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Sample records for steam electric station

  1. Evaluation of Waterford Steam Electric Station Unit 3 technical specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, D.E.; Bruske, S.J.

    1985-09-01

    This document was prepared for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to assist them in determining whether the Waterford Steam Electric Station Unit 3 Technical Specifications (T/S), which govern plant systems configurations and operations, are in conformance with the requirements of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) as amended, and the requirements of the Safety Evaluation Report (SER) as supplemented. A comparative audit of the FSAR as amended, and the SER as supplemented was performed with the Waterford T/S. Several discrepancies were identified and subsequently resolved by the cognizant NRC reviewer. Pending completion of the resolutions noted in Part 3 of this report, the Waterford Steam Electric Station Unit 3 T/S, to the extent reviewed, are in conformance with the FSAR and SER

  2. Solid waste processing experience at Susquehanna Steam Electric Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, J.W.; Granus, M.W.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reviews the first year's operation at the Susquehanna Steam Electric Station (SSES) with respect to the Westinghouse Hittman Nuclear Incorporated (Hittman) mobile solidification system and the dry activated waste generation, handling and processing. Experiences pertinent to the mobile solidification system are reviewed with emphasis on the integration of the system into the plant, problems associated with unexpected waste properties and the myriad of operating procedures that had to be prepared. The processing history for 1983 is reviewed in terms of the volume of waste, including solidified wastes, dewatered wastes an DAW. Factors that must be considered in evaluating processing alternatives, i.e., dewatering vs. solidification; steel liners vs. HICs, are discussed. Actions taken by Hittman and SSES to maximize the processing economics are also discussed. Finally, recommendations are provided to the utility considering implementing mobile solification services to ensure a smooth and timely integration of services into the plant

  3. MINAC radiography performed on susquehanna Steam Electric Station Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bognet, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    Ten welds were volumetrically examined with a manual and automated ultrasonic (UT) system during a Susquehanna Steam Electric Station (SES) Unit 1 preservice inspection. The automated system had been recently developed and several problems were encountered in this first field application. The ten welds examined had a Sweepolet-to-Risor weld configuration, which further complicated the examination effort. This weld configuration has corrosion-resistant cladding applied to the outside and inside circumference and, as a result of an installation/removal/reinstallation sequence during plant construction, is often referred to as the double weld. After several attempts to obtain interpretable UT data failed (e.g., repeatable data), the examination effort was terminated. PP and L opted to pursue using the Miniature Linear Accelerator (MINAC) to perform radiographic examination. The results were referenced in the Susquehanna SES Unit 1 outage summary report and submitted to the NRC. The total effort was viewed as a complete success with no impact to the overall outage duration. All welds previously attempted by automated and manual UT were successfully examined using the MINAC

  4. Recruiting, Training, Retaining, and Promoting the Workforce of the Future at Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunseri, M.

    1999-01-01

    TXU Electric expects to encounter a relatively high turnover in the workforce in the coming years. To prepare for this challenge and to maintain a high level of performance, a number of approaches are being implemented. These approaches involve recruiting experienced personnel, recruiting and developing local nonexperienced personnel, and developing current employees. Through these approaches, TXU Electric expects to maintain a high-quality workforce for the continued support of Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station

  5. Technical Specifications, Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station, Unit 1 (Docket No. 50-445)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    The Technical Specifications for Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station, Unit 1 were prepared by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. They set forth the limits, operating conditions, and other requirements applicable to a nuclear reactor facility, as set forth in Section 50.36 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 50, for the protection of the health and safety of the public

  6. Strategic elements of steam cycle chemistry control practices at TXU's Comanche Peak steam electric station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellers, B.; Stevens, J.; Nichols, G.

    2002-01-01

    Early industry experience defined the critical importance of Chemistry Control Practices to maintaining long-term performance of PWR steam generators. These lessons provided the impetus for a number of innovations and alternate practices at Comanche Peak. For example, advanced amine investigations and implementation of results provided record low iron transport and deposition. The benefits of the surface-active properties of dimethyl-amine exceeded initial expectations. Operation of pre-coat polishers and steam generator blowdown demineralizers in the amine cycle enabled optimization of amine concentrations and stable pH control. The strategy for coordinated control of oxygen and hydrazine dosing complemented the advanced amine program for protective oxide stabilization. Additionally, a proactive chemical cleaning was performed on Unit 1 to prevent degradations from general fouling of steam generator tube-tube support plate (TSP) and top-of-tubesheet (TTS) crevices. This paper shares the results of these innovations and practices. Also, the bases, theory, and philosophy supporting the strategic elements of program will be presented. (authors)

  7. Elevated-constant pH control assessment at TXU's Comanche peak steam electric station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellers, B.; Perkins, D.; Bosma, J.; Deshon, J.

    2002-01-01

    Industry experience with axial offset anomaly (AOA) has raised the importance of crud management strategies. Elevated-constant pH control is recognized as one potential solution. Additionally, minimizing radiation fields remains a high industry goal which is supported by this strategy. An investigation of industry experience and experimental data has supported a strategy of constant at-temperature pH of 7.4, requiring as much as 6-ppm lithium at the beginning-of-cycle (BOC). This approach, in a modern high temperature plant with high boron requirements, necessitated a careful assessment of potential risk for increased susceptibility to corrosion for both fuel cladding and RCS structural materials. This paper presents results of the assessment for Comanche peak steam electric station (CPSES) and plans for a demonstration of this practice. (author)

  8. Lessons learned while implementing a safety parameter display system at the Comanche Peak steam electric station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagar, B.

    1987-01-01

    With the completion of site Verification and Validation tests, the Safety Parameter Display System (SPDS) will be fully operational at the Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station. Implementation of the SPDS, which began in 1982, included: modifying generic Safety Assessment System Software; developing site-specific displays and features; installing and integrating system equipment into the plant; modifying station heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems to provide necessary cooling; installing an additional uninterruptible power supply system to provide necessary power; and training station personnel in the operation and use of the system. Lessons learned during this project can be discussed in terms of an ideal SPDS implementation project. Such a project would design and implement an SPDS for a plant that is already under construction or operating, and would progress through a sequence of activities that includes: (1) developing and documenting the system design bases, and including all major design influences; (2) developing a database description and system functional specifications to clarify specific system requirements; (3) developing detailed system hardware and software design specifications to fully describe the system, and to enable identification of necessary site design changes early in the project; (4) implementing the system design; (5) configuring and extensively testing the system prior to routine system operation; and (6) tuning the system after the completion of system installation. The ideal project would include future system users in design development and system testing, and would use Verification and Validation techniques throughout the project to ensure that each sequential step is appropriate and correct

  9. Volume reduction of filter media at Susquehanna steam and electric station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boris, G.F.; Hettinger, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the joint efforts between Pennsylvania Power ampersand Light (PPQL) and Scientific Ecology Group, Inc. (SEG) to reduce the volume of waste shipped to the burial site by the Susquehanna Steam and Electric Station (SSES) and the resulting savings realized as a result. The filter media used at SSES for its radwaste filters is composed of a mix of anion and cation powered resins, powered carbon, diatomaceous earth and a fibrous overlay. Due to the nature of this waste stream, dewatering was difficult using systems previously available in the industry. Thus, processing was accomplished by decanting (to concentrate the waste) and solidification. In the continuing effort to dewater wastes of this nature, SEG developed a new fabric filter dewatering system (RDU). To investigate its potential use in large containers, this dewatering system was installed in drum-size high integrity containers and used to test its dewatering capabilities on actual SSES waste. Promising results from these tests warranted a full-scale test. This proved successful and implementation of this processing scheme was immediate. Cost savings were substantial in transportation, burial and processing costs as well as personnel exposure. Also, additional waste volume reduction was found due to the volume reduction capability of the dewatering system (equivalent volume of new filter media approximately 1.2 times that of dewatered product volume). Additional savings resulted from SSES's continuing effort to minimize radwaste generation. Combined, these have reduced the number of shipments of filter media in 1989 to sixty percent of the number made in 1988 and have reduced costs by approximately fifty percent. 4 figs., 1 tab

  10. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Waterford Steam Electric Station, Unit No. 3 (Docket No. 50-382)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-03-01

    Supplement 10 to the Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by Louisiana Power and Light Company for a license to operate the Waterford Steam Electric Station, Unit 3 (Docket No. 50-382), located in St. Charles Parish, Louisiana, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of this supplement is to update the Safety Evaluation Report by providing the staff's evaluation of information submitted by the licensee since the Safety Evaluation Report and its nine previous supplements were issued

  11. Assessment of the once-through cooling alternative for central steam-electric generating stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paddock, R. A.; Ditmars, J. D.

    1978-12-01

    The efficacy of the disposal of waste heat from steam-electric power generation by means of once-through cooling systems was examined in the context of the physical aspects of water quality standards and guidelines for thermal discharges. Typical thermal standards for each of the four classes of water bodies (rivers, lakes, estuaries, and coastal waters) were identified. The mixing and dilution characteristics of various discharge modes ranging from simple, shoreline surface discharges to long, submerged multiport diffusers were examined in terms of the results of prototype measurements, analytical model predictions, and physical model studies. General guidelines were produced that indicate, for a given plant capacity, a given type of receiving water body, and a given discharge mode, the likelihood that once-through cooling can be effected within the restrictions of typical thermal standards. In general, it was found that shoreline surface discharges would not be adequate for large power plants (greater than or equal to 500 MW) at estuarine and marine coastal sites, would be marginally adequate at lake sites, and would be acceptable only at river sites with large currents and river discharges. Submerged multiport diffusers were found to provide the greatest likelihood of meeting thermal standards in all receiving water environments.

  12. Assessment of the once-through cooling alternative for central steam-electric generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paddock, R.A.; Ditmars, J.D.

    1978-12-01

    The efficacy of the disposal of waste heat from steam-electric power generation by means of once-through cooling systems was examined in the context of the physical aspects of water quality standards and guidelines for thermal discharges. Typical thermal standards for each of the four classes of water bodies (rivers, lakes, estuaries, and coastal waters) were identified. The mixing and dilution characteristics of various discharge modes ranging from simple, shoreline surface discharges to long, submerged multiport diffusers were examined in terms of the results of prototype measurements, analytical model predictions, and physical model studies. General guidelines were produced that indicate, for a given plant capacity, a given type of receiving water body, and a given discharge mode, the likelihood that once-through cooling can be effected within the restrictions of typical thermal standards. In general, it was found that shoreline surface discharges would not be adequate for large power plants (greater than or equal to 500 MW) at estuarine and marine coastal sites, would be marginally adequate at lake sites, and would be acceptable only at river sites with large currents and river discharges. Submerged multiport diffusers were found to provide the greatest likelihood of meeting thermal standards in all receiving water environments

  13. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station, Unit 2 (Docket No. 50-446)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    This document supplement 25 to the Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of the Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station (CPSES), Unit 2 (NUREG-0797), has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The facility is located in Somervell County, Texas, approximately 40 miles southwest of Fort Worth, Texas. This supplement reports the status of certain issues that had not been resolved when the Safety Evaluation Report and Supplements 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 12, 21, 22, 23, and 24 to that report were published. This supplement deals primarily with Unit 2 issues; however, it also references evaluations for several Unit 1 licensing items resolved since Supplement 24 was issued

  14. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station, Unit 2 (Docket No. 50-446)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    Supplement 26 to the Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of the Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station (CPSES), Unit 2, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The facility is located in Somervell County, Texas, approximately 40 miles southwest of Fort Worth, Texas. This supplement reports the status of certain issues that had not been resolved when the Safety Evaluation Report and Supplements 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 12, 21, 22, 23, 24, and 25 to that report were published. This supplement deals primarily with Unit 2 issues; however, it also references evaluations for several licensing issues that relate to Unit 1, which have been resolved since Supplement 25 was issued

  15. Technical specifications: Susquehanna Steam Electric Station, Unit No. 2 (Docket No. 50-388). Appendix A to License No. NPF-22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    Susquehanna Steam Electric Station, Unit 2 Technical Specifications were prepared by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to set forth the limits, operating conditions, and other requirements applicable to a nuclear reactor facility as set forth in Section 50.36 of 10 CFR Part 50 for the protection of the health and safety of the public

  16. Steam turbines for PWR stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muscroft, J.

    1989-01-01

    The thermodynamic cycle requirements and mechanical design features applying to modern GEC 3000 rev/min steam turbines for pressurised water reactor power stations are reviewed. The most recent developments include machines of 630 MW and 985 MW output which are currently under construction. The importance of service experience with nuclear wet steam turbines associated with a variety of types of water cooled reactor and its relevance to the design of modern 3000 rev/min turbines for pressurised water reactor applications is emphasised. (author)

  17. Final environmental statement related to the operation of Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2: (Docket Nos. 50-445 and 50-446)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    The proposed action is the issuance of operating licenses to the Texas Utilities Generating Company for the startup and operation of Units 1 and 2 of the Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station located on Squaw Creek Reservoir in Somervell County, Texas, about 7 km north-northeast of Glen Rose, Texas, and about 65 km southwest of Fort Worth in north-central Texas. The information in this environmental statement represents the second assessment of the environmental impact associated with the Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station pursuant to the guidelines of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and 10 CFR Part 51 of the Commission's Regulations. After receiving an application to construct this station, the staff carried out a review of impact that would occur during its construction and operation. This evaluation was issued as a Final Environmental Statement -- Construction Phase. After this environmental review, a safety review, an evaluation by the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards, and public hearings in Glen Rose, Texas, the US Atomic Energy Commission (now US Nuclear Regulatory Commission) issued construction permits for the construction of Units 1 and 2 of the Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station. 16 figs., 34 tabs

  18. Radioactivity in coal, ashes and selected wastewaters from Canadian coal-fired steam electric generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-09-01

    Coal is known to contain naturally occurring radioactive elements and there has been speculation that as a results, coal-fuelled power generation stations may be significant emitters of these substances. In this report, the subject of radioactivity is introduced. The kinds of radioactive substances which occur naturally in coal formations, the nature of their emissions and the existing information on their behaviour and their effects on environmental organisms are also reviewed. The results of an examination of levels of alpha, beta and gamma radiaton levels, and the substances which produce them in coals, fly ashes, bottom ashes and related wastewaters at six Canadian coal-fuelled power stations are presented. Difficulties in studies of this nature and the potential effects of these releases on organisms in the adjacent aquatic environment are discussed. Existing and potential technologies for the removal of these substances from wastewaters are examined. In general the releases in wastewaters from the six stations were found to be lower than those known to cause short-term or acute biological effects. The potential for long-term effects from such low-level releases could not be accurately assessed because of the paucity of information. A number of recommendations for: improvements in further studies of this nature; the further examination of the fate of naturally occurring radionuclides in the environment; and the determination of the long-term effects of low levels of naturally occurring radioactive substances on aquatic organisms, are made

  19. Final Environmental Statement related to the operation of Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-445 and 50-446)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-10-01

    In September 1981, the staff of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued its Final Environmental Statement (NUREG-0775) related to the operation of Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-445 and 50-446), located in Somervell County, Texas, approximately 40 miles southwest of Fort Worth, Texas. The NRC has prepared this supplement to NUREG-0775 to present its evaluation of the alternative of operating Comanche Peak with the installation of further severe-accident-mitigation design features. The NRC has discovered no substantial changes in the proposed action as previously evaluated in the Final Environmental Statement that are relevant to environmental concerns and bearing on the licensing of Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2. 6 refs., 3 tabs

  20. 1300MVA steam-turbine generators for Kansai Electric Power's Oi Nuclear Power Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oishi, N; Amagasa, N; Ito, H; Yagi, K [Mitsubishi Electric Corp., Kobe (Japan). Kobe Works

    1977-06-01

    Mitsubishi Electric has completed two 1300 MVA generators, equipped with 5500kW brushless exciters, that will be the No. 1 and No. 2 generators of the Oi plant. They are among the largest anywhere, and incorporate such technological innovations as water cooling of the stator coil and asymmetrical arrangement of the rotor slots. The article discusses generator specifications and construction, the brushless exciter, and the results of factory tests.

  1. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Waterford Steam Electric Station, Unit No. 3 (Docket No. 50-382). Supplement No. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-09-01

    Supplement 7 to the Safety Evaluation Report for Louisiana Power and Light's application for a license to operate Waterford Steam Electric Station, Unit 3 (Docket No. 50-382), located in St. Charles Parish, Louisiana, has been jointly prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and the Region IV Office of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This supplement provides the results to date of the staff's evaluation of approximately 350 allegations and concerns of poor construction practices at the Waterford 3 facility

  2. Ecological effects of nuclear steam electric station operations on estuarine systems. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihursky, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    This report summarizes the findings of studies of the impact of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant on the aquatic biota of Chesapeake Bay. Physical findings show that the typical radial extent of influence of the discharge on the physical and chemical environment of the Bay is rather limited (< 2 km). This suggestion is bolstered by findings of phytoplankton and zooplankton studies: when effects were noted at all, they only appeared at sampling stations nearest (within 2 km of) the discharge. Also, direct entrainment effects on these groups were either small (in the case of phytoplankton) or species-specific (in the case of zooplankton). Benthos showed mixed responses to plant operations - the populations of some species were enhanced, one species was adversely affected, and others were unaffected. The major plant effect on the benthos was due to habitat resource enrichment, and the consequence was higher standing stocks (e.g., more food for fish) in the affected area. Direct plant effects on finfish are dominated by impingement. Mortality as a result of impingement, for many species, tends to be moderate to slight. Effects as a result of entrainment of eggs and larvae are limited because the Calvert Cliffs area is not a major spawning location for any species. In sum, the Calvert Cliffs plant appears to have a limited effect on the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. 180 references, 6 figures, 18 tables

  3. Assessment of MTI Water Temperature Retrievals with Ground Truth from the Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station Cooling Lake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurzeja, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Surface water temperatures calculated from Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) brightness temperatures and the robust retrieval algorithm, developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), are compared with ground truth measurements at the Squaw Creek reservoir at the Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station near Granbury Texas. Temperatures calculated for thirty-four images covering the period May 2000 to March 2002 are compared with water temperatures measured at 10 instrumented buoy locations supplied by the Savannah River Technology Center. The data set was used to examine the effect of image quality on temperature retrieval as well as to document any bias between the sensor chip arrays (SCA's). A portion of the data set was used to evaluate the influence of proximity to shoreline on the water temperature retrievals. This study found errors in daytime water temperature retrievals of 1.8 C for SCA 2 and 4.0 C for SCA 1. The errors in nighttime water temperature retrievals were 3.8 C for SCA 1. Water temperature retrievals for nighttime appear to be related to image quality with the largest positive bias for the highest quality images and the largest negative bias for the lowest quality images. The daytime data show no apparent relationship between water temperature retrieval error and image quality. The average temperature retrieval error near open water buoys was less than corresponding values for the near-shore buoys. After subtraction of the estimated error in the ground truth data, the water temperature retrieval error was 1.2 C for the open-water buoys compared to 1.8 C for the near-shore buoys. The open-water error is comparable to that found at Nauru

  4. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Susquehanna Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-387 and 50-388). Suppl.6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    In April 1981, the staff of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued its Safety Evaluation Report (NUREG-0776) regarding the application of the Pennsylvania Power and Light Company (the applicant and/or licensee) and the Allegheny Electric Cooperative, Inc. (co-applicant) for licenses to operate the Susquehanna Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2, located on a site in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania. This supplement to NUREG-0776 addresses the remaining issues that required resolution before licensing operation of Unit 2 and closes them out

  5. Electricity from geothermal steam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheatcroft, E L.E.

    1959-01-01

    The development of the power station at Wairakei geothermal field is described. Wairakei is located at the center of New Zealand's volcanic belt, which lies within a major graben which is still undergoing some degree of downfaulting. A considerable number of wells, some exceeding 610 m, have been drilled. Steam and hot water are produced from both deep and shallow wells, which produce at gauge pressures of 1.5 MPa and 0.6 MPa, respectively. The turbines are fed by low, intermediate, and high pressure mains. The intermediate pressure turbine bank was installed as a replacement for a heavy water production facility which had originally been planned for the development. Stage 1 includes a 69 MW plant, and stage 2 will bring the capacity to 150 MW. A third stage, which would bring the output up to 250 MW had been proposed. The second stage involves the installation of more high pressure steam turbines, while the third stage would be powered primarily by hot water flashing. Generation is at 11 kV fed to a two-section 500 MVA board. Each section of the board feeds through a 40 MVA transformer to a pair of 220 V transmission lines which splice into the North Island grid. Other transformers feed 400 V auxiliaries and provide local supply.

  6. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Waterford Steam Electric Station, Unit No. 3 (Docket No. 50-382). Supplement No. 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    Supplement 8 to the Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by Louisiana Power and Light Company for a license to operate the Waterford Steam Electric Station, Unit 3 (Docket No. 50-382), located in St. Charles Parish, Louisiana, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of this supplement is to update the Safety Evaluation Report by providing the staff's evaluation of information submitted by the applicant since the Safety Evaluation Report and its seven previous supplements were issued

  7. Safety-evaluation report related to the operation of Waterford Steam Electric Station, Unit No. 3. Docket No. 50-382

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    Supplement 5 to the Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by Louisiana Power and Light Company for a license to operate the Waterford Steam Electric Station, Unit 3 (Docket No. 50-382), located in St. Charles Parish, Louisiana has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of this supplement is to update the Safety Evaluation Report by providing the staff's evaluation of information submitted by the applicant since the Safety Evaluation Report and its four previous Supplements were issued

  8. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Waterford Steam Electric Station, Unit No. 3 (Docket No. 50-382). Suppl.6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-06-01

    Supplement 6 to the Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by Louisiana Power and Light Company for a license to operate the Waterford Steam Electric Station, Unit 3 (Docket No. 50-382), located in St. Charles Parish, Louisiana, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of this supplement is to update the Safety Evaluation Report by providing the staff's evaluation of information submitted by the applicant since the Safety Evaluation Report and its five previous supplements were issued

  9. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Waterford Steam Electric Station, Unit No. 3 (Docket No. 50-382). Supplement 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    Supplement 9 to the Safety Evaluation Report for Louisiana Power and Light's application for a license to operate Waterford Steam Electric Station, Unit 3 (Docket No. 50-382), located in St. Charles Parish, Louisiana, has been jointly prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and the Region IV Office of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This supplement provides the results of the staff's completion of its evaluation of approximately 350 allegations and concerns of poor construction practices at the Waterford 3 facility

  10. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2. Docket Nos. 50-445 and 50-446

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    Supplement No. 3 to the Safety Evaluation Report (SER) related to the operation of the Comanche Peak Steam electric Station, Units 1 and 2, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. the facility is located in Somervell County, Texas. Subject to favorable resolution of the items identified in this supplement, the staff concludes that the facility can be operated by the applicatn without endangering the health and safety of the public. This document provides the NRC staff's evaluation of the outstanding and confirmatory issues that have been resolved since Supplement No. 2 was issued in January 1982, and addresses changes to the SER and its earlier supplements which have resulted from the receipt of additonal information from the applicant during the period of January throught October 1982

  11. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2: Docket No. 50-445 and 50-446

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-11-01

    Supplement 20 to the Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of the Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station (CPSES), Units 1 and 2 (NUREG-0797), has been prepared by the Office of Special Projects of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The facility is located in Somervell County, Texas, approximately 40 miles southwest of Fort Worth, Texas. This supplement presents the staff's evaluation of CPRT implementation of the Comanche Peak Response Team (CPRT) Program Plan and the issue-specific action plans (ISAPs), as well as the CPRT's investigations to determine the adequacy of various types of programs and hardware at CPSES. The results and conclusions of the CPRT activities are documented in a results report for each ISAP, a Collective Evaluation Report (CER), and a Collective Significance Report (CSR). This supplement also presents the staff's safety evaluation of TU Electric's root cause assessment of past CPSES design deficiencies and weaknesses. The NRC staff concludes that the CPRT has adequately implemented its investigative activities related to the design, construction, construction quality assurance/quality control, and testing at CPSES. The NRC staff further concludes that the CPRT evaluation of the results of its investigation is thorough and complete and its recommendations for corrective actions are sufficient to resolve identified deficiencies

  12. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-445 and 50-446)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-02-01

    Supplement 23 to the Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of the Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station (CPSES), Units 1 and 2 (NUREG-0797), has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The facility is located in Somervell County, Texas, approximately 40 miles southwest of Fort Worth, Texas. This supplement reports the status of certain issues that had not been resolved when the Safety Evaluation Report and supplements 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 12, 21, and 22 to that report were published. This supplement also includes the evaluations for licensing items resolved since Supplement 22 was issued. Supplement 5 has not been issued. Supplements 7, 8, 9, 10, and 11 were limited to the staff evaluation of allegations investigated by the NRC Technical Review Team. Supplement 13 presented the staff's evaluation of the Comanche Peak Response Team (CPRT) Program Plan, which was formulated by the applicant to resolve various construction and design issues raised by sources external to TU Electric. Supplements 14 through 19 presented the staff's evaluation of the CPSES Corrective Action Program: large- and small-bore piping and pipe supports (Supplement 14); cable trays and cable tray hangers (Supplement 15); conduit supports (Supplement 16); mechanical, civil/structural, electrical, instrumentation and controls, and systems portions of the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system workscopes (Supplement 17); HVAC structural design (Supplement 18); and equipment qualification (Supplement 19). Supplement 20 presented the staff's evaluation of the Comanche Peak Response Team implementation of the CPRT Program

  13. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-445 and 50-446)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    Supplement 24 to the Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of the Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station (CPSES), Units 1 and 2 (NUREG-0797), has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The facility is located in Somervell County, Texas, approximately 40 miles southwest of Fort Worth, Texas. This supplement reports the status of certain issues that had not been resolved when the Safety Evaluation Report and Supplements 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 12, 21, 22, and 23 to that report were published. This supplement also includes the evaluations for licensing items resolved since Supplement 23 was issued. Supplement 5 has not been issued. Supplements 7, 8, 9, 10, and 11 were limited to the staff evaluation of allegations investigated by the NRC Technical Review Team. Supplement 13 represented the staff's evaluation of the Comanche Peak Response Team (CPRT) Program Plan, which was formulated by the applicant to resolve various construction and design issues raised by sources external to TU Electric. Supplements 14 through 19 presented the staff's evaluation of the CPSES Corrective Action Program: large- and small-bore piping and pipe supports (Supplement 14); cable trays and cable tray hangers (Supplement 15); conduit supports (Supplement 16); mechanical, civil/structural, electrical, instrumentation and controls, and systems portions of the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system workscopes (Supplement 17); HVAC structural design (Supplement 18); and equipment qualification (Supplement 19). Supplement 20 presented the staff's evaluation of the CPRT implementation of its Program Plan and the issue-specific action plans, as well as the CPRT's investigations to determine the adequacy of various types of programs and hardware at CPSES

  14. Comparison of food habits of white perch (Morone americana) in the heated effluent canal of a steam electric station and in an adjacent river system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, C.J.; Fuller, S.L.H.; Burton, D.T.

    1975-01-01

    Analysis of the stomach contents of 97 white perch, Morone americana, taken from the effluent canal of a steam electric station (S.E.S.) and 106 white perch from adjacent Patuxent River waters indicated similar food habits from September 1970 through August 1971. However, 35 percent of all white perch taken from the heated effluent canal contained small pieces of coal and cinders, whereas only 3 percent of the river specimens contained such items in their stomachs. Fly ash and coal dust are present on the bottom of the S.E.S. canal, whereas little such material, if any, can be found on the river bottom in the study area. This suggests the canal fish were actively feeding in the heated effluent and not simply moving into the canal after feeding in the river. No significant difference (P greater than 0.05) was found between the average wet weight stomach contents of the river and canal fish within the same month

  15. Aerial radiological survey of the Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station and surrounding area, Glen Rose, Texas. Date of Survey: March 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-12-01

    An aerial radiological survey was performed from 1 to 9 March 1982 over a 260-square-kilometer area centered on the Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station located in Somervell County, Texas. The survey was conducted by the Energy Measurements Group of EG and G for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. All gamma ray data were collected by flying parallel lines spaced 152 meters (500 feet) apart at an altitude of 91 meters (300 feet) above ground level. Count rates obtained from the aerial platform were converted to total exposure rates at 1 meter above the ground and are presented in the form of an isoradiation contour map. The observed exposure rates ranged from 6 to 12 microroentgens per hour (μR/h), with the average background ranging from 6 to 8 μR/h. These values include an estimated cosmic ray contribution of 3.8 μR/h. The exposure rates obtained from ground-based measurements taken in typical background locations within the survey area displayed positive agreement with the aerial data

  16. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2: Docket Nos. 50-445 and 50-446

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    Supplement 15 to the Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of the Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station (CPSES), Units 1 and 2 (NUREG-0797), has been prepared by the Office of Special Projects of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The facility is located in Somervell County, Texas, approximately 40 miles southwest of Fort Worth, Texas. This supplement presents the staff's evaluation of the applicant's Corrective Action Program (CAP) related to the design of cable trays and cable tray hangers. The scope and methodologies for the CAP workscope as summarized in Revision O to the cable tray and cable tray hanger project status report and as detailed in related documents referenced in this evaluation were developed to resolve various design issues raised by the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board (ASLB) the intervenor, Citizens Association for Sound Energy (CASE); the Comanche Peak Response Team (CPRT); CYGNA Energy Services (CYGNA); and the NRC staff. The NRC staff concludes that the CAP workscope for cable trays and cable tray hangers provides a comprehensive program for resolving the associated technical concerns identified by the ASLB, CASE, CPRT, CYGNA, and the NRC staff and its implementation ensures that the design of cable trays and cable tray hangers at CPSES satisfies the applicable requirements of 10 CFR Part 50

  17. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-445 and 50-446)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-11-01

    Supplement 18 to the Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of the Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station (CPSES), Units 1 and 2 (NUREG-0797), has been prepared by the Office of Special Projects of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The facility is located in Somervell County, Texas, approximately 40 miles southwest of Fort Worth, Texas. This supplement presents the staff's evaluation of the applicant's Corrective Action Program (CAP) related to the structural design of the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. The scope and methodologies for the CAP workscope as summarized in Revision 0 to the HVAC project status report and as detailed in related documents referenced in this evaluation were developed to resolve the technical concerns identified in the HVAC area. The NRC staff concludes that the CAP workscope for the HVAC structural design provides a comprehensive program for resolving the associated technical concerns and its implementation ensures that the structural design of the HVAC systems at CPSES satisfies the applicable requirements of 10 CFR Part 50. 32 refs

  18. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-445 and 50-446)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Supplement 22 to the Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of the Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2 (NUREG-0797), has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located in Somervell County, Texas, approximately 40 miles southwest of Fort Worth, Texas. This supplement reports the status of certain issues that had not been resolved at the time of publication of the Safety Evaluation Report and Supplements 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 12, and 21 to that report. This supplement also includes the evaluations for licensing items resolved since Supplement 21 was issued. Supplement 5 has been cancelled. Supplements 7 through 11 were limited to the staff evaluation of allegations investigated by the NRC Technical Review Team. Supplement 13 presented the staff's evaluation of the Comanche Peak Response Team (CPRT) Program Plan, which was formulated by the applicant to resolve various construction and design issues raised by sources external to the applicant. Supplements 14 through 20 presented the staff's evaluation of the applicant's Corrective Action Program and CPRT activities. Items identified in Supplements 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 14, and 15 through 20 are not included in this supplement, except to the extent that they affect the applicant's Final Safety Analysis Report. 154 refs., 24 figs., 8 tabs

  19. Steam generator replacement at Surry Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKay, H.S.

    1982-01-01

    The purposes of the steam generator repair program at Surry Power Station were to repair the tube degradation caused by corrosion-related phenomena and to restore the integrity of the steam generators to a level equivalent to new equipment. The repair program consisted of (1) replacing the existing lower-shell assemblies with new ones and (2) adding new moisture separation equipment to the upper-shell assemblies. These tasks required that several pieces of reactor coolant piping, feedwater piping, main steam piping, and the steam generator be cut and refurbished for reinstallation after the new lower shell was in place. The safety implications and other potential effects of the repair program both during the repair work and after the unit was returned to power were part of the design basis of the repair program. The repair program has been completed on Unit 2 without any adverse effects on the health and safety of the general public or to the personnel engaged in the repair work. Before the Unit 1 repair program began, a review of work procedures and field changes for the Unit 2 repair was conducted. Several major changes were made to avoid recurrence of problems and to streamline procedures. Steam generator replacements was completed on June 1, 1981, and the unit is presently in the startup phase of the outrage

  20. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-445 and 50-446)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-11-01

    Supplement 19 to the Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of the Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station (CPSES), Units 1 and 2 (NUREG-0797), has been prepared by the Office of Special Projects of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The facility is located in Somervell County, Texas, approximately 40 miles southwest of Fort Worth, Texas. This supplement presents the staff's evaluation of the Texas Utilities Electric Company's (lead applicant's) corrective action program (CAP) related to equipment qualification. The scope and methodology for the CAP workscope, as summarized in Revision 0 to the Equipment Qualification Project Status Report and as detailed in related documents, were developed to resolve various issues raised by the Comanche Peak Response Team (CPRT) and the NRC staff to ensure that plant equipment is appropriately environmentally and/or seismically and dynamically qualified and documented in accordance with the validated plant design resulting from other CAP scopes of work for Unit 1 and areas common to Units 1 and 2. The staff concludes that the CAP workscope for equipment qualification provides a comprehensive program for resolving the concerns identified by the CPRT and the NRC staff, including issues raised in the Comanche Peak Safety Evaluation Report and its supplements, and its implementation will ensure that the environmental and/or seismic and dynamic qualification of equipment at CPSES satisfies the validated plant design and the applicable requirements of 10 CFR Part 50. As is routine staff practice, the NRC staff will verify the adequacy of implementation of the environmental and seismic and dynamic equipment qualification program at CPSES during inspections that will take place before fuel loading. 97 refs

  1. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Susquehanna Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2. Docket Nos. 50-387 and 50-388, Pennsylvania Power and Light Company and Allegheny Electric Cooperative, Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    In April 1981, the staff of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued its Safety Evaluation Report (NUREG-0776) regarding the application of the Pennsylvania Power and Light Company (the licensee) and the Allegheny Electric Cooperative, Inc. (co-licensee) for licenses to operate the Susquehanna Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2, located on a site in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania. Supplement 1, issued in June 1981, addressed outstanding issues. Supplement 2, issued in September 1981, contains the ACRS Report and responses. Supplement 3, issued in July 1982, contains the resolution to five items previously identified as open and closes them out. On July 17, 1982, License NPF-14 was issued to allow Unit 1 operation at power levels not to exceed 5% of rated power. This supplement discusses the resolution of several license conditions that have been met

  2. Steam generator replacement at the Obrigheim nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickel, E.; Schenk, H.; Huemmler, A.

    1984-01-01

    The Obrigheim Nuclear Power Station (KWO) is equipped with a dual-loop pressurized water reactor of 345 MW electric power; it was built by Siemens in the period 1965 to 1968. By the end of 1983, KWO had produced some 35 billion kWh in 109,000 hours of operation. Repeated leaks in the heater tubes of the two steam generators had occurred since 1971. Both steam generators were replaced in the course of the 1983 annual revision. Kraftwerk Union AG (KWU) was commissioned to plant and carry out the replacement work. Despite the leakages the steam generators had been run safely and reliably over a period of 14 years until their replacement. Replacing the steam generators was completed within twelve weeks. In addition to the KWO staff and the supervising crew of KWU, some 400 external fitters were employed on the job at peak work-load periods. For the revision of the whole plant, work on the emergency systems and replacement of the steam generators a maximum number of approx. 900 external fitters were employed in the plant in addition to some 250 members of the plant crew. The exposure dose of the personnel sustained in the course of the steam generator replacement was 690 man-rem, which was clearly below previous estimates. (orig.) [de

  3. Environmental codes of practice for steam electric power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-03-01

    The Design Phase Code is one of a series of documents being developed for the steam electric power generation industry. This industry includes fossil-fuelled stations (gas, oil and coal-fired boilers), and nuclear-powered stations (CANDU heavy water reactors). In this document, environmental concerns associated with water-related and solid waste activities of steam electric plants are discussed. Design recommendations are presented that will minimize the detrimental environmental effects of once-through cooling water systems, of wastewaters discharged to surface waters and groundwaters, and of solid waste disposal sites. Recommendations are also presented for the design of water-related monitoring systems and programs. Cost estimates associated with the implementation of these recommendations are included. These technical guides for new or modified steam electric stations are the result to consultation with a federal-provincial-industry task force

  4. Improvements in steam cycle electric power generating plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bienvenu, Claude.

    1973-01-01

    The invention relates to a steam cycle electric energy generating plants of the type comprising a fossil or nuclear fuel boiler for generating steam and a turbo alternator group, the turbine of which is fed by the boiler steam. The improvement is characterized in that use is made of a second energy generating group in which a fluid (e.g. ammoniac) undergoes a condensation cycle the heat source of said cycle being obtained through a direct or indirect heat exchange with a portion of the boiler generated steam whereby it is possible without overloading the turbo-alternator group, to accomodate any increase of the boiler power resulting from the use of another fuel while maintaining a maximum energy output. This can be applied to electric power stations [fr

  5. Steam turbines for nuclear power stations in Czechoslovakia and their use for district heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drahy, J.

    1989-01-01

    The first generation of nuclear power stations in Czechoslavakia is equipped with 440 MW e pressurized water reactors. Each reactor supplies two 220 MW, 3000 rpm condensing type turbosets operating with saturated steam. After the completion of heating water piping systems, all of the 24 units of 220 MW in Czechoslovak nuclear power stations will be operated as dual purpose units, delivering both electricity and heat. At the present time, second-generation nuclear power stations, with 1000 MW e PWRs, are being built. Each such plant is equipped with one 1000 MW full-speed saturated steam turbine. The turbine is so designed as to permit the extraction of steam corresponding to the following quantities of heat: 893 MJ/s with three-stage water heating (150/60 0 C); and 570 MJ/s with two-stage water heating (120/60 0 C). The steam is taken from uncontrolled steam extraction points. (author)

  6. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-445 and 50-446). Supplement No. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Supplement 7 to the Safety Evaluation Report for the Texas Utilities Electric Company application for a license to operate Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-445, 50-446), located in Somervell County, Texas, has been jointly prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and the Comanche Peak Technical Review of the US Nuclera Regulatory Commission. This supplement provides the results of the staff's evaluation and resolution of approximately 80 technical concerns and allegations in the areas of Electric/Instrumentation and Test Programs regarding construction and plant readiness testing practices at the Comanche Peak facility. Issues raised during Atomic Safety and Licensing Board hearings will be dealt with in future supplements to the Safety Evaluation Report

  7. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-445 and 50-446). Supplement No. 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-02-01

    Supplement 8 to the Safety Evaluation Report for the Texas Utilities Electric Company application for a license to operate Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-445, 50-446), located in Somervell County, Texas, has been jointly prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and the Comanche Peak Technical Review Team of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This Supplement provides the results of the staff's evaluation and resolution of approximately 80 technical concerns and allegations relating to civil and structural and miscellaneous issues regarding construction and plant readiness testing practices at the Comanche Peak facility. Issues raised during recent Atomic Safety and Licensing Board hearings will be dealt with in future supplements to the Safety Evaluation Report

  8. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-445 and 50-446): Supplement No. 21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-04-01

    Supplement 21 to the Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of the Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station (CPSES), Units 1 and 2 (NUREG-0797), has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The facility is located in Somervell County, Texas, approximately 40 miles southwest of Fort Worth, Texas. This supplement reports the status of certain issues that had not been resolved when the Safety Evaluation Report and Supplements 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 12 to that report were published. This supplement also lists the new issues that have been identified since Supplement 12 was issued and includes the evaluations for licensing items resolved in this interim period. 21 refs

  9. Automation of steam generator services at public service electric & gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruickshank, H.; Wray, J.; Scull, D. [Public Service Electric & Gas, Hancock`s Bridge, NJ (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Public Service Electric & Gas takes an aggressive approach to pursuing new exposure reduction techniques. Evaluation of historic outage exposure shows that over the last eight refueling outages, primary steam generator work has averaged sixty-six (66) person-rem, or, approximately tewenty-five percent (25%) of the general outage exposure at Salem Station. This maintenance evolution represents the largest percentage of exposure for any single activity. Because of this, primary steam generator work represents an excellent opportunity for the development of significant exposure reduction techniques. A study of primary steam generator maintenance activities demonstrated that seventy-five percent (75%) of radiation exposure was due to work activities of the primary steam generator platform, and that development of automated methods for performing these activities was worth pursuing. Existing robotics systems were examined and it was found that a new approach would have to be developed. This resulted in a joint research and development project between Westinghouse and Public Service Electric & Gas to develop an automated system of accomplishing the Health Physics functions on the primary steam generator platform. R.O.M.M.R.S. (Remotely Operated Managed Maintenance Robotics System) was the result of this venture.

  10. North Anna Power Station - Unit 1: Overview of steam generator replacement project activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gettler, M.W.; Bayer, R.K.; Lippard, D.W.

    1993-01-01

    The original steam generators at Virginia Electric and Power Company's (Virginia Power) North Anna Power Station (NAPS) Unit 1 have experienced corrosion-related degradation that require periodic inspection and plugging of steam generator tubes to ensure their continued safe and reliable operation. Despite improvements in secondary water chemistry, continued tube degradation in the steam generators necessitated the removal from service of approximately 20.3 percent of the tubes by plugging, (18.6, 17.3, and 25.1 for steam generators A, B, and C, respectively). Additionally, the unit power was limited to 95 % during, its last cycle of operation. Projections of industry and Virginia Power experience indicated the possibility of mid-cycle inspections and reductions in unit power. Therefore, economic considerations led to the decision to repair the steam generators (i.e., replace the steam generator lower assemblies). Three new Model 51F Steam Generator lower assembly units were ordered from Westinghouse. Virginia Power contracted Bechtel Power Corporation to provide the engineering and construction support to repair the Unit 1 steam generators. On January 4, 1993, after an extended coastdown period, North Anna Unit 1 was brought off-line and the 110 day (breaker-to-breaker) Steam Generator Replacement Project (SGRP) outage began. As of this paper, the outage is still in progress

  11. Reconstruction of steam generators super emergency feadwater supply system (SHNC) and steam dump stations to the atmosphere system PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzma, J.

    2001-01-01

    Steam Generators Super Emergency Feadwater Supply System (SHNC) and Steam Dump Stations to the Atmosphere System (PSA) are two systems which cooperate to remove residual heat from reactor core after seismic event. SHNC assure feeding of the secondary site of steam generator (Feed) where after heat removal.from primary loops, is relieved to the atmosphere by PSA (Bleed) in form of steam. (author)

  12. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-445 and 50-446)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    Supplement 14 to the Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of the Comanche Peak Stam Electric Station (CPSES), Units 1 and 2 (NUREG-0797), has been prepared by the Office of Special Projects of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The facility is located in Somerville County, Texas, approximately 40 miles southwest of Fort Worth, Texas. This supplement presents the staff's evaluation of the applicants' Corrective Action Program (CAP0 related to large ans small bore piping and pipe supports. The scope and methodologies for CAP workshop as summarized in revision O to the large and small bore piping project status reports and as detailed in related documents referenced in this evaluation were developed to resolve various design issues raised by the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board (ASLB);the intervenor, Citizens Association for Sound Energy (CASE);the Camanche Peak Response Team (CPRT);SYGNA Energy Services (CYGNA);and the NRC staff. The NRC staff concludes that the CAP workscopes for large and small bore piping provide a comprehensive program for resolving the associated technical concerns identified by the ASLB, CASE, CPRT, CYGNA, and the NRC staff and their implementation ensures that the design of large and small bore piping and pipe supports at CPSES satisfies the applicable requirements of 10 CFR 50

  13. VT Data - Electric Charging Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Locations of Electric Charging Stations provided by the NREL national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy....

  14. Three Mile Island Nuclear Station steam generator chemical cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    The Three Mile Island-1 steam generators were chemically cleaned in 1991 by the B and W Nuclear Service Co. (BWNS). This secondary side cleaning was accomplished through application of the EPRI/SGOG (Electric Power Research Institute - Steam Generator Owners Group) chemical cleaning iron removal process, followed by sludge lancing. BWNS also performed on-line corrosion monitoring. Corrosion of key steam generator materials was low, and well within established limits. Liquid waste, subsequently processed by BWNS was less than expected. 7 tabs

  15. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-445 and 50-446). Supplement No. 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-05-01

    Supplement 11 to the Safety Evaluation Report for the Texas Utilities Electric Company application for a license to operate Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-445, 50-446), located in Somervell County, Texas, has been jointly prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and the Comanche Peak Technical Review Team (TRT) of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and is in two parts. Part 1 (Appendix 0) of this supplement provides the results of the TRT's evaluation of approximately 124 concerns and allegations relating specifically to quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) issues regarding construction proctices at the Comanche Peak facility. Part 2 (Appendix P) contains an overall summary and conclusion of the QA/QC aspects of the NRC Technical Review Team efforts as reported in supplemental Safety Evaluation Report SERs 7, 8, 9, and 10. Since QA/QC issues are also contained in each of the other supplements, the TRT considered that such a summary and conclusion from all supplements was necessary for a complete TRT description of QA/QC activities at Comanche Peak

  16. Technical Feasible Study for Future Solar Thermal Steam Power Station in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohari, Z. H.; Atira, N. N.; Jali, M. H.; Sulaima, M. F.; Izzuddin, T. A.; Baharom, M. F.

    2017-10-01

    This paper proposed renewable energy which is potential to be used in Malaysia in generating electricity to innovate and improve current operating systems. Thermal and water act as the resources to replace limited fossil fuels such as coal which is still widely used in energy production nowadays. Thermal is also known as the heat energy while the water absorbs energy from the thermal to produce steam energy. By combining both of the sources, it is known as thermal steam renewable energy. The targeted area to build this power station has constant high temperature and low humidity which can maximize the efficiency of generating power.

  17. Steam Oxidation Testing in the Severe Accident Test Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pint, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    After the March 2011 accident at Fukushima Daiichi, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) began conducting high temperature steam oxidation testing of candidate materials for accident tolerant fuel (ATF) cladding in August 2011 [1-11]. The ATF concept is to enhance safety margins in light water reactors (LWR) during severe accident scenarios by identifying materials with 100× slower steam oxidation rates compared to current Zr-based alloys. In 2012, the ORNL laboratory equipment was expanded and made available to the entire ATF community as the Severe Accident Test Station (SATS) [4,12]. Compared to the current UO2/Zr-based alloy fuel system, an ATF alternative would significantly reduce the rate of heat and hydrogen generation in the core during a coolant-limited severe accident [13-14]. The steam oxidation behavior of candidate materials is a key metric in the evaluation of ATF concepts and also an important input into models [15-17]. However, initial modeling work of FeCrAl cladding has used incomplete information on the physical properties of FeCrAl. Also, the steam oxidation data being collected at 1200°-1700°C is unique as no prior work has considered steam oxidation of alloys at such high temperatures. Also, because many accident scenarios include steadily increasing temperatures, the required data are not traditional isothermal exposures but exposures with varying “ramp” rates. In some cases, the steam oxidation behavior has been surprising and difficult to interpret. Thus, more fundamental information continues to be collected. In addition, more work continues to focus on commercially-manufactured tube material. This report summarizes recent work to characterize the behavior of candidate alloys exposed to high temperature steam, evaluate steam oxidation behavior in various ramp scenarios and continue to collect integral data on FeCrAl compared to conventional Zr-based cladding.

  18. Autonomous Electrical Vehicles’ Charging Station

    OpenAIRE

    Józef Paska; Mariusz Kłos; Łukasz Rosłaniec; Rafał Bielas; Magdalena Błędzińska

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a model of an autonomous electrical vehicles’ charging station. It consists of renewable energy sources: wind turbine system, photovoltaic cells, as well as an energy storage, load, and EV charging station. In order to optimise the operating conditions, power electronic converters were added to the system. The model was implemented in the Homer Energy programme. The first part of the paper presents the design assumptions and technological solutions. Further in the paper...

  19. High level waste (HLW) steam reducing station evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gannon, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    Existing pressure equipment in High Level Waste does not have a documented technical baseline. Based on preliminary reviews, the existing equipment seems to be based on system required capacity instead of system capability. A planned approach to establish a technical baseline began September 1992 and used the Works Management System preventive maintenance schedule. Several issues with relief valves being undersized on steam reducing stations created a need to determine the risk of maintaining the steam in service. An Action Plan was developed to evaluate relief valves that did not have technical baselines and provided a path forward for continued operation. Based on Action Plan WER-HLE-931042, the steam systems will remain in service while the designs are being developed and implemented

  20. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-445 and 50-446). Supplement No. 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    Supplement 13 to the Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station (CPSES), Units 1 and 2 (NUREG-0797), has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The facility is located in Somervell County, Texas, approximately 40 miles southwest of Fort Worth, Texas. This supplement presents the staff's evaluation of the Comanche Peak Response Team (CPRT) Program Plan which was formulated by the applicant to resolve various construction and design issues raised by the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board, allegers, intervenor Citizens Association for Sound Energy (CASE), NRC inspections of various types, and Cygna Energy Services while conducting its independent design assessment. The NRC staff concludes that the CPRT Program Plan provides an overall structure for addressing all existing issues and any future issues which may be identified from further evaluations, and if properly implemented will provide important evidence of the design and construction quality of CPSES, and will identify any needed corrective action. The report identifies items to be addressed by the NRC staff during the implementation phase

  1. Station power supply by residual steam of Fugen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiya, Y.; Kato, H.; Hattori, S. (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1981-09-01

    In the advanced thermal reactor ''Fugen'', when the sudden decrease of load more than 40% occurs due to the failure of power system, the turbine regulating valve is rapidly shut, and the reactor is brought to scrum. However, the operation of turbo-generators is continued with the residual steam in the reactor, and the power for inside the station is supplied for 30 sec by the limiting timer, then the power-generating plant is automatically stopped. The reasons why such design was adopted are to reduce manual operation at the time of emergency, to continue water supply for cooling the reactor and to maintain the water level in the steam drum, and to reduce steam release from the safety valve and the turbine bypass valve. The output-load unbalance relay prevents the everspeed of the turbo-generator when load decreased suddenly, but when the failure of power system is such that recovers automatically in course of time, it does not work. The calculation for estimating the dynamic characteristics at the time of the sole operation within the station is carried out by the analysis code FATRAC. The input conditions for the calculation and the results are reported. Also the dynamic characteristics were actually tested to confirm the set value of the limiting timer and the safe working of turbine and generator trips. The estimated and tested results were almost in agreement.

  2. Alternatives to electrical cogeneration: The direct application of steam engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, W.C.

    1993-01-01

    Although small to medium sized industrial facilities are aware of electrical cogeneration, often they are too small for it to be economically justifiable. The direct application of steam turbine power to equipment formerly powered by electric motors, can allow them to use steam capacity to reduce electrical demand and consumption, bypassing cogeneration. Cogeneration converts the heat energy of steam into circular mechanical motion and then converts the circular mechanical motion into electricity. Each conversion entails a loss of energy due to friction and other conversion losses. A substantial amount of the generated electricity is then converted back into circular motion with electric motors, again incurring energy losses. Directly applying the mechanical motion of turbines eliminates both the motion-to-electricity (generator) and the electricity-to-motion (motor) conversion losses. Excess steam capacity during the summer is not unusual for facilities that use steam to provide winter heating. Similarly, most of these facilities experience a large electrical demand peak during the cooling season due to the electricity needed to operate centrifugal chillers. Steam capacity via a turbine to power the chillers can allow the boilers to operate at a higher loading while reducing electrical consumption and demand precisely those periods when demand reduction is most needed. In facilities where the steam generating capacity is sufficient, air compressors provide an appropriate year-round application for turbine power. This paper is the result of an on-going project by the Energy Division, State of North Carolina, Department of Economic and Community Development, in conjunction with the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. The objective of this project is to educate the operating engineers and managers of small to medium sized manufacturing facilities on the technical application and economic justification of steam turbine power

  3. Design and field operation of 1175 MW steam turbine for Ohi Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirota, Yoshio; Nakagami, Yasuo; Fujii, Hisashi; Shibanai, Hirooki.

    1980-01-01

    Two 1175 MW steam turbine and generator units have been successfully in commercial operation since March 1979 and December 1979 respectively at Ohi Nuclear Power Station of the Kansai Electric Power Company. Those units, the largest in their respective outputs in Japan, have also such remarkable design features as two-stage reheat, nozzle governing turbine, water cooled generator stator and turbine-driven feedwater pumps. This paper covers design features and some topics of various pre-operational tests of the above-mentioned units. (author)

  4. Design and field operation of 1175 MW steam turbine for Ohi Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirota, Y.; Nakagami, Y.; Fujii, H.; Shibanai, H.

    1980-01-01

    Two 1,175 MW steam turbine and generator units have been successfully in commercial operation since March 1979 and December 1979 respectively at Ohi Nuclear Power Station of the Kansai Electric Power Company. Those units, the largest in their respective outputs in Japan, have also such remarkable design features as two-stage reheat, nozzle governing turbine, water cooled generator stator and turbine-driven feedwater pumps. This paper covers design features and some topics of various pre-operational tests of the above-mentioned units. (author)

  5. LPGC, Levelized Steam Electric Power Generator Cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coen, J.J.; Delene, J.G.

    1994-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: LPGC is a set of nine microcomputer programs for estimating power generation costs for large steam-electric power plants. These programs permit rapid evaluation using various sets of economic and technical ground rules. The levelized power generation costs calculated may be used to compare the relative economics of nuclear and coal-fired plants based on life-cycle costs. Cost calculations include capital investment cost, operation and maintenance cost, fuel cycle cost, decommissioning cost, and total levelized power generation cost. These programs can be used for quick analyses of power generation costs using alternative economic parameters, such as interest rate, escalation rate, inflation rate, plant lead times, capacity factor, fuel prices, etc. The two major types of electric generating plants considered are pressurized-water reactor (PWR) and pulverized coal-fired plants. Data are also provided for the Large Scale Prototype Breeder (LSPB) type liquid metal reactor. Costs for plant having either one or two units may be obtained. 2 - Method of solution: LPGC consists of nine individual menu-driven programs controlled by a driver program, MAINPWR. The individual programs are PLANTCAP, for calculating capital investment costs; NUCLOM, for determining operation and maintenance (O and M) costs for nuclear plants; COALOM, for computing O and M costs for coal-fired plants; NFUEL, for calculating levelized fuel costs for nuclear plants; COALCOST, for determining levelized fuel costs for coal-fired plants; FCRATE, for computing the fixed charge rate on the capital investment; LEVEL, for calculating levelized power generation costs; CAPITAL, for determining capitalized cost from overnight cost; and MASSGEN, for generating, deleting, or changing fuel cycle mass balance data for use with NFUEL. LPGC has three modes of operation. In the first, each individual code can be executed independently to determine one aspect of the total

  6. Steam generator maintenance and life management at Embalse Nuclear Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sainz, R.; Diaz, G.; Sveruga, H.; Ramakrishnan, T.K.; Azeez, S.

    2004-01-01

    The Embalse Nuclear Station has four steam generators (SGs) with inverted vertical U tubes manufactured by Babcock and Wilcox Canada (B and W). These are main components, both from the operative point of view as the heat transfer from the Primary Heat Transport System (PHTS) to the Secondary System, and from the point of view of safety, as they are the part of the PHTS and its radioactive inventory pressure barrier. In addition, they are one of the most important cost-related elements for potential life extensions. Maintenance and inspections are carried out in order to maintain a high availability of the SGs, as they have had a positive impact on the operational availability of the plant, and to reduce the tube failure probabilities, thus minimizing the amount of radioactive effluents and taking care of the condition of the main components in order to enable the plant life management and the planning of the plant life extension. The most relevant maintenance activities performed have been the inspections performed on 100% of the tubes every 3 years. the mechanical cleaning of the inside of the tubes, the sludge removal from the secondary side tubesheet, the divider plate replacement, and the inspection of internals of the secondary side.Thanks to the latter and to the eddy current inspections, the degradation in the U-bend supports was detected early and every effort is being made to repair them shortly. Besides, a life management program has been started covering the entire plant starting with this important component. The Embalse Nuclear Station's SGs show a low percentage of plugged tubes compared to other stations in similar conditions, but they must be monitored continually and systematically if a life extension is intended. (author)

  7. Kawasaki steam power plant of Tokyo Electric Power Co. and an example of geothermal power generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1961-01-01

    The first part of this discussion is devoted to a description of the Kawasaki steam power plant, installed by Tokyo Electric Co. to supply electricity to the Keihin industrial area. The output is 700 MW and it possesses a thermal efficiency of 36.9%. The plant is operated automatically by remote control. The latter section describes the status of a geothermal power station in Hakone. It outlines the steam distribution piping, the steam itself, the turbine and vapor/water separation equipment. With regard to technical problems, it is suggested that old wells having weak pressure can be restored by self-cleaning and that further improvement can be brought about by dynamiting the base of the borehole.

  8. Sourcing of Steam and Electricity for Carbon Capture Retrofits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supekar, Sarang D; Skerlos, Steven J

    2017-11-07

    This paper compares different steam and electricity sources for carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) retrofits of pulverized coal (PC) and natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plants. Analytical expressions for the thermal efficiency of these power plants are derived under 16 different CCS retrofit scenarios for the purpose of illustrating their environmental and economic characteristics. The scenarios emerge from combinations of steam and electricity sources, fuel used in each source, steam generation equipment and process details, and the extent of CO 2 capture. Comparing these scenarios reveals distinct trade-offs between thermal efficiency, net power output, levelized cost, profit, and net CO 2 reduction. Despite causing the highest loss in useful power output, bleeding steam and extracting electric power from the main power plant to meet the CCS plant's electricity and steam demand maximizes plant efficiency and profit while minimizing emissions and levelized cost when wholesale electricity prices are below 4.5 and 5.2 US¢/kWh for PC-CCS and NGCC-CCS plants, respectively. At prices higher than these higher profits for operating CCS retrofits can be obtained by meeting 100% of the CCS plant's electric power demand using an auxiliary natural gas turbine-based combined heat and power plant.

  9. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Susquehanna Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2. Docket Nos. 50-387 and 50-388, Pennsylvania Power and Light Company, Allegheny Electric Cooperative, Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    Information is presented concerning site characteristics; design criteria for systems and components; reactor thermal and hydraulic characteristics; reactor coolant pressure boundary; engineered safety features; instrumentation and control; electrical power systems; auxiliary systems; conduct of operations; quality assurance; and TMI-2 requirements

  10. Steam-treated wood pellets: Environmental and financial implications relative to fossil fuels and conventional pellets for electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKechnie, Jon; Saville, Brad; MacLean, Heather L.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Steam-treated pellets can greatly reduce greenhouse gas emissions relative to coal. • Cost advantage is seen relative to conventional pellets. • Higher pellet cost is more than balanced by reduced retrofit capital requirements. • Low capacity factors further favour steam-treated pellets over conventional pellets. - Abstract: Steam-treated pellets can help to address technical barriers that limit the uptake of pellets as a fuel for electricity generation, but there is limited understanding of the cost and environmental impacts of their production and use. This study investigates life cycle environmental (greenhouse gas (GHG) and air pollutant emissions) and financial implications of electricity generation from steam-treated pellets, including fuel cycle activities (biomass supply, pellet production, and combustion) and retrofit infrastructure to enable 100% pellet firing at a generating station that previously used coal. Models are informed by operating experience of pellet manufacturers and generating stations utilising coal, steam-treated and conventional pellets. Results are compared with conventional pellets and fossil fuels in a case study of electricity generation in northwestern Ontario, Canada. Steam-treated pellet production has similar GHG impacts to conventional pellets as their higher biomass feedstock requirement is balanced by reduced process electricity consumption. GHG reductions of more than 90% relative to coal and ∼85% relative to natural gas (excluding retrofit infrastructure) could be obtained with both pellet options. Pellets can also reduce fuel cycle air pollutant emissions relative to coal by 30% (NOx), 97% (SOx), and 75% (PM 10 ). Lesser retrofit requirements for steam-treated pellets more than compensate for marginally higher pellet production costs, resulting in lower electricity production cost compared to conventional pellets ($0.14/kW h vs. $0.16/kW h). Impacts of retrofit infrastructure become increasingly

  11. Large steam turbines for nuclear power stations. Output growth prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riollet, G.; Widmer, M.; Tessier, J.

    1975-01-01

    The rapid growth of the output of nuclear reactors, even if temporary settlement occurs, leads the manufacturer to evaluate, at a given time, technological limitations encountered. The problems dealing with the main components of turbines: steam path, rotors and stators steam valves, controle devices, shafts and bearings, are reviewed [fr

  12. Evaluation of material integrity on electricity generator water steam cycles component (Main Steam Pipe)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudardjo; Histori; Triyadi, Ari

    1998-01-01

    The evaluation of material integrity on electricity generator component has been done. That component was main steam pipe of Unit II Suralaya Coal Fired Power Plant. evaluation was done by replication technique. The damage was found are two porosity's, from two point samples of six points sample population. Based on cavity evaluation in steels, which proposed by Neubauer and Wedel that porosity's still at class A damage. For class A damage, its means no remedial action would be required until next major scheduled maintenance outage. That porosity's was grouped on isolated cavities and not need ti repair that main steam pipe component less than three year after replication test

  13. Drying system for steam generators, particularly for steam generators of nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavalerie, Claude; Borrel, Christian.

    1982-01-01

    A drying system is described which allows for modular construction and which provides a significant available exchange area in a reduced volume. All the drying elements are identical and are distributed according to a ternay circular symmetry and are placed radially and associated to steam guiding facilities which alternately provide around the axis of revolution an output volume of dry steam from one element and an input volume of wet steam in the following element [fr

  14. 1000 MW steam turbine for Temelin nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drahy, J.

    1992-01-01

    Before the end 1991 the delivery was completed of the main parts (3 low-pressure sections and 1 high-pressure section, all of double-flow design) of the first full-speed (3000 r.p.m.) 1000 MW steam turbine for saturated admission steam for the Temelin nuclear power plant. Description of the turbine design and of new technologies and tools used in the manufacture are given. Basic technical parameters of the steam turbine are as follows: maximum output of steam generators 6060 th -1 ; maximum steam flow into turbine 5494.7 th -1 ; output of turbo-set 1024 MW; steam conditions before the turbine inlet: pressure 5.8 MPa, temperature 273.3 degC, steam wetness 0.5%; nominal temperature of cooling water 21 degC; temperature of feed water 220.8 degC; maximum consumption of heat from turbine for heating at 3-stage heating of heating water 60/150 degC. (Z.S.) 7 figs., 2 refs

  15. Results of Steam-Water-Oxygen Treatment of the Inside of Heating Surfaces in Heat-Recovery Steam Generators of the PGU-800 Power Unit at the Perm' District Thermal Power Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovechkina, O. V.; Zhuravlev, L. S.; Drozdov, A. A.; Solomeina, S. V.

    2018-05-01

    Prestarting, postinstallation steam-water-oxygen treatment (SWOT) of the natural circulation/steam reheat heat-recovery steam generators (HRSG) manufactured by OAO Krasny Kotelshchik was performed at the PGU-800 power unit of the Perm District Thermal Power Station (GRES). Prior to SWOT, steam-oxygen cleaning, passivation, and preservation of gas condensate heaters (GCH) of HRSGs were performed for 10 h using 1.3MPa/260°C/70 t/h external steam. After that, test specimens were cut out that demonstrated high strength of the passivating film. SWOT of the inside of the heating surfaces was carried out during no-load operation of the gas turbine unit with an exhaust temperature of 280-300°C at the HRSG inlet. The steam turbine was shutdown, and the generated steam was discharged into the atmosphere. Oxygen was metered into the discharge pipeline of the electricity-driven feed pumps and downcomers of the evaporators. The behavior of the concentration by weight of iron compounds and the results of investigation of cutout specimens by the drop or potentiometric method indicate that the steam-water-oxygen process makes it possible to remove corrosion products and reduce the time required to put a boiler into operation. Unlike other processes, SWOT does not require metal-intensive cleaning systems, temporary metering stations, and structures for collection of the waste solution.

  16. Steam turbine generators for Sizewell 'B' nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesketh, J.A.; Muscroft, J.

    1990-01-01

    The thermodynamic cycle of the modern 3000 r/min steam turbine as applied at Sizewell 'B' is presented. Review is made of the factors affecting thermal efficiency including the special nature of the wet steam cycle and the use of moisture separation and steam reheating. Consideration is given to the optimization of the machine and cycle parameters, including particular attention to reheating and to the provision of feedheating, in order to achieve a high overall level of performance. A modular design approach has made available a family of machines suitable for the output range 600-1300 MW. The constructional features of the 630 MW Sizewell 'B' turbine generators from this range are described in detail. The importance of service experience with wet steam turbines and its influence on the design of modern turbines for pressurized water reactor (PWR) applications is discussed. (author)

  17. Steam generator replacement at Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, S.; Dodo, Takashi; Negishi, Kazuo

    1995-01-01

    Eleven nuclear units are in operation at the Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc.. In seven of them, Mihama-1·2·3, Takahama-1·2, and Ohi-1·2, comparatively long duration for tube inspection and repair have been required during late annual outages. KEPCO decided to replace all steam generators in these 7 units with the latest model which was improved upon the past degradation experiences, as a result of comprehensive considerations including public confidence in nuclear power generation, maintenability, and economic efficiency. This report presents the design improvements in new steam generators, replacement techniques, and so on. (author)

  18. 1000 MW steam turbine for nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drahy, J.

    1987-01-01

    Skoda Works started the manufacture of the 1000 MW steam turbine for the Temelin nuclear power plant. The turbine will use saturated steam at 3,000 r.p.m. It will allow steam supply to heat water for district heating, this of an output of 893 MW for a three-stage water heating at a temperature of 150/60 degC or of 570 MW for a two-stage heating at a temperature of 120/60 degC. The turbine features one high-pressure and three identical low-pressure stages. The pressure gradient between the high-pressure and the low-pressure parts was optimized as concerns the thermal efficiency of the cycle and the thermodynamic efficiency of the low-pressure part. A value of 0.79 MPa was selected corresponding to the maximum flow rate of the steam entering the turbine. This is 5,495 t/h, the admission steam parameters are 273.3 degC and 5.8 MPa. The feed water temperature is 220.9 degC. It is expected that throughout the life of the turbine, there will be 300 cold starts, 1,000 starts following shutdown for 55 to 88 hours, and 600 starts following shutdown for 8 hours. (Z.M.). 8 figs., 1 ref

  19. Design of large steam turbines for PWR power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobson, G.; Muscroft, J.

    1983-01-01

    The thermodynamic cycle requirements for use with pressurized water reactors are reviewed and the manner in which thermal efficiency is maximised is outlined. The special nature of the wet steam cycle associated with turbines for this type of reactor is discussed. Machine and cycle parameters are optimised to achieve high thermal efficiency, particular attention being given to arrangements for water separation and steam reheating and to provisions for feedwater heating. Principles and details of mechanical design are considered for a range of both full-speed turbines running at 3000 rpm on 50 Hz systems and half-speed turbines running at 1800 rpm on 60 Hz systems. The importance of service experience with nuclear wet steam turbines and its relevance to the design of modern turbines for pressurized water reactor applications is discussed. (author)

  20. Water separator for a steam turbine for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzog, J.; Hubble, W.S.; Woods, K.K.

    1976-01-01

    The invention concerns a water separator for the condensation of humidity from steam of the inertia type, which has an improved flow distribution and can therefore be built for large dimensions. This is achieved by variation of the dimensions of the components of the liquid separator, particularly by the configuration of the drain trough, and by the fixing of suitable impact sheets, which produce turbulence and distribute the wet steam evenly over the separator elements. There is a detailed representation with drawings. (UW) [de

  1. Research on simulation of supercritical steam turbine system in large thermal power station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiongyang

    2018-04-01

    In order to improve the stability and safety of supercritical steam turbine system operation in large thermal power station, the body of the steam turbine is modeled in this paper. And in accordance with the hierarchical modeling idea, the steam turbine body model, condensing system model, deaeration system model and regenerative system model are combined to build a simulation model of steam turbine system according to the connection relationship of each subsystem of steam turbine. Finally, the correctness of the model is verified by design and operation data of the 600MW supercritical unit. The results show that the maximum simulation error of the model is 2.15%, which meets the requirements of the engineering. This research provides a platform for the research on the variable operating conditions of the turbine system, and lays a foundation for the construction of the whole plant model of the thermal power plant.

  2. Turbine steam path replacement at the Grafenrheinfeld Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weschenfelder, K.D.; Oeynhausen, H.; Bergmann, D.; Hosbein, P.; Termuehlen, H.

    1994-01-01

    In the last few years, replacement of old vintage steam turbine flow path components has been well established as a valid approach to improve thermal performance of aged turbines. In nuclear power plants, performance improvement is generally achieved only by design improvements since performance deterioration of old units is minor or nonexistent. With fossil units operating over decades loss in performance is an additional factor which can be taken into account. Such loss of performance can be caused by deposits, solid particle erosion, loss of shaft and inter-stage seal strips, etc. Improvement of performance is typically guaranteed as output increases for operation at full load. This value can be evaluated as a direct gain in unit capacity without fuel or steam supply increase. Since fuel intake does not change, the relative improvement of the net plant heat rate or efficiency is equal to the relative increase in output. The heat rate improvement is achieved not only at full load but for the entire load range. Such heat rate improvement not only moves a plant up on the load dispatch list increasing its capacity factor, but also extensive fuel savings can pay off for the investment cost of new steam path components. Another important factor is that quite often older turbine designs show a deterioration of their reliability and need costly repairs. With new flow path components an aged steam turbine starts a new useful life

  3. Review of the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant Probabilistic Risk Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattison, M.B.; Davis, P.R.; Satterwhite, D.G.; Gilmore, W.E.; Gregg, R.E.

    1989-11-01

    A review of the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant probabilistic risk Assessment was conducted with the objective of confirming the safety perspectives brought to light by the probabilistic risk assessment. The scope of the review included the entire Level I probabilistic risk assessment including external events. This is consistent with the scope of the probabilistic risk assessment. The review included an assessment of the assumptions, methods, models, and data used in the study. 47 refs., 14 figs., 15 tabs

  4. Design of large steam turbines for PWR power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobson, G.

    1984-01-01

    The authors review the thermodynamic cycle requirements for use with pressurized-water reactors, outline the way thermal efficiency is maximized, and discuss the special nature of the wet-steam cycle associated with turbines for this type of reactor. Machine and cycle parameters are optimized to achieve high thermal efficiency, particular attention being given to arrangements for water separation and steam reheating and to provisions for feedwater heating. Principles and details of mechanical design are considered for a range both of full-speed turbines running at 3000 rev/min on 50 Hz systems and of half-speed turbines running at 1800 rev/min on 60 Hz systems. The importance of service experience with nuclear wet-stream turbines, and its relevance to the design of modern turbines for PWR applications, is discussed. (author)

  5. Manufacture of the 300 MW steam generator and pressure stabilizer for Qinshan Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Yi; Miao Deming.

    1989-01-01

    A brief description of the manufacturing process of the steam generator and pressure stabilizer for 300 MWe Qinshan Nuclear Power Station in Shanghai Boiler Works is presented, with special emphasis on fabrication facilities, test procedures and technological evaluations during the manufaturing process-imcluding deep driling of tubesheets, welding of tubes to tube-sheets and tube rolling tests

  6. Electric power generating plant having direct-coupled steam and compressed-air cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drost, M.K.

    1981-01-07

    An electric power generating plant is provided with a Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system which is directly coupled to the steam cycle of the generating plant. The CAES system is charged by the steam boiler during off peak hours, and drives a separate generator during peak load hours. The steam boiler load is thereby levelized throughout an operating day.

  7. Electric power generating plant having direct coupled steam and compressed air cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drost, Monte K.

    1982-01-01

    An electric power generating plant is provided with a Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system which is directly coupled to the steam cycle of the generating plant. The CAES system is charged by the steam boiler during off peak hours, and drives a separate generator during peak load hours. The steam boiler load is thereby levelized throughout an operating day.

  8. Steam generator management at Ontario Hydro Nuclear Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickerson, J.; Maruska, C.C.

    1998-01-01

    Managing ageing steam generators involves costly decisions for the utility, both in terms of the cost of the maintenance activities and in terms of having the unit shutdown and consequent power loss while performing these activities. The benefits of these activities are seldom guaranteed and are sometimes very intangible. For nuclear utilities the most pertinent questions that arise are have we identified all the problem(s), can we predict the risk due to these problems? Can we implement corrective and preventive activities to manage the problem and what is the optimum timing of implementation? Is the money spent worthwhile, i.e. has it given us a return in production and safety? Can we avoid surprises? How can we tangibly measure success? This paper touches briefly on all the questions mentioned above but it mainly addresses the last question: 'how can we tangibly measure success?' by using several success indicators proposed by EPRI and by applying them to actual Ontario Hydro experience. The appropriateness of these success indicators as the means to assess the success of these programs, to feed back the results, and to enhance or revise the programs will be discussed. (author)

  9. Steam generator management at Ontario Hydro Nuclear Stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickerson, J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Maruska, C.C. [Ontario Hydro, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1998-07-01

    Managing ageing steam generators involves costly decisions for the utility, both in terms of the cost of the maintenance activities andin terms of having the unit shutdown and consequent power loss while performing these activities. The benefits of these activities are seldom guaranteed and are sometimes very intangible. For nuclear utilities the most pertinent questions that arise are have we identified all the problem(s), can we predict the risk due to these problems? Can we implement corrective and preventive activities to manage the problem and what is the optimum timing of implementation? Is the money spent worthwhile, i.e. has it given us a return in production and safety? Can we avoid surprises? How can we tangibly measure success? This paper touches briefly on all the questions mentioned above but it mainly addresses the last question: 'how can we tangibly measure success?' by using several success indicators proposed by EPRI and by applying them to actual Ontario Hydro experience. The appropriateness of these success indicators as the means to assess the success of these programs, to feed back the results, and to enhance or revise the programs will be discussed. (author)

  10. Examination of failed studs from No. 2 steam generator at the Maine Yankee Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czajkowski, C.

    1983-02-01

    Three studs removed from service on the primary manway cover from steam generator No. 2 of the Maine Yankee station were sent to Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for examination. The examination consisted of visual/dye penetrant examination, optical metallography and Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) evaluation. One bolt was through cracked and its fracture face was generally transgranular in nature with numerous secondary intergranular cracks. The report concludes that the environmenally assisted cracking of the stud was due to the interaction of the various lubricants used with steam leaks associated with this manway cover

  11. Aluminum-Enhanced Underwater Electrical Discharges for Steam Explosion Triggering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HOGELAND, STEVE R.; NELSON, LLOYD S.; ROTH, THOMAS CHRISTOPHER

    1999-01-01

    For a number of years, we have been initiating steam explosions of single drops of molten materials with pressure and flow (bubble growth) transients generated by discharging a capacitor bank through gold bridgewires placed underwater. Recent experimental and theoretical advances in the field of steam explosions, however, have made it important to substantially increase these relatively mild transients in water without using high explosives, if possible. To do this with the same capacitor bank, we have discharged similar energies through tiny strips of aluminum foil submerged in water. By replacing the gold wires with the aluminum strips, we were able to add the energy of the aluminum-water combustion to that normally deposited electrically by the bridgewire explosion in water. The chemical enhancement of the explosive characteristics of the discharges was substantial: when the same electrical energies were discharged through the aluminum strips, peak pressures increased as much as 12-fold and maximum bubble volumes as much as 5-fold above those generated with the gold wires. For given weights of aluminum, the magnitudes of both parameters appeared to exceed those produced by the underwater explosion of equivalent weights of high explosives

  12. CDIO – The steam engine powering the electric grid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Træholt, Chresten; Holbøll, Joachim; Thomsen, Ole Cornelius

    2011-01-01

    In building the new DTU B.Eng programme [1] one of the pilots on the 4’th semester is the Design-build project course in Electric Energy Systems. In this course, which is the last Designbuild course many of the CDIO Syllabus bullets [2] are addressed starting with problem identification and formu......In building the new DTU B.Eng programme [1] one of the pilots on the 4’th semester is the Design-build project course in Electric Energy Systems. In this course, which is the last Designbuild course many of the CDIO Syllabus bullets [2] are addressed starting with problem identification...... and formulation, experimental inquiry and modelling, finally leading to planning and solution. The goal is to acquire the skills that are needed for an engineer within electric power engineering to analyse a given task, define the necessary steps to solve the task, organize him/her self and others and finally...... solve the task with success. The concrete work is built up around a miniaturized electric energy system powered by a steam engine. The system mimics an essential sub-section of a real electric power system. The process is realised with a combination of optional lectures, optional exercises, 3 set...

  13. Design and development of steam generators for the AGR power stations at Heysham II/Torness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charcharos, A N; Jones, A G [National Nuclear Corp. Ltd., Cheshire (United Kingdom)

    1984-07-01

    The current AGR steam generator design is a development of the successful once-through units supplied for the Oldbury Magnox and Hinkley/Hunterston AGR power stations. These units have demonstrated proven control and reliability in service. In this paper the factors which have dictated the design and layout of the latest AGR steam generators are described and reference made to the latest high temperature design techniques that have been employed. Details of development work to support the design and establish the performance characteristics over the range of plant operating conditions are also given. To comply with current UK safety standards, the AGR steam generators and associated plant are designed to accommodate seismic loadings. In addition, provision is made for an independent heat removal system for post reactor trip operations. (author)

  14. Design and development of steam generators for the AGR power stations at Heysham II/Torness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charcharos, A.N.; Jones, A.G.

    1984-01-01

    The current AGR steam generator design is a development of the successful once-through units supplied for the Oldbury Magnox and Hinkley/Hunterston AGR power stations. These units have demonstrated proven control and reliability in service. In this paper the factors which have dictated the design and layout of the latest AGR steam generators are described and reference made to the latest high temperature design techniques that have been employed. Details of development work to support the design and establish the performance characteristics over the range of plant operating conditions are also given. To comply with current UK safety standards, the AGR steam generators and associated plant are designed to accommodate seismic loadings. In addition, provision is made for an independent heat removal system for post reactor trip operations. (author)

  15. 78 FR 41907 - Effluent Limitations Guidelines and Standards for the Steam Electric Power Generating Point...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-12

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 423 [EPA-HQ-OW-2009-0819. FRL-9832-7; EPA-HQ-RCRA-2013-0209] RIN 2040-AF14 Effluent Limitations Guidelines and Standards for the Steam Electric Power... proposed rule entitled, ``Effluent Limitations Guidelines and Standards for the Steam Electric Power...

  16. Chemistry, materials and related problems in steam generators of power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, P.K.

    2000-01-01

    The operational reliability and availability of power plants are considerably influenced by chemical factors. Researches all over the world indicate that several difficulties in power plants can be traced to off-normal or abnormal water chemistry conditions. Whatever the source of energy, be it fossil fuel or nuclear fuel, the ultimate aim is steam generation to drive a turbine. It is, therefore, natural that problems of water chemistry and material compatibility are similar in thermal and nuclear power stations. The present paper discusses various types of problems in the form of corrosion damages, taking place in the boiler-turbine cycles and describes different types of boiler feed water/boiler water treatments that have been in use both in nuclear and thermal power stations. Current positions in relation to requirements of boiler feed water, boiler water and steam quality have been described

  17. Studies and solutions of steam turbines for nuclear heating power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drahy, J.

    1979-01-01

    The possibilities of combined generation of heat and electric power and special features of the corresponding equipment for WWER type reactors are considered. Condensing steam turbines with bled steam points and the constructional solution of bled points are presented for heating the network water to 110 0 C, 120 0 C, and 160 0 C, respectively. The dimensions of the low pressure final stage of the turbine are given. Problems concerning condensing and bleeding turbines and combination types of back-pressure and condensing turbines as well as solutions to the design of 250 MW and 500 MW turbines are discussed

  18. The Japanese and Italian power station markets: prospects for steam coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, S D

    1989-02-01

    The world market for steam coal seems likely to fall far short of the expectations of 1980. Two markets which appeared to offer considerable scope for expansion, the Italian and Japanese power station markets, are examined and the factors behind their disappointing performance analysed. The reasons behind the lack of investments in new power stations differ. Difficulties in obtaining sites and financial problems are most important in Italy, whilst environmental restrictions and the attractions of competing technologies dominate in Japan. It is concluded that these factors will not weaken significantly in the next decade and coal's prospects in these two markets are correspondingly restricted. 20 refs., 20 tabs.

  19. Steam Pressure-Reducing Station Safety and Energy Efficiency Improvement Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lower, Mark D [ORNL; Christopher, Timothy W [ORNL; Oland, C Barry [ORNL

    2011-06-01

    The Facilities and Operations (F&O) Directorate is sponsoring a continuous process improvement (CPI) program. Its purpose is to stimulate, promote, and sustain a culture of improvement throughout all levels of the organization. The CPI program ensures that a scientific and repeatable process exists for improving the delivery of F&O products and services in support of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Management Systems. Strategic objectives of the CPI program include achieving excellence in laboratory operations in the areas of safety, health, and the environment. Identifying and promoting opportunities for achieving the following critical outcomes are important business goals of the CPI program: improved safety performance; process focused on consumer needs; modern and secure campus; flexibility to respond to changing laboratory needs; bench strength for the future; and elimination of legacy issues. The Steam Pressure-Reducing Station (SPRS) Safety and Energy Efficiency Improvement Project, which is under the CPI program, focuses on maintaining and upgrading SPRSs that are part of the ORNL steam distribution network. This steam pipe network transports steam produced at the ORNL steam plant to many buildings in the main campus site. The SPRS Safety and Energy Efficiency Improvement Project promotes excellence in laboratory operations by (1) improving personnel safety, (2) decreasing fuel consumption through improved steam system energy efficiency, and (3) achieving compliance with applicable worker health and safety requirements. The SPRS Safety and Energy Efficiency Improvement Project being performed by F&O is helping ORNL improve both energy efficiency and worker safety by modifying, maintaining, and repairing SPRSs. Since work began in 2006, numerous energy-wasting steam leaks have been eliminated, heat losses from uninsulated steam pipe surfaces have been reduced, and deficient pressure retaining components have been replaced. These improvements helped ORNL

  20. Analysis of steam generator tube sections removed from Gentilly-2 nuclear generating station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semmler, J.; Lockley, A.J.; Doyon, D.

    2010-01-01

    deposition rate in the steam generators from 2001 to 2009 were estimated and compared to the estimated values from 1983 (station commissioning) to 2001. This paper presents a summary of steam generator tube characterization results and describes how the data on the oxide deposition rate were correlated to the changes in station operating practices. These data demonstrate the benefits that resulted from recent changes to station chemistry and operational practices. (author)

  1. Manufacture of steam generator units and components for the AGR power stations at Heysham II and Torness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glasgow, J R; Parkin, K [N.E.I. Nuclear Systems Ltd., Gateshead, Tyne and Wear (United Kingdom)

    1984-07-01

    The current AGR Steam Generator is a development of the successful once-through units supplied for the Oldbury Magnox and Hinkley B/Hunterston B AGR power stations. In this paper a brief outline of the evolution of the steam generator design from the earlier gas cooled reactor stations is presented. A description of the main items of fabrication development is given. The production facilities for the manufacture of the units are described. Reference is also made to some of the work on associated components. The early experience on the construction site of installation of the steam generators is briefly outlined. (author)

  2. Manufacture of steam generator units and components for the AGR power stations at Heysham II and Torness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasgow, J.R.; Parkin, K.

    1984-01-01

    The current AGR Steam Generator is a development of the successful once-through units supplied for the Oldbury Magnox and Hinkley B/Hunterston B AGR power stations. In this paper a brief outline of the evolution of the steam generator design from the earlier gas cooled reactor stations is presented. A description of the main items of fabrication development is given. The production facilities for the manufacture of the units are described. Reference is also made to some of the work on associated components. The early experience on the construction site of installation of the steam generators is briefly outlined. (author)

  3. Electricity Generation Through the Koeberg Nuclear Power Station of Eskom in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dladla, G.; Joubert, J.

    2015-01-01

    The poster provides information on the process of nuclear energy generation in a nuclear power plant in order to produce electricity. Nuclear energy currently provides approximately 11% of the world’s electricity needs, with Koeberg Nuclear Power Station situated in the Western Cape providing 4.4% of South Africa’s electricity needs. As Africa’s first nuclear power station, Koeberg has an installed capacity of 1910 MW of power. Koeberg’ s total net output is 1860 MW. While there are significant differences, there are many similarities between nuclear power plants and other electrical generating facilities. Uranium is used for fuel in nuclear power plants to make electricity. With the exception of solar, wind, and hydroelectric plants, all others including nuclear plants convert water to steam that spins the propeller-like blades of a turbine that spins the shaft of a generator. Inside the generator coils of wire and magnetic fields interact to create electricity. The energy needed to boil water into steam is produced in one of two ways: by burning coal, oil, or gas (fossil fuels) in a furnace or by splitting certain atoms of uranium in a nuclear energy plant. The uranium fuel generates heat through a controlled fission process fission, which is described in this poster presentation. The Koeberg Nuclear Power Station is a Pressurised water reactor (PWR). The operating method and the components of the Koeberg Power Station are also described. The nuclear waste generated at a nuclear power station is described under three headings— low-level waste, intermediate-level waste and used or spent fuel, which can be solid, liquid or gaseous. (author)

  4. Summary of erosion-corrosion observations made in power stations on damp-steam circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacaille, L.

    1981-01-01

    The development of the light-water system has profoundly modified the operating conditions of the turbines, in which expansion now takes place from the first saturated-steam stages. In addition to the traditional phenomena of mechanical erosion there are now problems of a chemical nature, linked to the temperatures of the liquid phase, which cause destruction in the HP stages of the turbines, the drier-feed heaters, and the linking piping. Systematic observations have been made in the PWR stations at Chooz, Doel, Tihange, Fessenheim, and Le Bugey, followed by trials of materials, improvements in the flow, chemical treatment of the secondary circuit, and reduction of the liquid phase in the steam emerging from the HP turbine [fr

  5. Power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cawte, H.; Philpott, E.F.

    1980-01-01

    The object is to provide a method of operating a dual purpose power station so that the steam supply system is operated at a high load factor. The available steam not required for electricity generation is used to provide process heat and the new feature is that the process plant capacity is determined to make the most economic use of the steam supply system, and not to match the passout capacity of the turbine of the turbogenerator. The product of the process plant should, therefore, be capable of being stored. A dual-purpose power station with a nuclear-powered steam source, turbogenerating means connected to the steam source and steam-powered process plant susceptible to wide variation in its rate of operation is described. (U.K.)

  6. Dancing with STEAM: Creative Movement Generates Electricity for Young Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson Steele, Jamie; Fulton, Lori; Fanning, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    The integration of science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics (STEAM) serves to develop creative thinking and twenty-first-century skills in the classroom (Maeda 2012). Learning through STEAM promotes novelty, innovation, ingenuity, and task-specific purposefulness to solve real-world problems--all aspects that define creativity. Lisa…

  7. Duke Power Company - McGuire Nuclear Station: steam-generator hideout return and cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    McGuire Nuclear Station steam generator hideout return and cleanup are discussed. Hideout return data are presented for Unit 1 shutdowns that occurred on November 23, 1984, and April 19, 1985, and a Unit 2 shutdown on January 25, 1985. The data are presented as the concentrations of various species as a function of time after power reduction and primary water temperature. The steam generator blowdown as a function of time after power reduction is also presented. The concentrations of sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, aluminum, iron, and copper cations, and chloride, fluoride, sulfate, phosphate and nitrite anions were monitored during the each shutdown. Silica was also measured in the two 1985 shutdowns. The return of sulfate, phosphate, calcium and magnesium showed retrograde solubility. Silica concentrations showed an increase as the temperature decreased to about 450 to 500 0 F and then they decreased as the temperature decreased. McGuire has a holf point at 300 at 350 0 F to clean up the steam generator secondary water. The return of sulfates should occur within 4 to 6 hours. The blowdown is maximized to reduce the secondary water impurity concentrations. Cleanup continues until the sulfate concentration is reduced to below 100 ppb. At that point cooldown is continued

  8. Application of a steam injector for passive emergency core cooling during a station blackout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinze, D.; Behnke, L.; Schulenberg, T.

    2012-01-01

    One of the basic protection targets of reactor safety is the safe heat removal during normal operation but also following shut-down. Since the reactor accident in Fukushima an optimization of the plant robustness in case of beyond-design accident is performed. Special attention is given to the increase of time available for starting appropriate measures for emergency core cooling in case of a station blackout. The state-of the art in engineering and research is presented. Investigations on the applicability of a steam injector for passive emergency core cooling during a station blackout in BWR-type reactors have progressed, experiments on dynamic behavior of the injector are described. A precise design with respect to the thermal hydraulic boundary conditions has been performed.

  9. Evaluation of steam generator U-tube integrity during PWR station blackout with secondary system depressurization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidaka, Akihide; Asaka, Hideaki; Sugimoto, Jun; Ueno, Shingo; Yoshino, Takehito

    1999-12-01

    In PWR severe accidents such as station blackout, the integrity of steam generator U-tube would be threatened early at the transient among the pipes of primary system. This is due to the hot leg countercurrent natural circulation (CCNC) flow which delivers the decay heat of the core to the structures of primary system if the core temperature increases after the secondary system depressurization. From a view point of accident mitigation, this steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) is not preferable because it results in the direct release of primary coolant including fission products (FP) to the environment. Recent SCDAP/RELAP5 analyses by USNRC showed that the creep failure of pressurizer surge line which results in release of the coolant into containment would occur earlier than SGTR during the secondary system depressurization. However, the analyses did not consider the decay heat from deposited FP on the steam generator U-tube surface. In order to investigate the effect of decay heat on the steam generator U-tube integrity, the hot leg CCNC flow model used in the USNRC's calculation was, at first, validated through the analysis for JAERI's LSTF experiment. The CCNC model reproduced well the thermohydraulics observed in the LSTF experiment and thus the model is mostly reliable. An analytical study was then performed with SCDAP/RELAP5 for TMLB' sequence of Surry plant with and without secondary system depressurization. The decay heat from deposited FP was calculated by JAERI's FP aerosol behavior analysis code, ART. The ART analysis showed that relatively large amount of FPs may deposit on steam generator U-tube inlet mainly by thermophoresis. The SCDAP/RELAP5 analyses considering the FP decay heat predicted small safety margin for steam generator U-tube integrity during secondary system depressurization. Considering associated uncertainties in the analyses, the potential for SGTR cannot be ignored. Accordingly, this should be considered in the evaluation of merits

  10. Electric machinery and drives in thermal power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    The following subjects were dealt with during the VDE meeting: 1) Requirements made by the electric network on the generators and their excitation equipment, and the influence thereof on their design; 2) requirements made by the power station process on the electric drives and the influence thereof on type and design; 3) requirements made on protective measures from the point of the electric power station machinery. (TK) [de

  11. Dynamic underground stripping: steam and electric heating for in situ decontamination of soils and groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daily, William D.; Ramirez, Abelardo L.; Newmark, Robin L.; Udell, Kent; Buetnner, Harley M.; Aines, Roger D.

    1995-01-01

    A dynamic underground stripping process removes localized underground volatile organic compounds from heterogeneous soils and rock in a relatively short time. This method uses steam injection and electrical resistance heating to heat the contaminated underground area to increase the vapor pressure of the contaminants, thus speeding the process of contaminant removal and making the removal more complete. The injected steam passes through the more permeable sediments, distilling the organic contaminants, which are pumped to the surface. Large electrical currents are also applied to the contaminated area, which heat the impermeable subsurface layers that the steam has not penetrated. The condensed and vaporized contaminants are withdrawn by liquid pumping and vacuum extraction. The steam injection and electrical heating steps are repeated as necessary. Geophysical imaging methods can be used to map the boundary between the hot, dry, contamination-free underground zone and the cool, damp surrounding areas to help monitor the dynamic stripping process.

  12. Electric Vehicle Charging Stations as a Climate Change Mitigation Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cave, Bridget; DeYoung, Russell J.

    2014-01-01

    In order to facilitate the use of electric vehicles at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), charging stations should be made available to LaRC employees. The implementation of charging stations would decrease the need for gasoline thus decreasing CO2 emissions improving local air quality and providing a cost savings for LaRC employees. A charging station pilot program is described that would install stations as the need increased and also presents a business model that pays for the electricity used and installation at no cost to the government.

  13. A process for superheating steam in a nuclear power station circuit and device for putting in operation this process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteil, Marcel; Forestier, Jean; Leblanc, Bernard; Monteil, Pierre

    1975-01-01

    A process is described for superheating steam in a nuclear power station circuit, comprising a turbine with a high pressure chamber and a low pressure chamber. It consists in superheating the steam between the high and low pressure chambers of the turbine by using as heating fluid water under pressure at vaporisation temperature, directly taken from the recirculation or circulation flow water of the reactor or of the steam generators. The process is adapted to a pressurised water reactor using a once-through steam generator comprising in succession an economiser, a vaporiser and a superheater, the superheating water being taken at the vaporiser intake. It is also adapted for a boiling water reactor, in that the water is taken directly from the reactor vessel and at a suitable level in the recirculation water [fr

  14. Postfact phenomena of the wet-steam flow electrization in turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarelin, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    Physical processes occurring in a turbine with natural electrization of a humidity-steam flow and their effect on efficiency and reliability of the turbine operation has been considered. Causes of the electrical potential occurrence on a rotor shaft are analyzed. The wet steam's electrization exposure on the electrical potential that is one of the major factors of bearings' electroerosion has been demonstrated on the full-scale installation. Hydrogen formation in wheelspace of the turbine as a result of electrochemical processes and electric field exposure of the space charge has been considered. Hydrogen concentration dependence on a volume charge density in the steam flow has been determined. It is stated that the processes occurring behind the final stage of wet-steam turbines are similar to the ones in elaerosol ectrostatic generators. It has been demonstrated that this phenomenon causes the flow's temporal inhibition and starts pulsations. These factors' impact on power loss of the turbine has been evaluated and recommendations for their elimination have been offered. It has been determined that motions of charged drops can cause self-maintained discharges inside of the flow and between the flow and grounded surfaces that are accompanied by electromagnetic radiation of the wide spectrum. The integrated studies have shown that physical phenomena occurring due to natural electrization negatively affect efficiency and reliability of the turbine operation. Practical recommendations allowing one to minimize the negative effects of the flow natural electrization process have been offered.

  15. Composite electric generator equipped with steam generator for heating reactor coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watabe, Masaharu; Soman, Yoshindo; Kawanishi, Kohei; Ota, Masato.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention concerns a composite electric generator having coolants, as a heating source, of a PWR type reactor or a thermonuclear reactor. An electric generator driving gas turbine is disposed, and a superheater using a high temperature exhaust gas of the gas turbine as a heating source is disposed, and main steams are superheated by the superheater to elevate the temperature at the inlet of the turbine. This can increase the electric generation capacity as well as increase the electric generation efficiency. In addition, since the humidity in the vicinity of the exit of the steam turbine is reduced, occurrence of loss and erosion can be suppressed. When cooling water of the thermonuclear reactor is used, the electric power generated by the electric generator driven by the gas turbine can be used upon start of the thermonuclear reactor, and it is not necessary to dispose a large scaled special power source in the vicinity, which is efficient. (N.H.)

  16. Ecotaxes and their impact in the cost of steam and electric energy generated by a steam turbine system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montero, Gisela

    2006-01-01

    Ecotaxes allow the internalization of costs that are considered externalities associated with polluting industrial process emissions to the atmosphere. In this paper, ecotaxes internalize polluting emissions negative impacts that are added to electricity and steam generated costs of a steam turbine and heat recovery systems from a utilities refinery plant. Steam costs were calculated by means of an exergy analysis tool and Aspen Plus simulation models. Ecotaxes were calculated for specific substances emitted in the refinery flue gases, based on a toxicity and pollution scale. Ecotaxes were generated from a model that includes damages produced to biotic and abiotic resources and considers the relative position of those substances in a toxicity and pollution scale. These ecotaxes were internalized by an exergoeconomic analysis resulting in an increase in the cost per kWh produced. This kind of ecotax is not applied in Mexico. The values of ecotaxes used in the cost determination are referred to the values currently applied by some European countries to nitrogen oxides emissions. (author)

  17. Steam turbines of large output especially for nuclear power stations. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drahny, J.; Stasny, M.

    1986-01-01

    At the international conference, 53 papers were presented in 3 sessions dealing with the design of large output steam turbines, with problems of flow in steam turbines, and with the reliability and service life of steam turbines. Part 1 of the conference proceedings contains two introductory papers, one reviewing the 100 years history of steam turbines (not included in INIS), the other giving an overview of the development of steam turbines in the eighties; and the 13 papers heard in the session on steam turbine design, all inputted in INIS. (A.K.)

  18. Resilient design of recharging station networks for electric transportation vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kris Villez; Akshya Gupta; Venkat Venkatasubramanian

    2011-08-01

    As societies shift to 'greener' means of transportation using electricity-driven vehicles one critical challenge we face is the creation of a robust and resilient infrastructure of recharging stations. A particular issue here is the optimal location of service stations. In this work, we consider the placement of battery replacing service station in a city network for which the normal traffic flow is known. For such known traffic flow, the service stations are placed such that the expected performance is maximized without changing the traffic flow. This is done for different scenarios in which roads, road junctions and service stations can fail with a given probability. To account for such failure probabilities, the previously developed facility interception model is extended. Results show that service station failures have a minimal impact on the performance following robust placement while road and road junction failures have larger impacts which are not mitigated easily by robust placement.

  19. Technical and economic studies of small reactors for supply of electricity and steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiewak, I.; Klepper, O.H.; Fuller, L.C.

    1977-02-01

    Several years ago conventional opinion held that nuclear power plants must be very large to be competitive with fossil fuels. This situation has changed markedly in most countries within recent years, as oil and gas supplies have become more scarce and costly. Studies have been carried out for several nuclear steam supply systems in the small and intermediate size range. Detail studies are reported of the Consolidated Nuclear Steam Generator (CNSG), a 365 MW(th) pressurized water reactor being developed by Babcock and Wilcox, as applied to industrial energy needs. Both conventional and barge-mounted nuclear steam supply systems are considered. Conceptual studies have been started of pressurized and boiling water reactors in the range of 1000 MW(th), which are envisioned for utility operation for supply of electric power and steam. Design studies of a 500 MW(th) high temperature reactor are also reported. The small reactors are expected to have higher unit costs than the large commercial plants, but to have compensating advantages in higher plant availability, shorter construction schedule, and greater siting flexibility. Studies are also reported of power cycle parameters and cost allocations for extraction of steam from steam turbine plants. This steam could be used for industrial energy, district heating, or desalination

  20. Technical and economic studies of small reactors for supply of electricity and steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiewak, I.; Klepper, O.H.; Fuller, L.C.

    1977-01-01

    Several years ago conventional opinion held that nuclear power plants must be very large to be competitive with fossil fuels. This situation has changed markedly in most countries within recent years, as oil and gas supplies have become more scarce and costly. Studies have been carried out of several nuclear steam supply systems in the small and intermediate size range. Detail studies are reported of the Consolidated Nuclear Steam Generator (CNSG), a 313 MW(t) pressurized water reactor being developed by Babcock and Wilcox, as applied to industrial energy needs. Both conventional and barge-mounted nuclear steam supply systems are considered. Conceptual studies have been started of pressurized and boiling water reactors in the range of 1000 MW(t), which are envisioned for utility operation for supply of electric power and steam. Design studies of a 500 MW(t) high temperature reactor are also reported. The small reactors are expected to have higher unit costs than the large commercial plants, but to have compensating advantages in higher plant availability, shorter construction schedule and greater siting flexibility. Studies are also reported of power cycle parameters and cost allocations for extraction of steam from steam turbine plants. This steam could be used for industrial energy, district heating or desalination

  1. Technical and economic studies of small reactors for supply of electricity and steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiewak, I.; Klepper, O.H.; Fuller, L.C.

    1977-01-01

    Several years ago conventional opinion held that nuclear power plants must be very large to be competitive with fossil fuels. This situation has changed markedly in most countries within recent years, as oil and gas supplies have become more scarce and costly. Studies have been carried out of several nuclear steam supply systems in the small and intermediate size range. Detail studies are reported of the Consolidated Nuclear Steam Generator (CNSG), a 313MW(th) pressurized water reactor being developed by Babcock and Wilcox, as applied to industrial energy needs. Both conventional and barge-mounted nuclear steam supply systems are considered. Conceptual studies have been started of pressurized and boiling water reactors in the range of 1000MW(th), which are envisioned for utility operation for supply of electric power and steam. Design studies of a 500MW(th) high temperature reactor are also reported. The small reactors are expected to have higher unit costs than the large commercial plants, but to have compensating advantages in higher plant availability, shorter construction schedule and greater siting flexibility. Studies are also reported of power cycle parameters and cost allocations for extraction of steam from steam turbine plants. This steam could be used for industrial energy, district heating or desalination. (author)

  2. Design and performance of General Electric boiling water reactor main steam line isolation valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockwell, D.A.; van Zylstra, E.H.

    1976-08-01

    An extensive test program has been completed by the General Electric Company in cooperation with the Commonwealth Edison Company on the basic design type of large main steam line isolation valves used on General Electric Boiling Water Reactors. Based on a total of 40 tests under simulated accident conditions covering a wide range of mass flows, mixture qualities, and closing times, it was concluded that the commercially available valves of this basic type will close completely and reliably as required. Analytical methods to predict transient effects in the steam line and valve after postulated breaks were refined and confirmed by the test program

  3. Procedure for estimating nonfuel operation and maintenance costs for large steam-electric power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, M.L.; Fuller, L.C.

    1979-01-01

    Revised guidelines are presented for estimating annual nonfuel operation and maintenance costs for large steam-electric power plants, specifically light-water-reactor plants and coal-fired plants. Previous guidelines were published in October 1975 in ERDA 76-37, a Procedure for Estimating Nonfuel Operating and Maintenance Costs for Large Steam-Electric Power Plants. Estimates for coal-fired plants include the option of limestone slurry scrubbing for flue gas desulfurization. A computer program, OMCOST, is also presented which covers all plant options

  4. Development of the APR1400 model for countercurrent natural circulation in hot leg and steam generator under station blackout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Gil; Kim, Han Chul

    2012-01-01

    In order to analyze severe accident phenomena, Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) made a MELCOR model for APR1400 to examine natural circulation and creep rupture failure in the Reactor Coolant System (RCS) under station blackout (SBO). In this study, we are trying to advance the former model to describe natural circulation more accurately. After Fukushima accident, the concerns of severe accident management, assuring the heat removal capability, has risen for the case when the SBO is happened and there are no more electric powers to cool down decay heat. Under SBO there are three kinds of natural circulation which can delay the core heatup. One is in vessel natural circulation in the upper plenum of reactor vessel and the second is countercurrent natural circulation in hot leg through steam generator tubes and the last is full loop natural circulation when the reactor coolant pump loop seal is cleared and reactor coolant pump sealing is damaged by high temperature and high pressure. Among them this study focuses on the countercurrent natural circulation model using MELCOR1.8.6

  5. Surry Power Station secondary water chemistry improvement since steam generator replacement and the unit two feedwater pipe rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swindell, E.T.

    1988-01-01

    Surry Power Station has two Westinghouse-designed three-loop PWRs of 811 MWe design rating. The start of commercial operation was in July, 1972 in No.1 plant, and May, 1973 in No.2 plant. Both plants began the operation using controlled phosphate chemistry for the steam generators. In 1975, both plants were converted to all volatile treatment on the secondary side due to the tube wall thinning corrosion in the steam generators, which was associated with the phosphate sludge that was building up on the tube sheets and created acidic condition. Thereafter, condenser and air leakage and steam generator denting occurred, and after the operation of 8 years 2 month of No.1 plant and 5 years 9 months of No.2 plant, the steam generators were replaced. A major plant improvement program was designed and implemented from 1979 to 1980. The improvement in new steam generators, the modification for preventing corrosion, the addition of a steam generator blowdown recovery system, the reconstruction of condensers, the installation of full flow, deep bed condensate polishers, the addition of Dionex 8,000 on-line ion chromatograph, a long term maintenance agreement with Westinghouse and so on are reported. (Kako, I.)

  6. 75 FR 82414 - Carolina Power & Light Company; H. B. Robinson Steam Electric Plant, Unit No. 2; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-30

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 50-261; NRC-2010-0062] Carolina Power & Light Company; H. B. Robinson Steam Electric Plant, Unit No. 2; Exemption 1.0 Background Carolina Power & Light... authorizes operation of the H.B. Robinson Steam Electric Plant, Unit 2 (HBRSEP). The license provides, among...

  7. 75 FR 11579 - Carolina Power & Light Company H. B. Robinson Steam Electric Plant, Unit No. 2; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-11

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 50-261; NRC-2010-0062] Carolina Power & Light Company H. B. Robinson Steam Electric Plant, Unit No. 2; Exemption 1.0 Background Carolina Power & Light... of the H. B. Robinson Steam Electric Plant, Unit 2 (HBRSEP). The license provides, among other things...

  8. Integrated gasification and Cu-Cl cycle for trigeneration of hydrogen, steam and electricity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghahosseini, S; Dincer, I; Naterer, G F [University of Ontario, Oshawa, ON (Canada). Institute of Technology

    2011-02-15

    This paper develops and analyzes an integrated process model of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and a thermochemical copper-chlorine (Cu-Cl) cycle for trigeneration of hydrogen, steam and electricity. The process model is developed with Aspen HYSYS software. By using oxygen instead of air for the gasification process, where oxygen is provided by the integrated Cu-Cl cycle, it is found that the hydrogen content of produced syngas increases by about 20%, due to improvement of the gasification combustion efficiency and reduction of syngas NOx emissions. Moreover, about 60% of external heat required for the integrated Cu-Cl cycle can be provided by the IGCC plant, with minor modifications of the steam cycle, and a slight decrease of IGCC overall efficiency. Integration of gasification and thermochemical hydrogen production can provide significant improvements in the overall hydrogen, steam and electricity output, when compared against the processes each operating separately and independently of each other.

  9. The expected environmental consequences and hazards of laser-fusion electric generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devaney, J.J.; Pendergrass, J.H.

    The operation of an expected early form of a laser-fusion electric power plant is described and the hazards and the environmental effects of such a station are estimated. Possible environmental impacts and hazards to mankind can occur from nuclear excursions or explosions, nuclear weapon proliferation, loss of coolant accident (LOCA), tritium releases, chemical fires and accompanying releases of radioactivity or chemicals, induced radioactivity releases (other than tritium), radioactive waste disposal, lasers, normal electrical generation and steam plant effects, external intrusions, natural disasters, land use, resource and transportation use, thermal pollution, and air and water pollution. We find the principle environmental effects to be those of a medium size chemical plant. Electric, magnetic, steam, and radioactive hazards are of a lower order. Indeed in the event of extraordinary success in getting high temperatures and densities so that more difficult nuclear species can be reacted, such as protons with boron-11, there will be no radioactivity at all and also enormously lower hazardous chemical inventories. In our plant designs, for any fusion fuels, nuclear explosions (or even excursions beyond design limits) are not possible. (author)

  10. Reducing lighting electricity use in underground metro stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casals, Miquel; Gangolells, Marta; Forcada, Núria; Macarulla, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Lighting systems are big energy consumers in underground metro stations. • An adaptive lighting system strategy is developed for underground stations. • Dimming controls are based on station occupancy levels and maintenance cycles. • The k-means clustering technique is used to identify stations’ occupancy patterns. • Savings were found to amount to 255.47 MW h in 2 years for a case study metro network. - Abstract: Lighting systems are usually one of the largest electrical end-uses in underground metro stations. Taking into account that budget restrictions in publicly owned companies hinder energy efficiency retrofit projects that require high initial investments, affordable energy saving strategies are needed. This paper presents a low-cost approach for reducing lighting electricity use in underground stations, without affecting passengers’ comfort or the metro operator’s service. For this purpose, an adaptive lighting strategy of dimming the illuminance levels of artificial light sources has been developed. Dimming controls are based on the occupancy of the station, and the preventive maintenance and cleaning cycles of the luminaires. The stations’ monthly occupancy patterns are defined through the k-means clustering technique. To illustrate its effectiveness, the method was applied to 115 underground stations of the Barcelona metro network. The results revealed overall electricity savings of 255.47 MW h on a biannual basis, which represents 36.22% of the stations’ baseline lighting consumption. Individual energy savings were found to range from 25 to 87.5 MW h/year in the stations of the Barcelona metro network, depending on the number and profile of station users. The research findings will undoubtedly be useful for the future energy efficiency project plans of worldwide metro operators and managers of other underground spaces.

  11. Evolutionary growth for Space Station Freedom electrical power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Matthew Fisk; Mclallin, Kerry; Zernic, Mike

    1989-01-01

    Over an operational lifetime of at least 30 yr, Space Station Freedom will encounter increased Space Station user requirements and advancing technologies. The Space Station electrical power system is designed with the flexibility to accommodate these emerging technologies and expert systems and is being designed with the necessary software hooks and hardware scars to accommodate increased growth demand. The electrical power system is planned to grow from the initial 75 kW up to 300 kW. The Phase 1 station will utilize photovoltaic arrays to produce the electrical power; however, for growth to 300 kW, solar dynamic power modules will be utilized. Pairs of 25 kW solar dynamic power modules will be added to the station to reach the power growth level. The addition of solar dynamic power in the growth phase places constraints in the initial Space Station systems such as guidance, navigation, and control, external thermal, truss structural stiffness, computational capabilities and storage, which must be planned-in, in order to facilitate the addition of the solar dynamic modules.

  12. Electric vehicle station equipment for grid-integrated vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempton, Willett; Kiamilev, Fouad; McGee, Rodney; Waite, Nick

    2017-09-05

    Methods, systems, and apparatus transferring power between the grid and an electric vehicle are disclosed. The apparatus may include at least one vehicle communication port for interfacing with electric vehicle equipment (EVE) and a processor coupled to the at least one vehicle communication port to establish communication with the EVE, receive EVE attributes from the EVE, and transmit electric vehicle station equipment (EVSE) attributes to the EVE. Power may be transferred between the grid and the electric vehicle by maintaining EVSE attributes, establishing communication with the EVE, and transmitting the EVSE maintained attributes to the EVE.

  13. Electrical power systems for Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, W. E.

    1984-01-01

    Major challenges in power system development are described. Evolutionary growth, operational lifetime, and other design requirements are discussed. A pictorial view of weight-optimized power system applications shows which systems are best for missions of various lengths and required power level. Following definition of the major elements of the electrical power system, an overview of element options and a brief technology assessment are presented. Selected trade-study results show end-to-end system efficiencies, required photovoltaic power capability as a function of energy storage system efficiency, and comparisons with other systems such as a solar dynamic power system.

  14. Synergetic mechanism of methanol–steam reforming reaction in a catalytic reactor with electric discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taegyu; Jo, Sungkwon; Song, Young-Hoon; Lee, Dae Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Methanol–steam reforming was performed on Cu catalysts under an electric discharge. • Discharge had a synergetic effect on the catalytic reaction for methanol conversion. • Discharge lowered the temperature for catalyst activation or light off. • Discharge controlled the yield and selectivity of species in a reforming process. • Adsorption triggered by a discharge was a possible mechanism for a synergetic effect. - Abstract: Methanol–steam reforming was performed on Cu/ZnO/Al 2 O 3 catalysts under an electric discharge. The discharge occurred between the electrodes where the catalysts were packed. The electric discharge was characterized by the discharge voltage and electric power to generate the discharge. The existence of a discharge had a synergetic effect on the catalytic reaction for methanol conversion. The electric discharge provided modified reaction paths resulting in a lower temperature for catalyst activation or light off. The discharge partially controlled the yield and selectivity of species in a reforming process. The aspect of control was examined in view of the reaction kinetics. The possible mechanisms for the synergetic effect between the catalytic reaction and electric discharge on methanol–steam reforming were addressed. A discrete reaction path, particularly adsorption triggered by an electric discharge, was suggested to be the most likely mechanism for the synergetic effect. These results are expected to provide a guide for understanding the plasma–catalyst hybrid reaction

  15. Impact of Electric Vehicle Charging Station Load on Distribution Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchari Deb

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent concerns about environmental pollution and escalating energy consumption accompanied by the advancements in battery technology have initiated the electrification of the transportation sector. With the universal resurgence of Electric Vehicles (EVs the adverse impact of the EV charging loads on the operating parameters of the power system has been noticed. The detrimental impact of EV charging station loads on the electricity distribution network cannot be neglected. The high charging loads of the fast charging stations results in increased peak load demand, reduced reserve margins, voltage instability, and reliability problems. Further, the penalty paid by the utility for the degrading performance of the power system cannot be neglected. This work aims to investigate the impact of the EV charging station loads on the voltage stability, power losses, reliability indices, as well as economic losses of the distribution network. The entire analysis is performed on the IEEE 33 bus test system representing a standard radial distribution network for six different cases of EV charging station placement. It is observed that the system can withstand placement of fast charging stations at the strong buses up to a certain level, but the placement of fast charging stations at the weak buses of the system hampers the smooth operation of the power system. Further, a strategy for the placement of the EV charging stations on the distribution network is proposed based on a novel Voltage stability, Reliability, and Power loss (VRP index. The results obtained indicate the efficacy of the VRP index.

  16. 75 FR 8753 - Carolina Power & Light Company, Brunswick Steam Electric Plant, Units 1 and 2; Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ... Dusenbury of the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources regarding the environmental... & Light Company, Brunswick Steam Electric Plant, Units 1 and 2; Environmental Assessment and Finding of No... identification of licensing and regulatory actions requiring environmental assessments,'' the NRC prepared an...

  17. Environmental qualification test of electrical penetration for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kooziro, Tetsuya; Nakagawa, Akitoshi; Toyoda, Shigeru; Uno, Shunpei

    1979-01-01

    Environmental qualification test was conducted according to IEEE Std. 323-1974 in order to evaluate the safety and reliability of electrical penetration of PWR type nuclear power station. Electrical penetration is the assemblies of electric cables attached to the containment vessel and penetrate through the vessel. Since it is a part of the vessel, it is deemed to be one of the primary safety equipments that are important for the safety and reliability of nuclear power stations. Environmental tests were conducted continuously as to heat cycle, vibration and LOCA with the full size specimens of bushing type, pigtail type and triaxial cable type and at the same time thermal life and irradiation tests were conducted on the insulation materials used, in order to obtain the comprehensive evaluation of their electrical and mechanical characteristics. As the result, they all satisfied the requirements for the circuits for actual use during and after various environmental qualification tests according to IEEE Std. 323. (author)

  18. Utilization of waste heat from electricity generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.F.S.

    1977-06-01

    Historically the nuclear power station has been designed solely as an electricity producer. But in Canada today only 15 percent of our energy consumption is as electricity. The non-electrical needs today are supplied almost entirely by natural gas and oil. There is an incentive to see whether a nuclear station could supply energy for some of these non-electrical needs, thus freeing gas and oil for uses for which they may be more valuable and suitable, especially in transportation. A group located at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment undertook a series of studies to examine this problem. These studies were done in sufficient depth to provide technological and economic answers, and as a result several reports have been published on various topics. In this report, the findings from these studies are drawn together in an assessment of the potential in Canada for using waste heat. (author)

  19. ANALYSIS OF SOLAR POWER STATION SCHEMES ON PHOTOELECTRIC MODULES FOR ELECTRIC CARS CHARGING STATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hnatov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of existing schemes for building solar power stations on photoelectric modules with the revealing of their operation principles and functionality has been conducted. The specified technical characteristics of each of the analyzed schemes are given. The structural scheme of the solar charging station for electric cars with determining its functional capabilities and operation features is proposed. The practical application of this scheme will help to reduce the dependence on the general electric power supply network and will create conditions for its total rejection.

  20. Investigations of the gas-side heat transfer and flow characteristics of steam generators in AGR stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lis, J [Central Electricity Research Laboratories, Leatherhead, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    1984-07-01

    This paper describes the experimental and analytical investigations of the gas-side heat transfer and flow characteristics of steam generators in the AGR stations carried out by CERL. The majority of the experimental work on heat transfer and flow characteristics of close-packed tube arrangements in cross-flow of gases is carried out in a pressurised heat exchanger rig. The rig is operated on-line by a dedicated PDP 11/40 computer over the range of Reynolds number 10{sup 4} to 3x10{sup 5}. Atmospheric wind tunnels employing either small or large scale models of the specific sections of steam generators are used for a variety of supplementary and development studies. Various measurements techniques and, in particular, LDA and hot wire anemometry employed in these studies are described. The more important aspects of various investigations are illustrated by typical results. In order to ensure the efficient operation and integrity of steam generators under asymmetric boundary conditions a MIX suite of 2-dimensional codes has been developed. The codes calculate the gas and water/steam flow and temperature distributions in each channel of the steam generator taking into account thermal mixing in the gas as it passes through the generator. Application of the MIX codes to the solution of various operational problems is illustrated by typical examples and the continuing exercise of validating the codes against plant operational data is discussed. (author)

  1. Investigations of the gas-side heat transfer and flow characteristics of steam generators in AGR stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lis, J.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental and analytical investigations of the gas-side heat transfer and flow characteristics of steam generators in the AGR stations carried out by CERL. The majority of the experimental work on heat transfer and flow characteristics of close-packed tube arrangements in cross-flow of gases is carried out in a pressurised heat exchanger rig. The rig is operated on-line by a dedicated PDP 11/40 computer over the range of Reynolds number 10 4 to 3x10 5 . Atmospheric wind tunnels employing either small or large scale models of the specific sections of steam generators are used for a variety of supplementary and development studies. Various measurements techniques and, in particular, LDA and hot wire anemometry employed in these studies are described. The more important aspects of various investigations are illustrated by typical results. In order to ensure the efficient operation and integrity of steam generators under asymmetric boundary conditions a MIX suite of 2-dimensional codes has been developed. The codes calculate the gas and water/steam flow and temperature distributions in each channel of the steam generator taking into account thermal mixing in the gas as it passes through the generator. Application of the MIX codes to the solution of various operational problems is illustrated by typical examples and the continuing exercise of validating the codes against plant operational data is discussed. (author)

  2. Mechanical problems in turbomachines, steam and gas turbines. Large steam turbine manufacturing requirements to fulfill customer needs for electric power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazzini, R.

    1975-01-01

    The needs of the customers in large steam turbines for electric power are examined. The choices and decisions made by the utility about the equipments are dealt with after considering the evolution of power demand on the French network. These decisions and choices mainly result from a technical and economic optimization of production equipments: choice of field-proven solutions, trend to lower steam characteristics, trend to higher output of the units (i.e. size effect), spreading out standardization of machines and components (policy of technical as well as technological levels, i.e. mass production effect). Standardization of external characteristics of units of same level of output and even standardization of some main components. The requirements turbine manufacturers have to meet may fall in two categories: on one side: gaining experience and know-how, capability of making high quality experiments, out put capacity, will to hold a high efficiency level; on the other side: meeting the technical requirements related to the contracts. Among these requirements, one can differentiate those dealing with the service expected from the turbine and that resulting in the responsibility limits of the manufacturer and those tending to gain interchangeability, to improve availability of the equipment, to increase safety, and to make operation and maintenance easier [fr

  3. Draft environmental statement related to steam generator repair at H.B. Robinson Steam Electric Plant Unit No. 2, (Docket No. 50-261)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    The staff has considered the environmental impacts and economic costs of the proposed steam generator repair at the H.B. Robinson Steam Electric Plant Unit No. 2 along with reasonable alternatives to the proposed action. The staff has concluded that the proposed repair will not significantly affect the quality of the human environment and that there are no preferable alternatives to the proposed action. Furthermore, any impacts from the repair program are outweighted by its benefits

  4. Solar-Assisted Electric Vehicle Charging Station Interim Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapsa, Melissa Voss [ORNL; Durfee, Norman [ORNL; Maxey, L Curt [ORNL; Overbey, Randall M [ORNL

    2011-09-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been awarded $6.8 million in the Department of Energy (DOE) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds as part of an overall $114.8 million ECOtality grant with matching funds from regional partners to install 125 solar-assisted Electric Vehicle (EV) charging stations across Knoxville, Nashville, Chattanooga, and Memphis. Significant progress has been made toward completing the scope with the installation of 25 solar-assisted charging stations at ORNL; six stations at Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); and 27 stations at Nissan's Smyrna and Franklin sites, with three more stations under construction at Nissan's new lithium-ion battery plant. Additionally, the procurement process for contracting the installation of 34 stations at Knoxville, the University of Tennessee Knoxville (UTK), and Nashville sites is underway with completion of installation scheduled for early 2012. Progress is also being made on finalizing sites and beginning installations of 30 stations in Nashville, Chattanooga, and Memphis by EPRI and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The solar-assisted EV charging station project has made great strides in fiscal year 2011. A total of 58 solar-assisted EV parking spaces have been commissioned in East and Middle Tennessee, and progress on installing the remaining 67 spaces is well underway. The contract for the 34 stations planned for Knoxville, UTK, and Nashville should be underway in October with completion scheduled for the end of March 2012; the remaining three Nissan stations are under construction and scheduled to be complete in November; and the EPRI/TVA stations for Chattanooga, Vanderbilt, and Memphis are underway and should be complete by the end of March 2012. As additional Nissan LEAFs are being delivered, usage of the charging stations has increased substantially. The project is on course to complete all 125 solar-assisted EV charging stations in time to collect meaningful data

  5. Wet steam turbines for nuclear generating stations -design and operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usher, J.

    1977-01-01

    Lecture to the Institution of Nuclear Engineers, 11 Jan. 1977. The object of this lecture was to give an account of some design features of large wet steam turbines and to show by describing some recent operational experience how their design concepts were fulfilled. Headings are as follows: effects of wet steam cycle on turbine layout and operation (H.P. turbine, L.P. turbine); turbine control and operation; water separators; and steam reheaters. (U.K.)

  6. Electricity supplies in a French nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    As the operation of a nuclear power station requires a power supply system enabling this operation as well as the installation safety, this document describes how such systems are designed in the different French nuclear power stations to meet the requirements during a normal operation (when the station produces electricity) or when it is stopped, but also to ensure power supply to equipment ensuring safety functions during an incident or an accident occurring on the installation. More precisely, these safety functions are provided by two independent systems in the French nuclear power stations. Their operation is briefly described. Two different types of nuclear reactors are addressed: pressurised water reactors (PWR) of second generation, EPR (or PWR of third generation)

  7. Electricity pricing model in thermal generating stations under deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reji, P.; Ashok, S.; Moideenkutty, K.M.

    2007-01-01

    In regulated public utilities with competitive power markets, deregulation has replaced the monopoly. Under the deregulated power market, the electricity price primarily depends on market mechanism and power demand. In this market, generators generally follow marginal pricing. Each generator fixes the electricity price based on their pricing strategy and it leads to more price volatility. This paper proposed a model to determine the electricity price considering all operational constraints of the plant and economic variables that influenced the price, for a thermal generating station under deregulation. The purpose of the model was to assist existing stations, investors in the power sector, regulatory authorities, transmission utilities, and new power generators in decision-making. The model could accommodate price volatility in the market and was based on performance incentive/penalty considering plant load factor, availability of the plant and peak/ off peak demand. The model was applied as a case study to a typical thermal utility in India to determine the electricity price. It was concluded that the case study of a thermal generating station in a deregulated environment showed that the electricity price mainly depended on the gross calorific value (GCV) of fuel, mode of operation, price of the fuel, and operating charges. 11 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig

  8. Three Dimensional Visualization for the Steam Injection into Water Pool using Electrical Resistance Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khambampati, Anil Kumar; Lee, Jeong Seong; Kim, Sin; Kim, Kyung Youn

    2010-01-01

    The direct injection of steam into a water pool is a method of heat transfer used in many process industries. The amount of research in this area however is limited to the nuclear industry, with applications relating to reactor cooling systems. Electrical resistance tomography (ERT), a low cost, non-invasive and which has high temporal resolution characteristics, can be used as a visualization tool for the resistivity distribution for the steam injection into water pool such as IRWST. In this paper, three dimensional resistivity distribution of the process is obtained through ERT using iterative Gauss-Newton method. Numerical experiments are performed by assuming different resistive objects in the water pool. Numerical results show that ERT is successful in estimating the resistivity distribution for the injection of steam in the water pool

  9. Maintenance and life assessment of steam generators at Embalse Nuclear Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna, P.; Diaz, G.; Sveruga, H.; Sainz, R.

    2006-01-01

    The Embalse Nuclear Generating Station (ENGS) has four vertical I-800 U-tubes Steam Generators (SGs) manufactured by Babcock and Wilcox (B and W). They are one of the most important components from the point of view of safety and cost-related elements for potential life extensions in case of a replacement thereof. A Life Management program has been started covering the entire plant and starting with the Life Assessment (LA) of this component which consists in a systematic way to evaluate aging mechanisms focused on the plant refurbishment and life extension. Because of this, maintenance-based ageing assessment from beginning of operation is analyzed and current LA-frame maintenance and inspections programs are carried out in order to maintain a high availability of the SGs then to enable the planning for the plant life extension. The most important taken actions have been the Eddy Current (EC) In Service Inspection program which performs 100% of the tubes of two SG every 1.5 years started in 1992, the mechanical cleaning by blasting of the internal tube surface, the sludge removal from the secondary side tubesheet, the divider plate replacement, the installation of antivibration bars (AVB's), installation of TSP inspection ports and an exhaustive inspection of the secondary internals as a preliminary result of the Life Assessment started during early 2000. The most relevant aging mechanism up to 2004 was the Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) of U-bend supports and consequent fretting of tubes. The eddy current inspections allowed the fretting degradation to be detected and mitigated by installing AVB's. Currently, efficiency of this mitigating action is being performed by vibration measurements and visual inspections. However, other degradation mechanism that could have origin due to the U-bend FAC like loose part damage (LPD) is being to be analyzed since could be an issue in the future. At present, FAC degradation on the cold leg side and sludge deposition on the

  10. Heat treatment of large-sized welded rotors of steam turbines for atomic power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutasov, R F; Mukhina, M P; Tustanovskii, A S

    1977-01-01

    The heat treatment of a welded rotor of grade 25Kh2NMFA steel for steam turbines of nuclear power plants was considered. A following heat treatment schedule was suggested: charging the rotor in to a furnace at 100-150 deg C, heating to 200-250 deg C and holding for 12 hrs; slow heating (10 deg C/h) to 400-450 deg C and holding for 12 hrs; slow heating to 630-640 deg C and holding for 50 hrs, cooling at a rate of 5 deg C/h down to 100 deg C, holding for 20 hrs and cooling with the furnace open. The proposed heat treatment schedule of a duration of 356 hrs ensures a temperature gradient throughout the cross section and the length of the rotor of not more than +-5 deg C, least deviations of geometric dimensions and makes possible machining finish to within 0-0.02 mm. Described are the particularities of the design of a roll-out hearth electric chamber furnace, measuring 13000x5500x5000 mm and built for the purpose of carrying out said heat treatment. The power rating of the furnace is 2850 kW.

  11. Electric motorcycle charging station powered by solar energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwattanapong, Akarawat; Chantharasenawong, Chawin

    2018-01-01

    This research proposes a design and verification of an off-grid photovoltaic system (PVS) for electric motorcycle charging station to be located in King’s Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok, Thailand. The system is designed to work independently (off-grid) and it must be able to fully charge the batteries of a typical passenger electric motorcycle every evening. A 1,000W Toyotron electric motorcycle is chosen for this study. It carries five units of 12.8V 20Ah batteries in series; hence its maximum energy requirement per day is 1,200Wh. An assessment of solar irradiation data and the Generation Factor in Bangkok, Thailand suggests that the charging system consists of one 500W PV panel, an MPPT charge controller, 48V 150Ah battery, a 1,000W DC to AC inverter and other safety devices such as fuses and breakers. An experiment is conducted to verify the viability of the off-grid PVS charging station by collecting the total daily energy generation data in the raining season and winter. The data suggests that the designed off-grid solar power charging station for electric motorcycle is able to supply sufficient energy for daily charging requirements.

  12. Process for improving the load factor of an electricity generating power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rostaing, Michel.

    1974-01-01

    A description is given of a process for improving the load factor of an electricity generating power station feeding a supply network in which all or part of the power not required by the network during off-peak hours is used for producing hydrogen which is then stored. The stored hydrogen is then burned and the heat generated is employed for superheating the steam generated by the nuclear reactor of the power plant. This combustion is carried out permanently. The hydrogen is produced by water electrolysis. The oxygen also produced in this manner is used as a comburent in the combustion of the hydrogen. The reactor is of the pressurized water type [fr

  13. Economic analysis of process steam and electricity generation by a 200 MW NHR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Li; Wang Yongqing

    2000-01-01

    New applications for low temperature nuclear heating reactors should be developed using economic analysis. This paper compares and analyzes the economics of the generation 1.5 MPa process steam and electricity by a 200 MW nuclear heating reactor (NHR-200) for industrial development. The project is very attractive economically with an internal rate of return of 19.61%, a net present worth (discount rate 10%) of 765 million yuan RMB and a capital recovery or payback period of about 5 years after construction is completed. Compared with only using the NHR-200 for in winter heating, the economic of process steam and electricity generation by NHR-200 are much better. In addition, the NHR-200 will significantly improve environmental pollution in cities and reduce the transport of coal from north to south in China

  14. Total life cycle cost model for electric power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardullo, M.W.

    1995-01-01

    The Total Life Cycle Cost (TLCC) model for electric power stations was developed to provide a technology screening model. The TLCC analysis involves normalizing cost estimates with respect to performance standards and financial assumptions and preparing a profile of all costs over the service life of the power station. These costs when levelized present a value in terms of a utility electricity rate. Comparison of cost and the pricing of the electricity for a utility shows if a valid project exists. Cost components include both internal and external costs. Internal costs are direct costs associated with the purchase, and operation of the power station and include initial capital costs, operating and maintenance costs. External costs result from societal and/or environmental impacts that are external to the marketplace and can include air quality impacts due to emissions, infrastructure costs, and other impacts. The cost stream is summed (current dollars) or discounted (constant dollars) to some base year to yield a overall TLCC of each power station technology on a common basis. While minimizing life cycle cost is an important consideration, it may not always be a preferred method for some utilities who may prefer minimizing capital costs. Such consideration does not always result in technology penetration in a marketplace such as the utility sector. Under various regulatory climates, the utility is likely to heavily weigh initial capital costs while giving limited consideration to other costs such as societal costs. Policy makers considering external costs, such as those resulting from environmental impacts, may reach significantly different conclusions about which technologies are most advantageous to society. The TLCC analysis model for power stations was developed to facilitate consideration of all perspectives

  15. Lewis Research Center space station electric power system test facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchenough, Arthur G.; Martin, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center facilities were developed to support testing of the Space Station Electric Power System. The capabilities and plans for these facilities are described. The three facilities which are required in the Phase C/D testing, the Power Systems Facility, the Space Power Facility, and the EPS Simulation Lab, are described in detail. The responsibilities of NASA Lewis and outside groups in conducting tests are also discussed.

  16. Production of Fischer–Tropsch fuels and electricity from bituminous coal based on steam hydrogasification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Xiaoming; Norbeck, Joseph M.; Park, Chan S.

    2012-01-01

    A new thermochemical process for (Fischer–Tropsch) FT fuels and electricity coproduction based on steam hydrogasification is addressed and evaluated in this study. The core parts include (Steam Hydrogasification Reactor) SHR, (Steam Methane Reformer) SMR and (Fisher–Tropsch Reactor) FTR. A key feature of SHR is the enhanced conversion of carbon into methane at high steam environment with hydrogen and no need for catalyst or the use of oxygen. Facilities utilizing bituminous coal for coproduction of FT fuels and electricity with carbon dioxide sequestration are designed in detail. Cases with design capacity of either 400 or 4000 TPD (Tonne Per Day) (dry basis) are investigated with process modeling and cost estimation. A cash flow analysis is performed to determine the fuels (Production Cost) PC. The analysis shows that the 400 TPD case due to a FT fuels PC of 5.99 $/gallon diesel equivalent results in a plant design that is totally uneconomic. The 4000 TPD plant design is expected to produce 7143 bbl/day FT liquids with PC of 2.02 $/gallon and 2.27 $/gallon diesel equivalent at overall carbon capture ratio of 65% and 90%, respectively. Prospective commercial economics benefits with increasing plant size and improvements from large-scale demonstration efforts on steam hydrogasification. -- Highlights: ► We develop a new thermochemical method for synthetic fuels production. ► Detailed plant design and process modeling for the Coal-to-Liquid facilities are performed. ► Economic analysis has been carried out in determining the fuel production cost and IRR. ► The fuels produced in this study can compete with petroleum when crude oil price is 100 $/bbl. ► Further economic benefit comes with plant scale-up and process commercial demonstration efforts.

  17. Safety evaluation report related to steam generator repair at H.B. Robinson Steam Electric Plant, Unit No. 2. Docket No. 50-261

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-11-01

    A Safety Evaluation Report was prepared for the H.B. Robinson Steam Electric Plant Unit No. 2 by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. This report considers the safety aspects of the proposed steam generator repair at H.B. Robinson Steam Electric Plant Unit No. 2. The report focuses on the occupational radiation exposure associated with the proposed repair program. It concludes that there is reasonable assurance that the health and safety on the public will not be endangered by the conduct of the proposed action, such activities will be conducted in compliance with the Commission's regulations, and the issuance of this amendment will not be inimical to the common defense and security or the health and safety of the public

  18. Final environmental assessment for vegetation control at VHF stations, microwave stations, electrical substations, and pole yards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-13

    Southwestern Power Adm. operates very high frequency (VHF) and microwave radio stations, electrical substations, and pole yards for electric power transmission throughout AR, MO, and OK. Vegetation growth at the stations must be suppressed for safety of operation and personnel. Southwestern has been using a combination of mechanical/manual and herbicide control for this purpose; Federally- mandated reductions in staff and budgetary resources require Southwestern to evaluate all potentially efficient methods for vegetation control. Three alternatives were examined: no action, mechanical/manual control, and (proposed) a combination of mechanical/manual and herbicide control. Environmental impacts on air and water quality, wetlands, wildlife, endangered species, archaeological and other resources, farmland, human health, transportation, etc. were evaluated.

  19. Long-term security of electrical and control engineering equipment in nuclear power stations to withstand a loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, H.

    1996-01-01

    Electrical and control engineering equipment, which has to function even after many years of operation in the event of a fault in a saturated steam atmosphere of 160 C maximum, is essential in nuclear power stations in order to control a loss of coolant accident. The nuclear power station operators have, for this purpose, developed verification strategies for groups of components, by means of which it is ensured that the electrical and control engineering components are capable of dealing with a loss of coolant accident even at the end of their planned operating life. (orig.) [de

  20. Digital implementation, simulation and tests in MATLAB of the models of Steam line, the turbines, the pressure regulator of a BWR type nucleo electric power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez R, A.

    2004-01-01

    In this phase of the project they were carried out exhaustive tests to the models of the steam lines, turbines and pressure regulator of a BWR type nucleo electric central for to verify that their tendencies and behaviors are it more real possible. For it, it was necessary to also analyze the transfer functions of the different components along the steam line until the power generator. Such models define alone the dominant poles of the system, what is not limitation to reproduce a wide range of anticipated transitoriness of a power station operation. In the same manner, it was integrated and proved the integrated model form with the models of feeding water of the SUN-RAH, simulating the nuclear reactor starting from predetermined entrances of the prospective values of the vessel. Also it was coupled with the graphic interface developed with the libraries DirectX implementing a specific monitoring panel for this system. (Author)

  1. Design and construction features of steam generators at a nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakrabarti, A.K.; Gupta, K.N.; Bapat, C.N.; Sharma, V.K.

    1996-01-01

    The Indian nuclear power programme is based on Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) using natural uranium as fuel and heavy water as reactor coolant as well as moderator. The nuclear heat is generated in the fuel located in the pressure tubes. Pressurised heavy water in the primary heat transport (PHT) system is circulated through the tubes which picks up the heat from the fuel and transfers it to ordinary water in steam generators (SGs) to produce steam. The steam is used for providing power to the turbine. The steam generator is a critical equipment in the nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) of a nuclear reactor. SG tube surface area constitute about 80% of total primary circuit surface area. A typical value in a 220 MWe reactor is 9000 m 2 which can release considerable amount of corrosion products unless very low corrosion rates are achieved by proper design, material selection and water chemistry control. Design and construction features of SGs are given. 1 tab

  2. Experiences from Loviisa Nuclear Power Station concerning the decontamination of steam generators and primary system components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaernstroem, R.

    1989-01-01

    Loviisa 1 and 2 are 465 MWe PWR units of the Soviet type VVER-440. Loviisa 1 has been in commercial operation since spring 1977 and Loviisa 2 from the beginning of 1980. Decontamination of primary circuit components - even big ones as steam generators - can be performed in an efficient and quick way with good results and resonable expences. Total costs for decontamination of the two steam generators including planning, construction, documentation, operation, chemicals etc. did not rise above 100,000.00 dollars. (author) 6 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Burst protection device for largely cylindrical steam raising units, preferably of pressurized water nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutzl, J.

    1978-01-01

    This burst protection device controls forces to be expected in an accident by resolving them into axial (vertical) and radial (horizontal) components, which are taken by a large number of elements stressed in tension. The steam raising unit is surrounded by a containment, but remains easily accessible. The containment consists of a steel jacket, lid and floor. Several cylindrical sections above one another form the steel jacket, which surrounds the steam raising unit with an intermediate insulating layer of concrete. The insulating concrete cylinder is of several times the thickness of the steel jacket, and also consists of cylindrical sections. An outer supporting ring for the lid and floor of the containment have outside diameters which project beyond the jacket. Prestressed circumferential vertical tension ropes between the supporting ring and floor take any additional tensional forces. The lid is domed with downward curvature towards the upper boiler dome. Internal bursting forces produce compressive stresses in the lid, which thus pass along its outside diameter into the surrounding ring. The lid, which is devided along one diameter, makes dismantling and access to the boiler easy even with a central steam pipe going upwards. The floor of the burst protection is also the floor of the steam raising unit. It is of several times the thickness of the tube floor, which, with its spacing above the floor forms the usual inlet and outlet space for the reactor cooling water. The main coolant pump installed there is driven by an external motor through a floor penetration. (HP) [de

  4. Amazing & extraordinary facts the steam age

    CERN Document Server

    Holland, Julian

    2012-01-01

    Respected transport author Julian Holland delves into the intriguing world of steam in his latest book, which is full of absorbing facts and figures on subjects ranging from Cornish beam engines, steam railway locomotives, road vehicles and ships through to traction engines, steam rollers and electricity generating stations and the people who designed and built them. Helped along the way by the inventive minds of James Watt, Richard Trevithick and George Stephenson, steam became the powerhouse that drove the Industrial Revolution in Britain in the late 18th and 19th centuries.

  5. Improving nuclear generating station response for electrical grid islanding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Q.B.; Kundur, P.; Acchione, P.N.; Lautsch, B.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes problems associated with the performance characteristics of nuclear generating stations which do not have their overall plant control design functions co-ordinated with the other grid controls. The paper presents some design changes to typical nuclear plant controls which result in a significant improvement in both the performance of the grid island and the chances of the nuclear units staying on-line following the disturbance. This paper focuses on four areas of the overall unit controls and turbine governor controls which could be modified to better co-ordinate the control functions of the nuclear units with the electrical grid. Some simulation results are presented to show the performance of a typical electrical grid island containing a nuclear unit with and without the changes

  6. Comparing the steam and electric heat tracing solutions for petrochemical or refining facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Joseph G.; McQueen, Greg [Tyco Thermal Controls, Belgie (Belgium)

    2012-07-01

    In this era of energy conservation and cost reduction, the ability to effectively select the optimal solution to meet the heat management system needs of petrochemical or refining facilities is becoming increasingly important. Depending on the type and location of the plant, a heat management system (HMS) can comprise a significant portion of the overall capital expenditure, as well as the ongoing operating and maintenance costs. Several important heat management system design decisions affect the financial operations of a facility, including the selection of the heat tracing technology, the utility distribution scheme, and the insulation system criteria, among others. However, most of these decisions are made early in the project life-cycle without thorough analysis of the various options available. From a high level perspective, numerous heat trace media should be considered, including electric, steam, tempered water, and glycol. These systems also have different impacts on piping systems within the plant battery limits (ISBL) and transfer lines outside of the battery limits (OSBL). This paper takes a careful look at two of the predominant heat tracing technologies - electric heat tracing and steam tracing - and compares these within the larger framework of the heat management system, and relative to petrochemical or refining facilities within the general Brazil geography. In the broader context, a heat management system is defined as the heat tracing technology itself, the utility distribution associated with that technology, the control and monitoring scheme associated with that technology, and the insulation system. We will evaluate the capital expenditure cost, operating expenditure cost, and overall reliability of the electric and steam tracing mediums in both the ISBL and OSBL environments within this broader context. (author)

  7. Main unit electrical protection at Sizewell 'B' power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, A.; Keates, T.

    1992-01-01

    For any power station, reliable electrical protection of the main generating units (generators plus generator transformers) has important commercial implications. Spurious trips cause loss of generation and consequent loss of revenue, while failure to rapidly isolate a fault leads to unnecessary damage and again, loss of generation and revenue. While these conditions apply equally to Sizewell B there are additional factors to be taken into consideration. A spurious trip of a main generating unit may lead to a trip of the reactor with an associated challenge to the shutdown and core cooling plant. The generator transformers, besides exporting power from the generators to the 400 kV National Grid, also import power from the Grid to the 11 kV Main Electrical System, which in turn is the preferred source of supply to the Essential Electrical System. The Main Unit Protection is designed to clear generator faults leaving this off-site power route intact. Hence failure to operate correctly could affect the integrity of the Essential Electrical Supplies. (Author)

  8. Design and development of electric vehicle charging station equipped with RFID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panatarani, C.; Murtaddo, D.; Maulana, D. W.; Irawan, S.; Joni, I. M.

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports the development of electric charging station from distributed renewable for electric vehicle (EV). This designed refer to the input voltage standard of IEC 61851, plugs features of IEC 62196 and standard communication of ISO 15118. The developed electric charging station used microcontroller ATMEGA8535 and RFID as controller and identifier of the EV users, respectively. The charging station successfully developed as desired features for electric vehicle from renewable energy resources grid with solar panel, wind power and batteries storage.

  9. Steam generator materials and secondary side water chemistry in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudelli, M.D.

    1979-04-01

    The main purpose of this work is to summarize the European and North American experiences regarding the materials used for the construction of the steam generators and their relative corrosion resistance considering the water chemestry control method. Reasons underlying decision for the adoption of Incoloy 800 as the material for the secondary steam generator system for Atucha I Nuclear Power Plant (Atucha Reactor) and Embalse de Rio III Nuclear Power Plant (Cordoba Reactor) are pointed out. Backup information taken into consideration for the decision of utilizing the All Volatil Treatment for the water chemistry control of the Cordoba Reactor is detailed. Also all the reasonswhich justify to continue with the congruent fosfatic method for the Atucha Reactor are analyzed. Some investigation objectives which would eventually permit the revision of the decisions taken on these subjects are proposed. (E.A.C.) [es

  10. Tampa Electric Company Polk Power Station IGCC project: Project status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDaniel, J.E.; Carlson, M.R.; Hurd, R.; Pless, D.E.; Grant, M.D. [Tampa Electric Co., FL (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The Tampa Electric Company Polk Power Station is a nominal 250 MW (net) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant located to the southeast of Tampa, Florida in Polk County, Florida. This project is being partially funded under the Department of Energy`s Clean Coal Technology Program pursuant to a Round II award. The Polk Power Station uses oxygen-blown, entrained-flow IGCC technology licensed from Texaco Development Corporation to demonstrate significant reductions of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions when compared to existing and future conventional coal-fired power plants. In addition, this project demonstrates the technical feasibility of commercial scale IGCC and Hot Gas Clean Up (HGCU) technology. The Polk Power Station achieved ``first fire`` of the gasification system on schedule in mid-July, 1996. Since that time, significant advances have occurred in the operation of the entire IGCC train. This paper addresses the operating experiences which occurred in the start-up and shakedown phase of the plant. Also, with the plant being declared in commercial operation as of September 30, 1996, the paper discusses the challenges encountered in the early phases of commercial operation. Finally, the future plans for improving the reliability and efficiency of the Unit in the first quarter of 1997 and beyond, as well as plans for future alternate fuel test burns, are detailed. The presentation features an up-to-the-minute update on actual performance parameters achieved by the Polk Power Station. These parameters include overall Unit capacity, heat rate, and availability. In addition, the current status of the start-up activities for the HGCU portion of the plant is discussed.

  11. Steam drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowder, R.

    1978-01-01

    Steam drums are described that are suitable for use in steam generating heavy water reactor power stations. They receive a steam/water mixture via riser headers from the reactor core and provide by means of separators and driers steam with typically 0.5% moisture content for driving turbines. The drums are constructed as prestressed concrete pressure vessels in which the failure of one or a few of the prestressing elements does not significantly affect the overall strength of the structure. The concrete also acts as a radiation shield. (U.K.)

  12. Outline of Noto Nuclear Power Station, Hokuriku Electric Power Co., Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The location of the power station is in Shiga-cho, Hakui-gun, Ishikawa-ken. One BWR of about 1,600 MWt (540 MWe) capacity is installed. The area of the site is about 1.6 million m 2 , which is on the gentle slope of hilly land at the elevation of about 50 m, and faces Japan Sea. The nuclear reactor proper is installed at the position about 400 m eastward from the coastline. The height of the exhaust stack is about 100 m above the ground. The shortest distance from the center of the reactor core to the boundary of the site is about 450 m in the direction of south and southwest. The objective of use in commercial electric power generation. The start of operation is scheduled in March, 1993. The total cost of construction is about 235 billion yen, which is equivalent to about 435,000 yen-kW. The fuel assemblies are 8 x 8 type, the fuel material is uranium dioxide sintered pellets, and the average degree of enrichment of the initially charged fuel is about 1.6 wt.% in type 1, 2.4 wt.% in type 2 and 3.0 wt.% in type 3 (about 2.3 wt.% on the average). The highest burnup of fuel assemblies is 40,000 MWd-t. The total amount of fuel charged in the core is about 64 t of uranium. The main steam temperature at the reactor exit is 286 deg C, and the feedwater pressure at the reactor entrance is 72 kg-cm 2 g. The steam turbine is a tandem four-flow exhaust condensing turbine of 540 MW output. (Kako, I.)

  13. Radioactive waste management at nuclear electric power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordelier, S.C.

    1993-01-01

    After suitable treatment, gaseous and liquid wastes are routinely discharged from Nuclear Electric's stations and are diluted and dispersed in the environment. The discharges are controlled and authorized under UK legislation and the environmental impact is minimal. Most solid wastes were originally accumulated at the site of origin, but since 1978 low level wastes (LLW) have been send to the UK's main disposal site at Drigg. Recent changes at Drigg have resulted in changed arrangements for the transport and disposal of low-level wastes, including volume reduction by supercompaction. Small amounts of intermediate-level waste (ILW) have been conditioned and disposed of in the sea but this route is now effectively closed and there is currently no disposal route for ILW in the UK. Spent ion exchange resins at one power station have been conditioned and are stored pending the availability of a disposal route. Most ILW will continue to be stored in retrievable form on the site of origin until a mobile waste treatment plant can be brought into use. The timing of this will be subject to agreement with the regulators. In the case of Magnox fuel element debris, a demonstration dissolution plant has been constructed and this will significantly reduce the volume of waste being stored while retaining the bulk of the activity on site for later treatment. A further development has been the construction of a new facility which will hold Magnox fuel element debris in 500 liter drums

  14. Trouble found in regular inspection of No.1 plant in Ikata Power Station, Shikoku Electric Power Co., Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Since May 2, 1989, the regular inspection of No.1 plant which is a PWR plant with the rated output of 566 MW in Ikata Power Station, Shikoku Electric Power Co., Inc. has been carried out, and eddy current flaw detection inspection was conducted on the total 6585 heating tubes of steam generators except already plugged tubes. As the result, significant indication was observed in 12 heating tubes at the expanded part of the high temperature side tube plates. As to the cause, similarly to those observed in the same plant in the past, it is considered that the residual stress caused by expanding at the time of the manufacture and the internal pressure stress during the operation were superposed, and stress corrosion cracking occurred. It was decided that these 12 defective tubes are plugged. State of plugging in steam generators. Number of total heating tubes: 6776=3388 tubes x 2 steam generators. Number of plugged tubes: 203 including the increase of 12 this time. Ratio of plugging: 3.0 %. Heating tubes: Inconel 600 tubes of φ22.7 mm x 1.27 mm thickness. (K.I.)

  15. Steam turbine cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuzumi, Naoaki.

    1994-01-01

    In a steam turbine cycle, steams exhausted from the turbine are extracted, and they are connected to a steam sucking pipe of a steam injector, and a discharge pipe of the steam injector is connected to an inlet of a water turbine. High pressure discharge water is obtained from low pressure steams by utilizing a pressurizing performance of the steam injector and the water turbine is rotated by the high pressure water to generate electric power. This recover and reutilize discharged heat of the steam turbine effectively, thereby enabling to improve heat efficiency of the steam turbine cycle. (T.M.)

  16. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), Westinghouse phase 1. Volume 11: Advanced steam systems. [energy conversion efficiency for electric power plants using steam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    A parametric analysis was made of three types of advanced steam power plants that use coal in order to have a comparison of the cost of electricity produced by them a wide range of primary performance variables. Increasing the temperature and pressure of the steam above current industry levels resulted in increased energy costs because the cost of capital increased more than the fuel cost decreased. While the three plant types produced comparable energy cost levels, the pressurized fluidized bed boiler plant produced the lowest energy cost by the small margin of 0.69 mills/MJ (2.5 mills/kWh). It is recommended that this plant be designed in greater detail to determine its cost and performance more accurately than was possible in a broad parametric study and to ascertain problem areas which will require development effort. Also considered are pollution control measures such as scrubbers and separates for particulate emissions from stack gases.

  17. 76 FR 77022 - In the Matter of Carolina Power & Light Company, H.B. Robinson Steam Electric Plant, Unit No. 2...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-09

    ... and 72-3] In the Matter of Carolina Power & Light Company, H.B. Robinson Steam Electric Plant, Unit No. 2, H. B. Robinson Steam Electric Plant, Unit 2, Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation; Order Approving Indirect Transfer of Control of Licenses I. Carolina Power & Light Company (CP&L, the licensee) is...

  18. Modelling and simulation of the steam line, the high and low pressure turbines and the pressure regulator for the SUN-RAH nucleo electric university simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez R, A.

    2003-01-01

    In the following article the development of a simulator that allows to represent the dynamics of the following systems: steam line, nozzle, vapor separator, reheater, high pressure turbine, low pressure turbine, power generator and the pressure regulator of a nucleo electric power station. We start from the supposition that this plant will be modeled from a nuclear reactor type BWR (Boiling Water Reactor), using models of reduced order that represent the more important dynamic variables of the physical processes that happen along the steam line until the one generator. To be able to carry out the simulation in real time the Mat lab mathematical modeling software is used, as well as the specific simulation tool Simulink. It is necessary to point out that the platform on which the one is executed the simulator is the Windows operating system, to allow the intuitive use that only this operating system offers. The above-mentioned obeys to that the objective of the simulator it is to help the user to understand some of the dynamic phenomena that are present in the systems of a nuclear plant, and to provide a tool of analysis and measurement of variables to predict the desirable behavior of the same ones. The model of a pressure controller for the steam lines, the high pressure turbine and the low pressure turbine is also presented that it will be the one in charge of regulating the demand of the system according to the characteristics and critic restrictions of safety and control, assigned according to those wanted parameters of performance of this system inside the nucleo electric plant. This simulator is totally well defined and it is part of the University student nucleo electric simulator with Boiling Water Reactor (SUN-RAH), an integral project and of greater capacity. (Author)

  19. Fish protection at steam-electric power plants: alternative screening devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, J.B.

    1978-01-01

    Since the enactment of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 1972, very few innovations have surfaced that advance the state of intake technology for fish protection at steam-electric power plants. After careful examination of basic hydrology, hydraulics, and ecology of the source water body is completed and after a suitable location for the intake is established, the design process reduces to the development of proper screening techniques and to the provision of a means of preventing resident and migratory species from entering the intake structure. As a result of this design process, three basic fish protection concepts have evolved: fish deterrence, fish collection and removal, and fish diversion. Intake screening devices that protect fish are discussed

  20. The System of Fast Charging Station for Electric Vehicles with Minimal Impact on the Electrical Grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Chlebis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The searching and utilization of new energy sources and technologies is a current trend. The effort to increase the share of electricity production from renewable energy sources is characteristic for economically developed countries. The use of accumulation of electrical energy with a large number of decentralized storage units is most preferred, as well as the focus on the production of energy at the point of its consumption. Modern cogeneration units are a good example. This paper describes the accumulation of electrical energy for equalizing the power balance of electric charging stations with high instantaneous power. The possibility of re-utilization of electrical energy from the charged vehicle in the case of lack of electricity in the power grid is solved at the same time. This paper also deals with the selection of appropriate concept of accumulation system and its cooperation with both renewable and distribution networks. Details of the main power components including the results obtained from the system implementation are also described in this paper.

  1. 76 FR 66333 - Carolina Power & Light Company, H.B. Robinson Steam Electric Plant, Unit No. 2; Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-26

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 50-261; NRC-2011-0247] Carolina Power & Light Company, H.B. Robinson Steam Electric Plant, Unit No. 2; Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant... Facility Operating License No. DPR-23, issued to Carolina Power & Light Company (the licensee), for...

  2. Specific properties of the electrical equipment in the nuclear steam supply system; Specificnosti elektricne opreme u primarnom djelu nuklearne elektrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smiljanic, D [Rade Koncar Institut, Zagreb (Yugoslavia)

    1979-07-01

    The paper presents description of reactor coolant pump motor in the primary coolant loop. The motor is treated as a representative of all electrical equipment in the nuclear steam supply system that has to meet all the requirements concerning reliability, minimum maintenance, radiation, seismic etc. (author)

  3. Effects of electric current upon catalytic steam reforming of biomass gasification tar model compounds to syngas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, Jun; Lu, Qiang; Dong, Changqing; Du, Xiaoze; Dahlquist, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • ECR technique was proposed to convert biomass gasification tar model compounds. • Electric current enhanced the reforming efficiency remarkably. • The highest toluene conversion reached 99.9%. • Ni–CeO 2 /γ-Al 2 O 3 exhibited good stability during the ECR performance. - Abstract: Electrochemical catalytic reforming (ECR) technique, known as electric current enhanced catalytic reforming technique, was proposed to convert the biomass gasification tar into syngas. In this study, Ni–CeO 2 /γ-Al 2 O 3 catalyst was prepared, and toluene was employed as the major feedstock for ECR experiments using a fixed-bed lab-scale setup where thermal electrons could be generated and provided to the catalyst. Several factors, including the electric current intensity, reaction temperature and steam/carbon (S/C) ratio, were investigated to reveal their effects on the conversion of toluene as well as the composition of the gas products. Moreover, toluene, two other tar model compounds (benzene and 1-methylnaphthalene) and real tar (tar-containing wastewater) were subjected to the long period catalytic stability tests. All the used catalysts were analyzed to determine their carbon contents. The results indicated that the presence of electric current enhanced the catalytic performance remarkably. The toluene conversion reached 99.9% under the electric current of 4 A, catalytic temperature of 800 °C and S/C ratio of 3. Stable conversion performances of benzene, 1-methylnaphthalene and tar-containing wastewater were also observed in the ECR process. H 2 and CO were the major gas products, while CO 2 and CH 4 were the minor ones. Due to the promising capability, the ECR technique deserves further investigation and application for efficient tar conversion

  4. Adaptive Modeling of the International Space Station Electrical Power System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Justin Ray

    2007-01-01

    Software simulations provide NASA engineers the ability to experiment with spacecraft systems in a computer-imitated environment. Engineers currently develop software models that encapsulate spacecraft system behavior. These models can be inaccurate due to invalid assumptions, erroneous operation, or system evolution. Increasing accuracy requires manual calibration and domain-specific knowledge. This thesis presents a method for automatically learning system models without any assumptions regarding system behavior. Data stream mining techniques are applied to learn models for critical portions of the International Space Station (ISS) Electrical Power System (EPS). We also explore a knowledge fusion approach that uses traditional engineered EPS models to supplement the learned models. We observed that these engineered EPS models provide useful background knowledge to reduce predictive error spikes when confronted with making predictions in situations that are quite different from the training scenarios used when learning the model. Evaluations using ISS sensor data and existing EPS models demonstrate the success of the adaptive approach. Our experimental results show that adaptive modeling provides reductions in model error anywhere from 80% to 96% over these existing models. Final discussions include impending use of adaptive modeling technology for ISS mission operations and the need for adaptive modeling in future NASA lunar and Martian exploration.

  5. Planning and replacement of steam generators at the Ringhals nuclear power station in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Looft, H.

    1991-01-01

    Planning of the project was divided into different individual phases: studies, conceptual engineering and tender specifications, detailed engineering and construction planning. The paper describes the individual phases and the measures resulting from the studies. The organization of a smooth implementation of all the activities both by the electricity supply undertaking and also by the contractor merits special attention. (orig.) [de

  6. Optimal Allocation of Changing Station for Electric Vehicle Based on Queuing Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yagang Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Electric vehicle as the main development direction of the future automotive industry, has gained attention worldwide. The rationality of the planning and construction of the power station, as the foundation of energy supply, is an important premise for the development of electric vehicles. In full consideration of the electric demand and electricity consumption, this paper proposes a new construction mode in which charging station and centralized charging station are appropriately combined and presents a location optimization model. Not only can this model be applied to determine the appropriate location for the power station, but it can use the queuing theory to determine the optimal number of power equipment, with which we can achieve the minimum costs. Finally, taking a certain city as an example, the optimum plan for power station is calculated by using this model, which provides an important reference for the study of electric vehicle infrastructure planning.

  7. Experimental research of variable rotation speed ICE-based electric power station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dar’enkov Andrey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Developing variable rotation speed ICE-based stand-alone electric power stations which can supply distant regions and autonomous objects with electricity are of scientific interest due to the insufficient study. The relevance of developing such electric power stations is determined by their usage is to provide a significant fuel saving as well as increase ICE motor service life. The article describes the electric station of autonomous objects with improved fuel economy. The article describes multivariate characteristic. Multivariate characteristic shows the optimal frequency of rotation of the internal combustion engine. At this rotational speed there is the greatest fuel economy.

  8. Development in cooling water intake and outfall systems for atomic or steam power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Akira

    1987-01-01

    The condenser cooling water channel, in its functional aspects, is an important structure for securing a stable supply of cooling water. In its design it is necessary to give a thorough-going study to a reduction of ranges affected by discharged warm water and minimizing the effect of discharged water on navigating ships, and in its functional aspects as a structure for power generation, avoiding the recirculation of discharged warm water as well as to maintaining the operation of power stations in case of abnormalities (concentration of dirts owing to typhoons and floods, outbreak of a large amount of jellyfishes, etc.), and all these aspects must be reflected in the design of cooling water channel systems. In this paper, the present situation relating to the design of cooling water intake and outfall systems in Japan is discussed. (author). 10 figs

  9. A system for regulating the pressure of resuperheated steam in high temperature gas-cooled reactor power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braytenbah, A.S.; Jaegines, K.O.

    1975-01-01

    The invention relates to a system for regulating steam-pressure in the re-superheating portion of a steam-boiler receiving heat from a gas-cooled high temperature nuclear reactor, provided with gas distributing pumps driven by steam-turbines. The system comprises means for generating a pressure signal of desired magnitude for the re-superheating portion, and means for providing a real pressure in the re-superheating portion, means (including a by-passing device) for generating steam-flow rate signal of desired magnitude, a turbine by-pass device comprising a by-pass tapping means for regulating the steam-flow-rate in said turbine according to the desired steam-flow rate signal and means for controlling said by-pass tapping means according to said desired steam-flow-rate signal [fr

  10. Accurate calibration of steam turbine speed control system and its influence on primary regulation at electric grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irrazabal Bohorquez, Washington Orlando; Barbosa, Joao Roberto [Technological Institute of Aeronautics (ITA/CTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Center for Reference on Gas Turbine and Energy], E-mail: barbosa@ita.br

    2010-07-01

    In an interconnected electric system there are two very important parameters: the field voltage and the frequency system. The frequency system is very important for the primary regulation of the electric grid. Each turbomachine actuating as generator interconnected to the grid has an automatic speed regulator to keep the rotational speed and mechanical power of the prime machine operating at the set conditions and stable frequency. The electric grid is a dynamical system and in every moment the power units are exposed to several types of disturbances, which cause unbalance of the mechanical power developed by prime machine and the consumed electric power at the grid. The steam turbine speed control system controls the turbine speed to support the electric grid primary frequency at the same time it controls the frequency of the prime machine. Using a mathematical model for the speed control system, the transfer functions were calculated, as well as the proportionality constants of each element of the steam turbine automatic speed regulator. Among other parameters, the droop characteristic of steam turbine and the dynamic characteristics of the automatic speed regulator elements were calculated. Another important result was the determination of the behavior of the speed control when disturbances occur with the improvement of the calibration precision of the control system. (author)

  11. Electric machinery and drives in thermal power stations. Elektrische Maschinen und Antriebe in thermischen Kraftwerken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-01-01

    The following subjects were dealt with during the VDE meeting: 1) Requirements made by the electric network on the generators and their excitation equipment, and the influence thereof on their design; 2) requirements made by the power station process on the electric drives and the influence thereof on type and design; 3) requirements made on protective measures from the point of the electric power station machinery.

  12. Method and device allowing a more rational exploitation of electrical power-stations. [energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mascarello, J

    1974-04-12

    Description is given of a device permitting a more rational exploitation of electrical power stations characterized by the fact that, while electric power available during slack hours is used for pressurizing air (the pressurized air being stored in tanks), the electric power available during slack days is used for generating hydrogen from water, the hydrogen being stored in other tanks. Combustion of the stored hydrogen by the stored air is used for generating electric power during electric power consumption peak-periods.

  13. Costs of producing electricity from nuclear, coal-fired and oil-fired power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-07-01

    The Board publishes generation costs per kW h incurred at recently commissioned power stations so that the costs and performance of nuclear and conventional stations of roughly the same date of construction can be compared. The term 'conventional power station' is used to describe coal-fired and oil-fired steam power stations. The Board has now decided: (A) to supplement the past method of calculating costs at main stations commissioned between 1965 and 1977 by giving the associated figures for interest during construction, for research, and for training; (B) to give similar figures for the contemporary stations Hinkley Point B and the first half of Drax, (C) to provide estimates of generating costs of stations under construction; (D) to set out explicitly the relationship of this method of calculation to that employed in taking investment decisions on future stations. In this way the figures for stations in commission and under construction are arrived at more in line with the general principles of evaluating investment proposals. The present document provides this information. (author)

  14. Mini hydro electric power stations Lukar 1,2,3,4: Public enterprise (JP) Komunalec

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stojanova, Blagica

    2004-01-01

    The role of the Public enterprises in improving entire living conditions of the citizens, not only by its services towards the citizenship such as: water supplying and public hygiene but the opportunity to produce the electric power by the Mini hydro electric-power stations built on the main city water supply pipes. The paper presents experiences of building the mini hydro electric power stations Lukar 1,2,3,4. The successful completion of this project should be a motivation for building more electric power stations because there are great water potential in the Republic of Macedonia i.e. there have been recorded more than a hundred places suitable for construction of power electric stations. This will contribute not only for clean ecological energy but will have a direct influence on the total economic development of the Republic of Macedonia. (Author)

  15. Locating replenishment stations for electric vehicles: Application to Danish traffic data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wen, Min; Laporte, Gilbert; Madsen, Oli B.G.

    2012-01-01

    for electric vehicles on a traffic network with flow-based demand. The objective is to optimize the network performance, for example to maximize the flow covered by a prefixed number of stations, or to minimize the number of stations needed to cover traffic flows. Two mixed integer linear programming......Environment-friendly electric vehicles have gained substantial attention in governments, industry and universities. The deployment of a network of recharging stations is essential given their limited travel range. This paper considers the problem of locating electronic replenishment stations...

  16. Device for inspection and/or repair of a pipe of a steam raising unit of a nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermaat, H.P.

    1986-01-01

    Eddy current sensors are introduced into the pipe from the steam raising unit chamber. The two-part device on the supporting pillar is used to support the sensors and to position them, and so is an arm connected to it via a clutch. It is accommodated inside the steam raising chamber, but can be operated remotely from outside the steam raising chamber. This reduces the radiation loading of the operating staff. (DG) [de

  17. Troubles detected during regular inspection of No.1 plant in Oi Power Station, Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    No. 1 plant in Oi Power Station, Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc. is a PWR plant with rated output of 1175 MW, and its regular inspection is carried out since August 14, 1989. When eddy current flaw detection inspection was carried out on the total number (11426 except already plugged tubes) of the heating tubes of steam generators, significant indication was observed in tube supporting plate part of 279 tubes, at the boundary of tube plate expanded part of 34 tubes, and in the tube plate expanded part of 99 tubes, 411 heating tubes in total (all on high temperature side). Consequently, it was decided to repair 367 tubes using sleeves, and to plug other 44 tubes. Besides, among the heating tubes plugged in the past, it was decided to remove plugs from 161 tubes, and by repairing them with sleeves, to use them again. Total number of heating tubes 13552 (3388 tubes x 4 steam generators), Number of plugged tubes 2009 (decrease by 117 this time), Ratio of plugging 14.8%. (K.I.)

  18. Trouble found during regular inspection of No.3 plant in Mihama Power Station, Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    No.3 plant in Mihama Power Station, Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc. is a PWR type plant with the rated output of 826 MWe. Its regular inspection has been carried out since September 11, 1989, and eddy current flaw detection inspection was carried out on the total number of steam generator heating tubes (9997 tubes except already plugged tubes). As the result, significant indication was observed in 24 tubes in the expanded parts in tube plates, and in 36 tubes at the boundary of the expanded parts (all on high temperature side), in total in 60 tubes. Consequently, it was decided to plug these 60 defective heating tubes. The heating tubes are those made of Inconel 600, having 22.2 mm outside diameter and 1.27 mm wall thickness. The total number of heating tubes in 10164 (3388 tubes x 3 steam generators), the number of plugged tubes is 227, and the ratio of plugging is 2.2 %. (K.I.)

  19. Electric Vehicle Preparedness - Implementation Approach for Electric Vehicles at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island. Task 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schey, Stephen [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Francfort, Jim [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Several U.S. Department of Defense base studies have been conducted to identify potential U.S. Department of Defense transportation systems that are strong candidates for introduction or expansion of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs). This study is focused on the Naval Air Station Whidbey Island (NASWI) located in Washington State. Task 1 consisted of a survey of the non-tactical fleet of vehicles at NASWI to begin the review of vehicle mission assignments and types of vehicles in service. In Task 2, daily operational characteristics of vehicles were identified to select vehicles for further monitoring and attachment of data loggers. Task 3 recorded vehicle movements in order to characterize the vehicles’ missions. The results of the data analysis and observations were provided. Individual observations of the selected vehicles provided the basis for recommendations related to PEV adoption, i.e., whether a battery electric vehicle (BEV) or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) (collectively PEVs) can fulfill the mission requirements. It also provided the basis for recommendations related to placement of PEV charging infrastructure. This report focuses on an implementation plan for the near-term adoption of PEVs into the NASWI fleet.

  20. Wind-powered electrical systems : highway rest areas, weigh stations, and team section buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    This project considered the use of wind for providing electrical power at Illinois Department of Transportation : (IDOT) highway rest areas, weigh stations, and team section buildings. The goal of the project was to determine : the extent to which wi...

  1. Emissions from coal-fired electric stations : environmental health effects and reduction options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Love, P.; Lourie, B.; Pengelly, D.; Labatt, S.; Ogilvie, K.; Kelly, B.

    1998-01-01

    Findings of a study on the environmental effects of current emissions from coal-fired electric stations were summarized. Current and projected emissions from coal-fired electric stations for five emission reduction scenarios were estimated for Ontario, Eastern Canada, Ohio Valley/Great Lakes, and the U.S. northeast regions. Coal-fired electric stations generate a wide range of environmentally significant air emissions. The five pollutants selected - sulphur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, particulate matter (less than 10 micrometres in size), mercury, and carbon dioxide - are considered to impact most on environmental health. This report focused on 312 coal-fired electric stations in the regions named above. They were selected based on the likelihood that long-range transport of the emissions from these coal-fired utilities would have an impact on human health and the environment. 55 refs., 10 tabs., 8 figs

  2. Evaluation of a main steam line break with induced, multiple tube ruptures: A comparison of NUREG 1477 (Draft) and transient methodologies Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrish, K.R.

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents the approach taken to analyze the radiological consequences of a postulated main steam line break event, with one or more tube ruptures, for the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station. The analysis was required to support the restart of PVNGS Unit 2 following the steam generator tube rupture event on March 14, 1993 and to justify continued operation of Units 1 and 3. During the post-event evaluation, the NRC expressed concern that Unit 2 could have been operating with degraded tubes and that similar conditions could exist in Units 1 and 3. The NRC therefore directed that a safety assessment be performed to evaluate a worst case scenario in which a non-isolable main steam line break occurs inducing one or more tube failures in the faulted steam generator. This assessment was to use the generic approach described in NUREG 1477, Voltage-Based Interim Plugging Criteria for Steam Generator Tubes - Task Group Report. An analysis based on the NUREG approach was performed but produced unacceptable results for off-site and control room thyroid doses. The NUREG methodology, however, does not account for plant thermal-hydraulic transient effects, system performance, or operator actions which could be credited to mitigate dose consequences. To deal with these issues, a more detailed analysis methodology was developed using a modified version of the Combustion Engineering Plant Analysis Code, which examines the dose consequences for a main steam line break transient with induced tube failures for a spectrum equivalent to 1 to 4 double ended guillotine U-tube breaks. By incorporating transient plant system responses and operator actions, the analysis demonstrates that the off-site and control room does consequences for a MSLBGTR can be reduced to acceptable limits. This analysis, in combination with other corrective and recovery actions, provided sufficient justification for continued operation of PVNGS Units 1 and 3, and for the subsequent restart of Unit 2.

  3. Evaluation of a main steam line break with induced, multiple tube ruptures: A comparison of NUREG 1477 (Draft) and transient methodologies Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parrish, K.R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the approach taken to analyze the radiological consequences of a postulated main steam line break event, with one or more tube ruptures, for the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station. The analysis was required to support the restart of PVNGS Unit 2 following the steam generator tube rupture event on March 14, 1993 and to justify continued operation of Units 1 and 3. During the post-event evaluation, the NRC expressed concern that Unit 2 could have been operating with degraded tubes and that similar conditions could exist in Units 1 and 3. The NRC therefore directed that a safety assessment be performed to evaluate a worst case scenario in which a non-isolable main steam line break occurs inducing one or more tube failures in the faulted steam generator. This assessment was to use the generic approach described in NUREG 1477, Voltage-Based Interim Plugging Criteria for Steam Generator Tubes - Task Group Report. An analysis based on the NUREG approach was performed but produced unacceptable results for off-site and control room thyroid doses. The NUREG methodology, however, does not account for plant thermal-hydraulic transient effects, system performance, or operator actions which could be credited to mitigate dose consequences. To deal with these issues, a more detailed analysis methodology was developed using a modified version of the Combustion Engineering Plant Analysis Code, which examines the dose consequences for a main steam line break transient with induced tube failures for a spectrum equivalent to 1 to 4 double ended guillotine U-tube breaks. By incorporating transient plant system responses and operator actions, the analysis demonstrates that the off-site and control room does consequences for a MSLBGTR can be reduced to acceptable limits. This analysis, in combination with other corrective and recovery actions, provided sufficient justification for continued operation of PVNGS Units 1 and 3, and for the subsequent restart of Unit 2

  4. Commerical electric power cost studies. Capital cost addendum multi-unit coal and nuclear stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    This report is the culmination of a study performed to develop designs and associated capital cost estimates for multi-unit nuclear and coal commercial electric power stations, and to determine the distribution of these costs among the individual units. This report addresses six different types of 2400 MWe (nominal) multi-unit stations as follows: Two Unit PWR Station-1139 MWe Each, Two Unit BWR Station-1190 MWe Each, Two Unit High Sulfur Coal-Fired Station-1232 MWe Each, Two Unit Low Sulfur Coal-Fired Station-1243 MWe Each, Three Unit High Sulfur Coal-Fired Station-794 MWe Each, Three Unit Low Sulfur Coal-Fired Station-801 MWe Each. Recent capital cost studies performed for ERDA/NRC of single unit nuclear and coal stations are used as the basis for developing the designs and costs of the multi-unit stations. This report includes the major study groundrules, a summary of single and multi-unit stations total base cost estimates, details of cost estimates at the three digit account level and plot plan drawings for each multi-unit station identified

  5. Space Station Freedom power - A reliability, availability, and maintainability assessment of the proposed Space Station Freedom electric power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnquist, S. R.; Twombly, M.; Hoffman, D.

    1989-01-01

    A preliminary reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) analysis of the proposed Space Station Freedom electric power system (EPS) was performed using the unit reliability, availability, and maintainability (UNIRAM) analysis methodology. Orbital replacement units (ORUs) having the most significant impact on EPS availability measures were identified. Also, the sensitivity of the EPS to variations in ORU RAM data was evaluated for each ORU. Estimates were made of average EPS power output levels and availability of power to the core area of the space station. The results of assessments of the availability of EPS power and power to load distribution points in the space stations are given. Some highlights of continuing studies being performed to understand EPS availability considerations are presented.

  6. Impact of a 1,000-foot thermal mixing zone on the steam electric power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veil, J.A.

    1994-04-01

    Thermal discharge requirements for power plants using once-through cooling systems are based on state water quality standards for temperatures that must be met outside of designated mixing zones. This study evaluates the impact of limiting the extent of thermal mixing zones. This study evaluates the impact of limiting the extent of thermal mixing zones to no more than 1,000 feet from the discharge point. Data were collected from 79 steam electric plants. Of the plants currently using once-through cooling systems, 74% could not meet current thermal standards at the edge of a 1,000-foot mixing zone. Of this total, 68% would retrofit cooling towers, and 6% would retrofit diffusers. The estimated nationwide capital cost for retrofitting plants that could not meet current thermal standards at the edge of a 1,000-foot mixing zone is $21.4 billion. Conversion of a plant from once-through cooling to cooling towers or addition of diffusers would result in a lower energy output from that plant. For the affected plants, the total estimated replacement cost would be $370 to $590 million per year. Some power companies would have to construct new generating capacity to meet the increased energy demand. The estimated nationwide cost of this additional capacity would be $1.2 to $4.8 billion. In addition to the direct costs associated with compliance with a 1,000-foot mixing zone limit, other secondary environmental impacts would also occur. Generation of the additional power needed would increase carbon dioxide emissions by an estimated 8.3 million tons per year. In addition, conversion from once-through cooling systems to cooling towers at affected plants would result in increased evaporation of about 2.7 million gallons of water per minute nationwide

  7. Technical evaluation report on the monitoring of electric power to the reactor-protection system for the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant, Units 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selan, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    This report documents the technical evaluation of the monitoring of electric power to the reactor protection system (RPS) at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant, Units 1 and 2. The evaluation is to determine if the proposed design modification will protect the RPS from abnormal voltage and frequency conditions which could be supplied from the power supplies and will meet certain requirements set forth by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The proposed design modifications with time delays verified by GE, will protect the RPS from sustained abnormal voltage and frequency conditions from the supplying sources

  8. A method and device allowing a more rational exploitation of electrical power-stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mascarello, Jean.

    1974-01-01

    Description is given of a device permitting a more rational exploitation of electrical power-stations characterized by the fact that, while electric power available during slack hours is used for pressurizing air (the thus pressurized air being stored in tanks), the electric power available during slack days is used for generating hydrogen from water, said hydrogen being stored in other tanks, combustion of the stored hydrogen by the stored air being used for generating electric power during electric power consumption peak-periods [fr

  9. Eddy current magnetic bias x-probe qualification and inspection of steam generator Monel 400 tubing in Pickering Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepine, B.A.; Van Langen, J.; Obrutsky, L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the x-probe MB 350 eddy current inspection array probe, for detection of open OD axial crack-like flaws in Monel 400 tubes at Pickering Nuclear Generating Station. This report contains a selection of inspection results from the field inspections performed with this probe during the 2003 and 2004 period at Pickering Nuclear Generating Station A and B. During the 2003 in-service eddy current inspection results of Pickering Nuclear Generating Station A (PNGS-A) Unit 2, a 13 mm (0.5 inch) long axial indication was detected by the CTR1 bobbin and CTR2-C4 array probes in Tube R25-C52 of Steam Generator (SG) 11 in the hot leg sludge pile region. An experimental magnetic bias X-probe, specially designed by Zetec for inspection of Monel 400 tubing, was deployed and the indication was characterized as a potential out diameter (OD) axially oriented crack. Post-inspection tube pulling and destructive examination confirmed the presence of an Environmentally Assisted Crack (EAC), approximately 80% deep and 13mm long. Due to the significance of this discovery, Ontario Power Generation (OPG) requested AECL to initiate a program for qualification of the X-probe MB 350 for the detection of OD axial cracks in medium to high magnetic permeability μ r Monel 400 PNGS-A and B steam generator tubing at different locations. The X-probe MB 350 subsequently has been deployed as a primary inspection probe for crack detection for PNGS steam generators. (author)

  10. Optimal Charging Schedule Planning and Economic Analysis for Electric Bus Charging Stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-Ceng Leou

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The battery capacity of electric buses (EB used for public transportation is greater than that of electric cars, and the charging power is also several times greater than that used in electric cars; this can result in high energy consumption and negatively impact power distribution networks. This paper proposes a framework to determine the optimal contracted power capacity and charging schedule of an EB charging station in such a way that energy costs can be reduced. A mathematical model of controlled charging, which includes the capacity and energy charges of the station, was developed to minimize costs. The constraints of the model include the charging characteristics of an EB and the operational guidelines of the bus company. A practical EB charging station was used to verify the proposed model. The financial viability of this EB charging station is also studied in this paper. The economic analysis model for this charging station considers investment and operational costs, and the operational revenue. Sensitivity analyses with respect to some key parameters are also performed in this paper. Based on actual operational routes and EB charging schemes, test results indicate that the EB charging station investment is feasible, and the planning model proposed can be used to determine optimal station power capacity and minimize energy costs.

  11. 75 FR 43915 - Basin Electric Power Cooperative: Deer Creek Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-27

    ... factors that could be affected by the proposed Project were evaluated in detail in the EIS. These issues... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Rural Utilities Service Basin Electric Power Cooperative: Deer Creek... Energy Facility project (Project) in Brookings and Deuel Counties, South Dakota. The Administrator of RUS...

  12. An Analytical Planning Model to Estimate the Optimal Density of Charging Stations for Electric Vehicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Ahn

    Full Text Available The charging infrastructure location problem is becoming more significant due to the extensive adoption of electric vehicles. Efficient charging station planning can solve deeply rooted problems, such as driving-range anxiety and the stagnation of new electric vehicle consumers. In the initial stage of introducing electric vehicles, the allocation of charging stations is difficult to determine due to the uncertainty of candidate sites and unidentified charging demands, which are determined by diverse variables. This paper introduces the Estimating the Required Density of EV Charging (ERDEC stations model, which is an analytical approach to estimating the optimal density of charging stations for certain urban areas, which are subsequently aggregated to city level planning. The optimal charging station's density is derived to minimize the total cost. A numerical study is conducted to obtain the correlations among the various parameters in the proposed model, such as regional parameters, technological parameters and coefficient factors. To investigate the effect of technological advances, the corresponding changes in the optimal density and total cost are also examined by various combinations of technological parameters. Daejeon city in South Korea is selected for the case study to examine the applicability of the model to real-world problems. With real taxi trajectory data, the optimal density map of charging stations is generated. These results can provide the optimal number of chargers for driving without driving-range anxiety. In the initial planning phase of installing charging infrastructure, the proposed model can be applied to a relatively extensive area to encourage the usage of electric vehicles, especially areas that lack information, such as exact candidate sites for charging stations and other data related with electric vehicles. The methods and results of this paper can serve as a planning guideline to facilitate the extensive

  13. An Analytical Planning Model to Estimate the Optimal Density of Charging Stations for Electric Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Yongjun; Yeo, Hwasoo

    2015-01-01

    The charging infrastructure location problem is becoming more significant due to the extensive adoption of electric vehicles. Efficient charging station planning can solve deeply rooted problems, such as driving-range anxiety and the stagnation of new electric vehicle consumers. In the initial stage of introducing electric vehicles, the allocation of charging stations is difficult to determine due to the uncertainty of candidate sites and unidentified charging demands, which are determined by diverse variables. This paper introduces the Estimating the Required Density of EV Charging (ERDEC) stations model, which is an analytical approach to estimating the optimal density of charging stations for certain urban areas, which are subsequently aggregated to city level planning. The optimal charging station's density is derived to minimize the total cost. A numerical study is conducted to obtain the correlations among the various parameters in the proposed model, such as regional parameters, technological parameters and coefficient factors. To investigate the effect of technological advances, the corresponding changes in the optimal density and total cost are also examined by various combinations of technological parameters. Daejeon city in South Korea is selected for the case study to examine the applicability of the model to real-world problems. With real taxi trajectory data, the optimal density map of charging stations is generated. These results can provide the optimal number of chargers for driving without driving-range anxiety. In the initial planning phase of installing charging infrastructure, the proposed model can be applied to a relatively extensive area to encourage the usage of electric vehicles, especially areas that lack information, such as exact candidate sites for charging stations and other data related with electric vehicles. The methods and results of this paper can serve as a planning guideline to facilitate the extensive adoption of electric

  14. 75 FR 15462 - PPL Susquehanna, LLC; Susquehanna Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-29

    ... section through its Commission-approved Physical Security Plan, Training and Qualification Plan, Safeguards Contingency Plan, and Cyber Security Plan referred to collectively hereafter as `security plans...

  15. 75 FR 39986 - In the Matter of Entergy Operations, Inc., Waterford Steam Electric Station, Independent Spent...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-13

    ... or possess another active U.S. Government-granted security clearance (i.e., Top Secret, Secret, or....e., Top Secret, Secret or Confidential. 5. The licensee shall develop, implement, and maintain....e., Top Secret, Secret or Confidential. 6. The licensee shall develop, implement, and maintain...

  16. 75 FR 34787 - In the Matter of Luminant Generation Company LLC; Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-18

    ... or possess another active U.S. Government-granted security clearance (i.e., Top Secret, Secret, or....e., Top Secret, Secret or Confidential. 5. The licensee shall develop, implement, and maintain....e., Top Secret, Secret or Confidential. [[Page 34791

  17. 76 FR 12137 - Entergy Operations, Inc. Waterford Steam Electric Station, Unit 3 Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-04

    ... of the plant and personnel safety, would maintain protection of health and safety of the public...-informed evaluation process has shown to be significant to public health and safety; (2) performing health physics or chemistry duties required as a member of the onsite emergency response organization's minimum...

  18. 75 FR 15746 - Entergy Operations, Inc., Waterford Steam Electric Station, Unit 3; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    ... Security Plan, Training and Qualification Plan, Safeguards Contingency Plan, and Cyber Security Plan... necessary changes to its security plans. Pursuant to 10 CFR 51.32, ``Finding of no significant impact,'' the... and implementing comprehensive site security programs. The amendments to 10 CFR 73.55 published on...

  19. 77 FR 75674 - Susquehanna Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2, PPL Susquehanna, LLC, Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    ... ensure that the licensee's emergency response organization (ERO) personnel are familiar with their duties... licensees to conduct a biennial EP exercise is to ensure that ERO personnel are familiar with their duties... by each offsite authority having a role under the plan. Since the licensee has: (1) Conducted seven...

  20. 75 FR 13322 - PPL Susquehanna, LLC.: Susquehanna Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2 Environmental Assessment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-19

    ... workers and members of the public. Therefore, no changes or different types of radiological impacts are... to historical and cultural resources. There would be no impact to socioeconomic resources. Therefore...

  1. 75 FR 13798 - Entergy Operations, Inc.; Waterford Steam Electric Station, Unit 3 Environmental Assessment and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-23

    ...). There will be no change to radioactive effluents that affect radiation exposures to plant workers and... cultural resources. There would be no impact to socioeconomic resources. Therefore, no changes to or...

  2. Error Reduction in an Operating Environment - Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blevins, Mike; Gallman, Jim

    1998-01-01

    After having outlined that a program to manage human performance and to reduce human performance errors has reached an 88% error reduction rate and a 99% significant error reduction rate, the authors present this program. It takes three cornerstones of human performance management into account: training, leadership and procedures. Other aspects are introduced: communication, corrective action programs, a root cause analysis, seven steps of self checking, trending, and a human performance enhancement program. These other aspects and their relationships are discussed. Program strengths and downsides are outlined, as well as actions needed for success. Another approach is then proposed which comprises proactive interventions and indicators for human performance. These indicators are identified and introduced by analyzing the anatomy of an event. The limitations of this model are discussed

  3. A modular Space Station/Base electrical power system - Requirements and design study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliason, J. T.; Adkisson, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    The requirements and procedures necessary for definition and specification of an electrical power system (EPS) for the future space station are discussed herein. The considered space station EPS consists of a replaceable main power module with self-contained auxiliary power, guidance, control, and communication subsystems. This independent power source may 'plug into' a space station module which has its own electrical distribution, control, power conditioning, and auxiliary power subsystems. Integration problems are discussed, and a transmission system selected with local floor-by-floor power conditioning and distribution in the station module. This technique eliminates the need for an immediate long range decision on the ultimate space base power sources by providing capability for almost any currently considered option.

  4. Technical descriptions of Hudson River electricity generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchison, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    Six fossil-fueled and one nuclear electricity generating plants are sited along the Hudson River estuary between kilometers 8 and 228, measured from the river mouth. Their aggregate rated capacity is 5,798 MW of electricity; operating at that capacity they would withdraw cooling water from the river at the rate of 1.5 x 10 to the 9th power cu m/d and reject heat at the rate of 155 x 10 to the 9th power kcal/d. Three of these plants, the fossil-fueled Roseton and Bowline and the nuclear Indian Point facilities; account for 75% of total rated capacity, 62% of maximum water withdrawal, and 79% of potential heat rejection. These three plants and a proposed pumped-storage facility at Cornwall, all sited between km 60 and 106, were the focus of environmental litigation. The Indian Point plant normally operates at 100% generation capacity; the other plants may experience daily operating load changes that vary from approximately 50% to 100% of total generation capacity, depending on system electrical demand or economic considerations. All plants experience periodic unscheduled outages for repairs. 6 refs., 7 figs

  5. Study of the European market for industrial nuclear power plants for the mixed production of electricity and steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The opportunity of developing the mixed production of electricity and steam from nuclear power plants in the nine countries of the European Community is studied. Both public distribution and autonomous production are envisaged. An attempt is made to estimate the potentiel market for district heating and for chemical, agricultural and alimentary, textile, paper, car manufacture and wood industries. The reactors considered are LWR reactors of at least 1000MWth. Suggestions are given to overcome the difficulties and constraints that stand in the way of a nuclear solution [fr

  6. Business Models for Solar Powered Charging Stations to Develop Infrastructure for Electric Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Robinson

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Electric power must become less dependent on fossil fuels and transportation must become more electric to decrease carbon emissions and mitigate climate change. Increasing availability and accessibility of charging stations is predicted to increase purchases of electric vehicles. In order to address the current inadequate charging infrastructure for electric vehicles, major entities must adopt business models for solar powered charging stations (SPCS. These SPCS should be located in parking lots to produce electricity for the grid and provide an integrated infrastructure for charging electric vehicles. Due to the lack of information related to SPCS business models, this manuscript designs several models for major entities including industry, the federal and state government, utilities, universities, and public parking. A literature review of the available relevant business models and case studies of constructed charging stations was completed to support the proposals. In addition, a survey of a university’s students, staff, and faculty was conducted to provide consumer research on people’s opinion of SPCS construction and preference of business model aspects. Results showed that 69% of respondents would be more willing to invest in an electric vehicle if there was sufficient charging station infrastructure at the university. Among many recommendations, the business models suggest installing level 1 charging for the majority of entities, and to match entities’ current pricing structures for station use. The manuscript discusses the impacts of fossil fuel use, and the benefits of electric car and SPCS use, accommodates for the present gap in available literature on SPCS business models, and provides current consumer data for SPCS and the models proposed.

  7. Start-up support for New Brunswick Electric's Point Lepreau nuclear steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, W.; Leroux, A.

    1983-05-01

    The start-up of the 600 MW Point Lepreau reactor provided the opportunity for direct involvement in the important low and medium power start-up phase which was of particular interest because this was a first-of-a-kind reactor type incorporating a new steam generator design. Support included test assistance and test results interpretation for the thermal hydraulic performance of the steam generators and in particular, investigation of water level response to operating pressure, power and feed flow. This work resulted in both a greatly improved understanding of transient characteristics and in a number of beneficial refinements in the control methods

  8. An autonomous nuclear power plant with integrated nuclear steam supply system designed for electric power and heat supply in remote areas with difficult access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamovich, L.A.; Grechko, G.I.; Lapin, B.D.; Ulasevich, V.K.; Shishkin, V.A.

    1997-01-01

    The paper contains basic conceptual principles used to develop the technical assignment for an autonomous nuclear power plant with integrated nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) designed to provide heat and electricity for areas which are remote with difficult access. The paper also describes technical procedures and equipment, NPP thermal hydraulic flow chart, steam generator design, safety aspects as well as operational and maintenance procedures. (author)

  9. Multiple Charging Station Location-Routing Problem with Time Window of Electric Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Li-ying

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the electric vehicle (EV multiple charging station location-routing problem with time window to optimize the routing plan of capacitated EVs and the strategy of charging stations. In particular, the strategy of charging stations includes both infrastructure-type selection and station location decisions. The problem accounts for two critical constraints in logistic practice: the vehicle loading capacity and the customer time windows. A hybrid heuristic that incorporates an adaptive variable neighborhood search (AVNS with the tabu search algorithm for intensification was developed to address the problem. The specialized neighborhood structures and the selection methods of charging station used in the shaking step of AVNS were proposed. In contrast to the commercial solver CPLEX, experimental results on small-scale test instances demonstrate that the algorithm can find nearly optimal solutions on small-scale instances. The results on large-scale instances also show the effectiveness of the algorithm.

  10. Probabilistic modeling of nodal electric vehicle load due to fast charging stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Difei; Wang, Peng; Wu, Qiuwei

    2016-01-01

    In order to reduce greenhouse gas emission and fossil fuel dependence, Electric Vehicle (EV) has drawn increasing attention due to its zero emission and high efficiency. However, new problems such as range anxiety, long charging duration and high charging power may threaten the safe and efficient...... station into consideration. Fuzzy logic inference system is applied to simulate the charging decision of EV drivers at fast charging station. Due to increasing EV loads in power system, the potential traffic congestion in fast charging stations is modeled and evaluated by queuing theory with spatial...

  11. Clean coal technology project to Polk Power Station, Tampa Electric Company, Florida, Volume 1: Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    Tampa Electric Company proposes to construct and operate a 1,150-MW power station in southwestern Polk County, Florida. The proposed Polk Power Station would require an EPA NPDES permit for a new source and would include a 260-MW IGCC unit as a DOE Clean Coal Technology demonstration project. This EIS document assesses the proposed project and alternatives with respect to environmental impacts. Mitigative measures are also evaluated for the preferred alternative. Included in this Volume I are the following: alternatives including Tampa Electric Companies proposed project (preferred alternative with DOE financial assistance); affected environment; environmental consequences of the alternatives

  12. Evaluation of material integrity on electricity power steam generator cycles (turbine casing) component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Histori; Benedicta; Farokhi; S A, Soedardjo; Triyadi, Ari; Natsir, M

    1999-01-01

    The evaluation of material integrity on power steam generator cycles component was done. The test was carried out on casing turbine which is made from Inconel 617. The tested material was taken from t anjung Priok plant . The evaluation was done by metallography analysis using microscope with magnification of 400. From the result, it is shown that the material grains are equiaxed

  13. The Electric Fleet Size and Mix Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows and Recharging Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiermann, Gerhard; Puchinger, Jakob; Røpke, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Due to new regulations and further technological progress in the field of electric vehicles, the research community faces the new challenge of incorporating the electric energy based restrictions into vehicle routing problems. One of these restrictions is the limited battery capacity which makes...... detours to recharging stations necessary, thus requiring efficient tour planning mechanisms in order to sustain the competitiveness of electric vehicles compared to conventional vehicles. We introduce the Electric Fleet Size and Mix Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows and Recharging Stations (E......-FSMFTW) to model decisions to be made with regards to fleet composition and the actual vehicle routes including the choice of recharging times and locations. The available vehicle types differ in their transport capacity, battery size and acquisition cost. Furthermore, we consider time windows at customer...

  14. Analysis and quality of service evaluation of a fast charging station for electric vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenginis, Ioannis; Vardakas, John S.; Zorba, Nizar; Verikoukis, Christos V.

    2016-01-01

    Electrification of transportation is considered as one of the most promising ways to mitigate climate change and reduce national security risks from oil and gasoline imports. Fast charging stations that provide high quality of service will facilitate the wide market penetration of electric vehicles. In this paper, the operation of a fast charging station is analyzed by employing a novel queuing model. The proposed analysis considers that the various electric vehicle models are classified by their battery size, and computes the customers' mean waiting time in the queue by taking into account the available charging spots, as well as the stochastic arrival process and the stochastic recharging needs of the various electric vehicle classes. Furthermore, a charging strategy is proposed according to which the drivers are motivated to limit their energy demands. The implementation of the proposed strategy allows the charging station to serve more customers without any increase in the queue waiting time. The high precision of the present analytical model is confirmed through simulations. Therefore, it may be utilized by existing fast charging station operators that need to provide high quality of service, or by future investors that need to design an efficient installation. - Highlights: • A fast charging station for multiple classes of electric vehicles is presented and analyzed. • A novel multiclass queuing model is presented for the mean queue waiting time derivation. • The system's arrival rate capacity is derived given a maximum tolerable waiting time limit. • A charging strategy is proposed aiming at increasing the system's arrival rate capacity. • The charging station operator's revenue is calculated based on the energy drawn by the electric vehicles.

  15. Impact on the steam electric power industry of deleting Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act: Capital costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veil, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Many power plants discharge large volumes of cooling water. In some cases, the temperature of the discharge exceeds state thermal requirements. Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act (CWA) allows a thermal discharger to demonstrate that less stringent thermal effluent limitations would still protect aquatic life. About 32% of total US steam electric generating capacity operates under Section 316(a) variances. In 1991, the US Senate proposed legislation that would delete Section 316(a) from the CWA. This study, presented in two companion reports, examines how this legislation would affect the steam electric power industry. This report describes alternatives available to nuclear and coal-fired plants currently operating under variances. Data from 38 plants representing 14 companies are used to estimate the national cost of implementing such alternatives. Although there are other alternatives, most affected plants would be retrofitted with cooling towers. Assuming that all plants currently operating under variances would install cooling towers, the national capital cost estimate for these retrofits ranges from $22.7 billion to $24.4 billion (in 1992 dollars). The second report quantitatively and qualitatively evaluates the energy and environmental impacts of deleting the variance. Little justification has been found for removing the Section 316(a) variance from the CWA

  16. Design of electric vehicle charging station based on wind and solar complementary power supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li

    2018-05-01

    Electric vehicles have become a major trend in the development of the automobile industry. Green energy saving is an important feature of their development. At the same time, the related charging facilities construction is also critical. If we improve the charging measures to adapt to its green energy-saving features, it will be to a greater extent to promote its further development. This article will propose a highly efficient green energy-saving charging station designed for the electric vehicles.

  17. Energy and exergy analysis of electricity generation from natural gas pressure reducing stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neseli, Mehmet Alparslan; Ozgener, Onder; Ozgener, Leyla

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Forecasting the recoverable energy from natural gas pressure reduction stations. • Electricity generation through pressure reduction stations via turboexpanders. • A thermodynamics analysis of PRS. - Abstract: Electricity generation or power recovery through pressure reduction stations (PRS) for general use has not been realized in Izmir. The main objective of the present study was to do a case study for calculating electricity to be recovered in one natural gas pressure reduction stations in Izmir. It is the first forecasting study to obtain energy from natural gas pressure-reducing stations in Izmir. Energy can be obtained from natural gas PRS with turbo-expanders instead of using throttle valves or regulators from the PRS. The exergy performance of PRS with TE is evaluated in this study. Exergetic efficiencies of the system and components are determined to assess their individual performances. Based upon pressure change and volumetric flow rate, it can be obtained by recovering average estimated installed capacity and annual energy 494.24 kW, 4113.03 MW h, respectively. In terms of estimated installed capacity power and annual energy, the highest level is 764.88 kW, approximately 6365.34 MW h, in Aliaga PRS. Also it can be seen that CO 2 emission factor average value is 295.45 kg/MW h

  18. Trouble found during regular inspection of No.1 plant in Takahama Power Station, Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    No.1 plant in Takahama Power Station, Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc. is a PWR plant with the rated output of 826 MWe. Its regular inspection has been carried out since August 10, 1989, and eddy current flaw detection inspection was performed on the total number of steam generator heating tubes (9619 tubes except already plugged tubes). As the result, significant indication was observed in 6 tubes in the U-bend part, in 6 tubes in the tube-supporting plate part, in 4 tubes in the crevice part in the tube plate, in 9 tubes in the expanded part in the tube plate and in 11 tubes at the boundary of the expanded part, in total in 36 heating tubes, all of them on high temperature side. Consequently, it was decided to plug these 36 defective heating tubes. The heating tubes are those made of Inconel 600, having 22.2 mm outside diameter and 1.27 mm wall thickness. (K.I.)

  19. Papers of 4. Scientific-Technical Seminar: Material Study for Electric Power Stations and Energetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The research on the materials commonly used in electric power stations and energetics have been summarized in the course of the seminar. Especially a different kinds of steels have been investigated from the view point of their desirable mechanical and corrosion properties

  20. A Control Algorithm for Electric Vehicle Fast Charging Stations Equipped with Flywheel Energy Storage Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Bo; Dragicevic, Tomislav; Freijedo Fernandez, Francisco Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a control strategy for plugin electric vehicle (PEV) fast charging station (FCS) equipped with a flywheel energy storage system (FESS). The main role of the FESS is not to compromise the predefined charging profile of PEV battery during the provision of a hysteresis-type active...

  1. Two-Level Control for Fast Electrical Vehicle Charging Stations with Multi Flywheel Energy Storage System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SUN, BO; Dragicevic, Tomislav; Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    This paper applies a hierarchical control for a fast charging station (FCS) composed of paralleled PWM rectifier and dedicated paralleled multiple flywheel energy storage systems (FESSs), in order to mitigate peak power shock on grid caused by sudden connection of electrical vehicle (EV) chargers...

  2. The effects of solar-geomagnetically induced currents on electrical systems in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subudhi, M.; Carroll, D.P.; Kasturi, S.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study to evaluate the potential effects of geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) caused by the solar disturbances on the in-plant electrical distribution system and equipment in nuclear power stations. The plant-specific electrical distribution system for a typical nuclear plant is modeled using the ElectroMagnetic Transient Program (EMTP). The computer model simulates online equipment and loads from the station transformer in the switchyard of the power station to the safety-buses at 120 volts to which all electronic devices are connected for plant monitoring. The analytical model of the plant's electrical distribution system is studied to identify the transient effects caused by the half-cycle saturation of the station transformers due to GIC. This study provides results of the voltage harmonics levels that have been noted at various electrical buses inside the plant. The emergency circuits appear to be more susceptible to high harmonics due to the normally light load conditions. In addition to steady-state analysis, this model was further analyzed simulating various plant transient conditions (e.g., loss of load or large motor start-up) occurring during GIC events. Detail models of the plant's protective relaying system employed in bus transfer application were included in this model to study the effects of the harmonic distortion of the voltage input. Potential harmonic effects on the uniterruptable power system (UPS) are qualitatively discussed as well

  3. Optimal planning of electric vehicle charging station at the distribution system using hybrid optimization algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Awasthi, Abhishek; Venkitusamy, Karthikeyan; Padmanaban, Sanjeevikumar

    2017-01-01

    India's ever increasing population has made it necessary to develop alternative modes of transportation with electric vehicles being the most preferred option. The major obstacle is the deteriorating impact on the utility distribution system brought about by improper setup of these charging...... stations. This paper deals with the optimal planning (siting and sizing) of charging station infrastructure in the city of Allahabad, India. This city is one of the upcoming smart cities, where electric vehicle transportation pilot project is going on under Government of India initiative. In this context......, a hybrid algorithm based on genetic algorithm and improved version of conventional particle swarm optimization is utilized for finding optimal placement of charging station in the Allahabad distribution system. The particle swarm optimization algorithm re-optimizes the received sub-optimal solution (site...

  4. The Grand Quevilly thermal test station - the SMW sodium circuit with a generator of superheated steam at 545 deg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robin, M.G.

    1964-01-01

    A 5 MW installation is described which is a reduced model of the heat exchange system of a sodium-cooled reactor. This plant, which is situated at Grand Quevilly (near Rouen), consists of: 1 - A primary sodium loop made up of a sodium re-heater running on heavy diesel oil, a mechanical pump and an intermediate exchanger made up of clusters of tubes fitted with baffles. 2 - A NaK(56 per cent of K) secondary loop consisting mainly of a mechanical pump and a double-wall steam generator with forced circulation and complete vaporization. 3 - A tertiary water loop consisting of the inside of the steam generator pipes, a pressure-reducing valve which cools down the super-heated fluid and acts as a turbine, a condenser, a charge-pump and a supply pump for the boiler. The heat is given finally to a water-source flowing into the Seine. Two important points of the installation are: - The water treatment unit - The control and regulation system Apart from the general satisfactory operation of the installation which it is hoped to obtain, a careful study will be made of the heat transmission coefficients of the important equipment such as the intermediate exchanger and the steam generator. The construction was finished on April 28, 1964. (author) [fr

  5. Electric power and the environment: An analysis of pollutant emissions at Argentine state-owned electric power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnevali, D; Suarez, C E [Instituto de Economia Energetica, San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina)

    1991-08-01

    This paper describes the impact on particulate and 'greenhouse gases' emissions of substitution policies implemented by Argentine state-owned electric power stations. Those policies involve the substitution, on the one hand, of hydroelectric and nuclear energy for conventional thermal energy and, on the other hand, of natural gas for fuel oil, diesel oil and coal. As additional investments are required in conventional thermal power stations to prevent environmental pollution, the investment savings generated by substitution policies have been calculated. While the environmental impacts of hydroelectric, nuclear and natural gas facilities is locally significant and is experienced in geographical areas away from cities, there can be no doubt that the substitution policies implemented in the Argentine electricity sector have overall both ecological and economic benefits. (author). 1 ref., 8 figs, 2 tabs.

  6. Probabilistic Harmonic Calculation in Distribution Networks with Electric Vehicle Charging Stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxue Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrating EV charging station into power grid will bring impacts on power system, among which the most significant one is the harmonic pollution on distribution networks. Due to the uncertainty of the EV charging process, the harmonic currents brought by EV charging stations have a random nature. This paper proposed a mathematical simulation method for studying the working status of charging stations, which considers influencing factors including random leaving factor, electricity price, and waiting time. Based on the proposed simulation method, the probability distribution of the harmonic currents of EV charging stations is obtained and used in the calculation of the probability harmonic power flow. Then the impacts of EVs and EV charging stations on distribution networks can be analyzed. In the case study, the proposed simulation and analysis method is implemented on the IEEE-34 distribution network. The influences of EV arrival rates, the penetration rate, and the accessing location of EV charging station are also investigated. Results show that this research has good potential in guiding the planning and construction of charging station.

  7. Considering the dynamic refueling behavior in locating electric vehicle charging stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, K.; Sun, X. H.

    2014-11-01

    Electric vehicles (EVs) will certainly play an important role in addressing the energy and environmental challenges at current situation. However, location problem of EV charging stations was realized as one of the key issues of EVs launching strategy. While for the case of locating EV charging stations, more influence factors and constraints need to be considered since the EVs have some special attributes. The minimum requested charging time for EVs is usually more than 30minutes, therefore the possible delay time due to waiting or looking for an available station is one of the most important influence factors. In addition, the intention to purchase and use of EVs that also affects the location of EV charging stations is distributed unevenly among regions and should be considered when modelling. Unfortunately, these kinds of time-spatial constraints were always ignored in previous models. Based on the related research of refuelling behaviours and refuelling demands, this paper developed a new concept with dual objectives of minimum waiting time and maximum service accessibility for locating EV charging stations - named as Time-Spatial Location Model (TSLM). The proposed model and the traditional flow-capturing location model are applied on an example network respectively and the results are compared. Results demonstrate that time constraint has great effects on the location of EV charging stations. The proposed model has some obvious advantages and will help energy providers to make a viable plan for the network of EV charging stations.

  8. Impact of drought on U.S. steam electric power plant cooling water intakes and related water resource management issues.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimmell, T. A.; Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-04-03

    This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements their overall research effort by evaluating water availability at power plants under drought conditions. While there are a number of competing demands on water uses, particularly during drought conditions, this report focuses solely on impacts to the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet. Included are both fossil-fuel and nuclear power plants. One plant examined also uses biomass as a fuel. The purpose of this project is to estimate the impact on generation capacity of a drop in water level at U.S. steam electric power plants due to climatic or other conditions. While, as indicated above, the temperature of the water can impact decisions to halt or curtail power plant operations, this report specifically examines impacts as a result of a drop in water levels below power plant submerged cooling water intakes. Impacts due to the combined effects of excessive temperatures of the returned cooling water and elevated temperatures of receiving waters (due to high ambient temperatures associated with drought) may be examined in a subsequent study. For this study, the sources of cooling water used by the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet were examined. This effort entailed development of a database of power plants and cooling water intake locations and depths for those plants that use surface water as a source of cooling water. Development of the database and its general characteristics are described in Chapter 2 of this report. Examination of the database gives an indication of how low water levels can drop before cooling water intakes cease to function. Water level drops are evaluated against a number of different power plant characteristics, such as the nature of the water source (river vs. lake or reservoir

  9. On the legal nature of electricity supply contracts concluded by electricity companies and power stations generating electricity from renewable energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, B.J.

    1998-01-01

    Section 2 of the German Act for enhanced use of electricity from renewable energy sources (StEG) defines the obligation to contract but not the contractual obligations, i.e. the conditions of performance of the contract (supply and purchase of electricity and the legal obligations of contractors). The analysis here shows that characterising this mandatory contract required by the act as an agreement of purchase and sale more appropriately describes the legal nature of the contract and the intent of the legislator than other contracts for supply and purchase of electricity, as for instance those concluded by electric utilities and their customers. One specific aspect elaborated by the author is that the StEG does not constitute an obligation to supply on the part of the renewable energy generating power station, so that the power station operator is not obliged to ensure availability of the electricity at any time or in terms of supplies that can be called off by the purchasing utility, whereas the electric utility is obliged by section 2 of the StEG to purchase the contractual amounts from the generating station. (orig./CB) [de

  10. Severe accident analysis of a steam generator tube rupture accident using MAAP-CANDU to support level 2 PSA for the Point Lepreau Generating Station Refurbishment Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petoukhov, S.M.; Brown, M.J. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    A Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessment was performed for the Point Lepreau Generating Station. The MAAP-CANDU code was used to simulate the progression of postulated severe core damage accidents and fission product releases. This paper discusses the results for the reference case of the Steam Generator Tube Rupture initiating event. The reference case, dictated by the Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessment, was extreme and assumed most safety-related plant systems were not available: all steam generator feedwater; the emergency water supply; the moderator, shield and shutdown cooling systems; and all stages of emergency core cooling. The reference case also did not credit any post Fukushima lessons or any emergency mitigating equipment. The reference simulation predicted severe core damage beginning at 3.7 h, containment failure at 6.4 h, moderator boil off by 8.2 h, and calandria vessel failure at 42 h. A total release of 5.3% of the initial inventory of radioactive isotopes of Cs, Rb and I was predicted by the end of the simulation (139 h). Almost all noble gas fission products were released to the environment, primarily after the containment failure. No hydrogen/carbon monoxide burning was predicted. (author)

  11. On the possibility of generation of cold and additional electric energy at thermal power stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimenko, A. V.; Agababov, V. S.; Borisova, P. N.

    2017-06-01

    A layout of a cogeneration plant for centralized supply of the users with electricity and cold (ECCG plant) is presented. The basic components of the plant are an expander-generator unit (EGU) and a vapor-compression thermotransformer (VCTT). At the natural-gas-pressure-reducing stations, viz., gas-distribution stations and gas-control units, the plant is connected in parallel to a throttler and replaces the latter completely or partially. The plant operates using only the energy of the natural gas flow without burning the gas; therefore, it can be classified as a fuelless installation. The authors compare the thermodynamic efficiencies of a centralized cold supply system based on the proposed plant integrated into the thermal power station scheme and a decentralized cold supply system in which the cold is generated by electrically driven vapor-compression thermotransformers installed on the user's premises. To perform comparative analysis, the exergy efficiency was taken as the criterion since in one of the systems under investigation the electricity and the cold are generated, which are energies of different kinds. It is shown that the thermodynamic efficiency of the power supply using the proposed plant proves to be higher within the entire range of the parameters under consideration. The article presents the results of investigating the impact of the gas heating temperature upstream from the expander on the electric power of the plant, its total cooling capacity, and the cooling capacities of the heat exchangers installed downstream from the EGU and the evaporator of the VCTT. The results of calculations are discussed that show that the cold generated at the gas-control unit of a powerful thermal power station can be used for the centralized supply of the cold to the ventilation and conditioning systems of both the buildings of the power station and the neighboring dwelling houses, schools, and public facilities during the summer season.

  12. Space Station Freedom electrical power system hardware commonality with the United States Polar Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieker, Lorra L.; Haraburda, Francis M.

    1989-01-01

    Information is presented on how the concept of commonality is being implemented with respect to electric power system hardware for the Space Station Freedom and the U.S. Polar Platform. Included is a historical account of the candidate common items which have the potential to serve the same power system functions on both Freedom and the Polar Platform. The Space Station program and objectives are described, focusing on the test and development responsibilities. The program definition and preliminary design phase and the design and development phase are discussed. The goal of this work is to reduce the program cost.

  13. Improved HYLIFE-II heat transport system and steam power plant: Impact on performance and cost of electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, M.A.; Lee, Ying T.

    1992-12-01

    The HYLIFE-II conceptual design has evolved and improved continually over the past four years to its present form. This paper describes the latest FY92 versions, Reference Case H1 (nominally 1 GWe net output) and the Enhanced Case HE (nominally 2 GWe net output), which take advantage of improvements in the tritium management system to eliminate the intermediate loop and the intermediate heat exchangers (IHX's). The improvements in the heat transport system and the steam power plant are described and the resulting cost reductions are evaluated. The new estimated cost of electricity (in 1990 dollars) is 6.6 cents/kWh for Reference Case H1 and 4.7 cents/kWh for the Enhanced Case

  14. Robust velocity and load control of a steam turbine in a combined cycle thermoelectric power station; Control robusto de velocidad y carga de una turbina de vapor en una central termoelectrica de ciclo combinado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes Archundia, Enrique

    1998-12-31

    This research work is oriented to design, develop and validate an algorithm of modern control, that allows obtaining better performances in the control of speed of a steam turbine pertaining to a combined cycle thermoelectric power station, in all the operation interval, as well as obtaining better performances in the control of the amount of generated megawatts by the same when it is connected to an electric power generator, comparing the performance with the one obtained by means of the existing conventional controller. The changes in the speed reference or load are at the request of the operator and they always occur in incline form, indicating the rapidity with which it is desired to carry out the change of value in the reference. This is the reason for why the main objective of the control to design is to make a good follow up to references of the incline type. In the subsystem of the existing steam turbine the disadvantage is that the valves that regulate the steam flow to the turbine present a connection with the bypass valve that allows to derive the steam flow towards the main condenser without going through the turbine. It is for this reason that a multi-variable control that contemplates the interaction that occurs among the valves just mentioned, departing from a single variable design. The robust control H{infinity} has the following characteristics that allow it to be applied to the steam turbine process: the design can be made to have two poles in the origin, with which a good follow up to references of incline type is obtained; it allows the uncertainty handling, with which good results in everything are expected an entire operation interval; and it allows the design of multi-variable controllers, with which the existing interaction between the valves of control and bypass is considered. It is very difficult to be able to make tests with the real process, due to the cost and risks that it implies, nevertheless, the developments achieved in the areas

  15. Nuclear process steam for industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seddon, W.A.

    1981-11-01

    A joint industrial survey funded by the Bruce County Council, the Ontario Energy Corporation and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited was carried out with the cooperation of Ontario Hydro and the Ontario Ministry of Industry and Tourism. Its objective was to identify and assess the future needs and interest of energy-intensive industries in an Industrial Energy Park adjacent to the Bruce Nuclear Power Development. The Energy Park would capitalize on the infrastructure of the existing CANDU reactors and Ontario Hydro's proven and unique capability to produce steam, as well as electricity, at a cost currently about half that from a comparable coal-fired station. Four industries with an integrated steam demand of some 1 x 10 6 lb/h were found to be prepared to consider seriously the use of nuclear steam. Their combined plants would involve a capital investment of over $200 million and provide jobs for 350-400 people. The high costs of transportation and the lack of docking facilities were considered to be the major drawbacks of the Bruce location. An indication of steam prices would be required for an over-all economic assessment

  16. Electrical system design and reliability at Ontario Hydro nuclear generating stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Royce, C. J. [Ontario Hydro, 700 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X6 (Canada)

    1986-02-15

    This paper provides an overview of design practice and the predicted and actual reliability of electrical station service Systems at Ontario Nuclear Generating Stations. Operational experience and licensing changes have indicated the desirability of improving reliability in certain instances. For example, the requirement to start large emergency coolant injection pumps resulted in the turbine generator units in a multi-unit station being used as a back-up power supply. Results of reliability analyses are discussed. To mitigate the effects of common mode events Ontario Hydro adopted a 'two group' approach to the design of safety related Systems. This 'two group' approach is reviewed and a single fully environmentally qualified standby power supply is proposed for future use. (author)

  17. Reactive Power Support of Electrical Vehicle Charging Station Upgraded with Flywheel Energy Storage System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SUN, BO; Dragicevic, Tomislav; Savaghebi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Electrical vehicles (EVs) are presenting increasingly potential to replace the conventional fossil fuel based vehicles due to environmental friendly characteristic. Accordingly, Charging Stations (CS), as an intermediate between grid and large numbers of EVs, are supposed to have more critical...... influence on future smart transportation network. This paper explores an off-board charging station upgraded with flywheel energy storage system that could provide a reactive power support to the grid utility. A supervisory control scheme based on distributed bus signaling is proposed to coordinate...... the operation of each component in the system. As a result, the charging station could supply the reactive power support to the utility grid without compromising the charging algorithm and preserve the battery’s lifetime. Finally, the real-time simulation results based on dSPACE1006 verifies the proposed...

  18. Combined Solar Charging Stations and Energy Storage Units Allocation for Electric Vehicles by Considering Uncertainties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yousefi Khanghah, Babak; Anvari-Moghaddam, Amjad; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2017-01-01

    Electric vehicles (EVs) are becoming a key feature of smart grids. EVs will be embedded in the smart grids as a mobile load-storage with probabilistic behavior. In order to manage EVs as flexible loads, charging stations (CSs) have essential roles. In this paper, a new method for optimal sitting...... are considered based on time-of-use (TOU) demand response programs (DRPs). In order to solve the optimization problem considering uncertainty of load growth, electricity price, initial state of charge of batteries and solar power generation, genetic algorithm method using Monte-Carlo simulation is used...

  19. Assessment of environmental effects on Space Station Freedom Electrical Power System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cheng-Yi; Nahra, Henry K.

    1991-01-01

    Analyses of EPS (electrical power system) interactions with the LEO (low earth orbit) environment are described. The results of these analyses will support EPS design so as to be compatible with the natural and induced environments and to meet power, lifetime, and performance requirements. The environmental impacts to the Space Station Freedom EPS include aerodynamic drag, atomic oxygen erosion, ultraviolet degradation, VXB effect, ionizing radiation dose and single event effects, electromagnetic interference, electrostatic discharge, plasma interactions (ion sputtering, arcing, and leakage current), meteoroid and orbital debris threats, thermal cycling effects, induced current and voltage potential differences in the SSF due to induced electric field, and contamination degradation.

  20. Space station electrical power distribution analysis using a load flow approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, Ervin M.

    1987-01-01

    The space station's electrical power system will evolve and grow in a manner much similar to the present terrestrial electrical power system utilities. The initial baseline reference configuration will contain more than 50 nodes or busses, inverters, transformers, overcurrent protection devices, distribution lines, solar arrays, and/or solar dynamic power generating sources. The system is designed to manage and distribute 75 KW of power single phase or three phase at 20 KHz, and grow to a level of 300 KW steady state, and must be capable of operating at a peak of 450 KW for 5 to 10 min. In order to plan far into the future and keep pace with load growth, a load flow power system analysis approach must be developed and utilized. This method is a well known energy assessment and management tool that is widely used throughout the Electrical Power Utility Industry. The results of a comprehensive evaluation and assessment of an Electrical Distribution System Analysis Program (EDSA) is discussed. Its potential use as an analysis and design tool for the 20 KHz space station electrical power system is addressed.

  1. Orientation of Space Station Freedom electrical power system in environmental effects assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cheng-Yi

    1990-01-01

    The orientation effects of six Space Station Freedom Electrical Power System (EPS) components are evaluated for three environmental interactions: aerodynamic drag, atomic oxygen erosion, and orbital debris impact. Designers can directly apply these orientation factors to estimate the magnitude of the examined environment and the environmental effects for the EPS component of interest. The six EPS components are the solar array, photovoltaic module radiator, integrated equipment assembly, solar dynamic concentrator, solar dynamic radiator, and beta gimbal.

  2. Electric Vehicle Fast-Charging Station Unified Modeling and Stability Analysis in the dq Frame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Wang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The electric vehicle fast-charging station is an important guarantee for the popularity of electric vehicle. As the fast-charging piles are voltage source converters, stability issues will occur in the grid-connected fast-charging station. Since the dynamic input admittance of the fast-charging pile and the dynamic output impedance play an important role in the interaction system stability, the station and grid interaction system is regarded as load-side and source-side sub-systems to build the dynamic impedance model. The dynamic input admittance in matrix form is derived from the fast-charging pile current control loop considering the influence of the LC filter. Similarly, the dynamic output impedance can be obtained similarly by considering the regional power grid capacity, transformer capacity, and feed line length. On this basis, a modified forbidden region-based stability criterion is used for the fast-charging station stability analysis. The frequency-domain case studies and time-domain simulations are presented next to show the influence of factors from both the power grid side and fast-charging pile side. The simulation results validated the effectiveness of the dq frame impedance model and the stability analysis method.

  3. Study of the mechanical properties of the electric power station components: the punch test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isselin, J.

    2003-03-01

    The aging of the electric production park implies an increasing need of knowledge concerning the evolution of the mechanical properties of its components. With regard to this problem, the availability in material is more and more small. This work proposes to characterize these properties through a mechanical test called Punch test. The main characteristic of this test is to use very small volume samples. The development of this test has been carried out by the study of a 15 MDV 4-05 steel coming from a steam drum of a thermal power plant after 145000 hours of service. At first, we have measured the influence of the parameters of this test. Then, the study has dealt more particularly on the transition temperature of the material. With the finite element simulation method, the strain hardening coefficient of the material has been determined. (O.M.)

  4. A technological review on electric vehicle DC charging stations using photovoltaic sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Cheddadi; Fatima, Errahimi; najia, Es-sbai; Chakib, Alaoui

    2018-05-01

    Within the next few years, Electrified vehicles are destined to become the essential component of the transport field. Consequently, the charging infrastructure should be developed in the same time. Among this substructure, Charging stations photovoltaic-assisted are attracting a substantial interest due to increased environmental awareness, cost reduction and rise in efficiency of the PV modules. The intention of this paper is to review the technological status of Photovoltaic–Electric vehicle (PV-EV) charging stations during the last decade. The PV-EV charging station is divided into two categories, which are PV-grid and PV-standalone charging systems. From a practical point view, the distinction between the two architectures is the bidirectional inverter, which is added to link the station to the smart grid. The technological infrastructure includes the common hardware components of every station, namely: PV array, dc-dc converter provided with MPPT control, energy storage unit, bidirectional dc charger and inverter. We investigate, compare and evaluate many valuable researches that contain the design and control of PV-EV charging system. Additionally, this concise overview reports the studies that include charging standards, the power converters topologies that focus on the adoption of Vehicle-to grid technology and the control for both PV–grid and PV standalone DC charging systems.

  5. Steampunk: Full Steam Ahead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Heather M.

    2010-01-01

    Steam-powered machines, anachronistic technology, clockwork automatons, gas-filled airships, tentacled monsters, fob watches, and top hats--these are all elements of steampunk. Steampunk is both speculative fiction that imagines technology evolved from steam-powered cogs and gears--instead of from electricity and computers--and a movement that…

  6. Feasibility Study of a Solar-Powered Electric Vehicle Charging Station Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Ye

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In China, the power sector is currently the largest carbon emitter and the transportation sector is the fastest-growing carbon emitter. This paper proposes a model of solar-powered charging stations for electric vehicles to mitigate problems encountered in China’s renewable energy utilization processes and to cope with the increasing power demand by electric vehicles for the near future. This study applies the proposed model to Shenzhen City to verify its technical and economic feasibility. Modeling results showed that the total net present value of a photovoltaic power charging station that meets the daily electricity demand of 4500 kWh is $3,579,236 and that the cost of energy of the combined energy system is $0.098/kWh. In addition, the photovoltaic powered electric vehicle model has pollutant reduction potentials of 99.8%, 99.7% and 100% for carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen oxides, respectively, compared with a traditional gasoline-fueled car. Sensitivity analysis results indicated that interest rate has a relatively strong influence on COE (Cost of Energy. An increase in the interest rate from 0% to 6% increases COE from $0.027/kWh to $0.097/kWh. This analysis also suggests that carbon pricing promotes renewable energy only when the price of carbon is above $20/t.

  7. Novel wind powered electric vehicle charging station with vehicle-to-grid (V2G) connection capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fathabadi, Hassan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The only wind powered EV charging station reported in the literature. • The charging station maximally converts wind energy into electric energy. • Novel fast and highly accurate MPPT technique implemented in the EV charging station. • The charging station is grid-connected type with vehicle-to-grid (V2G) technology. • The charging station balances load demand in the grid connected to it. - Abstract: In this study, a novel grid-connected wind powered electric vehicle (EV) charging station with vehicle-to-grid (V2G) technology is designed and constructed. The wind powered EV charging station consists of a wind energy conversion system (WECS), a unidirectional DC/DC converter connected to the WECS, a maximum power point tracking (MPPT) controller, 15 bidirectional DC/DC converters dedicated to 15 charging stations provided for charging EVs, and a three-phase bidirectional DC/AC inverter connected to the grid. The contribution of this work is that the grid-connected wind powered EV charging station presented in this work is the only constructed EV charging station reported in the literature that uses wind energy as a renewable resource to produce electric energy for charging EVs, and moreover, it maximally converts wind energy into electric energy because it uses a novel fast and highly accurate MPPT technique proposed in this study. Other works are only simulated models without any new MPPT consideration. It is demonstrated that the constructed wind powered EV charging station is a perfect charging station that not only produces electric energy to charge EVs but also balances load demand in the grid connected to it.

  8. Electric utilities deregulation and its impact on nuclear power generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trehan, N.K.

    1998-01-01

    Under restructuring and deregulation, it is not clear as to who would have the responsibility, and what obligations the market participants would have to ensure that the electrical system reliability (stability) is maintained. Due to the dynamic nature of the electrical grid, especially with the implementation of restructuring and deregulation, vulnerabilities exist which may impact the reliability (stability) of the offsite electrical power system. In a nuclear power generating unit, an offsite electric power system and an onsite electric power system are required to permit the functioning of structures, systems, and components which are important to safety. The safety function for each system is to provide sufficient capacity and capability to assure that the containment integrity is maintained during power operation or in the event of a postulated accident. Analyses performed by the applicants must verify that the electrical grid remains stable in the event of a loss of the nuclear unit generator, the largest other unit on the grid or the most critical transmission line. The stability of the electric grid is assumed in the safety analyses and a change in it would impact those analyses. However, it may impact the availability of a stable electric power to the safety buses because of the limited number of available transmission lines. This paper discusses electrical power generation and demand, reserve margins, power transfer capability, development of new innovative technologies to compensate for lack of the construction of transmission lines, legislation for the formulation of a self regulation organization (SRO), grid disturbances that may lead to a voltage collapse, and the vulnerabilities which may impact the availability of a stable power to the nuclear power generating stations

  9. Steam-generator replacement sets new marks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    This article describes how, in one of the most successful steam-generator replacement experiences at PWRs worldwide, the V C Summer retrofit exceeded plant goals for critical-path duration, radiation, exposure, and radwaste generation. Intensive planning and teamwork, combined with the firm support of station management and the use of mockups to prepare the work crews for activity in a radiological environment, were key factors in the record performance achieved by South Carolina Electric and Gas Co (SCE and G) in replacing three steam generators at V C Summer nuclear station. The 97-day, two-hour breaker-to-breaker replacement outage -- including an eight-day delay for repair of leak in a small-bore seal-injection line of a reactor coolant pump (unrelated to the replacement activities) -- surpassed the project goal by over one day. Moreover, the outage was only 13 hours shy of the world record held by Virginia Power Co's North Anna Unit 1

  10. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), Westinghouse phase 1. Volume 5: Combined gas-steam turbine cycles. [energy conversion efficiency in electric power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, D. J.; Foster-Pegg, R. W.; Lee, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    The energy conversion efficiency of gas-steam turbine cycles was investigated for selected combined cycle power plants. Results indicate that it is possible for combined cycle gas-steam turbine power plants to have efficiencies several point higher than conventional steam plants. Induction of low pressure steam into the steam turbine is shown to improve the plant efficiency. Post firing of the boiler of a high temperature combined cycle plant is found to increase net power but to worsen efficiency. A gas turbine pressure ratio of 12 to 1 was found to be close to optimum at all gas turbine inlet temperatures that were studied. The coal using combined cycle plant with an integrated low-Btu gasifier was calculated to have a plant efficiency of 43.6%, a capitalization of $497/kW, and a cost of electricity of 6.75 mills/MJ (24.3 mills/kwh). This combined cycle plant should be considered for base load power generation.

  11. Brunswick Steam Electric Plant, Units 1 and 2. Annual operating report for 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Net electrical energy generated by Unit 1 was 30,399 MWH with the generator on line 334.5 hrs. Unit 2 generated 2,481,014 MWH with the generator on line 4,915.53 hrs. Information is presented concerning operations, shutdowns and power reductions, maintenance, power generation, modifications, changes to operational procedures, radiation exposures, and leak rate testing

  12. Safety evaluation report related to steam generator tube repair and return to operation Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit No. 1 (Docket No. 50-289)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, H.

    1983-11-01

    Based on our evaluation of the steam generator tube repair method and of subsequent operation using the repaired steam generators, we conclude that the steam generator tube kinetic expansion process is acceptable, that applicable GDC have been met, and that there is reasonable assurance that the health and safety of the public will not be endangered by subsequent operation of the plant

  13. Energy efficiency analysis of steam ejector and electric vacuum pump for a turbine condenser air extraction system based on supervised machine learning modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strušnik, Dušan; Marčič, Milan; Golob, Marjan; Hribernik, Aleš; Živić, Marija; Avsec, Jurij

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Steam ejector pump and electric liquid ring vacuum pump are analysed and modelled. • A supervised machine learning models by using real process data are applied. • The equation of ejector pumped mass flow from steam turbine condenser was solved. • The loss of specific energy capable of work in a SEPS or LRVP component was analysed. • The economic efficiency analysis per different coal heating values was made. - Abstract: This paper compares the vapour ejector and electric vacuum pump power consumptions with machine learning algorithms by using real process data and presents some novelty guideline for the selection of an appropriate condenser vacuum pump system of a steam turbine power plant. The machine learning algorithms are made by using the supervised machine learning methods such as artificial neural network model and local linear neuro-fuzzy models. The proposed non-linear models are designed by using a wide range of real process operation data sets from the CHP system in the thermal power plant. The novelty guideline for the selection of an appropriate condenser vacuum pumps system is expressed in the comparative analysis of the energy consumption and use of specific energy capable of work. Furthermore, the novelty is expressed in the economic efficiency analysis of the investment taking into consideration the operating costs of the vacuum pump systems and may serve as basic guidelines for the selection of an appropriate condenser vacuum pump system of a steam turbine.

  14. Unidirectional Magneto-Electric Dipole Antenna for Base Station: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idayachandran, Govindanarayanan; Nakkeeran, Rangaswamy

    2018-04-01

    Unidirectional base station antenna design using Magneto-Electric Dipole (MED) has created enormous interest among the researchers due to its excellent radiation characteristics like low back radiation, symmetrical radiation at E-plane and H-plane compared to conventional patch antenna. Generally, dual polarized antennas are used to increase channel capacity and reliability of the communication systems. In order to serve the evolving mobile communication standards like long term evolution LTE and beyond, unidirectional dual polarized MED antenna are required to have broad impedance bandwidth, broad half power beamwidth, high port isolation, low cross polarization level, high front to back ratio and high gain. In this paper, the critical electrical requirements of the base station antenna and frequently used frequency bands for modern mobile communication have been presented. It is followed by brief review on broadband patch antenna and discussion on complementary antenna concepts. Finally, the performance of linearly polarized and dual polarized magneto-electric dipole antennas along with their feeding techniques are discussed and summarized. Also, design and modeling of developed MED antenna is presented.

  15. Fast Demand Forecast of Electric Vehicle Charging Stations for Cell Phone Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majidpour, Mostafa; Qiu, Charlie; Chung, Ching-Yen; Chu, Peter; Gadh, Rajit; Pota, Hemanshu R.

    2014-07-31

    This paper describes the core cellphone application algorithm which has been implemented for the prediction of energy consumption at Electric Vehicle (EV) Charging Stations at UCLA. For this interactive user application, the total time of accessing database, processing the data and making the prediction, needs to be within a few seconds. We analyze four relatively fast Machine Learning based time series prediction algorithms for our prediction engine: Historical Average, kNearest Neighbor, Weighted k-Nearest Neighbor, and Lazy Learning. The Nearest Neighbor algorithm (k Nearest Neighbor with k=1) shows better performance and is selected to be the prediction algorithm implemented for the cellphone application. Two applications have been designed on top of the prediction algorithm: one predicts the expected available energy at the station and the other one predicts the expected charging finishing time. The total time, including accessing the database, data processing, and prediction is about one second for both applications.

  16. Engineering of electrical systems of nuclear power stations for improved reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narasinga Rao, S.N.; Ramanathan, K.; Choudhary, N.N.

    1977-01-01

    Operational problems experienced in electrical systems/equipment of the Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS) and the Rajasthan Atomic Power Station (RAPS) and their solutions are dealt in detail. This experience has led to new design concepts which are being introduced for improved reliability in design of the Madras Atomic Power Project (MAPP) and the Narora Atomic Power Project (NAPP). Saline pollution on switchyard equipments was the major problem of the TAPS due to its coastal location. Saline pollution resulted in flash over of insulators and failure of clamps. The problem was solved by suitable changes in insulators, conductors, transformers, switches and arranging portable live line washing of the switchyard equipment. In MAPP which is also located on coast, an indoor switchyard is built. NAPP is located in a seismic zone, therefore, all equipment is specified for appropriate seismic duty. Various other improvements are described. (M.G.B.)

  17. Levels of electric field strength within the immediate vicinity of FM radio stations in Accra, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azah, C K; Amoako, J K; Fletcher, J J

    2013-10-01

    Heightened awareness of the ever-expanding use of radiofrequency (RF) techniques and technology has led to mounting concerns from the general public and the scientific community regarding the possible health effects that may arise as a consequence of exposure to RF radiations and has drawn the attention of many researchers the world over. A survey of the RF electromagnetic radiation at public access points in the vicinity of 20 frequency-modulated (FM) radio stations has been made in Accra, Ghana. The fundamental object was to determine the levels of RF fields from FM broadcast antennae within 10-200 m radius about the foot of the FM base station and at a height of 1.5 m above the ground at selected locations. A spectrum analyser and a bi-conical antenna element sensitive and effective within the frequency band of 30-300 MHz were used. Results obtained indicated that the levels of electric field strength ranged from 5.4E-04 V m(-1) at FM station 'O' to 7.4E-08 V m(-1) at FM station 'D'. At a transmission frequency range of 88-108 MHz, the variation of power densities is from 2.5E-10 to 1.5E-17 Wm(-2). These values are very low and are far below the reference level set by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection and therefore do not pose any known hazard to the inhabitants of Accra, Ghana. The electric field levels presented in this work are comparable with those reported from epidemiological studies conducted elsewhere.

  18. Construction of Shika Nuclear Power Station Unit No.2 of the Hokuriku Electric Power Co., Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanari, Shozo; Miyahara, Ryohei; Umezawa, Takeshi; Teshiba, Ichiro

    2006-01-01

    Construction of the Shika Nuclear Power Station Unit No.2 of the Hokuriku Electric Power Co., Inc. (advanced boiling-water reactor; output: 1.358 mega watts) was begun in August 1999 and it will resume commercial operation in March 2006 as scheduled. Hitachi contributed effectually toward realizing the project with supply of a complete set of the advanced nuclear reactor and turbine-generator system with the latest design and construction technology in harmony. Large-scale modular structures for installation and a computer-aided engineering system for work procedure and schedule management were applied with the utmost priority placed on work efficiency, safety and quality assurance. (T.Tanaka)

  19. Power transmission cable development for the Space Station Freedom electrical power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Gregory V.; Biess, John J.

    1989-01-01

    Power transmission cable is presently being evaluated under a NASA Lewis Research Center advanced development contract for application in the Space Station Freedom (SSF) electrical power system (EPS). Evaluation testing has been performed by TRW and NASA Lewis Research Center. The results of this development contract are presented. The primary cable design goals are to provide (1) a low characteristic inductance to minimize line voltage drop at 20 kHz, (2) electromagnetic compatibility control of the 20-kHz ac power current, (3) a physical configuration that minimizes ac resistance and (4) release of trapped air for corona-free operation.

  20. A flowsheet model of a coal-fired MHD/steam combined electricity generating cycle, using the access computer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davison, J.E.; Eldershaw, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    This document forms the final report on a study of a coal-fired magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)/steam electric power generation system carried out by British Coal Corporation for the Commission of the European Communities. The study objective was to provide mass and energy balances and overall plant efficiency predictions for MHD to assist the Commission in their evaluation of advanced power generation technologies. In early 1990 the British Coal Corporation completed a study for the Commission in which a computer flowsheet modelling package was used to predict the performance of a conceptual air blown MHD plant. Since that study was carried out increasing emphasis has been placed on the possible need to reduce CO 2 emissions to counter the so-called greenhouse effect. Air blown MHD could greatly reduce CO 2 emissions per KWh by virtue of its high thermal efficiency. However, if even greater reductions in CO 2 emissions were required the CO 2 produced by coal combustion may have to be disposed of, for example into the deep ocean or underground caverns. To achieve this at minimum cost a concentrated CO 2 flue gas would be required. This could be achieved in an MHD plant by using a mixture of high purity oxygen and recycled CO 2 flue gas in the combustor. To assess this plant concept the European Commission awarded British Coal a contract to produce performance predictions using the access computer program

  1. Waste to Energy Conversion by Stepwise Liquefaction, Gasification and "Clean" Combustion of Pelletized Waste Polyethylene for Electric Power Generation---in a Miniature Steam Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi Anaraki, Saber

    The amounts of waste plastics discarded in developed countries are increasing drastically, and most are not recycled. The small fractions of the post-consumer plastics which are recycled find few new uses as their quality is degraded; they cannot be reused in their original applications. However, the high energy density of plastics, similar to that of premium fuels, combined with the dwindling reserves of fossil fuels make a compelling argument for releasing their internal energy through combustion, converting it to thermal energy and, eventually, to electricity through a heat engine. To minimize the emission of pollutants this energy conversion is done in two steps, first the solid waste plastics undergo pyrolytic gasification and, subsequently, the pyrolyzates (a mixture of hydrocarbons and hydrogen) are blended with air and are burned "cleanly" in a miniature power plant. This plant consists of a steam boiler, a steam engine and an electricity generator.

  2. Heuristic Storage System Sizing for Optimal Operation of Electric Vehicles Powered by Photovoltaic Charging Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Blasius

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the utilisation of PV systems for electric vehicles charging for transportation requirements of smart cities. The gap between PV power output and vehicles charging demand is highly variable. Therefore, there is a need for additional support from a public distribution grid or a storage device in order to handle the residual power. Long term measurement data retrieved from a charging station for 15 vehicles equipped with a PV system were used in the research. Low and high irradiation seasons influenced the PV output. The charging demand of electric vehicles varied over the course of a year and was correlated to weather conditions. Therefore, the sizing and performance of a supportive storage device should be evaluated in a statistical manner using long period observations.

  3. Distributed Cooperative Control of Multi Flywheel Energy Storage System for Electrical Vehicle Fast Charging Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Bo; Dragicevic, Tomislav; Quintero, Juan Carlos Vasquez

    2015-01-01

    Plug-in electrical vehicles will play a critical role in future smart grid and sudden connection of electrical vehicles chargers may cause huge power-peaks with high slew-rates on grid. In order to cope with this issue, this paper applies a distributed cooperative control for fast charging station...... with dedicated paralleled flywheel-based energy storage system. The distributed DC-bus signaling method is employed in the power coordination of grid and flywheel converters, and a distributed secondary controller generates DC voltage correction term to adjust the local voltage set-point through a dynamic...... consensus based voltage observer by communicating with its neighbors. The control system can realize the power balancing and DC voltage regulation with low reliance on communications. Finally, real-time hardware-in-the-loop results have been reported in order to verify the feasibility of proposed approach....

  4. Reconfigurable Magneto-Electric Dipole Antennas for Base Stations in Modern Wireless Communication Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Ge

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Magneto-electric (ME dipole antennas, with the function of changing the antenna characteristics, such as frequency, polarization, or radiation patterns, are reviewed in this paper. The reconfigurability is achieved by electrically altering the states of diodes or varactors to change the surface currents distributions or reflector size of the antenna. The purpose of the designs is to obtain agile antenna characteristics together with good directive radiation performances, such as low cross-polarization level, high front-to-back ratio, and stable gain. By reconfiguring the antenna capability to support more than one wireless frequency standard, switchable polarizations, or cover tunable areas, the reconfigurable ME dipole antennas are able to switch functionality as the mission changes. Therefore, it can help increase the communication efficiency and reduce the construction cost. This shows very attractive features in base station antennas of modern wireless communication applications.

  5. Steam generator life management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapping, R.L.; Nickerson, J.; Spekkens, P.; Maruska, C.

    1998-01-01

    Steam generators are a critical component of a nuclear power reactor, and can contribute significantly to station unavailability, as has been amply demonstrated in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). CANDU steam generators are not immune to steam generator degradation, and the variety of CANDU steam generator designs and tube materials has led to some unexpected challenges. However, aggressive remedial actions, and careful proactive maintenance activities, have led to a decrease in steam generator-related station unavailability of Canadian CANDUs. AECL and the CANDU utilities have defined programs that will enable existing or new steam generators to operate effectively for 40 years. Research and development work covers corrosion and mechanical degradation of tube bundles and internals, chemistry, thermal hydraulics, fouling, inspection and cleaning, as well as provision for specially tool development for specific problem solving. A major driving force is development of CANDU-specific fitness-for-service guidelines, including appropriate inspection and monitoring technology to measure steam generator condition. Longer-range work focuses on development of intelligent on-line monitoring for the feedwater system and steam generator. New designs have reduced risk of corrosion and fouling, are more easily inspected and cleaned, and are less susceptible to mechanical damage. The Canadian CANDU utilities have developed programs for remedial actions to combat degradation of performance (Gentilly-2, Point Lepreau, Bruce A/B, Pickering A/B), and have developed strategic plans to ensure that good future operation is ensured. This report shows how recent advances in cleaning technology are integrated into a life management strategy, discusses downcomer flow measurement as a means of monitoring steam generator condition, and describes recent advances in hideout return as a life management tool. The research and development program, as well as operating experience, has identified

  6. Soviet steam generator technology: fossil fuel and nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosengaus, J.

    1987-01-01

    In the Soviet Union, particular operational requirements, coupled with a centralized planning system adopted in the 1920s, have led to a current technology which differs in significant ways from its counterparts elsewhere in the would and particularly in the United States. However, the monograph has a broader value in that it traces the development of steam generators in response to the industrial requirements of a major nation dealing with the global energy situation. Specifically, it shows how Soviet steam generator technology evolved as a result of changing industrial requirements, fuel availability, and national fuel utilization policy. The monograph begins with a brief technical introduction focusing on steam-turbine power plants, and includes a discussion of the Soviet Union's regional power supply (GRES) networks and heat and power plant (TETs) systems. TETs may be described as large central co-generating stations which, in addition to electricity, provide heat in the form of steam and hot water. Plants of this type are a common feature of the USSR today. The adoption of these cogeneration units as a matter of national policy has had a central influence on Soviet steam generator technology which can be traced throughout the monograph. The six chapters contain: a short history of steam generators in the USSR; steam generator design and manufacture in the USSR; boiler and furnace assemblies for fossil fuel-fired power stations; auxiliary components; steam generators in nuclear power plants; and the current status of the Soviet steam generator industry. Chapters have been abstracted separately. A glossary is included containing abbreviations and acronyms of USSR organizations. 26 references

  7. Variable electricity and steam from salt, helium and sodium cooled base-load reactors with gas turbines and heat storage - 15115

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.; McDaniel, P.; Zohuri, B.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in utility natural-gas-fired air-Brayton combed cycle technology is creating the option of coupling salt-, helium-, and sodium-cooled nuclear reactors to Nuclear air-Brayton Combined Cycle (NACC) power systems. NACC may enable a zero-carbon electricity grid and improve nuclear power economics by enabling variable electricity output with base-load nuclear reactor operations. Variable electricity output enables selling more electricity at times of high prices that increases plant revenue. Peak power is achieved using stored heat or auxiliary fuel (natural gas, bio-fuels, hydrogen). A typical NACC cycle includes air compression, heating compressed air using nuclear heat and a heat exchanger, sending air through a turbine to produce electricity, reheating compressed air, sending air through a second turbine, and exhausting to a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). In the HRSG, warm air produces steam that is used to produce added electricity. For peak power production, auxiliary heat (natural gas, stored heat) is added before the air enters the second turbine to raise air temperatures and power output. Like all combined cycle plants, water cooling requirements are dramatically reduced relative to other power cycles because much of the heat rejection is in the form of hot air. (authors)

  8. Use and benefit summary of General Electric Company thermocase insulated tubulars for steam enhanced oil recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traynor, B.V. Jr.; Hawley, J.R.; Marziani, V.J.; Prevost, W.M.

    1982-01-01

    General Electric Co.'s (GE) first well-bore insulation in 1969 resulted from the industry's need to produce hot oil on Alaska's North Slope without damaging the permafrost. In the past 3 yr, over 500,000 linear ft of GE's Thermocase has been sold. Thermocase tubulars are in use in California, Wyoming, Texas, Canada, Venezuela, and the USSR. Thermocase insulated tubulars are being used in a wide range of reservoirs under a variety of completion designs. This study discusses field experience, thermal completion benefits afforded by Thermocase tubulars, a quantified economic evaluation in a 1000-ft application, as well as GE's product verification, test and rigid quality control program.

  9. Modeling of a Photovoltaic-Powered Electric Vehicle Charging Station with Vehicle-to-Grid Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azhar Ul-Haq

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed at modelling of a distinct smart charging station for electric vehicles (EVs that is suitable for DC quick EV charging while ensuring minimum stress on the power grid. Operation of the charging station is managed in such a way that it is either supplied by photovoltaic (PV power or the power grid, and the vehicle-to-grid (V2G is also implemented for improving the stability of the grid during peak load hours. The PV interfaced DC/DC converter and grid interfaced DC/AC bidirectional converter share a DC bus. A smooth transition of one operating mode to another demonstrates the effectiveness of the employed control strategy. Modelling and control of the different components are explained and are implemented in Simulink. Simulations illustrate the feasible behaviour of the charging station under all operating modes in terms of the four-way interaction among PV, EVs and the grid along with V2G operation. Additionally, a business model is discussed with comprehensive analysis of cost estimation for the deployment of charging facilities in a residential area. It has been recognized that EVs bring new opportunities in terms of providing regulation services and consumption flexibility by varying the recharging power at a certain time instant. The paper also discusses the potential financial incentives required to inspire EV owners for active participation in the demand response mechanism.

  10. Optimal recharging strategy for battery-switch stations for electric vehicles in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, M.; El Hajj Moussa, C.; Adnot, J.; Galli, A.; Riviere, P.

    2013-01-01

    Most papers that study the recharging of electric vehicles focus on charging the batteries at home and at the work-place. The alternative is for owners to exchange the battery at a specially equipped battery switch station (BSS). This paper studies strategies for the BSS to buy and sell the electricity through the day-ahead market. We determine what the optimal strategies would have been for a large fleet of EVs in 2010 and 2011, for the V2G and the G2V cases. These give the amount that the BSS should offer to buy or sell each hour of the day. Given the size of the fleet, the quantities of electricity bought and sold will displace the market equilibrium. Using the aggregate offers to buy and the bids to sell on the day-ahead market, we compute what the new prices and volumes transacted would be. While buying electricity for the G2V case incurs a cost, it would have been possible to generate revenue in the V2G case, if the arrivals of the EVs had been evenly spaced during the day. Finally, we compare the total cost of implementing the strategies with the cost of buying the same quantity of electricity from EDF. - Highlights: • Optimal strategies for buying/selling electricity through day-ahead auction market. • Given fleet size power bought and sold would change market price and volume. • New prices computed using aggregate offers to buy/sell power in 2010 and 2011. • Timing of arrival of EVs critical in V2G case. If evenly spaced BSS makes money. • Strategies are very robust even when French and German markets were coupled Nov. 2010

  11. Reliability measurement for mixed mode failures of 33/11 kilovolt electric power distribution stations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faris M Alwan

    Full Text Available The reliability of the electrical distribution system is a contemporary research field due to diverse applications of electricity in everyday life and diverse industries. However a few research papers exist in literature. This paper proposes a methodology for assessing the reliability of 33/11 Kilovolt high-power stations based on average time between failures. The objective of this paper is to find the optimal fit for the failure data via time between failures. We determine the parameter estimation for all components of the station. We also estimate the reliability value of each component and the reliability value of the system as a whole. The best fitting distribution for the time between failures is a three parameter Dagum distribution with a scale parameter [Formula: see text] and shape parameters [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. Our analysis reveals that the reliability value decreased by 38.2% in each 30 days. We believe that the current paper is the first to address this issue and its analysis. Thus, the results obtained in this research reflect its originality. We also suggest the practicality of using these results for power systems for both the maintenance of power systems models and preventive maintenance models.

  12. IEEE Std 317-1972: IEEE standard for electric penetration assemblies in containment structures for nuclear power generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This standard prescribes the mechanical, electrical, and test requirements for the design, construction, and installation of electric penetration assemblies in containment structures for stationary nuclear power generating stations. The electric conductor and insulation characteristics of external circuits which connect to penetration assemblies are beyond the scope of these criteria. If there should be any conflict between this standard and those documents referenced herein, this standard shall take precedence over the referenced documents

  13. Feasibility assessment of a solar-powered charging station for electric vehicles in the North Central region of Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilieva Liliya Mihaylova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the topical issue related to the prospects of widespread deployment of electric vehicles and their associated infrastructure in Bulgaria. The main problems hindering the development of electric vehicle transport are summarized and the current status of charging infrastructure in the country is discussed. An approach is proposed for analysis and evaluation of the financial feasibility of investment in a solar-powered charging station for electric vehicles in North Central region of Bulgaria.

  14. General Electric Company analytical model for loss-of-coolant analysis in accordance with 10CFR50 appendix K, amendment No. 3: effect of steam environment on BWR core spray distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-04-01

    The core spray sparger designs of the BWR/2 through BWR/5 product lines were verified by means of full-scale mock-ups tested in air at various flow conditions. In 1974, an overseas technical partner of General Electric reported that a steam environment changed the individual core spray nozzle patterns when compared to patterns measured in air. This document describes preliminary findings of how a steam environment alters the core spray nozzle pattern, and the actions which General Electric is pursuing to quantify the steam effects

  15. Steam coal trade: demand, supply and prices to 2020

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    This report on the international seaborne steam coal market was prepared using an electricity generation model developed for each coal-importing country, with the aid of WEFA Energy's power station database. The report contains chapters on: import demand forecasting methodology; orimulsion (environmental considerations and market potential); Scandinavia; North West Europe; British Isles; South West Europe; Eastern Europe; Eastern Mediterranean and North Africa; Asia; Latin America; North America; world steam coal demand summary; trade and price forecasting methodology; base case forecast; shipping rates; import demand; export supply and foreign exchange rates.

  16. Digital implementation, simulation and tests in MATLAB of the models of Steam line, the turbines, the pressure regulator of a BWR type nucleo electric power plant; Implementacion digital, simulacion y pruebas en MATLAB de los modelos de la linea de vapor, las turbinas y el regulador de presion de una central Nucleoelectrica tipo BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez R, A [UNAM, Laboratorio de Analisis de Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, DEPFI, Campus Morelos, en IMTA Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    In this phase of the project they were carried out exhaustive tests to the models of the steam lines, turbines and pressure regulator of a BWR type nucleo electric central for to verify that their tendencies and behaviors are it more real possible. For it, it was necessary to also analyze the transfer functions of the different components along the steam line until the power generator. Such models define alone the dominant poles of the system, what is not limitation to reproduce a wide range of anticipated transitoriness of a power station operation. In the same manner, it was integrated and proved the integrated model form with the models of feeding water of the SUN-RAH, simulating the nuclear reactor starting from predetermined entrances of the prospective values of the vessel. Also it was coupled with the graphic interface developed with the libraries DirectX implementing a specific monitoring panel for this system. (Author)

  17. Results of 7th regular inspection of No.1 plant in Oi Power Station, Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The 7th regular inspection of No.1 plant in Oi Power Station was carried out from December 25, 1987 to July 15, 1988. The parallel operation was resumed on June 23, 1988, 182 days after the start of the inspection. The facilities to be inspected were the reactor proper, reactor cooling system, measurement and control system, fuel facilities, radiation control facilities, waste facilities, reactor containment installation and emergency power generation system. On these facilities to be inspected, the appearance, disassembling, leak, function, performance and other inspections were carried out, and as the results, a part of the fitting of a water chamber partition cover for a steam generator broke off, significant signals were observed in 936 heating tubes of steam generators, 72 bolts for fixing the blade of a primary coolant pump were damaged, and leak was found in two fuel assemblies. The works related to this regular inspection were accomplished within the range of allowable radiation dose based on the relevant laws. The main reconstruction works carried out during the period of this regular inspection were the use of the fuel containing gadolinia, the removal of a thermometer bypass piping and the repair of defective steam generator tubes. (K.I.)

  18. Development project HTR-electricity-generating plant, concept design of an advanced high-temperature reactor steam cycle plant with spherical fuel elements (HTR-K)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-07-01

    The report gives a survey of the principal work which was necessary to define the design criteria, to determine the main design data, and to design the principal reactor components for a large steam cycle plant. It is the objective of the development project to establish a concept design of an edvanced steam cycle plant with a pebble bed reactor to permit a comparison with the direct-cycle-plant and to reach a decision on the concept of a future high-temperature nuclear power plant. It is tried to establish a largerly uniform basic concept of the nuclear heat-generating systems for the electricity-generating and the process heat plant. (orig.) [de

  19. Application of wire electrodes in electric discharge machining of metal samples of reactor blocks of the operative atomic power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gozhenko, S.V.

    2007-01-01

    Features of application of electroerosive methods are considered during the process of direct definition of properties of metal of the equipment of power units of the atomic power station. Results of development of a complex of the equipment for wire electric discharge machining of metal templet and its use are presented at the control of the basic metal of the main circulating pipelines over blocks of the atomic power station of Ukraine over long terms of operation

  20. S.I. 1987 No. 2182, The Electricity Generating Stations and Overhead Lines (Inquiries Procedure) Rules 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    These Rules, which came into force on 14 January 1988, make new provision for the procedure for any public inquiry held pursuant to Section 34 of the Electricity Act 1957 in relation to applications for consent to construct or extend a generating station (including nuclear stations). The Rules were made pursuant to Section 11 of the Tribunals and Inquiries Act 1971. They revoke the previous Electricity Generating Stations and Overhead Line (Inquiries Procedures) Rules 1981. These new Rules cover the same topics as the previous Rules but aim to shorten the potential length and thus cost of inquiries. They will apply to the Inquiry to be held into the application by the Central Electricity Generating Board to build a pressurised water reactor at Hinkley Point in Somerset. (NEA) [fr

  1. Risk impact of planned maintenance configuration at South Texas Project Electric Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loh, W.T.; Fleming, K.N.; Grantom, C.R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper is based on a study done for the Houston Lighting and Power Company. The purpose of this study is to estimate the risk impact of planned maintenance configurations at South Texas Project Electric Generating Station (STPEGS). To date, the focus of the STP probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) program has been to analyze risk in terms of estimates of accident frequencies that are expressed on a time-averaged basis. Thus, estimates of quantities such as severe core damage frequency have been made such that the temporal variations of this frequency with changing plant configurations are averaged out over time. The only condition that has been imposed on these estimates is that the plant is initially operating at full power when potential initiating events might occur. (author)

  2. Service hall in Number 1 Fukushima Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Company, Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawara, Shigesuke

    1979-01-01

    There are six BWR type nuclear power plants in the Number 1 Fukushima Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Company, Inc. The service hall of the station is located near the entrance of the station. In the center of this service hall, there is the model of a nuclear reactor of full scale. This mock-up shows the core region in the reactor pressure vessel for the number one plant. The diameter and the thickness of the pressure vessel are about 5 m and 16 cm, respectively. The fuel assemblies and control rods are set just like the actual reactor, and the start-up operation of the reactor is shown colorfully and dynamically by pushing a button. When the control rods are pulled out, the boiling of water is demonstrated. The 1/50 scale model of the sixth plant with the power generating capacity of 1100 MWe is set, and this model is linked to the mock-up of reactor written above. The operations of a recirculating loop, a turbine and a condenser are shown by switching on and off lamps. The other exhibitions are shielding concrete wall, ECCS model, and many kinds of panels and models. This service hall is incorporated in the course of study and observation of civics. The good environmental effects to fishes and shells are explained in this service hall. Official buildings and schools are built near the service hall utilizing the tax and grant concerning power generation. This service hall contributes to give much freedom from anxiety to the public by the tour. (Nakai, Y.)

  3. Interim report on the accident at Fukushima Nuclear Power Stations of Tokyo Electric Power Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-12-01

    The Investigation Committee on the Accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Stations (the Investigation Committee) of Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) was established by the Cabinet decision on May 24, 2011. Its objectives are: to conduct investigation for finding out the causes of accidents at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station (Fukushima Dai-ichi NPS) and Fukushima Dai-ni Nuclear Power Station (Fukushima Dai-ni NPS) of TEPCO as well as the causes of accident damage; and to make policy recommendations for limiting the expansion of damage and preventing reoccurrence of similar accidents. The Investigation Committee has conducted its investigation and evaluation since its first meeting on June 7, 2011. Its activities included: site visits to the Fukushima Dai-ichi and Dai-ni NPSs, as well as to other facilities; hearing of heads of local governments around the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPS; and hearing of people concerned through interviews mainly arranged by the Secretariat. As of December 16, 2011, the number of interviewees reached 456. The investigation and evaluation by the Investigation Committee are still ongoing and the Interim Report does not cover every item that the Committee aims at investigating and evaluating. Fact-finding of even some of those items discussed in the Interim Report are not yet completed. The Investigation Committee continues to conduct its investigation and evaluation and will issue its Final Report in the summer of 2012. This brief executive summary covers mainly considerations and evaluation of the issues in Chapter VII of the Interim Report, with brief reference to Chapters I to VI. The Investigation Committee recommendations are printed in bold. (author)

  4. On the complex analysis of the reliability, safety, and economic efficiency of atomic electric power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emel'yanov, I.Ya.; Klemin, A.I.; Polyakov, E.F.

    1977-01-01

    The problem is posed of effectively increasing the engineering performance of nuclear electric power stations (APS). The principal components of the engineering performance of modern large APS are considered: economic efficiency, radiation safety, reliability, and their interrelationship. A nomenclature is proposed for the quantitative indices which most completely characterize the enumerated properties and are convenient for the analysis of the engineering performance. The urgent problem of developing a methodology for the complex analysis and optimization of the principal performance components is considered; this methodology is designed to increase the efficiency of the work on high-performance competitive APS. The principle of complex optimization of the reliability, safety, and economic-efficiency indices is formulated; specific recommendations are made for the practical realization of this principle. The structure of the complex quantiative analysis of the enumerated performance components is given. The urgency and promise of the complex approach to solving the problem of APS optimization is demonstrated, i.e., the solution of the problem of creating optimally reliable, fairly safe, and maximally economically efficient stations

  5. Wind Energy Based Electric Vehicle Charging Stations Sitting. A GIS/Wind Resource Assessment Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Xydis

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The transportation sector is severely correlated with major problems in environment, citizens’ health, climate and economy. Issues such as traffic, fuel cost and parking space have make life more difficult, especially in the dense urban environment. Thus, there is a great need for the development of the electric vehicle (EV sector. The number of cars in cities has increased so much that the current transportation system (roads, parking places, traffic lights, etc. cannot accommodate them properly. The increasing number of vehicles does not affect only humans but also the environment, through air and noise pollution. According to EPA, the 39.2% of total gas emissions in 2007 was caused by transportation activities. Studies have shown that the pollutants are not only gathered in the major roads and/or highways but can travel depending on the meteorological conditions leading to generic pollution. The promotion of EVs and the charging stations are both equally required to be further developed in order EVs to move out of the cities and finally confront the range problem. In this work, a wind resource and a GIS analysis optimizes in a wider area the sitting of wind based charging stations and proposes an optimizing methodology.

  6. Condensate demineralizer system for Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, the Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ariyoshi, Shigeki; Ikeda, Yukio; Kuramoto, Kenji; Omori, Yoshi; Yamamoto, Hiroyoshi

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes the condensate demineralizing equipment recently supplied to the second, third, and fifth power units of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station of the Tokyo Electric Power Company, Inc. The output of this equipment is rated as 4,900 m 3 /h each, which is currently the largest capacity for this type of equipment in Japan. The purpose of this equipment is to remove any ion components and suspended solids contained in condensate to improve its water purity. By doing so, decreasing the corrosion rate of materials used in the plant and, at the same time, decreasing the radioactivity of the condensate, thus easing the whole plant operation can be achieved. The same kind of equipment is also employed at the conventional thermal power stations, but the required functioning and operating mode are quite different. In the case of the nuclear power plant, extremely severe requirements specific with nuclear technology must be met which arise solely from dealing with radioactive substances. Not only the water treatment method, but also layout and arrangement, operation and liquid waste processing methods differ from those for the conventional power plants. The equipment for the sixth unit at Fukushima is now under designing and that for the Tokai No.2 unit of the Japan Atomic Power Company is already under shop fabrication. Both have the rated capacity of 7,300 m 3 /h each, which exceeds far up the capacity of the previously mentioned equipment. (auth.)

  7. Periodical inspection in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Periodical inspection is presently being made of eight nuclear power plants in nuclear power stations. Up to the present time, in three of them, failures as follows have been observed. (1) Unit 3 (PWR) of the Mihama Power Station in The Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc. Nineteen heat-transfer tubes of the steam generators were plugged up due to failure. A fuel assembly with a failed spring fixture and in another the control-rod cluster with a failed control rod fixture were replaced. (2) Unit 2 (PWR) of the Oi Power Station in The Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc. Eight heat-transfer tubes of the heat exchangers were plugged up due to failure. (3) Unit 6 (BWR) of the Fukushima Nuclear Power Station I in The Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. A fuel assembly with leakage was replaced. (Mori, K.)

  8. Type test of Class 1E electric cables, field splices, and connections for nuclear power generating stations - 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    This Standard provides direction for establishing type tests which may be used in qualifying Class 1E electric cables, field splices, and other connections for service in nuclear power generating stations. General guidelines for qualifications are given in IEEE Std 323-1974, Standard for Qualifying Class 1E Electric Equipment for Nuclear Power Generating Stations. Categories of cables covered are those used for power control and instrumentation services. Though intended primarily to pertain to cable for field installation, this guide may also be used for the qualification of internal wiring of manufactured devices

  9. Managing operations of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) exchange stations for use with a smart grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurre, Sarah G.; Bent, Russell; Pan, Feng; Sharkey, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    We consider a deterministic integer programming model for determining the optimal operations of multiple plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) battery exchange stations over time. The operations include the number of batteries to charge, discharge, and exchange at each point in time over a set time horizon. We allow discharging of batteries back to the power grid, through vehicle-to-grid technology. We incorporate the exchange station's dependence on the power network, transportation network, and other exchange stations. The charging and discharging at these exchange stations lead to a greater amount of variability which creates a less predictable and flat power generation curve. We introduce and test three policies to smooth the power generation curve by balancing its load. Further, tests are conducted evaluating these policies while factoring wind energy into the power generation curve. These computational tests use realistic data and analysis of the results suggest general operating procedures for exchange stations and evaluate the effectiveness of these power flattening policies. - Highlights: • Model the operations of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery exchange stations. • Determine the optimal and general charging, discharging, and exchange operations. • Conclude that forced customer service levels are unnecessary with proper pricing. • Examine policies to reduce variability in power generation from PHEVs and wind. • Observe that strict constraints on exchange stations best reduce variability

  10. US central station nuclear electric generating units: significant milestones (status as of January 1, 1979)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    Construction and operational milestones are tabulated for US nuclear power plants. Data are presented on nuclear steam supply system orders. A schedule of commercial operation and projected capital costs through 1990 is given

  11. Optimization and Economic Analysis of Grid-Photovoltaic Electric Boat Charging Station in Kuala Terengganu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salleh N.A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the feasibility of developing grid-photovoltaic electric boat charging station in Kuala Terengganu using simulation-based method. The main focus is on reducing the dependency on subsidy spent by the government in fisheries sector and encouraging green technology in commercial sector. All data such as solar radiation, amount of subsidy received by fishermen, and fishing activities were collected for the selected area. Economic analyses of the proposed system are discussed based on payback period and net present cost (NPC. The comparison between the proposed system and the grid-only system is done based on the production and consumption of electricity per year, the NPC and emission of pollutant. The system also generates high income from selling energy to the grid with tariff rates RM 1.49/kWh. It is concluded that the proposed system is feasible to be developed in the selected area with the payback period and the NPC are 8.2 years and RM 759,098, respectively. The results also show that the performance of the proposed system is better than grid-only system in all the interested parameters.

  12. Alteration in reactor installation (addition of Unit 2) in Shimane Nuclear Power Station, Chugoku Electric Power Co., Inc. (inquiry)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    An inquiry was made by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry to Nuclear Safety Commission on the addition of Unit 2 in Shimane Nuclear Power Station of The Chugoku Electric Power Co., Inc., concerning the technical capability of Chugoku Electric Power Co., Inc., and the plant safety. The NSC requested the Committee on Examination of Reactor Safety to make a deliberation on this subject. Both the technical capability and the safety of Unit 1 were already confirmed by MITI. Unit 2 to be newly added in the Shimane Nuclear Power Station is a BWR power plant with electric output of 820 MW. The examination made by MITI is described: the technical capability of Chugoku Electric Power Co., Inc., the safety of Unit 2 about its siting, reactor proper, reactor cooling system, radioactive waste management, etc. (J.P.N.)

  13. Passive system with steam-water injector for emergency supply of NPP steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Il'chenko, A.G.; Strakhov, A.N.; Magnitskij, D.N.

    2009-01-01

    The calculation results of reliability indicators of emergency power supply system and emergency feed-water supply system of serial WWER-1000 unit are presented. To ensure safe water supply to steam generators during station blackout it was suggested using additional passive emergency feed-water system with a steam-water injector working on steam generators dump steam. Calculated analysis of steam-water injector operating capacity was conducted at variable parameters of steam at the entrance to injector, corresponding to various moments of time from the beginning of steam-and-water damping [ru

  14. In situ testing of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station electrical circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinsel, M.R.; Donaldson, M.R.; Soberano, F.T.

    1987-04-01

    This report discusses the results of electrical in situ testing of selected circuits and components at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station in Shippingport, Pennsylvania. Testing was performed by EG and G Idaho in support of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. The goal was to determine the extent of aging or degradation of various circuits from the original plant, and the two major coreplant upgrades (representing three distinct age groups), as well as to evaluate previously developed surveillance technology. The electrical testing was performed using the Electrical Circuit Characterization and Diagnostic (ECCAD) system developed by EG and G for the US Department of Energy to use at TMI-2. Testing included measurements of voltage, effective series capacitance, effective series inductance, impedance, effective series resistance, dc resistance, insulation resistance and time domain reflectometry (TDR) parameters. The circuits evaluated included pressurizer heaters, control rod position indicator cables, miscellaneous primary system Resistance Temperature Detectors (RTDs), nuclear instrumentation cables, and safety injection system motor operated valves. It is to be noted that the operability of these circuits was tested after several years had elapsed because plant operations had concluded at Shippingport. There was no need following plant shutdown to retain the circuits in working condition, so no effort was expended for that purpose. The in situ measurements and analysis of the data confirmed the effectiveness of the ECCAD system for detecting degradation of circuit connections and splices because of high resistance paths, with most of the problems caused by corrosion. Results indicate a correlation between the chronological age of circuits and circuit degradation

  15. Integration Assessment of Visiting Vehicle Induced Electrical Charging of the International Space Station Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Leonard; Kerslake, Thomas W.; Galofaro, Joel T.

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) undergoes electrical charging in low Earth orbit (LEO) due to positively biased, exposed conductors on solar arrays that collect electrical charges from the space plasma. Exposed solar array conductors predominately collect negatively charged electrons and thus drive the metal ISS structure electrical ground to a negative floating potential (FP) relative to plasma. This FP is variable in location and time as a result of local ionospheric conditions. ISS motion through Earth s magnetic field creates an addition inductive voltage up to 20 positive and negative volts across ISS structure depending on its attitude and location in orbit. ISS Visiting Vehicles (VVs), such as the planned Orion crew exploration vehicle, contribute to the ISS plasma charging processes. Upon physical contact with ISS, the current collection properties of VVs combine with ISS. This is an ISS integration concern as FP must be controlled to minimize arcing of ISS surfaces and ensure proper management of extra vehicular activity crewman shock hazards. This report is an assessment of ISS induced charging from docked Orion vehicles employing negatively grounded, 130 volt class, UltraFlex (ATK Space Systems) solar arrays. To assess plasma electron current collection characteristics, Orion solar cell test coupons were constructed and subjected to plasma chamber current collection measurements. During these tests, coupon solar cells were biased between 0 and 120 V while immersed in a simulated LEO plasma. Tests were performed using several different simulated LEO plasma densities and temperatures. These data and associated theoretical scaling of plasma properties, were combined in a numerical model which was integrated into the Boeing Plasma Interaction Model. It was found that the solar array design for Orion will not affect the ISS FP by more than about 2 V during worst case charging conditions. This assessment also motivated a trade study to determine

  16. Intake-to-delivered-energy ratios for central station and distributed electricity generation in California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heath, Garvin A.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2007-01-01

    In previous work, we showed that the intake fraction (iF) for nonreactive primary air pollutants was 20 times higher in central tendency for small-scale, urban-sited distributed electricity generation (DG) sources than for large-scale, central station (CS) power plants in California [Heath, G.A., Granvold, P.W., Hoats, A.S., Nazaroff, W.W., 2006. Intake fraction assessment of the air pollutant exposure implications of a shift toward distributed electricity generation. Atmospheric Environment 40, 7164-7177]. The present paper builds on that study, exploring pollutant- and technology-specific aspects of population inhalation exposure from electricity generation. We compare California's existing CS-based system to one that is more reliant on DG units sited in urban areas. We use Gaussian plume modeling and a GIS-based exposure analysis to assess 25 existing CSs and 11 DG sources hypothetically located in the downtowns of California's most populous cities. We consider population intake of three pollutants - PM 2.5 , NO x and formaldehyde - directly emitted by five DG technologies - natural gas (NG)-fired turbines, NG internal combustion engines (ICE), NG microturbines, diesel ICEs, and fuel cells with on-site NG reformers. We also consider intake of these pollutants from existing CS facilities, most of which use large NG turbines, as well as from hypothetical facilities located at these same sites but meeting California's best-available control technology standards. After systematically exploring the sensitivity of iF to pollutant decay rate, the iFs for each of the three pollutants for all DG and CS cases are estimated. To efficiently compare the pollutant- and technology-specific exposure potential on an appropriate common basis, a new metric is introduced and evaluated: the intake-to-delivered-energy ratio (IDER). The IDER expresses the mass of pollutant inhaled by an exposed population owing to emissions from an electricity generation unit per quantity of electric

  17. Intake-to-delivered-energy ratios for central station and distributed electricity generation in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Garvin A.; Nazaroff, William W.

    In previous work, we showed that the intake fraction (iF) for nonreactive primary air pollutants was 20 times higher in central tendency for small-scale, urban-sited distributed electricity generation (DG) sources than for large-scale, central station (CS) power plants in California [Heath, G.A., Granvold, P.W., Hoats, A.S., Nazaroff, W.W., 2006. Intake fraction assessment of the air pollutant exposure implications of a shift toward distributed electricity generation. Atmospheric Environment 40, 7164-7177]. The present paper builds on that study, exploring pollutant- and technology-specific aspects of population inhalation exposure from electricity generation. We compare California's existing CS-based system to one that is more reliant on DG units sited in urban areas. We use Gaussian plume modeling and a GIS-based exposure analysis to assess 25 existing CSs and 11 DG sources hypothetically located in the downtowns of California's most populous cities. We consider population intake of three pollutants—PM 2.5, NO x and formaldehyde—directly emitted by five DG technologies—natural gas (NG)-fired turbines, NG internal combustion engines (ICE), NG microturbines, diesel ICEs, and fuel cells with on-site NG reformers. We also consider intake of these pollutants from existing CS facilities, most of which use large NG turbines, as well as from hypothetical facilities located at these same sites but meeting California's best-available control technology standards. After systematically exploring the sensitivity of iF to pollutant decay rate, the iFs for each of the three pollutants for all DG and CS cases are estimated. To efficiently compare the pollutant- and technology-specific exposure potential on an appropriate common basis, a new metric is introduced and evaluated: the intake-to-delivered-energy ratio (IDER). The IDER expresses the mass of pollutant inhaled by an exposed population owing to emissions from an electricity generation unit per quantity of electric

  18. Boxberg III-2 x 500 MW units: Refurbishing and environmental protection measures on the 815 T/H steam generator of works II in Boxberg Power Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cossman, R.; Fritz, M.; Bauchmueller, R. [L& C Steinmueller GmbH, Gummersbach (Germany)

    1995-12-01

    The object of the upgrading measures on the steam generators is: (1) To comply with the requirements of the German antipollution law, which imposes a permissible NO{sub x} content in the flue gas of less than 200 Mg/m{sup 3} STP and a CO content of less than 250 Mg/m{sup 3} STP. (2) To increase the boiler efficiency and availability and the efficiency of the water/steam cycle.

  19. Decentralized energy management strategy based on predictive controllers for a medium voltage direct current photovoltaic electric vehicle charging station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torreglosa, Juan P.; García-Triviño, Pablo; Fernández-Ramirez, Luis M.; Jurado, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Electric vehicle charging station supplied by photovoltaic, batteries and grid connection is analyzed. • The bus voltage is the key parameter for controlling the system by decentralized approach. • Decentralized control approach facilities the enlargement of the system. • Photovoltaic and battery systems are controlled by model predictive controllers. • Response by model predictive controllers improves that by PI controllers. - Abstract: The use of distributed charging stations based on renewable energy sources for electric vehicles has increased in recent years. Combining photovoltaic solar energy and batteries as energy storage system, directly tied into a medium voltage direct current bus, and with the grid support, results to be an interesting option for improving the operation and efficiency of electric vehicle charging stations. In this paper, an electric vehicle charging station supplied by photovoltaic solar panels, batteries and with grid connection is analysed and evaluated. A decentralized energy management system is developed for regulating the energy flow among the photovoltaic system, the battery and the grid in order to achieve the efficient charging of electric vehicles. The medium voltage direct current bus voltage is the key parameter for controlling the system. The battery is controlled by a model predictive controller in order to keep the bus voltage at its reference value. Depending on the state-of-charge of the battery and the bus voltage, the photovoltaic system can work at maximum power point tracking mode or at bus voltage sustaining mode, or even the grid support can be needed. The results demonstrate the proper operation and energy management of the electric vehicle charging station under study.

  20. Study of a New Quick-Charging Strategy for Electric Vehicles in Highway Charging Stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixing Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available To solve the problem, because of which conventional quick-charging strategies (CQCS cannot meet the requirements of quick-charging for multiple types of electric vehicles (EV on highways where vehicle inflow is excessive, this paper proposed a new quick-charging strategy (NQCS for EVs: on the premise of not affecting those EVs being charged, the remaining power of the quick-charging pile with multiple power output interfaces is used to provide a synchronous charging service for EVs waiting in the queue. To verify the effectiveness of this strategy, a power distribution model of charging pile and a queuing model of charging station (CS were constructed. In addition, based on an actual highway service area where vehicle inflow is excessive during the simulation period (0:00–24:00, charging situations of CQCS and NQCS were respectively simulated in a charging station (CS, with different number of chargers, by basic queuing algorithm and an improved queuing algorithm. The simulation results showed that when the relative EV inflow is excessive, compared to CQCS, NQCS not only can reduce user waiting time, charging time, and stay time, but also can improve the utilisation rate of charging infrastructure and service capacity of CS and reduce the queue length of CS. At the same time, NQCS can reduce the impact on the power grid. In addition, in NQCS, the on-demand power distribution method is more efficient than the average power distribution method. Therefore, NQCS is more suitable for quick-charging for multiple types of EVs on highways where vehicle inflow is excessive.

  1. Ergonomics work stations decreases the health impairment and saves electrical energy at the woodworking workshop in Bali, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudiajeng, Lilik; Adiputra, Nyoman; Leibbrandt, Richard

    2012-12-01

    This research was conducted to assess the positive effect of the ergonomics work station on the health impairment and electrical energy usage at the woodworking workshop in Bali, Indonesia. Woodworking workshops are dangerous, particularly when they are used improperly. Workers are exposed to health hazards that cause health impairment and inefficiencies in their work conditions. A preliminary study at a woodworking workshop at the Bali State Polytechnic showed that the work station was not suitable to body size of the participants and caused awkward postures. In addition, there was also an inappropriate physical work environment. Both inappropriate work station and physical work environment caused participants to be less active and motivated. This paper reports on an experimental study into the effects of an ergonomic intervention at this workshop. The participants were 2 groups of male students with 10 participants in each group. The first group performed the task with the original work station as a control group, while the second group performed the task with the new work station. The study found a significant difference between groups (p work station decreased the working heart rate (16.7%), the total score of musculoskeletal disorders (17.3%), and the total score of psychological fatigue (21.5%). Furthermore, it also decreased the electrical energy usage (38.7%). This shows that an ergonomics intervention on work station decreased the health impairment and saved electrical energy usage. It also protected the workers from woodworking hazards and allowed participants to perform their tasks in healthy, safe, convenient and efficient work conditions.

  2. Assessment of Extremely Low Frequency (ELF Electric and Magnetic Fields in Hamedan High Electrical Power Stations and their Effects on Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshid Ghorbani Shahna

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Public and occupational exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF electric and magnetic fields induced by electrical equipment is a significant issue in the environment and at the workplace due to their potential health effects on public health. The purpose of this study was assessment of the electric and magnetic fields intensities and determination of mental and psychological effects of occupational exposure in the high voltage electric power stations in the city of Hamadan, Iran. Material and Methods: The intensities of the magnetic and electric fields were measured at eight high voltage electric power stations at three different intervals of sources using an HI-3604 instrument. A two-part questionnaire was used to assess mental and psychological effects of the exposure to these fields. Two groups of control and case workers including 30 samples were selected to determine the exposure effects. Results: The results of field measurements showed the highest average electric field intensity was related to the CVT unit with 3110 V/m at a 2 m distance from the source and the lowest average was related to the control room with 1.35 V/m next to the source. Also, the highest and lowest magnetic field intensities were close to the transformator 2 and the battery room (50.42 and 1.31 mG, respectively. Discussion and Conclusion: The intensities of electric and magnetic fields in the selected stations are lower than the ACGIH and ICNIRP standard levels for occupational exposures. The results obtained indicate that the distribution of these fields was nonlinear around the sources and the effects observed on exposed workers were non-thermal.

  3. Papers of 6. Scientific-Technical Seminar Material Study for Electric Power Stations and Energetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The report is an assembly of the papers concerning the material problems occurring during the exploitation of power station. The normalization problems in power station and gas pipelines according to the prescription of UE are also discussed. (author)

  4. Impact on the steam electric power industry of deleting Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act: Energy and environmental impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veil, J.A.; VanKuiken, J.C.; Folga, S.; Gillette, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    Many power plants discharge large volumes of cooling water. In some cases, the temperature of the discharge exceeds state thermal requirements. Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act (CWA) allows a thermal discharger to demonstrate that less stringent thermal effluent limitations would still protect aquatic life. About 32% of the total steam electric generating capacity in the United States operates under Section 316(a) variances. In 1991, the US Senate proposed legislation that would delete Section 316(a) from the CWA. This study, presented in two companion reports, examines how this legislation would affect the steam electric power industry. This report quantitatively and qualitatively evaluates the energy and environmental impacts of deleting the variance. No evidence exists that Section 316(a) variances have caused any widespread environmental problems. Conversion from once-through cooling to cooling towers would result in a loss of plant output of 14.7-23.7 billion kilowatt-hours. The cost to make up the lost energy is estimated at $12.8-$23.7 billion (in 1992 dollars). Conversion to cooling towers would increase emission of pollutants to the atmosphere and water loss through evaporation. The second report describes alternatives available to plants that currently operate under the variance and estimates the national cost of implementing such alternatives. Little justification has been found for removing the 316(a) variance from the CWA

  5. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), Westinghouse phase 1. Volume 7: Metal vapor Rankine topping-steam bottoming cycles. [energy conversion efficiency in electric power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, P. B.

    1976-01-01

    Adding a metal vapor Rankine topper to a steam cycle was studied as a way to increase the mean temperature at which heat is added to the cycle to raise the efficiency of an electric power plant. Potassium and cesium topping fluids were considered. Pressurized fluidized bed or pressurized (with an integrated low-Btu gasifier) boilers were assumed. Included in the cycles was a pressurizing gas turbine with its associated recuperator, and a gas economizer and feedwater heater. One of the ternary systems studied shows plant efficiency of 42.3% with a plant capitalization of $66.7/kW and a cost of electricity of 8.19 mills/MJ (29.5 mills/kWh).

  6. Results of 8th regular inspection of No.2 plant in Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station, Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The 8th regular inspection of No.2 plant in Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station was carried out from January 23 to June 28, 1988. The parallel operation was resumed on June 13, 1988, 143 days after the parallel off. The facilities to be inspected were the reactor proper, reactor cooling system, measurement and control system, fuel facilities, radiation control facilities, waste facilities, reactor containment installation and emergency power generation system. On these facilities to be inspected, the appearance, disassembling, leak, function, performance and other inspections were carried out, and as the result, abnormality was not found. However, during the preparation for running-in after starting up the reactor, the leak from a steam drain piping was found, therefore it was repaired. The works related to this regular inspection were accomplished within the range of allowable radiation dose based on the relevant laws. The maim reconstruction works carried out during the period of this regular inspection were the replacement of the components of cooling seawater pumps, the repair of a steam drain piping in the high pressure injection system and the replacement of LP turbine rotors. (K.I.)

  7. Stackelberg Game Model of Wind Farm and Electric Vehicle Battery Switch Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhe; Li, Zhimin; Li, Wenbo; Wang, Mingqiang; Wang, Mengxia

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, a cooperation method between wind farm and Electric vehicle battery switch station (EVBSS) was proposed. In the pursuit of maximizing their own benefits, the cooperation between wind farm and EVBSS was formulated as a Stackelberg game model by treating them as decision makers in different status. As the leader, wind farm will determine the charging/discharging price to induce the charging and discharging behavior of EVBSS reasonably. Through peak load shifting, wind farm could increase its profits by selling more wind power to the power grid during time interval with a higher purchase price. As the follower, EVBSS will charge or discharge according to the price determined by wind farm. Through optimizing the charging /discharging strategy, EVBSS will try to charge with a lower price and discharge with a higher price in order to increase its profits. Since the possible charging /discharging strategy of EVBSS is known, the wind farm will take the strategy into consideration while deciding the charging /discharging price, and will adjust the price accordingly to increase its profits. The case study proved that the proposed cooperation method and model were feasible and effective.

  8. Autonomous power expert fault diagnostic system for Space Station Freedom electrical power system testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Long V.; Walters, Jerry L.; Roth, Mary Ellen; Quinn, Todd M.; Krawczonek, Walter M.

    1990-01-01

    The goal of the Autonomous Power System (APS) program is to develop and apply intelligent problem solving and control to the Space Station Freedom Electrical Power System (SSF/EPS) testbed being developed and demonstrated at NASA Lewis Research Center. The objectives of the program are to establish artificial intelligence technology paths, to craft knowledge-based tools with advanced human-operator interfaces for power systems, and to interface and integrate knowledge-based systems with conventional controllers. The Autonomous Power EXpert (APEX) portion of the APS program will integrate a knowledge-based fault diagnostic system and a power resource planner-scheduler. Then APEX will interface on-line with the SSF/EPS testbed and its Power Management Controller (PMC). The key tasks include establishing knowledge bases for system diagnostics, fault detection and isolation analysis, on-line information accessing through PMC, enhanced data management, and multiple-level, object-oriented operator displays. The first prototype of the diagnostic expert system for fault detection and isolation has been developed. The knowledge bases and the rule-based model that were developed for the Power Distribution Control Unit subsystem of the SSF/EPS testbed are described. A corresponding troubleshooting technique is also described.

  9. Dynamic analysis of electric equipment for nuclear power stations under seismic loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, K.E.; Bodisco, U. von; Winkler, K.

    1977-01-01

    The response spectrum method, generally accepted as the most practical method for linear seismic analysis of power station components, is here applied in conjunction with the finite element method to electric components. The fully dynamic analysis based on the superposition of the natural modes as carried out for an electronics cabinet and for transmitter supports is outlined and selected results are presented. Several different methods are in use for the superposition of the contributions of the different modes. Here addition of absolute values, the square-root of the sum of squares, and a mixed method taking account of closely spaced modes is applied. For different structures, the degree of conservativity is thus demonstrated, the largest difference in the stresses computed by the different methods being approximately 30%. For structures whose natural frequencies are in the spectrum range with zero period response, a simplified response analysis using static loads is often carried out. This is demonstrated for the electronics cabinet and transmitter mountings, and the results are compared with the fully dynamic analyses. It is seen that this 'pseudo-dynamic' analysis yields useful approximations for the distributions of stresses. Practical details of the structural models as well as results are presented for several switchgear and electronics cabinets

  10. Occupational exposure to magnetic fields from transformer stations and electric enclosures in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çam, Semra Tepe; Fırlarer, Arzu; Özden, Semih; Canseven, Ayşe G; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2011-06-01

    We aimed to provide a systematic evaluation of magnetic field (MF) exposure of staff working in the offices located above or close to transformer stations (TS) and electric enclosures (EE). Occupational short-term "spot" measurements with Narda EFA-300 and isotropic magnetic field probe were carried out in two National Banks and one Industrial Company having more than 500 employees. Extremely low-frequency (ELF) MFs up to several tens of μT were measured in the mentioned working environments. 25% of the measured MFs were found less than 0.3 μT, the background exposure level that staff receive at home, 75% were above 0.3 μT with the highest value of 6.8 μT. The mean and median personal exposures were calculated to be 1.19 μT and 0.56 μT, respectively. Most of the staff (83%) is under risk based on epidemiological studies that reported a statistically significant association between risk of leukemia and averaged magnetic fields of 0.2 μT or over. Results showed that risk evaluation should be considered to minimize the possibility of the workers being harmed due to exposure to work-related electromagnetic sources.

  11. Electric Vehicle Performance at McMurdo Station (Antarctica) and Comparison with McMurdo Station Conventional Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sears, T.; Lammert, M.; Colby, K.; Walter, R.

    2014-09-01

    This report examines the performance of two electric vehicles (EVs) at McMurdo, Antarctica (McMurdo). The study examined the performance of two e-ride Industries EVs initially delivered to McMurdo on February 16, 2011, and compared their performance and fuel use with that of conventional vehicles that have a duty cycle similar to that of the EVs used at McMurdo.

  12. Setting up charging electric stations within residential communities in current China: Gaming of government agencies and property management companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Tian; Ma, Lin; Mao, Zhonggen; Ou, Xunmin

    2015-01-01

    The difficulty of charging electric vehicles (EVs) is now hindering their further development. Governments generally choose to build stations for home charging (including piles) within residential communities. Given the conflict of interest between various government agencies and property management companies, constructing a charging station within residential communities would result in welfare loss for the property management companies and therefore lead to the principal–agent problem. This paper constructs a two-period imperfect information game theory model to study the moral hazard involved in this issue and government agencies' optimal choice. In the analytic solution of the model, we find that the optimal choice for a farsighted government agency is to constantly improve the incentive mechanism and introduce charging stations only when the conflict of interest is eliminated. Any benefits derived from government regulations by force would prove short-lived. The government should focus on long-term returns in the development of EVs, and its optimal mechanism should be designed to mitigate the principal–agent problem of property management companies, thereby accelerate the progress of EV charging infrastructure and improve overall social welfare. - Highlights: • The charging of electric vehicles (EVs) is hindering their use. • A game theory model is used for analysis of EV charging station construction. • Charging stations are in residential communities in China. • Government agencies are constantly improving incentive mechanisms

  13. About the Territorial Potential of the Construction of Battery-Charging Stations for Autonomous Electric Motor Vehicles in the Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilova Lyubov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the main current trends in the development of electric motor vehicles with "zero emission" as well as the battery-charging stations concerned. The study is based on a preliminary comparative analysis of the RF regions with respect to five indices (average per capita income, number of private cars in the region, air pollution level, provision of the region with power supply and the potential use of local renewable energy resources, and it gives some recommendations on the prospects of possible construction of battery-charging stations in the regions.

  14. US central station nuclear electric generating units: significant milestones (status as of July 1, 1980)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    The status of 189 US nuclear power plants is reported in a table which gives the name, owner, capacity, type, NSSS architect and contractor and data of public announcement, NSSS order, licensing, and initial operation. The plants are also indexed according to state, region, utility, and alphabetical name. The utility nuclear steam supply system orders are also listed

  15. Steam turbines for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trassl, W.

    1988-01-01

    Approximately 75% of the electrical energy produced in the world is generated in power plants with steam turbines (fossil and nuclear). Although gas turbines are increasingly applied in combined cycle power plants, not much will change in this matter in the future. As far as the steam parameters and the maximum unit output are concerned, a certain consolidation was noted during the past decades. The standard of development and mathematical penetration of the various steam turbine components is very high today and is applied in the entire field: For saturated steam turbines in nuclear power plants and for steam turbines without reheat, with reheat and with double reheat in fossil-fired power plants and for steam turbines with and without reheat in combined cycle power plants. (orig.) [de

  16. Electrical Power System Design and Station Blackout (SBO) Management in Indian Fast Breeder Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijaya, N. M.; Theivarajan, N.; Madhusoodanan, K.

    2015-01-01

    In the nuclear new builds and projects in design stage SBO management measures have significant role. Depending on the onsite and offsite power supply configurations, deterministic SBO duration is established. Design of systems with adequately sized battery capacities for SBO duration, special SBO Diesel Generator Sets, structured load shedding strategy to conserve battery availability to cope with SBO and to monitor the plant safety beyond SBO duration are considered as part of electrical system design now. In the design of PFBR, SBO is given due importance right from conceptual design stage. Both deterministic SBO duration and probabilistic SBO duration versus frequency were established by detailed analysis. Dedicated DC power supply systems and additional SBO DG back-up systems are in place to cope with normal and extended SBO. After the Fukushima event, there is greater requirement to demonstrate plant safety during SBO for a long duration extended over several days. In light of this accident, thermal hydraulic synthesis of PFBR has been carried out to ascertain the capability of the plant to manage a prolonged station blackout event. This has brought out the robustness of the design. Safety design features of PFBR ensure comfortable management of extended SBO. In the design of future FBR projects, current trends in the new nuclear builds and recommendations of international bodies considering Fukushima are duly considered. SBO measures by means of alternate AC power sources, redundant emergency power supply sources with less dependence on other auxiliary systems and dedicated DC power systems are considered to cope with normal and extended SBO beyond design basis. Right from the conceptual design, the system robustness to manage normal and extended SBO will be taken care with the related thermal hydraulic and associated analysis. The paper highlights these SBO management strategies in PFBR and future FBRs. (author)

  17. Improved grid operation through power smoothing control strategies utilizing dedicated energy storage at an electric vehicle charging station

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsen, Thomas; Holjevac, Ninoslav; Bremdal, Bernt A.

    2016-01-01

    project (Flex-ChEV) supported by the ERA-Net Smart Grid FP7 program. The principal asset of the proposed charging station (CS) is a dedicated Energy Storage System (ESS) to compensate for adverse effects on the grid caused by peak charging demand and which could impose severe trials for the local DSO....... Furthermore, CS of this kind could serve multiple business purposes in a smart grid. It can serve as a hub for seamless integration of local renewable and distributed energy resources, it can provide added flexibility for the local grid through different ancillary services and it can act as an efficient......This paper addresses the principal service aspects for electric vehicles (EV), as well as issues related to energy storage design, charging station integration into power system and load management issues. It builds on the research conducted in the Flexible Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure...

  18. IEEE standard for type test of class 1E electric cables, field splices, and connections for nuclear power generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1974-01-01

    The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers has generated this document to provide guidance for developing a program to type test cables, field splices, and connections and obtain specific type test data. It supplements IEEE Std 323-1974 Standard for Qualifying Class IE Equipment for Nuclear Power Generating Stations, which describes basic requirements for equipment qualification. It is the integrated performance of the structures, fluid systems, the electrical systems, the instrumentation systems of the station, and in particular, the plant protection system, that limits the consequences of accidents. Seismic effects on installed cable systems are not within the scope of this document. Section 2 of this guide is an example of type tests. It is the purpose of this guide to deal with cable and connections; however, at the time of issue, detailed examples of tests for connections were not available

  19. Provision of Flexible Load Control by Multi-Flywheel-Energy-Storage System in Electrical Vehicle Charging Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Bo; Dragicevic, Tomislav; Andrade, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    in order to support basic electrical operation. This paper proposes a local implementation of a hysteresis-based aggregation algorithm for coordinated control of multiple stations that can provide functions such as peak shaving, spinning reserves, frequency control, regulation and load following. Local......Electrical vehicle (EV) chargers are going to occupy a considerable portion of total energy consumption in the future smart grid. Fast charging stations (FCS), as the most demanding representatives of charging infrastructure, will be requested to provide some ancillary services to the power system...... stability. Finally, corresponding hardware in the loop results based on dSPACE1006 platform have been reported in order to verify the validity of proposed approach....

  20. Transient Processes in Electric Power Supply System for Oil Terminal with Own Gas-Turbine Power Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Hаshimov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains results of the investigations concerning influence of symmetrical and non-symmetrical short circuits at main power network on electric power supply system of a huge oil terminal which is powered by own gas-turbine power station. Calculations have been made in accordance with the IEC and IEEЕ requirements. Estimations for voltage level and distribution of short circuit current in the electric power supply system of the Sangachal oil terminal being operated in parallel with the AzerEnerji grid are presented in the paper

  1. Guide to Federal Funding, Financing, and Technical Assistance for Plug-in Electric Vehicles and Charging Stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-07-29

    The U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Department of Transportation have published a guide to highlight examples of federal support and technical assistance for plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) and charging stations. The guide provides a description of each opportunity and a point of contact to assist those interested in advancing PEV technology. The Department of Energy’s Alternative Fuels Data Center provides a comprehensive database of federal and state programs that support plug-in electric vehicles and infrastructure.

  2. Analysis of induced steam generator tube rupture using MAAP 4.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenton, M.; Epstein, M.; Henry, R.E.; Paik, C.; Fuller, E.

    1996-01-01

    The nuclear industry has initiated a program of Steam Generator Degradation Specific Management (SGDSM) to cope with the various types of corrosion that have been observed in pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generators. In parallel, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission is promulgating revised rules on steam generator tube integrity. To support these efforts, the Electric Power Research Institute has sponsored calculations with the MAAP 4 code. The principal objective of these calculations is to estimate the peak temperatures experienced by the steam generator tubes during high-pressure severe accidents. These results are used to evaluate the potential for degraded tubes to leak or rupture. Attention was focused on station blackout (SBO) accidents with loss of turbine-driven auxiliary feedwater because these generally result in the greatest threat to the tubes

  3. Techno-economic and sensitivity analysis for grid-connected renewable energy electric boat charging station in Terengganu

    OpenAIRE

    Salleh N. A. S.; Muda W. M. W.

    2017-01-01

    In order to encourage the eco-friendly technologies in transportation sector, the reliance on fuel need to be reduced and the use of renewable energy (RE) technology as energy source are widely explored by researchers. Thus, this study focus on the feasibility of developing grid-connected renewable energy electric boat charging station for the fishermen in Terengganu using simulation-based method by HOMER software. Five year solar radiation and wind speed data were collected at Universiti Sul...

  4. Neural network based inspection of voids and karst conduits in hydro-electric power station tunnels using GPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Gokhan; Eren, Levent

    2018-04-01

    This paper reports on the fundamental role played by Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR), alongside advanced processing and presentation methods, during the tunnel boring project at a Dam and Hydro-Electric Power Station. It identifies from collected GPR data such issues as incomplete grouting and the presence of karst conduits and voids and provides full details of the procedures adopted. In particular, the application of collected GPR data to the Neural Network (NN) method is discussed.

  5. Steam 80 steam generator instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carson, W.H.; Harris, H.H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes two special instrumentation packages in an integral economizer (preheater) steam generator of one of the first System 80 plants scheduled to go into commercial operation. The purpose of the instrumentation is to obtain accurate operating information from regions of the secondary side of the steam generator inaccessible to normal plant instrumentation. In addition to verification of the System 80 steam generator design predictions, the data obtained will assist in verification of steam generator thermal/hydraulic computer codes developed for generic use in the industry

  6. The contribution of small hydro power stations to the electricity generation in Greece: Technical and economic considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaldellis, J.K.

    2007-01-01

    Hydropower is the most widely used renewable energy source worldwide, contributing almost with 18.5% to the fulfillment of the planet electricity generation. However, most locations in Europe appropriate for the installation of large hydro power stations have already been exploited. Furthermore, there is a significant local communities' opposition towards new large power stations; hence, small hydro power stations remain one of the most attractive opportunities for further utilization of the available hydro potential. Greece and more precisely the country's mainland possesses a significant hydro-power potential which is up to now only partially exploited. In parallel, a large number of private investors have officially expressed their interest in creating small hydro power stations throughout the country, encouraged by the significant Greek State subsidy opportunities for renewable energy applications. However, up to now a relatively small number of projects have been realized, mainly due to decision-making problems, like the administrative bureaucracy, the absence of a rational national water resources management plan and the over-sizing of the proposed installations. Certainly, if the above problems are suitably treated, small hydro-power plants can be proved considerably profitable investments, contributing also remarkably to the national electricity balance and replacing heavy polluting lignite and imported oil. In the context of the above interesting issues, the present study reviews in detail the existing situation of small hydropower plants in Greece and investigates their future prospects as far as the energy, economic and environmental contribution are concerned

  7. Chemical Recovery of Energy in a Combined MHD-Steam Power Station; Recuperation Chimique d'Energie dans une Centrale Combinee MHD-Vapeur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrasse, J. [Societe Alsthom, Paris (France)

    1966-12-15

    This paper studies the energetic and chemical aspects of the operation of a combined MHD-steam power station using the combustion gases from a fossil fuel in an open circuit with potassium seeding. It describes a process for the recovery of energy by endothermal chemical gasification of the fuel. The author first recalls briefly the thermal and chemical conditions to be met throughout the length of the gas flow and points out that it is vital to ensure as much recycling of energy as possible from below to above the MHD generator, at the expense of the conventional power station located further on in the system. The paper then describes the various processes intended to ensure the thermal operating conditions required, including preheating of the air, oxygen enrichment etc. The last part of the paper, which goes into greater detail while taking the foregoing considerations into account, explains the principle and various feasible methods of application of a process at present under study and experimentation. In this process some of the heat energy of the gases discharged from the MHD duct is recycled, partly in chemical form and partly as a limited amount of gas preheat. For this purpose the fuel, mixed with oxidizing agents such as water vapour or carbon dioxide, is gasified, at about 950 Degree-Sign C and after a series of collectively endothermal reactions, into a gas composed mainly of carbon monoxide, hydrogen, nitrogen and excess water vapour and carbon dioxide. It is thus possible to avoid the employment of very high temperature heat exchangers working with seeded gas. The paper stresses the extraction of seeding material, which is simple and can here take place to a great extent in liquid form (fused salts) due to the fact that operation is in the temperature range around 1000 Degree-Sign C. Consideration is finally given to the use after treatment (cooling, extraction of seeding material, absorption of excess H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}, compression and re

  8. Selling steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmer, M.J.; Goodwin, L.M.

    1991-01-01

    This article addresses the importance of steam sales contract is in financing cogeneration facilities. The topics of the article include the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act provisions and how they affect the marketing of steam from qualifying facilities, the independent power producers market shift, and qualifying facility's benefits

  9. Steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenet, J.-C.

    1980-01-01

    Steam generator particularly intended for use in the coolant system of a pressurized water reactor for vaporizing a secondary liquid, generally water, by the primary cooling liquid of the reactor and comprising special arrangements for drying the steam before it leaves the generator [fr

  10. Steam condenser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Fujio

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To enable safe steam condensation by providing steam condensation blades at the end of a pipe. Constitution: When high temperature high pressure steam flows into a vent pipe having an opening under water in a pool or an exhaust pipe or the like for a main steam eacape safety valve, non-condensable gas filled beforehand in the steam exhaust pipe is compressed, and discharged into the water in the pool. The non-condensable gas thus discharged from the steam exhaust pipe is introduced into the interior of the hollow steam condensing blades, is then suitably expanded, and thereafter exhausted from a number of exhaust holes into the water in the pool. In this manner, the non-condensable gas thus discharged is not directly introduced into the water in the pool, but is suitable expanded in the space of the steam condensing blades to suppress extreme over-compression and over-expansion of the gas so as to prevent unstable pressure vibration. (Yoshihara, H.)

  11. Modelling and simulation of the steam line, the high and low pressure turbines and the pressure regulator for the SUN-RAH nucleo electric university simulator; Modelado y simulacion de la linea de vapor, las turbinas de alta y de baja presion y el regulador de presion para el simulador universitario de nucleo electricas SUN RAH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez R, A. [DEPFI, Campus Morelos, en IMTA Jiutepec, Morelos, UNAM (Mexico)]. e-mail: andyskamx@yahoo.com.mx

    2003-07-01

    In the following article the development of a simulator that allows to represent the dynamics of the following systems: steam line, nozzle, vapor separator, reheater, high pressure turbine, low pressure turbine, power generator and the pressure regulator of a nucleo electric power station. We start from the supposition that this plant will be modeled from a nuclear reactor type BWR (Boiling Water Reactor), using models of reduced order that represent the more important dynamic variables of the physical processes that happen along the steam line until the one generator. To be able to carry out the simulation in real time the Mat lab mathematical modeling software is used, as well as the specific simulation tool Simulink. It is necessary to point out that the platform on which the one is executed the simulator is the Windows operating system, to allow the intuitive use that only this operating system offers. The above-mentioned obeys to that the objective of the simulator it is to help the user to understand some of the dynamic phenomena that are present in the systems of a nuclear plant, and to provide a tool of analysis and measurement of variables to predict the desirable behavior of the same ones. The model of a pressure controller for the steam lines, the high pressure turbine and the low pressure turbine is also presented that it will be the one in charge of regulating the demand of the system according to the characteristics and critic restrictions of safety and control, assigned according to those wanted parameters of performance of this system inside the nucleo electric plant. This simulator is totally well defined and it is part of the University student nucleo electric simulator with Boiling Water Reactor (SUN-RAH), an integral project and of greater capacity. (Author)

  12. Papers of 7. Scientific-Technical Seminar Material Study for Electric Power Stations and Energetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The report is the assembly of the papers concerning the material problems occurring during the exploitation of power station and gas pipelines. The normalization problems in the power station and in the gas pipelines according to the prescription of UE are also discussed. (author)

  13. Thermodynamic effects when utilizing waste heat from condensation in cases of a reduced vacuum in steam turbine plants of thermal power stations, to provide heat at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasiljevic, N.; Savic, B.; Stojakovic, M.

    1986-01-01

    There is an interesting variant of cogeneration in the steam turbine system of a thermal power plant, i.e. the utilisation of the waste heat of condensation with a reduced vacuum without reconstruction of the thermal power plant. The thermodynamic effect in cogeneration was calculated in consideration of the dynamics of heat consumption. This cogeneration process has the advantage of saving primary energy without reconstruction of the thermal power plant.

  14. Final environmental statement related to the operation of H.B. Robinson Nuclear Steam-Electric Plant, Unit 2: (Docket No. 50-261)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-04-01

    The proposed action is the continuation of Facility Operating License DPR-23 to Carolina Power and Light Company for H.B. Robinson Unit 2. Unit 2, located adjacent to Lake Robinson in Darlington County, near Hartsville, South Carolina, employs a pressurized water reactor to produce up to 2200 megawatts thermal (MWt). A steam turbine-generator uses this heat to provide 700 megawatts electric (MWe) of net electrical power capacity. A design power level of 2300 MWt (730 MWe) has been requested and is considered in the assessments contained in this statement. The exhaust steam is cooled by a flow of water obtained from the discharged to a 2250-acre cooling lake, Lake Robinson. Land areas disturbed during construction of the plant, but not used, have been seeded to native grasses, trees, and shrubs. Construction of a cooling water discharge canal extension resulted in alteration of about 100 acres of wildlife habitat. Subsequently, the canal banks were seeded with pines and legumes. Some erosion has taken place in the pine-seeded areas. Some small fish are killed by impingement on the water intake screens. Organisms passing through the screens very likely do not survive their passage through the circulating water system. Operation of the plant will cause an increase in the temperature of Black Creek below Lake Robinson. A small impact exists due to production and, after processing, disposal or release of sanitary and chemical wastes. Unit 2 may discharge up to 500 pounds/day of chemicals (primarily sulfates). Under conditions of low flow into and out of the lake, this increases the sulfate concentration in the lake by less than 1 ppM over the normal 7.7 ppM

  15. Reserving Charging Decision-Making Model and Route Plan for Electric Vehicles Considering Information of Traffic and Charging Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoming Liu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available With the advance of battery energy technology, electric vehicles (EV are catching more and more attention. One of the influencing factors of electric vehicles large-scale application is the availability of charging stations and convenience of charging. It is important to investigate how to make reserving charging strategies and ensure electric vehicles are charged with shorter time and lower charging expense whenever charging request is proposed. This paper proposes a reserving charging decision-making model for electric vehicles that move to certain destinations and need charging services in consideration of traffic conditions and available charging resources at the charging stations. Besides, the interactive mechanism is described to show how the reserving charging system works, as well as the rolling records-based credit mechanism where extra charges from EV is considered to hedge default behavior. With the objectives of minimizing driving time and minimizing charging expenses, an optimization model with two objective functions is formulated. Then the optimizations are solved by a K shortest paths algorithm based on a weighted directed graph, where the time and distance factors are respectively treated as weights of corresponding edges of transportation networks. Case studies show the effectiveness and validity of the proposed route plan and reserving charging decision-making model.

  16. Stationary Charging Station Design for Sustainable Urban Rail Systems: A Case Study at Zhuzhou Electric Locomotive Co., China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2014, more than 43 cities in China were racing to construct their urban rail systems (including metro and light rail systems, recognizing that an urban rail system will be a good solution to the tough problems that they are faced with, including traffic congestion and PM2.5 air pollution. On 22 August 2012, the first electric double-layer capacitor (EDLC energy storage-type rail vehicle in the world was unveiled at Zhuzhou Electric Locomotive Co., China. The EDLC rail system has been considered a promising sustainable urban rail system, which is expected to further improve the energy efficiency and to reduce environmental pollution. The first commercial EDLC tram produced by Zhuzhou Electric Locomotive Co. has been applied at Guangzhou Metro Corp. recently. From the view point of scientific research, the system design and energy management of EDLC rail systems have been extensively studied in the literature, while the stationary charging station design for the EDLC energy storage-type urban rail vehicles has been rarely reported. Thus, the aim of this paper is to report a stationary charging station that has been successfully applied in the EDLC rail system produced by Zhuzhou Electric Locomotive Co., China.

  17. Use of mock-up training to reduce personnel exposure at the North Anna Unit 1 Steam Generator Replacement Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, H.G. [Virginia Power, Mineral, VA (United States); Reilly, B.P. [Bechtel Power Corp., Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The North Anna Power Station is located on the southern shore of Lake Anna in Louisa County, approximately forty miles northwest of Richmond, Virginia. The two 910 Mw nuclear units located on this site are owned by Virginia Electric and Power Company (Virginia Power) and Old Dominion Electric Cooperative and operated by Virginia Power. Fuel was loaded into Unit 1 in December 1977, and it began commercial operation in June 1978. Fuel was loaded into Unit 2 in April 1980 and began commercial operation in December 1980. Each nuclear unit includes a three-coolant-loop pressurized light water reactor nuclear steam supply system that was furnished by Westinghouse Electric Corporation. Included within each system were three Westinghouse Model 51 steam generators with alloy 600, mill-annealed tubing material. Over the years of operation of Unit 1, various corrosion-related phenomena had occurred that affected the steam generators tubing and degraded their ability to fulfill their heat transfer function. Advanced inspection and repair techniques helped extend the useful life of the steam generators, but projections based on the results of the inspections indicated that the existing steam generators tubing and degraded their ability to fullfill their heat transfer function. Advanced inspection and repair techniques helped extend the useful life of the steam generators, but projections based on the results of the inspections indicated that the existing steam generators would not last their design life and must be repaired. To this end Virginia Power determined that a steam generator replacement (SGR) program was necessary to remove the old steam generator tube bundles and lower shell sections, including the channel heads (collectively called the lower assemblies), and replace them with new lower assemblies incorporating design features that will prevent the degradation problems that the old steam generators had experienced.

  18. Power station instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jervis, M.W.

    1993-01-01

    Power stations are characterized by a wide variety of mechanical and electrical plant operating with structures, liquids and gases working at high pressures and temperatures and with large mass flows. The voltages and currents are also the highest that occur in most industries. In order to achieve maximum economy, the plant is operated with relatively small margins from conditions that can cause rapid plant damage, safety implications, and very high financial penalties. In common with other process industries, power stations depend heavily on control and instrumentation. These systems have become particularly significant, in the cost-conscious privatized environment, for providing the means to implement the automation implicit in maintaining safety standards, improving generation efficiency and reducing operating manpower costs. This book is for professional instrumentation engineers who need to known about their use in power stations and power station engineers requiring information about the principles and choice of instrumentation available. There are 8 chapters; chapter 4 on instrumentation for nuclear steam supply systems is indexed separately. (Author)

  19. Results of evaluation of periodic safety review for No. 1 plant in Mihama Power Station, Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    No. 1 plant in Mihama Power Station started the commercial power generation in November, 1970, and has continued the operation for more than 23 years. During this period, the counter measures to troubles, periodic inspections and the maintenance by the electric power company have been carried out. These states of No. 1 plant in Mihama Power Station for more than 23 years are to be recollected from the view-points of the comprehensive evaluation of operation experiences and the reflection of latest technological knowledge, and the safety and reliability are to be further improved in the periodic safety review. Agency of Natural Resources and Energy evaluated the report of the periodic safety review for No. 1 plant in Mihama Power Station made by Kansai Electric Power Co., and summarized the results. The course of the evaluation of the report is shown. The facility utilization factor is 43.3% on the average of about 23 years, but in the last 10 years, it was improved to 69.4%. In the last five years, the rate of occurrence of unexpected shutoff was 0.6 times/year. These are the results of preventive maintenance and the improvement of the facilities and operation management. Operation management, maintenance management, fuel management, radiation control, and radioactive waste management have been carried out properly. The work plan for preventing disasters was established, and the experience of troubles and the latest technological knowledge were well reflected to improve the safety. (K.I.)

  20. Load demand profile for a large charging station of a fleet of all-electric plug-in buses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario A. Rios

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a general procedure to compute the load demand profile from a parking lot where a fleet of buses with electric propulsion mechanisms are charged. Such procedure is divided in three different stages, the first one models the daily energy utilisation of the batteries based on Monte Carlo simulations and route characteristics. The second one models the process in the charging station based on discrete event simulation of queues of buses served by a lot of available chargers. The third step computes the final demand profile in the parking lot because of the charging process based on the power consumption of batteries’ chargers and the utilisation of the available charges. The proposed procedure allows the computation of the number of required batteries’ chargers to be installed in a charging station placed at a parking lot in order to satisfy and ensure the operation of the fleet, the computation of the power demand profile and the peak load and the computation of the general characteristics of electrical infrastructure to supply the power to the station.

  1. A multi-factor GIS method to identify optimal geographic locations for electric vehicle (EV) charging stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongqin; Iman, Kory

    2018-05-01

    Fuel-based transportation is one of the major contributors to poor air quality in the United States. Electric Vehicle (EV) is potentially the cleanest transportation technology to our environment. This research developed a spatial suitability model to identify optimal geographic locations for installing EV charging stations for travelling public. The model takes into account a variety of positive and negative factors to identify prime locations for installing EV charging stations in Wasatch Front, Utah, where automobile emission causes severe air pollution due to atmospheric inversion condition near the valley floor. A walkable factor grid was created to store index scores from input factor layers to determine prime locations. 27 input factors including land use, demographics, employment centers etc. were analyzed. Each factor layer was analyzed to produce a summary statistic table to determine the site suitability. Potential locations that exhibit high EV charging usage were identified and scored. A hot spot map was created to demonstrate high, moderate, and low suitability areas for installing EV charging stations. A spatially well distributed EV charging system was then developed, aiming to reduce "range anxiety" from traveling public. This spatial methodology addresses the complex problem of locating and establishing a robust EV charging station infrastructure for decision makers to build a clean transportation infrastructure, and eventually improve environment pollution.

  2. Thermal-hydraulics in recirculating steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carver, M.B.; Carlucci, L.N.; Inch, W.W.R.

    1981-04-01

    This manual describes the THIRST code and its use in computing three-dimensional two-phase flow and heat transfer in a steam generator under steady state operation. The manual is intended primarily to facilitate the application of the code to the analysis of steam generators typical of CANDU nuclear stations. Application to other steam generator designs is also discussed. Details of the assumptions used to formulate the model and to implement the numerical solution are also included

  3. CANDU steam generator life management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapping, R.L.; Nickerson, J.; Spekkens, P.; Maruska, C.

    1998-01-01

    Steam generators are a critical component of a nuclear power reactor, and can contribute significantly to station unavailability, as has been amply demonstrated in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). CANDU steam generators are not immune to steam generator degradation, and the variety of CANDU steam generator designs and tube materials has led to some unexpected challenges. However, aggressive remedial actions, and careful proactive maintenance activities, have led to a decrease in steam generator-related station unavailability of Canadian CANDUs. AECL and the CANDU utilities have defined programs that will enable existing or new steam generators to operate effectively for 40 years. Research and development work covers corrosion and mechanical degradation of tube bundles and internals, chemistry, thermalhydraulics, fouling, inspection and cleaning, as well as provision for specially tool development for specific problem solving. A major driving force is development of CANDU-specific fitness-for-service guidelines, including appropriate inspection and monitoring technology to measure steam generator condition. Longer-range work focuses on development of intelligent on-line monitoring for the feedwater system and steam generator. New designs have reduced risk of corrosion and fouling, are more easily inspected and cleaned, and are less susceptible to mechanical damage. The Canadian CANDU utilities have developed programs for remedial actions to combat degradation of performance (Gentilly-2, Point Lepreau, Bruce A/B, Pickering A/B), and have developed strategic plans to ensure that good future operation is ensured. The research and development program, as well as operating experience, has identified where improvements in operating practices and/or designs can be made in order to ensure steam generator design life at an acceptable capacity factory. (author)

  4. Effects of the Chernobyl and Fukushima nuclear accidents on atmospheric electricity parameters recorded at Polish observation stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubicki, Marek; Baranski, Piotr; Odzimek, Anna; Michnowski, Stanislaw; Myslek-Laurikainen, Bogna

    2013-04-01

    We analyse the atmospheric electricity parameters, measured at Polish geophysical stations in Swider, Poland, and Hornsund, Spitsbergen, in connection with the radioactive incident in Fukushima, Japan, beginning on 11 March 2011, following the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami. We compare our results with the situation during and after the Chernobyl disaster on April 26, 1986, when the radioactive fallout detected at Swider increased in the last week of April 1986, from 4.111 to 238.7 Bq/m2 and up to 967.0 Bq/m2 in the second week of May 1986 - what was more than 235 times greater than the values measured prior to that accident. Besides the electric field especially the electric conductivity is very sensitive to the radioactive contamination of the air. Thus we postulate that these two measurements should be run at geophysical stations over the world and used as a relatively simple and low-cost tool for continuous monitoring of possible hazard caused by nuclear power plant accidents.

  5. Steam generator reliability improvement project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomgren, J.C.; Green, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    Upon successful completion of its research and development technology transfer program, the Electric Power Research Institute's Steam Generator Owners Group (SGOG II) will disband in December 1986 and be replaced in January 1987 by a successor project, the Steam Generator Reliability Project (SGRP). The new project, funded in the EPRI base program, will continue the emphasis on reliability and life extension that was carried forward by SGOG II. The objectives of SGOG II have been met. Causes and remedies have been identified for tubing corrosion problems, such as stress corrosion cracking and pitting, and steam generator technology has been improved in areas such as tube wear prediction and nondestructive evaluation (NDE). These actions have led to improved reliability of steam generators. Now the owners want to continue with a centrally managed program that builds on what has been learned. The goal is to continue to improve steam generator reliability and solve small problems before they become large problems

  6. Steam generator reliability improvement project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomgren, J.C.; Green, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    Upon successful completion of its research and development technology transfer program, the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Steam Generator Owners Group (SGOG II) will disband in December 1986, and be replaced in January 1987, by a successor project, the Steam Generator Reliability Project (SGRP). The new project, funded in the EPRI base program, will continue to emphasize reliability and life extension, which were carried forward by SGOG II. The objectives of SGOG II have been met. Causes and remedies have been identified for tubing corrosion problems such as stress corrosion cracking and pitting, and steam generator technology has been improved in areas such as tube wear prediction and nondestructive evaluation. These actions have led to improved reliability of steam generators. Now the owners want to continue with a centrally managed program that builds on what has been learned. The goal is to continue to improve steam generator reliability and to solve small problems before they become large problems

  7. Aseismatic design of electrical equipments and instruments for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yasuharu; Nishizawa, Kazuo; Miyazaki, Yoshio; Miura, Takumi

    1977-01-01

    The aseismatic design of electrical instruments is carried out according to IEEE Standard 344-1971 in the USA. In Japan also, the method of aseismatic design of electrical instruments has been investigated by the representatives of electric power companies and electric machine makers since 1972. In Hitachi Ltd., the statical method of confirming aseismatic property was established on the basis of the rigid design for electrical instruments. It is convenient to examine the aseismatic property of electrical equipments by classifying them into control and switch boards, electrical appliances, equipments and circuits. It is possible to use the static method treating earthquake force as static load by avoiding resonance with the electrical equipments which have the higher natural frequency than that of buildings. The purposes of the vibration test are to prove the validity of the theoretical analysis, to clarify the vibration characteristics, and to confirm the maintenance of functions and the strength of the equipments. The vibration tests of control boards, the switch boards of enclosed type, motor control centers, the racks for instrumentation, storage batteries and electrical appliances are explained. Moreover, the vibration analysis with a computer according to finite element method is described. (Kako, I.)

  8. Application of ORC power station to increase electric power of gas compression ignition engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mocarski Szymon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the calculation results of efficiency of the subcritical low temperature ORC power station powered by waste heat resulting from the process of cooling a stationary compression ignition engine. The source of heat to supply the ORC power station is the heat in a form of water jet cooling the engine at a temperature of 92°C, and the exhaust gas stream at a temperature of 420°C. The study considers three variants of systems with the ORC power stations with different ways of using heat source. The first variant assumes using just engine cooling water to power the ORC station. In the second variant the ORC system is powered solely by a heat flux from the combustion gases by means of an intermediary medium - thermal oil, while the third variant provides the simultaneous management of both heat fluxes to heat the water stream as a source of power supply to the ORC station. The calculations were made for the eight working media belonging both to groups of so-called dry media (R218, R1234yf, R227ea and wet media (R32, R161, R152a, R134a, R22.

  9. Effects of steam pretreatment and co-production with ethanol on the energy efficiency and process economics of combined biogas, heat and electricity production from industrial hemp

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The study presented here has used the commercial flow sheeting program Aspen Plus™ to evaluate techno-economic aspects of large-scale hemp-based processes for producing transportation fuels. The co-production of biogas, district heat and power from chopped and steam-pretreated hemp, and the co-production of ethanol, biogas, heat and power from steam-pretreated hemp were analysed. The analyses include assessments of heat demand, energy efficiency and process economics in terms of annual cash flows and minimum biogas and ethanol selling prices (MBSP and MESP). Results Producing biogas, heat and power from chopped hemp has the highest overall energy efficiency, 84% of the theoretical maximum (based on lower heating values), providing that the maximum capacity of district heat is delivered. The combined production of ethanol, biogas, heat and power has the highest energy efficiency (49%) if district heat is not produced. Neither the inclusion of steam pretreatment nor co-production with ethanol has a large impact on the MBSP. Ethanol is more expensive to produce than biogas is, but this is compensated for by its higher market price. None of the scenarios examined are economically viable, since the MBSP (EUR 103–128 per MWh) is higher than the market price of biogas (EUR 67 per MWh). The largest contribution to the cost is the cost of feedstock. Decreasing the retention time in the biogas process for low solids streams by partly replacing continuous stirred tank reactors by high-rate bioreactors decreases the MBSP. Also, recycling part of the liquid from the effluent from anaerobic digestion decreases the MBSP. The production and prices of methane and ethanol influence the process economics more than the production and prices of electricity and district heat. Conclusions To reduce the production cost of ethanol and biogas from biomass, the use of feedstocks that are cheaper than hemp, give higher output of ethanol and biogas, or combined production with

  10. The electric power stations viewed as a source of local and transfrontier pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motiu, C.; Sandu, I.

    1994-01-01

    The pollutant emission of the thermal power stations may have an important contribution to the local pollution as well as to regional (transfrontier) and global pollution. Due to the impossibility at present of making continuous monitoring of the emission of pollutants it is necessary to use computational models for obtaining inventories of the pollutant sources and for studying their dispersion into atmosphere. The computational code used to simulate the pollutant diffusion in the atmosphere is a climatologic model giving the annual average concentration and the evaluation of the maximum SO 2 concentration. The paper presents the analyses for the case of 14 thermal power stations of Romania

  11. Alternative central-station electric power generation technologies: a consistent engineering-economic framework of comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baughman, M.L.; Gordon, J.B.; Woodson, H.H.

    1983-01-01

    The electric utility sector is an intermediate processing sector of the economy that utilizes the factor inputs of labor, capital, and materials to process and convert chemical, nuclear, and other basic energy forms into electricity. The electricity is then delivered to and consumed by other intermediate or final users for purposes of heating, cooling, lighting, motive power, and materials processing. The economics of electricity supply encompass not only the selection of the basic energy form to be converted but also the selection of possible physical conversion processes to accomplish the conversion. The conversion processes can vary immensely in technical detail, physical configuration, and the basic scientific principle governing their operation. But whatever the design and technical detail, the basic purpose is to process some form of energy and manufacture electricity

  12. Investigation of a photo-voltaic pump station with asynchronous electric drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhagarov, N.; Vladimirov, P.

    2000-01-01

    A scheme of a photo-voltaic pump station with constant current drive is presented. The requirements for reliability and minimal maintenance necessitate the use of asynchronous drive which has been studied. The studies of the system's model for various regimes show its adequacy. The model can be used for determination of the optimal conditions providing maximal working efficiency

  13. Flexible Local Load Controller for Fast ElectricVehicle Charging Station Supplemented with Flywheel Energy Storage System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragicevic, Tomislav; SUN, BO; Schaltz, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Electric vehicle charging infrastructure is hitting the stage where its impact on performance and operation of power systems becomes more and more pronounced. Aiming to utilize the existing power distribution infrastructure and delay its expansion, an approach that includes installation of dedica......Electric vehicle charging infrastructure is hitting the stage where its impact on performance and operation of power systems becomes more and more pronounced. Aiming to utilize the existing power distribution infrastructure and delay its expansion, an approach that includes installation...... of dedicated flywheel energy storage system (FESS) within the charging station and compensating some of the adverse effects of high power charging is explored in this paper. Although sharing some similarities with vehicle to grid (V2G) technology, the principal advantage of this strategy is the fact that many...

  14. Integrated planning of electric vehicles routing and charging stations location considering transportation networks and power distribution systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Arias

    2018-09-01

    Full Text Available Electric Vehicles (EVs represent a significant option that contributes to improve the mobility and reduce the pollution, leaving a future expectation in the merchandise transportation sector, which has been demonstrated with pilot projects of companies operating EVs for products delivering. In this work a new approach of EVs for merchandise transportation considering the location of Electric Vehicle Charging Stations (EVCSs and the impact on the Power Distribution System (PDS is addressed. This integrated planning is formulated through a mixed integer non-linear mathematical model. Test systems of different sizes are designed to evaluate the model performance, considering the transportation network and PDS. The results show a trade-off between EVs routing, PDS energy losses and EVCSs location.

  15. Gas-based electricity production: which possibilities? - Thermal plants with steam generator; Perspectives for mini-cogeneration in collective housing; Electricity production by gas plants: which orientations on a middle term?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charrier, M.; Hubert, Charles-Emile; Lu, Long; Maire, Jacques; Bornard, Pierre; Garnier, Philippe-Jean; Jamme, Dominique; Cheylus, Jean-Christophe

    2012-01-01

    A set of articles proposes a comparison between coal fired and natural gas fired power stations, discusses the perspectives of low power cogeneration installations for collective housing (some examples are evoked). It also reports interventions of a meeting on middle-term orientation for gas-based electricity production during which interveners addressed several issues such as the opportunity of investment in new infrastructures, the evolution of the gas sector, modulation means

  16. National Account Energy Alliance Final Report for the Basin Electric Project at Northern Border Pipeline Company's Compressor Station #7, North Dakota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweetzer, Richard [Exergy Partners Corp.; Leslie, Neil [Gas Technology Institute

    2008-02-01

    A field research test and verification project was conducted at the recovered energy generation plant at Northern Border Pipeline Company Compressor Station #7 (CS#7) near St. Anthony. Recovered energy generation plant equipment was supplied and installed by ORMAT Technologies, Inc. Basin Electric is purchasing the electricity under a purchase power agreement with an ORMAT subsidiary, which owns and operates the plant.

  17. Water Pumping Stations, File name = UTILITIES - PARTIAL Data is incomplete. Contains electric trans lines, electric substations, sewer plants, sewer pumpstations, water plants, water tanks http://www.harfordcountymd.gov/gis/Index.cfm, Published in 2011, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Harford County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Water Pumping Stations dataset current as of 2011. File name = UTILITIES - PARTIAL Data is incomplete. Contains electric trans lines, electric substations, sewer...

  18. Sewerage Pumping Stations, File name = UTILITIES - PARTIAL Data is incomplete. Contains electric trans lines, electric substations, sewer plants, sewer pumpstations, water plants, water tanks http://www.harfordcountymd.gov/gis/Index.cfm, Published in 2011, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, Harford County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Sewerage Pumping Stations dataset current as of 2011. File name = UTILITIES - PARTIAL Data is incomplete. Contains electric trans lines, electric substations, sewer...

  19. Thermal power generation and the environment. I. Hydrothermal and hydrochemical regime studies of the cooling reservoir of the Lithuanian SSR Central Steam Power Station. Teploenergetika i okruzhayushchaya sreda i gidrotermicheskii i gidrokhinicheskii rezhim vodokhranilishcha okhzaditelya intovskoi gres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    Studies were of the physico-geographical conditions (relief, soil, vegetation, etc.) of a water-collection basin and their effect on the processes taking place in a reservoir. An analysis is made of the elements that make up the input and outflow segments of a reservoir's water balance, particularly the evaporation of heated waters from the surface of the reservoir. Data are given on long-term measurements of the thermal regime of a reservoir-coolant, heat-exchange processes and their connection with the efficient operation of a thermal power station. The thermal balance of a reservoir is defined. A study was made of the effect that the Lithuaniam central power steam station has on atmospheric sediments, the physico-chemical regime of the reservoir-coolant, river drainage, and ground water. A description is given of the chemical composition of the surface bottom deposits, the intensity of modern sedimentation processes and sediment accumulation in the reservoir. 126 references, 70 figures, 36 tables.

  20. Report from investigation committee on the accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Stations of Tokyo Electric Power Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2012-01-01

    Government's Investigation Committee on the Accident at Fukushima Nuclear Power Stations of Tokyo Electric Power Company published its final report on July 23, 2012. Results of investigation combined final report and interim report published on December 26, 2011. The author was head of accident accuse investigation team mostly in charge of site response, prior measure and plant behavior. This article reported author related technical investigation results focusing on site response and prior measures against tsunamis of units 1-3 of Fukushima Nuclear Power Stations. Misunderstanding of working state of isolation condenser of unit 1, unsuitability of alternative water injection at manual stop of high-pressure coolant injection (HPCI) system of unit 3 and improper prior measure against tsunami and severe accident were pointed out in interim report. Improper monitoring of suppression chamber of unit 2 and again unsuitable work for HPCI system of unit 3 were reported in final report. Thorough technical investigation was more encouraged to update safety measures of nuclear power stations. (T. Tanaka)

  1. Capacity Calculation of Shunt Active Power Filters for Electric Vehicle Charging Stations Based on Harmonic Parameter Estimation and Analytical Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niancheng Zhou

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The influence of electric vehicle charging stations on power grid harmonics is becoming increasingly significant as their presence continues to grow. This paper studies the operational principles of the charging current in the continuous and discontinuous modes for a three-phase uncontrolled rectification charger with a passive power factor correction link, which is affected by the charging power. A parameter estimation method is proposed for the equivalent circuit of the charger by using the measured characteristic AC (Alternating Current voltage and current data combined with the charging circuit constraints in the conduction process, and this method is verified using an experimental platform. The sensitivity of the current harmonics to the changes in the parameters is analyzed. An analytical harmonic model of the charging station is created by separating the chargers into groups by type. Then, the harmonic current amplification caused by the shunt active power filter is researched, and the analytical formula for the overload factor is derived to further correct the capacity of the shunt active power filter. Finally, this method is validated through a field test of a charging station.

  2. Optimal Coordinated Management of a Plug-In Electric Vehicle Charging Station under a Flexible Penalty Contract for Voltage Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jip Kim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The increasing penetration of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs may cause a low-voltage problem in the distribution network. In particular, the introduction of charging stations where multiple PEVs are simultaneously charged at the same bus can aggravate the low-voltage problem. Unlike a distribution network operator (DNO who has the overall responsibility for stable and reliable network operation, a charging station operator (CSO may schedule PEV charging without consideration for the resulting severe voltage drop. Therefore, there is a need for the DNO to impose a coordination measure to induce the CSO to adjust its charging schedule to help mitigate the voltage problem. Although the current time-of-use (TOU tariff is an indirect coordination measure that can motivate the CSO to shift its charging demand to off-peak time by imposing a high rate at the peak time, it is limited by its rigidity in that the network voltage condition cannot be flexibly reflected in the tariff. Therefore, a flexible penalty contract (FPC for voltage security to be used as a direct coordination measure is proposed. In addition, the optimal coordinated management is formulated. Using the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E 69-bus test distribution network, the effectiveness of the coordination was verified by comparison with the current TOU tariff.

  3. Studies on the seasonal variation of atmospheric electricity parameters at a tropical station in Kolkata, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, S. S.; Paul, Suman; Barui, S.; Pal, Pinaki; Bandyopadhyay, B.; Kala, D.; Ghosh, A.

    2013-12-01

    The paper deals with the analyses of the atmospheric vertical potential gradient (PG) from the ground for 90 fair weather days during 2006-2009 measured at Kolkata (Lat: 22.56°N). The variations of PG have been studied extensively to investigate their values during monsoon and winter seasons. Higher values of PG at Kolkata are observed due to higher abundance of pollutant particles. The observed PG are compared with the results of Potsdam station (Lat: 52°N) and Johannesburg station (Lat: 26°S), with 9 years data and 2 years data respectively. The correlations studies are carried out among PG, PDC (Point Discharge Current) as well as negative and positive carrier conductivities. The corresponding correlation coefficients are obtained as 0.93, -0.842 and -0.844.

  4. Control of Flywheel Energy Storage Systems in Electrical Vehicle Charging Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Bo

    energy storage system (FESS). The proposed PhD project supports a corresponding smart control strategy that could be termed “charging station to grid (CS2G)”. It explores the possibility of using a dedicated energy storage system (FESS) within the charging station to alleviate grid and market conditions...... converters is built and analyzed. |Based on modeling analysis, centralized and distributed control methods are both explored to realize the coordination control of each components in the system. Specially, this project proposes a “dc voltage vs speed” droop strategy for FESS control based on distributed bus...... function method when the system switches its operation behavior between two modes. Finally, a downscaled FCS prototype with FESS is built in the intelligent MG lab, and experiments and hardware-in-loop simulation results are conducted to verify the effectiveness and feasibility with the proposed FCS...

  5. Report of NII investigation into allegations of faulty welding at Hinkley 'B' nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This reports the procedure and findings of the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate's investigation into allegations of welding and radiography malpractice at Hinkley Point-B power station. These concerned welds and their radiographic testing made on pipework carrying water or steam associated with one of the main electricity turbo generators, during construction in 1971. The water or steam is not radioactive and pipe failure would have no nuclear safety significance. Both the Central Electricity Generating Board and the NII investigated the allegations. Both investigations concluded that there was no evidence to support the allegations. (U.K.)

  6. Manufacture and quality control of concrete for Ikata Nuclear Power Station, Shikoku Electric Power Co., Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Akiomi; Kitada, Takao

    1989-01-01

    Ikata Nuclear Power Station, only one nuclear power station in Shikoku, is located at the root of Sada Peninsula on Seto Inland sea side. At present, No.1 and No.2 plants of 566 MW each are in commercial operation, and on the east side, No.3 plant is under construction. No.3 plant is a PWR type plant of 890 MWe output, and the start of commercial operation is scheduled in March, 1995. In the construction of No.3 plant, the concrete used for civil engineering and building works is about 430,000 m 3 , and for the improvement of the quality control of concrete, the pursuit of economic efficiency, the fostering of concrete technology of employee and the coprosperity with local industries, the facilities for manufacturing concrete were constructed within the premise of the power station. The amount of use of concrete and respective materials classified by respective fiscal years, and the amount of manufacture of concrete that determines the scale of the concrete plant are shown. As to the construction of the concrete plant, the foundation work was started in March, 1987, and the machine foundation and building works were started in May, 1987. The acceptance was completed on August 17, 1987. The facilities of manufacturing concrete, the manufacture of concrete, and the quality control of materials and concrete are reported. (author)

  7. Enhanced efficiency steam turbine blading - for cleaner coal plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, A.; Bell, D.; Cao, C.; Fowler, R.; Oliver, P.; Greenough, C.; Timmis, P. [ALSTOM Power, Rugby (United Kingdom)

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this project was to increase the efficiency of the short height stages typically found in high pressure steam turbine cylinders. For coal fired power plant, this will directly lead to a reduction in the amount of fuel required to produce electrical power, resulting in lower power station emissions. The continual drive towards higher cycle efficiencies demands increased inlet steam temperatures and pressures, which necessarily leads to shorter blade heights. Further advances in blading for short height stages are required in order to maximise the benefit. To achieve this, an optimisation of existing 3 dimensional designs was carried out and a new 3 dimensional fixed blade for use in the early stages of the high pressure turbine was developed. 28 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Predicting steam generator crevice chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, G.; Strati, G.

    2006-01-01

    'Full text:' Corrosion of steam cycle components produces insoluble material, mostly iron oxides, that are transported to the steam generator (SG) via the feedwater and deposited on internal surfaces such as the tubes, tube support plates and the tubesheet. The build up of these corrosion products over time can lead to regions of restricted flow with water chemistry that may be significantly different, and potentially more corrosive to SG tube material, than the bulk steam generator water chemistry. The aim of the present work is to predict SG crevice chemistry using experimentation and modelling as part of AECL's overall strategy for steam generator life management. Hideout-return experiments are performed under CANDU steam generator conditions to assess the accumulation of impurities in hideout, and return from, model crevices. The results are used to validate the ChemSolv model that predicts steam generator crevice impurity concentrations, and high temperature pH, based on process parameters (e.g., heat flux, primary side temperature) and blowdown water chemistry. The model has been incorporated into ChemAND, AECL's system health monitoring software for chemistry monitoring, analysis and diagnostics that has been installed at two domestic and one international CANDU station. ChemAND provides the station chemists with the only method to predict SG crevice chemistry. In one recent application, the software has been used to evaluate the crevice chemistry based on the elevated, but balanced, SG bulk water impurity concentrations present during reactor startup, in order to reduce hold times. The present paper will describe recent hideout-return experiments that are used for the validation of the ChemSolv model, station experience using the software, and improvements to predict the crevice electrochemical potential that will permit station staff to ensure that the SG tubes are in the 'safe operating zone' predicted by Lu (AECL). (author)

  9. Nuclear steam turbines for power production in combination with heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frilund, B.; Knudsen, K.

    1977-01-01

    The general operating conditions for nuclear steam turbines in district heating system are briefly outlined. The turbine plant can consist of essentially the same types of machines as in conventional district heating systems. Some possible arrangements of back-pressure turbines, back-pressure turbines with condensing tails, or condensing turbines with heat extraction are considered for nuclear power and heat stations. Principles of control for hot water temperature and electrical output are described. Optimization of the plant, considering parallel variations during the year between heat load, cooling water temperature, and required outgoing temperature is discussed. (U.K.)

  10. Planning Future Electric Vehicle Central Charging Stations Connected to Low-Voltage Distribution Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marra, Francesco; Træholt, Chresten; Larsen, Esben

    2012-01-01

    A great interest is recently paid to Electric Vehicles (EV) and their integration into electricity grids. EV can potentially play an important role in power system operation, however, the EV charging infrastructures have been only partly defined, considering them as limited to individual charging...... on their investment cost. Investigation on location and size of CCS is conducted, analyzing two LV grids of different capacity. The results enlighten that a public CCS should be preferably located in the range of 100 m from the transformer. The AC charging levels of 11 kW and 22 kW have the highest potential in LV...

  11. Station blackout: Deterministic and probabilistic approach in the field of electrical supply losses by EDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meslin, T.; Carnino, A.

    1986-01-01

    This example shows the thoroughness of EDF's approach in processing the difficult problems of the loss of electrical power supplies. Efforts are continuing in several directions: continued revision and improvement of operating procedures in the event of loss of electrical power supplies, PWR plant operator training courses devoted to the problems of power supply losses, and continued testing on simulators, and particularly testing under real conditions, including tests lasting several hours made possible by the performance of the new EDF simulators (two-phase code and taking all power losses into account)

  12. Projected costs of generating electricity from nuclear and coal-fired power stations for commissioning in 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This report updates and extends the previous NEA study, ''The Costs of Generating Electricity in Nuclear and Coal-fired Power Stations'', published by the OECD in late 1983. Despite the changed expectations concerning coal prices and the considerable movements in exchange rates since the first study was completed, the conclusions remain essentially the same. Nuclear Power is projected to be economically superior by a significant margin to coal-fired plants for base load electricity production in Europe, Japan and some regions of North America. In areas of North America in close proximity to supplies of cheap coal, this would be the more economic fuel, unless future nuclear investment costs can be reduced to match the best US and Canadian experience. In all regions considered, the economic advantage of both coal and nuclear over oil and gas-fired plants for commissioning in the mid-1990s is expected to be substantial. These conclusions are based on an analysis of cost projections for 900 MWe to 1400 MWe Light Water Reactors to be commissioned in 1995, operating at a levelised load factor of about 72 per cent over an assumed 25 years economic life and calculated with a 5 per cent (real) discount rate. This parallels the reference reactor selected for the NEA report ''The Economics of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle'', which was published by the OECD in June 1985, though it deviates somewhat from the reference conditions of the previous generation cost study. Contemporary coal-fired stations ranging in capacity from 330 MWe to 700 MWe with the same assumed economic life and load factor provide the basis for comparison. Some data are included on CANDU Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors, and a brief comment is annexed on the relevance of the comparisons for the smaller plants that may be of interest to countries with smaller electricity networks or where special circumstances apply

  13. Steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayden, R.L.J.

    1979-01-01

    Steam generators for nuclear reactors are designed so that deposition of solids on the surface of the inlet side of the tubesheet or the inlet header with the consequent danger of corrosion and eventual tube failure is obviated or substantially reduced. (U.K.)

  14. Investigation of the mixed beta-photon radiation field in plant areas of the heat steam generator of the Obrigheim nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgkhardt, B.; Piesch, E.

    1988-10-01

    The investigations of the beta-photon radiation field in parts of the plant in the primary circuit were performed by irradiation experiments in different distances of exhausted disks of the heat steam generator using LiF-TLDs. The depth dose distribution for a detector free of mass is found on the basis of the measurement results by using a standardized extrapolation procedure. The measurement results show that the depth dose distribution is more or less independent of the detector-to-source distance if the absorption in air and the detector is taken into account. Thus low energy beta-photon fields can be analyzed, in general, using the results found in one distance of about 5 cm from the source. For the purpose of radiation protection at working places transmission factors for protective clothes and detectors of different thicknesses were determined. The estimation of the dose equivalents H'(0.07) and H'(10) and the dose equivalents in the lens of the eye and the testes shows that the low energy beta radiation component contributes only to the partial dose equivalent H'(0.07) and will be absorbed by a protective layer of 100 mg.cm -2 . (orig.) [de

  15. On safety 1E qualification of electrical equipment for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segarceanu, D.; Geambasu, C.; Avramescu, M.

    1995-01-01

    Electrical equipment and systems for the emergency shutdown of a nuclear reactor are qualified according to safety class 1E. Methods of qualification meeting the requirements should be used, either individually or in combination include, type-test qualification, qualification by operating experience, qualification by analysis, combined qualification. These methods qualification principles, procedures and documents are discussed. (N.T.). 1 fig

  16. System design for a solar powered electric vehicle charging station for workplaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chandra Mouli, G.R.; Bauer, P.; Zeman, M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the possibility of charging battery electric vehicles at workplace in Netherlands using solar energy. Data from the Dutch Meteorological Institute is used to determine the optimal orientation of PV panels for maximum energy yield in the Netherlands. The seasonal and diurnal

  17. Coupled heat-electromagnetic simulation of inductive charging stations for electric vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaufmann, C.; Günther, M.; Klagges, D.; Richwin, M.; Schöps, S.; Maten, ter E.J.W.

    2012-01-01

    Coupled electromagnetic-heat problems have been studied for induction or inductive heating, for dielectric heating, for testing of corrosion, for detection of cracks, for hardening of steel, and more recently for inductive charging of electric vehicles. In nearly all cases a simple co-simulation is

  18. Coupled heat-electromagnetic simulation of inductive charging stations for electric vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaufmann, C.; Günther, M.; Klagges, D.; Richwin, M.; Schöps, S.; Maten, ter E.J.W.; Fontes, M.; Günther, M.; Marheineke, N.

    2014-01-01

    Coupled electromagnetic-heat problems have been studied for induction or inductive heating, for dielectric heating, for testing of corrosion, for detection of cracks, for hardening of steel, and more recently for inductive charging of electric vehicles. In nearly all cases a simple co-simulation is

  19. Electric field effects on ionospheric and thermospheric parameters above the EISCAT station for summer conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Klimenko

    Full Text Available Numerical calculations of the thermospheric and ionospheric parameters above EISCAT are presented for quiet geomagnetic conditions in summer. The Global Self-consistent Model of the Thermosphere, Ionosphere and Protonosphere (GSM TIP was used. The numerical results were obtained both with a self-consistent calculation of the electric fields of magnetospheric and dynamo-action origin and with the magnetospheric electric fields only. It was found that the dynamo-electric field has some effect on the ionospheric convection pattern during quiet geomagnetic conditions. It has a marked effect mainly on the zonal neutral wind component above EISCAT (±20 m/s at 140 km altitude. We have studied the effects of various field-aligned current (FAC distributions on thermosphere/ionosphere parameters and we show that a qualitative agreement can be obtained with region-I and -II FAC zones at 75° and 65° geomagnetic latitude, respectively. The maximum FAC intensities have been assumed at 03–21 MLT for both regions with peak values of 2.5×10–7 A m–2 (region I and 1.25×10–7 A m–2 (region II. These results are in agreement with statistical potential distribution and FAC models constructed by use of EISCAT data. The lack of decreased electron density in the night-time sector as observed by the EISCAT radar was found to be due to the spatial distribution of ionospheric convection resulting from electric fields of magnetospheric origin.

    Key words. Electric fields and currents · Ionosphere- atmosphere interactions · Modelling and forecasting

  20. Electric field effects on ionospheric and thermospheric parameters above the EISCAT station for summer conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Klimenko

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerical calculations of the thermospheric and ionospheric parameters above EISCAT are presented for quiet geomagnetic conditions in summer. The Global Self-consistent Model of the Thermosphere, Ionosphere and Protonosphere (GSM TIP was used. The numerical results were obtained both with a self-consistent calculation of the electric fields of magnetospheric and dynamo-action origin and with the magnetospheric electric fields only. It was found that the dynamo-electric field has some effect on the ionospheric convection pattern during quiet geomagnetic conditions. It has a marked effect mainly on the zonal neutral wind component above EISCAT (±20 m/s at 140 km altitude. We have studied the effects of various field-aligned current (FAC distributions on thermosphere/ionosphere parameters and we show that a qualitative agreement can be obtained with region-I and -II FAC zones at 75° and 65° geomagnetic latitude, respectively. The maximum FAC intensities have been assumed at 03–21 MLT for both regions with peak values of 2.5×10–7 A m–2 (region I and 1.25×10–7 A m–2 (region II. These results are in agreement with statistical potential distribution and FAC models constructed by use of EISCAT data. The lack of decreased electron density in the night-time sector as observed by the EISCAT radar was found to be due to the spatial distribution of ionospheric convection resulting from electric fields of magnetospheric origin.Key words. Electric fields and currents · Ionosphere- atmosphere interactions · Modelling and forecasting

  1. Specific absorption rate and electric field measurements in the near field of six mobile phone base station antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toivonen, Tommi; Toivo, Tim; Puranen, Lauri; Jokela, Kari

    2009-05-01

    In this article, the exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic fields was studied in close proximity (distances of 10, 100, 300, and 600 mm) to six base station antennas. The specific absorption rate (SAR) in 800 mm x 500 mm x 200 mm box phantom as well as unperturbed electric field (E) in air was measured. The results were used to determine whether the measurement of local maximum of unperturbed electric field can be used as a compliance check for local exposure. Also, the conservativeness of this assessment method compared to the ICNIRP basic restriction was studied. Moreover, the assessment of whole-body exposure was discussed and the distance ranges presented in which the ICNIRP limit for local exposure could be exceeded before the limit for whole-body SAR. These results show that the electric field measurement alone can be used for easy compliance check for the local exposure at all distances and for all antenna types studied. However, in some cases when the local peak value of E was compared directly to the ICNIRP reference level for unperturbed E, the exposure was overestimated only very slightly (by factor 1.1) compared to the basic restriction for localized SAR in a human, and hence these results can not be generalized to all antenna types. Moreover, it was shown that the limit for localized exposure could be exceeded before the limit for the whole-body average SAR, if the distance to the antenna was less than 240 mm. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Using MAAP 4.0 to determine risks from steam generator tube leaks or ruptures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, E.L.; Kenton, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    As part of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) program on steam generator degradation specific management (SGDSM), the nuclear industry is investigating the effects on plant risk of severe accidents involving steam generator tube leaks or ruptures. Such accidents fall into three classes: those caused by spontaneous, steam generator tube ruptures (SGTRs) that subsequently result in core damage; those caused by design-basis accidents that lead to induced tube ruptures and subsequent core damage; and those that progress to core damage, such as a station blackout (SBO), with subsequent induced tube leakage or rupture. In each case, the potential exists for a significant fraction of the fission products released from a damaged core to reach the environment through the leaking or ruptured tubes

  3. Control of Flywheel Energy Storage Systems in Electrical Vehicle Charging Stations

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Growing environmental awareness and strong political impetus have resulted in plug-in electric vehicles (PEV) becoming ever more attractive means of transportation. They are expected to have a significant impact to the overall loading of future distribution networks. Thus, current distribution grids need to be updated in order to accommodate PEV fleets, which are recognized in smart grid (SG) objective. The prevailing concern in that sense is the combined impact of a large number of randomly ...

  4. The supplying of primary energy to electric power stations up to 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, J.P.

    1975-01-01

    After specifying the role of thermal power plants in supplying France with electric power, the report examines the impact on their activity of recent events affecting energy and, in the light of this analysis, shows how in the near future it is possible to plan their supplies of fossil fuels. In the face of some uncertainty still present in this field, the adaptability of the power plants to the many and uncertain constraints of the demand constitutes a favourable and important factor [fr

  5. Device for underwater use in nuclear power stations with an electrical distributor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The electrical connections for the different equipments used underwater are taken to a distributor via waterproof connectors. This distributor is situated in the head of a bell open at the bottom. When the bell is lowered into the water, water will penetrate into it, but only to a certain level, so that the water level inside the bell does not reach the distributor. This air cushion therefore protects the connections on the distributor against water entering them. (DG) [de

  6. Systems for controlling the electric power of a boiling water reactor power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukunishi, Koyu; Kiyokawa, Kazuhiro.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To achieve automatic increase and decrease of electric output in accordance with a predetermined rate of increase or decrease in output when the power output is raised or lowered. Structure: An electric output signal from an atomic power plant is led to a differentiating circuit through a smoothing circuit to produce a signal for rate of change of time, and an error signal between this signal and a preset signal produced from a circuit for a preset rate of change of output with time is supplied to an analog adjuster through a limiter. In this way, the flow rate in the reactor core is adjusted by a speed controller to obtain an output of a predetermined rate of increase. The difference signal between the electric output signal and a desired value signal is passed through an absolute circuit to a comparator circuit for comparison with a predetermined threshold value setting signal. The output signal of the comparator is used to operate a relay to open the contact so as to prevent an increase or decrease in the output beyond the required level. (Kamimura, M.)

  7. Water-related constraints to the development of geothermal electric generating stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, R.C.; Shepherd, A.D.; Rosemarin, C.S.; Mayfield, M.W.

    1981-06-01

    The water-related constraints, which may be among the most complex and variable of the issues facing commercialization of geothermal energy, are discussed under three headings: (1) water requirements of geothermal power stations, (2) resource characteristics of the most promising hydrothermal areas and regional and local water supply situations, and (3) legal issues confronting potential users of water at geothermal power plants in the states in which the resource areas are located. A total of 25 geothermal resource areas in California, New Mexico, Oregon, Idaho, Utah, Hawaii, and Alaska were studied. Each had a hydrothermal resource temperature in excess of 150/sup 0/C (300/sup 0/F) and an estimated 30-year potential of greater than 100-MW(e) capacity.

  8. Improved approach for electric vehicle rapid charging station placement and sizing using Google maps and binary lightning search algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shareef, Hussain; Mohamed, Azah

    2017-01-01

    The electric vehicle (EV) is considered a premium solution to global warming and various types of pollution. Nonetheless, a key concern is the recharging of EV batteries. Therefore, this study proposes a novel approach that considers the costs of transportation loss, buildup, and substation energy loss and that incorporates harmonic power loss into optimal rapid charging station (RCS) planning. A novel optimization technique, called binary lightning search algorithm (BLSA), is proposed to solve the optimization problem. BLSA is also applied to a conventional RCS planning method. A comprehensive analysis is conducted to assess the performance of the two RCS planning methods by using the IEEE 34-bus test system as the power grid. The comparative studies show that the proposed BLSA is better than other optimization techniques. The daily total cost in RCS planning of the proposed method, including harmonic power loss, decreases by 10% compared with that of the conventional method. PMID:29220396

  9. Applicability of Long Duration Exposure Facility environmental effects data to the design of Space Station Freedom electrical power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Robert J.; Lu, Cheng-Yi; Aronoff, Irene

    1992-01-01

    Data defining space environmental effects on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) are examined in terms of the design of the electrical power system (EPS) of the Space Station Freedom (SSF). The significant effects of long-term exposure to space are identified with respect to the performance of the LDEF's materials, components, and systems. A total of 57 experiments were conducted on the LDEF yielding information regarding coatings, thermal systems, electronics, optics, and power systems. The resulting database is analyzed in terms of the specifications of the SSF EPS materials and subsystems and is found to be valuable in the design of control and protection features. Specific applications are listed for findings regarding the thermal environment, atomic oxygen, UV and ionizing radiation, debris, and contamination. The LDEF data are shown to have a considerable number of applications to the design and planning of the SSF and its EPS.

  10. Probabilistic Physics-Based Risk Tools Used to Analyze the International Space Station Electrical Power System Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Bhogila M.; Hoge, Peter A.; Nagpal, Vinod K.; Hojnicki, Jeffrey S.; Rusick, Jeffrey J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the methods employed to apply probabilistic modeling techniques to the International Space Station (ISS) power system. These techniques were used to quantify the probabilistic variation in the power output, also called the response variable, due to variations (uncertainties) associated with knowledge of the influencing factors called the random variables. These uncertainties can be due to unknown environmental conditions, variation in the performance of electrical power system components or sensor tolerances. Uncertainties in these variables, cause corresponding variations in the power output, but the magnitude of that effect varies with the ISS operating conditions, e.g. whether or not the solar panels are actively tracking the sun. Therefore, it is important to quantify the influence of these uncertainties on the power output for optimizing the power available for experiments.

  11. An aerial radiological survey of the South Texas Project Electric Generating Station and surrounding area, Bay City, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.M.

    1988-12-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the South Texas Project Electric Generating Station (STPEGS) near Bay City, Texas, during the period 25 March to 4 April 1988. The purpose of the 259-square-kilometer (100-square-mile) survey was to document the terrestrial gamma environment of the plant and surrounding area. An exposure rate contour map at 1 meter above ground level (AGL) was constructed from the gamma data and overlaid on an aerial photograph and map of the area. Exposure rates were observed up to 10μR/h over land. No areas of enhanced exposure rates were observed. Ground-based exposure rate measurements and soil samples were obtained to support the aerial data. Oblique aerial photographs of the plant were also acquired during the survey. 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  12. Improved approach for electric vehicle rapid charging station placement and sizing using Google maps and binary lightning search algorithm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Mainul Islam

    Full Text Available The electric vehicle (EV is considered a premium solution to global warming and various types of pollution. Nonetheless, a key concern is the recharging of EV batteries. Therefore, this study proposes a novel approach that considers the costs of transportation loss, buildup, and substation energy loss and that incorporates harmonic power loss into optimal rapid charging station (RCS planning. A novel optimization technique, called binary lightning search algorithm (BLSA, is proposed to solve the optimization problem. BLSA is also applied to a conventional RCS planning method. A comprehensive analysis is conducted to assess the performance of the two RCS planning methods by using the IEEE 34-bus test system as the power grid. The comparative studies show that the proposed BLSA is better than other optimization techniques. The daily total cost in RCS planning of the proposed method, including harmonic power loss, decreases by 10% compared with that of the conventional method.

  13. OPTIMIZATION OF PATCHOULI OIL (POGOSTEMON CABLIN, BENTH WITH STEAM DISTILLATION ASSISTED BY PULSED ELECTRIC FIELD VIA RESPONSE SURFACE METHODOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUKARDI

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed to determine the role of pulsed electric field (PEF treatment before hydro-distillation of the patchouli oil. Response Surface Methodology (RSM was employed to optimize PEF treatment (voltages, frequencies and times of distillation of patchouli oil from dried patchouli crops. The experimental design and analysis the result to obtain the optimal processing parameters was a Box-Behnken Design (BBD. Three variables were examined in this study: voltages (1,000-2,000 volt; frequencies (1,000-2,000 Hz; and distillation time (4-8 hours. The results showed that the voltage greatly affects the volume of patchouli oil obtained and optimum condition of PEF was voltages of 2,000 volts, frequencies of 1,874 Hz, and 8 hours distillation. The patchouli oil obtained is 8.037 ml of 300 g of dry material (±2.7%. The verification of the model shows that 96.6% (7.76±0.15 ml can adequately for reflecting the expected optimization.

  14. Techno-economic and sensitivity analysis for grid-connected renewable energy electric boat charging station in Terengganu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salleh N. A. S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to encourage the eco-friendly technologies in transportation sector, the reliance on fuel need to be reduced and the use of renewable energy (RE technology as energy source are widely explored by researchers. Thus, this study focus on the feasibility of developing grid-connected renewable energy electric boat charging station for the fishermen in Terengganu using simulation-based method by HOMER software. Five year solar radiation and wind speed data were collected at Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin (UNISZA weather station. For load profile, the information about fishing activities and the amount of subsidy spent by the government were obtained from the interview session with the fishermen and validated with Lembaga Kemajuan Ikan Malaysia (LKIM. The results acquired are compared between grid-only and grid-connected RE systems in term of net present cost (NPC, operational cost and payback period. A sensitivity analysis is done to find the minimal Feed-in Tariff (FiT rate that can be implemented in order to encourage the use of RE system in this sector. Then, the relationship between FiT and NPC, payback period and emission of pollutants are analyzed. At current FiT rates RM 0.813/kWh, hybrid grid-PV system manages to achieve its optimal in generating high income from selling the power to the grid with convincing amount of electricity production and short payback period. It is concluded at minimum RM 0.56/kWh of FiT, the grid-connected RE system is possible to be developed because its performance shows better outcome compared to the grid-only system.

  15. Assessment of the use of vanadium redox flow batteries for energy storage and fast charging of electric vehicles in gas stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, Álvaro; Brito, F.P.; Martins, Jorge; Rodrigues, Nuno; Monteiro, Vitor; Afonso, João L.; Ferreira, Paula

    2016-01-01

    A network of conveniently located fast charging stations is one of the possibilities to facilitate the adoption of Electric Vehicles (EVs). This paper assesses the use of fast charging stations for EVs in conjunction with VRFBs (Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries). These batteries are charged during low electricity demand periods and then supply electricity for the fast charging of EVs during day, thus implementing a power peak shaving process. Flow batteries have unique characteristics which make them especially attractive when compared with conventional batteries, such as their ability to decouple rated power from rated capacity, as well as their greater design flexibility and nearly unlimited life. Moreover, their liquid nature allows their installation inside deactivated underground gas tanks located at gas stations, enabling a smooth transition of gas stations' business model towards the emerging electric mobility paradigm. A project of a VRFB system to fast charge EVs taking advantage of existing gas stations infrastructures is presented. An energy and cost analysis of this concept is performed, which shows that, for the conditions tested, the project is technologically and economically viable, although being highly sensitive to the investment costs and to the electricity market conditions. - Highlights: • Assessment of Vanadium Redox Flow Battery use for EV fast charge in gas stations. • This novel system proposal allows power peak shaving and use of deactivated gas tanks. • Philosophy allows seamless business transition towards the Electric Mobility paradigm. • Project is technologically and economically viable, although with long payback times. • Future Cost cuts due to technology maturation will consolidate project attractiveness.

  16. Effects of pellet yield on electricity cost in laser fusion generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohachevsky, I.O.; Booth, L.A.; Hafer, J.F.; Pendergrass, J.H.

    1978-01-01

    The dependence of capital and net electricity production costs on fuel pellet yield is investigated for laser fusion reactors based on the magnetically protected and the wetted wall reactor cavity concepts. It is determined that above a certain pellet yield, which depends on the cavity concept, diseconomies of scale occur and the costs per unit output increase with increasing fuel pellet yield. This behavior, determined with the trade-off and analysis computer code TROFAN, is explained through analytical examination of the scaling rules for the laser fusion reactor components

  17. Steam injection : analysis of a typical application.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penning, F.M.; Lange, de H.C.

    1996-01-01

    A cardboard factory requires steam and electricity, which are produced in its own powerplant. Conventional cogeneration systems cannot cope with the large fluctuations in steam demand, inherent to the cardboard production process, while power demand remains almost constant. For this reason, two

  18. IEEE Std 383-1974: IEEE standard for type test of Class IE electric cables, field splices, and connections for nuclear power generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This standard provides direction for establishing type tests which may be used in qualifying Class 1E electric cables, field splices, and other connections for service in nuclear power generating stations. General guidelines for qualifications are given in IEEE Std 323-1974, Standard for Qualifying Class IE Electric Equipment for Nuclear Power Generating Stations. Categories of cables covered are those used for power control and instrumentation services. Though intended primarily to pertain to cable for field installation, this guide may also be used for the qualification of internal wiring of manufactured devices. This guide does not cover cables for service within the reactor vessel

  19. Multi-station synthesis of early twentieth century surface atmospheric electricity measurements for upper tropospheric properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Harrison

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The vertical columnar current density in the global atmospheric electrical circuit depends on the local columnar resistance. A simple model for the columnar resistance is suggested, which separates the local boundary layer component from the upper troposphere cosmic ray component, and calculates the boundary layer component from a surface measurement of air conductivity. This theory is shown to provide reasonable agreement with observations. One application of the simple columnar model theory is to provide a basis for the synthesis of surface atmospheric electrical measurements made simultaneously at several European sites. Assuming the ionospheric potential to be common above all the sites, the theoretical air-earth current density present in the absence of a boundary layer columnar resistance can be found by extrapolation. This is denoted the free troposphere limit air-earth current density, J0. Using early surface data from 1909 when no ionospheric potential data are available for corroboration, J0 is found to be ~6 pA m−2, although this is subject to uncertainties in the data and limitations in the theory. Later (1966–1971 European balloon and surface data give J0=2.4 pA m−2.

  20. Quantitative indexes of gas-steam thermo electrical power plants thermodynamical cycles; Indices quantitativos de ciclos termodinamicos de centrais termoeletricas de gas-vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlassov, D.; Vargas, J.V.C. [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica]. E-mails: vlassov@demec.ufpr.br; jvargas@demec.ufpr.br

    2002-07-01

    This paper analyses various thermal schemes of the world wide most used cycles in gas-steam thermoelectric power plants. The combination of gas turbine cycle with the steam-gas cycle in thermoelectric power plants is performed in several ways, resulting in different thermal schemes, used equipment and operation plant basic characteristics. The thermal scheme of a gas-steam power plant is a determinant factor for the definition of energetic, economic and ecological characteristics. For the comparative analysis various quantitative indexes are presented, as for example: the heat fraction supplied to the gas turbine cycle and the cycle binary rate.

  1. The development of on-line thermal performance monitors in Nuclear Electric Company's stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conner, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    The paper examines the economic benefits of using on-line monitoring techniques in assisting Station Staff with the task of optimising the efficient use of reactor fuel. The role of thermal performance monitoring for detecting changes in plant condition is also examined and the way in which the data can be used by engineers to assist with the preparation of operating and maintenance programmes. To enable genuine gradual changes in plant performance to be detected when operating against a background of changing plant signal accuracy conditions, plant transducers have to be calibrated on a regular basis. This can be both costly and labour intensive. To reduce this requirement for regular calibrations, an automatic software signal verification program has been developed for use in on-line monitoring schemes. It forms part of the total unit performance calculation package and uses a whole plant model to verify plant signals. All plant signals used to calculate unit heat rate are verified typically every 15 minutes with signals going outside predetermined limits being automatically reported to the user. The program is interactive allowing the user to interrogate the condition of the signal, with respect to both its error magnitude and rate of drift outside signal limits. The program runs in real time mode on a Workstation connected directly to the plant

  2. Final Environmental Statement related to the operation of Wolf Creek Generating Station, Unit No. 1. Docket No. STN 50-482, Kansas Gas and Electric Company, et al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-06-01

    This final environmental statement contains the second assessment of the environmental impact associated with operation of Wolf Creek Generating Station Unit 1 pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and 10 CFR Part 51, as amended, of the NRC's regulations. This statement examines: the affected environment, environmental consequences and mitigating actions, and environmental and economic benefits and costs. Land use and terrestrial- and aquatic-ecological impacts will be small. Air-quality impacts will also be small. However, steam fog from the station's cooling lake has the potential for reducing visibility over nearby roads and bridges. A fog-monitoring program for roads and bridges near the lake has been recommended. Impacts to historic and prehistoric sites will be negligible. Chemical discharges to the Neosho River are expected to have no appreciable impacts on water quality under normal conditions and will be required to meet conditions of the station's NPDES permit. The effects of routine operations, energy transmission, and periodic maintenance of rights-of-way and transmission line facilities should not jeopardize any populations of endangered or threatened species. No significant impacts are anticipated from normal operational releases of radioactivity. The risk associated with accidental radiation exposure is very low. The net socioeconomic effects of the project will be beneficial. The action called for is the issuance of an operating license for the Wolf Creek Generating Station Unit 1

  3. Swarm Intelligence-Based Smart Energy Allocation Strategy for Charging Stations of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent researches towards the use of green technologies to reduce pollution and higher penetration of renewable energy sources in the transportation sector have been gaining popularity. In this wake, extensive participation of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs requires adequate charging allocation strategy using a combination of smart grid systems and smart charging infrastructures. Daytime charging stations will be needed for daily usage of PHEVs due to the limited all-electric range. Intelligent energy management is an important issue which has already drawn much attention of researchers. Most of these works require formulation of mathematical models with extensive use of computational intelligence-based optimization techniques to solve many technical problems. In this paper, gravitational search algorithm (GSA has been applied and compared with another member of swarm family, particle swarm optimization (PSO, considering constraints such as energy price, remaining battery capacity, and remaining charging time. Simulation results obtained for maximizing the highly nonlinear objective function evaluate the performance of both techniques in terms of best fitness.

  4. Commercialization of new energy technologies. Appendix A. Case study 1: central station electric power generation technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-06-01

    The results of a survey on Technologies for Central Power Generation are presented. The central power generation technologies selected for consideration were: fusion; breeder reactors; solar electric (thermal); geothermal; and magnetohydrodynamics. The responses of industry executives who make key investment decisions concerning new energy technologies and who to identify the problems faced in the development and commercialization of new energy systems are presented. Evaluation of these responses led to the following recommendations: increase industry input into the R, D and D planning process; establish and advocate priorities for new technologies based on detailed analysis of a technology's value in terms of overall national goals; create a mechanism for a joint ERDA/industry appraisal of priorities and programs; increase level of federal funding or subsidy of new technology demonstrations; and focus the activities of the national laboratories on basic research and very early product development; and emphasize industry involvement in systems development

  5. Hierarchical control of a photovoltaic/battery based DC microgrid including electric vehicle wireless charging station

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Zhao xia; Fan, Haodong; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the hierarchical control strategy of a photovoltaic/battery based dc microgrid is presented for electric vehicle (EV) wireless charging. Considering irradiance variations, battery charging/discharging requirements, wireless power transmission characteristics, and onboard battery...... coils, receiving coils and compensation capacitors, the wireless power transmission system is designed to be resonant when it is operating at the rated power, with the aim to achieve the optimum transmission system efficiency. Simulation and experimental results of the hierarchical control...... charging power change and other factors, the possible operation states are obtained. A hierarchical control strategy is established, which includes central and local controllers. The central controller is responsible for the selection and transfer of operation states and the management of the local...

  6. Electricity consumers' council statement of case to the Sizewell 'B' power station public inquiry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, M.

    1983-01-01

    Of the four arguments used in favour of Sizewell, the ECC considers that the economic benefit case is much the most important. Consumers will need to be convinced above all that Sizewell will help to restrain the growth of electricity prices. Of the other three arguments, plant need is not taken very seriously by the Board, making provision for future investment options hardly appears in the Statement of Case, and fuel diversity - while an important objective - can only be examined properly within the context of long-term investment strategy and relates only marginally to Sizewell as a self-standing project. Because a decision about Sizewell can in any case only be fully evaluated within the context of long-term plant strategy, the ECC has also briefly considered the most important long-term issues - the existence or otherwise of a nuclear programme, the questions surrounding technology acquisition and alternative energy investments - against which the Sizewell decision should be viewed. (author)

  7. The costs of generating electricity in nuclear and coal fired power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petroll, M.

    1984-01-01

    An ad-hoc group of experts for international comparison of electricity generation cost was established in the OECD more than two years ago. This group of experts submitted their report of results in English at the end of last year. This paper publishes an abbreviated version making use of original quotations exclusively in order to keep true to the content of the study as much as possible. The study arrives at the following conclusion: ''There is no uniform set of input data for nuclear and coalfired power plants and assumptions concerning the base parameters of the reactor differ from country to country. Despite these differences, the outcome is that, nuclear energy is cheaper than coal in all countries concerned with the exception of some parts of the United States and Canada.'' (orig./UA) [de

  8. Floating nuclear power station of APWS-80 type for electricity generation and fresh water production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zverev, K.V.; Polunichev, V.I.; Sergeev, Yu.A.

    1997-01-01

    To solve the problem of seawater desalination and electric energy generation, the designing organizations of Russia have developed two variants of floating nuclear desalination plant. The KLT-40 type reactors, with maximum 160 MW thermal power, is used as the power source for such plant. Depending on the customer requirement one or two power unit could be installed in the floating desalination plant. There are APWS-80 with two reactors, producing 80,000 m 3 desalinated water per day and APWS-40 with one reactor, producing 40,000 m 3 desalinated water per day. The advantages of floating desalination plants are the possibility to build and test them at the ship-build plant of the supplier country and to hand them over on turnkey base. (author). 5 figs

  9. Comparison of conventional vs. modular hydrogen refueling stations and on-site production vs. delivery.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hecht, Ethan S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Pratt, Joseph William [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-03-01

    To meet the needs of public and private stakeholders involved in the development, construction, and operation of hydrogen fueling stations needed to support the widespread roll-out of hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles, this work presents publicly available station templates and analyses. These ‘Reference Stations’ help reduce the cost and speed the deployment of hydrogen stations by providing a common baseline with which to start a design, enable quick assessment of potential sites for a hydrogen station, identify contributors to poor economics, and suggest areas of research. This work presents layouts, bills of materials, piping and instrumentation diagrams, and detailed analyses of five new station designs. In the near term, delivered hydrogen results in a lower cost of hydrogen compared to on-site production via steam methane reforming or electrolysis, although the on-site production methods have other advantages. Modular station concepts including on-site production can reduce lot sizes from conventional assemble-on-site stations.

  10. Evaluation of sub-soil geo-electric properties in a proposed power sub-station site at Ebubu, Rivers State, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    T.K.S. Abam; S.A. Ngah

    2014-01-01

    Electrical resistivity survey was carried out in a site proposed for the construction and installation of a Power sub-station. The project will involve subsurface installation of cables and other objects that easily conduct electricity. Extant laws including EIA also require knowledge of subsurface distribution of resistivity in construction projects that would involve burial of steel pipes and cables. The imperative of this is emphasized by the location of the project in an area of shallow g...

  11. Influence of the cost development in power station construction and operation on power station planning with special regard to the effects on electricity supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieb, K.H.; Frenzel, P.; Vogel, J.

    1974-01-01

    A survey on the present structure of thermal power facilities in the FRG is followed by a discussion of the development of power plant costs in the last few years. Also mentioned are the findings of studies of costs as a function of the power station size and the effects of the overall cost increase on the power generation costs of the last few years. Finally, a model conception for the development of power stations is presented which makes predictions about the future size of power stations and their constructional parts. (UA/AK) [de

  12. Recent technology for BWR nuclear steam turbine unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriya, Shin-ichi; Masuda, Toyohiko; Kashiwabara, Katsuto; Oshima, Yoshikuni

    1990-01-01

    As to the ABWR plants which is the third improvement standard boiling water reactor type plants, already the construction of a plant of 1356 MWe class for 50 Hz is planned. Hitachi Ltd. has accumulated the technology for the home manufacture of a whole ABWR plant including a turbine. As the results, the application of a butterfly type combination intermediate valve to No.5 plant in Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc., which began the commercial operation recently and later plants, the application of a moisture separating heater to No.4 plant in Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station, Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., which is manufactured at present and later plants and so on were carried out. As to the steam turbine facilities for nuclear power generation manufactured by Hitachi Ltd., three turbines of 1100 MWe class for 50 Hz and one turbine for 60 Hz are in operation. As the new technologies for the steam turbines, the development of 52 in long last stage blades, the new design techniques for the rotor system, the moisture separating heater, the butterfly type combination intermediate valve, cross-around pipes and condensate and feedwater system are reported. (K.I.)

  13. Technological investigations and efficiency analysis of a steam heat exchange condenser: Conceptual design of a hybrid steam condenser

    OpenAIRE

    Kapooria, R K; Kumar, S; Kasana, K S

    2008-01-01

    Most of the electricity being produced throughout the world today is from steam power plants. At the same time, many other competent means of generating electricity have been developed viz. electricity from natural gas, MHD generators, biogas, solar cells, etc. But steam power plants will continue to be competent because of the use of water as the main working fluid which is abundantly available and is also reusable. The condenser remains among one of the key components of a steam power plant...

  14. Introduction of Electric Vehicle Charging Stations to University Campuses: A Case Study for the University of Georgia from 2014 to 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sierra Hovet

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Electric vehicles (EVs are becoming increasingly popular in the United States of America (USA. EVs attract buyers with benefits including energy efficiency and environmental friendliness. As EV usage grows, more public spaces are installing EV charging stations. This paper presents a comprehensive analysis of EV charging station usage at the University of Georgia (UGA in Athens, Georgia. Three ChargePoint EV charging stations at UGA were used to collect data about each of 3204 charging events that occurred from 10 April 2014 to 20 June 2017. The charging event data included start date, start time, length of parking time, length of charging time, amount of energy delivered, and the postal code entered by the user during ChargePoint account registration. Analytical methods were proposed to obtain information about EV charging behavior, charging station occupancy, and geolocation of charging station users. The methodology presented here was time- and cost-effective, as well as scalable to other organizations that own charging stations. Because this study took place at a university, the results presented here can be used as a reference for EV charging station usage in other college towns in the USA that do not have EV charging stations but are planning to develop EV infrastructure.

  15. Technical evaluation report on the adequacy of station electric-distribution-system voltages for the Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Units 1 and 2. Docket Nos. 50-245, 50-336

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selan, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    This report documents the technical evaluation of the adequacy of the station electric-distribution-system voltages for the Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Units 1 and 2. The evaluation is to determine if the onsite distribution system, in conjunction with the offsite power sources, has sufficient capacity to automatically start and operate all Class 1E loads within the equipment voltage ratings under certain conditions established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The analyses submitted demonstrate that adequate voltages will be supplied to the Class 1E equipment under the worst-case conditions analyzed

  16. Projected costs of generating electricity from power stations for commissioning in the period 1995-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The study reviews the projected electricity generation costs for the base load power generation options expected to be available in the medium term, using an agreed common economic methodology. Cost projections were obtained for nuclear and fossil fuelled plants that could in principle be commissioned in the mid-1990s, or shortly thereafter, although not all countries plan to commission plants at that time. The major changes in expectations compared with earlier studies, apart from those associated with changed perceptions of fossil fuel prices, include significantly lower nuclear investment costs for the United States, associated with an improved design and the expectation of achieving shorter construction periods than projected in the 1985 study, and generally lower nuclear fuel costs. Some countries project higher operation and maintenance costs for either coal-fired or nuclear plant or both. In the case of coal-fired plants these may be associated with the extra costs of operating desulphurisation equipment. The most marked change in nuclear operating and maintenance costs has taken place in the United States, where these costs are now expected to be twice as large as the projected nuclear fuel costs. There remain major differences in investment cost expectations between countries. The reasons for these differences have been examined in previous studies. They arise from differences in factor costs, regulatory approach, design and siting, and exchange rates which do not adequately reflect the differences in the capital investment costs between countries. In brief, most OECD countries continue to expect nuclear power to have a lower levelised generating cost than coal-fired generation when using their own technical and economic assumptions

  17. [Hygienic problems in the location of modern wind electric power stations in their design].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kireeva, I S; Makhniuk, V M; Akimenko, V Ia; Dumanskiĭ, Iu D; Semashko, P V

    2013-01-01

    Hygienic aspects of the placement of wind power plants (WPP) in connection with the intensive development of wind power and the lack of systematic information on their effects of the environment and living conditions of the population are becoming more actual. In the article there are considered results of the sanitary-epidemiological expertise of the construction project of three modern large wind farm (the South - Ukrainian, Tiligulskaya and Pokrovskaya) with a total capacity offrom 180 to 500 MW of wind farms with 2.3 MW power generators of wind turbines. It is shown that in the process of wind farm construction a contamination of the environment (air soil, ground water) may take place due to the working of construction equipment and vehicle, excavation, welding and other operations, in the exploitation of wind farm there can be created elevated levels of acoustic and electromagnetic pollution in the neighborhood and emergencies with the destruction of WPP in adverse weather conditions. Based on the calculations presented in the projects, and the analysis of data on the impact offoreign windfarm on the environment it was found that the limiting factor of the influence is the wind farm noise pollution in the audio frequency range that extends beyond the territory of wind fields, electromagnetic radiation is recorded within the hygienic standards and below only in the immediate vicinity of its sources (electrical equipment and power lines). For considered modern wind farms there was grounded sanitary protective zone with dimensions of 700 mfrom the outermost wind turbines by the noise and it was recommended compliance distance of200 mfrom the wind turbine to limit any activity and people staying in times of possible emergency situations in adverse weather conditions.

  18. The Recharging Infrastructure Needs for Long Distance Travel by Electric Vehicles: A Comparison of Battery-Switching and Quick-Charging Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Linda; Jensen, Thomas Christian; Kaplan, Sigal

    2017-01-01

    of electric vehicles is beneficial when considering economic costs and benefits for operators and users, tax redistribution, and environmental externalities, even with a relatively modest market share; (ii) the number of required recharging stations for satisfaction of the travel demand is at the magnitude...

  19. Exergy Steam Drying and Energy Integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Prem; Muenter, Claes (Exergy Engineering and Consulting, SE-417 55 Goeteborg (Sweden)). e-mail: verma@exergyse.com

    2008-10-15

    Exergy Steam Drying technology has existed for past 28 years and many new applications have been developed during this period. But during past few years the real benefits have been exploited in connection with bio-fuel production and energy integration. The steam dryer consists of a closed loop system, where the product is conveyed by superheated and pressurised carrier steam. The carrier steam is generated by the water vapours from the product being dried, and is indirectly superheated by another higher temperature energy source such as steam, flue gas, thermal oil etc. Besides the superior heat transfer advantages of using pressurised steam as a drying medium, the energy recovery is efficient and simple as the recovered energy (80-90%) is available in the form of steam. In some applications the product quality is significantly improved. Examples presented in this paper: Bio-Combine for pellets production: Through integration of the Exergy Steam Dryer for wood with a combined heat and power (CHP) plant, together with HP steam turbine, the excess carrier steam can be utilised for district heating and/or electrical power production in a condensing turbine. Bio-ethanol production: Both for first and second generation of ethanol can the Exergy process be integrated for treatment of raw material and by-products. Exergy Steam Dryer can dry the distillers dark grains and solubles (DDGS), wood, bagasse and lignin. Bio-diesel production: Oil containing seeds and fruits can be treated in order to improve both the quality of oil and animal feed protein, thus minimizing further oil processing costs and increasing the sales revenues. Sewage sludge as bio-mass: Municipal sewage sludge can be considered as a renewable bio-fuel. By drying and incineration, the combustion heat value of the sludge is sufficient for the drying process, generation of electrical energy and production of district heat. Keywords; Exergy, bio-fuel, bio-mass, pellets, bio-ethanol, biodiesel, bio

  20. Weather-power station. Solar energy, wind energy, water energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schatta, M

    1975-10-02

    A combined power station is described, which enables one to convert solar energy and wind energy into other forms of energy. The plant consists of a water-filled boiler, in which solar energy heats the water by concentration, solar cells, and finally wind rotors, which transform wind energy into electrical energy. The transformed energy is partly available as steam heat, partly as mechanical or electrical energy. The plant can be used for supplying heating systems or electrolysis equipment. Finally, by incorporating suitable motors, a mobile version of the system can be produced.

  1. Steam generator waterlancing at DNGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seppala, D.; Malaugh, J.

    1995-01-01

    Darlington Nuclear Generating Station (DNGS) is a four 900 MW Unit nuclear station forming part of the Ontario Hydro East System. There are four identical steam generators(SGs) per reactor unit. The Darlington SGs are vertical heat exchangers with an inverted U-tube bundle in a cylindrical shell. The DNGS Nuclear Plant Life Assurance Group , a department of DNGS Engineering Services have taken a Proactive Approach to ensure long term SG integrity. Instead of waiting until the tubesheets are covered by a substantial and established hard deposit; DNGS plan to clean each steam generator's tubesheet, first half lattice tube support assembly and bottom of the thermal plate every four years. The ten year business plan provides for cleaning and inspection to be conducted on all four SGs in each unit during maintenance outages (currently scheduled for every four years)

  2. A drier unit for steam separators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyrelongue, J.-P.

    1973-01-01

    Description is given of a drier unit adapted to equip a water separator mounted in a unit for treating a wet steam fed from a high pressure enclosure, so as to dry and contingently superheat said steam prior to injecting same into a turbine low pressure stage. This drier unit is constituted by at least a stack of separating sheets maintained in parallel relationship and at a slight angle with respect to the horizontal so as to allow the water provided by wet steam to flow toward a channel communicating with a manifold, and by means for guiding the steam between the sheets and evenly distributing it. This can be applied to steam turbines in nuclear power stations [fr

  3. Feed water pre-heater with two steam spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tratz, H.; Kelp, F.; Netsch, E.

    1976-01-01

    A feed water pre-heater for the two stage heating of feed water by condensing steam, having a low installed height is described, which can be installed in the steam ducts of turbines of large output, as in LWRs in nuclear power stations. The inner steam space is closed on one side by the water vessel, while the tubes of the inner steam space go straight from the water vessel, and the tubes of the outer steam space are bent into a U shape and open out into the water vessel. The two-stage preheater is thus surrounded by feedwater in two ways. (UWI) [de

  4. Advanced steam cycles for light water reactors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, R.C.

    1975-07-01

    An appraisal of the potential of adding superheat to improve the overall LWR plant cycle performance is presented. The study assesses the economic and technical problems associated with the addition of approximately 500 0 F of superheat to raise the steam temperature to 1000 0 F. The practicality of adding either nuclear or fossil superheat to LWR's is reviewed. The General Electric Company Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) model 238-732 (BWR/6) is chosen as the LWR starting point for this evaluation. The steam conditions of BWR/6 are representative of LWR's. The results of the fossil superheat portion of the evaluation are considered directly applicable to all LWR's. In spite of the potential of a nuclear superheater to provide a substantial boost to the LWR cycle efficiency, nuclear superheat offers little promise of development at this time. There are difficult technical problems to resolve in the areas of superheat fuel design and emergency core cooling. The absence of a developed high integrity, high temperature fuel for operation in the steam/water environment is fundamental to this conclusion. Fossil superheat offers the potential opportunity to utilize fossil fuel supplies more efficiently than in any other mode of central station power generation presently available. Fossil superheat topping cycles evaluated included atmospheric fluidized beds (AFB), pressurized fluidized beds, pressurized furnaces, conventional furnaces, and combined gas/steam turbine cycles. The use of an AFB is proposed as the preferred superheat furnace. Fossil superheat provides a cycle efficiency improvement for the LWR of two percentage points, reduces heat rejection by 15 percent per kWe generated, increases plant electrical output by 54 percent, and burns coal with an incremental net efficiency of approximately 40 percent. This compares with a net efficiency of 36--37 percent which might be achieved with an all-fluidized bed fossil superheat plant design

  5. Plant for the delivery of long-distance steam combined with a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueller, K.H.

    1976-01-01

    It is proposed that long-distance steam should not be directly discharged in order to avoid each posibility of spreading radioactively contaminated steam. As a heat transmitter, a surface heat exchanger should be chosen, the heating steam of the nuclear power station heating pressurized water whose pressure is higher then that of the heating steam. Long-distance steam generation then results from expanding the pressurized water. The plant is described in detail. (UWI) [de

  6. Report of studies on geothermal steam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1954-09-01

    At the time of this report the exploitation of geothermal steam wells was only in the experimental stage. A great deal of information was derived for future use however. The steam is described in terms of its origin and characteristics and the life expectancy of the wells is estimated. Experimental work in Otake, Hakuryu, Beppu and Naruko is described. The power generation station at Larderello, Italy, is discussed. Extensive data from the experimental wells are summarized in tables.

  7. IEEE No. 323, IEEE trial-use standard: General guide for qualifying Class I electric equipment for nuclear power generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This document describes the basic requirements for the qualification of Class I electric equipment. This is equipment which is essential to the safe shutdown and isolation of the reactor or whose failure or damage could result in significant release of radioactive material. The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for demonstrating the qualifications of electrical equipment as required in the IEEE Std 279 -- Criteria for Nuclear Power Generating Station Protection Systems, and IEEE Std 308 -- Criteria for Class 1E Electric Systems for Nuclear Power Generating Stations. The qualification methods described may be used in conjunction with the Guides for qualifying specific types of equipment, (see Foreword), for updating qualification following modifications or for qualifying equipment for which no applicable Guide exists

  8. Physical decommissioning of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crimi, F.P.

    1988-01-01

    The Shippingport Atomic Power Station consists of the nuclear steam supply system and associated radioactive waste processing systems, which are owned by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), and the turbine-generator and balance of plant which is owned by the Duquesne Light Company. The station is located at Shippingport, Pennsylvania on seven acres of land leased by USDOE from the Duquesne Light Company. The Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project (SSDP) is being managed for the USDOE by the General Electric Company and its integated subcontractor, Morrison Knudsen-Ferguson (MK-F) Company. The objectives of the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project (SSDP) are to: Demonstrate the safe and cost effective dismantlement of a large scale nuclear power plant; Provide useful data for future decommissioning projects

  9. Optimal Site Selection of Electric Vehicle Charging Stations Based on a Cloud Model and the PROMETHEE Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunna Wu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The task of site selection for electric vehicle charging stations (EVCS is hugely important from the perspective of harmonious and sustainable development. However, flaws and inadequacies in the currently used multi-criteria decision making methods could result in inaccurate and irrational decision results. First of all, the uncertainty of the information cannot be described integrally in the evaluation of the EVCS site selection. Secondly, rigorous consideration of the mutual influence between the various criteria is lacking, which is mainly evidenced in two aspects: one is ignoring the correlation, and the other is the unconscionable measurements. Last but not least, the ranking method adopted in previous studies is not very appropriate for evaluating the EVCS site selection problem. As a result of the above analysis, a Preference Ranking Organization Method for Enrichment Evaluations (PROMETHEE method-based decision system combined with the cloud model is proposed in this paper for EVCS site selection. Firstly, the use of the PROMETHEE method can bolster the confidence and visibility for decision makers. Secondly, the cloud model is recommended to describe the fuzziness and randomness of linguistic terms integrally and accurately. Finally, the Analytical Network Process (ANP method is adopted to measure the correlation of the indicators with a greatly simplified calculation of the parameters and the steps required.

  10. Dungeness 'A' Nuclear Power Station. The findings of NII's assessment of Nuclear Electric's long term safety review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The assessment is reported of Nuclear Electrics' Long Term Safety Reviews (LTSR) of the Dungeness A magnox reactors. The assessment was undertaken by the Health and Safety Executive's Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII) which is responsible for regulating the safety of nuclear installations in the United Kingdom. This was one of a programme of LTSRs for all the UK magnox reactors. The LTSR for each plant was proceeded by a Generic Issues programme. The results of both the LTSR and the Generic Issues programme have been used by NII in forming the conclusions of this assessment. Overall the safety case for Dungeness A is satisfactory for continued operation. A programme of additional modifications and inspections has been put in place which further enhances the safety justification. Reactor operations will continue to be monitored and regulated in accordance with the inspections required under the licensing arrangements. Provided these requirements and the agreed further analysis, improvements and inspections give satisfactory results it is expected that the station will be able to operate safely till each reactor is at least 30 years old. Beyond this point a further Periodic Safety Review will be required. (UK)

  11. Steaming ahead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    An example of the development of geothermal power in Indonesia is described. Wells are being drilled into the Salak volcano on Java, about 60km south of Jakarta. These let out high pressure hot water trapped 1 to 3km below the surface which can be flashed into steam for driving turbines. The hot water field has already produced 110MW of power since 1994 and is currently being expanded to 330MW. Some details of the drilling and civil engineering are given. Since Indonesia sits on the edge of giant tectonic boundary known as the ''Pacific ring of fire'', the potential for further development is enormous. Ultimately volcanic activity could release an estimated 27,000MW capacity. More realistically, 2,000MW of crustal power by 2020 is spoken of. (UK)

  12. The impact research of control modes in steam turbine control system (digital electric hydraulic to the low-frequency oscillation of grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanghai Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Through the analysis of the control theory for steam turbine, the transfer function of the steam turbine control modes in the parallel operation was obtained. The frequency domain analysis indicated that different control modes of turbine control system have different influence on the damping characteristics of the power system. The comparative analysis shows the direction and the degree of the influence under the different oscillation frequency range. This can provide the theory for the suppression of the low-frequency oscillation from turbine side and has a guiding significance for the stability of power system. The results of simulation tests are consistent with the theoretic analysis.

  13. Thermal performances of molten salt steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Yibo; He, Canming; Lu, Jianfeng; Ding, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal performances of molten salt steam generator were experimentally studied. • Overall heat transfer coefficient reached maximum with optimal molten salt flow rate. • Energy efficiency first rose and then decreased with salt flow rate and temperature. • Optimal molten salt flow rate and temperature existed for good thermal performance. • High inlet water temperature benefited steam generating rate and energy efficiency. - Abstract: Molten salt steam generator is the key technology for thermal energy conversion from high temperature molten salt to steam, and it is used in solar thermal power station and molten salt reactor. A shell and tube type molten salt steam generator was set up, and its thermal performance and heat transfer mechanism were studied. As a coupling heat transfer process, molten salt steam generation is mainly affected by molten salt convective heat transfer and boiling heat transfer, while its energy efficiency is also affected by the heat loss. As molten salt temperature increased, the energy efficiency first rose with the increase of heat flow absorbed by water/steam, and then slightly decreased for large heat loss as the absorbed heat flow still rising. At very high molten salt temperature, the absorbed heat flow decreased as boiling heat transfer coefficient dropping, and then the energy efficiency quickly dropped. As the inlet water temperature increased, the boiling region in the steam generator remarkably expanded, and then the steam generation rate and energy efficiency both rose with the overall heat transfer coefficient increasing. As the molten salt flow rate increased, the wall temperature rose and the boiling heat transfer coefficient first increased and then decreased according to the boiling curve, so the overall heat transfer coefficient first increased and then decreased, and then the steam generation rate and energy efficiency of steam generator both had maxima.

  14. Steam Digest 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2003-11-01

    Steam Digest 2002 is a collection of articles published in the last year on steam system efficiency. DOE directly or indirectly facilitated the publication of the articles through it's BestPractices Steam effort. Steam Digest 2002 provides a variety of operational, design, marketing, and program and program assessment observations. Plant managers, engineers, and other plant operations personnel can refer to the information to improve industrial steam system management, efficiency, and performance.

  15. Liquid-phase problems in steam turbine LP stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanc-Feraud, P.

    1978-01-01

    Wet steam formation owing to incipient condensation in final steam turbine pressure stages results in a loss of efficiency and possible rotor blading erosion. The effects of erosion are now clearly understood and quite easily counteracted, but loss of thermodynamics, mechanical and aerodynamic efficiency is still a problem. Only the final LP stages of conventional power station plant operate with wet steam, whereas nuclear plant turbines use it to produce most of their total output [fr

  16. Environmental Statement. Oswego Steam Station. Unit 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-12-27

    of the draft environmental statement was conducted and found to be in accord with the requirements set forth in the Environmental Policy Act of 1969...furnishcd by the Government or through GovernraenT- cncd facilities for the use of the liconse, inclumire the liccnzee’s proportionate share of the cost of...Commerce, Bureau of the Census I4 Osweqo, N.Y.. Greater Oswego Chamber of Commerce, Inc. IJ 15 Land Use and Transportation Plan - Policies for- Action

  17. Environmental Statement, Oswego Steam Station, Unit Six.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-03-29

    Tamias striatus) muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus) woodchuck (Marmota monax) Rept ile s eastern painted turtle (Chrysemys pi~cta) Amphibians grass frog (Rana...Terrestrial Ecoloqy The analysis presented on terrestrial ecology is somewhat nebulous due to the fact that the location of the generating facility is in...The analysis presented on terrestrial ecology is somewhat nebulous due to the - fact that the location of the generating facility is in an industrial

  18. A Bi-Level Optimization Approach to Charging Load Regulation of Electric Vehicle Fast Charging Stations Based on a Battery Energy Storage System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Bao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fast charging stations enable the high-powered rapid recharging of electric vehicles. However, these stations also face challenges due to power fluctuations, high peak loads, and low load factors, affecting the reliable and economic operation of charging stations and distribution networks. This paper introduces a battery energy storage system (BESS for charging load control, which is a more user-friendly approach and is more robust to perturbations. With the goals of peak-shaving, total electricity cost reduction, and minimization of variation in the state-of-charge (SOC range, a BESS-based bi-level optimization strategy for the charging load regulation of fast charging stations is proposed in this paper. At the first level, a day-ahead optimization strategy generates the optimal planned load curve and the deviation band to be used as a reference for ensuring multiple control objectives through linear programming, and even for avoiding control failure caused by insufficient BESS energy. Based on this day-ahead optimal plan, at a second level, real-time rolling optimization converts the control process to a multistage decision-making problem. The predictive control-based real-time rolling optimization strategy in the proposed model was used to achieve the above control objectives and maintain battery life. Finally, through a horizontal comparison of two control approaches in each case study, and a longitudinal comparison of the control robustness against different degrees of load disturbances in three cases, the results indicated that the proposed control strategy was able to significantly improve the charging load characteristics, even with large disturbances. Meanwhile, the proposed approach ensures the least amount of variation in the range of battery SOC and reduces the total electricity cost, which will be of a considerable benefit to station operators.

  19. Technical evaluation report on the monitoring of electric power to the reactor-protection system for the Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selan, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    This report documents the technical evaluation of the monitoring of electric power to the reactor protection system (RPS) at the Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station. The evaluation is to determine if the proposed design modification will protect the RPS from abnormal voltage and frequency conditions which could be supplied from the power supplies and will meet certain requirements set forth by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The proposed design modifications will protect the RPS from sustained abnormal voltage and frequency conditions from the supplying sources

  20. Electrically Stimulated Antagonist Muscle Contraction Increased Muscle Mass and Bone Mineral Density of One Astronaut - Initial Verification on the International Space Station

    OpenAIRE

    Shiba, Naoto; Matsuse, Hiroo; Takano, Yoshio; Yoshimitsu, Kazuhiro; Omoto, Masayuki; Hashida, Ryuki; Tagawa, Yoshihiko; Inada, Tomohisa; Yamada, Shin; Ohshima, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal atrophy is one of the major problems of extended periods of exposure to weightlessness such as on the International Space Station (ISS). We developed the Hybrid Training System (HTS) to maintain an astronaut?s musculoskeletal system using an electrically stimulated antagonist to resist the volitional contraction of the agonist instead of gravity. The present study assessed the system?s orbital operation capability and utility, as well as its preventative effect on a...

  1. Output improvement of Sg. Piah run-off river hydro-electric station with a new computed river flow-based control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jidin, Razali; Othman, Bahari

    2013-06-01

    The lower Sg. Piah hydro-electric station is a river run-off hydro scheme with generators capable of generating 55MW of electricity. It is located 30km away from Sg. Siput, a small town in the state of Perak, Malaysia. The station has two turbines (Pelton) to harness energy from water that flow through a 7km tunnel from a small intake dam. The trait of a run-off river hydro station is small-reservoir that cannot store water for a long duration; therefore potential energy carried by the spillage will be wasted if the dam level is not appropriately regulated. To improve the station annual energy output, a new controller based on the computed river flow has been installed. The controller regulates the dam level with an algorithm based on the river flow derived indirectly from the intake-dam water level and other plant parameters. The controller has been able to maintain the dam at optimum water level and regulate the turbines to maximize the total generation output.

  2. Output improvement of Sg. Piah run-off river hydro-electric station with a new computed river flow-based control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jidin, Razali; Othman, Bahari

    2013-01-01

    The lower Sg. Piah hydro-electric station is a river run-off hydro scheme with generators capable of generating 55MW of electricity. It is located 30km away from Sg. Siput, a small town in the state of Perak, Malaysia. The station has two turbines (Pelton) to harness energy from water that flow through a 7km tunnel from a small intake dam. The trait of a run-off river hydro station is small-reservoir that cannot store water for a long duration; therefore potential energy carried by the spillage will be wasted if the dam level is not appropriately regulated. To improve the station annual energy output, a new controller based on the computed river flow has been installed. The controller regulates the dam level with an algorithm based on the river flow derived indirectly from the intake-dam water level and other plant parameters. The controller has been able to maintain the dam at optimum water level and regulate the turbines to maximize the total generation output.

  3. Energy Management and Control of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging Stations in a Grid-Connected Hybrid Power System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidra Mumtaz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The charging infrastructure plays a key role in the healthy and rapid development of the electric vehicle industry. This paper presents an energy management and control system of an electric vehicle charging station. The charging station (CS is integrated to a grid-connected hybrid power system having a wind turbine maximum power point tracking (MPPT controlled subsystem, photovoltaic (PV MPPT controlled subsystem and a controlled solid oxide fuel cell with electrolyzer subsystem which are characterized as renewable energy sources. In this article, an energy management system is designed for charging and discharging of five different plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs simultaneously to fulfil the grid-to-vehicle (G2V, vehicle-to-grid (V2G, grid-to-battery storage system (G2BSS, battery storage system-to-grid (BSS2G, battery storage system-to-vehicle (BSS2V, vehicle-to-battery storage system (V2BSS and vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V charging and discharging requirements of the charging station. A simulation test-bed in Matlab/Simulink is developed to evaluate and control adaptively the AC-DC-AC converter of non-renewable energy source, DC-DC converters of the storage system, DC-AC grid side inverter and the converters of the CS using adaptive proportional-integral-derivate (AdapPID control paradigm. The effectiveness of the AdapPID control strategy is validated through simulation results by comparing with conventional PID control scheme.

  4. Steam turbine installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bainbridge, A.

    1976-01-01

    The object of the arrangement described is to enable raising steam for driving steam turbines in a way suited to operating with liquid metals, such as Na, as heat transfer medium. A preheated water feed, in heat transfer relationship with the liquid metals, is passed through evaporator and superheater stages, and the superheated steam is supplied to the highest pressure stage of the steam turbine arrangement. Steam extracted intermediate the evaporator and superheater stages is employed to provide reheat for the lower pressure stage of the steam turbine. Only a major portion of the preheated water feed may be evaporated and this portion separated and supplied to the superheater stage. The feature of 'steam to steam' reheat avoids a second liquid metal heat transfer and hence represents a simplification. It also reduces the hazard associated with possible steam-liquid metal contact. (U.K.)

  5. Shiraz solar power plant operation with steam engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaghoubi, M.; Azizian, K.

    2004-01-01

    The present industrial developments and daily growing need of energy, as well as economical and environmental problem caused by fossil fuels consumption, resulted certain constraint for the future demand of energy. During the past two decades great attention has been made to use renewable energy for different sectors. In this regard for the first time in Iran, design and construction of a 250 K W Solar power plant in Shiraz, Iran is being carried out and it will go to operation within next year. The important elements of this power plant is an oil cycle and a steam cycle, and several studies have been done about design and operation of this power plant, both for steady state and transient conditions. For the steam cycle, initially a steam turbine was chosen and due to certain limitation it has been replaced by a steam engine. The steam engine is able to produce electricity with hot or saturated vapor at different pressures and temperatures. In this article, the effects of installing a steam engine and changing its vapor inlet pressure and also the effects of sending hot or saturated vapor to generate electricity are studied. Various cycle performance and daily electricity production are determined. The effects of oil cycle temperature on the collector field efficiency, and daily, monthly and annual amount of electricity production is calculated. Results are compared with the steam cycle output when it contains a steam turbine. It is found that with a steam engine it is possible to produce more annual electricity for certain conditions

  6. Study of the mechanical properties of the electric power station components: the punch test; Etude des proprietes mecaniques des composants de centrales thermiques: l'essai punch test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isselin, J

    2003-03-15

    The aging of the electric production park implies an increasing need of knowledge concerning the evolution of the mechanical properties of its components. With regard to this problem, the availability in material is more and more small. This work proposes to characterize these properties through a mechanical test called Punch test. The main characteristic of this test is to use very small volume samples. The development of this test has been carried out by the study of a 15 MDV 4-05 steel coming from a steam drum of a thermal power plant after 145000 hours of service. At first, we have measured the influence of the parameters of this test. Then, the study has dealt more particularly on the transition temperature of the material. With the finite element simulation method, the strain hardening coefficient of the material has been determined. (O.M.)

  7. Darlington steam generator life assurance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelinski, E.; Dymarski, M.; Maruska, C.; Cartar, E.

    1995-01-01

    The Darlington Nuclear Generating Station belonging to Ontario Hydro is one of the most modern and advanced nuclear generating stations in the world. Four reactor units each generate 881 net MW, enough to provide power to a major city, and representing approximately 20% of the Ontario grid. The nuclear generating capacity in Ontario represents approximately 60% of the grid. In order to look after this major asset, many proactive preventative and predictive maintenance programs are being put in place. The steam generators are a major component in any power plant. World wide experience shows that nuclear steam generators require specialized attention to ensure reliable operation over the station life. This paper describes the Darlington steam generator life assurance program in terms of degradation identification, monitoring and management. The requirements for chemistry control, surveillance of process parameters, surveillance of inspection parameters, and the integration of preventative and predictive maintenance programs such as water lancing, chemical cleaning, RIHT monitoring, and other diagnostics to enhance our understanding of life management issues are identified and discussed. We conclude that we have advanced proactive activities to avoid and to minimize many of the problems affecting other steam generators. An effective steam generator maintenance program must expand the knowledge horizon to understand life limiting processes and to analyze and synthesize observations with theory. (author)

  8. Power station for producing hydrogen and oxygen under pressure by electrolysis of water at great depth, then transformation into energy by propulsion of the two gases and combustion of their mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imberteche, R.J.

    1974-01-01

    A description is given of water distillation and electric power accumulation systems. First, by modifying the gas exhaust orifice of the reactor, the steam emerging from it is recovered, transformed into water and its properties used. Second, the power station's possibility of accumulating energy and releasing it as desired is employed [fr

  9. Steam generators secondary side chemical cleaning at Point Lepreau using the Siemen's high temperature process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, K.; MacNeil, C.; Odar, S.

    1996-01-01

    The secondary sides of all four steam generators at the Point Lepreau Nuclear Generating Stations were cleaned during the 1995 annual outage run-down using the Siemens high temperature chemical cleaning process. Traditionally all secondary side chemical cleaning exercises in CANDU as well as the other nuclear power stations in North America have been conducted using a process developed in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The Siemens high temperature process was applied for the first time in North America at the Point Lepreau Nuclear Generating Station (PLGS). The paper discusses experiences related to the pre and post award chemical cleaning activities, chemical cleaning application, post cleaning inspection results and waste handling activities. (author)

  10. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Waterford Steam Electric Station, Unit No. 3, Docket No. 50-382, Louisiana Power and Light Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    Information is presented concerning site characteristics; design criteria for structures, components, and equipment; reactor thermal-hydraulics; primary coolant circuits; engineered safety systems; radioactive waste system; accident analysis; and Three Mile Island-2 requirements

  11. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-445 and 50-446)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    This supplement reports the status of certain issues that had not been resolved at the time of publication of the Safety Evaluation Report and Supplements 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 to that report. This supplement also lists the new issues that have been identified since Supplement 6 was issued and includes the evaluations for licensing items resolved in this interim period. Supplement 5 has not been issued. Supplements 7, 8, 9, 10, and 11 were limited to the staff evaluations of allegations investigated by the NRC Technical Review Team, and items identified therein are not included in this supplement

  12. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-445 and 50-446)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    This supplement reports the status of certain issues that had not been resolved at the time of publication of the Safety Evaluation Report and Supplement 1, 2, 3, and 4 of that report. (Supplement 5, currently in preparation, will document the staff's evaluation findings pertaining solely to an independent design verification, conducted for the applicant by the CYGNA Corporation in late 1983-early 1984, and does not update the status of issues since the release of Supplement 4.)

  13. Solar electricity power station building. A preliminary project investigation for “PIRIN TEX LTD.” – Gotze Delchgev using

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolev, Boyko; Todorieva, Vanja

    2009-01-01

    The total solar energy absorbed by Earth's atmosphere, oceans and land masses is approximately 3,850,000 exa joules (EJ=1018 J) per year. In 2005, this was more energy in one hour than the world used in one year. Photosynthesis captures approximately 3,000 EJ per year in biomass. The amount of solar energy reaching the surface of the planet is so vast that in one year it is about twice as much as will ever be obtained from all of the Earth's non-renewable resources of coal, oil, natural gas, and mined uranium combined. Natural gas crisis such as this from January 2009 in Bulgaria turn into the best investments the development of technology for renewable energy sources using especially solar energy using for electricity production and water heating. The aims of this article are: To develop a preliminary project for solar electricity power station build-ing; To estimate the profits of solar energy used for electricity production and water heating. Keywords: renewable energy sources, solar energy accumulation, solar electricity power station, natural gas crisis

  14. Development of steam generator manufacturing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    In 1968 Babcock and Wilcox (Operations) Ltd., received an order from the CEGB to design, manufacture, install and commission 16 Steam Generators for 2 x 660 Mw (e) Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Power Station at Hartlepool. This order was followed in 1970 by a similar order for the Heysham Power Station. The design and manufacture of the Steam Generators represented a major advance in technology and the paper discusses the methods by which a manufacturing facility was developed, by the Production Division of Babcock, to produce components to a quality, complexity and accuracy unique in the U.K. commercial boilermaking industry. The discussion includes a brief design background, a description of the Steam Generators and a view of the Production Division background. This is followed by a description of the organisation of the technological development and a consideration of the results. (author)

  15. Design and performance of BWC replacement steam generators for PWR systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klarner, R.; Steinmoeller, F.; Millman, J.; Schneider, W. [Babcock and Wilcox Canada, Cambridge, Ontario (Canada)

    1998-07-01

    In recent years, Babcock and Wilcox Canada (BWC) has provided a number of PWR Replacement Steam Generators (RSGS) to replace units that had experienced extensive Alloy 600 tube degradation. BWC RSG units are in operation at Northeast Utilities' Millstone Unit 2, Rochester Gas and Electric's Ginna Station, Duke Energy's Catawba Unit 1, McGuire Unit 1 and 2, Florida Power and Light's St. Lucie Unit 1 and Commonwealth Edison's Byron 1 Station. Extensive start-up performance characteristics have been obtained for Millstone 2, Ginna, McGuire 1, and Catawba 1 RSGS. The Millstone 2, Ginna and Catawba 1 RSGs have also undergone extensive inspections following their first cycle of operation. The design and start-up performance characteristics of these RSGs are presented. The BWC Replacement Steam generators were designed to fit the existing envelope of pressure boundary dimensions to ensure licensability and integration into the Nuclear Steam Supply System. The RSGs were provided with a tube bundle of Alloy 690TT tubing, sized to match or exceed the original steam generator (OSG) thermal performance including provision for the reduced thermal conductivity of Alloy 690 relative to Alloy 600. The RSG tube bundle configurations provide a higher circulation design relative to the OSG, and feature corrosion resistant lattice grid and U-bend tube supports which provide effective anti-vibration support. The tube bundle supports accommodate relatively unobstructed flow and allow unrestrained structural interactions during thermal transients. Efficient steam separators assure low moisture carryover as well as high circulation. Performance measurements obtained during start-up verify that the BWC RSGs meet or exceed the specified thermal and moisture carryover performance requirements. RSG water level stability results at nor-mal operation and during plant transients have been excellent. Visual and ECT inspections have confirmed minimal deposition and 100

  16. Design and performance of BWC replacement steam generators for PWR systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klarner, R.; Steinmoeller, F.; Millman, J.; Schneider, W.

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, Babcock and Wilcox Canada (BWC) has provided a number of PWR Replacement Steam Generators (RSGS) to replace units that had experienced extensive Alloy 600 tube degradation. BWC RSG units are in operation at Northeast Utilities' Millstone Unit 2, Rochester Gas and Electric's Ginna Station, Duke Energy's Catawba Unit 1, McGuire Unit 1 and 2, Florida Power and Light's St. Lucie Unit 1 and Commonwealth Edison's Byron 1 Station. Extensive start-up performance characteristics have been obtained for Millstone 2, Ginna, McGuire 1, and Catawba 1 RSGS. The Millstone 2, Ginna and Catawba 1 RSGs have also undergone extensive inspections following their first cycle of operation. The design and start-up performance characteristics of these RSGs are presented. The BWC Replacement Steam generators were designed to fit the existing envelope of pressure boundary dimensions to ensure licensability and integration into the Nuclear Steam Supply System. The RSGs were provided with a tube bundle of Alloy 690TT tubing, sized to match or exceed the original steam generator (OSG) thermal performance including provision for the reduced thermal conductivity of Alloy 690 relative to Alloy 600. The RSG tube bundle configurations provide a higher circulation design relative to the OSG, and feature corrosion resistant lattice grid and U-bend tube supports which provide effective anti-vibration support. The tube bundle supports accommodate relatively unobstructed flow and allow unrestrained structural interactions during thermal transients. Efficient steam separators assure low moisture carryover as well as high circulation. Performance measurements obtained during start-up verify that the BWC RSGs meet or exceed the specified thermal and moisture carryover performance requirements. RSG water level stability results at nor-mal operation and during plant transients have been excellent. Visual and ECT inspections have confirmed minimal deposition and 100% tube integrity following

  17. Steam generator with perfected dryers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenet, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    This steam generator has vertically superposed array of steam dryers. These dryers return the steam flow of 180 0 . The return of the water is made by draining channels to the steam production zone [fr

  18. Wet steam turbines for CANDU-Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westmacott, C.H.L.

    1977-01-01

    The technical characteristics of 4 wet steam turbine aggregates used in the Pickering nuclear power station are reported on along with operational experience. So far, the general experience was positive. Furthermore, plans are mentioned to use this type of turbines in other CANDU reactors. (UA) [de

  19. Minimize corrosion degradation of steam generator tube materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Y.

    2006-01-01

    As part of a coordinated program, AECL is developing a set of tools to aid with the prediction and management of steam generator performance. Although stress corrosion cracking (of Alloy 800) has not been detected in any operating steam generator, for life management it is necessary to develop mechanistic models to predict the conditions under which stress corrosion cracking is plausible. Experimental data suggest that all steam generator tube materials are susceptible to corrosion degradation under some specific off-specification conditions. The tolerance to the chemistry upset for each steam generator tube alloy is different. Electrochemical corrosion behaviors of major steam generator tube alloys were studied under the plausible aggressive crevice chemistry conditions. The potential hazardous conditions leading to steam generator tube degradation and the conditions, which can minimize steam generator tube degradation have been determined. Recommended electrochemical corrosion potential/pH zones were defined for all major steam generator tube materials, including Alloys 600, 800, 690 and 400, under CANDU steam generator operating and startup conditions. Stress corrosion cracking tests and accelerated corrosion tests were carried out to verify and revise the recommended electrochemical corrosion potential/pH zones. Based on this information, utilities can prevent steam generator material degradation surprises by appropriate steam generator water chemistry management and increase the reliability of nuclear power generating stations. (author)

  20. HTGR steam generator development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuetzenduebel, W.G.; Hunt, P.S.; Weber, M.

    1976-01-01

    More than 40 gas-cooled reactor plants have produced in excess of 400 reactor years of operating experience which have proved a reasonably high rate of gas-cooled reactor steam generator availability. The steam generators used in these reactors include single U-tube and straight-tube steam generators as well as meander type and helically wound or involute tube steam generators. It appears that modern reactors are being equipped with helically wound steam generators of the once-through type as the end product of steam generator evolution in gas-cooled reactor plants. This paper provides a general overview of gas-cooled reactor steam generator evolution and operating experience and shows how design criteria and constraints, research and development, and experience data are factored into the design/development of modern helically wound tube steam generators for the present generation of gas-cooled reactors

  1. Steam Digest 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2002-01-01

    Steam Digest 2001 chronicles BestPractices Program's contributions to the industrial trade press for 2001, and presents articles that cover technical, financial and managerial aspects of steam optimization.

  2. Steam generator tube extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delorme, H.

    1985-05-01

    To enable tube examination on steam generators in service, Framatome has now developed a process for removing sections of steam generator tubes. Tube sections can be removed without being damaged for treating the tube section expanded in the tube sheet

  3. [Risk-oriented model of the control of the level of electric magnetic fields of base stations of cellular communications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutsenko, L A; Tulakin, A V; Egorova, A M; Mikhailova, O M; Gvozdeva, L L; Chigryay, E K

    The purpose of this study was to give the description of harmful effects of the impact of electromagnetic radiations from base stations of cellular communication as the most common sources of radio frequencies of electromagnetic fields in the environment. The highest values of the energy flux density were measured on the roofs of houses where antennas are installed - more than 10 pW/cm. The lowest values were recorded in inside premises with expositions of 0.1-1 pW/cm. In the close location of the railway station to the base stations of the cellular communication there was seen a cumulative effect. There are proposed both new safe hygienic approaches to the control for the safety of the work of base station and protective measures.

  4. Steam sterilization does not require saturated steam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doornmalen Gomez Hoyos, J. P.C.M.; Paunovic, A.; Kopinga, K.

    2017-01-01

    The most commonly applied method to sterilize re-usable medical devices in hospitals is steam sterilization. The essential conditions for steam sterilization are derived from sterilization in water. Microbiological experiments in aqueous solutions have been used to calculate various time–temperature

  5. Guide to the collection and presentation of electrical, electronic, and sensing component reliability data for nuclear-power generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    This Guide is intended to establish a method of collecting and presenting reliability data for quantitative systematic reliability analysis in nuclear power generating stations, as outlined in IEEE Std 351-1975. Appendix D, which is not a part of IEEE Std 500-1977 but which comprises the bulk of this publication, presents tables of reliability data for nuclear power generating stations, intended for use of nuclear systems reliability analysts or design engineers

  6. The Invisibility of Steam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Almost everyone "knows" that steam is visible. After all, one can see the cloud of white issuing from the spout of a boiling tea kettle. In reality, steam is the gaseous phase of water and is invisible. What you see is light scattered from the tiny droplets of water that are the result of the condensation of the steam as its temperature…

  7. Strategies for steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennagir, T.

    1996-01-01

    This article is a review of worldwide developments in the steam turbine and heat recovery steam generator markets. The Far East is driving the market in HRSGs, while China is driving the market in orders placed for steam turbine prime movers. The efforts of several major suppliers are discussed, with brief technical details being provided for several projects

  8. Steam Digest: Volume IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-07-01

    This edition of the Steam Digest is a compendium of 2003 articles on the technical and financial benefits of steam efficiency, presented by the stakeholders of the U.S. Department of Energy's BestPractices Steam effort.

  9. Steam Digest Volume IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-07-01

    This edition of the Steam Digest is a compendium of 2003 articles on the technical and financial benefits of steam efficiency, presented by the stakeholders of the U.S. Department of Energy's BestPractices Steam effort.

  10. Electric Power Plants and Generation Stations, Power Plants - is a seperate layer, however, we have them included in local building layer as well, Published in 2010, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Effingham County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Electric Power Plants and Generation Stations dataset current as of 2010. Power Plants - is a seperate layer, however, we have them included in local building layer...

  11. Sodium-water wastage and reactions program performed by general electric in support of the US. AEC LMFBR steam generator development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, D.A.

    1975-01-01

    This paper constitutes an interim report on the sodium-water reaction programs performed, using the GE-SOWAT, GE-SMALL LEAK BEHAVIOR RIG, and GE-PTTR facilities in support of LMFBR steam generator development and its application to the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant. Test data from these rigs are presented, including wastage data as a function of water injection rate, sodium temperature, and orifice geometry. Initial results for self-wastage of defects under prototypical conditions, and from proof-of-principle tests of a protected heat transfer tube concept are also presented. An analytical basis for wastage phenomena is suggested. (author)

  12. Sodium-water wastage and reactions program performed by general electric in support of the US. AEC LMFBR steam generator development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, D A

    1975-07-01

    This paper constitutes an interim report on the sodium-water reaction programs performed, using the GE-SOWAT, GE-SMALL LEAK BEHAVIOR RIG, and GE-PTTR facilities in support of LMFBR steam generator development and its application to the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant. Test data from these rigs are presented, including wastage data as a function of water injection rate, sodium temperature, and orifice geometry. Initial results for self-wastage of defects under prototypical conditions, and from proof-of-principle tests of a protected heat transfer tube concept are also presented. An analytical basis for wastage phenomena is suggested. (author)

  13. Integrated Gasification SOFC Plant with a Steam Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokni, Masoud; Pierobon, Leonardo

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and Steam Turbine (ST) plant is integrated with a gasification plant. Wood chips are fed to the gasification plant to produce biogas and then this gas is fed into the anode side of a SOFC cycle to produce electricity and heat. The gases from the SOFC stacks...... enter into a burner to burn the rest of the fuel. The offgases after the burner are now used to generate steam in a Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG). The generated steam is expanded in a ST to produce additional power. Thus a triple hybrid plant based on a gasification plant, a SOFC plant...... and a steam plant is presented and studied. The plant is called as IGSS (Integrated Gasification SOFC Steam plant). Different systems layouts are presented and investigated. Electrical efficiencies up to 56% are achieved which is considerably higher than the conventional integrated gasification combined...

  14. Sizewell 'B' power station public inquiry. CEGB proof of evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flint, R.A.

    1982-11-01

    The NNC cost estimates for the construction of the Sizewell B nuclear power station are discussed and the methods employed in their preparation are described. The preparation of the estimates for each of the major divisions of cost are outlined. These divisions are: civil engineering and building works; nuclear steam supply system; NNC costs; turbine generators; other mechanical plant; other electrical plant. The uncertainties which exist in making these estimates are discussed and the cost allowances which must be made as a result are outlined. (U.K.)

  15. Steam microturbines in distributed cogeneration

    CERN Document Server

    Kicinski, Jan

    2014-01-01

    This book presents the most recent trends and concepts in power engineering, especially with regard to prosumer and civic energy generation. In so doing, it draws widely on his experience gained during the development of steam microturbines for use in small combined heat and power stations based on the organic Rankine cycle (CHP-ORC). Major issues concerning the dynamic properties of mechanical systems, in particular rotating systems, are discussed, and the results obtained when using unconventional bearing systems, presented. Modeling and analysis of radial-flow and axial-flow microturbines a

  16. Utilization of high CO2 content formation gas for steam and electricity generation; Aprovechamiento del gas de formacion con alto contenido de CO2 para generacion de vapor y electricidad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villagomez, Paul; Lamino, Marcelo; Jacome, Jose; Pastor, Santiago [EcuadorTLC, Quito (Ecuador). Grupo PETROBRAS

    2008-07-01

    Ecuador TLC SA, as part of the PETROBRAS Group, respecting its mission to act safe, cost-effectiveness, social and environmental responsibility, currently operates an oil production project in the Ecuatorian Amazon, known as Block 18. In Block 18, the process of gas burning is response for launch approximately 10 MMSCF of the gas associated with 77% CO2 in the environment. For this reason it was built a centralized power generation plants (PGE), of 17.38 MW, taking advantage of the gas with 77% CO2 from boilers to burn it, using it as a source of heat in a combined cycle steam turbines, generating electricity. This project is environmentally efficient with reduced emissions of CO2 and as reducing fuel costs to zero. The results of CO2 reduction is a corporate goal of PETROBRAS and this project will contribute to reducing CO2 emissions by approximately 400,000 Ton over the life of the project.

  17. Heat exchanger tubing materials for CANDU nuclear generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, G.F.

    1977-07-01

    The performance of steam generator tubing (nickel-chromium-iron alloy in NPD and nickel-copper alloy in Douglas Point and Pickering generating stations) has been outstanding and no corrosion-induced failures have occurred. The primary coolant will be allowed to boil in the 600 MW (electrical) CANDU-PHW reactors. An iron-nickel-chromium alloy has been selected for the steam generator tubing because it will result in lower radiation fields than the alloys used before. It is also more resistant than nickel-chromium-iron alloy to stress corrosion cracking in the high purity water of the primary circuit, an unlikely but conceivable hazard associated with higher operating temperatures. Austenitic alloy and ferritic-austenitic stainless steel tubing have been selected for the moderator coolers in CANDU reactors being designed and under construction. These materials will reduce the radiation fields around the moderator circuit while retaining the good resistance to corrosion in service water that has characterized the copper-nickel alloys now in use. Brass and bronze tubes in feedwater heaters and condensers have given satisfactory service but do, however, complicate corrosion control in the steam cycle and, to reduce the transport of corrosion products from the feedtrain to the steam generator, stainless steel is preferred for feedwater heaters and stainlss steel or titanium for condensers. (author)

  18. Towards sustainable regions: the spatial distribution of electric vehicles’ recharging stations from a socio-economic perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Linda; Jensen, Thomas Christian; Kaplan, Sigal

    2012-01-01

    -free, low-emission vehicles due to the rising oil prices and global warming. Adequate on-road EV recharging infrastructure is essential in the transformation of EV into a practical transport option and the wide-scale market penetration of EV. Nevertheless, the efficient spatial distribution of EV recharging...... is rarely explored. current study focuses on assessing the demand driven need for on-road EV recharging stations, and finding their efficient spatial distribution, while accounting for economic, social, environmental and land-use considerations. The analysis, conducted for Demark, consists of four steps...... a discrete choice model, estimated on the basis of a stated preference survey. Last, the feasibility of the optimal EV spatial distribution of the EV charging stations is analyzed, based on the Danish official socio-economic framework (TERESA). Results show: (i) the number of required recharging stations...

  19. Development of a steam generator lancing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Woo-Tae; Kim, Seok-Tae; Hong, Sung-Yull

    2006-01-01

    It is recommended to clean steam generators of nuclear power plants during plant outages. Under normal operations, sludge is created and constantly accumulates in the steam generators. The constituents of this sludge are different depending on each power plant characteristics. The sludge of the Kori Unit 1 steam generator, for example, was found to be composed of 93% ferrous oxide, 3% carbon and 1% of silica oxide and nickel oxide each. The research to develop a lancing system that would remove sludge deposits from the tubesheet of a steam generator was started in 1998 by the Korea Electric Power Research Institute (KEPRI) of the Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO). The first commercial domestic lancing system in Korea, and KALANS-I Lancing System, was completed in 2000 for Kori Unit 1 for cleaning the tubesheet of its Westinghouse Delta-60 steam generator. Thereafter, the success of the development and site implementation of the KALANS-I lancing system for YGN Units 1 and 2 and Ulchin Units 3 and 4 was also realized in 2004 for sludge removal at those sites. The upper bundle cleaning system for Westinghouse model F steam generators is now under development

  20. Method for operating a steam turbine of the nuclear type with electronic reheat control of a cycle steam reheater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luongo, M.C.

    1975-01-01

    An electronic system is provided for operating a nuclear electric power plant with electronic steam reheating control applied to the nuclear turbine system in response to low pressure turbine temperatures, and the control is adapted to operate in a plurality of different automatic control modes to control reheating steam flow and other steam conditions. Each of the modes of control permit turbine temperature variations within predetermined constraints and according to predetermined functions of time. (Official Gazette)