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Sample records for status epilepticus induced

  1. Drug-induced status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cock, Hannah R

    2015-08-01

    Drug-induced status epilepticus (SE) is a relatively uncommon phenomenon, probably accounting for less than 5% of all SE cases, although limitations in case ascertainment and establishing causation substantially weaken epidemiological estimates. Some antiepileptic drugs, particularly those with sodium channel or GABA(γ-aminobutyric acid)-ergic properties, frequently exacerbate seizures and may lead to SE if used inadvertently in generalized epilepsies or less frequently in other epilepsies. Tiagabine seems to have a particular propensity for triggering nonconvulsive SE sometimes in patients with no prior history of seizures. In therapeutic practice, SE is most commonly seen in association with antibiotics (cephalosporins, quinolones, and some others) and immunotherapies/chemotherapies, the latter often in the context of a reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Status epilepticus following accidental or intentional overdoses, particularly of antidepressants or other psychotropic medications, has also featured prominently in the literature: whilst there are sometimes fatal consequences, this is more commonly because of cardiorespiratory or metabolic complications than as a result of seizure activity. A high index of suspicion is required in identifying those at risk and in recognizing potential clues from the presentation, but even with a careful analysis of patient and drug factors, establishing causation can be difficult. In addition to eliminating the potential trigger, management should be as for SE in any other circumstances, with the exception that phenobarbitone is recommended as a second-line treatment for suspected toxicity-related SE where the risk of cardiovascular complications is higher anyways and may be exacerbated by phenytoin. There are also specific recommendations/antidotes in some situations. The outcome of drug-induced status epilepticus is mostly good when promptly identified and treated, though less so in the context of overdoses. This article is

  2. Status epilepticus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hensiek, AE; Absalom, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Status epilepticus is defined as epileptic activity that continues for more than 30 minutes as a single seizure or as recurrent seizures without inter-ictal return of consciousness. The seizure activity is usually classified as partial or generalized. Although status epilepticus is an uncommon

  3. Chlorpromazine-induced status epilepticus: A case report

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    Momčilović-Kostadinović Dragana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. It is largely known that some antipsychotic agents could have proconvulsive and proepileptogenic effects in some patients and could induce EEG abnormalities as well. However, the association of status epilepticus with certain antipsychotic drugs has been very rarely reported. Case Report. A case of an 18-year-old adolescent girl, with chlorpromazine therapy started for anxiety-phobic disorder was reported. Her personal history disclosed delayed psychomotor development. Shortly after the introduction of the neuroleptic chlorpromazine therapy in minimal daily dose (37.5 mg, she developed myoclonic status epilepticus, confirmed by the EEG records. Frequent, symmetrical bilateral myoclonic jerks and altered behavior were associated with bilateral epileptiform discharges of polyspikes and spike-wave complexes. This epileptic event lasted 3.5 hours and it was stopped by the parenteral administration of valproate and lorazepam; she was EEG monitored until stable remission. Status epilepticus as initial epileptic event induced by neuroleptic agent was not previously reported in our national literature. Conclusion. Introduction of chlorpromazine to a patient without history of seizures is associated with the evolution of an epileptic activity, including the occurrence of status epilepticus. Clinical evaluation of the risk factors possibly related to chlorpromazine-induced seizure is recommended in individual patients before administering this drug.

  4. Status Epilepticus

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    Seinfeld, Syndi; Goodkin, Howard P.; Shinnar, Shlomo

    2016-01-01

    Although the majority of seizures are brief and cause no long-term consequences, a subset is sufficiently prolonged that long-term consequences can result. These very prolonged seizures are termed “status epilepticus” (SE) and are considered a neurological emergency. The clinical presentation of SE can be diverse. SE can occur at any age but most commonly occurs in the very young and the very old. There are numerous studies on SE in animals in which the pathophysiology, medication responses, and pathology can be rigorously studied in a controlled fashion. Human data are consistent with the animal data. In particular, febrile status epilepticus (FSE), a form of SE common in young children, is associated with injury to the hippocampus and subsequent temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) in both animals and humans. PMID:26931807

  5. Neuroprotective effect of lithium after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus in mice.

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    Hong, Namgue; Choi, Yun-Sik; Kim, Seong Yun; Kim, Hee Jung

    2017-01-01

    Status epilepticus is the most common serious neurological condition triggered by abnormal electrical activity, leading to severe and widespread cell loss in the brain. Lithium has been one of the main drugs used for the treatment of bipolar disorder for decades, and its anticonvulsant and neuroprotective properties have been described in several neurological disease models. However, the therapeutic mechanisms underlying lithium's actions remain poorly understood. The muscarinic receptor agonist pilocarpine is used to induce status epilepticus, which is followed by hippocampal damage. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of lithium post-treatment on seizure susceptibility and hippocampal neuropathological changes following pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus. Status epilepticus was induced by administration of pilocarpine hydrochloride (320 mg/kg, i.p.) in C57BL/6 mice at 8 weeks of age. Lithium (80 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered 15 minutes after the pilocarpine injection. After the lithium injection, status epilepticus onset time and mortality were recorded. Lithium significantly delayed the onset time of status epilepticus and reduced mortality compared to the vehicle-treated group. Moreover, lithium effectively blocked pilocarpine-induced neuronal death in the hippocampus as estimated by cresyl violet and Fluoro-Jade B staining. However, lithium did not reduce glial activation following pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus. These results suggest that lithium has a neuroprotective effect and would be useful in the treatment of neurological disorders, in particular status epilepticus.

  6. Nonconvulsive status epilepticus after electroconvulsive therapy

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    Povlsen, Uffe Juul; Wildschiødtz, Gordon; Høgenhaven, Hans

    2003-01-01

    SUMMARY: We describe three cases of nonconvulsive status epilepticus induced by electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Nonconvulsive status epilepticus is an important differential diagnosis in patients who develop prolonged confusion after ECT. The present cases exemplify the difficulty in defining...

  7. Pediatric Status Epilepticus Management

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    Abend, Nicholas S; Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review This review discusses management of status epilepticus in children including both anticonvulsant medications and overall management approaches. Recent Findings Rapid management of status epilepticus is associated with a greater likelihood of seizure termination and better outcomes, yet data indicate there are often management delays. This review discusses an overall management approach aiming to simultaneously identify and manage underlying precipitant etiologies, administer anticonvulsants in rapid succession until seizures have terminated, and identify and manage systemic complications. An example management pathway is provided. Summary Status epilepticus is a common neurologic emergency in children and requires rapid intervention. Having a predetermined status epilepticus management pathway can expedite management. PMID:25304961

  8. Management of status epilepticus.

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    Pichler, M; Hocker, S

    2017-01-01

    Status epilepticus is a neurologic and medical emergency manifested by prolonged seizure activity or multiple seizures without return to baseline. It is associated with substantial medical cost, morbidity, and mortality. There is a spectrum of severity dependent on the type of seizure, underlying pathology, comorbidities, and appropriate and timely medical management. This chapter discusses the evolving definitions of status epilepticus and multiple patient and clinical factors which influence outcome. The pathophysiology of status epilepticus is reviewed to provide a better understanding of the mechanisms which contribute to status epilepticus, as well as the potential long-term effects. The clinical presentations of different types of status epilepticus in adults are discussed, with emphasis on the hospital course and management of the most dangerous type, generalized convulsive status epilepticus. Strategies for the evaluation and management of status epilepticus are provided based on available evidence from clinical trials and recommendations from the Neurocritical Care Society and the European Federation of Neurological Societies. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Increased calcineurin expression after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus is associated with brain focal edema and astrogliosis.

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    Liu, Jinzhi; Li, Xiaolin; Chen, Liguang; Xue, Ping; Yang, Qianqian; Wang, Aihua

    2015-07-28

    Calcineurin plays an important role in the development of neuronal excitability, modulation of receptor's function and induction of apoptosis in neurons. It has been established in kindling models that status epilepticus induces brain focal edema and astrocyte activation. However, the role of calcineurin in brain focal edema and astrocyte activation in status epilepticus has not been fully understood. In this study, we employed a model of lithium-pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus and detected calcineurin expression in hippocampus by immunoblotting, brain focal edema by non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-7T) and astrocyte expression by immunohistochemistry. We found that the brain focal edema was seen at 24 h after status epilepticus, and astrocyte expression was obviously seen at 7 d after status epilepticus. Meanwhile, calcineurin expression was seen at24 h and retained to 7 d after status epilepticus. A FK506, a calcineurin inhibitor, remarkably suppressed the status epilepticus-induced brain focal edema and astrocyte expression. Our data suggested that calcineurin overexpression plays a very important role in brain focal edema and astrocyte expression. Therefore, calcineurin may be a novel candidate for brain focal edema occurring and intracellular trigger of astrogliosis in status epilepticus.

  10. Refractory status epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay P Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Refractory status epilepticus is a potentially life-threatening medical emergency. It requires early diagnosis and treatment. There is a lack of consensus upon its semantic definition of whether it is status epilepticus that continues despite treatment with benzodiazepine and one antiepileptic medication (AED, i.e., Lorazepam + phenytoin. Others regard refractory status epilepticus as failure of benzodiazepine and 2 antiepileptic medications, i.e., Lorazepam + phenytoin + phenobarb. Up to 30% patients in SE fail to respond to two antiepileptic drugs (AEDs and 15% continue to have seizure activity despite use of three drugs. Mechanisms that have made the treatment even more challenging are GABA-R that is internalized during status epilepticus and upregulation of multidrug transporter proteins. All patients of refractory status epilepticus require continuous EEG monitoring. There are three main agents used in the treatment of RSE. These include pentobarbital or thiopental, midazolam and propofol. RSE was shown to result in mortality in 35% cases, 39.13% of patients were left with severe neurological deficits, while another 13% had mild neurological deficits.

  11. Refractory status epilepticus

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    Singh, Sanjay P; Agarwal, Shubhi; Faulkner, M

    2014-01-01

    Refractory status epilepticus is a potentially life-threatening medical emergency. It requires early diagnosis and treatment. There is a lack of consensus upon its semantic definition of whether it is status epilepticus that continues despite treatment with benzodiazepine and one antiepileptic medication (AED), i.e., Lorazepam + phenytoin. Others regard refractory status epilepticus as failure of benzodiazepine and 2 antiepileptic medications, i.e., Lorazepam + phenytoin + phenobarb. Up to 30% patients in SE fail to respond to two antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and 15% continue to have seizure activity despite use of three drugs. Mechanisms that have made the treatment even more challenging are GABA-R that is internalized during status epilepticus and upregulation of multidrug transporter proteins. All patients of refractory status epilepticus require continuous EEG monitoring. There are three main agents used in the treatment of RSE. These include pentobarbital or thiopental, midazolam and propofol. RSE was shown to result in mortality in 35% cases, 39.13% of patients were left with severe neurological deficits, while another 13% had mild neurological deficits. PMID:24791086

  12. Super Refractory Status Epilepticus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    et al did retrospective cohort study from 1 January st. 1994 to 31 March 1998 at Presbyterian Medical. Centre in Columbia, to determine the frequency, risk factors and impact on the outcome of RSE. They found out that 69% of seizures recurred after. Key Words: Super refractory status epilepticus, Zambia. Medical Journal of ...

  13. Status Epilepticus and Refractory Status Epilepticus Management

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    Abend, Nicholas S.; Bearden, David; Helbig, Ingo; McGuire, Jennifer; Narula, Sona; Panzer, Jessica A.; Topjian, Alexis; Dlugos, Dennis J.

    2014-01-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) describes persistent or recurring seizures without a return to baseline mental status, and is a common neurologic emergency. SE can occur in the context of epilepsy or may be symptomatic of a wide range of underlying etiologies. The clinician’s aim is to rapidly institute care that simultaneously stabilizes the patient medically, identifies and manages any precipitant conditions, and terminates seizures. Seizure management involves “emergent” treatment with benzodiazepines followed by “urgent” therapy with other anti-seizure medications. If seizures persist then refractory SE is diagnosed and management options include additional anti-seizure medications or infusions of midazolam or pentobarbital. This paper reviews the management of pediatric SE and RSE. PMID:25727508

  14. Lithium-methomyl induced seizures in rats: A new model of status epilepticus?

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    Kaminski, Rafal M [Department of Toxicology, Institute of Agricultural Medicine, Jaczewskiego 2, 20-950 Lublin (Poland); Blaszczak, Piotr [Department of Toxicology, Institute of Agricultural Medicine, Jaczewskiego 2, 20-950 Lublin (Poland); Dekundy, Andrzej [Department of Toxicology, Institute of Agricultural Medicine, Jaczewskiego 2, 20-950 Lublin (Poland); Parada-Turska, Jolanta [Department of Rheumatology and Connective Tissue Diseases, Medical University, Jaczewskiego 8, 20-090 Lublin (Poland); Calderazzo, Lineu [Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Laboratory of Experimental Neurology, Escola Paulista de Medicina, R. Botucatu 862, BR-04023 Sao Paulo, S.P. (Brazil); Cavalheiro, Esper A [Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Laboratory of Experimental Neurology, Escola Paulista de Medicina, R. Botucatu 862, BR-04023 Sao Paulo, S.P. (Brazil); Turski, Waldemar A [Department of Toxicology, Institute of Agricultural Medicine, Jaczewskiego 2, 20-950 Lublin (Poland); Department of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology, Medical University, Jaczewskiego 8, 20-090 Lublin (Poland)

    2007-03-15

    Behavioral, electroencephalographic (EEG) and neuropathological effects of methomyl, a carbamate insecticide reversibly inhibiting acetylcholinesterase activity, were studied in naive or lithium chloride (24 h, 3 mEq/kg, s.c.) pretreated male Wistar rats. In naive animals, methomyl with equal potency produced motor limbic seizures and fatal status epilepticus. Thus, the CD50 values (50% convulsant dose) for these seizure endpoints were almost equal to the LD50 (50% lethal dose) of methomyl (13 mg/kg). Lithium pretreated rats were much more susceptible to convulsant, but not lethal effect of methomyl. CD50 values of methomyl for motor limbic seizures and status epilepticus were reduced by lithium pretreatment to 3.7 mg/kg (a 3.5-fold decrease) and 5.2 mg/kg (a 2.5-fold decrease), respectively. In contrast, lithium pretreatment resulted in only 1.3-fold decrease of LD50 value of methomyl (9.9 mg/kg). Moreover, lithium-methomyl treated animals developed a long-lasting status epilepticus, which was not associated with imminent lethality observed in methomyl-only treated rats. Scopolamine (10 mg/kg) or diazepam (10 mg/kg) protected all lithium-methomyl treated rats from convulsions and lethality. Cortical and hippocampal EEG recordings revealed typical epileptic discharges that were consistent with behavioral seizures observed in lithium-methomyl treated rats. In addition, convulsions induced by lithium-methomyl treatment were associated with widespread neurodegeneration of limbic structures. Our observations indicate that lithium pretreatment results in separation between convulsant and lethal effects of methomyl in rats. As such, seizures induced by lithium-methomyl administration may be an alternative to lithium-pilocarpine model of status epilepticus, which is associated with high lethality.

  15. Lithium-methomyl induced seizures in rats: A new model of status epilepticus?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminski, Rafal M.; Blaszczak, Piotr; Dekundy, Andrzej; Parada-Turska, Jolanta; Calderazzo, Lineu; Cavalheiro, Esper A.; Turski, Waldemar A.

    2007-01-01

    Behavioral, electroencephalographic (EEG) and neuropathological effects of methomyl, a carbamate insecticide reversibly inhibiting acetylcholinesterase activity, were studied in naive or lithium chloride (24 h, 3 mEq/kg, s.c.) pretreated male Wistar rats. In naive animals, methomyl with equal potency produced motor limbic seizures and fatal status epilepticus. Thus, the CD50 values (50% convulsant dose) for these seizure endpoints were almost equal to the LD50 (50% lethal dose) of methomyl (13 mg/kg). Lithium pretreated rats were much more susceptible to convulsant, but not lethal effect of methomyl. CD50 values of methomyl for motor limbic seizures and status epilepticus were reduced by lithium pretreatment to 3.7 mg/kg (a 3.5-fold decrease) and 5.2 mg/kg (a 2.5-fold decrease), respectively. In contrast, lithium pretreatment resulted in only 1.3-fold decrease of LD50 value of methomyl (9.9 mg/kg). Moreover, lithium-methomyl treated animals developed a long-lasting status epilepticus, which was not associated with imminent lethality observed in methomyl-only treated rats. Scopolamine (10 mg/kg) or diazepam (10 mg/kg) protected all lithium-methomyl treated rats from convulsions and lethality. Cortical and hippocampal EEG recordings revealed typical epileptic discharges that were consistent with behavioral seizures observed in lithium-methomyl treated rats. In addition, convulsions induced by lithium-methomyl treatment were associated with widespread neurodegeneration of limbic structures. Our observations indicate that lithium pretreatment results in separation between convulsant and lethal effects of methomyl in rats. As such, seizures induced by lithium-methomyl administration may be an alternative to lithium-pilocarpine model of status epilepticus, which is associated with high lethality

  16. Indomethacin can downregulate the levels of inflammatory mediators in the hippocampus of rats submitted to pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus

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    Michele Juliane Vieira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Refractory status epilepticus is one of the most life-threatening neurological emergencies and is characterized by high morbidity and mortality. Additionally, the use of anti-inflammatory drugs during this period is very controversial. Thus, this study has been designed to analyze the effect of a low dose of indomethacin (a COX inhibitor on the expression of inflammatory molecules. METHOD: The hippocampus of rats submitted to pilocarpine-induced long-lasting status epilepticus was analyzed to determine the expression of inflammatory molecules with RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Compared with controls, reduced levels of the kinin B2 receptors IL1β and TNFα were found in the hippocampus of rats submitted to long-lasting status epilepticus and treated with indomethacin. CONCLUSIONS: These data show that low doses of indomethacin could be employed to minimize inflammation during long-lasting status epilepticus.

  17. The mast cell stabilizer sodium cromoglycate reduces histamine release and status epilepticus-induced neuronal damage in the rat hippocampus.

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    Valle-Dorado, María Guadalupe; Santana-Gómez, César Emmanuel; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra Adela; Rocha, Luisa

    2015-05-01

    Experiments were designed to evaluate changes in the histamine release, mast cell number and neuronal damage in hippocampus induced by status epilepticus. We also evaluated if sodium cromoglycate, a stabilizer of mast cells with a possible stabilizing effect on the membrane of neurons, was able to prevent the release of histamine, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate during the status epilepticus. During microdialysis experiments, rats were treated with saline (SS-SE) or sodium cromoglycate (CG-SE) and 30 min later received the administration of pilocarpine to induce status epilepticus. Twenty-four hours after the status epilepticus, the brains were used to determine the neuronal damage and the number of mast cells in hippocampus. During the status epilepticus, SS-SE group showed an enhanced release of histamine (138.5%, p = 0.005), GABA (331 ± 91%, p ≤ 0.001) and glutamate (467%, p ≤ 0.001), even after diazepam administration. One day after the status epilepticus, SS-SE group demonstrated increased number of mast cells in Stratum pyramidale of CA1 (88%, p status epilepticus (p = 0.048), absence of wet-dog shakes, reduced histamine (but not GABA and glutamate) release, lower number of mast cells (p = 0.008) and reduced neuronal damage in hippocampus. Our data revealed that histamine, possibly from mast cells, is released in hippocampus during the status epilepticus. This effect may be involved in the subsequent neuronal damage and is diminished with sodium cromoglycate pretreatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Updates in Refractory Status Epilepticus

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    Mahulikar, Advait; Suchdev, Kushak; Shah, Aashit

    2018-01-01

    Refractory status epilepticus is defined as persistent seizures despite appropriate use of two intravenous medications, one of which is a benzodiazepine. It can be seen in up to 40% of cases of status epilepticus with an acute symptomatic etiology as the most likely cause. New-onset refractory status epilepticus (NORSE) is a recently coined term for refractory status epilepticus where no apparent cause is found after initial testing. A large proportion of NORSE cases are eventually found to have an autoimmune etiology needing immunomodulatory treatment. Management of refractory status epilepticus involves treatment of an underlying etiology in addition to intravenous anesthetics and antiepileptic drugs. Alternative treatment options including diet therapies, electroconvulsive therapy, and surgical resection in case of a focal lesion should be considered. Short-term and long-term outcomes tend to be poor with significant morbidity and mortality with only one-third of patients reaching baseline neurological status. PMID:29854452

  19. Status epilepticus in scleromyxedema

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    Soifa Markoula; Soifa Zouroudi; Soitrios Giannopoulos; Kimon Tsoukanelis; Ananstasia Zikou; Athanassios P Kyritsis

    2016-01-01

    Scleromyxedema is a rare dermatologic disorder, characterized by erythematous or yelowish lichenoid waxy papules. Neurological manifestations are rare but wel-recognized. A 51-year-old woman, diagnosed with scleromyxedema, was admitted to the hospital with status epilepticus, caused by brain lesions, as disclosed in a brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The patient was treated with anticonvulsants and corticosteroids and gradualy recovered fuly. A complete remission of the lesions was shown in a folow-up brain MRI. In cases with scleromyxedema and the presence of neurological manifestations, we need to pay attention to central nervous system involvement, especialy when combined with brain MRI lesions, and treat the patient appropriately.

  20. Hypothermia for Neuroprotection in Convulsive Status Epilepticus.

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    Legriel, Stephane; Lemiale, Virginie; Schenck, Maleka; Chelly, Jonathan; Laurent, Virginie; Daviaud, Fabrice; Srairi, Mohamed; Hamdi, Aicha; Geri, Guillaume; Rossignol, Thomas; Hilly-Ginoux, Julia; Boisramé-Helms, Julie; Louart, Benjamin; Malissin, Isabelle; Mongardon, Nicolas; Planquette, Benjamin; Thirion, Marina; Merceron, Sybille; Canet, Emmanuel; Pico, Fernando; Tran-Dinh, Yves-Roger; Bedos, Jean-Pierre; Azoulay, Elie; Resche-Rigon, Matthieu; Cariou, Alain

    2016-12-22

    Convulsive status epilepticus often results in permanent neurologic impairment. We evaluated the effect of induced hypothermia on neurologic outcomes in patients with convulsive status epilepticus. In a multicenter trial, we randomly assigned 270 critically ill patients with convulsive status epilepticus who were receiving mechanical ventilation to hypothermia (32 to 34°C for 24 hours) in addition to standard care or to standard care alone; 268 patients were included in the analysis. The primary outcome was a good functional outcome at 90 days, defined as a Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score of 5 (range, 1 to 5, with 1 representing death and 5 representing no or minimal neurologic deficit). The main secondary outcomes were mortality at 90 days, progression to electroencephalographically (EEG) confirmed status epilepticus, refractory status epilepticus on day 1, "super-refractory" status epilepticus (resistant to general anesthesia), and functional sequelae on day 90. A GOS score of 5 occurred in 67 of 138 patients (49%) in the hypothermia group and in 56 of 130 (43%) in the control group (adjusted common odds ratio, 1.22; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.75 to 1.99; P=0.43). The rate of progression to EEG-confirmed status epilepticus on the first day was lower in the hypothermia group than in the control group (11% vs. 22%; odds ratio, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.20 to 0.79; P=0.009), but there were no significant differences between groups in the other secondary outcomes. Adverse events were more frequent in the hypothermia group than in the control group. In this trial, induced hypothermia added to standard care was not associated with significantly better 90-day outcomes than standard care alone in patients with convulsive status epilepticus. (Funded by the French Ministry of Health; HYBERNATUS ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01359332 .).

  1. Encephalopathy with status epilepticus during sleep (ESES) induced by oxcarbazepine in idiopathic focal epilepsy in childhood

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    Pavlidis, Elena; Rubboli, Guido; Nikanorova, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Encephalopathy with status epilepticus during sleep (ESES) is an age-related disorder characterized by neuropsychological regression, epilepsy and a typical EEG pattern of continuous epileptiform activity (> 85%) during NREM sleep. Cases of worsening or induction of ESES with phenytoin...

  2. Curcumin protects neuronal cells against status-epilepticus-induced hippocampal damage through induction of autophagy and inhibition of necroptosis.

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    Wang, Jin; Liu, Yuan; Li, Xiao-Hui; Zeng, Xiang-Chang; Li, Jian; Zhou, Jun; Xiao, Bo; Hu, Kai

    2017-05-01

    Status epilepticus, the most severe form of epilepsy, is characterized by progressive functional and structural damage in the hippocampus, ultimately leading to the development and clinical appearance of spontaneous, recurrent seizures. Although the pathogenesis underlying epileptogenesis processes remains unclear, a substantial body of evidence has shown that status epilepticus acts as an important initial factor in triggering epileptogenesis. Notably, besides classical cell death mechanisms such as apoptosis and necrosis, 2 novel regulators of cell fate known as necroptosis and autophagy, are demonstrated to be involved in neuronal damage in various neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. However, whether necroptosis and autophagy play a role in post-status-epilepticus rat hippocampus and other epilepsy mechanisms deserves further research effort. In addition, research is needed to determine whether compounds from traditional Chinese herbs possess antiepileptic effects through the modulation of necroptosis and autophagy. In this study, we found that curcumin, a polyphenolic phytochemical extracted from the Curcuma longa plant, protects neuronal cells against status-epilepticus-induced hippocampal neuronal damage in the lithium-pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus rat model through induction of autophagy and inhibition of necroptosis.

  3. Treatment of Established Status Epilepticus.

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    Falco-Walter, Jessica J; Bleck, Thomas

    2016-04-25

    Status epilepticus is the most severe form of epilepsy, with a high mortality rate and high health care costs. Status epilepticus is divided into four stages: early, established, refractory, and super-refractory. While initial treatment with benzodiazepines has become standard of care for early status epilepticus, treatment after benzodiazepine failure (established status epilepticus (ESE)) is incompletely studied. Effective treatment of ESE is critical as morbidity and mortality increases dramatically the longer convulsive status epilepticus persists. Phenytoin/fosphenytoin, valproic acid, levetiracetam, phenobarbital, and lacosamide are the most frequently prescribed antiseizure medications for treatment of ESE. To date there are no class 1 data to support pharmacologic recommendations of one agent over another. We review each of these medications, their pharmacology, the scientific evidence in support and against each in the available literature, adverse effects and safety profiles, dosing recommendations, and limitations of the available evidence. We also discuss future directions including the established status epilepticus treatment trial (ESETT). Substantial further research is urgently needed to identify these patients (particularly those with non-convulsive status epilepticus), elucidate the most efficacious antiseizure treatment with head-to-head randomized prospective trials, and determine whether this differs for convulsive vs. non-convulsive ESE.

  4. Treatment of Established Status Epilepticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falco-Walter, Jessica J.; Bleck, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Status epilepticus is the most severe form of epilepsy, with a high mortality rate and high health care costs. Status epilepticus is divided into four stages: early, established, refractory, and super-refractory. While initial treatment with benzodiazepines has become standard of care for early status epilepticus, treatment after benzodiazepine failure (established status epilepticus (ESE)) is incompletely studied. Effective treatment of ESE is critical as morbidity and mortality increases dramatically the longer convulsive status epilepticus persists. Phenytoin/fosphenytoin, valproic acid, levetiracetam, phenobarbital, and lacosamide are the most frequently prescribed antiseizure medications for treatment of ESE. To date there are no class 1 data to support pharmacologic recommendations of one agent over another. We review each of these medications, their pharmacology, the scientific evidence in support and against each in the available literature, adverse effects and safety profiles, dosing recommendations, and limitations of the available evidence. We also discuss future directions including the established status epilepticus treatment trial (ESETT). Substantial further research is urgently needed to identify these patients (particularly those with non-convulsive status epilepticus), elucidate the most efficacious antiseizure treatment with head-to-head randomized prospective trials, and determine whether this differs for convulsive vs. non-convulsive ESE. PMID:27120626

  5. Glucose utilisation during status epilepticus in an epilepsy model induced by pilocarpine: a qualitative study

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    Scorza Fulvio Alexandre

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Status epilepticus (SE is a medical emergency and it is associated to brain damage. 2-deoxy-[14C] glucose (2-DG procedure has been used to measure the alterations in the functional activity of the brain induced by various pharmacological and toxicological agents. The aim of this study was to determine which changes occur in the seizure anatomic substrates during the SE induced by pilocarpine (PILO using [14C]-2 deoxyglucose functional mapping technique. Wistar male adult rats were submitted to SE PILO-induced for 6h and received [14C] 2-deoxyglucose injection via jugular vein 45 min before the 6th hour of SE. The control animals were submitted to all procedures but received saline and not pilocarpine. Brain sections were prepared and exposed X-ray film about seven days. The optical density of each region was obtained using a solid state digital analyser. The analysis revealed that 14C-2DG utilisation was pronounced in the SE rats on the areas corresponding to the hippocampal formation (+50.6%, caudate-putamen (+30.6%, frontoparietal cortex (+32.2%, amygdala (+31.7%, entorrinal cortex (+28.2%, thalamic nucleus (+93.5%, pre-tectal area (+50.1% and substantia nigra (+50.3% when compared to control. Our results suggest that the different activation levels of the distinct structures may be particularly important for understanding triggering and spreading mechanisms underlying epileptic activity during status epilepticus.

  6. Anti-retroviral therapy-induced status epilepticus in "pseudo-HIV serodeconversion".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etgen, Thorleif; Eberl, Bernhard; Freudenberger, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Diligence in the interpretation of results is essential as information gained from the psychiatric patient's history might often be restricted. Nonobservance of established guidelines may lead to a wrong diagnosis, induce a false therapy and result in life-threatening situations. Communication errors between hospitals and doctors and uncritical acceptance of prior diagnoses add substantially to this problem. We present a patient with alcohol-related dementia who received anti-retroviral therapy that promoted a non-convulsive status epilepticus. HIV serodeconversion was considered after our laboratory result yielded a HIV-negative status. Critical review of previous diagnostic investigations revealed several errors in the diagnosis of HIV infection leading to a "pseudo-serodeconversion." Finally, anti-retroviral therapy could be discontinued. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus in rats involves ischemic and excitotoxic mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Francesco Fabene

    Full Text Available The neuron loss characteristic of hippocampal sclerosis in temporal lobe epilepsy patients is thought to be the result of excitotoxic, rather than ischemic, injury. In this study, we assessed changes in vascular structure, gene expression, and the time course of neuronal degeneration in the cerebral cortex during the acute period after onset of pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE. Immediately after 2 hr SE, the subgranular layers of somatosensory cortex exhibited a reduced vascular perfusion indicative of ischemia, whereas the immediately adjacent supragranular layers exhibited increased perfusion. Subgranular layers exhibited necrotic pathology, whereas the supergranular layers were characterized by a delayed (24 h after SE degeneration apparently via programmed cell death. These results indicate that both excitotoxic and ischemic injuries occur during pilocarpine-induced SE. Both of these degenerative pathways, as well as the widespread and severe brain damage observed, should be considered when animal model-based data are compared to human pathology.

  8. Early metabolic responses to lithium/pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Imran; Hillert, Markus H; Klein, Jochen

    2015-12-01

    The lithium-pilocarpine model of status epilepticus is a well-known animal model of temporal lobe epilepsy. We combined this model with in vivo microdialysis to investigate energy metabolites and acute cellular membrane damage during seizure development. Rats were implanted with dialysis probes and pretreated with lithium chloride (127 mg/kg i.p.). Twenty-four hours later, they received pilocarpine (30 mg/kg s.c.) which initiated seizures within 30 min. In the dialysate from rat hippocampus, we observed a transient increase in glucose and a prominent, five-fold increase in lactate during seizures. Lactate release was because of neuronal activation as it was strongly reduced by infusion of tetrodotoxin, administration of atropine or when seizures were terminated by diazepam or ketamine. In ex vivo assays, mitochondrial function as measured by respirometry was not affected by 90 min of seizures. Extracellular levels of choline, however, increased two-fold and glycerol levels 10-fold, which indicate cellular phospholipid breakdown during seizures. Within 60 min of pilocarpine administration, hydroxylation of salicylate increased two-fold and formation of isoprostanes 20-fold, revealing significant oxidative stress in hippocampal tissue. Increases in lactate, glycerol and isoprostanes were abrogated, and increases in choline were completely prevented, when hippocampal probes were perfused with calcium-free solution. Similarly, administration of pregabalin (100 mg/kg i.p.), a calcium channel ligand, 15 min prior to pilocarpine strongly attenuated parameters of membrane damage and oxidative stress. We conclude that seizure development in a rat model of status epilepticus is accompanied by increases in extracellular lactate, choline and glycerol, and by oxidative stress, while mitochondrial function remains intact for at least 90 min. Membrane damage depends on calcium influx and can be prevented by treatment with pregabalin. Status epilepticus (SE) was induced in rats by

  9. Self-induced drug intoxication in baclofen: of the calm hypotonic coma in the status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thill, Chloé; Di Constanzo, Laurence; Pessey, François; Aries, Philippe; Montelescaut, Étienne; Sapin, Jeanne; Vaillant, Catherine; Drouillard, Isabelle

    2016-06-01

    Baclofen is an agonist of peripheral and central B gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors, whose activation causes a myorelaxation and a powerfull depression of the central nervous system. Moreover, it has an action against addiction, in reducing craving. Commercialized since 1975 in France, to control muscle spasticity due to medullar affection or multiple sclerosis, it receives a temporary recommendation of use in march 2014, as a last-line adjuvant treatment in alcohol withdrawal. Beyond its therapeutic use, baclofen is involved in many self-induced intoxications. We report the case of a patient who develops, after a massive ingestion of baclofen (supposed dose ingested: 1 200 mg), a hypotonic and calm coma, requiring her admission in our intensive care unit, and then a status epilepticus.

  10. Management of Status Epilepticus in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Douglas M.; McGinnis, Emily L.; Walleigh, Diana J.; Abend, Nicholas S.

    2016-01-01

    Status epilepticus is a common pediatric neurological emergency. Management includes prompt administration of appropriately selected anti-seizure medications, identification and treatment of seizure precipitant(s), as well as identification and management of associated systemic complications. This review discusses the definitions, classification, epidemiology and management of status epilepticus and refractory status epilepticus in children. PMID:27089373

  11. Management of Status Epilepticus in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas M. Smith

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Status epilepticus is a common pediatric neurological emergency. Management includes prompt administration of appropriately selected anti-seizure medications, identification and treatment of seizure precipitant(s, as well as identification and management of associated systemic complications. This review discusses the definitions, classification, epidemiology and management of status epilepticus and refractory status epilepticus in children.

  12. Neuronal degeneration induced by status epilepticus in the nucleus accumens of immature rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Druga, Rastislav; Mareš, Pavel; Kubová, Hana

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 48, s6 (2007), s. 19-20 ISSN 0013-9580. [Annual Meeting of the American Epilepsy Society. 31.112007-3.12.2007, Philadelphia] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/07/1137 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : cpo1 * neuronal degeneration * status epilepticus * immature rat Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  13. Degenerative neuronal changes in the rat thalamus induced by status epilepticus at different developmental stages

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Druga, Rastislav; Mareš, Pavel; Otáhal, Jakub; Kubová, Hana

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 1 (2005), s. 43-65 ISSN 0920-1211 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/01/0285 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : status epilepticus * lithium pilocarpine * thalamus Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.663, year: 2005

  14. Predicting outcome of status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitinger, M; Kalss, G; Rohracher, A; Pilz, G; Novak, H; Höfler, J; Deak, I; Kuchukhidze, G; Dobesberger, J; Wakonig, A; Trinka, E

    2015-08-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is a frequent neurological emergency complicated by high mortality and often poor functional outcome in survivors. The aim of this study was to review available clinical scores to predict outcome. Literature review. PubMed Search terms were "score", "outcome", and "status epilepticus" (April 9th 2015). Publications with abstracts available in English, no other language restrictions, or any restrictions concerning investigated patients were included. Two scores were identified: "Status Epilepticus Severity Score--STESS" and "Epidemiology based Mortality score in SE--EMSE". A comprehensive comparison of test parameters concerning performance, options, and limitations was performed. Epidemiology based Mortality score in SE allows detailed individualization of risk factors and is significantly superior to STESS in a retrospective explorative study. In particular, EMSE is very good at detection of good and bad outcome, whereas STESS detecting bad outcome is limited by a ceiling effect and uncertainty of correct cutoff value. Epidemiology based Mortality score in SE can be adapted to different regions in the world and to advances in medicine, as new data emerge. In addition, we designed a reporting standard for status epilepticus to enhance acquisition and communication of outcome relevant data. A data acquisition sheet used from patient admission in emergency room, from the EEG lab to intensive care unit, is provided for optimized data collection. Status Epilepticus Severity Score is easy to perform and predicts bad outcome, but has a low predictive value for good outcomes. Epidemiology based Mortality score in SE is superior to STESS in predicting good or bad outcome but needs marginally more time to perform. Epidemiology based Mortality score in SE may prove very useful for risk stratification in interventional studies and is recommended for individual outcome prediction. Prospective validation in different cohorts is needed for EMSE, whereas

  15. Enhanced inositide turnover in brain during bicuculline-induced status epilepticus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Rooijen, L.A.; Vadnal, R.; Dobard, P.; Bazan, N.G.

    1986-01-01

    Because brain inositides are enriched in the 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoyl species, they form a likely source for the tetraenoic free fatty acids (FFA) and diacylglycerols (DG) that are accumulated during seizures. To study inositide turnover during bicuculline-induced seizures, rats were injected intraventricularly and bilaterally with 10-20 microCi 32 P, mechanically ventilated and sacrificed by 6.5 KW head-focused microwave irradiation. Seizure activity was recorded by electroencephalography. Bicuculline-induced seizure activity resulted in: a) almost 50% increase in 32 P labeling of phosphatidic acid (PA); phosphatidylinositol (PI) and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) also increased (24% and 36%, respectively); b) no change in other lipids; and c) water-soluble phosphodiesteratic degradation products, analyzed by high voltage paper electrophoresis, increased 24% in the amount of radiotracer recovered as inositol 1,4-bisphosphate (IP2) and by 44% in the amount recovered as inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). These data indicate that during experimental status epilepticus the cerebral inositide cycle is accelerated: PIP2----(IP3----IP2----IP----I) + DG----PA----PI----PIP----PIP2

  16. Does status epilepticus induced at early postnatal period change excitability after cortical epileptic afterdischarges?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, Pavel; Kubová, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 8 (2016), E183-E186 ISSN 0013-9580 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11015; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0971; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-16605S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : status epilepticus * cortical stimulation * epileptic afterdischarges * ontogeny * rat Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 5.295, year: 2016

  17. Neuronal degeneration induced by status epilepticus in basal ganglia of immature rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Druga, Rastislav; Kubová, Hana; Mareš, Pavel

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. S8 (2005), s. 98-99 ISSN 0013-9580. [Joint Annual Meeting of the American Epilepsy Society and American Clinical Neurophysiology Society. 02.12.2005-06.12.2005, Washington, DC] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA304/04/0464 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : status epilepticus * neurodegeneration * basal ganglia Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  18. Exposure to Mozart music reduces cognitive impairment in pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yingshou; Qin, Yi; Jing, Wei; Zhang, Yunxiang; Wang, Yanran; Guo, Daqing; Xia, Yang; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-02-01

    Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) often display cognitive deficits. However, current epilepsy therapeutic interventions mainly aim at how to reduce the frequency and degree of epileptic seizures. Recovery of cognitive impairment is not attended enough, resulting in the lack of effective approaches in this respect. In the pilocarpine-induced temporal lobe epilepsy rat model, memory impairment has been classically reported. Here we evaluated spatial cognition changes at different epileptogenesis stages in rats of this model and explored the effects of long-term Mozart music exposure on the recovery of cognitive ability. Our results showed that pilocarpine rats suffered persisting cognitive impairment during epileptogenesis. Interestingly, we found that Mozart music exposure can significantly enhance cognitive ability in epileptic rats, and music intervention may be more effective for improving cognitive function during the early stages after Status epilepticus. These findings strongly suggest that Mozart music may help to promote the recovery of cognitive damage due to seizure activities, which provides a novel intervention strategy to diminish cognitive deficits in TLE patients.

  19. Status Epilepticus in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Lee

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This simulation can be used for EM learners of any level including medical students, junior residents and senior residents. Introduction: Seizures are the result of abnormal or disorganized cortical electrical activity in the brain. Status epilepticus is a dangerous complication of seizures. In adults and children older than five years old, generalized, convulsive status epilepticus refers to greater than 5 minutes of a continuous seizure OR two or more discrete seizures between which there is incomplete recovery of consciousness As with all emergency situations treatment must occur simultaneously while the physician manages primary assessment and resuscitation and determines the underlying cause. Objectives: At the end of this simulation session, the learner will: 1 Demonstrate the management of status epilepticus 2 Justify when airway intervention is needed for status epilepticus 3 Describe risk factors for status epilepticus 4 Prepare a differential diagnosis for the causes in status epilepticus. Method: This educational session is a high-fidelity simulation.

  20. Management of Autoimmune Status Epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batool F. Kirmani

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Status epilepticus is a neurological emergency with increased morbidity and mortality. Urgent diagnosis and treatment are crucial to prevent irreversible brain damage. In this mini review, we will discuss the recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune status epilepticus (ASE, a rare form of the disorder encountered in the intensive care unit. ASE can be refractory to anticonvulsant therapy and the symptoms include subacute onset of short-term memory loss with rapidly progressive encephalopathy, psychiatric symptoms with unexplained new-onset seizures, imaging findings, CSF pleocytosis, and availability of antibody testing makes an earlier diagnosis of ASE possible. Neuroimmunomodulatory therapies are the mainstay in the treatment of ASE. The goal is to maximize the effectiveness of anticonvulsant agents and find an optimal combination of therapies while undergoing immunomodulatory therapy to reduce morbidity and mortality.

  1. Attempt of differentiation acute encephalopathy with febrile convulsive status epilepticus from febrile convulsive status epilepticus induced by human herpesvirus 6 at early stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Junichi; Yamamuro, Miho; Togawa, Masao; Shiomi, Masashi

    2010-01-01

    It is difficult for clinicians to predict the subsequent development of acute encephalopathy with febrile convulsive status epilepticus (AEFCSE), when febrile convulsive status epilepticus (FCSE) develops. Comparing clinical and laboratory characteristics between patients with AEFCSE and those with FCSE, we investigated the factors which predict the later development of febrile convulsive status caused by human herpesvirus 6 (HHV6). The subjects of this study were patients treated for FCSE or AEFCSE due to HHV6 in our hospital between April 2004 and January 2008. The AEFCSE group included 5 patients, and the FCSE group included 6 patients. There were few differences in clinical characteristics or brain images on admission between the 2 groups. Disturbance of consciousness persisted for 24 hours or more in all patients in the AEFCSE group and in 2 patients in the FCSE group. The serum creatinine concentration was significantly higher in the AEFCSE group. Serum creatinine concentration could be a good indicator for the prediction of AEFCSE in patients with FCSE. (author)

  2. Attempt of differentiation acute encephalopathy with febrile convulsive status epilepticus from febrile convulsive status epilepticus induced by human herpesvirus 6 at early stage

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    Ishikawa, Junichi; Yamamuro, Miho; Togawa, Masao; Shiomi, Masashi [Osaka City General Hospital, Osaka, Osaka (Japan)

    2010-07-15

    It is difficult for clinicians to predict the subsequent development of acute encephalopathy with febrile convulsive status epilepticus (AEFCSE), when febrile convulsive status epilepticus (FCSE) develops. Comparing clinical and laboratory characteristics between patients with AEFCSE and those with FCSE, we investigated the factors which predict the later development of febrile convulsive status caused by human herpesvirus 6 (HHV6). The subjects of this study were patients treated for FCSE or AEFCSE due to HHV6 in our hospital between April 2004 and January 2008. The AEFCSE group included 5 patients, and the FCSE group included 6 patients. There were few differences in clinical characteristics or brain images on admission between the 2 groups. Disturbance of consciousness persisted for 24 hours or more in all patients in the AEFCSE group and in 2 patients in the FCSE group. The serum creatinine concentration was significantly higher in the AEFCSE group. Serum creatinine concentration could be a good indicator for the prediction of AEFCSE in patients with FCSE. (author)

  3. Emergency Surgery for Refractory Status Epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botre, Abhijeet; Udani, Vrajesh; Desai, Neelu; Jagadish, Spoorthy; Sankhe, Milind

    2017-08-15

    Management of refractory status epilepticus in children is extremely challenging. Two children with medically refractory status epilepticus, both of whom had lesional pathology on MRI and concordant data on EEG and PET scan. Emergency hemispherotomy performed in both patients. A complete, sustained seizure freedom obtained postoperatively. Emergency surgery is a treatment option in selected cases of drug refractory status epilepticus with lesional pathology and concordant data.

  4. Less Common Etiologies of Status Epilepticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleck, Thomas P

    2010-01-01

    Status epilepticus is treated as a neurologic emergency and only later are the potential etiologies assessed. While sometimes the cause for status epilepticus is apparent (e.g., antiepileptic drug withdrawal), all too often it is not identified, even after extensive diagnostic testing has been performed. With emphasis on the less-common etiologies, this review will cover various probable and known causes of status epilepticus among adults, children, and those patients with refractory epilepsy. PMID:20231917

  5. Status Epilepticus Induced Spontaneous Dentate Gyrus Spikes: In Vivo Current Source Density Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean P Flynn

    Full Text Available The dentate gyrus is considered to function as an inhibitory gate limiting excitatory input to the hippocampus. Following status epilepticus (SE, this gating function is reduced and granule cells become hyper-excitable. Dentate spikes (DS are large amplitude potentials observed in the dentate gyrus (DG of normal animals. DS are associated with membrane depolarization of granule cells, increased activity of hilar interneurons and suppression of CA3 and CA1 pyramidal cell firing. Therefore, DS could act as an anti-excitatory mechanism. Because of the altered gating function of the dentate gyrus following SE, we sought to investigate how DS are affected following pilocarpine-induced SE. Two weeks following lithium-pilocarpine SE induction, hippocampal EEG was recorded in male Sprague-Dawley rats with 16-channel silicon probes under urethane anesthesia. Probes were placed dorso-ventrally to encompass either CA1-CA3 or CA1-DG layers. Large amplitude spikes were detected from EEG recordings and subject to current source density analysis. Probe placement was verified histologically to evaluate the anatomical localization of current sinks and the origin of DS. In 9 of 11 pilocarpine-treated animals and two controls, DS were confirmed with large current sinks in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. DS frequency was significantly increased in pilocarpine-treated animals compared to controls. Additionally, in pilocarpine-treated animals, DS displayed current sinks in the outer, middle and/or inner molecular layers. However, there was no difference in the frequency of events when comparing between layers. This suggests that following SE, DS can be generated by input from medial and lateral entorhinal cortex, or within the dentate gyrus. DS were associated with an increase in multiunit activity in the granule cell layer, but no change in CA1. These results suggest that following SE there is an increase in DS activity, potentially arising from

  6. Nonconvulsive status epilepticus disguising as hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Yong Min; Lee, Sung Wook; Han, Sang Young; Baek, Yang Hyun; Ahn, Ji Hye; Choi, Won Jong; Lee, Ji Young; Kim, Sang Ho; Yoon, Byeol A

    2015-04-28

    Nonconvulsive status epilepticus has become an important issue in modern neurology and epileptology. This is based on difficulty in definitively elucidating the condition and its various clinical phenomena and on our inadequate insight into the intrinsic pathophysiological processes. Despite nonconvulsive status epilepticus being a situation that requires immediate treatment, this disorder may not be appreciated as the cause of mental status impairment. Although the pathophysiology of nonconvulsive status epilepticus remains unknown, this disorder is thought to lead to neuronal damage, so its identification and treatment are important. Nonconvulsive status epilepticus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with liver cirrhosis presenting an altered mental status. We report a case of a 52-year-old male with liver cirrhosis presenting an altered mental status. He was initially diagnosed with hepatic encephalopathy but ultimately diagnosed with nonconvulsive status epilepticus by electroencephalogram.

  7. Behavioral and genetic effects promoted by sleep deprivation in rats submitted to pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Gabriela; Ribeiro, Daniel A; Alvarenga, Tathiana A; Hirotsu, Camila; Scorza, Fulvio A; Le Sueur-Maluf, Luciana; Noguti, Juliana; Cavalheiro, Esper A; Tufik, Sergio; Andersen, Monica L

    2012-05-02

    The interaction between sleep deprivation and epilepsy has been well described in electrophysiological studies, but the mechanisms underlying this association remain unclear. The present study evaluated the effects of sleep deprivation on locomotor activity and genetic damage in the brains of rats treated with saline or pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE). After 50 days of pilocarpine or saline treatment, both groups were assigned randomly to total sleep deprivation (TSD) for 6 h, paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) for 24 h, or be kept in their home cages. Locomotor activity was assessed with the open field test followed by resection of brain for quantification of genetic damage by the single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay. Status epilepticus induced significant hyperactivity in the open field test and caused genetic damage in the brain. Sleep deprivation procedures (TSD and PSD) did not affect locomotor activity in epileptic or healthy rats, but resulted in significant DNA damage in brain cells. Although PSD had this effect in both vehicle and epileptic groups, TSD caused DNA damage only in epileptic rats. In conclusion, our results revealed that, despite a lack of behavioral effects of sleep deprivation, TSD and PSD induced genetic damage in rats submitted to pilocarpine-induced SE. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Propofol effectively inhibits lithium-pilocarpine- induced status epilepticus in rats via downregulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2B subunit expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Henglin; Wang, Zhuoqiang; Mi, Weidong; Zhao, Cong; Liu, Yanqin; Wang, Yongan; Sun, Haipeng

    2012-01-01

    Status epilepticus was induced via intraperitoneal injection of lithium-pilocarpine. The inhibitory effects of propofol on status epilepticus in rats were judged based on observation of behavior, electroencephalography and 24-hour survival rate. Propofol (12.5–100 mg/kg) improved status epilepticus in a dose-dependent manner, and significantly reduced the number of deaths within 24 hours of lithium-pilocarpine injection. Western blot results showed that, 24 hours after induction of status epilepticus, the levels of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2A and 2B subunits were significantly increased in rat cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Propofol at 50 mg/kg significantly suppressed the increase in N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2B subunit levels, but not the increase in N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2A subunit levels. The results suggest that propofol can effectively inhibit status epilepticus induced by lithium-pilocarpine. This effect may be associated with downregulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2B subunit expression after seizures. PMID:25737709

  9. Genetic mutations associated with status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, M; Shorvon, S

    2015-08-01

    This paper reports the results of a preliminary search of the literature aimed at identifying the genetic mutations reported to be strongly associated with status epilepticus. Genetic mutations were selected for inclusion if status epilepticus was specifically mentioned as a consequence of the mutation in standard genetic databases or in a case report or review article. Mutations in 122 genes were identified. The genetic mutations identified were found in only rare conditions (sometimes vanishingly rare) and mostly in infants and young children with multiple other handicaps. Most of the genetic mutations can be subdivided into those associated with cortical dysplasias, inborn errors of metabolism, mitochondrial disease, or epileptic encephalopathies and childhood syndromes. There are no identified 'pure status epilepticus genes'. The range of genes underpinning status epilepticus differs in many ways from the range of genes underpinning epilepsy, which suggests that the processes underpinning status epilepticus differ from those underpinning epilepsy. It has been frequently postulated that status epilepticus is the result of a failure of 'seizure termination mechanisms', but the wide variety of genes affecting very diverse biochemical pathways identified in this survey makes any unitary cause unlikely. The genetic influences in status epilepticus are likely to involve a wide range of mechanisms, some related to development, some to cerebral energy production, some to diverse altered biochemical pathways, some to transmitter and membrane function, and some to defects in networks or systems. The fact that many of the identified genes are involved with cerebral development suggests that status epilepticus might often be a system or network phenomenon. To date, there are very few genes identified which are associated with adult-onset status epilepticus (except in those with preexisting neurological damage), and this is disappointing as the cause of many adult

  10. Treatment of Convulsive Status Epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Eric H; Nazzal, Yara; Hirsch, Lawrence J

    2016-03-01

    Convulsive status epilepticus (CSE) is a medical emergency with an associated high mortality and morbidity. It is defined as a convulsive seizure lasting more than 5 min or consecutive seizures without recovery of consciousness. Successful management of CSE depends on rapid administration of adequate doses of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs). The exact choice of AED is less important than rapid treatment and early consideration of reversible etiologies. Current guidelines recommend the use of benzodiazepines (BNZ) as first-line treatment in CSE. Midazolam is effective and safe in the pre-hospital or home setting when administered intramuscularly (best evidence), buccally, or nasally (the latter two possibly faster acting than intramuscular (IM) but with lower levels of evidence). Regular use of home rescue medications such as nasal/buccal midazolam by patients and caregivers for prolonged seizures and seizure clusters may prevent SE, prevent emergency room visits, improve quality of life, and lower health care costs. Traditionally, phenytoin is the preferred second-line agent in treating CSE, but it is limited by hypotension, potential arrhythmias, allergies, drug interactions, and problems from extravasation. Intravenous valproate is an effective and safe alternative to phenytoin. Valproate is loaded intravenously rapidly and more safely than phenytoin, has broad-spectrum efficacy, and fewer acute side effects. Levetiracetam and lacosamide are well tolerated intravenous (IV) AEDs with fewer interactions, allergies, and contraindications, making them potentially attractive as second- or third-line agents in treating CSE. However, data are limited on their efficacy in CSE. Ketamine is probably effective in treating refractory CSE (RCSE), and may warrant earlier use; this requires further study. CSE should be treated aggressively and quickly, with confirmation of treatment success with epileptiform electroencephalographic (EEG), as a transition to non-convulsive status

  11. Epidemiology of Status Epilepticus in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The incidence, etiology, seizure characteristics, and outcome in childhood convulsive status epilepticus (CSE are reviewed by researchers from Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, and the Institute of Child Health, London, UK.

  12. Prognostic Factors for Refractory Status Epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gordon Millichap

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Researchers at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN studied the outcome and identified prognostic factors for refractory status epilepticus (RSE in 54 adult patients, median age 52 years [range 18-93].

  13. 4,4'-Diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid attenuates spontaneous recurrent seizures and vasogenic edema following lithium-pilocarpine induced status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tingting; Lin, Zhenzhou; Xie, Ling; Wang, Yao; Pan, Suyue

    2017-07-13

    Vasogenic edema induced by blood brain barrier disruption and neuronal loss play an important role in the epileptogenic process. 4,4'- diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS) is a commonly used anion channel inhibitor that has been reported to exert an anticonvulsant effect in rat hippocampus in vitro. The present study aimed to investigate whether DIDS could prevent epileptogenic process in rat lithium-pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy. The tight junction proteins and serum extravasation were examined in the piriform cortex 3days after status epilepticus. The findings showed that status epilepticus induced vasogenic edema. Based on these findings, rats were intracerebroventricularly infused with saline and DIDS 1 week after surgery, DIDS reduced vasogenic edema and prevented neuronal loss following status epilepticus in the piriform cortex. Moreover, spontaneous recurrent seizures were recorded by continuous video monitoring. DIDS significantly reduced the frequency and duration of spontaneous recurrent seizures from day 28 to day 42 post status epilepticus. These findings demonstrated that DIDS attenuated vasogenic edema and neuronal apoptosis and might exert disease-modifying effect in animal model of temporal lobe epilepsy. These results explored a novel therapeutic strategy for treatment of epilepsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Status epilepticus in scrub typhus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Jayantee; Mani, Vinita E; Bhoi, Sanjeev K; Misra, Usha K

    2016-07-01

    Scrub typhus is an emerging infection, and there is little information about status epilepticus (SE) in scrub typhus. We report the clinical spectrum and outcome of SE in scrub typhus. In a 3-year prospective hospital-based observational study, all scrub typhus patients with SE were included. Scrub typhus was diagnosed by immunochromatography assay. SE was defined if convulsions lasted longer than 5 min. The patients' demographic, clinical, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and electroencephalography (EEG) findings were noted. Response to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and outcome at 1 month and 1 year were recorded. Between 2012 and 2014, there were 66 patients with scrub typhus admitted with central nervous system (CNS) involvement, 10 (15.2%) of whom had SE (generalized convulsions in 5, secondary generalized in one). The median age of the patients was 34 (range 18-71) years and seven were female. The duration of SE ranged between 10 min and 48 h. SE responded to one AED in five patients, two AEDs in three patients, and more than two AEDs in two patients. Cranial MRI findings were normal. All patients recovered completely with doxycycline by 1 month and AED was withdrawn by 8 months in all. Although 15% patients with scrub typhus may have SE, they have good outcome. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  15. [Management of pediatric status epilepticus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas L, Carmen Paz; Varela E, Ximena; Kleinsteuber S, Karin; Cortés Z, Rocío; Avaria B, María de Los Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric Status Epilepticus (SE) is an emergency situation with high morbidity and mortality that requires early and aggressive management. The minimum time criterion to define SE was reduced from 30 to 5 minutes, defined as continuous seizure activity or rapidly recurrent seizures without resumption of consciousness for more than 5 minutes. This definition considers that seizures that persist for > 5 minutes are likely to do so for more than 30 min. Those that persist for more than 30 minutes are more difficult to treat. Refractory SE is the condition that extends beyond 60-120 minutes and requires anesthetic management. Super-refractory SE is the state of no response to anesthetic management or relapse during withdrawal of these drugs. The aim of this review is to provide and update on convulsive SE concepts, pathophysiology, etiology, available antiepileptic treatment and propose a rational management scheme. A literature search of articles published between January 1993 and January 2013, focused on pediatric population was performed. The evidence about management in children is limited, mostly corresponds to case series of patients grouped by diagnosis, mainly adults. These publications show treatment alternatives such as immunotherapy, ketogenic diet, surgery and hypothermia. A 35% mortality, 26% of neurological sequelae and 35% of recovery to baseline condition is described on patient’s evolution.

  16. Monitor for status epilepticus seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark; Simkins, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the sensor technology and associated electronics of a monitor designed to detect the onset of a seizure disorder called status epilepticus. It is a condition that affects approximately 3-5 percent of those individuals suffering from epilepsy. This form of epilepsy does not follow the typical cycle of start-peak-end. The convulsions continue until medically interrupted and are life threatening. The mortality rate is high without prompt medical treatment at a suitable facility. The paper describes the details of a monitor design that provides an inexpensive solution to the needs of those responsible for the care of individuals afflicted with this disorder. The monitor has been designed as a cooperative research and development effort involving the United States Army Armament Research, Development, and Engineering Center's Benet Laboratories (Benet) and the Cerebral Palsy Center for the Disabled (Center), in association with the Department of Neurology at Albany Medical College (AMC). Benet has delivered a working prototype of the device for field testing, in collaboration with Albany Medical College. The Center has identified several children in need of special monitoring and has agreed to pursue commercialization of the device.

  17. Cocaine-Associated Seizures and Incidence of Status Epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majlesi, Nima DO

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Acute complications from cocaine abuse are commonly treated in the emergency department (ED; one of the most consequential is status epilepticus. The incidence of this complication is not clearly defined in the prior literature on cocaine-associated sequelae. We evaluated the incidence of status epilepticus in patients with seizures secondary to suspected cocaine use.Methods: We performed a retrospective multi-center study of patients with seizures resulting from cocaine use. We identified study subjects at 15 hospitals by record review and conducted a computer-assisted records search to identify patients with seizures for each institution over a four-year period. We selected subjects from this group on the basis of cocaine use and determined the occurrence of status epilepticus among them. Data were collected on each subject using a standardized data collection form.Results: We evaluated 43 patients in the ED for cocaine-associated seizures. Their age range was 17 to 54, with a mean age was 31 years; 53% were male. Of 43 patients, 42 experienced a single tonic-clonic seizure and one developed status epilepticus. All patients had either a history of cocaine use or positive urine drug screen for cocaine.Conclusion: Despite reported cases of status epilepticus with cocaine-induced seizures, the incidence of this complication was unclear based on prior literature. This study shows that most cocaine-associated seizures are self-limited. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(2:157-160.

  18. Aborted and refractory status epilepticus in children : A comparative analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambrechtsen, Florise A. C. P.; Buchhalter, Jeffrey R.

    Purpose: The aims of this retrospective study were: (1) to compare the demographics, clinical characteristics, etiology, and EEG findings of status epilepticus aborted with medication (ASE) and refractory status epilepticus (RSE), (2) to describe the treatment response of status epilepticus (SE),

  19. Kainic Acid-Induced Post-Status Epilepticus Models of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy with Diverging Seizure Phenotype and Neuropathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Bertoglio

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of epilepsy models is to investigate disease ontogenesis and therapeutic interventions in a consistent and prospective manner. The kainic acid-induced status epilepticus (KASE rat model is a widely used, well-validated model for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. As we noted significant variability within the model between labs potentially related to the rat strain used, we aimed to describe two variants of this model with diverging seizure phenotype and neuropathology. In addition, we evaluated two different protocols to induce status epilepticus (SE. Wistar Han (Charles River, France and Sprague-Dawley (Harlan, The Netherlands rats were subjected to KASE using the Hellier kainic acid (KA and a modified injection scheme. Duration of SE and latent phase were characterized by video-electroencephalography (vEEG in a subgroup of animals, while animals were sacrificed 1 week (subacute phase and 12 weeks (chronic phase post-SE. In the 12 weeks post-SE groups, seizures were monitored with vEEG. Neuronal loss (neuronal nuclei, microglial activation (OX-42 and translocator protein, and neurodegeneration (Fluorojade C were assessed. First, the Hellier protocol caused very high mortality in WH/CR rats compared to SD/H animals. The modified protocol resulted in a similar SE severity for WH/CR and SD/H rats, but effectively improved survival rates. The latent phase was significantly shorter (p < 0.0001 in SD/H (median 8.3 days animals compared to WH/CR (median 15.4 days. During the chronic phase, SD/H rats had more seizures/day compared to WH/CR animals (p < 0.01. However, neuronal degeneration and cell loss were overall more extensive in WH/CR than in SD/H rats; microglia activation was similar between the two strains 1 week post-SE, but higher in WH/CR rats 12 weeks post-SE. These neuropathological differences may be more related to the distinct neurotoxic effects of KA in the two rat strains than being the outcome of seizure

  20. Kainic Acid-Induced Post-Status Epilepticus Models of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy with Diverging Seizure Phenotype and Neuropathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoglio, Daniele; Amhaoul, Halima; Van Eetveldt, Annemie; Houbrechts, Ruben; Van De Vijver, Sebastiaan; Ali, Idrish; Dedeurwaerdere, Stefanie

    2017-01-01

    The aim of epilepsy models is to investigate disease ontogenesis and therapeutic interventions in a consistent and prospective manner. The kainic acid-induced status epilepticus (KASE) rat model is a widely used, well-validated model for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). As we noted significant variability within the model between labs potentially related to the rat strain used, we aimed to describe two variants of this model with diverging seizure phenotype and neuropathology. In addition, we evaluated two different protocols to induce status epilepticus (SE). Wistar Han (Charles River, France) and Sprague-Dawley (Harlan, The Netherlands) rats were subjected to KASE using the Hellier kainic acid (KA) and a modified injection scheme. Duration of SE and latent phase were characterized by video-electroencephalography (vEEG) in a subgroup of animals, while animals were sacrificed 1 week (subacute phase) and 12 weeks (chronic phase) post-SE. In the 12 weeks post-SE groups, seizures were monitored with vEEG. Neuronal loss (neuronal nuclei), microglial activation (OX-42 and translocator protein), and neurodegeneration (Fluorojade C) were assessed. First, the Hellier protocol caused very high mortality in WH/CR rats compared to SD/H animals. The modified protocol resulted in a similar SE severity for WH/CR and SD/H rats, but effectively improved survival rates. The latent phase was significantly shorter (p < 0.0001) in SD/H (median 8.3 days) animals compared to WH/CR (median 15.4 days). During the chronic phase, SD/H rats had more seizures/day compared to WH/CR animals (p < 0.01). However, neuronal degeneration and cell loss were overall more extensive in WH/CR than in SD/H rats; microglia activation was similar between the two strains 1 week post-SE, but higher in WH/CR rats 12 weeks post-SE. These neuropathological differences may be more related to the distinct neurotoxic effects of KA in the two rat strains than being the outcome of seizure burden

  1. Long-term changes of activity of cortical neurons after status epilepticus induced at early developmental stages in rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doczi, J.; Bernášková, Klára; Kubová, Hana; Détari, L.; Világi, I.; Druga, Rastislav; Mareš, Pavel

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 352, č. 2 (2003), s. 125-128 ISSN 0304-3940 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/00/1643; GA ČR GA309/03/0770 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : cerebral cortex * unit activity * consequences of status epilepticus Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.967, year: 2003

  2. [Severe pulmonary embolism revealed by status epilepticus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allou, N; Coolen-Allou, N; Delmas, B; Cordier, C; Allyn, J

    2016-12-01

    High-risk pulmonary embolism (PE) is associated with high mortality rate (>50%). In some cases, diagnosis of PE remains a challenge with atypical presentations like in this case report with a PE revealed by status epilepticus. We report the case of a 40-year-old man without prior disease, hospitalized in ICU for status epilepticus. All paraclinical examinations at admission did not show any significant abnormalities (laboratory tests, cardiologic and neurological investigations). On day 1, he presented a sudden circulatory collapse and echocardiography showed right intra-auricular thrombus. He was treated by thrombolysis and arteriovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. After stabilization, computed tomography showed severe bilateral PE. He developed multi-organ failure and died 4days after admission. Pulmonary embolism revealed by status epilepticus has rarely been reported and is associated with poor prognosis. Physicians should be aware and think of the possibility of PE in patients with status epilepticus without any history or risk factors of seizure and normal neurological investigations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Risk of Status Epilepticus in Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of status epilepticus (SE after the initial diagnosis of epilepsy was determined in a prospective community-based cohort study of 613 children at Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY; Yale Medical School, New Haven, CT; and BIOS/NIU, DeKalb, IL.

  4. Mild hypothermia for refractory focal status epilepticus in an infant with hemimegalencephaly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elting, Jan Willem; van der Naalt, Joukje; Fock, Johanna Maria

    Hypothermia can reduce seizure frequency in animal models of status epilepticus, and its effectiveness in human status epilepticus has been reported occasionally. We report an infant with hemimegalencephaly who presented with generalized status epilepticus. After high dose intravenous drug therapy,

  5. Managing Status Epilepticus in the Older Adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legriel, Stephane; Brophy, Gretchen M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to describe particularities in epidemiology, outcome, and management modalities in the older adult population with status epilepticus. There is a higher incidence of status epilepticus in the older adult population, and it commonly has a nonconvulsive presentation. Diagnosis in this population may be difficult and requires an unrestricted use of EEG. Short and long term associated-mortality are high, and age over 60 years is an independent factor associated with poor outcome. Stroke (acute or remote symptomatic), miscellaneous metabolic causes, dementia, infections hypoxemia, and brain injury are among the main causes of status epilepticus occurrence in this age category. The use of anticonvulsive agents can be problematic as well. Thus, it is important to take into account the specific aspects related to the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes in older critically-ill adults. Beyond these precautions, the management may be identical to that of the younger adult, including prompt initiation of symptomatic and anticonvulsant therapies, and a broad and thorough etiological investigation. Such management strategies may improve the vital and functional prognosis of these patients, while maintaining a high overall quality of care. PMID:27187485

  6. Effect of Naringenin (A naturally occurring flavanone) Against Pilocarpine-induced Status Epilepticus and Oxidative Stress in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeel, Sheeba; Rehman, Muneeb U.; Tabassum, Nahida; Amin, Umar; Mir, Manzoor ur Rahman

    2017-01-01

    reduced lipid peroxidation. Abbreviations used: 6-OHDA: 6-hydroxydopamine, AED: Anti epileptic drugs, AIDS: Acquired immune deficiency syndrome, ANOVA: Analysis of variance, ATP: Adenosine triphosphate, CA: Cornu ammonis, CAT: Catalase, DG: Dentate gyrus, EDTA: Ethylenediamine tetra acetic acid, GR: Glutathione reductase, GSH: Glutathione reduced, HCl: Hydrochloric acid, IL-1β: Interleukin 1 beta, LPO: Lipid peroxidation, MDA: Malondialdehyde, NADPH: Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, PMS: post mitochondrial supernatant, SE: Status epilepticus, SEM: Standard error of the mean, SOD Superoxide dismutase, TBA: Thiobarbituric acid, TBARS: Thiobarbituric acid reactive substance, TLE: Temporal lobe epilepsy, TNF-α: Tumor necrosis factor alpha PMID:28479741

  7. Status epilepticus following intravenous N-acetylcysteine therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershkovitz, E; Shorer, Z; Levitas, A; Tal, A

    1996-11-01

    A previously healthy 2 1/2-year-old girl developed status epilepticus followed by cortical blindness during intravenous N-acetylcysteine therapy for paracetamol ingestion. The child's vision was almost completely recovered during the 18 months follow-up period. We assume that the cortical blindness was a postictal sequela after prolonged seizure episode, most probably due to respiratory depression induced by N-acetylcysteine.

  8. In vico 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy, T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted MRI during lithium-pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijsden, van P.; Notenboom, R.G.E.; Wu, O.; Graan, de P.N.E.; Nieuwenhuizen, van O.; Nicolaij, K.; Braun, K.P.J.

    2004-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is associated with febrile convulsions and childhood status epilepticus (SE). Since the initial precipitating injury, triggering epileptogenesis, occurs during this SE, we aimed to examine the metabolic and morphological cerebral changes during the acute phase of

  9. Acquisition and retrieval of conditioned taste aversion is impaired by brain damage caused by two hours of pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroubek, J; Hort, J; Komárek, V; Langmeier, M; Brozek, G

    2001-01-01

    The effect of Cavalheiro's pilocarpine model of epileptogenesis upon conditioned taste aversion (CTA), an important example of nondeclarative memory, was studied in adult Long Evans rats. Deterioration of CTA was studied during the silent period between pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE) and delayed spontaneous recurrent seizures. SE was elicited by i.p. injection of pilocarpine (320 mg/kg ) and interrupted after 2 hours by clonazepame (1 mg/kg i.p.). Peripheral cholinergic symptoms were suppressed by methylscopolamine (1 mg/kg i.p.), administered together with pilocarpine. CTA was formed against the salty taste of isotonic LiCl. In the experiment of CTA acquisition, the CTA was formed and tested during the silent period after SE. In the experiment of CTA retrieval, the CTA was acquired before SE and the retrieval itself was tested during the silent period. Retrieval of CTA acquired before SE was impaired more than the retrieval of CTA formed during the silent period. Our findings indicate that epileptic seizures can disrupt even non-declarative memory but that CTA formed by the damaged brain can use its better preserved parts for memory trace formation. Ketamine (50 mg/kg i.p.) applied 2 min after the onset of pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus protected memory deterioration.

  10. A case of nonconvulsive status epilepticus presenting as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nonconvulsive status epilepticus is characterised by changes in behaviour, memory, affect or level of consciousness. We report a case of nonconvulsive status epilepticus precipitated by carbamazepine that presented as dissociative fugue. The patient was a 49-year-old man. He first experienced a tonic-clonic seizure nine ...

  11. Advancements in the critical care management of status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauerschmidt, Andrew; Martin, Andrew; Claassen, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Status epilepticus has a high morbidity and mortality. There are little definitive data to guide management; however, new recent data continue to improve understanding of management options of status epilepticus. This review examines recent advancements regarding the critical care management of status epilepticus. Recent studies support the initial treatment of status epilepticus with early and aggressive benzodiazepine dosing. There remains a lack of prospective randomized controlled trials comparing different treatment regimens. Recent data support further study of intravenous lacosamide as an urgent-control therapy, and ketamine and clobazam for refractory status epilepticus. Recent data support the use of continuous EEG to help guide treatment for all patients with refractory status epilepticus and to better understand epileptic activity that falls on the ictal-interictal continuum. Recent data also improve our understanding of the relationship between periodic epileptic activity and brain injury. Many treatments are available for status epilepticus and there are much new data guiding the use of specific agents. However, there continues to be a lack of prospective data supporting specific regimens, particularly in cases of refractory status epilepticus.

  12. Can anesthetic treatment worsen outcome in status epilepticus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Raoul; Kaplan, Peter W

    2015-08-01

    Status epilepticus refractory to first-line and second-line antiepileptic treatments challenges neurologists and intensivists as mortality increases with treatment refractoriness and seizure duration. International guidelines advocate anesthetic drugs, such as continuously administered high-dose midazolam, propofol, and barbiturates, for the induction of therapeutic coma in patients with treatment-refractory status epilepticus. The seizure-suppressing effect of anesthetic drugs is believed to be so strong that some experts recommend using them after benzodiazepines have failed. Although the rationale for the use of anesthetic drugs in patients with treatment-refractory status epilepticus seems clear, the recommendation of their use in treating status epilepticus is based on expert opinions rather than on strong evidence. Randomized trials in this context are lacking, and recent studies provide disturbing results, as the administration of anesthetics was associated with poor outcome independent of possible confounders. This calls for caution in the straightforward use of anesthetics in treating status epilepticus. However, there are still more questions than answers, and current evidence for the adverse effects of anesthetic drugs in patients with status epilepticus remains too limited to advocate a change of treatment algorithms. In this overview, the rationale and the conflicting clinical implications of anesthetic drugs in patients with treatment-refractory status epilepticus are discussed, and remaining questions are elaborated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Status Epilepticus". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Consensus guidelines on management of childhood convulsive status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Devendra; Sharma, Suvasini; Sankhyan, Naveen; Konanki, Ramesh; Kamate, Mahesh; Kanhere, Sujata; Aneja, Satinder

    2014-12-01

    Status epilepticus has a wide etiological spectrum, and significant morbidity and mortality. Management using a pre-determined uniform protocol leads to better outcomes. Multiple protocols for management of childhood status epilepticus are available, without much consensus. A 'Multi-disciplinary Consensus Development Workshop on Management of Status Epilepticus in Children in India' was organized. The invited experts included Pediatricians, Pediatric neurologists, Neurologists, Epileptologists, and Pediatric intensive care specialists from India, with experience in the relevant field. Experts had previously been divided into focus groups and had interacted on telephone and e-mail regarding their group recommendations, and developed consensus on the topic. During the meeting, each group presented their recommendations, which were deliberated upon by the house and a consensus was reached on various issues; the document was finalized after incorporating suggestions of experts on the draft document. To provide consensus guidelines on evaluation and management of convulsive status epilepticus in children in India (excluding neonatal and super-refractory status epilepticus). Each institution should use a pre-determined protocol for management of status epilepticus; pre-hospital management and early stabilization is the key to a satisfactory outcome of status epilepticus. Pharmacotherapy should not be delayed for any investigations; the initial management should consist of a parenteral benzodiazepine by any route feasible. Subsequent management has been detailed. The group also felt the need for more epidemiological research on status epilepticus from India, and identified certain research areas for the purpose.

  14. Astroglial role in the pathophysiology of status epilepticus: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Sánchez, Karina; Mogilevskaya, Maria; Rodríguez-Pérez, John; Rubiano, María G; Javela, José J; González-Reyes, Rodrigo E

    2018-06-01

    Status epilepticus is a medical emergency with elevated morbidity and mortality rates, and represents a leading cause of epilepsy-related deaths. Though status epilepticus can occur at any age, it manifests more likely in children and elderly people. Despite the common prevalence of epileptic disorders, a complete explanation for the mechanisms leading to development of self-limited or long lasting seizures (as in status epilepticus) are still lacking. Apart from neurons, research evidence suggests the involvement of immune and glial cells in epileptogenesis. Among glial cells, astrocytes represent an ideal target for the study of the pathophysiology of status epilepticus, due to their key role in homeostatic balance of the central nervous system. During status epilepticus, astroglial cells are activated by the presence of cytokines, damage associated molecular patterns and reactive oxygen species. The persistent activation of astrocytes leads to a decrease in glutamate clearance with a corresponding accumulation in the synaptic extracellular space, increasing the chance of neuronal excitotoxicity. Moreover, major alterations in astrocytic gap junction coupling, inflammation and receptor expression, facilitate the generation of seizures. Astrocytes are also involved in dysregulation of inhibitory transmission in the central nervous system and directly participate in ionic homeostatic alterations during status epilepticus. In the present review, we focus on the functional and structural changes in astrocytic activity that participate in the development and maintenance of status epilepticus, with special attention on concurrent inflammatory alterations. We also include potential astrocytic treatment targets for status epilepticus.

  15. Autoimmun encefalitis debuterende med behandlingsrefraktær status epilepticus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Mette; Blaabjerg, Morten

    2017-01-01

    with status epilepticus. GABAB encephalitis is associated with small-cell lung cancer or neuroendocrine lung tumour. This is a case report of a patient having status epilepticus due to GABAB encephalitis. In cases which are presumed to be autoimmune it is important that treatment starts immediately instead...

  16. Ketogenic diet in 3 cases of childhood refractory status epilepticus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sort, Rune; Born, Alfred P; Pedersen, Karen N.

    2013-01-01

    Refractory status epilepticus (RSE) in children is associated with a significant risk of death or neurological morbidity. Recently attention has been drawn to the ketogenic diet (KD) as an acute treatment, as it has shown promise in controlling seizures in otherwise refractory status epilepticus...

  17. Novel clinical features of nonconvulsive status epilepticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Masao; Yang, Sunghoon; Geocadin, Romergryko G.; Kaplan, Peter W.; Hoshiyama, Eisei; Shiromaru-Sugimoto, Azusa; Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2017-01-01

    Nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) has rapidly expanded from classical features such as staring, repetitive blinking, chewing, swallowing, and automatism to include coma, prolonged apnea, cardiac arrest, dementia, and higher brain dysfunction, which were demonstrated mainly after the 2000s by us and other groups. This review details novel clinical features of NCSE as a manifestation of epilepsy, but one that is underdiagnosed, with the best available evidence. Also, we describe the new concept of epilepsy-related organ dysfunction (Epi-ROD) and a novel electrode and headset which enables prompt electroencephalography. PMID:28979770

  18. Ketogenic diet treatment for pediatric super-refractory status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appavu, Brian; Vanatta, Lisa; Condie, John; Kerrigan, John F; Jarrar, Randa

    2016-10-01

    We aimed to study whether ketogenic diet (KD) therapy leads to resolution of super-refractory status epilepticus in pediatric patients without significant harm. A retrospective review was performed at Phoenix Children's Hospital on patients with super-refractory status epilepticus undergoing ketogenic diet therapy from 2011 to 2015. Ten children with super-refractory status epilepticus, ages 2-16 years, were identified. 4/10 patients had immune mediated encephalitis, including Rasmussen encephalitis, anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis, and post-infectious mycoplasma encephalitis. Other etiologies included Lennox Gastaut Syndrome, non-ketotic hyperglycinemia, PCDH19 and GABRG2 genetic epilepsy, New Onset Refractory Status Epilepticus, and Febrile Infection-Related Epilepsy Syndrome. 4/10 patients' EEG features suggested focal with status epilepticus, and 6/10 suggested generalized with status epilepticus. Median hospital length was 61days and median ICU length was 27days. The median number of antiepileptic medications prior to diet initiation was 3.0 drugs, and the median after ketogenic diet treatment was 3.5 drugs. Median duration of status epilepticus prior to KD was 18days. 9/10 patients had resolution of super-refractory status epilepticus in a median of 7days after diet initiation. 8/9 patients were weaned off anesthesia within 15days of diet initiation, and within 1day of achieving ketonuria. 1/10 patients experienced side effects on the diet requiring supplementation. Most patients achieved resolution of status epilepticus on KD therapy, suggesting it could be an effective therapy that can be utilized early in the treatment of children with super refractory status epilepticus. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Status Epilepticus and Beyond: A Clinical Review of Status Epilepticus and an Update on Current Management Strategies in Super-refractory Status Epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Poblete

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Status epilepticus and refractory status epilepticus represent some of the most complex conditions encountered in the neurological intensive care unit. Challenges in management are common as treatment options become limited and prolonged hospital courses are accompanied by complications and worsening patient outcomes. Antiepileptic drug treatments have become increasingly complex. Rational polytherapy should consider the pharmacodynamics and kinetics of medications. When seizures cannot be controlled with medical therapy, alternative treatments, including early surgical evaluation can be considered; however, evidence is limited. This review provides a brief overview of status epilepticus, and a recent update on the management of refractory status epilepticus based on evidence from the literature, evidence-based guidelines, and experiences at our institution.

  20. Antagonist targeting microRNA-155 protects against lithium-pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus in C57BL/6 mice by activating brain-derived neurotrophic factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengxu eCai

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a severe brain disorder affecting numerous patients. Recently, it is inferred that modulation of microRNA-155 (miR-155 could serve as a promising treatment of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE. In the current study, the therapeutic potential of miR-155 antagonist against TLE was evaluated and the underlying mechanism involved in this regulation was explored. TLE model was induced by lithium-pilocarpine method. The effect of miR-155 antagonist on epilepticus symptoms of TLE mice was assessed using Racine classification and electroencephalogram (EEG recordings. The expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and its association with miR-155 were also assessed with a series of experiments. Our results showed that level of miR-155 was significantly up-regulated after induction of TLE model. Based on the results of EEG and behavior analyses, seizures in mice were alleviated by miR-155 antagonist. Moreover, administration of miR-155 antagonist also significantly increased the level of BDNF. The results of dual luciferase assay and western blotting showed that miR-155 antagonist exerted its action on status epilepticus by directly regulating the activity of BDNF. Taken all the information together, our results demonstrated that miR-155 antagonist might firstly induce the expression of BDNF, which then contributed to the alleviation of epilepsy in the current study.

  1. Inhibition of the prostaglandin EP2 receptor is neuroprotective and accelerates functional recovery in a rat model of organophosphorus induced status epilepticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Asheebo; Ganesh, Thota; Lelutiu, Nadia; Gueorguieva, Paoula; Dingledine, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high levels of organophosphorus compounds (OP) can induce status epilepticus (SE) in humans and rodents via acute cholinergic toxicity, leading to neurodegeneration and brain inflammation. Currently there is no treatment to combat the neuropathologies associated with OP exposure. We recently demonstrated that inhibition of the EP2 receptor for PGE2 reduces neuronal injury in mice following pilocarpine-induced SE. Here, we investigated the therapeutic effects of an EP2 inhibitor (TG6-10-1) in a rat model of SE using diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP). We tested the hypothesis that EP2 receptor inhibition initiated well after the onset of DFP-induced SE reduces the associated neuropathologies. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with pyridostigmine bromide (0.1 mg/kg, sc) and atropine methylbromide (20 mg/kg, sc) followed by DFP (9.5 mg/kg, ip) to induce SE. DFP administration resulted in prolonged upregulation of COX-2. The rats were administered TG6-10-1 or vehicle (ip) at various time points relative to DFP exposure. Treatment with TG6-10-1 or vehicle did not alter the observed behavioral seizures, however six doses of TG6-10-1 starting 80-150 min after the onset of DFP-induced SE significantly reduced neurodegeneration in the hippocampus, blunted the inflammatory cytokine burst, reduced microglial activation and decreased weight loss in the days after status epilepticus. By contrast, astrogliosis was unaffected by EP2 inhibition 4 d after DFP. Transient treatments with the EP2 antagonist 1 h before DFP, or beginning 4 h after DFP, were ineffective. Delayed mortality, which was low (10%) after DFP, was unaffected by TG6-10-1. Thus, selective inhibition of the EP2 receptor within a time window that coincides with the induction of cyclooxygenase-2 by DFP is neuroprotective and accelerates functional recovery of rats. PMID:25656476

  2. Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus in Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Kim

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We discuss a case of a 64-year-old male with a history of liver failure presenting with altered mental status, initially diagnosed with hepatic encephalopathy but ultimately diagnosed with nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE by electroencephalogram (EEG. NCSE is a difficult diagnosis to make, given no clear consensus on diagnostic criteria. Especially in the intensive care unit setting of persistent altered mental status with no clear etiology, NCSE must be considered in the differential diagnosis, as the consequences of delayed diagnosis and treatment can be substantial. EEG can be useful in the evaluation of patients with hepatic encephalopathy who have persistently altered levels of consciousness despite optimal medical management. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:372–374.

  3. Management of refractory status epilepticus in adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Andrea O.; Lowenstein, Daniel H.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Refractory status epilepticus (RSE) can be defined as status epilepticus that continues despite treatment with benzodiazepines and one antiepileptic drug. RSE should be treated promptly to prevent morbidity and mortality; however, scarce evidence is available to support the choice of specific treatments. Major independent outcome predictors are age (not modifiable) and etiology (that should be actively targeted). Recent recommendations for adults, relying upon limited evidence, suggest that RSE treatment aggressiveness should be tailored to the clinical situation: to minimize ICU-related complications, focal RSE without major consciousness impairment might initially be approached more conservatively; conversely, early induction of pharmacological coma is advisable in generalized-convulsive forms. At this stage, midazolam, propofol or barbiturates represent the most used alternatives. Several other treatments, such as additional anesthetics, other antiepileptic or immunomodulatory compounds, or non-pharmacological approaches (electroconvulsive treatment, hypothermia), have been used in protracted RSE. Treatment lasting weeks or months may sometimes result in a good outcome, as in selected cases after cerebral anoxia and encephalitis. Well-designed prospective studies of this condition are urgently needed. PMID:21939901

  4. New lessons: Classic treatments in convulsive status epilepticus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Renganathan, R

    2012-02-03

    Convulsive status epilepticus is a relatively common life-threatening illness requiring prompt intervention. There has been much debate about the appropriate protocol for management of convulsive status epilepticus. Published data on the management of this condition in Ireland is limited. Our aim was to establish if there was a structured, evidence-based or consensus-based protocol being implemented in the management of status epilepticus in our centre. We retrospectively audited all charts with a diagnosis of \\'Status Epilepticus\\' admitted to our hospital from January 1998 to December 2002. A total of 95 episodes of convulsive status epilepticus were recorded. 34 charts were reviewed. Benzodiazepines were the drug class of first choice in 96% of patients. However, the doses of benzodiazepines used varied widely. The most frequent dose of phenytoin used was 1 gram. No one received continuous EEG monitoring during treatment of refractory status epilepticus. Overall mortality was 18%. The results of this study show that there is no consistent protocol was being followed for the management of convulsive status epilepticus in our centre. The drugs of first choice varied between diazepam and lorazepam in most cases. Although phenytoin was used as second line drug, the dose used was frequently suboptimal. We have developed a protocol for the management for convulsive status in our centre.

  5. Prallethrin Poisoning Presenting as Status Epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Vijayaraju

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mosquito repellents contain pyrethroid derivatives, as the active ingredient. Data regarding human toxicity following oral intake is limited. This is a case report of an individual who presented with neurotoxicity following oral ingestion of prallethrin (2.4% w/w of a higher concentration present in formulations commercially available than previously. A 22 year old male presented to the emergency Room (ER in status epilepticus. He was managed in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU. No cause for his status could be determined after all laboratory investigations. A review of history with the patient revealed that he had ingested a bottle of liquid mosquito repellent (45 ml. The patient has had no further symptoms on follow up and has been off anti epileptics. Pyrethroid containing mosquito repellents act on neuronal sodium channels causing hyperexcitiability. With no known specific antidotes, symptomatic treatment is the main stay of management.

  6. De novo status epilepticus with isolated aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flügel, Dominique; Kim, Olaf Chan-Hi; Felbecker, Ansgar; Tettenborn, Barbara

    2015-08-01

    Sudden onset of aphasia is usually due to stroke. Rapid diagnostic workup is necessary if reperfusion therapy is considered. Ictal aphasia is a rare condition but has to be excluded. Perfusion imaging may differentiate acute ischemia from other causes. In dubious cases, EEG is required but is time-consuming and laborious. We report a case where we considered de novo status epilepticus as a cause of aphasia without any lesion even at follow-up. A 62-year-old right-handed woman presented to the emergency department after nurses found her aphasic. She had undergone operative treatment of varicosis 3 days earlier. Apart from hypertension and obesity, no cardiovascular risk factors and no intake of medication other than paracetamol were reported. Neurological examination revealed global aphasia and right pronation in the upper extremity position test. Computed tomography with angiography and perfusion showed no abnormalities. Electroencephalogram performed after the CT scan showed left-sided slowing with high-voltage rhythmic 2/s delta waves but no clear ictal pattern. Intravenous lorazepam did improve EEG slightly, while aphasia did not change. Lumbar puncture was performed which likely excluded encephalitis. Magnetic resonance imaging showed cortical pathological diffusion imaging (restriction) and cortical hyperperfusion in the left parietal region. Intravenous anticonvulsant therapy under continuous EEG resolved neurological symptoms. The patient was kept on anticonvulsant therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging after 6 months showed no abnormalities along with no clinical abnormalities. Magnetic resonance imaging findings were only subtle, and EEG was without clear ictal pattern, so the diagnosis of aphasic status remains with some uncertainty. However, status epilepticus can mimic stroke symptoms and has to be considered in patients with aphasia even when no previous stroke or structural lesions are detectable and EEG shows no epileptic discharges. Epileptic origin is

  7. Clinical decision making in seizures and status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teran, Felipe; Harper-Kirksey, Katrina; Jagoda, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Seizures and status epilepticus are frequent neurologic emergencies in the emergency department, accounting for 1% of all emergency department visits. The management of this time-sensitive and potentially life-threatening condition is challenging for both prehospital providers and emergency clinicians. The approach to seizing patients begins with differentiating seizure activity from mimics and follows with identifying potential secondary etiologies, such as alcohol-related seizures. The approach to the patient in status epilepticus and the patient with nonconvulsive status epilepticus constitutes a special clinical challenge. This review summarizes the best available evidence and recommendations regarding diagnosis and resuscitation of the seizing patient in the emergency setting.

  8. Status epilepticus increases mature granule cells in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus in rats★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhaoliang; Gao, Fei; Wang, Fajun; Wang, Xiaochen; Song, Xinyu; Liu, Kejing; Zhan, Ren-Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Enhanced neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus following seizure activity, especially status epilepticus, is associated with ectopic residence and aberrant integration of newborn granule cells. Hilar ectopic granule cells may be detrimental to the stability of dentate circuitry by means of their electrophysiological properties and synaptic connectivity. We hypothesized that status epilepticus also increases ectopic granule cells in the molecular layer. Status epilepticus was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by intraperitoneal injection of pilocarpine. Immunostaining showed that many doublecortin-positive cells were present in the molecular layer and the hilus 7 days after the induction of status epilepticus. At least 10 weeks after status epilepticus, the estimated number of cells positive for both prospero homeobox protein 1 and neuron-specific nuclear protein in the hilus was significantly increased. A similar trend was also found in the molecular layer. These findings indicate that status epilepticus can increase the numbers of mature and ectopic newborn granule cells in the molecular layer. PMID:25206705

  9. Status epilepticus severity score (STESS): A useful tool to predict outcome of status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Manoj Kumar; Chakravarthi, Sudheer; Modi, Manish; Bhalla, Ashish; Lal, Vivek

    2015-12-01

    The treatment protocols for status epilepticus (SE) range from small doses of intravenous benzodiazepines to induction of coma. The pros and cons of more aggressive treatment regimen remain debatable. The importance of an index need not be overemphasized which can predict outcome of SE and guide the intensity of treatment. We tried to evaluate utility of one such index Status epilepticus severity score (STESS). 44 consecutive patients of SE were enrolled in the study. STESS results were compared with various outcome measures: (a) mortality, (b) final neurological outcome at discharge as defined by functional independence measure (FIM) (good outcome: FIM score 5-7; bad outcome: FIM score 1-4), (c) control of SE within 1h of start of treatment and (d) need for coma induction. A higher STESS score correlated significantly with poor neurological outcome at discharge (p=0.0001), need for coma induction (p=0.0001) and lack of response to treatment within 1h (p=0.001). A STESS of status epilepticus. Further studies on STESS based treatment approach may help in designing better therapeutic regimens for SE. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Status Epilepticus: Epidemiology and Public Health Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Sebastián; Rincon, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is defined as a continuous clinical and/or electrographic seizure activity lasting five minutes or more or recurrent seizure activity without return to baseline. There is a paucity of epidemiological studies of SE, as most research is derived from small population studies. The overall incidence of SE is 9.9 to 41 per 100,000/year, with peaks in children and the elderly and with febrile seizures and strokes as its main etiologies. The etiology is the major determinant of mortality. Governments and the academic community should predominantly focus on the primary prevention of etiologies linked to SE, as these are the most important risk factors for its development. This review describes the incidence, prevalence, etiology, risk factors, outcomes and costs of SE and aims to identify future research and public health needs. PMID:27537921

  11. Chemokine CCL2–CCR2 Signaling Induces Neuronal Cell Death via STAT3 Activation and IL-1β Production after Status Epilepticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Dai-Shi; Feng, Li-Jie; Liu, Jun-Li

    2017-01-01

    Elevated levels of chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2) and its receptor CCR2 have been reported in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and in experimental seizures. However, the functional significance and molecular mechanism underlying CCL2–CCR2 signaling in epileptic brain remains largely unknown. In this study, we found that the upregulated CCL2 was mainly expressed in hippocampal neurons and activated microglia from mice 1 d after kainic acid (KA)-induced seizures. Taking advantage of CX3CR1GFP/+:CCR2RFP/+ double-transgenic mice, we demonstrated that CCL2–CCR2 signaling has a role in resident microglial activation and blood-derived monocyte infiltration. Moreover, seizure-induced degeneration of neurons in the hippocampal CA3 region was attenuated in mice lacking CCL2 or CCR2. We further showed that CCR2 activation induced STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) phosphorylation and IL-1β production, which are critical for promoting neuronal cell death after status epilepticus. Consistently, pharmacological inhibition of STAT3 by WP1066 reduced seizure-induced IL-1β production and subsequent neuronal death. Two weeks after KA-induced seizures, CCR2 deficiency not only reduced neuronal loss, but also attenuated seizure-induced behavioral impairments, including anxiety, memory decline, and recurrent seizure severity. Together, we demonstrated that CCL2–CCR2 signaling contributes to neurodegeneration via STAT3 activation and IL-1β production after status epilepticus, providing potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of epilepsy. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Epilepsy is a global concern and epileptic seizures occur in many neurological conditions. Neuroinflammation associated with microglial activation and monocyte infiltration are characteristic of epileptic brains. However, molecular mechanisms underlying neuroinflammation in neuronal death following epilepsy remain to be elucidated. Here we demonstrate that CCL2–CCR2 signaling is

  12. A case of nonconvulsive status epilepticus presenting as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    disorders has generated interest since ancient times. ... disorders and personality disorders. ... He was hospitalised for a diagnostic work-up. ... Nonconvulsive status epilepticus is characterised by changes in behaviour, memory, affect or level ...

  13. Ketogenic Diet in Super-Refractory Status Epilepticus

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Garnett; Press, Craig A.

    2017-01-01

    Researchers from the Children’s National Health System in Washington, D.C. studied the feasibility, rate of complications, and effect on seizures of initiating the Ketogenic Diet (KD) in pediatric patients with Super-Refractory Status Epilepticus (SRSE).

  14. Standardized Treatment of Neonatal Status Epilepticus Improves Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Mandy L; Malloy, Katherine M; Lawson, Sheena N; Rose, Rebecca S; Buss, William F; Mietzsch, Ulrike

    2016-12-01

    We aimed to decrease practice variation in treatment of neonatal status epilepticus by implementing a standardized protocol. Our primary goal was to achieve 80% adherence to the algorithm within 12 months. Secondary outcome measures included serum phenobarbital concentrations, number of patients progressing from seizures to status epilepticus, and length of hospital stay. Data collection occurred for 6 months prior and 12 months following protocol implementation. Adherence of 80% within 12 months was partially achieved in patients diagnosed in our hospital; in pretreated patients, adherence was not achieved. Maximum phenobarbital concentrations were decreased (56.8 vs 41.0 µg/mL), fewer patients progressed from seizures to status epilepticus (46% vs 36%), and hospital length of stay decreased by 9.7 days in survivors. In conclusion, standardized, protocol-driven treatment of neonatal status epilepticus improves consistency and short-term outcome. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Status epilepticus in the elderly: epidemiology, clinical aspects and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Assis, Telma M.R.; Costa, Gersonita; Bacellar, Aroldo; Orsini, Marco; Nascimento, Osvaldo J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to review the epidemiology, clinical profile and discuss the etiology, prognosis and treatment options in patients aged 60 years or older presenting with status epilepticus. We performed a systematic review involving studies published from 1996 to 2010, in Medline/PubMed, Scientific Electronic Library on line (Scielo), Latin-American and Caribbean Center of Health Sciences Information (Lilacs) databases and textbooks. Related articles published before 1996, when relevant for discussing epilepsy in older people, were also included. Several population studies had shown an increased incidence of status epilepticus after the age of 60 years. Status epilepticus is a medical and neurological emergency that is associated with high morbidity and mortality, and is a major concern in the elderly compared to the general population. Prompt diagnosis and effective treatment of convulsive status epilepticus are crucial to avoid brain injury and reduce the fatality rate in this age group. PMID:23355930

  16. Primary Amoebic (Naegleria fowleri Meningoencephalitis Presenting as Status Epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sharma

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM is a rare entity. Usual presenting features are fever, headache and seizures with meningeal signs and this disease carries high mortality rate. We present a case report of PAM presenting as status epilepticus.

  17. Dynamic changes of status epilepticus-induced neuronal degeneration in the mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus during postnatal development of the rat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubová, Hana; Druga, Rastislav; Haugvicová, Renata; Suchomelová, Lucie; Pitkanen, A.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 43, Suppl. 5 (2002), s. 54-60 ISSN 0013-9580 R&D Projects: GA MZd NF6474; GA ČR GA309/01/0285 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : status epilepticus Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.530, year: 2002

  18. Underestimated Rate of Status Epilepticus according to the Traditional Definition of Status Epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Cheung-Ter; Wong, Yi-Sin; Sung, Sheng-Feng; Wu, Chi-Shun; Hsu, Yung-Chu; Su, Yu-Hsiang; Hung, Ling-Chien

    2015-01-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is an important neurological emergency. Early diagnosis could improve outcomes. Traditionally, SE is defined as seizures lasting at least 30 min or repeated seizures over 30 min without recovery of consciousness. Some specialists argued that the duration of seizures qualifying as SE should be shorter and the operational definition of SE was suggested. It is unclear whether physicians follow the operational definition. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the incidence of SE was underestimated and to investigate the underestimate rate. This retrospective study evaluates the difference in diagnosis of SE between operational definition and traditional definition of status epilepticus. Between July 1, 2012, and June 30, 2014, patients discharged with ICD-9 codes for epilepsy (345.X) in Chia-Yi Christian Hospital were included in the study. A seizure lasting at least 30 min or repeated seizures over 30 min without recovery of consciousness were considered SE according to the traditional definition of SE (TDSE). A seizure lasting between 5 and 30 min was considered SE according to the operational definition of SE (ODSE); it was defined as underestimated status epilepticus (UESE). During a 2-year period, there were 256 episodes of seizures requiring hospital admission. Among the 256 episodes, 99 episodes lasted longer than 5 min, out of which 61 (61.6%) episodes persisted over 30 min (TDSE) and 38 (38.4%) episodes continued between 5 and 30 min (UESE). In the 38 episodes of seizure lasting 5 to 30 minutes, only one episode was previously discharged as SE (ICD-9-CM 345.3). Conclusion. We underestimated 37.4% of SE. Continuing education regarding the diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy is important for physicians.

  19. Prognosis of status epilepticus in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilella, L; González Cuevas, M; Quintana Luque, M; Toledo, M; Sueiras Gil, M; Guzmán, L; Salas Puig, J; Santamarina Pérez, E

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate the clinical features and prognosis of status epilepticus (SE) in patients above 70 years old. Retrospective analysis of all patients ≥70 years old with SE registered prospectively during 4 years. Follow-up after discharge was performed. Ninety patients were evaluated. Acute symptomatic etiology was the most prevalent. The mean number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) used was 2.7 ± 1.2, and 21% of the patients required sedation. A poor outcome was considered when death (31.1%) or developing of new neurological impairment at discharge (32.2%) occurred. After multivariate analysis, four variables predicted a poor outcome: acute symptomatic etiology (OR: 6.320; 95% CI: 1.976-20.217; P = .002), focal motor SE type (OR: 9.089; 95% CI: 2.482-33.283; P = .001), level of consciousness (OR: 4.596; 95% CI: 1.903-11.098; P = .001), and SE duration >12 hours (OR: 3.763; 95% CI: 1.130-12.530; P = .031). Independent predictive factors of mortality were SE duration >12 hours (OR: 4.306; 95% CI: 1.044-17.757; P = .043), modified Status Epilepticus Severity Score (mSTESS) (OR: 2.216; 95% CI: 1.313-3.740; P = .003), and development of complications (OR: 3.334; 95% CI: 1.004-11.070, P = .049). Considering long-term mortality, age (HR 1.036; 95% CI 1.001-1.071; P = .044), a potentially fatal underlying cause (HR 2.609; 95% CI 1.497- 4.548; P = .001), and mSTESS score >4 (HR 1.485; 95% CI 1.158-1.903; P = .002) remained as predictive factors. There was no association between sedation and the number of AEDs used with outcome at discharge or long-term mortality (P > .05). SE above 70 years old has a high morbimortality. Prognosis is not related to treatment aggressiveness. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Google search behavior for status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigo, Francesco; Trinka, Eugen

    2015-08-01

    Millions of people surf the Internet every day as a source of health-care information looking for materials about symptoms, diagnosis, treatments and their possible adverse effects, or diagnostic procedures. Google is the most popular search engine and is used by patients and physicians to search for online health-related information. This study aimed to evaluate changes in Google search behavior occurring in English-speaking countries over time for the term "status epilepticus" (SE). Using Google Trends, data on global search queries for the term SE between the 1st of January 2004 and 31st of December 2014 were analyzed. Search volume numbers over time (downloaded as CSV datasets) were analyzed by applying the "health" category filter. The research trends for the term SE remained fairly constant over time. The greatest search volume for the term SE was reported in the United States, followed by India, Australia, the United Kingdom, Canada, the Netherlands, Thailand, and Germany. Most terms associated with the search queries were related to SE definition, symptoms, subtypes, and treatment. The volume of searches for some queries (nonconvulsive, focal, and refractory SE; SE definition; SE guidelines; SE symptoms; SE management; SE treatment) was enormously increased over time (search popularity has exceeded a 5000% growth since 2004). Most people use search engines to look for the term SE to obtain information on its definition, subtypes, and management. The greatest search volume occurred not only in developed countries but also in developing countries where raising awareness about SE still remains a challenging task and where there is reduced public knowledge of epilepsy. Health information seeking (the extent to which people search for health information online) reflects the health-related information needs of Internet users for a specific disease. Google Trends shows that Internet users have a great demand for information concerning some aspects of SE

  1. Differential DNA methylation patterns define status epilepticus and epileptic tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Delaney, Suzanne F C; Das, Sudipto; Sano, Takanori; Jimenez-Mateos, Eva M; Bryan, Kenneth; Buckley, Patrick G; Stallings, Raymond L; Henshall, David C

    2012-02-01

    Prolonged seizures (status epilepticus) produce pathophysiological changes in the hippocampus that are associated with large-scale, wide-ranging changes in gene expression. Epileptic tolerance is an endogenous program of cell protection that can be activated in the brain by previous exposure to a non-harmful seizure episode before status epilepticus. A major transcriptional feature of tolerance is gene downregulation. Here, through methylation analysis of 34,143 discrete loci representing all annotated CpG islands and promoter regions in the mouse genome, we report the genome-wide DNA methylation changes in the hippocampus after status epilepticus and epileptic tolerance in adult mice. A total of 321 genes showed altered DNA methylation after status epilepticus alone or status epilepticus that followed seizure preconditioning, with >90% of the promoters of these genes undergoing hypomethylation. These profiles included genes not previously associated with epilepsy, such as the polycomb gene Phc2. Differential methylation events generally occurred throughout the genome without bias for a particular chromosomal region, with the exception of a small region of chromosome 4, which was significantly overrepresented with genes hypomethylated after status epilepticus. Surprisingly, only few genes displayed differential hypermethylation in epileptic tolerance. Nevertheless, gene ontology analysis emphasized the majority of differential methylation events between the groups occurred in genes associated with nuclear functions, such as DNA binding and transcriptional regulation. The present study reports select, genome-wide DNA methylation changes after status epilepticus and in epileptic tolerance, which may contribute to regulating the gene expression environment of the seizure-damaged hippocampus.

  2. Nonconvulsive status epilepticus due to ifosfamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilickap, Saadettin; Cakar, Mustafa; Onal, Ibrahim K; Tufan, Abdurrahman; Akoglu, Hadim; Aksoy, Sercan; Erman, Mustafa; Tekuzman, Gulten

    2006-02-01

    To report 2 cases of nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) following infusion of ifosfamide. Two patients who received ifosfamide-containing chemotherapy developed NCSE. One woman received ifosfamide 1000 mg/m2 (1 h infusion on days 1-5); confusion, lethargy, and speech deterioration developed on day 3. The second patient developed similar symptoms on day 3 of treatment with 2500 mg/m2. Both patients responded to intravenous administration of diazepam 10 mg and were given levetiracetam as maintenance therapy. The severity and presentation of central nervous system toxicity due to ifosfamide varies greatly and involves a spectrum ranging from subclinical electroencephalogram changes to coma. NCSE, an epileptic disorder in which typical convulsive activity is absent, has previously been reported in only 4 patients receiving ifosfamide. Levetiracetam may be used for maintenance antiepileptic therapy after diazepam administration. Among the many presentations of ifosfamide neurotoxicity, clinicians should consider NCSE as a possible explanation for changes in consciousness in a patient receiving this agent. An objective causality assessment by use of the Naranjo probability scale revealed that NCSE due to ifosfamide was probable.

  3. Status epilepticus: Why, what, and how

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P P Nair

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Status epilepticus (SE is an important neurological emergency with high mortality and morbidity. The first official definition of SE was the product of 10 th Marseilles colloquium held in 1962 which was accepted by International League Against Epilepsy in 1964. There are as many types of SE as of seizures. SE is supposed to result from failure of normal mechanisms that terminate an isolated seizure. In half of the cases, there is no history of epilepsy and SE is precipitated by some intercurrent infection. In children, it is often infection, whereas in adults, the major causes are stroke, hypoxia, metabolic derangements, and alcohol intoxication or drug withdrawal. The treatment of SE aims at termination of SE, prevention of seizure recurrence, management of precipitating causes, and the management of complications. The extent of investigations done should be based on the clinical picture and cost benefit analysis. The first line antiepileptic drugs (AED for SE include benzodiazepines, phenytoin, phosphenytoin, and sodium valproate. Mortality of SE ranges between 7 and 39% and depends on underlying cause and response to AEDs.

  4. Resistance of neurofilaments to degradation, and lack of neuronal death and mossy fiber sprouting after kainic acid-induced status epilepticus in the developing rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Picon, Francisco; Puustinen, Niina; Kukko-Lukjanov, Tiina-Kaisa; Holopainen, Irma E

    2004-12-01

    Neurofilament (NF) proteins, the major constituent of intermediate filaments in neurons, have an important role in cellular stability and plasticity. We have now studied the short-term (hours) and long-term (up to 1 week) effects of kainic acid (KA)-induced status epilepticus (SE) on the reactivity of NF proteins, and mossy fiber (MF) sprouting and neuronal death up to 4 weeks in 9-day-old rats. In Western blotting, the expression of the phosphorylation-independent epitopes of NF-L, NF-M, and NF-H rapidly but transiently increased after the treatment, whereas the phosphorylated NF-M remained elevated for 7 days. However, the treatment did not change the immunoreactivity of NF proteins, and no neuronal death or mossy fiber sprouting was detected at any time point. Our findings indicate seizure-induced reactivity of NF proteins but their resistance to degradation, which could be of importance in neuronal survival and may also prevent MF sprouting in the developing hippocampus.

  5. Acute alterations of somatodendritic action potential dynamics in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells after kainate-induced status epilepticus in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Minge

    Full Text Available Pathophysiological remodeling processes at an early stage of an acquired epilepsy are critical but not well understood. Therefore, we examined acute changes in action potential (AP dynamics immediately following status epilepticus (SE in mice. SE was induced by intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of kainate, and behavioral manifestation of SE was monitored for 3-4 h. After this time interval CA1 pyramidal cells were studied ex vivo with whole-cell current-clamp and Ca(2+ imaging techniques in a hippocampal slice preparation. Following acute SE both resting potential and firing threshold were modestly depolarized (2-5 mV. No changes were seen in input resistance or membrane time constant, but AP latency was prolonged and AP upstroke velocity reduced following acute SE. All cells showed an increase in AP halfwidth and regular (rather than burst firing, and in a fraction of cells the notch, typically preceding spike afterdepolarization (ADP, was absent following acute SE. Notably, the typical attenuation of backpropagating action potential (b-AP-induced Ca(2+ signals along the apical dendrite was strengthened following acute SE. The effects of acute SE on the retrograde spread of excitation were mimicked by applying the Kv4 current potentiating drug NS5806. Our data unveil a reduced somatodendritic excitability in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells immediately after acute SE with a possible involvement of both Na(+ and K(+ current components.

  6. [Efficacy of intravenous phenobarbital treatment for status epilepticus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramoto, Emiko; Mizobuchi, Masahiro; Sumi, Yoshihiro; Sako, Kazuya; Nihira, Atsuko; Takeuchi, Akiko; Nakamura, Hirohiko

    2013-08-01

    Intravenous phenobarbital (IV-PB) therapy was launched in Japan in October 2008. We retrospectively investigated its efficacy and tolerability in patients with status epilepticus. Forty-three consecutive patients received IV-PB for status epilepticus between June 2009 and April 2011. Among them, 39 patients had underlying diseases, which included acute diseases in 19 patients and chronic conditions in 20 patients. Although 18 patients had been taking antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) before the occurrence of status epilepticus, the blood AED concentrations in 8 patients was below the therapeutic levels. Before the administration of IV-PB, 39 patients were treated with intravenous benzodiazepine, 17 patients were treated with intravenous phenytoin, and 15 patients with intravenous infusion of lidocaine. The initial doses of IV-PB ranged from 125 to 1,250 mg (1.9-20.0 mg/kg). Additional doses of IV-PB were required in 12 patients. Seizures were controlled in 35 patients (81%) after IV-PB administration. Cessation of status epilepticus was attained in 24 patients after the initial dose and in 11 patients after additional doses. There were no serious adverse effects, although respiratory suppression was observed in 3 patients and drug eruption was observed in 1 patient. IV-PB is relatively safe and effective for controlling status epilepticus. If the first dose is not effective, additional doses are required up to the recommended maximum dose.

  7. Pyridoxine deficiency in adult patients with status epilepticus.

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    Dave, Hina N; Eugene Ramsay, Richard; Khan, Fawad; Sabharwal, Vivek; Irland, Megan

    2015-11-01

    An 8-year-old girl treated at our facility for superrefractory status epilepticus was found to have a low pyridoxine level at 5 μg/L. After starting pyridoxine supplementation, improvement in the EEG for a 24-hour period was seen. We decided to look at the pyridoxine levels in adult patients admitted with status epilepticus. We reviewed the records on patients admitted to the neurological ICU for status epilepticus (SE). Eighty-one adult patients were identified with documented pyridoxine levels. For comparison purposes, we looked at pyridoxine levels in outpatients with epilepsy (n=132). Reported normal pyridoxine range is >10 ng/mL. All but six patients admitted for SE had low normal or undetectable pyridoxine levels. A selective pyridoxine deficiency was seen in 94% of patients with status epilepticus (compared to 39.4% in the outpatients) which leads us to believe that there is a relationship between status epilepticus and pyridoxine levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Status epilepticus in the elderly: differential diagnosis and treatment

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    Mauricio EA

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth Ann Mauricio, William David FreemanMayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USADate of Preparation 28th January 2011 Conflict of interest: None declaredAbstract: Seizures are not an uncommon occurrence in older adults, and the incidence of status epilepticus is much greater in the elderly than in younger populations. Status epilepticus is a neurologic emergency and requires prompt intervention to minimize morbidity and mortality. Treatment involves both supportive care as well as initiation of medications to stop all clinical and electrographic seizure activity. Benzodiazepines are used as first-line agents, followed by antiepileptic drugs when seizures persist. In refractory status epilepticus, urgent neurologic consultation is indicated for the titration of anesthetic agents to a level of appropriate background suppression on EEG. In light of our aging population, physician awareness and competence in the management of status epilepticus is imperative and should be recognized as a growing public health concern.Keywords: status epilepticus, convulsive, generalized, nonconvulsive, refractory, elderly, treatment 

  9. Intensive care management of status epilepticus

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    Nidhi Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Status epilepticus (SE is a life-threatening neurological emergency that requires prompt diagnosis and treatment. SE may be classified into convulsive and non-convulsive types, based on the presence of rhythmic jerking of the extremities. Clinically, tonic-clonic convulsive SE (CSE is divided into four subsequent stages: Early, established, refractory and super-refractory. Initial elements of resuscitation include airway protection, haemodynamic resuscitation and seizure control. Further treatment should then be guided by the diagnostic workup. Rapid treatment of early SE is achieved with intravenous (IV lorazepam or intramuscular midazolam. In established SE, IV antiepileptic drugs (AEDs (phenytoin/fosphenytoin, valproate, levetiracetam, phenobarbital are most commonly used, but there is no Class I evidence for choosing one over the other. Considered overall, cumulative data from the literature are consistent with valproate and levetiracetam, being a safe and effective therapeutic alternative to phenobarbital and phenytoin for treatment of established SE. Refractory SE (RSE and super-RSE are treated with anaesthetic medications (propofol, midazolam, thiopental/pentobarbital, ketamine, non-anaesthetic drugs (lidocaine, magnesium, pyridoxine, AEDs (levetiracetam, lacosamide, topiramate, lacosamide, pregabalin, gabapentin and other cause-directed treatments with low success rates. Potential non-pharmacologic interventions to be considered in super-RSE include hypothermia, electroconvulsive therapy, ketogenic diet, immunomodulatory treatments, emergency resective epilepsy surgery, cerebrospinal fluid drainage and vagal nerve or deep brain stimulation or transcranial magnetic stimulation. Diagnosis of non-CSE requires continuous electroencephalography and involves a high index of suspicion in all patients with an altered mental status of unclear cause or with a prolonged postictal state. Treatment options include addressing underlying causes and

  10. Thymoquinone attenuates brain injury via an antioxidative pathway in a status epilepticus rat model

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    Shao Yi-ye

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Status epilepticus (SE results in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which contribute to seizure-induced brain injury. It is well known that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in status epilepticus (SE. Thymoquinone (TQ is a bioactive monomer extracted from black cumin (Nigella sativa seed oil that has anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and antioxidant activity in various diseases. This study evaluated the protective effects of TQ on brain injury in a lithium-pilocarpine rat model of SE and investigated the underlying mechanism related to antioxidative pathway.

  11. Study of Refractory Status Epilepticus from a Tertiary Care Center.

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    Kohli, Sahil; Pasangulapati, Suresh Babu; Yoganathan, Sangeetha; Rynjah, Gideon Lyngsyun; Prabhakar, A T; Aaron, Sanjith; Alexander, Mathew; Mathew, Vivek

    2017-01-01

    To determine the proportion of refractory status epilepticus (RSE) and super-RSE (SRSE) among patients with status epilepticus (SE) and to analyze RSE and non-RSE (NRSE) in terms of etiology and predictors for RSE. Patients were identified from discharge summaries database with keywords of SE and records of the portable electroencephalogram (EEG) machine from January 2011 to March 2016. Two hundred and eighteen events were included in the study with 114 (52.3%) males, bimodal age preponderance age status epilepticus severity score (STESS) was predictive for RSE ( P = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, de novo seizures ( P = 0.009) and abnormal EEG at admission ( P = 0.03) were predictive for RSE. Fifty patients had RSE (22.9%), of which 17 went on to become SRSE (7.8%). Unfavorable STESS score was predictive for RSE on bivariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, de novo seizures and abnormal initial EEG were predictors of RSE.

  12. Nonconvulsive status epilepticus after cessation of convulsive status epilepticus in pediatric intensive care unit patients.

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    Chen, Jin; Xie, Lingling; Hu, Yue; Lan, Xinghui; Jiang, Li

    2018-05-01

    Little is known about pediatric patients suffering from nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) after convulsive status epilepticus (CSE) cessation. The aim of this study was to identify in pediatric patients the clinical characteristics of NCSE after CSE cessation and the factors that contribute to patient outcomes. Data from clinical features, electroencephalography (EEG) characteristics, neuroimaging findings, treatments, and prognosis were systematically summarized, and the associations between clinical characteristics and prognosis were quantified. Thirty-eight children aged 51days-14years, 2months were identified in the Chongqing Medical University pediatric intensive care unit as having experienced NCSE after CSE cessation between October 1, 2014 and April 1, 2017. All patients were comatose, 15 of whom presented subtle motor signs. The most common underlying etiology was acute central nervous system (CNS) infection. Electroencephalography (EEG) data showed that, during the NCSE period, all patients had several discrete episodes (lasting from 30s to 6h long), and the most common duration was 1-5min. The ictal onset locations were classified as focal (16 patients, 42.1%), multiregional independent (10 patients, 26.3%), and generalized (12 patients, 31.6%). Wave morphologies varied during the ictal and interictal periods. Neuroimaging detected signal abnormalities in the cerebral cortex or subcortex of 33 patients with NCSE (87%), which were classified as either multifocal and consistent with extensive cortical edema (21 patients, 55.3%) or focal (12 patients, 31.6%). Twelve patients were on continuous intravenous phenobarbital, and 31 were on continuous infusion of either midazolam (27 patients) or propofol (4 patients). At least one other antiepileptic drug was prescribed for 32 patients. Three patients were on mild hypothermia therapy. The duration of NCSE lasted 24h for 18 patients. The mortality rate was 21.1%, and half of the surviving patients had

  13. Febrile status epilepticus due to respiratory syncytial virus infection.

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    Uda, Kazuhiro; Kitazawa, Katsuhiko

    2017-08-01

    Febrile status epilepticus can have neurological sequelae. The type of sequelae, however, depend on the etiology, including infection due to viral agents such as the influenza virus. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in childhood may also contribute to this. The aim of this study was therefore to characterize febrile status epilepticus associated with RSV infection, and to determine whether this type of infection is a risk factor for neurological sequelae in febrile status epilepticus. We reviewed the medical records of children aged ≤3 years with febrile status epilepticus who were admitted to a tertiary hospital between January 2007 and December 2011. The differences between the RSV-positive and RSV-negative groups were evaluated according to the demographic and clinical data. A total of 99 patients with febrile status epilepticus who had been tested for RSV infection were identified. Three patients in the RSV-positive group (n = 19) and four in the RSV-negative group (n = 80) presented with bronchiolitis. The incidence of intubation and anti-seizure drug treatment in the RSV-positive group was significantly higher than in the -negative group. While all of the patients in the RSV-negative group recovered completely, six patients in the RSV-positive group developed encephalopathy and profound neurological sequelae. In five of the six patients, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed subcortical white matter lesions. RSV infection in the absence of bronchiolitis can initially present as febrile status epilepticus and subsequently develop into acute encephalopathy with profound neurological sequelae. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  14. Pediatric intensive care treatment of uncontrolled status epilepticus.

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    Wilkes, Ryan; Tasker, Robert C

    2013-04-01

    The critically ill mechanically ventilated child with ongoing seizures that are refractory to any treatment presents a distinct challenge in pediatric neurocritical care. The evidence base from randomized controlled trials on which anti-epileptic drug (AED) strategy should be used is inadequate. This review of refractory and super-refractory status epilepticus summarizes recent pediatric case series regarding definitions, the second-tier AED therapies once initial anticonvulsants have failed, and the experience of high-dose midazolam, barbiturate anesthesia, and volatile anesthetics for uncontrolled status epilepticus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Inhibition of the prostaglandin E2 receptor EP2 prevents status epilepticus-induced deficits in the novel object recognition task in rats

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    Rojas, Asheebo; Ganesh, Thota; Manji, Zahra; O’neill, Theon; Dingledine, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Survivors of exposure to an organophosphorus nerve agent may develop a number of complications including long-term cognitive deficits (Miyaki et al., 2005; Nishiwaki et al., 2001). We recently demonstrated that inhibition of the prostaglandin E2 receptor, EP2, attenuates neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration caused by status epilepticus (SE) induced by the soman analog, diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP), which manifest within hours to days of the initial insult. Here, we tested the hypothesis that DFP exposure leads to a loss of cognitive function in rats that is blocked by early, transient EP2 inhibition. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered vehicle or the competitive EP2 antagonist, TG6-10-1, (ip) at various times relative to DFP-induced SE. DFP administration resulted in prolonged seizure activity as demonstrated by cortical electroencephalography (EEG). A single intraperitoneal injection of TG6-10-1 or vehicle 1 h prior to DFP did not alter the development of seizures, the latency to SE or the duration of SE. Rats administered six injections of TG6-10-1 starting 90 min after the onset of DFP-induced SE could discriminate between a novel and familiar object 6–12 weeks after SE, unlike vehicle treated rats which showed no preference for the novel object. By contrast, behavioral changes in the light-dark box and open field assays were not affected by TG6-10-1. Delayed mortality after DFP was also unaffected by TG6-10-1. Thus, selective inhibition of the EP2 receptor may prevent SE-induced memory impairment in rats caused by exposure to a high dose of DFP. PMID:27477533

  16. Epilepsy is associated with ventricular alterations following convulsive status epilepticus in children.

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    Ali, Wail; Bubolz, Beth A; Nguyen, Linh; Castro, Danny; Coss-Bu, Jorge; Quach, Michael M; Kennedy, Curtis E; Anderson, Anne E; Lai, Yi-Chen

    2017-12-01

    Convulsive status epilepticus can exert profound cardiovascular effects in adults including ventricular depolarization-repolarization abnormalities. Whether status epilepticus adversely affects ventricular electrical properties in children is less understood. Therefore, we sought to characterize ventricular alterations and the associated clinical factors in children following convulsive status epilepticus. We conducted a 2-year retrospective, case-control study. Children between 1 month and 21 years of age were included if they were admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit with primary diagnosis of convulsive status epilepticus and had 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) within 24 hours of admission. Children with heart disease, ion channelopathy, or on vasoactive medications were excluded. Age-matched control subjects had no history of seizures or epilepsy. The primary outcome was ventricular abnormalities represented by ST segment changes, abnormal T wave, QRS axis deviation, and corrected QT (QTc) interval prolongation. The secondary outcomes included QT/RR relationship, beat-to-beat QTc interval variability, ECG interval measurement between groups, and clinical factors associated with ECG abnormalities. Of 317 eligible children, 59 met the inclusion criteria. History of epilepsy was present in 31 children (epileptic) and absent in 28 children (non-epileptic). Compared with the control subjects (n = 31), the status epilepticus groups were more likely to have an abnormal ECG with overall odds ratio of 3.8 and 7.0 for the non-epileptic and the epileptic groups respectively. Simple linear regression analysis demonstrated that children with epilepsy exhibited impaired dependence and adaptation of the QT interval on heart rate. Beat-to-beat QTc interval variability, a marker of ventricular repolarization instability, was increased in children with epilepsy. Convulsive status epilepticus can adversely affect ventricular electrical properties and stability in children

  17. Refractory status epilepticus in children with and without prior epilepsy or status epilepticus.

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    Sánchez Fernández, Iván; Jackson, Michele C; Abend, Nicholas S; Arya, Ravindra; Brenton, James N; Carpenter, Jessica L; Chapman, Kevin E; Gaillard, William D; Gaínza-Lein, Marina; Glauser, Tracy A; Goldstein, Joshua L; Goodkin, Howard P; Helseth, Ashley; Kapur, Kush; McDonough, Tiffani L; Mikati, Mohamad A; Peariso, Katrina; Riviello, James; Tasker, Robert C; Topjian, Alexis A; Wainwright, Mark S; Wilfong, Angus; Williams, Korwyn; Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2017-01-24

    To compare refractory convulsive status epilepticus (rSE) management and outcome in children with and without a prior diagnosis of epilepsy and with and without a history of status epilepticus (SE). This was a prospective observational descriptive study performed from June 2011 to May 2016 on pediatric patients (1 month-21 years of age) with rSE. We enrolled 189 participants (53% male) with a median (25th-75th percentile) age of 4.2 (1.3-9.6) years. Eighty-nine (47%) patients had a prior diagnosis of epilepsy. Thirty-four (18%) patients had a history of SE. The time to the first benzodiazepine was similar in participants with and without a diagnosis of epilepsy (15 [5-60] vs 16.5 [5-42.75] minutes, p = 0.858). Patients with a diagnosis of epilepsy received their first non-benzodiazepine (BZD) antiepileptic drug (AED) later (93 [46-190] vs 50.5 [28-116] minutes, p = 0.002) and were less likely to receive at least one continuous infusion (35/89 [39.3%] vs 57/100 [57%], p = 0.03). Compared to patients with no history of SE, patients with a history of SE received their first BZD earlier (8 [3.5-22.3] vs 20 [5-60] minutes, p = 0.0073), although they had a similar time to first non-BZD AED (76.5 [45.3-124] vs 65 [32.5-156] minutes, p = 0.749). Differences were mostly driven by the patients with an out-of-hospital rSE onset. Our study establishes that children with rSE do not receive more timely treatment if they have a prior diagnosis of epilepsy; however, a history of SE is associated with more timely administration of abortive medication. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  18. Involvement of nitrergic system in anticonvulsant effect of zolpidem in lithium-pilocarpine induced status epilepticus: Evaluation of iNOS and COX-2 genes expression.

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    Eslami, Seyyed Majid; Ghasemi, Maryam; Bahremand, Taraneh; Momeny, Majid; Gholami, Mahdi; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2017-11-15

    This study aims to investigate the role of zolpidem in lithium-pilocarpine induced status epilepticus (SE) and probable mechanisms involved in seizure threshold alteration. In the present study, lithium chloride (127mg/kg) was administered 20h prior to pilocarpine (60mg/kg) to induce SE in adult male Wistar rats. Different doses of zolpidem (0.1, 1, 2, 5, 10mg/kg) were injected 30min before pilocarpine administration. Furthermore, to find out whether nitric oxide (NO) plays a role in the observed effect, L-arginine and L-NAME were injected 15min before zolpidem. Afterward, we identified the particular NO isoform mediating the effect of zolpidem by injecting aminoguanidine (AG) and 7-Nitroindazole (7-NI) 15min prior to zolpidem. Moreover, in both 6 and 24h after pilocarpine injection, experimental groups underwent hippocampectomy to evaluate cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) genes expression by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR). Pre-treatment with zolpidem significantly prevented the onset of SE in a dose-dependent manner. AG and L-NAME significantly potentiated the anticonvulsant effect of zolpidem while L-arginine inverted this effect. Our qRT-PCR exerted that there was a continuous elevation of iNOS and COX-2 genes expression over 6 and 24h after pilocarpine administration in SE and L-arginine+Zolpidem groups while in AG/L-NAME+Zolpidem and zolpidem groups this upregulation was prevented. Our study indicates that zolpidem prevents the onset of SE through inhibition of iNOS/COX-2 genes upregulation following lithium-pilocarpine administration. Consistent with our results, we suggest that iNOS activation could be probably upstream of COX-2 gene expression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of endurance training on seizure susceptibility, behavioral changes and neuronal damage after kainate-induced status epilepticus in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

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    Tchekalarova, J; Shishmanova, M; Atanasova, D; Stefanova, M; Alova, L; Lazarov, N; Georgieva, K

    2015-11-02

    The therapeutic efficacy of regular physical exercises in an animal model of epilepsy and depression comorbidity has been confirmed previously. In the present study, we examined the effects of endurance training on susceptibility to kainate (KA)-induced status epilepticus (SE), behavioral changes and neuronal damage in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Male SHRs were randomly divided into two groups. One group was exercised on a treadmill with submaximal loading for four weeks and the other group was sedentary. Immediately after the training period, SE was evoked in half of the sedentary and trained rats by KA, while the other half of the two groups received saline. Basal systolic (SP), diastolic (DP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) of all rats were measured at the beginning and at the end of the training period. Anxiety, memory and depression-like behaviour were evaluated a month after SE. The release of 5-HT in the hippocampus was measured using a liquid scintillation method and neuronal damage was analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. SP and MAP of exercised SHRs decreased in comparison with the initial values. The increased resistance of SHRs to KA-induced SE was accompanied by an elongated latent seizure-free period, improved object recognition memory and antidepressant effect after the training program. While the anticonvulsant and positive behavioral effects of endurance training were accompanied by an increase of 5-HT release in the hippocampus, it did not exert neuroprotective activity. Our results indicate that prior exercise is an effective means to attenuate KA-induced seizures and comorbid behavioral changes in a model of hypertension and epilepsy suggesting a potential influence of hippocampal 5-HT on a comorbid depression. However, this beneficial impact does not prevent the development of epilepsy and concomitant brain damage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The effect of metformin treatment on endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress induced by status epilepticus (SE via the PERK-eIF2α-CHOP pathway

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    Jing Chen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Status epilepticus (SE is defined as continuous seizure activity lasting more than 5 minutes. It results in neuronal cell death, mediated by endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress response. Previously, metformin demonstrated neuroprotective effects in primary cortical neurons. In this study, we analyzed the effect of metformin on ER stress via the pro-apoptotic protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK-eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α-C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP pathway. SE was induced in rats by pentylenetetrazole. Following SE, the rats were treated with salubrinal, GSK2656157, or metformin. In a control group (normal saline SE was not induced. CHOP, eIF2α, and PERK expression was determined by Western blot; apoptosis was analyzed by TUNEL assay. CHOP expression was significantly increased at 6 and 24 hours following SE. At both time points, eIF2α and PERK levels were also increased. At 6 hours, CHOP expression was significantly reduced in salubrinal, GSK2656157 and metformin groups versus SE group. eIF2α and PERK levels were decreased in metformin compared to SE group. eIF2α expression was markedly decreased in salubrinal versus SE group, while PERK expression was markedly reduced in GSK2656157 versus SE group. At 6 and 24 hours, the apoptosis rate was significantly increased in SE versus control group, while it was significantly reduced in salubrinal, GSK2656157, and metformin groups compared to SE group. The apoptosis rate also decreased in salubrinal group at 24 hours, although not to the extent observed in metformin group. Overall, CHOP expression and apoptosis induced by SE in rats were reduced with metformin. Further studies are required to evaluate the clinical relevance of metformin for patients with SE.

  1. An update in the initial management of paediatric status epilepticus.

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    Lawton, Ben; Davis, Tessa; Goldstein, Henry; Tagg, Andrew

    2018-06-01

    Over the last 2 years, algorithms for the optimal management of status epilepticus have changed, as the medical community has recognized the need to terminate seizures in status in a timely manner. Recent research has evaluated the different choices of benzodiazepine and has given consideration to second-line treatment options. There has been a move to examine alternatives to phenytoin (such as levetiracetam and lacosamide) as second-line agents. Valproate should be used cautiously in view of the potential side effects. Three ongoing trials [Established Staus Epilepticus Treatment Trial (ESETT), Convulsive Status Epilepticus Paediatric Trial (ConSEPT), and emergency treatment with levetiracetam or phenytoin in status epilepticus in children (EcLiPSE)] are comparing the efficacy of levetiracetam and phenytoin. Benzodiazepines remain the first-line agent of choice, although there is ongoing discussion about the mode of administration and the best drug to choose. The results of ESETT, ConSEPT, and EcLiPSE will affect our future management of status, as we give consideration to levetiracetam as an alternative to phenytoin. Other medications such as lacosamide may emerge in future algorithms too.

  2. Review and update of the Hong Kong Epilepsy Guideline on status epilepticus.

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    Fung, E Lw; Fung, B Bh

    2017-02-01

    Convulsive status epilepticus is the most extreme form of seizure. It is a medical and neurological emergency that requires prompt and appropriate treatment. Treatment of convulsive status epilepticus is usually divided into stages/steps. The International League Against Epilepsy has released a new definition of status epilepticus that may help to unify the definition in future studies. Over the last few years new information has become available regarding its management. The Rapid Anticonvulsant Medication Prior to Arrival Trial demonstrated non-inferiority of intramuscular midazolam in early status epilepticus compared with intravenous lorazepam. Valproate and levetiracetam have also emerged as possible alternatives to phenytoin in established status epilepticus. The potential role of lacosamide in this stage of status epilepticus remains to be defined. The ongoing Established Status Epilepticus Treatment Trial may help to determine the most effective treatment for benzodiazepine-resistant status epilepticus. Management of refractory status epilepticus and super-refractory status epilepticus remains mostly non-evidence-based. Increasing recognition of a possible autoimmune aetiology has led to the use of immune-modulation in super-refractory status epilepticus. Ketamine is also increasingly used in this challenging condition. There are also reports of potential use of a ketogenic diet and magnesium.

  3. Electrographic status epilepticus in children with critical illness: Epidemiology and outcome.

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    Abend, Nicholas S

    2015-08-01

    Electrographic seizures and electrographic status epilepticus are common in children with critical illness with acute encephalopathy, leading to increasing use of continuous EEG monitoring. Many children with electrographic status epilepticus have no associated clinical signs, so EEG monitoring is required for seizure identification. Further, there is increasing evidence that high seizure burdens, often classified as electrographic status epilepticus, are associated with worse outcomes. This review discusses the incidence of electrographic status epilepticus, risk factors for electrographic status epilepticus, and associations between electrographic status epilepticus and outcomes, and it summarizes recent guidelines and consensus statements addressing EEG monitoring in children with critical illness. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Status Epilepticus". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Inhibiting HIF-1α Decreases Expression of TNF-α and Caspase-3 in Specific Brain Regions Exposed Kainic Acid-Induced Status Epilepticus

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    Jixue Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: A recent study demonstrates that pro-inflammatory cytokines (PICs, i.e., IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in specific brain regions of rats play a role in regulating kainic acid (KA-induced status epilepticus (SE via a GABAergic mechanism. The purposes of this report were to examine contributions of hypoxia inducible factor subtype 1α (HIF-1α to expression of PICs in these specific brain regions in epileptic rats. Particularly, we investigated the parietal cortex, hippocampus and amygdala. In addition, we further examined expression of Caspase-3 indicating cell apoptosis in those brain regions of epileptic rats after infusing 2-methoxyestradiol (2-MET, inhibitor of HIF-1α and etanercept (TNF-α receptor antagonist. Methods: ELISA was used to determine the levels of HIF-1α and PICs and western blot analysis was used to examine Caspase-3 expression. Results: Our data show that HIF-1α was significantly increased in the parietal cortex, hippocampus and amygdala 1, 3 and 7 days after induction of SE (Pvs. control rats. Our results also show that inhibiting HIF-1α by central infusion of 2-MET significantly decreased the amplified TNF-α expression in these brain regions evoked by SE (Pvs. vehicle control, but did not modify IL-1β and IL-6. Our results demonstrate that 2-MET and etanercept attenuated an increase in Caspase-3 evoked by SE. Conclusion: Overall, we suggest that HIF-1α activated by SE is likely to contribute to epileptic activity via a TNF-α pathway, which has pharmacological implications to target specific HIF-1α and TNF-α pathways for neuronal dysfunction and vulnerability related to epilepsy.

  5. Super-refractory status epilepticus in West China.

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    Tian, L; Li, Y; Xue, X; Wu, M; Liu, F; Hao, X; Zhou, D

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to determine the general frequency, mortality, and risk factors of super-refractory status epilepticus (SRSE) versus non-refractory status epilepticus (NRSE) and refractory status epilepticus (RSE). This work is a retrospective study. Clinical data of patients who were diagnosed with status epilepticus (SE) in the neurological ward and neuro-intensive care unit of West China Hospital from January 2009 to December 2012 were collected and analyzed. A total of 98 patients were included in the study. The percentages of NRSE, RSE, and SRSE were 67.3%, 20.4%, and 12.2%, respectively. Convulsive SE was the main seizure type among the three groups. The most common cause of NRSE was related to epilepsy (EP). However, 67.7% of SRSE cases were caused by acute encephalitis. Moreover, 47% of SE and 40% of RSE cases had a history of EP, whereas only 8.3% of SRSE cases had such history (P  0.05). The general mortality of SE was 7.1%, whereas that of SRSE was 50%. During follow-up, most SRSE patients who survived have developed symptomatic EP. This study was the first to use the statistical percentage of SRSE. Approximately 12.2% of SE cases will result in SRSE, which is a challenging medical situation for doctors. Patients with first episodes and acute encephalitis were also prone to develop SRSE. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Bupropion Overdose Presenting as Status Epilepticus in an Infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas-Coppola, Marianna S; Patterson, Amy L; Morgan, Robin; Wheless, James W

    2015-09-01

    Bupropion is a monocyclic antidepressant in the aminoketone class, structurally related to amphetamines. The Food and Drug Administration withdrew this product from the market in 1986 after seizures were reported in bulimic patients. It was later reintroduced in 1989 when the incidence of seizures was shown to be dose-related in the immediate release preparation. Massive bupropion ingestion has been associated with status epilepticus and cardiogenic shock in adults. Seizures have been reported in children, but not status epilepticus. This report highlights a patient who presented with status epilepticus and developed cardiopulmonary arrest after bupropion ingestion. False-positive amphetamine diagnosis from urine drug screen on presentation was reported. We review the presentation, clinical course, diagnostic studies, and outcome of this patient. We then review the literature regarding bupropion overdose in children. Symptoms of bupropion toxicity and risk for seizures are dose-dependent and fatalities have been reported. Our patient developed status epilepticus and cardiopulmonary arrest and then progressed to have a hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy and refractory symptomatic partial seizures. Our report highlights the need to keep this medication away from children in order to prevent accidental overdose. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. New experimental therapies for status epilepticus in preclinical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Matthew C; Williams, Robin S B

    2015-08-01

    Starting with the established antiepileptic drug, valproic acid, we have taken a novel approach to develop new antiseizure drugs that may be effective in status epilepticus. We first identified that valproic acid has a potent effect on a biochemical pathway, the phosphoinositide pathway, in Dictyostelium discoideum, and we demonstrated that this may relate to its mechanism of action against seizures in mammalian systems. Through screening in this pathway, we have identified a large array of fatty acids and fatty acid derivatives with antiseizure potential. These were then evaluated in an in vitro mammalian system. One compound that we identified through this process is a major constituent of the ketogenic diet, strongly arguing that it may be the fatty acids that are mediating the antiseizure effect of this diet. We further tested two of the more potent compounds in an in vivo model of status epilepticus and demonstrated that they were more effective than valproic acid in treating the status epilepticus. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Status Epilepticus". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Epilepsy: MRI follow-up in paediatric convulsive status epilepticus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dulac, Olivier; Nabbout, Rima

    2012-01-01

    Convulsive status epilepticus (CSE)-defined as either a single convulsive seizure or a series of seizures without recovery of consciousness lasting for over 30 min - is a common disorder with an annual incidence of 18-20 cases per 100,000 people. CSE is primarily a disorder of infancy, observed in patients up to 4 years of age. (authors)

  9. Partial status epilepticus - rapid genetic diagnosis of Alpers' disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCoy, Bláthnaid

    2011-11-01

    We describe four children with a devastating encephalopathy characterised by refractory focal seizures and variable liver dysfunction. We describe their electroencephalographic, radiologic, genetic and pathologic findings. The correct diagnosis was established by rapid gene sequencing. POLG1 based Alpers\\' disease should be considered in any child presenting with partial status epilepticus.

  10. Propofol in status epilepticus: little evidence, many dangers?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niermeijer, Jikke-Mien F.; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; van Donselaar, Cees A.

    2003-01-01

    Several guidelines recommend the use of propofol for the treatment of refractory status epilepticus. An increased mortality rate in high dose, long-term treatment with propofol in adult patients was published recently. This prompted us to assess the literature on the scientific evidence for the

  11. Epilepsy: MRI follow-up in paediatric convulsive status epilepticus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dulac, Olivier; Nabbout, Rima [Paris Descartes Univ, Necker Enfants Malades Hosp, APHP, CEA, Inserm U1129, Neuropediat Dept, Orsay, (France)

    2012-05-15

    Convulsive status epilepticus (CSE)-defined as either a single convulsive seizure or a series of seizures without recovery of consciousness lasting for over 30 min - is a common disorder with an annual incidence of 18-20 cases per 100,000 people. CSE is primarily a disorder of infancy, observed in patients up to 4 years of age. (authors)

  12. Age dependent mortality in the pilocarpine model of status epilepticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Robert E.; Deshpande, Laxmikant S.; Holbert, William H.; Churn, Severn B.; DeLorenzo, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is an acute neurological emergency associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Age has been shown to be a critical factor in determining outcome after SE. Understanding the causes of this increased mortality with aging by developing an animal model to study this condition would play a major role in studying mechanisms to limit the mortality due to SE. Here we employed pilocarpine to induce SE in rats aged between 5 to 28 weeks. Similar to clinical studies in man, we observed that age was a significant predictor of mortality following SE. While no deaths were observed in 5-week old animals, mortality due to SE increased progressively with age and reached 90% in 28-week old animals. There was no correlation between the age of animals and severity of SE. With increasing age mortality occurred earlier after the onset of SE. These results indicate that pilocarpine-induced SE in the rat provides a useful model to study age-dependent SE-induced mortality and indicates the importance of using animal models to elucidate the mechanisms contributing to SE-induced mortality and the development of novel therapeutic interventions to prevent SE-induced death. PMID:19429042

  13. Thyroid-stimulating hormone elevation misdiagnosed as subclinical hypothyroidism following non-convulsive status epilepticus: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunii Yasuto

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Non-convulsive status epilepticus is a form of epileptic seizure that occurs without convulsions. Recent reviews suggest that the diagnosis of non-convulsive status epilepticus remains difficult. Here, we report the case of a patient with thyroid-stimulating hormone elevation misdiagnosed as subclinical hypothyroidism following non-convulsive status epilepticus. Case presentation Our patient was a 68-year-old Japanese woman. The results of endocrine testing after her first episode of non-convulsive status epilepticus suggested latent subclinical hypothyroidism: she had elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone with normal levels of free tri-iodothyronine and free thyroxine. On examination, a diagnosis of thyroid disorder was not supported by other test results and our patient remained untreated. A follow-up examination revealed that her thyroid-stimulating hormone levels had spontaneously normalized. When she consulted another doctor for confusion, the transient increase in thyroid-stimulating hormone levels following non-convulsive status epilepticus was mistaken for subclinical hypothyroidism, and unfortunately treated with levothyroxine. Our patient then experienced levothyroxine-induced non-convulsive status epilepticus. Conclusions In this report, we suggested possible mechanisms for latent hypothyroid-like hormone abnormality following epileptic seizures and the possibility of provoking epileptic seizures by administering levothyroxine for misdiagnosed subclinical hypothyroidism.

  14. Neurotrophin-3 mRNA a putative target of miR21 following status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risbud, Rashmi M; Lee, Carolyn; Porter, Brenda E

    2011-11-18

    Status epilepticus induces a cascade of protein expression changes contributing to the subsequent development of epilepsy. By identifying the cascade of molecular changes that contribute to the development of epilepsy we hope to be able to design therapeutics for preventing epilepsy. MicroRNAs influence gene expression by altering mRNA stability and/or translation and have been implicated in the pathology of multiple diseases. MiR21 and its co-transcript miR21, microRNAs produced from either the 5' or 3' ends of the same precursor RNA strand, are increased in the hippocampus following status epilepticus. We have identified a miR21 binding site, in the 3' UTR of neurotrophin-3 that inhibits translation. Neurotrophin-3 mRNA levels decrease in the hippocampus following SE concurrent with the increase in miR21. MiR21 levels in cultured hippocampal neurons inversely correlate with neurotrophin-3 mRNA levels. Treatment of hippocampal neuronal cultures with excess K(+)Cl(-), a depolarizing agent mimicking the episode of status epilepticus, also results in an increase in miR21 and a decrease in neurotrophin-3 mRNA. MiR21 is a candidate for regulating neurotrophin-3 signaling in the hippocampus following status epilepticus. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Head turning as a prominent motor symptom in status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Gerhard; Broessner, Gregor; Unterberger, Iris; Walser, Gerald; Pfausler, Bettina; Trinka, Eugen

    2008-06-01

    Head and eye turning is frequently observed during seizures. Versions with tonic and/or clonic symptoms can be differentiated from smooth head deviations. Head turning as a prominent symptom of status epilepticus has not previously been reported. We present eight case reports, (7 women/1 man, mean age 41 years, median 41.5, range 10 to 74), of status epilepticus (SE), with head turning as a prominent motor symptom. Six were accompanied by continuous frontal, occipital and temporal ictal epileptiform discharges. Furthermore, two patients had absence status with rhythmic and clonic head versions. While the localizing significance of head turnings in SE is low, in our cases, the direction was away from the discharging hemisphere in all cases of focal SE regardless of whether the turning was classified as version (three cases) or deviation (three cases). In this small series of SE, the classical observation of a patient looking away from the discharging hemisphere is still valid.

  16. Pilocarpine-Induced Status Epilepticus Increases the Sensitivity of P2X7 and P2Y1 Receptors to Nucleotides at Neural Progenitor Cells of the Juvenile Rodent Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozmer, Katalin; Gao, Po; Araújo, Michelle G L; Khan, Muhammad Tahir; Liu, Juan; Rong, Weifang; Tang, Yong; Franke, Heike; Krügel, Ute; Fernandes, Maria José S; Illes, Peter

    2017-07-01

    Patch-clamp recordings indicated the presence of P2X7 receptors at neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in hippocampal brain slices prepared from transgenic nestin reporter mice. The activation of these receptors caused inward current near the resting membrane potential of the NPCs, while P2Y1 receptor activation initiated outward current near the reversal potential of the P2X7 receptor current. Both receptors were identified by biophysical/pharmacological methods. When the brain slices were prepared from mice which underwent a pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus or when brain slices were incubated in pilocarpine-containing external medium, the sensitivity of P2X7 and P2Y1 receptors was invariably increased. Confocal microscopy confirmed the localization of P2X7 and P2Y1 receptor-immunopositivity at nestin-positive NPCs. A one-time status epilepticus in rats caused after a latency of about 5 days recurrent epileptic fits. The blockade of central P2X7 receptors increased the number of seizures and their severity. It is hypothesized that P2Y1 receptors after a status epilepticus may increase the ATP-induced proliferation/ectopic migration of NPCs; the P2X7 receptor-mediated necrosis/apoptosis might counteract these effects, which would otherwise lead to a chronic manifestation of recurrent epileptic fits. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Human Immunodeficiency Viral Infection and Status Epilepticus in United States (2002-2009).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Saqib A; Afzal, Mohammad Rauf; Rodriguez, Gustavo J; Majidi, Shahram; Bundlie, Scott; Hassan, Ameer E; Suri, M Fareed K; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2015-07-01

    To determine the association between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and status epilepticus and compare the outcomes of patients with status epilepticus with or without underlying HIV infection. Patients with primary diagnosis of status epilepticus (cases) and status asthmaticus (controls) were identified from the 2002-2009 Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) which is representative of all admissions in the United States. We performed logistic regression analysis adjusting for age, gender, co-morbid conditions, including hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), renal failure, alcohol use, and opportunistic infections. We compared the in hospital outcomes among patients admitted with status epilepticus in strata defined by underlying HIV infection. The rate of concurrent status epilepticus and HIV has increased over the last 7 years in hospitalized patients with status epilepticus in United States (0.14%-0.27% pstatus epilepticus (odds ratio [OR]: 2.2; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.8-2.6; pstatus epilepticus patients with underlying HIV infection (17.5% vs. 9.9%, pstatus epilepticus. The proportion of patients admitted with concurrent status epilepticus and HIV infections is increasing and such patients have higher rates of poor discharge outcomes.

  18. A Study of Super Refractory Status Epilepticus from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Usha K; Kalita, Jayantee; Dubey, Deepanshu

    2017-01-01

    Super refractory status epilepticus (SRSE) is an important and recently recognized neurological emergency. In view of paucity of studies on SRSE, we report the frequency, etiology and outcome of SRSE. In a hospital-based observational study during 2013 to 2016, consecutive patients with SRSE [persistence of status epilepticus (SE) for 24 h or more, or recurrence of SE on weaning of intravenous anesthetic] were included. The demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were obtained and the severity of SE was defined using Status Epilepticus Severity Score (STESS). The outcome was defined as control of SE, hospital death, and functional status at the time of discharge. Fourteen (13%) patients developed SRSE. Their median age was 27.5 (2-70) years and four were below 18 years of age. The etiology of SRSE was metabolic encephalopathy and encephalitis in five patients each, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in one and miscellaneous disorders in three patients. Six (43%) patients died. The patients with SRSE had higher admission STESS ( p  = 0.04), and longer intensive care unit ( p  < 0.01) and hospital ( p  = 0.004) stay compared to non-SRSE group. The patients with treatable etiology had better outcome. SRSE occurred in 13% patients with SE and 43% of them died. The SRSE patients with treatable etiology had a better outcome.

  19. Infraslow status epilepticus: A new form of subclinical status epilepticus recorded in a child with Sturge-Weber syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello-Espinosa, Luis E

    2015-08-01

    Analysis of infraslow EEG activity (ISA) has shown potential in the evaluation of patients with epilepsy and in the differentiation between focal and generalized epilepsies. Infraslow EEG activity analysis may also provide insights into the pathophysiology of refractory clinical and subclinical status epilepticus. The purpose of this report is to describe a girl with Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) who presented with a 96-h refractory encephalopathy and nonischemic hemiparesis and who was identified to have infraslow status epilepticus (ISSE), which successfully resolved after midazolam administration. The continuous EEG recording of a 5-year-old girl with known structural epilepsy due to Sturge-Weber syndrome is presented. The patient presented to the ED with acute confusion, eye deviation, and right hemiparesis similar to two previous admissions. Despite administration of lorazepam, fosphenytoin, phenobarbital, and valproic loads, the patient showed no improvement in the clinical condition after 48 h. The continuous video-EEG monitoring (VEM) showed continuous severe diffuse nonrhythmic asymmetric slowing but no apparent ictal activity on continuous conventional EEG recording settings. As brain CT, CTA, CTV, and complete MRI scans including DWI obtained within 72 h of presentation failed to demonstrate any ischemic changes, analysis of the EEG infraslow (ISA) activity was undertaken using LFF: 0.01 Hz and HFF: of 0.1 Hz, respectively. Continuous subclinical unilateral rhythmic ictal ISA was identified. This was only evident on the left hemisphere which correlated with the structural changes due to SWS. A trial of continuous 120 to 240 μg/kg/h of IV midazolam resulted in immediate resolution of the contralateral hemiparesis and encephalopathy. Continuous prolonged rhythmic ictal infraslow activity (ISA) can cause super-refractory subclinical focal status epilepticus. This has not been previously reported, and we propose that this be called infraslow status

  20. Supra-recommendation Treatment of Super-refractory Status Epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Devashish Dhiren; Dash, Gopal Krishna

    2016-06-01

    A 28-year old female was admitted with recurrent seizures following 2 days of febrile illness, after which she developed status epilepticus. Midazolam and later thiopentone infusions were started after failure of regular intravenous antiepileptics. Burst suppression was achieved at doses of 3 mg/kg/hr for midazolam and 6 mg/kg/hr of thiopentone. Adjunctive medications included methylprednisolone, intravenous immunoglobulin and acyclovir. Imaging and biochemical parameters were normal. She required 3 cycles of midazolam and 2 cycles of thiopentone for complete cessation of seizures. She recovered with mild attentional and recent memory deficits on follow up. Treatment of super-refractory status epilepticus requires individualized regimens and may need doses beyond conventional limits. To the best of our knowledge, there is no such reported case from India.

  1. Treatment of Generalized Convulsive Status Epilepticus in Pediatric Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Elizabeth L.; Wheless, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Generalized convulsive status epilepticus (GCSE) is one of the most common neurologic emergencies and can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality if not treated promptly and aggressively. Management of GCSE is staged and generally involves the use of life support measures, identification and management of underlying causes, and rapid initiation of anticonvulsants. The purpose of this article is to review and evaluate published reports regarding the treatment of impending, established, refractory, and super-refractory GCSE in pediatric patients. PMID:26380568

  2. New-Onset Refractory Status Epilepticus: More Investigations, More Questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Dillien

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A 27-year-old previously healthy woman was admitted to the hospital with recurrent seizures. Status epilepticus developed that became refractory to third-line therapy with propofol and barbiturates. The patient had a very extensive diagnostic workup including autoimmune, viral and genetic investigations. A tentative immune therapy was proposed with high doses of steroids and plasma exchanges. Our patient had an inherited heterozygous single nucleotide variant in the sequence c.1280A>G [p.Lys427Arg] of the SMC3 gene that was insufficient to explain the seizures. Surprisingly, IgM antibodies against Japanese encephalitis virus were positive on the serum drawn 11 days after symptom onset, as detected by ELISA and the immunofluorescence antibody (IFA technique. IgG antibodies were also positive using the IFA technique, but not with ELISA. The same investigations as well as the detection of the viral genome by the q-RT-PCR technique were negative on cerebrospinal fluid. Despite the suspicion of a viral infection, we concluded that our patient had a new-onset refractory status epilepticus of cryptogenic origin. Termination of the status epilepticus was obtained after 47 days, with a possible benefit from the introduction of ketamine.

  3. Adult Status Epilepticus: A Review of the Prehospital and Emergency Department Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billington, Michael; Kandalaft, Osama R.; Aisiku, Imoigele P.

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are a common presentation in the prehospital and emergency department setting and status epilepticus represents an emergency neurologic condition. The classification and various types of seizures are numerous. The objectives of this narrative literature review focuses on adult patients with a presentation of status epilepticus in the prehospital and emergency department setting. In summary, benzodiazepines remain the primary first line therapeutic agent in the management of status epilepticus, however, there are new agents that may be appropriate for the management of status epilepticus as second- and third-line pharmacological agents. PMID:27563928

  4. Local cerebral glucose utilization during status epilepticus in newborn primates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujikawa, D.G.; Dwyer, B.E.; Lake, R.R.; Wasterlain, C.G.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of bicuculline-induced status epilepticus (SE) on local cerebral metabolic rates for glucose (LCMRglc) was studied in 2-wk-old ketamine-anesthetized marmoset monkeys, using the 2-[ 14 C]-deoxy-D-glucose autoradiographical technique. To estimate LCMRglc in cerebral cortex and thalamus during SE, the lumped constant (LC) for 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) and the rate constants for 2-DG and glucose were calculated for these regions. The control LC was 0.43 in frontoparietal cortex, 0.51 in temporal cortex, and 0.50 in thalamus; it increased to 1.07 in frontoparietal cortex, 1.13 in temporal cortex, and 1.25 in thalamus after 30 min of seizures. With control LC values, LCMRglc in frontoparietal cortex, temporal cortex, and dorsomedial thalamus appeared to increase four to sixfold. With seizure LC values, LCMRglc increased 1.5- to 2-fold and only in cortex. During 45-min seizures, LCMRglc in cortex and thalamus probably increases 4- to 6-fold initially and later falls to the 1.5- to 2-fold level as tissue glucose concentrations decrease. Together with our previous results demonstrating depletion of high-energy phosphates and glucose in these regions, the data suggest that energy demands exceed glucose supply. The long-term effects of these metabolic changes on the developing brain remain to be determined

  5. Status epilepticus in immature rats is associated with oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction

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    Jaroslava eFolbergrová

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a neurologic disorder, particularly frequent in infants and children where it can lead to serious consequences later in life. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurological disorders including epilepsy in adults. However, their role in immature epileptic brain is unclear since there have been two contrary opinions: oxidative stress is age-dependent and does not occur in immature brain during status epilepticus and, on the other hand, evidence of oxidative stress in immature brain during a specific model of status epilepticus. To solve this dilemma, we have decided to investigate oxidative stress following status epilepticus induced in immature 12-day-old rats by three substances with a different mechanism of action, namely 4-aminopyridine, LiCl-pilocarpine or kainic acid. FluoroJade-B staining revealed mild brain damage especially in hippocampus and thalamus in each of the tested models. Decrease of glucose and glycogen with parallel rises of lactate clearly indicate high rate of glycolysis, which was apparently not sufficient in 4-AP and Li-Pilo status, as evident from the decreases of PCr levels. Hydroethidium method revealed significantly higher levels of superoxide anion (by ~60 % in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex and thalamus of immature rats during status. Status epilepticus lead to mitochondrial dysfunction with a specific pronounced decrease of complex I activity that persisted for a long period of survival. Complex II and IV activities remained in the control range. Antioxidant treatment with SOD mimetic MnTMPYP or peroxynitrite scavenger FeTPPS significantly attenuated oxidative stress and inhibition of complex I activity. These findings bring evidence that oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are age and model independent, and may thus be considered a general phenomenon. They can have a clinical relevance for a novel approach to the treatment of epilepsy

  6. Minocycline fails to exert antiepileptogenic effects in a rat status epilepticus model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russmann, Vera; Goc, Joanna; Boes, Katharina; Ongerth, Tanja; Salvamoser, Josephine D; Siegl, Claudia; Potschka, Heidrun

    2016-01-15

    The tetracycline antibiotic minocycline can exert strong anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antiapoptotic effects. There is cumulating evidence that epileptogenic brain insults trigger neuroinflammation and anti-inflammatory concepts can modulate the process of epileptogenesis. Based on the mechanisms of action discussed for minocycline, the compound is of interest for intervention studies as it can prevent the polarization of microglia into a pro-inflammatory state. Here, we assessed the efficacy of sub-chronic minocycline administration initiated immediately following an electrically-induced status epilepticus in rats. The treatment did not affect the development of spontaneous seizures. However, minocycline attenuated behavioral long-term consequences of status epilepticus with a reduction in hyperactivity and hyperlocomotion. Furthermore, the compound limited the spatial learning deficits observed in the post-status epilepticus model. The typical status epilepticus-induced neuronal cell loss was evident in the hippocampus and the piriform cortex. Minocycline exposure selectively protected neurons in the piriform cortex and the hilus, but not in the hippocampal pyramidal layer. In conclusion, the data argue against an antiepileptogenic effect of minocycline in adult rats. However, the findings suggest a disease-modifying impact of the tetracycline affecting the development of behavioral co-morbidities, as well as long-term consequences on spatial learning. In addition, minocycline administration resulted in a selective neuroprotective effect. Although strong anti-inflammatory effects have been proposed for minocycline, we could not verify these effects in our experimental model. Considering the multitude of mechanisms claimed to contribute to minocycline's effects, it is of interest to further explore the exact mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects in future studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Veiligheid en farmacokinetiek van levetiracetam intraveneus add-on bij status epilepticus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uges, Joris; Van Huizen, Marc; Engelsman, Jeroen; Wilms, Erik; Touw, Daan; Peeters, Els; Vecht, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate safety of intravenous levetiracetam added to the standard therapeutic regimen in adults with status epilepticus. and to assess a population pharmacokinetic model for intravenous levetiracetam in patients with status epilepticus. Design: Prospective, single-centre, single-arm,

  8. Study of refractory status epilepticus from a tertiary care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahil Kohli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the proportion of refractory status epilepticus (RSE and super-RSE (SRSE among patients with status epilepticus (SE and to analyze RSE and non-RSE (NRSE in terms of etiology and predictors for RSE. Materials and Methods: Patients were identified from discharge summaries database with keywords of SE and records of the portable electroencephalogram (EEG machine from January 2011 to March 2016. Results: Two hundred and eighteen events were included in the study with 114 (52.3% males, bimodal age preponderance age <5 years 30%, and second peak in age 15–65 years 52.8%, preexisting seizures were present in 34.4% (n = 75. Nearly 77.1% had NRSE (n = 168 and 22.9% had RSE (n = 50. This included 17 patients with SRSE (n = 17, 7.8% of all SE. Central nervous system (CNS infection was a single largest etiological group in SE (69/218, 31.7%. In RSE, autoimmune encephalitis (17/50 and CNS infection (13/50 were the largest groups. De novo seizures (P = 0.007, low sensorium at admission (P = 0.001, low albumin at admission (P = 0.002, and first EEG being abnormal (P = 0.001 were risk factors on bivariate analysis. An unfavorable status epilepticus severity score (STESS was predictive for RSE (P = 0.001. On multivariate analysis, de novo seizures (P = 0.009 and abnormal EEG at admission (P = 0.03 were predictive for RSE. Conclusions: Fifty patients had RSE (22.9%, of which 17 went on to become SRSE (7.8%. Unfavorable STESS score was predictive for RSE on bivariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, de novo seizures and abnormal initial EEG were predictors of RSE.

  9. Status epilepticus: Aetiology and D outcome in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, T.S.; Rehman, A.U.; Wazeer, M.S.

    2008-01-01

    Convulsing Status Epilepticus (CSE) is a common paediatric emergency especially under 24 months age group. Present study was done to know causes of Status Epilepticus (SE) and outcome during admission and at the time of discharge. A descriptive study in children 2 months to 15 years of age, admitted in Department of Paediatrics, Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad with first status epilepticus, was done to evaluate aetiology, complications and immediate outcome after relevant history, examination, laboratory tests. All information was recorded on Performa designed especially for this purpose. Study was conducted over 2 year period from November 2005 to November 2007. Total number of children admitted with SE was 125. Majority of SE episodes were related to acute febrile illnesses. Acute viral encephalitis was the common cause of SE especially in children younger than 24 months followed by febrile convulsions. Fifteen (12%) patients expired while neurological complications secondary to brain injury developed in 10(8%) cases. Mean seizure duration was 4.92+-9.18 hours in children with normal outcome, 5.93+-5.76 hours in children who died, and 12.85+-12.91 hours in children with abnormal neurological outcome at discharge (p>0.05). Correlation between age and duration of seizure was not significant (p>0.05). SE is a common paediatric emergency associated with high mortality and morbidity. In young children SE is commonly associated with acute viral encephalitis. Antiviral treatment should be started earlier in this group of young children after history, examination, laboratory tests along with appropriate management of SE. (author)

  10. Status epilepticus: Aetiology and D outcome in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiqui, T S; Rehman, A U [Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Paediatrics; Wazeer, M S [Saidu Group of Hospital, Swat (Pakistan). Dept. of Community Medicine

    2008-07-15

    Convulsing Status Epilepticus (CSE) is a common paediatric emergency especially under 24 months age group. Present study was done to know causes of Status Epilepticus (SE) and outcome during admission and at the time of discharge. A descriptive study in children 2 months to 15 years of age, admitted in Department of Paediatrics, Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad with first status epilepticus, was done to evaluate aetiology, complications and immediate outcome after relevant history, examination, laboratory tests. All information was recorded on Performa designed especially for this purpose. Study was conducted over 2 year period from November 2005 to November 2007. Total number of children admitted with SE was 125. Majority of SE episodes were related to acute febrile illnesses. Acute viral encephalitis was the common cause of SE especially in children younger than 24 months followed by febrile convulsions. Fifteen (12%) patients expired while neurological complications secondary to brain injury developed in 10(8%) cases. Mean seizure duration was 4.92+-9.18 hours in children with normal outcome, 5.93+-5.76 hours in children who died, and 12.85+-12.91 hours in children with abnormal neurological outcome at discharge (p>0.05). Correlation between age and duration of seizure was not significant (p>0.05). SE is a common paediatric emergency associated with high mortality and morbidity. In young children SE is commonly associated with acute viral encephalitis. Antiviral treatment should be started earlier in this group of young children after history, examination, laboratory tests along with appropriate management of SE. (author)

  11. Predictors of Outcome of Convulsive Status Epilepticus Among an Egyptian Pediatric Tertiary Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halawa, Eman F; Draz, Iman; Ahmed, Dalia; Shaheen, Hala A

    2015-11-01

    Convulsive status epilepticus is a common neurologic emergency in pediatrics. We aimed to study the etiology, clinical features, and prognostic factors among pediatric patients with convulsive status epilepticus. Seventy patients were included in this cohort study from pediatric emergency department of the specialized Children Hospital of Cairo University. The outcome was evaluated using the Glasgow Outcome Score. Acute symptomatic etiology was the most common cause of convulsive status epilepticus. Refractory convulsive status epilepticus was observed more significantly in cases caused by acute symptomatic etiologies. The outcome was mortality in 26 (37.1%) patients, severe disability in 15 (21.4%), moderate disability in 17 (24.3%), and good recovery in 12 (17.1%) patients. The significant predictor of mortality was lower modified Glasgow Coma Scale score on admission, whereas lower modified Glasgow Coma Scale score on admission and refractory convulsive status epilepticus were the significant predictors for disability and mortality. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Electrographic Status Epilepticus in Slow-Wave Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carosella, Christopher M; Greiner, Hansel M; Byars, Anna W; Arthur, Todd M; Leach, James L; Turner, Michele; Holland, Katherine D; Mangano, Francesco T; Arya, Ravindra

    2016-07-01

    Electrographic status epilepticus in slow sleep or continuous spike and waves during slow-wave sleep is an epileptic encephalopathy characterized by seizures, neurocognitive regression, and significant activation of epileptiform discharges during nonrapid eye movement sleep. There is no consensus on the diagnostic criteria and evidence-based optimal treatment algorithm for children with electrographic status epilepticus in slow sleep. We describe a 12-year-old girl with drug-resistant electrographic status epilepticus in slow wave sleep that was successfully treated with vagus nerve stimulation. Her clinical presentation, presurgical evaluation, decision-making, and course after vagus nerve stimulator implantation are described in detail. After vagus nerve stimulator implantation, the girl remained seizure free for more than a year, resolved the electrographic status epilepticus in slow sleep pattern on electroencephalography, and exhibited significant cognitive improvement. Vagus nerve stimulation may be considered for electrographic status epilepticus in slow sleep. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Human Immunodeficiency Viral Infection and Status Epilepticus in United States (2002–2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Saqib A.; Afzal, Mohammad Rauf; Rodriguez, Gustavo J.; Majidi, Shahram; Bundlie, Scott; Hassan, Ameer E.; Suri, M. Fareed K.; Qureshi, Adnan I.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the association between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and status epilepticus and compare the outcomes of patients with status epilepticus with or without underlying HIV infection. Methods Patients with primary diagnosis of status epilepticus (cases) and status asthmaticus (controls) were identified from the 2002–2009 Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) which is representative of all admissions in the United States. We performed logistic regression analysis adjusting for age, gender, co-morbid conditions, including hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), renal failure, alcohol use, and opportunistic infections. We compared the in hospital outcomes among patients admitted with status epilepticus in strata defined by underlying HIV infection. Results The rate of concurrent status epilepticus and HIV has increased over the last 7 years in hospitalized patients with status epilepticus in United States (0.14%–0.27% p<0.0001). The HIV infection was significantly associated with status epilepticus (odds ratio [OR]: 2.2; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.8–2.6; p<0.0001)) after adjusting for age, gender, opportunistic infections, and cardiovascular risk factors. The in-hospital mortality was significantly higher while discharge with none or minimal disability was significantly lower in status epilepticus patients with underlying HIV infection (17.5% vs. 9.9%, p<0.0001) and (50.4% vs. 63.3%, p<0.0001), respectively. Conclusions Our study suggests that there is a direct association between HIV infection and status epilepticus. The proportion of patients admitted with concurrent status epilepticus and HIV infections is increasing and such patients have higher rates of poor discharge outcomes. PMID:26301033

  14. Status epilepticus: Role for etiology in determining response to benzodiazepines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Suchitra; Rajasekaran, Karthik; Hawk, Kyle M; Chester, Stephen J; Goodkin, Howard P

    2018-04-01

    Clinical factors contributing to benzodiazepine failure in treating status epilepticus (SE) include suboptimal dosing and seizure duration. As many benzodiazepine-refractory episodes of SE arise from acute etiologies, we sought to determine whether etiology impacts SE treatment. The potency of diazepam to terminate SE induced by lithium-pilocarpine (LiPilo-SE) or kainic acid (KA-SE) in 3-week-old rats was studied by video-electroencephalography. Synaptic γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAR)-mediated currents were recorded from dentate granule cells using voltage-clamp electrophysiology. Surface expression of γ2 subunit-containing GABARs and Kv4.2 potassium channels in hippocampal slices was determined using a biotinylation assay. Expression of phosphorylated forms of β2/3 and γ2 subunits was determined using phosphospecific antibodies and Western blotting. Diazepam failed to terminate late SE in LiPilo-SE animals but was successful in terminating KA-SE of 1- and 3-hour duration. One hour after SE onset, GABAR-mediated synaptic inhibition and γ2 subunit-containing GABAR surface expression were reduced in LiPilo-SE animals. These were unchanged in KA-SE animals at 1 and 3 hours. Phosphorylation of γ2 subunit residue S327 was unchanged in both models, although GABAR β3 subunit S408/409 residues were dephosphorylated in the LiPilo-SE animals. Kv4.2 potassium channel surface expression was increased in LiPilo-SE animals but reduced in KA-SE animals. SE-model-dependent differences support a novel hypothesis that the development of benzodiazepine pharmacoresistance may be etiologically predetermined. Further studies are required to investigate the mechanisms that underlie such etiological differences during SE and whether etiology-dependent protocols for the treatment of SE need to be developed. Ann Neurol 2018;83:830-841. © 2018 American Neurological Association.

  15. Celiac crisis presenting with status epilepticus and encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijaz, Nadia M; Bracken, Julia M; Chandratre, Sonal R

    2014-12-01

    Celiac crisis is a life-threatening presentation of celiac disease which is described in the context of classic gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms of diarrhea, leading to dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. Neurologic manifestations are atypical symptoms of celiac crisis. To the best of our knowledge, there is no published report on seizure or encephalopathy as the presenting manifestation of celiac crisis. We describe a 2-year-old boy presenting with acute status epilepticus and lethargy. Prior to presentation, he had mild abdominal distention and intermittent diarrhea. Laboratory analysis revealed hyponatremia, anemia, hypocalcemia, transaminitis, and hyperglycemia. Electroencephalography revealed severe diffuse encephalopathy, and complete infectious work-up was negative. Initial brain magnetic resonance imaging was normal; however, repeat imaging showed osmotic demyelination syndrome. Given the history of GI symptoms and hyperglycemia, celiac serology was obtained revealing elevated tissue transglutaminase, and a diagnosis was confirmed by Marsh 3c lesions in the duodenum. He significantly improved with steroid therapy in addition to adequate nutrition, fluids, and initiation of a gluten-free diet. We report herein on the first case of celiac crisis presenting with status epilepticus and encephalopathy in the absence of profound GI symptoms. Our case suggests that celiac crisis should be considered in the differential of seizures and encephalopathy in children.

  16. VGKC antibodies in pediatric encephalitis presenting with status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, J; Brenner, T; Gill, D; Brilot, F; Antony, J; Vincent, A; Lang, B; Dale, R C

    2011-04-05

    Voltage-gated potassium channel antibodies (VGKC Ab) are associated with limbic encephalitis and neuromyotonia in adults. There have been no systematic investigations in children to date. We looked for antibodies that are associated with CNS syndromes in adults including antibodies to VGKCs, NMDARs, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), and glycine receptor (GlyR) in the stored acute serum from 10 children with unexplained encephalitis presenting with encephalopathy and status epilepticus. We also looked for antibodies to leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (Lgi1) and contactin-associated protein-like 2 (Caspr2), which are now known to be tightly complexed with VGKCs in vivo. Sixty-nine pediatric controls were used for comparison. An elevated VGKC Ab (>100 pM) was detected in 4/10 patients with encephalitis compared to only 1/69 controls (p VGKC Ab-positive patients with encephalitis was variable including good recovery (n = 1), cognitive impairment (n = 3), temporal lobe epilepsy (n = 2), and mesial temporal sclerosis (n = 1). No other antibodies were detected, including those to Lgi1 and Caspr2. Encephalitis associated with VGKC Ab occurs in children and presents with status epilepticus and focal epilepsy. These antibodies are not directed against Lgi1 or Caspr2.

  17. Current Diagnosis, Treatment and Etiology of Status Epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çetin Kürşad Akpınar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Status Epilepticus (SE is a medical emergency that causes significant morbidity and mortality and requires prompt diagnosis and treatment. Although SE can be divided into two subgroups as convulsive and nonconvulsive, treatment principles are generally similar. Treatment should be prompt and underlying cause should be corrected. Although intravenous lorazepam is the first-line treatment due to a lower risk of relapse, diazepam becomes the first choice since loeazepan is not available in our country. Even though intravenous benzodiazepine stops seizures, intravenous antiepileptic drug (phenytoin, etc. should be administered at a loading dose. Patients with refractory status epilepticus should be supported with respect to vital, respiratory, metabolic and hemodynamic aspects and followed up in an intensive care unit to monitor cerebral electrical activity. The most common cause in the etiology is the cessation of antiepileptic drugs. The aim of SE treatment is to stop seizures and prevent complications and recurrence. In this paper, current diagnosis, treatment and etiology of SE are reviewed.

  18. Syndrome of Electrical Status Epilepticus During Sleep: Epileptic Encephalopathy Related to Brain Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Qiao; Zhang, Wei-Na; Hu, Lin-Yan; Liu, Meng-Jia; Zou, Li-Ping

    2016-03-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy with electrical status epilepticus during sleep is an age-related and self-limited disorder. The present study analyzed the etiology, demographics, and pathogenesis of patients with electrical status epilepticus during sleep to provide information on the diagnosis and therapy of this syndrome. The etiologies of epileptic encephalopathy with electrical status epilepticus during sleep in patients admitted in Chinese People's Liberation Army General Hospital from 2009 to 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were classified into the genetic, structural-metabolic, and unknown groups according to the etiology. Demographics and clinical characteristics of all the patients were then analyzed and compared among groups. The etiologies of epileptic encephalopathy with electrical status epilepticus during sleep in 75 patients mainly included benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes, Landau-Kleffner syndrome, polymicrogyria, and migration disorders. Age at onset of epilepsy did not show a specific pattern, but age at onset of epileptic encephalopathy with electrical status epilepticus during sleep was concentrated at age 6-9 years. The mean age at onset of epilepsy in the genetic group was significantly older than that in the structural-metabolic group (P status epilepticus during sleep did not significantly differ between the two groups. Electrical status epilepticus during sleep is an epileptic encephalopathy related to brain development and presents an age-dependent occurrence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. New-Onset Status Epilepticus in Pediatric Patients: Causes, Characteristics, and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarpour, Saba; Hodgeman, Ryan M; De Marchi Capeletto, Carolina; de Lima, Mateus Torres Avelar; Kapur, Kush; Tasker, Robert C; Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2018-03-01

    Many pediatric patients presenting with status epilepticus have no history of seizures. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical characteristics of patients aged one month to 21 years who presented during six consecutive years with convulsive status epilepticus and without a history of seizures. New-onset refractory status epilepticus was defined as status epilepticus refractory to two lines of treatment, without an identified cause in the first 48 hours. Of 460 patients with status epilepticus, 79 (17.2%) presented with new-onset status epilepticus, including four (0.9%) with new-onset refractory status epilepticus. Of those patients, 54.4% were female, and the median age was 3.5 years (IQR: 1.08 to 6.75). The median seizure duration was 20 minutes (IQR: 10 to 40 minutes). Etiology was unknown in 36.7%, symptomatic in 30.3%, provoked in 16.5%, and provoked with an existing symptomatic etiology in 16.5%. Patients were followed for a median duration of 63 months (IQR: 21 to 97). The mortality rate was 3.8%. Of 55 patients who were developmentally normal at baseline, 29.1% had a significant cognitive impairment at the last follow-up, and 20% had academic difficulties or behavioral problems. Patients with symptomatic etiology had greater odds of having cognitive and behavioral problems compared with patients with unknown etiology (odds ratio = 3.83, P = 0.012). Patients with new-onset status epilepticus are at risk for recurrent seizures, recurrent status epilepticus, death, and subsequent cognitive-behavioral impairment. Specific monitoring and care interventions might be required in this high-risk population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. (R-[11C]Verapamil PET studies to assess changes in P-glycoprotein expression and functionality in rat blood-brain barrier after exposure to kainate-induced status epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lammertsma Adriaan A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased functionality of efflux transporters at the blood-brain barrier may contribute to decreased drug concentrations at the target site in CNS diseases like epilepsy. In the rat, pharmacoresistant epilepsy can be mimicked by inducing status epilepticus by intraperitoneal injection of kainate, which leads to development of spontaneous seizures after 3 weeks to 3 months. The aim of this study was to investigate potential changes in P-glycoprotein (P-gp expression and functionality at an early stage after induction of status epilepticus by kainate. Methods (R-[11C]verapamil, which is currently the most frequently used positron emission tomography (PET ligand for determining P-gp functionality at the blood-brain barrier, was used in kainate and saline (control treated rats, at 7 days after treatment. To investigate the effect of P-gp on (R-[11C]verapamil brain distribution, both groups were studied without or with co-administration of the P-gp inhibitor tariquidar. P-gp expression was determined using immunohistochemistry in post mortem brains. (R-[11C]verapamil kinetics were analyzed with approaches common in PET research (Logan analysis, and compartmental modelling of individual profiles as well as by population mixed effects modelling (NONMEM. Results All data analysis approaches indicated only modest differences in brain distribution of (R-[11C]verapamil between saline and kainate treated rats, while tariquidar treatment in both groups resulted in a more than 10-fold increase. NONMEM provided most precise parameter estimates. P-gp expression was found to be similar for kainate and saline treated rats. Conclusions P-gp expression and functionality does not seem to change at early stage after induction of anticipated pharmacoresistant epilepsy by kainate.

  1. (R)-[{sup 11}C]Verapamil PET studies to assess changes in P-glycoprotein expression and functionality in rat blood-brain barrier after exposure to kainate-induced status epilepticus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syvänen, Stina [Division of Pharmacology, LACDR, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Luurtsema, Gert [Department of Nuclear Medicine & Molecular Imaging, Groningen University Medical Center, P.O. Box 30.001 9700 RB Groningen (Netherlands); Molthoff, Carla FM; Windhorst, Albert D; Huisman, Marc C; Lammertsma, Adriaan A [Department of Nuclear Medicine & PET Research, VU University Medical Center, P.O. Box 7057, 1007 MB, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Voskuyl, Rob A [Division of Pharmacology, LACDR, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Epilepsy Institute of The Netherlands Foundation (SEIN), P.O. Box 21, 2100 AA, Heemstede (Netherlands); Lange, Elizabeth C de [Division of Pharmacology, LACDR, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2011-01-03

    Increased functionality of efflux transporters at the blood-brain barrier may contribute to decreased drug concentrations at the target site in CNS diseases like epilepsy. In the rat, pharmacoresistant epilepsy can be mimicked by inducing status epilepticus by intraperitoneal injection of kainate, which leads to development of spontaneous seizures after 3 weeks to 3 months. The aim of this study was to investigate potential changes in P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression and functionality at an early stage after induction of status epilepticus by kainate. (R)-[{sup 11}C]verapamil, which is currently the most frequently used positron emission tomography (PET) ligand for determining P-gp functionality at the blood-brain barrier, was used in kainate and saline (control) treated rats, at 7 days after treatment. To investigate the effect of P-gp on (R)-[{sup 11}C]verapamil brain distribution, both groups were studied without or with co-administration of the P-gp inhibitor tariquidar. P-gp expression was determined using immunohistochemistry in post mortem brains. (R)-[{sup 11}C]verapamil kinetics were analyzed with approaches common in PET research (Logan analysis, and compartmental modelling of individual profiles) as well as by population mixed effects modelling (NONMEM). All data analysis approaches indicated only modest differences in brain distribution of (R)-[{sup 11}C]verapamil between saline and kainate treated rats, while tariquidar treatment in both groups resulted in a more than 10-fold increase. NONMEM provided most precise parameter estimates. P-gp expression was found to be similar for kainate and saline treated rats. P-gp expression and functionality does not seem to change at early stage after induction of anticipated pharmacoresistant epilepsy by kainate.

  2. (R)-[11C]Verapamil PET studies to assess changes in P-glycoprotein expression and functionality in rat blood-brain barrier after exposure to kainate-induced status epilepticus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syvänen, Stina; Luurtsema, Gert; Molthoff, Carla FM; Windhorst, Albert D; Huisman, Marc C; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Voskuyl, Rob A; Lange, Elizabeth C de

    2011-01-01

    Increased functionality of efflux transporters at the blood-brain barrier may contribute to decreased drug concentrations at the target site in CNS diseases like epilepsy. In the rat, pharmacoresistant epilepsy can be mimicked by inducing status epilepticus by intraperitoneal injection of kainate, which leads to development of spontaneous seizures after 3 weeks to 3 months. The aim of this study was to investigate potential changes in P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression and functionality at an early stage after induction of status epilepticus by kainate. (R)-[ 11 C]verapamil, which is currently the most frequently used positron emission tomography (PET) ligand for determining P-gp functionality at the blood-brain barrier, was used in kainate and saline (control) treated rats, at 7 days after treatment. To investigate the effect of P-gp on (R)-[ 11 C]verapamil brain distribution, both groups were studied without or with co-administration of the P-gp inhibitor tariquidar. P-gp expression was determined using immunohistochemistry in post mortem brains. (R)-[ 11 C]verapamil kinetics were analyzed with approaches common in PET research (Logan analysis, and compartmental modelling of individual profiles) as well as by population mixed effects modelling (NONMEM). All data analysis approaches indicated only modest differences in brain distribution of (R)-[ 11 C]verapamil between saline and kainate treated rats, while tariquidar treatment in both groups resulted in a more than 10-fold increase. NONMEM provided most precise parameter estimates. P-gp expression was found to be similar for kainate and saline treated rats. P-gp expression and functionality does not seem to change at early stage after induction of anticipated pharmacoresistant epilepsy by kainate

  3. Status Epilepticus Impairs Synaptic Plasticity in Rat Hippocampus and Is Followed by Changes in Expression of NMDA Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postnikova, T Y; Zubareva, O E; Kovalenko, A A; Kim, K K; Magazanik, L G; Zaitsev, A V

    2017-03-01

    Cognitive deficits and memory loss are frequent in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Persistent changes in synaptic efficacy are considered as a cellular substrate underlying memory processes. Electrophysiological studies have shown that the properties of short-term and long-term synaptic plasticity in the cortex and hippocampus may undergo substantial changes after seizures. However, the neural mechanisms responsible for these changes are not clear. In this study, we investigated the properties of short-term and long-term synaptic plasticity in rat hippocampal slices 24 h after pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced status epilepticus. We found that the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) in CA1 pyramidal cells is reduced compared to the control, while short-term facilitation is increased. The experimental results do not support the hypothesis that status epilepticus leads to background potentiation of hippocampal synapses and further LTP induction becomes weaker due to occlusion, as the dependence of synaptic responses on the strength of input stimulation was not different in the control and experimental animals. The decrease in LTP can be caused by impairment of molecular mechanisms of neuronal plasticity, including those associated with NMDA receptors and/or changes in their subunit composition. Real-time PCR demonstrated significant increases in the expression of GluN1 and GluN2A subunits 3 h after PTZ-induced status epilepticus. The overexpression of obligate GluN1 subunit suggests an increase in the total number of NMDA receptors in the hippocampus. A 3-fold increase in the expression of the GluN2B subunit observed 24 h after PTZ-induced status epilepticus might be indicative of an increase in the proportion of GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors. Increased expression of the GluN2B subunit may be a cause for reducing the magnitude of LTP at hippocampal synapses after status epilepticus.

  4. Induction of burst suppression or coma using intravenous anesthetics in refractory status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Bong Su; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Shin, Jeong-Won; Moon, Jang Sup; Byun, Jung-Ick; Lim, Jung-Ah; Moon, Hye Jin; Kim, Young-Soo; Lee, Soon-Tae; Chu, Kon; Lee, Sang Kun

    2015-05-01

    General anesthetic-induced coma therapy has been recommended for the treatment of refractory status epilepticus (RSE). However, the influence of electroencephalographic (EEG) burst suppression (BS) on outcomes still remains unclear. This study investigated the impact of intravenous anesthetic-induced BS on the prognosis of RSE using a retrospective analysis of all consecutive adult patients who received intravenous anesthetic treatment for RSE at the Seoul National University Hospital between January 2006 and June 2011. Twenty-two of the 111 episodes of RSE were enrolled in this study. Of the 22 RSE patients, 12 (54.5%) were women and 18 (81.4%) exhibited generalized convulsive status epilepticus. Sixteen patients (72.7%) were classified as having acute symptomatic etiology, including three patients with anoxic encephalopathy, and others with remote symptomatic etiology. Only two patients (9.1%) had a favorable Status Epilepticus Severity Score (0-2) at admission. All patients received midazolam (MDZ) as a primary intravenous anesthetic drug for RSE treatment; three (13.6%) received MDZ and propofol, and one (4.5%) received MDZ and pentobarbital. The rates of mortality and poor outcome at discharge were 13.6% (n=3) and 54.5% (n=12), respectively. While BS was achieved in six (27.5%) patients, it was not associated with mortality or poor outcome. Induced BS was associated with prolonged hospital stay in subgroup analysis when excluding anoxic encephalopathy. Our results suggest that induction of BS for treating RSE did not affect mortality or outcome at discharge and may lead to an increased length of hospital stay. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Generalized status epilepticus associated with massive pulmonary aspiration and transient central diabetes insipidus: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARVALHO MAURICIO

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Status epilepticus causes significant morbidity and mortality. A case of generalized status epilepticus followed by massive pulmonary aspiration, acute respiratory failure and transient central diabetes insipidus is presented. Seizures were promptly controlled, but the patient required mechanical ventilation and correction of polyuria with desmopressin acetate. During hospitalization mental status improved, diabetes insipidus spontaneously remitted and he was discharged without neurologic sequelae. The clinical and pathophysiological features of this case are discussed.

  6. Effect of diet with omega-3 in basal brain electrical activity and during status epilepticus in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessoa, Daniella Tavares; da Silva, Eva Luana Almeida; Costa, Edbhergue Ventura Lola; Nogueira, Romildo Albuquerque

    2017-11-01

    Western diets are high in saturated fat and low in omega-3. Certain animals cannot produce omega-3 from their own lipids, making it necessary for it to be acquired from the diet. However, omega-3s are important components of the plasma membrane, and altering their proportions can promote physical and chemical alterations in the membranes, which may modify neuronal excitability. These alterations occur in healthy individuals, as well as in patients with epilepsy who are more sensitive to changes in brain electrical activity. This study evaluated the effect of a diet supplemented with omega-3 on the basal brain electrical activity both before and during status epilepticus in rats. To evaluate the brain electrical activity, we recorded electrocorticograms (ECoG) of animals both with and without omega-3 supplementation before and during status epilepticus induced by pilocarpine. Calculation of the average brain wave power by a power spectrum revealed that omega-3 supplementation reduced the average power of the delta wave by 20% and increased the average power of the beta wave by 45%. These effects were exacerbated when status epilepticus was induced in the animals supplemented with omega-3. The animals with and without omega-3 supplementation exhibited increases in basal brain electrical activities during status epilepticus. The two groups showed hyperactivity, but no significant difference between them was noted. Even though the brain activity levels observed during status epilepticus were similar between the two groups, neuron damage to the animals supplemented with omega-3 was more slight, revealing the neuroprotective effect of the omega-3. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Which EEG patterns in coma are nonconvulsive status epilepticus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinka, Eugen; Leitinger, Markus

    2015-08-01

    Nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) is common in patients with coma with a prevalence between 5% and 48%. Patients in deep coma may exhibit epileptiform EEG patterns, such as generalized periodic spikes, and there is an ongoing debate about the relationship of these patterns and NCSE. The purposes of this review are (i) to discuss the various EEG patterns found in coma, its fluctuations, and transitions and (ii) to propose modified criteria for NCSE in coma. Classical coma patterns such as diffuse polymorphic delta activity, spindle coma, alpha/theta coma, low output voltage, or burst suppression do not reflect NCSE. Any ictal patterns with a typical spatiotemporal evolution or epileptiform discharges faster than 2.5 Hz in a comatose patient reflect nonconvulsive seizures or NCSE and should be treated. Generalized periodic diacharges or lateralized periodic discharges (GPDs/LPDs) with a frequency of less than 2.5 Hz or rhythmic discharges (RDs) faster than 0.5 Hz are the borderland of NCSE in coma. In these cases, at least one of the additional criteria is needed to diagnose NCSE (a) subtle clinical ictal phenomena, (b) typical spatiotemporal evolution, or (c) response to antiepileptic drug treatment. There is currently no consensus about how long these patterns must be present to qualify for NCSE, and the distinction from nonconvulsive seizures in patients with critical illness or in comatose patients seems arbitrary. The Salzburg Consensus Criteria for NCSE [1] have been modified according to the Standardized Terminology of the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society [2] and validated in three different cohorts, with a sensitivity of 97.2%, a specificity of 95.9%, and a diagnostic accuracy of 96.3% in patients with clinical signs of NCSE. Their diagnostic utility in different cohorts with patients in deep coma has to be studied in the future. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Status Epilepticus". Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Status epilepticus in pregnancy: Etiology, management, and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajiv, Keni Ravish; Radhakrishnan, Ashalatha

    2017-11-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) in pregnancy carries significant risk to both mother and fetus. There is limited literature available on SE occurring in pregnancy world-over, with majority being from obstetric centers. All women who developed SE related to pregnancy (gestation, labor, or puerperium) between January 2000 and December 2016 were included in the study. Data were collected from our SE registry, maintained, and archived in the institute. The variables influencing the maternal and fetal outcome were compared using Student's t-test for continuous variables and Fisher's exact test for discrete variables. During the 16-year study period, a total of 348 SE events were recorded in 294 patients. Among these, there were 138 women, of which 17 had SE related to pregnancy. The etiology of SE was remote symptomatic in two and acute symptomatic in 15 patients. The various causes detected after initial evaluation for acute symptomatic SE were eclampsia (n=4), posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome due to various causes other than eclampsia (n=6), cortical venous thrombosis (n=3), subarachnoid hemorrhage (n=1), and NMDA receptor antibody-mediated encephalitis (n=1).13 of 17 women with SE (76%) had good outcome. Majority of the fetuses had good outcomes, i.e., Category 1 (n=9, 57%). Duration of intensive care unit stay (p=0.029) and Status Epilepticus Severity Score (p=0.0324) at admission, were found to be significantly associated with poor outcomes. In any patient presenting with SE occurring in pregnancy, though eclampsia is presumed to be the most common overall cause; it is relevant to consider other etiologies such as posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, cortical venous thrombosis, and autoimmune encephalitis especially in cases presenting with refractory SE. Posterior reversible encephalopathy may occur in pregnancy due to diverse etiologies other than eclampsia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Serial CT scans of cerebral hypoxia due to prolonged status epilepticus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saiwai, Shigeo; Matsumura, Yasumasa; Tamaoka, Koichi; Fukuda, Teruo; Miyamoto, Takeshi (Kobe Central Municipal Hospital, Kobe (Japan))

    1983-04-01

    Serial computed tomography (CT) scans of 5 infants with status epilepticus were reviewed. Four out of the 5 infants fortunately had CT scans before status epilepticus because of a convulsion. There was a diffuse and mild low density in the hemisphere, with small ventricles and tight sulci (brain swelling) at 1 to 2 days after ictus. Thereafter, a diffuse low density became apparent except for the cerebellum, the brain stem, the thalamus, and the basal ganglia. Two to 4 weeks after ictus, a localized, mottled low density was demonstrated on the cerebral mantle and atrophic changes became progressively clear. In 3 cases, no abnormal enhancement was elicited on contrast CT scans performed between 5 to 16 days after status epilepticus. We discussed the possible pathophysiological aspects of the brain damage due to ''prolonged status epilepticus.''

  10. Cortico-thalamic activation in generalized status epilepticus, a PET study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, B. M.; van de Hoeven, J. H.; Pruim, J.; van der Naalt, J.; Meertens, John H. J. M.

    In a patient with a refractory generalized convulsive status epilepticus, the ictal distribution of regional cerebral glucose was assessed with positron emission tomography (PET). Synchronized seizure activity in the EEG was associated with bilateral metabolic activation of medial sensorimotor

  11. Serial CT scans of cerebral hypoxia due to prolonged status epilepticus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saiwai, Shigeo; Matsumura, Yasumasa; Tamaoka, Koichi; Fukuda, Teruo; Miyamoto, Takeshi [Kobe Central Municipal Hospital, Kobe (Japan)

    1983-04-01

    Serial computed tomography (CT) scans of 5 infants with status epilepticus were reviewed. Four out of the 5 infants fortunately had CT scans before status epilepticus because of a convulsion. There was a diffuse and mild low density in the hemisphere, with small ventricles and tight sulci (brain swelling) at 1 to 2 days after ictus. Thereafter, a diffuse low density became apparent except for the cerebellum, the brain stem, the thalamus, and the basal ganglia. Two to 4 weeks after ictus, a localized, mottled low density was demonstrated on the cerebral mantle and atrophic changes became progressively clear. In 3 cases, no abnormal enhancement was elicited on contrast CT scans performed between 5 to 16 days after status epilepticus. We discussed the possible pathophysiological aspects of the brain damage due to ''prolonged status epilepticus.''

  12. Serial CT scans of cerebral hypoxia due to prolonged status epilepticus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saiwai, Shigeo; Matsumura, Yasumasa; Tamaoka, Koichi; Fukuda, Teruo; Miyamoto, Takeshi

    1983-01-01

    Serial computed tomography (CT) scans of 5 infants with status epilepticus were reviewed. Four out of the 5 infants fortunately had CT scans before status epilepticus because of a convulsion. There was a diffuse and mild low density in the hemisphere, with small ventricles and tight sulci (brain swelling) at 1 to 2 days after ictus. Thereafter, a diffuse low density became apparent except for the cerebellum, the brain stem, the thalamus, and the basal ganglia. Two to 4 weeks after ictus, a localized, mottled low density was demonstrated on the cerebral mantle and atrophic changes became progressively clear. In 3 cases, no abnormal enhancement was elicited on contrast CT scans performed between 5 to 16 days after status epilepticus. We discussed the possible pathophysiological aspects of the brain damage due to ''prolonged status epilepticus.'' (author)

  13. Lovastatin reduces neuronal cell death in hippocampal CA1 subfield after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus: preliminary results Lovastatina reduz a lesão celular na região CA1 do hipocampo após o status epilepticus induzido pela pilocarpina: resultados preliminares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Rangel

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To further characterize the capacity of lovastatin to prevent hippocampal neuronal loss after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE METHOD: Adult male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: (A control rats, received neither pilocarpine nor lovastatin (n=5; (B control rats, received just lovastatin (n=5; (C rats that received just pilocarpine (n=5; (D rats that received pilocarpine and lovastatin (n=5. After pilocarpine injection (350mg/kg, i.p., only rats that displayed continuous, convulsive seizure activity were included in our study. Seizure activity was monitored behaviorally and terminated with an injection of diazepam (10 mg/kg, i.p. after 4 h of convulsive SE. The rats treated with lovastatin received two doses of 20mg/kg via an oesophagic probe immediately and 24 hours after SE induction. Seven days after pilocarpine-induced SE, all the animals were perfused and their brains were processed for histological analysis through Nissl method. RESULTS: The cell counts in the Nissl-stained sections performed within the hippocampal formation showed a significant cell loss in rats that received pilocarpine and presented SE (CA1= 26.8 ± 13.67; CA3= 38.1 ± 7.2; hilus= 43.8 ± 3.95 when compared with control group animals (Group A: CA1= 53.2 ± 9.63; CA3= 63.5 ± 13.35; hilus= 59.08 ± 10.24; Group B: CA1= 74.3 ± 8.16; CA3= 70.1 ± 3.83; hilus= 70.6 ± 5.10. The average neuronal cell number of CA1 subfield of rats that present SE and received lovastatin (44.4 ± 17.88 was statically significant increased when compared with animals that just presented SE. CONCLUSION: Lovastatin exert a neuroprotective role in the attenuation of brain damage after SE.OBJETIVO: Capacidade da lovastatina em prevenir a perda de neurônios hipocampais após o status epilepticus (SE induzido pela pilocarpina. MÉTODO: Ratos adultos Wistar foram divididos em 4 grupos: (A ratos controles que não receberam pilocarpina nem lovastatina (n=5; (B ratos

  14. Top 100 cited articles on epilepsy and status epilepticus: A bibliometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kang Min; Kim, Sung Eun; Lee, Byung In; Kim, Hyung Chan; Yoon, Dae Young; Song, Hong Ki; Bae, Jong Seok

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the top 100-cited articles dedicated to epilepsy and status epilepticus published in journals from January, 1950 through February, 2016 that have made key contributions in the field. We performed a search of journals and selected the top 100-cited articles on epilepsy and status epilepticus, respectively, by utilizing the Institute for Scientific Information database available under the banner of the Web of Science. The top-cited articles on epilepsy and status epilepticus were all published in 24 journals, respectively. In both fields of epilepsy and status epilepticus, the most frequently cited journal was Epilepsia (26 articles on epilepsy and 19 articles on status epilepticus). The 100 most-cited articles in the field of both epilepsy and status epilepticus mainly originated from institutions in the United States of America. The articles on epilepsy included 25 laboratory studies, 15 pharmacotherapy studies, 13 general review studies, 12 surgery studies, 11 neuroimaging studies, eight epidemiology studies, eight neuropsychiatry studies, six genetic studies, and two electrophysiology studies, whereas 41 laboratory studies, 21 epidemiology studies, 16 pharmacotherapy studies, nine electrophysiology studies, nine general review studies, and four neuroimaging studies were included in the field of status epilepticus. We demonstrate that neuroimaging, genetics, and surgery are emerging topics in the field of epilepsy over the past decades. Moreover, we found that the majority of top-cited articles on epilepsy and status epilepticus originated from institutions in the United States of America and most were published in Epilepsia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Efficacy of levetiracetam versus fosphenytoin for the recurrence of seizures after status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kensuke; Inokuchi, Ryota; Daidoji, Hiroaki; Naraba, Hiromu; Sonoo, Tomohiro; Hashimoto, Hideki; Tokunaga, Kurato; Hiruma, Takahiro; Doi, Kent; Morimura, Naoto

    2017-06-01

    Benzodiazepines are used as first-line treatments for status epilepticus. Fosphenytoin (FPHT) is recommended for second-line therapy; however, intravenous injection of levetiracetam (LEV) may also be effective against status epilepticus. Herein, we compared the efficacy and safety of LEV as a second-line treatment for status epilepticus with FPHT in Japanese patients.Patients with status epilepticus were selected from the database of the Emergency and Critical Care Center of Hitachi General Hospital. The subjects were patients whose status epilepticus was successfully stopped by diazepam, and in whom FPHT or LEV was administered after diazepam. As LEV injections recently became clinically available in Japan, the choice of drug was determined by the treatment period. Thus, 21 patients who were intravenously injected with LEV as a second-line therapy and 42 matched patients (historical controls) who were treated with FPHT (1:2) were selected.The subjects had a mean age of 64.0 ± 2.2 years, and included 48 males and 15 females. The status epilepticus control rates of the FPHT and LEV groups did not differ significantly (81.0% [34/42] vs 85.1% [18/21], respectively; P  =  .69). As for serious adverse events, a reduction in blood pressure was observed in the FPHT group, but not in the LEV group. The oral anticonvulsant switching rates of the 2 groups were similar, but the same-drug switching rates of the FPHT and LEV groups were 8.1% and 77.8%, respectively.The efficacy of intravenous LEV injections after status epilepticus was equivalent to that of FPHT, and the incidence of adverse events was lower in the LEV group. LEV is effective and safe at preventing recurrent seizures after status epilepticus following benzodiazepine treatment.

  16. P2X purinoceptors as a link between hyperexcitability and neuroinflammation in status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henshall, David C; Engel, Tobias

    2015-08-01

    There remains a need for more efficacious treatments for status epilepticus. Prolonged seizures result in the release of ATP from cells which activates the P2 class of ionotropic and metabotropic purinoceptors. The P2X receptors gate depolarizing sodium and calcium entry and are expressed by both neurons and glia throughout the brain, and a number of subtypes are upregulated after status epilepticus. Recent studies have explored the in vivo effects of targeting ATP-gated P2X receptors in preclinical models of status epilepticus, with particular focus on the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R). The P2X7R mediates microglial activation and the release of the proepileptogenic inflammatory cytokine interleukin 1β. The receptor may also directly modulate neurotransmission and gliotransmission and promote the recruitment of immune cells into brain parenchyma. Data from our group and collaborators show that status epilepticus produced by intraamygdala microinjection of kainic acid increases P2X7R expression in the hippocampus and neocortex of mice. Antagonism of the P2X7R in the model reduced seizure severity, microglial activation and interleukin 1β release, and neuronal injury. Coadministration of a P2X7R antagonist with a benzodiazepine also provided seizure suppression in a model of drug-refractory status epilepticus when either treatment alone was minimally effective. More recently, we showed that status epilepticus in immature rats is also reduced by P2X7R antagonism. Together, these findings suggest that P2X receptors may be novel targets for seizure control and interruption of neuroinflammation after status epilepticus. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Status Epilepticus". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cardiac Arrest in Patients Managed for Convulsive Status Epilepticus: Characteristics, Predictors, and Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legriel, Stephane; Bresson, Edouard; Deye, Nicolas; Grimaldi, David; Sauneuf, Bertrand; Lesieur, Olivier; Lascarrou, Jean-Baptiste; Argaud, Laurent; Chelly, Jonathan; Beuret, Pascal; Schnell, David; Chateauneuf, Anne-Laure; Holleville, Mathilde; Perier, François; Lemiale, Virginie; Bruel, Cedric; Cronier, Pierrick; Pichon, Nicolas; Mongardon, Nicolas; de-Prost, Nicolas; Dumas, Florence; Cariou, Alain

    2018-05-08

    Cardiac arrest is a catastrophic event that may arise during the management of convulsive status epilepticus. We aimed to report the clinical characteristics, outcomes, and early predictors of convulsive status epilepticus-related cardiac arrest. Retrospective multicenter study. Seventeen university or university affiliated participating ICUs in France and Belgium. Consecutive patients admitted to the participating ICUs for management of successfully resuscitated out-of-hospital cardiac arrest complicating the initial management of convulsive status epilepticus between 2000 and 2015. Patients were compared with controls without cardiac arrest identified in a single-center registry of convulsive status epilepticus patients, regarding characteristics, management, and outcome. None. We included 49 cases with convulsive status epilepticus-cardiac arrest and 235 controls. In the cases, median time from medical team arrival to cardiac arrest was 25 minutes (interquartile range, 5-85 min). First recorded rhythm was asystole in 25 patients (51%) and pulseless electrical activity in 13 patients (27%). A significantly larger proportion of patients had a favorable 1-year outcome (Glasgow Outcome Scale score of 5) among controls (90/235; 38%) than among cases (10/49; 21%; p = 0.02). By multivariate analysis, independent predictors of cardiac arrest were pulse oximetry less than 97% on scene (odds ratio, 2.66; 95% CI, 1.03-7.26; p = 0.04), drug poisoning as the cause of convulsive status epilepticus (odds ratio, 4.13; 95% CI, 1.27-13.53; p = 0.02), and complications during early management (odds ratio, 11.98; 95% CI, 4.67-34.69; p status epilepticus, relative hypoxemia, on-scene management complications, and drug poisoning as the cause of convulsive status epilepticus were strong early predictors of cardiac arrest, suggesting areas for improvement.

  18. Status epilepticus as the only presentation of the neonatal Bartter syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Patra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bartter syndrome is a rare hereditary (autosomal recessive salt-losing tubulopathy characterized by hypokalemia, hypochloremia, metabolic alkalosis, and normal blood pressure with hyperreninemia, The underlying renal abnormality results in excessive urinary losses of sodium, chloride, and potassium. We report a case of a four-month-old infant with neonatal Bartter syndrome, who presented only with status epilepticus. To the best of our present knowledge, there is no reported case of Bartter syndrome who presented with status epilepticus.

  19. Status epilepticus as the only presentation of the neonatal Bartter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Soumya; Konar, Mithun C; Basu, Rajarshi; Khaowas, Ajoy K; Dutta, Soumyadeep; Sarkar, Debanjali

    2012-03-01

    Bartter syndrome is a rare hereditary (autosomal recessive) salt-losing tubulopathy characterized by hypokalemia, hypochloremia, metabolic alkalosis, and normal blood pressure with hyperreninemia, The underlying renal abnormality results in excessive urinary losses of sodium, chloride, and potassium. We report a case of a four-month-old infant with neonatal Bartter syndrome, who presented only with status epilepticus. To the best of our present knowledge, there is no reported case of Bartter syndrome who presented with status epilepticus.

  20. Neuroimaging in status epilepticus secondary to paraneoplastic autoimmune encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarria-Estrada, S.; Toledo, M.; Lorenzo-Bosquet, C.; Cuberas-Borrós, G.; Auger, C.; Siurana, S.; Rovira, À.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To describe the characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of paraneoplastic autoimmune encephalitis in patients with new-onset status epilepticus. Materials and methods: The neuroimaging and clinical data of five patients with paraneoplastic autoimmune encephalitis debuting as status epilepticus were retrospectively reviewed. All patients met the criteria for definite paraneoplastic syndrome and all underwent brain MRI during the status epilepticus episode or immediately after recovery. Results: All patients showed hyperintense lesions on T2-weighted imaging (WI) involving the limbic structures, specifically the hippocampus. Three of them showed additional extra-limbic areas of signal abnormalities. The areas of T2 hyperintensity were related to the electroclinical onset of the seizures. In three patients, various techniques were used to study cerebral perfusion, such as arterial spin labelling MRI, single photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT) and 2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-positron-emission tomography (PET). Arterial spin labelling showed hyperperfusion overlapping the inflammatory lesions, whereas PET and SPECT disclosed increased perfusion and increased metabolism. The subtraction SPECT co-registered to MRI (SISCOM) demonstrated hypermetabolism outside the areas of encephalitis. After clinical recovery, follow-up MRI revealed the development of atrophy in the initially affected hippocampus. Two patients who had recurrent paraneoplastic autoimmune encephalitis manifesting as status epilepticus showed new T2 lesions involving different structures. Conclusion: The presence of limbic and extra-limbic T2 signal abnormalities in new-onset status epilepticus should suggest the diagnosis of a paraneoplastic syndrome, especially when status epilepticus is refractory to treatment. The lesions are consistently seen as hyperintense on T2WI. - Highlights: • New onset status epilepticus can be caused by paraneoplastic encephalitis.

  1. Neuroimaging in status epilepticus secondary to paraneoplastic autoimmune encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarria-Estrada, S., E-mail: ssarria@idi-cat.org [Magnetic Resonance Unit, Radiology Department, Vall d' Hebrón University Hospital, Barcelona (Spain); Toledo, M. [Epilepsy Unit, Neurology Department, Vall d' Hebrón University Hospital, Barcelona (Spain); Lorenzo-Bosquet, C.; Cuberas-Borrós, G. [Nuclear Medicine Department, Vall d' Hebrón University Hospital, Barcelona (Spain); Auger, C.; Siurana, S.; Rovira, À. [Magnetic Resonance Unit, Radiology Department, Vall d' Hebrón University Hospital, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-08-15

    Aim: To describe the characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of paraneoplastic autoimmune encephalitis in patients with new-onset status epilepticus. Materials and methods: The neuroimaging and clinical data of five patients with paraneoplastic autoimmune encephalitis debuting as status epilepticus were retrospectively reviewed. All patients met the criteria for definite paraneoplastic syndrome and all underwent brain MRI during the status epilepticus episode or immediately after recovery. Results: All patients showed hyperintense lesions on T2-weighted imaging (WI) involving the limbic structures, specifically the hippocampus. Three of them showed additional extra-limbic areas of signal abnormalities. The areas of T2 hyperintensity were related to the electroclinical onset of the seizures. In three patients, various techniques were used to study cerebral perfusion, such as arterial spin labelling MRI, single photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT) and 2-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-positron-emission tomography (PET). Arterial spin labelling showed hyperperfusion overlapping the inflammatory lesions, whereas PET and SPECT disclosed increased perfusion and increased metabolism. The subtraction SPECT co-registered to MRI (SISCOM) demonstrated hypermetabolism outside the areas of encephalitis. After clinical recovery, follow-up MRI revealed the development of atrophy in the initially affected hippocampus. Two patients who had recurrent paraneoplastic autoimmune encephalitis manifesting as status epilepticus showed new T2 lesions involving different structures. Conclusion: The presence of limbic and extra-limbic T2 signal abnormalities in new-onset status epilepticus should suggest the diagnosis of a paraneoplastic syndrome, especially when status epilepticus is refractory to treatment. The lesions are consistently seen as hyperintense on T2WI. - Highlights: • New onset status epilepticus can be caused by paraneoplastic encephalitis

  2. De novo status epilepticus is associated with adverse outcome: An 11-year retrospective study in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Hoi Ki Kate; Hui, Kwok Fai; Fong, Wing Chi; Ip, Chun Tak; Lui, Hiu Tung Colin

    2016-08-01

    To identify predictors of poor clinical outcome in patients presenting to the intensive care units with status epilepticus (SE), in particular for patients presenting with de novo status epileptics. A retrospective review was performed on patients admitted to the intensive care units with status epilepticus in two hospitals in Hong Kong over an 11-year period from 2003 to 2013. A total of 87 SE cases were analyzed. The mean age of patients was 49.3 years (SD 14.9 years). Eighteen subjects (20.7%) had breakthrough seizure, which was the most common etiology for the status epilepticus episodes. Seventy-eight subjects (89.7%) had convulsive status epilepticus (CSE) and 9 subjects (10.3%) had non-convulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) on presentation. The 30-day mortality rate of all subjects was 18.4%. Non-convulsive status epilepticus was more common in patients with de novo status epilepticus when compared to those with existing history of epilepsy (15.5% Vs. 0%, p=0.03). Patients with de novo status epilepticus were older (52 Vs 43, p=0.009). De novo status epilepticus was associated with longer status duration (median 2.5 days, IQR 5 days), longer ICU stay (median 7.5 days, IQR 9 days) and poorer outcome (OR 4.15, 95% CI 1.53-11.2). For patients presenting to intensive care units with status epilepticus, those with de novo status epileptics were older and were more likely to develop non-convulsive status epilepticus. De novo status epilepticus was associated with poorer outcome. Continuous EEG monitoring would help identifying NCSE and potentially help improving clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evolution of Cerebral Atrophy in a Patient with Super Refractory Status Epilepticus Treated with Barbiturate Coma

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    Christopher R. Newey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Status epilepticus is associated with neuronal breakdown. Radiological sequelae of status epilepticus include diffusion weighted abnormalities and T2/FLAIR cortical hyperintensities corresponding to the epileptogenic cortex. However, progressive generalized cerebral atrophy from status epilepticus is underrecognized and may be related to neuronal death. We present here a case of diffuse cerebral atrophy that developed during the course of super refractory status epilepticus management despite prolonged barbiturate coma. Methods. Case report and review of the literature. Case. A 19-year-old male with a prior history of epilepsy presented with focal clonic seizures. His seizures were refractory to multiple anticonvulsants and eventually required pentobarbital coma for 62 days and midazolam coma for 33 days. Serial brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed development of cerebral atrophy at 31 days after admission to our facility and progression of the atrophy at 136 days after admission. Conclusion. This case highlights the development and progression of generalized cerebral atrophy in super refractory status epilepticus. The cerebral atrophy was noticeable at 31 days after admission at our facility which emphasizes the urgency of definitive treatment in patients who present with super refractory status epilepticus. Further research into direct effects of therapeutic coma is warranted.

  4. Neurogenic function in rats with unilateral hippocampal sclerosis that experienced early-life status epilepticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunleavy, Mark; Schindler, Clara K; Shinoda, Sachiko; Crilly, Shane; Henshall, David C

    2014-01-01

    Status epilepticus in the adult brain invariably causes an increase in hippocampal neurogenesis and the appearance of ectopic cells and this has been implicated as a causal factor in epileptogenesis. The effect of status epilepticus on neurogenesis in the developing brain is less well characterized and models of early-life seizures typically do not reproduce the hippocampal damage common to human mesial temporal sclerosis. We recently reported that evoking status epilepticus by intra-amygdala microinjection of kainic acid in post-natal (P) day 10 rats caused substantial acute neuronal death within the ipsilateral hippocampus and rats later developed unilateral hippocampal sclerosis and spontaneous recurrent seizures. Here, we examined the expression of a selection of genes associated with neurogenesis and assessed neurogenic function in this model. Protein levels of several markers of neurogenesis including polysialic acid neural cell adhesion molecule, neuroD and doublecortin were reduced in the hippocampus three days after status epilepticus in P10 rats. In contrast, protein levels of neurogenesis markers were similar to control in rats at P55. Pulse-chase experiments using thymidine analogues suggested there was a reduction in new neurons at 72 h after status epilepticus in P10 rats, whereas numbers of new neurons labelled in epileptic rats at P55 with hippocampal sclerosis were similar to controls. The present study suggests that status epilepticus in the immature brain suppresses neurogenesis but the neurogenic potential is retained in animals that later develop hippocampal sclerosis. PMID:25755841

  5. Hippocampal sclerosis and status epilepticus: cause or consequence? A MRI study; Esclerose hipocampal e status epilepticus: causa ou consequencia? Um estudo de RM

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    Kuster, Gustavo Wruck; Braga-Neto, Pedro; Santos-Neto, Denizart; Santana, Maria Teresa Garcia; Barsottini, Orlando Graziani [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Neurology. Div. of General Neurology; Maia Junior, Antonio Carlos Martins [Fleury Institute, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Magnetic Resonance Imaging Unit

    2007-12-15

    Background: Transient imaging abnormalities, including changes on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), may be seen in status epilepticus. These abnormalities can be followed by hippocampal sclerosis. Case Report: We report a 15-year-old lady with focal non convulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) and focal slowing on EEG. DWI exhibited abnormal hyperintense signals in bilateral temporal and insular cortices. After 3 weeks, MRI performed a localized hippocampal atrophy. Conclusion: The MRI findings indicated vasogenic and cytotoxic edema during seizure activity and subsequent loss of brain parenchyma. (author)

  6. Thymoquinone Attenuates Brain Injury via an Anti-oxidative Pathway in a Status Epilepticus Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yi-Ye; Li, Bing; Huang, Yong-Mei; Luo, Qiong; Xie, Yang-Mei; Chen, Ying-Hui

    2017-01-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) results in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which contribute to seizure-induced brain injury. It is well known that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in status epilepticus (SE). Thymoquinone (TQ) is a bioactive monomer extracted from black cumin (Nigella sativa) seed oil that has anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and antioxidant activity in various diseases. This study evaluated the protective effects of TQ on brain injury in a lithium-pilocarpine rat model of SE and investigated the underlying mechanism related to antioxidative pathway. Electroencephalogram and Racine scale were used to value seizure severity. Passive-avoidance test was used to determine learning and memory function. Moreover, anti-oxidative activity of TQ was observed using Western blot and super oxide dismutase (SOD) activity assay. Latency to SE increased in the TQ-pretreated group compared with rats in the model group, while the total power was significantly lower. Seizure severity measured on the Racine scale was significantly lower in the TQ group compared with the model group. Results of behavioral experiments suggest that TQ may also have a protective effect on learning and memory function. Investigation of the protective mechanism of TQ showed that TQ-pretreatment significantly increased the expression of Nrf2, HO-1 proteins and SOD in the hippocampus. These findings showed that TQ attenuated brain injury induced by SE via an anti-oxidative pathway.

  7. Why we prefer levetiracetam over phenytoin for treatment of status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccara, G; Giorgi, F S; Amantini, A; Giannasi, G; Campostrini, R; Giovannelli, F; Paganini, M; Nazerian, P

    2018-06-01

    Over last fifty years, intravenous (iv) phenytoin (PHT) loading dose has been the treatment of choice for patients with benzodiazepine-resistant convulsive status epilepticus and several guidelines recommended this treatment regimen with simultaneous iv diazepam. Clinical studies have never shown a better efficacy of PHT over other antiepileptic drugs. In addition, iv PHT loading dose is a complex and time-consuming procedure which may expose patients to several risks, such as local cutaneous reactions (purple glove syndrome), severe hypotension and cardiac arrhythmias up to ventricular fibrillation and death, and increased risk of severe allergic reactions. A further disadvantage of PHT is that it is a strong enzymatic inducer and it may make ineffective several drugs that need to be used simultaneously with antiepileptic treatment. In patients with a benzodiazepine-resistant status epilepticus, we suggest iv administration of levetiracetam as soon as possible. If levetiracetam would be ineffective, a further antiepileptic drug among those currently available for iv use (valproate, lacosamide, or phenytoin) can be added before starting third line treatment. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Towards acute pediatric status epilepticus intervention teams: Do we need "Seizure Codes"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stredny, Coral M; Abend, Nicholas S; Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2018-05-01

    To identify areas of treatment delay and barriers to care in pediatric status epilepticus, review ongoing quality improvement initiatives, and provide suggestions for further innovations to improve and standardize these patient care processes. Narrative review of current status epilepticus management algorithms, anti-seizure medication administration and outcomes associated with delays, and initiatives to improve time to treatment. Articles reviewing or reporting quality improvement initiatives were identified through a PubMed search with keywords "status epilepticus," "quality improvement," "guideline adherence," and/or "protocol;" references of included articles were also reviewed. Rapid initiation and escalation of status epilepticus treatment has been associated with shortened seizure duration and more favorable outcomes. Current evidence-based guidelines for management of status epilepticus propose medication algorithms with suggested times for each management step. However, time to antiseizure medication administration for pediatric status epilepticus remains delayed in both the pre- and in-hospital settings. Barriers to timely treatment include suboptimal preventive care, inaccurate seizure detection, infrequent or restricted use of home rescue medications by caregivers and pre-hospital emergency personnel, delayed summoning and arrival of emergency personnel, and use of inappropriately dosed medications. Ongoing quality improvement initiatives in the pre- and in-hospital settings targeting these barriers are reviewed. Improved preventive care, seizure detection, and rescue medication education may advance pre-hospital management, and we propose the use of acute status epilepticus intervention teams to initiate and incorporate in-hospital interventions as time-sensitive "Seizure Code" emergencies. Copyright © 2018 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Pharmacotherapy for Refractory and Super-Refractory Status Epilepticus in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtkamp, Martin

    2018-03-01

    Patients with prolonged seizures that do not respond to intravenous benzodiazepines and a second-line anticonvulsant suffer from refractory status epilepticus and those with seizures that do not respond to continuous intravenous anesthetic anticonvulsants suffer from super-refractory status epilepticus. Both conditions are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A strict pharmacological treatment regimen is urgently required, but the level of evidence for the available drugs is very low. Refractory complex focal status epilepticus generally does not require anesthetics, but all intravenous non-anesthetizing anticonvulsants may be used. Most descriptive data are available for levetiracetam, phenytoin and valproate. Refractory generalized convulsive status epilepticus is a life-threatening emergency, and long-term clinical consequences are eminent. Administration of intravenous anesthetics is mandatory, and drugs acting at the inhibitory gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) A receptor such as midazolam, propofol and thiopental/pentobarbital are recommended without preference for one of those. One in five patients with anesthetic treatment does not respond and has super-refractory status epilepticus. With sustained seizure activity, excitatory N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are increasingly expressed post-synaptically. Ketamine is an antagonist at this receptor and may prove efficient in some patients at later stages. Neurosteroids such as allopregnanolone increase sensitivity at GABA A receptors; a Phase 1/2 trial demonstrated safety and tolerability, but randomized controlled data failed to demonstrate efficacy. Adjunct ketogenic diet may contribute to termination of difficult-to-treat status epilepticus. Randomized controlled trials are needed to increase evidence for treatment of refractory and super-refractory status epilepticus, but there are multiple obstacles for realization. Hitherto, prospective multicenter registries for pharmacological

  10. P2X receptors as targets for the treatment of status epilepticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henshall, David C.; Diaz-Hernandez, Miguel; Miras-Portugal, M. Teresa; Engel, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged seizures are amongst the most common neurological emergencies. Status epilepticus is a state of continuous seizures that is life-threatening and prompt termination of status epilepticus is critical to protect the brain from permanent damage. Frontline treatment comprises parenteral administration of anticonvulsants such as lorazepam that facilitate γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) transmission. Because status epilepticus can become refractory to anticonvulsants in a significant proportion of patients, drugs which act on different neurotransmitter systems may represent potential adjunctive treatments. P2X receptors are a class of ligand-gated ion channel activated by ATP that contributes to neuro- and glio-transmission. P2X receptors are expressed by both neurons and glia in various brain regions, including the hippocampus. Electrophysiology, pharmacology and genetic studies suggest certain P2X receptors are activated during pathologic brain activity. Expression of several members of the family including P2X2, P2X4, and P2X7 receptors has been reported to be altered in the hippocampus following status epilepticus. Recent studies have shown that ligands of the P2X7 receptor can have potent effects on seizure severity during status epilepticus and mice lacking this receptor display altered seizures in response to chemoconvulsants. Antagonists of the P2X7 receptor also modulate neuronal death, microglial responses and neuroinflammatory signaling. Recent work also found altered neuronal injury and inflammation after status epilepticus in mice lacking the P2X4 receptor. In summary, members of the P2X receptor family may serve important roles in the pathophysiology of status epilepticus and represent novel targets for seizure control and neuroprotection. PMID:24324404

  11. miRNA Expression Profile after Status Epilepticus and Hippocampal Neuroprotection by Targeting miR-132

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Mateos, Eva M.; Bray, Isabella; Sanz-Rodriguez, Amaya; Engel, Tobias; McKiernan, Ross C.; Mouri, Genshin; Tanaka, Katsuhiro; Sano, Takanori; Saugstad, Julie A.; Simon, Roger P.; Stallings, Raymond L.; Henshall, David C.

    2011-01-01

    When an otherwise harmful insult to the brain is preceded by a brief, noninjurious stimulus, the brain becomes tolerant, and the resulting damage is reduced. Epileptic tolerance develops when brief seizures precede an episode of prolonged seizures (status epilepticus). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNAs that function as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. We investigated how prior seizure preconditioning affects the miRNA response to status epilepticus evoked by intra-amygdalar kainic acid in mice. The miRNA was extracted from the ipsilateral CA3 subfield 24 hours after focal-onset status epilepticus in animals that had previously received either seizure preconditioning (tolerance) or no preconditioning (injury), and mature miRNA levels were measured using TaqMan low-density arrays. Expression of 21 miRNAs was increased, relative to control, after status epilepticus alone, and expression of 12 miRNAs was decreased. Increased miR-132 levels were matched with increased binding to Argonaute-2, a constituent of the RNA-induced silencing complex. In tolerant animals, expression responses of >40% of the injury-group-detected miRNAs differed, being either unchanged relative to control or down-regulated, and this included miR-132. In vivo microinjection of locked nucleic acid-modified oligonucleotides (antagomirs) against miR-132 depleted hippocampal miR-132 levels and reduced seizure-induced neuronal death. Thus, our data strongly suggest that miRNAs are important regulators of seizure-induced neuronal death. PMID:21945804

  12. Cardiac Arrest After Status Epilepticus: Bupropion and Ecstasy Intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zübeyde Tuba Duran

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Bupropion is a monocyclic antidepressant that has been known to cause seizures in high therapeutic doses or acute high doses. Bupropion is a selective norepinephrine, dopamine and minimally serotonin reuptake inhibitor. Overdose of bupropion may lead to recurrent seizures, hypoxia and death. It is important to be aware in terms of bradycardia-asystole as a significant consequence of seizure and hypoxia. Patients using high dose of bupropion should be closely monitored in terms of cardiological and neurological. In this study, we presented a 19 year-old female patient who did not have previous history of epilepsy but who used oral bupropion to reduce nicotine addiction. A status epilepticus and cardiac arrest developed in a case receiving 1,8 g bupropion for suicide. 3.4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA and benzodiazepine were detected in urine sample. We did not find any cases in the literature related to MDMA and bupropion overdose. Therefore, we presented this rare case.

  13. A definition and classification of status epilepticus--Report of the ILAE Task Force on Classification of Status Epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinka, Eugen; Cock, Hannah; Hesdorffer, Dale; Rossetti, Andrea O; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Shinnar, Shlomo; Shorvon, Simon; Lowenstein, Daniel H

    2015-10-01

    The Commission on Classification and Terminology and the Commission on Epidemiology of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) have charged a Task Force to revise concepts, definition, and classification of status epilepticus (SE). The proposed new definition of SE is as follows: Status epilepticus is a condition resulting either from the failure of the mechanisms responsible for seizure termination or from the initiation of mechanisms, which lead to abnormally, prolonged seizures (after time point t1 ). It is a condition, which can have long-term consequences (after time point t2 ), including neuronal death, neuronal injury, and alteration of neuronal networks, depending on the type and duration of seizures. This definition is conceptual, with two operational dimensions: the first is the length of the seizure and the time point (t1 ) beyond which the seizure should be regarded as "continuous seizure activity." The second time point (t2 ) is the time of ongoing seizure activity after which there is a risk of long-term consequences. In the case of convulsive (tonic-clonic) SE, both time points (t1 at 5 min and t2 at 30 min) are based on animal experiments and clinical research. This evidence is incomplete, and there is furthermore considerable variation, so these time points should be considered as the best estimates currently available. Data are not yet available for other forms of SE, but as knowledge and understanding increase, time points can be defined for specific forms of SE based on scientific evidence and incorporated into the definition, without changing the underlying concepts. A new diagnostic classification system of SE is proposed, which will provide a framework for clinical diagnosis, investigation, and therapeutic approaches for each patient. There are four axes: (1) semiology; (2) etiology; (3) electroencephalography (EEG) correlates; and (4) age. Axis 1 (semiology) lists different forms of SE divided into those with prominent motor

  14. Clinical utility of EMSE and STESS in predicting hospital mortality for status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Chen, Deng; Xu, Da; Tan, Ge; Liu, Ling

    2018-05-25

    To explore the applicability of the epidemiology-based mortality score in status epilepticus (EMSE) and the status epilepticus severity score (STESS) in predicting hospital mortality in patients with status epilepticus (SE) in western China. Furthermore, we sought to compare the abilities of the two scales to predict mortality from convulsive status epilepticus (CSE) and non-convulsive status epilepticus (NCSE). Patients with epilepsy (n = 253) were recruited from the West China Hospital of Sichuan University from January 2012 to January 2016. The EMSE and STESS for all patients were calculated immediately after admission. The main outcome was in-hospital death. The predicted values were analysed using SPSS 22.0 receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Of the 253 patients with SE who were included in the study, 39 (15.4%) died in the hospital. Using STESS ≥4 points to predict SE mortality, the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.724 (P  0.05), while EMSE ≥90 points gave an AUC of 0.666 (P > 0.05). The hospital mortality rate from SE in this study was 15.4%. Those with STESS ≥4 points or EMSE ≥79 points had higher rates of SE mortality. Both STESS and EMSE are less useful predicting in-hospital mortality in NCSE compared to CSE. Furthermore, the EMSE has some advantages over the STESS. Copyright © 2018 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Status epilepticus in dogs and cats, part 1: etiopathogenesis, epidemiology, and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blades Golubovic, Susan; Rossmeisl, John H

    2017-05-01

    To review current knowledge of the etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, and consequences of status epilepticus (SE) in veterinary patients. Human and veterinary literature, including clinical and laboratory research and reviews. Status epilepticus is a common emergency in dogs and cats, and may be the first manifestation of a seizure disorder. It results from the failure of termination of an isolated seizure. Multiple factors are involved in SE, including initiation and maintenance of neuronal excitability, neuronal network synchronization, and brain microenvironmental contributions to ictogenesis. Underlying etiologies of epilepsy and SE in dogs and cats are generally classified as genetic (idiopathic), structural-metabolic, or unknown. Diagnosis of convulsive SE is usually made based on historical information and the nature of the seizures. Patient specific variables, such as the history, age of seizure onset, and physical and interictal neurological examination findings can help hone the rule out list, and are used to guide selection and prioritization of diagnostic tests. Electroencephalographic monitoring is routinely used in people to diagnose SE and guide patient care decisions, but is infrequently performed in veterinary medicine. Nonconvulsive status epilepticus has been recognized in veterinary patients; routine electroencephalography would aid in the diagnosis of this phenomenon in dogs and cats. Status epilepticus is a medical emergency that can result in life-threatening complications involving the brain and systemic organs. Status epilepticus often requires comprehensive diagnostic testing, treatment with multiple anticonvulsant agents, and intensive supportive care. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2017.

  16. Predictive value of the Status Epilepticus Severity Score (STESS) and its components for long-term survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aukland, Preben; Lando, Martin; Vilholm, Ole

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The "Status Epilepticus Severity Score" (STESS) is the most important clinical score to predict in-hospital mortality of patients with status epilepticus (SE), but its prognostic relevance for long-term survival is unknown. This study therefore examined if STESS and its components...

  17. Effect of glycemic state in rats submitted to status epilepticus during development Efeito do estado glicêmico em ratos submetidos ao status epilepticus durante o desenvolvimento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joselita F.C. Santiago

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of glycemic state on status epilepticus (SE development was studied in animals of different ages, submitted to pilocarpine model of epilepsy. Groups: I- Rats with 9-day-old (P9: IA. Submitted to 1SE; IB. Saline-treated; IC. Induced- hyperglycemia; ID. Induced- hyperglycemia+SE; II- Rats submitted to three consecutive episodes of SE at P7, P8 and P9; III- Rats submitted to 1SE at P17; IV- Rats submitted to 1SE at P21. Hippocampal cell death and the expression of glucose transporter GLUT3 were analyzed in group I. The results demonstrated normoglycemia in the groups IA, IB and II, hypoglycemia in group III and hyperglycemia in group IV, showing that the glycemia during SE is age dependent. Induced hyperglycemia during SE in P9 protected the hippocampal neurons from death and both groups IC and ID presented increased GLUT3 expression, showing high glucose consumption by the hippocampus.O efeito do estado glicêmico sobre o desenvolvimento do status epilepticus (SE foi estudado em animais de diferentes idades, submetidos ao modelo de epilepsia por pilocarpina. Grupos: I- Ratos com nove dias (P9: IA- Submetidos a 1SE; IB- Tratados com salina; IC- Hiperglicemia induzida; ID- Hiperglicemia induzida+SE; II- Ratos submetidos a 3 episódios consecutivos de SE em P7, P8 e P9; III- Ratos submetidos a 1SE em P17; IV- Ratos submetidos a 1SE em P21. Foram analisados no grupo I a morte celular hipocampal e a expressão do transportador de glicose GLUT3. Os resultados mostraram haver normoglicemia nos grupos IA, IB e II, hipoglicemia no grupo III e hiperglicemia no grupo IV, sendo a glicemia durante o SE, idade dependente. A hiperglicemia induzida durante o SE em P9 protegeu neurônios hipocampais e os grupos IC e ID apresentaram expressão aumentada de GLUT3, mostrando aumento no consumo de glicose pelo hipocampo.

  18. Early Use of the NMDA Receptor Antagonist Ketamine in Refractory and Superrefractory Status Epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. Zeiler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Refractory status epilepticus (RSE and superrefractory status epilepticus (SRSE pose a difficult clinical challenge. Multiple cerebral receptor and transporter changes occur with prolonged status epilepticus leading to pharmacoresistance patterns unfavorable for conventional antiepileptics. In particular, n-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA receptor upregulation leads to glutamate mediated excitotoxicity. Targeting these NMDA receptors may provide a novel approach to otherwise refractory seizures. Ketamine has been utilized in RSE. Recent systematic review indicates 56.5% and 63.5% cessation in seizures in adults and pediatrics, respectively. No complications were described. We should consider earlier implementation of ketamine or other NMDA receptor antagonists, for RSE. Prospective study of early implementation of ketamine should shed light on the role of such medications in RSE.

  19. Feasibility of Automatic Extraction of Electronic Health Data to Evaluate a Status Epilepticus Clinical Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafeez, Baria; Paolicchi, Juliann; Pon, Steven; Howell, Joy D; Grinspan, Zachary M

    2016-05-01

    Status epilepticus is a common neurologic emergency in children. Pediatric medical centers often develop protocols to standardize care. Widespread adoption of electronic health records by hospitals affords the opportunity for clinicians to rapidly, and electronically evaluate protocol adherence. We reviewed the clinical data of a small sample of 7 children with status epilepticus, in order to (1) qualitatively determine the feasibility of automated data extraction and (2) demonstrate a timeline-style visualization of each patient's first 24 hours of care. Qualitatively, our observations indicate that most clinical data are well labeled in structured fields within the electronic health record, though some important information, particularly electroencephalography (EEG) data, may require manual abstraction. We conclude that a visualization that clarifies a patient's clinical course can be automatically created using the patient's electronic clinical data, supplemented with some manually abstracted data. Future work could use this timeline to evaluate adherence to status epilepticus clinical protocols. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Blood-brain barrier leakage after status epilepticus in rapamycin-treated rats I: Magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Erwin A; Otte, Willem M; Wadman, Wytse J; Aronica, Eleonora; Kooij, Gijs; de Vries, Helga E; Dijkhuizen, Rick M; Gorter, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has received increasing attention as a potential antiepileptogenic target. Treatment with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin after status epilepticus reduces the development of epilepsy in a rat model. To study whether rapamycin mediates this effect via restoration of blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) was used to determine BBB permeability throughout epileptogenesis. Imaging was repeatedly performed until 6 weeks after kainic acid-induced status epilepticus in rapamycin (6 mg/kg for 6 weeks starting 4 h after SE) and vehicle-treated rats, using gadobutrol as contrast agent. Seizures were detected using video monitoring in the week following the last imaging session. Gadobutrol leakage was widespread and extensive in both rapamycin and vehicle-treated epileptic rats during the acute phase, with the piriform cortex and amygdala as the most affected regions. Gadobutrol leakage was higher in rapamycin-treated rats 4 and 8 days after status epilepticus compared to vehicle-treated rats. However, during the chronic epileptic phase, gadobutrol leakage was lower in rapamycin-treated epileptic rats along with a decreased seizure frequency. This was confirmed by local fluorescein staining in the brains of the same rats. Total brain volume was reduced by this rapamycin treatment regimen. The initial slow recovery of BBB function in rapamycin-treated epileptic rats indicates that rapamycin does not reduce seizure activity by a gradual recovery of BBB integrity. The reduced BBB leakage during the chronic phase, however, could contribute to the decreased seizure frequency in post-status epilepticus rats treated with rapamycin. Furthermore, the data show that CE-MRI (using step-down infusion with gadobutrol) can be used as biomarker for monitoring the effect of drug therapy in rats. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  1. Challenges in the treatment of convulsive status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccara, Gaetano; Giannasi, Gianfranco; Oggioni, Roberto; Rosati, Eleonora; Tramacere, Luciana; Palumbo, Pasquale

    2017-04-01

    Convulsive status epilepticus (CSE) is a medical emergency associated with high mortality and morbidity. The most recent definition of CSE is a convulsive seizure lasting more than 5min or consecutive seizures without recovery of consciousness. In adults, for the treatment of the early stages of CSE, diazepam, lorazepam or midazolam are the most common treatments, although the choice of agent seems less important than rapid treatment. Midazolam, when administered intramuscularly (best evidence), buccally, or nasally, is effective and safe in the pre-hospital setting. The antiepileptic drugs, phenytoin, valproate, levetiracetam and, more recently lacosamide, are used in CSE that persists after first-line treatments (established CSE). Phenytoin is more difficult to administer and is less well tolerated. Evidence of the efficacy of lacosamide is scarce. Anaesthetics are the drugs of choice for the treatment of refractory CSE (not responding to second-line drugs). Midazolam seems to be the best tolerated and is the most often used drug, followed by propofol and thiopental (pentobarbital in the USA). A few studies indicate that ketamine is effective with the possible advantage that it can be co-administered with other anaesthetics, such as midazolam or propofol. CSE becomes super-refractory after more than 24h of appropriate treatments and may last weeks. Several anaesthetics have been proposed but evidence is scarce. Autoimmune refractory CSE has been recently identified, and early treatment with immuno-modulatory agents (corticosteroids and IV immunoglobulins and also second-line agents such as cyclophosphamide and rituximab followed by chronic immunosuppressive treatment) is now recommended by many experts. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Anesthetic drugs in status epilepticus: Risk or rescue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsch, Stephan; Fuhr, Peter; Kaplan, Peter W.; Rüegg, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the risks of continuously administered IV anesthetic drugs (IVADs) on the outcome of adult patients with status epilepticus (SE). Methods: All intensive care unit patients with SE from 2005 to 2011 at a tertiary academic medical care center were included. Relative risks were calculated for the primary outcome measures of seizure control, Glasgow Outcome Scale score at discharge, and death. Poisson regression models were used to control for possible confounders and to assess effect modification. Results: Of 171 patients, 37% were treated with IVADs. Mortality was 18%. Patients with anesthetic drugs had more infections during SE (43% vs 11%; p < 0.0001) and a 2.9-fold relative risk for death (2.88; 95% confidence interval 1.45–5.73), independent of possible confounders (i.e., duration and severity of SE, nonanesthetic third-line antiepileptic drugs, and critical medical conditions) and without significant effect modification by different grades of SE severity and etiologies. As IVADs were used after first- and second-line drugs failed, there was a correlation between treatment-refractory SE and the use of IVADs, leading to insignificant results regarding the risk of IVADs and outcome after additional adjustment for refractory SE. Conclusion: Our findings heighten awareness regarding adverse effects of IVADs. Randomized controlled trials are needed to further clarify the association of IVADs with outcome in patients with SE. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that patients with SE receiving IVADs have a higher proportion of infection and an increased risk of death as compared to patients not receiving IVADs. PMID:24319039

  3. The prostaglandin EP1 receptor potentiates kainate receptor activation via a protein kinase C pathway and exacerbates status epilepticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Asheebo; Gueorguieva, Paoula; Lelutiu, Nadia; Quan, Yi; Shaw, Renee; Dingledine, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) regulates membrane excitability, synaptic transmission, plasticity, and neuronal survival. The consequences of PGE2 release following seizures has been the subject of much study. Here we demonstrate that the prostaglandin E2 receptor 1 (EP1, or Ptger1) modulates native kainate receptors, a family of ionotropic glutamate receptors widely expressed throughout the central nervous system. Global ablation of the EP1 gene in mice (EP1-KO) had no effect on seizure threshold after kainate injection but reduced the likelihood to enter status epilepticus. EP1-KO mice that did experience typical status epilepticus had reduced hippocampal neurodegeneration and a blunted inflammatory response. Further studies with native prostanoid and kainate receptors in cultured cortical neurons, as well as with recombinant prostanoid and kainate receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes, demonstrated that EP1 receptor activation potentiates heteromeric but not homomeric kainate receptors via a second messenger cascade involving phospholipase C, calcium and protein kinase C. Three critical GluK5 C-terminal serines underlie the potentiation of the GluK2/GluK5 receptor by EP1 activation. Taken together, these results indicate that EP1 receptor activation during seizures, through a protein kinase C pathway, increases the probability of kainic acid induced status epilepticus, and independently promotes hippocampal neurodegeneration and a broad inflammatory response. PMID:24952362

  4. Epidemiology of Pediatric Convulsive Status Epilepticus With Fever in the Emergency Department: A Cohort Study of 381 Consecutive Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Itaru; Miyama, Sahoko; Inoue, Nobuaki; Sakakibara, Hiroshi; Hataya, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Toshiro

    2016-09-01

    Pediatric convulsive status epilepticus with fever is common in the emergency setting but leads to severe neurological sequelae in some patients. To explore the epidemiology of convulsive status epilepticus with fever, a retrospective cohort covering all convulsive status epilepticus cases with fever seen in the emergency department of a tertiary care children's hospital were consecutively collected. Of the 381 consecutive cases gathered, 81.6% were due to prolonged febrile seizure, 6.6% to encephalopathy/encephalitis, 0.8% to meningitis, and 7.6% to epilepsy. In addition, seizures were significantly longer in encephalopathy/encephalitis cases than in prolonged febrile seizure cases (log rank test, P status epilepticus with fever in the emergency setting, and will help optimize the management of pediatric patients presenting to the emergency department with convulsive status epilepticus with fever. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Intravenous ketogenic diet therapy for treatment of the acute stage of super-refractory status epilepticus in a pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jainn-Jim; Lin, Kuang-Lin; Chan, Oi-Wa; Hsia, Shao-Hsuan; Wang, Huei-Shyong

    2015-04-01

    A ketogenic diet has been used successfully to treat intractable epilepsy. However, the role of early intravenous initiation of ketogenic diet in the acute phase of super-refractory status epilepticus is not well-described. An intravenous ketogenic diet was administered to a boy with super-refractory status epilepticus. At 24 hours after intravenous ketogenic diet, moderate ketosis appeared, and thiamylal was successfully weaned at 70 hours after admission. An intravenous ketogenic regimen led to subsequent ketosis and seizure control in a child with super-refractory status epilepticus. Early induction of ketosis may be a novel strategy to effectively treat super-refractory status epilepticus. Although there are few data regarding the early use of intravenous ketogenic diet in the treatment of super-refractory status epilepticus, it may be considered an alternative option. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Acute Systemic Complications of Convulsive Status Epilepticus-A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Raoul; Dittrich, Tolga; Semmlack, Saskia; Rüegg, Stephan; Marsch, Stephan; Kaplan, Peter W

    2018-01-01

    Status epilepticus is a neurologic emergency with high morbidity and mortality requiring neurointensive care and treatment of systemic complications. This systematic review compiles the current literature on acute systemic complications of generalized convulsive status epilepticus in adults and their immediate clinical impact along with recommendations for optimal neurointensive care. We searched PubMed, Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane library for articles published between 1960 and 2016 and reporting on systemic complications of convulsive status epilepticus. All identified studies were screened for eligibility by two independent reviewers. Key data were extracted using standardized data collection forms. Thirty-two of 3,046 screened articles were included. Acute manifestations and complications reported in association with generalized convulsive status epilepticus can affect all organ systems fueling complex cascades and multiple organ interactions. Most reported complications result from generalized excessive muscle contractions that increase body temperature and serum potassium levels and may interfere with proper and coordinated function of respiratory muscles followed by hypoxia and respiratory acidosis. Increased plasma catecholamines can cause a decay of skeletal muscle cells and cardiac function, including stress cardiomyopathy. Systemic complications are often underestimated or misinterpreted as they may mimic underlying causes of generalized convulsive status epilepticus or treatment-related adverse events. Management of generalized convulsive status epilepticus should center on the administration of antiseizure drugs, treatment of the underlying causes, and the attendant systemic consequences to prevent secondary seizure-related injuries. Heightened awareness, systematic clinical assessment, and diagnostic workup and management based on the proposed algorithm are advocated as they are keys to optimal outcome.

  7. Therapeutic burst-suppression coma in pediatric febrile refractory status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jainn-Jim; Chou, Cheng-Che; Lan, Shih-Yun; Hsiao, Hsiang-Ju; Wang, Yu; Chan, Oi-Wa; Hsia, Shao-Hsuan; Wang, Huei-Shyong; Lin, Kuang-Lin

    2017-09-01

    Evidence for the beneficial effect of therapeutic burst-suppression coma in pediatric patients with febrile refractory status epilepticus is limited, and the clinical outcomes of this treatment strategy are largely unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore the outcomes of therapeutic burst-suppression coma in a series of children with febrile refractory status epilepticus. We retrospectively reviewed consecutive pediatric patients with febrile refractory status epilepticus admitted to our pediatric intensive care unit between January 2000 and December 2013. The clinical characteristics were analyzed. Thirty-five patients (23 boys; age range: 1-18years) were enrolled, of whom 28 (80%) developed super-refractory status epilepticus. All of the patients received the continuous administration of intravenous antiepileptic drugs for febrile refractory status epilepticus, and 26 (74.3%) achieved therapeutic burst-suppression coma. All of the patients received mechanical ventilatory support, and 26 (74.3%) received inotropic agents. Eight (22.9%) patients died within 1month. The neurologically functional outcomes at 6months were good in six (27.3%) of the 22 survivors, of whom two returned to clinical baseline. The patients with therapeutic burst-suppression coma were significantly associated with hemodynamic support than the patients with electrographic seizures control (p=0.03), and had a trend of higher 1-month mortality rate, worse 6months outcomes, and a longer duration of hospitalization. Our results suggest that therapeutic burst-suppression coma to treat febrile refractory status epilepticus may lead to an increased risk of hemodynamic instability and a trend of worse outcomes. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The clinical outcome and neuroimaging of acute encephalopathy after status epilepticus in Dravet syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiaojuan; Ye, Jintang; Zeng, Qi; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Xiaoling; Liu, Aijie; Yang, Zhixian; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wu, Xiru; Zhang, Yuehua

    2018-06-01

    To analyze the clinical outcome and neuroimaging over a long duration follow-up in the currently largest series of acute encephalopathy after status epilepticus in patients with Dravet syndrome. Clinical and neuroimaging data of patients with Dravet syndrome with a history of acute encephalopathy (coma >24h) after status epilepticus from February 2005 to December 2016 at Peking University First Hospital were reviewed retrospectively. Thirty-five patients (15 males, 20 females) with a history of acute encephalopathy were enrolled from a total of 624 patients with Dravet syndrome (5.6%). The median onset age of acute encephalopathy was 3 years 1 month. The duration of status epilepticus varied between 40 minutes to 12 hours. Thirty-four patients had a high fever when status epilepticus occurred, and only one had a normal temperature. Coma lasted from 2 to 20 days. Twelve patients died and 23 survived with massive neurological regression. The median follow-up time was 2 years 1 month. Neuroimaging of 20 out of 23 survivors during the recovery phase showed diverse degrees of cortical atrophy with or without subcortical lesions. Acute encephalopathy after status epilepticus is more prone to occur in patients with Dravet syndrome who had a high fever. The mortality rate is high in severe cases. Survivors are left with severe neurological sequelae but often with either no seizure or low seizure frequency. Acute encephalopathy is more prone to occur in patients with Dravet syndrome with a high fever. The mortality rate is high for acute encephalopathy after status epilepticus in patients with Dravet syndrome. Survivors have neurological sequelae. © 2018 The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Mac Keith Press.

  9. Recovery from near drowning and postanoxic status epilepticus with controlled hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pont, A C J M; de Jager, C P C; van den Bergh, W M; Schultz, M J

    2011-04-01

    A diver was resuscitated after cardiac arrest due to near drowning and was hypothermic on hospital arrival. During rewarming, status epilepticus occurred, previously identified as a predictor of poor outcome. The seizures responded well to treatment with antiepileptic drugs and controlled hypothermia. After six weeks, the patient had completely recovered. This case supports the hypothesis that hypothermia offers neuroprotection, even in the presence of status epilepticus. We recommend that near-drowning victims who are comatose after resuscitation for cardiac arrest be treated with controlled mild hypothermia for 12 to 24 hours.

  10. Extreme delta brush evolving into status epilepticus in a patient with anti-NMDA encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Herlopian, MD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Extreme delta brush (EDB is an EEG pattern unique to anti-NMDA encephalitis. It is correlated with seizures and status epilepticus in patients who have a prolonged course of illness. The etiology of the underlying association between EDB and seizures is not understood. We present a patient with anti-NMDA encephalitis who developed status epilepticus evolving from the high frequency activity of the extreme delta brush. This case demonstrates that EDB is not only a marker for a greater propensity for seizures but also directly implicated in seizure generation.

  11. Diagnostic accuracy of the Salzburg EEG criteria for non-convulsive status epilepticus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leitinger, Markus; Trinka, Eugen; Gardella, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Background Several EEG criteria have been proposed for diagnosis of non-convulsive status epilepticus (NCSE), but none have been clinically validated. We aimed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of the EEG criteria proposed by a panel of experts at the fourth London–Innsbruck Colloquium on Status...... Epilepticus in Salzburg, 2013 (henceforth called the Salzburg criteria). Methods We did a retrospective, diagnostic accuracy study using EEG recordings from patients admitted for neurological symptoms or signs to three centres in two countries (Danish Epilepsy Centre, Dianalund, Denmark; Aarhus University...

  12. Changes on diffusion-weighted MRI with focal motor status epilepticus: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loevblad, K.O.; Senn, P.; Zutter, D.; Bassetti, C.; Donati, F.; Loevblad, K.O.; Zeller, O.; Schroth, G.

    2003-01-01

    Transient imaging abnormalities, including changes on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), may be seen in focal status epilepticus. The changes on DWI provide an insight into the pathophysiology. We report a 53-year-old man with focal motor status epilepticus involving the left hand, arm and face with focal slowing on EEG. The apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) were higher in the affected hemisphere than on the other side. At 10 days and 6 weeks after the end of the seizures, we saw normal ADCs and atrophy of the affected hemisphere. We conclude that the MRI findings indicate both cytotoxic and vasogenic oedema during seizure activity and subsequent loss of brain parenchyma. (orig.)

  13. Febrile infection-related status epilepticus in a child after a common infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anne Helene; Hansen, Lars Kjærsgaard

    2014-01-01

    A 13-year-old boy developed seizures and intractable status epilepticus a week after having had a sore throat. Ketogenic diet possibly had some effect. Antibodies to calmodulin dependent protein kinase II were found and could possibly suggest an immunologic aetiology.......A 13-year-old boy developed seizures and intractable status epilepticus a week after having had a sore throat. Ketogenic diet possibly had some effect. Antibodies to calmodulin dependent protein kinase II were found and could possibly suggest an immunologic aetiology....

  14. Hippocampal sclerosis and status epilepticus: cause or consequence? A MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuster, Gustavo Wruck; Braga-Neto, Pedro; Santos-Neto, Denizart; Santana, Maria Teresa Garcia; Barsottini, Orlando Graziani; Maia Junior, Antonio Carlos Martins

    2007-01-01

    Background: Transient imaging abnormalities, including changes on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), may be seen in status epilepticus. These abnormalities can be followed by hippocampal sclerosis. Case Report: We report a 15-year-old lady with focal non convulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) and focal slowing on EEG. DWI exhibited abnormal hyperintense signals in bilateral temporal and insular cortices. After 3 weeks, MRI performed a localized hippocampal atrophy. Conclusion: The MRI findings indicated vasogenic and cytotoxic edema during seizure activity and subsequent loss of brain parenchyma. (author)

  15. Changes on diffusion-weighted MRI with focal motor status epilepticus: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loevblad, K O [Neuroradiology, Radiodiagnostic, Hopital Cantonal de Geneve HUG, Geneve (Switzerland); Senn, P; Zutter, D; Bassetti, C; Donati, F [Dept. of Neurology, Inselspital, Univ. Hospital, Berne (Switzerland); Loevblad, K O; Zeller, O; Schroth, G [Div. of Neuroradiology, Inselspital, Univ. Hospital, Berne (Switzerland)

    2003-04-01

    Transient imaging abnormalities, including changes on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), may be seen in focal status epilepticus. The changes on DWI provide an insight into the pathophysiology. We report a 53-year-old man with focal motor status epilepticus involving the left hand, arm and face with focal slowing on EEG. The apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) were higher in the affected hemisphere than on the other side. At 10 days and 6 weeks after the end of the seizures, we saw normal ADCs and atrophy of the affected hemisphere. We conclude that the MRI findings indicate both cytotoxic and vasogenic oedema during seizure activity and subsequent loss of brain parenchyma. (orig.)

  16. Hemispherotomy in children with electrical status epilepticus of sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Anna; Strahle, Jennifer; Vellimana, Ananth K; Limbrick, David D; Smyth, Matthew D; Bertrand, Mary

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Electrical status epilepticus of sleep (ESES) is a rare electrographic pattern associated with global regression, which is often poorly responsive to traditional epilepsy treatments and can have a devastating and permanent neurocognitive outcome. The authors analyzed clinical, electroencephalographic, and neuropsychological outcomes in 9 patients with refractory ESES treated with functional hemispherotomy to illustrate the wide clinical spectrum associated with the disease and explore the role of hemispherotomy in its treatment. METHODS During the period between 2003 and 2015, 80 patients underwent hemispherotomy at the authors' institution. Video electroencephalography (EEG) reports were reviewed for ESES or continuous spikes and waves during sleep (CSWS). Patients with preoperative ESES (> 85% slow-wave sleep occupied by spike waves), a unilateral structural lesion amenable to surgery, and more than 6 months of follow-up data were included in the analysis. Clinical data, EEG recordings, neuropsychological testing, and parental and clinician reports were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS Nine patients were eligible for study inclusion. Age at seizure onset ranged from birth to 4.2 years (mean 1.9 years), age at ESES diagnosis ranged from 3.5 to 8.8 years (mean 6.0 years), and age at hemispherotomy ranged from 3.7 to 11.5 years (mean 6.8 years). All patients had drug-resistant epilepsy. The duration of epilepsy prior to hemispherotomy ranged from 2.7 to 8.9 years (mean ± SD, 5.0 ± 2.2 years). Engel Class I seizure outcome was observed in all 9 children, with a mean follow-up of 3.0 years (range 0.5-6.1 years). Hemispherotomy terminated ESES in 6 of 6 patients with available postoperative sleep EEG. All children had preoperative neuropsychological impairments. Developmental regression was halted postoperatively, but none of the children returned to their original pre-ESES baseline. Four children demonstrated academic gains, 2 of whom transitioned to

  17. Does semiology of status epilepticus have an impact on treatment response and outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baysal-Kirac, Leyla; Feddersen, Berend; Einhellig, Marion; Rémi, Jan; Noachtar, Soheyl

    2018-06-01

    This study investigated whether there is an association between semiology of status epilepticus (SE) and response to treatment and outcome. Two hundred ninety-eight consecutive adult patients (160 females, 138 males) with SE at the University of Munich Hospital were prospectively enrolled. Mean age was 63.2±17.5 (18-97) years. Patient demographics, SE semiology and electroencephalography (EEG) findings, etiology, duration of SE, treatment, and outcome measures were investigated. Status epilepticus semiology was classified according to a semiological status classification. Patient's short-term outcome was determined by Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). The most frequent SE type was nonconvulsive SE (NCSE) (39.2%), mostly associated with cerebrovascular etiology (46.6%). A potentially fatal etiology was found in 34.8% of the patients. More than half (60.7%) of the patients had poor short-term outcome (GOS≤3) with an overall mortality of 12.4%. SE was refractory to treatment in 21.5% of the patients. Older age, potentially fatal etiology, systemic infections, NCSE in coma, refractory SE, treatment with anesthetics, long SE duration (>24h), low Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) (≤8) at onset, and high Status Epilepticus Severity Score (STESS-3) (≥3) were associated with poor short-term outcome and death (pStatus epilepticus semiology has no independent association with outcome, but potentially fatal etiology and low GCS were strong predictive factors for poor short-term outcome of SE. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Quantitative Evaluation of Medial Temporal Lobe Morphology in Children with Febrile Status Epilepticus: Results of the FEBSTAT Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, A C; Gomes, W A; Shinnar, S; Hesdorffer, D C; Bagiella, E; Lewis, D V; Bello, J A; Chan, S; MacFall, J; Chen, M; Pellock, J M; Nordli, D R; Frank, L M; Moshé, S L; Shinnar, R C; Sun, S

    2016-12-01

    The pathogenesis of febrile status epilepticus is poorly understood, but prior studies have suggested an association with temporal lobe abnormalities, including hippocampal malrotation. We used a quantitative morphometric method to assess the association between temporal lobe morphology and febrile status epilepticus. Brain MR imaging was performed in children presenting with febrile status epilepticus and control subjects as part of the Consequences of Prolonged Febrile Seizures in Childhood study. Medial temporal lobe morphologic parameters were measured manually, including the distance of the hippocampus from the midline, hippocampal height:width ratio, hippocampal angle, collateral sulcus angle, and width of the temporal horn. Temporal lobe morphologic parameters were correlated with the presence of visual hippocampal malrotation; the strongest association was with left temporal horn width (P status epilepticus, encompassing both the right and left sides. This association was statistically strongest in the right temporal lobe, whereas hippocampal malrotation was almost exclusively left-sided in this cohort. The association between temporal lobe measurements and febrile status epilepticus persisted when the analysis was restricted to cases with visually normal imaging findings without hippocampal malrotation or other visually apparent abnormalities. Several component morphologic features of hippocampal malrotation are independently associated with febrile status epilepticus, even when complete hippocampal malrotation is absent. Unexpectedly, this association predominantly involves the right temporal lobe. These findings suggest that a spectrum of bilateral temporal lobe anomalies are associated with febrile status epilepticus in children. Hippocampal malrotation may represent a visually apparent subset of this spectrum. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  19. Intravenous levetiracetam terminates refractory status epilepticus in two patients with migrating partial seizures in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilio, Maria Roberta; Bianchi, Roberto; Balestri, Martina; Onofri, Alfredo; Giovannini, Simona; Di Capua, Matteo; Vigevano, Federico

    2009-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of intravenous (IV) levetiracetam in refractory status epilepticus of migrating partial seizures in infancy (MPSI). IV levetiracetam was infused in two infants, first as a loading dose of 60mg/kg in 30min, then at 30mg/kg twice a day. Both infants were continuously monitored with video-EEG before, during and after the drug trial. Blood count, liver enzymes, serum creatinine, ammonia and lactate blood levels were performed repeatedly before and after the IV levetiracetam administration. Follow-up was of 16 and 10 months. EEG monitoring allowed the diagnosis of MPSI, showing the typical seizures pattern in both patients. IV levetiracetam was effective in stopping status epilepticus in both infants. Levetiracetam also prevented the recurrence of status epilepticus during follow-up. No adverse reactions were observed during the infusion phase or during follow-up. MPSI is a newly recognized epileptic syndrome characterized by early onset of intractable partial seizures arisingly independently and sequentially from both hemispheres, migrating from one region of the brain to another and from one hemisphere to another. We report the efficacy of intravenous levetiracetam in resolving refractory status epilepticus in two infants with this new epilepsy syndrome.

  20. Treatment of electroencephalographic status epilepticus after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (TELSTAR): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijter, Barry J.; van Putten, Michel J. A. M.; Horn, Janneke; Blans, Michiel J.; Beishuizen, Albertus; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Hofmeijer, Jeannette

    2014-01-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) status epilepticus is described in 10 to 35% of patients with postanoxic encephalopathy after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation and is associated with case fatality rates of 90 to 100%. It is unclear whether these EEG patterns represent a condition to be treated

  1. Management protocols for status epilepticus in the pediatric emergency room: systematic review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheuk C. Au

    2017-11-01

    Conclusions: All of the guidelines share a similar framework for management of status epilepticus. The choice in route of administration and drug type varied across guidelines. Hence, the adoption of a particular guideline should take account of local practice options in health service delivery.

  2. An animal model of nonconvulsive status epilepticus: a contribution to clinical controversies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kršek, Pavel; Mikulecká, Anna; Druga, Rastislav; Hliňák, Zdeněk; Kubová, Hana; Mareš, Pavel

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 2 (2001), s. 171-180 ISSN 0013-9580 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/97/0552; GA AV ČR IAA7011603 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : complex partial status epilepticus * pilocarpine * epileptic brain damage Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.271, year: 2001

  3. Cortical interhemispheric responses to rhythmic stimulation are influenced by status epilepticus in developing rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tsenov, Grygoriy; Mareš, Pavel

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. S6 (2005), s. 209-210 ISSN 0013-9580. [International Epilepsy Congress /26./. 28.08.2005-01.09.2005, Paris] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : status epilepticus * interhemispheric responses * developing rats Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  4. Outcome of status epilepticus in immature rats varies according to the paraldehyde treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubová, Hana; Rejchrtová, Jana; Redkozubova, Olga; Mareš, Pavel

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 46, Suppl. 5 (2005), s. 38-42 ISSN 0013-9580 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NF6474 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : status epilepticus * paraldehyde * long-term consequences Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.227, year: 2005

  5. Changes of cortical interhemispheric responses after status epilepticus in immature rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, Pavel; Tsenov, Grygoriy; Aleksakhina, Katarina; Druga, Rastislav; Kubová, Hana

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 46, Suppl. 5 (2005), s. 31-37 ISSN 0013-9580 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/03/0770 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : status epilepticus * transcallosal responses * ontogeny Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.227, year: 2005

  6. Prevention of Status Epilepticus in Dravet Syndrome: Nationwide Survey in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Child neurologists and epileptologists at various university centers in Japan were surveyed by questionnaire to identify the most effective strategies for management of and prophylaxis against status epilepticus (SE in children with severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy (SMEI; Dravet syndrome, especially when associated with fever.

  7. Safety and pharmacokinetics of intravenous levetiracetam infusion as add-on in status epilepticus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uges, Joris W F; van Huizen, Marc D; Engelsman, Jeroen; Wilms, Erik B; Touw, Daniel J; Peeters, Els; Vecht, Charles J

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the feasibility and safety of intravenous (iv) levetiracetam (LEV) added to the standard therapeutic regimen in adults with status epilepticus (SE), and as secondary objective to assess a population pharmacokinetic (PK) model for ivLEV in patients with SE. METHODS: In 12 adults

  8. Treatment of convulsive status epilepticus in the UMCG: A retrospective, observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaskamp, D.R.M.; Brouwer, O.F.; Callenbach, P.M.C.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Little is known about clinical practice with respect to the application of guidelines in the treatment of Convulsive Status Epilepticus (CSE). This retrospective, observational study evaluated treatment of episodes of CSE in children at the University Medical Centre Groningen (UMCG).

  9. Role of Antineuronal Antibodies in Children with Encephalopathy and Febrile Status Epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang-Lin Lin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Status epilepticus in childhood is more common, with a different range of causes and a lower risk of death, than convulsive status epilepticus in adults. Acute central nervous system infections appear to be markers for morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, central nervous infection is usually presumed in these conditions. Many aspects of the pathogenesis of acute encephalitis and acute febrile encephalopathy with status epilepticus have been clarified in the past decade. The pathogenesis is divided into direct pathogens invasion or immune-mediated mechanisms. Over the past few decades, the number of antineuronal antibodies to ion channels, receptors, and other synaptic proteins described in association with central nervous system disorders has increased dramatically, especially their role in pediatric encephalitis and status epilepticus. These antineuronal antibodies are divided according to the location of their respective antigens: (1 intracellular antigens, including glutamic acid decarboxylase and classical onconeural antigens such as Hu (antineuronal nuclear antibody 1, ANNA1, Ma2, Yo (Purkinje cell autoantibody, PCA1, Ri (antineuronal nuclear antibody 2, ANNA2, CV2/CRMP5, and amphiphysin; and (2 cell membrane ion channels or surface antigens including voltage-gated potassium channel receptor, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor, α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor, γ-aminobutyric acid(B receptor, leucine-rich glioma-inactivated protein 1, and contactin-associated protein-like 2. Identifying the mechanism of the disease may have important therapeutic implications.

  10. Status epilepticus in the Netherlands. A study on causes, therapy and outcome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtes, F.B.J.

    2005-01-01

    This retrospective file study investigated the results of various types of status epilepticus (SE) in the Netherlands. We evaluated 576 adult patients and 112 children. The diagnosis of SE appeared wrong in about 20% of the cases. In both adults (346) and children (82) with generalized convulsive

  11. Progranulin and Its Related MicroRNAs after Status Epilepticus: Possible Mechanisms of Neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körtvelyessy, Peter; Huchtemann, Tessa; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Bittner, Daniel M

    2017-02-24

    The current knowledge about neuroprotective mechanisms in humans after status epilepticus is scarce. One reason is the difficulty to measure possible mediators of these neuroprotective mechanisms. The dawn of microRNA detection in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the recent advancements in measuring proteins in the CSF such as progranulin, which is, e.g., responsible for neurite outgrowth and limiting exceeding neuroinflammatory responses, have given us new insights into putative neuroprotective mechanisms following status epilepticus. This should complement the animal data. In this review, we cover what is known about the role of progranulin as well as the links between microRNA changes and the progranulin pathway following status epilepticus in humans and animals hypothesizing neuroprotective and neurorehabilitative effects. Progranulin has also been found to feature prominently in the neuroprotective processes under hypoxic conditions and initiating neurorehabilitative processes. These properties may be used therapeutically, e.g., through drugs that raise the progranulin levels and therefore the cerebral progranulin levels as well with the goal of improving the outcome after status epilepticus.

  12. Refractory status epilepticus and glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies in adults: presentation, treatment and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, Ayaz M; Vines, Brannon L; Miller, David W; Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Amara, Amy W

    2016-03-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GAD-Abs) have been implicated in refractory epilepsy. The association with refractory status epilepticus in adults has been rarely described. We discuss our experience in managing three adult patients who presented with refractory status epilepticus associated with GAD-Abs. Case series with retrospective chart and literature review. Three patients without pre-existing epilepsy who presented to our institution with generalized seizures between 2013 and 2014 were identified. Seizures proved refractory to first and second-line therapies and persisted beyond 24 hours. Patient 1 was a 22-year-old female who had elevated serum GAD-Ab titres at 0.49 mmol/l (normal: status epilepticus. Causation cannot be established since GAD-Abs may be elevated secondary to concurrent autoimmune diseases or formed de novo in response to GAD antigen exposure by neuronal injury. Based on this report and available literature, there may be a role for immuno- and chemotherapy in the management of refractory status epilepticus associated with GAD-Abs.

  13. Preliminary results of the global audit of treatment of refractory status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlisi, M; Hocker, S; Grade, M; Trinka, E; Shorvon, S

    2015-08-01

    The treatment of refractory and super refractory status epilepticus is a "terra incognita" from the point of view of evidence-based medicine. As randomized or controlled studies that are sufficiently powered are not feasible in relation to the many therapies and treatment approaches available, we carried out an online multinational audit (registry) in which neurologists or intensivists caring for patients with status epilepticus may prospectively enter patients who required general anesthesia to control the status epilepticus (SE). To date, 488 cases from 44 different countries have been collected. Most of the patients had no history of epilepsy and had a cryptogenic etiology. First-line treatment was delayed and not in line with current guidelines. The most widely used anesthetic of first choice was midazolam (59%), followed by propofol and barbiturates. Ketamine was used in most severe cases. Other therapies were administered in 35% of the cases, mainly steroids and immunotherapy. Seizure control was achieved in 74% of the patients. Twenty-two percent of patients died during treatment, and four percent had treatment actively withdrawn because of an anticipated poor outcome. The neurological outcome was good in 36% and poor in 39.3% of cases, while 25% died during hospitalization. Factors that positively influenced outcome were younger age, history of epilepsy, and low number of different anesthetics tried. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Status Epilepticus". Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Recovery from near drowning and postanoxic status epilepticus with controlled hypothermia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Pont, A C J M; de Jager, C P C; van den Bergh, W M; Schultz, M J

    A diver was resuscitated after cardiac arrest due to near drowning and was hypothermic on hospital arrival. During rewarming, status epilepticus occurred, previously identified as a predictor of poor outcome. The seizures responded well to treatment with antiepileptic drugs and controlled

  15. Recovery from near drowning and postanoxic status epilepticus with controlled hypothermia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Pont, A. C. J. M.; de Jager, C. P. C.; van den Bergh, W. M.; Schultz, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    A diver was resuscitated after cardiac arrest due to near drowning and was hypothermic on hospital arrival. During rewarming, status epilepticus occurred, previously identified as a predictor of poor outcome. The seizures responded well to treatment with antiepileptic drugs and controlled

  16. Discovery of recurrent multiple brain states in non-convulsive status epilepticus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria; van Putten, Maurice H.P.M.

    2007-01-01

    Objective We study burst-like patterns of epileptiform discharges in non-convulsive status epilepticus (SE). Methods Epileptiform burst-like transients were identified by estimating the amplitude envelope of the EEG signal, and recurrence and similarities were identified by pairwise matching in the

  17. Unstandardized treatment of electroencephalographic status epilepticus does not improve outcome of comatose patients after cardiac arrest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmeijer, Jeannette; Cloostermans, M.C.; Beishuizen, A.; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Electroencephalographic status epilepticus occurs in 9–35% of comatose patients after cardiac arrest. Mortality is 90–100%. It is unclear whether (some) seizure patterns represent a condition in which anti-epileptic treatment may improve outcome, or severe ischemic damage, in which

  18. Reversible changes in echo planar perfusion- and diffusion-weighted MRI in status epilepticus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flacke, S.; Keller, E.; Urbach, H.; Wuellner, U.; Hamzei, F.

    2000-01-01

    Perfusion imaging (PI) demonstrated increased perfusion and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) showed high signal limited to the left temporoparietal cortex in a 68-year-old man with nonconvulsive status epilepticus. The EEG showed a slow delta-wave focus. The patient recovered and PI, DWI and EEG changes completely resolved. (orig.)

  19. Reversible changes in echo planar perfusion- and diffusion-weighted MRI in status epilepticus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flacke, S; Keller, E; Urbach, H [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Bonn (Germany); Wuellner, U; Hamzei, F [Dept. of Neurology, Univ. of Bonn (Germany)

    2000-02-01

    Perfusion imaging (PI) demonstrated increased perfusion and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) showed high signal limited to the left temporoparietal cortex in a 68-year-old man with nonconvulsive status epilepticus. The EEG showed a slow delta-wave focus. The patient recovered and PI, DWI and EEG changes completely resolved. (orig.)

  20. Remission of encephalopathy with status epilepticus (ESES) during sleep renormalizes regulation of slow wave sleep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bölsterli, Bigna K.; Gardella, Elena; Pavlidis, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Objective: In previous studies, we showed an altered overnight decrease of non–rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep slow waves in children with encephalopathy related to status epilepticus during sleep (ESES). Here, we test the hypothesis that these alterations renormalize after remission of ESES...

  1. Ten patients with refractory status epilepticus in an intensive care department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Maaten, JC; van Schijndel, RJM; Heimans, JJ; Schreuder, WO

    1998-01-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is a serious disease, associated with a high morbidity and mortality, particularly if refractory to initial therapy. We describe the clinical manifestations and outcome in ten cases with refractory SE admitted to our medical intensive care unit. Three of these selected group

  2. Landau-Kleffner Syndrome, Electrical Status Epilepticus in Slow Wave Sleep, and Language Regression in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVicar, Kathryn A.; Shinnar, Shlomo

    2004-01-01

    The Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS) and electrical status epilepticus in slow wave sleep (ESES) are rare childhood-onset epileptic encephalopathies in which loss of language skills occurs in the context of an epileptiform EEG activated in sleep. Although in LKS the loss of function is limited to language, in ESES there is a wider spectrum of…

  3. Treatment of electroencephalopgraphic status epilepticus after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (TELSTAR): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijter, Barry Johannes; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria; Horn, J.; Blans, M.J.; Beishuizen, A.; van Rootselaar, A.F.; Hofmeijer, Jeannette

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Electroencephalographic (EEG) status epilepticus is described in 10 to 35% of patients with postanoxic encephalopathy after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation and is associated with case fatality rates of 90 to 100%. It is unclear whether these EEG patterns represent a

  4. Progranulin and Its Related MicroRNAs after Status Epilepticus: Possible Mechanisms of Neuroprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Körtvelyessy

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The current knowledge about neuroprotective mechanisms in humans after status epilepticus is scarce. One reason is the difficulty to measure possible mediators of these neuroprotective mechanisms. The dawn of microRNA detection in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and the recent advancements in measuring proteins in the CSF such as progranulin, which is, e.g., responsible for neurite outgrowth and limiting exceeding neuroinflammatory responses, have given us new insights into putative neuroprotective mechanisms following status epilepticus. This should complement the animal data. In this review, we cover what is known about the role of progranulin as well as the links between microRNA changes and the progranulin pathway following status epilepticus in humans and animals hypothesizing neuroprotective and neurorehabilitative effects. Progranulin has also been found to feature prominently in the neuroprotective processes under hypoxic conditions and initiating neurorehabilitative processes. These properties may be used therapeutically, e.g., through drugs that raise the progranulin levels and therefore the cerebral progranulin levels as well with the goal of improving the outcome after status epilepticus.

  5. Combinations of ketamine and atropine are neuroprotective and reduce neuroinflammation after a toxic status epilepticus in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhote, Franck; Carpentier, Pierre; Barbier, Laure; Peinnequin, André; Baille, Valérie; Pernot, Fabien; Testylier, Guy; Beaup, Claire; Foquin, Annie

    2012-01-01

    Epileptic seizures and status epilepticus (SE) induced by the poisoning with organophosphorus nerve agents (OP), like soman, are accompanied by neuroinflammation whose role in seizure-related brain damage (SRBD) is not clear. Antagonists of the NMDA glutamate ionotropic receptors are currently among the few compounds able to arrest seizures and provide neuroprotection even during refractory status epilepticus (RSE). Racemic ketamine (KET), in combination with atropine sulfate (AS), was previously shown to counteract seizures and SRBD in soman-poisoned guinea-pigs. In a mouse model of severe soman-induced SE, we assessed the potentials of KET/AS combinations as a treatment for SE/RSE-induced SRBD and neuroinflammation. When starting 30 min after soman challenge, a protocol involving six injections of a sub-anesthetic dose of KET (25 mg/kg) was evaluated on body weight loss, brain damage, and neuroinflammation whereas during RSE, anesthetic protocols were considered (KET 100 mg/kg). After confirming that during RSE, KET injection was to be repeated despite some iatrogenic deaths, we used these proof-of-concept protocols to study the changes in mRNA and related protein contents of some inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules in cortex and hippocampus 48 h post-challenge. In both cases, the KET/AS combinations showed important neuroprotective effects, suppressed neutrophil granulocyte infiltration and partially suppressed glial activation. KET/AS could also reduce the increase in mRNA and related pro-inflammatory proteins provoked by the poisoning. In conclusion, the present study confirms that KET/AS treatment has a strong potential for SE/RSE management following OP poisoning. The mechanisms involved in the reduction of central neuroinflammation remain to be studied. -- Highlights: ► During soman-induced status epilepticus, ketamine-atropine limit brain damage. ► Molecular neuroinflammatory response is strongly decreased. ► Glial activation is

  6. Combinations of ketamine and atropine are neuroprotective and reduce neuroinflammation after a toxic status epilepticus in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhote, Franck [Département de Toxicologie et risques chimiques, Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des armées – Centre de recherches du Service de santé des armées IRBA-CRSSA, 24 avenue des Maquis du Grésivaudan, B.P. 87, 38702 La Tronche cedex (France); Carpentier, Pierre; Barbier, Laure [Département de Toxicologie et risques chimiques, Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des armées – Centre de recherches du Service de santé des armées IRBA-CRSSA, 24 avenue des Maquis du Grésivaudan, B.P. 87, 38702 La Tronche cedex (France); Peinnequin, André [Département Effets biologiques des rayonnements, Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des armées – Centre de recherches du Service de santé des armées IRBA-CRSSA, 24 avenue des Maquis du Grésivaudan, B.P. 87, 38702 La Tronche cedex (France); Baille, Valérie; Pernot, Fabien; Testylier, Guy; Beaup, Claire; Foquin, Annie [Département de Toxicologie et risques chimiques, Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des armées – Centre de recherches du Service de santé des armées IRBA-CRSSA, 24 avenue des Maquis du Grésivaudan, B.P. 87, 38702 La Tronche cedex (France); others, and

    2012-03-01

    Epileptic seizures and status epilepticus (SE) induced by the poisoning with organophosphorus nerve agents (OP), like soman, are accompanied by neuroinflammation whose role in seizure-related brain damage (SRBD) is not clear. Antagonists of the NMDA glutamate ionotropic receptors are currently among the few compounds able to arrest seizures and provide neuroprotection even during refractory status epilepticus (RSE). Racemic ketamine (KET), in combination with atropine sulfate (AS), was previously shown to counteract seizures and SRBD in soman-poisoned guinea-pigs. In a mouse model of severe soman-induced SE, we assessed the potentials of KET/AS combinations as a treatment for SE/RSE-induced SRBD and neuroinflammation. When starting 30 min after soman challenge, a protocol involving six injections of a sub-anesthetic dose of KET (25 mg/kg) was evaluated on body weight loss, brain damage, and neuroinflammation whereas during RSE, anesthetic protocols were considered (KET 100 mg/kg). After confirming that during RSE, KET injection was to be repeated despite some iatrogenic deaths, we used these proof-of-concept protocols to study the changes in mRNA and related protein contents of some inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules in cortex and hippocampus 48 h post-challenge. In both cases, the KET/AS combinations showed important neuroprotective effects, suppressed neutrophil granulocyte infiltration and partially suppressed glial activation. KET/AS could also reduce the increase in mRNA and related pro-inflammatory proteins provoked by the poisoning. In conclusion, the present study confirms that KET/AS treatment has a strong potential for SE/RSE management following OP poisoning. The mechanisms involved in the reduction of central neuroinflammation remain to be studied. -- Highlights: ► During soman-induced status epilepticus, ketamine-atropine limit brain damage. ► Molecular neuroinflammatory response is strongly decreased. ► Glial activation is

  7. α-Asarone Attenuates Cognitive Deficit in a Pilocarpine-Induced Status Epilepticus Rat Model via a Decrease in the Nuclear Factor-κB Activation and Reduction in Microglia Neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-juan Liu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundTemporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is one of the most drug-resistant types of epilepsy with about 80% of TLE patients falling into this category. Increasing evidence suggests that neuroinflammation, which has a critical role in the epileptogenesis of TLE, is associated with microglial activation. Therefore, agents that act toward the alleviation in microglial activation and the attenuation of neuroinflammation are promising candidates to treat TLE. α-Asarone is a major active ingredient of the Acori Graminei Rhizoma used in Traditional Chinese Medicine, which has been used to improve various disease conditions including stroke and convulsions. In addition, an increasing number of studies suggested that α-asarone can attenuate microglia-mediated neuroinflammation. Thus, we hypothesized that α-asarone is a promising neuroprotective agent for the treatment of the TLE.MethodsThe present study evaluated the therapeutic effects of α-asarone on microglia-mediated neuroinflammation and neuroprotection in vitro and in vivo, using an untreated control group, a status epilepticus (SE-induced group, and an SE-induced α-asarone pretreated group. A pilocarpine-induced rat model of TLE was established to investigate the neuroprotective effects of α-asarone in vivo. For the in vitro study, lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated primary cultured microglial cells were used.ResultsThe results indicated that the brain microglial activation in the rats of the SE rat model led to important learning and memory deficit. Preventive treatment with α-asarone restrained microglial activation and reduced learning and memory deficit. In the in vitro studies, α-asarone significantly suppressed proinflammatory cytokine production in primary cultured microglial cells and attenuated the LPS-stimulated neuroinflammatory responses. Our mechanistic study revealed that α-asarone inhibited inflammatory processes by regulation the transcription levels of kappa-B, by blocking

  8. Age-dependent mortality in the pilocarpine model of status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Robert E; Deshpande, Laxmikant S; Holbert, William H; Churn, Severn B; DeLorenzo, Robert J

    2009-04-10

    Status epilepticus (SE) is an acute neurological emergency associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Age has been shown to be a critical factor in determining outcome after SE. Understanding the causes of this increased mortality with aging by developing an animal model to study this condition would play a major role in studying mechanisms to limit the mortality due to SE. Here we employed pilocarpine to induce SE in rats aged between 5 and 28 weeks. Similar to clinical studies in man, we observed that age was a significant predictor of mortality following SE. While no deaths were observed in 5-week-old animals, mortality due to SE increased progressively with age and reached 90% in 28-week-old animals. There was no correlation between the age of animals and severity of SE. With increasing age mortality occurred earlier after the onset of SE. These results indicate that pilocarpine-induced SE in the rat provides a useful model to study age-dependent SE-induced mortality and indicates the importance of using animal models to elucidate the mechanisms contributing to SE-induced mortality and the development of novel therapeutic interventions to prevent SE-induced death.

  9. Intravenous Lacosamide in Pediatric Status Epilepticus: An Open-Label Efficacy and Safety Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddar, Karan; Sharma, Rohan; Ng, Yu-Tze

    2016-08-01

    Lacosamide is an antiepilepsy drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration for patients aged 17 years and older for partial-onset seizures as monotherapy or adjunctive therapy. We reviewed the use of intravenous lacosamide in children aged less than 17 years with status epilepticus. Children who received at least one dose of intravenous lacosamide for status epilepticus at our tertiary care children's hospital from December 2011 to March 2014 were studied. Status epilepticus was defined as continuous seizure activity for longer than 20 minutes or two or more recurrent seizures without regaining baseline level of awareness. Efficacy was defined as seizure freedom or more than 50% reduction of seizures within 24 hours of administering lacosamide. Nine children with a mean age of 5.7 years (range: three months to 16 years) were included. The mean initial or loading dose was 8.7 mg/kg, with seven of nine patients receiving a dose of 10 mg/kg. The average total amount of intravenous lacosamide administered within the initial 24 hours was 13.8 mg/kg. Lacosamide was found to be efficacious in seven of nine (77.8%) patients. Four patients (44.4%) became seizure free. Two patients continued to have status epilepticus within 24 hours of lacosamide administration. Bradycardia was observed in one patient. In children with status epilepticus, intravenous lacosamide was efficacious in 78% of the patients and 44% become seizure free. In addition, no significant adverse reactions were observed. An appropriate safe, effective initial, or loading dose may be 10 mg/kg. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Risk of seizures and status epilepticus in older patients with liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhachroum, Ayham M; Rubinos, Clio; Kummer, Benjamin R; Parikh, Neal S; Chen, Monica; Chatterjee, Abhinaba; Reynolds, Alexandra; Merkler, Alexander E; Claassen, Jan; Kamel, Hooman

    2018-06-06

    Seizures can be provoked by systemic diseases associated with metabolic derangements, but the association between liver disease and seizures remains unclear. We performed a retrospective cohort study using inpatient and outpatient claims between 2008 and 2015 from a nationally representative 5% sample of Medicare beneficiaries. The primary exposure variable was cirrhosis, and the secondary exposure was mild, noncirrhotic liver disease. The primary outcome was seizure, and the secondary outcome was status epilepticus. Diagnoses were ascertained using validated International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Edition, Clinical Modification codes. Survival statistics were used to calculate incidence rates, and Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine the association between exposures and outcomes while adjusting for seizure risk factors. Among 1 782 402 beneficiaries, we identified 10 393 (0.6%) beneficiaries with cirrhosis and 19 557 (1.1%) with mild, noncirrhotic liver disease. Individuals with liver disease were older and had more seizure risk factors than those without liver disease. Over 4.6 ± 2.2 years of follow-up, 49 843 (2.8%) individuals were diagnosed with seizures and 25 patients (0.001%) were diagnosed with status epilepticus. Cirrhosis was not associated with seizures (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0-1.3), but there was an association with status epilepticus (HR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.3-2.8). Mild liver disease was not associated with a higher risk of seizures (HR = 0.8, 95% CI = 0.6-0.9) or status epilepticus (HR = 1.1, 95% CI = 0.7-1.5). In a large, population-based cohort, we found an association between cirrhosis and status epilepticus, but no overall association between liver disease and seizures. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 International League Against Epilepsy.

  11. Mortality, morbidity and refractoriness prediction in status epilepticus: Comparison of STESS and EMSE scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannini, Giada; Monti, Giulia; Tondelli, Manuela; Marudi, Andrea; Valzania, Franco; Leitinger, Markus; Trinka, Eugen; Meletti, Stefano

    2017-03-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is a neurological emergency, characterized by high short-term morbidity and mortality. We evaluated and compared two scores that have been developed to evaluate status epilepticus prognosis: STESS (Status Epilepticus Severity Score) and EMSE (Epidemiology based Mortality score in Status Epilepticus). A prospective observational study was performed on consecutive patients with SE admitted between September 2013 and August 2015. Demographics, clinical variables, STESS-3 and -4, and EMSE-64 scores were calculated for each patient at baseline. SE drug response, 30-day mortality and morbidity were the outcomes measure. 162 episodes of SE were observed: 69% had a STESS ≥3; 34% had a STESS ≥4; 51% patients had an EMSE ≥64. The 30-days mortality was 31.5%: EMSE-64 showed greater negative predictive value (NPV) (97.5%), positive predictive value (PPV) (59.8%) and accuracy in the prediction of death than STESS-3 and STESS-4 (pstatus epilepticus proved refractory to non-anaesthetic treatment. All three scales showed a high NPV (EMSE-64: 87.3%; STESS-4: 89.4%; STESS-3: 87.5%) but a low PPV (EMSE-64: 40.9%; STESS-4: 52.9%; STESS-3: 32%) for the prediction of refractoriness to first and second line drugs. This means that accuracy for the prediction of refractoriness was equally poor for all scales. EMSE-64 appears superior to STESS-3 and STESS-4 in the prediction of 30-days mortality and morbidity. All scales showed poor accuracy in the prediction of response to first and second line antiepileptic drugs. At present, there are no reliable scores capable of predicting treatment responsiveness. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Non-convulsive status epilepticus and consciousness disturbance after star fruit (Averrhoa carambola) ingestion in a dialysis patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chung-Hsin; Yeh, Jiann-Horng

    2004-12-01

    Star fruit ingestion may induce severe neurological complications in chronic renal failure patients. We present a case on maintenance dialysis therapy who developed a consciousness disturbance without convulsion after eating star fruit. The symptoms became aggravated after haemodialysis. The brain computed tomography scan showed no abnormal findings, but the electroencephalogram found active focal sharp waves in the left central regions and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging also showed hyperintense lesions in the left central regions that were compatible with non-convulsive status epilepticus. His condition improved dramatically after anticonvulsant therapy and regular haemodialysis. The patient was discharged 20 days later without neurological sequela.

  13. Use of the EpiNet database for observational study of status epilepticus in Auckland, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergin, Peter; Jayabal, Jayaganth; Walker, Elizabeth; Davis, Suzanne; Jones, Peter; Dalziel, Stuart; Yates, Kim; Thornton, Vanessa; Bennett, Patricia; Wilson, Kaisa; Roberts, Lynair; Litchfield, Rhonda; Te Ao, Braden; Parmer, Priya; Feigin, Valery; Jost, Jeremy; Beghi, Ettore; Rossetti, Andrea O

    2015-08-01

    The EpiNet project has been established to facilitate investigator-initiated clinical research in epilepsy, to undertake epidemiological studies, and to simultaneously improve the care of patients who have records created within the EpiNet database. The EpiNet database has recently been adapted to collect detailed information regarding status epilepticus. An incidence study is now underway in Auckland, New Zealand in which the incidence of status epilepticus in the greater Auckland area (population: 1.5 million) will be calculated. The form that has been developed for this study can be used in the future to collect information for randomized controlled trials in status epilepticus. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Status Epilepticus". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Intravenous lacosamide for treatment of absence status epilepticus in genetic generalized epilepsy: A case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, P S; Männer, A; Willems, L M; Kay, L; Zöllner, J P; Klein, K M; Rosenow, F; Strzelczyk, A

    2018-04-06

    Nearly 10 years after its introduction into the market, the significance of lacosamide in genetic generalized epilepsies is still unclear. Its new mode of action may qualify lacosamide as a therapeutic agent in this entity, but only a limited number of cases have been published so far. To describe the efficacy of lacosamide as treatment in a patient with the absence status epilepticus. We report on a 28-year-old woman with genetic generalized epilepsy who suffered recurrent absence status epilepticus during video-EEG-monitoring. After treatment failure of first- and second-line medication, lacosamide was administered. The outcome in this patient was evaluated, and a systematic literature review was performed for the use of lacosamide in the absence status epilepticus. After application of 400 mg lacosamide intravenously, the absence status epilepticus terminated within 30 minutes. No further seizures or epileptiform discharges reoccurred until the end of video-EEG-Monitoring 3 days later. The role of lacosamide as a therapeutic option in patients with the absence status epilepticus is unclear. Only two cases have been reported so far with conflicting results. Further randomized controlled studies are required to validate the relevance of lacosamide as treatment for status epilepticus in genetic generalized and the absence epilepsy. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Short-term outcomes and major barriers in the management of convulsive status epilepticus in children: a study in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatirishvili, Teona; Kipiani, Tamar; Lomidze, Giorgi; Gabunia, Maia; Tatishvili, Nino

    2015-09-01

    Convulsive status epilepticus is the most common childhood neurological emergency in developing countries, where poor healthcare organisation could play a negative role in the management of the condition. Unavailability of second-line injectable anticonvulsants is an additional hindering factor in Georgia. This report reflects the results of the first study aimed at evaluating the epidemiological features of convulsive status epilepticus, as well as identifying obstacles influencing the management of patients with convulsive status epilepticus in Georgia. A prospective, hospital-based study was performed. Paediatric patients with convulsive status epilepticus, admitted to the emergency department of a referral academic hospital from 2007 to 2012, were included in the study. Forty-eight paediatric patients admitted to hospital met the criteria for convulsive status epilepticus. Seizure duration was significantly shorter among the group with adequate and timely pre-hospital intervention. Moreover, patients with appropriate pre-hospital treatment less frequently required mechanical ventilation (p=0.039). Four deaths were detected during the follow-up period, thus the case fatality rate was 8%. Only 31% of patients received treatment with intravenous phenytoin. The study results show that adequate and timely intervention could improve outcome of convulsive status epilepticus and decrease the need for mechanical ventilation. Mortality parameters were comparable to the results from other resource-limited countries. More than one third of patients did not receive appropriate treatment due to unavailability of phenytoin.

  16. Effects of protease-activated receptor 1 inhibition on anxiety and fear following status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogovyk, Ruslan; Lunko, Oleksii; Fedoriuk, Mihail; Isaev, Dmytro; Krishtal, Oleg; Holmes, Gregory L; Isaeva, Elena

    2017-02-01

    Protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) is an important contributor to the pathogenesis of a variety of brain disorders associated with a risk of epilepsy development. Using the lithium-pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), we recently showed that inhibition of this receptor during the first ten days after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE) results in substantial anti-epileptogenic and neuroprotective effects. As PAR1 is expressed in the central nervous system regions of importance for processing emotional reactions, including amygdala and hippocampus, and TLE is frequently associated with a chronic alteration of the functions of these regions, we tested the hypothesis that PAR1 inhibition could modulate emotionally driven behavioral responses of rats experiencing SE. We showed that SE induces a chronic decrease in the animals' anxiety-related behavior and an increase of locomotor activity. PAR1 inhibition after SE abolished the alteration of the anxiety level but does not affect the increase of locomotor activity in the open field and elevated plus maze tests. Moreover, while PAR1 inhibition produces an impairment of memory recall in the context fear conditioning paradigm in the control group, it substantially improves contextual and cued fear learning in rats experiencing SE. These data suggest that PAR1-dependent signaling is involved in the mechanisms underlying emotional disorders in epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A KCNQ channel opener for experimental neonatal seizures and status epilepticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raol, YogendraSinh H.; Lapides, David A.; Keating, Jeffery; Brooks-Kayal, Amy R.; Cooper, Edward C.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Neonatal seizures occur frequently, are often refractory to anticonvulsants, and are associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Genetic and electrophysiological evidence indicates that KCNQ voltage-gated potassium channels are critical regulators of neonatal brain excitability. This study tests the hypothesis that selective openers of KCNQ channels may be effective for treatment of neonatal seizures. Methods We induced seizures in postnatal day 10 rats with either kainic acid or flurothyl. We measured seizure activity using quantified behavioral rating and electrocorticography. We compared the efficacy of flupirtine, a selective KCNQ channel opener, with phenobarbital and diazepam, two drugs in current use for neonatal seizures. Results Unlike phenobarbital or diazepam, flupirtine prevented animals from developing status epilepticus (SE) when administered prior to kainate. In the flurothyl model, phenobarbital and diazepam increased latency to seizure onset, but flupirtine completely prevented seizures throughout the experiment. Flupirtine was also effective in arresting electrographic and behavioral seizures when administered after animals had developed continuous kainate-induced SE. Flupirtine caused dose-related sedation and suppressed EEG activity, but did not result in respiratory suppression or result in any mortality. Interpretation Flupirtine appears more effective than either of two commonly used anti-epileptic drugs, phenobarbital and diazepam, in preventing and suppressing seizures in both the kainic acid and flurothyl models of symptomatic neonatal seizures. KCNQ channel openers merit further study as potential treatments for seizures in infants and children. PMID:19334075

  18. De-novo simple partial status epilepticus presenting as Wernicke's aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Bhimanagouda; Oware, Agyepong

    2012-04-01

    Language disturbances manifesting as brief periods of speech arrest occur with seizures originating in the frontal or temporal lobes. These language disturbances are usually present with other features of seizures or may occur in an episodic fashion suggesting their likely epileptic origin. Sustained but reversible aphasia as the sole manifestation of partial status epilepticus is rare, particularly without a history of prior seizures. A few cases have been described in the literature where Broca's or mixed aphasia seems to be more common than Wernicke's aphasia. Here we describe a patient who presented with Wernicke's aphasia secondary to simple partial status epilepticus but without any other features of seizures. The diagnosis was confirmed on EEG and the aphasia reversed after antiepileptic treatment. Copyright © 2011 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Dyke-Davidoff-Masson Syndrome. An unusual cause of status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawar, Ifrah; Khan, Ashfa A; Sultan, Tipu; Rathore, Ahsan W

    2015-10-01

    The Dyke-Davidoff-Masson Syndrome (DDMS) results from an insult to the growing brain in utero or early infancy, which lead to loss of neurons compromising the growth of the brain. Clinical presentation includes seizures, hemiparesis, facial asymmetry, and learning disability. Radiological findings include cerebral atrophy on one side. Here, we present a case with status epilepticus who had underlying DDMS. It is a rare syndrome and uncommon cause for status epilepticus. Infections of CNS, hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, intracranial bleed, trauma, congenital vascular malformations are the common causes of this syndrome. Diagnosis is established after clinical history, examination, and MRI. Intractable seizures can be controlled with appropriate anticonvulsants. Subsequently, these children may require physiotherapy, speech therapy, and occupational therapy in addition to the anticonvulsant medication. Outcome is better if the seizures are controlled.

  20. Status Epilepticus as an Initial Manifestation of Neurosyphilis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Hsun Li

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Seizures and focal neurologic deficits may be the complications of neurosyphilis, but status epilepticus as a presenting picture of neurosyphilis is rare. We describe a 41-year-old man with an acute onset of expressive dysphasia, followed by persistent seizure state and severe complications of systemic medical problems. An extensive laboratory evaluation confirmed the diagnosis of neurosyphilis and diabetes mellitus. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed edematous change in the left cingulate gyrus, left temporal lobe, and peri-Rolandic area, which suggested an inflammatory process. Due to varied clinical manifestations of neurosyphilis, we underscore the importance of considering neurosyphilis among the possible causes of status epilepticus and any central nervous system diseases.

  1. Refractory nonconvulsive status epilepticus in coma: analysis of the evolution of ictal patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Breno Noronha Liberalesso

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE is currently considered as one of the most frequent types of status epilepticus (SE. The objective of the present study was to identify the natural history of the electrographical evolution of refractory NCSE and to establish the relationship between ictal patterns and prognosis. METHODS: We analyzed, retrospectively, 14 patients with loss of consciousness and NCSE. The ictal patterns were classified as discrete seizures (DS, merging seizures (MS, continuous ictal discharges (CID, continuous ictal discharges with flat periods (CID-F, and periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges (PLEDs. RESULTS: The ictal patterns were DS (n=7; 50.0%, PLEDs (n=3; 1.4%, CID (n=2; 14.3%, MS (n=1; 7.1%, and CID-F (n=1; 7.1%. CONCLUSIONS: NCSE electrographic findings are heterogeneous and do not follow a stereotyped sequence. PLEDs were related to a higher probability of neurological morbidity and mortality.

  2. Fatal Cerebral Edema With Status Epilepticus in Children With Dravet Syndrome: Report of 5 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kenneth A; McMahon, Jacinta M; Mandelstam, Simone A; Mackay, Mark T; Kalnins, Renate M; Leventer, Richard J; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2017-04-01

    Dravet syndrome (DS) is a well-recognized developmental and epileptic encephalopathy associated with SCN1A mutations and 15% mortality by 20 years. Although over half of cases succumb to sudden unexpected death in epilepsy, the cause of death in the remainder is poorly defined. We describe the clinical, radiologic, and pathologic characteristics of a cohort of children with DS and SCN1A mutations who developed fatal cerebral edema causing mass effect after fever-associated status epilepticus. Cases were identified from a review of children with DS enrolled in the Epilepsy Genetics Research Program at The University of Melbourne, Austin Health, who died after fever-associated status epilepticus. Five children were identified, all of whom presented with fever-associated convulsive status epilepticus, developed severe brain swelling, and died. All had de novo SCN1A mutations. Fever of 40°C or greater was measured in all cases. Signs of brainstem dysfunction, indicating cerebral herniation, were first noted 3 to 5 days after initial presentation in 4 patients, though were apparent as early as 24 hours in 1 case. When MRI was performed early in a patient's course, focal regions of cortical diffusion restriction were noted. Later MRI studies demonstrated diffuse cytotoxic edema, with severe cerebral herniation. Postmortem studies revealed diffuse brain edema and widespread neuronal damage. Laminar necrosis was seen in 1 case. Cerebral edema leading to fatal brain herniation is an important, previously unreported sequela of status epilepticus in children with DS. This potentially remediable complication may be a significant contributor to the early mortality of DS. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  3. Status Epilepticus in Immature Rats Is Associated with Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Folbergrová, Jaroslava; Ješina, Pavel; Kubová, Hana; Druga, Rastislav; Otáhal, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 10, May 26 (2016), s. 136 ISSN 1662-5102 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/10/0999; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-08565S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : immature rats * status epilepticus * oxidative stress * mitochondrial dysfunction Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.555, year: 2016

  4. Are morphologic and functional consequences of status epilepticus in infant rats progressive?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubová, Hana; Mareš, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 235, APR 3 (2013), s. 232-249 ISSN 0306-4522 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0971; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) ME08045 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : status epilepticus * immature brain * brain atrophy * epilepsy * cognitive impairment Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.327, year: 2013

  5. Relationship between cortex and pulvinar abnormalities on diffusion-weighted imaging in status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakae, Yoshiharu; Kudo, Yosuke; Yamamoto, Ryoo; Dobashi, Yuichi; Kawabata, Yuichi; Ikeda, Shingo; Yokoyama, Mutsumi; Higashiyama, Yuichi; Doi, Hiroshi; Johkura, Ken; Tanaka, Fumiaki

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the pattern of magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) findings in status epilepticus in terms of clinical characteristics. Participants comprised 106 patients with status epilepticus who were admitted to our hospital and underwent DWI. Forty-five patients (42.5 %) showed abnormal findings on DWI and were divided into two groups, comprising 26 patients (24.5 %) with cortex lesions alone and 19 patients (17.9 %) with cortex and pulvinar lesions in the same hemisphere. A long duration of status epilepticus (>120 min) tended to be more prevalent among patients with cortex and pulvinar lesions (57.9 %) than among patients with cortex lesions alone (30.8 %) by univariate and multivariate analyses. Todd's palsy tended to be more frequent in patients with abnormalities on DWI (24/45, 53.3 %) than in patients with normal DWI (21/61, 34.4 %). Six of the 26 patients with cortex lesions alone (23.1 %) had taken anti-epileptic drugs before the attack compared to none of the 19 patients with both cortex and pulvinar lesions. The trend toward a longer duration of status epilepticus in patients with both cortex and pulvinar lesions favors a spreading pattern of seizure discharge from cortex to pulvinar via cortico-pulvinar pathways, and anti-epileptic drugs might, to some extent, prevent spreading of seizure discharge from cortex to pulvinar. In addition, existence of high-intensity areas on DWI at the onset of epilepsy may be a predictive factor for the occurrence of Todd's palsy.

  6. Spectrum and Predictors of Refractory Status Epilepticus in a Developing Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Deepanshu; Bhoi, Sanjeev K; Kalita, Jayantee; Misra, Usha K

    2017-09-01

    Refractory status epilepticus (RSE) can influence the outcome of status epilepticus (SE). In the present study, we report the aetiology and predictors of outcomes of RSE in a developing country. This is a prospective hospital-based study of SE patients (continuous seizures for five minutes or more). Those who had SE persisting after two antiepileptic drugs were defined as having RSE. We present the demographic information, duration, and type of SE, and we note its severity using the status epilepticus severity score (STESS), its aetiology, comorbidities and imaging findings. The outcome of RSE was defined as cessation of seizures and the condition upon discharge, as assessed by the modified Rankin Scale. A total of 35 (42.5%) of our 81 patients had RSE. The median duration of SE before starting treatment was 2 hours (range=0.008-160 h). The most common causes of RSE were stroke in 5 (14.3%), central nervous system (CNS) infections in 12 (34.3%) and metabolic encephalopathies in 13 (37.1%) patients. Some 21 (60%) patients had comorbidities, and the STESS was favourable in 7 (20%) patients. A total of 14 (20%) patients died, but death was directly related to SE in only one of these. Some 10 patients had super-refractory status epilepticus, which was due to CNS infection in 5 (50%) and metabolic encephalopathy in 3 (30%). On multivariate analysis, an unfavourable STESS (p=0.05) and duration of SE before treatment (p=0.01) predicted RSE. Metabolic aetiology (p=0.05), mechanical ventilation (p60 years (p=0.003) were predictors of poor outcomes. RSE was common (42.5%) among patients with SE in a tertiary care center in India. It was associated with high mortality and poor outcomes. Age above 60 years and metabolic aetiology were found to be predictors of poor outcomes.

  7. A one-year prospective study of refractory status epilepticus in Modena, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannini, Giada; Monti, Giulia; Polisi, Michela M; Mirandola, Laura; Marudi, Andrea; Pinelli, Giovanni; Valzania, Franco; Girardis, Massimo; Nichelli, Paolo F; Meletti, Stefano

    2015-08-01

    Refractory status epilepticus (RSE) is a particular critical condition characterized by seizures that continue despite the use of first- and second-line therapies and by high mortality. To date, only one prospective study investigated clinical features and prognostic factors in RSE. In this study, we performed a one-year prospective survey to identify clinical features, outcomes, and variables associated with the development of RSE in the adolescent and adult population of Modena, northern Italy. We observed 83 episodes of SE in 83 patients. In 31% of the cases, third-line therapy (anesthetic drug) was needed. Among this group, 14% resolved and were classified as RSE, while, in 17%, seizures recurred at withdrawal of anesthetics and were classified as super-RSE. The development of RSE/super-RSE was associated with a stuporous/comatose state at presentation and with the absence of a previous history of epilepsy. Refractory status epilepticus/super-refractory status epilepticus showed a worse outcome compared with responsive SE: 54% versus 21% for 30-day mortality; 19% versus 56% for a return to baseline condition. This prospective study confirms stupor/coma at onset as a relevant clinical factor associated with SE refractoriness. We observed a rate of RSE comparable with previous reports, with high mortality and morbidity. Mortality in the observed RSE was higher than in previous studies; this result is probably related to the low rate of a previous epilepsy history in our population that reflects a high incidence of acute symptomatic etiologies, especially the inclusion of patients with postanoxic SE who have a bad prognosis per se. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Status Epilepticus". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Seizures, refractory status epilepticus, and depolarization block as endogenous brain activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Houssaini, Kenza; Ivanov, Anton I.; Bernard, Christophe; Jirsa, Viktor K.

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy, refractory status epilepticus, and depolarization block are pathological brain activities whose mechanisms are poorly understood. Using a generic mathematical model of seizure activity, we show that these activities coexist under certain conditions spanning the range of possible brain activities. We perform a detailed bifurcation analysis and predict strategies to escape from some of the pathological states. Experimental results using rodent data provide support of the model, highlighting the concept that these pathological activities belong to the endogenous repertoire of brain activities.

  9. Do not overlook acute isoniazid poisoning in children with status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caksen, Hüseyin; Odabas, Dursun; Erol, Mehmet; Anlar, Omer; Tuncer, Oguz; Atas, Bülent

    2003-02-01

    A previously healthy 2-year-old girl was admitted with generalized convulsive status epilepticus. She was in a stupor and could respond only to painful stimuli. She also had severe metabolic acidosis. Although initial liver function tests were normal, they were found to be moderately high on the fifth day of admission; however, they dropped to their normal ranges on the twelfth day of admission. Initially, the patient was diagnosed as having idiopathic status epilepticus, and classic anticonvulsant agents, including diazepam, phenytoin, and then phenobarbital, were given. However, her seizures did not subside, and diazepam infusion was initiated. After initiation of diazepam infusion, the seizures were completely controlled. On the fourth day of admission, her parents said that she had accidentally received 20 tablets (a total dose of 2000 mg) of isoniazid just before admission to our hospital. Later, we injected 200 mg of pyridoxine intravenously. During follow-up, her general condition improved, and anticonvulsant agents were discontinued because an electroencephalogram was found to be norma. She was discharged from the hospital on the twelfth day of admission. At the fourth month of follow-up, she was seizure free. Because of this case, we would like to re-emphasize that acute isoniazid poisoning should also be considered in a child with unexplained status epilepticus.

  10. The ketogenic diet in two paediatric patients with refractory myoclonic status epilepticus.

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    Caraballo, Roberto Horacio; Valenzuela, Gabriela Reyes; Armeno, Marisa; Fortini, Sebastian; Mestre, Graciela; Cresta, Araceli

    2015-12-01

    We describe two patients with refractory myoclonic status epilepticus treated with the ketogenic diet. Between May 1, 2014 and January 1, 2015, two patients who met the diagnostic criteria for refractory myoclonic status epilepticus, seen at our department, were placed on the ketogenic diet and followed for a minimum of six months. One patient with myoclonic epilepsy of unknown aetiology had a 75-90% seizure reduction, and the other with progressive encephalopathy associated with myoclonic epilepsy had a 50% seizure reduction. Both patients retained good tolerability for the diet. At the last control, one patient had isolated myoclonias and EEG showed occasional generalized spike-and-polyspike waves; the patient is now successfully attending kindergarten. The quality of life of the second patient improved significantly. In both cases, the number of antiepileptic drugs was reduced. The ketogenic diet is an effective and well-tolerated treatment option for patients with refractory myoclonic status epilepticus and should be considered earlier in the course of treatment.

  11. Management protocols for status epilepticus in the pediatric emergency room: systematic review article

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    Cheuk C. Au

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: This systematic review of national or regional guidelines published in English aimed to better understand variance in pre-hospital and emergency department treatment of status epilepticus. Sources: Systematic search of national or regional guidelines (January 2000 to February 2017 contained within PubMed and Google Scholar databases, and article reference lists. The search keywords were status epilepticus, prolonged seizure, treatment, and guideline. Summary of findings: 356 articles were retrieved and 13 were selected according to the inclusion criteria. In all six pre-hospital guidelines, the preferred route of medication administration was to use alternatives to the intravenous route: all recommended buccal and intranasal midazolam; three also recommended intramuscular midazolam, and five recommended using rectal diazepam. All 11 emergency department guidelines described three phases in therapy. Intravenous medication, by phase, was indicated as such: initial phase - ten/11 guidelines recommended lorazepam, and eight/11 recommended diazepam; second phase - most (ten/11 guidelines recommended phenytoin, but other options were phenobarbital (nine/11, valproic acid (six/11, and either fosphenytoin or levetiracetam (each four/11; third phase - four/11 guidelines included the choice of repeating second phase therapy, whereas the other guidelines recommended using a variety of intravenous anesthetic agents (thiopental, midazolam, propofol, and pentobarbital. Conclusions: All of the guidelines share a similar framework for management of status epilepticus. The choice in route of administration and drug type varied across guidelines. Hence, the adoption of a particular guideline should take account of local practice options in health service delivery.

  12. Focal status epilepticus as a manifestation of idiopathic hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis.

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    Navalpotro-Gómez, Irene; Vivanco-Hidalgo, Rosa María; Cuadrado-Godia, Elisa; Medrano-Martorell, Santiago; Alameda-Quitllet, Francisco; Villalba-Martínez, Gloria; Roquer, Jaume

    2016-08-15

    Idiopathic hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis (IHCP) is an uncommon disease of unknown etiology characterized by thickening of the cerebral dura mater with possible associated inflammation. The most frequently described clinical symptoms include headache, cranial nerve palsy, and cerebellar dysfunction. Epilepsy and/or status epilepticus as main presentation is very uncommon. Two consecutive cases are presented of patients manifesting focal status epilepticus secondary to IHCP, with clinical, laboratory [blood test and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis], neuroradiologic [magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3 Tesla and digital subtraction angiography (DSA)], and therapeutic data. One patient underwent meningeal biopsy; pathology findings are also included. Corticosteroid therapy resulted in clinical improvement in both cases, and neuroimaging showed decreased abnormal morphology, compared to initial findings. In the diagnostic approach to focal status epilepticus or epilepsy, IHCP must be considered a potential, although extremely infrequent, cause. Anti-inflammatory treatment is an effective addition to antiepileptic drug therapy in patients with IHCP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A case of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency with status epilepticus and rapid regression.

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    Horino, Asako; Kawawaki, Hisashi; Fukuoka, Masataka; Tsuji, Hitomi; Hattori, Yuka; Inoue, Takeshi; Nukui, Megumi; Kuki, Ichiro; Okazaki, Shin; Tomiwa, Kiyotaka; Hirose, Shinichi

    2016-10-01

    Clinical phenotypic expression of SSADH deficiency is highly heterogeneous, and some infants may develop refractory secondary generalized seizures. A 9-month-old boy manifested partial seizures, developing severe status epilepticus, and conventional antiepileptic drugs were ineffective. Use of ketamine contributed to the control of status epilepticus, achieving a reduction in frequency of partial seizures, and improving EEG findings without apparent complications. Diffusion-weighted images showed hyperintensities in the bilateral basal ganglia and fornix, and multiple T2 hyperintensity lesions were detected. (123)I-iomazenil (IMZ) SPECT revealed a decrease in binding of (123)I-iomazenil predominantly in the left temporal region by the 18th day of hospitalization. However, repeated IMZ-SPECT on the 46th day of hospitalization demonstrated almost no accumulation across a broad region, sparing the left temporal region. The patient showed rapid regression, refractory myoclonus, and severe progressive brain atrophy. IMZ-SPECT findings demonstrated reduced benzodiazepine receptor binding and its dynamic changes in an SSADH-deficient patient. Considering the down regulation of the GABAA receptor, ketamine should be included in pharmacotherapeutic strategies for treatment of refractory status epilepticus in SSADH-deficient patients. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Ketamine infusion for refractory status epilepticus: A case report of cardiac arrest.

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    Koffman, Lauren; Yan Yiu, Ho; Farrokh, Salia; Lewin, John; Geocadin, Romergryko; Ziai, Wendy

    2018-01-01

    Refractory status epilepticus (RSE) has a high mortality rate and is often difficult to treat. When traditional therapies fail ketamine may be considered. There are limited reports of adverse cardiac events with the use of ketamine for RSE and no reports of cardiac arrest in this context. Evaluate the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias associated with the use of ketamine for RSE. Retrospective chart review of nine patients who underwent ketamine infusion for RSE. Etiology of refractory status epilepticus included autoimmune/infectious process (Zeiler et al., 2014), ischemic stroke (Bleck, 2005) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (Bleck, 2005). Of the nine patients who received ketamine, two had documented cardiac events; one remained clinically stable and the other developed multiple arrhythmias, including recurrent episodes of asystole. Once ketamine was discontinued the latter patient stabilized with the addition of anti arrhythmic therapy. Ketamine is utilized to treat refractory status epilepticus, but should be used with caution in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage, as there may be an increased risk of life threatening arrhythmias and cardiac arrest. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. New Onset Refractory Status Epilepticus as an Unusual Presentation of a Suspected Organophosphate Poisoning

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    Shahan Waheed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available New onset refractory status epilepticus (NORSE is a new entity in medical literature. It has different infectious and noninfectious etiologies showing a devastating impact onto the clinical outcome of patients. Therapy with anaesthetic and antiepileptic agents often fails to improve the condition, unless the primary cause is rectified. Here is presented the case of a young female with a history of depression who after a recent bereavement came to the Emergency Department of Aga Khan University Hospital with complaints of drowsiness that lasted for few hours. Though she had no history of organophosphate poisoning, her physical examination and further investigations were suggestive of the diagnosis. During her hospital stay, she developed refractory status epilepticus. Her seizures did not respond to standard antiepileptic and intravenous anesthetic agents and subsided only after intravenous infusion of atropine for a few days. Organophosphate poisoning is a very common presentation in the developing world and the associated status epilepticus poses a devastating problem for emergency physicians. In patients with suspected organophosphate poisoning with favoring clinical exam findings, the continuation of atropine intravenous infusion can be a safe option to abate seizures.

  16. Status epilepticus during early development disrupts sexual behavior in adult female rats: recovery with sexual experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coria-Avila, Genaro Alfonso; Paredes-Ramos, Pedro; Galán, Ricardo; Herrera-Covarrubias, Deissy; López-Meraz, Maria-Leonor

    2014-05-01

    Female sexual behavior is sensitive to stress and diseases. Some studies have shown that status epilepticus (SE) can affect sexual proceptivity and receptivity in female rats and also increases reject responses towards males. However, epidemiologic studies indicate that SE is more frequent in young individuals. Herein, we assessed the effects of SE in infant females on their sexual behavior during adulthood. Thirteen-day-old (P13) rat pups received intraperitoneal injections of lithium chloride (3 mEq/kg). Twenty hours later, at P14, SE was induced by subcutaneous injection of pilocarpine hydrochloride (100 mg/kg s.c.). Control animals were given an equal volume of saline subcutaneously. The animals were weaned at P21 and, later in adulthood, were ovariectomized and hormone-primed with estradiol+progesterone, and their sexual behavior assessed during 4 separate trials of 30 min each with a stud male. Our results indicate that proceptive behaviors (solicitations and hops and darts) were impaired during the first trial, but no alterations were observed for receptivity and attractivity. By trial 3, all SE females displayed normal proceptivity. These results indicate that SE in infancy readily affects proceptivity in a reversible manner. We discuss the role of sexual experience in recovery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Prolonged seizure activity leads to increased Protein Kinase A activation in the rat pilocarpine model of status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracey, James M; Kurz, Jonathan E; Low, Brian; Churn, Severn B

    2009-08-04

    Status epilepticus is a life-threatening form of seizure activity that represents a major medical emergency associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Protein Kinase A is an important regulator of synaptic strength that may play an important role in the development of status epilepticus-induced neuronal pathology. This study demonstrated an increase in PKA activity against exogenous and endogenous substrates during later stages of SE. As SE progressed, a significant increase in PKA-mediated phosphorylation of an exogenous peptide substrate was demonstrated in cortical structures. The increased activity was not due to altered expression of either regulatory or catalytic subunits of the enzyme. Through the use of phospho-specific antibodies, this study also investigated the effects of SE on the phosphorylation of the GluR1 subunit of the AMPA subtype of glutamate receptor. After the onset of continuous seizure activity, an increase in phosphorylation of the PKA site on the GluR1 subunit of the AMPA receptor was observed. These data suggest a potential mechanism by which SE may increase neuronal excitability in the cortex, potentially leading to maintenance of seizure activity or long-term neuronal pathology.

  18. Neonatal thalamic hemorrhage is strongly associated with electrical status epilepticus in slow wave sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersbergen, Karina J; de Vries, Linda S; Leijten, Frans S S; Braun, Kees P J; Nievelstein, Rutger A J; Groenendaal, Floris; Benders, Manon J N L; Jansen, Floor E

    2013-04-01

    Thalamic hemorrhage has been associated with neonatal cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CSVT), especially when the straight sinus is involved, and often presents with neonatal seizures. Early thalamic injury has previously been shown to predispose to epilepsy and electrical status epilepticus in slow wave sleep (ESES). The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of sleep-induced epileptic electroencephalography (EEG) abnormalities and postneonatal epilepsy after neonatal thalamic hemorrhage associated with CSVT, in the absence of more widespread cerebral damage. Between 2003 and 2008 15 neonates were diagnosed with a thalamic hemorrhage due to suspected or proven CSVT. Neurodevelopment and the history of seizures were assessed at follow-up in the outpatient clinic in all 14 survivors (age 2-9 years). Whole-night or sleep-deprived EEG recordings were obtained to assess the prevalence of interictal epileptiform activity (EA) and calculate a sleep-induced spike and wave index (SWI). Three children were diagnosed with classic ESES (SWI >85%). Two children had ESES spectrum disorder (SWI between 50% and 85%), and in two children significant sleep-induced epileptiform activity (SIEA) was noted (SWI between 25% and 50%). Two other children were diagnosed with focal epilepsy, in the absence of sleep-induced epileptiform EEG abnormalities. Five children (age 2-7 years) had normal EEG recordings at follow-up. Deficits in neurodevelopment were seen significantly more often in children with ESES, ESES spectrum, or SIEA. Neonates with thalamic hemorrhage associated with straight sinus thrombosis, without evidence of more widespread cerebral damage, are at high risk of developing ESES (spectrum) disorder (35%), SIEA (14%), or focal epilepsy (14%). Electrographic abnormalities may already be present prior to recognition of cognitive deficits. Early diagnosis may guide parents and caregivers, and subsequent treatment may improve neurodevelopmental outcome. Routine

  19. Experimental Models of Status Epilepticus and Neuronal Injury for Evaluation of Therapeutic Interventions

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    Ramkumar Kuruba

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This article describes current experimental models of status epilepticus (SE and neuronal injury for use in the screening of new therapeutic agents. Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures. SE is an emergency condition associated with continuous seizures lasting more than 30 min. It causes significant mortality and morbidity. SE can cause devastating damage to the brain leading to cognitive impairment and increased risk of epilepsy. Benzodiazepines are the first-line drugs for the treatment of SE, however, many people exhibit partial or complete resistance due to a breakdown of GABA inhibition. Therefore, new drugs with neuroprotective effects against the SE-induced neuronal injury and degeneration are desirable. Animal models are used to study the pathophysiology of SE and for the discovery of newer anticonvulsants. In SE paradigms, seizures are induced in rodents by chemical agents or by electrical stimulation of brain structures. Electrical stimulation includes perforant path and self-sustaining stimulation models. Pharmacological models include kainic acid, pilocarpine, flurothyl, organophosphates and other convulsants that induce SE in rodents. Neuronal injury occurs within the initial SE episode, and animals exhibit cognitive dysfunction and spontaneous seizures several weeks after this precipitating event. Current SE models have potential applications but have some limitations. In general, the experimental SE model should be analogous to the human seizure state and it should share very similar neuropathological mechanisms. The pilocarpine and diisopropylfluorophosphate models are associated with prolonged, diazepam-insensitive seizures and neurodegeneration and therefore represent paradigms of refractory SE. Novel mechanism-based or clinically relevant models are essential to identify new therapies for SE and neuroprotective interventions.

  20. Comparing the Effect of Intravenous Midazolam with Rectal Sodium Valproate in Controlling of Children with Refractory Status Epilepticus

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    T Mahmoudian

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Refractory status epilepticus usually defined as a seizure lasting at least 60 minutes which is uncontrollable by Diazepam, Phenytoin, or Phenobarbital. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of interavenous Midazolam and rectal Sodium valproate in controlling refractory status epilepticus. Methods: In this case-control study; 76 children with (mean age of 37± 20 months with refractory status epilepticus were randomly divided into two groups to receive IV Midazolam and rectal Sodium Valproate. The effect of the two drugs were compared in control of seizure during first 20 minutes of treatment. Results: In 84.2 percent of children treated with IV Midazolam, the seizure was under control within 4.5 ± 0.5 minutes, while in 63 percent of those receiving Sodium Valproate, the seizure was completely controlled within 16.5 ± 0.8 minutes (P < 0.00001. Conclusion: The IV Midazolam was more effective than Sodium valproate, but the latter can be used in hospitals or pediatric emergency wards without ICU for controlling of refractory status epilepticus. Key words: refractory status epilepticus, midazolam, sodium valproate

  1. Beneficial effects of enriched environment following status epilepticus in immature rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faverjon, S; Silveira, D C; Fu, D D; Cha, B H; Akman, C; Hu, Y; Holmes, G L

    2002-11-12

    There is increasing evidence that enriching the environment can improve cognitive and motor deficits following a variety of brain injuries. Whether environmental enrichment can improve cognitive impairment following status epilepticus (SE) is not known. To determine whether the environment in which animals are raised influences cognitive function in normal rats and rats subjected to SE. Rats (n = 100) underwent lithium-pilocarpine-induced SE at postnatal (P) day 20 and were then placed in either an enriched environment consisting of a large play area with toys, climbing objects, and music, or in standard vivarium cages for 30 days. Control rats (n = 32) were handled similarly to the SE rats but received saline injections instead of lithium-pilocarpine. Rats were then tested in the water maze, a measure of visual-spatial memory. A subset of the rats were killed during exposure to the enriched or nonenriched environment and the brains examined for dentate granule cell neurogenesis using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element binding protein (pCREB) immunostaining, a brain transcription factor important in long-term memory. Both control and SE rats exposed to the enriched environment performed significantly better than the nonenriched group in the water maze. There was a significant increase in neurogenesis and pCREB immunostaining in the dentate gyrus in both control and SE animals exposed to the enriched environment compared to the nonenriched groups. Environmental enrichment resulted in no change in SE-induced histologic damage. Exposure to an enriched environment in weanling rats significantly improves visual-spatial learning. Even following SE, an enriched environment enhances cognitive function. An increase in neurogenesis and activation of transcription factors may contribute to this enhanced visual-spatial memory.

  2. Bumetanide is not capable of terminating status epilepticus but enhances phenobarbital efficacy in different rat models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töllner, Kathrin; Brandt, Claudia; Erker, Thomas; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2015-01-05

    In about 20-40% of patients, status epilepticus (SE) is refractory to standard treatment with benzodiazepines, necessitating second- and third-line treatments that are not always successful, resulting in increased mortality. Rat models of refractory SE are instrumental in studying the changes underlying refractoriness and to develop more effective treatments for this severe medical emergency. Failure of GABAergic inhibition is a likely cause of the development of benzodiazepine resistance during SE. In addition to changes in GABAA receptor expression, trafficking, and function, alterations in Cl(-) homeostasis with increased intraneuronal Cl(-) levels may be involved. Bumetanide, which reduces intraneuronal Cl(-) by inhibiting the Cl(-) intruding Na(+), K(+), Cl(-) cotransporter NKCC1, has been reported to interrupt SE induced by kainate in urethane-anesthetized rats, indicating that this diuretic drug may be an interesting candidate for treatment of refractory SE. In this study, we evaluated the effects of bumetanide in the kainate and lithium-pilocarpine models of SE as well as a model in which SE is induced by sustained electrical stimulation of the basolateral amygdala. Unexpectedly, bumetanide alone was ineffective to terminate SE in both conscious and anesthetized adult rats. However, it potentiated the anticonvulsant effect of low doses of phenobarbital, although this was only seen in part of the animals; higher doses of phenobarbital, particularly in combination with diazepam, were more effective to terminate SE than bumetanide/phenobarbital combinations. These data do not suggest that bumetanide, alone or in combination with phenobarbital, is a valuable option in the treatment of refractory SE in adult patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Metabolic injury in a variable rat model of post-status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Patrice S; Wu, Yijen; Rapuano, Amedeo; Kelly, Kevin M; de Lanerolle, Nihal; Pan, Jullie W

    2016-12-01

    In vivo studies of epilepsy typically use prolonged status epilepticus to generate recurrent seizures. However, reports on variable status duration have found discrete differences in injury after 40-50 min of seizures, suggesting a pathophysiologic sensitivity to seizure duration. In this report we take a multivariate cluster analysis to study a short duration status epilepticus model using in vivo 7T magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and histologic evaluation. The Hellier Dudek model was applied with 45 min of status epilepticus after which the animals were imaged twice, at 3 days and 3 weeks post-status epilepticus. Single voxel point resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) MRS was used to acquire data from the dentate gyrus and CA3 region of the hippocampus, assessing metabolite ratios to total creatine (tCr). In a subset of animals after the second imaging study, brains were analyzed histologically by Nissl staining. A hierarchical cluster analysis performed on the 3-day data from 21 kainate-treated animals (dentate gyrus voxel) segregated into two clusters, denoted by KM (more injured, n = 6) and KL (less injured, n = 15). Although there was no difference in kainate dosing or seizure count between them, the metabolic pattern of injury was different. The KM group displayed the largest significant changes in neuronal and glial parameters; the KL group displayed milder but significant changes. At 3 weeks, the KL group returned to normal compared to controls, whereas the KM group persisted with depressed N-acetyl aspartate (NAA)/tCr, glutamate/tCr, and increased inositol/tCr and glutamine/tCr. The classification was also consistent with subsequent histologic patterns at 3 weeks. Although a short status period might be expected to generate a continuous distribution of metabolic injury, these data show that the short Hellier Dudek model appears to generate two levels of injury. The changes seen in segregated groups persisted into 3 weeks, and can be interpreted according

  4. Mega-dose phenobarbital therapy for super-refractory status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Jung-Ick; Chu, Kon; Sunwoo, Jun-Sang; Moon, Jangsup; Kim, Tae-Joon; Lim, Jung-Ah; Jun, Jin-Sun; Lee, Han Sang; Lee, Woo-Jin; Lee, Doo Young; Jeon, Daejong; Lee, Soon-Tae; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Jung, Ki-Young; Lee, Sang Kun

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of mega-dose phenobarbital (MDPB; enteral or parenteral phenobarbital >10 mg/kg/day) for treating super-refractory status epilepticus (SRSE; continuous or recurrent status epilepticus for ≥24 hours after the onset of continuous anaesthetic treatment) in adult patients. Adult patients with SRSE who were treated with MDPB in our institution from March 2005 to September 2014 were reviewed. We collected data on basic demographics, clinical features, functional status, anticonvulsant treatment, and possible adverse events. SRSE outcome was divided into six categories: successful therapy, initial failure, breakthrough seizures, withdrawal seizures, intolerable side effects, and death during treatment. Ten adult patients with SRSE received MDPB. Median age at seizure onset was 38 years (range: 18-59), and half were male. All patients had no history of seizures and had symptoms suggestive of viral encephalitis. Median duration of status epilepticus was 17.5 days (range: 6-60) and anaesthetics were used for a median of 14.0 days (range: 2-54) before MDPB. Successful control of SRSE was achieved in half of the patients, however, only one of ten patients was able to fully recover at discharge. Median duration of the MDPB was 45.5 days and the maximum serum phenobarbital level reached a median of 151.5 μg/ml. Patients with successful MDPB therapy had normal brain imaging (80% vs. 0%; p=0.048) and better functional outcome at discharge and after three months of follow-up. Infection was the most critical complication, along with cardiorespiratory depression. MDPB is a therapeutic option for control of SRSE when other choices are exhausted.

  5. Alterações agudas dos níveis de neurotransmissores em corpo estriado de ratos jovens após estado epiléptico induzido por pilocarpina Acute alterations of neurotransmitters levels in striatum of young rat after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus

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    Rivelilson Mendes de Freitas

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Altas doses de agonista colinérgico muscarínico, pilocarpina, produzem alterações comportamentais, convulsões e estado epiléptico em ratos. O objetivo desse estudo foi verificar as alterações nas concentrações dos neurotransmissores em corpo estriado de ratos em desenvolvimento após estado epiléptico induzido pela pilocarpina. Ratas Wistar foram tratadas com uma única dose de pilocarpina (400mg/Kg; s.c.. Controles receberam salina. A concentração dos neurotransmissores foi determinada através do HPLC, no corpo estriado de ratos que no período de observação de 1 e 24h desencadearam estado epiléptico e não sobreviveram à fase aguda do quadro convulsivo. Foi observada redução nos níveis de dopamina, serotonina, ácido dihidroxifenilacético, ácido 5-hidroxiindolacético, e aumento no ácido 4-hidroxi-3-metoxi-fenilacético. Os resultados mostraram que a ativação do sistema colinérgico pode interagir com os sistemas dopaminérgico e serotonérgico nos mecanismos referentes à fase aguda do processo convulsivo.High doses of the muscarinic cholinergic agonist, pilocarpine, result in behavioural changes, seizures and status epilepticus in rats. The purpose of the present work is to invetigate the striatal neurotransmissors level in young rats after status epilepticus induced by pilocarpine. Wistar rats were treated with a single dose of pilocarpine (400mg/Kg; s.c.. Controls received saline. Young animals were closed observed for behavioural changes during 1 and 24h. In these periods, the animals that developed status epilepticus and didn't survive this acute phase of seizures had the brains removed and striatal neurotransmissors level determined by HPLC. The concentration of dopamine, serotonine, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid was reduced and an increase in 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-phenylacetic acid was observed. These results suggest that cholinergic activation can interage with dopaminergic and

  6. Suppressing cAMP response element-binding protein transcription shortens the duration of status epilepticus and decreases the number of spontaneous seizures in the pilocarpine model of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xinjian; Dubey, Deepti; Bermudez, Camilo; Porter, Brenda E

    2015-12-01

    Current epilepsy therapies directed at altering the function of neurotransmitter receptors or ion channels, or release of synaptic vesicles fail to prevent seizures in approximately 30% of patients. A better understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying epilepsy is needed to provide new therapeutic targets. The activity of cyclic AMP (cAMP) response element-binding protein (CREB), a major transcription factor promoting CRE-mediated transcription, increases following a prolonged seizure called status epilepticus. It is also increased in the seizure focus of patients with medically intractable focal epilepsy. Herein we explored the effect of acute suppression of CREB activity on status epilepticus and spontaneous seizures in a chronic epilepsy model. Pilocarpine chemoconvulsant was used to induce status epilepticus. To suppress CREB activity, a transgenic mouse line expressing an inducible dominant negative mutant of CREB (CREB(IR) ) with a serine to alanine 133 substitution was used. Status epilepticus and spontaneous seizures of transgenic and wild-type mice were analyzed using video-electroencephalography (EEG) to assess the effect of CREB suppression on seizures. Our findings indicate that activation of CREB(IR) shortens the duration of status epilepticus. The frequency of spontaneous seizures decreased in mice with chronic epilepsy during CREB(IR) induction; however, the duration of the spontaneous seizures was unchanged. Of interest, we found significantly reduced levels of phospho-CREB Ser133 upon activation of CREB(IR) , supporting prior work suggesting that binding to the CRE site is important for CREB phosphorylation. Our results suggest that CRE transcription supports seizure activity both during status epilepticus and in spontaneous seizures. Thus, blocking of CRE transcription is a novel target for the treatment of epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  7. The CNTF-derived peptide mimetic Cintrofin attenuates spatial-learning deficits in a rat post-status epilepticus model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russmann, Vera; Seeger, Natalie; Zellinger, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic growth factor is considered a potential therapeutic agent for central nervous system diseases. We report first in vivo data of the ciliary neurotrophic growth factor peptide mimetic Cintrofin in a rat post-status epilepticus model. Cintrofin prevented long-term alterations...... in the number of doublecortin-positive neuronal progenitor cells and attenuated the persistence of basal dendrites. In contrast, Cintrofin did neither affect acute status epilepticus-associated alterations in hippocampal cell proliferation and neurogenesis nor reveal any relevant effect on seizure activity....... Whereas status epilepticus caused a significant disturbance in spatial learning in reversed peptide-treated rats, the performance of Cintrofin-treated rats did not differ from controls. The study confirms that Cintrofin comprises an active sequence mimicking effects of its parent molecule. While the data...

  8. Impact of the NCAM derived mimetic peptide plannexin on the acute cellular consequences of a status epilepticus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zellinger, Christina; Hadamitzky, Martin; Bock, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    Plannexin represents a NCAM-derived peptide mimicking trans-homophilic NCAM interaction, which proved to exert neuroprotective effects in vitro. The effect of plannexin was evaluated in a rat status epilepticus model. As expected, prolonged seizure activity resulted in a pronounced cell loss...... in hippocampal subregions. The comparison between the vehicle- and plannexin-treated animals with status epilepticus did not reveal neuroprotective effects of plannexin on mature neurons. However, treatment with plannexin partially prevented the reduction in the number of doublecortin-labeled neuronal progenitor...... cells, which was evident 48h following status epilepticus. In conclusion, the data might give first evidence that plannexin can protect immature neurons in vivo. Future studies are necessary to evaluate whether disease-modifying or preventive effects are observed in models of epileptogenesis....

  9. Different as night and day: Patterns of isolated seizures, clusters, and status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenholz, Daniel M; Rakesh, Kshitiz; Kapur, Kush; Gaínza-Lein, Marina; Hodgeman, Ryan; Moss, Robert; Theodore, William H; Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2018-05-01

    Using approximations based on presumed U.S. time zones, we characterized day and nighttime seizure patterns in a patient-reported database, Seizure Tracker. A total of 632 995 seizures (9698 patients) were classified into 4 categories: isolated seizure event (ISE), cluster without status epilepticus (CWOS), cluster including status epilepticus (CIS), and status epilepticus (SE). We used a multinomial mixed-effects logistic regression model to calculate odds ratios (ORs) to determine night/day ratios for the difference between seizure patterns: ISE versus SE, ISE versus CWOS, ISE versus CIS, and CWOS versus CIS. Ranges of OR values were reported across cluster definitions. In adults, ISE was more likely at night compared to CWOS (OR = 1.49, 95% adjusted confidence interval [CI] = 1.36-1.63) and to CIS (OR = 1.61, 95% adjusted CI = 1.34-1.88). The ORs for ISE versus SE and CWOS versus SE were not significantly different regardless of cluster definition. In children, ISE was less likely at night compared to SE (OR = 0.85, 95% adjusted CI = 0.79-0.91). ISE was more likely at night compared to CWOS (OR = 1.35, 95% adjusted CI = 1.26-1.44) and CIS (OR = 1.65, 95% adjusted CI = 1.44-1.86). CWOS was more likely during the night compared to CIS (OR = 1.22, 95% adjusted CI = 1.05-1.39). With the exception of SE in children, our data suggest that more severe patterns favor daytime. This suggests distinct day/night preferences for different seizure patterns in children and adults. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 International League Against Epilepsy.

  10. Management protocols for status epilepticus in the pediatric emergency room: systematic review article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Cheuk C; Branco, Ricardo G; Tasker, Robert C

    This systematic review of national or regional guidelines published in English aimed to better understand variance in pre-hospital and emergency department treatment of status epilepticus. Systematic search of national or regional guidelines (January 2000 to February 2017) contained within PubMed and Google Scholar databases, and article reference lists. The search keywords were status epilepticus, prolonged seizure, treatment, and guideline. 356 articles were retrieved and 13 were selected according to the inclusion criteria. In all six pre-hospital guidelines, the preferred route of medication administration was to use alternatives to the intravenous route: all recommended buccal and intranasal midazolam; three also recommended intramuscular midazolam, and five recommended using rectal diazepam. All 11 emergency department guidelines described three phases in therapy. Intravenous medication, by phase, was indicated as such: initial phase - ten/11 guidelines recommended lorazepam, and eight/11 recommended diazepam; second phase - most (ten/11) guidelines recommended phenytoin, but other options were phenobarbital (nine/11), valproic acid (six/11), and either fosphenytoin or levetiracetam (each four/11); third phase - four/11 guidelines included the choice of repeating second phase therapy, whereas the other guidelines recommended using a variety of intravenous anesthetic agents (thiopental, midazolam, propofol, and pentobarbital). All of the guidelines share a similar framework for management of status epilepticus. The choice in route of administration and drug type varied across guidelines. Hence, the adoption of a particular guideline should take account of local practice options in health service delivery. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. The ketogenic diet as broad-spectrum treatment for super-refractory pediatric status epilepticus: challenges in implementation in the pediatric and neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobo, Nicole H; Sankar, Raman; Murata, Kristina K; Sewak, Sarika L; Kezele, Michele A; Matsumoto, Joyce H

    2015-02-01

    Refractory status epilepticus carries significant morbidity and mortality. Recent reports have promoted the use of the ketogenic diet as an effective treatment for refractory status epilepticus. We describe our recent experience with instituting the ketogenic diet for 4 critically ill children in refractory status epilepticus, ranging in age from 9 weeks to 13.5 years after failure of traditional treatment. The ketogenic diet allowed these patients to be weaned off continuous infusions of anesthetics without recurrence of status epilepticus, though delayed ketosis and persistently elevated glucose measurements posed special challenges to effective initiation, and none experienced complete seizure cessation. The ease of sustaining myocardial function with fatty acid energy substrates compares favorably over the myocardial toxicity posed by anesthetic doses of barbiturates and contributes to the safety profile of the ketogenic diet. The ketogenic diet can be implemented successfully and safely for the treatment of refractory status epilepticus in pediatric patients. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Protective effects of endoplasmic reticulum stress preconditioning on hippocampal neurons in rats with status epilepticus

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    Yi ZHANG

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the protective effects of endoplasmic reticulum stress preconditioning induced by 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG on hippocampal neurons of rats with status epilepticus (SE and the possible mechanism.  Methods Ninety Sprague-Dawley (SD rats were randomly enrolled into preconditioning group (N = 30, SE group (N = 30 and control group (N = 30. Each group was divided into 6 subsets (N = 5 according to six time points (before seizure, 6 h, 12 h, 1 d, 2 d and 7 d after seizure. The preconditioning group was administered 2-DG intraperitoneally with a dose of 150 mg/kg for 7 days, and the lithium-pilocarpine induced SE rat model was established on both preconditioning group and SE group. The rats were sacrificed at the above six time points, and the brains were removed to make paraffin sections. Nissl staining was performed by toluidine blue to evaluate the hippocampal neuronal damage after seizure, and the number of survival neurons in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 regions of the rats were counted. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to detect the expressions of glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78 and X-box binding protein 1 (XBP-1 in hippocampal CA3 region of the rats.  Results The number of survival neurons in preconditioning group was much more than that in SE group at 7 d after seizure (t = 5.353, P = 0.000, and was more obvious in CA1 region. There was no significant hippocampal neuronal damage in control group. The expressions of GRP78 and XBP-1 in CA3 region of hippocampus in SE group at 6 h after seizure were significantly higher than that in control group (P = 0.000, and then kept increasing until reaching the peak at 2 d (P = 0.000, for all. The expressions of GRP78 and XBP-1 in hippocampal CA3 region in preconditioning group were significantly higher than that in control group before seizure (P = 0.000, for all. The level of GRP78 maintained the highest at 24 h and 2 d after seizure (P = 0.000, for all, while the XBP-1 level

  13. Intranasal Midazolam versus Rectal Diazepam for the Management of Canine Status Epilepticus: A Multicenter Randomized Parallel-Group Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalambous, M; Bhatti, S F M; Van Ham, L; Platt, S; Jeffery, N D; Tipold, A; Siedenburg, J; Volk, H A; Hasegawa, D; Gallucci, A; Gandini, G; Musteata, M; Ives, E; Vanhaesebrouck, A E

    2017-07-01

    Intranasal administration of benzodiazepines has shown superiority over rectal administration for terminating emergency epileptic seizures in human trials. No such clinical trials have been performed in dogs. To evaluate the clinical efficacy of intranasal midazolam (IN-MDZ), via a mucosal atomization device, as a first-line management option for canine status epilepticus and compare it to rectal administration of diazepam (R-DZP) for controlling status epilepticus before intravenous access is available. Client-owned dogs with idiopathic or structural epilepsy manifesting status epilepticus within a hospital environment were used. Dogs were randomly allocated to treatment with IN-MDZ (n = 20) or R-DZP (n = 15). Randomized parallel-group clinical trial. Seizure cessation time and adverse effects were recorded. For each dog, treatment was considered successful if the seizure ceased within 5 minutes and did not recur within 10 minutes after administration. The 95% confidence interval was used to detect the true population of dogs that were successfully treated. The Fisher's 2-tailed exact test was used to compare the 2 groups, and the results were considered statistically significant if P status epilepticus in 70% (14/20) and 20% (3/15) of cases, respectively (P = .0059). All dogs showed sedation and ataxia. IN-MDZ is a quick, safe and effective first-line medication for controlling status epilepticus in dogs and appears superior to R-DZP. IN-MDZ might be a valuable treatment option when intravenous access is not available and for treatment of status epilepticus in dogs at home. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  14. Disconnective Hemispherotomy for Medically Intractable Status Epilepticus in an 8-Year-Old Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Lucas; Bahgat, Diaa; Sharp, Gregory; Willis, Erin; Ocal, Eylem; Albert, Gregory; Serletis, Demitre

    2015-10-01

    We report here the unusual case of an 8-year-old child with left hemispheric focal epilepsy secondary to a perinatal infarction who presented with new onset absence seizures and eventual nonconvulsive status epilepticus that was refractory to medical management. Following review at our multidisciplinary Epilepsy Surgery conference, the patient underwent disconnective surgical hemispherotomy with immediate cessation of his seizures; and has remained seizure-free at 4 months following surgery. In this context, we present here an overview of hemispherectomy and related procedures, including peri-insular disconnective hemispherotomy, and we discuss the efficacy of surgery for challenging hemispheric epilepsies.

  15. Salzburg Consensus Criteria for Non-Convulsive Status Epilepticus--approach to clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitinger, M; Beniczky, S; Rohracher, A; Gardella, E; Kalss, G; Qerama, E; Höfler, J; Hess Lindberg-Larsen, A; Kuchukhidze, G; Dobesberger, J; Langthaler, P B; Trinka, E

    2015-08-01

    Salzburg Consensus Criteria for diagnosis of Non-Convulsive Status Epilepticus (SCNC) were proposed at the 4th London-Innsbruck Colloquium on status epilepticus in Salzburg (2013). We retrospectively analyzed the EEGs of 50 consecutive nonhypoxic patients with diagnoses of nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) at discharge and 50 consecutive controls with abnormal EEGs in a large university hospital in Austria. We implemented the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society's Standardized Critical Care EEG Terminology, 2012 version (ACNS criteria) to increase the test performance of SCNC. In patients without preexisting epileptic encephalopathy, the following criteria were applied: (1) more than 25 epileptiform discharges (ED) per 10-second epoch, i.e., >2.5/s and (2) patients with EDs ≤ 2.5/s or rhythmic delta/theta activity (RDT) exceeding 0.5/s AND at least one of the additional criteria: (2a) clinical and EEG improvements from antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), (2b) subtle clinical phenomena, or (2c) typical spatiotemporal evolution. In case of fluctuation without evolution or EEG improvement without clinical improvement, "possible NCSE" was diagnosed. For identification of RDT, the following criteria were compared: (test condition A) continuous delta-theta activity without further rules, (B) ACNS criterion for rhythmic delta activity (RDA), and (C) ACNS criteria for RDA and fluctuation. False positive rate in controls dropped from 28% (condition A) to 2% (B) (p = 0.00039) and finally to 0% (C) (p = 0.000042). Application of test condition C in the group with NCSE gives one false negative (2%). Various EEG patterns were found in patients with NCSE: (1) 8.2%, (2a) 2%, (2b) 12.2%, and (2c) 32.7%. Possible NCSE was diagnosed based on fluctuations in 57.1% and EEG improvement without clinical improvement in 14.2%. The modified SCNC with refined definitions including the ACNS terminology leads to clinically relevant and statistically significant reduction of false

  16. Outcomes in Children Treated with Pentobarbital Infusion for Refractory and Super-Refractory Status Epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erklauer, Jennifer; Graf, Jeanine; McPherson, Mona; Anderson, Anne; Wilfong, Angus; Minard, Charles G; Loftis, Laura

    2018-03-26

    Functional neurologic outcome for children with refractory and super-refractory status epilepticus has not been well defined. Retrospective chart review including children age 0-17 years who received pentobarbital infusion from 2003 to 2016 for status epilepticus. Outcomes were defined in terms of mortality, need for new medical technology assistance at hospital discharge and functional neurologic outcome determined by pediatric cerebral performance category score (PCPC). Potential patient characteristics associated with functional neurologic outcome including age, sex, ethnicity, etiology of the status epilepticus, and duration of pentobarbital infusion were evaluated. Forty children met inclusion criteria. In-hospital mortality was 30% (12/40). Of survivors, 21% (6/28) returned to baseline PCPC while half (14/28) declined in function ≥ 2 PCPC categories at hospital discharge. 25% (7/28) of survivors required tracheostomy and 27% (7/26) required new gastrostomy. Seizures persisted at discharge for most patients with new onset status epilepticus while the majority of patients with known epilepsy returned to baseline seizure frequency. Etiology (p = 0.015), PCPC at admission (p = 0.0006), new tracheostomy (p = 0.012), and new gastrostomy tube (p = 0.012) were associated with increase in PCPC score ≥ 2 categories in univariable analysis. Duration of pentobarbital infusion (p = 0.005) and length of hospital stay (p = 0.056) were longer in patients who demonstrated significant decline in neurologic function. None of these variables maintained statistical significance when multiple logistic regression model adjusting for PCPC score at admission was applied. At long-term follow-up, 36% (8/22) of children demonstrated improvement in PCPC compared to discharge and 23% (5/22) showed deterioration including three additional deaths. Mortality in this population was high. The majority of children experienced some degree of disability at discharge. Despite

  17. Does status epilepticus modify the effect of ifenprodil on cortical epileptic afterdischarges in immature rats?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abbasova, Kenul; Kubová, Hana; Mareš, Pavel

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 1 (2018), s. 126-132 ISSN 1734-1140 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0971; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-16605S; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA MŠk(CZ) LH15032 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : status epilepticus * immature rats * ifenprodil * cortical stimulation * epileptic afterdischarges Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neurosciences (including psychophysiology Impact factor: 2.587, year: 2016

  18. Focal status epilepticus: follow-up by perfusion- and diffusion MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Koussy, M.; Loevblad, K.O.; Kiefer, C.; Schroth, G.; Mathis, J.; Stepper, F.

    2002-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted MRI demonstrated bright right temporoparietal cortex, right hippocampus, and left cerebellum in a 63-year-old female suffering a focal convulsive status epilepticus. Hyperperfusion was noted in the right temporoparietal region. Two days later, a tendency to normalization of most of the diffusion and perfusion changes was noted, apart from the right hippocampus which became brighter on diffusion- and T2-weighted images. On the tenth day the apparent diffusion coefficient was slightly elevated, getting brighter on T2-weighted images with suspected mild post-contrast enhancement. We postulate that the discharging right hippocampus suffered cytotoxic edema, which later progressed to cell damage. (orig.)

  19. Focal status epilepticus: follow-up by perfusion- and diffusion MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Koussy, M; Loevblad, K O; Kiefer, C; Schroth, G [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Bern, Inselspital (Switzerland); Mathis, J; Stepper, F [Department of Neurology, University of Bern, Inselspital (Switzerland)

    2002-03-01

    Diffusion-weighted MRI demonstrated bright right temporoparietal cortex, right hippocampus, and left cerebellum in a 63-year-old female suffering a focal convulsive status epilepticus. Hyperperfusion was noted in the right temporoparietal region. Two days later, a tendency to normalization of most of the diffusion and perfusion changes was noted, apart from the right hippocampus which became brighter on diffusion- and T2-weighted images. On the tenth day the apparent diffusion coefficient was slightly elevated, getting brighter on T2-weighted images with suspected mild post-contrast enhancement. We postulate that the discharging right hippocampus suffered cytotoxic edema, which later progressed to cell damage. (orig.)

  20. Diagnosis and interpretation of EEG on non-convulsive status epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-gang KANG

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available It is difficult to diagnose non-convulsive status epilepticus (NCSE clinically because of the complicated etiology and various clinical and electroencephalographic features of NCSE without a universally accepted definition. Although the diagnosis of NCSE relies largely on electroencephalogram (EEG findings, the determination of NCSE on EEG is inevitably subjective, and the EEG changes of most patients is lack of specificity. As the diagnosis of NCSE is related to clinical and electroencephalographic manifestations, diagnostic criteria for NCSE should take into account both clinical and electroencephalographic features, and their response to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.11.005

  1. Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus Complicating Epstein-Barr Virus Encephalitis in a Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Greco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Children with acute encephalopathy show prolonged electrographic seizure activity consistent with nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE. Pediatric NCSE is a heterogeneous clinical entity with poor outcome and different etiologies, including central nervous system infection, stroke, toxic-metabolic syndrome, and epileptic syndrome. We report a 4-year-old girl with seizure and behavioral changes in whom the analysis of cerebrospinal fluid by polymerase chain reaction was positive for Epstein-Barr virus. We emphasize the importance of electroencephalography (EEG, and particularly, of continuous EEG monitoring for early recognition and appropriate treatment of this condition.

  2. A national database of incidence and treatment outcomes of status epilepticus in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiamkao, Somsak; Pranbul, Sineenard; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak; Thepsuthammarat, Kaewjai

    2014-06-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is a serious neurological condition. The national database of SE in Thailand and other developing countries is limited in terms of incidence and treatment outcomes. This study was conducted on the prevalence of status epilepticus (SE). The study group comprised of adult inpatients (over 18 years old) with SE throughout Thailand. SE patients were diagnosed and searched based on ICD 10 (G41) from the national database. The database used was from reimbursement documents submitted by the hospitals under the three health insurance systems, namely, the universal health coverage insurance, social security, and government health welfare system during the fiscal year 2010. We found 2190 SE patients receiving treatment at hospitals (5.10/100 000 population). The average age was 50.5 years and 1413 patients were males (64.5%). Mortality rate was 0.6 death/100 000 population or 11.96% of total patients. Significant factors associated with death or a nonimproved status at discharge were type of insurance, hospital level, chronic kidney disease, having pneumonia, having shock, on mechanical ventilator, and having cardiopulmonary resuscitation. In conclusion, the incidence of SE in Thailand was 5.10/100 000 population with mortality rate of 0.6/100 000 population.

  3. Reversible postoperative blindness caused by bilateral status epilepticus amauroticus following thoracolumbar deformity correction: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Tarik F; Sweis, Rochelle T; Nockels, Russ P

    2017-07-01

    Postoperative vision loss (POVL) is a devastating complication and has been reported after complex spine procedures. Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy and posterior optic neuropathy are the 2 most common causes of POVL. Bilateral occipital lobe seizures causing complete blindness are rare and have not been reported as a cause of POVL after spine surgery with the patient prone. The authors report the case of a 67-year-old man without a history of seizures who underwent a staged thoracolumbar deformity correction and developed POVL 6 hours after surgery. Imaging, laboratory, and ophthalmological examination results were nonrevealing. Routine electroencephalography study results were negative, but continuous electroencephalography captured bilateral occipital lobe seizures. The patient developed nonconvulsive status epilepticus despite initial treatment with benzodiazepines and loading doses of levetiracetam and lacosamide. He was therefore intubated for status epilepticus amauroticus and received a midazolam infusion. After electrographic seizure cessation for 48 hours, the patient was weaned off midazolam. The patient was maintained on levetiracetam and lacosamide without seizure recurrence and returned to his preoperative visual baseline status.

  4. Status epilepticus associated with platinum chemotherapy in a patient with cervical cancer: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, Laura L.; Ren, Yulan; Westin, Shannon N.

    2015-01-01

    While peripheral neuropathy is a common side effect of platinum-based chemotherapy, central nervous system (CNS) toxicity, such as encephalopathy or seizures, appears to be rare. This manuscript describes the only reported case of nonconvulsive status epilepticus associated with cisplatin in a cervical cancer patient who does not have other underlying medical conditions. The patient is a 54-year-old Chinese female with recurrent stage IIIB moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix who was being treated with cisplatin and topotecan. During the sixth cycle of this regimen, the patient presented with mental status changes. While imaging and laboratory values were within normal limits, the patient’s EEG revealed nonconvulsive status epilepticus. After appropriate intervention, she made a complete recovery with no further seizures. The patient currently remains on antiepileptic therapy, but is no longer receiving cisplatin. Patients who present with new onset seizures should primarily be evaluated for underlying medical conditions. Among patients who are suspected to have CNS side effects associated with platinum use, we recommend avoidance of platinum agents in future chemotherapeutic regimens. Although rare, providers should be aware of the potential for CNS toxicity associated with this drug class

  5. An audit of the predictors of outcome in status epilepticus from a resource-poor country: a comparison with developed countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Haseeb; Rajiv, Keni Ravish; Menon, Ramshekhar; Menon, Deepak; Nair, Muralidharan; Radhakrishnan, Ashalatha

    2016-06-01

    Status epilepticus is a neurological emergency with significant morbidity and mortality. This study describes the clinical profile, treatment, and predictors of outcome of status epilepticus in a tertiary referral centre in a developing country and aims to highlight the similarities and differences from data available from the western world. A retrospective analysis of data of patients treated for status epilepticus was conducted from prospectively maintained records, between January 2000 and September 2010. The demographic data, clinical profile and investigations (including neuroimaging and EEG), aetiology, treatment, and outcomes were studied and compared with data available from the western world. The analysis included 108 events in 84 patients. A single episode of status epilepticus was treated in 72 patients (86%) and multiple status epilepticus events, ranging from two to six per patient, were managed in 12 patients (14%). Mean age was 24.1±20.3 years and 63% were males. The types of status epilepticus included convulsive status in 98 (90.7%), non-convulsive status in seven (6.5%), and myoclonic status in three (2.8%). The majority of events (60%) were remote symptomatic, 16% were acute symptomatic, 16% were of unexplained aetiology, and 8% were progressive symptomatic. In 85 events (79%), status epilepticus could be aborted with first and second-line drugs. The remaining 23 events (21%) progressed to refractory status epilepticus, among which, 13 (56%) were controlled with continuous intravenous midazolam infusion. Case fatality rate was 11%, neurological sequelae were reported in 22%, and 67% returned to baseline. Acute symptomatic status, older age, altered sensorium at the time of admission, and delayed hospitalisation were predictors of poor outcome. Aetiology was the most important determinant of outcome of status epilepticus, as in reports from the western world, with remote symptomatic aetiology secondary to gliosis being the most common

  6. Progranulin levels in status epilepticus as a marker of neuronal recovery and neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huchtemann, T; Körtvélyessy, P; Feistner, H; Heinze, H J; Bittner, D

    2015-08-01

    Recently, a mouse model showed that progranulin, a mediator in neuroinflammation and a neuronal growth factor, was elevated in the hippocampus after status epilepticus (SE). This elevated level might mirror compensating neuronal mechanisms after SE. Studies concerning neuronal recovery and neuroprotective mechanisms after SE in humans are scarce, so we tested for progranulinin the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) after various types of SE. We performed a retrospective analysis of progranulin levels in CSF in patients (n = 24) who underwent lumbar puncture as part of diagnostic workup after having SE and in patients after having one single tonic-clonic seizure who comprised the control group (n = 8). In our group with SE, progranulin levels in CSF were not significantly elevated compared to our control group. Furthermore, there was no correlation between progranulin levels and the time interval between lumbar puncture and SE. Additionally, in cases of higher CSF progranulin levels, we found no impact on the clinical outcome after SE. Although our cohort is heterogeneous and not fully sufficient, we conclude that progranulin in CSF is not elevated after SE in our cohort. Therefore, our results do not suggest a change in cerebral progranulin metabolism as a possible neuroregenerative or neuroprotective mechanism in humans after SE in acute and subacute phases. A larger cohort study is needed to further strengthen this result. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Status Epilepticus". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Status Epilepticus due to Intraperitoneal Injection of Vehicle Containing Propylene Glycol in Sprague Dawley Rats

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    Evon S. Ereifej

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Published reports of status epilepticus due to intraperitoneal injection containing propylene glycol in rats are sparse. In fact, there are no reports specifying a maximum safe dose of propylene glycol through intraperitoneal administration. We report here a case of unexpected seizures in Sprague Dawley rats after receiving an intraperitoneal injection containing propylene glycol. Nine-week-old, 225–250 gram male rats were reported to experience tremor progressing to seizures within minutes after given injections of resveratrol (30 mg/kg dissolved in a 40 : 60 propylene glycol/corn oil vehicle solution by direct intraperitoneal (IP slow bolus injection or via a preplaced intraperitoneal catheter. The World Health Organization suggests a maximum dose of 25 mg/kg/day of propylene glycol taken orally and no more than 25 mg/dL in blood serum, whereas the animals used in our study got a calculated maximum 0.52 g/kg (25 times lower dose. Blood tests from the seizing rat support a diagnosis of hemolysis and lactic acidosis which may have led to the seizures, all of which appeared to be a consequence of the propylene glycol administration. These findings are consistent with oral and intravenous administration of propylene glycol toxicity as previously reported in other species, including humans. To our knowledge, this report represents the first published case of status epilepticus due to an IP injection containing propylene glycol.

  8. Analysis of factors influencing admission to intensive care following convulsive status epilepticus in children.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tirupathi, Sandya

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify clinical features and therapeutic decisions that influence admission to the Intensive Care unit (ICU) in children presenting with convulsive status epilepticus (CSE). METHODS: We evaluated 47 admissions with status epilepticus to a tertiary paediatric hospital A&E over a three year period (2003-2006). Following initial management 23 episodes required admission to ICU and 24 were managed on a paediatric ward. We compared clinical, demographic data and compliance with our CSE protocol between the ICU and ward groups. RESULTS: Median age at presentation in the ICU group was 17 months (range 3 months-11 years) compared to 46 months in the ward group (range 3 months-10 years). Fifty per cent of patients in both groups had a previous history of seizures. Median duration of pre-hospital seizure activity was 30 min in both groups. More than two doses of benzodiazepines were given as first line medication in 62% of the ICU group and 33% of the ward group. Among children admitted to ICU with CSE, 26% had been managed according to the CSE protocol, compared to 66% of children who were admitted to a hospital ward. Febrile seizures were the most common aetiology in both groups. CONCLUSION: Younger age at presentation, administration of more than two doses of benzodiazepines and deviation from the CSE protocol appear to be factors which influence admission of children to ICU. Recognition of pre-hospital administration of benzodiazepines and adherence to therapeutic guidelines may reduce the need for ventilatory support in this group.

  9. A Case Of Primary Central Nervous System Vasculitis Who Presented With Status Epilepticus

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    Sırma Geyik

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary central nervous system vasculitis (PCNV is limited with central nervous system and rare vasculitis that mostly seen in middle-aged men. PCNV vasculitis is usually presented that headache, dementia, stroke and multifocal common neurological symptoms. PCNV especially involves small medium-sized leptomeningeal and cortical arteries. 43 years old male patient who have been progressive forgetfulness and headache for 3 years. He applied with recurrent that before starting right focal and than sprawling whole body which generalized tonic-clonic seizures to us. During management that he was transfered to the intensive care unit due to status epilepticus (SE. Later than we found right hemiparesis, motor aphasia and right babinski positivity in neurologic examination. Diffusion restriction was revealed in left MCA territory in diffusion magnetic resonance imaging(MRI. EEG showed two types abnormality that a slow background ritm and epileptiform activity. Biochemistry of blood, complete blood count, blood sedimentation rate, CRP and markers of vasculitis were found in the normal range. Cerebral anjiography revealed that irregularities in the distal vascular areas and fusiform aneurysm at the top of basilar artery. He was consulted with rheumatology and diagnosed central nervous system vasculitis with the existing findings. Biopsy couldn't be taken from the brain to verify the diagnosis. Finally, we applied treatment that pulse steroid and cyclophosphamide to patient. This case has been presented due to emphasize that PCNV rarely may play a role in the etiology of recurrent stroke and status epilepticus.

  10. In vivo proton MR spectroscopy of canine status epilepticus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandstrom, J.C.; Partington, C.R.; Perman, W.H.

    1988-01-01

    Invasive studies of rodent seizure models have demonstrated twice-normal lactate accumulation at the seizure focus. The authors investigated metabolic changes in canine kainic acid-induced seizures by means of in vivo volume-selective water-suppressed proton MR spectroscopy (MVSTE pulse sequence). Spectra from several experiments are presented demonstrating changes in lactate and MR imaging-visible lipid concentration. Spectra were obtained with interlaced acquisition from the brain and an external standard for relative quantification, with best-case line width of 4 Hz and typical line widths of 7-15 Hz at 1.5 T. Direct injection of NAA and lactate in the brain allowed in vivo identification of resonances

  11. Transcriptional response of polycomb group genes to status epilepticus in mice is modified by prior exposure to epileptic preconditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James eReynolds

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Exposure of the brain to brief, non-harmful seizures can activate protective mechanisms that temporarily generate a damage-refractory state. This process, termed epileptic tolerance, is associated with large-scale down-regulation of gene expression. Polycomb group proteins are master controllers of gene silencing during development that are re-activated by injury to the brain. Here we explored the transcriptional response of genes associated with polycomb repressor complex (PRC 1 (Ring1A and Ring1B and Bmi1 and PRC2 (Ezh1, Ezh2 and Suz12, as well as additional transcriptional regulators Sirt1, Yy1 and Yy2, in a mouse model of status epilepticus. Findings were contrasted to changes after status epilepticus in mice previously given brief seizures to evoke tolerance. Real-time quantitative PCR showed status epilepticus prompted an early (1 h increase in expression of several genes in PRC1 and PRC2 in the hippocampus, followed by down-regulation of many of the same genes at later times points (4 , 8 and 24 h. Spatio-temporal differences were found among PRC2 genes in epileptic tolerance, including increased expression of Ezh2, Suz12 and Yy2 relative to the normal injury response to status epilepticus. In contrast, PRC1 complex genes including Ring 1B and Bmi1 displayed differential down-regulation in epileptic tolerance. The present study characterizes polycomb group gene expression following status epilepticus and shows prior seizure exposure produces select changes to PRC1 and PRC2 composition that may influence differential gene expression in epileptic tolerance.

  12. Outcome following postanoxic status epilepticus in patients with targeted temperature management after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragancea, Irina; Backman, Sofia; Westhall, Erik; Rundgren, Malin; Friberg, Hans; Cronberg, Tobias

    2015-08-01

    Postanoxic electrographic status epilepticus (ESE) is considered a predictor of poor outcome in resuscitated patients after cardiac arrest (CA). Observational data suggest that a subgroup of patients may have a good outcome. This study aimed to describe the prevalence of ESE and potential clinical and electrographic prognostic markers. In this retrospective single study, we analyzed consecutive patients who suffered from CA, and who received temperature management and were monitored with simplified continuous EEG (cEEG) during a five-year period. The patients' charts and cEEG data were initially screened to identify patients with clinical seizures or ESE. The cEEG diagnosis of ESE was retrospectively reanalyzed according to strict criteria by a neurophysiologist blinded to patient outcome. The EEG background patterns prior to the onset of ESE, duration of ESE, presence of clinical seizures, and use of antiepileptic drugs were analyzed. The results of somatosensory-evoked potentials (SSEPs) and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) at 48 h after CA were described in all patients with ESE. Antiepileptic treatment strategies were not protocolized. Outcome was evaluated using the Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) scale at 6 months, and good outcome was defined as CPC 1-2. Of 127 patients, 41 (32%) developed ESE. Twenty-five patients had a discontinuous EEG background prior to ESE, and all died without regaining consciousness. Sixteen patients developed a continuous EEG background prior to the start of ESE, four of whom survived, three with CPC 1-2 and one with CPC 3 at 6 months. Among survivors, ESE developed at a median of 46 h after CA. All had preserved N20 peaks on SSEP and NSE values of 18-37 μg/l. Electrographic status epilepticus is common among comatose patients after cardiac arrest, with few survivors. A combination of a continuous EEG background prior to ESE, preserved N20 peaks on SSEPs, and low or moderately elevated NSE levels may indicate a good outcome. This

  13. P2X7 receptor-mediated PARP1 activity regulates astroglial death in the rat hippocampus following status epilepticus

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    Ji Yang eKim

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP1 plays a regulatory role in apoptosis, necrosis, and other cellular processes after injury. Recently, we revealed that PARP1 regulates the differential neuronal/astroglial responses to pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE in the distinct brain regions. In addition, P2X7 receptor (P2X7R, an ATP-gated ion channel, activation accelerates astroglial apoptosis, while it attenuates clasmatodendrosis (lysosome-derived autophagic astroglial death. Therefore, we investigated whether P2X7R regulates regional specific astroglial PARP1 expression/activation in response to SE. In the present study, P2X7R activation exacerbates SE-induced astroglial apoptosis, while P2X7R inhibition attenuates it accompanied by increasing PARP1 activity in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus following SE. In the CA1 region, however, P2X7R inhibition deteriorates SE-induced clasmatodendrosis via PARP1 activation following SE. Taken together, our findings suggest that P2X7R function may affect SE-induced astroglial death by regulating PARP1 activation/expression in regional-specific manner. Therefore, the selective modulation of P2X7R-mediated PARP1 functions may be a considerable strategy for controls in various types of cell deaths.

  14. Combined use of intravenous anesthetics and hypothermia in treating refractory status epilepticus

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    Guo-ping REN

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The primary choice of treating refractory status epilepticus (RSE is intravenous anesthetics, but the seizures of some patients can not get a good control. Thus, other therapies must be combined. Hypothermia not only can terminate seizures, but also play a part in brain protection. Though combined use of intravenous anesthetics and hypothermia is not a regular clinical scheme, the favorable effect has been proved by a lot of clinical research. This paper mainly focuses on the dose of intravenous anesthetics, the time, temperature and procedure of hypothermia, the indications and contraindications of combined therapy, and so on. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.11.006

  15. Super-Refractory Status Epilepticus: Report of a Case and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapenta, Leonardo; Frisullo, Giovanni; Vollono, Catello; Brunetti, Valerio; Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Sandroni, Claudio; Di Lella, Giuseppe; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2015-10-01

    Super-refractory status epilepticus (SE; ie, SE continuing or recurring despite 24 hours of general anesthesia) is a severe condition with high percentage of mortality and morbidity. Usually, this condition occurs because of serious brain damage; nevertheless, some patients develop super-refractory SE without identifiable etiology. Although not uncommonly encountered in neurointensive care, scientific data on this condition are still lacking in terms of treatment and prognosis. Herein, we report a case of super-refractory SE with recovery after 50 days, despite electroencephalographic (EEG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signs traditionally related to poor prognosis. A review of the literature on super-refractory SE is also presented. © EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ECNS) 2014.

  16. Predictors of outcomes and refractoriness in status epilepticus: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmaca, Murat Mert; Bebek, Nerses; Baykan, Betül; Gökyiğit, Ayşen; Gürses, Candan

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the predictors of outcomes and refractoriness in status epilepticus (SE). This is a prospective study of 59 adult patients with SE who were admitted to the Emergency Department between February 2012 and December 2013. The effects of clinical, demographic, and electrophysiologic features of patients with SE were evaluated. To evaluate outcome in SE, STESS, mSTESS, and EMSE scales were used. Logistic regression analysis showed that being aged ≥65years (p=0.02, OR: 17.68, 95% CI: [1.6-198.4]) for the short term and having potentially fatal etiology (p=0.027, OR: 11.7, 95% CI: [1.3-103]) for the long term were the only independent predictors of poor outcomes; whereas, the presence of periodic epileptiform discharges (PEDs) in EEG was the only independent predictor of refractoriness (p=0.032, OR: 13.7, 95% CI: [1.3-148.5]). The patients with ≥3 Status Epilepticus Severity Score (STESS) did not have poorer outcomes in the short- (p=0.157) and long term (p=0.065). There was no difference between patients with 0-2, 3-4, and ≥4 mSTESS in the short- and long term in terms of outcome (p=0.28 and 0.063, respectively). Also, there was no difference between subgroups (convulsive SE [CSE], nonconvulsive SE [NCSE], and epilepsia partialis continua [EPC]) in terms of STESS and mSTESS. When patients with EPC were excluded, both STESS and mSTESS scores of the patients correlated with poorer long-term outcomes (p=0.025 and 0.017, respectively). The patients with ≥64 points in the Epidemiology-based Mortality in SE-Etiology, age, comorbidity, EEG (EMSE-EACE) score and those with ≥27 points in EMSE-Etiology, age, comorbidity (EMSE-EAC) score did not have poorer outcomes in the short term (p=0.06 and 0.274, respectively) while they had significantly poorer outcome in the long term (pStatus epilepticus was terminated with intravenous (IV) levetiracetam (LEV) in 68.75% of patients and with IV phenytoin (PHT) in 83.3% of patients. No

  17. Infodemiology of status epilepticus: A systematic validation of the Google Trends-based search queries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Bacigaluppi, Susanna; Robba, Chiara; Nardone, Raffaele; Trinka, Eugen; Brigo, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    People increasingly use Google looking for health-related information. We previously demonstrated that in English-speaking countries most people use this search engine to obtain information on status epilepticus (SE) definition, types/subtypes, and treatment. Now, we aimed at providing a quantitative analysis of SE-related web queries. This analysis represents an advancement, with respect to what was already previously discussed, in that the Google Trends (GT) algorithm has been further refined and correlational analyses have been carried out to validate the GT-based query volumes. Google Trends-based SE-related query volumes were well correlated with information concerning causes and pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatments. Google Trends can provide both researchers and clinicians with data on realities and contexts that are generally overlooked and underexplored by classic epidemiology. In this way, GT can foster new epidemiological studies in the field and can complement traditional epidemiological tools. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Emphysematous Cystitis During Treatment of Suspected Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus in Type 2 Diabetic Patient

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    Chung-Jung Wu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Emphysematous cystitis is a rare disorder and complication of urinary tract infection (UTI, characterized by spontaneous gas formation in the urinary bladder because of bacterial fermentation. We present a case of emphysematous cystitis during treatment of suspected nonconvulsive status epilepticus in a patient with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. The patient recovered satisfactorily after 27 days of hospitalization. Treatment of emphysematous cystitis consisted of adequate urinary drainage, empirical antibiotic therapy, and strict blood glucose control. Diabetic patients are susceptible to an increased incidence of UTI and its complications. An early and correct diagnosis of UTI in diabetic patients followed by adequate treatment will prevent the disease from developing into a serious or life-threatening condition, such as emphysematous cystitis, or progressing to septic shock.

  19. Immunity and inflammation in status epilepticus and its sequelae: possibilities for therapeutic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezzani, Annamaria; Dingledine, Raymond; Rossetti, Andrea O

    2016-01-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is a life-threatening neurological emergency often refractory to available treatment options. It is a very heterogeneous condition in terms of clinical presentation and causes, which besides genetic, vascular and other structural causes also include CNS or severe systemic infections, sudden withdrawal from benzodiazepines or anticonvulsants and rare autoimmune etiologies. Treatment of SE is essentially based on expert opinions and antiepileptic drug treatment per se seems to have no major impact on prognosis. There is, therefore, urgent need of novel therapies that rely upon a better understanding of the basic mechanisms underlying this clinical condition. Accumulating evidence in animal models highlights that inflammation ensuing in the brain during SE may play a determinant role in ongoing seizures and their long-term detrimental consequences, independent of an infection or auto-immune cause; this evidence encourages reconsideration of the treatment flow in SE patients. PMID:26312647

  20. Defining the therapeutic time window for suppressing the inflammatory prostaglandin E2 signaling after status epilepticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yifeng; Kemper, Timothy; Qiu, Jiange; Jiang, Jianxiong

    2016-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is a common feature in nearly all neurological and some psychiatric disorders. Resembling its extraneural counterpart, neuroinflammation can be both beneficial and detrimental depending on the responding molecules. The overall effect of inflammation on disease progression is highly dependent on the extent of inflammatory mediator production and the duration of inflammatory induction. The time-dependent aspect of inflammatory responses suggests that the therapeutic time window for quelling neuroinflammation might vary with molecular targets and injury types. Therefore, it is important to define the therapeutic time window for anti-inflammatory therapeutics, as contradicting or negative results might arise when different treatment regimens are utilized even in similar animal models. Herein, we discuss a few critical factors that can help define the therapeutic time window and optimize treatment paradigm for suppressing the cyclooxygenase-2/prostaglandin-mediated inflammation after status epilepticus. These determinants should also be relevant to other anti-inflammatory therapeutic strategies for the CNS diseases. PMID:26689339

  1. Short-term mortality and prognostic factors related to status epilepticus

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    Fernando Gustavo Stelzer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective Status epilepticus (SE is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, and there is some controversy concerning predictive indicators of outcome. Our main goal was to determine mortality and to identify factors associated with SE prognosis. Method This prospective study in a tertiary-care university hospital, included 105 patients with epileptic seizures lasting more than 30 minutes. Mortality was defined as death during hospital admission. Results The case-fatality rate was 36.2%, which was higher than in previous studies. In univariate analysis, mortality was associated with age, previous epilepsy, complex focal seizures; etiology, recurrence, and refractoriness of SE; clinical complications, and focal SE. In multivariate analysis, mortality was associated only with presence of clinical complications. Conclusions Mortality associated with SE was higher than reported in previous studies, and was not related to age, specific etiology, or SE duration. In multivariate analysis, mortality was independently related to occurrence of medical complications.

  2. Opercular myoclonic-anarthric status epilepticus: A report of two cases

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    Janapareddy Vijaya Bhaskara Rao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Opercular myoclonic-anarthric status epilepticus (OMASE is an uncommon disorder of diverse etiology. This condition is characterized by fluctuating cortical dysarthria associated with epileptic myoclonus involving glossopharyngeal musculature bilaterally. We report two cases of OMASE of vascular etiology in adults. In both patients, ictally clonic expression was consistent with epilepsia partialis continua and bilateral, symmetrical involvement of soft palate in one patient and tongue, lips, chin and inferior jaw in both patients due to bilateral projections of the inferior corticonuclear pathways. The inferior rolandic area of dominant and high frontal region in non-dominant hemispheres were involved by an epileptogenic lesion of vascular etiology, which was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging of brain and single photon emission computerized tomography. Carotid Doppler study showed thrombosis of internal carotid artery in both patients, suggestive of an embolic origin. Early recognition of OMASE is important for early management of carotid occlusive disease.

  3. Nonconvulsive status epilepticus associated with periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges in a patient with syphilis

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    Xin Yu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE has been increasingly recognized as a cause of impaired level of consciousness in the ICU and emergency rooms. The confirmation of NCSE is largely based on the EEG, given the nonspecific and pleomorphic clinical manifestations. Debate remains over electroencephalograms (EEG criteria for NCSE. Periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges (PLEDs, have sparked controversy with regard to being part of the ictal vs. interictal spectrum. We report a case of a patient with syphilis who had cognitive decline and damaged consciousness with PLEDs and T2 hyperintensity at temporal and occipital lobe in MRI. After antiepileptic treatment only, his consciousness improved markedly together with the EEG in few days, while the change of MRI was still serious. In this case PLEDs is the sign of NCSE and change of MRI is limbic encephalitis (LE. This report discusses the association of PLEDs and NCSE, and supports the concept of PLEDs as an ictal pattern in some condition.

  4. Efficacy and safety of ketamine for the management of refractory status epilepticus (RSE) in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liaqat, J.; Raja, W.; Wali, W.

    2018-01-01

    Objective: To determine the efficacy and safety of ketamine (KE) in the management of refractory status epilepticus (RSE) in adults. Study Design: Open Label, unblinded prospective case series. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at Neurology Department Military Hospital Rawalpindi, from Jan 2014 to Dec 2014. Material and Methods: All the patients with status epilepticus, from Jan 2014 to Dec 2014 were treated with ketamine in addition to benzodiazepines, phenytoin and levitricetam. Ketamine was the last drug added and if seizures were still not controlled then anesthetic agents like thiopental and propofol were used. Results: Between Jan 2014 and Dec 2014, twenty patients received IV Ketamine. In 18 patients RSE lasted for more than 24 hours, with a median of 4 days (range 1-8 days). Mean duration of seizures in the study group was 4.45 days (SD 2.01). Ketamine was successful in terminating seizure activity in 40% (n=8) patients while it failed in 15% (n=3) patients. There was additional 15% (n=3) partial response in the form of initial control but these patients had later breakthrough or with drawl seizures. Twenty five percent (n=5) of the patients died during the treatment while in one patient ketamine had to be stopped because of intolerable side effects. In our patients the adverse effects of ketamine included sepsis (35%, 5, n=7), shock (10%, n=2) and pneumonia (10%, n=2). Conclusion: In this small, open-label, unblinded study KE appears effective and safe in treating RSE in adults. Larger, randomized studies will help to confirm data emerging from this preliminary study. (author)

  5. Morphological alterations in newly born dentate gyrus granule cells that emerge after status epilepticus contribute to make them less excitable.

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    Julián Tejada

    Full Text Available Computer simulations of external current stimulations of dentate gyrus granule cells of rats with Status Epilepticus induced by pilocarpine and control rats were used to evaluate whether morphological differences alone between these cells have an impact on their electrophysiological behavior. The cell models were constructed using morphological information from tridimensional reconstructions with Neurolucida software. To evaluate the effect of morphology differences alone, ion channel conductances, densities and distributions over the dendritic trees of dentate gyrus granule cells were the same for all models. External simulated currents were injected in randomly chosen dendrites belonging to one of three different areas of dentate gyrus granule cell molecular layer: inner molecular layer, medial molecular layer and outer molecular layer. Somatic membrane potentials were recorded to determine firing frequencies and inter-spike intervals. The results show that morphologically altered granule cells from pilocarpine-induced epileptic rats are less excitable than control cells, especially when they are stimulated in the inner molecular layer, which is the target area for mossy fibers that sprout after pilocarpine-induced cell degeneration. This suggests that morphological alterations may act as a protective mechanism to allow dentate gyrus granule cells to cope with the increase of stimulation caused by mossy fiber sprouting.

  6. Increased histone H3 phosphorylation in neurons in specific brain structures after induction of status epilepticus in mice.

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    Tetsuji Mori

    Full Text Available Status epilepticus (SE induces pathological and morphological changes in the brain. Recently, it has become clear that excessive neuronal excitation, stress and drug abuse induce chromatin remodeling in neurons, thereby altering gene expression. Chromatin remodeling is a key mechanism of epigenetic gene regulation. Histone H3 phosphorylation is frequently used as a marker of chromatin remodeling and is closely related to the upregulation of mRNA transcription. In the present study, we analyzed H3 phosphorylation levels in vivo using immunohistochemistry in the brains of mice with pilocarpine-induced SE. A substantial increase in H3 phosphorylation was detected in neurons in specific brain structures. Increased H3 phosphorylation was dependent on neuronal excitation. In particular, a robust upregulation of H3 phosphorylation was detected in the caudate putamen, and there was a gradient of phosphorylated H3(+ (PH3(+ neurons along the medio-lateral axis. After unilateral ablation of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra by injection of 6-hydroxydopamine, the distribution of PH3(+ neurons changed in the caudate putamen. Moreover, our histological analysis suggested that, in addition to the well-known MSK1 (mitogen and stress-activated kinase/H3 phosphorylation/c-fos pathway, other signaling pathways were also activated. Together, our findings suggest that a number of genes involved in the pathology of epileptogenesis are upregulated in PH3(+ brain regions, and that H3 phosphorylation is a suitable indicator of strong neuronal excitation.

  7. Free radical scavenger, N-tert-butyl-alfa-phenylnitrone, affects long-term outcome of status epilepticus in immature rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubová, Hana; Rejchrtová, Jana; Folbergrová, Jaroslava; Mareš, Pavel

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. S8 (2005), s. 111-112 [Joint Annual Meeting of the American Epilepsy Society and American Clinical Neurophysiology Society. 02.12.2005-06.12.2005, Washington, DC] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA304/05/2582 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : status epilepticus * PBN * rat Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  8. Which component of treatment is important for changes of cortical epileptic afterdischarges after status epilepticus in immature rats?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tsenov, Grygoriy; Kubová, Hana; Mareš, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 644, Mar 22 (2017), s. 1-4 ISSN 0304-3940 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0971; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-16605S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : status epilepticus * immature rats * pilocarpine * lithium chloride * paraldehyde * cortical epileptic afterdischarges Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neuroscience s (including psychophysiology Impact factor: 2.180, year: 2016

  9. Costs and cost-driving factors for acute treatment of adults with status epilepticus: A multicenter cohort study from Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortland, Lena-Marie; Alfter, Anne; Bähr, Oliver; Carl, Barbara; Dodel, Richard; Freiman, Thomas M; Hubert, Kristina; Jahnke, Kolja; Knake, Susanne; von Podewils, Felix; Reese, Jens-Peter; Runge, Uwe; Senft, Christian; Steinmetz, Helmuth; Rosenow, Felix; Strzelczyk, Adam

    2016-12-01

    To provide first data on inpatient costs and cost-driving factors due to nonrefractory status epilepticus (NSE), refractory status epilepticus (RSE), and super-refractory status epilepticus (SRSE). In 2013 and 2014, all adult patients treated due to status epilepticus (SE) at the university hospitals in Frankfurt, Greifswald, and Marburg were analyzed for healthcare utilization. We evaluated 341 admissions in 316 patients (65.7 ± [standard deviation]18.2 years; 135 male) treated for SE. Mean costs of hospital treatment were €14,946 (median €5,278, range €776-€152,911, €787 per treatment day) per patient per admission, with a mean length of stay (LOS) of 19.0 days (median 14.0, range 1-118). Course of SE had a significant impact on mean costs, with €8,314 in NSE (n = 137, median €4,597, €687 per treatment day, 22.3% of total inpatient costs due to SE), €13,399 in RSE (n = 171, median €7,203, €638/day, 45.0% of total costs, p 14 days. Overall mortality at discharge was 14.4% and significantly higher in RSE/SRSE (20.1%) than in NSE (5.8%). Acute treatment of SE, and particularly SRSE and ventilation, are associated with high hospital costs and prolonged LOS. Extrapolation to the whole of Germany indicates that SE causes hospital costs of >€200 million per year. Along with the demographic change, incidence of SE will increase and costs for hospital treatment and sequelae of SE will rise. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  10. Níveis dos neurotransmissores estriatais durante o estado epiléptico Striatal monoamines levels during status epilepticus

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    Rivelilson Mendes de Freitas

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo desse estudo foi verificar os níveis dos neurotransmissores estriatais de ratas adultas durante o estado epiléptico induzido pela pilocarpina. Ratas wistar foram tratadas com uma única dose de pilocarpina (400 mg/kg por via subcutânea (S.C.; P400 e os controles receberam salina. A concentração dos neurotransmissores foi determinada através do HPLC eletroquímico, no corpo estriado de ratas que no período de observação de 1 hora desencadearam estado epiléptico e que sobreviveram à fase aguda do quadro convulsivo. Foi observada redução nos níveis de dopamina, serotonina, ácido diidroxifenilacético e aumento na concentração do ácido 5-hidroxiindolacético. Nenhuma alteração foi observada no 4-hidroxi-3-metoxi-fenilacético. Os resultados sugerem que a ativação do sistema colinérgico pode interagir com os sistemas dopaminérgico e serotonérgico nos mecanismos referentes à fase aguda do processo convulsivo no corpo estriado de ratos desenvolvidos.The purpose of the present work to investigate the striatal neurotransmissors level in adult rats after status epilepticus induced by pilocarpine. Wistar rats were treated with a single dose of pilocarpine (400 mg/kg; s.c.; P400 and the controls received saline. Adult animals were closed observed for behavioural changes during 1h. In this period, the animals that developed status epilepticus and survive this acute phase of seizures had the brains removed and striatal neurotransmissors level determiden by HPLC. The concentration of dopamine, serotonine, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid was reduced and an concentration increase in 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid. Didn't observed alteration in 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-phenylacetic acid. These results suggest that cholinergic activation can interage with dopaminergic and serotonergic systems in acute phase of the convulsive process in rat mature striatum.

  11. Epilepsy surgery in a liver-transplanted girl with temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis following PRES with status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilena, Robertino; Nebbia, Gabriella; Fiorica, Lorenzo; Farallo, Marcello; Degrassi, Irene; Gozzo, Francesca; Pelliccia, Veronica; Barbieri, Sergio; Cossu, Massimo; Tassi, Laura

    2016-07-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) with status epilepticus may occur after liver transplant. This may rarely lead to refractory epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis (HS). We report the first case of epilepsy surgery in a liver-transplanted patient with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. A 3-year-old girl underwent liver transplant for congenital biliary atresia. Four days after transplant she manifested PRES with status epilepticus, but she recovered within a couple of weeks. At the age of 5 years she started presenting complex partial seizures, that became refractory to antiepileptic drugs (AED), worsening psychosocial performances. The pre-surgical work-up identified a left HS and temporal pole alterations. A left antero-mesial temporal lobectomy was performed, leading to epilepsy remission and allowing AED withdrawal. Drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy and HS may occur as sequelae of PRES with status epilepticus related to liver transplant and cyclosporine use. In this setting early epilepsy surgery may reduce the time of chronic exposure to AED and severe illness due to repeated seizures. This option might have additional advantages in the subgroup of epileptic patients with liver transplant, preserving the liver from the potential damage due to multiple AED trials and their interaction with commonly used immunosuppressant drugs. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evidence-Based Guideline: Treatment of Convulsive Status Epilepticus in Children and Adults: Report of the Guideline Committee of the American Epilepsy Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinnar, Shlomo; Gloss, David; Alldredge, Brian; Arya, Ravindra; Bainbridge, Jacquelyn; Bare, Mary; Bleck, Thomas; Dodson, W. Edwin; Garrity, Lisa; Jagoda, Andy; Lowenstein, Daniel; Pellock, John; Riviello, James; Sloan, Edward; Treiman, David M.

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: The optimal pharmacologic treatment for early convulsive status epilepticus is unclear. OBJECTIVE: To analyze efficacy, tolerability and safety data for anticonvulsant treatment of children and adults with convulsive status epilepticus and use this analysis to develop an evidence-based treatment algorithm. DATA SOURCES: Structured literature review using MEDLINE, Embase, Current Contents, and Cochrane library supplemented with article reference lists. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials of anticonvulsant treatment for seizures lasting longer than 5 minutes. DATA EXTRACTION: Individual studies were rated using predefined criteria and these results were used to form recommendations, conclusions, and an evidence-based treatment algorithm. RESULTS: A total of 38 randomized controlled trials were identified, rated and contributed to the assessment. Only four trials were considered to have class I evidence of efficacy. Two studies were rated as class II and the remaining 32 were judged to have class III evidence. In adults with convulsive status epilepticus, intramuscular midazolam, intravenous lorazepam, intravenous diazepam and intravenous phenobarbital are established as efficacious as initial therapy (Level A). Intramuscular midazolam has superior effectiveness compared to intravenous lorazepam in adults with convulsive status epilepticus without established intravenous access (Level A). In children, intravenous lorazepam and intravenous diazepam are established as efficacious at stopping seizures lasting at least 5 minutes (Level A) while rectal diazepam, intramuscular midazolam, intranasal midazolam, and buccal midazolam are probably effective (Level B). No significant difference in effectiveness has been demonstrated between intravenous lorazepam and intravenous diazepam in adults or children with convulsive status epilepticus (Level A). Respiratory and cardiac symptoms are the most commonly encountered treatment-emergent adverse events

  13. [Change of hippocampal NMDA receptor and emotional behavior and spatial learning and memory in status epilepticus rat model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Ping; Lou, Yan; Li, Zhen-Zhong; Li, Pan; Duan, Rui-Sheng

    2007-02-01

    SD rats were utilized for the purpose of the exploration of effects of status epilepticus (SE) on their emotional behavior, spatial learning and memory, and explorating its molecular mechanism. Forty maturity male SD rats, weighing (200 +/- 20) g were divided randomly and equally into SE group (SG) and normal control group (NG). The SG rats were induced by Pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) and the control animals received a saline (0.9%) solution. The change of emotional behavior in two groups were tested in elevated plus maze. Furthermore, Morris water maze was applied to evaluate the effects by SE on spatial learning and memory in rats. At the same time, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor NR1 subunit mRNA in the hippocampus was determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In elevated plus test, SE rats increased the times of visits as well as the time spent on the open arms of the elevated plus maze (P emotional behavior and damage of spatial learning and memory in rats. NR1 might be involved in the patho- and physiological process in causing these behavioral changes.

  14. Nonintravenous rescue medications for pediatric status epilepticus: A cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Fernández, Iván; Gaínza-Lein, Marina; Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2017-08-01

    To quantify the cost-effectiveness of rescue medications for pediatric status epilepticus: rectal diazepam, nasal midazolam, buccal midazolam, intramuscular midazolam, and nasal lorazepam. Decision analysis model populated with effectiveness data from the literature and cost data from publicly available market prices. The primary outcome was cost per seizure stopped ($/SS). One-way sensitivity analyses and second-order Monte Carlo simulations evaluated the robustness of the results across wide variations of the input parameters. The most cost-effective rescue medication was buccal midazolam (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio ([ICER]: $13.16/SS) followed by nasal midazolam (ICER: $38.19/SS). Nasal lorazepam (ICER: -$3.8/SS), intramuscular midazolam (ICER: -$64/SS), and rectal diazepam (ICER: -$2,246.21/SS) are never more cost-effective than the other options at any willingness to pay. One-way sensitivity analysis showed the following: (1) at its current effectiveness, rectal diazepam would become the most cost-effective option only if its cost was $6 or less, and (2) at its current cost, rectal diazepam would become the most cost-effective option only if effectiveness was higher than 0.89 (and only with very high willingness to pay of $2,859/SS to $31,447/SS). Second-order Monte Carlo simulations showed the following: (1) nasal midazolam and intramuscular midazolam were the more effective options; (2) the more cost-effective option was buccal midazolam for a willingness to pay from $14/SS to $41/SS and nasal midazolam for a willingness to pay above $41/SS; (3) cost-effectiveness overlapped for buccal midazolam, nasal lorazepam, intramuscular midazolam, and nasal midazolam; and (4) rectal diazepam was not cost-effective at any willingness to pay, and this conclusion remained extremely robust to wide variations of the input parameters. For pediatric status epilepticus, buccal midazolam and nasal midazolam are the most cost-effective nonintravenous rescue

  15. Long-term outcome of refractory status epilepticus in adults: A retrospective population-based study.

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    Kantanen, Anne-Mari; Reinikainen, Matti; Parviainen, Ilkka; Kälviäinen, Reetta

    2017-07-01

    Refractory status epilepticus (RSE) is a neurological emergency with significant morbidity and mortality. We aimed to analyze the long-term outcome of intensive care unit (ICU)-treated RSE and super-refractory status epilepticus (SRSE) patients in a population based cohort. A retrospective study of ICU- and anesthesia-treated RSE patients in Kuopio University Hospital's (KUH) special responsibility area hospitals in the central and eastern part of Finland from Jan. 1, 2010 to Dec. 31, 2012 was conducted. KUH's catchment area consists of five hospitals-one university hospital and four central hospitals-and covers a population of 840 000. We included all consecutive adult (16 years or older) RSE patients admitted in the participating ICUs during the 3-year period and excluded patients with postanoxic etiologies. We used a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) as a long-term (1-year) outcome measure: good (mRS 0-3, recovered to baseline function) or poor (mRS 4-6, major functional deficit or death). We identified 75 patients with ICU- and anesthesia-treated RSE, corresponding to an annual incidence of 3.0 (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.4-3.8). 21% of the patients were classified as SRSE, with the annual incidence being 0.6/100 000 (95% CI 0.4-1.0). For RSE, the ICU mortality was 0%, hospital mortality was 7% (95% CI 1.2%-12.8%) (n=5), and one-year mortality was 23% (CI 95% 13.4%-32.5%) (n=17). 48% (n=36) of RSE patients recovered to baseline, and 29% (n=22) showed neurological deficit at 1year. Poor outcome (mRS 4-6) was recorded for 52% (n=39) of the patients. Older age was associated with poorer outcome at 1year (p=0.03). For SRSE, hospital mortality was 6% (n=1) and 1-year mortality was 19% (n=3) (95%CI 0%-38.2%). During 1-year follow-up, nearly 50% of the ICU-treated RSE patients recovered to baseline function, whereas 30% showed new functional defects and 20% died. SRSE does not have a necessarily poorer outcome. The outcome is worse in older patients and in patients with

  16. Efficacy and safety of intravenous sodium valproate versus phenobarbital in controlling convulsive status epilepticus and acute prolonged convulsive seizures in children: a randomised trial.

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    Malamiri, Reza Azizi; Ghaempanah, Mahdieh; Khosroshahi, Nahid; Nikkhah, Ali; Bavarian, Behrouz; Ashrafi, Mahmoud Reza

    2012-09-01

    Status epilepticus and acute prolonged seizures are the most commonly occurring neurological emergencies in children. Such events have high morbidity and mortality rates along with poor long-term outcomes, depending on their duration and causes. Therefore, such seizures warrant urgent treatment using appropriate doses of anticonvulsants. Benzodiazepines, phenobarbital, and phenytoin are the most commonly used anticonvulsants for controlling status epilepticus and acute prolonged seizures. However, these medications have several well-known adverse effects. Previous studies on both adults and children have shown the efficacy and safety of rapid infusion of valproate in controlling status epilepticus. However, few well-designed randomised trials have been carried out in children, and there remains a paucity of data regarding intravenous sodium valproate use in children. Therefore, our aim was to compare the efficacy and safety of rapid loading of valproate with those of intravenous phenobarbital in children with status epilepticus and acute prolonged seizures. Sixty children (30 in each group) with convulsive status epilepticus and acute prolonged seizures were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive either valproate or phenobarbital. The main outcome variable was termination of all convulsive activity within 20 min of starting anticonvulsant infusion. Intravenous rapid loading of valproate was successful in seizure termination in (27/30, 90%) of patients compared to phenobarbital (23/30, 77%) (p = 0.189). Clinically significant adverse effects occurred in 74% patients of the phenobarbital group and 24% patients of the valproate group (p < 0.001). In conclusion, rapid loading of valproate is effective and safe in controlling convulsive status epilepticus and acute prolonged convulsive seizures in children. Intravenous valproate should be considered as a suitable choice for terminating status epilepticus and acute prolonged seizures in children. Copyright

  17. Topography of generalized periodic epileptiform discharges in postanoxic nonconvulsive status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellariou, Dimitris Fotis; Kostopoulos, George Kostantinos; Richardson, Mark Philip; Koutroumanidis, Michalis

    2017-12-01

    We studied slow (≤2.5 Hz) nonevolving generalized periodic epileptiform discharges (GPEDs) in the electroencephalogram (EEG) of comatose patients after cardiac arrest (CA) in search of evidence that could assist early diagnosis of possible hypoxic nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) and its differentiation from terminal brain anoxia (BA), which can present with a similar EEG pattern. We investigated the topography of the GPEDs in the first post-CA EEGs of 13 patients, using voltage-mapping, and compared findings between two patients with NCSE and GPEDs > 2.5 Hz (group 1), and 11 with GPEDs ≤ 2 Hz, of whom six had possible NCSE (group 2) and five had terminal BA (group 3). Voltage mapping showed frontal maximum for the negative phase of the GPEDs in all patients of groups 1 and 2, but not in any of the patients of group 3, who invariably showed maximization of the negative phase posteriorly. Morphology, amplitude, and duration of the GPEDs varied across the groups, without distinctive features for possible NCSE. These findings provide evidence that, in hypoxic coma after CA with slow GPEDs, anterior topography of the maximum GPED negativity on voltage mapping may be a distinctive biomarker for possible NCSE contributing to the coma.

  18. New Onset Refractory Status Epilepticus in a Young Man with H1N1 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To report a case of refractory status epilepticus (SE as an unusual early manifestation of H1N1 influenza infection. Introduction. H1N1 neurological complications have been reported and consist mainly of seizures or encephalopathy occurring in children. However, we only found a single report of an adult developing complex partial SE with H1N1 infection. Case Report. A 21-year-old previously healthy man was brought to the emergency room (ER after a witnessed generalized tonic clonic seizure (GTCS. He was fully alert and afebrile upon ER arrival, but a second GTCS prompted treatment with Lorazepam and Fosphenytoin. The initial EEG showed diffuse slowing, but a repeat one requested as the patient failed to regain consciousness revealed recurrent focal seizures of independent bihemispheric origin, fulfilling the criteria for nonconvulsive SE. Chest X-ray, followed by chest CT scan, showed a left upper lobe consolidation. H1N1 infection was confirmed with PCR on bronchoalveolar lavage material. Despite aggressive treatment with Midazolam, Propofol, and multiple high dose antiepileptic drugs, the electrographic seizures recurred at every attempt to reduce the intravenous sedative drugs. The patient died two weeks after his initial presentation. Conclusion. H1N1 should be added to the list of rare causes of refractory SE, regardless of the patient’s age.

  19. Convulsive status epilepticus and health-related quality of life in children with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Mark A; Chin, Richard F M; Camfield, Carol S; Wiebe, Samuel; Levin, Simon D; Speechley, Kathy N

    2014-08-19

    The objective of this study was to examine the association between convulsive status epilepticus (CSE) and health-related quality of life (HRQL) during a 24-month follow-up in a multisite incident cohort of children with epilepsy. Data were collected in the Health-Related Quality of Life Study in Children with Epilepsy Study from 374 families of children with newly diagnosed epilepsy. The Quality of Life in Childhood Epilepsy (QOLCE) Questionnaire was used to evaluate parent-reported child HRQL. Hierarchical linear regression was used to examine the relationship between CSE and HRQL at 24 months postepilepsy. A total of 359 families completed the 24-month assessment. Twenty-two children (6.1%) had experienced CSE during the follow-up. Children with and without CSE were similar, except a larger proportion of children with CSE had partial seizures (p QOLCE scores. The findings suggested that not only do children with CSE have significantly poorer HRQL compared with their non-CSE counterparts, but that this factor is independent of the effects of demographic and clinical features known to affect HRQL. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  20. Newer antiepileptic drugs in the treatment of status epilepticus: impact on prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaques, Léonore; Rossetti, Andrea O

    2012-05-01

    Newer antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are increasingly prescribed and seem to have a comparable efficacy as the classical AEDs; however, their impact on status epilepticus (SE) prognosis has received little attention. In our prospective SE database (2006-2010), we assessed the use of older versus newer AEDs (levetiracetam, pregabalin, topiramate, lacosamide) over time and its relationship to outcome (return to clinical baseline conditions, new handicap, or death). Newer AEDs were used more often toward the end of the study period (42% of episodes versus 30%). After adjustment for SE etiology, SE severity score, and number of compounds needed to terminate SE, newer AEDs were independently related to a reduced likelihood of return to baseline (p<0.001) but not to increased mortality. These findings seem in line with recent findings on refractory epilepsy. Also, in view of the higher price of the newer AEDs, well-designed, prospective assessments analyzing the impact of newer AEDs on efficacy and tolerability in patients with SE appear mandatory. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Convulsive status epilepticus and health-related quality of life in children with epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Richard F.M.; Camfield, Carol S.; Wiebe, Samuel; Levin, Simon D.; Speechley, Kathy N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to examine the association between convulsive status epilepticus (CSE) and health-related quality of life (HRQL) during a 24-month follow-up in a multisite incident cohort of children with epilepsy. Methods: Data were collected in the Health-Related Quality of Life Study in Children with Epilepsy Study from 374 families of children with newly diagnosed epilepsy. The Quality of Life in Childhood Epilepsy (QOLCE) Questionnaire was used to evaluate parent-reported child HRQL. Hierarchical linear regression was used to examine the relationship between CSE and HRQL at 24 months postepilepsy. A total of 359 families completed the 24-month assessment. Results: Twenty-two children (6.1%) had experienced CSE during the follow-up. Children with and without CSE were similar, except a larger proportion of children with CSE had partial seizures (p children with CSE have significantly poorer HRQL compared with their non-CSE counterparts, but that this factor is independent of the effects of demographic and clinical features known to affect HRQL. PMID:25037204

  2. Rapid surface accumulation of NMDA receptors increases glutamatergic excitation during status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, David E; Liu, Hantao; Niquet, Jerome; Wasterlain, Claude G

    2013-06-01

    After 1h of lithium-pilocarpine status epilepticus (SE), immunocytochemical labeling of NMDA receptor NR1 subunits reveals relocation of subunits from the interior to the cell surface of dentate gyrus granule cells and CA3 pyramidal cells. Simultaneously, an increase in NMDA-miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSC) as well as an increase in NMDA receptor-mediated tonic currents is observed in hippocampal slices after SE. Mean-variance analysis of NMDA-mEPSCs estimates that the number of functional postsynaptic NMDA receptors per synapse increases 38% during SE, and antagonism by ifenprodil suggests that an increase in the surface representation of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors is responsible for the augmentation of both the phasic and tonic excitatory currents with SE. These results provide a potential mechanism for an enhancement of glutamatergic excitation that maintains SE and may contribute to excitotoxic injury during SE. Therapies that directly antagonize NMDA receptors may be a useful therapeutic strategy during refractory SE. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Mechanisms of levetiracetam in the control of status epilepticus and epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxmikant S Deshpande

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Status epilepticus (SE is a major clinical emergency that is associated with high mortality and morbidity. SE causes significant neuronal injury and survivors are at a greater risk of developing acquired epilepsy and other neurological morbidities, including depression and cognitive deficits. Benzodiazepines and some anticonvulsant agents are drugs of choice for initial SE management. Despite their effectiveness, over 40% of SE cases are refractory to the initial treatment with two or more medications. Thus there is an unmet need of developing newer anti-SE drugs. Levetiracetam (LEV is a widely prescribed anti-epileptic drug that has been reported to be used in SE cases, especially in benzodiazepine-resistant SE or where phenytoin cannot be used due to allergic side-effects. Levetiracetam’s non-classical antiepileptic mechanisms of action, favorable pharmacokinetic profile, general lack of central depressant effects and lower incidence of drug interactions contributes to its use in SE management. This review will focus on LEV’s unique mechanism of action that makes it a viable candidate for SE treatment.

  4. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Presenting as Expressive Aphasia and Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiz B. Mahboob

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD, the most common form of human prion diseases, is a fatal condition with a mortality rate reaching 85% within one year of clinical presentation. CJD is characterized by rapidly progressive neurological deterioration in combination with typical electroencephalography (EEG and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings and positive cerebrospinal spinal fluid (CSF analysis for 14-3-3 proteins. Unfortunately, CJD can have atypical clinical and radiological presentation in approximately 10% of cases, thus making the diagnosis often challenging. We report a rare clinical presentation of sporadic CJD (sCJD with combination of both expressive aphasia and nonconvulsive status epilepticus. This patient presented with slurred speech, confusion, myoclonus, headaches, and vertigo and succumbed to his disease within ten weeks of initial onset of his symptoms. He had a normal initial diagnostic workup, but subsequent workup initiated due to persistent clinical deterioration revealed CJD with typical MRI, EEG, and CSF findings. Other causes of rapidly progressive dementia and encephalopathy were ruled out. Though a rare condition, we recommend consideration of CJD on patients with expressive aphasia, progressive unexplained neurocognitive decline, and refractory epileptiform activity seen on EEG. Frequent reimaging (MRI, video EEGs and CSF examination might help diagnose this fatal condition earlier.

  5. Focal hemodynamic patterns of status epilepticus detected by susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI)

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    Aellen, Jerome; Kottke, Raimund; Springer, Elisabeth; Weisstanner, Christian; El-Koussy, Marwan; Schroth, Gerhard; Wiest, Roland; Gralla, Jan; Verma, Rajeev K. [University of Bern, University Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, University Hospital Bern and Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Abela, Eugenio; Schindler, Kaspar [University of Bern, Department of Neurology, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Buerki, Sarah E. [Inselspital, Department of Neuropaediatrics, University Children' s Hospital, Bern (Switzerland)

    2014-11-15

    To investigate pathological findings in the susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) of patients experiencing convulsive (CSE) or non-convulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) with focal hyperperfusion in the acute setting. Twelve patients (six with NCSE confirmed by electroencephalogram (EEG) and six patients with CSE with seizure event clinically diagnosed) underwent MRI in this acute setting (mean time between onset of symptoms and MRI was 3 h 8 min), including SWI, dynamic susceptibility contrast MR imaging (DSC) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). MRI sequences were retrospectively evaluated and compared with EEG findings (10/12 patients), and clinical symptoms. Twelve out of 12 (100 %) patients showed a focal parenchymal area with pseudo-narrowed cortical veins on SWI, associated with focal hyperperfused areas (increased cerebral blood flow (CBF) and mean transit time (MTT) shortening), and cortical DWI restriction in 6/12 patients (50 %). Additionally, these areas were associated with ictal or postical EEG patterns in 8/10 patients (80 %). Most frequent acute clinical findings were aphasia and/or hemiparesis in eight patients, and all of them showed pseudo-narrowed veins in those parenchymal areas responsible for these symptoms. In this study series with CSE and NCSE patients, SWI showed focally pseudo-narrowed cortical veins in hyperperfused and ictal parenchymal areas. Therefore, SWI might have the potential to identify an ictal region in CSE/NCSE. (orig.)

  6. Optogenetic delay of status epilepticus onset in an in vivo rodent epilepsy model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna Sukhotinsky

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a devastating disease, currently treated with medications, surgery or electrical stimulation. None of these approaches is totally effective and our ability to control seizures remains limited and complicated by frequent side effects. The emerging revolutionary technique of optogenetics enables manipulation of the activity of specific neuronal populations in vivo with exquisite spatiotemporal resolution using light. We used optogenetic approaches to test the role of hippocampal excitatory neurons in the lithium-pilocarpine model of acute elicited seizures in awake behaving rats. Hippocampal pyramidal neurons were transduced in vivo with a virus carrying an enhanced halorhodopsin (eNpHR, a yellow light activated chloride pump, and acute seizure progression was then monitored behaviorally and electrophysiologically in the presence and absence of illumination delivered via an optical fiber. Inhibition of those neurons with illumination prior to seizure onset significantly delayed electrographic and behavioral initiation of status epilepticus, and altered the dynamics of ictal activity development. These results reveal an essential role of hippocampal excitatory neurons in this model of ictogenesis and illustrate the power of optogenetic approaches for elucidation of seizure mechanisms. This early success in controlling seizures also suggests future therapeutic avenues.

  7. Focal hemodynamic patterns of status epilepticus detected by susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aellen, Jerome; Kottke, Raimund; Springer, Elisabeth; Weisstanner, Christian; El-Koussy, Marwan; Schroth, Gerhard; Wiest, Roland; Gralla, Jan; Verma, Rajeev K.; Abela, Eugenio; Schindler, Kaspar; Buerki, Sarah E.

    2014-01-01

    To investigate pathological findings in the susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) of patients experiencing convulsive (CSE) or non-convulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) with focal hyperperfusion in the acute setting. Twelve patients (six with NCSE confirmed by electroencephalogram (EEG) and six patients with CSE with seizure event clinically diagnosed) underwent MRI in this acute setting (mean time between onset of symptoms and MRI was 3 h 8 min), including SWI, dynamic susceptibility contrast MR imaging (DSC) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). MRI sequences were retrospectively evaluated and compared with EEG findings (10/12 patients), and clinical symptoms. Twelve out of 12 (100 %) patients showed a focal parenchymal area with pseudo-narrowed cortical veins on SWI, associated with focal hyperperfused areas (increased cerebral blood flow (CBF) and mean transit time (MTT) shortening), and cortical DWI restriction in 6/12 patients (50 %). Additionally, these areas were associated with ictal or postical EEG patterns in 8/10 patients (80 %). Most frequent acute clinical findings were aphasia and/or hemiparesis in eight patients, and all of them showed pseudo-narrowed veins in those parenchymal areas responsible for these symptoms. In this study series with CSE and NCSE patients, SWI showed focally pseudo-narrowed cortical veins in hyperperfused and ictal parenchymal areas. Therefore, SWI might have the potential to identify an ictal region in CSE/NCSE. (orig.)

  8. Factors associated with occurrence and outcome of super-refractory status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madžar, Dominik; Knappe, Ruben U; Reindl, Caroline; Giede-Jeppe, Antje; Sprügel, Maximilian I; Beuscher, Vanessa; Gollwitzer, Stephanie; Hamer, Hajo M; Huttner, Hagen B

    2017-11-01

    Super-refractory status epilepticus (SRSE) represents a challenging medical condition with high morbidity and mortality. In this study, we aimed to establish variables related to SRSE development and outcome. We retrospectively screened our databases for refractory SE (RSE) and SRSE episodes between January 2001 and January 2015. Baseline demographics, SE characteristics, and variables reflecting the clinical course were compared in order to identify factors independently associated with SRSE occurrence. Within the SRSE cohort, predictors of in-hospital mortality as well as good functional outcome in survivors to discharge were established through univariate and multivariable analyses. A total of 131 episodes were included, among those 46 (35.1%) meeting the criteria of SRSE. Comparison of RSE and SRSE episodes revealed a lower premorbid mRS score (odds ratio (OR) per mRS point, 0.769; p=0.039) and non-convulsive SE (NCSE) in coma (OR, 4.216; p=0.008) as independent predictors of SRSE. SRSE in-hospital mortality was associated with age (OR, 1.091 per increasing year; p=0.020) and worse premorbid functional status (OR, 1.938 per mRS point; p=0.044). Good functional outcome in survivors was independently related to shorter SRSE duration (OR, 0.714 per day; p=0.038). Better premorbid functional status and NCSE in coma as worst seizure type indicate a role of acute underlying etiologies in the development of SRSE. In-hospital mortality in SRSE is determined by nonmodifiable factors, while functional outcome in survivors depends on seizure duration underscoring the need of achieving rapid seizure termination. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Proposed consensus definitions for new-onset refractory status epilepticus (NORSE), febrile infection-related epilepsy syndrome (FIRES), and related conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Lawrence J; Gaspard, Nicolas; van Baalen, Andreas; Nabbout, Rima; Demeret, Sophie; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Navarro, Vincent; Specchio, Nicola; Lagae, Lieven; Rossetti, Andrea O; Hocker, Sara; Gofton, Teneille E; Abend, Nicholas S; Gilmore, Emily J; Hahn, Cecil; Khosravani, Houman; Rosenow, Felix; Trinka, Eugen

    2018-04-01

    We convened an international group of experts to standardize definitions of New-Onset Refractory Status Epilepticus (NORSE), Febrile Infection-Related Epilepsy Syndrome (FIRES), and related conditions. This was done to enable improved communication for investigators, physicians, families, patients, and other caregivers. Consensus definitions were achieved via email messages, phone calls, an in-person consensus conference, and collaborative manuscript preparation. Panel members were from 8 countries and included adult and pediatric experts in epilepsy, electroencephalography (EEG), and neurocritical care. The proposed consensus definitions are as follows: NORSE is a clinical presentation, not a specific diagnosis, in a patient without active epilepsy or other preexisting relevant neurological disorder, with new onset of refractory status epilepticus without a clear acute or active structural, toxic or metabolic cause. FIRES is a subcategory of NORSE, applicable for all ages, that requires a prior febrile infection starting between 2 weeks and 24 hours prior to onset of refractory status epilepticus, with or without fever at onset of status epilepticus. Proposed consensus definitions are also provided for Infantile Hemiconvulsion-Hemiplegia and Epilepsy syndrome (IHHE) and for prolonged, refractory and super-refractory status epilepticus. This document has been endorsed by the Critical Care EEG Monitoring Research Consortium. We hope these consensus definitions will promote improved communication, permit multicenter research, and ultimately improve understanding and treatment of these conditions. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 International League Against Epilepsy.

  10. Effectiveness of intravenous levetiracetam as an adjunctive treatment in pediatric refractory status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jon Soo; Lee, Jeong Ho; Ryu, Hye Won; Lim, Byung Chan; Hwang, Hee; Chae, Jong-Hee; Choi, Jieun; Kim, Ki Joong; Hwang, Yong Seung; Kim, Hunmin

    2014-08-01

    Intravenous levetiracetam (LEV) has been shown to be effective and safe in treating adults with refractory status epilepticus (SE). We sought to investigate the efficacy and safety of intravenous LEV for pediatric patients with refractory SE. We performed a retrospective medical-record review of pediatric patients who were treated with intravenous LEV for refractory SE. Clinical information regarding age, sex, seizure type, and underlying neurological status was collected. We evaluated other anticonvulsants that were used prior to administration of intravenous LEV and assessed loading dose, response to treatment, and any adverse events from intravenous LEV administration. Fourteen patients (8 boys and 6 girls) received intravenous LEV for the treatment of refractory SE. The mean age of the patients was 4.4 ± 5.5 years (range, 4 days to 14.6 years). Ten of the patients were neurologically healthy prior to the refractory SE, and the other 4 had been previously diagnosed with epilepsy. The mean loading dose of intravenous LEV was 26 ± 4.6 mg/kg (range, 20-30 mg/kg). Seizure termination occurred in 6 (43%) of the 14 patients. In particular, 4 (57%) of the 7 patients younger than 2 years showed seizure termination. No immediate adverse events occurred during or after infusions. The current study demonstrated that the adjunctive use of intravenous LEV was effective and well tolerated in pediatric patients with refractory SE, even in patients younger than 2 years. Intravenous LEV should be considered as an effective and safe treatment option for refractory SE in pediatric patients.

  11. Peri-ictal signal changes in seven patients with status epilepticus: interesting MRI observations

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    Goyal, Manoj K; Sinha, Sanjib [National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS), Department of Neurology, Bangalore, Karnataka (India); Ravishankar, Shivshankar; Shivshankar, Jai Jai [National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS), Department of Neuroimaging and Interventional Radiology, Bangalore (India)

    2009-03-15

    Transient peri-ictal changes on imaging had been described following status epilepticus (SE), but its cause is not very well understood. We analyzed the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in SE patients in order to elucidate such changes including peri-ictal signal. This prospective study involved 34 patients (M/F 23:11, mean age 25.8 {+-} 17.2 years) who experienced SE. MRI was performed during or within 96 h of cessation of seizures. Twenty-five patients had generalized convulsive status epilectus (GCSE; ten secondary GCSE and 15 primary GCSE). Seven patients had epilepsia partialis continua and two patients non-convulsive SE. Eight patients had a history of seizures and three patients previous SE. The mean duration of SE prior to MRI was 89.2 {+-} 105.3 h (range 2-360 h). MRI provided diagnosis in 17 patients, and in 13 patients, no structural cause was identified. Peri-ictal focal signal changes with restricted diffusion on apparent diffusion coefficient maps were present in seven (20.6%) patients with SE (generalized convulsive, three; partial, three; non-convulsive, one). The changes were observed when MRI was performed during SE in 3/10 (30%) patients, or within 24 h in 1/7 (14.3%), 48 h in 1/5 (20%), 72 h in 1/6 (16.7%), or 96 h in 1/6 (16.7%) patients after cessation of seizures. Repeat MRI revealed disappearance of signal changes in two patients. Peri-ictal MR changes with restricted diffusion appear to be an effect rather than the cause of SE. (orig.)

  12. Peri-ictal signal changes in seven patients with status epilepticus: interesting MRI observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, Manoj K.; Sinha, Sanjib; Ravishankar, Shivshankar; Shivshankar, Jai Jai

    2009-01-01

    Transient peri-ictal changes on imaging had been described following status epilepticus (SE), but its cause is not very well understood. We analyzed the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in SE patients in order to elucidate such changes including peri-ictal signal. This prospective study involved 34 patients (M/F 23:11, mean age 25.8 ± 17.2 years) who experienced SE. MRI was performed during or within 96 h of cessation of seizures. Twenty-five patients had generalized convulsive status epilectus (GCSE; ten secondary GCSE and 15 primary GCSE). Seven patients had epilepsia partialis continua and two patients non-convulsive SE. Eight patients had a history of seizures and three patients previous SE. The mean duration of SE prior to MRI was 89.2 ± 105.3 h (range 2-360 h). MRI provided diagnosis in 17 patients, and in 13 patients, no structural cause was identified. Peri-ictal focal signal changes with restricted diffusion on apparent diffusion coefficient maps were present in seven (20.6%) patients with SE (generalized convulsive, three; partial, three; non-convulsive, one). The changes were observed when MRI was performed during SE in 3/10 (30%) patients, or within 24 h in 1/7 (14.3%), 48 h in 1/5 (20%), 72 h in 1/6 (16.7%), or 96 h in 1/6 (16.7%) patients after cessation of seizures. Repeat MRI revealed disappearance of signal changes in two patients. Peri-ictal MR changes with restricted diffusion appear to be an effect rather than the cause of SE. (orig.)

  13. High dose phenobarbitone coma in pediatric refractory status epilepticus; a retrospective case record analysis, a proposed protocol and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Sheffali; Sondhi, Vishal; Chakrabarty, Biswaroop; Jauhari, Prashant; Lodha, Rakesh; Sankar, Jhuma

    2018-04-01

    Ongoing refractory status epilepticus is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Therapeutic coma induction with midazolam, thiopentone, phenobarbitone or propofol is indicated when conventional antiepileptics fail to abort seizure. Of these, the most extensively studied is midazolam. Amongst the remaining three, phenobarbitone has the most favourable pharmacological profile, but has not been studied adequately, more so in the pediatric age group. The current retrospective case records analysis is an attempt to describe use of phenobarbitone coma in pediatric refractory status epilepticus. Case records of patients, admitted with status epilepticus to the pediatric inpatient services of a tertiary care teaching hospital of North India between January 2014 and December 2016 were reviewed. Those with refractory status epilepticus who failed to respond to midaolam infusion and phenobarbitone coma was used were included for analysis. Overall, 108 children presented in status, of which 34 developed refractory status epilepticus. Of these 34, 21 responded to midazolam infusion and in 13 high dose phenobarbitone coma following a standardised protocol was used. Amongst these 13 (8 males and 5 females, median age 6 years, IQR: 2.5-9.5), 12 responded and 1 succumbed. The median time to clinical seizure resolution and desired electroencephalographic changes post phenobarbitone initiation were 16 (IQR: 12-25) and 72 h (IQR: 48-120) respectively. High dose phenobarbitone appears to be an effective therapeutic modality in pediatric refractory status epilepticus. The current study provides a protocol for its use which can be validated in future studies with larger sample size. Copyright © 2018 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Canine status epilepticus treated with fosphenytoin: A proof of principle study.

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    Patterson, Edward E; Leppik, Ilo E; Coles, Lisa D; Podell, Michael; Vite, Charles H; Bush, William; Cloyd, James C

    2015-06-01

    There are a limited number of marketed intravenous antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) available to treat status epilepticus (SE). All were first developed for chronic therapy of epilepsy, not specifically for SE. Epilepsy and canine SE (CSE) occur naturally in dogs, with prevalence, presentation, and percentage of refractory cases similar to human epilepsy. The objective of this study was to determine if CSE treated with fosphenytoin (FOS) results in a similar responder rate as for people. A randomized clinical trial was performed for dogs with CSE. Dogs who presented during a seizure or who had additional seizures after enrolling received intravenous (i.v.) benzodiazepine (BZD) followed immediately by intravenous infusion of 15 mg/kg phenytoin equivalent (PE) of fosphenytoin (FOS) or saline placebo (PBO). If seizures continued, additional AEDs were administered per the standard of care for veterinary patients. Total and unbound plasma phenytoin (PHT) concentrations were measured. Consent was obtained for 50 dogs with CSE. Thirty-one had additional motor seizures and were randomized to the study intervention (22 FOS and 9 PBO). There was a statistically significant difference in the 12 h responder rate, with 63% in the FOS group versus 22% in the placebo group (p = 0.043) having no further seizures. The unbound PHT concentrations at 30 and 60 min were within the therapeutic concentrations for people (1-2 μg/ml) with the exception of one dog. There was mild vomiting in 36% of the FOS group (7/22) within 20 min of FOS administration and none of the placebo group (0/9) (p = 0.064). This proof of concept study provides the first evidence that FOS is tolerated and effective in canine SE at PHT concentrations clinically relevant for human SE. Furthermore, naturally occurring CSE can be utilized as a translational platform for future studies of novel SE compounds. © 2015 The Authors. Epilepsia published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International League Against

  15. Emergency electroencephalogram: Usefulness in the diagnosis of nonconvulsive status epilepticus by the on-call neurologist.

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    Máñez Miró, J U; Díaz de Terán, F J; Alonso Singer, P; Aguilar-Amat Prior, M J

    2018-03-01

    We aim to describe the use of emergency electroencephalogram (EmEEG) by the on-call neurologist when nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) is suspected, and in other indications, in a tertiary hospital. Observational retrospective cohort study of emergency EEG (EmEEG) recordings with 8-channel systems performed and analysed by the on-call neurologist in the emergency department and in-hospital wards between July 2013 and May 2015. Variables recorded were sex, age, symptoms, first diagnosis, previous seizure and cause, previous stroke, cancer, brain computed tomography, diagnosis after EEG, treatment, patient progress, routine control EEG (rEEG), and final diagnosis. We analysed frequency data, sensitivity, and specificity in the diagnosis of NCSE. The study included 135 EEG recordings performed in 129 patients; 51.4% were men and their median age was 69 years. In 112 cases (83%), doctors ruled out suspected NCSE because of altered level of consciousness in 42 (37.5%), behavioural abnormalities in 38 (33.9%), and aphasia in 32 (28.5%). The EmEEG diagnosis was NCSE in 37 patients (33%), and this was confirmed in 35 (94.6%) as the final diagnosis. In 3 other cases, NCSE was the diagnosis on discharge as confirmed by rEEG although the EmEEG missed this condition at first. EmEEG performed to rule out NCSE showed 92.1% sensitivity, 97.2% specificity, a positive predictive value of 94.6%, and a negative predictive value of 96%. Our experience finds that, in an appropriate clinical context, EmEEG performed by the on-call neurologist is a sensitive and specific tool for diagnosing NCSE. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. From intravenous to enteral ketogenic diet in PICU: A potential treatment strategy for refractory status epilepticus.

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    Chiusolo, F; Diamanti, A; Bianchi, R; Fusco, L; Elia, M; Capriati, T; Vigevano, F; Picardo, S

    2016-11-01

    Ketogenic diet (KD) has been used to treat refractory status epilepticus (RSE). KD is a high-fat, restricted-carbohydrate regimen that may be administered with different fat to protein and carbohydrate ratios (3:1 and 4:1 fat to protein and carbohydrate ratios). Other ketogenic regimens have a lower fat and higher protein and carbohydrate ratio to improve taste and thus compliance to treatment. We describe a case of RSE treated with intravenous KD in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). An 8-year-old boy was referred to the PICU because of continuous tonic-clonic and myoclonic generalized seizures despite several antiepileptic treatments. After admission he was intubated and treated with intravenous thiopental followed by ketamine. Seizures continued with frequent myoclonic jerks localized on the face and upper arms. EEG showed seizure activity with spikes on rhythmic continuous waves. Thus we decided to begin KD. The concomitant ileus contraindicated KD by the enteral route and we therefore began IV KD. The ketogenic regimen consisted of conventional intravenous fat emulsion, plus dextrose and amino-acid hyperalimentation in a 2:1 then 3:1 fat to protein and carbohydrate ratio. Exclusive IV ketogenic treatment, well tolerated, was maintained for 3 days; peristalsis then reappeared so KD was continued by the enteral route at 3:1 ratio. Finally, after 8 days and no seizure improvement, KD was deemed unsuccessful and was discontinued. Our experience indicates that IV KD may be considered as a temporary "bridge" towards enteral KD in patients with partial or total intestinal failure who need to start KD. It allows a prompt initiation of KD, when indicated for the treatment of severe diseases such as RSE. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Autoimmune encephalitis: A potentially reversible cause of status epilepticus, epilepsy, and cognitive decline

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    Awadh Kishor Pandit

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To review clinical characteristics and response to immunomodulation therapy in autoimmune encephalitis presenting with status epilepticus (SE, epilepsy, and cognitive decline. Design: Observational, prospective case series. Setting: All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. Materials and Methods: Prospective analysis of 15 patients, who presented with SE, epilepsy, cognitive decline, and other neurological symptoms with positive autoantibodies. Demographic and clinical characteristics were recorded. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, cerebrospinal-fluid analysis (CSF, and tumor screening were done periodically. Treatment received and responses (categorized as per patients and treating doctor′s information were noted. Results: There were 15 (males = 10 patients of autoimmune encephalitis. The mean age of presentation was 24 years (range: 2-64 years. The most common onset was subacute (64% and four (29% patients presented as SE. Predominant clinical presentations were seizures (100% almost of every semiology. CSF was done in 10 patients; it was normal in 60%. Brain MRI was done in all patients, in six (40% it was normal, six (40% showed T2W and FLAIR hyperintensities in bilateral limbic areas. Antibodies found were the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibody in seven (50%, voltage-gated potassium channel antibody in five (36%, two of antiglutamic acid decarboxylase, and one patient with double stranded DNA (dsDNA antibodies. None showed evidence of malignancy. Patients received immunotherapy, either steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, or both. Follow-up showed significant improvement in majority of cases, neither further seizures nor relapse in nine (67% cases. One death occurred, due to delayed presentation. Conclusions: Uncommon but potentially reversible causes of SE, epilepsy, and cognitive decline may be immune-related and high index of suspicion will prevent missing the diagnosis.

  18. New onset status epilepticus in older patients: Clinical characteristics and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malter, M P; Nass, R D; Kaluschke, T; Fink, G R; Burghaus, L; Dohmen, C

    2017-10-01

    We here evaluated (1) the differential characteristics of status epilepticus (SE) in older (≥60 years) compared to younger adults (18-59 years). In particular, we were interested in (2) the proportion and characteristics of new onset SE in patients with no history of epilepsy (NOSE) in older compared to younger adults, and (3) predictive parameters for clinical outcome in older subjects with NOSE. We performed a monocentric retrospective analysis of all adult patients (≥18years) admitted with SE to our tertiary care centre over a period of 10 years (2006-2015) to evaluate clinical characteristics and short-time outcome at discharge. One-hundred-thirty-five patients with SE were included in the study. Mean age at onset was 64 years (range 21-90), eighty-seven of the patients (64%) were older than 60 years. In 76 patients (56%), SE occurred as NOSE, sixty-seven percent of them were aged ≥60 years. There was no age-dependent predominance for NOSE. NOSE was not a relevant outcome predictor, especially regarding age-related subgroups. Older patients with NOSE had less frequently general tonic clonic SE (GTCSE; p=0.001) and were more often female (p=0.01). Regarding outcome parameters and risk factors in older patients with NOSE, unfavourable outcome was associated with infections during in-hospital treatment (0.04), extended stay in ICU (p=0.001), and generally in hospital (p<0.001). In our cohort, older patients represented the predominant subgroup in patients with SE. Older patients suffered more often from non-convulsive semiology and had a less favourable short-time outcome. NOSE was not a predictive outcome parameter in older patients. Data suggest that avoiding infections should have a priority because higher infection rates were associated with unfavourable outcome. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Early predictors of refractory status epilepticus: an international two-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, R; Kaplan, P W; Marsch, S; Hammel, E M; Rüegg, S; Ziai, W C

    2015-01-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) refractory to first- and second-line antiepileptic drugs carries high mortality. Little is known on early prediction of refractory SE (RSE)—an essential tool for planning appropriate therapy. Our aim was to identify and validate independent early RSE predictors in adults. Clinical and laboratory data on consecutive intensive care unit patients with SE from two academic care centers (a derivation data set from a Swiss center and a validation data set from a US center) were assessed. Multivariable analysis was performed with the derivation set to identify RSE predictors at SE onset. Their external validity was evaluated with an independent validation set. Measures of calibration and discrimination were assessed. In all, 302 patients were analyzed (138 with and 164 without RSE), 171 in the derivation data set and 131 in the validation data set. Acute SE etiology, coma/stupor and serum albumin RSE in the derivation data set [odds ratio (OR) 2.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-4.07; OR 4.83, 95% CI 2.42-9.68; OR 2.45, 95% CI 1.16-5.16]. The prediction model showed good measures of calibration (Hosmer-Lemesow goodness-of-fit test P = 0.99) and discrimination (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve 0.8) on the derivation data set—results that were similar in the validation data set (Hosmer-Lemeshow P = 0.24; area under the receiver operating characteristic curve 0.73). This study confirms the independent prognostic value of readily available parameters for early RSE prediction. Prospective studies are needed to identify additional robust predictors, which could be added to the proposed model for further optimization towards a reliable prediction scoring system. © 2014 EAN.

  20. Mastery of Status Epilepticus Management via Simulation-Based Learning for Pediatrics Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakooti, Marcelo R.; McBride, Mary E.; Mobley, Bonnie; Goldstein, Joshua L.; Adler, Mark D.; McGaghie, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Management of status epilepticus (SE) in the pediatric population is highly time-sensitive. Failure to follow a standard management algorithm may be due to ineffective provider education, and can lead to unfavorable outcomes. Objective To design a learning module using high-fidelity simulation technology to teach mastery achievement of a hospital algorithm for managing SE. Methods Thirty pediatrics interns were enrolled. Using the Angoff method, an expert panel developed the minimal passing score, which defined mastery. Scoring of simulated performance was done by 2 observers. Sessions were digitally recorded. After the pretest, participants were debriefed on the algorithm and required to repeat the simulation. If mastery (minimal passing score) was not achieved, debriefing and the simulation were repeated until mastery was met. Once mastery was met, participants graded their comfort level in managing SE. Results No participants achieved mastery at pretest. After debriefing and deliberate simulator training, all (n = 30) achieved mastery of the algorithm: 30% achieved mastery after 1 posttest, 63% after a second, and 6.7% after a third. The Krippendorff α was 0.94, indicating strong interrater agreement. Participants reported more self-efficacy in managing SE, a preference for simulation-based education for learning practice-based algorithms of critical conditions, and highly rated the educational intervention. Conclusions A simulation-based mastery learning program using deliberate practice dramatically improves pediatrics residents' execution of a SE management protocol. Participants enjoyed and benefited from simulation education. Future applications include improving adherence to other hospital protocols. PMID:26221431

  1. Temporal seizure focus and status epilepticus are associated with high-sensitive troponin I elevation after epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzikonstantinou, Anastasios; Ebert, Anne D; Hennerici, Michael G

    2015-09-01

    Postictal elevation of high-sensitive troponin I (TNI), a highly specific biomarker for myocardial ischemia, has been reported. We aimed at evaluating its association of high-sensitive troponin I (TNI) with seizure type and focus, as well as vascular risk factors. TNI was measured in 247 patients admitted to our clinic via the emergency room with an acute epileptic seizure. TNI control measurements were performed in 61.5% of cases. All patients underwent electroencephalography and cerebral imaging. Seizure focus - when possible - was determined using results from these examinations as well as clinical data. Of 247 patients, 133 (53.8%) were men, the mean age was 59 ± 18 years. 70 (28.3%) patients had focal and 177 (71.7%) generalized seizures. Status epilepticus was present in 38 cases (15.4%). Mean TNI was 0.05 ± 0.17. TNI was elevated in 27 patients (10.9%). Higher age, status epilepticus and temporal seizure focus were significantly associated with TNI elevation in multivariate analysis. In 21 (13.8%) of the patients with TNI control measurement, TNI was continuously elevated. Higher age and temporal seizure focus were significantly associated with continuously high TNI. Coronary heart disease and vascular risk factors were significantly associated with high TNI only in univariate analysis. No patient had a symptomatic myocardial ischemia. Postictal TNI elevation is relatively common in older patients with status epilepticus or temporal seizure focus. These data support the concept of relevant and possibly dangerous ictal effects on cardiac function especially in temporal lobe seizures. Although the risk of manifest postictal myocardial infarction seems to be very low, selected patients could profit from closer monitoring. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical Significance of Human Metapneumovirus in Refractory Status Epilepticus and Encephalitis: Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    Aysel Vehapoglu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Encephalitis is a complex neurological disease that is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, and the etiology of the disease is often not identified. Human metapneumovirus (hMPV is a common cause of upper and lower respiratory tract infections in children. Few reports are available showing possible involvement of hMPV in development of neurologic complications. Here, we describe an infant, the youngest case in literature, with refractory status epilepticus and severe encephalitis in whom hMPV was detected in respiratory samples and review diagnostic workup of patient with encephalitis.

  3. Intentional intra-arterial injection of midazolam in a patient with status epilepticus in the intensive care unit

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    Muhammad Asghar Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental medical care includes intravenous (IV access which provides prompt resuscitation and reliable delivery of analgesics, antibiotics, and vasoactive medication. Difficult access populations, especially in critical area, continue to challenge providers to consider and utilize alternative means to provide IV access. Potential options under such circumstances include intramuscular, intraosseous, and intratracheal drug administration, but in extreme cases where no other options are available, intra-arterial route might be considered. We present a case where midazolam was intentionally injected intra-arterially to abort seizure activity in a patient with status epilepticus in the Intensive Care Unit.

  4. Transient attenuation of visual evoked potentials during focal status epilepticus in a patient with occipital lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Meng-Han; Hsu, Shih-Pin; Huang, Chi-Ren; Chang, Chen-Sheng; Chuang, Yao-Chung

    2010-06-01

    Seizures originating in the occipital areas are relatively uncommon. They are usually characterized by visual hallucinations and illusions or other symptoms related to the eyes and vision. In a 54-year-old woman with occipital lobe epilepsy, complex visual hallucinations, illusions, and migraine-like headache constitute the major clinical manifestations. During focal status epilepticus, ictal electroencephalography revealed rhythmic focal spikes in the right occipital region, rapidly propagating to the right parietal and contralateral occipital areas. Ictal brain single-photon emission computed topography revealed hyperperfusion of the right occipital region. Using a full-field pattern-shift visual evoked potential (VEP) study, we found that the P100 responses on both sides were markedly attenuated in amplitude during occipital focal status epilepticus, whereas the latencies of the VEPs were normal. The amplitude and morphology of P100 responses on both sides, however, returned to the normal range 7 days after cessation of the seizures. In addition to clinical seizure semiology, scalp EEG, SPECT and neuroimaging studies, VEP studies may be used as a supplementary examination tool to provide further information in the patients with occipital lobe seizures or epilepsies.

  5. A prospective study of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities in patients with cluster of seizures and status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabeen, S A; Cherukuri, Pavankumar; Mridula, Rukmini; Harshavardhana, K R; Gaddamanugu, Padmaja; Sarva, Sailaja; Meena, A K; Borgohain, Rupam; Jyotsna Rani, Y

    2017-04-01

    To study the frequency, imaging characteristics, and clinical predictors for development of periictal diffusion weighted MRI abnormalities. We prospectively analyzed electro clinical and imaging characteristic of adult patients with cluster of seizures or status epilepticus between November 2013 and November 2015, in whom the diffusion weighted imaging was done within 24h after the end of last seizure (clinical or electrographic). There were thirty patients who fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Twenty patients (66%) had periictal MRI abnormalities. Nine patients (34%) did not have any MRI abnormality. All the patients with PMA had abnormalities on diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). Hippocampal abnormalities were seen in nine (53%), perisylvian in two (11.7%), thalamic in five (30%), splenium involvement in two (11.7%) and cortical involvement (temporo-occipital, parieto-occipital, temporo-parietal, fronto-parietal and fronto-temporal) in sixteen (94.1%) patients. Complete reversal of DWI changes was noted in sixteen (80%) patients and four (20%) patients showed partial resolution of MRI abnormalities. Mean duration of seizures was significantly higher among patients with PMA (59.11+20.97h) compared to those without MRI changes (27.33+9.33h) (pstatus epilepticus and were highly concordant with clinical semiology and EEG activity. Patients with longer duration of seizures/status were more likely to have PMA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Distinguishing in-hospital and out-of-hospital status epilepticus: clinical implications from a 10-year cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, R; Semmlack, S; Spiegel, R; Tisljar, K; Rüegg, S; Marsch, S

    2017-09-01

    The aim was to determine differences of clinical, treatment and outcome characteristics between patients with in-hospital and out-of-hospital status epilepticus (SE). From 2005 to 2014, clinical data were assessed in adults with SE treated in an academic medical care centre. Clinical characteristics, treatment and outcomes were compared between patients with in-hospital and out-of-hospital SE. Amongst 352 patients, 213 were admitted with SE and 139 developed in-hospital SE. Patients with in-hospital SE had more acute/fatal aetiologies (60% vs. 35%, P Status Epilepticus Severity Score (STESS) was an independent predictor for death in both groups, increased Charlson Comorbidity Index and treatment refractory SE were associated with death only in patients with in-hospital SE. Continuous anaesthesia for refractory SE was associated with increased mortality only in patients with out-of-hospital SE. The area under the receiver operating curve was 0.717 for prediction of death by STESS in patients with in-hospital SE and 0.811 in patients with out-of-hospital SE. Patients with in-hospital SE had more fatal aetiologies and comorbidities, refractory SE, less return to functional baseline, and increased mortality compared to patients with out-of-hospital SE. Whilst the STESS was a robust predictor for death in both groups, the association between continuous anaesthesia and death was limited to out-of-hospital SE. © 2017 EAN.

  7. Risk factors associated with death in in-hospital pediatric convulsive status epilepticus.

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    Tobias Loddenkemper

    Full Text Available To evaluate in-patient mortality and predictors of death associated with convulsive status epilepticus (SE in a large, multi-center, pediatric cohort.We identified our cohort from the KID Inpatient Database for the years 1997, 2000, 2003 and 2006. We queried the database for convulsive SE, associated diagnoses, and for inpatient death. Univariate logistic testing was used to screen for potential risk factors. These risk factors were then entered into a stepwise backwards conditional multivariable logistic regression procedure. P-values less than 0.05 were taken as significant.We identified 12,365 (5,541 female patients with convulsive SE aged 0-20 years (mean age 6.2 years, standard deviation 5.5 years, median 5 years among 14,965,571 pediatric inpatients (0.08%. Of these, 117 died while in the hospital (0.9%. The most frequent additional admission ICD-9 code diagnoses in addition to SE were cerebral palsy, pneumonia, and respiratory failure. Independent risk factors for death in patients with SE, assessed by multivariate calculation, included near drowning (Odds ratio [OR] 43.2; Confidence Interval [CI] 4.4-426.8, hemorrhagic shock (OR 17.83; CI 6.5-49.1, sepsis (OR 10.14; CI 4.0-25.6, massive aspiration (OR 9.1; CI 1.8-47, mechanical ventilation >96 hours (OR9; 5.6-14.6, transfusion (OR 8.25; CI 4.3-15.8, structural brain lesion (OR7.0; CI 3.1-16, hypoglycemia (OR5.8; CI 1.75-19.2, sepsis with liver failure (OR 14.4; CI 5-41.9, and admission in December (OR3.4; CI 1.6-4.1. African American ethnicity (OR 0.4; CI 0.2-0.8 was associated with a decreased risk of death in SE.Pediatric convulsive SE occurs in up to 0.08% of pediatric inpatient admissions with a mortality of up to 1%. There appear to be several risk factors that can predict mortality. These may warrant additional monitoring and aggressive management.

  8. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor ameliorates brain stem cardiovascular dysregulation during experimental temporal lobe status epilepticus.

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    Ching-Yi Tsai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Status epilepticus (SE is an acute, prolonged epileptic crisis with a mortality rate of 20-30%; the underlying mechanism is not completely understood. We assessed the hypothesis that brain stem cardiovascular dysregulation occurs during SE because of oxidative stress in rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM, a key nucleus of the baroreflex loop; to be ameliorated by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF via an antioxidant action. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a clinically relevant experimental model of temporal lobe SE (TLSE using Sprague-Dawley rats, sustained hippocampal seizure activity was accompanied by progressive hypotension that was preceded by a reduction in baroreflex-mediated sympathetic vasomotor tone; heart rate and baroreflex-mediated cardiac responses remained unaltered. Biochemical experiments further showed concurrent augmentation of superoxide anion, phosphorylated p47(phox subunit of NADPH oxidase and mRNA or protein levels of BDNF, tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB, angiotensin AT1 receptor subtype (AT1R, nitric oxide synthase II (NOS II or peroxynitrite in RVLM. Whereas pretreatment by microinjection bilaterally into RVLM of a superoxide dismutase mimetic (tempol, a specific antagonist of NADPH oxidase (apocynin or an AT1R antagonist (losartan blunted significantly the augmented superoxide anion or phosphorylated p47(phox subunit in RVLM, hypotension and the reduced baroreflex-mediated sympathetic vasomotor tone during experimental TLSE, pretreatment with a recombinant human TrkB-Fc fusion protein or an antisense bdnf oligonucleotide significantly potentiated all those events, alongside peroxynitrite. However, none of the pretreatments affected the insignificant changes in heart rate and baroreflex-mediated cardiac responses. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that formation of peroxynitrite by a reaction between superoxide anion generated by NADPH oxidase in RVLM on activation by AT1R and NOS II

  9. Interleukin-1β increases neuronal death in the hippocampal dentate gyrus associated with status epilepticus in the developing rat.

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    Rincón-López, C; Tlapa-Pale, A; Medel-Matus, J-S; Martínez-Quiroz, J; Rodríguez-Landa, J F; López-Meraz, M-L

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) increases necrotic neuronal cell death in the CA1 area after induced status epilepticus (SE) in developing rats. However, it remains uncertain whether IL-1β has a similar effect on the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). In this study, we analysed the effects of IL-1β on 14-day-old Wistar rats experiencing DG neuronal death induced by SE. SE was induced with lithium-pilocarpine. Six hours after SE onset, a group of pups was injected with IL-1β (at 0, 0.3, 3, 30, or 300ng/μL) in the right ventricle; another group was injected with IL-1β receptor (IL-1R1) antagonist (IL-1Ra, at 30ng/μL) of IL-1RI antagonist (IL-1Ra) alone, and additional group with 30ng/μL of IL-1Ra plus 3ng/μL of IL-1β. Twenty-four hours after SE onset, neuronal cell death in the dentate gyrus of the dorsal hippocampus was assessed using haematoxylin-eosin staining. Dead cells showed eosinophilic cytoplasm and condensed and fragmented nuclei. We observed an increased number of eosinophilic cells in the hippocampal DG ipsilateral to the site of injection of 3ng/μL and 300ng/μL of IL-1β in comparison with the vehicle group. A similar effect was observed in the hippocampal DG contralateral to the site of injection of 3ng/μL of IL-1β. Administration of both of IL-1β and IL-1Ra failed to prevent an increase in the number of eosinophilic cells. Our data suggest that IL-1β increases apoptotic neuronal cell death caused by SE in the hippocampal GD, which is a mechanism independent of IL-1RI activation. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Administration of PBN (N-tert-butyl-alfa-phenylnitrone) during status epilepticus reduces neuronal injury, improves cognitive functions but enhances epileptogenesis in immature rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubová, Hana; Folbergrová, Jaroslava; Otáhal, Jakub; Mareš, Pavel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 59, Suppl. 1 (2007), s. 10-10 ISSN 1734-1140. [Day of neuropsychopharmacology /16./. 06.09.2007-08.09.2007, Wroclaw] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : PBN * status epilepticus * immature rats Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  11. Efficacy and safety of non-intravenous midazolam for the treatment of status epilepticus in children: a Meta-analysis

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    Yan LIN

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of non-intravenous midazolam for treating status epilepticus (SE in children.  Methods Taking midazolam, status epilepticus and children both in Chinese and English as search terms, retrieve in databases such as PubMed, ScienceDirect, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI, VIP and Wanfang Data, assisted by manual searching and Google Scholar, in order to collect randomized controlled trials (RCTs about non-intravenous midazolam for treating SE in children from January 2000 to January 2015. Jadad Scale was used to evaluate the quality of literatures. Meta-analysis was performed by using RevMan 5.3 software. Results There were a total of 258 records after preliminary searching, and 6 RCTs involving 766 episodes were finally included after excluding duplicate ones and those which did not meet the inclusion criteria. The results were as follows: 1 midazolam via intranasal administration was as effective as intravenous diazepam in achieving seizure control in children (RD = -0.070, 95%CI: -0.200—0.060, P = 0.290. However, non-intravenous (intranasal or buccal midazolam showed better effects on seizure control than rectal diazepam (RD = 0.170, 95% CI: 0.030—0.320; P = 0.020. 2 The mean time from arrival at hospital to cessation was not significantly different between intranasal midazolam and intravenous diazepam (SMD = -1.570, 95%CI: -3.280—0.140; P = 0.070. 3 There was no statistical difference between intranasal midazolam and intravenous diazepam for the time from giving drug to cessation (SMD = 0.240, 95%CI: -0.110—0.590; P = 0.170. 4 There was no statistical difference on the occurrence rate of adverse drug reactions between non-intravenous midazolam and intravenous or non-intravenous diazepam (RD = -0.010, 95% CI: -0.030—0.200; P = 0.500.  Conclusions Non-intravenous midazolam is safe and effective in the treatment for status epilepticus in children. However, the

  12. Diagnosing Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease in a Patient with a Suspected Status Epilepticus in the Intensive Care Unit

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    Harm J. van der Horn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Several tests are available in the diagnostics of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD; however, none of these is conclusive. We review the values of these tests, from an intensive care unit (ICU perspective. Methods. Case report and review of the literature. Results. A 53-year-old woman initially presenting with psychiatric symptoms developed myoclonus and was admitted 1 month later to the ICU with a suspected nonconvulsive status epilepticus and respiratory insufficiency, probably due to extensive antiepileptic drug therapy. Typical MRI and EEG findings and a positive 14-3-3 protein led to the diagnosis of sCJD. All treatments were terminated, and autopsy confirmed sCJD. Conclusions. Clinical signs combined with MRI, EEG, and 14-3-3 and/or tau protein determination might be sufficient to diagnose or exclude sCJD and may therefore prevent the application of unnecessary diagnostic tests.

  13. Novel Burst Suppression Segmentation in the Joint Time-Frequency Domain for EEG in Treatment of Status Epilepticus

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    Jaeyun Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed a method to distinguish bursts and suppressions for EEG burst suppression from the treatments of status epilepticus, employing the joint time-frequency domain. We obtained the feature used in the proposed method from the joint use of the time and frequency domains, and we estimated the decision as to whether the measured EEG was a burst segment or suppression segment by the maximum likelihood estimation. We evaluated the performance of the proposed method in terms of its accordance with the visual scores and estimation of the burst suppression ratio. The accuracy was higher than the sole use of the time or frequency domains, as well as conventional methods conducted in the time domain. In addition, probabilistic modeling provided a more simplified optimization than conventional methods. Burst suppression quantification necessitated precise burst suppression segmentation with an easy optimization; therefore, the excellent discrimination and the easy optimization of burst suppression by the proposed method appear to be beneficial.

  14. Epilepsy surgery in the elderly: an unusual case of a 75-year-old man with recurrent status epilepticus.

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    Tellez-Zenteno, Jose F; Sadanand, Venkatraman; Riesberry, Martha; Robinson, Christopher A; Ogieglo, Lissa; Masiowski, Paul; Vrbancic, Mirna

    2009-06-01

    Epilepsy surgery is increasingly well-supported as an effective treatment for patients with intractable epilepsy. It is most often performed on younger patients and the safety and efficacy of epilepsy surgery in elderly patients are not frequently described. We report a case of a 75-year-old right-handed man who underwent a left fronto-temporal craniotomy for resection of a suprasellar meningioma in 2002. Immediately following hospital discharge, he began to experience complex partial seizures. He continued to have frequent seizures despite treatment with multiple combinations of antiepileptic medications. He presented with status epilepticus every two or three months, and required long periods of hospitalization on each occasion for post-ictal confusion and aphasia. Scalp EEG showed continuous spikes and polyspikes and persistent slowing in the left temporal area, as well as spikes in the left frontal area. EEG telemetry recorded multiple seizures, all with a clear focus in the left temporal area. MRI scan showed an area of encephalomalacia in the left temporal lobe, as well as post-surgical changes in the left frontal area. Neuropsychological testing showed bilateral memory impairment with no significant cognitive decline expected after unilateral temporal lobe resection. A left anteromesial temporal lobectomy was performed with intraoperative electrocorticography. Since surgery, the patient was not seizure-free (Engel class II-b), but had no further episodes of status epilepticus in one year and two months of follow-up. This is one of the oldest patients reported in the literature with epilepsy surgery and supports the possibility of epilepsy surgery in elderly patients for particular cases. In addition, few cases with such a malignant evolution of temporal lobe epilepsy have been described in this age group.

  15. Convulsive status epilepticus in a quaternary hospital paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) in South Africa: An 8 year review.

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    Reddy, Yavini; Balakrishna, Yusentha; Mubaiwa, Lawrence

    2017-10-01

    Convulsive status epilepticus (CSE) is associated with a high morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to describe the clinical profile, aetiology, neuroimaging and EEG findings as well as outcome of children with CSE in Sub-Saharan Africa. This was a retrospective analysis of electronic records of children with CSE admitted to the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) over an 8-year period from January 2007 to December 2014. Seventy six patients were admitted to the PICU with CSE and 55(72%) had refractory status epilepticus. The median age at presentation was 15 months (IQR 6-37 months). The main aetiologies were meningoencephalitis and gastroenteritis in 33(43%) and 19(25%) patients respectively. The most frequently used antiepileptic drugs for CSE in PICU consisted of infusions of midazolam (96%) and thiopentone (22%). Neuroimaging findings were abnormal in 53(75%) patients with hypoxic changes in 17 patients. On multivariable regression, the predictors of poor outcome included the use of more than 3 antiepileptic drugs in PICU(RR-1.41(1.12-1.78), p=0.003), duration of mechanical ventilation for more than 3days (RR 1.98(1.22-3.20), p=0.005) and abnormal neuroimaging findings (RR 3.21(1.53-6.72), p=0.002). The mortality rate was 24%(n=18). Persistent seizures or a new neurological deficit occurred in 58%(n=44). The main cause of mortality was CSE related diffuse cortical and brainstem injury. Predominant neurological sequelae were cerebral palsy and persistent epilepsy. The high burden of infection related CSE is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates in contrast to the rates in developed countries. This highlights the need for early recognition and treatment of underlying conditions. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Early life status epilepticus and stress have distinct and sex-specific effects on learning, subsequent seizure outcomes, including anticonvulsant response to phenobarbital.

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    Akman, Ozlem; Moshé, Solomon L; Galanopoulou, Aristea S

    2015-02-01

    Neonatal status epilepticus (SE) is often associated with adverse cognitive and epilepsy outcomes. We investigate the effects of three episodes of kainic acid-induced SE (3KA-SE) and maternal separation in immature rats on subsequent learning, seizure susceptibility, and consequences, and the anticonvulsant effects of phenobarbital, according to sex, type, and age at early life (EL) event. 3KA-SE or maternal separation was induced on postnatal days (PN) 4-6 or 14-16. Rats were tested on Barnes maze (PN16-19), or lithium-pilocarpine SE (PN19) or flurothyl seizures (PN32). The anticonvulsant effects of phenobarbital (20 or 40 mg/kg/rat, intraperitoneally) pretreatment were tested on flurothyl seizures. FluoroJadeB staining assessed hippocampal injury. 3KA-SE or separation on PN4-6 caused more transient learning delays in males and did not alter lithium-pilocarpine SE latencies, but aggravated its outcomes in females. Anticonvulsant effects of phenobarbital were preserved and potentiated in specific groups depending on sex, type, and age at EL event. Early life 3KA-SE and maternal separation cause more but transient cognitive deficits in males but aggravate the consequences of subsequent lithium-pilocarpine SE in females. In contrast, on flurothyl seizures, EL events showed either beneficial or no effect, depending on gender, type, and age at EL events. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Influence of early life status epilepticus on the developmental expression profile of the GluA2 subunit of AMPA receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Szczurowska, Ewa; Ergang, Peter; Kubová, Hana; Druga, Rastislav; Salaj, M.; Mareš, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 283, Part A (2016), s. 97-109 ISSN 0014-4886 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-16605S; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : development * pilocarpine * status epilepticus * LiCl * AMPA * GluA2 * subunit * expression * GRIA2A Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.706, year: 2016

  18. How large must an epileptic focus be to cause an electrographic status epilepticus--a case report.

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    Fauser, Susanne; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas

    2004-10-01

    Based on experimental data from animal studies different theories regarding the size of an epileptic focus have been postulated which range from single pacemaker cells to extended neuronal networks. We report a case which gives further information about the size of a human epileptic focus which can trigger manifest epileptic seizures. We report a 22-year-old man with medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. This patient suffered from brief complex partial seizures and frequent epigastric auras. To differentiate a mesiotemporal from a temporolateral seizure origin the patient was implanted with a 10 contact depth electrode from a posterior approach into the right hippocampus, and additional temporobasal/temporolateral subdural strip electrodes. Depth recordings revealed an electrographic status with continuous rhythmic sharp wave activity (1 Hz), the field of which was confined to a diameter of less than 1 cm in the anterior hippocampus, whereas temporobasal subdural strip electrodes did not display this activity. Periodically, spread of this activity occurred to the amygdala, to the posterior part of the hippocampus, and less often to the temporobasal cortex. Most seizure patterns remained subclinical, few of them became symptomatic as partial seizures. This case demonstrates that a hippocampal epileptic focus causing electrographic focal status epilepticus may be limited to a volume of less than 1 cm in diameter. This observation is discussed with regard to implantation strategies and to possible superselective resective or modulatory approaches in the treatment of such limited epileptogenic areas.

  19. Evaluation of the efficacy of sodium valproate in convulsive status epilepticus following to ıschemic stroke

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    Hasan Hüseyin Özdemir

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective : Convulsive status epilepticus (CSE is very rarely observed after ischaemic stroke. Sodium valproate (SV is one of the agents used in the treatment of CSE, but its role still controversial, and its degree of efficacy in treating CSE that develops following stroke is unclear. Method : We evaluated 19 patients who were treated with intravenous (IV SV (20 mg/kg, 2 mg/kg/h-12h after diazepam. Patients’ modified Rankin scores (mRS, SE types, and changes in biochemical parameters after treatment were assessed. Results : CSE was successfully treated in 12 (63.15% patients. Side effects such as hypotension and allergic reactions were observed in two patients. Refractory SE development was observed in 5 (29.4% patients with high mRS (˃ 3. No significant deterioration in patients’ laboratory evaluations, conducted before and after status, was observed. Conclusion : SV may be safe and effective in the treatment of CSE observed after ischaemic stroke, especially in patients with low mRS.

  20. Costs, length of stay, and mortality of super-refractory status epilepticus: A population-based study from Germany.

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    Strzelczyk, Adam; Ansorge, Sonja; Hapfelmeier, Jana; Bonthapally, Vijayveer; Erder, M Haim; Rosenow, Felix

    2017-09-01

    Super-refractory status epilepticus (SRSE) is a severe condition in which a patient in status epilepticus (SE) for ≥24 h does not respond to first-, second-, or third-line therapy. The economic impact of SRSE treatment remains unclear. A health insurance research database was used for a population-based estimation of SRSE-associated inpatient costs, length of stay, and mortality in Germany. An algorithm using International Classification of Diseases, 10th Edition coding and treatment parameters identified and classified patients in a German statutory health insurance database covering admissions from 2008 to 2013 as having refractory SE (RSE) or SRSE. Admissions data in our study refer to these classifications. Associated patient data included costs, procedures, and demographics. The algorithm identified 2,585 (all type) SE admissions, classified as 1,655 nonrefractory SE (64%), 592 (22.9%) RSE, and 338 (13.1%) SRSE, producing database incidence rates of 15.0 in 100,000, 5.2 in 100,000, and 3.0 in 100,000 per year, respectively. Median cost per admission was €4,063 for nonrefractory SE, €4,581 (p < 0.001) for RSE, and €32,706 (p < 0.001) for SRSE. Median length of stay varied significantly between 8 days (mean = 13.6) in nonrefractory SE, 14 days in RSE, and up to 37 days in SRSE. Discharge mortality increased from 9.6% in nonrefractory SE to 15.0% (p < 0.001) in RSE and 39.9% (p < 0.001) in SRSE. This study evaluated the hospital treatment costs associated with admissions classified by the algorithm as SRSE in Germany. SRSE represented 13% of all SE admissions, but resulted in 56% of all SE-related costs. The lack of approved treatments and limited number of evidence-based treatment guidelines highlight the need for further evaluations of the SRSE burden of illness and the potential for further optimization of treatments for SRSE. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  1. Chaos theory and the treatment of refractory status epilepticus: Who benefits from prolonged anesthesia, and is there a better way?

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    Hutchinson, Michael; Swanson, Phillip D

    2007-01-01

    Refractory status epilepticus (SE) is a condition of continuous seizure activity in which there is a regular, rapid, succession of spike discharges in the brain. It is incompatible with normal consciousness and is associated with an extremely high morbidity and mortality. Prior to 1990, prevailing opinion held that a brief period of anesthesia (up to two weeks) was to be recommended, but that if SE persisted this was a sign of irreversible brain damage. Therefore support of the patient in SE was not recommended beyond two weeks. On the basis of the theoretical constructs of chaos theory we hypothesized that, for selected cases, anesthesia should be continued indefinitely until the SE resolved. This became the standard of care at the University of Washington and at other institutions. After several years, the accumulating evidence lends support for this hypothesis and we are now able to propose which patients will benefit from such therapy. It is hypothesized that only those patients for whom there is no underlying brain disease, beyond epilepsy, are likely to benefit. Secondly, chaos theory suggests that a strong perturbation will cause a rapid transition from the stable attractor of SE to the stable attractor representing normal consciousness. In certain ways, SE is analogous to ventricular tachycardia, where the cardiac muscle has an abnormally fast rhythm incompatible with proper cardiac function. Therefore the second hypothesis is that a brain perturbation, analogous to defibrillation, may be even more useful than anesthesia in refractory SE.

  2. Focal status epilepticus and progressive dyskinesia: A novel phenotype for glycine receptor antibody-mediated neurological disease in children.

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    Chan, D W S; Thomas, T; Lim, M; Ling, S; Woodhall, M; Vincent, A

    2017-03-01

    Antibody-associated disorders of the central nervous system are increasingly recognised in adults and children. Some are known to be paraneoplastic, whereas in others an infective trigger is postulated. They include disorders associated with antibodies to N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), voltage-gated potassium channel-complexes (VGKC-complex), GABA B receptor or glycine receptor (GlyR). With antibodies to NMDAR or VGKC-complexes, distinct clinical patterns are well characterised, but as more antibodies are discovered, the spectra of associated disorders are evolving. GlyR antibodies have been detected in patients with progressive encephalopathy with rigidity and myoclonus (PERM), or stiff man syndrome, both rare but disabling conditions. We report a case of a young child with focal seizures and progressive dyskinesia in whom GlyR antibodies were detected. Anticonvulsants and immunotherapy were effective in treating both the seizures and movement disorder with good neurological outcome and with a decline in the patient's serum GlyR-Ab titres. Glycine receptor antibodies are associated with focal status epilepticus and seizures, encephalopathy and progressive dyskinesia and should be evaluated in autoimmune encephalitis. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Neurocognitive and neurobehavioral disabilities in Epilepsy with Electrical Status Epilepticus in slow sleep (ESES) and related syndromes.

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    Raha, Sarbani; Shah, Urvashi; Udani, Vrajesh

    2012-11-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the cognitive and behavioral problems of patients with Epilepsy with Electrical Status Epilepticus in slow sleep (ESES) and related syndromes and to review their EEG (electroencephalography) findings and treatment options. Fourteen patients with ESES were evaluated and treated in 2010. Nine children had continuous spike and wave during slow-wave sleep (CSWS)/ESES syndrome, 3 had Atypical BECTS (benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes), 1 had Opercular syndrome, and 1 had Landau-Kleffner syndrome. The duration of ESES ranged from 6 to 52 months. Eleven (91%) children had behavioral issues, most prominent being hyperactivity. Seven of the 13 children (53%) showed evidence of borderline to moderate cognitive impairment. A total of 28 EEG findings of ESES were analyzed for SWI (spike-wave index). Antiepileptic drugs received by the patients included valproate, clobazam, levetiracetam, and others. Eleven patients had been treated with oral steroids and it was found to be efficacious in seven (63%). Disabilities caused by ESES affect multiple domains. Patients with an SWI>50% should be followed up frequently with neuropsychological assessments. Steroids appear to be effective, although there is a need to standardize the dose and duration of treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. P2X7 receptor activation ameliorates CA3 neuronal damage via a tumor necrosis factor-α-mediated pathway in the rat hippocampus following status epilepticus

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    Ryu Hea Jin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The release of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α appears depend on the P2X7 receptor, a purinergic receptor. In the present study, we addressed the question of whether P2X7 receptor-mediated TNF-α regulation is involved in pathogenesis and outcome of status epilepticus (SE. Methods SE was induced by pilocarpine in rats that were intracerebroventricularly infused with saline-, 2',3'-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl-adenosine 5'-triphosphate (BzATP, adenosine 5'-triphosphate-2',3'-dialdehyde (OxATP, A-438079, or A-740003 prior to SE induction. Thereafter, we performed Fluoro-Jade B staining and immunohistochemical studies for TNF-α and NF-κB subunit phosphorylations. Results Following SE, P2X7 receptor agonist (BzATP infusion increased TNF-α immunoreactivity in dentate granule cells as compared with that in saline-infused animals. In addition, TNF-α immunoreactivity was readily apparent in the mossy fibers, while TNF-α immunoreactivity in CA1-3 pyramidal cells was unaltered. However, P2X7 receptor antagonist (OxATP-, A-438079, and A-740003 infusion reduced SE-induced TNF-α expression in dentate granule cells. In the CA3 region, BzATP infusion attenuated SE-induced neuronal damage, accompanied by enhancement of p65-Ser276 and p65-Ser311 NF-κB subunit phosphorylations. In contrast, OxATP-, A-438079, and A-740003 infusions increased SE-induced neuronal death. Soluble TNF p55 receptor (sTNFp55R, and cotreatment with BzATP and sTNFp55R infusion also increased SE-induced neuronal damage in CA3 region. However, OxATP-, sTNFp55R or BzATP+sTNFp55R infusions could not exacerbate SE-induced neuronal damages in the dentate gyrus and the CA1 region, as compared to BzATP infusion. Conclusions These findings suggest that TNF-α induction by P2X7 receptor activation may ameliorate SE-induced CA3 neuronal damage via enhancing NF-κB p65-Ser276 and p65-Ser311 phosphorylations.

  5. Predictors of outcome in children with status epilepticus during resuscitation in pediatric emergency department: A retrospective observational study

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    Indumathy Santhanam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To study the clinical profile and predictors of outcome in children with status epilepticus (SE during resuscitation in pediatric emergency department. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study was carried out in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Admission and resuscitation data of children, aged between 1 month and 12 years, treated for SE, between September 2013 and August 2014, were extracted using a standard data collection form. Our SE management protocol had employed a modified pediatric assessment triangle to recognize and treat acute respiratory failure, cardiovascular dysfunction (CD, and subtle SE until all parameters resolved. Continuous positive airway pressure, fluid boluses based on shock etiology, inotropes, and cardiac safe anticonvulsants were the other modifications. Risk factors predicting mortality during resuscitation were analyzed using univariate and penalized logistic regression. Results: Among 610 who were enrolled, 582 (95.4% survived and 28 (4.6% succumbed. Grunt odds ratio (OR: 3.747 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.035−13.560, retractions OR: 2.429 (95% CI: 1.036−5.698, rales OR: 10.145 (95% CI: 4.027−25.560, prolonged capillary refill time OR: 3.352 (95% CI: 1.339−8.388, and shock requiring >60 mL/kg fluids OR: 2.439 (95% CI 1.040−5.721 were associated with 2−3 times rise in mortality. Inappropriate prehospital treatment and CD were the significant predictors of mortality OR: 7.82 (95% CI 2.10−29.06 and 738.71 (95% CI: 97.11−999, respectively. Resolution of CD was associated with improved survival OR: 0.02 (95% CI: 0.003−0.17. Conclusion: Appropriate prehospital management and treatment protocol targeting resolution of CD during resuscitation could reduce mortality in children with SE.

  6. Modificação do metodo "kindling" para obtenção de status epilepticus experimental em ratos

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    Carlos J. Reis de Campos

    1980-03-01

    Full Text Available Foi utilizada em nova espécie animal (ratos, uma modificação do método "kindling", introduzida por Taber e col. (1977 para obtenção de status epilepticus experimental. Para isso foram implantados mediante cirurgia estereotáxica, eletrodos duplos, torcidos no hipocampo dorsal de 12 ratos machos albinos. Esses animais foram submetidos, após uma semana de pós-operatório, a 1 segundo de estimulação elétrica de baixa intensidade em forma intermitente, um estímulo por minuto durante 2 horas, desenvolvendo-se em prazo de 30 minutos um estado de epilepsia eletrográfica e comportamental duradoura. Vários padrões de descargas epilépticas eletrográficas foram observados bem como manifestações convulsivas tônico-clônicas. Os animais que foram submetidos a novas sessões de estimulação após 7 e 14 dias mostraram aumento de atividade epiléptica demonstrando uma modificação plástica do hipocampo do rato submetido a estimulação elétrica a qual perdura no tempo. O método permite a obtenção de "kindling" em tempo bem mais curto (horas, comparativamente às técnicas anteriormente descritas (dias, tornando-se um promissor modelo de epilepsia para testes de drogas anticonvulsivantes e para o estudo dos mecanismos fisiopatológicos e bioquímicos envolvidos na descarga epiléptica.

  7. Incidence of status epilepticus in southern Europe: a population study in the health district of Ferrara, Italy.

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    Govoni, Vittorio; Fallica, Elisa; Monetti, Vincenza Cinzia; Guerzoni, Franco; Faggioli, Raffaella; Casetta, Ilaria; Granieri, Enrico

    2008-01-01

    The epidemiologic features of status epilepticus (SE) are still in the course of definition. We carried out an intensive survey of multiple sources of case material in the resident population of the health district of Ferrara, Italy, in 2003. Information was collected on age, gender, duration, seizure type and etiology of SE. The age- adjusted annual incidence rate of SE was 27.2/100,000 (95% CI = 19.4-36.9) and it was higher in men (41.7/100,000, 95% CI = 26.9-61.7) than in women (12.3/100,000, 95% CI = 6.9-20.4). The incidence was higher in the elderly (older than 60 years, 39.2/100,000) than in younger adults in the age group 20-59 years (14.7/100,000). The age-specific incidence showed a bimodal distribution peaking in the youngest (0-4 years) and in the oldest age group (75+ years). Cerebrovascular disease was the most frequent etiologic factor (45%). Epilepsy had previously been diagnosed in 40% of the patients. The case fatality was 5%. The study found a higher incidence of SE than that expected on the basis of the previous European studies suggesting that the risk of SE in southern Europe is higher and more similar to that estimated in population studies in the United States. The case fatality was lower than that reported in previous South-European population studies despite the similar clinical features of the patients. Indirect evidence suggests that several factors related to the SE management could have positively influenced the outcome. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Effect of dexmedetomidine on rats with convulsive status epilepticus and association with activation of cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kai-Liang; Liu, Xin-Qiu; Yao, Yu-Long; Ye, Ming-Rong; Han, Yao-Guo; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Gang; Lei, Ming

    2018-01-01

    Convulsive status epilepticus (CSE) is a neurological disease with contraction and extension of limbs, leading to damage of hippocampus and cognition. This study aimed to explore the effects of dexmedetomidine (DEX) on the cognitive function and neuroinflammation in CSE rats. All rats were divided into control group, CSE group and DEX group. Morris water maze test was used to measure cognitive function. Acute hippocampal slices were made to detect long-term potentiation (LTP). Immunohistochemistry was used to determine the expression of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to measure serum levels of IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), S-100β and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Our results showed that DEX improved the memory damage caused by CSE. DEX reduced seizure severity and increased the amplitudes and sustainable time of LTP, and also inhibited the hippocampal expression of α7-nAChR and IL-1β in CSE rats. DEX treatment decreased serum IL-1β, TNF-α and S-100β levels and increased BDNF levels. The effects of DEX on seizure severity and LTP could be simulated by nicotine or attenuated by concurrent α-bungarotoxin (α-BGT) treatment. In conclusions, DEX significantly improved spatial cognitive dysfunction, reduced seizure severity and increased LTP in CSE rats. Improvements by DEX were closely related to enhancement of cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Status epilepticus after prolonged umbilical cord occlusion is associated with greater neural injury in [corrected] fetal sheep at term-equivalent.

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    Paul P Drury

    Full Text Available The majority of pre-clinical studies of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy at term-equivalent have focused on either relatively mild insults, or on functional paradigms of cerebral ischemia or hypoxia-ischemia/hypotension. There is surprisingly little information on the responses to single, severe 'physiological' insults. In this study we examined the evolution and pattern of neural injury after prolonged umbilical cord occlusion (UCO. 36 chronically instrumented fetal sheep at 125-129 days gestational age (term = 147 days were subjected to either UCO until mean arterial pressure was < = 8 mmHg (n = 29, or sham occlusion (n = 7. Surviving fetuses were killed after 72 hours for histopathologic assessment with acid-fuchsin thionine. After UCO, 11 fetuses died with intractable hypotension and 5 ewes entered labor and were euthanized. The remaining 13 fetuses showed marked EEG suppression followed by evolving seizures starting at 5.8 (6.8 hours (median (interquartile range. 6 of 13 developed status epilepticus, which was associated with a transient secondary increase in cortical impedance (a measure of cytotoxic edema, p<0.05. All fetuses showed moderate to severe neuronal loss in the hippocampus and the basal ganglia but mild cortical cell loss (p<0.05 vs sham occlusion. Status epilepticus was associated with more severe terminal hypotension (p<0.05 and subsequently, greater neuronal loss (p<0.05. In conclusion, profound UCO in term-equivalent fetal sheep was associated with delayed seizures, secondary cytotoxic edema, and subcortical injury, consistent with the predominant pattern after peripartum sentinel events at term. It is unclear whether status epilepticus exacerbated cortical injury or was simply a reflection of a longer duration of asphyxia.

  10. Severe Respiratory Acidosis in Status Epilepticus as a Possible Etiology of Sudden Death in Lesch-Nyhan Disease: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, Alison; Nyhan, William; Wilson, Jenny

    2017-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) is an X-linked disorder of purine metabolism, associated with self-mutilation, dystonia, and chorea. Seizures are uncommon in LND. Patients with LND are at risk for sudden and unexpected death. The etiology of this is unknown, but appears to occur from a respiratory process. We propose that respiratory failure secondary to subclinical seizure may lead to sudden death in these patients. We report a case of an 11-year-old boy with LND who had two episodes of nocturnal gasping. The second event was immediately followed by a 10 min generalized seizure. Upon arrival at the hospital, an arterial blood gas test revealed a severe respiratory acidosis. Following aggressive treatment of his seizures, this patient did well, and was discharged home on oxcarbazepine with rectal diazepam. No further seizures have been noted in 1 year of follow-up. In this case report and review, we hypothesize that sudden death from respiratory failure in Lesch-Nyhan disease may in some cases be due to seizure-induced respiratory failure, akin to sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). We suggest screening for paroxysmal respiratory events; consideration of electroencephalography for patients with LND presenting in respiratory distress or failure; and consideration of more aggressive treatment of seizures in these patients. Brief Summary:We present an 11-year-old boy with Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) who developed respiratory failure and severe respiratory acidosis from his first known seizure, which evolved to subclinical status epilepticus. We propose that patients with LND have a predisposition to respiratory failure and sudden death, which in some cases may be provoked by seizure (sudden unexpected death in epilepsy, or SUDEP).

  11. Diffusion tensor MRI shows progressive changes in the hippocampus and dentate gyrus after status epilepticus in rat - histological validation with Fourier-based analysis.

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    Salo, Raimo A; Miettinen, Tuukka; Laitinen, Teemu; Gröhn, Olli; Sierra, Alejandra

    2017-05-15

    Imaging markers for monitoring disease progression, recovery, and treatment efficacy are a major unmet need for many neurological diseases, including epilepsy. Recent evidence suggests that diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides high microstructural contrast even outside major white matter tracts. We hypothesized that in vivo DTI could detect progressive microstructural changes in the dentate gyrus and the hippocampal CA3bc in the rat brain after status epilepticus (SE). To test this hypothesis, we induced SE with systemic kainic acid or pilocarpine in adult male Wistar rats and subsequently scanned them using in vivo DTI at five time-points: prior to SE, and 10, 20, 34, and 79 days post SE. In order to tie the DTI findings to changes in the tissue microstructure, myelin- and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-stained sections from the same animals underwent Fourier analysis. We compared the Fourier analysis parameters, anisotropy index and angle of myelinated axons or astrocyte processes, to corresponding DTI parameters, fractional anisotropy (FA) and the orientation angle of the principal eigenvector. We found progressive detectable changes in DTI parameters in both the dentate gyrus (FA, axial diffusivity [D || ], linear anisotropy [CL] and spherical anisotropy [CS], pFourier analysis revealed that both myelinated axons and astrocyte processes played a role in the water diffusion anisotropy changes detected by DTI in individual portions of the dentate gyrus (suprapyramidal blade, mid-portion, and infrapyramidal blade). In the whole dentate gyrus, myelinated axons markedly contributed to the water diffusion changes. In CA3bc as well as in CA3b and CA3c, both myelinated axons and astrocyte processes contributed to water diffusion anisotropy and orientation. Our study revealed that DTI is a promising method for noninvasive detection of microstructural alterations in the hippocampus proper. These alterations may be potential imaging markers for epileptogenesis

  12. Response to adrenocorticotropic in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder-like symptoms in electrical status epilepticus in sleep syndrome is related to electroencephalographic improvement: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunel, Attila; Altunel, Emine Özlem; Sever, Ali

    2017-09-01

    Encephalopathy with electrical status epilepticus in sleep (ESES) syndrome is a rare epilepsy syndrome of childhood that is characterized by sleep-induced epileptiform discharges and problems with cognition or behavior. The neuropsychiatric symptoms in ESES syndrome, among which the ADHD-like symptoms are prominent, bear a close resemblance to symptoms in various developmental disorders. Positive response to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) is associated with the normalization of the EEG and improvement of neuropsychiatric function. This study aimed to determine the improvement in ADHD-like symptoms in response to ACTH and establish a relationship between improvement in clinical symptoms and EEG parameters. Seventy-five patients with ESES syndrome, who had clinically displayed ADHD-like symptoms, had been treated with ACTH for ESES, and their medical records were retrospectively reviewed. Sleep EEGs were recorded at referral and follow-up visits, and short courses of ACTH were administered when spike-wave index (SWI) was ≥15%. The assessment of treatment effectiveness was based on reduction in SWI and the clinician-reported improvement in ADHD-like symptoms. Statistical analyses were conducted in order to investigate the relationship between the clinical and EEG parameters. Following treatment with ACTH, a reduction in SWI in all the patients was accompanied by a mean improvement of 67% in ADHD-like symptoms. Disappearance/reduction of foci and cessation/reduction of seizures were achieved in patients with formerly antiepileptic-resistant seizures. Multiple linear regressions established that pretreatment SWI and treatment delay predicted posttreatment SWI, while reduction in SWI, treatment delay, and the presence of foci predicted improvement in ADHD-like symptoms. Improvement in ADHD-like symptoms showed high correlation and was timely with the resolution of ESES. It is suggested that ESES and ADHD may be the two different expressions of a common

  13. The Efficacy of LY293558 in Blocking Seizures and Associated Morphological, and Behavioral Alterations Induced by Soman in Immature Male Rats and the Role of the M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor in Organophosphate Induced Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-30

    including seizures or status epilepticus (SE), and if left untreated results in long-term brain damage and neuropsychiatric symptoms or death. OPs...118 Abstract Exposure to nerve agents induces prolonged status epilepticus (SE), causing brain damage or death. Diazepam (DZP) is the presently...inhibition in the brain produces convulsive seizures and status epilepticus (SE), initiated by the excessive stimulation of cholinergic receptors. If

  14. The Limitations of Diazepam as a Treatment for Nerve Agent-Induced Seizures and Neuropathology in Rats: Comparison with UBP302

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    to nerve agents induces prolonged status epilepticus (SE), causing brain damage or death. Diazepam (DZP) is the cur- rent US Food and Drug... status epilepticus (SE), which are initiated by the excessive stimulation of cholinergic receptors. If immediate death is prevented by adequate...5-yl)ethyl] decahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid; PBS, phosphate-buffered saline; SE, status epilepticus ; UBP302, (S)-3-(2-carboxybenzyl

  15. Phenobarbital Versus Valproate for Generalized Convulsive Status Epilepticus in Adults: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yingying; Liu, Gang; Tian, Fei; Ren, Guoping; Jiang, Mengdi; Chun, Brian; Zhang, Yunzhou; Zhang, Yan; Ye, Hong; Gao, Daiquan; Chen, Weibi

    2016-12-01

    Although generalized convulsive status epilepticus (GCSE) is a life-threatening emergency, evidence-based data to guide initial drug treatment choices are lacking in the Chinese population. We conducted this prospective, randomized, controlled trial to evaluate the relative efficacy and safety of intravenous phenobarbital and valproate in patients with GCSE. After the failure of first-line diazepam treatment, Chinese adult patients with GCSE were randomized to receive either intravenous phenobarbital (standard doses, low rate) or valproate (standard). Successful treatment was considered when clinical and electroencephalographic seizure activity ceased. Adverse events following treatment, as well as the neurological outcomes at discharge and 3 months later, were also evaluated. Overall, 73 cases were enrolled in the study. Intravenous phenobarbital was successful in 81.1% of patients, and intravenous valproate was successful in 44.4% of patients (p phenobarbital (6.7%) was significantly lower than that in patients receiving valproate (31.3%), and the total number of adverse events did not differ significantly between the two groups (p > 0.05). In the phenobarbital group, two patients (5.4%) required ventilation and two patients (5.4%) developed serious hypotension. The neurological outcomes of the phenobarbital group were generally better than those of the valproate group; however, no significant differences were observed between phenobarbital and valproate with respect to mortality (8.1 vs. 16.6%) at discharge, or mortality (16.2 vs. 30.5%) and post-symptomatic epilepsy (26.3 vs. 42.8%) at 3-month follow-up. Intravenous phenobarbital appears to be more effective than intravenous valproate for Chinese adult patients with GCSE. The occurrence of serious respiratory depression and hypotension caused by phenobarbital was reduced by decreasing the intravenous infusion rate; however, even at a lower infusion rate than typically used in other institutions, intravenous

  16. Temporal profiles of age-dependent changes in cytokine mRNA expression and glial cell activation after status epilepticus in postnatal rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvelä, Juha T; Lopez-Picon, Francisco R; Plysjuk, Anna; Ruohonen, Saku; Holopainen, Irma E

    2011-04-08

    Status epilepticus (SE) is proposed to lead to an age-dependent acute activation of a repertoire of inflammatory processes, which may contribute to neuronal damage in the hippocampus. The extent and temporal profiles of activation of these processes are well known in the adult brain, but less so in the developing brain. We have now further elucidated to what extent inflammation is activated by SE by investigating the acute expression of several cytokines and subacute glial reactivity in the postnatal rat hippocampus. SE was induced by an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of kainic acid (KA) in 9- and 21-day-old (P9 and P21) rats. The mRNA expression of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-10 (IL-10), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), interferon gamma (IFN-γ), and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) were measured from 4 h up to 3 days after KA injection with real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). IL-1β protein expression was studied with ELISA, GFAP expression with western blotting, and microglial and astrocyte morphology with immunohistochemistry 3 days after SE. SE increased mRNA expression of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-10 mRNA in hippocampus of both P9 and P21 rats, their induction being more rapid and pronounced in P21 than in P9 rats. MMP-9 expression was augmented similarly in both age groups and GDNF expression augmented only in P21 rats, whereas neither IFN-γ nor TGF-β1 expression was induced in either age group. Microglia and astrocytes exhibited activated morphology in the hippocampus of P21 rats, but not in P9 rats 3 d after SE. Microglial activation was most pronounced in the CA1 region and also detected in the basomedial amygdala. Our results suggest that SE provokes an age-specific cytokine expression in the acute phase, and age-specific glial cell activation in the subacute phase as verified now in the postnatal rat hippocampus. In the juvenile hippocampus

  17. Status epilepticus and cardiopulmonary arrest in a patient with carbon monoxide poisoning with full recovery after using a neuroprotective strategy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulaziz Salman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Carbon monoxide poisoning can be associated with life-threatening complications, including significant and disabling cardiovascular and neurological sequelae. Case presentation We report a case of carbon monoxide poisoning in a 25-year-old Saudi woman who presented to our facility with status epilepticus and cardiopulmonary arrest. Her carboxyhemoglobin level was 21.4 percent. She made a full recovery after we utilized a neuroprotective strategy and normobaric oxygen therapy, with no delayed neurological sequelae. Conclusions Brain protective modalities are very important for the treatment of complicated cases of carbon monoxide poisoning when they present with neurological toxicities or cardiac arrest. They can be adjunctive to normobaric oxygen therapy when the use of hyperbaric oxygen is not feasible.

  18. Glucose utilization in the brain during acute seizure is a useful biomarker for the evaluation of anticonvulsants: effect of methyl ethyl ketone in lithium-pilocarpine status epilepticus rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Akifumi; Momosaki, Sotaro; Hosoi, Rie; Abe, Kohji; Yamaguchi, Masatoshi; Inoue, Osamu

    2009-01-01

    Enhancement of glucose utilization in the brain has been well known during acute seizure in various kinds of animal model of epilepsy. This enhancement of glucose utilization might be related to neural damage in these animal models. Recently, we found that methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) had both anticonvulsive and neuroprotective effects in lithium-pilocapine (Li-pilo) status epilepticus (SE) rat. In this article, we measured the uptake of [ 14 C]2-deoxyglucose ([ 14 C]DG) in the Li-pilo SE and Li-pilo SE with MEK rat brain in order to assess whether the glucose utilization was a useful biomarker for the detection of efficacy of anticonvulsive compounds. Significant increase of [ 14 C]DG uptake (45 min after the injection) in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, amygdala and thalamus during acute seizure induced by Li-pilo were observed. On the other hand, the initial uptake of [ 14 C]DG (1 min after the injection) in the Li-pilo SE rats was not different from the control rats. Therefore, the enhancement of glucose metabolism during acute seizure was due to the facilitation of the rate of phosphorylation process of [ 14 C]DG in the brain. Pretreatment with MEK (8 mmol/kg) completely abolished the enhancement of glucose utilization in the Li-pilo SE rats. The present results indicated that glucose utilization in the brain during acute seizure might be a useful biomarker for the evaluation of efficacy of anticonvulsive compounds.

  19. Glucose utilization in the brain during acute seizure is a useful biomarker for the evaluation of anticonvulsants: effect of methyl ethyl ketone in lithium-pilocarpine status epilepticus rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Akifumi [Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Momosaki, Sotaro; Hosoi, Rie [Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Abe, Kohji [Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Developmental Research Laboratories, Shionogi and Co., Ltd., Toyonaka, Osaka, 561-0825 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Masatoshi [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuoka University, Johnan, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Inoue, Osamu [Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan)

    2009-11-15

    Enhancement of glucose utilization in the brain has been well known during acute seizure in various kinds of animal model of epilepsy. This enhancement of glucose utilization might be related to neural damage in these animal models. Recently, we found that methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) had both anticonvulsive and neuroprotective effects in lithium-pilocapine (Li-pilo) status epilepticus (SE) rat. In this article, we measured the uptake of [{sup 14}C]2-deoxyglucose ([{sup 14}C]DG) in the Li-pilo SE and Li-pilo SE with MEK rat brain in order to assess whether the glucose utilization was a useful biomarker for the detection of efficacy of anticonvulsive compounds. Significant increase of [{sup 14}C]DG uptake (45 min after the injection) in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, amygdala and thalamus during acute seizure induced by Li-pilo were observed. On the other hand, the initial uptake of [{sup 14}C]DG (1 min after the injection) in the Li-pilo SE rats was not different from the control rats. Therefore, the enhancement of glucose metabolism during acute seizure was due to the facilitation of the rate of phosphorylation process of [{sup 14}C]DG in the brain. Pretreatment with MEK (8 mmol/kg) completely abolished the enhancement of glucose utilization in the Li-pilo SE rats. The present results indicated that glucose utilization in the brain during acute seizure might be a useful biomarker for the evaluation of efficacy of anticonvulsive compounds.

  20. Intranasal brain-targeted clonazepam polymeric micelles for immediate control of status epilepticus: in vitro optimization, ex vivo determination of cytotoxicity, in vivo biodistribution and pharmacodynamics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nour, Samia A; Abdelmalak, Nevine S; Naguib, Marianne J; Rashed, Hassan M; Ibrahim, Ahmed B

    2016-11-01

    Clonazepam (CZ) is an anti-epileptic drug used mainly in status epilepticus (SE). The drug belongs to Class II according to BCS classification with very limited solubility and high permeability and it suffers from extensive first-pass metabolism. The aim of the present study was to develop CZ-loaded polymeric micelles (PM) for direct brain delivery allowing immediate control of SE. PM were prepared via thin film hydration (TFH) technique adopting a central composite face-centered design (CCFD). The seventeen developed formulae were evaluated in terms of entrapment efficiency (EE), particle size (PS), polydispersity index (PDI), zeta potential (ZP), and in vitro release. For evaluating the in vivo behavior of the optimized formula, both biodistrbution using 99m Tc-radiolabeled CZ and pharmacodynamics studies were done in addition to ex vivo cytotoxicty. At a drug:Pluronic® P123:Pluronic® L121 ratio of 1:20:20 (PM7), a high EE, ZP, Q8h, and a low PDI was achieved. The biodistribution studies revealed that the optimized formula had significantly higher drug targeting efficiency (DTE = 242.3%), drug targeting index (DTI = 144.25), and nose-to-brain direct transport percentage (DTP = 99.30%) and a significant prolongation of protection from seizures in comparison to the intranasally administered solution with minor histopathological changes. The declared results reveal the ability of the developed PM to be a strong potential candidate for the emergency treatment of SE.

  1. Status epilepticus in the elderly: Prognostic implications of rhythmic and periodic patterns in electroencephalography and hyperintensities on diffusion-weighted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Hajime; Matsumoto, Riki; Ueda, Hiroyuki; Ariyoshi, Koichi; Kawamoto, Michi; Ishii, Junko; Ikeda, Akio; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Kohara, Nobuo

    2016-11-15

    To delineate the clinical characteristics and functional outcome of status epilepticus (SE) in elderly people, and elucidate prognostic implications of SE-associated rhythmic and periodic patterns (RPPs) in electroencephalography and hyperintensities on diffusion-weighted imaging. We retrospectively investigated 107 consecutive patients with SE aged≥65years in a comprehensive community hospital. RPPs were classified using the 2012 American Clinical Neurophysiology Society's Standardized Critical Care EEG Terminology. Poor outcome was defined as an increase in modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score at discharge compared with that at baseline, including death. Median age of patients was 80.0years. Median mRS score at baseline was 3. Thirty-four patients (31.8%) had a previous diagnosis of epilepsy. Cerebrovascular disease and dementia were major etiologies. Poor outcome occurred in 41 (38.3%). In electroencephalography, periodic discharges (PDs) were present in 21.0% (22/105), rhythmic delta activity (RDA) in 10.5% (11/105), and conventional seizure patterns in 9.5% (10/105). Diffusion-weighted hyperintensities associated with SE were observed in 28.0% (26/93). With univariate analysis, poor outcome was significantly associated with no previous diagnosis of epilepsy, etiology, refractory SE, specific electroencephalographic patterns (PDs and conventional seizure patterns, but not RDA), and diffusion-weighted hyperintensities. With multivariate logistic regression analysis, diffusion-weighted hyperintensities (OR 6.13 [95% CI 1.72-21.9]) and refractory SE (OR 5.36 [95% CI 1.28-22.4]) were independently associated with poor outcome. SE often occurred as the first seizure in already disabled elderly people, further worsening their functional disabilities. Diffusion-weighted hyperintensities and refractory SE, but not RPPs in electroencephalography, were independent functional prognostic factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Emergency treatment with levetiracetam or phenytoin in status epilepticus in children-the EcLiPSE study: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyttle, Mark D; Gamble, Carrol; Messahel, Shrouk; Hickey, Helen; Iyer, Anand; Woolfall, Kerry; Humphreys, Amy; Bacon, Naomi E A; Roper, Louise; Babl, Franz E; Dalziel, Stuart R; Ryan, Mary; Appleton, Richard E

    2017-06-19

    Convulsive status epilepticus (CSE) is the most common life-threatening neurological emergency in childhood. These children are also at risk of significant morbidity, with acute and chronic impact on the family and the health and social care systems. The current recommended first-choice, second-line treatment in children aged 6 months and above is intravenous phenytoin (fosphenytoin in the USA), although there is a lack of evidence for its use and it is associated with significant side effects. Emerging evidence suggests that intravenous levetiracetam may be effective as a second-line agent for CSE, and fewer adverse effects have been described. This trial therefore aims to determine whether intravenous phenytoin or levetiracetam is more effective, and safer, in treating childhood CSE. This is a phase IV, multi-centre, parallel group, randomised controlled, open-label trial. Following treatment for CSE with first-line treatment, children with ongoing seizures are randomised to receive either phenytoin (20 mg/kg, maximum 2 g) or levetiracetam (40 mg/kg, maximum 2.5 g) intravenously. The primary outcome measure is the cessation of all visible signs of CSE as determined by the treating clinician. Secondary outcome measures include the need for further anti-seizure medications or rapid sequence induction for ongoing CSE, admission to critical care areas, and serious adverse reactions. Patients are recruited without prior consent, with deferred consent sought at an appropriate time for the family. The primary analysis will be by intention-to-treat. The primary outcome is a time to event outcome and a sample size of 140 participants in each group will have 80% power to detect an increase in CSE cessation rates from 60% to 75%. Our total sample size of 308 randomised and treated participants will allow for 10% loss to follow-up. This clinical trial will determine whether phenytoin or levetiracetam is more effective as an intravenous second-line agent for CSE, and

  3. Nerve Agent Induced Status Epilepticus: From Seizure Onset to Long Lasting Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-31

    enhancement of glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic transmission in the mouse amygdala. J Neurophysiol 86:463-74 30. Barik J, Wonnacott S. 2006...reduces neurodegeneration in the amygdala but not in the hippocampus during epileptogenesis. Amino Acids 38: 189-97 235. Quarta D, Naylor CG, Barik

  4. Brain metabolism and diffusion in the rat cerebral cortex during pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šlais, Karel; Voříšek, Ivan; Zoremba, N.; Homola, Aleš; Dmytrenko, Lesia; Syková, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 209, č. 1 (2008), s. 145-154 ISSN 0014-4886 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0538; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant - others:EU(DE) 512146 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512; CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : Diffusion * Microdialysis * Pilocarpine Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.974, year: 2008

  5. Socioeconomic Outcome and Quality of Life in Adults after Status Epilepticus: A Multicenter, Longitudinal, Matched Case–Control Analysis from Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena-Marie Kortland

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThere is a lack of data concerning socioeconomic outcome and quality of life (QoL in patients after status epilepticus (SE in Germany.Patients and methodsAdult patients treated between 2011 and 2015 due to SE at the university hospitals in Frankfurt, Greifswald, and Marburg were asked to fill out a questionnaire regarding long-term outcome of at least 3 months after discharge. The SE cohort consisted of 25.9% patients with an acute symptomatic, 42% with a remote symptomatic and previous epilepsy, 22.2% with a new-onset remote symptomatic, and 9.9% with other or unknown etiology. A matched case–control analysis was applied for comparison with patients with drug refractory epilepsy and seizure remission, both not previously affected by SE.ResultsA total of 81 patients (mean age: 58.7 ± 18.0 years; 58% female participated. A non-refractory course was present in 59.3%, while 27.2% had a refractory SE (RSE and 13.6% had a superrefractory SE (SRSE. Before admission, a favorable modified Rankin Scale (mRS of 0–3 was found in 82.7% (67/81, deteriorating to 38.3% (31/81 (p = 0.003 at discharge. The majority returned home [51.9% (42/81], 32.1% entered a rehabilitation facility, while 12.3% were transferred to a nursing home and 3.7% to another hospital. The overall mRS at follow-up did not change; 61.8% (45/74 reached an mRS of 0–3. In RSE and SRSE, the proportion with a favorable mRS increased from 45.5% at discharge to 70% at follow-up, while QoL was comparable to a non-refractory SE course. Matched epilepsy controls in seizure remission were treated with a lower mean number of anticonvulsants (1.3 ± 0.7 compared to controls with drug refractory epilepsy (1.9 ± 0.8; p < 0.001 or SE (1.9 ± 1.1; p < 0.001. A major depression was found in 32.8% of patients with SE and in 36.8% of drug refractory epilepsy, but only in 20.3% of patients in seizure remission. QoL was reduced in all categories (QOLIE-31 in SE

  6. Diffuse Transcranial Electrical Stimulation (DTES)-induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Higher voltages were needed to induce convulsion in pretreated animals than in normal animals. It is therefore suggestive that DTES-induced hypermotility can be used as an animal model for testing drugs that can be of advantage in the management of non convulsive (petit mal) status epilepticus (SE), and DTES induced ...

  7. Interleukin-18 Expression Increases in Response to Neurovascular Damage Following Soman-induced Status Epilepticus in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-22

    CAS, Scopus and Google Scholar • Research which is freely available for redistribution Submit your manuscript at www.biomedcentral.com/submit Johnson et al. Journal of Inflammation (2015) 12:43 Page 11 of 11

  8. Group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist may reduce behavioural deficit induced by early status epilepticus in adult rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alaverdashvili, Mariam; Kaminskij, Julij; Haugvicová, Renata; Folbergrová, Jaroslava

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. S6 (2005), s. 203-203 ISSN 0013-9580. [International Epilepsy Congress /26./. 28.08.2005-01.09.2005, Paris] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/02/1238 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : APDC * memory * cognitive functions Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  9. Neuronal degeneration induced by status epilepticus in the thalami reuniens nucleus of immature rats. Are calcium binding proteins neuroprotective?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Druga, Rastislav; Kubová, Hana; Mareš, Pavel

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. S4 (2006), s. 302-302 ISSN 0013-9580. [Annual Meeting of the American Epilepsy Society and Canadian League against Epilepsy. 01.12.2006-05.12.2006, San Diego, CA] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA304/04/0464 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : pilocarpine * neurodegeneration * nucleus reuniens Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  10. Cognitive functions after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus: changes during silent priod precede appearance of spontaneous recurrent seizures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hort, J.; Brožek, Gustav; Mareš, Pavel; Langmeier, M.; Komárek, V.

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 9 (1999), s. 1177-1183 ISSN 0013-9580 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/96/1592; GA MZd IZ2904; GA MZd IZ3510; GA AV ČR IAA7011603 Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.218, year: 1999

  11. Pathophysiological Alterations In The Basolateral Amygdala And Neurodegeneration Of Limbic Structures During Epileptogenesis Induced By Status Epilepticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-05

    22 CHAPTER 2 TABLE 1 Stereological estimation of total Nissl - stained and GAD67-positive neurons in the BLA of sham control rats and KA-SE rats... Nissl - stained sections……………….... FIGURE 2 Counting site for stereological quantification of Nissl - stained neurons...FIGURE 3 Counting grid superimposed over tracing of BLA………………... 142 143 144 xii FIGURE 4 Disector height and guard zones in Nissl - stained

  12. Effects of rapamycin and curcumin treatment on the development of epilepsy after electrically induced status epilepticus in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drion, Cato M.; Borm, Lars E.; Kooijman, Lieneke; Aronica, Eleonora; Wadman, Wytse J.; Hartog, Aloysius F.; van Vliet, Erwin A.; Gorter, Jan A.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has been suggested as a possible antiepileptogenic strategy in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Here we aim to elucidate whether mTOR inhibition has antiepileptogenic and/or antiseizure effects using different treatment strategies in the

  13. Effects of rapamycin and curcumin treatment on the development of epilepsy after electrically induced status epilepticus in rats.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drion, C.M.; Borm, L.E.; Kooijman, L.; Aronica, E.; Wadman, W.J.; Hartog, A.F.; van Vliet, E.A.; Gorter, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has been suggested as a possible antiepileptogenic strategy in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Here we aim to elucidate whether mTOR inhibition has antiepileptogenic and/or antiseizure effects using different treatment

  14. Behandlingsrefraktaert status epilepticus med letal rabdomyolyse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreft, Andreas; Rasmussen, Niels; Hansen, Lars Kjaersgård

    2008-01-01

    We are reporting two cases of SE with lethal rhabdomyolysis. Both were treated according to the guidelines on antiepileptic drug management by the Danish Paediatric Society, with one and two hours' delay, respectively. Intubation and midazolam infusion were needed to control seizures. After appro...

  15. Elevated VGKC-Complex Antibodies in a Boy with Fever-Induced Refractory Epileptic Encephalopathy in School-Age Children (FIRES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illingworth, Marjorie A.; Hanrahan, Donncha; Anderson, Claire E.; O'Kane, Kathryn; Anderson, Jennifer; Casey, Maureen; de Sousa, Carlos; Cross, J. Helen; Wright, Sukvhir; Dale, Russell C.; Vincent, Angela; Kurian, Manju A.

    2011-01-01

    Fever-induced refractory epileptic encephalopathy in school-age children (FIRES) is a clinically recognized epileptic encephalopathy of unknown aetiology. Presentation in previously healthy children is characterized by febrile status epilepticus. A pharmacoresistant epilepsy ensues, occurring in parallel with dramatic cognitive decline and…

  16. Status of experimental data for neutron induced reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Mamoru [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)

    1998-11-01

    A short review is presented on the status of experimental data for neutron induced reactions above 20 MeV based on the EXFOR data base and journals. Experimental data which were obtained in a systematic manner and/or by plural authors are surveyed and tabulated for the nuclear data evaluation and the benchmark test of the evaluated data. (author). 61 refs.

  17. Cobalt-deficiency-induced hyperhomocysteinaemia and oxidative status of cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stangl, G I; Schwarz, F J; Jahn, B; Kirchgessner, M

    2000-01-01

    In ruminants, Co is required for the synthesis of vitamin B12, which in turn is needed for the resynthesis of methionine by methylation of homocysteine and thus, cobalamin deficiency may induce hyperhomocysteinaemia which is brought into context with perturbations of the antioxidative-prooxidative balance. The present study was conducted to explore whether Co deficiency in cattle is also associated with homocysteine-induced disturbances of oxidative status. Co deficiency was induced in cattle by feeding two groups of animals on either a basal maize-silage-based diet that was moderately low in Co (83 micrograms Co/kg DM), or the same diet supplemented with Co to a total of 200 micrograms Co/kg DM, for 43 weeks. Co deficiency was apparent from a reduced vitamin B12 status in serum and liver and an accumulation of homocysteine in plasma which was in excess of 4.8 times higher in Co-deprived cattle than in controls. The much increased level of circulating homocysteine did not indicate severe disturbances in antioxidant-prooxidant balance as measured by individual markers of lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, and the antioxidative defence system. There were no quantitative difference in plasma thiol groups, nor were there significant changes in concentrations of alpha-tocopherol, microsomal thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and carbonyl groups in liver. However, there was a trend toward increased plasma carbonyl levels indicating a slight degradation of plasma proteins in the hyperhomocysteinaemic cattle. Analysis of the hepatic catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) activity revealed an 11% reduction in Co-deficient cattle relative to the controls. These results indicate that long-term moderate Co deficiency may induce a severe accumulation of plasma homocysteine in cattle, but considerable abnormalities in oxidative status failed to appear.

  18. Hyperammonemic Encephalopathy Resulting From Intravenous Valproate for Status Epilepticus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Richards, Karen

    2004-01-01

    .... Intravenous vaiproate has been suggested as an alternative to phenytoin and/or phenobarbital in patients with hypersensitivity to or at high risk for the sedative or vasoactive effects of these drugs...

  19. Super Refractory Status Epilepticus: A Case Report from Livingstone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Case History: A 22 years old male nursing student with first episode of generalized tonic clonic seizures brought into the medical emergency of Livingstone Central Hospital. He was treated with 60mg of diazepam but fits continued and patient was transferred to ICU, where he was treated with phenobarbitone infusion with ...

  20. Status epilepticus, blood-brain barrier disruption, inflammation, and epileptogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorter, Jan A.; van Vliet, Erwin A.; Aronica, Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, attention has been focused on dysfunction of the cerebral vasculature and inflammation as important players in epileptogenic processes, with a specific emphasis on failure of the blood-brain barrier (BBB; Fig. 1) (Seiffert et al., 2004; Marchi et al., 2007; Oby and Janigro,

  1. Beta-ureidopropionase deficiency presenting with febrile status epilepticus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assmann, Birgit E.; van Kuilenburg, Andre B. P.; Distelmaier, Felix; Abeling, Nico G. G. M.; Rosenbaum, Thorsten; Schaper, Jörg; Duran, Marinus; Mayatepek, Ertan

    2006-01-01

    Beta-ureidopropionase is the third enzyme in the catabolic pathway of uracil and thymine. To date, only three other patients are reported with this inborn error of metabolism. We report the clinical presentation of a male patient who presented at the age of 4 months after an ALTE-like event (ALTE =

  2. High-dose radiation-induced meningioma following prophylactic cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Ryosuke; Nikaido, Yuji; Yamada, Tomonori; Mishima, Hideaki; Tamaki, Ryo

    2005-01-01

    A 12 year-old girl was treated with prophylactic cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). At the age of 39, she was admitted to our hospital for status epilepticus. Computed tomography demonstrated two, enhancing bilateral sided intracranial tumors. After surgery, this patient presented meningiomas which histologically, were of the meningothelial type. The high cure rate in childhood ALL, attributable to aggressive chemotherapy and prophylactic cranial irradiation, is capable of inducing secondary brain tumor. Twelve cases of high-dose radiation-induced meningioma following ALL are also reviewed. (author)

  3. High-dose radiation-induced meningioma following prophylactic cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Ryosuke; Nikaido, Yuji; Yamada, Tomonori; Mishima, Hideaki; Tamaki, Ryo [National Hospital Organization Osaka Minami Medical Center, Kawachinagano (Japan)

    2005-03-01

    A 12 year-old girl was treated with prophylactic cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). At the age of 39, she was admitted to our hospital for status epilepticus. Computed tomography demonstrated two, enhancing bilateral sided intracranial tumors. After surgery, this patient presented meningiomas which histologically, were of the meningothelial type. The high cure rate in childhood ALL, attributable to aggressive chemotherapy and prophylactic cranial irradiation, is capable of inducing secondary brain tumor. Twelve cases of high-dose radiation-induced meningioma following ALL are also reviewed. (author)

  4. Status of memory loss.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Iyer, Parameswaran Mahadeva

    2012-01-01

    A 72-year-old woman presented with first onset of seizure with no prior history of cognitive dysfunction. EEG revealed focal non-convulsive status epilepticus. MRI brain showed a left temporal non-enhancing lesion. Temporal pole biopsy showed acute neuronal necrosis and astrocyte hyperplasia together with extensive amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Perivascular oligodendroglial hyperplasia was present. Postmortem examination revealed extensive plaque and tangle disease. Perivascular oligodendroglial hyperplasia was limited to the left temporal area. The presence of focal perivascular oligodendroglial hyperplasia in the left temporal cortex, combined with extensive plaque and tangle disease may have contributed to the focal status epilepticus in this patient. Although the presence of focal perivascular oligodendroglial hyperplasia has been reported in cases of temporal lobe epilepsy, it has not been reported as a cause of seizure in patients with Alzheimer\\'s disease previously. Further studies for clinical-pathologic correlation would be required to confirm this hypothesis.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging in kainic acid-induced limbic seizure status in cats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Shigeya; Tanaka, Tatsuya; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Yonemasu, Yukichi [Asahikawa Medical Coll., Hokkaido (Japan); Kondo, Shinji; Hori, Tomokatsu; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Shindo, Kazuyuki

    1993-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging before, during, and after kainic acid (KA)-induced limbic seizure status in cats demonstrated the bilateral hippocampi as slightly high-intensity areas on the T[sub 2]-weighted images during the limbic seizure status, and isointensity areas 1-2 weeks after KA injection when the limbic seizure status subsided. However, the hippocampi again became high-intense 1-3 months after KA injection. Histological study suggested that the high-intensity area during the limbic seizure status resulted from regional edema, and in the chronic period from marked gliosis and/or atrophic change as a consequence of tissue damage in the hippocampus. (author).

  6. The research status of induced radioactivity in accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Feng; Deng Daping

    2005-01-01

    The hazards of subsequent-radiation produced by high-energy accelerator must be no ignore. The principle of induced radioactivity and the hazards to the people were introduced in this article. The radiation levels around the treatment head and in the air of the treatment room were discussed thor-oughly. Some effects of the induced radioactivity were also mentioned. At last, the article talks about some problems in present researches and some directions for the following study. (authors)

  7. Remote sensing vegetation status by laser-induced fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Günther, K.P.; Dahn, H.G.; Lüdeker, W.

    1994-01-01

    In November 1989 the EUREKA project LASFLEUR (EU 380) started as an European research effort to investigate the future application of far-field laser-induced plant fluorescence for synoptic, airborne environmental monitoring of vegetation. This report includes a brief introduction in a theoretically approach for the laser-induced fluorescence signals of leaves and their spectral and radiometric behaviour. In addition, a detailed description of the design and realization of the second generation of the far-field fluorescence lidar (DLidaR-2) is given with special regard to the optical and electronical setup, followed by a short explanation of the data processing. The main objectives of the far field measurements are to demonstrate the link between laser-induced fluorescence data and plant physiology and to show the reliability of remote single shot lidar measurements. The data sets include the typical daily cycles of the fluorescence for different global irradiation. As expected from biophysical models, the remotely sensed chlorophyll fluorescence is highly correlated with the carbon fixation rate, while the fluorescence ratio F685 / F730 is only dependent on the chlorophyll concentration. Drought stress measurement of evergreen oaks Quercus pubescens confirm the findings of healthy plants with regard to the fluorescence ratio F685 / F730 while the fluorescence signals of stressed plants show a different behavior than nonstressed plants. Additionally, the corresponding physiological data (porometer and PAM data) are presented. (author)

  8. Induced variation in Jatropha curcas L.: status and scope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gour, V.K.; Sahu, Mamta; Prajapati, Vinod

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Jatropha curcas L. rich in reduced hydrocarbon, has become an important candidate for quality oil due to its convertibility in to bio-diesel and, suitability to sustain better in minimal resources makes it suitable for plantation in wastelands. It continued to evolve in varied agro-climatic niche through adaptation, natural selection and mutation in allogamous mode without directed selection across globe. Jatropha mission is one of the most promising and challenging ventures of the millennium to improve and make it economically viable as alternate crop for biofuel. The large collection of germplasm and its evaluation to reveal narrow phenotypic variability and scattered economic traits is an obvious challenge for the breeders to provide high yielding variety and suitability to varied environment. The basic objective is to induce variability and know the spectrum of variation to isolate traits of economic importance viz. floral changes with high proportion of pistillate flowers, tolerant to temporal changes, high capsule fertility, dwarfing, male sterility and high quality oil. The seeds of two provenances were induced with 60, 120, 180 and 240 Gy at BARC, Mumbai in the year 2004. The nursery was raised in the month of March 2004 and transplanted treatment wise to raise the M1 population. The M1 population across provenances and treatment exhibited plants with morphological variation and also through chimera. The major variations observed are for stem and foliage colour, narrow leaves, leaves without lobes, wavy margin and red petiole. The variation for proportion of male Vs female flowers and a plant with profuse flowering are desirable types. The spontaneous mutants isolated across 536 accessions raised in field gene bank exhibits variation for height (dwarf), stem succulence, hermaphrodites, dark green foliage and stem, leaves without lobes, branching from cotyledonary nodes (tri and tetra). The possibility of direct and indirect use of economic

  9. Led induced chlorophyll fluorescence transient imager for measurements of health and stress status of whole plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jalink, H.; Schoor, van der R.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed LED (light emitting diode) induced fluorescence transient imaging instrumentation to image the plant health/stress status by calculation of two images: Fv/Fm (variable fluorescence over saturation level of fluorescence) and the time response, tTR, of the fluorescence time curve.

  10. The status and new trends of ion beam induced charge technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Rongrong; Qiu Huiyuan; Zhu Dezhang

    2002-01-01

    Ion beam induced charge technique (IBIC) with low beam current (fA level) and high efficiency is a new development of nuclear microscopy. It has been widely applied to the fields of semiconductor and microelectronic materials. The principle and the experimental method of the IBIC technique were described and reviewed its status and new trends were reviewed

  11. Status of experimental data of proton-induced reactions for intermediate-energy nuclear data evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Yukinobu; Kawano, Toshihiko [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Yamano, Naoki; Fukahori, Tokio

    1998-11-01

    The present status of experimental data of proton-induced reactions is reviewed, with particular attention to total reaction cross section, elastic and inelastic scattering cross section, double-differential particle production cross section, isotope production cross section, and activation cross section. (author)

  12. A novel PET imaging protocol identifies seizure-induced regional overactivity of P-glycoprotein at the blood-brain barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankstahl, Jens P.; Bankstahl, Marion; Kuntner, Claudia; Stanek, Johann; Wanek, Thomas; Meier, Martin; Ding, Xiao-Qi; Müller, Markus; Langer, Oliver; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    About one third of epilepsy patients are pharmacoresistant. Overexpression of P-glycoprotein and other multidrug transporters at the blood-brain barrier is thought to play an important role in drug-refractory epilepsy. Thus, quantification of regionally different P-glycoprotein activity in the brain in vivo is essential to identify P-glycoprotein overactivity as the relevant mechanism for drug-resistance in an individual patient. Using the radiolabeled P-glycoprotein substrate (R)-[11C]verapamil and different doses of co-administered tariquidar, which is an inhibitor of P-glycoprotein, we evaluated whether small-animal positron emission tomography (PET) can quantify regional changes in transporter function in the rat brain at baseline and 48 h after a pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus. P-glycoprotein expression was additionally quantified by immunohistochemistry. To reveal putative seizure-induced changes in blood-brain barrier integrity, we performed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance scans on a 7.0 Tesla small-animal scanner. Before P-glycoprotein modulation, brain uptake of (R)-[11C]verapamil was low in all regions investigated in control and post-status epilepticus rats. After administration of 3 mg/kg tariquidar, which inhibits P-glycoprotein only partially, we observed increased regional differentiation in brain activity uptake in post-status epilepticus versus control rats, which diminished after maximal P-glycoprotein inhibition. Regional increases in the efflux rate constant k2, but not in distribution volume VT or influx rate constant K1, correlated significantly with increases in P-glycoprotein expression measured by immunohistochemistry. This imaging protocol proves to be suitable to detect seizure-induced regional changes in P-glycoprotein activity and is readily applicable to humans, with the aim to detect relevant mechanisms of pharmacoresistance in epilepsy in vivo. PMID:21677164

  13. Assessment of Potential Long Term Health Effects on Army Human Test Subjects of Relevant Biological and Chemical Agents, Drugs, Medications and Substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-29

    status epilepticus , contributing to profound brain damage. The exposure of experimental ani- mals to tabun in convulsion-inducing doses may result in...Basolateral Amygdala after Soman-Induced Status Epilepticus : Relation to Anxiety-Like Be...to Nerve Agents: From Status Epilepticus to Neuroinflammation, Brain Damage, Neuro- genesis and Epilepsy." Neurotoxicology 33, no. 6 (2012): 1476-1490

  14. Increased Expression of the Chemokines CXCL1 and MIP-1a by Resident Brain Cells Precedes Neutrophil Infiltration in the Brain Following Prolonged Soman-Induced Status Epilepticus in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    brain cytokine concentrations. J Neuroinflammation 2010, 7:40. 12. Manley NC, Bertrand AA, Kinney KS, Hing TC, Sapolsky RM: Characterization of monocyte...neurodegeneration. J Neurosci 2007, 27:9301-9309. 16. Wolpe SD, Davatelis G, Sherry B, Beutler B, Hesse DG, Nguyen HT, Moldawer LL , Nathan CF, Lowry SF

  15. Study of microflora status of radiation-induced peripheral blood T cell and its subgroup changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Hao; Wang Shengzi; Wang Shuyi; Lu Shenbin; Guo Ming; Tian Jie

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To observe the differences of the radiation-induced peripheral blood T cell and its subgroup changes between SPF and CV rats after nasopharyngeal radiation with gradient doses and explore the microflora factors in the pathogenesis of abnormal radiation-induced immunity status. Methods: 8 from each SPF and CV rats were chosen for oropharyngeal bacteria cultivation and determination and the spleen organ coefficients. The rest were irradiated with 6MX linear accelerator in the nasopharyngeal fields at dose of 0, 10, 20, 30 Gy, 5 in each group. 24 ∼ 36 h later, blood T lymphocytes and their subgroups were detected by FCM. Results: The bacteria of CV rats were pathogen mostly and the one from SPF rats was Proteus mirabilis uniquely. Spleen organ coefficients between two groups showed no statistical difference. CD + 3 , CD + 4 lymphocytes and the ratio of CD + 4 / CD + 8 of CV rats decreased dramatically after radiation is in close relation with radiation doses while The CD + 8 lymphocyte increased a bit. The CD + 3 , CD + 4 , CD + 8 lymphocytes and the ratio of CD + 4 / CD + 8 of SPF rats remained in a stable level. Conclusions: There exists the difference of radiation-induced injuries of immune system in relation with different microflora status. Micro-flora plays an important role in the radiation-induced immune system abnormity. (authors)

  16. Curcuma aromatica Water Extract Attenuates Ethanol-Induced Gastritis via Enhancement of Antioxidant Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo-Young Jeon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Curcuma aromatica is an herbal medicine and traditionally used for the treatment of various diseases in Asia. We investigated the effects of C. aromatica water extract (CAW in the stomach of rats with ethanol-induced gastritis. Gastritis was induced in rats by intragastric administration of 5 mL/kg body weight of absolute ethanol. The CAW groups were given 250 or 500 mg of extract/kg 2 h before administration of ethanol, respectively. To determine the antioxidant effects of CAW, we determined the level of lipid peroxidation, the level of reduced glutathione (GSH, the activities of catalase, degree of inflammation, and mucus production in the stomach. CAW reduced ethanol-induced inflammation and loss of epithelial cells and increased the mucus production in the stomach. CAW reduced the increase in lipid peroxidation associated with ethanol-induced gastritis (250 and 500 mg/kg, p<0.01, resp. and increased mucosal GSH content (500 mg/kg, p<0.01 and the activity of catalase (250 and 500 mg/kg, p<0.01, resp.. CAW increased the production of prostaglandin E2. These findings suggest that CAW protects against ethanol-induced gastric mucosa injury by increasing antioxidant status. We suggest that CAW could be developed for the treatment of gastritis induced by alcohol.

  17. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in endotoxemic rat hepatocytes is dependent on the cellular glutathione status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, TA; van Goor, H; Tuyt, L; de Jager-Krikken, A; Leuvenink, R; Kuipers, F; Jansen, PLM; Moshage, H

    The inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) promoter contains nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B) binding sites. NF-kappa B activation is determined, in part, by the intracellular redox status, The aim of this study was to determine the importance of the cellular glutathione status in relation to

  18. Zingiber officinale Roscoe prevents acetaminophen-induced acute hepatotoxicity by enhancing hepatic antioxidant status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajith, T A; Hema, U; Aswathy, M S

    2007-11-01

    A large number of xenobiotics are reported to be potentially hepatotoxic. Free radicals generated from the xenobiotic metabolism can induce lesions of the liver and react with the basic cellular constituents - proteins, lipids, RNA and DNA. Hepatoprotective activity of aqueous ethanol extract of Zingiber officinale was evaluated against single dose of acetaminophen-induced (3g/kg, p.o.) acute hepatotoxicity in rat. Aqueous extract of Z. officinale significantly protected the hepatotoxicity as evident from the activities of serum transaminase and alkaline phosphatase (ALP). Serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT), serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT) and ALP activities were significantly (pHepatic lipid peroxidation was enhanced significantly (pofficinale (200 and 400mg/kg, p.o.) prior to acetaminophen significantly declines the activities of serum transaminases and ALP. Further the hepatic antioxidant status was enhanced in the Z. officinale plus acetaminophen treated group than the control group. The results of the present study concluded that the hepatoprotective effect of aqueous ethanol extract of Z. officinale against acetaminophen-induced acute toxicity is mediated either by preventing the decline of hepatic antioxidant status or due to its direct radical scavenging capacity.

  19. Contribution of caspase-3 differs by p53 status in apoptosis induced by X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Tokino, Takashi; Watanabe, Naoki

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the effect of p53 status on involvement of caspase-3 activation in cell death induced by X-irradiation, using rat embryonic fibroblasts (REFs) transduced with a temperature-sensitive mutant (mt) p53 gene. Cells with wild-type (wt) p53 showed greater resistance to X-irradiation than cells with mt p53. In cells with wt p53, X-irradiation-induced apoptosis was not inhibited by the caspase-3 inhibitor acetyl-L-aspartyl-L-methionyl-L-glutaminyl-L-aspartyl-aldehyde (Ac-DMQD-CHO) and caspase-3 activity was not elevated following X-irradiation, although induction of p53 and p21/WAF-1 protein was observed. In contrast, irradiated cells with mt p53 showed 89% inhibition of cell death with Ac-DMQD-CHO and 98% inhibition with the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). In cells with mt p53, caspase-3 activity was increased approximately 5 times beyond baseline activity at 24 h after irradiation. This increase was almost completely inhibited by NAC. However, inhibition of caspase-3 by Ac-DMQD-CHO failed to decrease production of reactive oxygen species by cells with mt p53. Differential involvement of caspase-3 is a reason for differences in sensitivity to X-irradiation in cells with different p53 status. Caspase-3 activation appears to occur downstream from generation of reactive oxygen species occurring independently of wt p53 during X-irradiation-induced cell death. (author)

  20. Alpha-Linolenic Acid Confers Neuroprotection and Improves Behavioral Deficits After Soman Exposure: Involvement of Neurogenesis Through an mTOR-Mediated Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-15

    chemical warfare agent that irreversibly inhibits acetylcholinesterase in the periphery and central nervous system. Soman induces status epilepticus ...of signs and symptoms including status epilepticus and death. The neuropathology leads to severe cognitive performance, including long-term cognitive... status epilepticus and excessive synaptic accumulation of acetylcholine affects other organ systems beside the brain causing hypersecretions

  1. Pathological and Pathophysiological Alterations in Temporal Lobe Structures After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-31

    Acetylcholinesterase inhibition in the basolateral amygdala plays a key role in the induction of status epilepticus after soman exposure...alterations in the rat basolateral amygdala after soman-induced status epilepticus : Relation to anxiety-like behavior...INHIBITION IN THE BASOLA TERAL AMYGDALA PLAYS A KEY ROLE IN THE INDUCTION OF STATUS EPILEPTICUS AFTER SOMAN EXPOSURE. Prager EM, Aroniadou

  2. Impact of training status on LPS-induced acute inflammation in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jesper; Biensø, Rasmus Sjørup; Meinertz, S.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the impact of training status on the ability to induce a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory response systemically as well as in skeletal muscle (SkM) and adipose tissue (AT) in human subjects. Methods: Seventeen young (23.8 ± 2.5 years of age......) healthy male subjects were included in the study with eight subjects assigned to a trained (T) group and nine subjects assigned to an untrained (UT) group. On the experimental day, catheters were inserted in the femoral artery and vein of one leg for blood sampling and a bolus of 0.3 ng LPS•kg-1 body...... weight was injected into an antecubital vein in the forearm. Femoral arterial blood flow was measured before (Pre) the LPS injection and continuously throughout the experiment by Ultrasound Doppler and arterial and venous blood samples were drawn Pre and 30, 60, 90 and 120 min after the LPS injection...

  3. Influence of genic status in relation to gamma ray and EMS induced pollen sterility in chillies (Capsicum Annum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asha, M.S.; Nayar, N.K.

    1986-01-01

    Fifteen genotypes of the same species tested to study the effect of gamma rays and ethylmethane sulphonate showed wide variability in their effect. Pollen sterility increased with increase in dose. Gamma rays induced a higher per cent sterility compared to EMS. Genic status influenced variation was noted in the effect of mutagens in inducing pollen sterility. 7 refs. (author)

  4. Prevalence and Complications of Drug-induced Seizures in Baharloo Hospital, Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Behnoush

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Seizure is a frequent and important finding in the field of clinical toxicology. Almost all poisons and drugs can produce seizure. We have evaluated frequency and complications of drug-induced seizure in present study. Methods: The present descriptive cross-sectional study was done on patients who were referred to Baharloo Hospital, Tehran, Iran, that had developed seizure before or after hospitalization following intoxication between 20 March 2010 and 20 March 2011. The exclusion criteria were a positive history of epilepsy, head trauma, or abnormal findings in EEG or brain CT scan. Results: Tramadol and tricyclic antidepressants were the most common causes of drug-induced seizure (31.5% and 14.7% of the cases, respectively. Overall, 6 patients (4.2% had developed persistent vegetative state in consequence of brain hypoxia, 16 patients (11.2% had died due to complications of seizure or the poisoning itself. Tramadol was the leading cause of drug-induced seizure and its morbidity and mortality. Tonic-colonic seizure was the most common type of drug-induced seizure. Seizure had occurred once in 58% of the patients, twice in 37.1% of the patients, and had been revolutionized to status epilepticus in 4.9% of them. Among the 7 patients who had developed status epilepticus, 3 cases had died. Conclusion: Appropriate measures for treatment of seizure and prevention of its complications should be taken when patients with drug poisoning are admitted into hospital, especially when the offending drug(s has a higher likelihood to induce seizure.

  5. Seizure-induced brain lesions: A wide spectrum of variably reversible MRI abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cianfoni, A.; Caulo, M.; Cerase, A.; Della Marca, G.; Falcone, C.; Di Lella, G.M.; Gaudino, S.; Edwards, J.; Colosimo, C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction MRI abnormalities in the postictal period might represent the effect of the seizure activity, rather than its structural cause. Material and Methods Retrospective review of clinical and neuroimaging charts of 26 patients diagnosed with seizure-related MR-signal changes. All patients underwent brain-MRI (1.5-Tesla, standard pre- and post-contrast brain imaging, including DWI-ADC in 19/26) within 7 days from a seizure and at least one follow-up MRI, showing partial or complete reversibility of the MR-signal changes. Extensive clinical work-up and follow-up, ranging from 3 months to 5 years, ruled out infection or other possible causes of brain damage. Seizure-induced brain-MRI abnormalities remained a diagnosis of exclusion. Site, characteristics and reversibility of MRI changes, and association with characteristics of seizures were determined. Results MRI showed unilateral (13/26) and bilateral abnormalities, with high (24/26) and low (2/26) T2-signal, leptomeningeal contrast-enhancement (2/26), restricted diffusion (9/19). Location of abnormality was cortical/subcortical, basal ganglia, white matter, corpus callosum, cerebellum. Hippocampus was involved in 10/26 patients. Reversibility of MRI changes was complete in 15, and with residual gliosis or focal atrophy in 11 patients. Reversibility was noted between 15 and 150 days (average, 62 days). Partial simple and complex seizures were associated with hippocampal involvement (p = 0.015), status epilepticus with incomplete reversibility of MRI abnormalities (p = 0.041). Conclusions Seizure or epileptic status can induce transient, variably reversible MRI brain abnormalities. Partial seizures are frequently associated with hippocampal involvement and status epilepticus with incompletely reversible lesions. These seizure-induced MRI abnormalities pose a broad differential diagnosis; increased awareness may reduce the risk of misdiagnosis and unnecessary intervention

  6. Seizure-induced brain lesions: A wide spectrum of variably reversible MRI abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cianfoni, A., E-mail: acianfoni@hotmail.com [Neuroradiology, Neurocenter of Italian Switzerland–Ospedale regionale Lugano, Via Tesserete 46, Lugano, 6900, CH (Switzerland); Caulo, M., E-mail: caulo@unich.it [Department of Neuroscience and Imaging, University of Chieti, Via dei Vestini 33, 6610 Chieti. Italy (Italy); Cerase, A., E-mail: alfonsocerase@gmail.com [Unit of Neuroimaging and Neurointervention NINT, Department of Neurological and Sensorineural Sciences, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Policlinico “Santa Maria alle Scotte”, V.le Bracci 16, Siena (Italy); Della Marca, G., E-mail: dellamarca@rm.unicatt.it [Neurology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy); Falcone, C., E-mail: carlo_falc@libero.it [Radiology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy); Di Lella, G.M., E-mail: gdilella@rm.unicatt.it [Radiology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy); Gaudino, S., E-mail: sgaudino@sirm.org [Radiology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy); Edwards, J., E-mail: edwardjc@musc.edu [Neuroscience Dept., Medical University of South Carolina, 96J Lucas st, 29425, Charleston, SC (United States); Colosimo, C., E-mail: colosimo@rm.unicatt.it [Radiology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy)

    2013-11-01

    Introduction MRI abnormalities in the postictal period might represent the effect of the seizure activity, rather than its structural cause. Material and Methods Retrospective review of clinical and neuroimaging charts of 26 patients diagnosed with seizure-related MR-signal changes. All patients underwent brain-MRI (1.5-Tesla, standard pre- and post-contrast brain imaging, including DWI-ADC in 19/26) within 7 days from a seizure and at least one follow-up MRI, showing partial or complete reversibility of the MR-signal changes. Extensive clinical work-up and follow-up, ranging from 3 months to 5 years, ruled out infection or other possible causes of brain damage. Seizure-induced brain-MRI abnormalities remained a diagnosis of exclusion. Site, characteristics and reversibility of MRI changes, and association with characteristics of seizures were determined. Results MRI showed unilateral (13/26) and bilateral abnormalities, with high (24/26) and low (2/26) T2-signal, leptomeningeal contrast-enhancement (2/26), restricted diffusion (9/19). Location of abnormality was cortical/subcortical, basal ganglia, white matter, corpus callosum, cerebellum. Hippocampus was involved in 10/26 patients. Reversibility of MRI changes was complete in 15, and with residual gliosis or focal atrophy in 11 patients. Reversibility was noted between 15 and 150 days (average, 62 days). Partial simple and complex seizures were associated with hippocampal involvement (p = 0.015), status epilepticus with incomplete reversibility of MRI abnormalities (p = 0.041). Conclusions Seizure or epileptic status can induce transient, variably reversible MRI brain abnormalities. Partial seizures are frequently associated with hippocampal involvement and status epilepticus with incompletely reversible lesions. These seizure-induced MRI abnormalities pose a broad differential diagnosis; increased awareness may reduce the risk of misdiagnosis and unnecessary intervention.

  7. Glutamate decarboxylase activity in rat brain during experimental epileptic seizures induced by pilocarpine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Netopilova, M; Drsata, J [Department of Biochemical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, Charles University, 50005 Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Haugvicova, R; Kubova, H; Mares, P [Institute of Physiology, Czech Academy of Sciences, 14220 Prague (Czech Republic)

    1998-07-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) activity was studied rat brain parts in a pilocarpine model of epileptic seizures. An increased enzyme activity was found in hippocampus a cerebellum during the acute phase of seizures, while the cortex and cerebellum showed increased GAD activity in the chronic phase of the process. Systematic administration of pilocarpine to rats induces status epilepticus. The aim of this research was to find out if seizures induced by pilocarpine are connected changes in glutamate decarboxylase activity, the enzyme that catalyzes synthesis of inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. GAD was assayed by means of radiometric method using {sup 14}C-carboxyl-labelled glutamate and measurement of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} radioactivity. Obtained results suggest that pilocarpine seizures are connected with changes of GAD activity in individual parts of rat brain. (authors)

  8. Glutamate decarboxylase activity in rat brain during experimental epileptic seizures induced by pilocarpine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Netopilova, M.; Drsata, J.; Haugvicova, R.; Kubova, H.; Mares, P.

    1998-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) activity was studied rat brain parts in a pilocarpine model of epileptic seizures. An increased enzyme activity was found in hippocampus a cerebellum during the acute phase of seizures, while the cortex and cerebellum showed increased GAD activity in the chronic phase of the process. Systematic administration of pilocarpine to rats induces status epilepticus. The aim of this research was to find out if seizures induced by pilocarpine are connected changes in glutamate decarboxylase activity, the enzyme that catalyzes synthesis of inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. GAD was assayed by means of radiometric method using 14 C-carboxyl-labelled glutamate and measurement of 14 CO 2 radioactivity. Obtained results suggest that pilocarpine seizures are connected with changes of GAD activity in individual parts of rat brain. (authors)

  9. Alpha particle induced DNA damage and repair in normal cultured thyrocytes of different proliferation status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyckesvärd, Madeleine Nordén; Delle, Ulla; Kahu, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Childhood exposure to ionizing radiation increases the risk of developing thyroid cancer later in life and this is suggested to be due to higher proliferation of the young thyroid. The interest of using high-LET alpha particles from Astatine-211 ((211)At), concentrated in the thyroid by the same...... mechanism as (131)I [1], in cancer treatment has increased during recent years because of its high efficiency in inducing biological damage and beneficial dose distribution when compared to low-LET radiation. Most knowledge of the DNA damage response in thyroid is from studies using low-LET irradiation...... and much less is known of high-LET irradiation. In this paper we investigated the DNA damage response and biological consequences to photons from Cobolt-60 ((60)Co) and alpha particles from (211)At in normal primary thyrocytes of different cell cycle status. For both radiation qualities the intensity...

  10. Present status of doctors' awareness for radiation-induced carotid artery disease in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Yoshiharu; Takashima, Shutaro; Tanaka, Kortaro

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced carotid artery disease (RCAD) often develops in patients who have received neck radiotherapy for the treatment of various malignant tumors. However, the doctors who ordered or performed neck radiotherapy seem to pay little attention to RCAD which may subsequently occur, and the present status of the awareness in these doctors for RCAD is unclear in Japan. Therefore, we conducted a questionnaire survey of the present status of these doctors' awareness for RCAD. A questionnaire form regarding the recognition of RCAD was sent to 368 departments of otolaryngology, oral surgery, or radiology of university hospitals in Japan. Responses to the questionnaire were received from 213 of the 368 departments of otolaryngology, oral surgery or radiology of university hospitals (response collection rate: 57.9%). One hundred and sixty-one departments (75.9%) were aware of the existence of RCAD, but only 20 departments (9.4%) conducted regular examinations for RCAD after neck radiotherapy such as ultrasound neck echography and MR angiography. Only 6.3% departments took preventive measures for RCAD such as reduction in radiation dose or administration of antiplatelets. The present survey revealed that many patients who had undergone neck radiotherapy for the treatment of malignancy did not receive proper medical attention for RCAD in Japan. Healthcare providers should be given adequate education about RCAD including its risk factors, possible preventive measures, diagnostic modalities, and treatment. Furthermore, a systematic clinical network should be established in which stroke specialists conduct proper examinations for early diagnosis of RCAD. (author)

  11. Liver Status Assessment by Spectrally and Time Resolved IR Detection of Drug Induced Breath Gas Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Rubin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The actual metabolic capacity of the liver is crucial for disease identification, liver therapy, and liver tumor resection. By combining induced drug metabolism and high sensitivity IR spectroscopy of exhaled air, we provide a method for quantitative liver assessment at bedside within 20 to 60 min. Fast administration of 13C-labelled methacetin induces a fast response of liver metabolism and is tracked in real-time by the increase of 13CO2 in exhaled air. The 13CO2 concentration increase in exhaled air allows the determination of the metabolic liver capacity (LiMAx-test. Fluctuations in CO2 concentration, pressure and temperature are minimized by special gas handling, and tracking of several spectrally resolved CO2 absorption bands with a quantum cascade laser. Absorption measurement of different 12CO2 and 13CO2 rotation-vibration transitions in the same time window allows for multiple referencing and reduction of systematic errors. This FLIP (Fast liver investigation package setup is being successfully used to plan operations and determine the liver status of patients.

  12. Oxidant and enzymatic antioxidant status (gene expression and activity) in the brain of chickens with cold-induced pulmonary hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanpour, Hossein; Khalaji-Pirbalouty, Valiallah; Nasiri, Leila; Mohebbi, Abdonnaser; Bahadoran, Shahab

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate oxidant and antioxidant status of the brain (hindbrain, midbrain, and forebrain) in chickens with cold-induced pulmonary hypertension, the measurements of lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, antioxidant capacity, enzymatic activity, and gene expression (for catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutases) were done. There were high lipid peroxidation/protein oxidation and low antioxidant capacity in the hindbrain of cold-induced pulmonary hypertensive chickens compared to control ( P pulmonary hypertension.

  13. Aloe vera gel improves behavioral deficits and oxidative status in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei, Seyed Reza Fatemi; Ghaderi, Shahab; Bahrami-Tapehebur, Mohammad; Farbood, Yaghoob; Rashno, Masome

    2017-12-01

    Oxidative stress has a major role in progression of diabetes-related behavioral deficits. It has been suggested that Aloe vera has anti-diabetic, antioxidative, and neuroprotective effects. The present study was designed to determine the effects of Aloe vera gel on behavioral functions, oxidative status, and neuronal viability in the hippocampus of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Fifty five adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups, including: control (normal saline 8ml/kg/day; P.O.), diabetic (normal saline 8ml/kg/day; P.O.), Aloe vera gel (100mg/kg/day; P.O.), diabetic+Aloe vera gel (100mg/kg/day; P.O.) and diabetic+NPH insulin (10 IU/kg/day; S.C.). All treatments were started immediately following confirmation of diabetes in diabetic groups and were continued for eight weeks. Behavioral functions were evaluated by employing standard behavioral paradigms. Additionally, oxidative status and neuronal viability were assessed in the hippocampus. The results of behavioral tests showed that diabetes enhanced anxiety/depression-like behaviors, reduced exploratory and locomotor activities, decreased memory performance, and increased stress related behaviors. These changes in diabetic rats were accompanied by increasing oxidative stress and neuronal loss in the hippocampus. Interestingly, eight weeks of treatment with Aloe vera gel not only alleviated all the mentioned deficits related to diabetes, but in some aspects, it was even more effective than insulin. In conclusion, the results suggest that both interrelated hypoglycemic and antioxidative properties of Aloe vera gel are possible mechanisms that improve behavioral deficits and protect hippocampal neurons in diabetic animals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Alpha particle induced DNA damage and repair in normal cultured thyrocytes of different proliferation status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyckesvärd, Madeleine Nordén, E-mail: madeleine.lyckesvard@oncology.gu.se [Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Delle, Ulla; Kahu, Helena [Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Lindegren, Sture [Department of Radiation Physics, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Jensen, Holger [The PET and Cyclotron Unit Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet (Denmark); Bäck, Tom [Department of Radiation Physics, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Swanpalmer, John [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Elmroth, Kecke [Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • We study DNA damage response to low-LET photons and high-LET alpha particles. • Cycling primary thyrocytes are more sensitive to radiation than stationary cells. • Influence of radiation quality varies due to cell cycle status of normal cells. • High-LET radiation gives rise to a sustained DNA damage response. - Abstract: Childhood exposure to ionizing radiation increases the risk of developing thyroid cancer later in life and this is suggested to be due to higher proliferation of the young thyroid. The interest of using high-LET alpha particles from Astatine-211 ({sup 211}At), concentrated in the thyroid by the same mechanism as {sup 131}I [1], in cancer treatment has increased during recent years because of its high efficiency in inducing biological damage and beneficial dose distribution when compared to low-LET radiation. Most knowledge of the DNA damage response in thyroid is from studies using low-LET irradiation and much less is known of high-LET irradiation. In this paper we investigated the DNA damage response and biological consequences to photons from Cobolt-60 ({sup 60}Co) and alpha particles from {sup 211}At in normal primary thyrocytes of different cell cycle status. For both radiation qualities the intensity levels of γH2AX decreased during the first 24 h in both cycling and stationary cultures and complete repair was seen in all cultures but cycling cells exposed to {sup 211}At. Compared to stationary cells alpha particles were more harmful for cycling cultures, an effect also seen at the pChk2 levels. Increasing ratios of micronuclei per cell nuclei were seen up to 1 Gy {sup 211}At. We found that primary thyrocytes were much more sensitive to alpha particle exposure compared with low-LET photons. Calculations of the relative biological effectiveness yielded higher RBE for cycling cells compared with stationary cultures at a modest level of damage, clearly demonstrating that cell cycle status influences the relative

  15. Ebselen alters cellular oxidative status and induces endoplasmic reticulum stress in rat hippocampal astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santofimia-Castaño, Patricia; Izquierdo-Alvarez, Alicia; de la Casa-Resino, Irene; Martinez-Ruiz, Antonio; Perez-Lopez, Marcos; Portilla, Juan C; Salido, Gines M; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2016-05-16

    Ebselen (2-phenyl-1,2-benzisoselenazol-3(2H)-one) is an organoselenium radical scavenger compound, which has strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Because of its properties, it may be protective against injury to the nervous tissue. However, evidence suggests that its glutathione peroxidase activity could underlie certain deleterious actions on cell physiology. In this study we have analyzed the effect of ebselen on rat hippocampal astrocytes in culture. Cellular oxidative status, cytosolic free-Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c), setting of endoplasmic reticulum stress and phosphorylation of glial fibrillary acidic protein and major mitogen-activated protein kinases were analyzed. Our results show that ebselen induced a concentration-dependent increase in the generation of reactive oxygen species in the mitochondria. We observed a concentration-dependent increase in global cysteine oxidation and in the level of malondialdehyde in the presence of ebselen. We also detected increases in catalase, glutathione S-transferase and glutathione reductase activity. Ebselen also evoked a concentration-dependent increase in [Ca(2+)]c. Moreover, we observed a concentration-dependent increase in the phosphorylation of the unfolded protein response markers, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α and X-box binding protein 1. Finally, ebselen also induced an increase in the phosphorylation of glial fibrillary acidic protein, SAPK/JNK, p38 MAPK and p44/42 MAPK. Our results provide strong evidence that implicate endoplasmic reticulum stress and activation of crucial mitogen-activated protein kinases in an oxidative damage of cells in the presence of ebselen. The compound thus might exert deleterious actions on astrocyte physiology that could compromise their function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Investigation of redox status in chronic cerebral hypoperfusion-induced neurodegeneration in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar Saxena

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aging related reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF has been linked with neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease and dementia. Experimentally, a condition of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion due to reduced CBF can be induced by permanent bilateral occlusion of common carotid arteries (2-vessel occlusion, 2VO in rats. Since oxidative stress, leading to neuronal apoptosis and death, is one of the mechanisms, which is thought to play a significant role in chronic degenerative neurological disorders, the present study was planned to assess the ROS status by measuring the levels of anti-oxidant enzymes that might occur during chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. Antioxidant enzymes namely glutathione peroxidase (GPx, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and catalase were measured in the brain tissue at eight weeks of 2VO induction in rats. Results show significantly elevated levels of GPx, SOD, and catalase enzymes as compared with the control group. It is possible that compensatory rise in antioxidant enzymes occurs in response to increased oxidative stress following ischemic insult.

  17. Correlation of Vitamin D status and orthodontic-induced external apical root resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehranchi, Azita; Sadighnia, Azin; Younessian, Farnaz; Abdi, Amir H; Shirvani, Armin

    2017-01-01

    Adequate Vitamin D is essential for dental and skeletal health in children and adult. The purpose of this study was to assess the correlation of serum Vitamin D level with external-induced apical root resorption (EARR) following fixed orthodontic treatment. In this cross-sectional study, the prevalence of Vitamin D deficiency (defined by25-hydroxyvitamin-D) was determined in 34 patients (23.5% male; age range 12-23 years; mean age 16.63 ± 2.84) treated with fixed orthodontic treatment. Root resorption of four maxillary incisors was measured using before and after periapical radiographs (136 measured teeth) by means of a design-to-purpose software to optimize data collection. Teeth with a maximum percentage of root resorption (%EARR) were indicated as representative root resorption for each patient. A multiple linear regression model and Pearson correlation coefficient were used to assess the association of Vitamin D status and observed EARR. P 0.05). This study suggests that Vitamin D level is not among the clinical variables that are potential contributors for EARR. The prevalence of Vitamin D deficiency does not differ in patients with higher EARR. These data suggest the possibility that Vitamin D insufficiency may not contribute to the development of more apical root resorption although this remains to be confirmed by further longitudinal cohort studies.

  18. Carbohydrate Status of Tulip Bulbs during Cold-Induced Flower Stalk Elongation and Flowering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrechts, H.; Rook, F.; Kolloffel, C.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of a cold treatment on the carbohydrate status of the scales and flower stalk of Tulipa gesneriana L. cv Apeldoorn bulbs during growth after planting was studied and compared with bulbs not given cold treatment. Bulbs were stored dry for 12 weeks at 5[deg]C (precooled) or 17[deg]C (noncooled). Only the 5[deg]C treatment led to rapid flower stalk elongation and flowering following planting at higher temperatures. Precooling enhanced mobilization of starch, fructans, and sucrose in the scales. The cold-stimulated starch breakdown was initially accompanied by increased [alpha]-amylase activity per scale. In noncooled bulbs, [alpha]-amylase activity slightly decreased or remained more or less constant. Cold-induced flower stalk elongation was partially accompanied by a decrease in the sucrose content and an increase in the glucose content and invertase activity per g dry weight. The starch content in internodes initially decreased and subsequently increased; [alpha]-amylase activity per g dry weight of the lowermost internode showed a peak pattern during starch breakdown and increased thereafter. The internodes of noncooled bulbs, on the contrary, accumulated sucrose. Their glucose content and invertase activity per g dry weight remained low. Starch breakdown was not found and [alpha]-amylase activity per g dry weight of the lowermost internode remained at a low level. Precooling of tulip bulbs thus favors reserve mobilization in the scales and flower stalk and glucose accumulation in the elongating internodes. PMID:12232100

  19. Radiation-induced vasculopathy implicated by depressed blood flow and metabolism in a pineal glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mineura, K; Sasajima, T; Kowada, M [Akita University Hospital (Japan). Neurosurgical Service; Saitoh, H [Oodate Municipal Hospital (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Shishido, F [Research Inst. of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan)

    1993-08-01

    A case of radiation-induced vasculopathy of a pineal glioma was presented with haemodynamic and metabolic changes before and after radiotherapy. After radiation of 60 Gy with conventional fractionation (1.8-2.0 Gy daily, 5 days per week), regional blood flow, oxygen extraction fraction, metabolic rate of oxygen, kinetic metabolic rate of glucose and the rate constants (K2, K3) were markedly depressed (20% or greater) compared with the pre-irradiated study. 7 months after radiotherapy, the patient developed transient episodes of both right and left upper limb convulsion, terminating in generalized convulsion. When she developed status epilepticus, computed tomography showed extensive low density areas in the territory supplied by the right middle cerebral and the right posterior cerebral arteries. (author).

  20. Radiation-induced vasculopathy implicated by depressed blood flow and metabolism in a pineal glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineura, K.; Sasajima, T.; Kowada, M.

    1993-01-01

    A case of radiation-induced vasculopathy of a pineal glioma was presented with haemodynamic and metabolic changes before and after radiotherapy. After radiation of 60 Gy with conventional fractionation (1.8-2.0 Gy daily, 5 days per week), regional blood flow, oxygen extraction fraction, metabolic rate of oxygen, kinetic metabolic rate of glucose and the rate constants (K2, K3) were markedly depressed (20% or greater) compared with the pre-irradiated study. 7 months after radiotherapy, the patient developed transient episodes of both right and left upper limb convulsion, terminating in generalized convulsion. When she developed status epilepticus, computed tomography showed extensive low density areas in the territory supplied by the right middle cerebral and the right posterior cerebral arteries. (author)

  1. Cefepime-induced encephalopathy in patient without renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Fernando Morgadinho Santos; Bernstein, Maurício; Yokota, Paula Kiyomi Onaga; Coelho, Rosilene Motta Elias; Wachemberg, Marcelo; Sampaio, Letícia Pereira de Brito; Caboclo, Luis Otávio

    2010-09-01

    This case report describes neurotoxicity in an older patient on cefepime 2 g twice a day. The 81-year-old male patient developed non-convulsive status epilepticus during cefepime treatment with 1 g twice a day. There was recovery 30 days after discontinuation of cefepime.

  2. Cefepime-induced encephalopathy in patient without renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Morgadinho Santos Coelho

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes neurotoxicity in an older patient on cefepime 2 g twice a day. The 81-year-old male patient developed non-convulsive status epilepticus during cefepime treatment with 1 g twice a day. There was recovery 30 days after discontinuation of cefepime.

  3. Changes in cytochrome oxidase in the piriform cortex after status epilepticus in adult rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Otáhal, Jakub; Suchomelová, Lucie; Druga, Rastislav; Kubová, Hana

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 46, Suppl. 5 (2005), s. 89-93 ISSN 0013-9580 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/03/0770 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : seizures * lithium-pilocarpine * piriform cortex Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.227, year: 2005

  4. Nonconvulsive status epilepticus and Creutzfeldt–Jakob-like EEG changes in a case of lithium toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.K. Madhusudhan

    2014-01-01

    This case highlights the importance of therapeutic drug-level monitoring of lithium, especially where toxicity is suspected, and the important role electroencephalography plays in diagnosing NCSE and its management.

  5. Adrenal failure followed by status epilepticus and hemolytic anemia in primary antiphospholipid syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bures Vladimir

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on a 14 year old boy who presented with the symptoms abdominal pain, fever and proteinuria. A hematoma in the region of the right pararenal space was diagnosed. Prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were prolonged, lupus anticoagulant and anticardiolipin antibodies were positive and serum cortisol was normal. Ten days after admission the boy suddenly suffered generalized seizures due to low serum sodium. As well, the patient developed hemolytic anemia, acute elevated liver enzymes, hematuria and increased proteinuria. At this time a second hemorrhage of the left adrenal gland was documented. Adrenal function tests revealed adrenal insufficiency. We suspected microthromboses in the adrenals and secondary bleeding and treated the boy with hydrocortisone, fludrocortisone and phenprocoumon. Conclusion Adrenal failure is a rare complication of APS in children with only five cases reported to date. As shown in our patient, this syndrome can manifest in a diverse set of simultaneously occurring symptoms.

  6. Status epilepticus in immature rats leads to behavioural and cognitive impairment and epileptogenesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubová, Hana; Mareš, Pavel; Suchomelová, Lucie; Brožek, Gustav; Druga, Rastislav; Pitkanen, A.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 12 (2004), s. 3255-3265 ISSN 0953-816X R&D Projects: GA MZd NF6474; GA ČR GA309/01/0285 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : epilepsy * elevated plus-maze * Morris water-maze Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.820, year: 2004

  7. Impact of the erythropoietin-derived peptide mimetic Epotris on the histopathological consequences of status epilepticus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zellinger, Christina; Seeger, Natalie; Hadamitzky, Martin

    2011-01-01

    the microglial response caused by prolonged seizure activity in the thalamus but not in other brain regions. The study renders support that the Epotris' sequences from binding site 2 in helix C of Epo play a role in receptor interaction and cytokine function. In addition, the data demonstrate that Epotris can...

  8. Magnesium treatment for patients with refractory status epilepticus due to POLG1-mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Nora A.; Braun, Kees P. J.; Leijten, Frans S. S.; van Nieuwenhuizen, Onno; Wokke, John H. J.; van den Bergh, Walter M.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding of the catalytic subunit of mtDNA polymerase gamma (POLG1) can cause typical Alpers' syndrome. Recently, a new POLG1 mutation phenotype was described, the so-called juvenile-onset Alpers' syndrome. This POLG1 mutation phenotype is characterized by refractory epilepsy

  9. Transient MRI abnormalities associated with partial status epilepticus: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amato, Carmelo; Elia, Maurizio; Musumeci, Sebastiano A; Bisceglie, Pierluigi; Moschini, Massimo

    2001-04-01

    We report the case of an 18-year-old woman who presented a long-lasting cluster of partial seizures, and MRI cortical abnormalities localized in the left parietal lobe. The MRI changes correlated with the site of the epileptogenic focus, and disappeared within 2 weeks. The recognition of these reversible MRI abnormalities, which are presumably due to a temporary alteration of blood-brain barrier in the epileptogenic zone with subsequent edema, and are not associated with any underlying organic conditions, is extremely useful in the medical management of the patient and allows to avoid other invasive diagnostic procedures.

  10. Rare presentation of a common disease: Idiopathic hypoparathyroidism presenting with extrapyramidal symptoms and status epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushik Ghosh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report of an 18-year-old male who presented with an epileptiform disorder, features of hypocalcemia, and an extrapyramidal symptom in the form of choreoathetosis. On evaluation he had idiopathic hypoparathyroidism with extensive calcifications in the extrapyramidal system of the brain; basal ganglion, as well as in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum, which is a rare entity. We report the rare presentation of a common disorder, which requires to be considered in evaluating hypoparathyroidism.

  11. Transient MRI abnormalities associated with partial status epilepticus: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amato, Carmelo; Elia, Maurizio; Musumeci, Sebastiano A.; Bisceglie, Pierluigi; Moschini, Massimo

    2001-01-01

    We report the case of an 18-year-old woman who presented a long-lasting cluster of partial seizures, and MRI cortical abnormalities localized in the left parietal lobe. The MRI changes correlated with the site of the epileptogenic focus, and disappeared within 2 weeks. The recognition of these reversible MRI abnormalities, which are presumably due to a temporary alteration of blood-brain barrier in the epileptogenic zone with subsequent edema, and are not associated with any underlying organic conditions, is extremely useful in the medical management of the patient and allows to avoid other invasive diagnostic procedures

  12. Radiation-Induced Dedifferentiation of Head and Neck Cancer Cells Into Cancer Stem Cells Depends on Human Papillomavirus Status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlashi, Erina; Chen, Allen M.; Boyrie, Sabrina; Yu, Garrett; Nguyen, Andrea; Brower, Philip A.; Hess, Clayton B.; Pajonk, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that the radiation response of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive and HPV-negative head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) differs and is not reflected in the radiation response of the bulk tumor populations, that radiation therapy (RT) can dedifferentiate non-stem HNSCC cells into CSCs, and that radiation-induced dedifferentiation depends on the HPV status. Methods and Materials: Records of a cohort of 162 HNSCC patients were reviewed, and their outcomes were correlated with their HPV status. Using a panel of HPV-positive and HPV-negative HNSCC cell lines expressing a reporter for CSCs, we characterized HPV-positive and HPV-negative lines via flow cytometry, sphere-forming capacity assays in vitro, and limiting dilution assays in vivo. Non-CSCs were treated with different doses of radiation, and the dedifferentiation of non-CSCs into CSCs was investigated via flow cytometry and quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction for re-expression of reprogramming factors. Results: Patients with HPV-positive tumors have superior overall survival and local–regional control. Human papillomavirus–positive HNSCC cell lines have lower numbers of CSCs, which inversely correlates with radiosensitivity. Human papillomavirus–negative HNSCC cell lines lack hierarchy owing to enhanced spontaneous dedifferentiation. Non-CSCs from HPV-negative lines show enhanced radiation-induced dedifferentiation compared with HPV-positive lines, and RT induced re-expression of Yamanaka reprogramming factors. Conclusions: Supporting the favorable prognosis of HPV-positive HNSCCs, we show that (1) HPV-positive HNSCCs have a lower frequency of CSCs; (2) RT can dedifferentiate HNSCC cells into CSCs; and (3) radiation-induced dedifferentiation depends on the HPV status of the tumor.

  13. Radiation-Induced Dedifferentiation of Head and Neck Cancer Cells Into Cancer Stem Cells Depends on Human Papillomavirus Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlashi, Erina, E-mail: evlashi@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Chen, Allen M.; Boyrie, Sabrina; Yu, Garrett; Nguyen, Andrea; Brower, Philip A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Hess, Clayton B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Sacramento, California (United States); Pajonk, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that the radiation response of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive and HPV-negative head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) differs and is not reflected in the radiation response of the bulk tumor populations, that radiation therapy (RT) can dedifferentiate non-stem HNSCC cells into CSCs, and that radiation-induced dedifferentiation depends on the HPV status. Methods and Materials: Records of a cohort of 162 HNSCC patients were reviewed, and their outcomes were correlated with their HPV status. Using a panel of HPV-positive and HPV-negative HNSCC cell lines expressing a reporter for CSCs, we characterized HPV-positive and HPV-negative lines via flow cytometry, sphere-forming capacity assays in vitro, and limiting dilution assays in vivo. Non-CSCs were treated with different doses of radiation, and the dedifferentiation of non-CSCs into CSCs was investigated via flow cytometry and quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction for re-expression of reprogramming factors. Results: Patients with HPV-positive tumors have superior overall survival and local–regional control. Human papillomavirus–positive HNSCC cell lines have lower numbers of CSCs, which inversely correlates with radiosensitivity. Human papillomavirus–negative HNSCC cell lines lack hierarchy owing to enhanced spontaneous dedifferentiation. Non-CSCs from HPV-negative lines show enhanced radiation-induced dedifferentiation compared with HPV-positive lines, and RT induced re-expression of Yamanaka reprogramming factors. Conclusions: Supporting the favorable prognosis of HPV-positive HNSCCs, we show that (1) HPV-positive HNSCCs have a lower frequency of CSCs; (2) RT can dedifferentiate HNSCC cells into CSCs; and (3) radiation-induced dedifferentiation depends on the HPV status of the tumor.

  14. Sevoflurane Induces DNA Damage Whereas Isoflurane Leads to Higher Antioxidative Status in Anesthetized Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalita L. A. Rocha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Taking into account that there are controversial antioxidative effects of inhalational anesthetics isoflurane and sevoflurane and absence of comparison of genotoxicity of both anesthetics in animal model, the aim of this study was to compare DNA damage and antioxidant status in Wistar rats exposed to a single time to isoflurane or sevoflurane. The alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis assay (comet assay was performed in order to evaluate DNA damage in whole blood cells of control animals (unexposed; n = 6 and those exposed to 2% isoflurane (n = 6 or 4% sevoflurane (n = 6 for 120 min. Plasma antioxidant status was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. There was no statistically significant difference between isoflurane and sevoflurane groups regarding hemodynamic and temperature variables (P > 0.05. Sevoflurane significantly increased DNA damage compared to unexposed animals (P = 0.02. In addition, Wistar rats anesthetized with isoflurane showed higher antioxidative status (MTT than control group (P = 0.019. There were no significant differences in DNA damage or antioxidant status between isoflurane and sevoflurane groups (P > 0.05. In conclusion, our findings suggest that, in contrast to sevoflurane exposure, isoflurane increases systemic antioxidative status, protecting cells from DNA damage in rats.

  15. Cisplatin Induces a Mitochondrial-ROS Response That Contributes to Cytotoxicity Depending on Mitochondrial Redox Status and Bioenergetic Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marullo, Rossella; Werner, Erica; Degtyareva, Natalya; Moore, Bryn; Altavilla, Giuseppe; Ramalingam, Suresh S.; Doetsch, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most effective and widely used anticancer agents for the treatment of several types of tumors. The cytotoxic effect of cisplatin is thought to be mediated primarily by the generation of nuclear DNA adducts, which, if not repaired, cause cell death as a consequence of DNA replication and transcription blockage. However, the ability of cisplatin to induce nuclear DNA (nDNA) damage per se is not sufficient to explain its high degree of effectiveness nor the toxic effects exerted on normal, post-mitotic tissues. Oxidative damage has been observed in vivo following exposure to cisplatin in several tissues, suggesting a role for oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced dose-limiting toxicities. However, the mechanism of cisplatin-induced generation of ROS and their contribution to cisplatin cytotoxicity in normal and cancer cells is still poorly understood. By employing a panel of normal and cancer cell lines and the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as model system, we show that exposure to cisplatin induces a mitochondrial-dependent ROS response that significantly enhances the cytotoxic effect caused by nDNA damage. ROS generation is independent of the amount of cisplatin-induced nDNA damage and occurs in mitochondria as a consequence of protein synthesis impairment. The contribution of cisplatin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in determining its cytotoxic effect varies among cells and depends on mitochondrial redox status, mitochondrial DNA integrity and bioenergetic function. Thus, by manipulating these cellular parameters, we were able to enhance cisplatin cytotoxicity in cancer cells. This study provides a new mechanistic insight into cisplatin-induced cell killing and may lead to the design of novel therapeutic strategies to improve anticancer drug efficacy. PMID:24260552

  16. Effect of Illumination on Ocular Status Modifications Induced by Short-Term 3D TV Viewing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This study aimed to compare changes in ocular status after 3D TV viewing under three modes of illumination and thereby identify optimal illumination for 3D TV viewing. Methods. The following measures of ocular status were assessed: the accommodative response, accommodative microfluctuation, accommodative facility, relative accommodation, gradient accommodative convergence/accommodation (AC/A ratio, phoria, and fusional vergence. The observers watched 3D television for 90 minutes through 3D shutter glasses under three illumination modes: A, complete darkness; B, back illumination (50 lx; and C, front illumination (130 lx. The ocular status of the observers was assessed both before and after the viewing. Results. After 3D TV viewing, the accommodative response and accommodative microfluctuation were significantly changed under illumination Modes A and B. The near positive fusional vergence decreased significantly after the 90-minute 3D viewing session under each illumination mode, and this effect was not significantly different among the three modes. Conclusions. Short-term 3D viewing modified the ocular status of adults. The least amount of such change occurred with front illumination, suggesting that this type of illumination is an appropriate mode for 3D shutter TV viewing.

  17. Effects of potassium concentration on firing patterns of low-calcium epileptiform activity in anesthetized rat hippocampus: inducing of persistent spike activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhouyan; Durand, Dominique M

    2006-04-01

    It has been shown that a low-calcium high-potassium solution can generate ictal-like epileptiform activity in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, during status epileptiform activity, the concentration of [K+]o increases, and the concentration of [Ca2+]o decreases in brain tissue. Therefore we tested the hypothesis that long-lasting persistent spike activity, similar to one of the patterns of status epilepticus, could be generated by a high-potassium, low-calcium solution in the hippocampus in vivo. Artificial cerebrospinal fluid was perfused over the surface of the exposed left dorsal hippocampus of anesthetized rats. A stimulating electrode and a recording probe were placed in the CA1 region. By elevating K+ concentration from 6 to 12 mM in the perfusate solution, the typical firing pattern of low-calcium ictal bursts was transformed into persistent spike activity in the CA1 region with synaptic transmission being suppressed by calcium chelator EGTA. The activity was characterized by double spikes repeated at a frequency approximately 4 Hz that could last for >1 h. The analysis of multiple unit activity showed that both elevating [K+]o and lowering [Ca2+]o decreased the inhibition period after the response of paired-pulse stimulation, indicating a suppression of the after-hyperpolarization (AHP) activity. These results suggest that persistent status epilepticus-like spike activity can be induced by nonsynaptic mechanisms when synaptic transmission is blocked. The unique double-spike pattern of this activity is presumably caused by higher K+ concentration augmenting the frequency of typical low-calcium nonsynaptic burst activity.

  18. Antidiabetic, antioxidant and antihyperlipidemic status of Heliotropium zeylanicum extract on streptozotocin-induced diabetes in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugesh, Kandasamy; Yeligar, Veerendra; Dash, Deepak Kumar; Sengupta, Pinaki; Maiti, Bhim Chandra; Maity, Tapan Kumar

    2006-11-01

    The potential role of the methanolic extract of Heliotropium zeylanicum (BURM.F) LAMK (MEHZ) in the treatment of diabetes along with its antioxidant and antihyperlipidemic effects was studied in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Oral administration of (MEHZ) 150 and 300 mg/kg/d for 14 d significantly decreased the blood glucose level and considerably increased the body weight, food intake, and liquid intake of diabetic-induced rats. MEHZ significantly decreased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and significantly increased reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase and catalase in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats at the end of 14 d of treatment. The study also investigated the antihyperlipidemic potential of MEHZ. The results show that the active fraction of MEHZ is promising for development of a standardized phytomedicine for the treatment of diabetes mellitus.

  19. Influence of artistic gymnastics on iron nutritional status and exercise-induced hemolysis in female athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureira, Thaiz Mattos; Amancio, Olga Silverio; Pellegrini Braga, Josefina Aparecida

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluates the relationship between body iron losses and gains in artistic gymnastics female athletes. It shows that despite the low iron intake and exercise-induced hemolysis, iron deficiency or iron-deficiency anemia does not occur, but partial changes in the hematological profile do. The hypothesis that gymnasts' nutritional behavior contributes to anemia, which may be aggravated by exercise-induced hemolysis, led to this cross-sectional study, conducted with 43 female artistic gymnasts 6-16 yr old. The control group was formed by 40 nontraining girls, paired by age. Hemogram, serum iron, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, haptoglobin, total and fractional bilirubin, Type I urine, and parasitologic and occult fecal blood tests were evaluated. The athletes presented mean hematimetric and serum iron values (p = .020) higher than those of the control