, total aerobic count and nitrite content, but were firmer. Sausages produced with reduced beef contents had lower fat contents, lower stearic (C18:0) and higher oleic (C18:1) fatty acid contents than sausages of high beef content, their texture was very soft and had the lowest score for juiciness. Finally the sausages with chicken meat had the lowest fat and highest salt contents, and lower stearic (C18:0) and higher linoleic (C18:3) fatty acid contents than those made with beef . Also their colour was lighter, less red and more yellow and they had the lowest flavor intensity and overall acceptability.

  17. Effect of saturated and unsaturated fatty acid supplementation on bio-plastic production under submerged fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, S K; Tripathi, Abhishek Dutt

    2013-10-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are intracellular reserve material stored by gram-negative bacteria under nutrient-limited condition. PHAs are utilized in biodegradable plastics (bio-plastics) synthesis due to their similarity with conventional synthetic plastic. In the present study, the effect of addition of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids (palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid and linoleic acid) on the production of PHAs by the soil bacterium Alcaligenes sp. NCIM 5085 was studied. Fatty acid supplementation in basal media produced saturated and unsaturated PHAs of medium and short chain length. Gas chromatography analysis of palmitic acid-supplemented media showed the presence of short chain length (scl) PHAs which could potentially serve as precursors for bio-plastic production. The scl PHA was subsequently characterized as PHB by NMR and FTIR. On the other hand, oleic acid and linoleic acid addition showed both saturated and unsaturated PHAs of different chain lengths. Palmitic acid showed maximum PHB content of 70.8 % at concentration of 15 g l -1 under shake flask cultivation. When shake flask cultivation was scaled up in a 7.5-l bioreactor (working volume 3 l), 7.6 g l -1 PHA was produced with a PHB yield (Y P/X ) and productivity of 75.89 % and 0.14 g l -1  h, respectively.

  18. Curcumin improves alcoholic fatty liver by inhibiting fatty acid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chang; Ma, Jingfan; Zhong, Qionghong; Zhao, Mengyuan; Hu, Tianxing; Chen, Tong; Qiu, Longxin; Wen, Longping

    2017-08-01

    Alcoholic fatty liver is a threat to human health. It has been long known that abstinence from alcohol is the most effective therapy, other effective therapies are not available for the treatment in humans. Curcumin has a great potential for anti-oxidation and anti-inflammation, but the effect on metabolic reconstruction remains little known. Here we performed metabolomic analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and explored ethanol pathogenic insight as well as curcumin action pattern. We identified seventy-one metabolites in mouse liver. Carbohydrates and lipids were characteristic categories. Pathway analysis results revealed that ethanol-induced pathways including biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids, fatty acid biosynthesis and pentose and glucuronate interconversions were suppressed by curcumin. Additionally, ethanol enhanced galactose metabolism and pentose phosphate pathway. Glyoxylate and dicarboxylate metabolism and pyruvate metabolism were inhibited in mice fed ethanol diet plus curcumin. Stearic acid, oleic acid and linoleic acid were disease biomarkers and therapical biomarkers. These results reflect the landscape of hepatic metabolism regulation. Our findings illustrate ethanol pathological pathway and metabolic mechanism of curcumin therapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Cholesterol and fatty acids profile of Brazilian commercial chicken giblets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Nádia Rosa; Muniz, Edvani Curti; Matsushita, Makoto; Evelázio de Souza, Nilson

    2002-06-01

    This study was carried out to determine the chemical composition, cholesterol contents and fatty acids profile of Brazilian commercial chicken giblets. The analysis were performed in gizzard, liver and heart in natura and also in cooked gizzard, fried liver and roasted heart. Fat and cholesterol contents ranged from 0.88% and 72.68 mg/100 g, in cooked gizzard, to 22.19% and 213.18 mg/100 g, in roasted heart. As the fat content gets higher, so does the cholesterol content. Palmitic (C16:0) and stearic acids (C18:0) were the predominant saturated fatty acids (SFA). The C16:0 ranged from 6.39% in cooked gizzard to 18.51% in fried liver. The C18:0 level ranged from 6.62% in roasted heart to 19.19% in cooked gizzard. Linoleic acid (C18:2 omega 6) was the predominant polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA). The data revealed that the three different analysed giblets presented a good PUFA/SFA ratio, with values of 1.11, 1.14 and 1.40 for cooked gizzard, fried liver and roasted heart, respectively.

  20. Erythrocyte and platelet fatty acids in retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanzial, A M; Bonomi, L; Cobbe, C; Olivieri, O; Girelli, D; Trevisan, M T; Bassi, A; Ferrari, S; Corrocher, R

    1991-05-01

    The fatty acid composition and the glutathione-peroxidase activity (GSH-Px) of erythrocytes and platelets, the production of malondialdehyde (MDA) by platelets and the activity of the main systems of transmembrane cation transport in erythrocyte have been studied in 12 patients (5 males and 7 females) affected by retinitis pigmentosa (RP). A remarkable increase of saturated fatty acids (SFA), particularly of stearic acid (C18:0), has been noted in these patients. The reduced unsaturated/saturated fatty acids ratio (PUFA/SFA) observed in both erythrocytes and platelets and the decrease of arachidonic acid in platelets may depend by an active peroxidation process as documented by the increase of MDA. Platelet glutathione-peroxidase (PTL-GSH-PX) and plasma retinol were in the normal range, whereas erythrocyte glutathione-peroxidase (E-GSH-PX), MDA and plasma alfa-toco-pherol were increased in patients with RP. The activities of Na(+)-K+ pump, cotransport and Na(+)-Li+ countertransport were normal in RP erythrocytes.

  1. CONTENT OF LONG CHAIN OMEGA-3 FATTY ACID COMPOSITION IN SOME IRANIAN CANNED FISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahar Nazari

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract    BACKGROUND: Ecological studies have found a negative correlation between the risk of developing heart disease and fish consumption because of their long chain omega-3 fatty acids. This study was undertaken to determine the amounts of the common fatty acid content of several commercial canned fish marketing in Iran, with particular attention to long chain omega-3 fatty acids.    METHODS: The most consumed available brands of canned fish were randomly selected seven times from products available in supermarkets. Total lipids were extracted by using the Folch method and prepared for fatty acid analysis. Individual fatty acids were quantified by gas chromatography (GC with 60 meter capillary column and flame ionization detector.    RESULTS: The most common saturated fatty acids (SFA in Iranian canned fish was palmitic acid (C16:0 followed by stearic acid (C18:0. The amount of all trans fatty acids (TFAs except elaidic acid (C18:1 9t was 0%. The highest amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs related to long chain omega-3 fatty acids include eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA. The most abundant monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs were oleic acid (C18:1 9c.     CONCLUSION: This study showed higher contents of EPA and DHA in Iranian commercially available canned fish compared to the canned fish in other countries.      Keywords: Iranian canned fish, fatty acids, long chain omega-3 fatty acids, gas chromatography.  

  2. Human carbonyl reductase 1 participating in intestinal first-pass drug metabolism is inhibited by fatty acids and acyl-CoAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Akira; Endo, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Miura, Takeshi; Nishinaka, Toru; Terada, Tomoyuki

    2017-08-15

    Human carbonyl reductase 1 (CBR1), a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily, reduces a variety of carbonyl compounds including endogenous isatin, prostaglandin E 2 and 4-oxo-2-nonenal. It is also a major non-cytochrome P450 enzyme in the phase I metabolism of carbonyl-containing drugs, and is highly expressed in the intestine. In this study, we found that long-chain fatty acids and their CoA ester derivatives inhibit CBR1. Among saturated fatty acids, myristic, palmitic and stearic acids were inhibitory, and stearic acid was the most potent (IC 50 9µM). Unsaturated fatty acids (oleic, elaidic, γ-linolenic and docosahexaenoic acids) and acyl-CoAs (palmitoyl-, stearoyl- and oleoyl-CoAs) were more potent inhibitors (IC 50 1.0-2.5µM), and showed high inhibitory selectivity to CBR1 over its isozyme CBR3 and other SDR superfamily enzymes (DCXR and DHRS4) with CBR activity. The inhibition by these fatty acids and acyl-CoAs was competitive with respect to the substrate, showing the K i values of 0.49-1.2µM. Site-directed mutagenesis of the substrate-binding residues of CBR1 suggested that the interactions between the fatty acyl chain and the enzyme's Met141 and Trp229 are important for the inhibitory selectivity. We also examined CBR1 inhibition by oleic acid in cellular levels: The fatty acid effectively inhibited CBR1-mediated 4-oxo-2-nonenal metabolism in colon cancer DLD1 cells and increased sensitivity to doxorubicin in the drug-resistant gastric cancer MKN45 cells that highly express CBR1. The results suggest a possible new food-drug interaction through inhibition of CBR1-mediated intestinal first-pass drug metabolism by dietary fatty acids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Experimental determination of the (vapor + liquid) equilibrium data of binary mixtures of fatty acids by differential scanning calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matricarde Falleiro, Rafael M.; Meirelles, Antonio J.A.; Kraehenbuehl, Maria A.

    2010-01-01

    (Vapor + liquid) equilibrium (VLE) data for three binary mixtures of saturated fatty acids were obtained by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). However, changes in the calorimeter pressure cell and the use of hermetic pans with holes (φ = 250 mm) in the lids were necessary to make it possible to apply this analytical technique, obtaining accurate results with smaller samples and shorter operational times. The systems evaluated in this study were: myristic acid (C 14:0 ) + palmitic acid (C 16:0 ), myristic acid (C 14:0 ) + stearic acid (C 18:0 ), and palmitic acid (C 16:0 ) + stearic acid (C 18:0 ), all measured at 50 mm Hg and with mole fractions between 0.0 and 1.0 in relation to the most volatile component of each diagram. The fugacity coefficients for the components in the vapor phase were calculated using the Hayden and O'Connell method [J.G. Hayden, J.P. O'Connell, Ind. Eng. Chem. Process Design Develop. 14 (3) (1975) 209-216] and the activity coefficients for the liquid phase were correlated with the traditional g E models (NRTL [H. Renon, J.M. Prausnitz, Aiche J. 14 (1968) 135-144], UNIQUAC [D.S. Abrams, J.M. Prausnitz, Aiche J. 21 (1975) 116-128], and Wilson [J.M. Prausnitz, N.L. Linchtenthaler, E.G. Azevedo, Molecular Thermodynamics of Fluid-phase Equilibria, River-Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle, 1999]). The sets of parameters were then compared in order to determine which adjustments best represented the VLE.

  4. Effects of furfural and acetic acid on growth and lipid production from glucose and xylose by Rhodotorula glutinis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guochang; French, William Todd; Hernandez, Rafael; Alley, Earl; Paraschivescu, Maria [Dave C. Swalm School of Chemical Engineering, Mississippi State University, P.O. Box 9595, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Microbial conversion of lignocellulosic sugars to triacylglycerols (a biodiesel or renewable diesel feedstock) was investigated using the oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula glutinis (ATCC 15125). In the shake flask experiments, R. glutinis was first grown in a nitrogen-rich medium utilizing an artificial acid hydrolysate of lignocellulosic biomass switchgrass as the sole carbon and energy source. Once the culture had reached the stationary phase, the cells were harvested and transferred to a fresh nitrogen-free media containing artificial acid hydrolysate sugars for lipid accumulation. Analysis of the data collected showed that the yeast were able to grow in the medium containing artificial acid hydrolysate sugars as the carbon and energy source. The net specific Growth rate(s) indicated that the presence of acetic acid and furfural in the artificial acid hydrolysate inhibited the growth of R. glutinis on glucose, but not the growth on xylose. The lipid accumulated in the cells, determined by gravimetrical method, increased from initial 4.3%-39.0% of dry cell mass weight. The major fatty acids of the accumulated lipids were palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and {gamma}-linoleic acid. These results indicate that it is feasible to convert the sugars in acid hydrolysate of lignocellulosic biomass to triacylglycerols using R. glutinis. (author)

  5. Multivariate data analysis for finding the relevant fatty acids contributing to the melting fractions of cream

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buldo, Patrizia; Larsen, Mette Krogh; Wiking, Lars

    2013-01-01

    :0 and palmitoleic acid (C16:1) in milk fat, whereas it decreased the amount of stearic acid (C18:0) and C18:1 trans fatty acid. Average data on the melting behaviour of cream separated the farms into two groups where the main differences in feeding were the amounts of maize silage and rapeseed cake used. CONCLUSION......BACKGROUND: The melting behaviour and fatty acid composition of cream from a total of 33 cows from four farms were analysed. Multivariate data analysis was used to identify the fatty acids that contributed most to the melting points and to differentiate between creams from different practical...... feeding regimes. RESULTS: It was demonstrated that the melting point of the medium melting fraction of milk fat was positively correlated with palmitic acid (C16:0), whereas it was negatively correlated with oleic acid (C18:1 cis9), conjugated linoleic acid (CLA cis9 trans11), vaccenic acid (C18:1 trans11...

  6. Extraction and the Fatty Acid Profile of Rosa acicularis Seed Oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Huanan; Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Ruchun; Zhang, Lu; Yu, Dianyu; Jiang, Lianzhou

    2017-12-01

    Rosa acicularis seed oil was extracted from Rosa acicularis seeds by the ultrasonic-assisted aqueous enzymatic method using cellulase and protease. Based on a single experiment, Plackett-Burman design was applied to ultrasonic-assisted aqueous enzymatic extraction of wild rose seed oil. The effects of enzyme amount, hydrolysis temperature and initial pH on total extraction rate of wild rose seed oil was studied by using Box-Behnken optimize methodology. Chemical characteristics of a sample of Rosa acicularis seeds and Rosa acicularis seed oil were characterized in this work. The tocopherol content was 200.6±0.3 mg/100 g oil. The Rosa acicularis seed oil was rich in linoleic acid (56.5%) and oleic acid (34.2%). The saturated fatty acids included palmitic acid (4%) and stearic acid (2.9%). The major fatty acids in the sn-2 position of triacylglycerol in Rosa acicularis oil were linoleic acid (60.6%), oleic acid (33.6%) and linolenic acid (3.2%). According to the 1,3-random-2-random hypothesis, the dominant triacylglycerols were LLL (18%), LLnL (1%), LLP (2%), LOL (10%), LLSt (1.2%), PLP (0.2%), LLnP (0.1%), LLnO (0.6%) and LOP (1.1%). This work could be useful for developing applications for Rosa acicularis seed oil.

  7. Perfluorodecanoic acid enhances the formation of oleic acid in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, A; Kawashima, Y

    1997-01-01

    The feeding of perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA) to male rats at a dietary concentration of 0.005% (w/w) for 7 days resulted in a marked increase in the activity of microsomal stearoyl-CoA desaturation in the liver. This increase in the overall desaturation activity was due to the induction of terminal desaturase among the components comprising the desaturation system. In contrast, PFDA inhibited desaturation in vitro, seemingly due to interference with electron transport through the desaturation system. Accordingly, PFDA can be an inducer and also an inhibitor of delta9-desaturation. PFDA feeding enhanced the conversion of radioactive stearic acid into oleic acid in the liver in vivo, indicating that the induction of delta9-desaturase by PFDA functions in vivo. PFDA feeding increased the mass of octadecenoic acid (C18:1) in the liver and the proportion of C18:1 in microsomal lipid. A highly significant linear correlation existed between the microsomal desaturase activity and the proportion of C18:1 in microsomal lipid when compared using rats in five different physiological states: control, PFDA-fed, p-chlorophenoxyisobutyric acid (clofibric acid)-fed, starved and starved/refed. These results suggest that the increase in the hepatic level of C18:1 caused by feeding of PFDA to rats can be explained by the common concept of regulation, i.e. the hepatic level of C18:1 is under the control of delta9-desaturase. The dietary administration of PFDA also increased the content of cytochrome P-450 and the activity of 7-ethoxycoumarin O-de-ethylase in the liver. PMID:9230124

  8. Impact of methods used to express levels of circulating fatty acids on the degree and direction of associations with blood lipids in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeant, Susan; Ruczinski, Ingo; Ivester, Priscilla; Lee, Tammy C; Morgan, Timothy M; Nicklas, Barbara J; Mathias, Rasika A; Chilton, Floyd H

    2016-01-28

    Numerous studies have examined relationships between disease biomarkers (such as blood lipids) and levels of circulating or cellular fatty acids. In such association studies, fatty acids have typically been expressed as the percentage of a particular fatty acid relative to the total fatty acids in a sample. Using two human cohorts, this study examined relationships between blood lipids (TAG, and LDL, HDL or total cholesterol) and circulating fatty acids expressed either as a percentage of total or as concentration in serum. The direction of the correlation between stearic acid, linoleic acid, dihomo-γ-linolenic acid, arachidonic acid and DHA and circulating TAG reversed when fatty acids were expressed as concentrations v. a percentage of total. Similar reversals were observed for these fatty acids when examining their associations with the ratio of total cholesterol:HDL-cholesterol. This reversal pattern was replicated in serum samples from both human cohorts. The correlations between blood lipids and fatty acids expressed as a percentage of total could be mathematically modelled from the concentration data. These data reveal that the different methods of expressing fatty acids lead to dissimilar correlations between blood lipids and certain fatty acids. This study raises important questions about how such reversals in association patterns impact the interpretation of numerous association studies evaluating fatty acids and their relationships with disease biomarkers or risk.

  9. Fatty acid effects on fibroblast cholesterol synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shireman, R.B.; Muth, J.; Lopez, C.

    1987-01-01

    Two cell lines of normal (CRL 1475, GM5565) and of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) (CM 486,488) fibroblasts were preincubated with medium containing the growth factor ITS, 2.5 mg/ml fatty acid-free BSA, or 35.2 μmol/ml of these fatty acids complexed with 2.5 mg BSA/ml: stearic (18:0), caprylic (8:0), oleic (18:1;9), linoleic (18:2;9,12), linolenic (18:3;9,12,15), docosahexaenoic (22:6;4,7,10,13,16,19)(DHA) or eicosapentaenoic (20:5;5,8,11,14,17)(EPA). After 20 h, cells were incubated for 2 h with 0.2 μCi [ 14 C]acetate/ml. Cells were hydrolyzed; an aliquot was quantitated for radioactivity and protein. After saponification and extraction with hexane, radioactivity in the aqueous and organic phases was determined. The FH cells always incorporated 30-90% more acetate/mg protein than normal cells but the pattern of the fatty acid effects was similar in both types. When the values were normalized to 1 for the BSA-only group, cells with ITS had the greatest [ 14 C]acetate incorporation (1.45) followed by the caprylic group (1.14). Cells incubated with 18:3, 20:6 or 22:6 incorporated about the same amount as BSA-only. Those preincubated with 18:2, 18:1, 18:0 showed the least acetate incorporation (0.87, 0.59 and 0.52, respectively). The percentage of total 14 C counts which extracted into hexane was much greater in FH cells; however, these values varied with the fatty acid, e.g., 1.31(18:0) and 0.84(8:0) relative to 1

  10. Fatty Acid Composition of Hibiscus trionum L. (Malvaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceyda Sibel Kılıç

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The genus Hibiscus plants have different uses, some are used as foods (H. esculenta L., and some species as remedy in traditional medicine (H. sabdariffa L. as well as a colorant for herbal teas. The only species that grows naturally in Turkey is H. trionum L. The plant especially infests soy and corn fields, and therefore it is considered to be a noxious weed. The plant is also found to be a host for Potato Virus Y (PVY and Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus (TSWV. Infestation of the crop fields by this plant shows that it germinates easily. Since it produces many seeds, distribution of the plant is also quiet easy. Though, seed oil yield is low (4.7% since linoleic acid composition of the seed oil is quiet high (67,5%, it can still be used as a source of unsaturated fatty acids. The other major fatty acids are palmitic, oleic and stearic acids in the studied seed oil .

  11. Aspartic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... we eat. Aspartic acid is also called asparaginic acid. Aspartic acid helps every cell in the body work. It ... release Normal nervous system function Plant sources of aspartic acid include: avocado, asparagus, and molasses. Animal sources of ...

  12. Thermal properties and thermal reliability of eutectic mixtures of some fatty acids as latent heat storage materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sari, Ahmet; Sari, Hayati; Oenal, Adem

    2004-01-01

    The present study deals with two subjects. The first one is to determine the thermal properties of lauric acid (LA)-stearic acid (SA), myristic acid (MA)-palmitic acid (PA) and palmitic acid (PA)-stearic acid (SA) eutectic mixtures as latent heat storage material. The properties were measured by the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis technique. The second one is to study the thermal reliability of these materials in view of the change in their melting temperatures and latent heats of fusion with respect to repeated thermal cycles. For this aim, the eutectic mixtures were subjected to 360 repeated melt/freeze cycles, and their thermal properties were measured after 0, 90,180 and 360 thermal cycles by the technique of DSC analysis. The DSC thermal analysis results show that the binary systems of LA-SA in the ratio of 75.5:24.5 wt.%, MA-PA in the ratio of 58:42 wt.% and PA-SA in the ratio of 64.2:35.8 wt.% form eutectic mixtures with melting temperatures of 37.0, 42.60 and 52.30 deg. C and with latent heats of fusion of 182.7, 169.7 and 181.7 J g -1 , respectively. These thermal properties make them possible for heat storage in passive solar heating applications with respect to climate conditions. The accelerated thermal cycle tests indicate that the changes in the melting temperatures and latent heats of fusion of the studied eutectic mixtures are not regular with increasing number of thermal cycles. However, these materials, latent heat energy storage materials, have good thermal reliability in terms of the change in their thermal properties with respect to thermal cycling for about a one year utility period

  13. Preparation of Salicylic Acid Loaded Nanostructured Lipid Carriers Using Box-Behnken Design: Optimization, Characterization and Physicochemical Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantub, Ketrawee; Wongtrakul, Paveena; Janwitayanuchit, Wicharn

    2017-01-01

    Nanostructured lipid carriers loaded salicylic acid (NLCs-SA) were developed and optimized by using the design of experiment (DOE). Box-Behnken experimental design of 3-factor, 3-level was applied for optimization of nanostructured lipid carriers prepared by emulsification method. The independent variables were total lipid concentration (X 1 ), stearic acid to Lexol ® GT-865 ratio (X 2 ) and Tween ® 80 concentration (X 3 ) while the particle size was a dependent variable (Y). Box-Behnken design could create 15 runs by setting response optimizer as minimum particle size. The optimized formulation consists of 10% of total lipid, a mixture of stearic acid and capric/caprylic triglyceride at a 4:1 ratio, and 25% of Tween ® 80 which the formulation was applied in order to prepare in both loaded and unloaded salicylic acid. After preparation for 24 hours, the particle size of loaded and unloaded salicylic acid was 189.62±1.82 nm and 369.00±3.37 nm, respectively. Response surface analysis revealed that the amount of total lipid is a main factor which could affect the particle size of lipid carriers. In addition, the stability studies showed a significant change in particle size by time. Compared to unloaded nanoparticles, the addition of salicylic acid into the particles resulted in physically stable dispersion. After 30 days, sedimentation of unloaded lipid carriers was clearly observed. Absolute values of zeta potential of both systems were in the range of 3 to 18 mV since non-ionic surfactant, Tween ® 80, providing steric barrier was used. Differential thermograms indicated a shift of endothermic peak from 55°C for α-crystal form in freshly prepared samples to 60°C for β´-crystal form in storage samples. It was found that the presence of capric/caprylic triglyceride oil could enhance encapsulation efficiency up to 80% and facilitate stability of the particles.

  14. Effect of Processing on Physiochemical Properties and Fatty Acid Composition of Fluted Pumpkin (Telfairia occidentails) Seed Oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alademeyin, J. O.; Arawande, J. O.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the physicochemical properties and fatty acid composition of the seed oil extracted from fluted pumpkin (Telfairia occidentalis). The extracted oil was degummed, neutralised and bleached. The oil yield was 42.26±0.20%. The specific gravity (at 25 degree C) of the oil was 0.923±0.003 and the refractive index (at 25 degree C) was 1.475±0.002. Processing of the crude oil resulted in progressive decrease in turbidity, colour, free fatty acid, acid value, peroxide value and saponification value. However, there was increase in smoke point (243.00±0.03 to 253.00±0.03 degree C), flash point (285.00±1.20 to 304.0 1.10 degree C) and fire point (345.001.10 to 358.0 1.55 degree C) as well as iodine value (113.00 to 121.50 g/100 g) and fatty acid composition during the processing of the oil. The fatty acids detected in the oil samples were myristic, palmitic, stearic, oleic, arachidic, behenic, linoleic and linolenic acids. The predominant fatty acid was oleic acid (47.40-47.90%) followed by linoleic acid (26.36-30.44%) while the least fatty acid was linolenic acid (0.01-0.05%). (author)

  15. Correlation of secretory phospholipase-A2 activity and fatty acids in cerebrospinal fluid with liver enzymes tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh Ghodoosifar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim was to determine whether secretory phospholipase-A2 (sPLA2 activity and fatty acids in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF are correlated with liver enzymes tests. Methods: CSF and serum samples were collected from 49 patients (age 18-65 as part of routine diagnostic testing. Along with serum liver enzymes aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT and alkaline phosphatase (ALP, the fatty acid composition of CSF was measured by gas liquid chromatography. CSF enzyme activities of sPLA2 were measured using the standard assay with diheptanoyl thio-phosphatidylcholin as substrate. Results: The saturated fatty acids (SFAs including palmitic acid and stearic acid were positively, and the unsaturated fatty acids including oleic acid and linoleic acid were negatively correlated with liver enzymes tests. In regression analysis with adjustment for body mass index (BMI, the elevated liver enzymes tests were positively associated with activity of sPLA2 (β > 0.31, P 0.38, P < 0.010 and negatively with total monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs (β < -0.40, P < 0.001 contents of CSF. Conclusion: CSF activity of sPLA2 and fatty acids may be linked to peripheral markers of liver function, suggesting an indirect impact of central fatty acids on hepatocytes function and metabolism.

  16. Capsaicinoids, amino acid and fatty acid profiles in different fruit components of the world hottest Naga king chilli (Capsicum chinense Jacq).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthan, R; Subhash, K; Longvah, T

    2018-01-01

    The world hottest Naga king chilli is cultivated and consumed in Northeast India. Capsaicinoids, amino acids and fatty acids were studied in fruit and fruit components of Naga king chilli. Capsaicinoid content was increased in each ripening stage and maximum level was observed at red color fruits. Total protein and fat content of placenta was 19.41 and 20.36% respectively. Capsaicinoids of placenta (7.35±2.241%) was higher followed by seed (3.83±1.358%) and pericarp (2.91±0.667%). Similarly, essential amino acid content was also higher in placenta compared to other components. Amino acid score ranged from 37 to 38 with cystine and methionine as limiting amino acid. Low level of palmitic, stearic and α-linolenic acid and very high level of linoleic acid were found in seeds. Total polyunsaturates of seeds were higher followed by whole fruit. Naga king chilli is unique due to its high capsaicinoid content and it offers potential crop for the future exploitation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Proximate analysis and fatty acid composition of nigella sativa (kalonji) seed oil growing in pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleema, R.; Sultana, R.; Begum, A.

    2007-01-01

    Physical and chemical characteristics including fatty acid composition of samples of seven commercially available Nigella sativa oil-and three freshly extracted seed oil, collected from different localities, were determined by gas liquid chromatography. The average and standard deviations found were: refractive index at 20 degree C, 1.473 +- 0.0018; specific gravity at 20 degree C, 0.9166 +- 0.0002; iodine value (IV, WiJ's), 119.98 +- 1.8; saponification value, 201.80 +-2.2 and unsaponifiable matter, 0.61% +- 0.05. Fatty acid (FA) profile was based on high levels of unsaturated FA like oleic acid, 24.17% +- 0.61; linoleic acid, 53.64% +-0.799 and eicosadienoic acid, 2.3%+-0.37. Saturated FA such as palmitic acid and stearic acid amounted to 14.82%+-0.49 and 2.95% +- 0.37, respectively. Myristic and palmitoleic acids were also detected in minor quantity. (author)

  18. Brain and liver fatty acid composition changes upon consumption of Lactobacillus rhamnosus LA68.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovic, Nevena; Minic, Rajna; Djuricic, Ivana; Dimitrijevic, Ljiljana; Sobajic, Sladjana; Zivkovic, Irena; Djordjevic, Brizita

    2015-02-01

    Recent reports suggest that the metabolic activity of the enteric microbiota may influence the fatty acid composition of the host tissue. There are many studies dealing with the influence of lactobacilli on various pathological conditions, and some of the effects are strain-specific. This study was designed to test the effects of a particular Lactobacillus strain, Lactobacillus rhamnosus LA68 on fatty acid composition of the liver and the brain of C57BL/6 mice in the absence of an underlying pathological condition. Female mice were supplemented with live L. rhamnosus LA68 bacteria for the duration of 1 month. Serum biochemistry was analyzed and liver and brain fatty acid composition was assessed by gas-liquid chromatography. Significant changes in liver and brain fatty acid composition were detected. In the liver tissue we detected an increase in palmitoleic acid (p = 0.038), while in the brain compartment we found an increase in palmitic (p = 0.042), stearic (p = 0.017), arachidonic acid (p = 0.009) and docosahexaenoic acid (p = 0.004) for control versus experimental group. These results show discrete changes caused by LA68 strain consumption. Even short duration of administration of LA68 influences the fatty acid composition of the host which adds to the existing knowledge about Lactobacillus host interaction, and adds to the growing knowledge of metabolic intervention possibilities.

  19. Kelussia odoratissima Mozaff. as a rich source of essential fatty acids and phthalides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasemi Mehdi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present study is the first assessment of the fatty acids of leaf and essential oil compositions of new three habitats of aerial parts of K. odoratissima. Methods: The aerial parts of K. odoratissima from the three habitats were dried. The essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation for 3 h in a Clevenger-type apparatus, then the analysis of the components was carried out using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. To study the oil yield and fatty acids, the dried leaves subjected to extraction in hexane by using Soxhlet Apparatus. To analyze fatty acids from the oil fractions by gas chromatography technique, the oil was subjected to transesterification to obtain the fatty acid methyl esters, which, were dissolved in hexane and subjected to GC analysis. Results: According to the results, a total of 43 components, the major constitutes of essential oil compositions were (Z-Ligustilide (76.45%, Unknown-A (4.47%, (E-Ligustilide (2.57%, (Z-Butylidene phthalide (2.37%, 5-pentyl cyclohexa-1,3-diene (1.57% and Kessane (0.77% in K. odoratissima. The sixteen fatty acids were separated from the oil (5% yield per 100 g dry matter. Linoleic acid (25.46%, α-Linolenic acid (16.66%, Palmitic acid (11.92%, Oleic acid (9.33%, Stearic acid (4.72%, Petroselinic acid (2.53%, Arachidonic acid (2.51% and Erucic acid (1.76% were major fatty acids. Conclusion: Generally, K. odoratissima is a rich source of essential fatty acids and phthalide derivatives, specially (Z-ligustilide. This study was presented valuable information about the phytochemical properties, which can be useful for the future researches on the pharmacological effects of K. odoratissima.

  20. Proximate and fatty acid composition of some commercially important fish species from the Sinop region of the Black Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocatepe, Demet; Turan, Hülya

    2012-06-01

    The proximate and fatty acid compositions of the commercially important fish species (Engraulis encrasicolus, Alosa alosa, Belone belone, Scorpaena porcus, Pomatomus saltatrix, Mullus barbatus) from the Sinop region of the Black Sea were examined. The fat contents ranged from 1.26% (for scorpion fish) to 18.12% (for shad). The protein contents were min 14.54% (for red mullet) and maximum 20.26% (for belone). The fatty acid compositions of the fish ranged from 27.83 to 35.91% for saturated fatty acids, 19.50-33.80% for monounsaturated fatty acids and 15.25-40.02% for polyunsaturated fatty acids. Among the saturated fatty acids, palmitic acid (16:0) (17.75-22.20%) was the dominant fatty acid for all the fish species. As a second saturated fatty acid, myristic acid (14:0) was observed in four of the fish species and its content ranged from 4.72 to 7.31%. Whereas, for the other two fish species, the second saturated fatty acid was stearic acid (18:0) ranging between 4.54 and 10.64%. Among the monounsaturated fatty acids, those occurring in the highest proportions were oleic acid (18:1n-9c) (11.67-22.45%) and palmitoleic acid (16:1) (4.50-9.40%). Docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3) (5.41-28.52%), eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3) (4.68-11.06) and linoleic acid (18:2n-6) (1.38-3.49%) were dominant polyunsaturated fatty acids, respectively. All the species, in particular the belone, the anchovy and the shad had high levels of the n-3 series.

  1. A Δ-9 Fatty Acid Desaturase Gene in the Microalga Myrmecia incisa Reisigl: Cloning and Functional Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Bin Xue

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The green alga Myrmecia incisa is one of the richest natural sources of arachidonic acid (ArA. To better understand the regulation of ArA biosynthesis in M. incisa, a novel gene putatively encoding the Δ9 fatty acid desaturase (FAD was cloned and characterized for the first time. Rapid-amplification of cDNA ends (RACE was employed to yield a full length cDNA designated as MiΔ9FAD, which is 2442 bp long in sequence. Comparing cDNA open reading frame (ORF sequence to genomic sequence indicated that there are 8 introns interrupting the coding region. The deduced MiΔ9FAD protein is composed of 432 amino acids. It is soluble and localized in the chloroplast, as evidenced by the absence of transmembrane domains as well as the presence of a 61-amino acid chloroplast transit peptide. Multiple sequence alignment of amino acids revealed two conserved histidine-rich motifs, typical for Δ9 acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP desaturases. To determine the function of MiΔ9FAD, the gene was heterologously expressed in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strain with impaired desaturase activity. Results of GC-MS analysis indicated that MiΔ9FAD was able to restore the synthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids, generating palmitoleic acid and oleic acid through the addition of a double bond in the Δ9 position of palmitic acid and stearic acid, respectively.

  2. Screening of the entire USDA castor germplasm collection for oil content and fatty acid composition for optimum biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming Li; Morris, J Bradley; Tonnis, Brandon; Pinnow, David; Davis, Jerry; Raymer, Paul; Pederson, Gary A

    2011-09-14

    Castor has tremendous potential as a feedstock for biodiesel production. The oil content and fatty acid composition in castor seed are important factors determining the price for production and affecting the key fuel properties of biodiesel. There are 1033 available castor accessions collected or donated from 48 countries worldwide in the USDA germplasm collection. The entire castor collection was screened for oil content and fatty acid composition by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and gas chromatography (GC), respectively. Castor seeds on the average contain 48.2% oil with significant variability ranging from 37.2 to 60.6%. Methyl esters were prepared from castor seed by alkaline transmethylation. GC analysis of methyl esters confirmed that castor oil was composed primarily of eight fatty acids: 1.48% palmitic (C16:0), 1.58% stearic (C18:0), 4.41% oleic (C18:1), 6.42% linoleic (C18:2), 0.68% linolenic (C18:3), 0.45% gadoleic (C20:1), 84.51% ricinoleic (C18:1-1OH), and 0.47% dihydroxystearic (C18:0-2OH) acids. Significant variability in fatty acid composition was detected among castor accessions. Ricinoleic acid (RA) was positively correlated with dihydroxystearic acid (DHSA) but highly negatively correlated with the five other fatty acids except linolenic acid. The results for oil content and fatty acid composition obtained from this study will be useful for end-users to explore castor germplasm for biodiesel production.

  3. Increased production of free fatty acids in Aspergillus oryzae by disruption of a predicted acyl-CoA synthetase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamano, Koichi; Bruno, Kenneth S; Koike, Hideaki; Ishii, Tomoko; Miura, Ai; Umemura, Myco; Culley, David E; Baker, Scott E; Machida, Masayuki

    2015-04-01

    Fatty acids are attractive molecules as source materials for the production of biodiesel fuel. Previously, we attained a 2.4-fold increase in fatty acid production by increasing the expression of fatty acid synthesis-related genes in Aspergillus oryzae. In this study, we achieved an additional increase in the production of fatty acids by disrupting a predicted acyl-CoA synthetase gene in A. oryzae. The A. oryzae genome is predicted to encode six acyl-CoA synthetase genes and disruption of AO090011000642, one of the six genes, resulted in a 9.2-fold higher accumulation (corresponding to an increased production of 0.23 mmol/g dry cell weight) of intracellular fatty acid in comparison to the wild-type strain. Furthermore, by introducing a niaD marker from Aspergillus nidulans to the disruptant, as well as changing the concentration of nitrogen in the culture medium from 10 to 350 mM, fatty acid productivity reached 0.54 mmol/g dry cell weight. Analysis of the relative composition of the major intracellular free fatty acids caused by disruption of AO090011000642 in comparison to the wild-type strain showed an increase in stearic acid (7 to 26 %), decrease in linoleic acid (50 to 27 %), and no significant changes in palmitic or oleic acid (each around 20-25 %).

  4. Abnormal fatty acid pattern in the superior temporal gyrus distinguishes bipolar disorder from major depression and schizophrenia and resembles multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Robert K; Rider, Therese; Jandacek, Ronald; Tso, Patrick

    2014-03-30

    This study investigated the fatty acid composition of the postmortem superior temporal gyrus (STG), a cortical region implicated in emotional processing, from normal controls (n=15) and patients with bipolar disorder (BD, n=15), major depressive disorder (MDD, n=15), and schizophrenia (SZ, n=15). For comparative purposes, STG fatty acid composition was determined in a separate cohort of multiple sclerosis patients (MS, n=15) and normal controls (n=15). Compared with controls, patients with BD, but not MDD or SZ, exhibited abnormal elevations in the saturated fatty acids (SFA) palmitic acid (16:0), stearic acid (18:0), the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) linoleic acid (18:2n-6), arachidonic acid (20:4n-6), and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3), and reductions in the monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) oleic acid (18:1n-9). The total MUFA/SFA and 18:1/18:0 ratios were lower in the STG of BD patients and were inversely correlated with total PUFA composition. MS patients exhibited a pattern of fatty acid abnormalities similar to that observed in BD patients including elevated PUFA and a lower 18:1/18:0 ratio. Collectively, these data demonstrate that BD patients exhibit a pattern of fatty acid abnormalities in the STG that is not observed in MDD and SZ patients and closely resembles MS patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Variation in oil content and fatty acid composition of sesame accessions from different origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Kurt

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Oil content and fatty acid composition are very important parameters for the human consumption of oilseed crops. Twenty-four sesame accessions including seven collected from various geographical regions of Turkey and 11 from different countries were investigated under field conditions for two consecutive years (2015 and 2016. The sesame accessions varied widely in their oil content and fatty acid compositions. The oil content varied between 44.6 and 53.1% with an average value of 48.15%. The content of oleic acids, linoleic acid, linolenic acid, palmitic acid,and stearic acid varied between 36.13–43.63%, 39.13–46.38%, 0.28–0.4%, 8.19–10.26%, and 4.63–6.35%, respectively. When total oil content and fatty acid composition were compared, Turkish sesame showed wide variation in oil and fatty acid compositions compared to those from other countries. However, the accessions from other countries were fewer compared to those from Turkey. It is essential to compare oil and fatty acid composition using a large number of germ plasm from different origins. In sesame oil, the average contents of oleic acid and linoleic acid were 39.02% and 43.64%, respectively, and their combined average content was 82.66%, representing the major fatty acid components in the oil from the sesame accessions used in the present study. The results obtained in this study provide useful information for the identification of better parents with high linoleic and oleic acid contents for developing elite sesame varieties with traits which are beneficial to consumer health.

  6. Biochemical precursor effects on the fatty acid production in cell suspension cultures of Theobroma cacao L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, O; Gallego, A M; Urrea, A; Rojas, L F; Correa, C; Atehortúa, L

    2017-02-01

    Cocoa butter (CB) is composed of 96% palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic and linolenic fatty acids that are responsible for the hardness, texture and fusion properties of chocolate. Through in vitro plant cell culture it is possible to modify CB lipid profiles and to study the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway on a subcellular level, evaluating fundamental aspects to enhance in vitro fatty acid production in a specific and controlled way. In this research, culture media was supplemented with acetate, biotin, pyruvate, bicarbonate and glycerol at three different concentrations and the effects on the biomass production (g/L), cell viability, and fatty acids profile and production was evaluated in in vitro cell suspensions culture. It was found that biotin stimulated fatty acid synthesis without altering cell viability and cell growth. It was also evident a change in the lipid profile of cell suspensions, increasing middle and long chain fatty acids proportion, which are unusual to those reported in seeds; thus implying that it is possible to modify lipid profiles according to the treatment used. According to the results of sucrose gradients and enzyme assays performed, it is proposed that cacao cells probably use the pentose phosphate pathway, mitochondria being the key organelle in the carbon flux for the synthesis of reductant power and fatty acid precursors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Chemical characteristics and fatty acid profile of butterfly tree seed oil (Bauhinia purpurea L)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soetjipto, H.; Riyanto, C. A.; Victoria, T.

    2018-04-01

    Butterfly tree (Kachnar) in Indonesia is only used as ornamental plants in garden, park, and roadsides. The seed of Butterfly tree was extracted with n-hexane and physicochemical properties were determined based on Standard Nasional Indonesia (SNI) 01-3555-1998 while the oil chemical composition was determined using GC-MS. The result showed that yield of the oil as 57.33±1.14 % (w/w) and the chemical characteristic of seed oil include acid value (13.7.8±0.23 mg KOH/g) saponification value (153.32±1.85 mg KOH/g), peroxide value (43.51±0.57. mg KOH/g). The butterfly tree seed oil showed that linoleic acid (28.11 %), palmitic acid (29.2%), oleic acid (19.82%) and stearic acid (10.7.4 %) were the main fatty acids in the crude seed oils. Minor amounts of neophytadiena and arachidic acid were also identified.

  8. Impregnation of 12-tungstophosphoric acid on silica - part I: determination of impregnation parameters, characterization and evaluation of catalytic activity; Impregnacao do acido 12-fosfotungstico em silica - parte I: determinacao de parametros de impregnacao, caracterizacao e avaliacao da atividade catalitica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scroccaro, Karine Isabel; Tanobe, Valcineide Oliveira de Andrade; Cocco, Lilian Cristina; Yamamoto, Carlos Itsuo, E-mail: karineisabel@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Centro Politecnico. Dept. de Engenharia Quimica; Wypych, Fernando [Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Centro Politecnico. Dept. de Quimica

    2012-07-01

    Catalyst based on Kegging-type heteropolyacids (H{sub 3}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} - HPA), supported on SiO{sub 2} (H{sub 3}PW), were prepared by the impregnation method under different thermal treatment conditions. The materials were characterized by different instrumental techniques and used as catalysts in the methyl esterification reactions of stearic acid. Using the catalyst with 15% of HPA, conversions higher than 60% were obtained after 2 h of reaction at 65 deg C. Recovery studies using hot-filtration with ethanol at 75 deg C showed satisfactory activity for two additional reaction cycles. (author)

  9. Postruminal Delivery System for Amino Acids and Proteins in Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Sýkora

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this experiment was to develop an effective postruminal transport system (PTS with a high content of suitable vegetable proteins and amino acids. PTS serves for nutrient delivery to the abomasum and small intestine of dairy cows in order to increase the milk yield. Direct addition of proteins and amino acids to the diet is not useful as the ruminal microbes will utilize active substances before they reach absorption sites in the small intestine. PTS has several advantages, e.g. a possibility of the direct application in a food, low cost, and nutritional and therapeutical improvement. PTS consists of a core (pellets, small tablets and a coating, which protects the core against the environment of rumen and enables to release the core content in the environment of abomasum and small intestine. Lenticular tablets - cores of PTS were prepared by wet granulation method and compression. Qualitative indicators of tablets (average weight, weight uniformity, hardness, friability, disintegration time were determined according to valid Czech and European Pharmacopoeias. Cores were subsequently coated with several types of coating - ethylcellulose, stearic acid and pH sensitive polymer poly-(2-vinylpyridine-co-styren, alone or in combination of various rates. Nine samples of coated protein tablets exhibiting appropriate characteristics in vitro were prepared. The presence of the pH sensitive polymer at least in 10% concentration of the coating and the coating amount of 9.0 to 12.6% per tablet were necessary to ensure the requested PTS properties.

  10. Oils of insects and larvae consumed in Africa: potential sources of polyunsaturated fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Womeni Hilaire Macaire

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to present the beneficial aspects of some insects consumed in sub-Saharan Africa, based on examples of insects consumed in Cameroon, to present their potential as sources of lipids and essential fatty acids. In Africa, termites, larvae of raphia weevil, caterpillars, crickets, bees, maggots, butterflies, weevil, etc. are significant sources of food. These insects belong mainly to the orders of : Isoptera, Orthoptera, Dictyoptera, Coleoptera, Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera and Diptera. Depending on the species, insects are rich in proteins, minerals (K, Ca, Mg, Zn, P, Fe and/or vitamins (thiamine/B1, riboflavine/B2, pyridoxine/B6, acid pantothenic, niacin. The composition of oils extracted from the following six insects consumed in Cameroon was investigated : larvaes of raphia weevil (Rhynchophorus phoenicis, crickets (Homorocoryphus nitidulus, grasshopper (Zonocerus variegates, termites (Macrotermes sp., a variety of caterpillars (Imbrasia sp. and an unidentified caterpillar from the forest (UI carterpillar. The extraction yields of oil were 53.75%, 67.25%, 9.12%, 49.35%, 24.44% and 20.17% respectively for raphia weevil larvae, crickets, devastating crickets, termites, Imbrasia and UI caterpillar. The oil from raphia weevil mainly contains 37.60% of palmitoleic acid and 45.46% of linoleic acid. The oil from crickets is principally made up of palmitoleic acid (27.59%, linoleic acid (45.63% and α-linolenic acid (16.19%. The oil from grasshoppers is composed of palmitoleic acid (23.83%, oleic acid (10.71%, linoleic acid (21.07%, α-linolenic acid (14.76% and γ-linolenic acid (22.54%. The main components of termite oil are : palmitic acid (30.47%, oleic acid (47.52% and linoleic acid (8.79%. Palmitic acid (36.08% and linolenic acid (38.01% are the two dominant fatty acids of Imbrasia oil. As Imbrasia oil, UI caterpillar oil is composed of palmitic acid (30.80% and linolenic acid (41.79%. Stearic acid (7.04%, oleic acid

  11. Radiometric studies on the oxidation of (I-14C) fatty acids by drug-susceptible and drug-resistant mycobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, E.E.; Kopajtic, T.M.; Hopkins, G.K.; Cannon, N.P.; Wagner Junior, H.N.

    1987-01-01

    A radiometric assay system has been used to study oxidation patterns of (l - 14 C) fatty acids by drug-susceptible and drug-resistant organisms of the genus Mycobacterium (M. tuberculosis - H 37 Rv and Erdman, M. bovis, M. avium, M. intracellulare, M.Kansasii and M. chelonei). The organisms were inoculated in sterile reaction vials containing liquid 7H9 medium, 10% ADC enrichment and 1.0 uli of one of the (l- 14 C) fatty acids (butyric, hexanoic, octanoic, decanoic, lauric, myristic, palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic, linolenic). Vials were incubated at 37 0 C and the 14 CO 2 envolved was measured daily for 3 days with a Bactec R-301 instrument. (M.A.C.) [pt

  12. Fatty acid analysis of Iranian junk food, dairy, and bakery products: Special attention to trans-fats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahar Nazari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low attention to dairy product consumptions and high intake of junk foods and bakery products might be related to high prevalence of chronic diseases because of their fat content and fatty acid composition. Objective: In this study we investigated the kind and amount of fatty acid content in Iranian junk foods, dairy, and bakery products Materials and Methods: Some common brands of Iranian′s junk foods, dairy, and bakery products were chosen randomly from different supermarkets in Iran. The amount of 10 g sample was considered for fatty acid analysis by gas chromatography equipment with flam ionization detector. Results: In this study stearic acid (C18:0 and palmitic (C16:0 acid have the highest amount among other saturated fatty acids in all groups. In junk foods and bakery products, the most common trans-fatty acid (TFA is elaidic acid (C18:1 9t with ranging from 2.4% to 18.5% and in dairy products vaccinic acid (C18:1 11t has the high level of TFAs among others (2.1% to 11.5%. Conclusion: The amount of TFAs in Iranian junk foods and bakery products was in a high level.

  13. Effect of Nitrogen and biological Fertilizers on Seed Yield and Fatty acid Composition of Sesame cultivars under Yazd conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Shakeri

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of different levels of nitrogen fertilizer and biofertilizers Azotobacter sp. and Azosprillum sp. on seed yield, oil yield and its percent and fatty acid composition in three sesame (Sesamum indicum L. cultivars an experiment was conducted using splite plot factorial arrangement based on randomized complete block design with three replications at Agricultural and Natural Resources Reasearch Center of Yazd in 2009 cropping season. The treatments included : cultivars ( Darab-14, Jiroft and Yazdi assigned to main plots, nitrogen fertilizer (0, 25 and 50 kg ha-1 and biofertilizer (inoculation and no-inoculation as factorial were randomized in sub-plots. Oil percent was measured using the Soxhlet method and fatty acid composition was measured using GC method. Results showed the significant differenc among three varieties concerning seed yield, oil yield and four fatty acids (oleic, linoleic, palmetic and stearis acid. Seed yield, oil yield, Oleic, Linolenic and Arasshidic acid significantly increased with applying N fertilizer. Seed yield, oil yield and linolenic acid percent significantly increased with applying biofertilizer. Oleic acid percent had negative and significant correlation with Linoleic acid (r = -0.759** and stearic acid (r=-0.774** percent. Generally, results showed the importance of applying biofertilizers against chemical fertilizers to protect the environment from harmful chemical pollution.

  14. Fatty acid analysis of Iranian junk food, dairy, and bakery products: Special attention to trans-fats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, Bahar; Asgary, Sedigheh; Azadbakht, Leila

    2012-10-01

    Low attention to dairy product consumptions and high intake of junk foods and bakery products might be related to high prevalence of chronic diseases because of their fat content and fatty acid composition. In this study we investigated the kind and amount of fatty acid content in Iranian junk foods, dairy, and bakery products. Some common brands of Iranian's junk foods, dairy, and bakery products were chosen randomly from different supermarkets in Iran. The amount of 10 g sample was considered for fatty acid analysis by gas chromatography equipment with flam ionization detector. In this study stearic acid (C18:0) and palmitic (C16:0) acid have the highest amount among other saturated fatty acids in all groups. In junk foods and bakery products, the most common trans-fatty acid (TFA) is elaidic acid (C18:1 9t) with ranging from 2.4% to 18.5% and in dairy products vaccinic acid (C18:1 11t) has the high level of TFAs among others (2.1% to 11.5%). The amount of TFAs in Iranian junk foods and bakery products was in a high level.

  15. ESTERIFICATION OF FATTY ACID FROM PALM OIL WASTE (SLUDGE OIL BY USING ALUM CATALYST

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    Thamrin Usman

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Esterification of fatty acids from palm oil waste (sludge oil as biodiesel liquid base has been done by using alum [Al2(SO43.14H2O] catalyst. Some reaction variables like reaction time, catalyst quantity, and molar ratio of sample-reactant was applied for optimal reaction. Yield of 94.66% was obtained at reaction condition 65 °C, 5 h, sample-reactant ratio 1:20, and catalyst quantity 3% (w/w. GC-MS analysis request showed that composition of methyl esters biodiesel are methyl caproic (0.67%, methyl lauric (0.21%, methyl miristic (1.96%, methyl palmitic (49.52%, methyl oleic (41.51%, and methyl stearic (6.13%. Physical properties of synthesized product (viscosity, refraction index and density are similar with those of commercial product.   Keywords: alum, biodiesel, esterification, sludge oil

  16. Oil and fatty acid composition of peanut cultivars grown in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, F.; Ahmed, M.

    2012-01-01

    Quality and flavor of edible peanuts and its products are affected by fatty acid composition of oil. The information related to chemical composition of Peanut grown in the country are scarce, therefore, the present investigation was designed to determine the oil and fatty acid composition of some commonly grown peanut cultivars in Pakistan. Seven Peanut cultivars were grown during 2008 in randomized complete block design replicated thrice. The tested cultivars differed significantly for oil content which ranged from 49.83 to 53.06% on dry weight basis, thus showing differences of 7% among cultivars. The saturated fatty acids (Palmetic and Stearic acid) in different cultivars ranged between 9.95 to 10.79% and 1.63 to 2.19%, respectively. Differences among cultivars for oleic acid exhibited significance which ranged between 49.34 to 54.83%. Similarly, cultivars differed statistically for linoleic ac id which showed a range of 28.99 to 34.23%, thus depicted difference of 7%. Significant differences among tested cultivars may be attributed to the place of origin of particular cultivar. An inverse relationship was exhibited between oleic and linoleic acid, similar to other edible oils. (author)

  17. Co-expression analysis identifies CRC and AP1 the regulator of Arabidopsis fatty acid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xinxin; Yin, Linlin; Xue, Hongwei

    2012-07-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) play crucial rules in signal transduction and plant development, however, the regulation of FA metabolism is still poorly understood. To study the relevant regulatory network, fifty-eight FA biosynthesis genes including de novo synthases, desaturases and elongases were selected as "guide genes" to construct the co-expression network. Calculation of the correlation between all Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) genes with each guide gene by Arabidopsis co-expression dating mining tools (ACT) identifies 797 candidate FA-correlated genes. Gene ontology (GO) analysis of these co-expressed genes showed they are tightly correlated to photosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolism, and function in many processes. Interestingly, 63 transcription factors (TFs) were identified as candidate FA biosynthesis regulators and 8 TF families are enriched. Two TF genes, CRC and AP1, both correlating with 8 FA guide genes, were further characterized. Analyses of the ap1 and crc mutant showed the altered total FA composition of mature seeds. The contents of palmitoleic acid, stearic acid, arachidic acid and eicosadienoic acid are decreased, whereas that of oleic acid is increased in ap1 and crc seeds, which is consistent with the qRT-PCR analysis revealing the suppressed expression of the corresponding guide genes. In addition, yeast one-hybrid analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) revealed that CRC can bind to the promoter regions of KCS7 and KCS15, indicating that CRC may directly regulate FA biosynthesis. © 2012 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  18. Direct injection analysis of fatty and resin acids in papermaking process waters by HPLC/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valto, Piia; Knuutinen, Juha; Alén, Raimo

    2011-04-01

    A novel HPLC-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/MS (HPLC-APCI/MS) method was developed for the rapid analysis of selected fatty and resin acids typically present in papermaking process waters. A mixture of palmitic, stearic, oleic, linolenic, and dehydroabietic acids was separated by a commercial HPLC column (a modified stationary C(18) phase) using gradient elution with methanol/0.15% formic acid (pH 2.5) as a mobile phase. The internal standard (myristic acid) method was used to calculate the correlation coefficients and in the quantitation of the results. In the thorough quality parameters measurement, a mixture of these model acids in aqueous media as well as in six different paper machine process waters was quantitatively determined. The measured quality parameters, such as selectivity, linearity, precision, and accuracy, clearly indicated that, compared with traditional gas chromatographic techniques, the simple method developed provided a faster chromatographic analysis with almost real-time monitoring of these acids. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Nutritional value and fatty acid composition of some traditional Argentinean meat sausages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Cristina Romero

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the nutritional composition (moisture, protein, carbohydrates, and total fat of some meat products produced in the northeastern Argentina, analyzing fatty acids composition, polyunsaturated/saturated fatty acid ratio PUFA/SFA ratio (polyunsaturated/ saturated fatty acids, n-6/n-3 ratio, and CLA (conjugated linoleic acid content. Thirty traditional meat products produced by different processes were used. The samples were classified into 4 different categories as follows: salamín (dry cured and fermented sausage, chorizos (raw sausage, chorizo ahumado (cooked and smoked sausage, and morcilla (cooked sausage. From the results obtained it can be said that the total carbohydrate contents of the salamín studied were slightly lower; fat content of raw chorizo was significantly lower, and protein content of chorizo ahumado was significantly higher than those comparison from databases from other regions of Argentina, USA, and Spain. Except for chorizo, which has a value lower than 0.4, the PUFA/SFA-stearic ratio of the other products were a little higher than those reported by other researchers. CLA (Conjugated linoleic acid contents between 0.03% and 0.19% were detected. The results obtained indicate that salamín produced in northeastern Argentina, Chaco state, shows high protein and PUFA (Polyunsaturated fatty acids contents, and low atherogenic and thrombogenic indexes, which makes it a more healthful product than those of similar composition produced in other countries.

  20. Higher acclimation temperature modulates the composition of muscle fatty acid of Tor putitora juveniles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Akhtar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A 30-day acclimation trial was conducted using golden mahseer, Tor putitora juveniles to study its muscle fatty acid composition at five acclimation temperatures (AT. Ninety juveniles of T. putitora were distributed among five treatment groups (20, 23, 26, 29 and 32±0.5 °C. At the end of 30 days trial, highest percentage of monounsaturated fatty acids was found at 20 °C and lowest at 26 °C. The highest percentage of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA was found at 23 °C and a decreasing trend was observed with increase in AT. However, highest percentage of n-3 PUFA was found at 32 °C and lowest at 29 °C. The maximum n-6 to n-3 ratio was observed at 23 °C and ratio decreased to a minimum at 32 °C. The results revealed that T. putitora juveniles could adapt to higher acclimation temperatures by altering its muscle fatty acid composition mainly by increasing its total saturated fatty acids especially stearic acid.

  1. Acid Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricker, Owen P.; Rice, Karen C.

    1995-01-01

    Although acid rain is fading as a political issue in the United States and funds for research in this area have largely disappeared, the acidity of rain in the Eastern United States has not changed significantly over the last decade, and it continues to be a serious environmental problem. Acid deposition (commonly called acid rain) is a term applied to all forms of atmospheric deposition of acidic substances - rain, snow, fog, acidic dry particulates, aerosols, and acid-forming gases. Water in the atmosphere reacts with certain atmospheric gases to become acidic. For example, water reacts with carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to produce a solution with a pH of about 5.6. Gases that produce acids in the presence of water in the atmosphere include carbon dioxide (which converts to carbonic acid), oxides of sulfur and nitrogen (which convert to sulfuric and nitric acids}, and hydrogen chloride (which converts to hydrochloric acid). These acid-producing gases are released to the atmosphere through natural processes, such as volcanic emissions, lightning, forest fires, and decay of organic matter. Accordingly, precipitation is slightly acidic, with a pH of 5.0 to 5.7 even in undeveloped areas. In industrialized areas, most of the acid-producing gases are released to the atmosphere from burning fossil fuels. Major emitters of acid-producing gases include power plants, industrial operations, and motor vehicles. Acid-producing gases can be transported through the atmosphere for hundreds of miles before being converted to acids and deposited as acid rain. Because acids tend to build up in the atmosphere between storms, the most acidic rain falls at the beginning of a storm, and as the rain continues, the acids "wash out" of the atmosphere.

  2. Preparation of five 3-MCPD fatty acid esters, and the effects of their chemical structures on acute oral toxicity in Swiss mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Man; Liu, Jie; Wu, Yizhen; Gao, Boyan; Wu, Pingping; Shi, Haiming; Sun, Xiangjun; Huang, Haiqiu; Wang, Thomas Ty; Yu, Liangli Lucy

    2017-02-01

    3-monochloro-1, 2-propanediol fatty acid esters (3-MCPDEs) comprise a group of food toxicants formed during food processing. 3-MCPDEs have received increasing attention concerning their potential negative effects on human health. However, reports on the toxicity of 3-MCPD esters are still limited. To determine the effects of fatty acid substitutions on the toxicity of their esters, 1-stearic, 1-oleic, 1-linoleic, 1-linoleic-2-palmitic and 1-palmitic-2-linoleic acid esters of 3-MCPD were synthesized and evaluated with respect to their acute oral toxicities in Swiss mice. 3-MCPDEs were obtained through the reaction of 3-MCPD and fatty acid chlorides, and their purities and structures were characterized by ultraperformance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight-mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS), infrared, 1 H and 13 C spectroscopic analyses. Medial lethal doses of 1-stearic, 1-oleic, 1-linoleic, 1-linoleic-2-palmitic and 1-palmitic-2-linoleic acid esters were 2973.8, 2081.4, 2016.3, 5000 and > 5000 mg kg -1 body weight. For the first time, 3-MCPDEs were observed for their toxic effects in the thymus and lung. In addition, major histopathological changes, as well as blood urea nitrogen and creatinine, were examined for mice fed the five 3-MCPDEs. The results from the present study suggest that the degree of unsaturation, chain length, number of substitution and relative substitution locations of fatty acids might alter the toxicity of 3-MCPDEs. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Fatty acid solubilizer from the oral disk of the blowfly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Ishida

    Full Text Available Blowflies are economic pests of the wool industry and potential vectors for epidemics. The establishment of a pesticide-free, environmentally friendly blowfly control strategy is necessary. Blowflies must feed on meat in order to initiate the cascade of events that are involved in reproduction including juvenile hormone synthesis, vitellogenesis, and mating. During feeding blowflies regurgitate salivary lipase, which may play a role in releasing fatty acids from triglycerides that are found in food. However, long-chain fatty acids show low solubility in aqueous solutions. In order to solubilize and ingest the released hydrophobic fatty acids, the blowflies must use a solubilizer.We applied native PAGE, Edman degradation, cDNA cloning, and RT-PCR to characterize a protein that accumulated in the oral disk of the black blowfly, Phormia regina. In situ hybridization was carried out to localize the expression at the cellular level. A fluorescence competitive binding assay was used to identify potential ligands of this protein.A protein newly identified from P. regina (PregOBP56a belonged to the classic odorant-binding protein (OBP family. This gene was expressed in a cluster of cells that was localized between pseudotracheae on the oral disk, which are not accessory cells of the taste peg chemosensory sensilla that normally synthesize OBPs. At pH 7 and pH 6, PregOBP56a bound palmitic, stearic, oleic, and linoleic acids, that are mainly found in chicken meat. The binding affinity of PregOBP56a decreased at pH 5. We propose that PregOBP56a is a protein that solubilizes fatty acids during feeding and subsequently helps to deliver the fatty acids to the midgut where it may help in the process of reproduction. As such, PregOBP56a is a potential molecular target for controlling the blowfly.

  4. Influence of goats feeding on the fatty acids content in milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Željka Klir

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have demonstrated the possibility of modeling the content of fatty acids of milk fat, in order to increase the contents of desirable n-3 unsaturated fatty acids and decrease saturated fatty acid with adequate nutrition of goats. Previous studies showed that the milk of goats on pasture increased content of caproic (C6:0, caprylic (C8:0, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA, rumenic acid, cis-9, trans-11 C18:2, linolenic (C18:3, eicosapentaenoic (C20:5 and docosahexaenoic (C22:6 and total content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA. In the same group of goats lower content of palmitoleic (C16:1, linoleic (C18:2 and total n-6 unsaturated fatty acids was found, as well as lower n-6/n-3 ratio compared with group of goats kept indoors and fed with alfalfa hay. In milk of goats fed with diets supplemented with safflower oil, content of CLA significantly increased, while goats fed with diets supplement with linseed oil had significantly higher content of C18:3 in milk, compared with group of goats fed without addition of these oils. Goats fed with addition of protected fish oil had significant transfer of eicosapentaenoic-EPA and docosahexaenoic-DHA fatty acids in milk. Protected fish oil reduced the negative impact of long chain fatty acids on the activity of ruminal microorganisms, consumption and digestibility of fiber, as well as inhibition of synthesis of fatty acids in milk gland. When adding unprotected fish oil, increase of stearic (C18:0 and oleic (C18:1 fatty acids occurred, because of the biohydrogenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids in rumen.

  5. Validation of a One-Step Method for Extracting Fatty Acids from Salmon, Chicken and Beef Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhichao; Richardson, Christine E; Hennebelle, Marie; Taha, Ameer Y

    2017-10-01

    Fatty acid extraction methods are time-consuming and expensive because they involve multiple steps and copious amounts of extraction solvents. In an effort to streamline the fatty acid extraction process, this study compared the standard Folch lipid extraction method to a one-step method involving a column that selectively elutes the lipid phase. The methods were tested on raw beef, salmon, and chicken. Compared to the standard Folch method, the one-step extraction process generally yielded statistically insignificant differences in chicken and salmon fatty acid concentrations, percent composition and weight percent. Initial testing showed that beef stearic, oleic and total fatty acid concentrations were significantly lower by 9-11% with the one-step method as compared to the Folch method, but retesting on a different batch of samples showed a significant 4-8% increase in several omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid concentrations with the one-step method relative to the Folch. Overall, the findings reflect the utility of a one-step extraction method for routine and rapid monitoring of fatty acids in chicken and salmon. Inconsistencies in beef concentrations, although minor (within 11%), may be due to matrix effects. A one-step fatty acid extraction method has broad applications for rapidly and routinely monitoring fatty acids in the food supply and formulating controlled dietary interventions. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  6. Role of Changes in Cell Fatty Acids Composition in the Increasing of Frost Resistance of Winter Wheat Suspension Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Lyubushkina

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Influences of low temperatures (4 and 8 ° С on the frost tolerance and fatty acid compositions of cells in a winter wheat suspension culture have been studied. It has been found that treatment of the culture with 4 °C (7 days did not protect cells from subsequent freezing temperature action (-8 °С, 6 h and was not accompanied significant changes in the fatty acid composition. On the contrary, the treatment of the culture with the temperature 8 °C (7 days prevented the death caused by freezing temperature and the content of saturated fatty acids decreased: pentadecanoic acid (by 35,0%, palmitic acid (by 19,9% and stearic acid (by 65,4%, and the content of α-linolenic acid increased by 94%. That was the cause of the double bond index (DBI increase by 16%. The role of fatty acids composition changes in the process of increasing frost tolerance in plants are discussed.

  7. Clustering effects on postprandial insulin secretion and sensitivity in response to meals with different fatty acid compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, Beatriz; Ortega-Gomez, Almudena; Varela, Lourdes M; Villar, Jose; Abia, Rocio; Muriana, Francisco J G; Lopez, Sergio

    2014-07-25

    Dietary fatty acids play a role in glucose homeostasis. The aim of this study was to assess the individual relationship between dietary saturated (SFA), monounsaturated (MUFA) and polyunsaturated (PUFA) fatty acids with postprandial β-cell function and insulin sensitivity in subjects with normal and high fasting triglycerides. We assessed postprandial β-cell function (by the insulinogenic index and the ratio of the insulin to glucose areas under the time-concentration curve) and insulin sensitivity (by the oral glucose and the minimal model insulin sensitivity indices) over four nonconsecutive, randomly assigned, high-fat meals containing a panel of SFA (palmitic and stearic acids), MUFA (palmitoleic and oleic acids) and PUFA (linoleic and α-linolenic acids) in 14 subjects with normal and in 14 subjects with high fasting triglycerides. The proportions of each fatty acid in the meals and the values for surrogate measures of postprandial β-cell function and insulin sensitivity were subjected to a Pearson correlation and hierarchical cluster analysis, which revealed two classes of dietary fatty acids for regulating postprandial glucose homeostasis. We successfully discriminated the adverse effects of SFA palmitic acid from the beneficial effects of MUFA oleic acid on postprandial β-cell function (r ≥ 0.84 for SFA palmitic acid and r ≥ -0.71 for MUFA oleic acid; P < 0.05) and insulin sensitivity (r ≥ -0.92 for SFA palmitic acid and r ≥ 0.89 for MUFA oleic acid; P < 0.001) both in subjects with normal and high fasting triglycerides. In conclusion, dietary MUFA oleic acid, in contrast to SFA palmitic acid, favours the tuning towards better postprandial glycaemic control in subjects with normal and high fasting triglycerides.

  8. Assessment of oil content and fatty acid composition variability in two economically important Hibiscus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming Li; Morris, Brad; Tonnis, Brandon; Davis, Jerry; Pederson, Gary A

    2012-07-04

    The Hibiscus genus encompasses more than 300 species, but kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) and roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) are the two most economically important species within the genus. Seeds from these two Hibiscus species contain a relatively high amount of oil with two unusual fatty acids: dihydrosterculic and vernolic acids. The fatty acid composition in the oil can directly affect oil quality and its utilization. However, the variability in oil content and fatty acid composition for these two species is unclear. For these two species, 329 available accessions were acquired from the USDA germplasm collection. Their oil content and fatty acid composition were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and gas chromatography (GC), respectively. Using NMR and GC analyses, we found that Hibiscus seeds on average contained 18% oil and seed oil was composed of six major fatty acids (each >1%) and seven minor fatty acids (each Hibiscus cannabinus seeds contained significantly higher amounts of oil (18.14%), palmitic (20.75%), oleic (28.91%), vernolic acids (VA, 4.16%), and significantly lower amounts of stearic (3.96%), linoleic (39.49%), and dihydrosterculic acids (DHSA, 1.08%) than H. sabdariffa seeds (17.35%, 18.52%, 25.16%, 3.52%, 4.31%, 44.72%, and 1.57%, respectively). For edible oils, a higher oleic/linoleic (O/L) ratio and lower level of DHSA are preferred, and for industrial oils a high level of VA is preferred. Our results indicate that seeds from H. cannabinus may be of higher quality than H. sabdariffa seeds for these reasons. Significant variability in oil content and major fatty acids was also detected within both species. The variability in oil content and fatty acid composition revealed from this study will be useful for exploring seed utilization and developing new cultivars in these Hibiscus species.

  9. Prospects of fatty acid profile and bioactive composition from lipid seeds for the discrimination of apple varieties with the application of chemometrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arain, S.; Sherazzi, S. T. H.; Bhanger, M. I.; Memon, N.; Mahesar, S. A.; Rajput, M. T.

    2012-11-01

    The extracted oils from four apple seed varieties (Royal Gala, Red Delicious, Pyrus Malus and Golden Delicious) from Pakistan were investigated for their fatty acid profiles and lipid biactives by GC-MS. The oil contents in the seeds of the apple varieties ranged from 26.8-28.7%. The results revealed that linoleic acid (40.5-49.6%) was the main fatty acid in the Royal Gala, Red Delicious and Pyrus Malus seeds, and oleic acid (38.7-45.5%) was the main fatty acid in the Golden Delicious seeds. Palmitic acid (6.1-7.4%) and stearic acid (2.0-3.1%) were the dominant saturated fatty acids, besides the small amount of palmitoleic, heptadecanoic, linolenic, archidic, eicosanoic, and behenic acids. Sterols, tocopherols, hydrocarbons and some other minor components were also identified from the unsaponifiable lipid fraction. The variation among the results of both fatty acids and lipid bio actives for the four different varieties was assessed by principal component analysis, discriminant analysis and cluster analyses. The results conclude that both oil fractions could be applied as a useful tool to discriminate among the apple seed varieties. (Author) 42 refs.

  10. Study on the change of total fat content and fatty acid composition of the ethanol extract from cooking drips of thunnus thynnus by ionizing irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hee Sub; Choi, Jong Il; Kim, Hyun Joo; Kim, Jin Kyu; Byun, Myung Woo; Lee, Ju Woon [Team for Radiation Food Science and Biotechnology, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Cheon Woo; Kim, Ju Bong [Dongwon Research and Development Center, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Young Jung [Division of Food Science, Jinju International University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Young Jin [Dept. of Food and Nutrition, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    This study was conducted to examine the effect of a gamma irradiation (GM) and an electron-beam irradiation (EB) on the total fat content and fatty acid composition of ethanol extract from cooking drips of Thunnus thynnus (ECT). The total fat content of samples were determined by fat extraction (Folch method) and fatty acid composition was by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) after fat extraction. The results showed that total fat contents were not changed by GM and EB up to the dose of 50 kGy. The content of unsaturated fatty acids (USFA) such as vaccenic acid and DHA, was decreased by irradiation. But, the content of palmitoleic acid was not changed by GM. In contrast, the content of saturated fatty acids(SFA) such as myristic acid and palmitic acid, was increased by the irradiation. But, the content of stearic acid was decreased with the increase of irradiation dose. Also, it has been shown that the GM had further affected the change of fatty acid content than EB.

  11. Study on the change of total fat content and fatty acid composition of the ethanol extract from cooking drips of thunnus thynnus by ionizing irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hee Sub; Choi, Jong Il; Kim, Hyun Joo; Kim, Jin Kyu; Byun, Myung Woo; Lee, Ju Woon; Yoo, Cheon Woo; Kim, Ju Bong; Hwang, Young Jung; Chung, Young Jin

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effect of a gamma irradiation (GM) and an electron-beam irradiation (EB) on the total fat content and fatty acid composition of ethanol extract from cooking drips of Thunnus thynnus (ECT). The total fat content of samples were determined by fat extraction (Folch method) and fatty acid composition was by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) after fat extraction. The results showed that total fat contents were not changed by GM and EB up to the dose of 50 kGy. The content of unsaturated fatty acids (USFA) such as vaccenic acid and DHA, was decreased by irradiation. But, the content of palmitoleic acid was not changed by GM. In contrast, the content of saturated fatty acids(SFA) such as myristic acid and palmitic acid, was increased by the irradiation. But, the content of stearic acid was decreased with the increase of irradiation dose. Also, it has been shown that the GM had further affected the change of fatty acid content than EB

  12. Fatty acids in six small pelagic fish species and their crustacean prey from the mindanao sea, southern Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metillo, Ephrime Bicoy; Aspiras-Eya, Anna Arlene

    2014-08-01

    Fatty acids are important in human health and useful in the analysis of the marine food web, however information on tropical pelagic organisms is scarce. Six zooplanktivorous small pelagic fish species (Decapterus kurroides, Decapterus macarellus, Selar crumenophthalmus, Sardinella lemuru, Spratilloides gracilis and Stolephorus insularis) and four of their zooplanktonic crustacean prey [three sergestoid species (Acetes erythraeus, Acetes intermedius and Lucifer penicillifer) and one calanoid copepod (Acartia erythraea)] were collected from the Mindanao Sea, and their fatty acids were profiled. The resulting profiles revealed 17 fatty acids that were specific to certain species and 9 {myristic acid [C14:0], palmitic acid [C16:0], stearic acid [C18:0]; palmitoleic acid [C16:1], oleic acid [C18:1n9c], linoleic acid [C18:2n6c], linolenic acid [C18:3n3], eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) [C20:5n3] and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) [C22:6n3]} that were common to all species. Cluster analysis and non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) of fatty acids indicate a high similarity in profiles in all species, but separate fish and zooplankton clusters were obtained. Mackerel species (D. macarellus, D. kurroides and S. crumenophthalmus) had concentrations of total n-3 fatty acids that match those of their Acetes prey. The copepod A. erythraea and the sergestoid L. penicillifer exhibited the lowest values of the EPA:DHA ratio, which was most likely due to their phytoplanktivorous feeding habits, but the occurrence of the highest values of the ratio in Acetes suggests the inclusion of plant detritus in their diet. DHA values appear to affirm the trophic link among copepod, Lucifer, Acetes and mackerel species.

  13. Effect of cassava wastewater on physicochemical characteristics and fatty acids composition of meat from feedlot-finished lambs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Adelson Santana Neto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effects of includingcassava wastewater (0.0, 0.5, 1.0, or 1.5 L animal-1 day-1 in diets of feedlot-finished lambs on the physicochemical characteristics and fatty acid composition of their meat. Thirty-two uncastrated lambs atan average age of 167 days and an average body weight of 24.76 ± 3.00 kg were distributed into four groups in a completely randomized design with eight animals per group for each treatment. Inclusion of cassava wastewater linearly reduced cooking losses, shear force, and yellow intensity and linearly increased the fat content of the meat. The amounts of myristic, stearic, linoleic, and total fatty acids were changed. Additionally, an effect of cassava wastewater was observed on the amounts of saturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, desirable fatty acids, and n-6:n-3ratio. A positive quadratic effect was observed for the following nutritional quality indices: Δ9 desaturase 16, elongase, at herogenicity, and thrombogenicity. Cassava wastewater changesthe physicochemical characteristics and fatty acid composition of lamb meat. Furtherstudies should be carried outto more accurately determine the fatty acid composition of cassava wastewater to better understand its effectson animal nutrition.

  14. Distribution of fatty acids from dietary oils into phospholipid classes of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abia, Rocio; Pacheco, Yolanda M; Montero, Emilio; Ruiz-Gutierrez, Valentina; Muriana, Francisco J G

    2003-02-21

    Several studies have suggested that lipoprotein metabolism can be affected by lipoprotein phospholipid composition. We investigated the effect of virgin olive oil (VOO) and high-oleic sunflower oil (HOSO) intake on the distribution of fatty acids in triacylglycerols (TG), cholesteryl esters (CE) and phospholipid (PL) classes of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins (TRL) from normolipidemic males throughout a 7 h postprandial metabolism. Particularly, changes in oleic acid (18:1n-9) concentration of PL were used as a marker of in vivo hydrolysis of TRL external monolayer. Both oils equally promoted the incorporation of oleic acid into the TG and CE of postprandial TRL. However, PL was enriched in oleic acid (18:1n-9) and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) after VOO meal, whereas in stearic (18:0) and linoleic (18:2n-6) acids after HOSO meal. We also found that VOO produced TRL which PL 18:1n-9 content was dramatically reduced along the postprandial period. We conclude that the fatty acid composition of PL can be a crucial determinant for the clearance of TRL during the postprandial metabolism of fats.

  15. [Peculiarities of the phospholipid and fatty acid composition of erythrocyte plasma membranes of the Black Sea fish].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silkin, Iu A; Silkina, E N; Zabelinskiĭ, S A

    2012-01-01

    The phospholipid and the fatty acid composition of the main phospholipids families of erythrocyte plasma membranes was studied in two species of cartilaginous fish: the common thrasher (Raja clavata L.) and the common stingray (Dasyatis pastinaca) and three bony fish species: the scorpion fish (Scorpaena porcus L.), the smarida (Spicara flexuosa Raf.), and the horse mackerel (Trachurus mediterraneus ponticus Aleev). It was shown that in the studied fish, 70.0-80.0 % of all membrane phospholipids were composed of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. Phosphatidylserine, monophosphoinositide, and sphingomyelin were minor components whose content in the erythrocyte membrane fluctuated from 3.0 % to 13.0 %. The fatty acid phospholipids composition was represented by a large specter of acids. From saturated acids, basic for plasma membranes are palmitic (C16: 0) and stearic (C18: 0) acids. From unsaturated acids, the larger part belong to mono-, tetra-, penta-, and hexaenoic acids in fish phospholipids. The calculation of the double bond index and of the unsaturation coefficient showed difference in the deformation ability of erythrocyte membranes of the studied fish.

  16. Eutectic mixtures of some fatty acids for latent heat storage: Thermal properties and thermal reliability with respect to thermal cycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sari, Ahmet

    2006-01-01

    Accelerated thermal cycle tests have been conducted to study the change in melting temperatures and latent heats of fusion of the eutectic mixtures of lauric acid (LA)-myristic acid (MA), lauric acid (LA)-palmitic acid (PA) and myristic acid (MA)-stearic acid (SA) as latent heat storage materials. The thermal properties of these materials were determined by the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis method. The thermal reliability of the eutectic mixtures after melt/freeze cycles of 720, 1080 and 1460 was also evaluated using the DSC curves. The accelerated thermal cycle tests indicate that the melting temperatures usually tend to decrease, and the variations in the latent heats of fusion are irregular with increasing number of thermal cycles. Moreover, the probable reasons for the change in thermal properties of the eutectic mixtures after repeated thermal cycles were investigated. Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic analysis indicates that the accelerated melt/freeze processes do not cause any degradation in the chemical structure of the mixtures. The change in thermal properties of the eutectic mixtures with increasing number of thermal cycles is only because of the presence of certain amounts of impurities in the fatty acids used in their preparation. It is concluded that the tested eutectic mixtures have reasonable thermal properties and thermal reliability as phase change materials (PCMs) for latent heat storage in any solar heating applications that include a four year utilization period

  17. Assesment of spineless safflower (Carthamus tinctorius, L.) mutant lines for seed oil content and fatty acid profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragab, A.I.; Kassem, M.; Moustafa, H.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the new spineless mutants that previously induced through gamma radiation and hybridization techniques in the advanced generation for seed oil content and fatty acid profiles The obtained results cleared that oil percentages of all seven safflower mutants were increased than local variety Giza (1) and the new mutant hybrid 2 line (white petals) had the highest increase value of oil percentage (10%) but the mutant line M14 (dark red petals) had the lowest increase value of oil percentage (3.1 %) The mutant line M7 (yellow petals) had the highest value of total saturated fatty acid (40.38%), because it had the highest value of palmitic fatty acid (25.16%), comparing to 10.01% value for local variety Giza (1), followed by mutant line hybrid 2 (white petals) which had (39.88%) because it had the highest value of caprylic, capric, lauric, myristic and stearic fatty acids. All safflower mutant lines had higher value of oleic fatty acid than that of the local variety Giza (1) the two new safflower mutant lines M7 (yellow petals) and hybrid 2 (white petal) had the highest value of oleic fatty acid 41.22% and 39.88% respectively in comparison with 13.5% for local variety Giza (1), the obtained results are indicating to seed oil content negative correlation between oleic and linoleic acids

  18. Amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002222.htm Amino acids To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . ...

  19. Valproic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... acid is in a class of medications called anticonvulsants. It works by increasing the amount of a ... older (about 1 in 500 people) who took anticonvulsants such as valproic acid to treat various conditions ...

  20. Ascorbic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascorbic acid is used to prevent and treat scurvy, a disease caused by a lack of vitamin C in ... Ascorbic acid comes in extended-release (long-acting) capsules and tablets, lozenges, syrup, chewable tablets, and liquid drops to ...

  1. Aminocaproic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminocaproic acid is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This type ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid is also used to control bleeding in the ...

  2. Ethacrynic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethacrynic acid, a 'water pill,' is used to treat swelling and fluid retention caused by various medical problems. It ... Ethacrynic acid comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken once or twice a day ...

  3. Participation of GABAA Chloride Channels in the Anxiolytic-Like Effects of a Fatty Acid Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Francisco Rodríguez-Landa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human amniotic fluid and a mixture of eight fatty acids (FAT-M identified in this maternal fluid (C12:0, lauric acid, 0.9 μg%; C14:0, myristic acid, 6.9 μg%; C16:0, palmitic acid, 35.3 μg%; C16:1, palmitoleic acid, 16.4 μg%; C18:0, stearic acid, 8.5 μg%; C18:1cis, oleic acid, 18.4 μg%; C18:1trans, elaidic acid, 3.5 μg%; C18:2, linoleic acid, 10.1 μg% produce anxiolytic-like effects that are comparable to diazepam in Wistar rats, suggesting the involvement of γ-aminobutyric acid-A (GABAA receptors, a possibility not yet explored. Wistar rats were subjected to the defensive burying test, elevated plus maze, and open field test. In different groups, three GABAA receptor antagonists were administered 30 min before FAT-M administration, including the competitive GABA binding antagonist bicuculline (1 mg/kg, GABAA benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil (5 mg/kg, and noncompetitive GABAA chloride channel antagonist picrotoxin (1 mg/kg. The FAT-M exerted anxiolytic-like effects in the defensive burying test and elevated plus maze, without affecting locomotor activity in the open field test. The GABAA antagonists alone did not produce significant changes in the behavioral tests. Picrotoxin but not bicuculline or flumazenil blocked the anxiolytic-like effect of the FAT-M. Based on the specific blocking action of picrotoxin on the effects of the FAT-M, we conclude that the FAT-M exerted its anxiolytic-like effects through GABAA receptor chloride channels.

  4. [Modification of the pattern of fatty acids of erythrocytes’ membranes due to the acetone intoxication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momot, T V; Kushnerova, N F; Rakhmanin, Yu A

    Results of the study of the impact of acetone intoxication on the fatty acids pattern of the general lipids of erythrocytes’ membranes in rats are presented. The inhalation exposure of acetone was carried out in the inoculation chamber with the volume of 100 liters. The chamber was designed for the type of B.A. Kurlyandsky with self-contained system of purification and air regeneration and specified parameters of temperature (20-22С) and air humidity. The flow rate of the air and aerosolized acetone passed through the chamber accounted of 10 liters/min. Concentration of acetone in the chamber was sustained at the level of 206 ± 3,9 mg/m that corresponds to maximum permissible concentration for acetone vapor in the air of a working area. The time of exposure was 6 hours per day for 3 weeks in a monotonous mode, excluding weekend, and was based upon specific parameters of environment simulation in industry. The acetone impact was shown to be accompanied by the gain in the quantity of all kinds of saturated fatty acids and the fall of unsaturated fatty acids in general lipids of erythrocytes ’ membranes in rats and in the structure ofphospholipid fractions. In the content of phosphatydilcholine and phosphatydilethanolamine, as a basic structural phospholipids of biological membranes, there was noted the increase in palmitic and stearic acids. In the range offatty acids of the n-6 family the amount of linoleic and arachidonic acids decreased. In the array of fatty acids of the n-3 family the content of linolenic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids (n-3 family) declined. Redistribution of fatty acids in the erythrocytes membrane towards to such alteration in quantity as the increasing of saturation and decreasing of the unsaturated fatty acids supposes the change of its physical and chemical properties, permeability, lability and complexity of passing erythrocyte via microcircular channels.

  5. Growth, Fatty Acid, and Lipid Composition of Marine Microalgae Skeletonema costatum Available in Bangladesh Coast: Consideration as Biodiesel Feedstock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Sharmin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the various potential sources of renewable energy, biofuels are of most interest. Marine microalgae are the most promising oil sources for making biofuels, which can grow very rapidly and convert solar energy to chemical energy via CO2 fixation. The fatty acid profile of almost all the microalgal oil is suitable for the synthesis of biofuel. In this research, fatty acid and lipid contents of Bangladeshi strains of marine microalgae Skeletonema costatum were performed. For this, the crude oil was extracted by Soxhlet extraction method, using three most common solvent systems, pure hexane and mixture of CHCl3 : MeOH (2 : 1 and hexane : EtOH (3 : 1 one by one. Highest oil recovery (15.37% came from CHCl3 : MeOH (2 : 1 solvent system from dry biomass whereas the lowest (2.49% came from n-hexane from wet biomass. The qualitative analysis of the extracted oil by GC/MS analysis revealed that it contained significant amount of myristic acid (C14:0, palmitic acid (C16:0, stearic acid (C18:0, and palmitoleic acid (C16:1. It also indicated presence of hexadecatrienoic acid, benzenedicarboxylic acid, oleic acid, arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 9-Octadecenoic acid methyl ester (C19H36O2, and so forth. The obtained fatty acid profile indicates high potentiality of S. costatum species to be used as promising biofuel feedstock a little improvisation and substantially it can replace diesel in near future.

  6. Analysis of the fatty acid composition of taraxicuum officinale flowers oil by gas chromatography mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, I.; Ullah, R.

    2013-01-01

    Taraxicum officinale, is a highly valuable medicinal plant. The roots is an important herbal drug, having long been used on the continent as a remedy for liver complaints. Keeping in view the importance and wide applications in the pharmaceutical industries, the present study was therefore aimed to analyze the chemical constituents of the flowers of T. officinale. The T. officinale flowers oil constituents of methyl ester derivatives of fatty acids were analyzed applying gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometer. The results obtained showed the presence of both containing the saturated as well as unsaturated fatty acids in T. officinale flower oils. A total of 19 different components were identified and quantified. The concentration level of Methyl ester of Lenolenic acid was found very effective in concentration 3.33%, among the identified analytes of interest. In addition, the level of other chemical constituents of methyl ester of palmitic acid 3.11%, myristic acid 1.87, linolenic acids 1.67%, stearic acid 0.97 were found. The concentration level of the rest of identified fatty acids analytes were below 1%. Thus the results obtained from the current initiative is very promising due to the presence of high percentage of valuable analytes concentrations recorded in the fatty acid of T. officinale flower oil. Thus due to the presence of highly important analytes which have increased their importance for consumption in the pharmaceuticals as well as its applications in the new formulations for different skin, cosmetics and health purposes and for use by local practioners. The study will also provide a scientific database line. (author)

  7. Effects of Harvest Times on the Fatty Acids Composition of Rose Hip (Rosa sp. Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Güneş

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the change of fatty acids ratios of some rose hip species seeds in different harvest times. Seeds of five genotypes belonging to rose hip species (Rosa sp. were used in the study. The fruits of species were harvested in six different ripening times and analyzed. Total oil analysis was performed for the fifth harvest only, which was determined as the optimal harvest time. As a result; total oil ratio of rose hip seeds varied as 5.22 and 6.62 g/100g respectively for accessions of Rosa dumalis (MR-12 and MR-15, 6.37 g/100g for R. canina (MR-26, 5.00 g/100g for R. dumalis ssp. boissieri (MR-46 and 5.29 g/100g for R. villosa (MR-84. Eleven fatty acids were determined in rose hip seeds. Among these fatty acids linoleic, oleic, linolenic, palmitic and stearic acids respectively had high ratio. Saturated fatty acids ratio (SFAs was the highest in R. canina (MR-26 and the lowest in R. dumalis (MR-12; monounsaturated fatty acids ratio (MUFAs was the highest in R. dumalis (MR-12 and the lowest in R. dumalis ssp. boissieri (MR-46; polyunsaturated fatty acids ratio (PUFAs was the highest in R. dumalis ssp. boissieri (MR-46 and the lowest in R. dumalis (MR-12. Mono and polyunsaturated fatty acid contents obtained in this study was high; the change of fatty acid profile in the studied species in relation to harvest time was significant for some species and insignificant for others. A conclusion was reached that it is important to pay attention to qualitative and quantitative properties of seeds when conducting studies about rose hip improvement.

  8. Comparison of sterols and fatty acids in two species of Ganoderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Two species of Ganoderma, G. sinense and G. lucidum, are used as Lingzhi in China. Howerver, the content of triterpenoids and polysaccharides, main actives compounds, are significant different, though the extracts of both G. lucidum and G. sinense have antitumoral proliferation effect. It is suspected that other compounds contribute to their antitumoral activity. Sterols and fatty acids have obvious bioactivity. Therefore, determination and comparison of sterols and fatty acids is helpful to elucidate the active components of Lingzhi. Results Ergosterol, a specific component of fungal cell membrane, was rich in G. lucidum and G. sinense. But its content in G. lucidum (median content 705.0 μg·g-1, range 189.1-1453.3 μg·g-1, n = 19) was much higher than that in G. sinense (median content 80.1 μg·g-1, range 16.0-409.8 μg·g-1, n = 13). Hierarchical clustering analysis based on the content of ergosterol showed that 32 tested samples of Ganoderma were grouped into two main clusters, G. lucidum and G. sinense. Hierarchical clustering analysis based on the contents of ten fatty acids showed that two species of Ganoderma had no significant difference though two groups were also obtained. The similarity of two species of Ganoderma in fatty acids may be related to their antitumoral proliferation effect. Conclusions The content of ergosterol is much higher in G. lucidum than in G. sinense. Palmitic acid, linoleic acid, oleic acid, stearic acid are main fatty acids in Ganoderma and their content had no significant difference between G. lucidum and G. sinense, which may contribute to their antitumoral proliferation effect. PMID:22293530

  9. Ameliorative potential of S-allylcysteine: effect on lipid profile and changes in tissue fatty acid composition in experimental diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, Ganapathy; Ponmurugan, Ponnusamy

    2012-09-01

    Hyperlipidemia is an associated complication of diabetes mellitus. The association of hyperglycemia with an alteration of lipid parameters presents a major risk for cardiovascular complications in diabetes. The present study was designed to examine the antihyperlipidemic effect of S-allylcysteine (SAC) in STZ induced diabetic rats. The levels of blood glucose, cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), free fatty acids, phospholipids and fatty acid composition were estimated in the liver and kidneys of control and experimental groups of rats. Oral administration of SAC at a dose of 150 mg/kg bodyweight per day to STZ-induced diabetic rats for a period of 45 days resulted in a significant reduction in fasting blood glucose, TC, TG, free fatty acids, phospholipids, LDL-C, VLDL-C and elevation of HDL-C in comparison with diabetic control group. Oral administration of SAC to diabetic rats also decreased the concentrations of fatty acids, viz., palmitic, stearic (16:1), and oleic acid (18:1), whereas linolenic (18:3) and arachidonic acid (20:4) were elevated. The antihyperlipidemic effect of SAC was compared with glyclazide; a well-known antihyperglycemic drug. The result of the present study indicates that SAC showed an antihyperlipidemic effect in addition to its antidiabetic effect in experimental diabetes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Detection of Lard in Cocoa Butter—Its Fatty Acid Composition, Triacylglycerol Profiles, and Thermal Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marliana Azir

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the detection of lard in cocoa butter through changes in fatty acids composition, triacylglycerols profile, and thermal characteristics. Cocoa butter was mixed with 1% to 30% (v/v of lard and analyzed using a gas chromatography flame ionization detector, high performance liquid chromatography, and differential scanning calorimetry. The results revealed that the mixing of lard in cocoa butter showed an increased amount of oleic acid in the cocoa butter while there was a decrease in the amount of palmitic acid and stearic acids. The amount of POS, SOS, and POP also decreased with the addition of lard. A heating thermogram from the DSC analysis showed that as the concentration of lard increased from 3% to 30%, two minor peaks at −26 °C and 34.5 °C started to appear and a minor peak at 34.5 °C gradually overlapped with the neighbouring major peak. A cooling thermogram of the above adulterated cocoa butter showed a minor peak shift to a lower temperature of −36 °C to −41.5 °C. Values from this study could be used as a basis for the identification of lard from other fats in the food authentication process.

  11. Detection of Lard in Cocoa Butter—Its Fatty Acid Composition, Triacylglycerol Profiles, and Thermal Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azir, Marliana; Abbasiliasi, Sahar; Tengku Ibrahim, Tengku Azmi; Manaf, Yanty Noorzianna Abdul; Sazili, Awis Qurni; Mustafa, Shuhaimi

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigates the detection of lard in cocoa butter through changes in fatty acids composition, triacylglycerols profile, and thermal characteristics. Cocoa butter was mixed with 1% to 30% (v/v) of lard and analyzed using a gas chromatography flame ionization detector, high performance liquid chromatography, and differential scanning calorimetry. The results revealed that the mixing of lard in cocoa butter showed an increased amount of oleic acid in the cocoa butter while there was a decrease in the amount of palmitic acid and stearic acids. The amount of POS, SOS, and POP also decreased with the addition of lard. A heating thermogram from the DSC analysis showed that as the concentration of lard increased from 3% to 30%, two minor peaks at −26 °C and 34.5 °C started to appear and a minor peak at 34.5 °C gradually overlapped with the neighbouring major peak. A cooling thermogram of the above adulterated cocoa butter showed a minor peak shift to a lower temperature of −36 °C to −41.5 °C. Values from this study could be used as a basis for the identification of lard from other fats in the food authentication process. PMID:29120362

  12. [The fatty acid composition of large pumpkin seed oil (Curucbitae maxima Dich) cultivated in Georgia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the study was to identify qualitatively and quantitatively fatty acid composition of large pumpkin seed oil cultivated in Georgia (Cucurbitae maxima Duch) and evaluate its biological activities. Evaluation was conducted using high-performance liquid chromatography method. Fatty acids ranging from C12:0 to C22:0 were identified in the probe. The oil contained 0,2В±0,01mg% lauric, 0,3В±0,01 mg% miristic, 9,0В±0,7mg% palmitic, 5,5В±0,4 mg% stearic, 28,1В±1,0 mg% oleic, 40,2В±1,9 mg% linolic, 12,1В±1,0 mg% linolenic, 2,0В±0,2mg% arachinic and 1,2В±0,1 mg% begenic acids. The investigation showed that large pumpkin seed oil contains a range of biologically significant fatty acids, unique proportion of which attaches great value to the vegetative material.

  13. Vapor pressure data for fatty acids obtained using an adaptation of the DSC technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matricarde Falleiro, Rafael M. [LPT, Departamento de Processos Quimicos (DPQ), Faculdade de Engenharia Quimica, Universidade de Campinas (UNICAMP), 13083-852 Campinas - SP (Brazil); Akisawa Silva, Luciana Y. [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), 09972-270 Diadema - SP (Brazil); Meirelles, Antonio J.A. [EXTRAE, Departamento de Engenharia de Alimentos (DEA), Faculdade de Engenharia de Alimentos, Universidade de Campinas (UNICAMP), 13083-862 Campinas - SP (Brazil); Kraehenbuehl, Maria A., E-mail: mak@feq.unicamp.br [LPT, Departamento de Processos Quimicos (DPQ), Faculdade de Engenharia Quimica, Universidade de Campinas (UNICAMP), 13083-852 Campinas - SP (Brazil)

    2012-11-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vapor pressure data of fatty acids were measured by Differential Scanning Calorimetry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The DSC technique is especially advantageous for expensive chemicals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High heating rate was used for measuring the vapor pressure data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antoine constants were obtained for the selected fatty acids. - Abstract: The vapor pressure data for lauric (C{sub 12:0}), myristic (C{sub 14:0}), palmitic (C{sub 16:0}), stearic (C{sub 18:0}) and oleic (C{sub 18:1}) acids were obtained using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). The adjustments made in the experimental procedure included the use of a small sphere (tungsten carbide) placed over the pinhole of the crucible (diameter of 0.8 mm), making it possible to use a faster heating rate than that of the standard method and reducing the experimental time. The measurements were made in the pressure range from 1333 to 9333 Pa, using small sample quantities of fatty acids (3-5 mg) at a heating rate of 25 K min{sup -1}. The results showed the effectiveness of the technique under study, as evidenced by the low temperature deviations in relation to the data reported in the literature. The Antoine constants were fitted to the experimental data whose values are shown in Table 5.

  14. Vapor pressure data for fatty acids obtained using an adaptation of the DSC technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matricarde Falleiro, Rafael M.; Akisawa Silva, Luciana Y.; Meirelles, Antonio J.A.; Krähenbühl, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Vapor pressure data of fatty acids were measured by Differential Scanning Calorimetry. ► The DSC technique is especially advantageous for expensive chemicals. ► High heating rate was used for measuring the vapor pressure data. ► Antoine constants were obtained for the selected fatty acids. - Abstract: The vapor pressure data for lauric (C 12:0 ), myristic (C 14:0 ), palmitic (C 16:0 ), stearic (C 18:0 ) and oleic (C 18:1 ) acids were obtained using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). The adjustments made in the experimental procedure included the use of a small sphere (tungsten carbide) placed over the pinhole of the crucible (diameter of 0.8 mm), making it possible to use a faster heating rate than that of the standard method and reducing the experimental time. The measurements were made in the pressure range from 1333 to 9333 Pa, using small sample quantities of fatty acids (3–5 mg) at a heating rate of 25 K min −1 . The results showed the effectiveness of the technique under study, as evidenced by the low temperature deviations in relation to the data reported in the literature. The Antoine constants were fitted to the experimental data whose values are shown in Table 5.

  15. Effect of carboxylic acids as compatibilizer agent on mechanical properties of thermoplastic starch and polypropylene blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Andréa Bercini; Santana, Ruth Marlene Campomanes

    2016-01-01

    In this work, polypropylene/thermoplastic starch (PP/TPS) blends were prepared as an alternative material to use in disposable packaging, reducing the negative polymeric environmental impact. Unfortunately, this material displays morphological characteristics typical of immiscible polymer blends and a compatibilizer agent is needed. Three different carboxyl acids: myristic (C14), palmitic (C16) and stearic acids (C18) were used as natural compatibilizer agent (NCA). The effects of NCA on the mechanical, physical, thermal and morphological properties of PP/TPS blends were investigated and compared against PP/TPS with and without PP-grafted maleic anhydride (PPgMA). When compared to PP/TPS, blends with C18, PPgMA and C14 presented an improvement of 25, 22 and 17% in tensile strength at break and of 180, 194 and 259% in elongation at break, respectively. The highest increase, 54%, in the impact strength was achieved with C14 incorporation. Improvements could be seen, through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images, in the compatibility between the immiscible components by acids incorporation. These results showed that carboxylic acids, specifically C14, could be used as compatibilizer agent and could substitute PPgMA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Gas Chromatographic Determination of Fatty Acids in Oils with Regard to the Assessment of Fire Hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartošová, Alica; Štefko, Tomáš

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the paper was to study and research the application of processing gas chromatographic method for the rapid and accurate determination of the composition of different types of oils, such as substances with the possibility of an adverse event spontaneous combustion or self-heating. Tendency to spontaneous combustion is chemically characterized mainly by the amount of unsaturated fatty acids, which have one or more double bonds in their molecule. Vegetable oils essentially consist of the following fatty acids: palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic, and linoleic. For the needs of assessment, the fire hazard must be known, in which the double bond is present, as well as their number in a molecule. As an analytical method, GCMS was used for determination of oils content. Three types of oil were used - rapeseed, sunflower, and coconut oil. Owing to the occurrence of linoleic acid C18:2 (49.8 wt.%) and oleic acid C18:1 (43.3 wt.%) with double bonds, sunflower oil is the most prone to self-heating. The coconut and rapeseed oils contain double bond FAME in lesser amount, and their propensity to self-heating is relatively low.

  17. The Effects of a Plant Growth Regulator, Leaf Removal, Bagging, and Harvest Time on the Lipoxygenase Activity and Fatty Acid Composition of Pinot Noir Grapevines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Y.; Zeng, J.; Zhu, M.; Lv, X.; Wang, T.; Zhang, Z.; Li, H.; Fang, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Green leaf volatiles (GLVs) are an important source of grape aromas, and lipoxygenase is a key enzyme involved in the formation of green leaf volatile substances. In addition, fatty acids are the main substrates that compose GLVs and are the main precursor compound utilized in the formation of grape aromas, which are an important index of grape quality. We examined the effects of a plant growth regulator, leaf removal, bagging, and harvest time on the lipoxygenase (LOX) activity, and the fatty acid composition of grapevines were studied. The following four experimental treatments were conducted using Pinot Noir (Vitis vinifera L.) grapevines to study the following variables: treatment with a plant growth regulator, leaf removal, fruit bagging, and harvest time. We obtained the following results. (1) 16 types of fatty acids were detected in the grape skins. The unsaturated fatty acid content consisted mainly of linoleic acid, oleic acid and palmitoleic acid; however, no linolenic acid was detected. In addition, the saturated fatty acid content consisted primarily of palmitic acid, stearic acid, behenic acid and arachidic acid. (2) Abscisic acid (ABA), methyl jasmonate (MeJA), light intensity, and harvest time appeared to effect LOX activity. (3) According to a principal component analysis (PCA) of the four treatments and the fatty acid content of the skins, ABA (concentration of 1000 mg/L), MeJA (concentrations of 100 meu mol/L, 400 meu mol/L and 800 meu mol/L) and early harvest treatment were responsible for the changes in fatty acid content. These results could be helpful in vineyard management and in improving the quality of grapes. (author)

  18. Interleukin-6 and Cyclooxygenase-2 downregulation by fatty-acid fractions of Ranunculus constantinopolitanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fostok, Sabreen F; Ezzeddine, Rima A; Homaidan, Fadia R; Al-Saghir, Jamal A; Salloum, Ralph G; Saliba, Najat A; Talhouk, Rabih S

    2009-11-16

    Medicinal plants represent alternative means for the treatment of several chronic diseases, including inflammation. The genus Ranunculus, a representative of the Ranunculaceae family, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antiviral, antibacterial, antiparasitic and antifungal activities, possibly due to the presence of anemonin and other. Different studies have shown the occurrence of unusual fatty acids (FAs) in Ranunculaceae; however, their therapeutic role has not been investigated. The purpose of this study is to characterize potential anti-inflammatory bioactivities in Ranunculus constantinopolitanus D'Urv., traditionally used in Eastern Mediterranean folk medicine. The aerial part of R. constantinopolitanus was subjected to methanol (MeOH) extraction and solvent fractionation. The bioactive fraction (I.2) was further fractionated using column chromatography, and the biologically active subfraction (Y2+3) was identified using infrared (IR) spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The effects of I.2 and Y2+3 on cell viability were studied in mouse mammary epithelial SCp2 cells using trypan blue exclusion method. To study the anti-inflammatory activities of I.2 and Y2+3, their ability to reduce interleukin (IL)-6 levels was assessed in endotoxin (ET)-stimulated SCp2 cells using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In addition, the ability of Y2+3 to reduce cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression was studied in IL-1-treated mouse intestinal epithelial Mode-K cells via western blotting. Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Student-Newman-Keuls (SNK), Tukey HSD, two-sample t-test and Dunnett t-tests for multiple comparisons. The chloroform fraction (I.2) derived from crude MeOH extract of the plant, in addition to Y2+3, a FA mix isolated from this fraction and containing palmitic acid, C18:2 and C18:1 isomers and stearic acid (1:5:8:1 ratio), reduced ET-induced IL-6

  19. Interleukin-6 and Cyclooxygenase-2 downregulation by fatty-acid fractions of Ranunculus constantinopolitanus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Saghir Jamal A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medicinal plants represent alternative means for the treatment of several chronic diseases, including inflammation. The genus Ranunculus, a representative of the Ranunculaceae family, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antiviral, antibacterial, antiparasitic and antifungal activities, possibly due to the presence of anemonin and other. Different studies have shown the occurrence of unusual fatty acids (FAs in Ranunculaceae; however, their therapeutic role has not been investigated. The purpose of this study is to characterize potential anti-inflammatory bioactivities in Ranunculus constantinopolitanus D'Urv., traditionally used in Eastern Mediterranean folk medicine. Methods The aerial part of R. constantinopolitanus was subjected to methanol (MeOH extraction and solvent fractionation. The bioactive fraction (I.2 was further fractionated using column chromatography, and the biologically active subfraction (Y2+3 was identified using infrared (IR spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. The effects of I.2 and Y2+3 on cell viability were studied in mouse mammary epithelial SCp2 cells using trypan blue exclusion method. To study the anti-inflammatory activities of I.2 and Y2+3, their ability to reduce interleukin (IL-6 levels was assessed in endotoxin (ET-stimulated SCp2 cells using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. In addition, the ability of Y2+3 to reduce cyclooxygenase (COX-2 expression was studied in IL-1-treated mouse intestinal epithelial Mode-K cells via western blotting. Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, Student-Newman-Keuls (SNK, Tukey HSD, two-sample t-test and Dunnett t-tests for multiple comparisons. Results The chloroform fraction (I.2 derived from crude MeOH extract of the plant, in addition to Y2+3, a FA mix isolated from this fraction and containing palmitic acid, C18:2 and C18:1 isomers and stearic acid

  20. Cuticle Fatty Acid Composition and Differential Susceptibility of Three Species of Cockroaches to the Entomopathogenic Fungi Metarhizium anisopliae (Ascomycota, Hypocreales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Alejandra C; Gołębiowski, Marek; Pennisi, Mariana; Peterson, Graciela; García, Juan J; Manfrino, Romina G; López Lastra, Claudia C

    2015-04-01

    Differences in free fatty acids (FFAs) chemical composition of insects may be responsible for susceptibility or resistance to fungal infection. Determination of FFAs found in cuticular lipids can effectively contribute to the knowledge concerning insect defense mechanisms. In this study, we have evaluated the susceptibility of three species of cockroaches to the entomopathogenic fungi Metarhizium anisopliae (Metschnikoff) Sorokin by topical application. Mortality due to M. anisopliae was highly significant on adults and nymphs of Blattella germanica L. (Blattodea: Blattellidae). However, mortality was faster in adults than in nymphs. Adults of Blatta orientalis L. (Blattodea: Blattidae) were not susceptible to the fungus, and nymphs of Blaptica dubia Serville (Blattodea: Blaberidae) were more susceptible to the fungus than adults. The composition of cuticular FFAs in the three species of cockroaches was also studied. The analysis indicated that all of the fatty acids were mostly straight-chain, long-chain, saturated or unsaturated. Cuticular lipids of three species of cockroaches contained 19 FFAs, ranging from C14:0 to C24:0. The predominant fatty acids found in the three studied species of cockroaches were oleic, linoleic, palmitic, and stearic acid. Only in adults of Bl. orientalis, myristoleic acid, γ-linolenic acid, arachidic acid, dihomolinoleic acid, and behenic acid were identified. Lignoceric acid was detected only in nymphs of Bl. orientalis. Heneicosylic acid and docosahexaenoic acid were identified in adults of Ba. dubia. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Well acidizing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Street, E H

    1980-01-23

    The apparatus relates in particular to a well-treating process in which an aqueous acid solution having a pH of < 2 is injected into a subterranean reservoir in a manner such that materials that contain ferric ions are present in the acid and, as the acid reacts within the reservoir and attains a pH exceeding 3, tend to be precipitated as ferric ion-containing solid materials that may plug the pores of the reservoir. Such a precipitation is prevented by dissolving in the acid solution an amount of 5-sulfosalicylic acid which is at least sufficient to sequester significant proportions of ferric ions when the pH of the acid is from 0.5 to 3 but is less than enough to cause a significant salting-out of solid materials, and an amount of citric acid which is at least sufficient to sequester significant proportions of ferric ions when the pH of the acid is from 3 to 6 but is less than enough to precipitate a significant amount of calcium citrate. The amount of the 5-sulfosalicylic acid may be from 0.01 to 0.05 moles/l and the amount of citric acid is from 0.001 to 0.009 moles/l. 11 claims.

  2. Ibotenic acid and thioibotenic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermit, Mette B; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Nielsen, Birgitte

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we have determined and compared the pharmacological profiles of ibotenic acid and its isothiazole analogue thioibotenic acid at native rat ionotropic glutamate (iGlu) receptors and at recombinant rat metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors expressed in mammalian cell lines....... Thioibotenic acid has a distinct pharmacological profile at group III mGlu receptors compared with the closely structurally related ibotenic acid; the former is a potent (low microm) agonist, whereas the latter is inactive. By comparing the conformational energy profiles of ibotenic and thioibotenic acid...... with the conformations preferred by the ligands upon docking to mGlu1 and models of the other mGlu subtypes, we propose that unlike other subtypes, group III mGlu receptor binding sites require a ligand conformation at an energy level which is prohibitively expensive for ibotenic acid, but not for thioibotenic acid...

  3. Fatty Acids Composition and Antibacterial Activity of Aristolochia longa L. and Bryonia dioïca Jacq. Growing Wild in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhouioui, Mouna; Boulila, Abdennacer; Jemli, Maroua; Schiets, Fréderic; Casabianca, Hervé; Zina, Mongia Saïd

    2016-08-01

    The composition of the fatty acids of the roots and aerial parts of Aritolochia longa (Aristolacheae) and Bryonia dioïca (Cucurbutaceae) was analyzed by gas chromatography (GC-FID) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The oils extracted from the aerial parts of both species were rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids with the essential linolenic and linoleic acids being the most prominent compounds. Oleic and linoleic acids were the majors fatty acids in the roots of both species. Whatever the plant part analyzed and the species, the saturated fatty acids were predominantly composed of palmitic and stearic acids. The antibacterial activity, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of the lipid extracts were determined against a panel of five bacterial strains. The results showed that the sensitivity to the lipid extracts was different for the test bacterial strains, and the susceptibility of gram positive bacteria was found to be greater than gram negative bacteria. The antibacterial activity of the root lipid extracts was particularly important against Enterococcus feacium (CMI value of 125 µg/mL; CMB values > 250 µg/mL) and Streptococcus agalactiae (CMI value of 125 µg/mL; CMB values 250 µg/mL for A. longa roots). These results indicate that A. longa and B. dioïca could be considered as good sources of essential fatty acids which can act as natural antibacterial agents.

  4. Effects of roasting temperature and duration on fatty acid composition, phenolic composition, Maillard reaction degree and antioxidant attribute of almond (Prunus dulcis) kernel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jau-Tien; Liu, Shih-Chun; Hu, Chao-Chin; Shyu, Yung-Shin; Hsu, Chia-Ying; Yang, Deng-Jye

    2016-01-01

    Roasting treatment increased levels of unsaturated fatty acids (linoleic, oleic and elaidic acids) as well as saturated fatty acids (palmitic and stearic acids) in almond (Prunus dulcis) kernel oils with temperature (150 or 180 °C) and duration (5, 10 or 20 min). Nonetheless, higher temperature (200 °C) and longer duration (10 or 20 min) roasting might result in breakdown of fatty acids especially for unsaturated fatty acids. Phenolic components (total phenols, flavonoids, condensed tannins and phenolic acids) of almond kernels substantially lost in the initial phase; afterward these components gradually increased with roasting temperature and duration. Similar results also observed for their antioxidant activities (scavenging DPPH and ABTS(+) radicals and ferric reducing power). The changes of phenolic acid and flavonoid compositions were also determined by HPLC. Maillard reaction products (estimated with non-enzymatic browning index) also increased with roasting temperature and duration; they might also contribute to enhancing the antioxidant attributes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Effect of E-Selen Antioxidant on the Fatty Acids Content of the Homogenate of Unirradiated and Irradiated Pupae of Ceratitis Capitata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaghloul, Y.S.; Abbassy, S.A.; Elakhdar, E.A.H.; Elakhdar, E.A.H.

    2011-01-01

    As antioxidant E-selen was added to the larval artificial diets of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata. The produced full grown pupae were exposed to gamma rays at dose rate of 90 Gy. The fatty acid contents of the normal and irradiated insects were analyzed to test to what extent, the uptake of the antioxidant will ameliorate the physiological damage induced to the medfly pupae, as a result of their exposure to irradiation. The results obtained by using Gas-liquid chromatography of fatty acid methyl esters, showed the palmitic and oleic acids to be the most predominant fatty acids in all pupal homogenates in both normal and irradiated pupae, either by the uptake of doses of the E-selen or without. The uptake of E-Selen with a dose of 0.3 mg led to a complete absence of the lauric and myristic acids in the homogenates of the unirradiated pupae of the medfly. This absence of lauric and myristic acids was accompanied by a decrease in the concentrations of the palmitic and linoleic acids reaching 25.17% and 32.98%, respectively as compared to pupae without the uptake of antioxidant. The concentrations of both the stearic and oleic acids showed an obvious increment reaching 199.22% and 58.94%, respectively, relative to those reared on the defined media and no added E.Selen. Exposure of the pupae to a dose of 90 Gy, resulted in an increment in the concentrations of the saturated lauric and myristic acid reaching 96.77% and 34.07%, respectively, relative to the untreated ones. While, at the same dose level, there were decrements in the concentrations of the palmitic, stearic, oleic and linoleic acids with percentages reaching 6.4, 9.22, 3.65 and 1.15%, respectively as compared to unirradiated controls. Irradiation of the pupae with sterilizing dose (90 Gy) after up taking the E-Selen in their larval diets, led to the increase of the concentrations of lauric, oleic and linoleic acids by ratios of 16.82, 8.84 and 29.26%, respectively as compared to their

  6. Determination of oil and fatty acids concentration in seeds of coastal halophytic Sueada aegyptica plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Assadi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Suaeda aegyptica (S. aegyptica species belong to the Chenepodiaceae family, the second largest family in the world of plants kingdom. It is indigenous to arid and semi-arid regions of the world and salty coastal zones Persian Gulf of Iran. It is an annual succulent halophyte plant which is characterized by producing oily seeds, high growth rate and large number of biomass. The aim of this study was analysis and determination of oil and fatty acids concentration in the S. aegyptica seed. Material and Methods: The seeds of S. aegyptica were collected form coastal zones of Persian Gulf in Bushehr province, washed and dried. The fatty acids content of the dried seeds were extracted in n-hexane solvent by soxhellet apparatus. The residue of n-hexane in oily phase was evaporated by rotary evaporator and remaining oil was collected for fatty acids analysis. In the presence of potassium hydroxide and BF3 by refluxing for 30 minutes, the methyl ester derivative of fatty acids were produced. Then the resulted derivatives were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC-FID. Results: The seeds of S. aegyptica contains eight fatty acids as: Pelargonic (C9, Capric (C10, Undecylic (C11, Tridecylic (C13, Myristic (C14, Palmitic (C16, Stearic (C18, Linoleic (18:2 and Linolenic (18:3. Average oil content in seeds 014/0 ± 87 / percent. Conclusion: The ratio of unsaturated fatty acids was higher than the saturated ones. Linoleic and Palmitic acids are major unsaturated and saturated fatty acids of S. aegyptica seed respectively.

  7. Coriander seed oil methyl esters as biodiesel fuel: Unique fatty acid composition and excellent oxidative stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, Bryan R.; Vaughn, Steven F.

    2010-01-01

    Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) seed oil methyl esters were prepared and evaluated as an alternative biodiesel fuel and contained an unusual fatty acid hitherto unreported as the principle component in biodiesel fuels: petroselinic (6Z-octadecenoic; 68.5 wt%) acid. Most of the remaining fatty acid profile consisted of common 18 carbon constituents such as linoleic (9Z,12Z-octadeca-dienoic; 13.0 wt%), oleic (9Z-octadecenoic; 7.6 wt%) and stearic (octadecanoic; 3.1 wt%) acids. A standard transesterification procedure with methanol and sodium methoxide catalyst was used to provide C. sativum oil methyl esters (CSME). Acid-catalyzed pretreatment was necessary beforehand to reduce the acid value of the oil from 2.66 to 0.47 mg g -1 . The derived cetane number, kinematic viscosity, and oxidative stability (Rancimat method) of CSME was 53.3, 4.21 mm 2 s -1 (40 o C), and 14.6 h (110 o C). The cold filter plugging and pour points were -15 o C and -19 o C, respectively. Other properties such as acid value, free and total glycerol content, iodine value, as well as sulfur and phosphorous contents were acceptable according to the biodiesel standards ASTM D6751 and EN 14214. Also reported are lubricity, heat of combustion, and Gardner color, along with a comparison of CSME to soybean oil methyl esters (SME). CSME exhibited higher oxidative stability, superior low temperature properties, and lower iodine value than SME. In summary, CSME has excellent fuel properties as a result of its unique fatty acid composition.

  8. Variation in the fatty-acid content in seeds of various black, red, and white currant varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šavikin, Katarina P; Ðorđević, Boban S; Ristić, Mihailo S; Krivokuća-Ðokić, Dragana; Pljevljakušić, Dejan S; Vulić, Todor

    2013-01-01

    Currant seeds, a by-product of juice production, are recognized as a valuable source of oil rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids. We have evaluated 28 currant varieties for their oil content and fatty-acid composition. The oil content in the seeds ranged from 18.2-27.7%, and no statistical difference between varieties of different fruit color were recorded. Furthermore, the estimated oil yields in the field production ranged from 26.4-212.4 kg/ha. The GC and GC/MS chemical profiles of the seed oils extracted from all examined varieties were common for currants. Linoleic acid (LA) was the major component, with contents ranging from 32.7-46.9% of total fatty acids, followed by α-linolenic acid (ALA; 2.9-32.0 %), oleic acid (OA; 9.8-19.9%), γ-linolenic acid (GLA; 3.3-18.5%), palmitic acid (PA; 4.4-8.1%), stearidonic acid (SDA; 2.2-4.7%), and stearic acid (SA; 1.2-2.4%). Quantitative differences in the fatty-acid profiles between varieties of different fruit color were observed. Blackcurrant varieties showed significantly higher contents of LA, GLA, and PA than red and white currant varieties, whereas significantly higher amounts of ALA and OL were detected in the red and white varieties. Cluster analysis based on the chemical oil profiles joined the blackcurrants in one group, while most of the red and white cultivars joined in a second group at the same linkage distance. Copyright © 2013 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  9. Influence of different curing methods on the fatty acid composition in sausages prepared from red deer meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Šnirc

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available These curing agents play a decisive role in obtaining the specific sensory properties, stability and hygienic safety of products such as fermented sausages, ham and, more recently, emulsion type of sausages. The effect of using two different curing agents (sodium chloride and nitrate on fatty acid compounds in dry-cured deer meat was investigated in our study. The concentration of free fatty acids in the fat depends on the hydrolytic activity of the lipases, the microbial metabolic processes, and the oxidative reactions that work on the free fatty acids released in the lipolysis. The main identified fatty acids in all different types of curing were palmitic acid (16 : 0, oleic acid (c18 : 1 cis-9, stearic acid (C18 : 0. The resulting n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio in the muscle samples of red deer showed no variation in different types of curing and was beneficially low within the range of 3.9 : 1 and 4.49 : 1. Total free fatty acids, whether saturated, monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fatty acids, did not increased (p >0.05 greatly through the processing of dry-cured deer meat. Also there was no effect of curing method on fatty acids composition in two different muscles Semitendinosus muscle (ANOVA, p >0.05, F - 0.003, F crit. - 3.041 and Triceps brachii muscle (ANOVA, p >0.05, F - 0.05, F crit. - 3.01. There were found no significant (p >0.05 differences between fatty acids content in sausages prepared by brining in NaCl and Nitrate salt. The present study revealed that game meat can function as a good source of bioactive compounds that are essential for human nutrition. 

  10. Formic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, H; Laing, B

    1921-12-03

    The production of formic acid by the oxidation of methane with a metallic oxide or by the interaction of carbon monoxide and water vapor in the presence of a catalyst, preferably a metallic oxide, is described along with the destructive distillation of carbonaceous material in the preesnce of formic acid vapor for the purpose of increasing the yield of condensible hydrocarbons.

  11. Bacterial and protozoal communities and fatty acid profile in the rumen of sheep fed a diet containing added tannins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasta, Valentina; Yáñez-Ruiz, David R; Mele, Marcello; Serra, Andrea; Luciano, Giuseppe; Lanza, Massimiliano; Biondi, Luisa; Priolo, Alessandro

    2010-04-01

    This study evaluated the effects of tannins on ruminal biohydrogenation (BH) due to shifts in the ruminal microbial environment in sheep. Thirteen lambs (45 days of age) were assigned to two dietary treatments: seven lambs were fed a barley-based concentrate (control group) while the other six lambs received the same concentrate with supplemental quebracho tannins (9.57% of dry matter). At 122 days of age, the lambs were slaughtered, and the ruminal contents were subjected to fatty acid analysis and sampled to quantify populations of Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, which converts C(18:2) c9-c12 (linoleic acid [LA]) to C(18:2) c9-t11 (rumenic acid [RA]) and then RA to C(18:1) t11 (vaccenic acid [VA]); we also sampled for Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus, which converts VA to C(18:0) (stearic acid [SA]). Tannins increased (P tannin-free diet. The concentration of SA was not affected by tannins. The SA/VA ratio was lower (P tannin-fed lambs than for the controls, suggesting that the last step of the BH process was inhibited by tannins. The B. proteoclasticus population was lower (-30.6%; P tannin-supplemented diet than in controls. These results suggest that quebracho tannins altered BH by changing ruminal microbial populations.

  12. Bacterial and Protozoal Communities and Fatty Acid Profile in the Rumen of Sheep Fed a Diet Containing Added Tannins ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasta, Valentina; Yáñez-Ruiz, David R.; Mele, Marcello; Serra, Andrea; Luciano, Giuseppe; Lanza, Massimiliano; Biondi, Luisa; Priolo, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of tannins on ruminal biohydrogenation (BH) due to shifts in the ruminal microbial environment in sheep. Thirteen lambs (45 days of age) were assigned to two dietary treatments: seven lambs were fed a barley-based concentrate (control group) while the other six lambs received the same concentrate with supplemental quebracho tannins (9.57% of dry matter). At 122 days of age, the lambs were slaughtered, and the ruminal contents were subjected to fatty acid analysis and sampled to quantify populations of Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, which converts C18:2 c9-c12 (linoleic acid [LA]) to C18:2 c9-t11 (rumenic acid [RA]) and then RA to C18:1 t11 (vaccenic acid [VA]); we also sampled for Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus, which converts VA to C18:0 (stearic acid [SA]). Tannins increased (P tannin-free diet. The concentration of SA was not affected by tannins. The SA/VA ratio was lower (P tannin-fed lambs than for the controls, suggesting that the last step of the BH process was inhibited by tannins. The B. proteoclasticus population was lower (−30.6%; P tannin-supplemented diet than in controls. These results suggest that quebracho tannins altered BH by changing ruminal microbial populations. PMID:20173064

  13. Ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) and solvent extraction of papaya seed oil: yield, fatty acid composition and triacylglycerol profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaram, Shadi; Mirhosseini, Hamed; Tan, Chin Ping; Ghazali, Hasanah Mohd

    2013-10-10

    The main objective of the current work was to evaluate the suitability of ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) for the recovery of oil from papaya seed as compared to conventional extraction techniques (i.e., Soxhlet extraction (SXE) and solvent extraction (SE)). In the present study, the recovery yield, fatty acid composition and triacylglycerol profile of papaya seed oil obtained from different extraction methods and conditions were compared. Results indicated that both solvent extraction (SE, 12 h/25 °C) and ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) methods recovered relatively high yields (79.1% and 76.1% of total oil content, respectively). Analysis of fatty acid composition revealed that the predominant fatty acids in papaya seed oil were oleic (18:1, 70.5%-74.7%), palmitic (16:0, 14.9%-17.9%), stearic (18:0, 4.50%-5.25%), and linoleic acid (18:2, 3.63%-4.6%). Moreover, the most abundant triacylglycerols of papaya seed oil were triolein (OOO), palmitoyl diolein (POO) and stearoyl oleoyl linolein (SOL). In this study, ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) significantly (p < 0.05) influenced the triacylglycerol profile of papaya seed oil, but no significant differences were observed in the fatty acid composition of papaya seed oil extracted by different extraction methods (SXE, SE and UAE) and conditions.

  14. Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction (UAE and Solvent Extraction of Papaya Seed Oil: Yield, Fatty Acid Composition and Triacylglycerol Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasanah Mohd Ghazali

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the current work was to evaluate the suitability of ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE for the recovery of oil from papaya seed as compared to conventional extraction techniques (i.e., Soxhlet extraction (SXE and solvent extraction (SE. In the present study, the recovery yield, fatty acid composition and triacylglycerol profile of papaya seed oil obtained from different extraction methods and conditions were compared. Results indicated that both solvent extraction (SE, 12 h/25 °C and ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE methods recovered relatively high yields (79.1% and 76.1% of total oil content, respectively. Analysis of fatty acid composition revealed that the predominant fatty acids in papaya seed oil were oleic (18:1, 70.5%–74.7%, palmitic (16:0, 14.9%–17.9%, stearic (18:0, 4.50%–5.25%, and linoleic acid (18:2, 3.63%–4.6%. Moreover, the most abundant triacylglycerols of papaya seed oil were triolein (OOO, palmitoyl diolein (POO and stearoyl oleoyl linolein (SOL. In this study, ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE significantly (p < 0.05 influenced the triacylglycerol profile of papaya seed oil, but no significant differences were observed in the fatty acid composition of papaya seed oil extracted by different extraction methods (SXE, SE and UAE and conditions.

  15. [Effect of soil phenolic acids on soil microbe of coal-mining depressed land after afforestation restoration by different tree species].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Li; Yang, Li Xue

    2017-12-01

    Phenolic acids are one of the most important factors that influence microbial community structure. Investigating the dynamic changes of phenolic acids and their relationship with the microbial community structure in plantation soils with different tree species could contribute to better understanding and revealing the mechanisms of microbial community changes under afforestation restoration in coal-mining subsidence areas. In this study, plantations of three conifer and one deciduous species (Pinus koraiensis, Larix gmelinii, Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica, and Populus ussuriensis) were established on abandoned coal-mining subsidence areas in Baoshan District, Shuangyashan City. The contents of soil phenols, 11 types of phenolic acids, and microbial communities in all plots were determined. The results showed that the contents of soil complex phenol in plantations were significantly higher than that of abandoned land overall. Specifically, soils in larch and poplar plantations had higher contents of complex phenol, while soils in larch and Korean pine plantations had greater contents of total phenol. Moreover, soil in the P. koraiensis plantation had a higher content of water-soluble phenol compared with abandoned lands. The determination of 11 phenolic acids indicated that the contents of ferulic acid, abietic acid, β-sitosterol, oleanolic acid, shikimic acid, linoleic acid, and stearic acid were higher in plantation soils. Although soil phenol contents were not related with soil microbial biomass, the individual phenolic acids showed a significant relationship with soil microbes. Ferulic acid, abietic acid, and β-sitosterol showed significant promoting effects on soil microbial biomass, and they showed positive correlations with fungi and fungi/bacteria ratio. These three phenolic acids had higher contents in the poplar plantation, suggesting that poplar affo-restation had a beneficial effect on soil quality in coal-mining subsidence areas.

  16. New method for GC/FID and GC-C-IRMS analysis of plasma free fatty acid concentration and isotopic enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangani, Cyrous O; Kelley, David E; Delany, James P

    2008-09-15

    A simple, direct and accurate method for the determination of concentration and enrichment of free fatty acids (FFAs) in human plasma was developed. The validation and comparison to a conventional method are reported. Three amide derivatives, dimethyl, diethyl and pyrrolidide, were investigated in order to achieve optimal resolution of the individual fatty acids. This method involves the use of dimethylamine/Deoxo-Fluor to derivatize plasma free fatty acids to their dimethylamides. This derivatization method is very mild and efficient, and is selective only towards FFAs so that no separation from a total lipid extract is required. The direct method gave lower concentrations for palmitic acid and stearic acid and increased concentrations for oleic acid and linoleic acid in plasma as compared to methyl ester derivative after thin-layer chromatography. The [(13)C]palmitate isotope enrichment measured using direct method was significantly higher than that observed with the BF(3)/MeOH-TLC method. The present method provided accurate and precise measures of concentration as well as enrichment when analyzed with gas chromatography combustion-isotope ratio-mass spectrometry.

  17. Growth, fatty acid profile in major lipid classes and lipid fluidity of Aurantiochytrium mangrovei SK-02 As a function of growth temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodchoey, Kanokwan; Verduyn, Cornelis

    2012-01-01

    Aurantiochytrium mangrovei Sk-02 was grown in a medium containing glucose (40 g/l), yeast extract (10 g/L) and sea salts (15 g/L) at temperatures ranging from 12 to 35°C. The fastest growth (µmax= 0.15 h(-1)) and highest fatty acid content of 415 mg/g-dry cell weight were found in the cells grown at 30°C. However, the cells grown at 12°C showed the highest percentage of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) (48.6% of total fatty acid). The percentage of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and pentadecanoic acid (C15:0) decreased with an increase in the growth temperature, whereas, palmitic acid (C16:0), stearic acid (C18:0) and DPA (C22:5n6) increased with an increase in the growth temperature. The composition of the major lipid class (%w/w) was slightly affected by the growth temperature. The fluidity of the organelle membrane or intracellular lipid (by DPH measurement) decreased with an increase in the growth temperatures, while the plasma membrane fluidity (by TMA-DPH measurement) could still maintain its fluidity in a wide range of temperatures (15 - 37°C). Furthermore, the distribution of DHA was found to be higher (36 - 54%) in phospholipid (PL) as compared to neutral lipid (NL) (20 - 41%).

  18. Fatty acid composition of heavy pig back fat in relationship to some animal factors

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    Mauro Vitale

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of genetic type, lean meat percentage and sex on fatty acids (FA composition of back fat of heavy pigs, reared for the production of San Daniele dry cured ham, was studied. One-hundred pigs of four genetic types - Large White or Duroc x (Landrace x Large White, GOLAND and DANBRED - were considered. They were randomly chosen during the slaughtering of 21 lots of heavy animals, in groups of four to eight subjects, balanced by sex, female and castrated males, and carcass leanness, U and R classes following the European grading system. Principal components (PCs analysis showed that 94.3% of lot-diets’ FA variability was accounted for a five PCs model. The diet effect on the lard composition was weighted using the PCs scores as covariates in a tri-factorial (genotype, carcass leanness, sex covariance design. Diet had a great effect on lard composition, indeed every examined back fat FA co-varied with the extracted PCs. On the other hand, sex effect never reached a significance threshold, as well as the interactions between factors. Genetic type influenced stearic acid and MUFA content and n6-PUFA to n3-PUFA ratio of back fat while leanness mainly influenced PUFA, the fatter class showing a significantly lower content of linoleic acid (13.2 vs. 11.9% total lipids in U vs. R class respectively.

  19. Synthesis of sulfur-containing lubricant additives on the basis of fatty acid ethyl esters

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    Iurii S. Bodachivskyi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study reveals an energy-, resource- and eco-friendly method for preparation of sulfur-containing lubricant additives via interaction of fatty acid ethyl esters of rapeseed oil with elemental sulfur. The structure of synthesized compounds under various reactants ratio (5–50 wt.% of sulfur, duration (30–240 min and temperature of the process (160–215°С was investigated using various analytical techniques. According to the established data, aside from addition to double bonds, the side reaction of hydrogen substitution at α-methylene groups near these bonds occurs and induces the formation of conjugated systems and chromophoric sulfur-rich derivatives. Also, we found that increase of process duration evokes growth of polysulfane chains, in contrast to the raise of temperature, which leads to the formation of sulfur-containing heterocycles and hydrogen sulfide, as a result of elimination. Influence of accelerators on sulfurization of fatty acid ethyl esters was also examined. The most effective among them are mixtures of zinc dibutyldithiocarbamate with zinc oxide or stearic acid, which soften synthesis conditions and doubly decrease duration of the high-temperature stage. In addition, sulfur-containing compositions of ethyl esters and α-olefins, vulcanized esters by benzoyl peroxide, nonylphenols and zinc dinonylphenyldithiophosphate were designed. The study identified that lithium lubricant with sulfurized vulcanized esters provides improved tribological properties, in comparison with base lubricant or lubricant with the non-modified product.

  20. Fatty acid profile in meat of culling ewes in different feedlot periods fed diets containing levels of inclusion of linseed

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    Ana Claudia Radis

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Linseed plays an important role in animal nutrition as it contains long-chain fatty acids in its composition, which, once absorbed, are incorporated into meat and milk. For evaluate the concentration of fatty acids in the Longissimus dorsi muscle of culling ewes fed diets containing levels of inclusion of linseed, 88 culling ewes were used with an average initial body weight of 37.65 ± 6.98 kg were distributed in a completely randomized design with 12 treatments. Treatments consisted of the interaction between levels of linseed (0, 5, 10, and 15% and days in feedlot (30, 45, and 60. The most present fatty acids in the composition of the muscle L. dorsi were palmitic (27.32 g 100 g-1 and stearic (17.77 g 100 g-1. Saturated acids remained at low levels as the animals were fed greater levels of linseed, demonstrating the importance of introducing quality foods in animal feeding. Oleic acid was the most present monounsaturated fatty acid, with 40 g 100 g-1. Palmitoleic and elaidic fatty acids increased linearly as the linseed inclusion in the diet was increased. Polyunsaturated acids increased with the presence of linseed in the diet. For the linolenic acid (C18: 3n3, the best result was with inclusion of 10% of linseed in the total diet. All groups of animals that received linseed obtained better n6:n3 ratios, which varied from 1.81 to 4.14. The higher CLA values obtained in this study are related to the higher amounts of inclusion of linseed in the sheep diet, varying from 1.15 to 5.72 g 100 g-1. It is recommended culling ewes supplemented with inclusion of 10% linseed, for 60 days in feedlot, because they comprise a larger number of favorable traits regarding to the profile fatty acids of Longissimus dorsi.

  1. Effect of salinity stress on growth, lipid productivity, fatty acid composition, and biodiesel properties in Acutodesmus obliquus and Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Priti Raj; Fulekar, Madhusudan H; Karuna, Mallampalli Sri Lakshmi

    2017-05-01

    Two microalgae strains including Chlorella vulgaris and Acutodesmus obliquus were grown on BG11 medium with salinity stress ranging from 0.06 to 0.4 M NaCl. Highest lipid content in C. vulgaris and A. obliquus was 49 and 43% in BG11 amended with 0.4 M NaCl. The microalgal strains C. vulgaris and A. obliquus grow better at 0.06 M NaCl concentration than control condition. At 0.06 M NaCl, improved dry biomass content in C. vulgaris and A. obliquus was 0.92 and 0.68 gL -1 , respectively. Stress biomarkers like reactive oxygen species, antioxidant enzyme catalase, and ascorbate peroxidase were also lowest at 0.06 M NaCl concentration revealing that both the microalgal strains are well acclimatized at 0.06 M NaCl concentration. The fatty acid composition of the investigated microalgal strains was also improved by increased NaCl concentration. At 0.4 M NaCl, palmitic acid (37%), oleic acid (15.5%), and linoleic acid (20%) were the dominant fatty acids in C. vulgaris while palmitic acid (54%) and stearic acid (26.6%) were major fatty acids found in A. obliquus. Fatty acid profiling of C. vulgaris and A. obliquus significantly varied with salinity concentration. Therefore, the study showed that salt stress is an effective stress that could increase not only the lipid content but also improved the fatty acid composition which could make C. vulgaris and A. obliquus potential strains for biodiesel production.

  2. Monoglycerides and fatty acids from Ibervillea sonorae root: isolation and hypoglycemic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Galicia, Erica; Calzada, Fernando; Roman-Ramos, Rubén; Alarcón-Aguilar, Francisco J

    2007-03-01

    Eleven monoglycerides (MG), 1-monopalmitin (1), glyceryl 1-monomargarate (2), 1-monostearin (3), glyceryl 1-monononadecylate ( 4), glyceryl 1-monoarachidate (5), glyceryl 1-monobehenate (6), glyceryl 1-monotricosanoate (7), glyceryl 1-monotetracosanoate (8), glyceryl 1-monopentacosanoate (9), glyceryl 1-monohexacosanoate (10) and glyceryl 1-monooctacosanoate (11), together with five fatty acids (FA), lauric acid (12), myristic acid (13), pentadecanoic acid (14), palmitic acid (15) and stearic acid (16) were isolated of the root of IBERVILLEA SONORAE Greene (Cucurbitaceae). Their structures were determined by spectroscopic and chemical methods as well as GC-MS analysis. The hypoglycemic activity of the dichloromethane (DCM) extract, of fractions (F1-F10 and SF1-SF5), of monoglycerides (MG) and of fatty acids (FA) mixtures obtained of the root from I. SONORAE was evaluated in normoglycemic and alloxan-induced diabetic mice. The results showed that by intraperitoneal administration the DCM extract (300 mg/kg), F9 (300 mg/kg) and SF1 (150 mg/kg) significantly reduced glucose levels in both models. For fraction SF1, the hypoglycemic activity was more pronounced than that of tolbutamide (150 mg/kg) used as control. However, neither MG (75 mg/kg) nor FA (75 mg/kg) mixtures isolated from SF1 exhibited a significant hypoglycemic effect. However, when MG and FA were combined in equal proportions (75 mg: 75 mg/kg), their effect was comparable to that of SF1. The observed activity for the DCM extract, F9, SF1 and the MG-FA mixture provides additional support for the popular use of this plant in the treatment of diabetes mellitus in Mexican traditional medicine.

  3. Leukotriene B4 omega-hydroxylase in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Suicidal inactivation by acetylenic fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shak, S; Reich, N O; Goldstein, I M; Ortiz de Montellano, P R

    1985-10-25

    Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) not only generate and respond to leukotriene B4 (LTB4), but also catabolize this mediator of inflammation rapidly and specifically by omega-oxidation (probably due to the action of a cytochrome P-450 enzyme). To develop pharmacologically useful inhibitors of the LTB4 omega-hydroxylase in human PMN, we devised a general scheme for synthesizing terminal acetylenic fatty acids based on the "acetylenic zipper" reaction. We found that the LTB4 omega-hydroxylase in intact PMN and in PMN sonicates is inactivated in a concentration-dependent fashion by terminal acetylenic analogues of lauric, palmitic, and stearic acids (i.e. 11-dodecynoic, 15-hexadecynoic, and 17-octadecynoic acids). Consistent with a suicidal process, inactivation of the LTB4 omega-hydroxylase requires molecular oxygen and NADPH, is time-dependent, and follows pseudo-first-order kinetics. Inactivation of the omega-hydroxylase by acetylenic fatty acids also is dependent on the terminal acetylenic moiety and the carbon chain length. Saturated fatty acids lacking a terminal acetylenic moiety do not inactivate the omega-hydroxylase. In addition, the two long-chain (C16, C18) acetylenic fatty acids inactivate the omega-hydroxylase at much lower concentrations (less than 5.0 microM) than those required for inactivation by the short-chain (C12) terminal acetylenic fatty acid (100 microM). Potent suicidal inhibitors of the LTB4 omega-hydroxylase in human PMN will help elucidate the roles played by LTB4 and its omega-oxidation products in regulating PMN function and in mediating inflammation.

  4. Fatty Acid and Transcript Profiling in Developing Seeds of Three Brassica napus Cultivars

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    Petkova Mariana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acid levels and gene expression profiles for selected genes associated with the synthesis of fatty acids (FA, triacylglycerol, and oil body proteins were examined in three oilseed rape (Brassica napus cultivars that have utility for cultivar development in our spring canola breeding program. The seed oil content of Bronowski, Q2, and Westar was 39.0, 40.1, and 40.6%, respectively at 40 days after flowering (DAF. During the 20 to 40 day period of seed development, cultivars had varying levels of palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic, α-linolenic, eicosenoic, and erucic acid. In general, the percentage of each FA was similar among the cultivars during seed development. However, the level of oleic acid was lower and the levels of eicosenoic acid and erucic acid were higher in Bronowski than in Q2 and Westar seeds; linoleic acid also tended to be lower in Bronowski. Gene expression among the cultivars was similar from 10 to 40 DAF. The few exceptions were that expression of KAS1 and SAD were higher in Westar and Q2 than in Bronowski at 25 DAF, SAD was highest in Q2, intermediate in Westar, and lowest in Bronowski at 35 DAF, FAD2 was higher in Q2 than in Bronowski at 35 DAF, FAD3 was higher in Q2 than in Bronowski at 15 DAF and Q2 and Westar at 25 and 30 DAF, and FAE1 was higher in Westar and Q2 than in Bronowski at 30 DAF. Correlation analysis for gene expression against DAF for each genotype supported a common trend in gene expression among the three cultivars with gene expression tending to decrease over time; except for LPAAT, which tended to increase. The correlation between the level of FAs and expression of genes by genotype indicated no general trend; rather correlations seem to depend on the genotype.

  5. CLINICAL IMPLICATION OF FATTY ACID CHANGES IN PATIENTS WITH PRIMARY GOUT ASSOCIATED WITH ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION

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    N. N. Kushnarenko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study blood levels of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs and adenyl nucleotides, and fatty acids levels in lipids of erythrocyte membranes in patients with primary gout associated with arterial hypertension (HT. Material and methods. 175 male patients with primary gout were included in the study. According to 24-hour blood pressure (BP monitoring results patients were split into two groups: 74 patients with normal BP (group 1 and 101 patients with HT (group 2. 29 healthy age-comparable subjects were included into control group. Uric acid, total NEFAs and glycerol blood levels were studied in all patients. Adenyl nucleotides (ATP , ADP and AMP levels were determined in erythrocytes. Higher fatty acid levels were specified in lipids of erythrocyte membranes, including the following acids: myristinic (С14:0, palmitinic (С16:0, stearic (С18:0, pentadecanic (С15:0, heptadecanic (С17:0, pentadecenic (С15:1, heptadecenic (С17:1, palmitooleic (С16:1, oleic (С18:1, linoleic (С18:2ω6, α-linolenic (С18:3ω3, γ-linolenic (С18:3ω6, dihomo-γ-linolenic (С20:3ω6, arachidonic (С20:4ω6, eicosapentaenoic (С20:5ω3, and docosapentaenoic (С22:5ω3. Results and discussion. Hypertensive patients with gout demonstrated higher NEFAs blood level and greater changes in ATP-ADP-AMP system than normotensive gout patients and healthy subjects as well as 2.2 and 3.7 times higher NEFAs/ATP ratio, respectively. In hypertensive patients with primary gout the composition of fatty acids in erythrocyte membranes lipids changed due to increase in saturated fatty acids amount and decrease in unsaturated fatty acids amount, at that monoenic acid levels increased while polyenic acid levels decreased in unsaturated acids composition. Hypertensive patients with gout shown 1.3 and 2.5 times less levels of ω-3 poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFA than normotensive gout patients and healthy subjects, respectively. At the same time ω-6 PUFA levels changed in

  6. Genome-Wide Association Study Singles Out SCD and LEPR as the Two Main Loci Influencing Intramuscular Fat Content and Fatty Acid Composition in Duroc Pigs.

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    Roger Ros-Freixedes

    Full Text Available Intramuscular fat (IMF content and fatty acid composition affect the organoleptic quality and nutritional value of pork. A genome-wide association study was performed on 138 Duroc pigs genotyped with a 60k SNP chip to detect biologically relevant genomic variants influencing fat content and composition. Despite the limited sample size, the genome-wide association study was powerful enough to detect the association between fatty acid composition and a known haplotypic variant in SCD (SSC14 and to reveal an association of IMF and fatty acid composition in the LEPR region (SSC6. The association of LEPR was later validated with an independent set of 853 pigs using a candidate quantitative trait nucleotide. The SCD gene is responsible for the biosynthesis of oleic acid (C18:1 from stearic acid. This locus affected the stearic to oleic desaturation index (C18:1/C18:0, C18:1, and saturated (SFA and monounsaturated (MUFA fatty acids content. These effects were consistently detected in gluteus medius, longissimus dorsi, and subcutaneous fat. The association of LEPR with fatty acid composition was detected only in muscle and was, at least in part, a consequence of its effect on IMF content, with increased IMF resulting in more SFA, less polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA, and greater SFA/PUFA ratio. Marker substitution effects estimated with a subset of 65 animals were used to predict the genomic estimated breeding values of 70 animals born 7 years later. Although predictions with the whole SNP chip information were in relatively high correlation with observed SFA, MUFA, and C18:1/C18:0 (0.48-0.60, IMF content and composition were in general better predicted by using only SNPs at the SCD and LEPR loci, in which case the correlation between predicted and observed values was in the range of 0.36 to 0.54 for all traits. Results indicate that markers in the SCD and LEPR genes can be useful to select for optimum fatty acid profiles of pork.

  7. Association between plasma fatty acids and inflammatory markers in patients with and without insulin resistance and in secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersch-Ferreira, Ângela Cristine; Sampaio, Geni Rodrigues; Gehringer, Marcella Omena; Torres, Elizabeth Aparecida Ferraz da Silva; Ross-Fernandes, Maria Beatriz; da Silva, Jacqueline Tereza; Torreglosa, Camila Ragne; Kovacs, Cristiane; Alves, Renata; Magnoni, Carlos Daniel; Weber, Bernardete; Rogero, Marcelo Macedo

    2018-02-21

    Proinflammatory biomarkers levels are increased among patients with cardiovascular disease, and it is known that both the presence of insulin resistance and diet may influence those levels. However, these associations are not well studied among patients with established cardiovascular disease. Our objective is to compare inflammatory biomarker levels among cardiovascular disease secondary prevention patients with and without insulin resistance, and to evaluate if there is any association between plasma fatty acid levels and inflammatory biomarker levels among them. In this cross-sectional sub-study from the BALANCE Program Trial, we collected data from 359 patients with established cardiovascular disease. Plasma fatty acids and inflammatory biomarkers (interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), adiponectin, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha) were measured. Biomarkers and plasma fatty acid levels of subjects across insulin resistant and not insulin resistant groups were compared, and general linear models were used to examine the association between plasma fatty acids and inflammatory biomarkers. Subjects with insulin resistance had a higher concentration of hs-CRP (p = 0.002) and IL-6 (p = 0.002) than subjects without insulin resistance. Among subjects without insulin resistance there was a positive association between stearic fatty acid and IL-6 (p = 0.032), and a negative association between alpha-linolenic fatty acid and pro-inflammatory biomarkers (p fatty acids and arachidonic fatty acid and adiponectin (p fatty acids and pro-inflammatory biomarkers (p fatty acids and adiponectin (p fatty acids. Subjects in secondary prevention for cardiovascular disease with insulin resistance have a higher concentration of hs-CRP and IL-6 than individuals without insulin resistance, and these inflammatory biomarkers are positively associated with saturated fatty acids and negatively associated with

  8. Preparation, characterization and thermal properties of styrene maleic anhydride copolymer (SMA)/fatty acid composites as form stable phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sari, Ahmet; Alkan, Cemil; Karaipekli, Ali; Onal, Adem

    2008-01-01

    Fatty acids such as stearic acid (SA), palmitic acid (PA), myristic acid (MA) and lauric acid (LA) are promising phase change materials (PCMs) for latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) applications, but high cost is the major drawback of them, limiting their utility area in thermal energy storage. The use of fatty acids as form stable PCMs will increase their feasibilities in practical applications due to the reduced cost of the LHTES system. In this regard, a series of styrene maleic anhydride copolymer (SMA)/fatty acid composites, SMA/SA, SMA/PA, SMA/MA, and SMA/LA, were prepared as form stable PCMs by encapsulation of fatty acids into the SMA, which acts as a supporting material. The encapsulation ratio of fatty acids was as much as 85 wt.% and no leakage of fatty acid was observed even when the temperature of the form stable PCM was over the melting point of the fatty acid in the composite. The prepared form stable composite PCMs were characterized using optic microscopy (OM), viscosimetry and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy methods, and the results showed that the SMA was physically and chemically compatible with the fatty acids. In addition, the thermal characteristics such as melting and freezing temperatures and latent heats of the form stable composite PCMs were measured by using the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) technique, which indicated they had good thermal properties. On the basis of all the results, it was concluded that form stable SMA/fatty acid composite PCMs had important potential for practical LHTES applications such as under floor space heating of buildings and passive solar space heating of buildings by using wallboard, plasterboard or floors impregnated with a form stable PCM due to their satisfying thermal properties, easy preparation in desired dimensions, direct usability without needing additional encapsulation thereby eliminating the thermal resistance caused by the shell and, thus, reducing the cost of

  9. Non-Esterified Fatty Acids Profiling in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Associations with Clinical Features and Th1 Response.

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    Javier Rodríguez-Carrio

    Full Text Available Since lipid compounds are known to modulate the function of CD4+ T-cells and macrophages, we hypothesize that altered levels of serum non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA may underlie rheumatoid arthritis (RA pathogenesis.Serum levels of NEFA (palmitic, stearic, palmitoleic, oleic, linoleic, γ-linoleic, arachidonic -AA-, linolenic, eicosapentaenoic -EPA- and docosahexaenoic -DHA- were quantified by LC-MS/MS after methyl-tert-butylether (MTBE-extraction in 124 RA patients and 56 healthy controls (HC. CD4+ phenotype was studied by flow cytometry. TNFα, IL-8, VEGF, GM-CSF, IFNγ, IL-17, CCL2, CXCL10, leptin and resistin serum levels were quantified by immunoassays. The effect of FA on IFNγ production by PBMC was evaluated in vitro.Lower levels of palmitic (p<0.0001, palmitoleic (p = 0.002, oleic (p = 0.010, arachidonic (p = 0.027, EPA (p<0.0001 and DHA (p<0.0001 were found in RA patients, some NEFA being altered at onset. Cluster analysis identified a NEFA profile (hallmarked by increased stearic and decreased EPA and DHA overrepresented in RA patients compared to HC (p = 0.002, being associated with clinical features (RF, shared epitope and erosions, increased IFNγ expression in CD4+ T-cells (p = 0.002 and a Th1-enriched serum milieu (IFNγ, CCL2 and CXCL10, all p<0.005. In vitro assays demonstrated that imbalanced FA could underlie IFNγ production by CD4+ T-cells. Finally, changes on NEFA levels were associated with clinical response upon TNFα-blockade.An altered NEFA profile can be found in RA patients associated with clinical characteristics of aggressive disease and enhanced Th1 response. These results support the relevance of lipidomic studies in RA and provide a rationale for new therapeutic targets.

  10. Fat characteristics and fatty acid profile of sea cucumbers (Holothuria Scabra obtained from the coasts of the Bushehr province -Iran

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    Najmeh Jadavi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sea cucumbers are belonging to echinoderms and one of the important members of the food chain in temperate ecosystems and tropical coral reefs. The medicinal and nutritional uses of these invertebrates are primordial and are important as ecological, biological and economic properties. Holothuria Scabra, as one of the most valuable commercial species of sea cucumber in the world, is the dominant species in many Persian Gulf coasts such as the Bushehr province coasts. Conspicuous characteristics such as the use of inexpensive foods in their culture, the rather rapid, easy and low cost growth and reproduction, the possibility of culture with other fish, reduce the organic substrate in pools, the broad tolerance in water factors changes such as salinity and temperature it has selected them to culture.It seems they are containing the significant amounts of nutrients, especially appreciated fatty acids. Therefore, the aims of the current study are determination of total fat content, quality and quantity evaluations of some physicochemical parameters such as acid value (AV, peroxide value (PV, and refractive index (RI as well as, identify the profile of fatty acids in the fat. Materials & Methods: In this study, after collecting the 36 samples of sea cucumbers from the coasts of the bushehr province, sample preparation, and extraction of fat, their fatty acids profile were analyzed using gas chromatography with flame ionization detector (GC-FID. Results: The peroxide and the acid values were 0.62±0.0435 and 0.7553±0.0034. The optical refractive index of the oil was 1467 at 26°C, and total fat was also 2%. Among 19 identified fatty acids obtained from the GC analysis of Holothuria Scabra oil, fatty acids: heneicosanoic acid, linoleic acid, palimitic acid, stearic acid, linoleic acid, and Meristic acid, with respectively amounts of 40.81%, 27.5%, 15.24%, 4.73%, 4.46% and 2.38% had the highest values, and other fatty acids were negligible

  11. Damage of guinea pig heart and arteries by a trioleate-enriched diet and of cultured cardiomyocytes by oleic acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Krieglstein

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Mono-unsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs like oleic acid have been shown to cause apoptosis of cultured endothelial cells by activating protein phosphatase type 2C alpha and beta (PP2C. The question arises whether damage of endothelial or other cells could be observed in intact animals fed with a trioleate-enriched diet.Dunkin-Hartley guinea pigs were fed with a trioleate-enriched diet for 5 months. Advanced atherosclerotic changes of the aorta and the coronary arteries could not be seen but the arteries appeared in a pre-atherosclerotic stage of vascular remodelling. However, the weight and size of the hearts were lower than in controls and the number of apoptotic myocytes increased in the hearts of trioleate-fed animals. To confirm the idea that oleic acid may have caused this apoptosis by activation of PP2C, cultured cardiomyocytes from guinea pigs and mice were treated with various lipids. It was demonstrable that oleic acid dose-dependently caused apoptosis of cardiomyocytes from both species, yet, similar to previous experiments with cultured neurons and endothelial cells, stearic acid, elaidic acid and oleic acid methylester did not. The apoptotic effect caused by oleic acid was diminished when PP2C alpha and beta were downregulated by siRNA showing that PP2C was causally involved in apoptosis caused by oleic acid.The glycerol trioleate diet given to guinea pigs for 5 months did not cause marked atherosclerosis but clearly damaged the hearts by activating PP2C alpha and beta. The diet used with 24% (wt/wt glycerol trioleate is not comparable to human diets. The detrimental role of MUFAs for guinea pig heart tissue in vivo is shown for the first time. Whether it is true for humans remains to be shown.

  12. Kinetics of different 123-I and 14-C fatty acids in normal and diabetic rat myocardium in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckurts, T.E.; Shreeve, W.W.; Machulla, H.-J.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1984-01-01

    For measuring myocardial metabolism by single photon scintigraphy various iodinated substrate analogues have been proposed. The present study compares in normal and diabetic rats the metabolic pathways of 14-C-palmitic acid (PA), 123-I-para-phenylpentadecanoic acid (I-pPPDA), 123-I-ortho-phenylpentadecanoic acid (I-oPPDA), 14-C-stearic acid (SA) and 123-I-w-heptadecanoic acid (I-ωHDA). In normal and diabetic rats free fatty acids showed a rapid tracer accumulation and an initial rapid, then a slow rate component of release. PA and I-pPPDA were preferentially esterified into triglycerides, whereas SA and I-ωHDA equally distributed between triglycerides and phospholipids. I-oPPDA nearly exclusively labelled the free fatty acid pool. - Turnover of SA and I-ωHDA was similar in triglycerides and phospholipids; yet PA and I-pPPDA continued to increase in triglycerides for 3-5 minutes after injection but decreased in phospholipids. - Following induction of diabetes by Streptocotocin, the primary effect was an inhibition of incorporation of all substrates tested into triglycerides and phospholipids with an initial rapid turnover in the total lipid fraction. - Of the total myocardial activities a considerable fraction was water soluble and another bound to solid tissue residue, with an early maximum and subsequent decline; the values for 14-C-labelled substrates remained below those of radioiodine. Thus different labelled fatty acids behave metabolically differently and promise to be useful for differentiating various intracellular metabolic pathways. External analysis of myocardial fatty acids metabolism requires correction for labelled catabolites. (Author)

  13. On the microstructure of organic solutions of mono-carboxylic acids: Combined study by infrared spectroscopy, small-angle neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eremin, Roman A., E-mail: era@jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Kholmurodov, Kholmirzo T. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); International University “Dubna”, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Petrenko, Viktor I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Kyiv 03022 (Ukraine); Rosta, László [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest H-1525 (Hungary); Grigoryeva, Natalia A. [Faculty of Physics, Saint-Petersburg State University, 198504 Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Avdeev, Mikhail V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-05

    Highlights: • The model of the scattering particle for a reliable SANS analysis is proposed. • The structural parameters of saturated mono-carboxylic acids in solutions are obtained. • The differences in nematic transitions correlate to solvation peculiarities. - Abstract: The data of infrared spectroscopy (IR), molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) have been combined to conclude about the nanoscale structural organization of organic non-polar solutions of saturated mono-carboxylic acids with different alkyl chain lengths for diluted solutions of saturated myristic (C14) and stearic (C18) acids in benzene and decalin. In particular, the degree of dimerization was found from the IR spectra. The structural anisotropy of the acids and their dimers was used in the treatment of the data of MD simulations to describe the solute–solvent interface in a cylindrical approximation and show its rather strong influence on SANS. The corresponding scattering length density profiles were used to fit the experimental SANS data comprising the information about the acid molecule isomerization. The SANS data from concentrated solutions showed a partial self-assembling of the acids within the nematic transition is different for two solvents due to lyophobic peculiarities.

  14. Structural and surface morphological studies of long chain fatty acid thin films deposited by Langmuir-Blodgett technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Nayan Mani, E-mail: nayanmanidas3@gmail.com [Department of Applied Physics, Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad 826004 (India); Roy, Dhrubojyoti [Department of Applied Physics, Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad 826004 (India); Gupta, Mukul [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452017 (India); Gupta, P.S. [Department of Applied Physics, Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad 826004 (India)

    2012-12-15

    In the present work we aim to study the structural and surface morphological characteristics of divalent cation (cadmium ion, Cd{sup 2+}) induced thin mono- to multilayer films of fatty acids such as arachidic acid and stearic acid prepared by the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. These ultra thin films of various numbers of layers were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). In this specific Y-type deposition, it was found that as the individual layer thickness increases, the corresponding layer by layer interfacial electron density of the thin films decreases. Since the fatty acid chain tries to maintain its minimum value of cross-sectional area, tilting occurs with respect to its nearest neighbor. The tilt angle calculated for 9 layers of cadmium arachidate (CdA{sub 2}) and cadmium stearate (CdSt{sub 2}) are 18 Degree-Sign and 19.5 Degree-Sign , respectively. An asymmetric air gap of thickness {approx}3 A was also seen between the tail parts of 2 molecular chains. The RMS roughness and average height factors calculated through AFM studies show non-uniform surface morphology of both CdA{sub 2} and CdSt{sub 2}, although the calculated topographic variations were found to have more irregularity in case of CdSt{sub 2} than in case of CdA{sub 2}.

  15. Effects of nanorod structure and conformation of fatty acid self-assembled layers on superhydrophobicity of zinc oxide surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badre, Chantal; Dubot, P; Lincot, Daniel; Pauporte, Thierry; Turmine, Mireille

    2007-12-15

    Superhydrophobic surfaces have been prepared from nanostructured zinc oxide layers by a treatment with fatty acid molecules. The layers are electrochemically deposited from an oxygenated aqueous zinc chloride solution. The effects of the layer's structure, from a dense film to that of a nanorod array, as well as that of the properties of the fatty acid molecules based on C18 chains are described. A contact angle (CA) as high as 167 degrees is obtained with the nanorod structure and the linear saturated molecule (stearic acid). Lower values are found with molecules having an unsaturated bond on C9, in particular with a cis conformation (140 degrees ). These results, supplemented by infrared spectroscopy, indicate an enhancement of the sensitivity to the properties of the fatty acid molecules (conformation, flexibility, saturated or not) when moving from the flat surface to the nanostructured surface. This is attributed to a specific influence of the structure of the tops of the rods and lateral wall properties on the adsorption and organization of the molecules. CA measurements show a very good stability of the surface in time if stored in an environment protected from UV radiations.

  16. Studies on the role of unsaturation in the fatty acid surfactant molecule on the thermal conductivity of magnetite nanofluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenin, Ramanujam; Joy, Pattayil Alias

    2017-11-15

    To study the role of unsaturation in the surfactant molecule on the thermal conductivity of magnetite nanofluids, four different fatty acid (stearic, oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acids with different degree of unsaturation) coated magnetite nanoparticles of comparable size are prepared and dispersed in toluene. It is found that the nanofluid with the saturated fatty acid coated nanoparticles show larger viscosity than the fluid with the unsaturated fatty acid coated particles at all concentrations. Thermal conductivity studies show enhancement only above a critical concentration for all fluids. The critical concentration for thermal conductivity enhancement varies with the surfactant, possibly due to the difference in the degree of aggregation of the nanoparticles in the fluid, because of the difference in the conformation of the surfactant molecules on the nanoparticle's surface. The experimental thermal conductivity follows the Maxwell model at higher concentrations. From the overall studies, it is observed that the thermal conductivity of the fluids with aggregated or assembled nanoparticles shows slightly larger enhancement than that of the fluids with isolated particles. However, in the presence of a magnetic field, the fluids with isolated nanoparticles showed relatively larger enhancement, possibly due to the easy response of the isolated magnetite nanoparticles to the applied field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of Bioactivity, Volatile and Fatty Acid Profile in Supercritical Fluid Extracts of Mexican arnica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Saúl García-Pérez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE is a sustainable technique used for the extraction of lipophilic metabolites such as pigments and fatty acids. Arnica plant is considered a potential candidate material with high antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. Therefore, in this study, a locally available Heterotheca inuloides, also known as Mexican arnica, was analyzed for the extraction of high-value compounds. Based on different pressure (P, temperature (T, and co-solvent (CoS, four treatments (T were prepared. A maximum 7.13% yield was recovered from T2 (T = 60 °C, P = 10 MPa, CoS = 8 g/min, followed by 6.69% from T4 (T = 60 °C, P = 30 MPa, CoS = 4 g/min. Some bioactive sesquiterpenoids such as 7-hydroxycadalene, caryophyllene and δ-cadinene were identified in the extracts by GC/MS. The fatty acid profile revealed that the main components were palmitic acid (C16:0, followed by linoleic acid (C18:2ω6c, α-linolenic acid (C18:3ω3 and stearic acid (C18:0 differing in percent yield per treatment. Antibacterial activities were determined by the agar diffusion method, indicating that all the treatments exerted strong antibacterial activity against S. aureus, C. albicans, and E. coli strains. The antioxidant capacity of the extracts was also measured by three in vitro assays, DPPH, TEAC and FRAP, using Trolox as a standard. Results showed high antioxidant capacity enabling pharmaceutical applications of Mexican arnica.

  18. Folate and vitamin B12 concentrations are associated with plasma DHA and EPA fatty acids in European adolescents: the Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence (HELENA) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesia, I; Huybrechts, I; González-Gross, M; Mouratidou, T; Santabárbara, J; Chajès, V; González-Gil, E M; Park, J Y; Bel-Serrat, S; Cuenca-García, M; Castillo, M; Kersting, M; Widhalm, K; De Henauw, S; Sjöström, M; Gottrand, F; Molnár, D; Manios, Y; Kafatos, A; Ferrari, M; Stehle, P; Marcos, A; Sánchez-Muniz, F J; Moreno, L A

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the association between vitamin B6, folate and vitamin B12 biomarkers and plasma fatty acids in European adolescents. A subsample from the Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence study with valid data on B-vitamins and fatty acid blood parameters, and all the other covariates used in the analyses such as BMI, Diet Quality Index, education of the mother and physical activity assessed by a questionnaire, was selected resulting in 674 cases (43 % males). B-vitamin biomarkers were measured by chromatography and immunoassay and fatty acids by enzymatic analyses. Linear mixed models elucidated the association between B-vitamins and fatty acid blood parameters (changes in fatty acid profiles according to change in 10 units of vitamin B biomarkers). DHA, EPA) and n-3 fatty acids showed positive associations with B-vitamin biomarkers, mainly with those corresponding to folate and vitamin B12. Contrarily, negative associations were found with n-6:n-3 ratio, trans-fatty acids and oleic:stearic ratio. With total homocysteine (tHcy), all the associations found with these parameters were opposite (for instance, an increase of 10 nmol/l in red blood cell folate or holotranscobalamin in females produces an increase of 15·85 µmol/l of EPA (P value DHA (P value acids might suggest underlying mechanisms between B-vitamins and CVD and it is worth the attention of public health policies.

  19. Radiotherapy improves serum fatty acids and lipid profile in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Sana; Channa, Naseem Aslam; Talpur, Farha Naz; Younis, Muhammad; Tabassum, Naila

    2017-05-18

    Breast cancer is a disease with diverse clinical symptoms, molecular profiles, and its nature to response its therapeutic treatments. Radiotherapy (RT), along with surgery and chemotherapy is a part of treatment in breast cancer. The aim of present study was to investigate pre and post treatment effects of radiotherapy in serum fatty acids and its lipids profile in patients with breast cancer. In this comparative as well as follow up study, Serum fatty acids were performed by gas chromatography to investigate fatty acids and Microlab for analysis of lipid profile. Among serum free and total fatty acids the major saturated fatty acids (SFAs) in serum lipids of breast cancer patients (pre and post treated) were stearic acid (18:0) and palmitic acid (16:0). These fatty acids contributed about 35-50% of total fatty acids. The decreased concentrations of linoleic acid (C18:2) and arachidonic acid (C20:4) with a lower ratio of C18:2/C18:1 was found in pretreated breast cancer patients as compared to controls. The n-3/n-6 ratio of breast cancer patients was decreased before treatment but it was 35% increased after treatment. In addition, plasma activity of D6 desaturase was increased in the breast cancer patients, while the activity of D5 desaturase was decreased. Increased levels of SFAs, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) and decreased polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) levels in breast cancer patients (pre and post treated) as compared to controls. Serum total cholesterol (TC) (224.4 mg/dL) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (142.9 mg/dL) were significantly increased in pretreated breast cancer patients but after the radiotherapy treatment, the TC (150.2 mg/dL) and LDL-C (89.8 mg/dL) were decreased. It seems that RT would have played a potential role in the treatment of BC. After RT the serum levels of PUFAs, TC, and LDL-C are improved. Our study reinforces the important role of RT in the management of BC. The level of PUFAs, TC, and LDL-C can be

  20. Lipoic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Tetikcok

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lipoic acid, which is defined as a miralce antioxidan, is used by many departments. Eventhough clinical using data are very limited , it is used in treatment of diabetic neuropathy, physical therapy and rehabilitation clinic, dermatology clinic, geriatric clinics. It has usage area for cosmetic purposes. Although there are reports there are the direction of the effectiveness in these areas, the works done are not enough. Today lipoic acid , used in many areas ,is evaluated as universal antioxidant [J Contemp Med 2015; 5(3.000: 206-209

  1. Investigation of Fatty Acid Ketohydrazone Modified Liposome’s Properties as a Drug Carrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keita Hayashi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available pH-responsive liposomes were prepared by modifying the liposome with acid-cleaving amphiphiles. Palmitic ketohydrazone (P-KH or stearic ketohydrazone (S-KH, composed of hydrophilic sugar headgroup and hydrophobic acyl chain, was used as a modifier of the DMPC liposome. Because the ketohydrazone group of P-KH or S-KH was cleaved at low pH conditions (acidic pH was found to become more hydrophobic and less fluidic as compared with that at neutral pH; that is, P-KH modified liposome became more rigid structure. Therefore, it seems that the P-KH modified liposome could protect encapsulated drugs from the enzymes in the lysosome. This study shows the novel approach about design of pH-responsive liposomes based on the membrane properties.

  2. Simultaneous analysis of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids present in pequi fruits by capillary electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia M. de Castro Barra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, an alternative method has been proposed for simultaneous analysis of palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acids by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE using indirect detection. The background electrolyte (BGE used for the analysis of these fatty acids (FAs consisted of 15.0 mmol L−1 NaH2PO4/Na2HPO4 at pH 6.86, 4.0 mmol L−1 SDBS, 8.3 mmol L−1 Brij 35, 45% v/v acetonitrile (can, and 2.1% n-octanol. The FAs quantification of FAs was performed using a response factor approach, which provided a high analytical throughput for the real sample. The CZE method, which was applied successfully for the analysis of pequi pulp, has advantages such as short analysis time, absence of lipid fraction extraction and derivatization steps, and no significant difference in the 95% confidence intervals for FA quantification results, compared to the gas chromatography official method (AOCS Ce 1h-05.

  3. The fatty acid and tocopherol constituents of the seed oil extracted from 21 grape varieties (Vitis spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabir, Ali; Unver, Ahmet; Kara, Zeki

    2012-07-01

    Fatty acids and tocopherols in appropriate quantities are invaluable attributes that are desirable in seeds of agricultural products. Studies have generally focused on the evaluation of the oil and tocopherol components of oil crops. Recently, investigations revealed that the grape seed has robust potential in the production of healthy fatty acids as well as tocopherols. This study was thus conducted to determine the oil and tocopherol components of grape seeds, obtained from various grape cultivars of different species, including two rootstock varieties. The grape seed oil concentration of the studied varieties ranged from 7.3 to 22.4%. The determined fatty acid profiles of the genotypes conformed to the pattern described in the literature for grapes. Linoleic acid is the major component comprising 53.6-69.6% of the total, followed by oleic (16.2-31.2%), palmitic (6.9-12.9%) and stearic (1.44-4.69%). The oils of all the seeds analysed showed a preponderance of α-tocopherol (ranging from 260.5 to 153.1 mg kg⁻¹ oil extract). β-Tocopherol, γ-tocopherol and δ-tocopherol were also detected with the general means of 0.98, 22.2 and 0.92 mg kg⁻¹, respectively. Linoleic acid showed a significantly negative correlation with all the fatty acids analysed. The strongest negative correlation existed between linoleic and oleic acids (r = -0.834, P grape seed show great variation among the genotypes. Markedly higher proportions of linoleic acid with considerable amounts of tocopherols found in the oil samples suggest that grape seed is a good source for culinary, pharmaceutical and cosmetic uses. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. ToF-SIMS and principal component analysis of lipids and amino acids from inflamed and dysplastic human colonic mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbini, Marco; Petito, Valentina; de Notaristefani, Francesco; Scaldaferri, Franco; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Tortora, Luca

    2017-10-01

    Here, time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and multivariate analysis were combined to study the role of ulcerative colitis (UC), a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), in the colon cancer progression. ToF-SIMS was used to obtain mass spectra and chemical maps from the mucosal surface of human normal (NC), inflamed (IC), and dysplastic (DC) colon tissues. Chemical mapping with a lateral resolution of ≈ 1 μm allowed to evaluate zonation of fatty acids and amino acids as well as the morphological condition of the intestinal glands. High mass resolution ToF-SIMS spectra showed chemical differences in lipid and amino acid composition as a function of pathological state. In positive ion mode, mono- (MAG), di- (DAG), and triacylglycerol (TAG) signals were detected in NC tissues, while in IC and DC tissues, the only cholesterol was present as lipid class representative. Signals from fatty acids, collected in negative ion mode, were subjected to principal component analysis (PCA). PCA showed a strict correlation between IC and DC samples, due to an increase of stearic, arachidonic, and linoleic acid. In the same way, differences in the amino acid composition were highlighted through multivariate analysis. PCA revealed that glutamic acid, leucine/isoleucine, and valine fragments are related to IC tissues. On the other hand, tyrosine, methionine, and tryptophan peaks contributed highly to the separation of DC tissues. Finally, a classification of NC, IC, and DC patients was also achieved through hierarchical cluster analysis of amino acid fragments. In this case, human colonic inflammation showed a stronger relationship with normal than dysplastic condition. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  5. [Mineral elements analysis of Momordica charantiap seeds by ICP-AES and fatty acid profile identification of seed oil by GC-MS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-ru; Deng, Ze-yuan; Fan, Ya-wei; Li, Jing; Liu, Zhi-han

    2010-08-01

    In the present study, a special kind of Momordica charantia seeds produced in Hai Nan was selected and analyzed. Firstly, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrophotometry (ICP-AES) was used to determine the mineral elements. It was clear that the contents of K, Mg and P are the highest in the seeds; Cr and Zn takes up to 5.65% and 45.45% high, especially, which are rare in plant foods. These minerals, especially Cr and Zn might have a complex effect on those proteins or polysaccharides and form a stronger anticipation of hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia and cholesterol. Secondly, seed oil was extracted by supercritical CO2 extraction with a yield ratio of 36.89, and the fatty acids were treated by methylation in alkaline process and purified by thin-layer chromatography, then analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) identification. The saturated fatty acids (SFA) take up 36.712, and mainly are stearic acid; monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) is only 3.33% which is dominantly linoleic acid (LA); Polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) accounted for 59.96%, and the alpha-eleostearic acid takes up 54.26% as the main fatty acids in all. The plentiful alpha-eleostearic acid leads to strong effects of inhibiting tumor cell proliferation, lowering blood fat, anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory and preventing cardiovascular diseases, and so on. Knowing clearly the mineral elements distribution and identifying the composition of fatty acid, especially the main fatty acids in the oil, are both of great guiding importance to further exploit the clinical and edible value in Momordica charantiap seeds.

  6. Mefenamic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mefenamic acid comes as a capsule to take by mouth. It is usually taken with food every 6 hours as needed for up to 1 week. Follow ... pain vomit that is bloody or looks like coffee grounds black, tarry, or bloody stools slowed breathing ...

  7. Acid rain. Les pluies acides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curren, T

    1979-11-28

    This report was produced for the use of Members of Parliament and House of Commons committees. The document describes the formation of acid rain, emissions of acidifying pollutants in North America, the growth of the problem and its environmental effects on aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, human health and man-made structures. Areas of Canada which are most susceptible are identified. Actions taken by Parliament are given, including the formation of a sub-committee on acid rain and the passing of Bill C-51 in 1980 to amend the Clean Air Act, bringing it closer to a similar law in the U.S. A chronology of government responses to acid rain at the international, national and provincial level, is given. The most recent government actions included the passing of the US Clean Air Act by the Senate, the amending of the act into law, and commencement of negotiations to develop a Canada-US Air Quality Accord. 10 refs.

  8. Consumer sensory evaluation, fatty acid composition, and shelf-life of ground beef with subcutaneous fat trimmings from different carcass locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerth, Chris R; Harbison, Amanda L; Smith, Stephen B; Miller, Rhonda K

    2015-06-01

    Brisket, chuck, plate, flank, and round subcutaneous fat trim were used to produce ground beef patties then evaluated for color, lipid oxidation, fatty acid composition, volatile chemical compounds and consumer sensory evaluation. Color, TBARS, consumer sensory evaluation, and cook/freezer loss did not differ (P>0.05) among carcass fat locations. Percentage stearic acid was lower (P=0.044) in the ground beef using brisket fat than using the chuck and flank fat. Patties made with brisket fat were higher in cis-vaccenic acid (P=0.016) and the saturated to monounsaturated fatty acid ratio (P=0.018) than all other sources of subcutaneous fat. Butanedione was highest (P=0.013) in patties using flank and plate fat. Ground beef with brisket fat was higher (P=0.003) than all other sources for beefy aroma. Altering the profile of non-polar, triglyceride fatty acids has no effect on sensory flavor or major volatile chemical compounds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of olive scale (Parlatoria oleae (Colvée attack on yield, quality and fatty acid profile of virgin olive oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Krapac

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Olive scale (Parlatoria oleae (Colvée is a common pest in Mediterranean olive orchards which primarily causes damage on olive fruits. The quality of virgin olive oil is strongly related to the health status of the olive fruits from which is extracted. In this paper the effects of olive scale (Parlatoria oleae (Colvée attack on the oil yield, chemical and sensorial quality, as well as on the fatty acid profile of virgin olive oil were studied. Olive fruits (Olea europea L. from Bova cultivar (Istria, Croatia were collected and divided into different groups according to the presence or absence of infestation by the olive scale. Olive scale attack did not induce ripening process nor stimulate oil synthesis in the infested fruits. Healthy and infested fruit groups were processed separately to produce corresponding olive oils. As regards the oil acidity, the oil samples obtained from infested fruits had similar values as samples obtained from healthy fruits. However, olive scale attack led to slight oxidative deterioration of oil, but had no effect on sensory characteristics of obtained olive oils. Fatty acid profile was slightly affected by olive scale attack: an increase of linoleic (about 13 % and palmitoleic acid (about 8 %, but a decrease of oleic (about 3 % and stearic acid (about 4 % in oils obtained from infested fruits was detected. Oleic to linoleic ratio was lower in oils obtained from infested fruits indicating its lower oxidative stability.

  10. Microelement contents and fatty acid compositions of Rhus coriaria L. and Pistacia terebinthus L. fruits spread commonly in the south eastern Anatolia region of Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizil, Suleyman; Turk, Murat

    2010-01-01

    Sumac (Rhus coriaria L.) and terebinth (Pistacia terebinthus L.) are two important spice plants of south eastern Anatolia, Turkey. Nutrients, physical properties including moisture, ash, dry matter, protein, fatty oil and essential oil content, along with Al, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Na, Ni, Pb, Zn and characteristics of fruit sizes and fatty acid compositions of both plants were determined from ripe fruits. The free fatty acid content was determined in the fruit oil, and the main fatty acids of sumac and terebinth were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. They included oleic, linoleic, palmitic and stearic acids in a ratio of 37.7% and 34.8%, 27.4% and 17.3%, 21.1% and 21.7% and, 4.7% and 2.5%, respectively. The fruits of both plants were rich in oil, fatty acids and minerals, suggesting that they are valuable for using in food. The data may also be useful for the evaluation of nutritional information.

  11. Alternations in Cholesterol and Fatty Acids Composition in Egg Yolk of Rhode Island Red x Fyoumi Hens Fed with Hemp Seeds (Cannabis sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhaib Shahid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to evaluate the influence of hemp seed (HS supplementation on egg yolk cholesterol and fatty acid composition in laying hens. Sixty hens (Rhode Island Red x Fyoumi were evenly distributed into four groups (three replicates per group at the peak production (34 weeks. HS was included into the ration at the level of 0.0 (HS-0, 15 (HS-15, 20 (HS-20, and 25% (HS-25 and continued the supplementation for consecutively three weeks. At the end of the experiment, three eggs per replicate were randomly collected and analyzed for egg yolk fatty acids and cholesterol profile. The statistical analysis of the result revealed that supplementation of HS-25 significantly (P<0.05 decreased egg yolk total cholesterol, myristic (C14:0, palmitic (C16:0, and stearic (C18:0. Similarly, total as well as individual monounsaturated fatty acids decreased significantly (P<0.05 while total and individual polyunsaturated fatty acids increased significantly in the HS-25. In addition, total omega-3 and omega-6 increased significantly in the HS-25 group. From the present result, we concluded that addition of HS at the rate of 25% to the diet of laying hens augmented the cholesterol and fatty acids profile in egg yolk.

  12. Contrasting effects of Bifidobacterium breve NCIMB 702258 and Bifidobacterium breve DPC 6330 on the composition of murine brain fatty acids and gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Rebecca; Marques, Tatiana M; O'Sullivan, Orla; Ross, R Paul; Shanahan, Fergus; Quigley, Eamonn M; Dinan, Timothy G; Kiely, Barry; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Cotter, Paul D; Fouhy, Fiona; Stanton, Catherine

    2012-05-01

    We previously showed that microbial metabolism in the gut influences the composition of bioactive fatty acids in host adipose tissue. This study compared the effect of dietary supplementation for 8 wk with human-derived Bifidobacterium breve strains on fat distribution and composition and the composition of the gut microbiota in mice. C57BL/6 mice (n = 8 per group) received B. breve DPC 6330 or B. breve NCIMB 702258 (10(9) microorganisms) daily for 8 wk or no supplement (controls). Tissue fatty acid composition was assessed by gas-liquid chromatography while 16S rRNA pyrosequencing was used to investigate microbiota composition. Visceral fat mass and brain stearic acid, arachidonic acid, and DHA were higher in mice supplemented with B. breve NCIMB 702258 than in mice in the other 2 groups (P breve DPC 6330 and B. breve NCIMB 702258 supplementation resulted in higher propionate concentrations in the cecum than did no supplementation (P breve DPC 6330 than in mice supplemented with B. breve NCIMB 702258 and unsupplemented controls, respectively. The response of fatty acid metabolism to administration of bifidobacteria is strain-dependent, and strain-strain differences are important factors that influence modulation of the gut microbial community by ingested microorganisms.

  13. Chemical Compositions of Achillea sivasica: Different Plant Part Volatiles, Enantiomers and Fatty Acids

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    Gülmira Özek

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, Microsteam distillation - Solid phase microextraction (MSD-SPME and hydrodistillation (HD techniques were applied to obtain volatiles from Achillea sivasica, an endemic species from Turkey. GC-FID and GC/MS analysis revealed that 1,8-cineole (22.1% and a -pinene (9.3% were the main constituents of the hydrodistilled flower volatiles. (Z- b -Farnesene (23.9%, decanoic acid (10.1%, b- eudesmol (8.0%, tricosane (7.3% and hexadecanoic acid (7.2% were the main volatiles obtained from flowers by MSD-SPME. The leaf volatiles obtained by HD contained camphor (9.0%, b -pinene (6.9%, 1,8-cineole (6.7%, a -pinene (6.7% and a -bisabolol (6.6% as the main constituents while the leaf volatiles obtained by MSD-SPME technique were rich in (E-geranyl acetone (10.5%, (E- b -ionone (10.3%, camphor (10.2%, 1,8-cineole (9.6%, longiverbenone (7.9%, b -eudesmol (7.5%, isopropyl myristate (6.7% and epi- a -bisabolol (6.4%. The root volatiles were rich in longiverbenone (14.1%, (E-geranyl acetone (9.3%, nonanol (12.1% and decanol (12.5%. The enantiomeric distribution of the major volatile constituents was analyzed by using different b -cyclodextrin chiral columns. (1R-(+- a -Pinene, (1S-(-- b -pinene, (4R-(+-limonene, (1R,3S,5R-(--trans-pinocarveol, (1S,2R,4S-(--borneol, (2S-(-- a -bisabolol were detected as dominant enantiomers. The lipids extracted from the flower and leaf with Folch method and methylated with BF 3 reagent contained common acids: linolenic, linoleic, hexadecanoic acids. Oleic and stearic acids were detected particularly in high amount in the flower lipids

  14. Fatty acid composition and antioxidant activity of oils from two cultivars of Cantaloupe extracted by supercritical fluid extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, M.; Mariod, A.; Bagalkotkar, G.; Ling, H. S

    2010-07-01

    The effect of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) fractionation of three oil fractions (1st, 2nd, 3rd fraction) on the fatty acid composition and antioxidant activity of oils from two cultivars of cantaloupe were investigated. Rock melon oil (RMO) and Golden Langkawi oil (GLO) were extracted using SFE and the major fatty acids for both cultivars were linoleic, oleic, palmitic, and stearic acid. The SFA decreased from 15.78 to 14.14% in RMO 1st fraction, and MUFA decreased from 18.30 to 16.56% in RMO 2nd fraction, while PUFA increased from 65.9 to 69.30% in RMO 3rd fraction. On the other hand SFA decreased from 16.35 to 13.91% in GLO 1{sup s}t fraction, and MUFA decreased from 17.50 to 15.57% in GLO 2nd fraction, while PUFA increased from 66.15 to 70.52% in GLO 3rd fraction. The different fractions of the two oils showed high antioxidant activity in reducing the oxidation of {beta}-carotene in beta-carotene bleaching assay (BCB) and the quenching of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). (Author) 41 refs.

  15. Relationships between the daily intake of unsaturated plant lipids and the contents of major milk fatty acids in dairy goats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez Marín, A.L.; Núñez Sánchez, N.; Garzón Sigler, A. I.; Peña Blanco, F.; Fuente, M.A. de la

    2015-07-01

    A meta-regression of the effects of the amount of plant lipids consumed by dairy goats on the contents of some milk fat fatty acids (FA) was carried out. Fourteen peer-reviewed published papers reporting 17 experiments were used in the study. Those experiments compared control diets without added fat with diets that included plant lipids rich in unsaturated FA, summing up to 64 treatments. The results showed that increasing daily intake of plant lipids linearly reduced the contents of all medium chain saturated FA in milk fat. Moreover, it was observed that the longer the chain of the milk saturated FA, the greater the negative effect of the plant lipid intake on their contents. On the other hand, the contents of stearic acid and the sum of oleic, linoleic and α-linolenic acids in milk fat linearly increased as daily plant lipid intake rose. The results obtained corroborate previous reports on the effects of feeding dairy goats with increasing amounts of unsaturated plant lipids on milk FA profile. (Author)

  16. Les acides gras hydroxylés : agro-tensioactifs aux propriétés moussantes originales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fameau Anne-Laure

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfactants, which are molecules bearing a hydrophobic part and a hydrophilic part, are widely used in many daily life products (detergent, cosmetic, pharmaceutical... because of their foaming properties. Indeed, they spontaneously go to the interface between air and water, which stabilizes the thin water films surrounding air bubbles to obtain foams. Currently, since the most used surfactants come from derivatives from petroleum-based products, their replacement by biomolecules is a major issue in the current context of sustainable development and green chemistry. This could promote the use of molecules from agricultural resources, such as hydroxyl fatty acids that can be extracted from oil or from the tegument of fruits and vegetables, as new agro-based surfactants. Here, we present recent research on the surfactant properties of the 12-hydroxy stearic acid coming from the castor oil. This fatty acid has very advantageous foaming properties compared to conventional synthetic surfactant systems: it enables the production of foams which are at the same time very abundant and, remarkably, stables over a span lasting more than 6 months. Moreover, these foams are thermoresponsive because the foam stability can be easily modulated by a simple modification of the temperature.

  17. Acidic methanolysis v. alkaline saponification in gas chromatographic characterization of mycobacteria: differentiation between Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare and Mycobacterium gastri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, L

    1983-08-01

    Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare and M.gastri were analyzed with capillary gas chromatography after each strain had been subjected to acidic methanolysis or to alkaline saponification followed by methylation. Prominent peaks of myristic, palmitoleic, palmitic, oleic, stearic and tuberculostearic acids were found in the chromatograms of both species, whereas 2-octadecanol and 2-eicosanol were detected only in M. avium-intracellulare. In initial runs, both of the derivatization principles yielded virtually identical chromatograms for a given strain. After repeated injections of extracts from alkaline saponification, however, the alcohol peaks showed pronounced tailing and finally almost disappeared from the chromatograms. This disadvantage, which was not observed when only acid methanolysis was used, could be overcome with trifluoroacetylation. Restored peak shape of the underivatized alcohols could be achieved by washing the cross-linked stationary phase in the capillary tubing with organic solvents. The study demonstrated the importance of conditions which enable separation of 2-octadecanol and 2-eicosanol when gas chromatography is used for species identification of mycobacteria.

  18. Dietary intake of ain-93 standard diet induces Fatty liver with altered hepatic fatty acid profile in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias Santos, Juliana; Suruagy Amaral, Monique; Lima Oliveira, Suzana; Porto Barbosa, Júnia; Rego Cabral, Cyro; Sofia Melo, Ingrid; Bezerra Bueno, Nassib; Duarte Freitas, Johnatan; Goulart Sant'ana, Antônio; Rocha Ataíde, Terezinha

    2015-05-01

    There are several standard diets for animals used in scientific research, usually conceived by scientific institutions. The AIN-93 diet is widely used, but there are some reports of fatty liver in Wistar rats fed this diet. We aimed to evaluate the hepatic repercussions of the AIN-93 diet intake in Wistar rats. Forty newly-weaned 21-day-old male Wistar rats were fed either the AIN-93 diet or a commercial diet for either 1 month or 4 months. Weight gain, serum biochemistry, hepatic histology, and hepatic fatty acid profile were analyzed. Hepatic steatosis was observed, especially in the group fed the AIN-93 diet. Serum blood glucose, absolute and relative liver weight and hepatic levels of oleic, palmitoleic, stearic, and palmitic fatty acids were related to the observed steatosis, while lipidogram and serum markers of liver function and injury were not. AIN-93 diet induced acute hepatic steatosis in Wistar rats, which may compromise its use as a standard diet for experimental studies with rodents. The hepatic fatty acid profile was associated with steatosis, with possible implications for disease prognosis. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  19. Levulinic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Hachuła

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The title compound (systematic name: 4-oxopentanoic acid, C5H8O3, is close to planar (r.m.s. deviation = 0.0762 Å. In the crystal, the molecules interact via O—H...O hydrogen bonds in which the hydroxy O atoms act as donors and the ketone O atoms in adjacent molecules as acceptors, forming C(7 chains along [20-1].

  20. Analysis of fatty acid methyl esters and oxidative stability of seed purpose watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) genotypes for edible oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahla, H R; Rathore, S S; Venkatesan, K; Sharma, R

    2018-04-01

    World's vegetable oil demand is increasing day by day and oil seed supply is limited to a dozen oil seed crops on commercial scale. Efforts were made to explore the potential of water melon a traditionally grown native crop of Indian arid zone having oil content over 30% and seed yield potential of 500-600 kg per hectare under rainfed conditions. An analysis was carried out to explore the suitability of watermelon [ Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.)] oil for human consumption on the basis of fatty acid (FA) composition in selected genotypes. Total oil content ranged between 10.0 and 31.0%. Eleven FA were identified in seed oil. Linoleic, stearic, palmitic and oleic acid were found as major FA while myristic, heptadecanoic, arachidic, 9-hexadecenoic and 14-eicosenoic acid was present in traces. Linoleic acid single polyunsaturated FA contributor found in the range of 43.95% (WM-44) to 55.29% (WM-18). Saturated FA content ranged between 32.24 and 37.61%. Significant genetic variation was observed for mono-unsaturated FA. Metabolic capacity to inter-conversion of FA and nutritive value of watermelon oil was described on the basis of ratio of FA group. Total phenolics, antioxidant activity, peroxide value and oxidizability were also estimated along with oxidative stability of oil. Multivariate analysis showed that, oil content has positive correlation with linoleic acid. The Euclidean based UPGMA clustering revealed that genotypes WM-18 is most suitable for trait specific breeding program for high linoleic acid ( n -6), desaturation ratio and oleic desaturation ratio with higher oil content and lowest palmitic acid.

  1. Protective role of 20-OH ecdysone on lipid profile and tissue fatty acid changes in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naresh Kumar, Rajendran; Sundaram, Ramalingam; Shanthi, Palanivelu; Sachdanandam, Panchanatham

    2013-01-05

    Hyperlipidemia is an associated complication of diabetes mellitus. The association of hyperglycemia with an alteration of lipid parameters presents a major risk for cardiovascular complications in diabetes. The present study was designed to examine the antihyperlipidemic effect of 20-OH ecdysone on lipid profile and tissue fatty acid changes in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. The levels of blood glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, free fatty acids, phospholipids, low density lipoprotein, very low density lipoprotein, high density lipoprotein, lipoprotein lipase, lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase, 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and fatty acid composition were estimated in plasma, liver and kidneys of control and experimental groups of rats. Oral administration of 20-OH ecdysone at a dose of 5mg/kg bodyweight per day to STZ-induced diabetic rats for a period of 30 days resulted in a significant reduction in fasting blood glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, free fatty acids, phospholipids, low density lipoprotein, very low density lipoprotein, 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and elevation of high density lipoprotein, lipoprotein lipase and lecithin cholesterol acyl transferasein comparison with diabetic untreated rats. Moreover, administration of 20-OH ecdysone to diabetic rats also decreased the concentrations of fatty acids, viz., palmitic, stearic (16:1) and oleic acid (18:1), whereas linolenic (18:3) and arachidonic acid (20:4) were elevated. The antihyperlipidemic effect of 20-OH ecdysone was compared with glibenclamide a well-known antihyperglycemic drug. The result of the present study indicates that 20-OH ecdysone showed an antihyperlipidemic effect in addition to its antidiabetic effect in experimental diabetes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Characteristics of venison. The research of vitamin and fatty acid composition of the meat of domesticated reindeer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan E. G.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin and fatty acid composition of meat of the domesticated reindeer shoulder in order to experimentally prove its rational use as a component of healthy diet not only population of the Kola Peninsula, but also in other regions of the world has been researched. Reindeer herd population figures have been given. The value of reindeer herding for life of the indigenous peoples of the Far North has been proved. There are the results of studying vitamin content of domesticated reindeer meat on the main important parameters by the fluorimetric method using the fluid analyzer based on the acidic and enzymatic hydrolysis test, which results in release of bound forms of vitamins, as well as by alkaline hydrolysis of the sample followed by separation and determination of the mass fraction of vitamins. The study of fatty acids contained in venison has been labeled and graphically reflected. The composition of saturated and mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids using the gas chromatography method based on the solvent extraction of animal lipids organic solvents, and triglyceride lipid methylation by hydrolysis has been determined. The results of these studies have shown extraordinary characteristics of reindeer meat, its well-balanced ratio of fatty acids and high mass fractions of vitamins. High percentage of these fatty acids as saturated – palmitic (26.79 %, stearic (19.15 %, margarine (1.22 % and unsaturated – oleic acid (36.23 %, linoleic (5.12 %, and palmitoleic (2.68 % and their importance for the human body have been noted. Comparative characteristics of the vitamin content of venison with other kinds of meat (beef, pork, and lamb which clearly reflects the high vitamin C content (2.63 mg per 100 g product and vitamin B2 (0.27 mg per 100 g product has been presented.

  3. Mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs for fatty acid composition in an interspecific cross of oil palm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Mukesh

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marker Assisted Selection (MAS is well suited to a perennial crop like oil palm, in which the economic products are not produced until several years after planting. The use of DNA markers for selection in such crops can greatly reduce the number of breeding cycles needed. With the use of DNA markers, informed decisions can be made at the nursery stage, regarding which individuals should be retained as breeding stock, which are satisfactory for agricultural production, and which should be culled. The trait associated with oil quality, measured in terms of its fatty acid composition, is an important agronomic trait that can eventually be tracked using molecular markers. This will speed up the production of new and improved oil palm planting materials. Results A map was constructed using AFLP, RFLP and SSR markers for an interspecific cross involving a Colombian Elaeis oleifera (UP1026 and a Nigerian E. guinneensis (T128. A framework map was generated for the male parent, T128, using Joinmap ver. 4.0. In the paternal (E. guineensis map, 252 markers (199 AFLP, 38 RFLP and 15 SSR could be ordered in 21 linkage groups (1815 cM. Interval mapping and multiple-QTL model (MQM mapping (also known as composite interval mapping, CIM were used to detect quantitative trait loci (QTLs controlling oil quality (measured in terms of iodine value and fatty acid composition. At a 5% genome-wide significance threshold level, QTLs associated with iodine value (IV, myristic acid (C14:0, palmitic acid (C16:0, palmitoleic acid (C16:1, stearic acid (C18:0, oleic acid (C18:1 and linoleic acid (C18:2 content were detected. One genomic region on Group 1 appears to be influencing IV, C14:0, C16:0, C18:0 and C18:1 content. Significant QTL for C14:0, C16:1, C18:0 and C18:1 content was detected around the same locus on Group 15, thus revealing another major locus influencing fatty acid composition in oil palm. Additional QTL for C18:0 was detected on Group 3

  4. Micropropagation and subsequent enrichment of carotenoids, fatty acids and tocopherol contents in Sedum dasyphyllum L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Han Yong; Saini, Ramesh Kumar; Gopal, Judy; Keum, Young-Soo; Kim, Doo Hwan; Lee, Onew; Sivanesan, Iyyakkannu

    2017-10-01

    A promising micropropagation protocol has been systematically established and demonstrated for the enhanced production of carotenoids, tocopherol and fatty acids in shoot tissues of Sedum dasyphyllum. Shoot tip explants were grown on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium. Different concentrations of N6-benzyladenine (BA) or thidiazuron (TDZ) alone or in combination with α-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) were tested in order to stimulate multiple shoot production. Ideal shoot induction (100%) and maximized shoot numbers (36.4) were obtained on explants cultured on media incorporated with 2 µM BA and 1 µM NAA combinations. The in vitro-developed shoots rooted best on half-strength MS media incorporated with 2 µM indole 3-butyric acid. Plantlets were effectively acclimatized in the greenhouse with 100% survival rate. The composition and contents of bioactive compounds such as carotenoids, tocopherol and fatty acids in shoot tissues of S. dasyphyllum were investigated using HPLC and GC-MS. The most abundant carotenoid in the shoot tissue was all-E-lutein (40.3-70.5 µg g-1 FW) followed by 9'-Z-neoxanthin (5.3-9.9 µg g-1 FW), all-E-violaxanthin (4.4-8.2 µg g-1 FW), and all-E-β-carotene (1.6-3.6 µg g-1 FW). The α-tocopherol contents of in vitro-raised shoots was 6.5-fold higher than shoots of greenhouse-grown plants. The primary fatty acids found in shoot tissues were α-linolenic acid (32.0-39.3%), linoleic acid (27.4-38.2%), palmitic acid (13.3-15.5%) and stearic acid (5.2-12.2%). In all, summarizing the findings, the micropropagated S. dasyphyllum showed significant enrichment of valuable bioactive carotenoids (92.3 µg g-1 FW), tocopherols (14.6 µg g-1 FW) and α-linolenic acid (39.3%) compared to their greenhouse counterparts. The protocol demonstrated here could be applied for the mass propagation and production of enhanced bioactive compounds from S. dasyphyllum with credibility.

  5. Transesterification of canola, palm, peanut, soybean and sunflower oil with methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, butanol and tert-butanol to biodiesel: Modelling of chemical equilibrium, reaction kinetics and mass transfer based on fatty acid composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Likozar, Blaž; Levec, Janez

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Modelling of chemical equilibrium, reaction kinetics and mass transfer for triglyceride transesterification with different alcohols based on fatty acid composition. - Highlights: • Catalysed transesterification to biodiesel with various oils, alcohols and catalysts. • Analysis of components and reactivity based on fatty acid composition of all species. • Simultaneous modelling of mass transfer, reaction kinetics and chemical equilibrium. • Diffusivities, distribution and mass transfer coefficients for individual components. • Correlation of kinetic parameters with molecular structure of reactants and products. - Abstract: Mechanism of alcoholysis (e.g. methanolysis) using different oils, alcohols and homogeneous base catalysts was utilized to devise chemical kinetics and thermodynamics based on fatty acid composition, differentiating among triglycerides, diglycerides, monoglycerides and fatty acid alkyl esters (e.g. fatty acid alkyl esters, FAME) with bonded gadoleic, linoleic, linolenic, oleic, palmitic and stearic acid-originating substituents. Their concentrations were measured using an optimized high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. Hydrodynamics and diffusion limitations in emulsion were considered in overall model by determining diffusivities, distribution coefficients, molar volumes, boiling points and viscosities of individual components. Pre-exponential factors and activation energies were related with structure of reactants, intermediates and products acknowledging number of carbons, double bonds and alkyl branches by linear and mixed response surface methodology. Developed model may be used with batch and continuous flow reactors, e.g. for novel micro-structured or industrial-scale process intensification, different vegetable or non-edible oils (waste cooking Jatropha or microalgae lipids)

  6. Effect of lauric acid and coconut oil on ruminal fermentation, digestion, ammonia losses from manure, and milk fatty acid composition in lactating cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristov, A N; Vander Pol, M; Agle, M; Zaman, S; Schneider, C; Ndegwa, P; Vaddella, V K; Johnson, K; Shingfield, K J; Karnati, S K R

    2009-11-01

    This experiment (replicated 3 x 3 Latin square design) was conducted to investigate the effects of lauric acid (LA) or coconut oil (CO) on ruminal fermentation, nutrient digestibility, ammonia losses from manure, and milk fatty acid (FA) composition in lactating cows. Treatments consisted of intraruminal doses of 240 g of stearic acid/d (SA; control), 240 g of LA/d, or 530 g of CO/d administered once daily, before feeding. Between periods, cows were inoculated with ruminal contents from donor cows and allowed a 7-d recovery period. Treatment did not affect dry matter intake, milk yield, or milk composition. Ruminal pH was slightly increased by CO compared with the other treatments, whereas LA and CO decreased ruminal ammonia concentration compared with SA. Both LA and CO decreased protozoal counts by 80% or more compared with SA. Methane production rate in the rumen was reduced by CO compared with LA and SA, with no differences between LA and SA. Treatments had no effect on total tract apparent dry matter, organic matter, N, and neutral detergent fiber digestibility coefficients or on cumulative (15 d) in vitro ammonia losses from manure. Compared with SA, LA and CO increased milk fat 12:0, cis-9 12:1, and trans-9 12:1 content and decreased 6:0, 8:0, 10:0, cis-9 10:1, 16:0, 18:0, cis 18:1, total 18:2, 18:3 n-3 and total polyunsaturated FA concentrations. Administration of LA and 14:0 (as CO) in the rumen were apparently transferred into milk fat with a mean efficiency of 18 and 15%, respectively. In conclusion, current data confirmed that LA and CO exhibit strong antiprotozoal activity when dosed intraruminally, an effect that is accompanied by decreases in ammonia concentration and, for CO, lowered methane production. Administration of LA and CO in the rumen also altered milk FA composition.

  7. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, cholesterol, and fatty acids modulate the calcium-activated chloride channel TMEM16A (ANO1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesús-Pérez, José J; Cruz-Rangel, Silvia; Espino-Saldaña, Ángeles E; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Qu, Zhiqiang; Hartzell, H Criss; Corral-Fernandez, Nancy E; Pérez-Cornejo, Patricia; Arreola, Jorge

    2018-03-01

    The TMEM16A-mediated Ca 2+ -activated Cl - current drives several important physiological functions. Membrane lipids regulate ion channels and transporters but their influence on members of the TMEM16 family is poorly understood. Here we have studied the regulation of TMEM16A by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2), cholesterol, and fatty acids using patch clamp, biochemistry and fluorescence microscopy. We found that depletion of membrane PI(4,5)P2 causes a decline in TMEM16A current that is independent of cytoskeleton, but is partially prevented by removing intracellular Ca 2+ . On the other hand, supplying PI(4,5)P2 to inside-out patches attenuated channel rundown and/or partially rescued activity after channel rundown. Also, depletion (with methyl-β-cyclodextrin M-βCD) or restoration (with M-βCD+cholesterol) of membrane cholesterol slows down the current decay observed after reduction of PI(4,5)P2. Neither depletion nor restoration of cholesterol change PI(4,5)P2 content. However, M-βCD alone transiently increases TMEM16A activity and dampens rundown whereas M-βCD+cholesterol increases channel rundown. Thus, PI(4,5)P2 is required for TMEM16A function while cholesterol directly and indirectly via a PI(4,5)P2-independent mechanism regulate channel function. Stearic, arachidonic, oleic, docosahexaenoic, and eicosapentaenoic fatty acids as well as methyl stearate inhibit TMEM16A in a dose- and voltage-dependent manner. Phosphatidylserine, a phospholipid whose hydrocarbon tails contain stearic and oleic acids also inhibits TMEM16A. Finally, we show that TMEM16A remains in the plasma membrane after treatment with M-βCD, M-βCD+cholesterol, oleic, or docosahexaenoic acids. Thus, we propose that lipids and fatty acids regulate TMEM16A channels through a membrane-delimited protein-lipid interaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Understanding Acid Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    The term acid rain describes rain, snow, or fog that is more acidic than normal precipitation. To understand what acid rain is, it is first necessary to know what an acid is. Acids can be defined as substances that produce hydrogen ions (H+), when dissolved in water. Scientists indicate how acidic a substance is by a set of numbers called the pH…

  9. Fatty acids in female’s gonads of the Red Sea fish Rhabdosargus sarba during the spawning season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhaila Qari

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the fatty acids profiles in female fish, Rhabdosargus sarba (R. sarba from the Red Sea during the spawning season. Methods: Monthly individual R. sarba were obtained from Bangalah market in Jeddah, Red Sea and transported to the laboratory in ice aquarium. The total length, standard length and weight were measured, fishes were dissected. Ovaries were removed, weighed and 10 mL of concentrated hydrochloric acid were added to 10 g of the ovary in a conical flask and immersed in boiling water until the sample was dissolved and the fat was seen to collect on the surface. The conical was cooled and the fat was extracted by shaking with 30 mL of diethyl ether. The extract was bowled after allowing the layers to separate into a weighed flask. The extraction was repeated three times more and distilled off the solvent then the fat dried at 100 °C, cooled and weighed. Then 50 mg of lipid was put in a tube, 5 mL of methanolic sulphuric acid was added and 2 mL of benzene, the tube well closed and placed in water bath at 90 °C for an hour and a half. After cooling, 8 mL water and 5 mL petroleum were added and shaked strongly and the ethereal layer was separated in a dry tube, evaporated to dryness. The fatty acid methyl esters were analyzed by using a Hewlett Packard (HP 6890 chromatography, a split/splitless injector and flame ionization detector. Results: In female R. sarba, a total of 29 fatty acids were detected in ovaries throughout the spawning season. The main fatty acid group in total lipid was saturated fatty acid (SFA, 28.9%, followed by 23.5% of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA and 12.9% of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA. The dominant SFA were palmitic and stearic, the major MUFA were palmitoleic and oleic, and the major PUFA were C18:2 and C22:2. During spawning stages, there were no significant differences in total SFA, MUFA and PUFA. The highest value of SFA was in late spawning (36.78%. However, the highest value

  10. The acidic functional groups of humic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanxiang, Li; Shuhe, Sun; Zhai Zongxi, Wu Qihu

    1983-09-01

    The acidic functional groups content, pK value, DELTAH and DELTAS of humic acid (HA) and nitro-humic acid (NHA) were determined by potentiometry, conductometry and calorimetric titration. The thermodynamic parameters of carboxylic groups and phenolic hydroxyl groups of humic acid are similar to that of simple hydroxy-benzoic acid. The configuration sites of acidic functional groups in humic acid from different coals are different. The carbonyl groups on aromatic rings are probably ortho to phenolic -OH for HA and NHA extracted from Huangxian's brown coal and Japanese lignite, while those from Lingshi's weathered coal are not. The weak -COOH groups of the latter possess higher chemical activity. The -COOH content in HA increases, phenolic -OH group decreases and the chemical acidity of acidic functional groups increases when HA is oxidized by nitric acid. (14 refs.)

  11. Effects of feeding whole linseed on ruminal fatty acid composition and microbial population in goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamaleldin Abuelfatah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of feeding different levels of whole linseed, as a source of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA, on ruminal fatty acid composition and microbial population in the goat. Twenty-four crossbred Boer goats were assigned to 3 dietary treatments: L0 (control, L10 and L20 containing 0, 10%, or 20% whole linseed, respectively. The ruminal pH and concentration of total volatile fatty acids (VFA were not affected by dietary treatments. The feeding of L10 and L20 diets produced higher (P < 0.05 molar proportions of acetate and lower (P < 0.05 molar proportions of butyrate and valerate than the L0 diet. Molar proportions of myristic acid (C14:0 and palmitic acid (C16:0 were lower (P < 0.05 in the rumen of goats offered L10 and L20 diets than the control diet. However, stearic acid (C18:0, vaccenic acid (C18:1 trans-11, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA, C18:2 trans-10, cis-12 and α-lenolenic acid (C18:3 n-3 were higher (P < 0.05 in the rumen of goats fed L10 and L20 than L0. Both inclusion levels of linseed in the diet (L10 and L20 reduced the ruminal total bacteria, methanogens, and protozoa compared with L0 (P < 0.05. The effect of the dietary treatments on cellulolytic bacteria, varied between the individual species. Both inclusion levels of linseed resulted in a significant decrease (P < 0.05 in the population of Fibrobacter succinogenes, and Rumunococus flavefaciens compared with L0, with no significant difference between the groups fed linseed diets. The population of Rumunococus albus was not affected by the different dietary treatments. It was concluded that inclusion of whole linseed in the diet of goats could increase the concentration of PUFA in the rumen, and decrease the population of F. succinogenes, R. flavefaciens, methanogens and protozoa in rumen liquid of goats.

  12. Effects of Saline and Sodic Stress on Yield and Fatty Acid Profile in Sunflower Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Cucci

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Among the objectives concerned in this research, much importance has been attached to the assessment of the influence of soil type, irrigation water quality and leaching requirement on the production and composition in fatty acids of sunflower oil. The trial was run in 2001 on a sunflower crop (cv. HS 90 grown in cylindrical pots at the Campus of Bari University (Italy. 36 treatments obtained from the factorial combination of two clay soils with nine types of brackish water and two leaching fractions (10 and 20% were compared. The nine types of irrigation water were obtained by dissolving the proper amounts of NaCl and CaCl2 in de-ionized water, according to the factorial combination of three salt concentration levels (0.01, 0.032 and 0.064 M with three sodium levels (SAR = 5, 15 and 45. At ripening the main yield traits, oil yield and acid composition of seeds were analysed. At the highest salinity level about 70% yield reduction, in terms of seeds per plant was observed. The oil yield and the final acid composition of seeds were significantly affected by soil type, leaching requirement, salinity and the SAR levels of irrigation water. A progressive decline in oil yield was recorded as the salt concentration and sodium level of irrigation solutions increased. As to the fatty acid composition, a gradual increase in oleic and linolenic acid content and a corresponding decrease in the other fatty acids were found as the salinity and sodium levels of irrigation water increased. The oleic/linoleic acid ratio too increased as the salinity increased. The salt and sodium-induced stresses of irrigation water reduced the seed and oil yields while still favouring a progressive increase in the oleic acid content and a slight decrease of linoleic, palmitic and stearic acids, thus improving oil quality. The results point out both the influence of the soil and the positive effect of sodium and salt stress and of the leaching fraction on the food quality of

  13. Proximate Composition, Mineral Content and Fatty Acids Analyses of Aromatic and Non-Aromatic Indian Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Kumar Verma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Awareness on nutritive value and health benefits of rice is of vital importance in order to increase the consumption of rice in daily diet of the human beings. In this study, a total of six aromatic and two non-aromatic rice accessions grown in India were analysed for their nutritional quality attributes including proximate composition, mineral contents and fatty acids. Data with three replications were used to measure Pearson's simple correlation co-efficient in order to establish the relationship among various nutritional quality attributes. The result on proximate composition showed that Govind Bhog had the highest moisture (13.57% and fat (0.92% content, which signifies its tasty attribute. Badshah Bhog exhibited the highest fibre content (0.85%, carbohydrate content (82.70% and food energy (365.23 kCal per 100 g. Among the minerals, the higher Ca (98.75 mg/kg, Zn (17.00 mg/kg and Fe (31.50 mg/kg were in Gopal Bhog, whereas the highest Na (68.85 mg/kg was in Badshah Bhog, the highest K (500.00 mg/kg was in Swetganga, Khushboo and Sarbati. The highest contents of unsaturated fatty acids viz. oleic acid (49.14%, linoleic acid (46.99% and linolenic acid (1.27% were found in Sarbati, whereas the highest content of saturated fatty acids viz. myristic acid (4.60% and palmitic acid (31.91% were found in Govind Bhog and stearic acid (6.47% in Todal. The identified aromatic rice accessions Gopal Bhog, Govind Bhog and Badshah Bhog and non-aromatic rice accession Sarbati were found nutritionally superior among all eight tested accessions. The nutritional quality oriented attributes in this study were competent with recognized prominent aromatic and non-aromatic rice accessions as an index of their nutritional worth and recommend to farmers and consumers which may be graded as export quality rice with good unique nutritional values in international market.

  14. Effects of Saline and Sodic Stress on Yield and Fatty Acid Profile in Sunflower Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele Tarantino

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Among the objectives concerned in this research, much importance has been attached to the assessment of the influence of soil type, irrigation water quality and leaching requirement on the production and composition in fatty acids of sunflower oil. The trial was run in 2001 on a sunflower crop (cv. HS 90 grown in cylindrical pots at the Campus of Bari University (Italy. 36 treatments obtained from the factorial combination of two clay soils with nine types of brackish water and two leaching fractions (10 and 20% were compared. The nine types of irrigation water were obtained by dissolving the proper amounts of NaCl and CaCl2 in de-ionized water, according to the factorial combination of three salt concentration levels (0.01, 0.032 and 0.064 M with three sodium levels (SAR = 5, 15 and 45. At ripening the main yield traits, oil yield and acid composition of seeds were analysed. At the highest salinity level about 70% yield reduction, in terms of seeds per plant was observed. The oil yield and the final acid composition of seeds were significantly affected by soil type, leaching requirement, salinity and the SAR levels of irrigation water. A progressive decline in oil yield was recorded as the salt concentration and sodium level of irrigation solutions increased. As to the fatty acid composition, a gradual increase in oleic and linolenic acid content and a corresponding decrease in the other fatty acids were found as the salinity and sodium levels of irrigation water increased. The oleic/linoleic acid ratio too increased as the salinity increased. The salt and sodium-induced stresses of irrigation water reduced the seed and oil yields while still favouring a progressive increase in the oleic acid content and a slight decrease of linoleic, palmitic and stearic acids, thus improving oil quality. The results point out both the influence of the soil and the positive effect of sodium and salt stress and of the leaching fraction on the food quality of

  15. Okadaic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E Michael; Hansen, Gert H; Severinsen, Mai C K

    2014-01-01

    are the hallmark of phospholipidosis, a pathological condition characterized by lysosomal phospholipid accumulation. Phospholipidosis is observed in acquired lysosomal storage diseases and is induced by a large number of cationic amphiphilic drugs. Unlike the latter, however, OA does not act by accumulating...... in acidic organelles, implying a different toxic mechanism of action. We propose that rapid induction of LBs, an indicator of phospholipidosis, should be included in the future toxicity profile of OA....... hyper protein phosphorylation, but no detectable loss of cell polarity or cytoskeletal integrity of the enterocytes. Using a fluorescent membrane marker, FM dye, endocytosis from the brush border was affected by the toxin. Although constitutive uptake into subapical terminal web-localized early...

  16. Preparation and characterization of composites based on poly(lactic acid) and CaCO{sub 3} nanofiller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Janaína Fernandes; Silva, Ana Lúcia N. da, E-mail: janamoreno.quim@gmail.com, E-mail: ananazareth@ima.ufrj.br [Instituto de Macromoléculas Professora Eloisa Mano - IMA/UFRJ – Brasil, Rio de Janeiro – RJ (Brazil); Silva, Antonio Henrique Monteiro da Fonseca T. da, E-mail: antoniohmfts@id.uff.br [Departamento Agrícola e Meio Ambiente – UFF – Brasil, Niterói – RJ (Brazil); Sousa, Ana Maria F. de, E-mail: ana.furtado.souza@gmail.com [Instituto de Química da Universidade - IQ/UERJ – Brasil, Rio de Janeiro – RJ (Brazil)

    2015-05-22

    In recent years, extensive studies have been conducted on the study of the poly(lactic acid) (PLA) properties, because of its being a typical biobased and biodegradable polymer, with good mechanical properties. However, its toughness and gas barrier properties are not satisfactory and can be improved by the addition of nanofillers, such as calcium carbonate (n-CaCO{sub 3}). The present work PLA composites with nano-sized precipitated calcium carbonate (n-NPCC) were prepared by melt extrusion. Thermal, mechanical and flow properties of the composites were evaluated by using a factorial design.The results showed that the addition of the nanofiller in the PLA matrix didn’t improve thethermal and mechanical properties of the matrix significantly. This behavior is probably due to the presence of the stearic acid that is coating on the n-NPCC particles, resulting in a weak polymer-particle interaction. Beyond this, it was also observed a decrease in MFI of the composites when nanofiller was added and at a higher screw speed.

  17. Effect of Cultivars and Planting Date on Yield, Oil Content, and Fatty Acid Profile of Flax Varieties (Linum usitatissimum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricel Andrea Gallardo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the effect of cultivars and planting date on flax fatty acid profile, seed yield, and oil content, an assay with seven cultivars (Baikal, Prointa Lucero, Prointa Ceibal, Panambí INTA, Curundú INTA, Carapé INTA, and Tape INTA was carried out at Parana Agricultural Experimental Station, Argentina. Significant differences among cultivars were found for content of palmitic (5–7 g/100 g, stearic (5–8 g/100 g, linoleic (13–19 g/100 g, saturated (11–15 g/100 g, and unsaturated acids (92–96 g/100 g within the seven cultivars. The best seed yields were observed in Prointa Lucero and Carapé INTA varieties (2091.50 kg·ha−1 and 2183.34 kg·ha−1, respectively in the first planting date and in Carapé INTA and Prointa Lucero (1667 kg·ha−1 and 1886 kg·ha−1, respectively in the second planting date. A delayed planting date had a negative effect on seed yield (1950 kg·ha−1 and 1516 kg·ha−1 and oil content (845 kg·ha−1 and 644 kg·ha−1 but did not affect oil composition.

  18. Influence of temperature and time during malaxation on fatty acid profile and oxidation of centrifuged avocado oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica del Pilar RAMÍREZ-ANAYA

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Virgin oil from avocados (Persea americana Mill. is obtained by mechanical processes after pulp malaxation at temperatures that minimize oxidation and improve separation. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of time (0, 20, 30, 40, 60, 120 and 180 min and temperature (40 and 50 °C conditions during pulp malaxation on extraction yield, nutritional value (normalized fatty acid profile and specific extintion (K232 and K270 of virgin oil extracted under laboratory conditions from avocados cultivated in southern Jalisco, Mexico. When pulp was malaxated for 120 min at 40 and 50 °C, a larger proportion of oil was extracted (82.9 ± 0.3% and 80.2 ± 0.8%, respectively. We observed that the normalized percentage of the fatty acids linoleic (18 ± 2% and linolenic (1.2 ± 0.2% decreased with mixing time, while that of palmitoleic (9 ± 1%, oleic (51.6 ± 1.2% and stearic (0.5 ± 0.1% remained without change. The ω-6:ω-3 ratio (15 ± 1 was higher than the recommended values but similar to those reported as favorable for health. Specific extinction (K232, 2.2 ± 0.3 and K270, 0.20 ± 0.03 indicate that the oxidation level remained low. Malaxation at 40 or 50 °C did not significantly alter the characteristics of the oil, but time significantly affected yield.

  19. Changes in the content of fatty acids in CA1 and CA3 areas of the hippocampus of Krushinsky-Molodkina rats after single and fivefold audiogenic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savina, Tatyana; Aripovsky, Alexander; Kulagina, Tatyana

    2017-09-01

    Audiogenic seizures (AS) are generalized seizures evoked by high frequency sounds. Since the hippocampus is involved in the generation and maintenance of seizures, the effect of AS on the composition and content of fatty acids in the CA1 and CA3 hippocampal areas of AS-susceptible Krushinsky-Molodkina (KM) rats on days 1, 3, and 14 after single and fivefold seizures were examined. The total content of all fatty acids in field СА1 was found to be lower compared with the control at all times of observation after both a single seizure or fivefold seizures. The total content of fatty acids in field СА3 decreased at all times of examination after a single seizure, whereas it remained unchanged on days 3 and 14 following five AS. The content of omega-3 fatty acids in both fields at all times of observation after a single seizure and fivefold AS did not significantly differ from that in intact animals. The absence of significant changes in the content of stearic and α-linolenic acids and a considerable decrease in the levels of palmitic, oleic, and eicosapentaenoic acids were common to both fields at all times after both a single seizure or fivefold AS. The changes in the content of fatty acids in the СА3 and СА1 fields of the brain of AS-susceptible rats indicate that fatty acids are involved in both the development of seizure activity and neuroprotective anticonvulsive processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of Diets Differing in Composition of 18-C Fatty Acids on Adipose Tissue Thermogenic Gene Expression in Mice Fed High-Fat Diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunhye Shin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Dietary fatty acids play important roles in the regulation of fat accumulation or metabolic phenotype of adipocytes, either as brown or beige fat. However, a systematic comparison of effects of diets with different composition of 18-C fatty acids on browning/beiging phenotype has not been done. In this study, we compared the effects of different dietary fats, rich in specific 18-carbon fatty acids, on thermogenesis and lipid metabolism. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed a control diet containing 5.6% kcal fat from lard and 4.4% kcal fat from soybean oil (CON or high-fat diets (HFD containing 25% kcal from lard and 20% kcal fat from shea butter (stearic acid-rich fat; SHB, olive oil (oleic acid-rich oil; OO, safflower oil (linoleic acid-rich oil; SFO, or soybean oil (mixed oleic, linoleic, and α-linolenic acids; SBO ad libitum for 12 weeks, with or without a terminal 4-h norepinephrine (NE treatment. When compared to SHB, feeding OO, SFO, and SBO resulted in lower body weight gain. The OO fed group had the highest thermogenesis level, which resulted in lower body fat accumulation and improved glucose and lipid metabolism. Feeding SFO downregulated expression of lipid oxidation-related genes and upregulated expression of lipogenic genes, perhaps due to its high n-6:n-3 ratio. In general, HFD-feeding downregulated Ucp1 expression in both subcutaneous and epididymal white adipose tissue, and suppressed NE-induced Pgc1a expression in brown adipose tissue. These results suggest that the position of double bonds in dietary fatty acids, as well as the quantity of dietary fat, may have a significant effect on the regulation of oxidative and thermogenic conditions in vivo.

  1. EFFECT OF SOME PLANT OILS ON THE FATTY ACIDS OF HUMP BEETLE GIBBIUM PSYLLOIDES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ABBASY, S.A.; ALY, W.M.; REZK, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    The efficiency of some plant oils (sesame oil, camphor oil, castor oil and camomile oil) as insecticides were studied on newly emerged males and females Gibbium psylloids and also the effect of LC50 of each plant oils on fatty acids composition and relative concentration were determined. The obtained results showed that sesame oil had proved to be more effective with it's advantage over other tested oils of being used at lower concentration and it followed by chamomile oil then camphor oil and finally castor oil. The susceptibility of the males and females to plant oils was the same. There were differences in the number and relative concentration of fatty acids between males and females. Nine fatty acids were detected by the analysis of the whole body of untreated males , these fatty acids are capric (C10) , lauric (C12) , myristic (C14), palmiloleic (C16), margic (C17), stearic (C18) , oleic (C18:1) , linoleic (C18:2) and linolenic (C18:3) . Treatments of males with LC50 sesame oil lead to the appearance of ten fatty acids with increase of caprylic acid (C8) while LC50 chamomile oil lead to the appearance of six fatty acids and fatty acid with C10 , C18:1 and C18:2 were disappeared as compared to control. LC50 of camphor oil lead to the appearance of ten fatty acids and castor oil lead to the appearance of six fatty acids. In untreated females, five fatty acids with C12 , C16 , C17 , C18 and C18:1 were detected. Treatments with sesame oil lead to the appearance of new fatty acid with C18:2 and chamomile oil lead to the appearance of nine fatty acids with increase of C8 , C10 , C14 and C18:2 as compared with untreated females. Camphor oil treatment lead to the appearance of nine fatty acids with increase of four fatty acids with C6 , C8 , C10 and C18:2 as compared to untreated females and fatty acid with C18:1 was disappeared in the treatments. Castor oil leads to the appearance of seven fatty acids. The relative concentration of C12 was the highest fatty acid in

  2. Fatty acid profile and in vitro antioxidant and antibacterial activities of red grape (Vitis vinifera L. cvs. Oküzgözü and Boğazkere) Marc extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibik, Bilge; Ozaydin, Zuhal; Böke, Nazli; Karabay, Ulkü; Pekmez, Murat; Arda, Nazhi; Kirmizigüla, Süheyla

    2009-03-01

    The marcs of two red grape (V. vinifera L.) varieties (Boğazkere and Oküzgözü), grown in eastern Anatolia (Elazig), were evaluated for their fatty acid composition, and antioxidant and antibacterial activities. The hexane extracts of both varieties were found to contain linoleic, palmitic, stearic and oleic acids by GC-MS analyses. The major fatty acid (linoleic acid) was detected relatively as 57.13% in Oküzgözü and 59.07% in Bogazkere in methylated hexane extracts. In addition, myristic and palmitoleic acids were observed in Boğazkere as minor components. The free radical (DPPH) scavenging activity of Oküzgözü was higher than that of Bogazkere. The IC50 values were calculated as 403.0 +/- 7.8 microg/mL for Oküzgozü and 552.0 +/- 23.6 microg/mL for Bogazkere. The extracts were found to be effective on the four gram (+) and four gram (-) test bacteria, but not as good as standard antibiotic, gentamycine by MIC method.

  3. Pro-inflammatory fatty acid profile and colorectal cancer risk: A Mendelian randomisation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May-Wilson, Sebastian; Sud, Amit; Law, Philip J; Palin, Kimmo; Tuupanen, Sari; Gylfe, Alexandra; Hänninen, Ulrika A; Cajuso, Tatiana; Tanskanen, Tomas; Kondelin, Johanna; Kaasinen, Eevi; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Eriksson, Johan G; Rissanen, Harri; Knekt, Paul; Pukkala, Eero; Jousilahti, Pekka; Salomaa, Veikko; Ripatti, Samuli; Palotie, Aarno; Renkonen-Sinisalo, Laura; Lepistö, Anna; Böhm, Jan; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Al-Tassan, Nada A; Palles, Claire; Farrington, Susan M; Timofeeva, Maria N; Meyer, Brian F; Wakil, Salma M; Campbell, Harry; Smith, Christopher G; Idziaszczyk, Shelley; Maughan, Timothy S; Fisher, David; Kerr, Rachel; Kerr, David; Passarelli, Michael N; Figueiredo, Jane C; Buchanan, Daniel D; Win, Aung K; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A; Lindor, Noralane M; Newcomb, Polly A; Gallinger, Steven; Conti, David; Schumacher, Fred; Casey, Graham; Aaltonen, Lauri A; Cheadle, Jeremy P; Tomlinson, Ian P; Dunlop, Malcolm G; Houlston, Richard S

    2017-10-01

    While dietary fat has been established as a risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC), associations between fatty acids (FAs) and CRC have been inconsistent. Using Mendelian randomisation (MR), we sought to evaluate associations between polyunsaturated (PUFA), monounsaturated (MUFA) and saturated FAs (SFAs) and CRC risk. We analysed genotype data on 9254 CRC cases and 18,386 controls of European ancestry. Externally weighted polygenic risk scores were generated and used to evaluate associations with CRC per one standard deviation increase in genetically defined plasma FA levels. Risk reduction was observed for oleic and palmitoleic MUFAs (OR OA  = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.65-0.92, P = 3.9 × 10 -3 ; OR POA  = 0.36, 95% CI: 0.15-0.84, P = 0.018). PUFAs linoleic and arachidonic acid had negative and positive associations with CRC respectively (OR LA  = 0.95, 95% CI: 0.93-0.98, P = 3.7 × 10 -4 ; OR AA  = 1.05, 95% CI: 1.02-1.07, P = 1.7 × 10 -4 ). The SFA stearic acid was associated with increased CRC risk (OR SA  = 1.17, 95% CI: 1.01-1.35, P = 0.041). Results from our analysis are broadly consistent with a pro-inflammatory FA profile having a detrimental effect in terms of CRC risk. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Fatty acid methyl esters and Solutol HS 15 confer neuroprotection after focal and global cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hung Wen; Saul, Isabel; Gresia, Victoria L; Neumann, Jake T; Dave, Kunjan R; Perez-Pinzon, Miguel A

    2014-02-01

    We previously showed that palmitic acid methyl ester (PAME) and stearic acid methyl ester (SAME) are simultaneously released from the sympathetic ganglion and PAME possesses potent vasodilatory properties which may be important in cerebral ischemia. Since PAME is a potent vasodilator simultaneously released with SAME, our hypothesis was that PAME/SAME confers neuroprotection in rat models of focal/global cerebral ischemia. We also examined the neuroprotective properties of Solutol HS15, a clinically approved excipient because it possesses similar fatty acid compositions as PAME/SAME. Asphyxial cardiac arrest (ACA, 6 min) was performed 30 min after PAME/SAME treatment (0.02 mg/kg, IV). Solutol HS15 (2 ml/kg, IP) was injected chronically for 14 days (once daily). Histopathology of hippocampal CA1 neurons was assessed 7 days after ACA. For focal ischemia experiments, PAME, SAME, or Solutol HS15 was administered following reperfusion after 2 h of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). 2,3,5-Triphenyltetrazolium staining of the brain was performed 24 h after MCAO and the infarct volume was quantified. Following ACA, the number of surviving hippocampal neurons was enhanced by PAME-treated (68%), SAME-treated (69%), and Solutol-treated HS15 (68%) rats as compared to ACA only-treated groups. Infarct volume was decreased by PAME (83%), SAME (68%), and Solutol HS15 (78%) as compared to saline (vehicle) in MCAO-treated animals. PAME, SAME, and Solutol HS15 provide robust neuroprotection in both paradigms of ischemia. This may prove therapeutically beneficial since Solutol HS15 is already administered as a solublizing agent to patients. With proper timing and dosage, administration of Solutol HS15 and PAME/SAME can be an effective therapy against cerebral ischemia.

  5. Catalytic transformations of fatty acids derivatives for food, oleochemicals and fuels over carbon supported platinum group metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simakova, I.

    2010-07-01

    The main focus of the research is in the development of an alternative harmless Pd-based hydrogenation technology compared to the traditional one based on Ni. Pd counterparts could be recycled, is more active and resistant to acids and form less trans isomers. In order to be economically viable and competitive this technology has to be based on the best catalyst that means an optimized combination of high activity, high life-time and high selectivity. Therefore, the engineering aspects were closely taken into account and much effort was directed into the design of Pd on a mesoporous carbon support as well as in establishing the correlation between catalyst characteristics and its activity in the C=C hydrogenation and isomerization. Detailed characterization (TEM, XRD, XPS, TPR, CO TPD, physisorption and CO chemisorption) of the tested catalysts was carried out. In addition, the influence of temperature, hydrogen pressure, catalytic concentration on the fatty-acid and isomeric composition of hydrogenated oils were determined in the absence of mass transfer limitations. Deoxygenation by full decarboxylation of -COOH function of fatty acid is the best way to make green diesel because paraffins are produced and utilization of expensive hydrogen is not required. Deoxygenation was systematically investigated over Pd/C (Sibunit) using saturated fatty acids C16 - C20 and C22, as feeds, producing one less carbon containing, diesel-like hydrocarbons. The same decarboxylation rates were obtained for pure saturated fatty acids. Comparison of deoxygenation rate for stearic, oleic or linoleic acids as a feedstock at 300 deg C under 1 vol% hydrogen over mesoporous Pd/C (Sibunit) catalyst revealed that catalyst activity and selectivity increased with less unsaturated feedstock. The main products in the case of stearic acid were desired C17 hydrocarbons, whereas the amounts of C17 aromatic compounds increased in case of oleic and linoleic acids. Catalyst deactivation was relatively

  6. Effect of the inclusion of fish residue oils in diets on the fatty acid profile of muscles of males and females lambari (Astyanax altiparanae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia Uribe Gonçalves

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effects of two lipids sources of fish residue (tilapia and salmon compared with a vegetable oil source (soybean oil on the fatty acid profiles of male and female lambari. This experiment was developed in a completely randomized experimental design in a 3 × 2 factorial arrangement, totaling 6 treatments resulting from the combination of the three experimental diets for both sexes, with four replications for each treatment. This study involved 120 male (2.58±0.13 g and 72 female lambari (4.00±0.09 g, fed the experimental diets twice a day until apparent satiation for a period of 60 days. Oleic, linoleic, palmitic and stearic fatty acids were found at higher concentrations in all experimental oils and diets, as well in the muscle of male and female lambari. The low amounts of arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids in the experimental diets and subsequent greater concentrations in muscle tissue, suggested that lambari are able to desaturate and elongate the chain of fatty acids with 18 carbons. The fish of both sexes that received the diet with soybean oil showed high levels of n-6 fatty acids, especially of C18: 2n-6 and low levels of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids. The diet with salmon residue oil promoted higher levels of fatty acids of the n-3 series and resulted in the best n-3/n-6 ratio in the muscle of male and female lambari. The oils from fish residues can be a substitute for traditional fish oil and its use in the lambari diets does not impair its growth.

  7. Fatty acid composition of commercially available Iranian edible oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Asgary

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: Trans-fatty acids (TFAs, unsaturated fats with at least one double bond in the Trans configuration, are industrially formed in large quantities when vegetable oils are partially hydrogenated. This study was  ndertaken to quantify the amounts of the common fatty acids in several commercial oils marketing in Iran.
    • METHODS: The most consumed commercially available brands of vegetable oils were randomly selected from products available in supermarkets. A 10g sample was drawn from each mixed sample and prepared for fatty cid analysis by gas chromatography (GC.
    • RESULTS: Palmitic acid (C16:0 and stearic acid (C18:0 jointly constituted 21% of total fatty acids in partially hydrogenated vegetable oils (PHVOs. More than one third of total fatty acids in Iranian PHVOs were Trans fats. TFAs constituted almost 1% and 3% of total fatty  cids in Iranian cooking and frying oils. This study  howed higher contents of TFAs in Iranian commercially available hydrogenated vegetable oils. Statistical Package for Social Sciences was used for all statistical analyses.
    • CONCLUSIONS: Although

    • [Teichoic acids from lactic acid bacteria].

      Science.gov (United States)

      Livins'ka, O P; Harmasheva, I L; Kovalenko, N K

      2012-01-01

      The current view of the structural diversity of teichoic acids and their involvement in the biological activity of lactobacilli has been reviewed. The mechanisms of effects of probiotic lactic acid bacteria, in particular adhesive and immunostimulating functions have been described. The prospects of the use of structure data of teichoic acid in the assessment of intraspecific diversity of lactic acid bacteria have been also reflected.

    • Plasma amino acids

      Science.gov (United States)

      Amino acids blood test ... types of methods used to determine the individual amino acid levels in the blood. ... test is done to measure the level of amino acids in the blood. An increased level of a ...

    • Uric acid - urine

      Science.gov (United States)

      ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003616.htm Uric acid urine test To use the sharing features on ... are no risks with this test. Images Uric acid test Uric acid crystals References Burns CM, Wortmann RL. Clinical ...

    • Uric acid test (image)

      Science.gov (United States)

      Uric acid urine test is performed to check for the amount of uric acid in urine. Urine is collected over a 24 ... for testing. The most common reason for measuring uric acid levels is in the diagnosis or treatment of ...

    • Methylmalonic acid blood test

      Science.gov (United States)

      ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003565.htm Methylmalonic acid blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The methylmalonic acid blood test measures the amount of methylmalonic acid in the ...

    • Facts about Folic Acid

      Science.gov (United States)

      ... Information For… Media Policy Makers Facts About Folic Acid Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... of the baby’s brain and spine. About folic acid Folic acid is a B vitamin. Our bodies ...

    • Saturated fatty acids enhance TLR4 immune pathways in human trophoblasts.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Yang, Xiaohua; Haghiac, Maricela; Glazebrook, Patricia; Minium, Judi; Catalano, Patrick M; Hauguel-de Mouzon, Sylvie

      2015-09-01

      What are the effects of fatty acids on placental inflammatory cytokine with respect to toll-like receptor-4/nuclear factor-kappa B (TLR4/NF-kB)? Exogenous fatty acids induce a pro-inflammatory cytokine response in human placental cells in vitro via activation of TLR4 signaling pathways. The placenta is exposed to changes in circulating maternal fatty acid concentrations throughout pregnancy. Fatty acids are master regulators of innate immune pathways through recruitment of toll-like receptors and activation of cytokine synthesis. Trophoblast cells isolated from 14 normal term human placentas were incubated with long chain fatty acids (FA) of different carbon length and degree of saturation. The expression and secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Antibodies against TLR4 ligand binding domain, downstream signaling and anti-p65 NFkB-inhibitor were used to characterize the pathways of FA action. General approach used primary human term trophoblast cell culture. Methods and end-points used real-time quantitative PCR, cytokine measurements, immunohistochemistry, western blots. The long chain saturated fatty acids, stearic and palmitic (PA), stimulated the synthesis as well as the release of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 by trophoblast cells (2- to 6-fold, P acids did not modify cytokine expression significantly. Palmitate-induced inflammatory effects were mediated via TLR4 activation, NF-kB phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. TNF-α protein level was close to the limit of detection in the culture medium even when cells were cultured with PA. These mechanisms open the way to a better understanding of how changes in maternal lipid homeostasis may regulate placental inflammatory status. X.Y. was recipient of fellowship award from West China Second University Hospital, Sichuan University (NIH HD 22965-19). The authors have nothing

    • Acid distribution in phosphoric acid fuel cells

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Okae, I.; Seya, A.; Umemoto, M. [Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., Chiba (Japan)

      1996-12-31

      Electrolyte acid distribution among each component of a cell is determined by capillary force when the cell is not in operation, but the distribution under the current load conditions had not been clear so far. Since the loss of electrolyte acid during operation is inevitable, it is necessary to store enough amount of acid in every cell. But it must be under the level of which the acid disturbs the diffusion of reactive gases. Accordingly to know the actual acid distribution during operation in a cell is very important. In this report, we carried out experiments to clarify the distribution using small single cells.

    • Fatty Acid Profiles of , and Muscles and Serum in Kacang Goats Supplemented with Inorganic Selenium and Iodine

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Z. A. Aghwan

      2014-04-01

      Full Text Available Fat and fatty acids in muscle and adipose tissues are among the major factors influencing meat quality particularly nutritional value and palatability. The present study was carried out to examine the effects of supplementing inorganic selenium (Se, iodine (I and a combination of both on fatty acid compositions in serum, and supraspinatus (SS, longissimus lumborum (LL, and semitendinosus (ST muscles in goats. Twenty-four, 7 to 8 months old, Kacang male goats with a mean live weight of 22.00±1.17 kg were individually and randomly assigned into four groups of six animals each for 100 d of feeding prior to slaughter. The animals were offered the same concentrate (basal diet as 1% of body weight with ad libitum amount of fresh guinea grass. The four groups were as follows: T1 (control - basal diet without supplementation; T2 - basal diet with 0.6 mg Se/kg DM; T3 - basal diet with 0.6 mg I/kg DM; T4 - basal diet with combination of 0.6 mg Se/kg DM and 0.6 mg I/kg DM. The major fatty acids (FAs detected in the serum were palmitic (C16:0, stearic (C18:0, oleic (C18:1n9 and linoleic (C18:2n-6, while the major FAs in the selected muscles were C16:0, C18:0 and C18:1n9 acids. The main polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA detected in muscles and serum were (CI8:2n-6, linolenic acid (C18:3n-3, and arachidonic acid (C20:4n-6. No significant differences (p>0.05 were observed in the concentration of total saturated fatty acids (SFA among the four groups. PUFA concentrations in the goats supplemented with Se (T2 were significantly higher (p<0.05 than the goats of the control group (T1. The PUFA: SFA ratio was significantly higher in the animals supplemented with dietary Se (T2 than those of control ones (T1. It is concluded that dietary supplementation of inorganic Se increased the unsaturated fatty acids in muscle. The supplementation of iodine with or without Se had negligible effects on muscle fatty acid content of Kacang crossbred male goats.

    • Physiochemical characteristics, fatty acid profile and tocopherol composition of the oil from Camellia oleifera Abel cultivated in Henan, China

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      J. B. Hu

      2018-06-01

      Full Text Available As a unique woody oil tree, Camellia oleifera Abel originates from southern China and is now being cultivated in central China, such as the southern Henan province. The aim of this work is to determine some physiochemical parameters, fatty acid profile and tocopherol composition of the Camellia oleifera seed oils harvested in southern Henan in the 2016 season. The lipid contents of the kernel are in the range of 28.39- 56.94% on dry matter. The acid value (AV, saponification value (SV, iodine value (IV, and refractive index of the oils are in the ranges: 0.22-5.17 mg KOH/g, 178.90-196.91 mg KOH/g, 82.0-87.1 g I2/100g, and 1.4667-1.4720 (nD25 , respectively. The main fatty acids are: palmitic 7.07-9.52%, palmitoleic 0.09-0.22%, stearic 1.45-2.94%, oleic 77.02-84.33%, linoleic 5.19-11.23%, linolenic 0.53-0.70% and arachidic 0.22-0.70%. The sn-2 fatty acid composition is: 84.36-91.33% oleic, 7.14-14.22% linoleic, and 0.89-1.96% others. The tocopherol content is in the range of 39.55-75.94 mg/100g oil, including mainly α-tocopherol (33.98-67.82 mg/100g and γ-tocopherol (5.57- 8.27 mg/100g when the oils are extracted with hexane; and 14.91-44.36 mg/100g, including mainly α-tocopherol (9.42-37.08 mg/100g and γ-tocopherol (5.50-7.33 mg/100g when the oils are extracted by ethyl ether. The physiochemical properties C. oleifera seed oils from southern Henan are similar to those from other districts of China.

    • Unsaturated free fatty acids increase benzodiazepine receptor agonist binding depending on the subunit composition of the GABAA receptor complex.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Witt, M R; Westh-Hansen, S E; Rasmussen, P B; Hastrup, S; Nielsen, M

      1996-11-01

      It has been shown previously that unsaturated free fatty acids (FFAs) strongly enhance the binding of agonist benzodiazepine receptor ligands and GABAA receptor ligands in the CNS in vitro. To investigate the selectivity of this effect, recombinant human GABAA/benzodiazepine receptor complexes formed by different subunit compositions (alpha x beta y gamma 2, x = 1, 2, 3, and 5; y = 1, 2, and 3) were expressed using the baculovirus-transfected Sf9 insect cell system. At 10(-4) M, unsaturated FFAs, particularly arachidonic (20:4) and docosahexaenoic (22:6) acids, strongly stimulated (> 200% of control values) the binding of [3H]flunitrazepam ([3H]FNM) to the alpha 3 beta 2 gamma 2 receptor combination in whole cell preparations. No effect or small increases in levels of unsaturated FFAs on [3H]FNM binding to alpha 1 beta x gamma 2 and alpha 2 beta x gamma 2 receptor combinations were observed, and weak effects (130% of control values) were detected using the alpha 5 beta 2 gamma 2 receptor combination. The saturated FFAs, stearic and palmitic acids, were without effect on [3H]FNM binding to any combination of receptor complexes. The hydroxylated unsaturated FFAs, ricinoleic and ricinelaidic acids, were shown to decrease the binding of [3H]FNM only if an alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 receptor combination was used. Given the heterogeneity of the GABAA/ benzodiazepine receptor subunit distribution in the CNS, the effects of FFAs on the benzodiazepine receptor can be assumed to vary at both cellular and regional levels.

    • Effects of Chain Length and Saturability of Fatty Acids on Phospholipids and Proteins in Plasma Membranes of Bovine Mammary Gland.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Yan, Qiongxian; Tang, Shaoxun; Han, Xuefeng; Bamikole, Musibau Adungbe; Zhou, Chuanshe; Kang, Jinhe; Wang, Min; Tan, Zhiliang

      2016-12-01

      Free fatty acids (FFAs) in plasma are essential substrates for de novo synthesis of milk fat, or directly import into mammary cells. The physico-chemical properties of mammary cells membrane composition affected by FFAs with different chain lengths and saturability are unclear yet. Employing GC, FTIR and fluorescence spectroscopy, the adsorption capacity, phospholipids content, membrane proteins conformation, lipid peroxidation product, and free sulfhydryl of plasma membranes (PMs) interacted with different FFAs were determined. The mammary cells PMs at 38 and 39.5 °C showed different adsorption capacities: acetic acid (Ac) > stearic acid (SA) > β-hydroxybutyric acid (BHBA) > trans10, cis12 CLA. In the FTIR spectrum, the major adsorption peaks appeared at 2920 and 2850 cm -1 for phospholipids, and at 1628 and 1560 cm -1 for membrane proteins. The intensities of PMs-FFAs complexes were varied with the FFAs species and their initial concentrations. The β-sheet and turn structures of membrane proteins were transferred into random coil and α-helix after BHBA, SA and trans10, cis12 CLA treatments compared with Ac treatment. The quenching effects on the fluorescence of endogenous membrane protein, 1, 8-ANS, NBD-PE, and DHPE entrapped in PMs by LCFA were different from those of short chain FFAs. These results indicate that the adsorption of FFAs could change membrane protein conformation and polarity of head group in phospholipids. This variation of the mammary cells PMs was regulated by carbon chain length and saturability of FFAs.

    • Vaccenic acid and trans fatty acid isomers from partially hydrogenated oil both adversely affect LDL cholesterol: a double-blind, randomized controlled trial.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Gebauer, Sarah K; Destaillats, Frédéric; Dionisi, Fabiola; Krauss, Ronald M; Baer, David J

      2015-12-01

      Adverse effects of industrially produced trans fatty acids (iTFAs) on the risk of coronary artery disease are well documented in the scientific literature; however, effects of naturally occurring trans fatty acids (TFAs) from ruminant animals (rTFA), such as vaccenic acid (VA) and cis-9,trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid (c9,t11-CLA), are less clear. Although animal and cell studies suggest that VA and c9,t11-CLA may be hypocholesterolemic and antiatherogenic, epidemiologic data comparing rTFAs and iTFAs are inconsistent, and human intervention studies have been limited, underpowered, and not well controlled. We determined the effects of VA, c9,t11-CLA, and iTFA, in the context of highly controlled diets (24 d each), on lipoprotein risk factors compared with a control diet. We conducted a double-blind, randomized, crossover feeding trial in 106 healthy adults [mean ± SD age: 47 ± 10.8 y; body mass index (in kg/m(2)): 28.5 ± 4.0; low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol: 3.24 ± 0.63 mmol/L]. Diets were designed to have stearic acid replaced with the following TFA isomers (percentage of energy): 0.1% mixed isomers of TFA (control), ∼3% VA, ∼3% iTFA, or 1% c9,t11-CLA. Total dietary fat (34% of energy) and other macronutrients were matched. Total cholesterol (TC), LDL cholesterol, triacylglycerol, lipoprotein(a), and apolipoprotein B were higher after VA than after iTFA; high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and apolipoprotein AI also were higher after VA. Compared with control, VA and iTFA both increased TC, LDL cholesterol, ratio of TC to HDL cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B (2-6% change; P cholesterol, apolipoprotein AI, apolipoprotein B, and lipoprotein(a) (2-6% change; P < 0.05), whereas iTFA did not. c9,t11-CLA lowered triacylglycerol (P ≤ 0.01) and had no effect on other lipoprotein risk factors. With respect to risk of cardiovascular disease, these results are consistent with current nutrition labeling guidelines, with the requirement of VA, but

  1. Evolution of fatty acids in medlar (Mespilus germanica L. mesocarp at different stages of ripening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strnad, M.

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The fatty acid composition of medlar (Mespilus germanica L. varied significantly among the ripening stages sampled at 157, 172 and 187 DAFs (days after full bloom. Twenty-one different fatty acids were detected in preclimacteric fruit and 17 when the climacteric began. Principal fatty acids, determined in medlar fruit harvested from October (157 and 172 DAFs to November (187 DAF were mainly palmitic acid (16:0, linoleic acid (18:2n-6, and a-linolenic acid (18:3n-3. While the content of saturated fatty acids [palmitic acid (16:0 and stearic acid (18:0] increased, the content of the essential polyunsaturated fatty acids [linoleic acid (18:2n-6 and linolenic acid (18:3n-3] decreased through ripening, in parallel with pulp darkening. The percentage of linoleic acid and a-linolenic acid in ripe, hard fruits was 60.0 and 13.5 % of dry wt at 157 DAF which decreased throughout ripening, remaining at 28.7 and 5.6 % of dry wt, respectively, in the fully softened and darkened pulp. A marked decreases in the double bond index, percentage of unsaturation and the ratio of unsaturation/saturation were also seen throughout the medlar ripening. The contribution of unsaturated fatty acid to the total fatty acid content decreased markedly as the medlar fruit became progressively softer and darkened.La composición en ácidos grasos del níspero (Mespilus germanica L. varió significativamente entre los estados de maduración muestreados a los 157, 172 y 187 DAFs (días después de la floración. Veinte y un ácidos grasos diferentes fueron detectados en el fruto preclimatérico y 17 cuando comenzó el climaterio. Los ácidos grasos principales encontrados en nísperos, recolectados desde Octubre (157 y 172 DAFs hasta Noviembre (187 DAF, fueron principalmente ácido palmítico (16:0, ácido linoléico (18:2n-6, y ácido a-linolénico (18:3n-3. En tanto que el contenido en ácidos grasos saturados (ácido palmítico (16:0 y ácido esteárico (18:0 aumentó, el

  2. Citric acid urine test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urine - citric acid test; Renal tubular acidosis - citric acid test; Kidney stones - citric acid test; Urolithiasis - citric acid test ... No special preparation is necessary for this test. But the results ... test is usually done while you are on a normal diet. Ask your ...

  3. Effect of Alcohols on the Phase Behavior and Emulsification of a Sucrose Fatty Acid Ester/Water/Edible Oil System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Tsutashi; Ogawa, Akihiro; Ohara, Yukari; Nishina, Shogo; Nakanishi, Maho; Gohtani, Shoichi

    2018-02-01

    The effect of alcohols (ethanol, 1-propanol, propylene glycol, glycerin, sucrose) on the phase behavior and emulsification of sucrose stearic acid ester (SSE)/water/edible vegetable oil (EVO) systems was investigated. Adding sucrose, propylene glycol, and glycerin narrowed the oil-separated two-phase region in the phase diagram of the SSE/water/EVO systems, whereas adding ethanol and 1-propanol expanded the oil-separated two-phase region. Changing the course of emulsification in the phase diagram showed that the size of the oil-droplet particle typically decreased in a system with a narrowed oil-separated region. The emulsification properties of the systems varied with respect to changes in the phase diagram. The microstructure of the systems was examined using small-angle X-ray scattering, and the ability to retain the oil in the lamellar structure of the SSEs was suggested as an important role in emulsification, because the mechanism of the systems was the same as that for the liquid crystal emulsification method.

  4. Conserved Function of ACYL–ACYL CARRIER PROTEIN DESATURASE 5 on Seed Oil and Oleic Acid Biosynthesis between Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changyu Jin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that several ACYL–ACYL CARRIER PROTEIN DESATURASE (AtAAD members in Arabidopsis thaliana are responsible for oleic acid (C18:1 biosynthesis. Limited research has been conducted on another member, AtAAD5, and its paralog BnAAD5 in the closely related and commercially important plant, Brassica napus. Here, we found that AtAAD5 was predominantly and exclusively expressed in developing embryos at the whole seed developmental stages. The aad5 mutation caused a significant decrease in the amounts of oil and C18:1, and a considerable increase in the content of stearic acid (C18:0 in mature seeds, suggesting that AtAAD5 functioned as an important facilitator of seed oil biosynthesis. We also cloned the full-length coding sequence of BnAAD5-1 from the A3 subgenome of the B. napus inbred line L111. We showed that ectopic expression of BnAAD5-1 in the A. thaliana aad5-2 mutant fully complemented the phenotypes of the mutant, such as lower oil content and altered contents of C18:0 and C18:1. These results help us to better understand the functions of AAD members in A. thaliana and B. napus and provide a promising target for genetic manipulation of B. napus.

  5. Production of Chlorella vulgaris as a source of essential fatty acids in a tubular photobioreactor continuously fed with air enriched with CO2 at different concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz Montoya, Erika Y; Casazza, Alessandro A; Aliakbarian, Bahar; Perego, Patrizia; Converti, Attilio; de Carvalho, João C Monteiro

    2014-01-01

    To reduce CO2 emissions and simultaneously produce biomass rich in essential fatty acids, Chlorella vulgaris CCAP 211 was continuously grown in a tubular photobioreactor using air alone or air enriched with CO2 as the sole carbon source. While on one hand, nitrogen-limited conditions strongly affected biomass growth, conversely, they almost doubled its lipid fraction. Under these conditions using air enriched with 0, 2, 4, 8, and 16% (v/v) CO2 , the maximum biomass concentration was 1.4, 5.8, 6.6, 6.8, and 6.4 gDB L(-1) on a dry basis, the CO2 consumption rate 62, 380, 391, 433, and 430 mgCO2 L(-1) day(-1) , and the lipid productivity 3.7, 23.7, 24.8, 29.5, and 24.4 mg L(-1) day(-1) , respectively. C. vulgaris was able to grow effectively using CO2 -enriched air, but its chlorophyll a (3.0-3.5 g 100gDB (-1) ), chlorophyll b (2.6-3.0 g 100gDB (-1) ), and lipid contents (10.7-12.0 g 100gDB (-1) ) were not significantly influenced by the presence of CO2 in the air. Most of the fatty acids in C. vulgaris biomass were of the saturated series, mainly myristic, palmitic, and stearic acids, but a portion of no less than 45% consisted of unsaturated fatty acids, and about 80% of these were high added-value essential fatty acids belonging to the ω3 and ω6 series. These results highlight that C. vulgaris biomass could be of great importance for human health when used as food additive or for functional food production. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  6. Comparison of plasma and erythrocyte membrane fatty acid compositions in patients with end-stage renal disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sertoglu, Erdim; Kurt, Ismail; Tapan, Serkan; Uyanik, Metin; Serdar, Muhittin A; Kayadibi, Huseyin; El-Fawaeir, Saad

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we aimed to compare the serum lipid profile and fatty acid (FA) compositions of erythrocyte membrane (EM) and plasma in three different patient groups (group 1: type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM)+end-stage renal disease (ESRD), group 2: ESRD, group 4: T2DM) and healthy controls (group 3) simultaneously. 40 ESRD patients treated with hemodialysis (HD) in Gulhane School of Medicine (20 with T2DM) and 32 controls (17 with T2DM, 15 healthy controls) were included in the study. Plasma and EM FA concentrations were measured by gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID). Plasma and EM palmitic acid (PA) and stearic acid (SA) levels were significantly higher in T2DM patients compared to controls (p=0.040 and p=0.002 for plasma, p=0.001 and p=0.010 for EM, respectively). EM docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels were also significantly lower in patients with ESRD+T2DM and ESRD compared to controls (p=0.004 and p=0.037, respectively). Patients with insulin resistance display a pattern of high long chain saturated FAs (PA, SA and arachidic acids). However, while there are no recognized standards for normal EM DHA content, decreased levels of EM DHA in ESRD patient groups (groups 1 and 2) suggest that there may be reduced endogenous synthesis of DHA in HD subjects, due to the decreased functionality of desaturase and elongase enzymes. Because membrane PUFA content affects membrane fluidity and cell signaling, these findings are worthy of further investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Acid Deposition Phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadan, A.E.K.

    2004-01-01

    Acid deposition, commonly known as acid rain, occurs when emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels and other industrial processes undergo complex chemical reactions in the atmosphere and fall to the earth as wet deposition (rain, snow, cloud, fog) or dry deposition (dry particles, gas). Rain and snow are already naturally acidic, but are only considered problematic when less than a ph of 5.0 The main chemical precursors leading to acidic conditions are atmospheric concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) and nitrogen oxides (NO x ). When these two compounds react with water, oxygen, and sunlight in the atmosphere, the result is sulfuric (H 2 SO 4 ) and nitric acids (HNO 3 ), the primary agents of acid deposition which mainly produced from the combustion of fossil fuel and from petroleum refinery. Airborne chemicals can travel long distances from their sources and can therefore affect ecosystems over broad regional scales and in locations far from the sources of emissions. According to the concern of petroleum ministry with the environment and occupational health, in this paper we will discussed the acid deposition phenomena through the following: Types of acidic deposition and its components in the atmosphere Natural and man-made sources of compounds causing the acidic deposition. Chemical reactions causing the acidic deposition phenomenon in the atmosphere. Factors affecting level of acidic deposition in the atmosphere. Impact of acid deposition. Procedures for acidic deposition control in petroleum industry

  8. Acid Lipase Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Neurological Disorders and Stroke conducts and supports research to understand lipid storage diseases such as acid lipase deficiency and ... of Neurological Disorders and Stroke conducts and supports research to understand lipid storage diseases such as acid lipase deficiency and ...

  9. Lactic acid test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003507.htm Lactic acid test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lactic acid is mainly produced in muscle cells and red ...

  10. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this process. One group of these disorders is amino acid metabolism disorders. They include phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple syrup urine disease. Amino acids are "building blocks" that join together to form ...

  11. Folic Acid and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Folic Acid and Pregnancy KidsHealth / For Parents / Folic Acid and Pregnancy Print ...

  12. Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-6 fatty acids are types of fats. Some types are found in vegetable oils, including corn, evening primrose seed, safflower, and soybean oils. Other types of omega-6 fatty acids are found in black currant seed, borage seed, ...

  13. Hydrochloric acid poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrochloric acid is a clear, poisonous liquid. It is highly corrosive, which means it immediately causes severe damage, such ... poisoning due to swallowing or breathing in hydrochloric acid. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  14. Aminolevulinic Acid Topical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminolevulinic acid is used in combination with photodynamic therapy (PDT; special blue light) to treat actinic keratoses (small crusty ... skin cancer) of the face or scalp. Aminolevulinic acid is in a class of medications called photosensitizing ...

  15. Zoledronic Acid Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is used to prevent or treat osteoporosis (condition in which the bones become thin and weak ... of life,' end of regular menstrual periods). Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is also used to treat osteoporosis in ...

  16. Azelaic Acid Topical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azelaic acid gel and foam is used to clear the bumps, lesions, and swelling caused by rosacea (a skin ... redness, flushing, and pimples on the face). Azelaic acid cream is used to treat the pimples and ...

  17. Aminocaproic Acid Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminocaproic acid injection is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid injection is also used to control bleeding in ...

  18. Deoxycholic Acid Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deoxycholic acid injection is used to improve the appearance and profile of moderate to severe submental fat ('double chin'; fatty tissue located under the chin). Deoxycholic acid injection is in a class of medications called ...

  19. Quantitation of (beta)N-Alkanoyl-5-hydroxytryptamides in coffee by means of LC-MS/MS-SIDA and assessment of their gastric acid secretion potential using the HGT-1 cell assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Roman; Bardelmeier, Ina; Weiss, Carola; Rubach, Malte; Somoza, Veronika; Hofmann, Thomas

    2010-02-10

    A straightforward stable isotope dilution analysis (SIDA) for the reliable quantitative determination of (beta)N-C(18:0)- to (beta)N-C(24:0)-alkanoyl-5-hydroxytryptamides (C5HTs) in coffee powder and beverages by means of LC-MS/MS was developed. The developed SIDA showing accuracy values of 92.6-107% and precision between 0.5 and 7% relative standard deviation for the individual derivatives allowed the sensitive and selective quantification of the target compounds in coffee beverages. Depending on the type of coffee, quantitation revealed C5HT levels between 65 and 144 microg/L in filtered coffee and up to 3500 microg/L in a French press beverage, thus indicating that about 0.3 or 7.2% of the C5HTs were extracted from the coffee powder into the beverage when using the cellulose filter method or the French press, respectively. To estimate the potential contribution of the C5HTs to the phenomenon of stomach irritation after ingestion of coffee brew, in vitro cell studies were performed with pure individual 5-hydroxytryptamides and a mixture of the predominating derivatives in ratios matching those found in coffee. All substances tested induced a decrease in the intracellular proton index (IPX) coined as an indicator of stomach acid secretion. While the biomimetic C5HT mixture was highest in its inducing effect, the individual stearic acid, oleic acid, and linoleic acid 5-hydroxytryptamide did not differ significantly from each other, but showed a less pronounced effect compared to arachinic acid 5-hydroxytryptamide. In conclusion, not the grade of saturation seems to determine the C5HT's mode of action in driving the stomach acid secretion, rather than the fatty acid chain length.

  20. Genetic architecture of palm oil fatty acid composition in cultivated oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) compared to its wild relative E. oleifera (H.B.K) Cortés.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Carmenza; Cochard, Benoit; Flori, Albert; Cros, David; Lopes, Ricardo; Cuellar, Teresa; Espeout, Sandra; Syaputra, Indra; Villeneuve, Pierre; Pina, Michel; Ritter, Enrique; Leroy, Thierry; Billotte, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    We searched for quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with the palm oil fatty acid composition of mature fruits of the oil palm E. guineensis Jacq. in comparison with its wild relative E. oleifera (H.B.K) Cortés. The oil palm cross LM2T x DA10D between two heterozygous parents was considered in our experiment as an intraspecific representative of E. guineensis. Its QTLs were compared to QTLs published for the same traits in an interspecific Elaeis pseudo-backcross used as an indirect representative of E. oleifera. Few correlations were found in E. guineensis between pulp fatty acid proportions and yield traits, allowing for the rather independent selection of both types of traits. Sixteen QTLs affecting palm oil fatty acid proportions and iodine value were identified in oil palm. The phenotypic variation explained by the detected QTLs was low to medium in E. guineensis, ranging between 10% and 36%. The explained cumulative variation was 29% for palmitic acid C16:0 (one QTL), 68% for stearic acid C18:0 (two QTLs), 50% for oleic acid C18:1 (three QTLs), 25% for linoleic acid C18:2 (one QTL), and 40% (two QTLs) for the iodine value. Good marker co-linearity was observed between the intraspecific and interspecific Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) linkage maps. Specific QTL regions for several traits were found in each mapping population. Our comparative QTL results in both E. guineensis and interspecific materials strongly suggest that, apart from two common QTL zones, there are two specific QTL regions with major effects, which might be one in E. guineensis, the other in E. oleifera, which are independent of each other and harbor QTLs for several traits, indicating either pleiotropic effects or linkage. Using QTL maps connected by highly transferable SSR markers, our study established a good basis to decipher in the future such hypothesis at the Elaeis genus level.

  1. Genetic Architecture of Palm Oil Fatty Acid Composition in Cultivated Oil Palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) Compared to Its Wild Relative E. oleifera (H.B.K) Cortés

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Carmenza; Cochard, Benoit; Flori, Albert; Cros, David; Lopes, Ricardo; Cuellar, Teresa; Espeout, Sandra; Syaputra, Indra; Villeneuve, Pierre; Pina, Michel; Ritter, Enrique; Leroy, Thierry; Billotte, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    We searched for quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with the palm oil fatty acid composition of mature fruits of the oil palm E. guineensis Jacq. in comparison with its wild relative E. oleifera (H.B.K) Cortés. The oil palm cross LM2T x DA10D between two heterozygous parents was considered in our experiment as an intraspecific representative of E. guineensis. Its QTLs were compared to QTLs published for the same traits in an interspecific Elaeis pseudo-backcross used as an indirect representative of E. oleifera. Few correlations were found in E. guineensis between pulp fatty acid proportions and yield traits, allowing for the rather independent selection of both types of traits. Sixteen QTLs affecting palm oil fatty acid proportions and iodine value were identified in oil palm. The phenotypic variation explained by the detected QTLs was low to medium in E. guineensis, ranging between 10% and 36%. The explained cumulative variation was 29% for palmitic acid C16:0 (one QTL), 68% for stearic acid C18:0 (two QTLs), 50% for oleic acid C18:1 (three QTLs), 25% for linoleic acid C18:2 (one QTL), and 40% (two QTLs) for the iodine value. Good marker co-linearity was observed between the intraspecific and interspecific Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) linkage maps. Specific QTL regions for several traits were found in each mapping population. Our comparative QTL results in both E. guineensis and interspecific materials strongly suggest that, apart from two common QTL zones, there are two specific QTL regions with major effects, which might be one in E. guineensis, the other in E. oleifera, which are independent of each other and harbor QTLs for several traits, indicating either pleiotropic effects or linkage. Using QTL maps connected by highly transferable SSR markers, our study established a good basis to decipher in the future such hypothesis at the Elaeis genus level. PMID:24816555

  2. Amino acids and proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goudoever, Johannes B.; Vlaardingerbroek, Hester; van den Akker, Chris H.; de Groof, Femke; van der Schoor, Sophie R. D.

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids and protein are key factors for growth. The neonatal period requires the highest intake in life to meet the demands. Those demands include amino acids for growth, but proteins and amino acids also function as signalling molecules and function as neurotransmitters. Often the nutritional

  3. Acid Rain Study Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunger, Carolyn; And Others

    Acid rain is a complex, worldwide environmental problem. This study guide is intended to aid teachers of grades 4-12 to help their students understand what acid rain is, why it is a problem, and what possible solutions exist. The document contains specific sections on: (1) the various terms used in conjunction with acid rain (such as acid…

  4. Immunoglobulin and fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a composition comprising 0.1-10 w/w % immunoglobulin (Ig), 4-14 w/w % saturated fatty acids, 4-14 w/w % mono-unsaturated fatty acids and 0-5 w/w % poly-unsaturated fatty acids, wherein the weight percentages are based on the content of dry matter in the composition...

  5. The Acid Rain Reader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    A topic which is often not sufficiently dealt with in elementary school textbooks is acid rain. This student text is designed to supplement classroom materials on the topic. Discussed are: (1) "Rain"; (2) "Water Cycle"; (3) "Fossil Fuels"; (4) "Air Pollution"; (5) "Superstacks"; (6) "Acid/Neutral/Bases"; (7) "pH Scale"; (8) "Acid Rain"; (9)…

  6. Stomach acid test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastric acid secretion test ... of the cells in the stomach to release acid. The stomach contents are then removed and analyzed. ... 3.5). These numbers are converted to actual acid production in units of milliequivalents per hour (mEq/ ...

  7. Acidic Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasekara, Ananda S

    2016-05-25

    Ionic liquid with acidic properties is an important branch in the wide ionic liquid field and the aim of this article is to cover all aspects of these acidic ionic liquids, especially focusing on the developments in the last four years. The structural diversity and synthesis of acidic ionic liquids are discussed in the introduction sections of this review. In addition, an unambiguous classification system for various types of acidic ionic liquids is presented in the introduction. The physical properties including acidity, thermo-physical properties, ionic conductivity, spectroscopy, and computational studies on acidic ionic liquids are covered in the next sections. The final section provides a comprehensive review on applications of acidic ionic liquids in a wide array of fields including catalysis, CO2 fixation, ionogel, electrolyte, fuel-cell, membrane, biomass processing, biodiesel synthesis, desulfurization of gasoline/diesel, metal processing, and metal electrodeposition.

  8. Rapid magnetic solid-phase extraction based on monodisperse magnetic single-crystal ferrite nanoparticles for the determination of free fatty acid content in edible oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Fang; Zhao, Qin; Lv, Xin; Dong, Xu-Yan; Feng, Yu-Qi; Chen, Hong

    2013-01-09

    This study proposes a rapid magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) based on monodisperse magnetic single-crystal ferrite (Fe(3)O(4)) nanoparticles (NPs) for determining the quantities of eight free fatty acids (FFAs), including palmitic acid (C16:0), stearic acid (C18:0), oleic acid (C18:1), linoleic acid (C18:2), linolenic acid (C18:3), arachidic acid (C20:0), eicosenoic acid (C20:1), and behenic acid (C22:0) in oil. The amine-functionalized mesoporous Fe(3)O(4) magnetic NPs were applied as a sorbent for MSPE of FFAs from oil samples in a process that is based on hydrophilic interaction. The extraction can be completed rapidly in a dispersive mode with the aid of vigorous vortex. Additional tedious processing steps such as centrifugation and evaporation of organic solvent were not necessary with this procedure. Furthermore, esterification of FFAs can be accomplished during the desorption procedure by using methanol/sulfuric acid (99:1, v/v) as the desorption solvent. Several parameters affecting the extraction efficiency were investigated, including the matrix solvent for extraction, the desorption solvent and desorption time, and the amount of sorbent and extraction time. The pretreatment process was rapid under optimal conditions, being accomplished within 15 min. When coupled with gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID), a rapid, simple, and convenient MSPE-GC-FID method for the determination of FFAs in oil samples was established with a total analysis time within 25 min. The limits of detection for the target FFAs were found to be 7.22-26.26 ng/mL. Recoveries in oil samples were in the range of 81.33-117.75%, with RSDs of <6.4% (intraday) and <6.9% (interday). This method was applied successfully to the analysis of dynamic FFA formation in four types of edible oils subjected to an accelerated storage test. The simple, rapid, and cost-effective method developed in the current study offers a potential application for the extraction and

  9. Efeito da adição de ácidos graxos em filmes à base de pectina The effect of addition of fatty acids on pectin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana A. Batista

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Os objetivos deste trabalho foram desenvolver filmes à base de pectina de baixo teor de esterificação, amidada, com adição dos ácidos graxos láurico (AL, palmítico (AP e esteárico (AE e caracterizá-los quanto às propriedades de permeabilidade ao vapor de água (PVA e ao oxigênio, propriedades mecânicas (tensão de ruptura e elongação, solubilidade em água e opacidade, além de observar a morfologia da superfície dos filmes utilizando microscopia eletrônica de varredura (MEV. A adição de 12 e 18% dos ácidos promoveu aumento da PVA e da elongação e redução da tensão de ruptura, em relação aos filmes com 6% de ácido graxo. Todos os filmes apresentaram-se 100% solúveis em água e mais opacos quando os ácidos graxos foram adicionados. A partir da MEV, foi observado que os ácidos graxos não se incorporaram à matriz filmogênica.The purposes of this research were to develop and characterize composite biofilms produced with low methoxyl amidated pectin plus lauric, palmitic and stearic acids. Water vapor permeability, oxigen permeability, mechanical properties (tensile strength and elongation, water solubility, opacity and, surface morphology were evaluated. The increase of fatty acids addition to 12 and 18% resulted in an increase in water vapor permeability and elongation and a decrease in tensile strength compared to the level of 6% of fatty acids. All formulations produced films showing 100% water solubility. As observed by scanning electronic microscopy the fatty acids were not homogeneously incorporated on the filmogenic matrices.

  10. Process for the preparation of lactic acid and glyceric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, James E [Haslett, MI; Miller, Dennis J [Okemos, MI; Marincean, Simona [Dewitt, MI

    2008-12-02

    Hexose and pentose monosaccharides are degraded to lactic acid and glyceric acid in an aqueous solution in the presence of an excess of a strongly anionic exchange resin, such as AMBERLITE IRN78 and AMBERLITE IRA400. The glyceric acid and lactic acid can be separated from the aqueous solution. Lactic acid and glyceric acid are staple articles of commerce.

  11. Amino acids in the sedimentary humic and fulvic acids

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sardessai, S.

    acids in the coastal Arabian Sea sediments: whereas amino acids content of fulvic acids was lower than that of humic acids in the coastal sediments of Bay of Bengal. Slope sedimentary humic acids were relatively enriched in amino acids as compared...

  12. Age-related changes in the percentage of oleate in adipose tissue of male and female Fischer rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorling, E.B.; Hansen, Harald S.

    1995-01-01

    . Oestrogen injections twice a week to the castrated rats increased their oleate percentage within the same period to 23.4 ± 0.3%, partly reflecting the increase observed in the female rats. Stearic acid showed similar but less pronounced changes. The ratio oleic acid/stearic acid was constantly higher...

  13. Designing inhibitors of cytochrome c/cardiolipin peroxidase complexes: mitochondria-targeted imidazole-substituted fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jianfei; Bakan, Ahmet; Kapralov, Alexandr A; Silva, K Ishara; Huang, Zhentai; Amoscato, Andrew A; Peterson, James; Garapati, Venkata Krishna; Saxena, Sunil; Bayir, Hülya; Atkinson, Jeffrey; Bahar, Ivet; Kagan, Valerian E

    2014-06-01

    Mitochondria have emerged as the major regulatory platform responsible for the coordination of numerous metabolic reactions as well as cell death processes, whereby the execution of intrinsic apoptosis includes the production of reactive oxygen species fueling oxidation of cardiolipin (CL) catalyzed by cytochrome (Cyt) c. As this oxidation occurs within the peroxidase complex of Cyt c with CL, the latter represents a promising target for the discovery and design of drugs with antiapoptotic mechanisms of action. In this work, we designed and synthesized a new group of mitochondria-targeted imidazole-substituted analogs of stearic acid TPP-n-ISAs with various positions of the attached imidazole group on the fatty acid (n = 6, 8, 10, 13, and 14). By using a combination of absorption spectroscopy and EPR protocols (continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance and electron spin echo envelope modulation) we demonstrated that TPP-n-ISAs indeed were able to potently suppress CL-induced structural rearrangements in Cyt c, paving the way to its peroxidase competence. TPP-n-ISA analogs preserved the low-spin hexa-coordinated heme-iron state in Cyt c/CL complexes whereby TPP-6-ISA displayed a significantly more effective preservation pattern than TPP-14-ISA. Elucidation of these intermolecular stabilization mechanisms of Cyt c identified TPP-6-ISA as an effective inhibitor of the peroxidase function of Cyt c/CL complexes with a significant antiapoptotic potential realized in mouse embryonic cells exposed to ionizing irradiation. These experimental findings were detailed and supported by all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Based on the experimental data and computation predictions, we identified TPP-6-ISA as a candidate drug with optimized antiapoptotic potency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 78 FR 20029 - Castor Oil, Polymer With Adipic Acid, Linoleic Acid, Oleic Acid and Ricinoleic Acid; Tolerance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-03

    ..., Polymer With Adipic Acid, Linoleic Acid, Oleic Acid and Ricinoleic Acid; Tolerance Exemption AGENCY... from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of castor oil, polymer with adipic acid, linoleic acid... pesticide formulation. Advance Polymer Technology submitted a petition to EPA under the Federal Food, Drug...

  15. A study of the fatty acid and tocochromanol patterns of some Fabaceae (Leguminosae plants from Turkey I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahim, Ahmet

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the fatty acid, tocopherol, tocotrienol and plastochromanol-8 contents of some selected Fabaceae (Leguminosae species belonging to different genera (Colutea, Vicia, Lathyrus, Gonocytisus, Lupinus, Hedysarum, Onobrychis, Trigonella from Turkey were determined by using GLC and HPLC techniques. Some of the studied species are endemic to Turkey. The seed oils of different Leguminous taxa contained linoleic, oleic and linolenic acids as their major components. The ratios of these fatty acids in the Leguminous genera were found to be highly variable. Palmitic and stearic acids are the major saturated fatty acids in the seed oils. Vicia and Onobrychis patterns showed high similarity in means of qualitative fatty acid concentration. The tocopherol and tocochromanol patterns of the seed oils were also found to be highly variable among the genera investigated here. The total tocopherols was higher than the total tocotrienols. Alpha and gamma tocopherols were also the highest tocopherols present in the whole species. Beta, gamma and delta-tocotrienols were not found in most of the studied leguminous patterns. The results are discussed in view of renewable sources and chemotaxonomy.En este estudio, los contenidos en ácidos grasos, tocoferoles, tocotrienoles y plastocromanol-8 de algunas especies seleccionadas de Fabaceae (Leguminosae, pertenecientes a diferentes géneros (Colutea, Vicia, Lathyrus, Gonocytisus, Lupinus, Hedysarum, Onobrychis, Trigonella de Turquía, fueron determinadas usando técnicas de GLC y HPLC. Algunas de las especies estudiadas son endémicas de Turquía. Los aceites de semillas de los diferentes taxones de leguminosas contenían los ácidos linoleico, oleico y linolénico como principales componentes. Las proporciones de estos ácidos grasos fueron muy variables entre los géneros de leguminosas. Los ácidos palmítico y esteárico son los principales ácidos grasos saturados en los aceites de semillas. Los patrones

  16. Bile acid sequestrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Sonne, David P; Knop, Filip K

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized in the liver from cholesterol and have traditionally been recognized for their role in absorption of lipids and in cholesterol homeostasis. In recent years, however, bile acids have emerged as metabolic signaling molecules that are involved in the regulation of lipid...... and glucose metabolism, and possibly energy homeostasis, through activation of the bile acid receptors farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and TGR5. Bile acid sequestrants (BASs) constitute a class of drugs that bind bile acids in the intestine to form a nonabsorbable complex resulting in interruption...... of the enterohepatic circulation. This increases bile acid synthesis and consequently reduces serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Also, BASs improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Despite a growing understanding of the impact of BASs on glucose metabolism, the mechanisms behind their glucose...

  17. Citric Acid Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Pattie L. (Compiler)

    2013-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of the GSDO Program, the purpose of this project is to demonstratevalidate citric acid as a passivation agent for stainless steel. Successful completion of this project will result in citric acid being qualified for use as an environmentally preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys in NASA and DoD applications.

  18. USGS Tracks Acid Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, John D.; Nilles, Mark A.; Schroder, LeRoy J.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been actively studying acid rain for the past 15 years. When scientists learned that acid rain could harm fish, fear of damage to our natural environment from acid rain concerned the American public. Research by USGS scientists and other groups began to show that the processes resulting in acid rain are very complex. Scientists were puzzled by the fact that in some cases it was difficult to demonstrate that the pollution from automobiles and factories was causing streams or lakes to become more acidic. Further experiments showed how the natural ability of many soils to neutralize acids would reduce the effects of acid rain in some locations--at least as long as the neutralizing ability lasted (Young, 1991). The USGS has played a key role in establishing and maintaining the only nationwide network of acid rain monitoring stations. This program is called the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). Each week, at approximately 220 NADP/NTN sites across the country, rain and snow samples are collected for analysis. NADP/NTN site in Montana. The USGS supports about 72 of these sites. The information gained from monitoring the chemistry of our nation's rain and snow is important for testing the results of pollution control laws on acid rain.

  19. Acidity of hydroxamic acids and amides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Böhm, S.; Exner, Otto

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 7 (2003), s. 1176-1180 ISSN 1477-0520 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4072005 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : hydroxamic acids * DFT calculations * isodesmic reactions Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  20. Relationship between free fatty acid spectrum, blood stasis score, and macroangiopathy in patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Liang Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Our aim was to investigate the correlation between free fatty acid (FFA spectrum, blood stasis (BS score, and macroangiopathy in type 2 diabetic patients with or without BS, as well as the possible relationship between BS and lipotoxicity. Methods: A total of 50 type 2 diabetes (T2D patients with or without BS were enrolled from June to December 2014 in Shenzhen Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM Hospital, with 25 patients allocated to each of two groups. Basic information, BS score, blood glucose, blood lipids, etc., were measured for each patient. In addition, we tested the levels of interleukin (IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α, and IL-18 with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The macroangiopathy status of patients in the two groups was examined by color ultrasound and all factors related to BS scores were analyzed. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to explore the difference in the serum FFA spectra between the two different groups. In addition, the relationship between FFA spectra, BS scores, and macroangiopathy was analyzed. Results: BS scores, total cholesterol (TC, total triglyceride (TG, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-18, carotid and femoral artery plaque, carotid intima-media thickness, carotid plaque area, and femoral artery plaque area were all significantly increased in T2D patients with BS syndrome (P < 0.05. A positive correlation was observed between age, duration of diabetes, carotid intima-media thickness, carotid plaque area, femoral artery plaque area, and BS score (P < 0.05. A total of 21 fatty acids were found in the serum, and total FFA (TFFA, saturated fatty acid (SFA, lauric acid (C12:0, palmitic acid (16:0, stearic acid (C18:0, arachidonic acid (C20:4n6, behenic acid (C22:0, and lignoceric acid (C24:0 scores were all found to contribute to the difference between FFA spectrums of the two groups; of the fatty acids, C12:0, C16:0, C18:0, C22:0, TFFA, and SFA positively

  1. Fusidic acid in dermatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schöfer, Helmut; Simonsen, Lene

    1995-01-01

    Studies on the clinical efficacy of fusidic acid in skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs), notably those due to Staphylococcus aureus, are reviewed. Oral fusidic acid (tablets dosed at 250 mg twice daily, or a suspension for paediatric use at 20 mg/kg/day given as two daily doses) has shown goo...

  2. Characterization of acid tars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, Sunday A.; Stegemann, Julia A.; Roy, Amitava

    2010-01-01

    Acid tars from the processing of petroleum and petrochemicals using sulfuric acid were characterized by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), inductively coupled plasma/optical emission spectrometry (ICP/OES), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry, and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray (SEM/EDX) micro-analysis. Leaching of contaminants from the acid tars in 48 h batch tests with distilled water at a liquid-to-solid ratio 10:1 was also studied. GC/MS results show that the samples contained aliphatic hydrocarbons, cyclic hydrocarbons, up to 12 of the 16 USEPA priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and numerous other organic groups, including organic acids (sulfonic acids, carboxylic acids and aromatic acids), phenyl, nitrile, amide, furans, thiophenes, pyrroles, and phthalates, many of which are toxic. Metals analysis shows that Pb was present in significant concentration. DSC results show different transition peaks in the studied samples, demonstrating their complexity and variability. FTIR analysis further confirmed the presence of the organic groups detected by GC/MS. The SEM/EDX micro-analysis results provided insight on the surface characteristics of the samples and show that contaminants distribution was heterogeneous. The results provide useful data on the composition, complexity, and variability of acid tars; information which hitherto have been scarce in public domain.

  3. Characterization of acid tars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, Sunday A., E-mail: sunday.leonard@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Civil Environmental and Geomatic Engineering, University College London, Chadwick Building, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Stegemann, Julia A. [Department of Civil Environmental and Geomatic Engineering, University College London, Chadwick Building, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Roy, Amitava [J. Bennett Johnston, Sr., Centre for Advance Microstructures and Devices (CAMD), 6980 Jefferson Highway, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, 70806 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Acid tars from the processing of petroleum and petrochemicals using sulfuric acid were characterized by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), inductively coupled plasma/optical emission spectrometry (ICP/OES), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry, and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray (SEM/EDX) micro-analysis. Leaching of contaminants from the acid tars in 48 h batch tests with distilled water at a liquid-to-solid ratio 10:1 was also studied. GC/MS results show that the samples contained aliphatic hydrocarbons, cyclic hydrocarbons, up to 12 of the 16 USEPA priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and numerous other organic groups, including organic acids (sulfonic acids, carboxylic acids and aromatic acids), phenyl, nitrile, amide, furans, thiophenes, pyrroles, and phthalates, many of which are toxic. Metals analysis shows that Pb was present in significant concentration. DSC results show different transition peaks in the studied samples, demonstrating their complexity and variability. FTIR analysis further confirmed the presence of the organic groups detected by GC/MS. The SEM/EDX micro-analysis results provided insight on the surface characteristics of the samples and show that contaminants distribution was heterogeneous. The results provide useful data on the composition, complexity, and variability of acid tars; information which hitherto have been scarce in public domain.

  4. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  5. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  6. Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  7. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands, and generally do so more strongly than the corresponding DNA or RNA strands while exhibiting increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from...

  8. Folic acid in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... regularly removed from the body through urine, so excess amounts do not build up in the body. You should not get more than 1000 mcg per day of folic acid. Using higher levels of folic acid can mask vitamin B12 deficiency.

  9. Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  10. Locked nucleic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Jan Stenvang; Sørensen, Mads D; Wengel, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA) is a class of nucleic acid analogs possessing very high affinity and excellent specificity toward complementary DNA and RNA, and LNA oligonucleotides have been applied as antisense molecules both in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we briefly describe the basic...

  11. Halogenated fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Huiling; Wesén, Clas; Sundin, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Chlorinated fatty acids have been found to be major contributors to organohalogen compounds in fish, bivalves, jellyfish, and lobster, and they have been indicated to contribute considerably to organohalogens in marine mammals. Brominated fatty acids have been found in marine sponges. Also...

  12. Amino Acid Crossword Puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Learning the 20 standard amino acids is an essential component of an introductory course in biochemistry. Later in the course, the students study metabolism and learn about various catabolic and anabolic pathways involving amino acids. Learning new material or concepts often is easier if one can connect the new material to what one already knows;…

  13. Phosphates and phosphoric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, P [Compagnie Francaise de l' Azote, Paris (France)

    1983-01-01

    In chapter 8.5 the following aspects of uranium recovery are treated: basis of extraction process, extraction principle, solvents, strength of the acid to be treated, technology, main processes in use, impact of uranium recovery on phosphoric acid plants, and economics of uranium recovery plants.

  14. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-3 fatty acids are used together with lifestyle changes (diet, weight-loss, exercise) to reduce the amount of triglycerides (a fat- ... in people with very high triglycerides. Omega-3 fatty acids are in a class of medications called antilipemic ...

  15. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid are absorbed in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olthof, Margreet R.; Hollman, Peter C H; Katan, Martijn B.

    2001-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid, an ester of caffeic acid and quinic acid, is a major phenolic compound in coffee; daily intake in coffee drinkers is 0.5-1 g. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid are antioxidants in vitro and might therefore contribute to the prevention of cardiovascular disease. However, data on the

  16. Enzymatic formation of hexadecenoic acid from palmitic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Masao; Fujino, Yasuhiko

    1975-01-01

    Desaturation of palmitic acid was investigated in an enzyme system prepared from rat liver. 2-trans-Hexadecenoic acid as well as 9-cis-gexadecenoic acid (palmitoleic acid) were found to be formed as monoenoic acid in this system. (author)

  17. Differential intracellular calcium influx, nitric oxide production, ICAM-1 and IL8 expression in primary bovine endothelial cells exposed to nonesterified fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loaiza, Anitsi; Carretta, María D; Taubert, Anja; Hermosilla, Carlos; Hidalgo, María A; Burgos, Rafael A

    2016-02-25

    Nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs) are involved in proinflammatory processes in cattle, including in the increased expression of adhesion molecules in endothelial cells. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects are still unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of NEFAs on the intracellular calcium (Ca(2+) i) influx, nitric oxide production, and ICAM-1 and IL-8 expression in primary bovine umbilical vein endothelial cells (BUVECs). Myristic (MA), palmitic (PA), stearic (SA), oleic (OA) and linoleic acid (LA) rapidly increased Ca(2+) i. The calcium response to all tested NEFAs showed an extracellular calcium dependence and only the LA response was significantly inhibited until the intracellular calcium was chelated. The EC50 values for MA and LA were 125 μM and 37 μM, respectively, and the MA and LA effects were dependent on calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum stores and on the L-type calcium channels. Only the calcium response to MA was significantly reduced by GW1100, a selective G-protein-coupled free fatty acid receptor (GPR40) antagonist. We also detected a functional FFAR1/GPR40 protein in BUVECs by using western blotting and the FFAR1/GPR40 agonist TAK-875. Only LA increased the cellular nitric oxide levels in a calcium-dependent manner. LA stimulation but not MA stimulation increased ICAM-1 and IL-8-expression in BUVECs. This effect was inhibited by GW1100, an antagonist of FFAR1/GPR40, but not by U-73122, a phospholipase C inhibitor. These findings strongly suggest that each individual NEFA stimulates endothelial cells in a different way, with clearly different effects on intracellular calcium mobilization, NO production, and IL-8 and ICAM-1 expression in primary BUVECs. These findings not only extend our understanding of NEFA-mediated diseases in ruminants, but also provide new insight into the different molecular mechanisms involved during endothelial cell activation by NEFAs.

  18. [Comparative study between two different sources of n-3 poliunsaturated fatty acids and it effect on thymus and lipid profile in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Inés; Pallaro, Anabel N; Slobodianik, Nora H

    2007-06-01

    In the present paper we analyzed the effect caused by different recovery diets enriched with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA n-3) on thymus and serum lipid pattern. Severe depleted weanling Wistar rats (D) were divided in three groups that received during 10 days a 20% casein diet supplemented with EPA+DHA (group Cas), a 20% protein milk diet prepared using a commercial reduced-fat product enriched with linolenic and linoleic acids (group L) and a 20% casein diet as control group C. Cas and L gave each other 24 mg/day of PUFA n-3 being the ratio n-6/n-3 8.1/1 and 7.6/1, respectively. Thymus was removed and weighted and cell number were determined; blood was recollected and Total cholesterol, triacylglycerol, HDL and LDL-cholesterol fractions and myristic, palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic, linolenic, araquidonic, EPA and DHA fatty acid concentrations were measured in serum. Statistical analysis was performed using Anova test. Cell number were higher (p<0.01) in Cas (44.48+/-8.20) and in L (56.45+/-14.72) when compared to group D (1.80+/-0.70) and group C (23.70+/-4.04). L presented lower values of cholesterol, HDL and LDL-cholesterol (p<0.01) and higher values of triacylglycerol (p<0.05) when compared to Cas, being EPA (p<0.05) and DHA (p<0.01) higher in Cas. Being PUFA n-3 contribution the same in Cas and L, both diets were able to reverse the thymic athropy presenting a different hipolipemic behavior due to the different sources of PUFA n-3 used in the diets.

  19. Mitigating crystallization of saturated FAMEs (fatty acid methyl esters) in biodiesel: 2. The phase behavior of 2-stearoyl diolein–methyl stearate binary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, Mark; Bouzidi, Laziz; Narine, Suresh S.

    2015-01-01

    The phase behavior of a model binary system made of OSO (2-stearoyl diolein) and MeS (methyl stearate) was investigated with differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. The study is part of a series of investigations of unconventional additives such as TAGs (triacylglycerols) and dimers of TAGs with a demonstrated potential to significantly alter the crystallization of biodiesel. The TAG (triacylglycerol) was found to be effective in depressing the crystallization onset of the FAME (fatty acid methyl ester) significantly even at low concentration. OSO was shown to affect the crystallization of the mixtures strongly, and to dramatically alter their polymorphism. The system's phase diagram involved marked transformation lines including eutectics and solid–solid transitions. The molecular interactions were evaluated using a simple thermodynamic model. A mechanism for disruption of crystallization was proposed to be dependent on the peculiar geometry of OSO: the “straight” stearic acid participates easily in the lamellar packing of the equally “straight” FAME, whilst its kinked oleic acids effectively halt additional saturated FAMEs from participating due to steric hindrances. The findings of the study indicate that judicious loadings of TAGs which would target biodiesel's saturated FAMEs will have a substantial beneficial effect on the low temperature performance of the fuel. - Highlights: • 2-Steroyl diolein/methyl stearate (OSO/MeS) binary system investigated comprehensively. • OSO/MeS mixtures presented very complex phase trajectories and behavior. • OSO alters crystallization at both nucleation and growth stages profoundly. • Mechanism for disruption of crystallization proposed and verified. • OSO and homologues formulations can be effectives cold flow additives for biodiesel

  20. Lewis Acidic Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lucy C; Hogg, James M; Swadźba-Kwaśny, Małgorzata

    2017-08-21

    Until very recently, the term Lewis acidic ionic liquids (ILs) was nearly synonymous with halometallate ILs, with a strong focus on chloroaluminate(III) systems. The first part of this review covers the historical context in which these were developed, speciation of a range of halometallate ionic liquids, attempts to quantify their Lewis acidity, and selected recent applications: in industrial alkylation processes, in supported systems (SILPs/SCILLs) and in inorganic synthesis. In the last decade, interesting alternatives to halometallate ILs have emerged, which can be divided into two sub-sections: (1) liquid coordination complexes (LCCs), still based on halometallate species, but less expensive and more diverse than halometallate ionic liquids, and (2) ILs with main-group Lewis acidic cations. The two following sections cover these new liquid Lewis acids, also highlighting speciation studies, Lewis acidity measurements, and applications.

  1. Acidity in rainfall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tisue, G.T.; Kacoyannakis, J.

    1975-01-01

    The reported increasing acidity of rainfall raises many interesting ecological and chemical questions. In spite of extensive studies in Europe and North America there are, for example, great uncertainties in the relative contributions of strong and weak acids to the acid-base properties of rainwater. Unravelling this and similar problems may require even more rigorous sample collection and analytical procedures than previously employed. Careful analysis of titration curves permits inferences to be made regarding chemical composition, the possible response of rainwater to further inputs of acidic components to the atmosphere, and the behavior to be expected when rainwater interacts with the buffers present in biological materials and natural waters. Rainwater samples collected during several precipitation events at Argonne National Laboratory during October and November 1975 have been analyzed for pH, acid and base neutralizing properties, and the ions of ammonium, nitrate, chloride, sulfate, and calcium. The results are tabulated

  2. Effect of Sunflower and Marine Oils on Ruminal Microbiota, In vitro Fermentation and Digesta Fatty Acid Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio E. Vargas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study using the rumen simulation technique (RUSITEC investigated the changes in the ruminal microbiota and anaerobic fermentation in response to the addition of different lipid supplements to a ruminant diet. A basal diet with no oil added was the control, and the treatment diets were supplemented with sunflower oil (2% only, or sunflower oil (2% in combination with fish oil (1% or algae oil (1%. Four fermentation units were used per treatment. RUSITEC fermenters were inoculated with rumen digesta. Substrate degradation, fermentation end-products (volatile fatty acids, lactate, gas, methane, and ammonia, and microbial protein synthesis were determined. Fatty acid profiles and microbial community composition were evaluated in digesta samples. Numbers of representative bacterial species and microbial groups were determined using qPCR. Microbial composition and diversity were based on T-RFLP spectra. The addition of oils had no effect on substrate degradation or microbial protein synthesis. Differences among diets in neutral detergent fiber degradation were not significant (P = 0.132, but the contrast comparing oil–supplemented diets with the control was significant (P = 0.039. Methane production was reduced (P < 0.05 with all oil supplements. Propionate production was increased when diets containing oil were fermented. Compared with the control, the addition of algae oil decreased the percentage C18:3 c9c12c15 in rumen digesta, and that of C18:2 c9t11 was increased when the control diet was supplemented with any oil. Marine oils decreased the hydrogenation of C18 unsaturated fatty acids. Microbial diversity was not affected by oil supplementation. Cluster analysis showed that diets with additional fish or algae oils formed a group separated from the sunflower oil diet. Supplementation with marine oils decreased the numbers of Butyrivibrio producers of stearic acid, and affected the numbers of protozoa, methanogens, Selenomonas ruminantium

  3. N-3 poly-unsaturated fatty acids shift estrogen signaling to inhibit human breast cancer cell growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqing Cao

    Full Text Available Although evidence has shown the regulating effect of n-3 poly-unsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA on cell signaling transduction, it remains unknown whether n-3 PUFA treatment modulates estrogen signaling. The current study showed that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5 shifted the pro-survival and proliferative effect of estrogen to a pro-apoptotic effect in human breast cancer (BCa MCF-7 and T47D cells. 17 β-estradiol (E2 enhanced the inhibitory effect of n-3 PUFAs on BCa cell growth. The IC50 of DHA or EPA in MCF-7 cells decreased when combined with E2 (10 nM treatment (from 173 µM for DHA only to 113 µM for DHA+E2, and from 187 µm for EPA only to 130 µm for EPA+E2. E2 also augmented apoptosis in n-3 PUFA-treated BCa cells. In contrast, in cells treated with stearic acid (SA, C18:0 as well as cells not treated with fatty acid, E2 promoted breast cancer cell growth. Classical (nuclear estrogen receptors may not be involved in the pro-apoptotic effects of E2 on the n-3 PUFA-treated BCa cells because ERα agonist failed to elicit, and ERα knockdown failed to block E2 pro-apoptotic effects. Subsequent studies reveal that G protein coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER1 may mediate the pro-apoptotic effect of estrogen. N-3 PUFA treatment initiated the pro-apoptotic signaling of estrogen by increasing GPER1-cAMP-PKA signaling response, and blunting EGFR, Erk 1/2, and AKT activity. These findings may not only provide the evidence to link n-3 PUFAs biologic effects and the pro-apoptotic signaling of estrogen in breast cancer cells, but also shed new insight into the potential application of n-3 PUFAs in BCa treatment.

  4. Accurate Mass GC/LC-Quadrupole Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Fatty Acids and Triacylglycerols of Spicy Fruits from the Apiaceae Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thao Nguyen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The triacylglycerol (TAG structure and the regio-stereospecific distribution of fatty acids (FA of seed oils from most of the Apiaceae family are not well documented. The TAG structure ultimately determines the final physical properties of the oils and the position of FAs in the TAG molecule affects the digestion; absorption and metabolism; and physical and technological properties of TAGs. Fixed oils from the fruits of dill (Anethum graveolens, caraway (Carum carvi, cumin (Cuminum cyminum, coriander (Coriandrum sativum, anise (Pimpinella anisum, carrot (Daucus carota, celery (Apium graveolens, fennel (Foeniculum vulgare, and Khella (Ammi visnaga, all from the Apiaceae family, were extracted at room temperature in chloroform/methanol (2:1 v/v using percolators. Crude lipids were fractionated by solid phase extraction to separate neutral triacylglycerols (TAGs from other lipids components. Neutral TAGs were subjected to transesterification process to convert them to their corresponding fatty acids methyl esters (FAMES using 1% boron trifluoride (BF3 in methanol. FAMES were analyzed by gas chromatography-quadrupole time of flight (GC-QTOF mass spectrometry. Triglycerides were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight (LC-QTOF mass spectrometry. Petroselinic acid was the major fatty acid in all samples ranging from 57% of the total fatty acids in caraway up to 82% in fennel. All samples contained palmitic (16:0, palmitoleic (C16:1n-9, stearic (C18:0, petroselinic (C18:1n-12, linoleic (C18:2n-6, linolinic (18:3n-3, and arachidic (C20:0 acids. TAG were analyzed using LC-QTOF for accurate mass identification and mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS techniques for regiospesific elucidation of the identified TAGs. Five major TAGs were detected in all samples but with different relative concentrations in all of the tested samples. Several other TAGs were detected as minor components and were present in some

  5. Conjugated Fatty Acid Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Richa; Yu, Xiao-Hong; Sweet, Marie; Shanklin, John

    2012-01-01

    Conjugated linolenic acids (CLNs), 18:3 Δ9,11,13, lack the methylene groups found between the double bonds of linolenic acid (18:3 Δ9,12,15). CLNs are produced by conjugase enzymes that are homologs of the oleate desaturases FAD2. The goal of this study was to map the domain(s) within the Momordica charantia conjugase (FADX) responsible for CLN formation. To achieve this, a series of Momordica FADX-Arabidopsis FAD2 chimeras were expressed in the Arabidopsis fad3fae1 mutant, and the transformed seeds were analyzed for the accumulation of CLN. These experiments identified helix 2 and the first histidine box as a determinant of conjugase product partitioning into punicic acid (18:3 Δ9cis,11trans,13cis) or α-eleostearic acid (18:3 Δ9cis,11trans,13trans). This was confirmed by analysis of a FADX mutant containing six substitutions in which the sequence of helix 2 and first histidine box was converted to that of FAD2. Each of the six FAD2 substitutions was individually converted back to the FADX equivalent identifying residues 111 and 115, adjacent to the first histidine box, as key determinants of conjugase product partitioning. Additionally, expression of FADX G111V and FADX G111V/D115E resulted in an approximate doubling of eleostearic acid accumulation to 20.4% and 21.2%, respectively, compared with 9.9% upon expression of the native Momordica FADX. Like the Momordica conjugase, FADX G111V and FADX D115E produced predominantly α-eleostearic acid and little punicic acid, but the FADX G111V/D115E double mutant produced approximately equal amounts of α-eleostearic acid and its isomer, punicic acid, implicating an interactive effect of residues 111 and 115 in punicic acid formation. PMID:22451660

  6. Glycosyltransferase glycosylating flavokermesic acid and/or kermesic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    An isolated glycosyltransferase (GT) polypeptide capable of: (I) : conjugating glucose to flavokermesic acid (FK); and/or (II) : conjugating glucose to kermesic acid (KA) and use of this GT to e.g. make Carminic acid.......An isolated glycosyltransferase (GT) polypeptide capable of: (I) : conjugating glucose to flavokermesic acid (FK); and/or (II) : conjugating glucose to kermesic acid (KA) and use of this GT to e.g. make Carminic acid....

  7. GLYCOSYLTRANSFERASE GLYCOSYLATING FLAVOKERMESIC ACID AND/OR KERMESIC ACID

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    An isolated glycosyltransferase (GT) polypeptide capable of: (I): conjugating glucose to flavokermesic acid (FK); and/or (II): conjugating glucose to kermesic acid (KA) and use of this GT to e.g. make Carminic acid.......An isolated glycosyltransferase (GT) polypeptide capable of: (I): conjugating glucose to flavokermesic acid (FK); and/or (II): conjugating glucose to kermesic acid (KA) and use of this GT to e.g. make Carminic acid....

  8. Enzymatic epoxidation of biodiesel optimized by response surface ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During the enzymatic epoxidation of biodiesel, stearic acid was selected as oxygen carrier. Enzyme screening and the load of stearic acid were investigated. The effects of four main reaction conditions including reaction time, temperature, enzyme load, and mole ratio of H2O2/C=C-bonds on the epoxy oxygen group content ...

  9. Investigation of the effects of certain formulation factors on release ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To study the effects of three formulation variables (PVP, stearic acid and Avicel PH101) on disintegration time and release properties of paracetamol tablets using a 23 factorial experimental design. Methodology: Three formulation variables; Polyvinyl pyrrolidone (factor A), Stearic acid (factor B) and Avicel PH 101 ...

  10. Waht is 'molybdic acid' or 'polymolybdic acid'?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tytko, K.H.; Baethe, G.; Mehmke, K.

    1987-01-01

    According to a comparative study of the literature, supplemented by well-aimed experimental investigations and equilibrium calculations, the terms 'molybdic acid' or 'polymolybdic acid', used for many substances, species, or solutions in the literature, are applicable to a species, a solution, and two solids: a) The monomeric molybdic acid, most probably having the formula MoO 2 (OH) 2 (H 2 O) 2 (= H 2 MoO 4 , aq), exists in (aqueous) solution only and never exceeds a concentration of ∼ 10 -3 M since at higher concentrations it reacts with other monomeric molybdenum(VI) species to give anionic or cationic polymers. b) A concentrated (> 0.1 M Mo VI ) aqueous molybdate solution of degree of acidification P = 2 (realized, e.g., by a solution of one of the Mo VI oxides; by any molybdate solutions whose cations have been exchanged by H 2 O + on a cation exchanger; by suitable acidification of a molybdate solution) contains 8 H 3 O + and the well-known polyanion Mo 36 O 112 (H 2 O) 16 8- exactly in the stoichiometric proportions. c) A glassy substance, obtained from an alkali metal salt-free solution prepared acording to (b), refers to the compound (H 3 O) 8 [Mo 36 O 112 (H 2 O) 16 ] · xH 2 O, x = 25 - 29. d) A solid having the ideal composition [(H 3 O)Mo 5 O 15 (OH)H 2 O · H 2 O] ∞ consists of a polymolybdate skeleton (the well-known 'decamolybdate' structure), in the tunnels of which H 3 O + and H 2 O are intercalated. The structure is very unstable if only H 3 O + cations are present, but it is enormously stabilized by a partial exchange of H 3 O + by certain alkali or alkaline earth metal cations. For the compounds MoO 3 , MoO 3 ·H 2 O, and MoO 3 · 2 H 2 O the term 'molybdic acid' is unjustified. The commercial product 'molybdic acid, ∼ 85% MoO 3 ' is the well-known polymolybdate (NH 4 ) 2 O · 4 MoO 3 with a layer structure of the polyanion. 84 refs. (author)

  11. Amino acid racemisation dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray-Wallace, C.V.

    1999-01-01

    The potential of the time-dependent amino acid racemisation reaction as a method of age assessment was first reported by Hare and Abelson (1968). They noted that in specimens of the bivalve mollusc Mercenaria sp., greater concentrations of amino acids in the D-configuration with increasing fossil age. Hare and Abelson (1968) also reported negligible racemisation in a modern specimen of Mecanaria sp. On this basis they suggested that the extent of amino acid racemisation (epimerisation in the case of isoleucine) may be used to assess the age of materials within and beyond the range of radiocarbon dating. For the past thirty years amino acid racemisation has been extensively applied in Quaternary research as a method of relative and numeric dating, and a particularly large literature has emerged on the subject

  12. Amino Acids and Chirality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jamie E.

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most heavily studied organic compound class in carbonaceous chondrites. The abundance, distributions, enantiomeric compositions, and stable isotopic ratios of amino acids have been determined in carbonaceous chondrites fi'om a range of classes and petrographic types, with interesting correlations observed between these properties and the class and typc of the chondritcs. In particular, isomeric distributions appear to correlate with parent bodies (chondrite class). In addition, certain chiral amino acids are found in enantiomeric excess in some chondrites. The delivery of these enantiomeric excesses to the early Earth may have contributed to the origin of the homochirality that is central to life on Earth today. This talk will explore the amino acids in carbonaceous chondritcs and their relevance to the origin of life.

  13. Acid Mine Drainage Treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fripp, Jon

    2000-01-01

    .... Acid mine drainage (AMD) can have severe impacts to aquatic resources, can stunt terrestrial plant growth and harm wetlands, contaminate groundwater, raise water treatment costs, and damage concrete and metal structures...

  14. Amoxicillin and Clavulanic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in a class of medications called penicillin-like antibiotics. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria. Clavulanic acid ... It works by preventing bacteria from destroying amoxicillin. Antibiotics will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections.

  15. Alpha Hydroxy Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or tenderness (8), chemical burns (6), and increased sunburn (3). The frequency of such reports for skin ... bear a statement that conveys the following information: Sunburn Alert: This product contains an alpha hydroxy acid ( ...

  16. Azetidinic amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Bunch, Lennart; Chopin, Nathalie

    2005-01-01

    A set of ten azetidinic amino acids, that can be envisioned as C-4 alkyl substituted analogues of trans-2-carboxyazetidine-3-acetic acid (t-CAA) and/or conformationally constrained analogues of (R)- or (S)-glutamic acid (Glu) have been synthesized in a diastereo- and enantiomerically pure form from...... of two diastereoisomers that were easily separated and converted in two steps into azetidinic amino acids. Azetidines 35-44 were characterized in binding studies on native ionotropic Glu receptors and in functional assays at cloned metabotropic receptors mGluR1, 2 and 4, representing group I, II and III...... beta-amino alcohols through a straightforward five step sequence. The key step of this synthesis is an original anionic 4-exo-tet ring closure that forms the azetidine ring upon an intramolecular Michael addition. This reaction was proven to be reversible and to lead to a thermodynamic distribution...

  17. Valproic Acid and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is possible. Studies have found that women with seizure disorders and women with bipolar disorder might have menstrual ... valproic acid to leave your body. Women with epilepsy or bipolar disorder who are planning a pregnancy ...

  18. Genetic relationships among Ethiopian mustard genotypes based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    For the second principal component stearic acid, saturated fatty acid, palmitic acid, ... Five principal components explained ...... accounting for nearly 96.01% of the total variation of the ..... The financial support of The Agricultural Research and.

  19. [Acids in coffee. XI. The proportion of individual acids in the total titratable acid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, U H; Maier, H G

    1985-07-01

    22 acids in ground roast coffees and instant coffees were determined by GLC of their silyl derivatives (after preseparation by gel electrophoresis) or isotachophoresis. The contribution to the total acidity (which was estimated by titration to pH 8 after cation exchange of the coffee solutions) was calculated for each individual acid. The mentioned acids contribute with 67% (roast coffee) and 72% (instant coffee) to the total acidity. In the first place citric acid (12.2% in roast coffee/10.7% in instant coffee), acetic acid (11.2%/8.8%) and the high molecular weight acids (8%/9%) contribute to the total acidity. Also to be mentioned are the shares of chlorogenic acids (9%/4.8%), formic acid (5.3%/4.6%), quinic acid (4.7%/5.9%), malic acid (3.9%/3%) and phosphoric acid (2.5%/5.2%). A notable difference in the contribution to total acidity between roast and instant coffee was found for phosphoric acid and pyrrolidonecarboxylic acid (0.7%/1.9%). It can be concluded that those two acids are formed or released from e.g. their esters in higher amounts than other acids during the production of instant coffee.

  20. Portable nucleic acid thermocyclers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almassian, David R; Cockrell, Lisa M; Nelson, William M

    2013-11-21

    A nucleic acid thermal cycler is considered to be portable if it is under ten pounds, easily carried by one individual, and battery powered. Nucleic acid amplification includes both polymerase chain reaction (e.g. PCR, RT-PCR) and isothermal amplification (e.g. RPA, HDA, LAMP, NASBA, RCA, ICAN, SMART, SDA). There are valuable applications for portable nucleic acid thermocyclers in fields that include clinical diagnostics, biothreat detection, and veterinary testing. A system that is portable allows for the distributed detection of targets at the point of care and a reduction of the time from sample to answer. The designer of a portable nucleic acid thermocycler must carefully consider both thermal control and the detection of amplification. In addition to thermal control and detection, the designer may consider the integration of a sample preparation subsystem with the nucleic acid thermocycler. There are a variety of technologies that can achieve accurate thermal control and the detection of nucleic acid amplification. Important evaluation criteria for each technology include maturity, power requirements, cost, sensitivity, speed, and manufacturability. Ultimately the needs of a particular market will lead to user requirements that drive the decision between available technologies.

  1. Fatty Acid Biosynthesis IX

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carey, E. M.; Hansen, Heinz Johs. Max; Dils, R.

    1972-01-01

    # 1. I. [I-14C]Acetate was covalently bound to rabbit mammary gland fatty acid synthetase by enzymic transacylation from [I-14C]acetyl-CoA. Per mole of enzyme 2 moles of acetate were bound to thiol groups and up to I mole of acetate was bound to non-thiol groups. # 2. 2. The acetyl-fatty acid...... synthetase complex was isolated free from acetyl-CoA. It was rapidly hydrolysed at 30°C, but hydrolysis was greatly diminished at o°C and triacetic lactone synthesis occurred. In the presence of malonyl-CoA and NADPH, all the acetate bound to fatty acid synthetase was incorporated into long-chain fatty acids....... Hydrolysis of bound acetate and incorporation of bound acetate into fatty acids were inhibited to the same extent by guanidine hydrochloride. # 3. 3. Acetate was also covalently bound to fatty acid synthetase by chemical acetylation with [I-14C]acetic anhydride in the absence of CoASH. A total of 60 moles...

  2. Photoactive layer-by-layer films of cellulose phosphate and titanium dioxide containing phosphotungstic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullah, Sajjad [Instituto de Química de São Carlos, Universid