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Sample records for steady-state fusion reactors

  1. Steady-state operation requirements of tokamak fusion reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knobloch, A.F.

    1991-06-01

    In the last two decades tokamak conceptual reactor design studies have been deriving benefit from progressing plasma physics experiments, more depth in theory and increasing detail in technology and engineering. Recent full-scale reactor extrapolations such as the US ARIES-I and the EC Reference Reactor study provide information on rather advanced concepts that are called for when economic boundary conditions are imposed. The ITER international reactor design activity concentrated on defining the next step after the JET generation of experiments. For steady-state operation as required for any future commercial tokamak fusion power plants it is essential to have non-inductive current drive. The current drive power and other internal power requirements specific to magnetic confinement fusion have to be kept as low as possible in order to attain a competitive overall power conversion efficiency. A high plasma Q is primarily dependent on a high current drive efficiency. Since such conditions have not yet been attained in practice, the present situation and the degree of further development required are characterized. Such development and an appropriately designed next-step tokamak reactor make the gradual realization of high-Q operation appear feasible. (orig.)

  2. Continuous cryopump for steady state mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batzer, T.H.; Call, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    The characteristics of mirror fusion reactors, i.e., steady state operation, a low neutral gas density, and a large gas throughput require unique vacuum pumping capabilities. One approach that appears to meet these requirements is a liquid helium-cooled cryopump system in which a fixed portion can be isolated and degassed while the remainder continues to pump. The time to degas a rotating, fixed portion of the pumping area and the ratio of that area to the total area fixes the gas inventory in the chamber. It follows that the active pump area maintains the required neutral gas density and the time-averaged degassing rate equals the gas throughput. We have built such a cryopump whereby the gas condensed (deuterium) on the liquid helium-cooled panel can be transferred to a collector pump and subsequently to an exterior mechanical pump and exhausted. At panel loadings as high as 0.55 Torr-/lcm 2 the gas leakage during degassing is less than 8% and the degassing time is less than 10 min. Scaling to reactor size appears to be feasible

  3. System and method for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisch, N.J.

    1981-01-01

    A system for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor providing steady-state generation of the thermonuclear power. A dense, hot toroidal plasma is initially prepared with a confining magnetic field with toroidal and poloidal components. Continuous wave rf energy is injected into said plasma to establish a spectrum of traveling waves in the plasma, where the traveling waves have momentum components substantially either all parallel, or all anti-parallel to the confining magnetic field. The injected rf energy is phased to couple to said traveling waves with both a phase velocity component and a wave momentum component in the direction of the plasma traveling wave components. The injected rf energy has a predetermined spectrum selected so that said traveling waves couple to plasma electrons having velocities in a predetermined range delta . The velocities in the range are substantially greater than the thermal electron velocity of the plasma. In addition, the range is sufficiently broad to produce a raised plateau having width delta in the plasma electron velocity distribution so that the plateau electrons provide steady-state current to generate a poloidal magnetic field component sufficient for confining the plasma. In steady state operation of the fusion reactor, the fusion power density in the plasma exceeds the power dissipated in the plasma

  4. System and method for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bers, A.

    1981-01-01

    A system for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor providing steady-state generation of the thermonuclear power. A dense, hot toroidal plasma is initially prepared with a confining magnetic field with toroidal and poloidal components. Continuous wave rf energy is injected into said plasma to estalish a spectrum of traveling waves in the plasma, where the traveling waves have momentum components substantially either all parallel, or all anti-parallel to the confining magnetic field. The injected rf energy is phased to couple to said traveling waves with both a phase velocity component and a wave momentum component in the direction of the plasma traveling wave components. The injected rf energy has a predetermined spectrum selected so that said traveling waves couple to plasma electrons having velocities in a predetermined range delta . The velocities in the range are substantially greater than the thermal electron velocity of the plasma. In addition, the range is sufficiently broad to produce a raised plateau having width delta in the plasma electron velocity distribution so that the plateau electrons provide steady-state current to generate a poloidal magnetic field component sufficient for confining the plasma. In steady state operation of the fusion reactor, the fusion power density in the plasma exceeds the power dissipated inthe plasma

  5. Status of fusion technology development in JAERI stressing steady-state operation for future reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Shinzaburo

    2000-01-01

    This paper reports on the progress of the fusion reactor technologies developed at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and expected to lead to a future steady state operation reactor. In particular, superconducting coil technology for plasma confinement, NBI and RF systems technology for plasma control and current drive, fueling and pumping systems technology for particle control, heat removal technology, and development of long life materials are highlighted as the important key elements for the future steady state operation. It will be discussed how these key technologies have already been developed by the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) technology R and D as well as by the Japanese domestic program, and which technologies are planned for the near future

  6. Pellet acceleration studies relating to the refuelling of a steady-state fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimock, D.; Jensen, K.; Jensen, V.O.; Joergensen, L.W.; Pecseli, H.L.; Soerensen, H.; Oester, F.

    1975-11-01

    Several methods for refuelling a steady state-fusion reactor have been proposed, and the pellet method seems advantageous if the pellet can be accelerated to the necessary velocity. A study group was formed to analyze this acceleration problem. Two pellet velocity values were considered: 10 4 m/s and 300 m/s. A pellet velocity of 10 4 m/s may be suitable in the case of a reactor, whereas 300 m/s is believed to be a reasonable velocity at which to perform realistic ablation experiments in the near future. A pneumatic acceleration method was found promising. The pressure is either supplied separately or by evaporation of a part of the pellet. In the latter case, a spark behind the pellet should provide the evoporation and the necessary heating of the driving gas. A preliminary test at room temperature with pellets made of beeswax (the density being ten times that of solid hydrogen, and plastic properties similar to those of solid hydrogen) resulted in a pellet velocity of 100 m/s at a modest value of the energy supplied to the spark. (Auth.)

  7. A fission-fusion hybrid reactor in steady-state L-mode tokamak configuration with natural uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, Mark; Parker, Ronald R.; Forget, Benoit

    2012-01-01

    This work develops a conceptual design for a fusion-fission hybrid reactor operating in steady-state L-mode tokamak configuration with a subcritical natural or depleted uranium pebble bed blanket. A liquid lithium-lead alloy breeds enough tritium to replenish that consumed by the D-T fusion reaction. The fission blanket augments the fusion power such that the fusion core itself need not have a high power gain, thus allowing for fully non-inductive (steady-state) low confinement mode (L-mode) operation at relatively small physical dimensions. A neutron transport Monte Carlo code models the natural uranium fission blanket. Maximizing the fission power gain while breeding sufficient tritium allows for the selection of an optimal set of blanket parameters, which yields a maximum prudent fission power gain of approximately 7. A 0-D tokamak model suffices to analyze approximate tokamak operating conditions. This fission blanket would allow the fusion component of a hybrid reactor with the same dimensions as ITER to operate in steady-state L-mode very comfortably with a fusion power gain of 6.7 and a thermal fusion power of 2.1 GW. Taking this further can determine the approximate minimum scale for a steady-state L-mode tokamak hybrid reactor, which is a major radius of 5.2 m and an aspect ratio of 2.8. This minimum scale device operates barely within the steady-state L-mode realm with a thermal fusion power of 1.7 GW. Basic thermal hydraulic analysis demonstrates that pressurized helium could cool the pebble bed fission blanket with a flow rate below 10 m/s. The Brayton cycle thermal efficiency is 41%. This reactor, dubbed the Steady-state L-mode non-Enriched Uranium Tokamak Hybrid (SLEUTH), with its very fast neutron spectrum, could be superior to pure fission reactors in terms of breeding fissile fuel and transmuting deleterious fission products. It would likely function best as a prolific plutonium breeder, and the plutonium it produces could actually be more

  8. Conceptual design study of quasi-steady state fusion experimental reactor (FEQ-Q), part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-12-01

    Since 1980 the design study has been conducted at JAERI for the Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) which has been proposed to be the next machine to JT-60 in the Japanese long term program of fusion reactor development. Starting from 1984 JER design is being reviewed and redesigned. This report is a part of the interim report which describes the results obtained in the review and redesign activities in FY 1984. The results of the following design items are included; core plasma, reactor structure, reactor core components, magnets. (author)

  9. Conceptual design study of quasi-steady state fusion experimental reactor (FER-Q), part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-12-01

    Since 1980 the design study has been conducted at JAERI for the Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) which has been proposed to be the next machine to JT-60 in the Japanese long term program of fusion reactor development. Starting from 1984 FER design is being reviewed and redesigned. This report is a part of the interim report which describes the results obtained in the review and redesign activities in FY 1984. The results of the following design items are included: heating/current drive system, plasma position control, power supply, diagnostics, neutronics, blanket test module, repair and maintenance and safety. (author)

  10. A design of steady state fusion burner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Hatori, Tadatsugu; Itoh, Kimitaka; Ikuta, Takashi; Kodama, Yuji.

    1975-01-01

    We present a brief design of a steady state fusion burner in which a continuous burning of nuclear fuel may be achieved with output power of a gigawatt. The laser fusion is proposed to ignite the fuel. (auth.)

  11. Radioactivity computation of steady-state and pulsed fusion reactors operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attaya, H.

    1994-06-01

    Different mathematical methods are used to calculate the nuclear transmutation in steady-state and pulsed neutron irradiation. These methods are the Schuer decomposition, the eigenvector decomposition, and the Pade approximation of the matrix exponential function. In the case of the linear decay chain approximation, a simple algorithm is used to evaluate the transition matrices

  12. Steady-state spheromak reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Hagenson, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    After summarizing the essential elements of a gun-sustained spheromak, the potential for a steady-state is explored by means of a comprehensive physics/engineering/costing model. A range of cost-optimized reactor design points is presented, and the sensitivity of cost to key physics, engineering, and operational variables is reported

  13. Contour analysis of steady state tokamak reactor performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devoto, R.S.; Fenstermacher, M.E.

    1990-01-01

    A new method of analysis for presenting the possible operating space for steady state, non-ignited tokamak reactors is proposed. The method uses contours of reactor performance and plasma characteristics, fusion power gain, wall neutron flux, current drive power, etc., plotted on a two-dimensional grid, the axes of which are the plasma current I p and the normalized beta, β n = β/(I p /aB 0 ), to show possible operating points. These steady state operating contour plots are called SOPCONS. This technique is illustrated in an application to a design for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) with neutral beam, lower hybrid and bootstrap current drive. The utility of the SOPCON plots for pointing out some of the non-intuitive considerations in steady state reactor design is shown. (author). Letter-to-the-editor. 16 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab

  14. Reactor kinetics - pulse and steady state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estes, B F; Morris, F M [Sandia Laboratories (United States)

    1974-07-01

    An analytical model has been developed which couples the nuclear and thermal characteristics of the Annular Core Pulse Reactor (ACPR) into a solution which describes both the neutron kinetics of the reactor and the temperature behavior of a fuel-moderator element. The model describes both pulse and steady state operations. This paper describes the important aspects of the reactor, the fuel- moderator elements, the neutron kinetic equations of the reactor, and the time-temperature behavior of a fuel-moderator element that is being subjected to the maximum power density in the core. The parameters which are utilized in the equations are divided into two classes, those that can be measured directly and those that are assumed to be known (each is described briefly). Some of the solutions which demonstrate the versatility of the analytical model are described. (author)

  15. Conceptual design of the steady state tokamak reactor (SSTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikawa, A.; Kikuchi, M.; Seki, Y.; Nishio, S.; Ando, T.; Ohara, Y.; Takizuka, Tani, K.; Ozeki, T.; Koizumi, K.; Ikeda, B.; Suzuki, Y.; Ueda, N.; Kageyama, T.; Yamada, M.; Mizoguchi, T.; Iida, F.; Ozawa, Y.; Mori, S.; Yamazaki, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Adachi, H.J.; Shinya, K.; Ozaki, A.; Asahara, M.; Konishi, K.; Yokogawa, N.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that on the basis of a high bootstrap current fraction observation with JT-60, the concept of steady state tokamak reactor , the SSTR, was conceived and was evolved with the design activity of the SSTR at JAERI. Also results of ITER/FER design activities has enhanced the SSTR design. Moreover the remarkable progress of R and D for fusion reactor engineering, especially in the development of superconducting coils and negative ion based NBI at JAERI have promoted the SSTR conceptual design as a realistic power reactor. Although present fusion power reactor designs are currently considered to be too large and costly, results of the SSTR conceptual design suggest that an efficient and promising tokamak reactor will be feasible. The conceptual design of the SSTR provides a realistic reference for a demo tokamak reactor

  16. A Review of Fusion and Tokamak Research Towards Steady-State Operation: A JAEA Contribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuru Kikuchi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Providing a historical overview of 50 years of fusion research, a review of the fundamentals and concepts of fusion and research efforts towards the implementation of a steady state tokamak reactor is presented. In 1990, a steady-state tokamak reactor (SSTR best utilizing the bootstrap current was developed. Since then, significant efforts have been made in major tokamaks, including JT-60U, exploring advanced regimes relevant to the steady state operation of tokamaks. In this paper, the fundamentals of fusion and plasma confinement, and the concepts and research on current drive and MHD stability of advanced tokamaks towards realization of a steady-state tokamak reactor are reviewed, with an emphasis on the contributions of the JAEA. Finally, a view of fusion energy utilization in the 21st century is introduced.

  17. Extension of high poloidal beta scenario in DIII-D to lower q95 for steady state fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J.; Gong, X.; Qian, J.; Ding, S.; Ren, Q.; Guo, W.; Pan, C.; Li, G.; Xia, T.; Garofalo, A.; Lao, L.; Hyatt, A.; Ferron, J.; Collins, C.; Lin, D.; McKee, G.; Rhode, T.; McClenaghan, J.; Holcomb, C.; Cui, L.; Heidbrink, W.; Zhu, Y.; Diiid Team; East Team

    2017-10-01

    DIII-D/EAST joint experiments have improved the high poloidal beta scenario with sustained large-radius internal transport barrier (ITB) extended to high plasma current Ip 1MA with q95 6.0. Slight off-axis NBCD is applied to obtain broader current density profile, ITBs can now be sustained below the previously observed βp threshold with excellent confinement (H98y2 1.8). The scenario also exhibits a local negative shear appearing with q increased at rho 0.4, which helps ITB formation and sustainment. This confirms TGLF prediction that negative magnetic shear can help recover ITB and achieve high confinement with reduced q95. Detailed analysis shows that the Shafranov shift and q profile is critical in the ITB formation at high βp regime. Supported in part by National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Program of China 2015GB102000, 2015GB110005, and US Department of Energy under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  18. The software-defined fast post-processing for GEM soft x-ray diagnostics in the Tungsten Environment in Steady-state Tokamak thermal fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Rafał Dominik; Czarski, Tomasz; Linczuk, Paweł; Wojeński, Andrzej; Kolasiński, Piotr; GÄ ska, Michał; Chernyshova, Maryna; Mazon, Didier; Jardin, Axel; Malard, Philippe; Poźniak, Krzysztof; Kasprowicz, Grzegorz; Zabołotny, Wojciech; Kowalska-Strzeciwilk, Ewa; Malinowski, Karol

    2018-06-01

    This article presents a novel software-defined server-based solutions that were introduced in the fast, real-time computation systems for soft X-ray diagnostics for the WEST (Tungsten Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) reactor in Cadarache, France. The objective of the research was to provide a fast processing of data at high throughput and with low latencies for investigating the interplay between the particle transport and magnetohydrodynamic activity. The long-term objective is to implement in the future a fast feedback signal in the reactor control mechanisms to sustain the fusion reaction. The implemented electronic measurement device is anticipated to be deployed in the WEST. A standalone software-defined computation engine was designed to handle data collected at high rates in the server back-end of the system. Signals are obtained from the front-end field-programmable gate array mezzanine cards that acquire and perform a selection from the gas electron multiplier detector. A fast, authorial library for plasma diagnostics was written in C++. It originated from reference offline MATLAB implementations. They were redesigned for runtime analysis during the experiment in the novel online modes of operation. The implementation allowed the benchmarking, evaluation, and optimization of plasma processing algorithms with the possibility to check the consistency with reference computations written in MATLAB. The back-end software and hardware architecture are presented with data evaluation mechanisms. The online modes of operation for the WEST are discussed. The results concerning the performance of the processing and the introduced functionality are presented.

  19. Concept study of the Steady State Tokamak Reactor (SSTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    The Steady State Tokamak Reactor (SSTR) concept has been proposed as a realistic fusion power reactor to be built in the near future. An overall concept of SSTR is introduced which is based on a small extension of the present day physics and technologies. The major feature of SSTR is the maximum utilization of a bootstrap current in order to reduce the power required for the steady state operation. This requirement leads to the choice of moderate current (12 MA), and high βp (2.0) for the device, which are achieved by selecting high aspect ratio (A=4) and high toroidal magnetic field (16.5 T). A negative-ion-based neutral beam injection system is used both for heating and central current drive. Notable engineering features of SSTR are: the use of a uniform vacuum vessel and periodical replacements of the first wall and blanket layers and significant reduction of the electromagnetic force with the use of functionally gradient material. It is shown that a tokamak machine comparable to ITER in size can become a power reactor capable of generating about 1 GW of electricity with a plant efficiency of ∼30%. (author)

  20. Realizing steady-state tokamak operation for fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luce, T. C.

    2011-01-01

    Continuous operation of a tokamak for fusion energy has clear engineering advantages but requires conditions beyond those sufficient for a burning plasma. The fusion reactions and external sources must support both the pressure and the current equilibrium without inductive current drive, leading to demands on stability, confinement, current drive, and plasma-wall interactions that exceed those for pulsed tokamaks. These conditions have been met individually, and significant progress has been made in the past decade to realize scenarios where the required conditions are obtained simultaneously. Tokamaks are operated routinely without disruptions near pressure limits, as needed for steady-state operation. Fully noninductive sustainment with more than half of the current from intrinsic currents has been obtained for a resistive time with normalized pressure and confinement approaching those needed for steady-state conditions. One remaining challenge is handling the heat and particle fluxes expected in a steady-state tokamak without compromising the core plasma performance.

  1. Dust remobilization in fusion plasmas under steady state conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolias, P.; Ratynskaia, S.; de Angeli, M.; De Temmerman, G.; Ripamonti, D.; Riva, G.; I. Bykov,; Shalpegin, A.; Vignitchouk, L.; Brochard, F.; Bystrov, K.; Bardin, S.; Litnovsky, A.

    2016-01-01

    The first combined experimental and theoretical studies of dust remobilization by plasma forces are reported. The main theoretical aspects of remobilization in fusion devices under steady state conditions are analyzed. In particular, the dominant role of adhesive forces is highlighted and generic

  2. Scaling laws for steady-state fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husseiny, A A [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, Pa. (USA)

    1975-12-01

    Experimental and semi-theoretical scaling laws are extrapolated to include the effect of fusion burn on the lifetime of plasma ions. Fractional burnups are also reconsidered on the same basis. The actual lifetime of fusion plasma ions and the estimated time necessary for feasible reactors, provide a correlation between the laboratory data and the hypothesis of reactor feasibility conditions. Based on these correlations criteria for the realization of self-heated plasmas are established.

  3. Steady-state tokamak reactor with non-divertor impurity control: STARFIRE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.C.

    1980-01-01

    STARFIRE is a conceptual design study of a commercial tokamak fusion electric power plant. Particular emphasis has been placed on simplifying the reactor concept by developing design concepts to produce a steady-state tokamak with non-divertor impurity control and helium ash removal. The concepts of plasma current drive using lower hybrid rf waves and a limiter/vacuum system for reactor applications are described

  4. MHD stability regimes for steady state and pulsed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardin, S.C.; Kessel, C.E.; Pomphrey, N.

    1994-02-01

    A tokamak reactor will operate at the maximum value of β≡2μ 0 /B 2 that is compatible with MHD stability. This value depends upon the plasma current and pressure profiles, the plasma shape and aspect ratio, and the location of nearby conducting structures. In addition, a steady state reactor will minimize its external current drive requirements and thus achieve its maximum economic benefit with a bootstrap fraction near one, I bs /I p ∼ 1, which constrains the product of the inverse aspect ratio and the plasma poloidal beta to be near unity, ε β p ∼ 1. An inductively driven pulsed reactor has different constraints set by the steady-state Ohm's law which relates the plasma temperature and density profiles to the parallel current density. We present the results obtained during the ARIES I, II/IV, and III and the PULSAR reactor studies where these quantities were optimized subject to different design philosophies. The ARIES-II/IV and ARIES-III designs are both in the second stability regime, but differ in requirements on the form of the profiles at the plasma edge, and in the location of the conducting wall. The relation between these, as well as new attractive MHD regimes not utilized in the ARIES or PULSAR studies is also discussed

  5. Magnetohydrodynamic stability regimes for steady state and pulsed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardin, S.C.; Kessel, C.E.; Pomphrey, N.

    1994-01-01

    A tokamak reactor will operate at the maximum value of β≡2μ 0 left angle p right angle /B 2 that is compatible with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability. This value depends on the plasma current and pressure profiles, the plasma shape and aspect ratio, and the location of nearby conducting structures. In addition, a steady state reactor will minimize its external current drive requirements and thus achieve its maximum economic benefit with a bootstrap fraction near unity, I BS /I P ∼1, which constrains the product of the inverse aspect ratio and the plasma poloidal β to be near unity, arepsilonβ P ∼1. An inductively driven pulsed reactor has different constraints set by the steady-state Ohm's law which relates the plasma temperature and density profiles to the parallel current density. We present the results obtained during ARIES I, II/IV, and III and PULSAR reactor studies where these quantities were optimized subject to different design philosophies. The ARIES-II/IV and ARIES-III designs are both in the second stability regime, but differ in requirements in the form of the profiles at the plasma edge, and in the location of the conducting wall. The relation between these, as well as new attractive MHD regimes not utilized in the ARIES or PULSAR studies, is also discussed. ((orig.))

  6. Steady State Turbulent Transport in Magnetic Fusion Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.W.; Ethier, S.; Kolesnikov, R.; Wang, W.X.; Tang, W.M.

    2007-01-01

    For more than a decade, the study of microturbulence, driven by ion temperature gradient (ITG) drift instabilities in tokamak devices, has been an active area of research in magnetic fusion science for both experimentalists and theorists alike. One of the important impetus for this avenue of research was the discovery of the radial streamers associated the ITG modes in the early nineties using a Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code. Since then, ITG simulations based on the codes with increasing realism have become possible with the dramatic increase in computing power. The notable examples were the demonstration of the importance of nonlinearly generated zonal flows in regulating ion thermal transport and the transition from Bohm to GyroBoham scaling with increased device size. In this paper, we will describe another interesting nonlinear physical process associated with the parallel acceleration of the ions, that is found to play an important role for the steady state turbulent transport. Its discovery is again through the use of the modern massively parallel supercomputers

  7. Plasma control issues for an advanced steady state tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, D.

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with specific control issues related to the advanced tokamak scenarios in which rather accurate tailoring of the current density profile is a requirement in connection with the steady state operation of a reactor in a high confinement optimized shear mode. It is found that adequate current profile control can be performed if real-time magnetic flux reconstruction is available through a set of dedicated diagnostics and computers, with sufficient accuracy to deduce the radial profile of the safety factor and of the internal plasma loop voltage. It is also shown that the safety factor can be precisely controlled in the outer half of the plasma through the surface loop voltage and the off-axis current drive power, but that a compromise must be made between the accuracy of the core safety factor control and the total duration of the current and fuel density ramp-up phases, so that the demonstration of the steady state reactor potential of the optimized/reversed shear concept in the Next Step device will demand pulse lengths of the order of one thousand seconds (or more for an ITER-size machine). (author)

  8. Plasma control issues for an advanced steady state tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, D.; Voitsekhovitch, I.

    1999-01-01

    This paper deals with specific control issues related to the advanced tokamak scenarios in which rather accurate tailoring of the current density profile is a requirement in connection with the steady state operation of a reactor in a high confinement optimized shear mode. It is found that adequate current profile control can be performed if real-time magnetic flux reconstruction is available through a set of dedicated diagnostics and computers, with sufficient accuracy to deduce the radial profile of the safety factor and of the internal plasma loop voltage. It is also shown that the safety factor can be precisely controlled in the outer half of the plasma through the surface loop voltage and the off-axis current drive power, but that a compromise must be made between the accuracy of the core safety factor control and the total duration of the current and fuel density ramp-up phases, so that the demonstration of the steady state reactor potential of the optimized/reversed shear concept in the Next Step device will demand pulse lengths of the order of one thousand seconds (or more for an ITER-size machine). (author)

  9. On the optimization of a steady-state bootstrap-reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polevoy, A.R.; Martynov, A.A.; Medvedev, S.Yu.

    1993-01-01

    A commercial fusion tokamak-reactor may be economically acceptable only for low recirculating power fraction r 0 ≡ P CD /P α BS ≡I BS /I > 0.9 to sustain the steady-state operation mode for high plasma densities > 1.5 10 20 m -3 , fulfilled the divertor conditions. This paper presents the approximate expressions for the optimal set of reactor parameters for r BS /I∼1, based on the self-consistent plasma simulations by 1.5D ASTRA code. The linear MHD stability analysis for ideal n=1 kink and ballooning modes has been carried out to determine the conditions of stabilization for bootstrap steady state tokamak reactor BSSTR configurations. (author) 10 refs., 1 tab

  10. BR2 reactor core steady state transient modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarenko, A.; Petrova, T.

    2000-01-01

    A coupled neutronics/hydraulics/heat-conduction model of the BR2 reactor core is under development at SCK-CEN. The neutron transport phenomenon has been implemented as steady state and time dependent nodal diffusion. The non-linear heat conduction equation in-side fuel elements is solved with a time dependent finite element method. To allow coupling between functional modules and to simulate subcooled regimes, a simple single-phase hydraulics has been introduced, while the two-phase hydraulics is under development. Multiple tests, general benchmark cases as well as calculation/experiment comparisons demonstrated a good accuracy of both neutronic and thermal hydraulic models, numerical reliability and full code portability. A refinement methodology has been developed and tested for better neutronic representation in hexagonal geometry. Much effort is still needed to complete the development of an extended cross section library with kinetic data and two-phase flow representation. (author)

  11. Very high flux steady state reactor and accelerator based sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.; Simos, N.; Shapiro, S.; Hastings, J.

    2004-01-01

    With the number of steady state neutron sources in the US declining (including the demise of the Bnl HFBR) the remaining intense sources are now in Europe (i.e. reactors - ILL and FMR, accelerator - PSI). The intensity of the undisturbed thermal flux for sources currently in operation ranges from 10 14 n/cm 2 *s to 10 15 n/cm 2 *s. The proposed Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) was to be a high power reactor (about 350 MW) with a projected undisturbed thermal flux of 7*10 15 n/cm 2 *s but never materialized. The objective of the current study is to explore the requirements and implications of two source concepts with an undisturbed flux of 10 16 n/cm 2 *s. The first is a reactor based concept operating at high power density (10 MW/l - 15 MW/l) and a total power of 100 MW - 250 MW, depending on fissile enrichment. The second is an accelerator based concept relying on a 1 GeV - 1.5 GeV proton Linac with a total beam power of 40 MW and a liquid lead-bismuth eutectic target. In the reactor source study, the effects of fissile material enrichment, coolant temperature and pressure drop, and estimates of pressure vessel stress levels will be investigated. The fuel form for the reactor will be different from all other operating source reactors in that it is proposed to use an infiltrated graphitic structure, which has been developed for nuclear thermal propulsion reactor applications. In the accelerator based source the generation of spallation products and their activation levels, and the material damage sustained by the beam window will be investigated. (authors)

  12. COOLOD, Steady-State Thermal Hydraulics of Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminaga, Masanori

    1997-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The COOLOD-N2 code provides a capability for the analyses of the steady-state thermal-hydraulics of research reactors. This code is a revised version of the COOLOD-N code, and is applicable not only for research reactors in which plate-type fuel is adopted, but also for research reactors in which rod-type fuel is adopted. In the code, subroutines to calculate temperature distribution in rod-type fuel have been newly added to the COOLOD-N code. The COOLOD-N2 code can calculate fuel temperatures under both forced convection cooling mode and natural convection cooling mode. A 'Heat Transfer package' is used for calculating heat transfer coefficient, DNB heat flux etc. The 'Heat Transfer package' is a subroutine program and is especially developed for research reactors in which plate-type fuel is adopted. In case of rod-type fuel, DNB heat flux is calculated by both the 'Heat Transfer package' and Lund DNB heat flux correlation which is popular for TRIGA reactor. The COOLOD-N2 code also has a capability of calculating ONB temperature, the heat flux at onset of flow instability as well as DNB heat flux. 2 - Method of solution: The 'Heat Transfer Package' is a subprogram for calculating heat transfer coefficients, ONB temperature, heat flux at onset of flow instability and DNB heat flux. The 'Heat transfer package' was especially developed for research reactors which are operated under low pressure and low temperature conditions using plate-type fuel, just like the JRR-3M. Heat transfer correlations adopted in the 'Heat Transfer Package' were obtained or estimated based on the heat transfer experiments in which thermal-hydraulic features of the upgraded JRR-3 core were properly reflected. The 'Heat Transfer Package' is applicable to upward and downward flow

  13. Steady-state resistive toroidal-field coils for tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalnavarns, J.; Jassby, D.L.

    1979-12-01

    If spatially-averaged values of the beta ratio can reach 5 to 10% in tokamaks, as now seems likely, resistive toroidal-field coils may be advantageous for use in reactors intended for fusion-neutron applications. The present investigation has parameterized the design of steady-state water-cooled copper coils of rectangular cross section in order to maximize figures of merit such as the ratio of fusion neutron wall loading to coil power dissipation. Four design variations distinguished by different ohmic-heating coil configurations have been examined. For a wall loading of 0.5 MW/m 2 , minimum TF-coil lifetime costs (including capital and electricity costs) are found to occur with coil masses in the range 2400 to 4400 tons, giving 200 to 250 MW of resistive dissipation, which is comparable with the total power drain of the other reactor subsystems

  14. Vulcan: A steady-state tokamak for reactor-relevant plasma–material interaction science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olynyk, G.M.; Hartwig, Z.S.; Whyte, D.G.; Barnard, H.S.; Bonoli, P.T.; Bromberg, L.; Garrett, M.L.; Haakonsen, C.B.; Mumgaard, R.T.; Podpaly, Y.A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A new scaling for obtaining reactor similarity in the divertor of scaled tokamaks. ► Conceptual design for a tokamak (“Vulcan”) to implement this new scaling. ► Demountable superconducting coils and compact neutron shielding. ► Helium-cooled high-temperature vacuum vessel and first wall. ► High-field-side lower hybrid current drive for non-inductive operation. - Abstract: An economically viable magnetic-confinement fusion reactor will require steady-state operation and high areal power density for sufficient energy output, and elevated wall/blanket temperatures for efficient energy conversion. These three requirements frame, and couple to, the challenge of plasma–material interaction (PMI) for fusion energy sciences. Present and planned tokamaks are not designed to simultaneously meet these criteria. A new and expanded set of dimensionless figures of merit for PMI have been developed. The key feature of the scaling is that the power flux across the last closed flux surface P/S ≃ 1 MW m −2 is to be held constant, while scaling the core volume-averaged density weakly with major radius, n ∼ R −2/7 . While complete similarity is not possible, this new “P/S” or “PMI” scaling provides similarity for the most critical reactor PMI issues, compatible with sufficient current drive efficiency for non-inductive steady-state core scenarios. A conceptual design is developed for Vulcan, a compact steady-state deuterium main-ion tokamak which implements the P/S scaling rules. A zero-dimensional core analysis is used to determine R = 1.2 m, with a conventional reactor aspect ratio R/a = 4.0, as the minimum feasible size for Vulcan. Scoping studies of innovative fusion technologies to support the Vulcan PMI mission were carried out for three critical areas: a high-temperature, helium-cooled vacuum vessel and divertor design; a demountable superconducting toroidal field magnet system; and a steady-state lower hybrid current drive system

  15. Study of heat and synchrotron radiation transport in fusion tokamak plasmas. Application to the modelling of steady state and fast burn termination scenarios for the international experimental fusion reactor ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villar Colome, J.

    1997-12-01

    The aim of this thesis is to give a global scope of the problem of energy transport within a thermonuclear plasma in the context of its power balance and the implications when modelling ITER operating scenarios. This is made in two phases. First, by furnishing new elements to the existing models of heat and synchrotron radiation transport in a thermonuclear plasma. Second, by applying the improved models to plasma engineering studies of ITER operating scenarios. The scenarios modelled are the steady state operating point and the transient that appears to have the biggest technological implications: the fast burn termination. The conduction-convection losses are modelled through the energy confinement time. This parameter is empirically obtained from the existing experimental data, since the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. In chapter 2 an expression for the energy confinement time is semi-analytically deduced from the Rebut-Lallia-Watkins local transport model. The current estimates of the synchrotron radiation losses are made with expressions of the dimensionless transparency factor deduced from a 0-dimensional cylindrical model proposed by Trubnikov in 1979. In chapter 3 realistic hypothesis for the cases of cylindrical and toroidal geometry are included in the model to deduce compact explicit expressions for the fast numerical computation of the synchrotron radiation losses. Numerical applications are provided for the cylindrical case. The results are checked against the existing models. In chapter 4, the nominal operating point of ITER and its thermal stability is studied by means of a 0-dimensional burn model of the thermonuclear plasma in ignition. This model is deduced by the elements furnished by the plasma particle and power balance. Possible heat overloading on the plasma facing components may provoke severe structural damage, implying potential safety problems related to tritium inventory and metal activation. In chapter 5, the assessment

  16. Study of heat and synchrotron radiation transport in fusion tokamak plasmas. Application to the modelling of steady state and fast burn termination scenarios for the international experimental fusion reactor ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villar Colome, J. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee]|[Universitat Polytechnica de Catalunya (Spain)

    1997-12-01

    The aim of this thesis is to give a global scope of the problem of energy transport within a thermonuclear plasma in the context of its power balance and the implications when modelling ITER operating scenarios. This is made in two phases. First, by furnishing new elements to the existing models of heat and synchrotron radiation transport in a thermonuclear plasma. Second, by applying the improved models to plasma engineering studies of ITER operating scenarios. The scenarios modelled are the steady state operating point and the transient that appears to have the biggest technological implications: the fast burn termination. The conduction-convection losses are modelled through the energy confinement time. This parameter is empirically obtained from the existing experimental data, since the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. In chapter 2 an expression for the energy confinement time is semi-analytically deduced from the Rebut-Lallia-Watkins local transport model. The current estimates of the synchrotron radiation losses are made with expressions of the dimensionless transparency factor deduced from a 0-dimensional cylindrical model proposed by Trubnikov in 1979. In chapter 3 realistic hypothesis for the cases of cylindrical and toroidal geometry are included in the model to deduce compact explicit expressions for the fast numerical computation of the synchrotron radiation losses. Numerical applications are provided for the cylindrical case. The results are checked against the existing models. In chapter 4, the nominal operating point of ITER and its thermal stability is studied by means of a 0-dimensional burn model of the thermonuclear plasma in ignition. This model is deduced by the elements furnished by the plasma particle and power balance. Possible heat overloading on the plasma facing components may provoke severe structural damage, implying potential safety problems related to tritium inventory and metal activation. In chapter 5, the assessment

  17. Diagnostics Development towards Steady State Operation in Fusion Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burhenn, R.; Baldzuhn, J.; Dreier, H.; Endler, M.; Hartfuss, H.J.; Hildebrandt, D.; Hirsch, M.; Koenig, R.; Kornejev, P.; Krychowiak, M.; Laqua, H.P.; Laux, M.; Oosterbeek, J.W.; Pasch, E.; Schneider, W.; Thomsen, H.; Weller, A.; Werner, A.; Wolf, R.; Zhang, D. [Max-Planck-Institute fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Biel, W. [Institut fuer Energieforschung - Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH EURATOM Association, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The stellarator Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) is being presently under construction and is already equipped with superconducting coil systems and principally is capable of quasi-continuous operation. However, W7-X is faced with new enhanced technical requirements which have to be met by plasma facing components as well as the diagnostic systems in general. Depending on the available heating power, the continuous heat flux to plasma facing components during long pulse operation might lead to unacceptable local thermal overload and necessitates sufficient but often complicate active cooling precautions. Fusion devices with electron cyclotron frequency heating (ECRH) are concerned with significant stray radiation, depending on the chosen heating scheme and the plasma parameters. The required shielding is often not compatible with optimal UHV-consistent design and high intensity throughput. For machine safety, diagnostics are required which are able to identify enhanced plasma wall interaction on a fast time scale in order to prevent damage in time. For W7-X, video camera systems covering most of the inner wall, fast IR-camera systems with coating-resistant pinhole-optics for the observation of the divertor surface temperature and spectrometers with large spectral survey covering relevant spectral lines of all intrinsic impurities with sufficient spectral resolution and sensitivity are necessary. In combination with energy integrating but spatially resolving diagnostics like bolometers and soft-X cameras slow impurity accumulation phenomena on a time scale much larger than flat-top times typically achieved in short-pulse operation can be identified and a radiative plasma collapse possibly be avoided by counteractive measures. Longer port dimensions due to thermal insulation of the cryogenic coil system and high density operation with strong density gradients necessitate the choice of shorter wavelengths for interferometer laser beams. This complicates the avoidance of fringe

  18. 7. IAEA Technical Meeting on Steady State Operation of Magnetic Fusion Devices - Booklet of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This meeting has provided an appropriate forum to discuss current issues covering a wide range of technical topics related to the steady state operation issues and also to encourage forecast of the ITER performances. The technical meeting includes invited and contributed papers. The topics that have been dealt with are: 1) Superconducting devices (ITER, KSTAR, Tore-Supra, HT-7U, EAST, LHD, Wendelstein-7-X,...); 2) Long-pulse operation and advanced tokamak physics; 3) steady state fusion technologies; 4) Long pulse heating and current drive; 5) Particle control and power exhaust, and 6) ITER-related research and development issues. This document gathers the abstracts

  19. Burn cycle requirements comparison of pulsed and steady-state tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, J.N.; Ehst, D.A.

    1983-12-01

    Burn cycle parameters and energy transfer system requirements were analyzed for an 8-m commercial tokamak reactor using four types of cycles: conventional, hybrid, internal transformer, and steady state. Not surprisingly, steady state is the best burn mode if it can be achieved. The hybrid cycle is a promising alternative to the conventional. In contrast, the internal transformer cycle does not appear attractive for the size tokamak in question

  20. Progress of design studies on an LHD-type steady-state reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motojima, O.; Komori, A.; Sagara, A.

    2007-01-01

    Helical Heliotrons such as the Large Helical Device (LHD) and Stellarators (H and S systems) have a high potential to realize a current-less steady-state and stable magnetic fusion energy reactor as an alternative to the tokamak DEMO-reactor. H and S systems ideally have an intrinsic property of Q=infinite. Here it is very important to remember that the understanding of the physics of 3-D toroidal magnetic confinement system is naturally extended to tokamak systems. The physics is universal among these two types of systems and the technology is common. We present our recent results from LHD experiments and reactor studies of a next generation LHD-type DEMO Reactor called FFHR. (1) Development of 3-D superconducting (SC) coil technology Due to the successful results of the LHD construction from 1990 to 2007, and steady operation over 8 years from 1998 to 2007, more than 2,000 hrs/year at a high field of around 3 Tesla, we have a large enough data base to demonstrate that 3D coil technology has become the standard technology for a fusion energy reactor. LHD is the largest SC fusion device in the world, contributing to the development of the SC technology necessary for fusion research. The poloidal coils of LHD adopted a super critical forced flow cooling system and their dimensions are almost the same as the ITER toroidal coils. (2) Extended physics understanding of high beta, high T, high n τT , and steady state operation Recent LHD experiments have demonstrated the broad and advanced capabilities of LHD as a toroidal magnetic confinement device, which are highlighted by the achievements of 5% volume averaged beta, electron and ion temperatures of 10 keV, super high density of 10E15/cc and 1 hr discharges. We plan to increase the heating power up to 35 MW, and to use deuterium gas for confinement improvement. The n τT will be improved to the design nominal value of Q=0.3 within several years and ultimately would approach unity. The key issue for this is the

  1. Tokamak burn cycle study: a data base for comparing long pulse and steady-state power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.A.; Brooks, J.N.; Cha, Y.; Evans, K. Jr.; Hassanein, A.; Kim, S.; Majumdar, S.; Misra, B.; Stevens, H.C.

    1983-11-01

    Several distinct operating modes (conventional ohmic, noninductive steady state, internal transformer, etc.) have been proposed for tokamaks. Our study focuses on capital costs and lifetime limitations of reactor subsystems in an attempt to quantify sensitivity to pulsed operation. Major problem areas considered include: thermal fatigue on first wall, limiter/divertor; thermal energy storage; fatigue and eddy current heating in toroidal field coils; electric power supply costs; and noninductive driver costs. We assume a high availability and low cost of energy will be mandatory for a commercial fusion reactor, and we characterize improvements in physics (current drive efficiency) and engineering (superior materials) which will help achieve these goals for different burn cycles

  2. Current drive efficiency requirements for an attractive steady-state reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonon, G

    1994-12-31

    The expected values of the figure of merit and the electrical efficiency of various non-inductive current drive methods are considered. The main experimental results achieved today with neutral beams and radiofrequency systems are summarized. Taking into account the simplified energy flow diagram of a steady state reactor, the figure of merit and the electrical efficiency values which are necessary in order to envisage an attractive steady-state reactor are determined. These values are compared to the theoretical predictions. (author). 16 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Current drive efficiency requirements for an attractive steady-state reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonon, G.

    1994-01-01

    The expected values of the figure of merit and the electrical efficiency of various non-inductive current drive methods are considered. The main experimental results achieved today with neutral beams and radiofrequency systems are summarized. Taking into account the simplified energy flow diagram of a steady state reactor, the figure of merit and the electrical efficiency values which are necessary in order to envisage an attractive steady-state reactor are determined. These values are compared to the theoretical predictions. (author). 16 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Steady state technologies for tokamak based fusion neutron sources and hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azizov, E.A.; Kuteev, B.V.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. The development of demonstration fusion neutron sources for fusion nuclear science activity and hybrid applications has reached the stage of conceptual design on the basis of tokamak device in Russia. The conceptual design of FNS-ST has been completed in details (plasma current 1.5 MA, magnetic field 1.5 T, major radius 0.5 m, aspect ratio 1.67 and auxiliary heating power up to 15 MW) [1, 2]. A comparison of physical plasma parameters and economics for FNS-ST and a conventional tokamak FNS-CT (plasma current 1.5 MA, magnetic field 6.7 T, major radius 2.25 m, aspect ratio 3 and auxiliary heating power up to 30 MW) has been fulfilled [3]. This study suggested the feasibility to reach 1-20 MW of fusion power using these magnetic configuration options. Nevertheless, the efficiency of neutron production Q remains comparable for both due to the beam fusion input. The total ST-economics for the full project including operation and utilization costs is by a factor of 2 better than of CT. Zero [4] and one-dimensional [5] models have been developed and used in this system analysis. The characteristics of plasma confinement, stability and current drive in operation have been confirmed by numerous benchmarking simulations of modern experiments. Scenarios allowing us to reach and maintain steady state operation have been considered and optimized. The results of these studies will be presented. Prospective technical solutions for SSO-technology systems have been evaluated, and the choice of enabling technologies and materials of the basic FNS options has been made. A conceptual design of a thin-wall water cooled vacuum chamber for heat loadings up to 1.5 MW/m 2 has been fulfilled. The chamber consists of 2 mm Be tiles, pre-shaped CuCrZr 1 mm shell and 1 mm of stainless steel shell as a structural material. A concept of double-null divertor for FNS-ST has been offered that is capable to withstand heat fluxes up to 6 MW/m 2 . Lithium dust

  5. Review of fusion DEMO reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Yasushi

    1996-01-01

    Fusion DEMO Reactor is defined and the Steady State Tokamak Reactor (SSTR) concept is introduced as a typical example of a DEMO reactor. Recent DEMO reactor studies in Japan and abroad are introduced. The DREAM Reactor concept is introduced as an ultimate target of fusion research. (author)

  6. Small mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.; Schultz, K.R.; Smith, A.C. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Basic requirements for the pilot plants are that they produce a net product and that they have a potential for commercial upgrade. We have investigated a small standard mirror fusion-fission hybrid, a two-component tandem mirror hybrid, and two versions of a field-reversed mirror fusion reactor--one a steady state, single cell reactor with a neutral beam-sustained plasma, the other a moving ring field-reversed mirror where the plasma passes through a reaction chamber with no energy addition

  7. Steady-state and loss-of-pumping accident analyses of the Savannah River new production reactor representative design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pryor, R.J.; Maloney, K.J.

    1990-10-01

    This document contains the steady-state and loss-of-pumping accident analysis of the representative design for the Savannah River heavy water new production reactor. A description of the reactor system and computer input model, the results of the steady-state analysis, and the results of four loss-of-pumping accident calculations are presented. 5 refs., 37 figs., 4 tabs

  8. The steady-state tokamak program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Politzer, D.A.; Nevins, W.M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on a steady-state tokamak experiment (STE) needed to develop the technology and physics data base required for construction of a steady-state fusion power demonstration reactor in the early 21st century. The STE will provide an integrated facility for the development and demonstration of steady-state and particle handling, low-activation high-heat-flux components and materials, efficient current drive, and continuous plasma performance in steady-state, with reactor-like plasma conditions under severe conditions of heat and particle bombardment of the wall. The STE facility will also be used to develop operation and control scenarios for ITER

  9. Steady state characteristics of acclimated hydrogenotrophic methanogens on inorganic substrate in continuous chemostat reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ako, Olga Y; Kitamura, Y; Intabon, K; Satake, T

    2008-09-01

    A Monod model has been used to describe the steady state characteristics of the acclimated mesophilic hydrogenotrophic methanogens in experimental chemostat reactors. The bacteria were fed with mineral salts and specific trace metals and a H(2)/CO(2) supply was used as a single limited substrate. Under steady state conditions, the growth yield (Y(CH4)) reached 11.66 g cells per mmol of H(2)/CO(2) consumed. The daily cells generation average was 5.67 x 10(11), 5.25 x 10(11), 4.2 x 10(11) and 2.1 x 10(11) cells/l-culture for the dilutions 0.071/d, 0.083/d, 0.1/d and 0.125/d, respectively. The maximum specific growth rate (mu(max)) and the Monod half-saturation coefficient (K(S)) were 0.15/d and 0.82 g/L, respectively. Using these results, the reactor performance was simulated. During the steady state, the simulation predicts the dependence of the H(2)/CO(2) concentration (S) and the cell concentration (X) on the dilution rate. The model fitted the experimental data well and was able to yield a maximum methanogenic activity of 0.24 L CH(4)/g VSS.d. The dilution rate was estimated to be 0.1/d. At the dilution rate of 0.14/d, the exponential cells washout was achieved.

  10. A method for statistical steady state thermal analysis of reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whetton, P.A.

    1981-01-01

    In a previous publication the author presented a method for undertaking statistical steady state thermal analyses of reactor cores. The present paper extends the technique to an assessment of confidence limits for the resulting probability functions which define the probability that a given thermal response value will be exceeded in a reactor core. Establishing such confidence limits is considered an integral part of any statistical thermal analysis and essential if such analysis are to be considered in any regulatory process. In certain applications the use of a best estimate probability function may be justifiable but it is recognised that a demonstrably conservative probability function is required for any regulatory considerations. (orig.)

  11. Calculations of steady-state and reactivity insertion transients in a research reactor simulating the PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mladin, Mirea; Mladin, Daniela; Prodea, Ilie

    2010-01-01

    In 2008, IAEA started a Coordinated Research Project for benchmarking the thermalhydraulic and neutronic computer codes for research reactor analysis against the experimental data. In this framework, for the first year of research contract, the Institute for Nuclear Research engaged in steady-state analysis of SPERT-III reactor and also in the simulation of the reactivity insertion tests performed in this reactor during mid sixties. In the first part, the paper describes a Monte Carlo input model of the oxide core selected for investigation and the results of the steady-state neutronic calculations with respect to hot and cold core reactivity excess and control rods worth. Also, prompt neutron life and reactivity feed-back coefficients were examined. These results were compared with the data provided in the reactor specification document concerning neutronic design calculated data. The second part of the paper is dedicated to calculation of the reactivity insertion transients with RELAP5 and CATHARE2 thermalhydraulic codes, both including point reactor kinetics models, and to comparison with experimental data. (authors)

  12. Characterization of the TRIGA Mark II reactor full-power steady state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cammi, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.cammi@polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano – Department of Energy, CeSNEF (Enrico Fermi Center for Nuclear Studies), via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); Zanetti, Matteo [Politecnico di Milano – Department of Energy, CeSNEF (Enrico Fermi Center for Nuclear Studies), via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); Chiesa, Davide; Clemenza, Massimiliano; Pozzi, Stefano; Previtali, Ezio; Sisti, Monica [University of Milano-Bicocca, Physics Department “G. Occhialini” and INFN Section, Piazza dell’Ateneo Nuovo, 20126 Milan (Italy); Magrotti, Giovanni; Prata, Michele; Salvini, Andrea [University of Pavia, Applied Nuclear Energy Laboratory (L.E.N.A.), Via Gaspare Aselli 41, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Full-power steady state characterization of the TRIGA Mark II reactor. • Monte Carlo and Multiphysics simulation of the TRIGA Mark II reactor. • Sub-cooled boiling effects in the TRIGA Mark II reactor. • Thermal feedback effects in the TRIGA Mark II reactor. • Experimental data based validation. - Abstract: In this paper, the characterization of the full-power steady state of the TRIGA Mark II nuclear reactor at the University of Pavia is achieved by coupling the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation for neutronics with the “Multiphysics” model for thermal-hydraulics. Neutronic analyses have been carried out with a MCNP5 based MC model of the entire reactor system, already validated in fresh fuel and zero-power configurations (in which thermal effects are negligible) and using all available experimental data as a benchmark. In order to describe the full-power reactor configuration, the temperature distribution in the core must be established. To evaluate this, a thermal-hydraulic model has been developed, using the power distribution results from the MC simulation as input. The thermal-hydraulic model is focused on the core active region and takes into account sub-cooled boiling effects present at full reactor power. The obtained temperature distribution is then entered into the MC model and a benchmark analysis is carried out to validate the model in fresh fuel and full-power configurations. An acceptable correspondence between experimental data and simulation results concerning full-power reactor criticality proves the reliability of the adopted methodology of analysis, both from the perspective of neutronics and thermal-hydraulics.

  13. Burn-up dependent steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis of Pakistan research reactor-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Atta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The burn-up dependent steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis of Pakistan research reactor-1, reference operating core, has been carried out utilizing standard computer codes WIMS/D4, CITATION, and RELAP5/MOD3.4. Reactor codes WIMS/D4 and CITATION have been used for the calculations of neutronic parameters including peaking factors and power profiles at different burn-up considering a xenon free core and also the equilibrium xenon values. RELAP5/MOD3.4 code was utilized for the determination of peak fuel centerline, clad and coolant temperatures to ensure the safety of the reactor throughout the cycle. The calculations reveal that the reactor is safe and no nucleate boiling will commence at any part of the core throughout the cycle and that the safety margin increases with burnup as peaking factors decrease.

  14. Steady-state and transient simulations of gas cooled reactor with the computer code CATHARE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tauveron, N.; Saez, M.; Marchand, M.; Chataing, T.; Geffraye, G.; Cherel, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    This work concerns the design and safety analysis of Gas Cooled Reactors. The CATHARE code is used to test the design and safety of two different concepts, a High Temperature Gas Reactor concept (HTGR) and a Gas Fast Reactor concept (GFR). Relative to the HTGR concept, three transient simulations are performed and described in this paper: loss of electrical load without turbomachine trip, 10 inch cold duct break, 10 inch cold duct break combined with a tube rupture of a cooling exchanger. A second step consists in modelling a GFR concept. A nominal steady state situation at a power of 600 MW is obtained and first transient simulations are carried out to study decay heat removal situations after primary loop depressurisation

  15. Parametric study of the primary and secondary systems of the CAREM-25 reactor on steady state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halpert, Silvia; Vazquez, Luis

    2000-01-01

    In the CAREM-25 reactor the primary coolant flows by natural convection that's why the flow is established when the balance between the buoyancy force and friction pressure drop through circuit is obtained. This paper presents a parametric study on primary and secondary systems of the reactor on steady state, for different values of some thermohydraulics parameters: safety factor on friction loss pressure calculations (f), steam generator heat transfer area (A T ) and primary pressure (P P ). The ESCAREM 2.08 thermohydraulic code, which calculates the primary system behavior for steady state conditions, was used for this study. The conclusions of this study are: -) There was a variation of the 15% on the primary coolant flow when the safety factor was changed a 50 %; -) The primary and secondary systems conditions do not change when the power is less than 100 MW; -) Between 100 and 110 MW the decrease of the heat transfer area produces an important change on the secondary systems conditions: the outlet steam generator temperature decrease and there is an important rice in the flow; -) The primary pressure could decrease up to 11.4 MPa without violating turbine requirements. (author)

  16. Wave-driver options for low-aspect-ratio steady-state tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.A.

    1981-02-01

    Low aspect ratio designs are proposed for steady-state tokamak reactors. Benefits stem from reduced major radius and lessened stresses in the toroidal field coils, resulting in possible cost savings in the tokamak construction. In addition, a low aspect ratio (A = 2.6) permits the application of a bundle divertor capable of diverting 3-T fields to a power reactor using STARFIRE technology. Such a low aspect ratio is possible with the elimination of poloidal field coils in the central hole of the tokamak, which implies a need for noninductive current drive. Several plasma waves are considered for this application, and it appears likely that a candidate can be found which reduces the electric power for current maintenance to an acceptable value

  17. Plasma flow reactor for steady state monitoring of physical and chemical processes at high temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroglu, Batikan; Mehl, Marco; Armstrong, Michael R; Crowhurst, Jonathan C; Weisz, David G; Zaug, Joseph M; Dai, Zurong; Radousky, Harry B; Chernov, Alex; Ramon, Erick; Stavrou, Elissaios; Knight, Kim; Fabris, Andrea L; Cappelli, Mark A; Rose, Timothy P

    2017-09-01

    We present the development of a steady state plasma flow reactor to investigate gas phase physical and chemical processes that occur at high temperature (1000 flow injector). We have modeled the system using computational fluid dynamics simulations that are bounded by measured temperatures. In situ line-of-sight optical emission and absorption spectroscopy have been used to determine the structures and concentrations of molecules formed during rapid cooling of reactants after they pass through the plasma. Emission spectroscopy also enables us to determine the temperatures at which these dynamic processes occur. A sample collection probe inserted from the open end of the reactor is used to collect condensed materials and analyze them ex situ using electron microscopy. The preliminary results of two separate investigations involving the condensation of metal oxides and chemical kinetics of high-temperature gas reactions are discussed.

  18. Small-angle scattering at a pulsed neutron source: comparison with a steady-state reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borso, C S; Carpenter, J M; Williamson, F S; Holmblad, G L; Mueller, M H; Faber, J Jr; Epperson, J E; Danyluk, S S [Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)

    1982-08-01

    A time-of-flight small-angle diffractometer employing seven tapered collimator elements and a two-dimensional gas proportional counter was successfully utilized to collect small-angle scattering data from a solution sample of the lipid salt cetylpyridinium chloride, C/sub 21/H/sub 38/N/sup +/.Cl/sup -/, at the Argonne National Laboratory prototype pulsed spallation neutron source, ZING-P'. Comparison of the small-angle scattering observed from the same compound at the University of Missouri Research Reactor corroborated the ZING-P' results. The results are used to compare the neutron flux available from the ZING-P' source relative to the well characterized University of Missouri source. Calculations based on experimentally determined parameters indicated the time-averaged rate of detected neutrons at the ZING-P' pulsed spallation source to have been at least 33% higher than the steady-state count rate from the same sample. Differences between time-of-flight techniques and conventional steady-state techniques are discussed.

  19. Thermal Hydraulic Fortran Program for Steady State Calculations of Plate Type Fuel Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khedr, H.

    2008-01-01

    The safety assessment of Research and Power Reactors is a continuous process over their life and that requires verified and validated codes. Power Reactor codes all over the world are well established and qualified against a real measuring data and qualified experimental facilities. These codes are usually sophisticated, require special skills and consume much more running time. On the other hand, most of the Research Reactor codes still requiring more data for validation and qualification. Therefore it is benefit for a regulatory body and the companies working in the area of Research Reactor assessment and design to have their own program that give them a quick judgment. The present paper introduces a simple one dimensional Fortran program called THDSN for steady state best estimate Thermal Hydraulic (TH) calculations of plate type fuel RRs. Beside calculating the fuel and coolant temperature distribution and pressure gradient in an average and hot channel the program calculates the safety limits and margins against the critical phenomena encountered in RR such as the burnout heat flux and the onset of flow instability. Well known TH correlations for calculating the safety parameters are used. THDSN program is verified by comparing its results for 2 and 10 MW benchmark reactors with that published in IAEA publications and good agreement is found. Also the program results are compared with those published for other programs such as PARET and TERMIC. An extension for this program is underway to cover the transient TH calculations

  20. Pellet injectors for steady state plasma fuelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinyar, I.; Geraud, A.; Yamada, H.; Lukin, A.; Sakamoto, R.; Skoblikov, S.; Umov, A.; Oda, Y.; Gros, G.; Krasilnikov, I.; Reznichenko, P.; Panchenko, V.

    2005-01-01

    Successful steady state operation of a fusion reactor should be supported by repetitive pellet injection of solidified hydrogen isotopes in order to produce high performance plasmas. This paper presents pneumatic pellet injectors and its implementation for long discharge on the LHD and TORE SUPRA, and a new centrifuge pellet injector test results. All injectors are fitted with screw extruders well suited for steady state operation

  1. Vibration analysis of primary inlet pipe line during steady state and transient conditions of Pakistan research reactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayazuddin, S.K.; Qureshi, A.A.; Hayat, T.

    1997-11-01

    The Primary Water Inlet Pipeline (PW-IPL) is of stainless steel conveying demineralized water from hold-up tank to the reactor pool of Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1). The section of the pipeline from heat exchangers to the valve pit is hanger supported in the pump room and the rest of the section from valve pit to the reactor pool is embedded. The PW-IPL is subjected to steady state and transient vibrations. The reactor pumps, which drive the coolant through various circuits mainly contribute the steady state vibrations, while transient vibrations arise due to instant closure of the check valve (water hammer). The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel code provides data about the acceptable limits of stresses related to the primary static stress due to steady state vibrations. However, due to complexity in the pipe structure, stresses related to the transient vibrations are neglected in the code. In this report attempt has been made to analyzed both steady state and transient vibrations of PW-IPL of PARR-1. Since, both the steady state and transient vibrations affect the hanger-supported section of the PW-IPL, therefore, it was selected for vibration test measurements. In the analysis vibration data was compared with the allowable limits and estimations of maximum pressure build-up, eflection, natural frequency, tensile and shear load on hanger support, and the ratio of maximum combine stress to the allowable load were made. (author)

  2. LAVENDER: A steady-state core analysis code for design studies of accelerator driven subcritical reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Shengcheng; Wu, Hongchun; Cao, Liangzhi; Zheng, Youqi, E-mail: yqzheng@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Huang, Kai; He, Mingtao; Li, Xunzhao

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • A new code system for design studies of accelerator driven subcritical reactors (ADSRs) is developed. • S{sub N} transport solver in triangular-z meshes, fine deletion analysis and multi-channel thermal-hydraulics analysis are coupled in the code. • Numerical results indicate that the code is reliable and efficient for design studies of ADSRs. - Abstract: Accelerator driven subcritical reactors (ADSRs) have been proposed and widely investigated for the transmutation of transuranics (TRUs). ADSRs have several special characteristics, such as the subcritical core driven by spallation neutrons, anisotropic neutron flux distribution and complex geometry etc. These bring up requirements for development or extension of analysis codes to perform design studies. A code system named LAVENDER has been developed in this paper. It couples the modules for spallation target simulation and subcritical core analysis. The neutron transport-depletion calculation scheme is used based on the homogenized cross section from assembly calculations. A three-dimensional S{sub N} nodal transport code based on triangular-z meshes is employed and a multi-channel thermal-hydraulics analysis model is integrated. In the depletion calculation, the evolution of isotopic composition in the core is evaluated using the transmutation trajectory analysis algorithm (TTA) and fine depletion chains. The new code is verified by several benchmarks and code-to-code comparisons. Numerical results indicate that LAVENDER is reliable and efficient to be applied for the steady-state analysis and reactor core design of ADSRs.

  3. Coupled MCNP - SAS-SFR calculations for sodium fast reactor core at steady-state - 15460

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponomarev, A.; Travleev, A.; Pfrang, W.; Sanchez, V.

    2015-01-01

    The prediction of core parameters at steady state is the first step when studying core accident transient behaviour. At this step thermal hydraulics (TH) and core geometry parameters are calculated corresponding to initial operating conditions. In this study we present the coupling of the SAS-SFR code to the Monte-Carlo neutron transport code MCNP at steady state together with application to the European Sodium Fast Reactor (ESFR). The SAS-SFR code employs a multi-channel core representation where each channel represents subassemblies with similar power, thermal-hydraulics and pin mechanics conditions. For every axial node of every channel the individual geometry and material compositions parameters are calculated in accord with power and cooling conditions. This requires supplying the SAS-SFR-code with nodal power values which should be calculated by neutron physics code with given realistic core parameters. In the conventional approach the neutron physics model employs some core averaged TH and geometry data (fuel temperature, coolant density, core axial and radial expansion). In this study we organize a new approach coupling the MCNP neutron physics models and the SAS-SFR models, so that calculations of power can be improved by using distributed core parameters (TH and geometry) taken from SAS-SFR. The MCNP code is capable to describe cores with distributed TH parameters and even to model non-uniform axial expansion of fuel subassemblies. In this way, core TH and geometrical data calculated by SAS-SFR are taken into account accurately in the neutronics model. The coupling implementation is done by data exchange between two codes with help of processing routines managed by driver routine. Currently it is model-specific and realized for the ESFR 'Reference Oxide' core. The Beginning-Of-Life core state is considered with 10 channel representation for fuel subassemblies. For this model several sets of coupled calculations are performed, in which different

  4. New steady-state microbial community compositions and process performances in biogas reactors induced by temperature disturbances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Gang; De Francisci, Davide; Kougias, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    that stochastic factors had a minor role in shaping the profile of the microbial community composition and activity in biogas reactors. On the contrary, temperature disturbance was found to play an important role in the microbial community composition as well as process performance for biogas reactors. Although...... three different temperature disturbances were applied to each biogas reactor, the increased methane yields (around 10% higher) and decreased volatile fatty acids (VFAs) concentrations at steady state were found in all three reactors after the temperature disturbances. After the temperature disturbance...... in shaping the profile of the microbial community composition and activity in biogas reactors. New steady-state microbial community profiles and reactor performances were observed in all the biogas reactors after the temperature disturbance....

  5. Physics design of advanced steady-state tokamak reactor A-SSTR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Satoshi; Ushigusa, Kenkichi

    2000-10-01

    Based on design studies on the fusion power reactor such as the DEMO reactor SSTR, the compact power reactor A-SSTR and the DREAM reactor with a high environmental safety and high availability, a new concept of compact and economic fusion power reactor (A-SSTR2) with high safety and high availability is proposed. Employing high temperature superconductor, the toroidal filed coils supplies the maximum field of 23T on conductor which corresponds to 11T at the magnetic axis. A-SSTR2 (R p =6.2m, a p =1.5m, I p =12MA) has a fusion power of 4GW with β N =4. For an easy maintenance and for an enough support against a strong electromagnetic force on coils, a poloidal coils system has no center solenoid coils and consists of 6 coils located on top and bottom of the machine. Physics studies on the plasma equilibrium, controllability of the configuration, the plasma initiation and non-inductive current ramp-up, fusion power controllability and the diverter have shown the validity of the A-SSTR2 concept. (author)

  6. A method for statistical steady state thermal analysis of reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whetton, P.A.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents a method for performing a statistical steady state thermal analysis of a reactor core. The technique is only outlined here since detailed thermal equations are dependent on the core geometry. The method has been applied to a pressurised water reactor core and the results are presented for illustration purposes. Random hypothetical cores are generated using the Monte-Carlo method. The technique shows that by splitting the parameters into two types, denoted core-wise and in-core, the Monte Carlo method may be used inexpensively. The idea of using extremal statistics to characterise the low probability events (i.e. the tails of a distribution) is introduced together with a method of forming the final probability distribution. After establishing an acceptable probability of exceeding a thermal design criterion, the final probability distribution may be used to determine the corresponding thermal response value. If statistical and deterministic (i.e. conservative) thermal response values are compared, information on the degree of pessimism in the deterministic method of analysis may be inferred and the restrictive performance limitations imposed by this method relieved. (orig.)

  7. TRANP - a computer code for digital simulation of steady - state and transient behavior of a pressurizer water reactor primary circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalhoub, E.S.

    1980-09-01

    A digital computer code TRANP was developed to simulate the steady-state and transient behavior of a pressurizer water reactor primary circuit. The development of this code was based on the combining of three codes already developed for the simulation of a PWR core, a pressurizer, a steam generator and a main coolant pump, representing the primary circuit components. (Author) [pt

  8. The behaviour of impurities in a steady-state DT gas-blanket reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markvoort, J.A.

    1975-11-01

    A four-fluid model of a cylindrical steady-state DT gas-blanket reactor is analysed. The four fluids are electrons, deuterium-tritium, helium and a high -Z impurity. The behaviour of the plasma is described by the multifluid MHD-equations which are numerically solved with the aid of a Runge Kutta method. Whether impurities tend to concentrate on the axis is found to depend on how, in the collision term, the Nernst effect is taken into account. In order to show the influence of the Nernst terms arising from electron-ion collisions and the Nernst terms due to ion-ion collisions separately, the thermal force is dealt with in two ways. In model A, only the contribution from electron-ion collisions was considered. The computer calculations show that the impurities have their maximum concentration on the axis. A theoretical analysis explains this result. In model B, which is more realistic, these ion-ion collisions are included. The computer calculations as well as the theoretical analysis show that the influence of the thermoforce due to ion-ion collisions on the density profiles dominates over the force due to electron collisions, and lead to a minimum in the impurity density on the axis. As in model A, the analytical analysis yields relationships between the various density profiles and the temperature profile

  9. HEATHYD, Steady-State Thermal Hydraulic Analysis of Low-Enriched U Fuel Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NABBI, R.

    1989-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: HEATHYD is a code for the steady-state heat transfer calculation of research nuclear reactors with forced convection. It models heat transfer and coolant flow for assemblies of parallel fuel plates of MTR type with any axial power distribution. The thermodynamic model accounts for single phase cooling and sub- cooled boiling condition using the transition criterion of Bergeles-Rosenow. In addition to the calculation of the channel flow velocities and coolant pressure drops, HEATHYD calculates axial distribution of the coolant and clad-surface temperatures. Safety margins to the critical heat flux as a result of burnout condition or flow instability are determined. 2 - Method of solution: Applying the finite difference method, HEATHYD solves the equations of heat conduction and heat transfer to the coolant. For the physical properties of the coolant as a function of the coolant temperature polynomials of degree 6 are used. Depending on the coolant condition, different correlations for the heat transfer coefficient can be applied. The analysis of the critical cooling conditions resulting in burnout or flow instability, is performed according to the correlations developed by Mirshak/ Labuntsov and Forgan/Whittle

  10. Current drive studies for the ARIES steady-state tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mau, T.K.; Ehst, D.A.; Mandrekas, J.

    1994-01-01

    Steady-state plasma operating scenarios are designed for three versions of the ARIES reactor, using non-inductive current drive techniques that have an established database. R.f. waves, including fast and lower hybrid waves, are the reference drivers for the D-T burning ARIES-I and ARIES-II/IV, while neutral beam injection is employed for ARIES-III which burns D- 3 He. Plasma equilibria with a high bootstrap-current component have been used, in order to minimize the recirculating power fraction and cost of electricity. To maintain plasma stability, the driven current profile has been aligned with that of equilibrium by proper choices of the plasma profiles and power launch parameters. Except for ARIES-III, the current-drive power requirements and the relevant technology developments are found to be quite reasonable. The wave-power spectrum and launch requirements are also considered achievable with a modest development effort. Issues such as an improved database for fast-wave current drive, lower-hybrid power coupling to the plasma edge, profile control in the plasma core, and access to the design point of operation remain to be addressed. ((orig.))

  11. Prospects for Tokamak Fusion Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, J.; Galambos, J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper first reviews briefly the status and plans for research in magnetic fusion energy and discusses the prospects for the tokamak magnetic configuration to be the basis for a fusion power plant. Good progress has been made in achieving fusion reactor-level, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas with the production of significant fusion power in the Joint European Torus (up to 2 MW) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (up to 10 MW) tokamaks. Advances on the technologies of heating, fueling, diagnostics, and materials supported these achievements. The successes have led to the initiation of the design phases of two tokamaks, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the US Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX). ITER will demonstrate the controlled ignition and extended bum of D-T plasmas with steady state as an ultimate goal. ITER will further demonstrate technologies essential to a power plant in an integrated system and perform integrated testing of the high heat flux and nuclear components required to use fusion energy for practical purposes. TPX will complement ITER by testing advanced modes of steady-state plasma operation that, coupled with the developments in ITER, will lead to an optimized demonstration power plant

  12. A highly efficient autothermal microchannel reactor for ammonia decomposition: Analysis of hydrogen production in transient and steady-state regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrecht, Nicolaas; Chiuta, Steven; Bessarabov, Dmitri G.

    2018-05-01

    The experimental evaluation of an autothermal microchannel reactor for H2 production from NH3 decomposition is described. The reactor design incorporates an autothermal approach, with added NH3 oxidation, for coupled heat supply to the endothermic decomposition reaction. An alternating catalytic plate arrangement is used to accomplish this thermal coupling in a cocurrent flow strategy. Detailed analysis of the transient operating regime associated with reactor start-up and steady-state results is presented. The effects of operating parameters on reactor performance are investigated, specifically, the NH3 decomposition flow rate, NH3 oxidation flow rate, and fuel-oxygen equivalence ratio. Overall, the reactor exhibits rapid response time during start-up; within 60 min, H2 production is approximately 95% of steady-state values. The recommended operating point for steady-state H2 production corresponds to an NH3 decomposition flow rate of 6 NL min-1, NH3 oxidation flow rate of 4 NL min-1, and fuel-oxygen equivalence ratio of 1.4. Under these flows, NH3 conversion of 99.8% and H2 equivalent fuel cell power output of 0.71 kWe is achieved. The reactor shows good heat utilization with a thermal efficiency of 75.9%. An efficient autothermal reactor design is therefore demonstrated, which may be upscaled to a multi-kW H2 production system for commercial implementation.

  13. STEADY STATE MODELING OF THE MINIMUM CRITICAL CORE OF THE TRANSIENT REACTOR TEST FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony L. Alberti; Todd S. Palmer; Javier Ortensi; Mark D. DeHart

    2016-05-01

    With the advent of next generation reactor systems and new fuel designs, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has identified the need for the resumption of transient testing of nuclear fuels. The DOE has decided that the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is best suited for future testing. TREAT is a thermal neutron spectrum, air-cooled, nuclear test facility that is designed to test nuclear fuels in transient scenarios. These specific scenarios range from simple temperature transients to full fuel melt accidents. DOE has expressed a desire to develop a simulation capability that will accurately model the experiments before they are irradiated at the facility. It is the aim for this capability to have an emphasis on effective and safe operation while minimizing experimental time and cost. The multi physics platform MOOSE has been selected as the framework for this project. The goals for this work are to identify the fundamental neutronics properties of TREAT and to develop an accurate steady state model for future multiphysics transient simulations. In order to minimize computational cost, the effect of spatial homogenization and angular discretization are investigated. It was found that significant anisotropy is present in TREAT assemblies and to capture this effect, explicit modeling of cooling channels and inter-element gaps is necessary. For this modeling scheme, single element calculations at 293 K gave power distributions with a root mean square difference of 0.076% from those of reference SERPENT calculations. The minimum critical core configuration with identical gap and channel treatment at 293 K resulted in a root mean square, total core, radial power distribution 2.423% different than those of reference SERPENT solutions.

  14. Theoretical investigation on the steady-state natural circulation characteristics of a new type of pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gou Junli; Qiu Suizheng; Su Guanghui; Jia Dounan

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a theoretical investigation on the steady-state natural circulation characteristics of a new type of pressurized water reactor. Through numerically solving the one-dimensional steady-state single-phase conservative equations for the primary circuit and the steady-state two-phase drift-flux conservative equations for the secondary side of the steam generator, the natural circulation characteristics were studied. On the basis of the preliminary calculation analysis, it was found that natural circulation mass flow rate was proportional to the exponential function of the power and that the value of the exponent is related to the operating conditions of the secondary side of the steam generator. The higher the outlet pressure of the secondary side of the steam generator, the higher the primary natural circulation mass flow rate. The larger height difference between the core center and the steam generator center is favorable for the heat removal capacity of the natural circulation. (authors)

  15. Dynamical and technological consequences of multiple isolas of steady states in a catalytic fluidised-bed reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bizon Katarzyna

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Steady-state characteristics of a catalytic fluidised bed reactor and its dynamical consequences are analyzed. The occurrence of an untypical steady-state structure manifesting in a form of multiple isolas is described. A two-phase bubbling bed model is used for a quantitative description of the bed of catalyst. The influence of heat exchange intensity and a fluidisation ratio onto the generation of isolated solution branches is presented for two kinetic schemes. Dynamical consequences of the coexistence of such untypical branches of steady states are presented. The impact of linear growth of the fluidisation ratio and step change of the cooling medium temperature onto the desired product yield is analyzed. The results presented in this study confirm that the identification of a region of the occurrence of multiple isolas is important due to their strong impact both on the process start-up and its control.

  16. Comparative study of pulsed and steady-state tokamak reactor burn cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.A.; Brooks, J.N.; Cha, Y.; Evans, K.; Hassanein, A.M.; Kim, S.; Majumdar, S.; Misra, B.; Stevens, H.C.

    1984-05-01

    Four distinct operating modes have been proposed for tokamaks. Our study focuses on capital costs and lifetime limitations of reactor subsystems in an attempt to quantify sensitivity to pulsed operation. Major problem areas considered include: thermal fatigue on first wall, limiter/divertor; thermal energy storage; fatigue in pulsed poloidal field coils; out-of-plant fatigue and eddy current heating in toroidal field coils; electric power supply costs; and noninductive driver costs. We assume a high availability and low cost of energy will be mandatory for a commercial fusion reactor, and we characterize improvements in physics and engineering which will help achieve these goals for different burn cycles

  17. Magnetic Fusion Energy Plasma Interactive and High Heat Flux Components: Volume 5, Technical assessment of critical issues in the steady state operation of fusion confinement devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    Critical issues for the steady state operation of plasma confinement devices exist in both the physics and technology fields of fusion research. Due to the wide range and number of these issues, this technical assessment has focused on the crucial issues associated with the plasma physics and the plasma interactive components. The document provides information on the problem areas that affect the design and operation of a steady state ETR or ITER type confinement device. It discusses both tokamaks and alternative concepts, and provides a survey of existing and planned confinement machines and laboratory facilities that can address the identified issues. A universal definition of steady state operation is difficult to obtain. From a physics point of view, steady state is generally achieved when the time derivatives approach zero and the operation time greatly exceeds the characteristic time constants of the device. Steady state operation for materials depends on whether thermal stress, creep, fatigue, radiation damage, or power removal are being discussed. For erosion issues, the fluence and availability of the machine for continuous operation are important, assuming that transient events such as disruptions do not limit the component lifetimes. The panel suggests, in general terms, that steady state requires plasma operation from 100 to 1000 seconds and an availability of more than a few percent, which is similar to the expectations for an ETR type device. The assessment of critical issues for steady state operation is divided into four sections: physics issues; technology issues; issues in alternative concepts; and devices and laboratory facilities that can address these problems.

  18. Magnetic Fusion Energy Plasma Interactive and High Heat Flux Components: Volume 5, Technical assessment of critical issues in the steady state operation of fusion confinement devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Critical issues for the steady state operation of plasma confinement devices exist in both the physics and technology fields of fusion research. Due to the wide range and number of these issues, this technical assessment has focused on the crucial issues associated with the plasma physics and the plasma interactive components. The document provides information on the problem areas that affect the design and operation of a steady state ETR or ITER type confinement device. It discusses both tokamaks and alternative concepts, and provides a survey of existing and planned confinement machines and laboratory facilities that can address the identified issues. A universal definition of steady state operation is difficult to obtain. From a physics point of view, steady state is generally achieved when the time derivatives approach zero and the operation time greatly exceeds the characteristic time constants of the device. Steady state operation for materials depends on whether thermal stress, creep, fatigue, radiation damage, or power removal are being discussed. For erosion issues, the fluence and availability of the machine for continuous operation are important, assuming that transient events such as disruptions do not limit the component lifetimes. The panel suggests, in general terms, that steady state requires plasma operation from 100 to 1000 seconds and an availability of more than a few percent, which is similar to the expectations for an ETR type device. The assessment of critical issues for steady state operation is divided into four sections: physics issues; technology issues; issues in alternative concepts; and devices and laboratory facilities that can address these problems

  19. Design constraints for rf-driven steady-state tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.A.

    1979-02-01

    Plasma current density profiles are computed due to electron Landau damping of lower hybrid waves launched into model tokamak density and temperature profiles. The total current and current profile shape are chosen consistent with magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium for a variety of temperature and density distributions and plasma beta values. Surface current equilibria appear attractive and are accessible to waves with n/sub z/ as low as 1.2. By suitably choosing the spectrum location and width it is possible to drive the 9.8 MA current of a 7.0-m reactor with as little as 2.8% of the fusion power recirculated as rf input from the waveguides

  20. Analysis of the steady-state operation of vacuum systems for fusion machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roose, T.R.; Hoffman, M.A.; Carlson, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    A computer code named GASBAL was written to calculate the steady-state vacuum system performance of multi-chamber mirror machines as well as rather complex conventional multichamber vacuum systems. Application of the code, with some modifications, to the quasi-steady tokamak operating period should also be possible. Basically, GASBAL analyzes free molecular gas flow in a system consisting of a central chamber (the plasma chamber) connected by conductances to an arbitrary number of one- or two-chamber peripheral tanks. Each of the peripheral tanks may have vacuum pumping capability (pumping speed), sources of cold gas, and sources of energetic atoms. The central chamber may have actual vacuum pumping capability, as well as a plasma capable of ionizing injected atoms and impinging gas molecules and ''pumping'' them to a peripheral chamber. The GASBAL code was used in the preliminary design of a large mirror machine experiment--LLL's MX

  1. Vacuum system problems of EBT: a steady-state fusion experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livesey, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Many of the vacuum problems faced by EBT will soon be shared by other plasma devices as high-power microwave systems and long pulse lengths become more common. The solutions used on EBT (such as the raised lip with elastomer seal) are not unique; however, experience has shown that microwave-compatible designs must be carefully thought out. All details of the vacuum must be carefully thought out. All details of the vacuum must be carefully screened in advance to insure that microwaves do not leak into pumps or diagnostics where they can cause major damage. Sputter coating, which even now is noticeably present in most pulsed plasma systems, becomes much worse as systems approach steady state. And finally, radiation degradation of components which is presently a minor problem will become significant on high-power microwave-fed devices, such as EBT-P

  2. Steady state and LOCA analysis of Kartini reactor using RELAP5/SCDAP code: The role of passive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antariksawan, Anhar R.; Wahyono, Puradwi I.; Taxwim

    2018-02-01

    Safety is the priority for nuclear installations, including research reactors. On the other hand, many studies have been done to validate the applicability of nuclear power plant based best estimate computer codes to the research reactor. This study aims to assess the applicability of the RELAP5/SCDAP code to Kartini research reactor. The model development, steady state and transient due to LOCA calculations have been conducted by using RELAP5/SCDAP. The calculation results are compared with available measurements data from Kartini research reactor. The results show that the RELAP5/SCDAP model steady state calculation agrees quite well with the available measurement data. While, in the case of LOCA transient simulations, the model could result in reasonable physical phenomena during the transient showing the characteristics and performances of the reactor against the LOCA transient. The role of siphon breaker hole and natural circulation in the reactor tank as passive system was important to keep reactor in safe condition. It concludes that the RELAP/SCDAP could be use as one of the tool to analyse the thermal-hydraulic safety of Kartini reactor. However, further assessment to improve the model is still needed.

  3. Design of long pulse/steady state negative hydrogen ion sources for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prelec, K.

    1980-01-01

    By using parameters of ion sources when operating in a pulsed mode and without cooling (pulse length 2 . For the range of cathode power densities between 0.2 kW/cm 2 and 1 Kw/cm 2 , nucleated boiling has to be used for heat removal; below 0.2 kW/cm 2 water flow cooling suffices. Although this source should deliver 0.3 to 0.5 A of H - ions in a steady state operation and at full power, the other source, which has a magnetron geometry, is more promising. The latter incorporates two new features compared to first designs, geometrical focusing of fast, primary negative hydrogen ions from the cathode into the extraction slit, and a wider discharge gap in the back of the source. These two changes have resulted in an improvement of the power and gas efficiencies by a factor of 3 to 4 and in a reduction of the cathode power density by an order of magnitude. The source has water cooling for all the electrodes, because maximum power densities will not be higher than 0.2 kW/cm 2 . Very recently a modification of this magnetron source is being considered; it consists of plasma injection into the source from a hollow cathode discharge

  4. Mathematical Modeling and Simulation of the Dehydrogenation of Ethyl Benzene to Form Styrene Using Steady-State Fixed Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaidon M. Shakoor

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this research, two models are developed to simulate the steady state fixed bed reactor used for styrene production by ethylbenzene dehydrogenation. The first is one-dimensional model, considered axial gradient only while the second is two-dimensional model considered axial and radial gradients for same variables.The developed mathematical models consisted of nonlinear simultaneous equations in multiple dependent variables. A complete description of the reactor bed involves partial, ordinary differential and algebraic equations (PDEs, ODEs and AEs describing the temperatures, concentrations and pressure drop across the reactor was given. The model equations are solved by finite differences method. The reactor models were coded with Mat lab 6.5 program and various numerical techniques were used to obtain the desired solution.The simulation data for both models were validated with industrial reactor results with a very good concordance.

  5. Steady-State Thermal-Hydraulics Analyses for the Conversion of the BR2 Reactor to LEU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licht, J. R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bergeron, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dionne, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Van den Branden, G. [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Kalcheva, S [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Sikik, E [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Koonen, E [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium)

    2016-09-01

    BR2 is a research reactor used for radioisotope production and materials testing. It’s a tank-in-pool type reactor cooled by light water and moderated by beryllium and light water. The reactor core consists of a beryllium moderator forming a matrix of 79 hexagonal prisms in a hyperboloid configuration; each having a central bore that can contain a variety of different components such as a fuel assembly, a control or regulating rod, an experimental device, or a beryllium or aluminum plug. Based on a series of tests, the BR2 operation is currently limited to a maximum allowable heat flux of 470 W/cm2 to ensure fuel plate integrity during steady-state operation and after a loss-of-flow/loss-of-pressure accident. A feasibility study for the conversion of the BR2 reactor from highly-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel was previously performed to verify it can operate safely at the same maximum nominal steady-state heat flux. An assessment was also performed to quantify the heat fluxes at which the onset of flow instability and critical heat flux occur for each fuel type. This document updates and expands these results for the current representative core configuration (assuming a fresh beryllium matrix) by evaluating the onset of nucleate boiling (ONB), onset of fully developed nucleate boiling (FDNB), onset of flow instability (OFI) and critical heat flux (CHF).

  6. The behaviour of water-cooled reactor fuel rods in steady state and transient conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strupczewski, A.; Marks, P.

    1997-01-01

    In this report, the results of temperature field and filling gas pressure calculations by means of contemporary calculational models for a WWER-440 and WWER-1000 type fuel rod at low and high burnup operating under steady-state conditions are presented. A review of in-core temperature and pressure measurements for various types of LWR fuel is also included. Basing on calculational and collected measured data, the behaviour of fuel cladding during large and small break LOCA, is estimated with special emphasis on their oxidation and failure resistance. (author)

  7. Study on small long-life LBE cooled fast reactor with CANDLE burn-up. Part 1. Steady state research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Mingyu; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Small long-life reactor is required for some local areas. CANDLE small long-life fast reactor which does not require control rods, mining, enrichment and reprocessing plants can satisfy this demand. In a CANDLE reactor, the shapes of neutron flux, nuclide number densities and power density distributions remain constant and only shift in axial direction. The core with 1.0 m radius, 2.0 m length can realize CANDLE burn-up with nitride (enriched N-15) natural uranium as fresh fuel. Lead-Bismuth is used as coolant. From steady state analysis, we obtained the burn-up velocity, output power distribution, core temperature distribution, etc. The burn-up velocity is less than 1.0 cm/year that enables a long-life design easily. The core averaged discharged fuel burn-up is about 40%. (author)

  8. Steady-State Thermal-Hydraulics Analyses for the Conversion of the BR2 Reactor to LEU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licht, J. R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bergeron, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dionne, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Van den Branden, G. [SCK CEN (Belgium); Kalcheva, S. [SCK CEN (Belgium); Sikik, E. [SCK CEN (Belgium); Koonen, E. [SCK CEN (Belgium)

    2015-12-01

    BR2 is a research reactor used for radioisotope production and materials testing. It’s a tank-in-pool type reactor cooled by light water and moderated by beryllium and light water (Figure 1). The reactor core consists of a beryllium moderator forming a matrix of 79 hexagonal prisms in a hyperboloid configuration; each having a central bore that can contain a variety of different components such as a fuel assembly, a control or regulating rod, an experimental device, or a beryllium or aluminum plug. Based on a series of tests, the BR2 operation is currently limited to a maximum allowable heat flux of 470 W/cm2 to ensure fuel plate integrity during steady-state operation and after a loss-of-flow/loss-of-pressure accident.

  9. Towards nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    The results of nuclear fusion researches in JAERI are summarized. In this report, following themes are collected: the concept of fusion reactor (including ITER), fusion reactor safety, plasma confinement, fusion reactor equipment, and so on. Includes glossary. (J.P.N.)

  10. The long way to steady state fusion plasmas - the superconducting stellarator device Wendelstein 7-X

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The stable generation of high temperature Hydrogen plasmas (ion and electron temperature in the range 10-20 keV) is the basis for the use of nuclear fusion to generate heat and thereby electric power. The most promising path is to use strong, toroidal, twisted magnetic fields to confine the electrically charged plasma particles in order to avoid heat losses to the cold, solid wall elements. Two magnetic confinement concepts have been proven to be most suitable: (a) the tokamak and (b) the stellarator. The stellarator creates the magnetic field by external coils only, the tokamak by combining the externally created field with the magnetic field generated by a strong current in the plasma. “Wendelstein 7-X” is the name of a large superconducting stellarator that went successfully into operation after 15 years of construction. With 30 m3 plasma volume, 3 T magnetic field on axis, and 10 MW micro wave heating power, Hydrogen plasmas are generated that allow one to establish a scientific basis for the extrapol...

  11. Conceptual design of fusion experimental reactor (FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Conceptual Design of Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) of which the objective will be to realize self-ignition with D-T reaction is reported. Mechanical Configurations of FER are characterized with a noncircular plasma and a double-null divertor. The primary aim of design studies is to demonstrate fissibility of reactor structures as compact and simple as possible with removable torus sectors. The structures of each component such as a first-wall, blanket, shielding, divertor, magnet and so on have been designed. It is also discussed about essential reactor plant system requirements. In addition to the above, a brief concept of a steady-state reactor based on RF current drive is also discussed. The main aim, in this time, is to examine physical studies of a possible RF steady-state reactor. (author)

  12. Thermal-hydraulic Fortran program for steady-state calculations of plate-type fuel research reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khedr Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The safety assessment of research and power reactors is a continuous process covering their lifespan and requiring verified and validated codes. Power reactor codes all over the world are well established and qualified against real measuring data and qualified experimental facilities. These codes are usually sophisticated, require special skills and consume a lot of running time. On the other hand, most research reactor codes still require much more data for validation and qualification. It is, therefore, of benefit to any regulatory body to develop its own codes for the review and assessment of research reactors. The present paper introduces a simple, one-dimensional Fortran program called THDSN for steady-state thermal-hydraulic calculations of plate-type fuel research reactors. Besides calculating the fuel and coolant temperature distributions and pressure gradients in an average and hot channel, the program calculates the safety limits and margins against the critical phenomena encountered in research reactors, such as the onset of nucleate boiling, critical heat flux and flow instability. Well known thermal-hydraulic correlations for calculating the safety parameters and several formulas for the heat transfer coefficient have been used. The THDSN program was verified by comparing its results for 2 and 10 MW benchmark reactors with those published in IAEA publications and a good agreement was found. Also, the results of the program are compared with those published for other programs, such as the PARET and TERMIC.

  13. NATBWR: a steady-state model for natural circulation in boiling-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Healzer, J.M.; Abdollahian, D.

    1983-02-01

    This report documents the NATBWR steady-state BWR natural-circulation model and activities under EPRI Project RP1561-1 to gather data and predict the natural-circulation operation of the BWR. The report is organized into two parts, with the first part describing the NATBWR model and applications of the model to available BWR natural-circulation data and the second part providing user and programming information about the model. Five different operating BWR's were selected to demonstrate the application of the NATBWR model, one of each type from BWR/1 through BWR/4. For each operating plant, the available natural circulation data has been compared to model predictions. In addition to the data predictions, the behavior of the BWR system at reduced inventory, where the system is isolated and scrammed, and cooling provided by natural circulation has been analyzed. Finally, included as an appendix to Part 1 of this report is a discussion of the stability of the BWR system at natural-circulation conditions

  14. Fusion reactor design studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmert, G.A.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Santarius, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the ARIES tokamak: systems; plasma power balance; impurity control and fusion ash removal; fusion product ripple loss; energy conversion; reactor fueling; first wall design; shield design; reactor safety; and fuel cost and resources

  15. Thermal hydraulic core simulation of the MYRRHA Reactor in steady state operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferandes, Gustavo H.N.; Ramos, Mário C.; Carvalho, Athos M.S.S.; Cabrera, Carlos E.V.; Costa, Antonella L.; Pereira, Claubia

    2017-01-01

    MYRRHA (Multi-purpose Hybrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) is a prototype nuclear subcritical reactor driven by a particle accelerator. As a special property, the reactor maintains the nuclear fission chain reaction by means of an external neutron source provided by a particle accelerator. The main aim of this work is to study two types of coolants, LBE (Lead-Bismuth Eutectic) and Na (Sodium) that are two strong candidates to be used in ADS systems as well as in Generation IV (GEN-IV) reactors. Firstly, it was developed a thermal hydraulic model of the MYRRHA core using the RELAP5-3D, considering LBE as coolant (original project). After this, the LBE was substituted by Na coolant to investigate the reactor behavior in such case. Results have demonstrated the high heat transfer capacity of the LBE coolant in this type of system. (author)

  16. Thermal hydraulic core simulation of the MYRRHA Reactor in steady state operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferandes, Gustavo H.N.; Ramos, Mário C.; Carvalho, Athos M.S.S.; Cabrera, Carlos E.V.; Costa, Antonella L.; Pereira, Claubia, E-mail: ghnfernandes@gmail.com, E-mail: marc5663@gmail.com, E-mail: athos1495@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: carlosvelcab@hotmail.com, E-mail: antonella@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores/CNPq (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    MYRRHA (Multi-purpose Hybrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) is a prototype nuclear subcritical reactor driven by a particle accelerator. As a special property, the reactor maintains the nuclear fission chain reaction by means of an external neutron source provided by a particle accelerator. The main aim of this work is to study two types of coolants, LBE (Lead-Bismuth Eutectic) and Na (Sodium) that are two strong candidates to be used in ADS systems as well as in Generation IV (GEN-IV) reactors. Firstly, it was developed a thermal hydraulic model of the MYRRHA core using the RELAP5-3D, considering LBE as coolant (original project). After this, the LBE was substituted by Na coolant to investigate the reactor behavior in such case. Results have demonstrated the high heat transfer capacity of the LBE coolant in this type of system. (author)

  17. COOLOD-N2: a computer code, for the analyses of steady-state thermal-hydraulics in research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminaga, Masanori

    1994-03-01

    The COOLOD-N2 code provides a capability for the analyses of the steady-state thermal-hydraulics of research reactors. This code is revised version of the COOLOD-N code, and is applicable not only for research reactors in which plate-type fuel is adopted, but also for research reactors in which rod-type fuel is adopted. In the code, subroutines to calculate temperature distribution in rod-type fuel have been newly added to the COOLOD-N code. The COOLOD-N2 code can calculate fuel temperatures under both forced convection cooling mode and natural convection cooling mode as well as COOLOD-N code. In the COOLOD-N2 code, a 'Heat Transfer package' is used for calculating heat transfer coefficient, DNB heat flux etc. The 'Heat Transfer package' is subroutine program and is especially developed for research reactors in which plate-type fuel is adopted. In case of rod-type fuel, DNB heat flux is calculated by both the 'Heat Transfer package' and Lund DNB heat flux correlation which is popular for TRIGA reactor. The COOLOD-N2 code also has a capability of calculating ONB temperature, the heat flux at onset of flow instability as well as DNB heat flux. (author)

  18. Steady-state thermal-hydraulic design analysis of the Advanced Neutron Source reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoder, G.L. Jr.; Dixon, J.R.; Elkassabgi, Y.; Felde, D.K.; Giles, G.E.; Harrington, R.M.; Morris, D.G.; Nelson, W.R.; Ruggles, A.E.; Siman-Tov, M.; Stovall, T.K.

    1994-05-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a research reactor that is planned for construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This reactor will be a user facility with the major objective of providing the highest continuous neutron beam intensities of any reactor in the world. Additional objectives for the facility include providing materials irradiation facilities and isotope production facilities as good as, or better than, those in the High Flux Isotope Reactor. To achieve these objectives, the reactor design uses highly subcooled heavy water as both coolant and moderator. Two separate core halves of 67.6-L total volume operate at an average power density of 4.5 MW(t)/L, and the coolant flows upward through the core at 25 m/s. Operating pressure is 3.1 MPa at the core inlet with a 1.4-MPa pressure drop through the core region. Finally, in order to make the resources available for experimentation, the fuel is designed to provide a 17-d fuel cycle with an additional 4 d planned in each cycle for the refueling process. This report examines the codes and models used to develop the thermal-hydraulic design for ANS, as well as the correlations and physical data; evaluates thermal-hydraulic uncertainties; reports on thermal-hydraulic design and safety analysis; describes experimentation in support of the ANS reactor design and safety analysis; and provides an overview of the experimental plan

  19. Modular Stellarator Fusion Reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1981-08-01

    A preliminary conceptual study is made of the Modular Stellarator Reactor (MSR). A steady-state ignited, DT-fueled, magnetic fusion reactor is proposed for use as a central electric-power station. The MSR concept combines the physics of the classic stellarator confinement topology with an innovative, modular-coil design. Parametric tradeoff calculations are described, leading to the selection of an interim design point for a 4-GWt plant based on Alcator transport scaling and an average beta value of 0.04 in an l = 2 system with a plasma aspect ratio of 11. The physics basis of the design point is described together with supporting magnetics, coil-force, and stress computations. The approach and results presented herein will be modified in the course of ongoing work to form a firmer basis for a detailed conceptual design of the MSR

  20. The code DYN3DR for steady-state and transient analyses of light water reactor cores with Cartesian geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grundmann, U.

    1995-11-01

    The code DYN3D/M2 was developed for 3-dimensional steady-state and transient analyses of reactor cores with hexagonal fuel assemblies. The neutron kinetics of the new version DYN3DR is based on a nodal method for the solution of the 3-dimensional 2-group neutron diffusion equation for Cartesian geometry. The thermal-hydraulic model FLOCAL simulating the two phase flow of coolant and the fuel rod behaviour is used in the two versions. The fundamentals for the solution of the neutron diffusion equations in DYN3DR are described. The 3-dimensional NEACRP benchmarks for rod ejections in LWR with quadratic fuel assemblies were calculated and the results were compared with the published solutions. The developed algorithm for neutron kinetics are suitable for using parallel processing. The behaviour of speed-up versus the number of processors is demonstrated for calculations of a static neutron flux distribution using a workstation with 4 processors. (orig.) [de

  1. Method for calculating the steady-state distribution of tritium in a molten-salt breeder reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, R.B.; Nestor, C.W.

    1975-04-01

    Tritium is produced in molten salt reactors primarily by fissioning of uranium and absorption of neutrons by the constituents of the fuel carrier salt. At the operating temperature of a large power reactor, tritium is expected to diffuse from the primary system through pipe and vessel walls to the surroundings and through heat exchanger tubes into the secondary system which contains a coolant salt. Some tritium will pass from the secondary system into the steam power system. This report describes a method for calculating the steady state distribution of tritium in a molten salt reactor plant and a computer program for making the calculations. The method takes into account the effects of various processes for removing tritium, the addition of hydrogen or hydrogenous compounds to the primary and secondary systems, and the chemistry of uranium in the fuel salt. Sample calculations indicate that 30 percent or more of the tritium might reach the steam system in a large power reactor unless special measures are taken to confine the tritium. (U.S.)

  2. A Singular Perturbation Problem for Steady State Conversion of Methane Oxidation in Reverse Flow Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aang Nuryaman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The governing equations describing the methane oxidation process in reverse flow reactor are given by a set of convective-diffusion equations with a nonlinear reaction term, where temperature and methane conversion are dependent variables. In this study, the process is assumed to be one-dimensional pseudo homogeneous model and takes place with a certain reaction rate in which the whole process of reactor is still workable. Thus, the reaction rate can proceed at a fixed temperature. Under this condition, we restrict ourselves to solve the equations for the conversion only. From the available data, it turns out that the ratio of the diffusion term to the reaction term is small. Hence, this ratio is considered as small parameter in our model and this leads to a singular perturbation problem. In the vicinity of small parameter in front of higher order term, the numerical difficulties will be found. Here, we present an analytical solution by means of matched asymptotic expansions. Result shows that, up to and including the first order of approximation, the solution is in agreement with the exact and numerical solutions of the boundary value problem.

  3. Fusion reactors - types - problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitter, K.H.

    1979-07-01

    A short account is given of the principles of fusion reactions and of the expected advantages of fusion reactors. Descriptions are presented of various Tokamak experimental devices being developed in a number of countries and of some mirror machines. The technical obstacles to be overcome before a fusion reactor could be self-supporting are discussed. (U.K.)

  4. Standard mirror fusion reactor design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    This report covers the work of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Division's reactor study group during FY 1976 on the standard mirror reactor. The ''standard'' mirror reactor is characterized as a steady state, neutral beam sustained, D-T fusioning plasma confined by a Yin-Yang magnetic mirror field. The physics parameters are obtained from the same physics model that explains the 2XIIB experiment. The model assumes that the drift cyclotron loss cone mode occurs on the boundary of the plasma, and that it is stabilized by warm plasma with negligible energy investment. The result of the study was a workable mirror fusion power plant, steady-state blanket removal made relatively simple by open-ended geometry, and no impurity problem due to the positive plasma potential. The Q (fusion power/injected beam power) turns out to be only 1.1 because of loss out the ends from Coulomb collisions, i.e., classical losses. This low Q resulted in 77% of the gross electrical power being used to power the injectors, thereby causing the net power cost to be high. The low Q stimulated an intensive search for Q-enhancement concepts, resulting in the LLL reactor design effort turning to the field reversal mirror and the tandem mirror, each having Q of order 5

  5. Conceptual design of fusion experimental reactor (FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) being developed at JAERI as a next generation tokamak to JT-60 has a major mission of realizing a self-ignited long-burning DT plasma and demonstrating engineering feasibility. During FY82 and FY83 a comprehensive and intensive conceptual design study has been conducted for a pulsed operation FER as a reference option which employs a conventional inductive current drive and a double-null divertor. In parallel with the reference design, studies have been carried out to evaluate advanced reactor concepts such as quasi-steady state operation and steady state operation based on RF current drive and pumped limiter, and comparative studies for single-null divertor/pumped limiter. This report presents major results obtained primarily from FY83 design studies, while the results of FY82 design studies are described in previous references (JAERI-M 83-213--216). (author)

  6. Status of fusion reactor concept development in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji-Iio, Shunji

    1996-01-01

    Fusion power reactor studies in Japan based on magnetic confinement schemes are reviewed. As D-T fusion reactors, a steady-state tokamak reactor (SSTR) was proposed and extensively studied at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and an inductively operated day-long tokamak reactor (IDLT) was proposed by a group at the University of Tokyo. The concept of a drastically easy maintenance (DREAM) tokamak reactor is being developed at JAERI. A high-field tokamak reactor with force-balanced coils as a volumetric neutron source is being studied by our group at Tokyo Institute of Technology. The conceptual design of a force-free helical reactor (FFHR) is under way at the National Institute for Fusion Science. A design study of a D- 3 He field-reversed configuration (FRC) fusion reactor called ARTEMIS was conducted by the FRC fusion working group of research committee of lunar base an lunar resources. (author)

  7. Steady State Advanced Tokamak (SSAT): The mission and the machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, K.; Goldston, R.; Nevins, B.; Neilson, H.; Shannon, T.; Montgomery, B.

    1992-03-01

    Extending the tokamak concept to the steady state regime and pursuing advances in tokamak physics are important and complementary steps for the magnetic fusion energy program. The required transition away from inductive current drive will provide exciting opportunities for advances in tokamak physics, as well as important impetus to drive advances in fusion technology. Recognizing this, the Fusion Policy Advisory Committee and the US National Energy Strategy identified the development of steady state tokamak physics and technology, and improvements in the tokamak concept, as vital elements in the magnetic fusion energy development plan. Both called for the construction of a steady state tokamak facility to address these plan elements. Advances in physics that produce better confinement and higher pressure limits are required for a similar unit size reactor. Regimes with largely self-driven plasma current are required to permit a steady-state tokamak reactor with acceptable recirculating power. Reliable techniques of disruption control will be needed to achieve the availability goals of an economic reactor. Thus the central role of this new tokamak facility is to point the way to a more attractive demonstration reactor (DEMO) than the present data base would support. To meet the challenges, we propose a new ''Steady State Advanced Tokamak'' (SSAT) facility that would develop and demonstrate optimized steady state tokamak operating mode. While other tokamaks in the world program employ superconducting toroidal field coils, SSAT would be the first major tokamak to operate with a fully superconducting coil set in the elongated, divertor geometry planned for ITER and DEMO

  8. Advanced fuels for nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNally, J.R. Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Should magnetic confinement of hot plasma prove satisfactory at high β (16 πnkT//sub B 2 / greater than 0.1), thermonuclear fusion fuels other than D.T may be contemplated for future fusion reactors. The prospect of the advanced fusion fuels D.D and 6 Li.D for fusion reactors is quite promising provided the system is large, well reflected and possesses a high β. The first generation reactions produce the very active, energy-rich fuels t and 3 He which exhibit a high burnup probability in very hot plasmas. Steady state burning of D.D can ensue in a 60 kG field, 5 m reactor for β approximately 0.2 and reflectivity R/sub mu/ = 0.9 provided the confinement time is about 38 sec. The feasibility of steady state burning of 6 Li.D has not yet been demonstrated but many important features of such systems still need to be incorporated in the reactivity code. In particular, there is a need for new and improved nuclear cross section data for over 80 reaction possibilities

  9. The fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, M.H.

    1974-01-01

    Basic principles of the fusion reactor are outlined. Plasma heating and confinement schemes are described. These confinement systems include the linear Z pinch, magnetic mirrors and Tokamaks. A fusion reactor is described and a discussion is given of its environmental impact and its fuel situation. (R.L.)

  10. Progress on the reference mirror fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.; Doggett, J.N.; Moir, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    The design of a reference mirror fusion reactor is underway at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The reactor, rated at about 900 MWe, features steady-state operation, an absence of plasma impurity problems, and good accessibility for blanket maintenance. It is concluded that a mirror reactor appears workable, but its dollar/kWe cost will be considerably higher than present-day nuclear costs. The cost would be reduced most markedly by an increase in plasma Q

  11. Mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Conceptual design studies were made of fusion reactors based on the three current mirror-confinement concepts: the standard mirror, the tandem mirror, and the field-reversed mirror. Recent studies of the standard mirror have emphasized its potential as a fusion-fission hybrid reactor, designed to produce fuel for fission reactors. We have designed a large commercial hybrid and a small pilot-plant hybrid based on standard mirror confinement. Tandem mirror designs include a commercial 1000-MWe fusion power plant and a nearer term tandem mirror hybrid. Field-reversed mirror designs include a multicell commercial reactor producing 75 MWe and a single-cell pilot plant

  12. Mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.; Moir, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    We have carried out conceptual design studies of fusion reactors based on the three current mirror confinement concepts: the standard mirror, the tandem mirror, and the field-reversed mirror. Recent studies of the standard mirror have emphasized its potential as a fusion-fission hybrid reactor, designed to produce fission fuel for fission reactors. We have designed a large commercial hybrid based on standard mirror confinement, and also a small pilot plant hybrid. Tandem mirror designs include a commercial 1000 MWe fusion power plant and a nearer term tandem mirror hybrid. Field-reversed mirror designs include a multicell commercial reactor producing 75 MWe and a single cell pilot plant

  13. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the radiation-induced behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components as well as to help the international community in building the scientific and technical basis needed for the construction of the future reactor. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical and chemical (corrosion) behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation and water coolant environment; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; investigations on the management of materials resulting from the dismantling of fusion reactors including waste disposal. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are discussed

  14. Steady-state CFD simulations of an EPR™ reactor pressure vessel: A validation study based on the JULIETTE experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puragliesi, R.; Zhou, L.; Zerkak, O.; Pautz, A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • CFD validation of k–ε (RANS model of EPR RPV. • Flat inlet velocity profile is not sufficient to correctly predict the pressure drops. • Swirl is responsible for asymmetric loads at the core barrel. • Parametric study to the turbulent Schmidt number for better predictions of passive-scalar transport. • The optimal turbulent Schmidt number was found to be one order of magnitude smaller than the standard value. - Abstract: Validating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models against experimental measurements is a fundamental step towards a broader acceptance of CFD as a tool for reactor safety analysis when best-estimate one-dimensional thermal-hydraulic codes present strong modelling limitations. In the present paper numerical results of steady-state RANS analyses are compared to pressure, volumetric flow rate and concentration distribution measurements in different locations of an Areva EPR™ reactor pressure vessel (RPV) mock-up named JULIETTE. Several flow configurations are considered: Three different total volumetric flow rates, cold leg velocity field with or without swirl, three or four reactor coolant pumps functioning. Investigations on the influence of two types of inlet boundary profiles (i.e. flat or 1/7th power-law) and the turbulent Schmidt number have shown that the first affects sensibly the pressure loads at the core barrel whereas the latter parameter strongly affects the transport and the mixing of the tracer (passive scalar) and consequently its distribution at the core inlet. Furthermore, the introduction of an integral parameter as the swirl number has helped to decrease the large epistemic uncertainty associated with the swirling device. The swirl is found to be the cause of asymmetric loads on the walls of the core barrel and also asymmetries are enhanced for the tracer concentration distribution at the core inlet. The k–ϵ CFD model developed with the commercial code STAR-CCM+ proves to be able to predict

  15. Steady-state CFD simulations of an EPR™ reactor pressure vessel: A validation study based on the JULIETTE experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puragliesi, R., E-mail: riccardo.puragliesi@psi.ch [Laboratory for Reactor Physics and Systems Behaviour, PSI, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Zhou, L. [Science and Technology on Reactor System Design Technology Laboratory, NPIC, Chengdu (China); Zerkak, O.; Pautz, A. [Laboratory for Reactor Physics and Systems Behaviour, PSI, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • CFD validation of k–ε (RANS model of EPR RPV. • Flat inlet velocity profile is not sufficient to correctly predict the pressure drops. • Swirl is responsible for asymmetric loads at the core barrel. • Parametric study to the turbulent Schmidt number for better predictions of passive-scalar transport. • The optimal turbulent Schmidt number was found to be one order of magnitude smaller than the standard value. - Abstract: Validating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models against experimental measurements is a fundamental step towards a broader acceptance of CFD as a tool for reactor safety analysis when best-estimate one-dimensional thermal-hydraulic codes present strong modelling limitations. In the present paper numerical results of steady-state RANS analyses are compared to pressure, volumetric flow rate and concentration distribution measurements in different locations of an Areva EPR™ reactor pressure vessel (RPV) mock-up named JULIETTE. Several flow configurations are considered: Three different total volumetric flow rates, cold leg velocity field with or without swirl, three or four reactor coolant pumps functioning. Investigations on the influence of two types of inlet boundary profiles (i.e. flat or 1/7th power-law) and the turbulent Schmidt number have shown that the first affects sensibly the pressure loads at the core barrel whereas the latter parameter strongly affects the transport and the mixing of the tracer (passive scalar) and consequently its distribution at the core inlet. Furthermore, the introduction of an integral parameter as the swirl number has helped to decrease the large epistemic uncertainty associated with the swirling device. The swirl is found to be the cause of asymmetric loads on the walls of the core barrel and also asymmetries are enhanced for the tracer concentration distribution at the core inlet. The k–ϵ CFD model developed with the commercial code STAR-CCM+ proves to be able to predict

  16. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components during and after irradiation. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; the detection of abrupt electrical degradation of insulating ceramics under high temperature and neutron irradiation; and the study of dismantling and waste disposal strategy for fusion reactors. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2000 are discussed

  17. Assessment of tritium breeding requirements for fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, J.

    1983-12-01

    This report presents an assessment of tritium-breeding requirements for fusion power reactors. The analysis is based on an evaluation of time-dependent tritium inventories in the reactor system. The method presented can be applied to any fusion systems in operation on a steady-state mode as well as on a pulsed mode. As an example, the UWMAK-I design was analyzed and it has been found that the startup inventory requirement calculated by the present method significantly differs from those previously calculated. The effect of reactor-parameter changes on the required tritium breeding ratio is also analyzed for a variety of reactor operation scenarios

  18. Materials for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlich, K.; Kaletta, D.

    1978-03-01

    The following report describes five papers which were given during the IMF seminar series summer 1977. The purpose of this series was to discuss especially the irradiation behaviour of materials intended for the first wall of future fusion reactors. The first paper deals with the basic understanding of plasma physics relating to the fusion reactor and presents the current state of art of fusion technology. The next two talks discuss the metals intended for the first wall and structural components of a fusion reactor. Since 14 MeV neutrons play an important part in the process of irradiation damage their role is discussed in detail. The question which machines are presently available to simulate irradiation damage under conditions similar to the ones found in a fusion reactor are investigated in the fourth talk which also presents the limitations of the different methods of simulation. In this context also discussed is the importance future intensive neutron sources and materials test reactors will have for this problem area. The closing paper has as a theme the review of the present status of research of metallic and non-metallic materials in view of the quite different requirements for different fusion systems; a closing topic is the world supply on rare materials required for fusion reactors. (orig) [de

  19. A pilot application of the RELAP file to the steady state and transient analysis of a test section inside the BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferri, M. G.; D'Auria, F.; Forasassi, G.; Giot, M.

    2000-01-01

    BR2 is a material test reactor sited in the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre in Mol. The main research programs carried out in BR2 are related to the safety of nuclear reactor structural materials and fuels, in normal and accidental conditions, plant lifetime evaluation and ageing of components. In this framework, a computer program that allows the performance of detailed, steady state analysis of several kinds of in-pile sections with an axisymmetrical geometry has been developed. Furthermore, comparing its results with those of the well known, extensively used, Relap5/Mod 3.2 code on a test problem has validated this program. This was performed in three steps: 1. modalisation development of a subsystem of a typical in-pile section. 2. steady state analysis and comparison with the above-mentioned program. 3. transient simulation of the same system; the considered transient consists of a loss of coolant flow. (author)

  20. Steady-state thermal-hydraulic analysis of the Moroccan TRIGA MARK II reactor by using PARET/ANL and COOLOD-N2 codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulaich, Y.; Nacir, B.; El Bardouni, T.; Zoubair, M.; El Bakkari, B.; Merroun, O.; El Younoussi, C.; Htet, A.; Boukhal, H.; Chakir, E.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The COOLOD/N2 and PARET/ANL codes were used for a steady-state thermal-hydraulic and safety analysis of the 2 MW TRIGA MARK II reactor located at the Nuclear Studies Center of Maamora (CENM), Morocco. → The main objective of this study is to ensure the safety margins of different safety related parameters by steady-state calculations at full power level (2 MW). → The most important conclusion is that all obtained values of DNBR, fuel center and surface temperature, cladding surface temperature and coolant temperature across the hottest channel are largely far to compromise safety of the reactor. - Abstract: The COOLOD/N2 and PARET/ANL codes were used for a steady-state thermal-hydraulic and safety analysis of the 2 MW TRIGA MARK II reactor located at the Nuclear Studies Center of Maamora (CENM), Morocco. In order to validate our PARET/ANL and COOLOD-N2 models, the fuel center temperature as function of core power was calculated and compared with the corresponding experimental values. The comparison indicates that the calculated values are in satisfactory agreement with the measurement. The main objective of this study is to ensure the safety margins of different safety related parameters by steady-state calculations at full power level (2 MW). Therefore, we have calculated the departure from nucleate boiling ratio (DNBR), fuel center and surface temperature, cladding surface temperature and coolant temperature profiles across the hottest channel. The most important conclusion is that all obtained values are largely far to compromise safety of the reactor.

  1. Possible fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, S.

    1976-05-01

    A scheme to improve performance characteristics of a tokamak-type fusion reactor is proposed. Basically, the tokamak-type plasma could be moved around so that the plasma could be heated by compression, brought to the region where the blanket surrounds the plasma, and moved so as to keep wall loading below the acceptable limit. This idea should be able to help to economize a fusion reactor

  2. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The following topics are briefly discussed: (1) surface blistering studies on fusion reactor materials, (2) TFTR design support activities, (3) analysis of samples bombarded in-situ in PLT, (4) chemical sputtering effects, (5) modeling of surface behavior, (6) ion migration in glow discharge tube cathodes, (7) alloy development for irradiation performance, (8) dosimetry and damage analysis, and (9) development of tritium migration in fusion devices and reactors

  3. KIM, Steady-State Transport for Fixed Source in 2-D Thermal Reactor by Monte-Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cupini, E.; De Matteis, A.; Simonini, R.

    1980-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: KIM (K-infinite Monte Carlo) is a program which solves the steady-state linear transport equation for a fixed-source problem (or, by successive fixed-source runs, for the eigenvalue problem) in a two-dimensional infinite thermal reactor lattice. The main quantities computed in some broad energy groups are the following: - Fluxes and cross sections averaged over the region (i.e. a space portion that can be unconnected but contains everywhere the same homogeneous material), grouping of regions, the whole element. - Average absorption and fission rates per nuclide. - Average flux, absorption and production distributions versus energy. 2 - Method of solution: Monte Carlo simulation is used by tracing particle histories from fission birth down through the resonance region until absorption in the thermal range. The program is organised in three sections for fast, epithermal and thermal simulation, respectively; each section implements a particular model for both numerical techniques and cross section representation (energy groups in the fast section, groups or resonance parameters in the epithermal section, points in the thermal section). During slowing down (energy above 1 eV) nuclei are considered as stationary, with the exception of some resonance nuclei whose spacing between resonances is much greater than the resonance width. The Doppler broadening of s-wave resonances of these nuclides is taken into account by computing cross sections at the current neutron energy and at the temperature of the nucleus hit. During thermalization (energy below 1 eV) the thermal motion of some nuclides is also considered, by exploiting scattering kernels provided by the library for light water, heavy water and oxygen at several temperatures. KIM includes splitting and Russian roulette. A characteristic feature of the program is its approach to the lattice geometry. In fact, besides the usual continuous treatment of the geometry using the well

  4. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethi, V.K.; Scholz, R.; Nolfi, F.V. Jr.; Turner, A.P.L.

    1980-01-01

    Data are given for each of the following areas: (1) effects of irradiation on fusion reactor materials, (2) hydrogen permeation and materials behavior in alloys, (3) carbon coatings for fusion applications, (4) surface damage of TiB 2 coatings under energetic D + and 4 He + irradiations, and (5) neutron dosimetry

  5. Fusion reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    Nuclear fusion could soon become a viable energy source. Work in plasma physics, fusion technology and fusion safety is progressing rapidly in a number of Member States and international collaboration continues on work aiming at the demonstration of fusion power generation. Safety of fusion reactors and technological and radiological aspects of waste management are important aspects in the development and design of fusion machines. In order to provide an international forum to review and discuss the status and the progress made since 1983 in programmes related to operational safety aspects of fusion reactors, their waste management and decommissioning concepts, the IAEA had organized the Technical Committee on ''Fusion Reactor Safety'' in Culham, 3-7 November 1986. All presentations of this meeting were divided into four sessions: 1. Statements on National-International Fusion Safety Programmes (5 papers); 2. Operation and System Safety (15 papers); 3. Waste Management and Decommissioning (5 papers); 4. Environmental Impacts (6 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 31 papers. Refs, figs, tabs

  6. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowcliffe, A.F.; Burn, G.L.; Knee', S.S.; Dowker, C.L.

    1994-02-01

    This is the fifteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; Special purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide

  7. Compact fusion reactors

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Fusion research is currently to a large extent focused on tokamak (ITER) and inertial confinement (NIF) research. In addition to these large international or national efforts there are private companies performing fusion research using much smaller devices than ITER or NIF. The attempt to achieve fusion energy production through relatively small and compact devices compared to tokamaks decreases the costs and building time of the reactors and this has allowed some private companies to enter the field, like EMC2, General Fusion, Helion Energy, Lawrenceville Plasma Physics and Lockheed Martin. Some of these companies are trying to demonstrate net energy production within the next few years. If they are successful their next step is to attempt to commercialize their technology. In this presentation an overview of compact fusion reactor concepts is given.

  8. Fusion Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2002-04-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the radiation-induced behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components as well as to help the international community in building the scientific and technical basis needed for the construction of the future reactor. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical and chemical (corrosion) behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation and water coolant environment; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; investigations on the management of materials resulting from the dismantling of fusion reactors including waste disposal. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are discussed.

  9. User's manual for ASTERIX-2: A two-dimensional modular code system for the steady state and xenon transient analysis of a pebble bed high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, T.; Cowan, C.L.; Lauer, A.; Schwiegk, H.J.

    1982-03-01

    The ASTERIX modular code package was developed at KFA Laboratory-Juelich for the steady state and xenon transient analysis of a pebble bed high temperature reactor. The code package was implemented on the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Computer in August, 1980, and a user's manual for the current version of the code, identified as ASTERIX-2, was prepared as a cooperative effort by KFA Laboratory and GE-ARSD. The material in the manual includes the requirements for accessing the program, a description of the major subroutines, a listing of the input options, and a listing of the input data for a sample problem. The material is provided in sufficient detail for the user to carry out a wide range of analysis from steady state operations to the xenon induced power transients in which the local xenon, temperature, buckling and control feedback effects have been incorporated in the problem solution. (orig.)

  10. Fusion reactor radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaser, J.D.; Postma, A.K.; Bradley, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    Quantities and compositions of non-tritium radioactive waste are estimated for some current conceptual fusion reactor designs, and disposal of large amounts of radioactive waste appears necessary. Although the initial radioactivity of fusion reactor and fission reactor wastes are comparable, the radionuclides in fusion reactor wastes are less hazardous and have shorter half-lives. Areas requiring further research are discussed

  11. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2000-01-01

    SCK-CEN's research and development programme on fusion reactor materials includes: (1) the study of the mechanical behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation (including steels, inconel, molybdenum, chromium); (2) the determination and modelling of the characteristics of irradiated first wall materials such as beryllium; (3) the detection of abrupt electrical degradation of insulating ceramics under high temperature and neutron irradiation; (4) the study of the dismantling and waste disposal strategy for fusion reactors.; (5) a feasibility study for the testing of blanket modules under neutron radiation. Main achievements in these topical areas in the year 1999 are summarised

  12. Fusion Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2000-07-01

    SCK-CEN's research and development programme on fusion reactor materials includes: (1) the study of the mechanical behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation (including steels, inconel, molybdenum, chromium); (2) the determination and modelling of the characteristics of irradiated first wall materials such as beryllium; (3) the detection of abrupt electrical degradation of insulating ceramics under high temperature and neutron irradiation; (4) the study of the dismantling and waste disposal strategy for fusion reactors.; (5) a feasibility study for the testing of blanket modules under neutron radiation. Main achievements in these topical areas in the year 1999 are summarised.

  13. Pulsed fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    This summer school specialized in examining specific fusion center systems. Papers on scientific feasibility are first presented: confinement of high-beta plasma, liners, plasma focus, compression and heating and the use of high power electron beams for thermonuclear reactors. As for technological feasibility, lectures were on the theta-pinch toroidal reactors, toroidal diffuse pinch, electrical engineering problems in pulsed magnetically confined reactors, neutral gas layer for heat removal, the conceptual design of a series of laser fusion power plants with ''Saturn'', implosion experiments and the problem of the targets, the high brightness lasers for plasma generation, and topping and bottoming cycles. Some problems common to pulsed reactors were examined: energy storage and transfer, thermomechanical and erosion effects in the first wall and blanket, the problems of tritium production, radiation damage and neutron activation in blankets, and the magnetic and inertial confinement

  14. An accelerator based steady state neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, R.J.; Johnson, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Using high current, c.w. linear accelerator technology, a spallation neutron source can achieve much higher average intensities than existing or proposed pulsed spallation sources. With about 100 mA of 300 MeV protons or deuterons, the Accelerator Based Neutron Research Facility (ABNR) would initially achieve the 10 16 n/cm 2 .s thermal flux goal of the advanced steady state neutron source, and upgrading could provide higher steady state fluxes. The relatively low ion energy compared to other spallation sources has an important impact on R and D requirements as well as capital cost, for which a range of $300-450M is estimated by comparison to other accelerator-based neutron source facilities. The source is similar to a reactor source in most respects. It has some higher energy neutrons but fewer gamma rays, and the moderator region is free of many of the design constraints of a reactor, which helps to implement sources for various neutron energy spectra, many beam tubes, etc. With the development of multi-beam concept and the basis for currents greater than 100 mA that is assumed in the R and D plan, the ABNR would serve many additional uses, such as fusion materials development, production of proton-rich isotopes, and other energy and defense program needs

  15. Fusion reactor development: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    This paper is a review of the current prospects for fusion reactor development based upon the present status in plasma physics research, fusion technology development and reactor conceptual design for the tokamak magnetic confinement concept. Recent advances in tokamak plasma research and fusion technology development are summarized. The direction and conclusions of tokamak reactor conceptual design are discussed. The status of alternate magnetic confinement concept research is reviewed briefly. A feasible timetable for the development of fusion reactors is presented

  16. Fusion reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1989-01-01

    This paper discuses the following topics on fusion reactor materials: irradiation, facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; fundamental mechanical behavior; radiation effects; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials; and ceramics.

  17. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This paper discuses the following topics on fusion reactor materials: irradiation, facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; fundamental mechanical behavior; radiation effects; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials; and ceramics

  18. Fusion reactor wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    The fusion reactor currently is being developed as a clean source of electricity with an essentially infinite source of fuel. These reactors are visualized as using a fusion reaction to generate large quantities of high temperature energy which can be used as process heat or for the generation of electricity. The energy would be created primarily as the kinetic energy of neutrons or other reaction products. Neutron energy could be converted to high-temperature heat by moderation and capture of the neutrons. The energy of other reaction products could be converted to high-temperature heat by capture, or directly to electricity by direct conversion electrostatic equipment. An analysis to determine the wastes released as a result of operation of fusion power plants is presented

  19. Fusion reactor problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carruthers, R.

    It is pointed out that plasma parameters for a fusion reactor have been fairly accurately defined for many years, and the real plasma physics objective must be to find the means of achieving and maintaining these specifiable parameters. There is good understanding of the generic technological problems: breading blankets and shields, radiation damage, heat transfer and methods of magnet design. The required plasma parameters for fusion self-heated reactors are established at ntausub(E) approximately 2.10 14 cm -3 sec, plasma radius 1.5 to 3 m, wall loading 5 to 10 MW cm -2 , temperature 15 keV. Within this model plasma control by quasi-steady burn as a key problem is studied. It is emphasized that the future programme must interact more closely with engineering studies and should concentrate upon research which is relevant to reactor plasmas. (V.P.)

  20. Tritium permeation in fusion reactors: INTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baskes, M.I.; Bauer, W.; Kerst, R.A.; Swansiger, W.A.; Wilson, K.L.

    1981-12-01

    Tritium permeation through the first wall of advanced fusion reactors is examined. A fraction of the D-T which bombards the first wall as charge exchange neutral particles will permeate through the first wall and enter the coolant. Calculations of the steady state permeation rate for the US INTOR Tokamak design result in values of less than or equal to 0.002 grams of tritium per day under the most favorable conditions. For unfavorable surface conditions the rate is greater than or equal to 0.1 g/day. The magnitude of these permeation rates is critically dependent on the temperatures and surface conditions of the wall. The introduction of permeation barriers at the wall-coolant interface can significantly reduce permeation rates and hence may be desirable for reactor applications

  1. Fusion reactor pumped laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear pumped laser is described comprising: a toroidal fusion reactor, the reactor generating energetic neutrons; an annular gas cell disposed around the outer periphery of the reactor, the cell including an annular reflecting mirror disposed at the bottom of the cell and an annular output window disposed at the top of the cell; a gas lasing medium disposed within the annular cell for generating output laser radiation; neutron reflector material means disposed around the annular cell for reflecting neutrons incident thereon back into the gas cell; neutron moderator material means disposed between the reactor and the gas cell and between the gas cell and the neutron reflector material for moderating the energy of energetic neutrons from the reactor; converting means for converting energy from the moderated neutrons to energy pumping means for pumping the gas lasing medium; and beam compactor means for receiving output laser radiation from the annular output window and generating a single output laser beam therefrom

  2. Mirror Fusion Test Facility: an intermediate device to a mirror fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpenko, V.N.

    1983-01-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) now under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory represents more than an order-of-magnitude step from earlier magnetic-mirror experiments toward a future mirror fusion reactor. In fact, when the device begins operating in 1986, the Lawson criteria of ntau = 10 14 cm -3 .s will almost be achieved for D-T equivalent operation, thus signifying scientific breakeven. Major steps have been taken to develop MFTF-B technologies for tandem mirrors. Steady-state, high-field, superconducting magnets at reactor-revelant scales are used in the machine. The 30-s beam pulses, ECRH, and ICRH will also introduce steady-state technologies in those systems

  3. Advanced fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Yukihiro

    2003-01-01

    The main subjects on fusion research are now on D-T fueled fusion, mainly due to its high fusion reaction rate. However, many issues are still remained on the wall loading by the 14 MeV neutrons. In the case of D-D fueled fusion, the neutron wall loading is still remained, though the technology related to tritium breeding is not needed. The p- 6 Li and p- 11 B fueled fusions are not estimated to be the next generation candidate until the innovated plasma confinement technologies come in useful to achieve the high performance plasma parameters. The fusion reactor of D- 3 He fuels has merits on the smaller neutron wall loading and tritium handling. However, there are difficulties on achieving the high temperature plasma more than 100 keV. Furthermore the high beta plasma is needed to decrease synchrotron radiation loss. In addition, the efficiency of the direct energy conversion from protons coming out from fusion reaction is one of the key parameters in keeping overall power balance. Therefore, open magnetic filed lines should surround the plasma column. In this paper, we outlined the design of the commercial base reactor (ARTEMIS) of 1 GW electric output power configured by D- 3 He fueled FRC (Field Reversed Configuration). The ARTEMIS needs 64 kg of 3 He per a year. On the other hand, 1 million tons of 3 He is estimated to be in the moon. The 3 He of about 10 23 kg are to exist in gaseous planets such as Jupiter and Saturn. (Y. Tanaka)

  4. Advanced fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomita, Yukihiro [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2003-04-01

    The main subjects on fusion research are now on D-T fueled fusion, mainly due to its high fusion reaction rate. However, many issues are still remained on the wall loading by the 14 MeV neutrons. In the case of D-D fueled fusion, the neutron wall loading is still remained, though the technology related to tritium breeding is not needed. The p-{sup 6}Li and p-{sup 11}B fueled fusions are not estimated to be the next generation candidate until the innovated plasma confinement technologies come in useful to achieve the high performance plasma parameters. The fusion reactor of D-{sup 3}He fuels has merits on the smaller neutron wall loading and tritium handling. However, there are difficulties on achieving the high temperature plasma more than 100 keV. Furthermore the high beta plasma is needed to decrease synchrotron radiation loss. In addition, the efficiency of the direct energy conversion from protons coming out from fusion reaction is one of the key parameters in keeping overall power balance. Therefore, open magnetic filed lines should surround the plasma column. In this paper, we outlined the design of the commercial base reactor (ARTEMIS) of 1 GW electric output power configured by D-{sup 3}He fueled FRC (Field Reversed Configuration). The ARTEMIS needs 64 kg of {sup 3}He per a year. On the other hand, 1 million tons of {sup 3}He is estimated to be in the moon. The {sup 3}He of about 10{sup 23} kg are to exist in gaseous planets such as Jupiter and Saturn. (Y. Tanaka)

  5. Inertial fusion reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, W.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, a variety of reactor concepts are proposed. One of the prime concerns is dealing with the x-rays and debris that are emitted by the target. Internal neutron shielding can reduce radiation damage and activation, leading to longer life systems, reduced activation and fewer safety concerns. There is really no consensus on what the best reactor concept is at this point. There has been virtually no chamber technology development to date. This is the flip side of the coin of the separability of the target physics and the reactor design. Since reactor technology has not been required to do target experiments, it's not being developed. Economic analysis of conceptual designs indicates that ICF can be economically competitive with magnetic fusion, fission and fossil plants

  6. Advanced spheromak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.

    1996-01-01

    The spheromak has no toroidal magnetic field coils or other structure along its geometric axis, and is thus more attractive than the leading magnetic fusion reactor concept, the tokamak. As a consequence of this and other attributes, the spheromak reactor may be compact and produce a power density sufficiently high to warrant consideration of a liquid 'blanket' that breeds tritium, converts neutron kinetic energy to heat, and protects the reactor vessel from severe neutron damage. However, the physics is more complex, so that considerable research is required to learn how to achieve the reactor potential. Critical physics problems and possible ways of solving them are described. The opportunities and issues associated with a possible liquid wall are considered to direct future research

  7. A model for steady-state and transient determination of subcooled boiling for calculations coupling a thermohydraulic and a neutron physics calculation program for reactor core calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, R.G.

    1987-06-01

    Due to the strong influence of vapour bubbles on the nuclear chain reaction, an exact calculation of neutron physics and thermal hydraulics in light water reactors requires consideration of subcooled boiling. To this purpose, in the present study a dynamic model is derived from the time-dependent conservation equations. It contains new methods for the time-dependent determination of evaporation and condensation heat flow and for the heat transfer coefficient in subcooled boiling. Furthermore, it enables the complete two-phase flow region to be treated in a consistent manner. The calculation model was verified using measured data of experiments covering a wide range of thermodynamic boundary conditions. In all cases very good agreement was reached. The results from the coupling of the new calculation model with a neutron kinetics program proved its suitability for the steady-state and transient calculation of reactor cores. (orig.) [de

  8. The spheromak as a compact fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1987-03-01

    After summarizing the economic and utility-based rationale for compact, higher-power-density fusion reactors, the gun-sustained spheromak concept is explored as one of a number of poloidal-field-dominated confinement configurations that might improve the prospects for economically attractive and operationally simplified fusion power plants. Using a comprehensive physics/engineering/costing model for the spheromak, guided by realistic engineering constraints and physics extrapolation, a range of cost-optimized reactor design points is presented, and the sensitivity of cost to key physics, engineering, and operational variables is reported. The results presented herein provide the basis for conceptual engineering designs of key fusion-power-core (FPC) subsystems and more detailed plasma modeling of this promising, high mass-power-density concept, which stresses single-piece FPC maintenance, steady-state current drive through electrostatic magnetic helicity injection, a simplified co-axial electrode-divertor, and efficient resistive-coal equilibrium-field coils. The optimal FPC size and the cost estimates project a system that competes aggressively with the best offered by alternative energy sources while simplifying considerably the complexity that has generally been associated with most approaches to magnetic fusion energy

  9. The spheromak as a compact fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1987-03-01

    After summarizing the economic and utility-based rationale for compact, higher-power-density fusion reactors, the gun-sustained spheromak concept is explored as one of a number of poloidal-field-dominated confinement configurations that might improve the prospects for economically attractive and operationally simplified fusion power plants. Using a comprehensive physics/engineering/costing model for the spheromak, guided by realistic engineering constraints and physics extrapolation, a range of cost-optimized reactor design points is presented, and the sensitivity of cost to key physics, engineering, and operational variables is reported. The results presented herein provide the basis for conceptual engineering designs of key fusion-power-core (FPC) subsystems and more detailed plasma modeling of this promising, high mass-power-density concept, which stresses single-piece FPC maintenance, steady-state current drive through electrostatic magnetic helicity injection, a simplified co-axial electrode-divertor, and efficient resistive-coal equilibrium-field coils. The optimal FPC size and the cost estimates project a system that competes aggressively with the best offered by alternative energy sources while simplifying considerably the complexity that has generally been associated with most approaches to magnetic fusion energy.

  10. Materials needs for compact fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    The economic prospects for magnetic fusion energy can be dramatically improved if for the same total power output the fusion neutron first-wall (FW) loading and the system power density can be increased by factors of 3 to 5 and 10 to 30, respectively. A number of compact fusion reactor embodiments have been proposed, all of which would operate with increased FW loadings, would use thin (0.5 to 0.6 m) blankets, and would confine quasi-steady-state plasma with resistive, water-cooled copper or aluminum coils. Increased system power density (5 to 15 MWt/m 3 versus 0.3 to 0.5 MW/m 3 ), considerably reduced physical size of the fusion power core (FPC), and appreciably reduced economic leverage exerted by the FPC and associated physics result. The unique materials requirements anticipated for these compact reactors are outlined against the well documented backdrop provided by similar needs for the mainline approaches. Surprisingly, no single materials need that is unique to the compact systems is identified; crucial uncertainties for the compact approaches must also be addressed by the mainline approaches, particularly for in-vacuum components (FWs, limiters, divertors, etc.)

  11. Long-term ammonia removal in a coconut fiber-packed biofilter: analysis of N fractionation and reactor performance under steady-state and transient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquerizo, Guillermo; Maestre, Juan P; Machado, Vinicius C; Gamisans, Xavier; Gabriel, David

    2009-05-01

    A comprehensive study of long-term ammonia removal in a biofilter packed with coconut fiber is presented under both steady-state and transient conditions. Low and high ammonia loads were applied to the reactor by varying the inlet ammonia concentration from 90 to 260 ppm(v) and gas contact times ranging from 20 to 36 s. Gas samples and leachate measurements were periodically analyzed and used for characterizing biofilter performance in terms of removal efficiency (RE) and elimination capacity (EC). Also, N fractions in the leachate were quantified to both identify the experimental rates of nitritation and nitratation and to determine the N leachate distribution. Results showed stratification in the biofilter activity and, thus, most of the NH(3) removal was performed in the lower part of the reactor. An average EC of 0.5 kg N-NH(3)m(-3)d(-1) was obtained for the whole reactor with a maximum local average EC of 1.7 kg N-NH(3)m(-3)d(-1). Leachate analyses showed that a ratio of 1:1 of ammonium and nitrate ions in the leachate was obtained throughout steady-state operation at low ammonia loads with similar values for nitritation and nitratation rates. Low nitratation rates during high ammonia load periods occurred because large amounts of ammonium and nitrite accumulated in the packed bed, thus causing inhibition episodes on nitrite-oxidizing bacteria due to free ammonia accumulation. Mass balances showed that 50% of the ammonia fed to the reactor was oxidized to either nitrite or nitrate and the rest was recovered as ammonium indicating that sorption processes play a fundamental role in the treatment of ammonia by biofiltration.

  12. Probability analysis of WWER-1000 fuel elements behavior under steady-state, transient and accident conditions of reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tutnov, A.; Alexeev, E.

    2001-01-01

    'PULSAR-2' and 'PULSAR+' codes make it possible to simulate thermo-mechanical and thermo-physical parameters of WWER fuel elements. The probabilistic approach is used instead of traditional deterministic one to carry out a sensitive study of fuel element behavior under steady-state operation mode. Fuel elements initial parameters are given as a density of the probability distributions. Calculations are provided for all possible combinations of initial data as fuel-cladding gap, fuel density and gas pressure. Dividing values of these parameters to intervals final variants for calculations are obtained . Intervals of permissible fuel-cladding gap size have been divided to 10 equal parts, fuel density and gas pressure - to 5 parts. Probability of each variant realization is determined by multiplying the probabilities of separate parameters, because the tolerances of these parameters are distributed independently. Simulation results are turn out in the probabilistic bar charts. The charts present probability distribution of the changes in fuel outer diameter, hoop stress kinetics and fuel temperature versus irradiation time. A normative safety factor is introduced for control of any criterion realization and for determination of a reserve to the criteria failure. A probabilistic analysis of fuel element behavior under Reactivity Initiating Accident (RIA) is also performed and probability fuel element depressurization under hypothetical RIA is presented

  13. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moons, F.

    1998-01-01

    SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials includes studies (1) to investigate fracture mechanics of neutron-irradiated beryllium; (2) to describe the helium behaviour in irradiated beryllium at atomic scale; (3) to define the kinetics of beryllium reacting with air or steam; (3) to perform a feasibility study for the testing of integrated blanket modules under neutron irradiation. Progress and achievements in 1997 are reported

  14. Steady-state operation of magnetic fusion devices: Plasma control and plasma facing components. Report on the IAEA technical committee meeting held at Fukuoka, 25-29 October 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelmann, F.

    2000-01-01

    An IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Steady-State Operation of Magnetic Fusion Devices - Plasma Control and Plasma Facing Components was held at Fukuoka, Japan, from 25 to 29 October 1999. The meeting was the second IAEA Techical Committee Meeting on the subject, following the one held at Hefei, China, a year earlier. The meeting was attended by over 150 researchers from 10 countries

  15. Steady-state plasma and reactor parameters for elliptical cross section tokamaks with very large power ratings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usher, J.L.; Powell, J.R.

    1975-06-01

    In previous studies only circular cross section reactor plasmas were considered. The purpose of this research is to examine the effects of elliptical plasma cross sections. Several technological benefits have been determined. Maximum magnetic field strength requirements are 30 to 65 percent less than for 5000 MW (th) reactors and may be as much as 40 percent less than for circular cross section reactors of comparable size. Very large n tau values are found (10 15 to 10 17 sec/cm 3 ), which produce large burn-up fractions (15 to 60 percent). There is relatively little problem with impurity build-up. Long confinement times (60 to 500 seconds) are found. Finally, the elliptical cross section reactors exhibit a major toroidal radius reduction of as large as 30 percent over circular reactors operating at comparable power levels

  16. Material for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abhishek, Anuj; Ranjan, Prem

    2011-01-01

    To make nuclear fusion power a reality, the scientists are working restlessly to find the materials which can confine the power generated by the fusion of two atomic nuclei. A little success in this field has been achieved, though there are still miles to go. Fusion reaction is a special kind of reaction which must occur at very high density and temperature to develop extremely large amount of energy, which is very hard to control and confine within using the present techniques. As a whole it requires the physical condition that rarely exists on the earth to carry out in an efficient manner. As per the growing demand and present scenario of the world energy, scientists are working round the clock to make effective fusion reactions to real. In this paper the work presently going on is considered in this regard. The progress of the Joint European Torus 2010, ITER 2005, HiPER and minor works have been studied to make the paper more object oriented. A detailed study of the technological and material requirement has been discussed in the paper and a possible suggestion is provided to make a contribution in the field of building first ever nuclear fusion reactor

  17. Radioactivity computation of steady-state and pulsed fusion reactors operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attaya, H.

    1994-11-01

    The International Thermonuclear Report (ITER) is expected to operate in a pulsed operational mode. Accurate radioactivity calculations, that take into account this mode of operation, are required in order to determine precisely the different safety aspects of ITER. The authors previous examined analytically the effect of pulsed operation in ITER and showed how it depends on the burn time, the dwell time, and the half-lives. That analysis showed also that for ITER's low duty factor, using the continuous operation assumption would considerably overestimate the radioactivities, for a wide range of half-lives. At the same time, the large improvements in the quality and the quantity of the decay and the cross-section data libraries has considerably increased the computation times of the radioactivity calculations. For both reasons it is imperative to seek different methods of solution that reduce the computational time and can be easily adopted to the treatment of the pulsed operation. In this work, they have developed algorithms based on several mathematical methods that were chosen based on their generality, reliability, stability, accuracy, and efficiency. These methods are the matrix Schuer decomposition, the eigenvector decomposition, and the Pade approximation for the matrix exponential functions

  18. Design considerations for a steady state fusion reactor's thermal energy dump (TED) with emphasis on SAFFIRE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werley, K.A.

    1980-01-01

    This work examines the use of a thermal dump to handle the severe particle and energy handling requirements of a diverted plasma. We outline a general approach for evaluating the design parameters and limitations of a thermal dump, considering such things as thermomechanical and erosion effects, compatibility, availability, machinability, coolant recirculation, vacuum pumping, economics, lifetime, etc. To demonstrate how the performance requirements are reflected in design decisions, we apply a solid-walled dump to a small-sized field reversed mirror (FRM). We also examine a liquid-lithium droplet thermal dump and point out some distinct advantages of this new concept over the solid-wall design in reducing stress, erosion, and vacuum pumping problems. The chief disadvantages of this scheme include liquid-metal safe-handling problems, vapor pressure-temperature limitations, and the need for differential pumping if T/sub Li/ > 310 0 C is desired

  19. On steady-state concentrations of ammonia and molecular hydrogen in the primary circuit of the WWER-1000 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkhipov, O.P.; Bugaenko, V.L.; Kamakchi, S.A.

    1997-01-01

    It is shown that the MORAVA-N2 software package describes well the coolant state in the primary circuit of an actual reactor facility with the WWER-1000 during on-load operation. It permits using the package for analysis of process perturbation effect on the coolant composition. Specific feature of ammonia radiation chemistry in the primary circuit of a reactor facility with the WWER-1000, assuring the rates hydrogen concentration in the coolant with ammonia concentration variation in the coolant within wide limits, when reactor operates on power, can be mentioned by way of example, the fact being ascertained in this study

  20. The ITER fusion reactor and its role in the development of a fusion power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLean, A.

    2002-01-01

    Energy from nuclear fusion is the future source of sustained, full life-cycle environmentally benign, intrinsically safe, base-load power production. The nuclear fusion process powers our sun, innumerable other stars in the sky, and some day, it will power the Earth, its cities and our homes. The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, ITER, represents the next step toward fulfilling that promise. ITER will be a test bed for key steppingstones toward engineering feasibility of a demonstration fusion power plant (DEMO) in a single experimental step. It will establish the physics basis for steady state Tokamak magnetic containment fusion reactors to follow it, exploring ion temperature, plasma density and containment time regimes beyond the breakeven power condition, and culminating in experimental fusion self-ignition. (author)

  1. COOLOD-N: a computer code, for the analyses of steady-state thermal-hydraulics in plate-type research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminaga, Masanori

    1990-02-01

    The COOLOD-N code provides a capability for the analysis of the steady-state thermal-hydraulics of research reactors in which plate-type fuel is employed. This code is revised version of the COOLOD code, and is applicable not only to a forced convection cooling mode, but also to a natural convection cooling mode. In the code, a function to calculate flow rate under a natural convection, and a heat transfer package which was a subroutine program to calculate heat transfer coefficient, ONB temperature and DNB heat flux, and was especially developed for the upgraded JRR-3, have been newly added to the COOLOD code. The COOLOD-N code also has a capability of calculating the heat flux at onset of flow instability as well as DNB heat flux. (author)

  2. Progress and prospect of true steady state operation with RF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquinot Jean

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Operation of fusion confinement experiments in full steady state is a major challenge for the development towards fusion energy. Critical to achieving this goal is the availability of actively cooled plasma facing components and auxiliary systems withstanding the very harsh plasma environment. Equally challenging are physics issues related to achieving plasma conditions and current drive efficiency required by reactor plasmas. RF heating and current drive systems have been key instruments for obtaining the progress made until today towards steady state. They hold all the records of long pulse plasma operation both in tokamaks and in stellarators. Nevertheless much progress remains to be made in particular for integrating all the requirements necessary for maintaining in steady state the density and plasma pressure conditions of a reactor. This is an important stated aim of ITER and of devices equipped with superconducting magnets. After considering the present state of the art, this review will address the key issues which remain to be solved both in physics and technology for reaching this goal. They constitute very active subjects of research which will require much dedicated experimentation in the new generation of superconducting devices which are now in operation or becoming close to it.

  3. Directions for improved fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.; Delene, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    Conceptual fusion reactor studies over the past 10 to 15 years have projected systems that may be too large, complex, and costly to be of commercial interest. One main direction for improved fusion reactors points towards smaller, higher-power-density approaches. First-order economic issues (i.e., unit direct cost and cost of electricity) are used to support the need for more compact fusion reactors. A generic fusion physics/engineering/costing model is used to provide a quantiative basis for these arguments for specific fusion concepts

  4. Fusion reactor fuel processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.F.

    1972-06-01

    For thermonuclear power reactors based on the continuous fusion of deuterium and tritium the principal fuel processing problems occur in maintaining desired compositions in the primary fuel cycled through the reactor, in the recovery of tritium bred in the blanket surrounding the reactor, and in the prevention of tritium loss to the environment. Since all fuel recycled through the reactor must be cooled to cryogenic conditions for reinjection into the reactor, cryogenic fractional distillation is a likely process for controlling the primary fuel stream composition. Another practical possibility is the permeation of the hydrogen isotopes through thin metal membranes. The removal of tritium from the ash discharged from the power system would be accomplished by chemical procedures to assure physiologically safe concentration levels. The recovery process for tritium from the breeder blanket depends on the nature of the blanket fluids. For molten lithium the only practicable possibility appears to be permeation from the liquid phase. For molten salts the process would involve stripping with inert gas followed by chemical recovery. In either case extremely low concentrations of tritium in the melts would be desirable to maintain low tritium inventories, and to minimize escape of tritium through unwanted permeation, and to avoid embrittlement of metal walls. 21 refs

  5. Coatings for fusion reactor environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattox, D.M.

    1979-01-01

    The internal surfaces of a tokamak fusion reactor control the impurity injection and gas recycling into the fusion plasma. Coating of internal surfaces may provide a desirable and possibly necessary design flexibility for achieving the temperatures, ion densities and containment times necessary for net energy production from fusion reactions to take place. In this paper the reactor environments seen by various componentare reviewed along with possible materials responses. Characteristics of coating-substrate systems, important to fusion applications, are delineated and the present status of coating development for fusion applications is reviewed. Coating development for fusion applications is just beginning and poses a unique and important challenge for materials development

  6. Steady state thermal hydraulic analysis of a boiling water reactor core, for various power distributions, using computer code THABNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkat Raj, V.; Saha, D.

    1976-01-01

    The core of a boiling water reactor may see different power distributions during its operational life. How some of the typical power distributions affect some of the thermal hydraulic parameters such as pressure drop minimum critical heat flux ratio, void distribution etc. has been studied using computer code THABNA. The effect of an increase in the leakage flow has also been analysed. (author)

  7. Technology and physics in the Tokamak Program: The need for an integrated, steady-state RandD tokamak experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    The Steady-state Tokamak (STE) Experiment is a proposed superconducting-coil, hydrogen-plasma tokamak device intended to address the integrated non-nuclear issues of steady state, high-power tokamak physics and technology. Such a facility has been called for in the US program plan for the mid 1990's, and will play a unique role in the world-wide fusion effort. Information from STE on steady-state current drive, plasma control, and high power technology will contribute significantly to the operating capabilities of future steady-state devices. This paper reviews preliminary designs and expected technological contributions to the US and world fusion reactor research from each of the above mentioned reactor systems. This document is intended as a proposal and feasibility discussion and does not include exhaustive technical reviews. 12 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Steady-state thermal-hydraulic analysis of the pellet-bed reactor for nuclear thermal propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Morley, N.J.; Yang, J.Y.

    1992-01-01

    The pellet-bed reactor (PBR) for nuclear thermal propulsion is a hydrogen-cooled, BeO-reflected, fast reactor, consisting of an annular core region filled with randomly packed, spherical fuel pellets. The fuel pellets in the PBR are self-supported, eliminating the need for internal core structure, which simplifies the core design and reduces the size and mass of the reactor. Each spherical fuel pellet is composed of hundreds of fuel microspheres embedded in a zirconium carbide (ZrC) matrix. Each fuel microsphere is composed of a UC-NbC fuel kernel surrounded by two consecutive layers of the NbC and ZrC. Gaseous hydrogen serves both as core coolant and as the propellant for the PBR rocket engine. The cold hydrogen flows axially down the inlet channel situated between the core and the external BeO reflector and radially through the orifices in the cold frit, the core, and the orifices in the hot frit. Finally, the hot hydrogen flows axially out the central channel and exits through converging-diverging nozzle. A thermal-hydraulic analysis of the PBR core was performed with an emphasis on optimizing the size and axial distribution of the orifices in the hot and cold frits to ensure that hot spots would not develop in the core during full-power operation. Also investigated was the validity of the assumptions of neglecting the axial conduction and axial cross flow in the core

  9. Steady State Simulation of Two-Gas Phase Fluidized Bed Reactors in Series for Producing Linear Low Density Polyethylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Farhangiyan Kashani

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE production process, including two- fuidized bed reactors in series (FBRS and other process equipment, was completely simulated by Aspen Polymer Plus software. Fluidized bed reactors were considered as continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR consisted of polymer and gas phases. POLY-SRK and NRTL-RK equations of state were used to describe polymer and non-polymer streams, respectively. In this simulation, a kinetic model, based on a double active site heterogeneous Ziegler-Natta catalyst was used for simulation of LLDPE process consisting of two FBRS. Simulator using this model has the capability to  predict a number of  principal characteristics of LLDPE such as melt fow index (MFI, density, polydispersity index, numerical and weight average molecular weights (Mn,Mw and copolymer molar fraction (SFRAC. The results of the simulation were compared with industrial plant data and a good agreement was observed between the predicted model and plant data. The simulation results show the relative error of about 0.59% for prediction of polymer mass fow and 2.67% and 0.04% for prediction of product MFI and density, respectively.

  10. Steady state investigation on neutronics of a molten salt reactor considering the flow effect of fuel salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Dalin; Qiu Suizheng; Su Guanghui; Liu Changliang

    2008-01-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR), one of the 'Generation IV' concepts, is a liquid-fuel reactor, which is different from the conventional reactors using solid fissile materials due to the flow effect of fuel salt. The study on its neutronics considering the fuel salt flow, which is the base of the thermal-hydraulic calculation and safety analysis, must be done. In this paper, the theoretical model on neutronics under steady condition for a single-liquid-fueled MSR is conducted and calculated by numerical method. The neutronics model consists of two group neutron diffusion equations for fast and thermal neutron fluxes, and balance equations for six-group delayed neutron precursors considering the flow effect of fuel salt. The spatial discretization of the above models is based on the finite volume method, and the discretization equations are computed by the source iteration method. The distributions of neutron fluxes and the distributions of the delayed neutron precursors in the core are obtained. The numerical calculated results show that, the fuel salt flow has little effect on the distribution of fast and thermal neutron fluxes and the effective multiplication factor; however, it affects the distribution of the delayed neutron precursors significantly, especially the long-lived one. In addition, it could be found that the delayed neutron precursors influence the neutronics slightly under the steady condition. (authors)

  11. Steady state investigation on neutronics of a molten salt reactor considering the flow effect of fuel salt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Da-Lin; QIU Sui-Zheng; LIU Chang-Liang; SU Guang-Hui

    2008-01-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR),one of the‘Generation Ⅳ'concepts,is a liquid-fuel reactor,which is different from the conventional reactors using solid fissile materials due to the flow effect of fuel salt.The study on its neutronice considering the fuel salt flow,which is the base of the thermal-hydraulic calculation and safety analysis,must be done.In this paper,the theoretical model on neutronics under steady condition for a single-liquid-fueled MSR is conducted and calculated by numerical method.The neutronics model consists of two group neutron diffusion equations for fast and thermal neutron fluxes,and balance equations for six-group delayed neutron precursors considering the flow effect of fuel salt. The spatial discretization of the above models is based on the finite volume method,and the discretization equations are computed by the source iteration method.The distributions of neutron fluxes and the distributions of the delayed neutron precursors in the core are obtained.The numerical calculated results show that,the fuel salt flow has little effect on the distribution of fast and thermal neutron fluxes and the effective multiplication factor;however,it affects the distribution of the delayed neutron precursors significantly,especially the long-lived one.In addition,it could be found that the delayed neutron precursors influence the nentronics slightly under the steady condition.

  12. Numerical investigation of the 3-dimensional steady-state temperature- and flow distribution in the core of a pebble bed high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verfondern, K.

    1983-01-01

    This work presents a computer model determining the steady-state temperature- and flow field in 3 dimensions in the core of a pebble bed high temperature reactor. The numerical sprinkler method, basind on the Thermix-model, allows to describe the thermo-hydraulics of a non-rotational-symmetric core-geometry. The AVR-reactor in Juelich, in operation since 1967, represents a suitable investigation-object for the computer model of Thermix-3D. It is in a 3D-mesh-structure to reproduce very precisely the so called ''graphite noses'', in which the shut-down rods are conducted as well as the filling cones in the inner and outer area. The results of the final calculation of the normal operation condition for the AVR-reactor unambiguously show, that within the core reproduced in 3 dimensions there are evident deviations in the flow profile and in the temperatures of the cooling gas in contrast to a 2D-handling. (orig.) [de

  13. Prokaryotic diversity and dynamics in a full-scale municipal solid waste anaerobic reactor from start-up to steady-state conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinali-Rezende, Juliana; Colturato, Luís F D B; Colturato, Thiago D B; Chartone-Souza, Edmar; Nascimento, Andréa M A; Sanz, José L

    2012-09-01

    The prokaryotic diversity of an anaerobic reactor for the treatment of municipal solid waste was investigated over the course of 2 years with the use of 16S rDNA-targeted molecular approaches. The fermentative Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes predominated, and Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Tenericutes and the candidate division WWE1 were also identified. Methane production was dominated by the hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales (Methanoculleus sp.) and their syntrophic association with acetate-utilizing and propionate-oxidizing bacteria. qPCR demonstrated the predominance of the hydrogenotrophic over aceticlastic Methanosarcinaceae (Methanosarcina sp. and Methanimicrococcus sp.), and Methanosaetaceae (Methanosaeta sp.) were measured in low numbers in the reactor. According to the FISH and CARD-FISH analyses, Bacteria and Archaea accounted for 85% and 15% of the cells, respectively. Different cell counts for these domains were obtained by qPCR versus FISH analyses. The use of several molecular tools increases our knowledge of the prokaryotic community dynamics from start-up to steady-state conditions in a full-scale MSW reactor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Parameter study toward economical magnetic fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Tomoaki; Okano, Kunihiko; Nanahara, Toshiya; Hatayama, Akiyoshi; Yamaji, Kenji; Takuma, Tadashi.

    1996-01-01

    Although the R and D of nuclear fusion reactors has made a steady progress as seen in ITER project, it has become of little doubt that fusion power reactors require hugeness and enormous amount of construction cost as well as surmounting the physics and engineering difficulties. Therefore, it is one of the essential issues to investigate the prospect of realizing fusion power reactors. In this report we investigated the effects of physics and engineering improvements on the economics of ITER-like steady state tokamak fusion reactors using our tokamak system and costing analysis code. With the results of this study, we considered what is the most significant factor for realizing economical competitive fusion reactors. The results show that with the conventional TF coil maximum field (12T), physics progress in β-value (or Troyon coefficient) has the most considerable effect on the reduction of fusion plant COE (Cost of Electricity) while the achievement of H factor = 2-3 and neutron wall load =∼5MW/m 2 is necessary. The results also show that with the improvement of TF coil maximum field, reactors with a high aspect ratio are economically advantageous because of low plasma current driving power while the improvement of current density in the conductors and yield strength of support structures is indispensable. (author)

  15. Fusion-fission hybrid reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter discusses the range of characteristics attainable from hybrid reactor blankets; blanket design considerations; hybrid reactor designs; alternative fuel hybrid reactors; multi-purpose hybrid reactors; and hybrid reactors and the energy economy. Hybrid reactors are driven by a fusion neutron source and include fertile and/or fissile material. The fusion component provides a copious source of fusion neutrons which interact with a subcritical fission component located adjacent to the plasma or pellet chamber. Fissile fuel and/or energy are the main products of hybrid reactors. Topics include high F/M blankets, the fissile (and tritium) breeding ratio, effects of composition on blanket properties, geometrical considerations, power density and first wall loading, variations of blanket properties with irradiation, thermal-hydraulic and mechanical design considerations, safety considerations, tokamak hybrid reactors, tandem-mirror hybrid reactors, inertial confinement hybrid reactors, fusion neutron sources, fissile-fuel and energy production ability, simultaneous production of combustible and fissile fuels, fusion reactors for waste transmutation and fissile breeding, nuclear pumped laser hybrid reactors, Hybrid Fuel Factories (HFFs), and scenarios for hybrid contribution. The appendix offers hybrid reactor fundamentals. Numerous references are provided

  16. Safety analysis on tokamak helium cooling slab fuel fusion-fission hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Renjie; Jian Hongbing

    1992-01-01

    The thermal analyses for steady state, depressurization and total loss of flow in the tokamak helium cooling slab fuel element fusion-fission hybrid reactor are presented. The design parameters, computed results of HYBRID program and safety evaluation for conception design are given. After all, it gives some recommendations for developing the design

  17. Radioisotope production in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engholm, B.A.; Cheng, E.T.; Schultz, K.R.

    1986-01-01

    Radioisotope production in fusion reactors is being investigated as part of the Fusion Applications and Market Evaluation (FAME) study. /sup 60/Co is the most promising such product identified to date, since the /sup 60/Co demand for medical and food sterilization is strong and the potential output from a fusion reactor is high. Some of the other radioisotopes considered are /sup 99/Tc, /sup 131/l, several Eu isotopes, and /sup 210/Po. Among the stable isotopes of interest are /sup 197/Au, /sup 103/Rh and Os. In all cases, heat or electricity can be co-produced from the fusion reactor, with overall attractive economics

  18. Experimental and theoretical comparison of fuel temperature and bulk coolant characteristics in the Oregon State TRIGA reactor during steady state operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcum, W.R., E-mail: marcumw@engr.orst.ed [Oregon State University, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, 116 Radiation Center, Corvallis, OR 97330 (United States); Woods, B.G.; Reese, S.R. [Oregon State University, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, 116 Radiation Center, Corvallis, OR 97330 (United States)

    2010-01-15

    In September of 2008 Oregon State University (OSU) completed its core conversion analysis as part of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program. Experimental bulk coolant temperatures were collected in various locations throughout the Oregon State TRIGA Reactor (OSTR) core in order to supplement the validity of the numerical thermal hydraulic results produced in RELAP5-3D Version 2.4.2. Axial bulk coolant temperature distributions were collected by acquiring discrete thermocouple measurements in individual subchannel locations during steady state operation at 1.0 MW{sub th}. The experimental axial temperature distribution collected was compared to one-channel, two-channel, and eight-channel RELAP5-3D models and found to match within 11.94%, 11.69%, and 8.78%, respectively, on average. Comparisons to similar studies were made based on a dimensional analysis of fluid body forces in the discrete core locations, indicating that the chosen approach produces conservative results for use in the OSTR safety analysis.

  19. The STAT7 Code for Statistical Propagation of Uncertainties In Steady-State Thermal Hydraulics Analysis of Plate-Fueled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Floyd E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hu, Lin-wen [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Nuclear Reactor Lab.; Wilson, Erik [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-12-01

    The STAT code was written to automate many of the steady-state thermal hydraulic safety calculations for the MIT research reactor, both for conversion of the reactor from high enrichment uranium fuel to low enrichment uranium fuel and for future fuel re-loads after the conversion. A Monte-Carlo statistical propagation approach is used to treat uncertainties in important parameters in the analysis. These safety calculations are ultimately intended to protect against high fuel plate temperatures due to critical heat flux or departure from nucleate boiling or onset of flow instability; but additional margin is obtained by basing the limiting safety settings on avoiding onset of nucleate boiling. STAT7 can simultaneously analyze all of the axial nodes of all of the fuel plates and all of the coolant channels for one stripe of a fuel element. The stripes run the length of the fuel, from the bottom to the top. Power splits are calculated for each axial node of each plate to determine how much of the power goes out each face of the plate. By running STAT7 multiple times, full core analysis has been performed by analyzing the margin to ONB for each axial node of each stripe of each plate of each element in the core.

  20. Hydrogen production in fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-11-01

    As one of methods of innovative energy production in fusion reactors without having a conventional turbine-type generator, an efficient use of radiation produced in a fusion reactor with utilizing semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas are studied. Taking the candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system for application of the new concepts, the expected efficiency and a concept of plant system are investigated. (author).

  1. Hydrogen production in fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-11-01

    As one of the methods of innovative energy production in fusion reactors (that do not include a conventional turbine-type generator), the efficient use of fusion-reactor radiation and semiconductors to supply clean fuel in the form of hydrogen gas is studied. Taking the reactor candidates such as a toroidal system and an open system for application of the new concepts, the expected efficiency and a plant system concept are investigated.

  2. Hydrogen production in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-11-01

    As one of methods of innovative energy production in fusion reactors without having a conventional turbine-type generator, an efficient use of radiation produced in a fusion reactor with utilizing semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas are studied. Taking the candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system for application of the new concepts, the expected efficiency and a concept of plant system are investigated. (author)

  3. Tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nohara, Kiyohiko

    2009-01-01

    The structural material is one of key issues for the development of reliable superconducting magnets and peripheral equipments of fusion reactors. Standard stainless steels like SUS 304 and 316 steels available at present do not meet requirements. We are developing a new austenitic steel that has proposed target properties named 'JAERI BOX'. Additions of N and V at different amounts were tested to improve strength and fracture toughness of a base alloy SUS316LN at 4.2 K. Mechanical properties of the developed steel were examined. It is found that the charpy absorbed energy and the fracture toughness of the developed steel at 4.2 K are within JAERI BOX. (T.I.)

  4. US-Japan workshop on field-reversed configurations with steady-state high-temperature fusion plasmas and the 11th US-Japan workshop on compact toroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, D.C.; Fernandez, J.C.; Rej, D.J.

    1990-05-01

    The US-Japan Workshop on Field-Reversed Configurations with Steady-State High-Temperature Fusion Plasma and the 11th US-Japan Workshop on Compact Toroids were held at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico on November 7--9, 1989. These proceedings contain the papers presented at the workshops as submitted by the authors. These papers have been indexed separately

  5. US-Japan workshop on field-reversed configurations with steady-state high-temperature fusion plasmas and the 11th US-Japan workshop on compact toroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, D.C.; Fernandez, J.C.; Rej, D.J. (comps.)

    1990-05-01

    The US-Japan Workshop on Field-Reversed Configurations with Steady-State High-Temperature Fusion Plasma and the 11th US-Japan Workshop on Compact Toroids were held at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico on November 7--9, 1989. These proceedings contain the papers presented at the workshops as submitted by the authors. These papers have been indexed separately.

  6. Steady-state spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarboe, T.R.

    1982-01-01

    A major effort is being made in the national program to make the operation of axisymmetric, toroidal confinement systems steady state by the application of expensive rf current drive. Described here is a method by which such a confinement system, the spheromak, can be refluxed indefinitely through the application of dc power. As a step towards dc sustainment we have operated the present CTX source in the slow source mode with a longer power application time (approx. 0.1 ms) and successfully generated long-lived spheromaks. If the erosion of the electrodes can be controlled as well as it is with MPD arcs then dc operation should be very clean. If only a small fraction (approx. 10% for an experiment) of the poloidal flux of the spheromak connects to the source then the dc sustainment can be very efficient. The amount of connecting flux that is necessary for sustainment needs to be determined experimentally

  7. Fusion reactor start-up without an external tritium source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, S., E-mail: Shanliang.Zheng@ccfe.ac.uk; King, D.B.; Garzotti, L.; Surrey, E.; Todd, T.N.

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Investigated the feasibility (including plasma physics, neutronics and economics) of starting a fusion reactor from running pure D–D fusion reactor to gradually move towards the D–T operation. • Proposed building up tritium from making use of neutrons generated by D–D fusion reactions. • Studied plasma physics feasibility for pure D–D operation and provided consistent fusion power and neutron yield in the plasma with different mixture of deuterium and tritium. • Discussed the economics aspect for operating a pure D–D fusion reactor towards a full-power D–T fusion reactor. - Abstract: It has long been recognised that the shortage of external tritium sources for fusion reactors using D–T, the most promising fusion fuel, requires all such fusion power plants (FPP) to breed their own tritium. It is also recognised that the initial start-up of a fusion reactor will require several kilograms of tritium within a scenario in which radioactive decay, ITER and subsequent demonstrator reactors are expected to have consumed most of the known tritium stockpile. To circumvent this tritium fuel shortage and ultimately achieve steady-state operation for a FPP, it is essential to first accumulate sufficient tritium to compensate for loss due to decay and significant retention in the materials in order to start a new FPP. In this work, we propose to accumulate tritium starting from D–D fusion reactions, since D exists naturally in water, and to gradually build up the D–T plasma targeted in fusion reactor designs. There are two likely D–D fusion reaction channels, (1) D + D → T + p, and (2) D + D → He3 + n. The tritium can be generated via the reaction channel ‘(1)’ and the 2.45 MeV neutrons from ‘(2)’ react with lithium-6 in the breeding blanket to produce more tritium to be fed back into plasma fuel. Quantitative evaluations are conducted for two blanket concepts to assess the feasibility and suitability of this approach to FPP

  8. Overview of fusion reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.; Crocker, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    Use of deuterium-tritium burning fusion reactors requires examination of several major safety and environmental issues: (1) tritium inventory control, (2) neutron activation of structural materials, fluid streams and reactor hall environment, (3) release of radioactivity from energy sources including lithium spill reactions, superconducting magnet stored energy release, and plasma disruptions, (4) high magnetic and electromagnetic fields associated with fusion reactor superconducting magnets and radio frequency heating devices, and (5) handling and disposal of radioactive waste. Early recognition of potential safety problems with fusion reactors provides the opportunity for improvement in design and materials to eliminate or greatly reduce these problems. With an early start in this endeavor, fusion should be among the lower risk technologies for generation of commercial electrical power

  9. Conceptual design of the SlimCS fusion DEMO reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobita, Kenji; Nishio, Satoshi; Enoeda, Mikio; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Hayashi, Takumi; Asakura, Nobuyuki; Utoh, Hiroyasu; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Nishitani, Takeo; Isono, Takaaki; Sakurai, Shinji; Kurita, Genichi; Hayashi, Takao; Oyama, Naoyuki; Liu Changle; Hamamatsu, Kiyotaka; Inoue, Takashi; Ozeki, Takahisa; Sato, Masayasu; Suzuki, Satoshi; Kawashima, Hisato; Ezato, Koichiro; Tsuru, Daigo; Koizumi, Norikiyo; Sakamoto, Keiji; Ando, Masami; Sakamoto, Yoshiteru; Shibama, Yusuke; Suzuki, Takahiro; Takechi, Manabu; Takahashi, Koji; Hirose, Takanori; Sato, Satoru; Nozawa, Takashi; Tanigawa, Hisashi; Kakudate, Satoshi; Kawamura, Yoshinori; Yamanishi, Toshihiko; Hoshino, Tsuyoshi; Ochiai, Kentaro; Ide, Shunsuke; Aiba, Nobuyuki; Shimizu, Katsuhiro; Honda, Mitsuru; Nakamichi, Masaru; Nishi, Hiroshi; Seki, Yoji; Nakamura, Yukiharu; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Yoshida, Tohru; Song Yuntao

    2010-08-01

    This report describes the results of the conceptual design study of the SlimCS fusion DEMO reactor aiming at demonstrating fusion power production in a plant scale and allowing to assess the economic prospects of a fusion power plant. The design study has focused on a compact and low aspect ratio tokamak reactor concept with a reduced-sized central solenoid, which is novel compared with previous tokamak reactor concept such as SSTR (Steady State Tokamak Reactor). Owing to low aspect ratio, the reactor will be capable of having comparatively high beta limit and high elongation (which can elevate the Greenwald density limit), having potential for high power density. The reactor has the main parameters of a major radius of 5.5 m, aspect ratio of 2.6, elongation of 2.0, normalized beta of 4.3, fusion out put of 2.95 GW and average neutron wall load of 3 MW/m 2 . This report covers various aspects of design study including systematic design, physics design, torus configuration, blanket, superconducting magnet, maintenance and building, which were carried out increase the engineering feasibility of the concept. (author)

  10. The ARIES tokamak fusion reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlit, J.R.; Bathke, C.G.; Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.; Beecraft, W.R.; Hogan, J.T.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Reid, R.L.; Strickler, D.J.; Whitson, J.C.; Blanchard, J.P.; Emmert, G.A.; Santarius, J.F.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Wittenberg, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    The ARIES study is a community effort to develop several visions of the tokamak as fusion power reactors. The aims are to determine their potential economics, safety, and environmental features and to identify physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving the best tokamak reactor. Three ARIES visions are planned, each having a different degree of extrapolation from the present data base in physics and technology. The ARIES-I design assumes a minimum extrapolation from current tokamak physics (e.g., 1st stability) and incorporates technological advances that can be available in the next 20 to 30 years. ARIES-II is a DT-burning tokamak in 2nd stability regime and employs both potential advances in the physics and expected advances in technology and engineering; and ARIES-III is a conceptual D 3 He reactor. This paper focuses on the ARIES-I design. Parametric systems studies show that the optimum 1st stability tokamak has relatively low plasma current (∼ 12 MA), high plasma aspect ratio (∼ 4-6), and high magnetic field (∼ 24 T at the coil). ARIES-I is 1,000 MWe (net) reactor with a plasma major radius of 6.5 m, a minor radius of 1.4 m, a neutron wall loading of about 2.8 MW/m 2 , and a mass power density of about 90 kWe/ton. The ARIES-I reactor operates at steady state using ICRF fast waves to drive current in the plasma core and lower-hybrid waves for edge-plasma current drive. The current-drive system supplements a significant (∼ 57%) bootstrap current contribution. The impurity control system is based on high-recycling poloidal divertors. Because of the high field and large Lorentz forces in the toroidal-field magnets, innovative approaches with high-strength materials and support structures are used. 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  11. Fusion reactors and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancox, R.

    1990-04-01

    Fusion power, based on the nuclear fusion of light elements to yield a net gain of energy, has the potential to extend the world's resources in a way which is environmentally attractive. Nevertheless, the easiest route to fusion - the reaction between deuterium and tritium - involves hazards from the use of tritium and the neutron activation of the structural materials. These hazards have been considered on the basis of simple conceptual reactor designs, both in relation to normal operation and decommissioning and to potential accident situations. Results from several studies are reviewed and suggest that fusion reactors appear to have an inherently lower environmental impact than fission reactors. However, the realization of this potential has yet to be demonstrated. (author)

  12. Technical issues in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohatgi, V.K.; Vijayan, T.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper the issues in fusion reactor technology are examined. Rapid progress in fusion technology research in recent years can be attributed to the advances in various technologies. The commercial generation of fusion power greatly depends on the evolution and improvements in these technologies. With better understanding of plasma physics, fusion reactor designs are becoming more and more realistic and comprehensive. It is now possible to compare various concepts within the framework of established technologies. The technological issues needing better understanding and solutions to problem areas are identified. Various instabilities and energy losses are major problem areas. Extensive developments in reactor-relevant advanced materials, compact and powerful superconducting magnets, high-power systems, and plasma heating drivers need to be undertaken and emphasized

  13. Polymer materials for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaoka, H.

    1993-01-01

    The radiation-resistant polymer materials have recently drawn much attention from the viewpoint of components for fusion reactors. These are mainly applied to electrical insulators, thermal insulators and structural supports of superconducting magnets in fusion reactors. The polymer materials used for these purposes are required to withstand the synergetic effects of high mechanical loads, cryogenic temperatures and intense nuclear radiation. The objective of this review is to summarize the anticipated performance of candidate materials including polymer composites for fusion magnets. The cryogenic properties and the radiation effects of polymer materials are separately reviewed, because there is only limited investigation on the above-mentioned synergetic effects. Additional information on advanced polymer materials for fusion reactors is also introduced with emphasis on recent developments. (orig.)

  14. Environmental aspects of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffman, F.E.; Williams, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    With the continued depletion of fossil and uranium resources in the coming decades, the U. S. will be forced to look more toward renewable energy resources (e.g., wind, tidal, geothermal, and solar power) and toward such longer-term and nondepletable energy resources as fissile fast breeder reactors and fusion power. Several reference reactor designs have been completed for full-scale fusion power reactors that indicate that the environmental impacts from construction, operation, and eventual decommissioning of fusion reactors will be quite small. The principal environmental impact from fusion reactor operation will be from thermal discharges. Some of the safety and environmental characteristics that make fusion reactors appear attractive include an effectively infinite fuel supply at low cost, inherent incapability for a ''nuclear explosion'' or a ''nuclear runaway,'' the absence of fission products, the flexibility of selecting low neutron-cross-section structural materials so that emergency core cooling for a loss-of-coolant or other accident will not be necesary, and the absence of special nuclear materials such as 235 U or 239 Pu, so that diversion of nuclear weapons materials will not be possible and nuclear blackmail will not be a serious concern

  15. Prospects for spheromak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.; Hua, D.D.

    1995-01-01

    The reactor study of Hagenson and Krakowski demonstrated the attractiveness of the spheromak as a compact fusion reactor, based on physics principles confirmed in CTX experiments in many respects. Most uncertain was the energy confinement time and the role of magnetic turbulence inherent in the concept. In this paper, a one-dimensional model of heat confinement, calibrated by CTX, predicts negligible heat loss by magnetic turbulence at reactor scale

  16. Overview of fusion reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.; Crocker, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    Present trends in magnetic fusion research and development indicate the promise of commercialization of one of a limited number of inexhaustible energy options early in the next century. Operation of the large-scale fusion experiments, such as the Joint European Torus (JET) and Takamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) now under construction, are expected to achieve the scientific break even point. Early design concepts of power producing reactors have provided problem definition, whereas the latest concepts, such as STARFIRE, provide a desirable set of answers for commercialization. Safety and environmental concerns have been considered early in the development of magnetic fusion reactor concepts and recognition of proplem areas, coupled with a program to solve these problems, is expected to provide the basis for safe and environmentally acceptable commercial reactors. First generation reactors addressed in this paper are expected to burn deuterium and tritium fuel because of the relatively high reaction rates at lower temperatures compared to advanced fuels such as deuterium-deuterium. This paper presents an overwiew of the safety and environmental problems presently perceived, together with some of the programs and techniques planned and/or underway to solve these problems. A preliminary risk assessment of fusion technology relative to other energy technologies is made. Improvements based on material selection are discussed. Tritium and neutron activation products representing potential radiological hazards in fusion reactor are discussed, and energy sources that can lead to the release of radioactivity from fusion reactors under accident conditions are examined. The handling and disposal of radioactive waste are discussed; the status of biological effects of magnetic fields are referenced; and release mechanisms for tritium and activation products, including analytical methods, are presented. (orig./GG)

  17. Magnetic fusion reactor economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    An almost primordial trend in the conversion and use of energy is an increased complexity and cost of conversion systems designed to utilize cheaper and more-abundant fuels; this trend is exemplified by the progression fossil fission → fusion. The present projections of the latter indicate that capital costs of the fusion ''burner'' far exceed any commensurate savings associated with the cheapest and most-abundant of fuels. These projections suggest competitive fusion power only if internal costs associate with the use of fossil or fission fuels emerge to make them either uneconomic, unacceptable, or both with respect to expensive fusion systems. This ''implementation-by-default'' plan for fusion is re-examined by identifying in general terms fusion power-plant embodiments that might compete favorably under conditions where internal costs (both economic and environmental) of fossil and/or fission are not as great as is needed to justify the contemporary vision for fusion power. Competitive fusion power in this context will require a significant broadening of an overly focused program to explore the physics and simbiotic technologies leading to more compact, simplified, and efficient plasma-confinement configurations that reside at the heart of an attractive fusion power plant

  18. Survey of fusion reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, M.K.; Kang, H.D.; Oh, Y.K.; Lee, K.W.; In, S.Y.; Kim, Y.C.

    1983-01-01

    The present object of the fusion research is to accomplish the scientific break even by the year of 1986. In view of current progress in the field of Fusion reactor development, we decided to carry out the conceptual design of Tokamak-type fusion reactor during the year of 82-86 in order to acquire the principles of the fusion devices, find the engineering problems and establish the basic capabilities to develop the key techniques with originality. In this year the methods for calculating the locations of the poloidal coils and distribution of the magnetic field, which is one of the most essential and complicated task in the fusion reactor design works, were established. Study on the optimization of the design method of toroidal field coil was also done. Through this work, we established the logic for the design of the toroidal field coil in tokamak and utilize this technique to the design of small compact tokamak. Apart from the development work as to the design technology of tokamak, accelerating column and high voltage power supply (200 KVDC, 100 mA) for intense D-T neutron generator were constructed and now beam transport systems are under construction. This device will be used to develop the materials and the components for the tokamak fusion reactor. (Author)

  19. Mirror fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neef, W.S. Jr.; Carlson, G.A.

    1979-01-01

    Recent conceptual reactor designs based on mirror confinement are described. Four components of mirror reactors for which materials considerations and structural mechanics analysis must play an important role in successful design are discussed. The reactor components are: (a) first-wall and thermal conversion blanket, (b) superconducting magnets and their force restraining structure, (c) neutral beam injectors, and (d) plasma direct energy converters

  20. Tritium management in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galloway, T.R.

    1978-05-01

    This is a review paper covering the key environmental and safety issues and how they have been handled in the various magnetic and inertial confinement concepts and reference designs. The issues treated include: tritium accident analyses, tritium process control, occupational safety, HTO formation rate from the gas-phase, disposal of tritium contaminated wastes, and environmental impact--each covering the Joint European Tokamak (J.E.T. experiment), Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), Russian T-20, The Next Step (TNS) designs by Westinghouse/ORNL and General Atomic/ANL, the ANL and ORNL EPR's, the G.A. Doublet Demonstration Reactor, the Italian Fintor-D and the ORNL Demo Studies. There are also the following full scale plant reference designs: UWMAK-III, LASL's Theta Pinch Reactor Design (RTPR), Mirror Fusion Reactor (MFR), Tandem Mirror Reactor (TMR), and the Mirror Hybrid Reactor (MHR). There are four laser device breakeven experiments, SHIVA-NOVA, LLL reference designs, ORNL Laser Fusion power plant, the German ''Saturn,'' and LLL's Laser Fusion EPR I and II

  1. Reactor concepts for laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, W.R.; Maniscalco, J.A.

    1977-07-01

    Scoping studies were initiated to identify attractive reactor concepts for producing electric power with laser fusion. Several exploratory reactor concepts were developed and are being subjected to our criteria for comparing long-range sources of electrical energy: abundance, social costs, technical feasibility, and economic competitiveness. The exploratory concepts include: a liquid-lithium-cooled stainless steel manifold, a gas-cooled graphite manifold, and fluidized wall concepts, such as a liquid lithium ''waterfall'', and a ceramic-lithium pellet ''waterfall''. Two of the major reactor vessel problems affecting the technical feasibility of a laser fusion power plant are: the effects of high-energy neutrons and cyclical stresses on the blanket structure and the effects of x-rays and debris from the fusion microexplosion on the first-wall. The liquid lithium ''waterfall'' concept is presented here in more detail as an approach which effectively deals with these damaging effects

  2. Reversed-field pinch fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    A conceptual engineering design of a fusion reactor based on plasma confinement in a toroidal Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) configuration is described. The plasma is ohmically ignited by toroidal plasma currents which also inherently provide the confining magnetic fields in a toroidal chamber having major and minor radii of 12.7 and 1.5 m, respectively. The DT plasma ignites in 2 to 3 s and undergoes a transient, unrefueled burn at 10 to 20 keV for approx. 20 s to give a DT burnup of approx. 50%. The 5-s dwell period between burn pulses for plasma quench and refueling allows steady-state operation of all thermal systems outside the first wall; no auxiliary thermal capacity is required. Tritium breeding occurs in a granular Li 2 O blanket which is packed around an array of radially oriented water/steam coolant tubes. The slightly superheated steam emerging from this blanket directly drives a turbine that produces electrical power at an efficiency of 30%. A borated-water shield is located immediately outside the thermal blanket to protect the superconducting magnet coils. Both the superconducting poloidal and toroidal field coils are energized by homopolar motor/generators. Accounting for all major energy sinks yields a cost-optimized system with a recirculating power fraction of 0.17; the power output is 750 MWe

  3. Advances in fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    The author addresses the tokamak as a power reactor. Contrary to popular opinion, there are still a few people that think a tokamak might make a good fusion power reactor. In thinking about advances in fusion reactor design, in the U.S., at least, that generally means advances relevant to the Starfire design. He reviews some of the features of Starfire. Starfire is the last major study done of the tokamak as a reactor in this country. It is now over eight years old in the sense that eight years ago was really the time in which major decisions were made as to its features. Starfire was a tokamak with a major radius of seven meters, about twice the linear dimensions of a machine like TIBER

  4. Fusion reactors as a future energy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifritz, W.

    A detailed update of fusion research concepts is given. Discussions are given for the following areas: (1) the magnetic confinement principle, (2) UWMAK I: conceptual design for a fusion reactor, (3) the inertial confinement principle, (4) the laser fusion power plant, (5) electron-induced fusion, (6) the long-term development potential of fusion reactors, (7) the symbiosis between fusion and fission reactors, (8) fuel supply for fusion reactors, (9) safety and environmental impact, and (10) accidents, and (11) waste removal and storage

  5. Fusion reactors and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrixon, A.D.

    1976-01-01

    A summary is given of the report of a study group set up in 1971 by the Director of the UKAEA Culham Laboratory to investigate environmental and safety aspects of future commercial fusion reactors (1975, Carruthers, R., Dunster, H.J., Smith, R.D., Watson, C.J.H., and Mitchell, J.T.D., Culham Study Group Report on Fusion Reactors and the Environment, CLM-R148, HMSO, London). This report was originally issued in 1973 under limited distribution, but has only recently been made available for open circulation. Deuterium/tritium fusion is thought to be the most likely reaction to be used in the first generation of reactors. Estimates were made of the local and world-wide population hazards from the release of tritium, both under normal operating conditions and in the event of an accident. One serious type of accident would be a lithium metal fire in the blanket region of the reactor. The use of a fusible lithium salt (FLIBE), eliminating the lithium fire risk, is considered but the report concentrates on lithium metal in the blanket region. The main hazards to operating staff arise both from tritium and from neutron activation of the construction materials. Remote servicing of the reactor structure will be essential, but radioactive waste management seems less onerous than for fission reactors. Meaningful comparison of the overall hazards associated with fusion and fission power programmes is not yet possible. The study group emphasized the need for more data to aid the safety assessments, and the need for such assessments to keep pace with fusion power station design. (U.K.)

  6. Recent developments in the design of conceptual fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribe, F.L.

    1977-01-01

    Since the first round of conceptual fusion reactor designs in 1973 - 1974, there has been considerable progress in design improvement. Two recent tokamak designs of the Wisconsin and Culham groups, with increased plasma beta and wall loading (power density), lead to more compact reactors with easier maintenance. The Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor has undergone considerable upgrading in the design of the first wall insulator and blanket. In addition, a conceptual homopolar energy storage and transfer system has been designed. In the case of the mirror reactor, there are design changes toward improved modular construction and ease of handling, as well as improved direct converters. Conceptual designs of toroidal-multiple-mirror, liner-compression, and reverse-field pinch reactors are also discussed. A design is presented of a toroidal multiple-mirror reactor that combines the advantages of steady-state operation and high-aspect ratio. The liner-compression reactor eliminates a major problem of radiation damage by using a liquid-metal first wall that also serves as a neutron-thermalizing blanket. The reverse-field pinch reactor operates at higher beta, larger current density and larger aspect ratio than a tokamak reactor. These properties allow the possibility of ignition by ohmic heating alone and greater ease of maintenance

  7. Controlled thermonuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walstrom, P.L.

    1976-01-01

    Controlled production of energy by fusion of light nuclei has been the goal of a large portion of the physics community since the 1950's. In order for a fusion reaction to take place, the fuel must be heated to a temperature of 100 million degrees Celsius. At this temperature, matter can exist only in the form of an almost fully ionized plasma. In order for the reaction to produce net power, the product of the density and energy confinement time must exceed a minimum value of 10 20 sec m -3 , the so-called Lawson criterion. Basically, two approaches are being taken to meet this criterion: inertial confinement and magnetic confinement. Inertial confinement is the basis of the laser fusion approach; a fuel pellet is imploded by intense laser beams from all sides and ignites. Magnetic confinement devices, which exist in a variety of geometries, rely upon electromagnetic forces on the charged particles of the plasma to keep the hot plasma from expanding. Of these devices, the most encouraging results have been achieved with a class of devices known as tokamaks. Recent successes with these devices have given plasma physicists confidence that scientific feasibility will be demonstrated in the next generation of tokamaks; however, an even larger effort will be required to make fusion power commercially feasible. As a result, emphasis in the controlled thermonuclear research program is beginning to shift from plasma physics to a new branch of nuclear engineering which can be called fusion engineering, in which instrumentation and control engineers will play a major role. Among the new problem areas they will deal with are plasma diagnostics and superconducting coil instrumentation

  8. Steady states in conformal theories

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    A novel conjecture regarding the steady state behavior of conformal field theories placed between two heat baths will be presented. Some verification of the conjecture will be provided in the context of fluid dynamics and holography.

  9. Helium cooling of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Baxi, C.; Bourque, R.; Dahms, C.; Inamati, S.; Ryder, R.; Sager, G.; Schleicher, R.

    1994-01-01

    On the basis of worldwide design experience and in coordination with the evolution of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) program, the application of helium as a coolant for fusion appears to be at the verge of a transition from conceptual design to engineering development. This paper presents a review of the use of helium as the coolant for fusion reactor blanket and divertor designs. The concept of a high-pressure helium cooling radial plate design was studied for both ITER and PULSAR. These designs can resolve many engineering issues, and can help with reaching the goals of low activation and high performance designs. The combination of helium cooling, advanced low-activation materials, and gas turbine technology may permit high thermal efficiency and reduced costs, resulting in the environmental advantages and competitive economics required to make fusion a 21st century power source. ((orig.))

  10. On fusion and fission breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, B.; Schuurman, W.; Klippel, H.Th.

    1981-02-01

    Fast breeder reactors and fusion reactors are suitable candidates for centralized, long-term energy production, their fuel reserves being practically unlimited. The technology of a durable and economical fusion reactor is still to be developed. Such a development parallel with the fast breeder is valuable by reasons of safety, proliferation, new fuel reserves, and by the very broad potential of the development of the fusion reactor. In order to facilitate a discussion of these aspects, the fusion reactor and the fast breeder reactor were compared in the IIASA-report. Aspects of both reactor systems are compared

  11. Fusion reactors: physics and technology. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.

    1983-08-01

    Fusion reactors are designed to operate at full power and generally at steady state. Yet experience shows the load variations, licensing constraints, and frequent sub-system failures often require a plant to operate at fractions of rated power. The aim of this study has been to assess the technology problems and design implications of startup and fractional power operation on fusion reactors. The focus of attention has been tandem mirror reactors (TMR) and we have concentrated on the plasma and blanket engineering for startup and fractional power operation. In this report, we first discuss overall problems of startup, shutdown and staged power operation and their influence on TMR design. We then present a detailed discussion of the plasma physics associated with TMR startup and various means of achieving staged power operation. We then turn to the issue of instrumentation and safety controls for fusion reactors. Finally we discuss the limits on transient power variations during startup and shutdown of Li 17 Pb 83 cooled blankets

  12. Simulation of fusion power in tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaber, F.A.; Elsharif, R.N.; Sayed, Y.A.

    1993-01-01

    The paper deals with the transient response of the fusion power against perturbation in the injection rate of the fuel to ± 10% step change. The steady state results are in good agreement with the references results. The adequacy of these study was tested by assessing the physical plausibility of the obtained result, as well as, comparison with other validated model. 2 fig., 2 tab

  13. Radiation shielding for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, R.T.

    2000-01-01

    Radiation shielding requirements for fusion reactors present different problems than those for fission reactors and accelerators. Fusion devices, particularly tokamak reactors, are complicated by geometry constraints that complicate disposition of fully effective shielding. This paper reviews some of these shielding issues and suggested solutions for optimizing the machine and biological shielding. Radiation transport calculations are essential for predicting and confirming the nuclear performance of the reactor and, as such, must be an essential part of the reactor design process. Development and optimization of reactor components from the first wall and primary shielding to the penetrations and containment shielding must be carried out in a sensible progression. Initial results from one-dimensional transport calculations are used for scoping studies and are followed by detailed two- and three-dimensional analyses to effectively characterize the overall radiation environment. These detail model calculations are essential for accounting for the radiation leakage through ports and other penetrations in the bulk shield. Careful analysis of component activation and radiation damage is cardinal for defining remote handling requirements, in-situ replacement of components, and personnel access at specific locations inside the reactor containment vessel. (author)

  14. Prospects for toroidal fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, J.; Galambos, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Work on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak has refined understanding of the realities of a deuterium-tritium (D-T) burning magnetic fusion reactor. An ITER-like tokamak reactor using ITER costs and performance would lead to a cost of electricity (COE) of about 130 mills/kWh. Advanced tokamak physics to be tested in the Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX), coupled with moderate components in engineering, technology, and unit costs, should lead to a COE comparable with best existing fission systems around 60 mills/kWh. However, a larger unit size, ∼2000 MW(e), is favored for the fusion system. Alternative toroidal configurations to the conventional tokamak, such as the stellarator, reversed-field pinch, and field-reversed configuration, offer some potential advantage, but are less well developed, and have their own challenges

  15. Study of impurity effects on CFETR steady-state scenario by self-consistent integrated modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Nan; Chan, Vincent S.; Jian, Xiang; Li, Guoqiang; Chen, Jiale; Gao, Xiang; Shi, Shengyu; Kong, Defeng; Liu, Xiaoju; Mao, Shifeng; Xu, Guoliang

    2017-12-01

    Impurity effects on fusion performance of China fusion engineering test reactor (CFETR) due to extrinsic seeding are investigated. An integrated 1.5D modeling workflow evolves plasma equilibrium and all transport channels to steady state. The one modeling framework for integrated tasks framework is used to couple the transport solver, MHD equilibrium solver, and source and sink calculations. A self-consistent impurity profile constructed using a steady-state background plasma, which satisfies quasi-neutrality and true steady state, is presented for the first time. Studies are performed based on an optimized fully non-inductive scenario with varying concentrations of Argon (Ar) seeding. It is found that fusion performance improves before dropping off with increasing {{Z}\\text{eff}} , while the confinement remains at high level. Further analysis of transport for these plasmas shows that low-k ion temperature gradient modes dominate the turbulence. The decrease in linear growth rate and resultant fluxes of all channels with increasing {{Z}\\text{eff}} can be traced to impurity profile change by transport. The improvement in confinement levels off at higher {{Z}\\text{eff}} . Over the regime of study there is a competition between the suppressed transport and increasing radiation that leads to a peak in the fusion performance at {{Z}\\text{eff}} (~2.78 for CFETR). Extrinsic impurity seeding to control divertor heat load will need to be optimized around this value for best fusion performance.

  16. Development of liquid lithium divertor for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evtihkin, V. A.; Lyublinskij, I. E.; Vertkov, A.V.; Chumanov, A.V.; Shpolyanskij, V.N.

    2000-01-01

    Development of divertor is one of the most acute problems of the tokamak fusion reactor. The use of such materials as tungsten, beryllium, graphite and CFC's enabled to solve the problem to a certain extent fulfilling the need of the ITER project. The problem still rests unsolved for the DEMO-type reactors. Lithium if used as a material for high heat flux components may provide a successful solution of the problem. A concept of Li divertor based on the use of capillary-pore structures (CPS) is proposed and is being validated by a complex of experimental research and engineering developments. An optional concept of Li divertor for power removal at 400 MW in steady-state (DEMO-S project) is presented. The complex of experimental research is under way to prove the serviceability of the Li CPS in different conditions that would be realized in divertor

  17. Fusion reactor critical issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    The document summarizes the results of a series of INTOR-related meetings organized by the IAEA in 1985-1986 with the following topics: Impurity control modelling, non-inductive current-drive, confinement in tokamaks with intense heating and DEMO requirements. These results are useful to the specialists involved in research on large fusion machines or in the design activity on the next generation tokamaks. Refs, figs and tabs

  18. User's manual for ASTERIX-2: a two-dimensional modular-code system for the steady-state and xenon-transient analysis of a pebble-bed high-temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauer, A.; Schwiegk, H.J.; Wu, T.; Cowan, C.L.

    1982-03-01

    The ASTERIX modular code package was developed at KFA Laboratory-Juelich for the steady state and xenon transient analysis of a pebble bed high temperature reactor. The code package was implemented on the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Computer in August, 1980, and a user's manual for the current version of the code, identified as ASTERIX-2, was prepared as a cooperative effort by KFA Laboratory and GE-ARSD. The material in the manual includes the requirements for accessing the program, a description of the major subroutines, a listing of the input options, and a listing of the input data for a sample problem. The material is provided in sufficient detail for the user to carry out a wide range of analyses from steady state operations to the xenon induced power transients in which the local xenon, temperature, buckling and control feedback effects have been incorporated in the problem solution

  19. A preliminary conceptual design study for Korean fusion DEMO reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Keeman, E-mail: kkeeman@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, 169-148 Gwahak-ro, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoung Chan; Oh, Sangjun; Lee, Young Seok; Yeom, Jun Ho; Im, Kihak; Lee, Gyung-Su [National Fusion Research Institute, 169-148 Gwahak-ro, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Neilson, George; Kessel, Charles; Brown, Thomas; Titus, Peter [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Perform a preliminary conceptual study for a steady-state Korean DEMO reactor. ► Present design guidelines and requirements of Korean DEMO reactor. ► Present a preliminary design of TF (toroidal field) and CS (central solenoid) magnet. ► Present a preliminary result of the radial build scheme of Korean DEMO reactor. -- Abstract: As the ITER is being constructed, there is a growing anticipation for an earlier realization of fusion energy, so called fast-track approach. Korean strategy for fusion energy can be regarded as a fast-track approach and one special concept discussed in this paper is a two-stage development plan. At first, a steady-state Korean DEMO Reactor (K-DEMO) is designed not only to demonstrate a net electricity generation and a self-sustained tritium cycle, but also to be used as a component test facility. Then, at its second stage, a major upgrade is carried out by replacing in-vessel components in order to show a net electric generation on the order of 300 MWe and the competitiveness in cost of electricity (COE). The major radius is designed to be just below 6.5 m, considering practical engineering feasibilities. By using high performance Nb{sub 3}Sn-based superconducting cable currently available, high magnetic field at the plasma center above 8 T can be achieved. A design concept for TF magnets and radial builds for the K-DEMO considering a vertical maintenance scheme, are presented together with preliminary design parameters.

  20. Review of mirror fusion reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, D.J.

    1977-01-01

    Three magnetic confinement concepts, based on the mirror principle, are described. These mirror concepts are summarized as follows: (1) fusion-fission hybrid reactor, (2) tandem mirror reactor, and (3) reversed field mirror reactor

  1. Structural materials for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Victoria, M.; Baluc, N.; Spaetig, P.

    2001-01-01

    In order to preserve the condition of an environmentally safe machine, present selection of materials for structural components of a fusion reactor is made not only on the basis of adequate mechanical properties, behavior under irradiation and compatibility with other materials and cooling media, but also on their radiological properties, i.e. activity, decay heat, radiotoxicity. These conditions strongly limit the number of materials available to a few families of alloys, generically known as low activation materials. We discuss the criteria for deciding on such materials, the alloys resulting from the application of the concept and the main issues and problems of their use in a fusion environment. (author)

  2. Synfuels production from fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.; Steinberg, M.

    The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approximately 40 to 60 percent and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approximately 50 to 70 percent are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets

  3. Steady-state leaching of tritiated water from silica gel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Das, H.A.; Hou, Xiaolin

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous leaching of tritium from silica gel, loaded by absorption of water vapor, makes part of reactor de-commissioning. It is found to follow the formulation of steady-state diffusion.......Aqueous leaching of tritium from silica gel, loaded by absorption of water vapor, makes part of reactor de-commissioning. It is found to follow the formulation of steady-state diffusion....

  4. Vacuum engineering for fusion research and fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittenger, L.C.

    1976-01-01

    The following topics are described: (1) surface pumping by cryogenic condensation, (2) operation of large condensing cryopumps, (3) pumping for large fusion experiments, and (4) vacuum technology for fusion reactors

  5. Fusion reactor systems studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Fusion Technology Institute personnel actively participated in the ARIES/PULSAR project during the present contract period. Numerous presentations were made at PULSAR project meetings, major contributions were written for the ARIES-II/IV Final Report presentations and papers were given at technical conferences contributions were written for the ARIES Lessons Learned report and a very large number of electronic-mail and regular-mail communications were sent. The remaining sections of this progress report win summarize the work accomplished and in progress for the PULSAR project during the contract period. The main areas of effort are: PULSAR Research; ARIES-II/IV Report Contributions; ARIES Lessons Learned Report Contributions; and Stellarator Study

  6. Fusion reactor high vacuum pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedgley, D.W.; Walthers, C.R.; Jenkins, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on recent experiments which have shown the practicality of using activated carbon (coconut charcoal) at 4K to pump helium and hydrogen isotopes for a fusion reactor. Both speed and capacity for deuterium/helium and tritium/helium-3 mixtures were satisfactory. The long-term effects of tritium on the charcoal/cement system developed by Grumman and LLNL was now known; therefore a program was undertaken to see what, if any, effect long-term tritium exposure has on the cryosorber. Several charcoal on aluminum test samples were subjected to six months exposure of tritium at approximately 77 K. The tritium was scanned several times with a residual gas analyzer and the speed-capacity performance of the samples was measured before, approximately one-third way through, and after the exposure. Modest effects were noted which would not seriously restrict the use of charcoal as a cryosorber for fusion reactor high-vacuum pumping applications

  7. The behaviour of water-cooled reactor fuel rods in steady state and transient conditions; Zachowanie sie pretow paliwowych reaktorow chlodzonych woda w stanach ustalonych i nieustalonych

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strupczewski, A.; Marks, P. [Institute of Atomic Energy, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    In this report, the results of temperature field and filling gas pressure calculations by means of contemporary calculational models for a WWER-440 and WWER-1000 type fuel rod at low and high burnup operating under steady-state conditions are presented. A review of in-core temperature and pressure measurements for various types of LWR fuel is also included. Basing on calculational and collected measured data, the behaviour of fuel cladding during large and small break LOCA, is estimated with special emphasis on their oxidation and failure resistance. (author) 38 refs, 40 figs, 15 tabs

  8. Tritium in fusion reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, J.S.; Fisher, P.W.; Talbot, J.B.

    1980-01-01

    When tritium is used in a fusion energy experiment or reactor, several implications affect and usually restrict the design and operation of the system and involve questions of containment, inventory, and radiation damage. Containment is expected to be particularly important both for high-temperature components and for those components that are prone to require frequent maintenance. Inventory is currently of major significance in cases where safety and environmental considerations limit the experiments to very low levels of tritium. Fewer inventory restrictions are expected as fusion experiments are placed in more-remote locations and as the fusion community gains experience with the use of tritium. However, the advent of power-producing experiments with high-duty cycle will again lead to serious difficulties based principally on tritium availability; cyclic operations with significant regeneration times are the principal problems

  9. Assessment of fusion reactor development. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, N.; Tazima, T.

    1994-04-01

    Symposium on assessment of fusion reactor development was held to make clear critical issues, which should be resolved for the commercial fusion reactor as a major energy source in the next century. Discussing items were as follows. (1) The motive force of fusion power development from viewpoints of future energy demand, energy resources and earth environment for 'Sustainable Development'. (2) Comparison of characteristics with other alternative energy sources, i.e. fission power and solar cell power. (3) Future planning of fusion research and advanced fuel fusion (D 3 He). (4) Critical issues of fusion reactor development such as Li extraction from the sea water, structural material and safety. (author)

  10. Tokamak fusion reactor exhaust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, M.F.A.; Harbour, P.J.; Hotston, E.S.

    1981-08-01

    This report presents a compilation of papers dealing with reactor exhaust which were produced as part of the TIGER Tokamak Installation for Generating Electricity study at Culham. The papers are entitled: (1) Exhaust impurity control and refuelling. (2) Consideration of the physical problems of a self-consistent exhaust and divertor system for a long burn Tokamak. (3) Possible bundle divertors for INTOR and TIGER. (4) Consideration of various magnetic divertor configurations for INTOR and TIGER. (5) A appraisal of divertor experiments. (6) Hybrid divertors on INTOR. (7) Refuelling and the scrape-off layer of INTOR. (8) Simple modelling of the scrape-off layer. (9) Power flow in the scrape-off layer. (10) A model of particle transport within the scrape-off plasma and divertor. (11) Controlled recirculation of exhaust gas from the divertor into the scrape-off plasma. (U.K.)

  11. Nuclear data requirements for fusion reactor nucleonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, M.R.; Abdou, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    Nuclear data requirements for fusion reactor nucleonics are reviewed and the present status of data are assessed. The discussion is divided into broad categories dealing with data for Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT), D-T Fusion Reactors, Alternate Fuel Cycles and the Evaluated Data Files that are available or would be available in the near future

  12. Fusion reactor development using high power particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Y.

    1990-01-01

    The present paper outlines major applications of the ion source/accelerator to fusion research and also addresses the present status and future plans for accelerator development. Applications of ion sources/accelerators for fusion research are discussed first, focusing on plasma heating, plasma current drive, plasma current profile control, and plasma diagnostics. The present status and future plan of ion sources/accelerators development are then described focusing on the features of existing and future tokamak equipment. Positive-ion-based NBI systems of 100 keV class have contributed to obtaining high temperature plasmas whose parameters are close to the fusion break-even condition. For the next tokamak fusion devices, a MeV class high power neutral beam injector, which will be used to obtain a steady state burning plasma, is considered to become the primary heating and current drive system. Development of such a system is a key to realize nuclear fusion reactor. It will be entirely indebted to the development of a MeV class high current negative deuterium ion source/accelerator. (N.K.)

  13. Conceptual design study of fusion experimental reactor (FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-11-01

    Since 1980 the design study has been conducted at JAERI for the Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) which has been proposed to be the next machine to JT-60 in the Japanese long term program of fusion reactor development. During two years from 1984 to 1985 FER concept was reviewed and redesigned. This report is the summary of the results obtained in the review and redesign activities in 1984 and 85. In the first year FER concept was discussed again and its frame work was reestablished. According to the new frame work the major reactor components of FER were designed. In the second year the whole plant system design including plant layout plan was conducted as well as the more detailed design analysis of the reactor conponents. The newly established frame for FER design is as follows: 1) Plasma : Self-ignition. 2) Operation scenario : Quasi-steady state operation with long burn pulse. 3) Neutron fluence on the first wall : 0.3 MWY/M 2 . 4) Blanket : Non-tritium breeding blanket with test modules for breeding blanket development. 5) Magnets : Superconducting Magnets. (author)

  14. Generic magnetic fusion reactor cost assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, J.

    1985-01-01

    The Fusion Energy Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory discusses ''generic'' magnetic fusion reactors. The author comments on DT burning magnetic fusion reactor models being possibly operational in the 21st century. Representative parameters from D-T reactor studies are given, as well as a shematic diagram of a generic fusion reactor. Values are given for winding pack current density for existing and future superconducting coils. Topics included are the variation of the cost of electricity (COE), the dependence of the COE on the net electric power of the reactor, and COE formula definitions

  15. Steady-State Process Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cameron, Ian; Gani, Rafiqul

    2011-01-01

    illustrate the “equation oriented” approach as well as the “sequential modular” approach to solving complex flowsheets for steady state applications. The applications include the Williams-Otto plant, the hydrodealkylation (HDA) of toluene, conversion of ethylene to ethanol and a bio-ethanol process....

  16. Development of dynamic simulation code for fuel cycle fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Isao; Seki, Yasushi [Department of Fusion Engineering Research, Naka Fusion Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Sasaki, Makoto; Shintani, Kiyonori; Kim, Yeong-Chan

    1999-02-01

    A dynamic simulation code for fuel cycle of a fusion experimental reactor has been developed. The code follows the fuel inventory change with time in the plasma chamber and the fuel cycle system during 2 days pulse operation cycles. The time dependence of the fuel inventory distribution is evaluated considering the fuel burn and exhaust in the plasma chamber, purification and supply functions. For each subsystem of the plasma chamber and the fuel cycle system, the fuel inventory equation is written based on the equation of state considering the fuel burn and the function of exhaust, purification, and supply. The processing constants of subsystem for steady states were taken from the values in the ITER Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) report. Using this code, the time dependence of the fuel supply and inventory depending on the burn state and subsystem processing functions are shown. (author)

  17. Advances in laser solenoid fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.; Quimby, D.C.

    1978-01-01

    The laser solenoid is an alternate fusion concept based on a laser-heated magnetically-confined plasma column. The reactor concept has evolved in several systems studies over the last five years. We describe recent advances in the plasma physics and technology of laser-plasma coupling. The technology advances include progress on first walls, inner magnet design, confinement module design, and reactor maintenance. We also describe a new generation of laser solenoid fusion and fusion-fission reactor designs

  18. Prospect of realizing nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This Report describes the results of the research work on nuclear fusion, which CRIEPI has carried out for about ten years from the standpoint of electric power utilities, potential user of its energy. The principal points are; (a) economic analysis (calculation of costs) based on Japanese analysis procedures and database of commercial fusion reactors, including fusion-fission hybrid reactors, and (b) conceptual design of two types of hybrid reactors, that is, fission-fuel producing DMHR (Demonstration Molten-Salt Hybrid Reactor) and electric-power producing THPR (Tokamak Hybrid Power Reactor). The Report consists of the following chapters: 1. Introduction. 2. Conceptual Design of Hybrid Reactors. 3. Economic Analysis of Commercial Fusion Reactors. 4. Basic Studies Applicable Also to Nuclear Fusion Technology. 5. List of Published Reports and Papers; 6. Conclusion. Appendices. (author)

  19. Confinement inertial fusion. Power reactors of nuclear fusion by lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velarde, G.; Ahnert, C.; Aragones, J.M.; Leira, G; Martinez-Val, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The energy crisis and the need of the nuclear fusion energy are analized. The nuclear processes in the laser interation with the ablator material are studied, as well as the thermohydrodinamic processes in the implossion, and the neutronics of the fusion. The fusion reactor components are described and the economic and social impact of its introduction in the future energetic strategies.(author)

  20. Evaluation of performance of select fusion experiments and projected reactors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, G.H.

    1978-10-01

    The performance of NASA Lewis fusion experiments (SUMMA and Bumpy Torus) is compared with other experiments and that necessary for a power reactor. Key parameters cited are gain (fusion power/input power) and the time average fusion power, both of which may be more significant for real fusion reactors than the commonly used Lawson parameter. The NASA devices are over 10 orders of magnitude below the required powerplant values in both gain and time average power. The best experiments elsewhere are also as much as 4 to 5 orders of magnitude low. However, the NASA experiments compare favorably with other alternate approaches that have received less funding than the mainline experiments. The steady-state character and efficiency of plasma heating are strong advantages of the NASA approach. The problem, though, is to move ahead to experiments of sufficient size to advance in gain and average power parameters

  1. What have fusion reactor studies done for you today?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulchinski, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin examines the fusion program and puts into perspective what return is being made on investments in fusion reactor studies. Illustations show financial support for fusion research from the four major programs, FY'82 expenditures on fusion research, and the total expenditures on fusion research since 1951. Topics discussed include the estimated number of scientists conducting fusion research, the conceptual design study of a fusion reactor, scoping study of a reactor, the chronology of fusion reactor design studies, published fusion reactor studies 1967-1983, conceptual fusion reactor design studies, STARFIRE reference design, MARS central cell, HYLIFE reaction chamber, and selected contributions of reactor design studies to base programs

  2. Vanadium recycling for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, T.J.; Butterworth, G.J.

    1994-04-01

    Very stringent purity specifications must be applied to low activation vanadium alloys, in order to meet recycling goals requiring low residual dose rates after 50--100 years. Methods of vanadium production and purification which might meet these limits are described. Following a suitable cooling period after their use, the vanadium alloy components can be melted in a controlled atmosphere to remove volatile radioisotopes. The aim of the melting and decontamination process will be the achievement of dose rates low enough for ''hands-on'' refabrication of new reactor components from the reclaimed metal. The processes required to permit hands-on recycling appear to be technically feasible, and demonstration experiments are recommended. Background information relevant to the use of vanadium alloys in fusion reactors, including health hazards, resources, and economics, is provided

  3. Steady State Shift Damage Localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sekjær, Claus; Bull, Thomas; Markvart, Morten Kusk

    2017-01-01

    The steady state shift damage localization (S3DL) method localizes structural deterioration, manifested as either a mass or stiffness perturbation, by interrogating the damage-induced change in the steady state vibration response with damage patterns cast from a theoretical model. Damage is, thus...... the required accuracy when examining complex structures, an extensive amount of degrees of freedom (DOF) must often be utilized. Since the interrogation matrix for each damage pattern depends on the size of the system matrices constituting the FE-model, the computational time quickly becomes of first......-order importance. The present paper investigates two sub-structuring approaches, in which the idea is to employ Craig-Bampton super-elements to reduce the amount of interrogation distributions while still providing an acceptable localization resolution. The first approach operates on a strict super-element level...

  4. Reactor performance and microbial community dynamics during anaerobic co-digestion of municipal wastewater sludge with restaurant grease waste at steady state and overloading stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razaviarani, Vahid; Buchanan, Ian D

    2014-11-01

    Linkage between reactor performance and microbial community dynamics was investigated during mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion of restaurant grease waste (GTW) with municipal wastewater sludge (MWS) using 10L completely mixed reactors and a 20day SRT. Test reactors received a mixture of GTW and MWS while control reactors received only MWS. Addition of GTW to the test reactors enhanced the biogas production and methane yield by up to 65% and 120%, respectively. Pyrosequencing revealed that Methanosaeta and Methanomicrobium were the dominant acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogen genera, respectively, during stable reactor operation. The number of Methanosarcina and Methanomicrobium sequences increased and that of Methanosaeta declined when the proportion of GTW in the feed was increased to cause an overload condition. Under this overload condition, the pH, alkalinity and methane production decreased and VFA concentrations increased dramatically. Candidatus cloacamonas, affiliated within phylum Spirochaetes, were the dominant bacterial genus at all reactor loadings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Steady state neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattoo, S.K.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Baruah, U.K.; Bisai, N.; Chakbraborty, A.K.; Chakrapani, Ch.; Jana, M.R.; Bajpai, M.; Jaykumar, P.K.; Patel, D.; Patel, G.; Patel, P.J.; Prahlad, V.; Rao, N.V.M.; Rotti, C.; Singh, N.P.; Sridhar, B.

    2000-01-01

    Learning from operational reliability of neutral beam injectors in particular and various heating schemes including RF in general on TFTR, JET, JT-60, it has become clear that neutral beam injectors may find a greater role assigned to them for maintaining the plasma in steady state devices under construction. Many technological solutions, integrated in the present day generation of injectors have given rise to capability of producing multimegawatt power at many tens of kV. They have already operated for integrated time >10 5 S without deterioration in the performance. However, a new generation of injectors for steady state devices have to address to some basic issues. They stem from material erosion under particle bombardment, heat transfer > 10 MW/m 2 , frequent regeneration of cryopanels, inertial power supplies, data acquisition and control of large volume of data. Some of these engineering issues have been addressed to in the proposed neutral beam injector for SST-1 at our institute; the remaining shall have to wait for the inputs of the database generated from the actual experience with steady state injectors. (author)

  6. Comparison between temperature distributions of an annular fuel rod of circular cross-section and of a hemoglobin shaped cross-section rod for PWR reactors in steady state conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Maria Vitória A. de; Alvim, Antônio Carlos Marques, E-mail: moliveira@con.ufrj.br, E-mail: alvim@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this work is to make a comparison between the temperature distributions of an annular fuel rod of circular cross-section and a hemoglobin shaped cross-section for PWR reactors in steady state conditions. The motivation for this article is due to the fact that the symmetric form of the red globules particles allows the O{sub 2} gases to penetrate the center of the cell homogeneously and quickly. The diffusion equation of gases in any environment is very similar to the heat diffusion equation: Diffusion - Fick's Law; Heat Flow - Fourier; where, the temperature (T) replaces the concentration (c). In previous works the comparison between the shape of solid fuel rods with circular section, and a with hemoglobin-shaped cross-section has proved that this new format optimizes the heat transfer, decreasing the thermal resistance between the center of the UO{sub 2} pellets and the clad. With this, a significant increase in the specific power of the reactor was made possible (more precisely a 23% increase). Currently, the advantages of annular fuel rods are being studied and recent works have shown that 12 x 12 arrays of annular fuel rods perform better, increasing the specific power of the reactor by at least 20% in relation to solid fuel rods, without affecting the safety of the reactor. Our proposal is analyzing the temperature distribution in annular fuel rods with cross sections with red blood cell shape and compare with the theoretical results of the annular fuel rods of circular cross section, initially in steady state. (author)

  7. Comparison between temperature distributions of an annular fuel rod of circular cross-section and of a hemoglobin shaped cross-section rod for PWR reactors in steady state conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Maria Vitória A. de; Alvim, Antônio Carlos Marques

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this work is to make a comparison between the temperature distributions of an annular fuel rod of circular cross-section and a hemoglobin shaped cross-section for PWR reactors in steady state conditions. The motivation for this article is due to the fact that the symmetric form of the red globules particles allows the O 2 gases to penetrate the center of the cell homogeneously and quickly. The diffusion equation of gases in any environment is very similar to the heat diffusion equation: Diffusion - Fick's Law; Heat Flow - Fourier; where, the temperature (T) replaces the concentration (c). In previous works the comparison between the shape of solid fuel rods with circular section, and a with hemoglobin-shaped cross-section has proved that this new format optimizes the heat transfer, decreasing the thermal resistance between the center of the UO 2 pellets and the clad. With this, a significant increase in the specific power of the reactor was made possible (more precisely a 23% increase). Currently, the advantages of annular fuel rods are being studied and recent works have shown that 12 x 12 arrays of annular fuel rods perform better, increasing the specific power of the reactor by at least 20% in relation to solid fuel rods, without affecting the safety of the reactor. Our proposal is analyzing the temperature distribution in annular fuel rods with cross sections with red blood cell shape and compare with the theoretical results of the annular fuel rods of circular cross section, initially in steady state. (author)

  8. Tritium production in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, E.

    1981-08-01

    The present analyses on the possibilities of extracting tritium from the liquid and solid fusion reactor blankets show up many problems. A consistent ensemble of materials and devices for extracting the heat and the tritium has not yet been integrated in a fusion reactor blanket project. The dimensioning of the many pipes required for shifting the tritium can only be done very approximately and the volume taken up by the blanket is difficult to evaluate, etc. The utilization of present data leads to over-dimensioning the installations by prudence and perhaps rejecting the best solutions. In order to measure the parameters of the most promising materials, work must be carried out on well defined samples and not only determine the base physical-chemical coefficients, such as thermal conductivity, scattering coefficients, Sievert parameters, but also the kinetic parameters conventional in chemical engineering, such as the hourly space rates of degassing. It is also necessary to perform long duration experiments under radiation and at operating temperatures, or above, in order to study the ageing of the bodies employed [fr

  9. Thermal safety analysis for pebble bed blanket fusion-fission hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Renjie

    1998-01-01

    Pebble bed blanket hybrid reactor may have more advantages than slab element blanket hybrid reactor in nuclear fuel production and nuclear safety. The thermo-hydraulic calculations of the blanket in the Tokamak helium cooling pebble bed blanket fusion-fission hybrid reactor developed in China are carried out using the Code THERMIX and auxiliary code. In the calculations different fuel pebble material and steady state, depressurization and total loss of flow accident conditions are included. The results demonstrate that the conceptual design of the Tokamak helium cooling pebble bed blanket fusion-fission hybrid reactor with dump tank is feasible and safe enough only if the suitable fuel pebble material is selected and the suitable control system and protection system are established. Some recommendations for due conceptual design are also presented

  10. Steady-state Operational Characteristics of Ghana Research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Steady state operational characteristics of the 30 kW tank-in-pool type reactor named Ghana Research Reactor-1 were investigated after a successful on-site zero power critical experiments. The steadystate operational character-istics determined were the thermal neutron fluxes, maximum period of operation at nominal ...

  11. Hefei experimental hybrid fusion-fission reactor conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Lijian; Luan Guishi; Xu Qiang

    1992-03-01

    A new concept of hybrid reactor is introduced. It uses JET-like(Joint European Tokamak) device worked at sub-breakeven conditions, as a source of high energy neutrons to induce a blanket fission of depleted uranium. The solid breeding material and helium cooling technique are also used. It can produce 100 kg of 239 Pu per year by partial fission suppressed. The energy self-sustained of the fusion core is not necessary. Plasma temperature is maintained by external 20 MW ICRF (ion cyclotron resonance frequency) and 10 MW ECRF (electron cyclotron resonance frequency) heating. A steady state plasma current at 1.5 Ma is driven by 10 MW LHCD (lower hybrid current driven). Plasma density will be kept by pellet injection. ICRF can produce a high energy tail in ion distribution function and lead to significant enhancement of D-T reaction rate by 2 ∼ 5 times so that the neutron source strength reaches to the level of 1 x 10 19 n/s. This system is a passive system. It's power density is 10 W/cm 3 and the wall loading is 0.6 W/cm 2 that is the lower limitation of fusion and fission technology. From the calculation of neutrons it could always be in sub-critical and has intrinsic safety. The radiation damage and neutron flux distribution on the first wall are also analyzed. According to the conceptual design the application of this type hybrid reactor earlier is feasible

  12. Real-time control of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, B.; Sousa, J.; Varandas, C.A.F.

    2010-01-01

    The next generation fusion experiments, e.g. ITER, will be highly complex and raise new challenges in the field of control and data acquisition systems. The more advanced operation scenarios have to be capable of sustaining long pulse steady-state plasma and to suppress plasma instabilities almost completely. Such scenarios will heavily rely on Multiple-Input-Multiple-Output (MIMO) fast control systems. To ensure safety for the operation these systems have to be robust and resilient to faults while ensuring high availability. Mindful of the importance of such features for future fusion experiments ATCA based systems have been successfully used in fusion experiment as MIMO fast controller. This is the most promising architecture to substantially enhance the performance and capability of existing standard systems delivering well high throughput as well as high availability. The real-time control needs of a fusion experiment, the rational for the presently pursued solutions, the existing problems and the broad scientific and technical questions that need to be addressed on the path to a fusion power plant will be discussed.

  13. Progress in the development of the blanket structural material for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, J.L.; Bloom, E.E.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Maziasz, P.J.; Wiffen, F.W.; Gold, R.E.; Holmes, J.J.; Reuther, P.C. Jr.; Rosenwasser, S.N.

    1981-01-01

    The Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance Program has become more focused since the last Fusion Reactor Technology Conference two years ago. Since austenitic stainless steels and ferritic steels are candidate structural materials for the near-term reactors ETF and INTOR and austenitic stainless steel is also the preferred structural material for the steady-state commercial fusion reactor, STARFIRE, a vigorous experimental program is under way to identify the best alloy from each of these alloy classes and to provide the engineering data base in a timely manner. In addition the comprehensive program that includes high-strength Fe-Ni-Cr alloys, reactive and refractory metals, and advanced concepts continues in an orderly fashion

  14. Multimode optical fibers: steady state mode exciter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, M; Sugimura, A; Ikegami, T

    1976-09-01

    The steady state mode power distribution of the multimode graded index fiber was measured. A simple and effective steady state mode exciter was fabricated by an etching technique. Its insertion loss was 0.5 dB for an injection laser. Deviation in transmission characteristics of multimode graded index fibers can be avoided by using the steady state mode exciter.

  15. Advanced nuclear reactor and nuclear fusion power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-04-01

    This book comprised of two issues. The first one is a advanced nuclear reactor which describes nuclear fuel cycle and advanced nuclear reactor like liquid-metal reactor, advanced converter, HTR and extra advanced nuclear reactors. The second one is nuclear fusion for generation energy, which explains practical conditions for nuclear fusion, principle of multiple magnetic field, current situation of research on nuclear fusion, conception for nuclear fusion reactor and economics on nuclear fusion reactor.

  16. Lower activation materials and magnetic fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; Bloom, E.E.; Davis, J.W.; Gold, R.E.; Little, R.; Schultz, K.R.; Smith, D.L.; Wiffen, F.W.

    1984-01-01

    Radioactivity in fusion reactors can be effectively controlled by materials selection. The detailed relationship between the use of a material for construction of a magnetic fusion reactor and the material's characteristics important to waste disposal, safety, and system maintainability has been studied. The quantitative levels of radioactivation are presented for many materials and alloys, including the role of impurities, and for various design alternatives. A major outcome has been the development of quantitative definitions to characterize materials based on their radioactivation properties. Another key result is a four-level classification scheme to categorize fusion reactors based on quantitative criteria for waste management, system maintenance, and safety. A recommended minimum goal for fusion reactor development is a reference reactor that (a) meets the requirements for Class C shallow land burial of waste materials, (b) permits limited hands-on maintenance outside the magnet's shield within 2 days of a shutdown, and (c) meets all requirements for engineered safety. The achievement of a fusion reactor with at least the characteristics of the reference reactor is a realistic goal. Therefore, in making design choices or in developing particular materials or alloys for fusion reactor applications, consideration must be given to both the activation characteristics of a material and its engineering practicality for a given application

  17. Activation product transport in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, A.C.; Vogelsang, W.F.

    1984-01-01

    Activated corrosion and neutron sputtering products will enter the coolant and/or tritium breeding material of fusion reactor power plants and experiments and cause personnel access problems. Radiation levels around plant components due to these products will cause difficulties with maintenance and repair operations throughout the plant. A computer code, RAPTOR, has been developed to determine the transport of these products in fusion reactor coolant/tritium breeding materials. Without special treatment, it is likely that fusion reactor power plant operators could experience dose rates as high as 8 rem per hour around a number of plant components after only a few years of operation. (orig.)

  18. Development of 'low activation superconducting wire' for an advanced fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishinuma, Y.; Yamada, S.; Sagara, A.; Kikuchi, A.; Takeuchi, T.; Matsuda, K.; Taniguchi, H.

    2011-01-01

    In the D-T burning plasma reactor beyond ITER such as DEMO and fusion power plants assuming the steady-state and long time operation, it will be necessary to consider carefully induced radioactivity and neutron irradiation properties on the all components for fusion reactors. The decay time of the induced radioactivity can control the schedule and scenarios of the maintenance and shutdown on the fusion reactor. V 3 Ga and MgB 2 compound have shorter decay time within 1 years and they will be desirable as a candidate material to realize 'low activation and high magnetic field superconducting magnet' for advanced fusion reactor. However, it is well known that J c -B properties of V 3 Ga and MgB 2 wires are lower than that of the Nb-based A15 compound wires, so the J c -B enhancements on the V 3 Ga and MgB 2 wires are required in order to apply for an advanced fusion reactor. We approached and succeeded to developing the new process in order to improve J c properties of V 3 Ga and MgB 2 wires. In this paper, the recent activities for the J c improvements and detailed new process in V 3 Ga and MgB 2 wires are investigated. (author)

  19. Progress of nuclear fusion research and review on development of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Set up in October 1971, the ad hoc Committee on Survey of Nuclear Fusion Reactors has worked on overall fusion reactor aspects and definition of the future problems under four working groups of core, nuclear heat, materials and system. The presect volume is intended to provide reference materials in the field of fusion reactor engineering, prepared by members of the committee. Contents are broadly the following: concept of the nuclear fusion reactor, fusion core engineering, fusion reactor blanket engineering, fusion reactor materials engineering, and system problems in development of fusion reactors. (Mori, K.)

  20. Designing the Cascade inertial confinement fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    The primary goal in designing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactors is to produce electrical power as inexpensively as possible, with minimum activation and without compromising safety. This paper discusses a method for designing the Cascade rotating ceramic-granule-blanket reactor (Pitts, 1985) and its associated power plant (Pitts and Maya, 1985). Although focus is on the cascade reactor, the design method and issues presented are applicable to most other ICF reactors

  1. SOLASE: a conceptual laser fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Moses, G.A.

    1977-12-01

    The SOLASE conceptual laser fusion reactor has been designed to elucidate the technological problems posed by inertial confinement fusion reactors. This report contains a detailed description of all aspects of the study including the physics of pellet implosion and burn, optics and target illumination, last mirror design, laser system analysis, cavity design, pellet fabrication and delivery, vacuum system requirements, blanket design, thermal hydraulics, tritium analysis, neutronics calculations, radiation effects, stress analysis, shield design, reactor and plant building layout, maintenance procedures, and power cycle design. The reactor is designed as a 1000 MW/sub e/ unit for central station electric power generation

  2. Introduction to magnetic fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Kenji

    1988-01-01

    Trend of the tokamak reactor design works so far carried out is reviewed, and method of conceptual design for commercial fusion reactor is critically considered concerning the black-box conpepts. System-framework of the engineering of magnetic fusion (commercial) reactor design is proposed as four steps. Based on it the next design studies are recommended in parallel approaches for making real-overcome of reactor material problem, from the view point of technological realization and not from the economical one. Real trials are involved. (author)

  3. Inertial fusion reactors and magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornwell, J.B.; Pendergrass, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The application of magnetic fields of simple configurations and modest strengths to direct target debris ions out of cavities can alleviate recognized shortcomings of several classes of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactors. Complex fringes of the strong magnetic fields of heavy-ion fusion (HIF) focusing magnets may intrude into reactor cavities and significantly affect the trajectories of target debris ions. The results of an assessment of potential benefits from the use of magnetic fields in ICF reactors and of potential problems with focusing-magnet fields in HIF reactors conducted to set priorities for continuing studies are reported. Computational tools are described and some preliminary results are presented

  4. Recent results on steady state and confinement improvement research on JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ide, Shunsuke

    2000-01-01

    On the JT-60U tokamak, fusion plasma research for realization of a steady state tokamak reactor has been pursued. Towards that goal, confinement improved plasmas such as H-mode, high β p , reversed magnetic shear (RS) and latter two combined with H-mode edge pedestal have been developed and investigated intensively. A key issue to achieve non-inductive current drive relevant to a steady state fusion reactor is to increase the fraction of the bootstrap current and match the spatial profile to the optimum. In 1999, as the result of the optimization, the equivalent deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion gain (Q DT eq ) of 0.5 was sustained for 0.8 s, which is roughly equal to the energy confinement time, in a RS plasma. In order to achieve a RS plasma in steady state two approach have been explored. One is to use external current driver such as lower hybrid current drive (LHCD), and by optimizing LHCD a quasi-steady RS discharge was obtained. The other approach is to utilize bootstrap current as much as possible, and with highly increased fraction of the bootstrap current, a confinement enhancement factor of 3.6 was maintained for 2.7 s in a RS plasma with H-mode edge. A heating and current drive system in the electron cyclotron range of frequency for localized heating and current drive has been installed on JT-60U, and in initial experiments a clear increase of the central electron temperature in a RS high density central region was confirmed only with injected power of 0.75 MW. (author)

  5. Safety and environmental aspects of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilic, H.; Jensen, B.

    1982-01-01

    This paper deals with those problems concerning safety and environmental aspects of the future fusion reactors (e.g. fuel cycle, magnetic failure, after heat disturbances, radioactive waste and magnetic field)

  6. Fuel cycle problems in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickman, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Fuel cycle problems of fusion reactors evolve around the breeding, recovery, containment, and recycling of tritium. These processes are described, and their implications and alternatives are discussed. Technically, fuel cycle problems are solvable; economically, their feasibility is not yet known

  7. Note: Readout of a micromechanical magnetometer for the ITER fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimminen, H.; Kyynäräinen, J.

    2013-01-01

    We present readout instrumentation for a MEMS magnetometer, placed 30 m away from the MEMS element. This is particularly useful when sensing is performed in high-radiation environment, where the semiconductors in the readout cannot survive. High bandwidth transimpedance amplifiers are used to cancel the cable capacitances of several nanofarads. A frequency doubling readout scheme is used for crosstalk elimination. Signal-to-noise ratio in the range of 60 dB was achieved and with sub-percent nonlinearity. The presented instrument is intended for the steady-state magnetic field measurements in the ITER fusion reactor.

  8. Fusion reactor safety studies, FY 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darby, J.B. Jr.

    1978-04-01

    This report reviews the technical progress in the fusion reactor safety studies performed during FY 1977 in the Fusion Power Program at the Argonne National Laboratory. The subjects reported on include safety considerations of the vacuum vessel and first-wall design for the ANL/EPR, the thermal responses of a tokamak reactor first wall, the vacuum wall electrical resistive requirements in relationship to magnet safety, and a major effort is reported on considerations and experiments on air detritiation

  9. High temperature fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkness, S.D.; dePaz, J.F.; Gohar, M.Y.; Stevens, H.C.

    1979-01-01

    Fusion energy may have unique advantages over other systems as a source for high temperature process heat. A conceptual design of a blanket for a 7 m tokamak reactor has been developed that is capable of producing 1100 0 C process heat at a pressure of approximately 10 atmospheres. The design is based on the use of a falling bed of MgO spheres as the high temperature heat transfer system. By preheating the spheres with energy taken from the low temperature tritium breeding part of the blanket, 1086 MW of energy can be generated at 1100 0 C from a system that produces 3000 MW of total energy while sustaining a tritium breeding ratio of 1.07. The tritium breeding is accomplished using Li 2 O modules both in front of (6 cm thick) and behind (50 cm thick) the high temperature ducts. Steam is used as the first wall and front tritium breeding module coolant while helium is used in the rear tritium breeding region. The system produces 600 MW of net electricity for use on the grid

  10. Trends in fusion reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herring, J.S.; Holland, D.F.; Piet, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    Fusion has the potential to be an attractive energy source. From the safety and environmental perspective, fusion must avoid concerns about catastrophic accidents and unsolvable waste disposal. In addition, fusion must achieve an acceptable level of risk from operational accidents that result in public exposure and economic loss. Finally, fusion reactors must control routine radioactive effluent, particularly tritium. Major progress in achieving this potential rests on development of low-activation materials or alternative fuels. The safety and performance of various material choices and fuels for commercial fusion reactors can be investigated relatively inexpensively through reactor design studies. These studies bring together experts in a wide range of backgrounds and force the group to either agree on a reactor design or identify areas for further study. Fusion reactors will be complex with distributed radioactive inventories. The next generation of experiments will be critical in demonstrating that acceptable levels of safe operation can be achieved. These machines will use materials which are available today and for which a large database exists (e.g. for 316 stainless steel). Researchers have developed a good understanding of the risks associated with operation of these devices. Specifically, consequences from coolant system failures, loss of vacuum events, tritium releases, and liquid metal reactions have been studied. Recent studies go beyond next step designs and investigate commercial reactor concerns including tritium release and liquid metal reactions. 18 refs

  11. Efficient modeling for pulsed activation in inertial fusion energy reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanz, J.; Yuste, P.; Reyes, S.; Latkowski, J.F.

    2000-01-01

    First structural wall material (FSW) materials in inertial fusion energy (IFE) power reactors will be irradiated under typical repetition rates of 1-10 Hz, for an operation time as long as the total reactor lifetime. The main objective of the present work is to determine whether a continuous-pulsed (CP) approach can be an efficient method in modeling the pulsed activation process for operating conditions of FSW materials. The accuracy and practicability of this method was investigated both analytically and (for reaction/decay chains of two and three nuclides) by computational simulation. It was found that CP modeling is an accurate and practical method for calculating the neutron-activation of FSW materials. Its use is recommended instead of the equivalent steady-state method or the exact pulsed modeling. Moreover, the applicability of this method to components of an IFE power plant subject to repetition rates lower than those of the FSW is still being studied. The analytical investigation was performed for 0.05 Hz, which could be typical for the coolant. Conclusions seem to be similar to those obtained for the FSW. However, further future work is needed for a final answer

  12. Implications of steady-state operation on divertor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevier, D.L.; Reis, E.E.; Baxi, C.B.; Silke, G.W.; Wong, C.P.C.; Hill, D.N.

    1996-01-01

    As fusion experiments progress towards long pulse or steady state operation, plasma facing components are undergoing a significant change in their design. This change represents the transition from inertially cooled pulsed systems to steady state designs of significant power handling capacity. A limited number of Plasma Facing Component (PFC) systems are in operation or planning to address this steady state challenge at low heat flux. However in most divertor designs components are required to operate at heat fluxes at 5 MW/m 2 or above. The need for data in this area has resulted in a significant amount of thermal/hydraulic and thermal fatigue testing being done on prototypical elements. Short pulse design solutions are not adequate for longer pulse experiments and the areas of thermal design, structural design, material selection, maintainability, and lifetime prediction are undergoing significant changes. A prudent engineering approach will guide us through the transitional phase of divertor design to steady-state power plant components. This paper reviews the design implications in this transition to steady state machines and the status of the community efforts to meet evolving design requirements. 54 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  13. The technology and science of steady-state operation in magnetically confined plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becoulet, A; Hoang, G T

    2008-01-01

    fusion device. The first includes specific additional heating and current drive methods (through externally launched radio-frequency waves or energetic atoms), fuelling and pumping methods, dedicated plasma diagnostics as well as software technologies required for mandatory real time control loops, involving such actuators and sensors. The second class of technologies, generic to any magnetic fusion device, includes the superconducting magnet technologies, in order to provide a stationary confinement magnetic field, the actively cooled plasma facing components (PFCs) handling either radiated or convected power fluxes (often in excess of several tens of MW m -2 ), dedicated diagnostics monitoring the interfaces (e.g. infrared survey of PFCs), etc. The detailed specifications of all elements must comply with a reactor-relevant environment, in terms of operational parameters as well as lifetime. The paper presents a summary of the present status and understanding of the technology and science of steady-state operation in magnetically confined plasmas, as well as the forthcoming work programme dedicated to the vast R and D programme undertaken in this domain, in particular within the European fusion framework.

  14. Tritium problems in fusion reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickman, R.G.

    1975-01-01

    A brief introduction is given to the role tritium will play in the development of fusion power. The biological and worldwide environmental behavior of tritium is reviewed. The tritium problems expected in fusion power reactors are outlined. A few thoughts on tritium permeation and recent results for tritium cleanup and CT 4 accumulation are presented. Problems involving the recovery of tritium from the breeding blanket in fusion power reactors are also considered, including the possible effect of impurities in lithium blankets and the use of lithium as a regenerable getter pump. (auth)

  15. LANSCE steady state unperturbed thermal neutron fluxes at 100 μA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.

    1989-01-01

    The ''maximum'' unperturbed, steady state thermal neutron flux for LANSCE is calculated to be 2 /times/ 10 13 n/cm 2 -s for 100 μA of 800-MeV protons. This LANSCE neutron flux is a comparable entity to a steady state reactor thermal neutron flux. LANSCE perturbed steady state thermal neutron fluxes have also been calculated. Because LANSCE is a pulsed neutron source, much higher ''peak'' (in time) neutron fluxes can be generated than at a steady state reactor source. 5 refs., 5 figs

  16. Parametric and alternative studies for fusion experimental reactor (FER) (FY 1984)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Since 1980 the design study has been conducted at JAERI for the Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) which has been proposed to be the next machine to JT-60 in the Japanese long term program of fusion reactor development. Starting from 1984 FER design is being reviewed and redesigned. This report is a part of the interim report which describes the results obtained in the review and redesign activities in FY 1984. This report includes the following parametric and alternative studies for the FER reference design: 1) parametric studies concerning with core plasma magnets, and operation scenario and power supply, 2) tritium breeding blanket, 3) the study for the steady state operation FER, 4) OTHERS. (AUTHOR)

  17. Composites as structural materials in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megusar, J.

    1989-01-01

    In fusion reactors, materials are used under extreme conditions of temperature, stress, irradiation, and chemical environment. The absence of adequate materials will seriously impede the development of fusion reactors and might ultimately be one of the major difficulties. Some of the current materials problems can be solved by proper design features. For others, the solution will have to rely on materials development. A parallel and balanced effort between the research in plasma physics and fusion-related technology and in materials research is, therefore, the best strategy to ultimately achieve economic, safe, and environmentally acceptable fusion. The essential steps in developing composites for structural components of fusion reactors include optimization of mechanical properties followed by testing under fusion-reactor-relevant conditions. In optimizing the mechanical behavior of composite materials, a wealth of experience can be drawn from the research on ceramic matrix and metal matrix composite materials sponsored by the Department of Defense. The particular aspects of this research relevant to fusion materials development are methodology of the composite materials design and studies of new processing routes to develop composite materials with specific properties. Most notable examples are the synthesis of fibers, coatings, and ceramic materials in their final shapes form polymeric precursors and the infiltration of fibrous preforms by molten metals

  18. Open-ended fusion devices and reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabe, T.; Nariai, H.

    1983-01-01

    Conceptual design studies on fusion reactors based upon open-ended confinement schemes, such as the tandem mirror and rf plugged cusp, have been carried out in Japan. These studies may be classified into two categories: near-term devices (Fusion Engineering Test Facility), and long-term fusion power recators. In the first category, a two-component cusp neutron source was proposed. In the second category, the GAMMA-R, a tandem-mirror power reactor, and the RFC-R, an axisymetric mirror and cusp, reactor studies are being conducted at the University of Tsukuba and the Institute of Plasma Physics. Mirror Fusion Engineering Facility parameters and a schematic are shown. The GAMMA-R central-cell design schematic is also shown

  19. Studies of conceptual spheromak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsurai, M.; Yamada, M.

    1982-01-01

    Preliminary design studies are carried out for a spheromak fusion reactor. Simplified circuit theory is applied to obtain the characteristic relations among various parameters of the spheromak configuration for an aspect ratio of A >or approx. 1.6. These relations are used to calculate the parameters for the conceptual designs of three types of fusion reactor: (1) the DT reactor with two-component-type operation, (2) the ignited DT reactor, and (3) the ignited catalysed-type DD reactor. With a total wall loading of approx. 4 MW.m -2 , it is found that edge magnetic fields of only approx. 4 T (DT) and approx. 9 T (Cat. DD) are required for ignited reactors of 1 m plasma (minor) radius with output powers in the gigawatt range. An assessment of various schemes of generation, compression and translation of spheromak plasmas is presented. (author)

  20. Breeder control fusion reactor. Topical interview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlueter, A [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching/Muenchen (Germany, F.R.)

    1977-09-01

    The energy sources of the future are extremely controversial. The consumption of fossil fuel shall decrease during the next decades, because exhaustion of the resources, pollution, increase of CO/sub 2/ in the atmosphere and other reasons. But at present the question it not yet settled which alternative energy system should replace the fossil fuel. First of all nuclear energy in the form of fission reactions seems to come into operation to a larger extent. The next step may be the controlled thermonuclear fusion reaction. Furthermore, a comparison between fusion and fission is given which shows that fusion would bring about less risks than the breeders. An advantage of the fusion reactor would be the fact that the fuel cycle is closed. Unfortunately, the physical questions are not as yet satisfactorily clarified so that one cannot be sure whether a fusion reactor can really be built.

  1. SOLASE: a conceptual laser fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Moses, G.A.

    1977-12-01

    The SOLASE conceptual laser fusion reactor has been designed to elucidate the technological problems posed by inertial confinement fusion ractors. This report contains a detailed description of all aspects of the study including the physics of pellet implosion and burn, optics and target illumination, last mirror design, laser system analysis, cavity design, pellet fabrication and delivery, vacuum system requirements, blanket design, thermal hydraulics, tritium analysis, neutronics calculations, radiation effects, stress analysis, shield design, reactor and plant building layout, maintenance procedures, and power cycle design. The reactor is designed as a 1000 MW/sub e/ unit for central station electric power generation

  2. Status of fusion reactor blanket design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.; Sze, D.K.

    1986-02-01

    The recent Blanket Comparison and Selection Study (BCSS), which was a comprehensive evaluation of fusion reactor blanket design and the status of blanket technology, serves as an excellent basis for further development of blanket technology. This study provided an evaluation of over 130 blanket concepts for the reference case of electric power producing, DT fueled reactors in both Tokamak and Tandem Mirror (TMR) configurations. Based on a specific set of reactor operating parameters, the current understanding of materials and blanket technology, and a uniform evaluation methodology developed as part of the study, a limited number of concepts were identified that offer the greatest potential for making fusion an attractive energy source

  3. A look at the fusion reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohatgi, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    The prospects of fusion energy have been summarised in this paper. The rapid progress in the field in recent years can be attributed to the advances in various technologies. The commercial fusion energy depends more heavily on the evolution and improvement in these technologies. With better understanding of plasma physics, the fusion reactor designs have become more realistic and comprehensive. It is now possible to make intercomparison between various concepts within the frame work of the established technologies. Assuming certain growth rate of the technological development, it is estimated that fusion energy can become available during the early part of the next century. (author)

  4. Extrap conceptual fusion reactor design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eninger, J.E; Lehnert, B.

    1987-12-01

    A study has recently been initiated to asses the fusion reactor potential of the Extrap concept. A reactor model is defined that fulfills certain economic and environmental criteria. This model is applied to Extrap and a reference reactor is outlined. The design is optimized by varying parameters subject to both physics and engineering constraints. Several design options are examined and key engineering issues are identified and addressed. Some preliminary results and conclusions of this work are summarized. (authors)

  5. Space Propulsion via Spherical Torus Fusion Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Craig H.; Juhasz, Albert J.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Dudzinski, Leonard A.

    2003-01-01

    A conceptual vehicle design enabling fast outer solar system travel was produced predicated on a small aspect ratio spherical torus nuclear fusion reactor. Analysis revealed that the vehicle could deliver a 108 mt crew habitat payload to Saturn rendezvous in 204 days, with an initial mass in low Earth orbit of 1630 mt. Engineering conceptual design, analysis, and assessment were performed on all major systems including nuclear fusion reactor, magnetic nozzle, power conversion, fast wave plasma heating, fuel pellet injector, startup/re-start fission reactor and battery, and other systems. Detailed fusion reactor design included analysis of plasma characteristics, power balance and utilization, first wall, toroidal field coils, heat transfer, and neutron/X-ray radiation

  6. New materials in nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Shuichi

    1988-01-01

    In the autumn of 1987, the critical condition was attained in the JET in Europe and Japanese JT-60, thus the first subject in the physical verification of nuclear fusion reactors was resolved, and the challenge to the next attainment of self ignition condition started. As the development process of nuclear fusion reactors, there are the steps of engineering, economical and social verifications after this physical verification, and in respective steps, there are the critical problems related to materials, therefore the development of new materials must be advanced. The condition of using nuclear fusion reactors is characterized by high fluence, high thermal flux and strong magnetic field, and under such extreme condition, the microscopic structures of materials change, and they behave much differently from usual case. The subjects of material development for nuclear fusion reactors, the material data base being built up, the materials for facing plasma and high thermal flux, first walls, blanket structures, electric insulators and others are described. The serious effect of irradiation and the rate of defect inducement must be taken in consideration in the structural materials for nuclear fusion reactors. (Kako, I.)

  7. New Tore Supra steady state operating scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, G.; Parlange, F.; van Houtte, D.; Wijnands, T.

    1995-01-01

    This document deals with plasma control in steady state conditions. A new plasma control systems enabling feedback control of global plasma equilibrium parameters has been developed. It also enables to operate plasma discharge in steady state regime. (TEC). 4 refs., 5 figs

  8. The mechanical performance of the fusion reactor first wall. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daenner, W.; Raeder, J.

    1977-03-01

    While the first part of this report was concerned with the steady-state mechanical analysis of the fusion reactor first wall, this part deals with the analysis based upon pulsed load conditions. In a first section we elaborate various solutions of the non-stationary heat conduction problem in plane geometry capable of describing the temperature response of the wall due to characteristic plasma pulse sequences. these solutions are input to a quasi-steady-state stress and strain analysis. Finally, the results of this analysis are set in relation to the fatigue properties of the wall material. A further section presents a description of a computer program which uses the mathematical procedure described. The results of some test runs are followed by those of detailed parameter studies. In the course of these calculations the influences of a number of design and operational quantities of a fusion reactor were investigated. It turned out that the choice of wall thickness and wall loading are of predominant importance for the first wall fatigue life. (orig.) [de

  9. Mirror hybrid (fusion--fission) reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, D.J.; Lee, J.D.; Neef, W.S.; Devoto, R.S.; Galloway, T.R.; Fink, J.H.; Schultz, K.R.; Culver, D.; Rao, S.

    1977-10-01

    The reference mirror hybrid reactor design performed by LLL and General Atomic is summarized. The reactor parameters have been chosen to minimize the cost of producing fissile fuel for consumption in fission power reactors. As in the past, we have emphasized the use of existing technology where possible and a minimum extrapolation of technology otherwise. The resulting reactor may thus be viewed as a comparatively near-term goal of the fusion program, and we project improved performance for the hybrid in the future as more advanced technology becomes available

  10. Conceptual design of fusion experimental reactor (FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-02-01

    This report describes the engineering conceptual design of Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) which is to be built as a next generation tokamak machine. This design covers overall reactor systems including MHD equilibrium analysis, mechanical configuration of reactor, divertor, pumped limiter, first wall/breeding blanket/shield, toroidal field magnet, poloidal field magnet, cryostat, electromagnetic analysis, vacuum system, power handling and conversion, NBI, RF heating device, tritium system, neutronics, maintenance, cooling system and layout of facilities. The engineering comparison of a divertor with pumped limiters and safety analysis of reactor systems are also conducted. (author)

  11. Fusion reactor remote maintenance study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sniderman, M.

    1979-04-01

    An analysis of a major maintenance operation, the remote replacement of a modular sector of a tokamak reactor, was performed in substantial detail. Specific assumptions were developed which included concepts from various existing designs so that the operation which was studied includes some design features generic to any fusion reactor design. Based on the work performed in this study, the principal conclusions are: (1) It appears feasible to design a tokamak fusion reactor plant with availability comparable to existing fossil and fission plants, but this will require diligence and comprehensive planning during the complete design phase. (2) Since the total fusion program is paced by the success of each device, maintenance considerations must be incorporated into each device during design, even if the device is an experimental unit. (3) Innovative approaches, such as automatic computer controlled operations, should be developed so that large step reductions in planned maintenance times can be achieved

  12. Fusion-Fission hybrid reactors and nonproliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.

    1984-09-01

    New options for the development of the nuclear energy economy which might become available by a successful development of fusion-breeders or fusion-fission hybrid power reactors, identified and their nonproliferative attributes are discussed. The more promising proliferation-resistance ettributes identified include: (1) Justification for a significant delay in the initiation of fuel processing, (2) Denaturing the plutonium with 238 Pu before its use in power reactors of any kind, and (3) Making practical the development of denatured uranium fuel cycles and, in particular, denaturing the uranium with 232 U. Fuel resource utilization, time-table and economic considerations associated with the use of fusion-breeders are also discussed. It is concluded that hybrid reactors may enable developing a nuclear energy economy which is more proliferation resistant than possible otherwise, whileat the same time, assuring high utilization of t he uranium and thorium resources in an economically acceptable way. (author)

  13. Remote assembly and maintenance of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becquet, M.C.; Farfaletti-Casali, F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper intend to present the state of the art in the field of remote assembly and maintenance, including system analysis design and operation for controlled fusion device such as JET, and the next NET and ITER reactors. The operational constraints of fusion reactors with respect to temperature, radiations dose rates and cumulated doses are considered with the resulting design requirements. Concepts like articulated boom, in-vessel vehicle and blanket handling device are presented. The close relations between computer simulations and experimental validation of those concepts are emphasized to ensure reliability of the operational behavior. Mockups and prototypes in reduced and full scale, as operating machines are described to illustrate the progress in remote operations for fusion reactors. The developments achieved at the Institute for System Engineering and Informatics of the Joint Research Center, in the field of remote blanket maintenance, reliability assessment of RH systems and remote cut and welding of lips joints are considered. (author)

  14. Nuclear data needs for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohar, Y.

    1986-01-01

    The nuclear design of fusion components (e.g., first wall, blanket, shield, magnet, limiter, divertor, etc.) requires an accurate prediction of the radiation field, the radiation damage parameters, and the activation analysis. The fusion nucleonics for these tasks are reviewed with special attention to point out nuclear data needs and deficiencies which effect the design process. The main areas included in this review are tritium breeding analyses, nuclear heating calculations, radiation damage in reactor components, shield designs, and results of uncertainty analyses as applied to fusion reactor studies. Design choices and reactor parameters that impact the neutronics performance of the blanket are discussed with emphasis on the tritium breeding ratio. Nuclear data required for kerma factors, shielding analysis, and radiation damage are discussed. Improvements in the evaluated data libraries are described to overcome the existing problems. 84 refs., 11 figs., 9 tabs

  15. Solution of generalized control system equations at steady state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilim, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    Although a number of reactor systems codes feature generalized control system models, none of the models offer a steady-state solution finder. Indeed, if a transient is to begin from steady-state conditions, the user must provide estimates for the control system initial conditions and run a null transient until the plant converges to steady state. Several such transients may have to be run before values for control system demand signals are found that produce the desired plant steady state. The intent of this paper is (a) to present the control system equations assumed in the SASSYS reactor systems code and to identify the appropriate set of initial conditions, (b) to describe the generalized block diagram approach used to represent these equations, and (c) to describe a solution method and algorithm for computing these initial conditions from the block diagram. The algorithm has been installed in the SASSYS code for use with the code's generalized control system model. The solution finder greatly enhances the effectiveness of the code and the efficiency of the user in running it

  16. Nuclear data for fusion reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    The meeting was organized in four sessions and four working groups devoted to the following topics: Requirements of nuclear data for fusion reactor technology (6 papers); Status of experimental and theoretical investigations of microscopic nuclear data (10 papers); Status of existing libraries for fusion neutronic calculations (5 papers); and Status of integral experiments and benchmark tests (6 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  17. Health physics in fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.Y.; Dinner, P.J.

    1984-06-01

    Experience in the control of tritium exposures to workers and the public gained through the design and operation of Ontario Hydro's nuclear stations has been applied to fusion projects and to design studies on emerging fusion reactor concepts. Ontario Hydro performance in occupational tritium exposure control and environmental impact is reviewed. Application of tritium control technologies and dose management methodology during facility design is highlighted

  18. TORFA - toroidal reactor for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.

    1980-09-01

    The near-term goal of the US controlled fusion program should be the development, for practical applications, of an intense, quasi-steady, reliable 14-MeV neutron source with an electrical utilization efficiency at least 10 times larger than the value characterizing beam/solid-target neutron generators. This report outlines a method for implementing that goal, based on tokamak fusion reactors featuring resistive toroidal-field coils designed for ease of demountability

  19. Compact approach to fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Miller, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    The potential of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) for development into an efficient, compact, copper-coil fusion reactor has been quantified by comprehensive parametric tradeoff studies. These compact systems promise to be competitive in size, power density, and cost to alternative energy sources. Conceptual engineering designs that largely substantiate these promising results have since been completed. This 1000-MWe(net) design is described along with a detailed rationale and physics/technology assessment for the compact approach to fusion

  20. Investigation of nonplanar modular coil systems for stellarator fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmeyer, E.

    1988-12-01

    Steady-state stellarators constitute an important option for a future fusion reactor. The helical magnetic field required for plasma confinement can be produced by means of a set of modular nonplanar coils. In order to achieve optimum power density of the plasma, the magnetic flux density inside the torus is made as high as possible. State-of-the-art estimates allow values of the magnetic flux density on axis of B 0 = 4-7 T. The present report is concerned with investigations on modular nonplanar stellarator coil systems. Coil systems with poloidal periodicity l=2 and a coil system of the W VII-AS type with superposed l=0, 1, 2, 3 terms are treated. Furthermore, the parameters are simultaneously varied while keeping constant the ratios of certain magnitudes. In the parameter space of the geometric values and coil number the following quantities are evaluated: maximum magnetic flux density in the coil domain, stored magnetic energy of the coil system, magnetic force density distribution or magnetic forces, and mechanical stress distribution in the coils. Numerical methods are applied in the programme systems used for these calculations. The aim of the study is to determine an optimum regime for the above parameters. The numerical results are compared with those of analytical approximation solutions. (orig.)

  1. Prospects for improved fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.; Hagenson, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    Ideally, a new energy source must be capable of displacing old energy sources while providing both economic opportunities and enhanced environmental benefits. The attraction of an essentially unlimited fuel supply has generated a strong impetus to develop advanced fission breeders and, even more strongly, the exploitation of nuclear fusion. Both fission and fusion systems trade a reduced fuel charge for a more capital-intensive plant needed to utilize a cheaper and more abundant fuel. Results from early conceptual designs of fusion power plants, however, indicated a capital intensiveness that could override cost savings promised by an inexpensive fuel cycle. Early warnings of these problems appeared, and generalized routes to more economically attractive systems have been suggested; specific examples have also recently been given. Although a direct reduction in the cost (and mass) of the fusion power core (FPC, i.e., plasma chamber, first wall, blanket, shield, coils, and primary structure) most directly reduces the overall cost of fusion power, with the mass power density (MPD, ratio of net electric power to FPC mass, kWe/tonne) being suggested as a figure-of-merit in this respect, other technical, safety/environmental, and institutional issues also enter into the definition of and direction for improved fusion concepts. These latter issues and related tradeoffs are discussed

  2. Simulations of KSTAR high performance steady state operation scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Yong-Su; Kessel, C.E.; Park, J.M.; Yi, Sumin; Kim, J.Y.; Becoulet, A.; Sips, A.C.C.

    2009-01-01

    We report the results of predictive modelling of high performance steady state operation scenarios in KSTAR. Firstly, the capabilities of steady state operation are investigated with time-dependent simulations using a free-boundary plasma equilibrium evolution code coupled with transport calculations. Secondly, the reproducibility of high performance steady state operation scenarios developed in the DIII-D tokamak, of similar size to that of KSTAR, is investigated using the experimental data taken from DIII-D. Finally, the capability of ITER-relevant steady state operation is investigated in KSTAR. It is found that KSTAR is able to establish high performance steady state operation scenarios; β N above 3, H 98 (y, 2) up to 2.0, f BS up to 0.76 and f NI equals 1.0. In this work, a realistic density profile is newly introduced for predictive simulations by employing the scaling law of a density peaking factor. The influence of the current ramp-up scenario and the transport model is discussed with respect to the fusion performance and non-inductive current drive fraction in the transport simulations. As observed in the experiments, both the heating and the plasma current waveforms in the current ramp-up phase produce a strong effect on the q-profile, the fusion performance and also on the non-inductive current drive fraction in the current flattop phase. A criterion in terms of q min is found to establish ITER-relevant steady state operation scenarios. This will provide a guideline for designing the current ramp-up phase in KSTAR. It is observed that the transport model also affects the predictive values of fusion performance as well as the non-inductive current drive fraction. The Weiland transport model predicts the highest fusion performance as well as non-inductive current drive fraction in KSTAR. In contrast, the GLF23 model exhibits the lowest ones. ITER-relevant advanced scenarios cannot be obtained with the GLF23 model in the conditions given in this work

  3. Light ion driven inertial fusion reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, D.L.; Sweeney, M.A.; Buttram, M.T.; Prestwich, K.R.; Moses, G.A.; peterson, R.R.; Lovell, E.G.; Englestad, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    The possibility of designing fusion reactor systems using intense beams of light ions has been investigated. concepts for beam production, transport, and focusing on target have been analyzed in light of more conservative target performance estimates. Analyses of the major criteria which govern the design of the beam-target-cavity tried indicate the feasibility of designing power systems at the few hundred megawatt (electric) level. This paper discusses light ion fusion reactor (LIFR) concepts and presents an assessment of the design limitations through quantitative examples

  4. Progress of electromagnetic analysis for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, T.; Ruatto, P.; Boccaccini, L.V.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the recent progress of electromagnetic analysis research for fusion reactors including methods, codes, verification tests and some applications. Due to the necessity of the research effort for the structural design of large tokamak devices since the 1970's with the help of the introduction of new numerical methods and the advancement of computer technologies, three-dimensional analysis methods have become as practical as shell approximation methods. The electromagnetic analysis is now applied to the structural design of new fusion reactors. Some more modeling and verification tests are necessary when the codes are applied to new materials with nonlinear material properties. (orig.)

  5. Present status of fusion reactor materials, 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasaki, Ryukichi; Shiraishi, Kensuke; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Murakami, Yoshio; Takamura, Saburo

    1982-01-01

    Recently, the design of fusion reactors such as Intor has been carried out, and various properties that fusion reactor materials should have been clarified. In the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the research and development of materials aiming at a tokamak type experimental fusion reactor are in progress. In this paper, the problems, the present status of research and development and the future plan about the surface materials and structural materials for the first wall, blanket materials and magnet materials are explained. The construction of the critical plasma testing facility JT-60 developed by JAERI has progressed smoothly, and the operation is expected in 1985. The research changes from that of plasma physics to that of reactor technology. In tokamak type fusion reactors, high temperature D-T plasma is contained with strong magnetic field in vacuum vessels, and the neutrons produced by nuclear reaction, charged particles diffusing from plasma and neutral particles by charge exchange strike the first wall. The PCA by improving 316 stainless steel is used as the structural material, and TiC coating techniques are developed. As the blanket material, Li 2 O is studied, and superconducting magnets are developed. (Koko, I.)

  6. Computational multiple steady states for enzymatic esterification of ethanol and oleic acid in an isothermal CSTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Pang-Yen; Chuang, Guo-Syong; Chao, An-Chong; Li, Hsing-Ya

    2005-05-01

    The capacity of complex biochemical reaction networks (consisting of 11 coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations) to show multiple steady states, was investigated. The system involved esterification of ethanol and oleic acid by lipase in an isothermal continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). The Deficiency One Algorithm and the Subnetwork Analysis were applied to determine the steady state multiplicity. A set of rate constants and two corresponding steady states are computed. The phenomena of bistability, hysteresis and bifurcation are discussed. Moreover, the capacity of steady state multiplicity is extended to the family of the studied reaction networks.

  7. Blankets for fusion reactors : materials and neutronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, S.H. de.

    1980-03-01

    The studies about Fusion Reactors have lead to several problems for which there is no general agreement about the best solution. Nevertheless, several points seem to be well defined, at least for the first generation of reactors. The fuel, for example, should be a mixture of deuterium and tritium. Therefore, the reactor should be able to generate the tritium to be burned and also to transform kinetic energy of the fusion neutrons into heat in a process similar to the fission reactors. The best materials for the composition of the blanket were first selected and then the neutronics for the proposed system was developed. The neutron flux in the blanket was calculated using the discrete ordinates transport code, ANISN. All the nuclides cross sections came from the DLC-28/CTR library, that processed the ENDF/B data, using the SUPERTOG Program. (Author) [pt

  8. Occupational health physics at a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shank, K.E.; Easterly, C.E.; Shoup, R.L.

    1975-01-01

    Future generation of electrical power using controlled thermonuclear reactors will involve both traditional and new concerns for health protection. A review of the problems associated with exposures to tritium and magnetic fields is presented with emphasis on the occupational worker. The radiological aspects of tritium, inventories and loss rates of tritium for fusion reactors, and protection of the occupational worker are discussed. Magnetic fields in which workers may be exposed routinely and possible biological effects are also discussed

  9. High-β steady-state advanced tokamak regimes for ITER and FIRE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meade, D.M.; Sauthoff, N.R.; Kessel, C.E.; Budny, R.V.; Gorelenkov, N.; Jardin, S.C.; Schmidt, J.A.; Navratil, G.A.; Bialek, J.; Ulrickson, M.A.; Rognlein, T.; Mandrekas, J.

    2005-01-01

    An attractive tokamak-based fusion power plant will require the development of high-β steady-state advanced tokamak regimes to produce a high-gain burning plasma with a large fraction of self-driven current and high fusion-power density. Both ITER and FIRE are being designed with the objective to address these issues by exploring and understanding burning plasma physics both in the conventional H-mode regime, and in advanced tokamak regimes with β N ∼ 3 - 4, and f bs ∼50-80%. ITER has employed conservative scenarios, as appropriate for its nuclear technology mission, while FIRE has employed more aggressive assumptions aimed at exploring the scenarios envisioned in the ARIES power-plant studies. The main characteristics of the advanced scenarios presently under study for ITER and FIRE are compared with advanced tokamak regimes envisioned for the European Power Plant Conceptual Study (PPCS-C), the US ARIES-RS Power Plant Study and the Japanese Advanced Steady-State Tokamak Reactor (ASSTR). The goal of the present work is to develop advanced tokamak scenarios that would fully exploit the capability of ITER and FIRE. This paper will summarize the status of the work and indicate critical areas where further R and D is needed. (author)

  10. Tritium resources available for fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovari, M.; Coleman, M.; Cristescu, I.; Smith, R.

    2018-02-01

    The tritium required for ITER will be supplied from the CANDU production in Ontario, but while Ontario may be able to supply 8 kg for a DEMO fusion reactor in the mid-2050s, it will not be able to provide 10 kg at any realistic starting time. The tritium required to start DEMO will depend on advances in plasma fuelling efficiency, burnup fraction, and tritium processing technology. It is in theory possible to start up a fusion reactor with little or no tritium, but at an estimated cost of 2 billion per kilogram of tritium saved, it is not economically sensible. Some heavy water reactor tritium production scenarios with varying degrees of optimism are presented, with the assumption that only Canada, the Republic of Korea, and Romania make tritium available to the fusion community. Results for the tritium available for DEMO in 2055 range from zero to 30 kg. CANDU and similar heavy water reactors could in theory generate additional tritium in a number of ways: (a) adjuster rods containing lithium could be used, giving 0.13 kg per year per reactor; (b) a fuel bundle with a burnable absorber has been designed for CANDU reactors, which might be adapted for tritium production; (c) tritium production could be increased by 0.05 kg per year per reactor by doping the moderator with lithium-6. If a fusion reactor is started up around 2055, governments in Canada, Argentina, China, India, South Korea and Romania will have the opportunity in the years leading up to that to take appropriate steps: (a) build, refurbish or upgrade tritium extraction facilities; (b) extend the lives of heavy water reactors, or build new ones; (c) reduce tritium sales; (d) boost tritium production in the remaining heavy water reactors. All of the alternative production methods considered have serious economic and regulatory drawbacks, and the risk of diversion of tritium or lithium-6 would also be a major concern. There are likely to be serious problems with supplying tritium for future

  11. A conceptual design study of a reversed field pinch fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, S.; Tanaka, S.; Terai, T.; Hashizume, H.

    1989-01-01

    A conceptual design of a Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) fusion reactor with a solid breeder blanket REPUTER-1 has been studied through parametric system studies and detailed design and analysis in order to clarify the technical feasibility of a compact fusion reactor. F-θ pumping is used for driving the plasma current necessary for steady state operation. A maintenance policy of replacing a whole fusion power core including TF coils is proposed to cope with the requirements of high wall loading and high mass power density. For the same reason a normal conductor is selected for most of the coils. The first wall is structurally independent of the blanket. The blanket module is composed of SiC reinforced blocks which form a stable arch so as to keep the stresses in SiC basically compressive. The coolant for the first wall and the limiter is pressurized water, while the coolant for the blanket is helium gas. A number of thin Li 2 O and thick beryllium tiles are packed into the blanket block so as to obtain a proper tritium breeding ratio. A pumped limiter is chosen for the plasma exhaust system. The study has shown the technical feasibility of a high power density fusion power reactor (330 kWe/tonne) with solid breeder blanket and many key physics and engineering issues are also clarified. (orig.)

  12. Scyllac fusion test reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudziak, D.J.; Gerstl, S.A.; Houck, D.L.; Jalbert, R.A.; Krakowski, R.A.; Linford, R.K.; McDonald, T.E.; Rogers, J.D.; Thomassen, K.I.

    1975-01-01

    A general design of the system is given. The implosion heating and compression systems (METS) are described. Tritium handling, shielding and activation of the reactor, and safety and environmental aspects are discussed

  13. Tritium breeding in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.

    1982-10-01

    Key technological problems that influence tritium breeding in fusion blankets are reviewed. The breeding potential of candidate materials is evaluated and compared to the tritium breeding requirements. The sensitivity of tritium breeding to design and nuclear data parameters is reviewed. A framework for an integrated approach to improve tritium breeding prediction is discussed with emphasis on nuclear data requirements

  14. Materials problems associated with fusion reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutton, R.

    This paper outlines the principles of design and operation of conceptual fusion reactors, indicates the level of research funding and activity being proposed at major centres and reviews the major materials problems which have been identified, together with an outline of the experimental techniques which have been suggested for investigating these problems. (author)

  15. System studies for quasi-steady-state advanced physics tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Peng, Y.K.M.

    1983-11-01

    Parametric studies were conducted using the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) Tokamak Systems Code to investigate the impact of veriation in physics parameters and technology limits on the performance and cost of a low q/sub psi/, high beta, quasi-steady-state tokamak for the purpose of fusion engineering experimentation. The features and characteristics chosen from each study were embodied into a single Advanced Physics Tokamak design for which a self-consistent set of parameters was generated and a value of capital cost was estimated

  16. Waste management for JAERI fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobita, K.; Nishio, S.; Konishi, S.; Jitsukawa, S.

    2004-01-01

    In the fusion reactor design study at Japan Atomic Energy Institute (JAERI), several waste management strategies were assessed. The assessed strategies are: (1) reinforced neutron shield to clear the massive ex-shielding components from regulatory control; (2) low aspect ratio tokamak to reduce the total waste; (3) reuse of liquid metal breeding material and neutron shield. Combining these strategies, the weight of disposal waste from a low aspect ratio reactor VECTOR is expected to be comparable with the metal radwaste from a light water reactor (∼4000 t)

  17. The Steady State Calculation for SMART with MIDAS/SMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Hwa; Kim, Dong Ha; Chung, Young Jong; Park, Sun Hee; Cho, Seong Won

    2010-01-01

    KAERI is developing a new concept of reactor that all the main components such as the steam generator, the coolant pumps and the pressurizer are located inside the reactor vessel. Before the severe accident sequences are estimated, it is prerequisite that MIDAS code predicts the steady state conditions properly. But MIDAS code does not include the heat transfer model for the helical tube. Therefore, the heat transfer models for the helical tube from TASS/SMR-S were implemented into MIDAS code. To estimate the validity of the implemented heat transfer correlations for the helical tube and the input data, the steady state was recalculated with MIDAS/SMR based on design level 2 and compared with the design values

  18. Optical design considerations for laser fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monsler, M.J.; Maniscalco, J.A.

    1977-09-01

    The plan for the development of commercial inertial confinement fusion (ICF) power plants is discussed, emphasizing the utilization of the unique features of laser fusion to arrive at conceptual designs for reactors and optical systems which minimize the need for advanced materials and techniques requiring expensive test facilities. A conceptual design for a liquid lithium fall reactor is described which successfully deals with the hostile x-ray and neutron environment and promises to last the 30 year plant lifetime. Schemes for protecting the final focusing optics are described which are both compatible with this reactor system and show promise of surviving a full year in order to minimize costly downtime. Damage mechanisms and protection techniques are discussed, and a recommendation is made for a high f-number metal mirror final focusing system

  19. Materials design data for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavassoli, A.A.F.

    1998-01-01

    Design data needed for fusion reactors are characterized by the diversity of materials and the complexity of loading situations found in these reactors. In addition, advanced fabrication techniques, such as hot isostatic pressing, envisaged for fabrication of single and multilayered in-vessel components, could significantly change the original materials properties for which the current design rules are written. As a result, additional materials properties have had to be generated for fusion reactors and new structural design rules formulated. This paper recalls some of the materials properties data generated for ITER and DEMO, and gives examples of how these are converted into design criteria. In particular, it gives specific examples for the properties of 316LN-IG and modified 9Cr-1Mo steels, and CuCrZr alloy. These include, determination of tension, creep, isochronous, fatigue, and creep-fatigue curves and their analysis and conversion into design limits. (orig.)

  20. Neutronic study of fusion reactor blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, F.

    1983-06-01

    The problem of effective regeneration is a crucial issue for the fusion reactor, specially for the power reactor because of the conflicting requirements of heat removal and tritium breeding. For that, calculations are performed to evaluate blanket materials. Precise techniques are herein developed to improve the accuracy of the tritium production and the neutron and gamma transport calculations. Many configurations are studied with realistic breeder, structure, and coolant proportions. Accuracy of the results are evaluated from the sensitivity theory and uncertainty study using covariance matrices. At the end of this work, we presented the needs of nuclear data for fusion reactors and we give some advices for improving our knowledge of these data [fr

  1. Neutronic study of fusion reactor blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, F.

    1984-02-01

    The problem of effective regeneration is a crucial issue for the fusion reactor, specially for the power reactor because of the conflicting requirements of heat removal and tritium breeding. For that, calculations are performed to evaluate blanket materials. Precise techniques are herein developed to improve the accuracy of the tritium production and the neutron and gamma transport calculations. Many configurations are studied with realistic breeder, structure, and coolant proportions. Accuracy of the results are evaluated from the sensitivity theory and uncertainty study using covariance matricies. At the end of this work, we presented the needs of nuclear data for fusion reactors and we give some advices for improving our knowledge of these data [fr

  2. Materials design data for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavassoli, A.A.F. [CEA Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, Gif sur Yvette (France). CEREM

    1998-10-01

    Design data needed for fusion reactors are characterized by the diversity of materials and the complexity of loading situations found in these reactors. In addition, advanced fabrication techniques, such as hot isostatic pressing, envisaged for fabrication of single and multilayered in-vessel components, could significantly change the original materials properties for which the current design rules are written. As a result, additional materials properties have had to be generated for fusion reactors and new structural design rules formulated. This paper recalls some of the materials properties data generated for ITER and DEMO, and gives examples of how these are converted into design criteria. In particular, it gives specific examples for the properties of 316LN-IG and modified 9Cr-1Mo steels, and CuCrZr alloy. These include, determination of tension, creep, isochronous, fatigue, and creep-fatigue curves and their analysis and conversion into design limits. (orig.) 19 refs.

  3. Magnet design considerations for Tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purcell, J.R.; Chen, W.; Thomas, R.

    1976-01-01

    Design problems for superconducting ohmic heating and toroidal field coils for large Tokamak fusion reactors are discussed. The necessity for making these coils superconducting is explained, together with the functions of these coils in a Tokamak reactor. Major problem areas include materials related aspects and mechanical design and cryogenic considerations. Projections and comparisons are made based on existing superconducting magnet technology. The mechanical design of large-scale coils, which can contain the severe electromagnetic loading and stress generated in the winding, are emphasized. Additional major tasks include the development of high current conductors for pulsed applications to be used in fabricating the ohmic heating coils. It is important to note, however, that no insurmountable technical barriers are expected in the course of developing superconducting coils for Tokamak fusion reactors. (Auth.)

  4. Tritium management for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouyer, J.L.; Djerassi, H.

    1985-01-01

    To determine a waste management strategy, one has to identify first the wastes (quantities, activities, etc.), then to define options, and to compare these options by appropriate criteria and evaluations. Two European Associations are working together, i.e., Studsvik and CEA, on waste treatment and tritium problems. A contribution to fusion specific tritiated waste management strategy is presented. It is demonstrated that the best strategy is to retain tritium (outgas and recover, or immobilize it) so that residual tritium releases are kept to a minimum. For that, wastes are identified, actual regulations are described and judged inadequate without amendments for fusion problems. Appropriate criteria are defined. Options for treatment and disposal of tritiated wastes are proposed and evaluated. A tritium recovery solution is described

  5. Radiation environment of fusion experimental reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Seiji; Seki, Yasushi

    1988-01-01

    Next step device (experimental reactor), which is planned to succeed the large plasma experimental devices such as JT-60, JET and TFTR, generates radiation (neutron + gamma ray) during its operation. Radiation (neutronic) properties of the material are basis for the study on neutron utilization (energy recovery and tritium breeding), material selection (irradiation damage and lifetime evaluation) and radiation safety (personnel exposure and radiation waste). It is necessary, therefore, to predict radiation behaviour in the reactor correctly for the engineering design of the reactor. This report describes the outline of the radiation environment of the reactor based on the information obtained by the neutronic and shielding design calculation of the fusion experimental reactor (FER). (author)

  6. Radiolytic production of chemical fuels in fusion reactor systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fish, J D

    1977-06-01

    Miley's energy flow diagram for fusion reactor systems is extended to include radiolytic production of chemical fuel. Systematic study of the economics and the overall efficiencies of fusion reactor systems leads to a criterion for evaluating the potential of radiolytic production of chemical fuel as a means of enhancing the performance of a fusion reactor system. The ecumenicity of the schema is demonstrated by application to (1) tokamaks, (2) mirror machines, (3) theta-pinch reactors, (4) laser-heated solenoids, and (5) inertially confined, laser-pellet devices. Pure fusion reactors as well as fusion-fission hybrids are considered.

  7. Radiolytic production of chemical fuels in fusion reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fish, J.D.

    1977-06-01

    Miley's energy flow diagram for fusion reactor systems is extended to include radiolytic production of chemical fuel. Systematic study of the economics and the overall efficiencies of fusion reactor systems leads to a criterion for evaluating the potential of radiolytic production of chemical fuel as a means of enhancing the performance of a fusion reactor system. The ecumenicity of the schema is demonstrated by application to (1) tokamaks, (2) mirror machines, (3) theta-pinch reactors, (4) laser-heated solenoids, and (5) inertially confined, laser-pellet devices. Pure fusion reactors as well as fusion-fission hybrids are considered

  8. Neutron personnel dosimetry considerations for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, T.P.; Easterly, C.E.

    1979-07-01

    The increasing development of fusion reactor technology warrants an evaluation of personnel neutron dosimetry systems to aid in the concurrent development of a radiation protection program. For this reason, current state of knowledge neutron dosimeters have been reviewed with emphasis placed on practical utilization and the problems inherent in each type of dosimetry system. Evaluations of salient parameters such as energy response, latent image instability, and minimum detectable dose equivalent are presented for nuclear emulsion films, track etch techniques, albedo and other thermoluminescent dosimetry techniques, electrical conductivity damage effects, lyoluminescence, thermocurrent, and thermally stimulated exoelectron emission. Brief summaries of dosimetry regulatory requirements and intercomparison study results help to establish compliance and recent trends, respectively. Spectrum modeling data generated by the Neutron Physics Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the Princeton Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Facility have been analyzed by both International Commission on Radiological Protection fluence to dose conversion factors and an adjoint technique of radiation dosimetry, in an attempt to determine the applicability of current neutron dosimetry systems to deuterium and tritium fusion reactor leakage spectra. Based on the modeling data, a wide range of neutron energies will probably be present in the leakage spectra of the TFTR facility, and no appreciable risk of somatic injury to occupationally exposed workers is expected. The relative dose contributions due to high energy and thermal neutrons indicate that neutron dosimetry will probably not be a serious limitation in the development of fusion power

  9. Maintenance of fission and fusion reactors. 10. workshop on fusion reactor engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    This report contains copies of OHP presented at the title meeting. The presented topics are as follows, maintenance of nuclear power plants and ITER, exchange of shroud in BWR type reactors, deterioration of fission and fusion reactor materials, standards of pressure vessels, malfunction diagnosis method with neural network. (J.P.N.)

  10. Tritium monitor for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalbert, R.A.

    1982-08-01

    This report describes the design, operation, and performance of a flow-through ion-chamber instrument designed to measure tritium concentrations in air containing /sup 13/N, /sup 16/N, and /sup 41/Ar produced by neutrons generated by D-T fusion devices. The instrument employs a chamber assembly consisting of two coaxial ionization chambers. The inner chamber is the flow-through measuring chamber and the outer chamber is used for current subtraction. A thin wall common to both chambers is opaque to the tritium betas. Currents produced in the two chambers by higher energy radiation are automatically subtracted, leaving only the current due to tritium.

  11. Cermet coatings for magnetic fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.F.; Whitley, J.B.; McDonald, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Cermet coatings consisting of SiC particles in an aluminum matrix were produced by a low pressure chamber plasma spray process. Properties of these coatings are being investigated to evaluate their suitability for use in the next generation of magnetic confinement fusion reactors. Although this preliminary study has focused primarily upon SiC-Al cermets, the deposition process can be adapted to other ceramic-metal combinations. Potential applications for cermet coatings in magnetic fusion devices are presented along with experimental results from thermal tests of candidate coatings. (Auth.)

  12. Fusion reactors for hydrogen production via electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.; Steinberg, M.

    1979-01-01

    The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approx. 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approx. 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets

  13. ITER: the first experimental fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebut, P.H.

    1995-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project is a multiphased project, at present proceeding under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency according to the terms of a four-party agreement between the European Atomic Energy Community, the Government of Japan, the Government of the USA and the Government of Russia (''the parties''). The project is based on the tokamak, a Russian invention which has been brought to a high level of development and progress in all major fusion programs throughout the world.The objective of ITER is to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy for commercial energy production and to test technologies for a demonstration fusion power plant. During the extended performance phase of ITER, it will demonstrate the characteristics of a fusion power plant, producing more than 1500MW of fusion power.The objective of the engineering design activity (EDA) phase is to produce a detailed, complete and fully integrated engineering design of ITER and all technical data necessary for the future decision on the construction of ITER.The ITER device will be a major step from present fusion experiments and will encompass all the major elements required for a fusion reactor. It will also require the development and the implementation of major new components and technologies.The inside surface of the plasma containment chamber will be designed to withstand temperature of up to 500 C, although normal operating temperatures will be substantially lower. Materials will have to be carefully chosen to withstand these temperatures, and a high neutron flux. In addition, other components of the device will be composed of state-of-the-art metal alloys, ceramics and composites, many of which are now in the early stage of development of testing. (orig.)

  14. Reactor potential for magnetized target fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlin, J.E.

    2001-06-01

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) is a possible pathway to thermonuclear fusion different from both magnetic fusion and inertial confinement fusion. An imploding cylindrical metal liner compresses a preheated and magnetized plasma configuration until thermonuclear conditions are achieved. In this report the Magnetized Target Fusion concept is evaluated and a zero-dimensional computer model of the plasma, liner and circuit as a connected system is designed. The results of running this code are that thermonuclear conditions are achieved indeed, but only during a very short time. At peak compression the pressure from the compressed plasma and magnetic field is so large reversing the liner implosion into an explosion. The time period of liner motion reversal is termed the dwell time and is crucial to the performance of the fusion system. Parameters as liner thickness and plasma density are certainly of significant importance to the dwell time, but it seems like a reactor based on the MTF principle hardly can become economic if not innovative solutions are introduced. In the report two such solutions are presented as well

  15. Hybrid fission-fusion nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucchetti, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    A fusion-fission hybrid could contribute to all components of nuclear power - fuel supply, electricity production, and waste management. The idea of the fusion-fission hybrid is many decades old. Several ideas, both new and revisited, have been investigated by hybrid proponents. These ideas appear to have attractive features, but they require various levels of advances in plasma science and fusion and nuclear technology. As a first step towards the development of hybrid reactors, fusion neutron sources can be considered as an option. Compact high-field tokamaks can be a candidate for being the neutron source in a fission-fusion hybrid, essentially due to their design characteristics, such as compact dimensions, high magnetic field, flexibility of operation. This study presents the development of a tokamak neutron source for a material testing facility using an Ignitor-based concept. The computed values show the potential of this neutron-rich device for fusion materials testing. Some full-power months of operation are sufficient to obtain relevant radiation damage values in terms of dpa. (Author)

  16. Reactor potential for magnetized target fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlin, J.E

    2001-06-01

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) is a possible pathway to thermonuclear fusion different from both magnetic fusion and inertial confinement fusion. An imploding cylindrical metal liner compresses a preheated and magnetized plasma configuration until thermonuclear conditions are achieved. In this report the Magnetized Target Fusion concept is evaluated and a zero-dimensional computer model of the plasma, liner and circuit as a connected system is designed. The results of running this code are that thermonuclear conditions are achieved indeed, but only during a very short time. At peak compression the pressure from the compressed plasma and magnetic field is so large reversing the liner implosion into an explosion. The time period of liner motion reversal is termed the dwell time and is crucial to the performance of the fusion system. Parameters as liner thickness and plasma density are certainly of significant importance to the dwell time, but it seems like a reactor based on the MTF principle hardly can become economic if not innovative solutions are introduced. In the report two such solutions are presented as well.

  17. Fusion core start-up, ignition, and burn simulations of reversed-field pinch (RFP) reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Y.Y.

    1988-01-01

    A transient reactor simulation model is developed to investigate and simulate the start-up, ignition, and burn of a reversed-field pinch reactor. The simulation is based upon a spatially averaged plasma balance model with field profiles obtained from MHD quasi-equilibrium analysis. Alpha particle heating is estimated from Fokker-Planck calculations. The instantaneous plasma current is derived from a self-consistent circuit analysis for plasma/coil/eddy current interactions. The simulation code is applied to the TITAN RFP reactor design which features a compact, high-power-density reversed-field pinch fusion system. A contour analysis is performed using the steady-state global plasma balance. The results are presented with contours of constant plasma current. A saddle point is identified in the contour plot which determined the minimum value of plasma current required to achieve ignition. In the simulations of the TITAN RFP reactor, the OH-driven super-conducting EF coils are found to deviate from the required equilibrium values as the induced plasma current increases. A set of basic results from the simulation of TITAN RFP reactor yield a picture of RFP plasma operation in a reactor. Investigations of eddy currents are also presented and have very important in reactor design

  18. Conceptual design of fusion experimental reactor (FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    A conceptual design study (option C) has been carried out for the fusion experimental reactor (FER). In addition to design of the tokamak reactor and associated systems based on the reference design specifications, feasibility of a water-shield reactor concept was examined as a topical study. The design study for the reference tokamak reactor has produced a reactor concept for the FER, along with major R D items for the concept, based on close examinations on thermal design, electromagnetics, neutronics and remote maintenance. Particular efforts have been directed to the area of electromagnetics. Detailed analyses with close simulation models have been performed on PF coil arrangements and configurations, shell effects of the blanket for plasma position unstability, feedback control, and eddy currents during disruptions. The major design specifications are as follows; Peak fusion power 437 MW Major radius 5.5 m Minor radius 1.1 m Plasma elongation 1.5 Plasma current 5.3 MA Toroidal beta 4 % Field on axis 5.7 T (author)

  19. Reduction of surface erosion in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossing, T.D.; Das, S.K.; Kaminsky, M.

    1976-01-01

    Some of the major processes leading to surface erosion in fusion reactors are reviewed briefly, including blistering by implanted gas, sputtering by ions, atoms, and neutrons, and vaporization by local heating. Surface erosion affects the structural integrity and limits the lifetime of reactor components exposed to plasma radiation. In addition, some of the processes leading to surface erosion also cause the release of plasma contaminants. Methods proposed to reduce surface erosion have included control of surface temperature, selection of materials with a favorable microstructure, chemical and mechanical treatment of surfaces, and employment of protective surface coatings, wall liners, and divertors. The advantages and disadvantages of some of these methods are discussed

  20. Nuclear data requirements for fusion reactor shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.

    1979-01-01

    The nuclear data requirements for experimental, demonstration and commercial fusion reactors are reviewed. Particular emphasis is given to the shield as well as major reactor components of concern to the nuclear performance. The nuclear data requirements are defined as a result of analyzing four key areas. These are the most likely candidate materials, energy range, types of needed nuclear data, and the required accuracy in the data. Deducing the latter from the target goals for the accuracy in prediction is also discussed. A specific proposal of measurements is recommended. Priorities for acquisition of data are also assigned. (author)

  1. Recent designs for advanced fusion reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sze, D.K.

    1994-06-01

    A series of reactor design studies based on the Tokamak configuration have been carried out under the direction of Professor Robert Conn of UCLA. They are called ARIES-1 through 4 and PULSAR 1 and 2. The key mission of these studies is to evaluate the attractiveness of fusion assuming different degrees of advancement in either physics or engineering development. Also, the requirements of engineering and physics systems for a pulsed reactor were evaluated by the PULSAR design studies. This paper discusses the directions and conclusions of the blanket and related engineering systems for those design studies

  2. Thermal response of a pin-type fusion reactor blanket during steady and transient reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grotz, S.; Ghoniem, N.M.

    1986-02-01

    The thermal analysis of the blanket examines both the steady-state and transient reactor operations. The steady-state analysis covers full power and fractional power operation whereas the transient analysis examines the effects of power ramps and blanket preheat. The blanket configuration chosen for this study is a helium cooled solid breeder design. We first discuss the full power, steady-state temperature fields in the first wall, beryllium rods, and breeder rods. Next we examine the effects of fractional power on coolant flow and temperature field distributions. This includes power plateaus of 10%, 20%, 50%, 80%, and 100% of full power. Also examined are the restrictions on the rates of power ramping between plateaus. Finally we discuss the power and time requirements for pre-heating the primary from cold iron conditions up to startup temperature (250 0 C)

  3. FRESCO: fusion reactor simulation code for tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantsinen, M.J.

    1995-03-01

    The study of the dynamics of tokamak fusion reactors, a zero-dimensional particle and power balance code FRESCO (Fusion Reactor Simulation Code) has been developed at the Department of Technical Physics of Helsinki University of Technology. The FRESCO code is based on zero-dimensional particle and power balance equations averaged over prescribed plasma profiles. In the report the data structure of the FRESCO code is described, including the description of the COMMON statements, program input, and program output. The general structure of the code is described, including the description of subprograms and functions. The physical model used and examples of the code performance are also included in the report. (121 tabs.) (author)

  4. Overview of materials research for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muroga, T.; Gasparotto, M.; Zinkle, S.J.

    2002-01-01

    Materials research for fusion reactors is overviewed from Japanese, EU and US perspectives. Emphasis is placed on programs and strategies for developing blanket structural materials, and recent highlights in research and development for reduced activation ferritic martensitic steels, vanadium alloys and SiC/SiC composites, and in mechanistic experimental and modeling studies. The common critical issue for the candidate materials is the effect of irradiation with helium production. For the qualification of materials up to the full lifetime of a DEMO and Power Plant reactors, an intense neutron source with relevant fusion neutron spectra is crucial. Elaborate use of the presently available irradiation devices will facilitate efficient and sound materials development within the required time scale

  5. Environmental aspects of fusion reactors 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casini, G.; Ponti, C.; Rocco, P.

    1986-01-01

    The aspects of the environmental impact as expected from future fusion reactors are reviewed. The radioactive inventories consist in tritium and neutron-induced radioactivity in the structures. An analysis is performed of the radioactive releases from the different plant's systems in normal and accident conditions and typical emissions to the ambient are defined. Information is given on the waste management problems. Two appendixes give general information on tritium and safety guidelines

  6. Designs of tandem-mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.; Barr, W.L.; Boghosian, B.M.

    1981-01-01

    We have completed a comparative evaluation of several end plug configurations for tandem mirror fusion reactors with thermal barriers. The axi-cell configuration has been selected for further study and will be the basis for a detailed conceptual design study to be carried out over the next two years. The axi-cell end plug has a simple mirror cell produced by two circular coils followed by a transition coil and a yin-yang pair, which provides for MHD stability

  7. The ICRH tokamak fusion test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, F.W.

    1976-01-01

    A Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor where the ion are maintained at Tsub(i) approximately 20keV>Tsub(e) approximately 7keV by ion-cyclotron resonance heating is shown to produce an energy amplification of Q>2 provided the principal ion energy loss channel is via collisional transfer to the electrons. Such a reactor produces 19MW of fusion power to the electrons. Such a reactor produces 19MW of fusion power and requires a 50MHz radio-frequency generator capable of 50MW peak power; it is otherwise compatible with the conceptual design for the Princeton TFTR. The required n tausub(E) values for electrons and ions are respectively ntausub(Ee)>1.5.10 13 cm -3 -sec and ntausub(Ei)>4.10 13 cm -3 -sec. The principal areas where research is needed to establish this concept are: tokamak transport calculations, ICRH physics, trapped-particle instability energy losses, tokamak equilibria with high values of βsub(theta), and, of course, impurities

  8. Tritium containment of controlled thermonuclear fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yoshihisa; Tsukumo, Kiyohiko; Suzuki, Tatsushi

    1979-01-01

    It is well known that tritium is used as the fuel for nuclear fusion reactors. The neutrons produced by the nuclear fusion reaction of deuterium and tritium react with lithium in blankets, and tritium is produced. The blankets reproduce the tritium consumed in the D-T reaction. Tritium circulates through the main cooling system and the fuel supply and evacuation system, and is accumulated. Tritium is a radioactive substance emitting β-ray with 12.6 year half-life, and harmful to human bodies. It is an isotope of hydrogen, and apt to diffuse and leak. Especially at high temperature, it permeates through materials, therefore it is important to evaluate the release of tritium into environment, to treat leaked tritium to reduce its release, and to select the method of containing tritium. The permeability of tritium and its solubility in structural materials are discussed. The typical blanket-cooling systems of nuclear fusion reactors are shown, and the tungsten coating of steam generator tubes and tritium recovery system are adopted for reducing tritium leak. In case of the Tokamak type reactor of JAERI, the tritium recovery system is installed, in which the tritium gas produced in blankets is converted to tritium steam with a Pd-Pt catalytic oxidation tower, and it is dehydrated and eliminated with a molecular sieve tower, then purified and recovered. (Kako, I.)

  9. Practical steady-state enzyme kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorsch, Jon R

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes are key components of most biological processes. Characterization of enzymes is therefore frequently required during the study of biological systems. Steady-state kinetics provides a simple and rapid means of assessing the substrate specificity of an enzyme. When combined with site-directed mutagenesis (see Site-Directed Mutagenesis), it can be used to probe the roles of particular amino acids in the enzyme in substrate recognition and catalysis. Effects of interaction partners and posttranslational modifications can also be assessed using steady-state kinetics. This overview explains the general principles of steady-state enzyme kinetics experiments in a practical, rather than theoretical, way. Any biochemistry textbook will have a section on the theory of Michaelis-Menten kinetics, including derivations of the relevant equations. No specific enzymatic assay is described here, although a method for monitoring product formation or substrate consumption over time (an assay) is required to perform the experiments described. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Numerical method for three dimensional steady-state two-phase flow calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, P.; Toumi, I.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the numerical scheme which was developed for the FLICA-4 computer code to calculate three dimensional steady state two phase flows. This computer code is devoted to steady state and transient thermal hydraulics analysis of nuclear reactor cores 1,3 . The first section briefly describes the FLICA-4 flow modelling. Then in order to introduce the numerical method for steady state computations, some details are given about the implicit numerical scheme based upon an approximate Riemann solver which was developed for calculation of flow transients. The third section deals with the numerical method for steady state computations, which is derived from this previous general scheme and its optimization. We give some numerical results for steady state calculations and comparisons on required CPU time and memory for various meshing and linear system solvers

  11. Steady-state oxygen-solubility in niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, K.; Jehn, H.

    1977-01-01

    During annealing of niobium in oxygen in certain temperature and pressure ranges steady states are established between the absorption of molecular oxygen and the evaporation of volatile oxides. The oxygen concentration in the niobium-oxygen α-solid solution is a function of oxygen pressure and temperature and has been redetermined in the ranges 10 -5 - 10 -2 Pa O 2 and 2,070 - 2,470 K. It follows differing from former results the equation csub(o) = 9.1 x 10 -6 x sub(po2) x exp (502000/RT) with csub(o) in at.-ppm, sub(po2) in Pa, T in K, R = 8.31 J x mol -1 x K -1 . The existence of steady states is limited to a temperature range from 1870 to 2470 K and to oxygen concentrations below the solubility limit given by solidus and solvus lines in the T-c diagram. In the experiments high-purity niobium wires with a specific electrical ratio rho (273 K)/rho(4.2 K) > 5,000 have been gassed under isothermal-isobaric conditions until the steady state has been reached. The oxygen concentration has been determined analytically by vacuum fusion extraction with platinum-flux technique as well as by electrical residual resistivity measurements at 4.2 K. (orig.) [de

  12. Fusion reactors-high temperature electrolysis (HTE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    Results of a study to identify and develop a reference design for synfuel production based on fusion reactors are given. The most promising option for hydrogen production was high-temperature electrolysis (HTE). The main findings of this study are: 1. HTE has the highest potential efficiency for production of synfuels from fusion; a fusion to hydrogen energy efficiency of about 70% appears possible with 1800 0 C HTE units and 60% power cycle efficiency; an efficiency of about 50% possible with 1400 0 C HTE units and 40% power cycle efficiency. 2. Relative to thermochemical or direct decomposition methods HTE technology is in a more advanced state of development, 3. Thermochemical or direct decomposition methods must have lower unit process or capital costs if they are to be more attractive than HTE. 4. While design efforts are required, HTE units offer the potential to be quickly run in reverse as fuel cells to produce electricity for restart of Tokamaks and/or provide spinning reserve for a grid system. 5. Because of the short timescale of the study, no detailed economic evaluation could be carried out.A comparison of costs could be made by employing certain assumptions. For example, if the fusion reactor-electrolyzer capital installation is $400/(KW(T) [$1000/KW(E) equivalent], the H 2 energy production cost for a high efficiency (about 70 %) fusion-HTE system is on the same order of magnitude as a coal based SNG plant based on 1976 dollars. 6. The present reference design indicates that a 2000 MW(th) fusion reactor could produce as much at 364 x 10 6 scf/day of hydrogen which is equivalent in heating value to 20,000 barrels/day of gasoline. This would fuel about 500,000 autos based on average driving patterns. 7. A factor of three reduction in coal feed (tons/day) could be achieved for syngas production if hydrogen from a fusion-HTE system were used to gasify coal, as compared to a conventional syngas plant using coal-derived hydrogen

  13. Progress Towards High Performance, Steady-state Spherical Torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, M.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.E.; Bigelow, T.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Boedo, J.; Bourdelle, C.; Bush, C.; Choe, W.; Chrzanowski, J.; Darrow, D.S.; Diem, S.J.; Doerner, R.; Efthimion, P.C.; Ferron, J.R.; Fonck, R.J.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Garstka, G.D.; Gates, D.A.; Gray, T.; Grisham, L.R.; Heidbrink, W.; Hill, K.W.; Hoffman, D.; Jarboe, T.R.; Johnson, D.W.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.M.; Kessel, C.; Kim, J.H.; Kissick, M.W.; Kubota, S.; Kugel, H.W.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Lee, K.; Lee, S.G.; Lewicki, B.T.; Luckhardt, S.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Manickam, J.; Maqueda, R.; Mau, T.K.; Mazzucato, E.; Medley, S.S.; Menard, J.; Mueller, D.; Nelson, B.A.; Neumeyer, C.; Nishino, N.; Ostrander, C.N.; Pacella, D.; Paoletti, F.; Park, H.K.; Park, W.; Paul, S.F.; Peng, Y.-K. M.; Phillips, C.K.; Pinsker, R.; Probert, P.H.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Raman, R.; Redi, M.; Roquemore, A.L.; Rosenberg, A.; Ryan, P.M.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Schaffer, M.; Schooff, R.J.; Seraydarian, R.; Skinner, C.H.; Sontag, A.C.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Spaleta, J.; Stevenson, T.; Stutman, D.; Swain, D.W.; Synakowski, E.; Takase, Y.; Tang, X.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Tritz, K.L.; Unterberg, E.A.; Von Halle, A.; Wilgen, J.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J.R.; Xu, X.; Zweben, S.J.; Akers, R.; Barry, R.E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bialek, J.M.; Blagojevic, B.; Bonoli, P.T.; Carter, M.D.; Davis, W.; Deng, B.; Dudek, L.; Egedal, J.; Ellis, R.; Finkenthal, M.; Foley, J.; Fredd, E.; Glasser, A.; Gibney, T.; Gilmore, M.; Goldston, R.J.; Hatcher, R.E.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Houlberg, W.; Harvey, R.; Jardin, S.C.; Hosea, J.C.; Ji, H.; Kalish, M.; Lowrance, J.; Lao, L.L.; Levinton, F.M.; Luhmann, N.C.; Marsala, R.; Mastravito, D.; Menon, M.M.; Mitarai, O.; Nagata, M.; Oliaro, G.; Parsells, R.; Peebles, T.; Peneflor, B.; Piglowski, D.; Porter, G.D.; Ram, A.K.; Rensink, M.; Rewoldt, G.; Roney, P.; Shaing, K.; Shiraiwa, S.; Sichta, P.; Stotler, D.; Stratton, B.C.; Vero, R.; Wampler, W.R.; Wurden, G.A.

    2003-01-01

    Research on the Spherical Torus (or Spherical Tokamak) is being pursued to explore the scientific benefits of modifying the field line structure from that in more moderate aspect-ratio devices, such as the conventional tokamak. The Spherical Tours (ST) experiments are being conducted in various U.S. research facilities including the MA-class National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton, and three medium-size ST research facilities: Pegasus at University of Wisconsin, HIT-II at University of Washington, and CDX-U at Princeton. In the context of the fusion energy development path being formulated in the U.S., an ST-based Component Test Facility (CTF) and, ultimately a Demo device, are being discussed. For these, it is essential to develop high-performance, steady-state operational scenarios. The relevant scientific issues are energy confinement, MHD stability at high beta (B), noninductive sustainment, ohmic-solenoid-free start-up, and power and particle handling. In the confinement area, the NSTX experiments have shown that the confinement can be up to 50% better than the ITER-98-pby2 H-mode scaling, consistent with the requirements for an ST-based CTF and Demo. In NSTX, CTF-relevant average toroidal beta values bT of up to 35% with the near unity central betaT have been obtained. NSTX will be exploring advanced regimes where bT up to 40% can be sustained through active stabilization of resistive wall modes. To date, the most successful technique for noninductive sustainment in NSTX is the high beta-poloidal regime, where discharges with a high noninductive fraction (∼60% bootstrap current + neutral-beam-injected current drive) were sustained over the resistive skin time. Research on radio-frequency-based heating and current drive utilizing HHFW (High Harmonic Fast Wave) and EBW (Electron Bernstein Wave) is also pursued on NSTX, Pegasus, and CDX-U. For noninductive start-up, the Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI), developed in HIT/HIT-II, has been adopted

  14. Engineering and physics of high-power-density, compact, reversed-field-pinch fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najmabadi, F.; Conn, R.W.; Krakowski, R.A.; Schultz, K.R.; Steiner, D.

    1989-01-01

    The technical feasibility and key developmental issues of compact, high-power-density Reversed-Field-Pinch (RFP) reactors are the primary results of the TITAN RFP reactor study. Two design approaches emerged, TITAN-I and TITAN-II, both of which are steady-state, DT-burning, circa 1000 MWe power reactors. The TITAN designs are physically compact and have a high neutron wall loading of 18 MW m 2 . Detailed analyses indicate that: a) each design is technically feasible; b) attractive features of compact RFP reactors can be realized without sacrificing the safety and environmental potential of fusion; and c) major features of this particular embodiment of the RFP reactor are retained in a design window of neutron wall loading ranging from 10 to 20 MW/m 2 . A major product of the TITAN study is the identification and quantification of major engineering and physics requirements for this class of RFP reactors. These findings are the focus of this paper. (author). 26 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  15. Modular Stellarator Fusion Reactor (MSR) concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    A preliminary conceptual study has been made of the Modulator Stellarator Reactor (MSR) as a stedy-state, ignited, DT-fueled, magnetic fusion reactor. The MSR concept combines the physics of classic stellarator confinement with an innovative, modular-coil design. Parametric tradeoff calculations are described, leading to the selection of an interim design point for a 4.8-GWt plant based on Alcator transport scaling and an average beta value of 0.04 in an l = 2 system with a plasma aspect ratio of 11. Neither an economic analysis nor a detailed conceptual engineering design is presented here, as the primary intent of this scoping study is the elucidation of key physics tradeoffs, constraints, and uncertainties for the ultimate power-reactor embodiment

  16. Innovative energy production in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-10-01

    Concepts of innovative energy production in neutron-lean fusion reactors without having the conventional turbine-type generator are proposed for improving the plant efficiency. These concepts are (a) traveling wave direct energy conversion of 14.7 MeV protons, (b) cusp type direct energy conversion of charged particles, (c) efficient use of radiation with semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas, and (d) direct energy conversion from deposited heat to electric power with semiconductor utilizing Nernst effect. The candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system are also studied for application of the new concepts. The study shows the above concepts for a commercial reactor are promising. (author)

  17. Innovative energy production in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.

    1994-01-01

    Concepts of innovative energy production in neutron-lean fusion reactors without having the conventional turbine-type generator are proposed for improving the plant efficiency. These concepts are (a) traveling wave direct energy conversion of 14.7 MeV protons, (b) cusp type direct energy conversion of charged particles, (c) efficient use of radiation with semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas, and (d) direct energy conversion from deposited heat to electric power with semiconductor utilizing Nernst effect. The candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system are also studied for application of the new concepts. The study shows the above concepts for a commercial reactor are promising. (author)

  18. Innovative energy production in fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-10-01

    Concepts of innovative energy production in neutron-lean fusion reactors without having the conventional turbine-type generator are proposed for improving the plant efficiency. These concepts are: (1) traveling wave direct energy conversion of 14.7 MeV protons; (2) cusp type direct energy conversion of charged particles; (3) efficient use of radiation with semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas; and (4) direct energy conversion from deposited heat to electric power with semiconductor utilizing Nernst effect. The candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system are also studied for application of the new concepts. The study shows the above concepts for a commercial reactor are promising.

  19. Innovative energy production in fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-10-01

    Concepts of innovative energy production in neutron-lean fusion reactors without having the conventional turbine-type generator are proposed for improving the plant efficiency. These concepts are (a) traveling wave direct energy conversion of 14.7 MeV protons, (b) cusp type direct energy conversion of charged particles, (c) efficient use of radiation with semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas, and (d) direct energy conversion from deposited heat to electric power with semiconductor utilizing Nernst effect. The candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system are also studied for application of the new concepts. The study shows the above concepts for a commercial reactor are promising. (author).

  20. SEBREZ: an inertial-fusion-reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    The neutronic aspects of an inertial fusion reactor concept that relies on asymmetrical neutronic effects to enhance the tritium production in the breeding zones have been studied. We find that it is possible to obtain a tritium breeding ratio greater than 1.0 with a chamber configuration in which the breeding zones subtend only a fraction of the total solid angle. This is the origin of the name SEBREZ which stands for SEgregated BREeding Zones. It should be emphasized that this is not a reactor design study; rather this study illustrates certain neutronic effects in the context of a particular reactor concept. An understanding of these effects forms the basis of a design technique which has broader application than just the SEBREZ concept

  1. Interatomic potentials for fusion reactor material simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoerkas, C.

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, the behaviour of a material situated in a fusion reactor was studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Simulations of processes in the next generation fusion reactor ITER include the reactor materials beryllium, carbon and tungsten as well as the plasma hydrogen isotopes. This means that interaction models, i.e. interatomic potentials, for this complicated quaternary system are needed. The task of finding such potentials is nonetheless nearly at its end, since models for the beryllium-carbon-hydrogen interactions were constructed in this thesis and as a continuation of that work, a beryllium-tungsten model is under development. These potentials are combinable with the earlier tungsten-carbon-hydrogen ones. The potentials were used to explain the chemical sputtering of beryllium due to deuterium plasma exposure. During experiments, a large fraction of the sputtered beryllium atoms were observed to be released as BeD molecules, and the simulations identified the swift chemical sputtering mechanism, previously not believed to be important in metals, as the underlying mechanism. Radiation damage in the reactor structural materials vanadium, iron and iron chromium, as well as in the wall material tungsten and the mixed alloy tungsten carbide, was also studied in this thesis. Interatomic potentials for vanadium, tungsten and iron were modified to be better suited for simulating collision cascades that are formed during particle irradiation, and the potential features affecting the resulting primary damage were identified. Including the often neglected electronic effects in the simulations was also shown to have an impact on the damage. With proper tuning of the electronphonon interaction strength, experimentally measured quantities related to ion-beam mixing in iron could be reproduced. The damage in tungsten carbide alloys showed elemental asymmetry, as the major part of the damage consisted of carbon defects. On the other hand, modelling the damage

  2. Material Challenges For Plasma Facing Components in Future Fusion Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linke, J; Pintsuk, G.; Rödig, M.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing attention is directed towards thermonuclear fusion as a possible future energy source. Major advantages of this energy conversion technology are the almost inexhaustible resources and the option to produce energy without CO2-emissions. However, in the most advanced field of magnetic plasma confinement a number of technological challenges have to be met. In particular high-temperature resistant and plasma compatible materials have to be developed and qualified which are able to withstand the extreme environments in a commercial thermonuclear power reactor. The plasma facing materials (PFMs) and components (PFCs) in such fusion devices, i.e. the first wall (FW), the limiters and the divertor, are strongly affected by the plasma wall interaction processes and the applied intense thermal loads during plasma operation. On the one hand, these mechanisms have a strong influence on the plasma performance; on the other hand, they have major impact on the lifetime of the plasma facing armour. In present-day and next step devices the resulting thermal steady state heat loads to the first wall remain below 1 MWm-2; the limiters and the divertor are expected to be exposed to power densities being at least one order of magnitude above the FW-level, i.e. up to 20 MWm-2 for next step tokamaks such as ITER or DEMO. These requirements are responsible for high demands on the selection of qualified PFMs and heat sink materials as well as reliable fabrication processes for actively cooled plasma facing components. The technical solutions which are considered today are mainly based on the PFMs beryllium, carbon or tungsten joined to copper alloys or stainless steel heat sinks. In addition to the above mentioned quasi-stationary heat loads, short transient thermal pulses with deposited energy densities up to several tens of MJm-2 are a serious concern for next step tokamak devices. The most frequent events are so-called Edge Localized Modes (type I ELMs) and plasma disruptions

  3. A simulation study on burning profile tailoring of steady state, high bootstrap current tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Takei, N.; Tobita, K.; Sakamoto, Y.; Fujita, T.; Fukuyama, A.; Jardin, S.C.

    2007-01-01

    From the aspect of fusion burn control in steady state DEMO plant, the significant challenges are to maintain its high power burning state of ∝3-5 GW without burning instability, hitherto well-known as ''thermal stability'', and also to keep its desired burning profile relevant with internal transport barrier (ITB) that generates high bootstrap current. The paper presents a simulation modeling of the burning stability coupled with the self-ignited fusion burn and the structure-formation of the ITB. A self-consistent simulation, including a model for improved core energy confinement, has pointed out that in the high power fusion DEMO plant there is a close, nonlinear interplay between the fusion burnup and the current source of non-inductive, ITB-generated bootstrap current. Consequently, as much distinct from usual plasma controls under simulated burning conditions with lower power (<<1 GW), the selfignited fusion burn at a high power burning state of ∝3-5 GW becomes so strongly selforganized that any of external means except fuelling can not provide the effective control of the stable fusion burn.It is also demonstrated that externally applied, inductive current perturbations can be used to control both the location and strength of ITB in a fully noninductive tokamak discharge. We find that ITB structures formed with broad noninductive current sources such as LHCD are more readily controlled than those formed by localized sources such as ECCD. The physics of the inductive current is well known. Consequently, we believe that the controllability of the ITB is generic, and does not depend on the details of the transport model (as long as they can form an ITB for sufficiently reversed magnetic shear q-profile). Through this external control of the magnetic shear profile, we can maintain the ITB strength that is otherwise prone to deteriorate when the bootstrap current increases. These distinguishing capabilities of inductive current perturbation provide steady

  4. Steady-State Creep of Asphalt Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alibai Iskakbayev

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the experimental investigation of the steady-state creep process for fine-grained asphalt concrete at a temperature of 20 ± 2 °С and under stress from 0.055 to 0.311 MPa under direct tension and was found to occur at a constant rate. The experimental results also determined the start, the end point, and the duration of the steady-state creep process. The dependence of these factors, in addition to the steady-state creep rate and viscosity of the asphalt concrete on stress is satisfactorily described by a power function. Furthermore, it showed that stress has a great impact on the specific characteristics of asphalt concrete: stress variation by one order causes their variation by 3–4.5 orders. The described relations are formulated for the steady-state of asphalt concrete in a complex stressed condition. The dependence is determined between stress intensity and strain rate intensity.

  5. A comparison of steady-state ARIES and pulsed PULSAR tokamak power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathke, C.G.

    1994-01-01

    The multi-institutional ARIES study has completed a series of three steady-state and two pulsed cost-optimized conceptual designs of commercial tokamak fusion power plants that vary the level of assumed advances in technology and physics. The cost benefits of various design options are compared quantitatively. Possible means to improve the economic competitiveness of fusion are suggested

  6. Development of dynamic simulation code for fuel cycle of fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Isao; Seki, Yasushi; Sasaki, Makoto; Shintani, Kiyonori; Kim, Yeong-Chan

    1999-02-01

    A dynamic simulation code for fuel cycle of a fusion experimental reactor has been developed. The code follows the fuel inventory change with time in the plasma chamber and the fuel cycle system during 2 days pulse operation cycles. The time dependence of the fuel inventory distribution is evaluated considering the fuel burn and exhaust in the plasma chamber, purification and supply functions. For each subsystem of the plasma chamber and the fuel cycle system, the fuel inventory equation is written based on the equation of state considering the fuel burn and the function of exhaust, purification, and supply. The processing constants of subsystem for steady states were taken from the values in the ITER Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) report. Using this code, the time dependence of the fuel supply and inventory depending on the burn state and subsystem processing functions are shown. (author)

  7. Development of dynamic simulation code for fuel cycle of fusion reactor. 1. Single pulse operation simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Isao; Seki, Yasushi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Sasaki, Makoto; Shintani, Kiyonori; Kim, Yeong-Chan

    1997-11-01

    A dynamic simulation code for the fuel cycle of a fusion experimental reactor has been developed. The code follows the fuel inventory change with time in the plasma chamber and the fuel cycle system during a single pulse operation. The time dependence of the fuel inventory distribution is evaluated considering the fuel burn and exhaust in the plasma chamber, purification and supply functions. For each subsystem of the plasma chamber and the fuel cycle system, the fuel inventory equation is written based on the equation of state considering the function of fuel burn, exhaust, purification, and supply. The processing constants of subsystem for the steady states were taken from the values in the ITER Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) report. Using the code, the time dependence of the fuel supply and inventory depending on the burn state and subsystem processing functions are shown. (author)

  8. Survey of the laser-solenoid fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amherd, N.A.

    1975-09-01

    This report surveys the prospects for a laser-solenoid fusion reactor. A sample reactor and scaling laws are used to describe the concept's characteristics. Experimental results are reviewed, and the laser and magnet technologies that undergird the laser-solenoid concept are analyzed. Finally, a systems analysis of fusion power reactors is given, including a discussion of direct conversion and fusion-fission effects, to ascertain the system attributes of the laser-solenoid configuration

  9. A comparison of implantation-driven permeation characteristics of fusion reactor structural materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, G. R.; Anderl, R. A.; Struttmann, D. A.

    1986-11-01

    Implantation-driven permeation experiments have been conducted on samples of the ferritic steel HT-9, the austenitic Primary Candidate Alloy (PCA) and the vanadium alloy V-15Cr-5Ti using D 3+ ions under conditions that simulate charge-exchange neutral loading on a fusion reactor first wall. The steels all exhibited an initially intense permeation "spike" followed by an exponential decrease to low steady-state values. That spike was not evident in the V-15Cr-5Ti experiments. Steady-state permeation was highest in the vanadium alloy and lowest in the austenitic steel. Though permeation rates in the HT-9 were lower than those in V-15Cr-5Ti, permeation transients were much faster in HT-9 than in other materials tested. Sputtering of the steel surface resulted in enhanced reemission, whereas in the vanadium tests, recombination and diffusivity both appeared to diminish as the deuterium concentration rose. We conclude that for conditions comparable to those of these experiments, tritium retention and permeation loss in first wall structures made of steels will be less than in structures made of V-15Cr-5Ti.

  10. Comparison on implantation-driven permeation characteristics of fusion reactor structural materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Anderl, R.A.; Struttmann, D.A. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls)

    Implantation-driven permeation experiments have been conducted on samples of the ferritic steel HT-9, the austenitic Primary Candidate Alloy (PCA) and the vanadium alloy V-15Cr-5Ti using D{sub 3}{sup +} ions under conditions that simulate charge-exchange neutral loading on a fusion reactor first wall. The steels all exhibited an initially intense permeation spike followed by an exponential decrease to low steady-state values. That spike was not evident in the V-15Cr-5Ti experiments. Steady-state permeation was highest in the vanadium alloy and lowest in the austenitic steel. Though permeation rates in the HT-9 were lower than those in V-15Cr-5Ti, permeation transients were much faster in HT-9 than in other materials tested. Sputtering of the steel surface resulted in enhanced reemission, whereas in the vanadium tests, recombination and diffusivity both appeared to diminish as the deuterium concentration rose. We conclude that for conditions comparable to those of these experiments, tritium retention and permeation loss in first wall structures made of steels will be less than in structures made of V-15Cr-5Ti.

  11. Comparison of implantation-driven permeation characteristics of fusion reactor structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Anderl, R.A.; Struttmann, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Implantation-driven permeation experiments have been conducted on samples of the ferritic steel HT-9, the austenitic Primary Candidate Alloy (PCA) and the vanadium alloy V-15Cr-5Ti using D 3 + ions under conditions that simulate charge-exchange neutral loading on a fusion reactor first wall. The steels all exhibited an initially intense permeation ''spike'' followed by an exponential decrease to low steady-state values. That spike was not evident in the V-15Cr-5Ti experiments. Steady-state permeation was highest in the vanadium alloy and lowest in the austenitic steel. Though permeation rates in the HT-9 were lower than those in V-15Cr-5Ti, permeation transients were much faster in HT-9 than in other materials tested. Ion-beam sputtering of the surface in the steel experiments resulted in enhanced remission at the front surface, whereas in the vanadium tests, recombination and diffusivity both appeared to diminish as the deuterium concentration rose. This may be due to a phase change in the material. We conclude that for conditions comparable to those of these experiments, tritium retention and loss in first wall structures made of steels will be less than in structures made of V-15Cr-5Ti

  12. Tritium chemistry in fission and fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, E.; Masson, M.; Briec, M.

    1986-09-01

    We are interested in the behaviour of tritium inside the solids where it is generated both in the case of fission nuclear reactor fuel elements, and in that of blankets of future fusion reactor. In the first case it is desirable to be able to predict whether tritium will be found in the hulls or in the uranium oxide, and under what chemical form, in order to take appropriate steps for it's removal in reprocessing plants. In fusion reactors breeding large amounts of tritium and burning it in the plasma should be accomplished in as short a cycle as possible in order to limit inventories that are associated with huge activities. Mastering the chemistry of every step is therefore essential. Amounts generated are not of the same order of magnitude in the two cases studied. Ternary fissions produce about 66 10 13 Bq (18 000 Ci) per year of tritium in a 1000 MWe fission generator, i.e., about 1.8 10 10 Bq (0.5 Ci) per day per ton of fuel

  13. Investigation of materials for fusion power reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhaddane, A.; Slugeň, V.; Sojak, S.; Veterníková, J.; Petriska, M.; Bartošová, I.

    2014-06-01

    The possibility of application of nuclear-physical methods to observe radiation damage to structural materials of nuclear facilities is nowadays a very actual topic. The radiation damage to materials of advanced nuclear facilities, caused by extreme radiation stress, is a process, which significantly limits their operational life as well as their safety. In the centre of our interest is the study of the radiation degradation and activation of the metals and alloys for the new nuclear facilities (Generation IV fission reactors, fusion reactors ITER and DEMO). The observation of the microstructure changes in the reactor steels is based on experimental investigation using the method of positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). The experimental part of the work contains measurements focused on model reactor alloys and ODS steels. There were 12 model reactor steels and 3 ODS steels. We were investigating the influence of chemical composition on the production of defects in crystal lattice. With application of the LT 9 program, the spectra of specimen have been evaluated and the most convenient samples have been determined.

  14. Series lecture on advanced fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    The problems concerning fusion reactors are presented and discussed in this series lecture. At first, the D-T tokamak is explained. The breeding of tritium and the radioactive property of tritium are discussed. The hybrid reactor is explained as an example of the direct use of neutrons. Some advanced fuel reactions are proposed. It is necessary to make physics consideration for burning advanced fuel in reactors. The rate of energy production and the energy loss are important things. The bremsstrahlung radiation and impurity radiation are explained. The simple estimation of the synchrotron radiation was performed. The numerical results were compared with a more detailed calculation of Taimor, and the agreement was quite good. The calculation of ion and electron temperature was made. The idea to use the energy more efficiently is that one can take X-ray or neutrons, and pass them through a first wall of a reactor into a second region where they heat the material. A method to convert high temperature into useful energy is the third problem of this lecture. The device was invented by A. Hertzberg. The lifetime of the reactor depends on the efficiency of energy recovery. The idea of using spin polarized nuclei has come up. The spin polarization gives a chance to achieve a large multiplication factor. The advanced fuel which looks easiest to make go is D plus He-3. The idea of multipole is presented to reduce the magnetic field inside plasma, and discussed. Two other topics are explained. (Kato, T.)

  15. Conceptual design of Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tone, T.; Fujisawa, N.

    1983-01-01

    Conceptual design studies of the Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) have been performed. The FER has an objective of achieving selfignition and demonstrating engineering feasibility as a next generation tokamak to JT-60. Various concepts of the FER have been considered. The reference design is based on a double-null divertor. Optional design studies with some attractive features based on advanced concepts such as pumped limiter and RF current drive have been carried out. Key design parameters are; fusion power of 440 MW, average neutron wall loading of 1MW/m 2 , major radius of 5.5m, plasma minor radius of 1.1m, plasma elongation of 1.5, plasma current of 5.3MA, toroidal beta of 4%, toroidal field on plasma axis of 5.7T and tritium breeding ratio of above unity

  16. Assessment of materials needs for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, G.S.

    1976-07-01

    This report has the goal of presenting for the CTR designer and material supplier potentially significant problem areas in materials manufacturing and in structural material resources projected for potential application in fusion power reactor construction. The projected material requirements are based on presently available bills-of-materials for conceptual CTR designs used for constructing a hypothetical fusion power generating capacity of 10 6 MW(e) maturing exponentially over a 20-year period. The projected elemental requirements, the ratio of these requirements to the projected total U.S. demand, and the salient problems currently identified with the CTR use of these elements are summarized. The projected requirements are based upon a ''model'' industry, which is described, and the estimated potential use of molybdenum, niobium, vanadium, and tantalum as blanket structural materials

  17. Assessment of materials needs for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, G.S. (comp.)

    1976-07-01

    This report has the goal of presenting for the CTR designer and material supplier potentially significant problem areas in materials manufacturing and in structural material resources projected for potential application in fusion power reactor construction. The projected material requirements are based on presently available bills-of-materials for conceptual CTR designs used for constructing a hypothetical fusion power generating capacity of 10/sup 6/ MW(e) maturing exponentially over a 20-year period. The projected elemental requirements, the ratio of these requirements to the projected total U.S. demand, and the salient problems currently identified with the CTR use of these elements are summarized. The projected requirements are based upon a ''model'' industry, which is described, and the estimated potential use of molybdenum, niobium, vanadium, and tantalum as blanket structural materials.

  18. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This paper on titan plasma engineering contains papers on the following topics: reversed-field pinch as a fusion reactor; parametric systems studies; magnetics; burning-plasma simulations; plasma transient operations; current drive; and physics issues for compact RFP reactors

  19. Afterheat assessment of a conceptual fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayatissa, S.P.; Goddard, A.J.H.

    1987-01-01

    Structural activation and decay heat deposition calculations have been undertaken for the DEMO fusion reactor design. The DEMO design was based on an earlier conceptual design of a blanket sector which could breed tritium and generate electricity. These calculations have taken account of the redistribution of energy by the transport of γ radiation. Calculated heat deposition patterns have been used as data for simplified heat transfer calculations to judge temperature rises in relation to materials limits in a severe accident involving complete coolant flow failure. (author)

  20. Dust removal system for fusion experimental reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozuka, M.; Ueda, Y.; Takahashi, K.; Oda, Y.; Seki, Y.; Ueda, S.; Aoki, I.

    1995-01-01

    Development of a dust removal system using static electricity has been conducted. It is envisioned that the system can collect and transport dust under vacuum. In the system, the dust is charged by dielectric polarization and floated by an electrostatic attraction force that is generated by the DC electric field. The dust is then transported by the electric curtain formed by the three-phase AC electric field. Experimental investigation has been conducted to examine the characteristics of the system. Current research results indicate that the dust removal system using static electricity can be used for fusion experimental reactors

  1. Dust removal system for fusion experimental reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onozuka, M.; Ueda, Y.; Takahashi, K.; Oda, Y. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Yokohama (Japan); Seki, Y.; Ueda, S.; Aoki, I. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    Development of a dust removal system using static electricity has been conducted. It is envisioned that the system can collect and transport dust under vacuum. In the system, the dust is charged by dielectric polarization and floated by an electrostatic attraction force that is generated by the DC electric field. The dust is then transported by the electric curtain formed by the three-phase AC electric field. Experimental investigation has been conducted to examine the characteristics of the system. Current research results indicate that the dust removal system using static electricity can be used for fusion experimental reactors.

  2. Organic materials for fusion-reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurley, G.F.; Coltman, R.R. Jr.

    1983-09-01

    Organic materials requirements for fusion-reactor magnets are described with reference to the temperature, radiation, and electrical and mechanical stress environment expected in these magnets. A review is presented of the response to gamma-ray and neutron irradiation at low temperatures of candidate organic materials; i.e. laminates, thin films, and potting compounds. Lifetime-limiting features of this response as well as needed testing under magnet operating conditions not yet adequately investigated are identified and recomendations for future work are made

  3. The tritium and the controlled fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leger, D.; Rouyer, J.L.

    1986-04-01

    It is shown how tritium is used how it is circulating in a fusion reactor. The great functions of tritium circuits are detailed: reprocessing of burnt gases, reprocessing of gases coming from neutral injectors, reprocessing from gaseous wastes, detritiation of cooling fluids. Current technologic developments are quoted. Then tritium confinement and containment, in normal or accidental situations, are displayed. Limitation devices of effluents and release for normal operating (noticeably the reprocessing systems of atmosphere) and safety and protection systems in case of accident are described [fr

  4. Vanadium alloys for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattas, R.F.; Loomis, B.A.; Smith, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that fusion reactors will produce a severe operating environment for structural materials. The material should have good mechanical strength and ductility to high temperature, be corrosion resistant to the local environment, have attractive thermophysical properties to accommodate high heat loads, and be resistant to neutron damage. Vanadium alloys are being developed for such applications, and they exhibit desirable properties in many areas Recent progress in vanadium alloy development indicates good strength and ductility to 700 degrees C, minimal degradation by neutron irradiation, and reduced radioactivity compared with other candidate alloy systems

  5. Environmental considerations for alternative fusion reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Young, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    Comparisons of alternative fusion reactor blanket/coolant systems suggest that environmental considerations will enter strongly into selection of design and materials. Liquid blankets and coolants tend to maximize transport of radioactive corrosion products. Liquid lithium interacts strongly with tritium, minimizing permeation and escape of gaseous tritium in accidents. However, liquid lithium coolants tend to create large tritium inventories and have a large fire potential compared to flibe and solid blankets. Helium coolants minimize radiation transport, but do not have ability to bind the tritium in case of accidental releases. (auth)

  6. Trends and developments in magnetic confinement fusion reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.C.; Carlson, G.A.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    An overview is presented of recent design trends and developments in reactor concepts for magnetic confinement fusion. The paper emphasizes the engineering and technology considerations of commercial fusion reactor concepts. Emphasis is placed on reactors that operate on the deuterium/tritium/lithium fuel cycle. Recent developments in tokamak, mirror, and Elmo Bumpy Torus reactor concepts are described, as well as a survey of recent developments on a wide variety of alternate magnetic fusion reactor concepts. The paper emphasizes recent developments of these concepts within the last two to three years

  7. Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, E.; Chrzanowski, J.; Gentile, C.; Parsells, R.; Rule, K.; Strykowsky, R.; Viola, M.

    2003-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was operated from 1982 until 1997. The last several years included operations with mixtures of deuterium and tritium. In September 2002, the three year Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Project for TFTR was successfully completed. The need to deal with tritium contamination as well as activated materials led to the adaptation of many techniques from the maintenance work during TFTR operations to the D and D effort. In addition, techniques from the decommissioning of fission reactors were adapted to the D and D of TFTR and several new technologies, most notably the development of a diamond wire cutting process for complex metal structures, were developed. These techniques, along with a project management system that closely linked the field crews to the engineering staff who developed the techniques and procedures via a Work Control Center, resulted in a project that was completed safely, on time, and well below budget

  8. MARS input data for steady-state calculation of ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyun Sik; Euh, D. J.; Choi, K. Y.; Kwon, T. S.; Jeong, J. J.; Baek, W. P.

    2004-12-01

    An integral effect test loop for Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs), the ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation), is under construction by Thermal-Hydraulics Safety Research Division in Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). This report includes calculation sheets of the input for the best-estimate system analysis code, the MARS code, based on the ongoing design features of ATLAS. The ATLAS facility has been designed to have the length scale of 1/2 and area scale of 1/144 compared with the reference plant, APR1400. The contents of this report are divided into three parts: (1) core and reactor vessel, (2) steam generator and steam line, and (3) primary piping, pressurizer and reactor coolant pump. The steady-state analysis for the ATLAS facility will be performed based on these calculation sheets, and its results will be applied to the detailed design of ATLAS. Additionally, the calculation results will contribute to getting optimum test conditions and preliminary operational test conditions for the steady-state and transient experiments

  9. Activation product transport in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, A.C.

    1983-01-01

    Activated corrosion and neutron sputtering products will enter the coolant and/or tritium breeding material of fusion reactor power plants and experiments and cause personnel access problems. Radiation levels around plant components due to these products will cause difficulties with maintenance and repair operations throughout the plant. Similar problems are experienced around fission reactor systems. The determination of the transport of radioactive corrosion and neutron sputtering products through the system is achieved using the computer code RAPTOR. This code calculates the mass transfer of a number of activation products based on the corrosion and sputtering rates through the system, the deposition and release characteristics of various plant components, the neturon flux spectrum, as well as other plant parameters. RAPTOR assembles a system of first order linear differential equations into a matrix equation based upon the reactor system parameters. Included in the transfer matrix are the deposition and erosion coefficients, and the decay and activation data for the various plant nodes and radioactive isotopes. A source vector supplies the corrosion and neutron sputtering source rates. This matrix equation is then solved using a matrix operator technique to give the specific activity distribution of each radioactive species throughout the plant. Once the amount of mass transfer is determined, the photon transport due to the radioactive corrosion and sputtering product sources can be evaluated, and dose rates around the plant components of interest as a function of time can be determined. This method has been used to estimate the radiation hazards around a number of fusion reactor system designs

  10. Present status of inertial confinement fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mima, Kunioki; Ido, Shunji; Nakai, Sadao.

    1986-01-01

    Since inertial nuclear fusion reactors do not require high vacuum and high magnetic field, the structure of the reactor cavity becomes markedly simple as compared with tokamak type fusion reactors. In particular, since high vacuum is not necessary, liquid metals such as lithium and lead can be used for the first wall, and the damage of reactor structures by neutrons can be prevented. As for the core, the energy efficiency of lasers is not very high, accordingly it must be designed so that the pellet gain due to nuclear fusion becomes sufficiently high, and typically, the gain coefficient from 100 to 200 is necessary. In this paper, the perspective of pellet gain, the plan from the present status to the practical reactors, and the conceptual design of the practical reactors are discussed. The plan of fuel ignition, energy break-even and high gain by the implosion mode, of which the uncertain factor due to uneven irradiation and instability was limited to the minimum, was clarified. The scenario of the development of laser nuclear fusion reactors is presented, and the concept of the reactor system is shown. The various types of nuclear fusion-fission hybrid reactors are explained. As for the design of inertial fusion power reactors, the engineering characteristics of the core, the conceptual design, water fall type reactors and DD fuel reactors are discussed. (Kako, I.)

  11. Steady state compact toroidal plasma production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, William C.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus and method for maintaining steady state compact toroidal plasmas. A compact toroidal plasma is formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun and held in close proximity to the gun electrodes by applied magnetic fields or magnetic fields produced by image currents in conducting walls. Voltage supply means maintains a constant potential across the electrodes producing an increasing magnetic helicity which drives the plasma away from a minimum energy state. The plasma globally relaxes to a new minimum energy state, conserving helicity according to Taylor's relaxation hypothesis, and injecting net helicity into the core of the compact toroidal plasma. Controlling the voltage so as to inject net helicity at a predetermined rate based on dissipative processes maintains or increases the compact toroidal plasma in a time averaged steady state mode.

  12. Steady state of tapped granular polygons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlevaro, Carlos M; Pugnaloni, Luis A

    2011-01-01

    The steady state packing fraction of a tapped granular bed is studied for different grain shapes via a discrete element method. Grains are monosized regular polygons, from triangles to icosagons. Comparisons with disc packings show that the steady state packing fraction as a function of the tapping intensity presents the same general trends in polygon packings. However, better packing fractions are obtained, as expected, for shapes that can tessellate the plane (triangles, squares and hexagons). In addition, we find a sharp transition for packings of polygons with more than 13 vertices signaled by a discontinuity in the packing fraction at a particular tapping intensity. Density fluctuations for most shapes are consistent with recent experimental findings in disc packing; however, a peculiar behavior is found for triangles and squares

  13. On Steady-State Tropical Cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Press: London. Marks FD, Black PG, Montgomery MT, Burpee RW. 2008. Structure of the eye and eyewall of Hurricane Hugo (1989). Mon. Weather Rev. 136: 1237... hurricanes ; tropical cyclones; typhoons; steady-state Received 18 April 2013; Revised 25 November 2013; Accepted 29 December 2013; Published online in Wiley...the concept of the ‘mature stage’ of a hurricane vortex. The definition of the ‘mature stage’ is commonly based on the time period in which the maximum

  14. Steady State versus Pulsed Tokamak DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orsitto, F.P., E-mail: francesco.orsitto@enea.it [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA Unita Tecnica Fusione, Frascati (Italy); Todd, T. [CCFE/Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: The present report deals with a Review of problems for a Steady state(SS) DEMO, related argument is treated about the models and the present status of comparison between the characteristics of DEMO pulsed versus a Steady state device.The studied SS DEMO Models (SLIM CS, PPCS model C EU-DEMO, ARIES-RS) are analyzed from the point of view of the similarity scaling laws and critical issues for a steady state DEMO. A comparison between steady state and pulsed DEMO is therefore carried out: in this context a new set of parameters for a pulsed (6 - 8 hours pulse) DEMO is determined working below the density limit, peak temperature of 20 keV, and requiring a modest improvement in the confinement factor(H{sub IPBy2} = 1.1) with respect to the H-mode. Both parameters density and confinement parameter are lower than the DEMO models presently considered. The concept of partially non-inductive pulsed DEMO is introduced since a pulsed DEMO needs heating and current drive tools for plasma stability and burn control. The change of the main parameter design for a DEMO working at high plasma peak temperatures T{sub e} {approx} 35 keV is analyzed: in this range the reactivity increases linearly with temperature, and a device with smaller major radius (R = 7.5 m) is compatible with high temperature. Increasing temperature is beneficial for current drive efficiency and heat load on divertor, being the synchrotron radiation one of the relevant components of the plasma emission at high temperatures and current drive efficiency increases with temperature. Technology and engineering problems are examined including efficiency and availability R&D issues for a high temperature DEMO. Fatigue and creep-fatigue effects of pulsed operations on pulsed DEMO components are considered in outline to define the R&D needed for DEMO development. (author)

  15. Comparative study of cost models for tokamak DEMO fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oishi, Tetsutarou; Yamazaki, Kozo; Arimoto, Hideki; Ban, Kanae; Kondo, Takuya; Tobita, Kenji; Goto, Takuya

    2012-01-01

    Cost evaluation analysis of the tokamak-type demonstration reactor DEMO using the PEC (physics-engineering-cost) system code is underway to establish a cost evaluation model for the DEMO reactor design. As a reference case, a DEMO reactor with reference to the SSTR (steady state tokamak reactor) was designed using PEC code. The calculated total capital cost was in the same order of that proposed previously in cost evaluation studies for the SSTR. Design parameter scanning analysis and multi regression analysis illustrated the effect of parameters on the total capital cost. The capital cost was predicted to be inside the range of several thousands of M$s in this study. (author)

  16. SOLASE conceptual laser fusion reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, G.A.; Conn, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Cooper, G.W.; Howard, J.; Magelssen, G.R.

    1978-01-01

    A conceptual laser fusion reactor for electric power, SOLASE, has been designed. The SOLASE design utilizes a 1 MJ, 6.7% efficient laser to implode 20 fusion targets per second. The target gain is 150 and produces a net electrical power of 1000 MW. The reactor cavity is spherical with a 6 m radius. The first wall is graphite and has a neutron wall loading of 5 MW/m 2 . It is protected from the target debris by low pressure xenon gas that is introduced into the cavity. The blanket structure is a honeycombed graphite composite. The tritium breeding and heat transport medium is Li 2 O in the form of pellets that flow through the blanket. The tritium breeding ration is 1.34. Temperature decoupling of the graphite structure and the Li 2 O coolant enables the structure to operate at temperatures that minimize radiation damage effects. The graphite blanket is replaced every year but exhibits low levels of radioactivity so that limited hands on maintenance is possible two weeks after shutdown, thus facilitating rapid replacement

  17. Pulse Star inertial confinement fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blink, J.A.; Hogan, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    Pulse Star is a pool-type ICF reactor that emphasizes low cost and high safety levels. The reactor consists of a vacuum chamber (belljar) submerged in a compact liquid metal (Li 17 Pb 83 or lithium) pool which also contains the heat exchangers and liquid metal pumps. The shielding efficiency of the liquid metal pool is high enough to allow hands-on maintenance of (removed) pumps and heat exchangers. Liquid metal is allowed to spray through the 5.5 m radius belljar at a controlled rate, but is prohibited from the target region by a 4 m radius mesh first wall. The wetted first wall absorbs the fusion x-rays and debris while the spray region absorbs the fusion neutrons. The mesh allows vaporized liquid metal to blow through to the spray region where it can quickly cool and condense. Preliminary calculations show that a 2 m thick first wall could handle the mechanical (support, buckling, and x-ray-induced hoop) loads. Wetting and gas flow issues are in an initial investigation stage

  18. Towards diagnostics for a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costley, A. E.

    2009-01-01

    The requirements for measurements on modern tokamak fusion plasmas are outlined, and the techniques and systems used to make the measurements, usually referred to as 'diagnostics', are introduced. The basics of three particular diagnostics - magnetics, neutron systems and a laser based optical system - are outlined as examples of modern diagnostic systems, and the implementation of these diagnostics on a current tokamak (JET) are described. The next major step in magnetic confinement fusion is the construction and operation of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), which is a joint project of China, Europe, Japan, India, Korea, the Russian Federation, and the United States. Construction has begun in Cadarache, France. It is expected that ITER will operate at the 500 MW level. Because of the harsh environment in the vacuum vessel where many diagnostic components are located, the development of diagnostics for ITER is a major challenge - arguably the most difficult challenge ever undertaken in the field of diagnostics. The main elements in the diagnostic step are outlined using the three chosen techniques as examples. Finally, the step beyond ITER to a demonstration reactor, DEMO, that is expected to produce several GWs of fusion power is considered and the impact on diagnostics outlined. It is shown that the applicability and development steps needed for the individual diagnostics techniques will differ. The challenges for DEMO diagnostics are substantial and a dedicated effort should be made to find and develop new techniques, and especially techniques appropriate to the DEMO environment. It is argued that the limitations and difficulties in diagnostics should be a consideration in the optimization and designs of DEMO. (author)

  19. Neutronics issues in fusion-fission hybrid reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chengan

    1995-01-01

    The coupled neutron and γ-ray transport equations and nuclear number density equations, and its computer program systems concerned in fusion-fission hybrid reactor design are briefly described. The current status and focal point for coming work of nuclear data used in fusion reactor design are explained

  20. Hydrogen production from high temperature electrolysis and fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, V.D.; Steinberg, J.F.; Issacs, H.S.; Lazareth, O.; Powell, J.R.; Salzano, F.J.

    1978-01-01

    Production of hydrogen from high temperature electrolysis of steam coupled with a fusion reactor is studied. The process includes three major components: the fusion reactor, the high temperature electrolyzer and the power conversion cycle each of which is discussed in the paper. Detailed process design and analysis of the system is examined. A parametric study on the effect of process efficiency is presented

  1. Graphs of neutron cross section data for fusion reactor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asami, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Shigeya

    1979-03-01

    Graphs of neutron cross section data relevant to fusion reactor development are presented. Nuclides and reaction types in the present compilation are based on a WRENDA request list from Japan for fusion reactor development. The compilation contains various partial cross sections for 55 nuclides from 6 Li to 237 Np in the energy range up to 20 MeV. (author)

  2. The need and prospects for improved fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Hagenson, R.L.; Miller, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    Conceptual fusion reactor studies over the past 10-15 yr have projected systems that may be too large, complex, and costly to be of commercial interest. One main direction for improved fusion reactors points toward smaller, higher-power-density approaches. First-order economic issues (i.e., unit direct cost and cost of electricity) are used to support the need for more compact fusion reactors. The results of a number of recent conceptual designs of reversed-field pinch, spheromak, and tokamak fusion reactors are summarized as examples of more compact approaches. While a focus has been placed on increasing the fusion-power-core mass power density beyond the minimum economic threshold of 100-200 kWe/tonne, other means by which the overall attractiveness of fusion as a long-term energy source are also addressed

  3. The fusion reactor - a chance to solve the energy problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wienecke, R.

    1975-01-01

    The work deals with the physical fundamentals of nuclear fusion and the properties of the necessary plasma and gives a survey on the arrangements used today for magnetic confinement such as tokamak, stellarator, high-beta experiments and laser fusion. Finally, the technology of the fusion reactor and its potential advantages are explained. (RW/LH) [de

  4. Roles of plasma neutron source reactor in development of fusion reactor engineering: Comparison with fission reactor engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, Shoichi; Kawabe, Takaya

    1995-01-01

    The history of development of fusion power reactor has come to a turning point, where the main research target is now shifting from the plasma heating and confinement physics toward the burning plasma physics and reactor engineering. Although the development of fusion reactor system is the first time for human beings, engineers have experience of development of fission power reactor. The common feature between them is that both are plants used for the generation of nuclear reactions for the production of energy, nucleon, and radiation on an industrial scale. By studying the history of the development of the fission reactor, one can find the existence of experimental neutron reactors including irradiation facilities for fission reactor materials. These research neutron reactors played very important roles in the development of fission power reactors. When one considers the strategy of development of fusion power reactors from the points of fusion reactor engineering, one finds that the fusion neutron source corresponds to the neutron reactor in fission reactor development. In this paper, the authors discuss the roles of the plasma-based neutron source reactors in the development of fusion reactor engineering, by comparing it with the neutron reactors in the history of fission power development, and make proposals for the strategy of the fusion reactor development. 21 refs., 6 figs

  5. Fusion reactor design and technology 1986. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The first volume of the Proceedings of the Fourth Technical Committee Meeting and Workshop on Fusion Reactor Design and Technology organized by the IAEA (Yalta, 26 May - 6 June 1986) includes 36 papers devoted to the following topics: fusion programmes (3 papers), tokamaks (15 papers), non-tokamak reactors and open systems (9 papers), inertial confinement concepts (5 papers), fission-fusion hybrids (4 papers). Each of these papers has a separate abstract. Refs, figs and tabs

  6. Past, present and future of the fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum P, M.

    1992-01-01

    Among the alternate technologies that have acquired a special interest in the present decade, we find the nuclear fusion. Within this, the fusion reactors by magnetic confinement of the Tokamak type have shown an increasing technological progress during this period. For this reason, a new strategy, coordinated at international level, has been implemented for the specific development of the nuclear fusion reactors, aimed to face those scientific and technological aspects which still remain, and which will determine their future economic feasibility. (Author)

  7. Symbiosis of near breeder HTR's with hybrid fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifritz, W.

    1978-07-01

    In this contribution to INFCE a symbiotic fusion/fission reactor system, consisting of a hybrid beam-driven micro-explosion fusion reactor (HMER) and associated high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTR) with a coupled fuel cycle, is proposed. This system is similar to the well known Fast Breeder/Near Breeder HTR symbiosis except that the fast fission breeder - running on the U/Pu-cycle in the core and the axial blankets and breeding the surplus fissile material as U-233 in its radial thorium metal or thorium oxide blankets - is replaced by a hybrid micro-explosion DT fusion reactor

  8. Exploration of one-dimensional plasma current density profile for K-DEMO steady-state operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, J.S. [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, L. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Byun, C.-S.; Na, D.H.; Na, Y.-S. [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Y.S., E-mail: yhwang@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • One-dimensional current density and its optimization for the K-DEMO are explored. • Plasma current density profile is calculated with an integrated simulation code. • The impact of self and external heating profiles is considered self-consistently. • Current density is identified as a reference profile by minimizing heating power. - Abstract: Concept study for Korean demonstration fusion reactor (K-DEMO) is in progress, and basic design parameters are proposed by targeting high magnetic field operation with ITER-sized machine. High magnetic field operation is a favorable approach to enlarge relative plasma performance without increasing normalized beta or plasma current. Exploration of one-dimensional current density profile and its optimization process for the K-DEMO steady-state operation are reported in this paper. Numerical analysis is conducted with an integrated plasma simulation code package incorporating a transport code with equilibrium and current drive modules. Operation regimes are addressed with zero-dimensional system analysis. One-dimensional plasma current density profile is calculated based on equilibrium, bootstrap current analysis, and thermal transport analysis. The impact of self and external heating profiles on those parameters is considered self-consistently, where thermal power balance and 100% non-inductive current drive are the main constraints during the whole exploration procedure. Current and pressure profiles are identified as a reference steady-state profile by minimizing the external heating power with desired fusion power.

  9. Bioaccumulation factors and the steady state assumption for cesium isotopes in aquatic foodwebs near nuclear facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, D J

    2013-07-01

    Steady state approaches, such as transfer coefficients or bioaccumulation factors, are commonly used to model the bioaccumulation of (137)Cs in aquatic foodwebs from routine operations and releases from nuclear generating stations and other nuclear facilities. Routine releases from nuclear generating stations and facilities, however, often consist of pulses as liquid waste is stored, analyzed to ensure regulatory compliance and then released. The effect of repeated pulse releases on the steady state assumption inherent in the bioaccumulation factor approach has not been evaluated. In this study, I examine the steady state assumption for aquatic biota by analyzing data for two cesium isotopes in the same biota, one isotope in steady state (stable (133)Cs) from geologic sources and the other released in pulses ((137)Cs) from reactor operations. I also compare (137)Cs bioaccumulation factors for similar upstream populations from the same system exposed solely to weapon test (137)Cs, and assumed to be in steady state. The steady state assumption appears to be valid for small organisms at lower trophic levels (zooplankton, rainbow smelt and 0+ yellow perch) but not for older and larger fish at higher trophic levels (walleye). Attempts to account for previous exposure and retention through a biokinetics approach had a similar effect on steady state, upstream and non-steady state, downstream populations of walleye, but were ineffective in explaining the more or less constant deviation between fish with steady state exposures and non-steady state exposures of about 2-fold for all age classes of walleye. These results suggest that for large, piscivorous fish, repeated exposure to short duration, pulse releases leads to much higher (137)Cs BAFs than expected from (133)Cs BAFs for the same fish or (137)Cs BAFs for similar populations in the same system not impacted by reactor releases. These results suggest that the steady state approach should be used with caution in any

  10. Progress Toward Steady State Tokamak Operation Exploiting the high bootstrap current fraction regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Q.

    2015-11-01

    Recent DIII-D experiments have advanced the normalized fusion performance of the high bootstrap current fraction tokamak regime toward reactor-relevant steady state operation. The experiments, conducted by a joint team of researchers from the DIII-D and EAST tokamaks, developed a fully noninductive scenario that could be extended on EAST to a demonstration of long pulse steady-state tokamak operation. Fully noninductive plasmas with extremely high values of the poloidal beta, βp >= 4 , have been sustained at βT >= 2 % for long durations with excellent energy confinement quality (H98y,2 >= 1 . 5) and internal transport barriers (ITBs) generated at large minor radius (>= 0 . 6) in all channels (Te, Ti, ne, VTf). Large bootstrap fraction (fBS ~ 80 %) has been obtained with high βp. ITBs have been shown to be compatible with steady state operation. Because of the unusually large ITB radius, normalized pressure is not limited to low βN values by internal ITB-driven modes. βN up to ~4.3 has been obtained by optimizing the plasma-wall distance. The scenario is robust against several variations, including replacing some on-axis with off-axis neutral beam injection (NBI), adding electron cyclotron (EC) heating, and reducing the NBI torque by a factor of 2. This latter observation is particularly promising for extension of the scenario to EAST, where maximum power is obtained with balanced NBI injection, and to a reactor, expected to have low rotation. However, modeling of this regime has provided new challenges to state-of-the-art modeling capabilities: quasilinear models can dramatically underpredict the electron transport, and the Sauter bootstrap current can be insufficient. The analysis shows first-principle NEO is in good agreement with experiments for the bootstrap current calculation and ETG modes with a larger saturated amplitude or EM modes may provide the missing electron transport. Work supported in part by the US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-AC52-07NA

  11. Fusion neutronics plan in the development of fusion reactor. With the aim of realizing electric power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Hiroo; Morimoto, Yuichi; Ochiai, Kentarou; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Nishitani, Takeo; Takeuchi, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-10-01

    On June 1992, Atomic Energy Commission in Japan has settled Third Phase Program of Fusion Research and Development to achieve self-ignition condition, to realize long pulse burning plasma and to establish basis of fusion engineering for demonstration reactor. This report describes research plan of Fusion Neutron Laboratory in JAERI toward a development of fusion reactor with an aim of realizing electric power. The fusion neutron laboratory has a fusion neutronics facility (FNS), intense fusion neutron source. The plan includes research items in the FNS; characteristics of shielding and breeding materials, nuclear characteristics of materials, fundamental irradiation process of insulator, diagnostics materials and structural materials, and development of in-vessel diagnostic technology. Upgrade of the FNS is also described. Also, the International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) for intense neutron source to develop fusion materials is described. (author)

  12. An electromagnetic spherical phased array thermonuclear fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okress, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    Discussed are salient physics aspects of a microwave singly reentrant spherical periodic phased array of uniformally distributed identical coaxial radiation elements in an essentially simulated infinite array environment. The array is capable of maintaining coherence or phase control (to the limit of the order of 300 GHz) of its spherically converging electromagnetic transverse magnetic mode radiation field, for confinement (and heating) of thermonuclear plasma in steady-state or inertial thermonuclear fusion. The array also incorporates capability for coaxial directional coupler extraction of fusionpower. The radiation elements of the array are shielded against DT Thermonuclear plasma emissions (i.e., neutrons and bremsstrahlung) by either sufficiently (available) low less tangent and cooled, spherically concentric shield (e.g., Titanium oxide); or alternately by identical material dome windows mounted on each radiation element's aperture of the array. The pump microwave power required for thermonuclear fusion feasibility comprises an array of phase-locked available klystron amplifiers (comparable gyratron amplifiers remain to be developed)

  13. Recent designs for advanced fusion reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sze, D.K.

    1994-01-01

    A series of reactor design studies based on the Tokamak configuration have been carried out under the direction of Professor Robert Conn of UCLA. They are called ARIES-I through IV. The key mission of these studies is to evaluate the attractiveness of fusion assuming different degrees of advancement in either physics or engineering development. This paper discusses the directions and conclusions of the blanket and related engineering systems for those design studies. ARIES-1 investigated the use of SiC composite as the structural material to increase the blanket temperature and reduce the blanket activation. Li 2 ZrO 3 was used as the breeding material due to its high temperature stability and good tritium recovery characteristics. The ARIES-IV is a modification of ARIES-1. The plasma was in the second stability regime. Li 2 O was used as the breeding material to remove Zr. A gaseous divertor was used to replace the conventional divertor so that high Z divertor target is not required. The physics of ARIES-II was the same as ARIES-IV. The engineering design of the ARIES-II was based on a self-cooled lithium blanket with a V-alloy as the structural material. Even though it was assumed that the plasma was in the second stability regime, the plasma beta was still rather low (3.4%). The ARIES-III is an advanced fuel (D- 3 He) tokamak reactor. The reactor design assumed major advancement on the physics, with a plasma beta of 23.9%. A conventional structural material is acceptable due to the low neutron wall loading. From the radiation damage point of view, the first wall can last the life of the reactor, which is expected to be a major advantage from the engineering design and waste disposal point of view

  14. Liquid lithium applications for solving challenging fusion reactor issues and NSTX-U contributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, M., E-mail: mono@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, PO Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Jaworski, M.A.; Kaita, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, PO Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Hirooka, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Gray, T.K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Steady-state fusion reactor operation presents major divertor technology challenges, including high divertor heat flux both steady-state and transients. In addition, there are unresolved issues of long term dust accumulation and associated tritium inventory and safety concerns (Federici et al., 2001) . It has been suggested that radiative liquid lithium divertor concepts with a modest lithium-loop could provide a possible solution for these outstanding fusion reactor technology issues, while potentially improving reactor plasma performance (Ono et al., 2013, 2014) . The application of lithium (Li) in NSTX resulted in improved H-mode confinement, H-mode power threshold reduction, and reduction in the divertor peak heat flux while maintaining essentially Li-free core plasma operation even during H-modes. These promising results in NSTX and related modeling calculations motivated the radiative liquid lithium (LL) divertor (RLLD) concept (Ono et al., 2013) and its variant, the active liquid lithium divertor concept (ARLLD) (Ono et al., 2014) , taking advantage of the enhanced non-coronal Li radiation in relatively poorly confined divertor plasmas. It was estimated that only a few moles/s of lithium injection would be needed to significantly reduce the divertor heat flux in a tokamak fusion power plant. By operating at lower temperatures ≤450 °C than the first wall ∼600–700 °C, the LL-covered divertor chamber wall surfaces can serve as an effective particle pump, as impurities generally migrate toward lower temperature LL divertor surfaces. To maintain the LL purity, a closed LL loop system with a modest circulating capacity of ∼1 l/s (l/s) is envisioned to sustain the steady-state operation of a 1 GW-electric class fusion power plant. By running the Li loop continuously, it can carry the dust particles and impurities generated in the vacuum vessel to outside where the dust/impurities are removed by relatively simple filter and cold/hot trap systems. Using a

  15. Blanket materials for DT fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the critical materials issues that must be considered in the development of a tritium breeding blanket for a tokamak fusion reactor that operates on the D-T-Li fuel cycle. The primary requirements of the blanket system are identified and the important criteria that must be considered in the development of blanket technology are summarized. The candidate materials are listed for the different blanket components, e.g., breeder, coolant, structure and neutron multiplier. Three blanket concepts that appear to offer the most potential are: (1) liquid-metal breeder/coolant, (2) liquid-metal breeder/separate coolant, and (3) solid breeder/separate coolant. The major uncertainties associated with each of the design concepts are discussed and the key materials R and D requirements for each concept are identified

  16. Burning nuclear wastes in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meldner, H.W.; Howard, W.M.

    1979-01-01

    A study was made up of actinide burn-up in ICF reactor pellets; i.e. 14 Mev neutron fission of the very long-lived actinides that pose storage problems. A major advantage of pellet fuel region burn-up is safety: only milligrams of highly toxic and active material need to be present in the fusion chamber, whereas blanket burn-up requires the continued presence of tons of actinides in a small volume. The actinide data tables required for Monte Carlo calculations of the burn-up of /sup 241/Am and /sup 243/Am are discussed in connection with a study of the sensitivity to cross section uncertainties. More accurate and complete cross sections are required for realistic quantitative calculations. 13 refs

  17. Decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spampinato, P.T.; Walton, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) will complete its experimental lifetime with a series of deuterium-tritium pulses in 1994. As a result, the machine structures will become radioactive, and vacuum components will also be contaminated with tritium. Dose rate levels will range from less than 1 mr/h for external structures to hundreds of mr/h for the vacuum vessel. Hence, decommissioning operations will range from hands on activities to the use of remotely operated equipment. After 21 months of cool down, decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) operations will commence and continue for approximately 15 months. The primary objective is to render the test cell complex re-usable for the next machine, the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). This paper presents an overview of decommissioning TFTR and discusses the D and D objectives

  18. Intelligible seminar on fusion reactors. (12) Next step toward the realization of fusion reactors. Future vision of fusion energy research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Kunihiko; Kurihara, Kenichi; Tobita, Kenji

    2006-01-01

    In the last session of this seminar the progress of research and development for the realization of fusion reactors and future vision of fusion energy research and development are summarized. The some problems to be solved when the commercial fusion reactors would be realized, (1) production of deuterium as the fuel, (2) why need the thermonuclear reactors, (3) environmental problems, and (4) ITER project, are described. (H. Mase)

  19. Research on the HYLIFE liquid-first-wall concept for future laser-fusion reactors: liquid jet impact experiments. Final report No. 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, M.A.

    1982-08-01

    The goal of this initial scoping study was to evaluate the transient and steady state drag of a single bar and of some selected arrays of bars and to determine the momentum removed from impacting liquid slugs. In order to achieve this aim, use has been made of both the published literature and experimental data obtained from a small-scale experimental apparatus. The implications of two possible scaling laws for use in designing the small-scale experiment are discussed. The use of near-universal curves to evaluate the momentum removed during the initial transient period is described. The small-scale apparatus used to obtain steady-state drag data is described. Finally, these results are applied to the HYLIFE fusion reactor

  20. Early fusion reactor neutronic calculations: A reevaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, R.T.

    1996-01-01

    Several fusion power plant design studies were made at a number of universities and laboratories in the late 1960s and early 1970s. These studies included such designs as the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Fusion Power Plan and the University of Wisconsin UWMAK-I Reactor Neutronic analyses of the blankets and shields were part of the studies. During this time there were dissertations written on neutronic analysis systems and the results of neutronic analysis on several blanket and shield designs. The results were presented in the literature. Now in the fifth decade of fusion research, investigators often return to the earlier analyses for the neutronic results that are applicable to current blanket and shield designs, with the idea of using the older work as a basis for the new. However, the analyses of the past were made with cross-section data sets that have long been replaced with more modern versions. In addition, approximations were often made to the cross sections used because more exact data were not available. Because these results are used as guides, it is important to know if they are reproducible using more modern data. In this paper, several of the neutronic calculations made in the early studies are repeated using the MATXS-11 data library. This library is the ENDF/B-VI version of the MATXS-5 library. The library has 80 neutron groups. Tritium breeding ratios, heating rates, and fluxes are calculated and compared. This transport code used here is the one- dimensional S n code, ONEDANT. It is important to note that the calculations here are not to be considered as benchmarks because parameter and sensitivity studies were not made. They are used only to see if the results of older calculations are in reasonable agreement with a more modern library

  1. Introduction to Nuclear Fusion Power and the Design of Fusion Reactors. An Issue-Oriented Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillo, J. A.

    This three-part module focuses on the principles of nuclear fusion and on the likely nature and components of a controlled-fusion power reactor. The physical conditions for a net energy release from fusion and two approaches (magnetic and inertial confinement) which are being developed to achieve this goal are described. Safety issues associated…

  2. The LOFA analysis of fusion-fission hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Z.-C.; Xie, H.

    2014-01-01

    The fusion-fission hybrid energy reactor can produce energy, breed nuclear fuel, and handle the nuclear waste, etc, with the fusion neutron source striking the subcritical blanket. The passive safety system, consisting of passive residual heat removal system, passive safety injection system and automatic depressurization system, was adopted into the fusion-fission hybrid energy reactor in this paper. Modeling and nodalization of primary loop, passive core cooling system and partial secondary loop of the fusion-fission hybrid energy reactor using RELAP5 were conducted and LOFA (Loss of Flow Accident) was analyzed. The results of key transient parameters indicated that the PRHRs could mitigate the accidental consequence of LOFA effectively. It is also concluded that it is feasible to apply the passive safety system concept to fusion-fission hybrid energy reactor. (author)

  3. Fusion reactor design studies: standard accounts for cost estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte, S.C.; Willke, T.L.; Young, J.R.

    1978-05-01

    The fusion reactor design studies--standard accounts for cost estimates provides a common format from which to assess the economic character of magnetically confined fusion reactor design concepts. The format will aid designers in the preparation of design concept costs estimates and also provide policymakers with a tool to assist in appraising which design concept may be economically promising. The format sets forth a categorization and accounting procedure to be used when estimating fusion reactor busbar energy cost that can be easily and consistently applied. Reasons for developing the procedure, explanations of the procedure, justifications for assumptions made in the procedure, and the applicability of the procedure are described in this document. Adherence to the format when evaluating prospective fusion reactor design concepts will result in the identification of the more promising design concepts thus enabling the fusion power alternatives with better economic potential to be quickly and efficiently developed

  4. Statistical steady states in turbulent droplet condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bec, Jeremie; Krstulovic, Giorgio; Siewert, Christoph

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the general problem of turbulent condensation. Using direct numerical simulations we show that the fluctuations of the supersaturation field offer different conditions for the growth of droplets which evolve in time due to turbulent transport and mixing. This leads to propose a Lagrangian stochastic model consisting of a set of integro-differential equations for the joint evolution of the squared radius and the supersaturation along droplet trajectories. The model has two parameters fixed by the total amount of water and the thermodynamic properties, as well as the Lagrangian integral timescale of the turbulent supersaturation. The model reproduces very well the droplet size distributions obtained from direct numerical simulations and their time evolution. A noticeable result is that, after a stage where the squared radius simply diffuses, the system converges exponentially fast to a statistical steady state independent of the initial conditions. The main mechanism involved in this convergence is a loss of memory induced by a significant number of droplets undergoing a complete evaporation before growing again. The statistical steady state is characterised by an exponential tail in the droplet mass distribution.

  5. Application of Bondarenko formalism to fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soran, P.D.; Dudziak, D.J.

    1975-01-01

    The Bondarenko formalism used to account for resonance self-shielding effects (temperature and composition) in a Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor is reviewed. A material of interest in the RTPR blanket is 93 Nb, which exhibits a large number of capture resonance in the energy region below 800 keV. Although Nb constitutes a small volume fraction of the blanket, its presence significantly affects the nucleonic properties of the RTPR blanket. The effects of self-shielding in 93 Nb on blanket parameters such as breeding ratio, total afterheat, radioactivity, magnet-coil heating and total energy depositions have been studied. Resonance self-shielding of 93 Nb, as compared to unshielded cross sections, will increase tritium breeding by approximately 7 percent in the RTPR blanket and will decrease blanket radioactivity, total recoverable energy, and magnet-coil heating. Temperature effects change these parameters by less than 2 percent. The method is not restricted to the RTPR, as a single set of Bondarenko f-factors is suitable for application to a variety of fusion reactor designs

  6. Conceptual design of imploding liner fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turchi, P.J.; Robson, A.E.

    1976-01-01

    The basic new ingredient is the concept of rotationally stabilized liquid metal liners accelerated with free pistons. The liner motion is constrained on its outer surface by the pistons, laterally by channel walls, during acceleration, and on its inner surface, where megagauss field levels are attained by the centrifugal motion of the liner material. In this way, stable, reversible motion of the liner should be possible, permitting repetitive, pulsed operation at interior pressures far greater than can be allowed in static conductor systems. Such higher operating pressures permit the use of simple plasma geometries, such as theta pinches, with greatly reduced dimensions. Furthermore, the implosion of thick, lithium-bearing liners with large radial compression ratios inherently provides the plasma with a surrounding blanket of neutron absorbing liquid metal, thereby substantially reducing the problems of induced radioactivity and first wall damage that haunt conventional fusion reactor designs. The following article discusses the basic operation of liner reactors and several important features influencing their design

  7. Fusion reactor blanket-main design aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strebkov, Yu.; Sidorov, A.; Danilov, I.

    1994-01-01

    The main function of the fusion reactor blanket is ensuring tritium breeding and radiation shield. The blanket version depends on the reactor type (experimental, DEMO, commercial) and its parameters. Blanket operation conditions are defined with the heat flux, neutron load/fluence, cyclic operation, dynamic heating/force loading, MHD effects etc. DEMO/commercial blanket design is distinguished e.g. by rather high heat load and neutron fluence - up to 100 W/cm 2 and 7 MWa/m 2 accordingly. This conditions impose specific requirements for the materials, structure, maintenance of the blanket and its most loaded components - FW and limiter. The liquid Li-Pb eutectic is one of the possible breeder for different kinds of blanket in view of its advantages one of which is the blanket convertibility that allow to have shielding blanket (borated water) or breeding one (Li-Pb eutectic). Using Li-Pb eutectic for both ITER and DEMO blankets have been considered. In the conceptual ITER design the solid eutectic blanket was carried out. The liquid eutectic breeder/coolant is suggested also for the advanced (high parameter) blanket

  8. Self-sustaining nuclear pumped laser-fusion reactor experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boody, F.P.; Choi, C.K.; Miley, G.H.

    1977-01-01

    The features of a neutron feedback nuclear pumped (NFNP) laser-fusion reactor equipment were studied with the intention of establishing the feasibility of the concept. The NFNP laser-fusion concept is compared schematically to electrically pumped laser fusion. The study showed that, once a method of energy storage has been demonstrated, a self-sustaining fusion-fission hybrid reactor with a ''blanket multiplication'' of two would be feasible using nuclear pumped Xe F* excimer lasers having efficiencies of 1 to 2 percent and D-D-T pellets with gains of 50 to 100

  9. SUPERENERGY-2: a multiassembly, steady-state computer code for LMFBR core thermal-hydraulic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basehore, K.L.; Todreas, N.E.

    1980-08-01

    Core thermal-hydraulic design and performance analyses for Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs) require repeated detailed multiassembly calculations to determine radial temperature profiles and subchannel outlet temperatures for various core configurations and subassembly structural analyses. At steady-state, detailed core-wide temperature profiles are required for core restraint calculations and subassembly structural analysis. In addition, sodium outlet temperatures are routinely needed for each reactor operating cycle. The SUPERENERGY-2 thermal-hydraulic code was designed specifically to meet these designer needs. It is applicable only to steady-state, forced-convection flow in LMFBR core geometries.

  10. SUPERENERGY-2: a multiassembly, steady-state computer code for LMFBR core thermal-hydraulic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basehore, K.L.; Todreas, N.E.

    1980-08-01

    Core thermal-hydraulic design and performance analyses for Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs) require repeated detailed multiassembly calculations to determine radial temperature profiles and subchannel outlet temperatures for various core configurations and subassembly structural analyses. At steady-state, detailed core-wide temperature profiles are required for core restraint calculations and subassembly structural analysis. In addition, sodium outlet temperatures are routinely needed for each reactor operating cycle. The SUPERENERGY-2 thermal-hydraulic code was designed specifically to meet these designer needs. It is applicable only to steady-state, forced-convection flow in LMFBR core geometries

  11. Numerical analysis of magnetoelastic coupled buckling of fusion reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demachi, K.; Yoshida, Y.; Miya, K.

    1994-01-01

    For a tokamak fusion reactor, it is one of the most important subjects to establish the structural design in which its components can stand for strong magnetic force induced by plasma disruption. A number of magnetostructural analysis of the fusion reactor components were done recently. However, in these researches the structural behavior was calculated based on the small deformation theory where the nonlinearity was neglected. But it is known that some kinds of structures easily exceed the geometrical nonlinearity. In this paper, the deflection and the magnetoelastic buckling load of fusion reactor components during plasma disruption were calculated

  12. On the implementation of new technology modules for fusion reactor systems codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franza, F., E-mail: fabrizio.franza@kit.edu [Institute of Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, 76344 (Germany); Boccaccini, L.V.; Fisher, U. [Institute of Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, 76344 (Germany); Gade, P.V.; Heller, R. [Institute for Technical Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, 76344 (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • At KIT a new technology modules for systems code are under development. • A new algorithm for the definition of the main reactor's components is defined. • A new blanket model based on 1D neutronics analysis is described. • A new TF coil stress model based on 3D electromagnetic analysis is described. • The models were successfully benchmarked against more detailed models. - Abstract: In the frame of the pre-conceptual design of the next generation fusion power plant (DEMO), systems codes are being used from nearly 20 years. In such computational tools the main reactor components (e.g. plasma, blanket, magnets, etc.) are integrated in a unique computational algorithm and simulated by means of rather simplified mathematical models (e.g. steady state and zero dimensional models). The systems code tries to identify the main design parameters (e.g. major radius, net electrical power, toroidal field) and to make the reactor's requirements and constraints to be simultaneously accomplished. In fusion applications, requirements and constraints can be either of physics or technology kind. Concerning the latest category, at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology a new modelling activity has been recently launched aiming to develop improved models focusing on the main technology areas, such as neutronics, thermal-hydraulics, electromagnetics, structural mechanics, fuel cycle and vacuum systems. These activities started by developing: (1) a geometry model for the definition of poloidal profiles for the main reactors components, (2) a blanket model based on neutronics analyses and (3) a toroidal field coil model based on electromagnetic analysis, firstly focusing on the stresses calculations. The objective of this paper is therefore to give a short outline of these models.

  13. On the implementation of new technology modules for fusion reactor systems codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franza, F.; Boccaccini, L.V.; Fisher, U.; Gade, P.V.; Heller, R.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • At KIT a new technology modules for systems code are under development. • A new algorithm for the definition of the main reactor's components is defined. • A new blanket model based on 1D neutronics analysis is described. • A new TF coil stress model based on 3D electromagnetic analysis is described. • The models were successfully benchmarked against more detailed models. - Abstract: In the frame of the pre-conceptual design of the next generation fusion power plant (DEMO), systems codes are being used from nearly 20 years. In such computational tools the main reactor components (e.g. plasma, blanket, magnets, etc.) are integrated in a unique computational algorithm and simulated by means of rather simplified mathematical models (e.g. steady state and zero dimensional models). The systems code tries to identify the main design parameters (e.g. major radius, net electrical power, toroidal field) and to make the reactor's requirements and constraints to be simultaneously accomplished. In fusion applications, requirements and constraints can be either of physics or technology kind. Concerning the latest category, at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology a new modelling activity has been recently launched aiming to develop improved models focusing on the main technology areas, such as neutronics, thermal-hydraulics, electromagnetics, structural mechanics, fuel cycle and vacuum systems. These activities started by developing: (1) a geometry model for the definition of poloidal profiles for the main reactors components, (2) a blanket model based on neutronics analyses and (3) a toroidal field coil model based on electromagnetic analysis, firstly focusing on the stresses calculations. The objective of this paper is therefore to give a short outline of these models.

  14. Modelling 'steady-state' water radiolysis in nuclear reactors: status of the reaction set, rate constants and g-Values for 20o - 350oC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliot, J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper gives a review of water radiolysis in reactor circuits. The discussion is illustrated with experimental results from the radiolysis of water under high temperature, high dose conditions in a re-circulating water loop in a reactor. It also gives the status of the database for modeling radiation chemistry under power reactor conditions.

  15. First preliminary design of an experimental fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    A preliminary design of a tokamak experimental fusion reactor to be built in the near future is under way. The goals of the reactor are to achieve reactor-level plasma conditions for a sufficiently long operation period and to obtain design, construction and operational experience for the main components of full-scale power reactors. This design covers overall reactor system including plasma characteristics, reactor structure, blanket neutronics, shielding, superconducting magnets, neutral beam injector, electric power supply system, fuel circulating system, reactor cooling system, tritium recovery system and maintenance scheme. The main design parameters are as follows: the reactor fusion power 100 MW, torus radius 6.75 m, plasma radius 1.5 m, first wall radius 1.75 m, toroidal magnet field on axis 6 T, blanket fertile material Li 2 O, coolant He, structural material 316SS and tritium breeding ratio 0.9. (auth.)

  16. Engineering the fusion reactor first wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurden, Glen; Scott, Willms

    2008-01-01

    Recently the National Academy of Engineering published a set of Grand Challenges in Engineering in which the second item listed was entitled 'Provide energy from fusion'. Clearly a key component of this challenge is the science and technology associated with creating and maintaining burning plasmas. This is being vigorously addressed with both magnetic and inertial approaches with various experiments such as ITER and NIF. Considerably less attention is being given to another key component of this challenge, namely engineering the first wall that will contain the burning plasma. This is a daunting problem requiring technologies and materials that can not only survive, but also perform multiple essential functions in this extreme environment. These functions are (1) shield the remainder of the device from radiation. (2) convert of neutron energy to useful heat and (3) breed and extract tritium to maintain the reactor fuel supply. The first wall must not contaminate the plasma with impurities. It must be infused with cooling to maintain acceptable temperatures on plasma facing and structural components. It must not degrade. It must avoid excessive build-up of tritium on surfaces, and, if surface deposits do form, must be receptive to cleaning techniques. All these functions and constraints must be met while being subjected to nuclear and thermal radiation, particle bombardment, high magnetic fields, thermal cycling and occasional impingement of plasma on the surface. And, operating in a nuclear environment, the first wall must be fully maintainable by remotely-operated manipulators. Elements of the first wall challenge have been studied since the 1970' s both in the US and internationally. Considerable foundational work has been performed on plasma facing materials and breeding blanket/shield modules. Work has included neutronics, materials fabrication and joining, fluid flow, tritium breeding, tritium recovery and containment, energy conversion, materials damage and

  17. High Beta Steady State Research and Future Directions on JT-60U and JFT-2M

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Shinichi

    2003-10-01

    JT-60U and JFT-2M research is focused on high beta steady state operation towards economically and environmentally attractive reactors. In JT-60U, a high-βp H-mode plasma was sustained with βN 2.7 for 7.4 s in which neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) limited the attainable β_N. Real-time tracking NTM stabilization system using ECCD demonstrated complete suppression of NTM leading to recovery of βN before onset of NTM. Performance in a fully non-inductive H-mode plasma was improved up to n_i(0) τE T_i(0) = 3.1 x 10^20 keV s m-3 using N-NBCD with βN 2.4, HH_y,2=1.2 and bootstrap fraction f_BS 0.5. ECH experiments extended the confinement enhancement for dominantly electron heated reversed shear plasmas up to HH_y,2 2 at T_e/Ti 1.25. A world record ECCD efficiency, 4.2 x 10^18 A/W/m^2, was achieved at Te 23 keV with a highly localized central current density. Innovative initiation and current build-up without center solenoid currents were established by LHCD/ECH and bootstrap current up to f_BS 0.9. In JFT-2M, the inside of the vacuum vessel wall was fully covered with low-activation ferritic steel plates to investigate their use in plasmas near fusion conditions. High βN plasmas were produced up to βN = 3.3 with an internal transport barrier (ITB) and a steady H-mode edge. A new H-mode regime with steady high recycling (HRS) and an ITB was exploited leading to βN H_89P 6.2 at n_e/nG 0.7. In 2003, JT-60U will be able to operate for the duration up to 65 s at 1 MA/2.7 T and the heating/current-drive duration up to 30 s at 17 MW to prolong high-βN and/or high-f_BS discharges with feedback controls. JFT-2M is planning to implement wall stabilization experiments in 2004 to pursue plasmas above the ideal no-wall limit using a ferritic wall. The modification of JT-60 to a fully superconducting tokamak is under discussion to explore high-β steady state operation in collision-less plasmas well above no-wall limit with ferritic wall in a steady state.

  18. Steady-State Operation in Tore Supra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, G. T.; Tore Supra, Equipe

    1999-11-01

    The Tore Supra superconducting tokamak is devoted to steady-state operation. The CIEL (French acronym for internal component and limiter) project( LIPA, M., et al., Proc. of the 17th IEEE/NPSS Symp. on Fus. Engineering, San Diego, USA, 1997.) consists of a complete upgrade of the inner chamber of Tore Supra, planned to be installed during the year 2000. This project will allow physics scenarios with up to 24 MW of radio frequency heating and current drive (typically 8 - 10 MW of ICRF, 10 - 12 MW of LHCD and 2 MW of ECRF) in stationary plasmas up to 1000 s, with active particle control. This paper presents an overview of the experiments planned to explore the properties, such as the confinement and MHD stability, of various heating and current drive scenarios for long duration discharges. The expected performance for the CIEL phase is also reported.

  19. Producing a steady-state population inversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, R.K.; Griffin, D.C.

    1986-03-01

    An observed steady-state transition at 17.5 nm is identified as the 2p 5 3s3p 4 S/sub 3/2/ → 2p 6 3p 2 P/sub 3/2/ transition in Na-like aluminum. The upper level is populated by electron inner shell ionization of metastable Mg-like aluminum. From the emission intensity, the rate coefficient for populating the upper level is calculated to be approximately 5 x 10 -10 ) cm 3 /sec. Since the upper level is quasimetastable with a lifetime 22 times longer than the lower level, it may be possible to produce a population inversion, if a competing process to populate the lower level can be reduced

  20. Magnetic sensor for steady state tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neyatani, Yuzuru; Mori, Katsuharu; Oguri, Shigeru; Kikuchi, Mitsuru [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1996-06-01

    A new type of magnetic sensor has been developed for the measurement of steady state magnetic fields without DC-drift such as integration circuit. The electromagnetic force induced to the current which leads to the sensor was used for the measurement. For the high frequency component which exceeds higher than the vibration frequency of sensor, pick-up coil was used through the high pass filter. From the results using tokamak discharges, this sensor can measure the magnetic field in the tokamak discharge. During {approx}2 hours measurement, no DC drift was observed. The sensor can respond {approx}10ms of fast change of magnetic field during disruptions. We confirm the extension of measured range to control the current which leads to the sensor. (author).

  1. Progress towards Steady State on NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gates, D.A.; Kessel, C.; Menard, J.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    In order to reduce recirculating power fraction to acceptable levels, the spherical torus concept relies on the simultaneous achievement of high toroidal β and high bootstrap fraction in steady state. In the last year, as a result of plasma control system improvements, the achievable plasma elongation on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has been raised from κ ∼ 2.1 to κ ∼ 2.6--approximately a 25% increase. This increase in elongation has lead to a doubling increase in the toroidal β for long-pulse discharges. The increase in β is associated with an increase in plasma current at nearly fixed poloidal β, which enables higher β t with nearly constant bootstrap fraction. As a result, for the first time in a spherical torus, a discharge with a plasma current of 1 MA has been sustained for 1 second. Data is presented from NSTX correlating the increase in performance with increased plasma shaping capability. In addition to improved shaping, H-modes induced during the current ramp phase of the plasma discharge have been used to reduce flux consumption during and to delay the onset of MHD instabilities. A modeled integrated scenario, which has 100% non-inductive current drive with very high toroidal β, will also be presented. The NSTX poloidal field coils are currently being modified to produce the plasma shape which is required for this scenario, which requires high triangularity ((delta) ∼ 0.8) at elevated elongation (κ ∼ 2.5). The other main requirement for steady state on NSTX is the ability to drive a fraction of the total plasma current with radio-frequency waves. The results of High Harmonic Fast Wave heating and current drive studies as well as electron Bernstein Wave emission studies will be presented

  2. Control of tritium permeation through fusion reactor strucural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maroni, V.A.

    1978-01-01

    The intention of this paper is to provide a brief synopsis of the status of understanding and technology pertaining to the dissolution and permeation of tritium in fusion reactor materials. The following sections of this paper attempt to develop a simple perspective for understanding the consequences of these phenomena and the nature of the technical methodology being contemplated to control their impact on fusion reactor operation. Considered in order are: (1) the occurrence of tritium in the fusion fuel cycle, (2) a set of tentative criteria to guide the analysis of tritium containment and control strategies, (3) the basic mechanisms by which tritium may be released from a fusion plant, and (4) the methods currently under development to control the permeation-related release mechanisms. To provide background and support for these considerations, existing solubility and permeation data for the hydrogen isotopes are compared and correlated under conditions to be expected in fusion reactor systems

  3. Plutonium-239 production rate study using a typical fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faghihi, F.; Havasi, H.; Amin-Mozafari, M.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to compute fissile 239 Pu material by supposed typical fusion reactor operation to make the fuel requirement for other purposes (e.g. MOX fissile fuel, etc.). It is assumed that there is a fusion reactor has a cylindrical geometry and uses uniformly distributed deuterium-tritium as fuel so that neutron wall load is taken at 10(MW)/(m 2 ) . Moreover, the reactor core is surrounded by six suggested blankets to make best performance of the physical conditions described herein. We determined neutron flux in each considered blanket as well as tritium self-sufficiency using two groups neutron energy and then computation is followed by the MCNP-4C code. Finally, material depletion according to a set of dynamical coupled differential equations is solved to estimate 239 Pu production rate. Produced 239 Pu is compared with two typical fission reactors to find performance of plutonium breeding ratio in the case of the fusion reactor. We found that 0.92% of initial U is converted into fissile Pu by our suggested fusion reactor with thermal power of 3000 MW. For comparison, 239 Pu yield of suggested large scale PWR is about 0.65% and for LMFBR is close to 1.7%. The results show that the fusion reactor has an acceptable efficiency for Pu production compared with a large scale PWR fission reactor type

  4. Plutonium-239 production rate study using a typical fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faghihi, F. [Research Center for Radiation Protection, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: faghihif@shirazu.ac.ir; Havasi, H.; Amin-Mozafari, M. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, 71348-51154 Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of the present paper is to compute fissile {sup 239}Pu material by supposed typical fusion reactor operation to make the fuel requirement for other purposes (e.g. MOX fissile fuel, etc.). It is assumed that there is a fusion reactor has a cylindrical geometry and uses uniformly distributed deuterium-tritium as fuel so that neutron wall load is taken at 10(MW)/(m{sup 2}) . Moreover, the reactor core is surrounded by six suggested blankets to make best performance of the physical conditions described herein. We determined neutron flux in each considered blanket as well as tritium self-sufficiency using two groups neutron energy and then computation is followed by the MCNP-4C code. Finally, material depletion according to a set of dynamical coupled differential equations is solved to estimate {sup 239}Pu production rate. Produced {sup 239}Pu is compared with two typical fission reactors to find performance of plutonium breeding ratio in the case of the fusion reactor. We found that 0.92% of initial U is converted into fissile Pu by our suggested fusion reactor with thermal power of 3000 MW. For comparison, {sup 239}Pu yield of suggested large scale PWR is about 0.65% and for LMFBR is close to 1.7%. The results show that the fusion reactor has an acceptable efficiency for Pu production compared with a large scale PWR fission reactor type.

  5. Alternative fusion concepts and the prospects for improved reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Past trends, present status, and future directions in the search for an improved fusion reactor are reviewed, and promising options available to boh the principle tokamak and other supporting concept are summarized

  6. Nuclear data for structural materials of fission and fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulo, V.

    1989-06-01

    The document presents the status of nuclear reaction theory concerning optical model development, level density models and pre-equilibrium and direct processes used in calculation of neutron nuclear data for structural materials of fission and fusion reactors. 6 refs

  7. Health physics aspects of activation products from fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoup, R.L.; Poston, J.W.; Easterly, C.E.; Jacobs, D.G.

    1975-01-01

    A review of the activation products from fusion reactors and their attendant impacts is discussed. This includes a discussion on their production, expected inventories, and the status of metabolic data on these products

  8. Nuclear characteristics of D-D fusion reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Hideki; Ohta, Masao

    1978-01-01

    Fusion reactors operating on deuterium (D-D) cycle are considered to be of long range interest for their freedom from tritium breeding in the blanket. The present paper discusses the various possibilities of D-D fusion reactor blanket designs mainly from the standpoint of the nuclear characteristics. Neutronic and photonic calculations are based on presently available data to provide a basis of the optimal blanket design in D-D fusion reactors. It is found that it appears desirable to design a blanket with blanket/shield (BS) concept in D-D fusion reactors. The BS concept is designed to obtain reasonable shielding characteristics for superconducting magnet (SCM) by using shielding materials in the compact blanket. This concept will open the possibility of compact radiation shield design based on assured technology, and offer the advantage from the system economics point of view. (auth.)

  9. Development of a real-time simulation tool towards self-consistent scenario of plasma start-up and sustainment on helical fusion reactor FFHR-d1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, T.; Miyazawa, J.; Sakamoto, R.; Suzuki, Y.; Suzuki, C.; Seki, R.; Satake, S.; Huang, B.; Nunami, M.; Yokoyama, M.; Sagara, A.; the FFHR Design Group

    2017-06-01

    This study closely investigates the plasma operation scenario for the LHD-type helical reactor FFHR-d1 in view of MHD equilibrium/stability, neoclassical transport, alpha energy loss and impurity effect. In 1D calculation code that reproduces the typical pellet discharges in LHD experiments, we identify a self-consistent solution of the plasma operation scenario which achieves steady-state sustainment of the burning plasma with a fusion gain of Q ~ 10 was found within the operation regime that has been already confirmed in LHD experiment. The developed calculation tool enables systematic analysis of the operation regime in real time.

  10. Fusion-reactor blanket and coolant material compatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeppson, D.W.; Keough, R.F.

    1981-01-01

    Fusion reactor blanket and coolant compatibility tests are being conducted to aid in the selection and design of safe blanket and coolant systems for future fusion reactors. Results of scoping compatibility tests to date are reported for blanket material and water interactions at near operating temperatures. These tests indicate the quantitative hydrogen release, the maximum temperature and pressures produced and the rates of interactions for selected blanket materials

  11. Influence of Impurities on the Fuel Retention in Fusion Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Reinhart, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is the influence of plasma impurities on the hydrogen retentionin metals, in the scope of plasma-wall-interaction research for fusion reactors.This is addressed experimentally and by modelling. The mechanisms of the hydrogenretention are influenced by various parameters like the wall temperature, ionenergy, flux and fluence as well as the plasma composition. The plasma compositionis a relevant factor for hydrogen retention in fusion reactors, as their plasma willalso ...

  12. An analysis of the estimated capital cost of a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollis, A.A.

    1981-06-01

    The cost of building a fusion reactor similar to the Culham Conceptual Tokamak reactor Mark IIB is assessed and compared with other published capital costs of fusion and fission reactors. It is concluded that capital-investment and structure-renewal costs for a typical fusion reactor as presently conceived are likely to be higher than for thermal-fission reactors. (author)

  13. An analysis of the estimated capital cost of a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollis, A.A.; Evans, L.S.

    1981-01-01

    The cost of building a fusion reactor similar to the Culham Conceptual Tokamak reactor Mark IIB is assessed and compared with other published capital costs of fusion and fission reactors. It is concluded that capital-investment and structure-renewal costs for a typical fusion reactor as presently conceived are likely to be higher than for thermal-fission reactors. (author)

  14. Tritium-related materials problems in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickman, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Pressing materials problems that must be solved before tritium can be used to produce energy economically in fusion reactors are discussed. The following topics are discussed: (1) breeding tritium, (2) recovering bred tritium, (3) containing tritium, (4) fuel recycling, and (5) laser-fusion fueling

  15. Thermal aspects of a superconducting coil for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, H.T.

    1975-01-01

    Computer models are used to simulate both localized and extensive thermal excursions in a large superconducting magnet for fusion reactor. Conditions for the failure of fusion magnet due to thermal excursion are delineated. Designs to protect the magnet against such thermal excursion are evaluated

  16. Fission-suppressed hybrid reactor: the fusion breeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.; Lee, J.D.; Coops, M.S.

    1982-12-01

    Results of a conceptual design study of a 233 U-producing fusion breeder are presented. The majority of the study was devoted to conceptual design and evaluation of a fission-suppressed blanket and to fuel cycle issues such as fuel reprocessing, fuel handling, and fuel management. Studies in the areas of fusion engineering, reactor safety, and economics were also performed

  17. Colliding beam fusion reactor space propulsion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wessel, Frank J.; Binderbauer, Michl W.; Rostoker, Norman; Rahman, Hafiz Ur; O'Toole, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    We describe a space propulsion system based on the Colliding Beam Fusion Reactor (CBFR). The CBFR is a high-beta, field-reversed, magnetic configuration with ion energies in the range of hundreds of keV. Repetitively-pulsed ion beams sustain the plasma distribution and provide current drive. The confinement physics is based on the Vlasov-Maxwell equation, including a Fokker Planck collision operator and all sources and sinks for energy and particle flow. The mean azimuthal velocities and temperatures of the fuel ion species are equal and the plasma current is unneutralized by the electrons. The resulting distribution functions are thermal in a moving frame of reference. The ion gyro-orbit radius is comparable to the dimensions of the confinement system, hence classical transport of the particles and energy is expected and the device is scaleable. We have analyzed the design over a range of 10 6 -10 9 Watts of output power (0.15-150 Newtons thrust) with a specific impulse of, I sp ∼10 6 sec. A 50 MW propulsion system might involve the following parameters: 4-meters diameterx10-meters length, magnetic field ∼7 Tesla, ion beam current ∼10 A, and fuels of either D-He 3 ,P-B 11 ,P-Li 6 ,D-Li 6 , etc

  18. Communication links for fusion reactor maintenance operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Uffelen, M.

    2005-01-01

    Different architectures are envisaged for data transmission with fibre optic links in a radiation environment, as proposed in literature for both space and high energy physics applications. Their needs and constraints differ from those encountered for maintenance tasks in the future ITER environment, not only in terms of temperature and radiation levels, but also with respect to transmission speed requirements. Our approach attempts to limit the use of radiation-sensitive electronics for transmission of both digital and/or analogue data to the control room, using glass fibres as transport medium. We therefore assessed the radiation behaviour of a cost-effective fibre optic transmitter at 850 nm, consisting of a PWM (pulse width modulator), a radiation tolerant current driver (previously developed at SCK-CEN) and a VCSEL (Vertical-Cavity Surface Emitting Laser assembly, up to 10 MGy at 60 degrees Celsius. The PWM enables to transform an analogue sensor signal into a pseudo numerical signal, with a pulse width proportional to the incoming signal. The main objective of this task is to contribute to the major design of the maintenance equipment and strategy needed for the remote replacement of the divertor system in the future ITER fusion reactor, with particular attention to the implications of radiation hardening rules and recommendations. Next to the radiation assessment studies of remote handling tools, including actuators and sensors, we also develop radiation tolerant communication links with multiplexing capabilities

  19. Safety vessels for explosive fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineev, V.

    1994-01-01

    The failure of several types of geometrically similar cylindrical and spherical steel and glass fibers vessels filled with water or air was investigated when an explosive charge of TNT was detonated in the center. Vessels had radius 50-1000 mm, thickness of walls 2-20%. The detonation on TNT imitated energy release. The parameter: K = M/mf is a measure of the strength of the vessel where M is the mass of the vessel, and mf is the mass of TNT for which the vessel fails. This demanded 2-4 destroyed and nondestroyed shots. It may be showed that: K=A/σ f where σ f is the fracture stress of the material vessel, and A = const = F(energy TNT, characteristic of elasticity of vessel material). The chief results are the following: (1) A similar increase in the geometrical dimensions of steel vessels by a factor of 10 leads to the increase of parameter K in about 5 times and to decrease of failure deformation in 7 times (scale effect). (2) For glass fibers, scale effect is absent. (3) This problem is solved in terms of theory energetic scale effect. (4) The concept of TNT equivalent explosive makes it possible to use these investigations to evaluate the response of safety vessels for explosive fusion reactor

  20. Superconducting magnets for toroidal fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.

    1980-01-01

    Fusion reactors will soon be employing superconducting magnets to confine plasma in which deuterium and tritium (D-T) are fused to produce usable energy. At present there is one small confinement experiment with superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils: Tokamak 7 (T-7), in the USSR, which operates at 4 T. By 1983, six different 2.5 x 3.5-m D-shaped coils from six manufacturers in four countries will be assembled in a toroidal array in the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for testing at fields up to 8 T. Soon afterwards ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT-P) will begin operation at Oak Ridge with superconducting TF coils. At the same time there will be tokamaks with superconducting TF coils 2 to 3 m in diameter in the USSR and France. Toroidal field strength in these machines will range from 6 to 9 T. NbTi and Nb 3 Sn, bath cooling and forced flow, cryostable and metastable - various designs are being tried in this period when this new application of superconductivity is growing and maturing

  1. Fusion reactor horizontal versus vertical maintenance approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charruyer, Ph.; Djerassi, H.; Leger, D.; Maupou, M.; Rouillard, J.; Salpietro, E.; Holloway, C.; Suppan, A.

    1987-01-01

    This paper concerns the comparison of horizontal versus vertical maintenance options of internal components (blanket and segment) of fusion reactors NET (Next European Torus) and INTOR Design. The described mechanical options are taken to ensure the handling of internals with the required precision, taking into account the problems raised by the safety and confinement requirements. Handling is obviously performed remotely. The option comparisons are performed according to the criteria of feasibility, building size, duration of maintenance operations, safety, flexibility, availability and cost. The first conclusions point on that the vertical handling option offers advantages, as regards the ease of handling and confinement possibilities. From the building size point of view, the two solutions are almost equivalent, while other criteria do not provide a basis for choice. It is emphasized that the confinement option C.T.U. (Containment Transfer Unit) or T.I.C. (Tight Intermediate Confinement) should be the major factor in determining the best options. In additions, a cost comparative analysis emphasizes the best cost/benefit ratio for the different options studied

  2. Nuclear design of a very-low-activation fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, E.T.; Hopkins, G.R.

    1983-06-01

    An investigation was conducted to study the nuclear design aspects of using very-low-activation materials, such as SiC, MgO, and aluminum for fusion-reactor first wall, blanket, and shield applications. In addition to the advantage of very-low radioactive inventory, it was found that the very-low-activation fusion reactor can also offer an adequate tritium-breeding ratio and substantial amount of blanket nuclear heating as a conventional-material-structured reactor does. The most-stringent design constraint found in a very-low-activation fusion reactor is the limited space available in the inboard region of a tokamak concept for shielding to protect the superconducting toroidal field coil. A reference design was developed which mitigates the constraint by adopting a removable tungsten shield design that retains the inboard dimensions and gives the same shield performance as the reference STARFIRE tokamak reactor design

  3. ITER, the 'Broader Approach', a DEMO fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janeschitz, G.; Bahm, W.

    2007-01-01

    Fusion is a very promising future energy option, which is characterized by almost unlimited fuel reserves, favourable safety features and environmental sustainability. The aim of the worldwide fusion research is a fusion power station which imitates the process taking place in the sun and thus gains energy from the fusion of light atomic nuclei. The experimental reactor ITER which will be built in Cadarache, France, marks a breakthrough in the worldwide fusion research: For the first time an energy multiplication factor of at least 10 will be achieved, the factor by which the fusion power exceeds the external plasma heating. Partners in this project are the European Union, Japan, the Russian Federation, USA, China, South Korea and India as well as Brazil as associated partner. The facility is supposed to demonstrate a long burning, reactor-typical plasma and to test techniques such as plasma heating, plasma confinement by superconducting magnets, fuel cycle as well as energy transition, tritium breeding and remote handling technologies. The next step beyond ITER will be the demonstration power station DEMO which requires further developments in order to create the basis for its design and construction. The roadmap to fusion energy is described. It consists of several elements which are needed to develop the knowledge required for a commercial fusion reactor. The DEMO time schedule depends on the efforts in terms of personnel and budget resources the society is willing to invest in fusion taking into account the long term energy supply and its environmental impact. (orig.)

  4. Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactors (CRFPR): fusion-power-core integration study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copenhaver, C.; Krakowski, R.A.; Schnurr, N.M.

    1985-08-01

    Using detailed two-dimensional neutronics studies based on the results of a previous framework study (LA-10200-MS), the fusion-power-core (FPC) integration, maintenance, and radio-activity/afterheat control are examined for the Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (CRFPR). While maintaining as a base case the nominal 20-MW/m 2 neutron first-wall loading design, CRFPR(20), the cost and technology impact of lower-wall-loading designs are also examined. The additional detail developed as part of this follow-on study also allows the cost estimates to be refined. The cost impact of multiplexing lower-wall-loading FPCs into a approx. 1000-MWe(net) plant is also examined. The CRFPR(20) design remains based on a PbLi-cooled FPC with pressurized-water used as a coolant for first-wall, pumped-limiter, and structural-shield systems. Single-piece FPC maintenance of this steady-state power plant is envisaged and evaluated on the basis of a preliminary layout of the reactor building. This follow-on study also develops the groundwork for assessing the feasibility and impact of impurity/ash control by magnetic divertors as an alternative to previously considered pumped-limiter systems. Lastly, directions for future, more-detailed power-plant designs based on the Reversed-Field Pinch are suggested

  5. Pseudo Steady-State Free Precession for MR-Fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assländer, Jakob; Glaser, Steffen J; Hennig, Jürgen

    2017-03-01

    This article discusses the signal behavior in the case the flip angle in steady-state free precession sequences is continuously varied as suggested for MR-fingerprinting sequences. Flip angle variations prevent the establishment of a steady state and introduce instabilities regarding to magnetic field inhomogeneities and intravoxel dephasing. We show how a pseudo steady state can be achieved, which restores the spin echo nature of steady-state free precession. Based on geometrical considerations, relationships between the flip angle, repetition and echo time are derived that suffice to the establishment of a pseudo steady state. The theory is tested with Bloch simulations as well as phantom and in vivo experiments. A typical steady-state free precession passband can be restored with the proposed conditions. The stability of the pseudo steady state is demonstrated by comparing the evolution of the signal of a single isochromat to one resulting from a spin ensemble. As confirmed by experiments, magnetization in a pseudo steady state can be described with fewer degrees of freedom compared to the original fingerprinting and the pseudo steady state results in more reliable parameter maps. The proposed conditions restore the spin-echo-like signal behavior typical for steady-state free precession in fingerprinting sequences, making this approach more robust to B 0 variations. Magn Reson Med 77:1151-1161, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  6. Advanced materials: The key to attractive magnetic fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.E.

    1992-01-01

    Fusion is one of the most attractive central station power sources from the viewpoint of potential safety and environmental impact characteristics. Studies also indicate that fusion can be economically competitive with other options such as fission reactors and fossil-fired power stations. However, to achieve this triad of characteristics we must develop advanced materials with properties tailored for performance in the various fusion reactor systems. This paper discusses the desired characteristics of materials and the status of materials technology in four critical areas: (1) structural material for the first wail and blanket (FWB), (2) plasma-facing materials, (3) materials for superconducting magnets, and (4) ceramics for electrical and structural applications

  7. Fusion reactor design: On the road to commercialization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulcinski, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    The worldwide effort in fusion is now approximately 2 billion dollars per year and over 12 billion dollars has been invested since 1951 in developing this energy source for the 21st century. A vital component of the past efforts in fusion research has been the conceptual design activities performed by scientists and engineers around the world. Almost 80 such major designs of Tokamak, Mirror, Laser and Ion Beam Reactors have been published and this article discusses how recent conceptual designs have afftected our perception of future fusion reactor performance. (orig.) [de

  8. Advanced materials - the key to attractive magnetic fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.E.

    1992-01-01

    Fusion is one of the most attractive central station power sources from the viewpoint of potential safety and environmental impact characteristics. Studies also indicate that fusion can be economically competitive with other options such as fission reactors and fossil-fired power stations. However, to achieve this triad of characteristics we must develop advanced materials with properties tailored for performance in the various fusion reactor systems. This paper discusses the desired characteristics of materials and the status of materials technology in four critical areas: (1) structural materials for the first wall and blanket (FWB), (2) plasmafacing materials, (3) materials for superconducting magnets, and (4) ceramics for electrical and structural applications. (author)

  9. Fusion reactor nucleonics: status and needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.D.; Engholm, B.A.; Dudziak, D.J.; Haight, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    The national fusion technology effort has made a good start at addressing the basic nucleonics issues, but only a start. No fundamental nucleonics issues are seen as insurmountable barriers to the development of commercial fusion power. To date the fusion nucleonics effort has relied almost exclusively on other programs for nuclear data and codes. But as we progress through and beyond ETF type design studies the fusion program will need to support a broad based nucleonics effort including code development, sensitivity studies, integral experiments, data acquisition etc. It is clear that nucleonics issues are extremely important to fusion development and that we have only scratched the surface

  10. Feasibility study of a magnetic fusion production reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moir, R. W.

    1986-12-01

    A magnetic fusion reactor can produce 10.8 kg of tritium at a fusion power of only 400 MW —an order of magnitude lower power than that of a fission production reactor. Alternatively, the same fusion reactor can produce 995 kg of plutonium. Either a tokamak or a tandem mirror production plant can be used for this purpose; the cost is estimated at about 1.4 billion (1982 dollars) in either case. (The direct costs are estimated at 1.1 billion.) The production cost is calculated to be 22,000/g for tritium and 260/g for plutonium of quite high purity (1%240Pu). Because of the lack of demonstrated technology, such a plant could not be constructed today without significant risk. However, good progress is being made in fusion technology and, although success in magnetic fusion science and engineering is hard to predict with assurance, it seems possible that the physics basis and much of the needed technology could be demonstrated in facilities now under construction. Most of the remaining technology could be demonstrated in the early 1990s in a fusion test reactor of a few tens of megawatts. If the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program constructs a fusion test reactor of approximately 400 MW of fusion power as a next step in fusion power development, such a facility could be used later as a production reactor in a spinoff application. A construction decision in the late 1980s could result in an operating production reactor in the late 1990s. A magnetic fusion production reactor (MFPR) has four potential advantages over a fission production reactor: (1) no fissile material input is needed; (2) no fissioning exists in the tritium mode and very low fissioning exists in the plutonium mode thus avoiding the meltdown hazard; (3) the cost will probably be lower because of the smaller thermal power required; (4) and no reprocessing plant is needed in the tritium mode. The MFPR also has two disadvantages: (1) it will be more costly to operate because it consumes rather than sells

  11. Modeling steady state and transient fission gas behaviour with the Karlsruhe code LAKU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaeth, L.

    1984-08-01

    The programme LAKU models the behaviour of gaseous fission products in reactor fuel under steady state and transient conditions, including molten fuel. A presentation of the full model is given, starting with gas behaviour in the grains and on grain faces and including the treatment of release from porosity. The results of some recent calculations are presented. (orig.) [de

  12. Brief review of the fusion-fission hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenney, F.H.

    1977-01-01

    Much of the conceptual framework of present day fusion-fission hybrid reactors is found in the original work of the early 1950's. Present day motivations for development are quite different. The role of the hybrid reactor is discussed as well as the current activities in the development program

  13. ELMO Bumpy Torus fusion-reactor design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathke, C.G.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    A complete power plant design of a 1200-MWe ELMO Bumpy Torus Reactor (EBTR) is described that emphasizes those features that are unique to the EBT confinement concept, with subsystems and balance-of-plant items that are generic to magnetic fusion being adopted from past, more extensive tokamak reactor designs

  14. A steady-state axisymmetric toroidal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, K.

    1984-01-01

    Conditions for achieving a steady state in an axisymmetric toroidal system are studied with emphasis on a very-high-beta field-reversed configuration. The analysis is carried out for the electromotive force produced by the Ohkawa current that is induced by neutral-beam injection. It turns out that, since the perpendicular component of the current j-vectorsub(perpendicular) to the magnetic field can be generated automatically by the diamagnetic effect, only the parallel component j-vectorsub(parallel) must be driven by the electromotive force. The drive of j-vectorsub(parallel) generates shear in the field line so that the pure toroidal field on the magnetic axis is rotated towards the plasma boundary and matched to the external field lines. This matching condition determines the necessary amount of injection beam current and power. It is demonstrated that a very-high-beta field-reversed configuration requires only a small amount of current-driving beam power because almost all the toroidal current except that close to the magnetic axis is carried by the diamagnetic current due to high beta. A low-beta tokamak, on the other hand, needs very high current-driving power since most of the toroidal current is composed of j-vectorsub(parallel) which must be driven by the beam. (author)

  15. Fluctuations When Driving Between Nonequilibrium Steady States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riechers, Paul M.; Crutchfield, James P.

    2017-08-01

    Maintained by environmental fluxes, biological systems are thermodynamic processes that operate far from equilibrium without detailed-balanced dynamics. Yet, they often exhibit well defined nonequilibrium steady states (NESSs). More importantly, critical thermodynamic functionality arises directly from transitions among their NESSs, driven by environmental switching. Here, we identify the constraints on excess heat and dissipated work necessary to control a system that is kept far from equilibrium by background, uncontrolled "housekeeping" forces. We do this by extending the Crooks fluctuation theorem to transitions among NESSs, without invoking an unphysical dual dynamics. This and corresponding integral fluctuation theorems determine how much work must be expended when controlling systems maintained far from equilibrium. This generalizes thermodynamic feedback control theory, showing that Maxwellian Demons can leverage mesoscopic-state information to take advantage of the excess energetics in NESS transitions. We also generalize an approach recently used to determine the work dissipated when driving between functionally relevant configurations of an active energy-consuming complex system. Altogether, these results highlight universal thermodynamic laws that apply to the accessible degrees of freedom within the effective dynamic at any emergent level of hierarchical organization. By way of illustration, we analyze a voltage-gated sodium ion channel whose molecular conformational dynamics play a critical functional role in propagating action potentials in mammalian neuronal membranes.

  16. Triple echo steady-state (TESS) relaxometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heule, Rahel; Ganter, Carl; Bieri, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Rapid imaging techniques have attracted increased interest for relaxometry, but none are perfect: they are prone to static (B0 ) and transmit (B1 ) field heterogeneities, and commonly biased by T2 /T1 . The purpose of this study is the development of a rapid T1 and T2 relaxometry method that is completely (T2 ) or partly (T1 ) bias-free. A new method is introduced to simultaneously quantify T1 and T2 within one single scan based on a triple echo steady-state (TESS) approach in combination with an iterative golden section search. TESS relaxometry is optimized and evaluated from simulations, in vitro studies, and in vivo experiments. It is found that relaxometry with TESS is not biased by T2 /T1 , insensitive to B0 heterogeneities, and, surprisingly, that TESS-T2 is not affected by B1 field errors. Consequently, excellent correspondence between TESS and reference spin echo data is observed for T2 in vitro at 1.5 T and in vivo at 3 T. TESS offers rapid T1 and T2 quantification within one single scan, and in particular B1 -insensitive T2 estimation. As a result, the new proposed method is of high interest for fast and reliable high-resolution T2 mapping, especially of the musculoskeletal system at high to ultra-high fields. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. New facilities in Japan materials testing reactor for irradiation test of fusion reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, H.; Sagawa, H.; Ishitsuka, E.; Sakamoto, N.; Niiho, T.

    1996-01-01

    The testing and evaluation of fusion reactor components, i.e. blanket, plasma facing components (divertor, etc.) and vacuum vessel with neutron irradiation is required for the design of fusion reactor components. Therefore, four new test facilities were developed in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor: an in-pile functional testing facility, a neutron multiplication test facility, an electron beam facility, and a re-weldability facility. The paper describes these facilities

  18. 8th International School of Fusion Reactor Technology "Ettore Majorana"

    CERN Document Server

    Leotta, G G; Muon-catalyzed fusion and fusion with polarized nuclei

    1988-01-01

    The International School of Fusion Reactor Technology started its courses 15 years ago and since then has mantained a biennial pace. Generally, each course has developed the subject which was announced in advance at the closing of the previous course. The subject to which the present proceedings refer was chosen in violation of that rule so as to satisfy the recent and diffuse interest in cold fusion among the main European laboratories involved in controlled thermonuclear research (CTR). In the second half of 1986 we started to prepare a workshop aimed at assessing the state of the art and possibly of the perspectives of muon- catalyzed fusion. Research in this field has recently produced exciting experimental results open to important practical applications. We thought it worthwhile to consider also the beneficial effects and problems of the polarization ofthe nuclei in both cold and thermonuclear fusion. In preparing the 8th Course on Fusion Reactor Technology, it was necessary to abandon the tradi...

  19. Electromagnetic analysis for fusion reactors: status and needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.

    1983-01-01

    Electromagnetic effects have far-reaching implications for the design, operation, and maintenance of future fusion reactors. Two-dimensional (2-D) eddy current computer codes are available, but are of limited value in analyzing reactors. Three-dimensional (3-D) codes are needed, but are only beginning to be developed. Both 2-D and 3-D codes need verification against experimental data, such as that provided by the upcoming FELIX experiments. Coupling between eddy currents and deflections has application in fusion reactor design and is being studied both by analysis and experiment

  20. Tritium experience in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, C.H.; Blanchard, W.; Hosea, J.; Mueller, D.; Nagy, A.; Hogan, J.

    1998-01-01

    Tritium management is a key enabling element in fusion technology. Tritium fuel was used in 3.5 years of successful deuterium-tritium (D-T) operations in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The D-T campaign enabled TFTR to explore the transport, alpha physics, and MHD stability of a reactor core. It also provided experience with tritium retention and removal that highlighted the importance of these issues in future D-T machines. In this paper, the authors summarize the tritium retention and removal experience in TFTR and its implications for future reactors

  1. Second preliminary design of JAERI experimental fusion reactor (JXFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sako, Kiyoshi; Tone, Tatsuzo; Seki, Yasushi; Iida, Hiromasa; Yamato, Harumi

    1979-06-01

    Second preliminary design of a tokamak experimental fusion reactor to be built in the near future has been performed. This design covers overall reactor system including plasma characteristics, reactor structure, blanket neutronics radiation shielding, superconducting magnets, neutral beam injector, electric power supply system, fuel recirculating system, reactor cooling and tritium recovery systems and maintenance scheme. Safety analyses of the reactor system have been also performed. This paper gives a brief description of the design as of January, 1979. The feasibility study of raising the power density has been also studied and is shown as appendix. (author)

  2. S3C: EBT Steady-State Shooting code description and user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downum, W.B.

    1983-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) one-dimensional (1-D) Steady-State Shooting code (S3C) for ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) plasmas is described. Benchmark calculations finding the steady-state density and electron and ion temperature profiles for a known neutral density profile and known external energy sources are carried out. Good agreement is obtained with results from the ORNL Radially Resolved Time Dependent 1-D Transport code for an EBT-Q type reactor. The program logic is described, along with the physics models in each code block and the variable names used. Sample input and output files are listed, along with the main code

  3. Secret high-temperature reactor concept for inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monsler, M.J.; Meier, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    The goal of our SCEPTRE project was to create an advanced second-generation inertial fusion reactor that offers the potential for either of the following: (1) generating electricity at 50% efficiency, (2) providing high temperature heat (850 0 C) for hydrogen production, or (3) producing fissile fuel for light-water reactors. We have found that these applications are conceptually feasible with a reactor that is intrinsically free of the hazards of catastrophic fire or tritium release

  4. Cold fusion reactors and new modern physics

    OpenAIRE

    Huang Zhenqiang Huang Yuxiang

    2013-01-01

    The author of the "modern physics classical particle quantization orbital motion model general solution", referred to as the “new modern physics” a book. “The nuclear force constraint inertial guidance cold nuclear fusion collides” patent of invention referred to as the “cold nuclear fusion reactor” detailed technical data. Now provide to you, hope you help spread and the mainstream of modern physics of academic and fusion engineering academic communication. We work together to promote the c...

  5. Diagnostics development for steady state operation of the stellarator wendelstein 7-x

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burhenn, R.; Baldzuhn, J.; Dreier, H.; Endler, M.; Jimenez-Gomez, R.; Grosser, K.; Hartfuss, H.J.; Hildebrandt, D.; Hirsch, M.; Koenig, R.; Kornejew, P.; Krychowiak, M.; Laqua, H.P.; Laux, M.; Oosterbeek, J.W.; Pasch, E.; Schneider, W.; Thomsen, H.; Weller, A.; Werner, A.; Wolf, R.; Zhang, D. [Max-Planck-Institute fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-17491, Greifswald (Germany); Biel, W. [Institut fuer Energieforschung - Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    The gain in experience with long-pulse operation under fusion relevant plasma conditions is an important step towards successful sustainment of future steady state reactor plasmas. The stellarator Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) [1], presently being under construction, is already equipped with a superconducting coil system and principally capable of quasi-continuous operation. Like other long pulse devices, W7-X is faced with new enhanced technical requirements which have to be met by plasma facing components as well as the diagnostic systems in general. Water-cooled windows were qualified up to 60 kW/m{sup 2} thermal load, and shutters against evaporation of sensitive elements outside the attended time of the diagnostic as well as for baseline control had been developed. Shielding of in-vessel components against damage by absorption of microwave stray radiation originating from the heating systems appears to be one of the most challenging tasks. Experiments using a microwave test chamber identify critical materials and approved the necessity for careful shielding of both, sensitive diagnostics and cables. Spectroscopic systems for monitoring the impurity content and divertor load as well as for robust density measurement are presented (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Joint DIII-D/EAST Experiments Toward Steady State AT Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, A. M.; Meneghini, O.; Staebler, G. M.; van Zeeland, M. A.; Gong, X.; Ding, S.; Qian, J.; Ren, Q.; Xu, G.; Grierson, B. A.; Solomon, W. M.; Holcomb, C. T.

    2015-11-01

    Joint DIII-D/EAST experiments on fully noninductive operation at high poloidal beta have demonstrated several attractive features of this regime for a steady-state fusion reactor. Very large bootstrap fraction (>80 %) is desirable because it reduces the demands on external noninductive current drive. High bootstrap fraction with an H-mode edge results in a broad current profile and internal transport barriers (ITBs) at large minor radius, leading to high normalized energy confinement and high MHD stability limits. The ITB radius expands with higher normalized beta, further improving both stability and confinement. Electron density ITB and large Shafranov shift lead to low AE activity in the plasma core and low anomalous fast ion losses. Both the ITB and the current profile show remarkable robustness against perturbations, without external control. Supported by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-AC02-09CH11466 & DE-AC52-07NA27344 & by NMCFSP under contracts 2015GB102000 and 2015GB110001.

  7. An equation oriented approach to steady state flowsheeting of methanol synthesis loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fathikalajahi, J.; Baniadam, M.; Rahimpour, M.R.

    2008-01-01

    An equation-oriented approach was developed for steady state flowsheeting of a commercial methanol plant. The loop consists of fixed bed reactor, flash separator, preheater, coolers, and compressor. For steady sate flowsheeting of the plant mathematical model of reactor and other units are needed. Reactor used in loop is a Lurgi type and its configuration is rather complex. Previously reactor and flash separator are modeled as two important units of plant. The model is based on mass and energy balances in each equipment and utilizing some auxiliary equations such as rate of reaction and thermodynamics model for activity coefficients of liquid. In order to validate the mathematical model for the synthesis loop, some simulation data were performed using operating conditions and characteristics of the commercial plant. The good agreement between the steady state simulation results and the plant data shows the validity of the model

  8. Steady-state heat transfer in an inverted U-tube steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucher, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental results are presented involving U-tube steam generator tube bundle local heat transfer and fluid conditions during steady-state, full-power operations performed at high temperatures and pressures with conditions typical of a pressurized water reactor (15.0 MPa primary pressure, 600 K hot-leg fluid temperatures, 6.2 MPa secondary pressure). The MOD-2C facility represents the state-of-the-art in measurement of tube local heat transfer data and average tube bundle secondary fluid density at several elevations, which allows an estimate of the axial heat transfer and void distributions during steady-state and transient operations. The method of heat transfer data reduction is presented and the heat flux, secondary convective heat transfer coefficient, and void fraction distributions are quantified for steady-state, full-power operations

  9. Proceedings of A3 foresight program seminar on critical physics issues specific to steady state sustainment of high-performance plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Shigeru; Hu Liqun; Oh, Yeong-Kook

    2013-06-01

    The A3 Foresight Program titled by 'Critical Physics Issues Specific to Steady State Sustainment of High-Performance Plasmas', based on the scientific collaboration among China, Japan and Korea in the field of plasma physics, has been newly started from August 2012 under the auspice of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS, Japan), the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF, Korea) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC, China). A seminar on the A3 collaboration took place in Hotel Gozensui, Kushiro, Japan, 22-25 January 2013. This seminar was organized by National Institute for Fusion Science. One special talk and 36 oral talks were presented in the seminar including 13 Chinese, 14 Japanese and 9 Korean attendees. Steady state sustainment of high-performance plasmas is a crucial issue for realizing a nuclear fusion reactor. This seminar was motivated along the issues. Results on fusion experiments and theory obtained through A3 foresight program during recent two years were discussed and summarized. Possible direction of future collaboration and further encouragement of scientific activity of younger scientists were also discussed in this seminar with future experimental plans in three countries. This issue is the collection of 29 papers presented at the entitled meeting. All the 29 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  10. Updated comparison of economics of fusion reactors with advanced fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delene, J.G.

    1990-01-01

    The projected cost of electricity (COE) for fusion is compared with that from current and advanced nuclear fission and coal-fired plants. Fusion cost models were adjusted for consistency with advanced fission plants and the calculational methodology and cost factors follow guidelines recommended for cost comparisons of advanced fission reactors. The results show COEs of about 59--74 mills/kWh for the fusion designs considered. In comparison, COEs for future fission reactors are estimated to be in the 43--54 mills/kWh range with coal-fired plant COEs of about 53--69 mills/kWh ($2--3/GJ coal). The principal cost driver for the fusion plants relative to fission plants is the fusion island cost. Although the estimated COEs for fusion are greater than those for fission or coal, the costs are not so high as to preclude fusion's competitiveness as a safe and environmentally sound alternative

  11. Radioactive waste management and disposal scenario for fusion power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabara, Takashi; Yamano, Naoki [Sumitomo Atomic Energy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Seki, Yasushi; Aoki, Isao

    1997-10-01

    The environmental and economic impact of radioactive waste (radwaste) generated from fusion power reactors using five types of structural materials and a light water reactor (LWR) have been evaluated and compared. At first, the amount and the radioactive level of the radwaste generated in five fusion reactors ware evaluated by an activation calculation code. Next, a possible radwaste disposal scenario applicable to fusion radwaste in Japan is considered and the disposal cost evaluated under certain assumptions. The exposure doses are evaluated for the skyshine of gamma-rays during the disposal operation, groundwater migration scenario during the institutional control period of 300 years and future site use scenario after the institutional period. The radwaste generated from a typical LWR was estimated based on a literature survey and the disposal cost was evaluated using the same assumptions as for the fusion reactors. It is found that the relative cost of disposal is strongly dependent on the cost for interim storage of medium level waste of fusion reactors and the cost of high level waste for the LWR. (author)

  12. Cost assessment of a generic magnetic fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, J.; Dory, R.A.; Cohn, S.M.; Delene, J.G.; Parsly, L.F.; Ashby, D.E.T.F.; Reiersen, W.T.

    1986-03-01

    A generic reactor model is used to examine the economic viability of generating electricity by magnetic fusion. The simple model uses components that are representative of those used in previous reactor studies of deuterium-tritium-burning tokamaks, stellarators, bumpy tori, reversed-field pinches (RFPs), and tandem mirrors. Conservative costing assumptions are made. The generic reactor is not a tokamak; rather, it is intended to emphasize what is common to all magnetic fusion rectors. The reactor uses a superconducting toroidal coil set to produce the dominant magnetic field. To this extent, it is not as good an approximation to systems such as the RFP in which the main field is produced by a plasma current. The main output of the study is the cost of electricity as a function of the weight and size of the fusion core - blanket, shield, structure, and coils. The model shows that a 1200-MW(e) power plant with a fusion core weight of about 10,000 tonnes should be competitive in the future with fission and fossil plants. Studies of the sensitivity of the model to variations in the assumptions show that this result is not sensitively dependent on any given assumption. Of particular importance is the result that a fusion reactor of this scale may be realized with only moderate advances in physics and technology capabilities

  13. Individual dose due to radioactivity accidental release from fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, Baojie [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China); Ni, Muyi, E-mail: muyi.ni@fds.org.cn [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Wei, Shiping [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China)

    2017-04-05

    Highlights: • Conservative early dose of different unit fusion radioactivity release were assessed. • Data of accident level in INES for fusion reactor were proposed. • Method of environmental restoration time after fusion accident was proposed. • The maximum possible accident level for ITER like fusion reactor is 6. • We need 34–52 years to live after the fusion hypothetical accident. - Abstract: As an important index shaping the design of fusion safety system, evaluation of public radiation consequences have risen as a hot topic on the way to develop fusion energy. In this work, the comprehensive public early dose was evaluated due to unit gram tritium (HT/HTO), activated dust, activated corrosion products (ACPs) and activated gases accidental release from ITER like fusion reactor. Meanwhile, considering that we cannot completely eliminate the occurrence likelihood of multi-failure of vacuum vessel and tokamak building, we conservatively evaluated the public radiation consequences and environment restoration after the worst hypothetical accident preliminarily. The comparison results show early dose of different unit radioactivity release under different conditions. After further performing the radiation consequences, we find it possible that the hypothetical accident for ITER like fusion reactor would result in a level 6 accident according to INES, not appear level 7 like Chernobyl or Fukushima accidents. And from the point of environment restoration, we need at least 69 years for case 1 (1 kg HTO and 1000 kg dust release) and 34–52 years for case 2 (1 kg HTO and 10kg–100 kg dust release) to wait the contaminated zone drop below the general public safety limit (1mSv per year) before it is suitable for human habitation.

  14. Integrity of the first wall in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Ryoichi

    2004-07-01

    Future fusion power reactors DREAM and A-SSTR2, which have been conceptually designed in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, use the SiC/SiC composite material as the first wall of the blanket because of its characteristics of high heat-resistance and low radiation material. DEMO reactor, which was conceptually designed in 2001, uses the low activation ferritic steel as the first-wall material of the blanket. The problems in the thermal structural design of the plasma facing component such as the blanket first wall and the divertor plate which receives very high heat flux were examined in the design of the fusion power reactors. Compact high fusion power reactor must give high heat flux and high-speed neutron flux from the plasma to the first wall and the divertor plate. In this environmental situation, the micro cracks should be generated in material of the first wall. Structural integrity of the first wall would be very low during the operation of the reactor, if those micro-cracks grow in a crack having significant size by the fatigue or the creep. The crack penetration in the first wall can be a factor which threatens the safety of the fusion power reactor. This paper summarizes the problems on the structural integrity in the first wall made of the SiC/SiC composite material or the ferritic steel. (author)

  15. Neutron irradiation experiments for fusion reactor materials through JUPITER program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, K.; Namba, C.; Wiffen, F.W.; Jones, R.H.

    1998-01-01

    A Japan-USA program of irradiation experiments for fusion research, ''JUPITER'', has been established as a 6 year program from 1995 to 2000. The goal is to study ''the dynamic behavior of fusion reactor materials and their response to variable and complex irradiation environment''. This is phase-three of the collaborative program, which follows RTNS-II program (phase-1: 1982-1986) and FFTF/MOTA program (phase-2: 1987-1994). This program is to provide a scientific basis for application of materials performance data, generated by fission reactor experiments, to anticipated fusion environments. Following the systematic study on cumulative irradiation effects, done through FFTF/MOTA program. JUPITER is emphasizing the importance of dynamic irradiation effects on materials performance in fusion systems. The irradiation experiments in this program include low activation structural materials, functional ceramics and other innovative materials. The experimental data are analyzed by theoretical modeling and computer simulation to integrate the above effects. (orig.)

  16. Elemental volatility of HT-9 fusion reactor alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henslee, S.P.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The volatility of elemental constituents from HT-9, a ferritic steel, proposed for fusion reactor structures, was investigated. Tests were conducted in flowing air at temperatures from 800 to 1200 0 C for durations of 1 to 20 h. Elemental volatility was calculated in terms of the weight fraction of the element volatilized from the initial alloy; molybdenum, manganese, and nickel were the primary constituents volatilized. Comparisons with elemental volatilities observed for another candidate fusion reactor materials. Primary Candidate Alloy (PCA), an austenitic stainless steel, indicate significant differences between the volatilities of these steels that may impact fusion reactor safety analysis and alloy selection. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometry were used to investigate the oxide layers formed on HT-9 and to measure elemental contents within these layers

  17. Conceptual design study of Fusion Experimental Reactor (FY87FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    The design study of Fusion Experimental Reactor(FER) which has been proposed to be the next step fusion device has been conducted by JAERI Reactor System Laboratory since 1982 and by FER design team since 1984. This is the final report of the FER design team program and describes the results obtained in FY1987 (partially in FY1986) activities. The contents of this report consist of the reference design which is based on the guideline in FY1986 by the Subcomitees set up in Nuclear Fusion Council of Atomic Energy Commission of Japan, the Low-Physics-Risk reactor design for achieving physics mission more reliably and the system study of FER design candidates including above two designs. (author)

  18. MINIMARS: An attractive small tandem mirror fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, L.J.; Logan, B.G.; Doggett, J.N.; Devoto, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    Through the innovative design of a novel end plug scheme employing octopole MHD stabilization, the authors present the conceptual design of ''MINIMARS'', a small commercial fusion reactor based on the tandem mirror principle. The current baseline for MINIMARS has a net electric output of 600 MWe and they have configured the design for short construction times, factory-built modules, inherently safe blanket systems, and multiplexing in station sizes of ≅ 600-2400 MWe. They demonstrate that the compact octopole end cell provides a number of advantages over the more conventional quadrupole (yin-yang) end cell encountered in the MARS tandem mirror reactor study, and enables ignition to be achieved with much shorter central cell lengths. Accordingly, being economic in small sizes, MINIMARS provides an attractive alternative to the more conventional larger conceptual fusion reactors encountered to date, and would contribute significantly to the lowering of utility financial risk in a developing fusion economy

  19. Japanese program of materials research for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasiguti, R.R.

    1982-01-01

    The Japanese program of materials research for fusion reactors is described based on the report to the Nuclear Fusion Council, the project research program of the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture, and other official documents. The alloy development for the first wall and its radiation damage are the main topics discussed in this paper. Materials viewpoints for the Japanese Tokamak facilities and the problems of irradiation facilities are also discussed. (orig.)

  20. Definition and conceptual design of a small fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-04-01

    The objective of this project is to evaluate various mirror fusion reactor concepts that might result in small systems for the effective production of electrical power or stored energy (e.g., nuclear and chemical fuels). The basic two-year program goal is to select a particular concept and develop the conceptual design of a pilot plant that could provide a useful output from fusion. The pilot plant would be built and operated in the late 1980s