WorldWideScience

Sample records for statistical turbulence models

  1. [Statistical modeling studies of turbulent reacting flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwyer, H.A.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses the study of turbulent wall shear flows, and we feel that this problem is both more difficult and a better challenge for the new methods we are developing. Turbulent wall flows have a wide variety of length and time scales which interact with the transport processes to produce very large fluxes of mass, heat, and momentum. At the present time we have completed the first calculation of a wall diffusion flame, and we have begun a velocity PDF calculation for the flat plate boundary layer. A summary of the various activities is contained in this report

  2. Probability density function shape sensitivity in the statistical modeling of turbulent particle dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Jeng, San-Mou

    1992-01-01

    The performance of a recently introduced statistical transport model for turbulent particle dispersion is studied here for rigid particles injected into a round turbulent jet. Both uniform and isosceles triangle pdfs are used. The statistical sensitivity to parcel pdf shape is demonstrated.

  3. Vortex dynamics and Lagrangian statistics in a model for active turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Martin; Wilczek, Michael

    2018-02-14

    Cellular suspensions such as dense bacterial flows exhibit a turbulence-like phase under certain conditions. We study this phenomenon of "active turbulence" statistically by using numerical tools. Following Wensink et al. (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 109, 14308 (2012)), we model active turbulence by means of a generalized Navier-Stokes equation. Two-point velocity statistics of active turbulence, both in the Eulerian and the Lagrangian frame, is explored. We characterize the scale-dependent features of two-point statistics in this system. Furthermore, we extend this statistical study with measurements of vortex dynamics in this system. Our observations suggest that the large-scale statistics of active turbulence is close to Gaussian with sub-Gaussian tails.

  4. Statistically accurate low-order models for uncertainty quantification in turbulent dynamical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapsis, Themistoklis P; Majda, Andrew J

    2013-08-20

    A framework for low-order predictive statistical modeling and uncertainty quantification in turbulent dynamical systems is developed here. These reduced-order, modified quasilinear Gaussian (ROMQG) algorithms apply to turbulent dynamical systems in which there is significant linear instability or linear nonnormal dynamics in the unperturbed system and energy-conserving nonlinear interactions that transfer energy from the unstable modes to the stable modes where dissipation occurs, resulting in a statistical steady state; such turbulent dynamical systems are ubiquitous in geophysical and engineering turbulence. The ROMQG method involves constructing a low-order, nonlinear, dynamical system for the mean and covariance statistics in the reduced subspace that has the unperturbed statistics as a stable fixed point and optimally incorporates the indirect effect of non-Gaussian third-order statistics for the unperturbed system in a systematic calibration stage. This calibration procedure is achieved through information involving only the mean and covariance statistics for the unperturbed equilibrium. The performance of the ROMQG algorithm is assessed on two stringent test cases: the 40-mode Lorenz 96 model mimicking midlatitude atmospheric turbulence and two-layer baroclinic models for high-latitude ocean turbulence with over 125,000 degrees of freedom. In the Lorenz 96 model, the ROMQG algorithm with just a single mode captures the transient response to random or deterministic forcing. For the baroclinic ocean turbulence models, the inexpensive ROMQG algorithm with 252 modes, less than 0.2% of the total, captures the nonlinear response of the energy, the heat flux, and even the one-dimensional energy and heat flux spectra.

  5. Statistical description of turbulent dispersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, J.J.H.

    2012-01-01

    We derive a comprehensive statistical model for dispersion of passive or almost passive admixture particles such as fine particulate matter, aerosols, smoke and fumes, in turbulent flow. The model rests on the Markov limit for particle velocity. It is in accordance with the asymptotic structure of

  6. Filtering a statistically exactly solvable test model for turbulent tracers from partial observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershgorin, B.; Majda, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    A statistically exactly solvable model for passive tracers is introduced as a test model for the authors' Nonlinear Extended Kalman Filter (NEKF) as well as other filtering algorithms. The model involves a Gaussian velocity field and a passive tracer governed by the advection-diffusion equation with an imposed mean gradient. The model has direct relevance to engineering problems such as the spread of pollutants in the air or contaminants in the water as well as climate change problems concerning the transport of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide with strongly intermittent probability distributions consistent with the actual observations of the atmosphere. One of the attractive properties of the model is the existence of the exact statistical solution. In particular, this unique feature of the model provides an opportunity to design and test fast and efficient algorithms for real-time data assimilation based on rigorous mathematical theory for a turbulence model problem with many active spatiotemporal scales. Here, we extensively study the performance of the NEKF which uses the exact first and second order nonlinear statistics without any approximations due to linearization. The role of partial and sparse observations, the frequency of observations and the observation noise strength in recovering the true signal, its spectrum, and fat tail probability distribution are the central issues discussed here. The results of our study provide useful guidelines for filtering realistic turbulent systems with passive tracers through partial observations.

  7. Modeling of Dissipation Element Statistics in Turbulent Non-Premixed Jet Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denker, Dominik; Attili, Antonio; Boschung, Jonas; Hennig, Fabian; Pitsch, Heinz

    2017-11-01

    The dissipation element (DE) analysis is a method for analyzing and compartmentalizing turbulent scalar fields. DEs can be described by two parameters, namely the Euclidean distance l between their extremal points and the scalar difference in the respective points Δϕ . The joint probability density function (jPDF) of these two parameters P(Δϕ , l) is expected to suffice for a statistical reconstruction of the scalar field. In addition, reacting scalars show a strong correlation with these DE parameters in both premixed and non-premixed flames. Normalized DE statistics show a remarkable invariance towards changes in Reynolds numbers. This feature of DE statistics was exploited in a Boltzmann-type evolution equation based model for the probability density function (PDF) of the distance between the extremal points P(l) in isotropic turbulence. Later, this model was extended for the jPDF P(Δϕ , l) and then adapted for the use in free shear flows. The effect of heat release on the scalar scales and DE statistics is investigated and an extended model for non-premixed jet flames is introduced, which accounts for the presence of chemical reactions. This new model is validated against a series of DNS of temporally evolving jet flames. European Research Council Project ``Milestone''.

  8. Simple statistical channel model for weak temperature-induced turbulence in underwater wireless optical communication systems

    KAUST Repository

    Oubei, Hassan M.

    2017-06-16

    In this Letter, we use laser beam intensity fluctuation measurements to model and describe the statistical properties of weak temperature-induced turbulence in underwater wireless optical communication (UWOC) channels. UWOC channels with temperature gradients are modeled by the generalized gamma distribution (GGD) with an excellent goodness of fit to the measured data under all channel conditions. Meanwhile, thermally uniform channels are perfectly described by the simple gamma distribution which is a special case of GGD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first model that comprehensively describes both thermally uniform and gradient-based UWOC channels.

  9. Statistical Mechanics of Turbulent Dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2014-01-01

    Incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and magnetic dynamos, which occur in magnetofluids with large fluid and magnetic Reynolds numbers, will be discussed. When Reynolds numbers are large and energy decays slowly, the distribution of energy with respect to length scale becomes quasi-stationary and MHD turbulence can be described statistically. In the limit of infinite Reynolds numbers, viscosity and resistivity become zero and if these values are used in the MHD equations ab initio, a model system called ideal MHD turbulence results. This model system is typically confined in simple geometries with some form of homogeneous boundary conditions, allowing for velocity and magnetic field to be represented by orthogonal function expansions. One advantage to this is that the coefficients of the expansions form a set of nonlinearly interacting variables whose behavior can be described by equilibrium statistical mechanics, i.e., by a canonical ensemble theory based on the global invariants (energy, cross helicity and magnetic helicity) of ideal MHD turbulence. Another advantage is that truncated expansions provide a finite dynamical system whose time evolution can be numerically simulated to test the predictions of the associated statistical mechanics. If ensemble predictions are the same as time averages, then the system is said to be ergodic; if not, the system is nonergodic. Although it had been implicitly assumed in the early days of ideal MHD statistical theory development that these finite dynamical systems were ergodic, numerical simulations provided sufficient evidence that they were, in fact, nonergodic. Specifically, while canonical ensemble theory predicted that expansion coefficients would be (i) zero-mean random variables with (ii) energy that decreased with length scale, it was found that although (ii) was correct, (i) was not and the expected ergodicity was broken. The exact cause of this broken ergodicity was explained, after much

  10. Statistical Mechanics of Turbulent Flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambon, C

    2004-01-01

    This is a handbook for a computational approach to reacting flows, including background material on statistical mechanics. In this sense, the title is somewhat misleading with respect to other books dedicated to the statistical theory of turbulence (e.g. Monin and Yaglom). In the present book, emphasis is placed on modelling (engineering closures) for computational fluid dynamics. The probabilistic (pdf) approach is applied to the local scalar field, motivated first by the nonlinearity of chemical source terms which appear in the transport equations of reacting species. The probabilistic and stochastic approaches are also used for the velocity field and particle position; nevertheless they are essentially limited to Lagrangian models for a local vector, with only single-point statistics, as for the scalar. Accordingly, conventional techniques, such as single-point closures for RANS (Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes) and subgrid-scale models for LES (large-eddy simulations), are described and in some cases reformulated using underlying Langevin models and filtered pdfs. Even if the theoretical approach to turbulence is not discussed in general, the essentials of probabilistic and stochastic-processes methods are described, with a useful reminder concerning statistics at the molecular level. The book comprises 7 chapters. Chapter 1 briefly states the goals and contents, with a very clear synoptic scheme on page 2. Chapter 2 presents definitions and examples of pdfs and related statistical moments. Chapter 3 deals with stochastic processes, pdf transport equations, from Kramer-Moyal to Fokker-Planck (for Markov processes), and moments equations. Stochastic differential equations are introduced and their relationship to pdfs described. This chapter ends with a discussion of stochastic modelling. The equations of fluid mechanics and thermodynamics are addressed in chapter 4. Classical conservation equations (mass, velocity, internal energy) are derived from their

  11. Is there a statistical mechanics of turbulence?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraichnan, R.H.; Chen, S.Y.

    1988-09-01

    The statistical-mechanical treatment of turbulence is made questionable by strong nonlinearity and strong disequilibrium that result in the creation of ordered structures imbedded in disorder. Model systems are described which may provide some hope that a compact, yet faithful, statistical description of turbulence nevertheless is possible. Some essential dynamic features of the models are captured by low-order statistical approximations despite strongly non-Gaussian behavior. 31 refs., 5 figs

  12. Statistical properties of transport in plasma turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, V.; Garcia, O.E.; Nielsen, A.H.

    2004-01-01

    The statistical properties of the particle flux in different types of plasma turbulence models are numerically investigated using probability distribution functions (PDFs). The physics included in the models range from two-dimensional drift wave turbulence to three-dimensional MHD dynamics...

  13. Statistical theory of plasmas turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun-jin; Anderson, Johan

    2009-01-01

    We present a statistical theory of intermittency in plasma turbulence based on short-lived coherent structures (instantons). In general, the probability density functions (PDFs) of the flux R are shown to have an exponential scaling P(R) ∝ exp (-cR s ) in the tails. In ion-temperature-gradient turbulence, the exponent takes the value s=3/2 for momentum flux and s=3 for zonal flow formation. The value of s follows from the order of the highest nonlinear interaction term and the moments for which the PDFs are computed. The constant c depends on the spatial profile of the coherent structure and other physical parameters in the model. Our theory provides a powerful mechanism for ubiquitous exponential scalings of PDFs, often observed in various tokamaks. Implications of the results, in particular, on structure formation are further discussed. (author)

  14. Plasma Soliton Turbulence and Statistical Mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treumann, R.A.; Pottelette, R.

    1999-01-01

    Collisionless kinetic plasma turbulence is described approximately in terms of a superposition of non-interacting solitary waves. We discuss the relevance of such a description under astrophysical conditions. Several types of solitary waves may be of interest in this relation as generators of turbulence and turbulent transport. A consistent theory of turbulence can be given only in a few particular cases when the description can be reduced to the Korteweg-de Vries equation or some other simple equation like the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation. It turns out that the soliton turbulence is usually energetically harder than the ordinary weakly turbulent plasma description. This implies that interaction of particles with such kinds of turbulence can lead to stronger acceleration than in ordinary turbulence. However, the description in our model is only classical and non-relativistic. Transport in solitary turbulence is most important for drift wave turbulence. Such waves form solitary drift wave vortices which may provide cross-field transport. A more general discussion is given on transport. In a model of Levy flight trapping of particles in solitons (or solitary turbulence) one finds that the residence time of particles in the region of turbulence may be described by a generalized Lorentzian probability distribution. It is shown that under collisionless equilibrium conditions far away from thermal equilibrium such distributions are natural equilibrium distributions. A consistent thermodynamic description of such media can be given in terms of a generalized Lorentzian statistical mechanics and thermodynamics. (author)

  15. Numerical simulation of swirling flow in complex hydroturbine draft tube using unsteady statistical turbulence models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paik, Joongcheol [University of Minnesota; Sotiropoulos, Fotis [University of Minnesota; Sale, Michael J [ORNL

    2005-06-01

    A numerical method is developed for carrying out unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) simulations and detached-eddy simulations (DESs) in complex 3D geometries. The method is applied to simulate incompressible swirling flow in a typical hydroturbine draft tube, which consists of a strongly curved 90 degree elbow and two piers. The governing equations are solved with a second-order-accurate, finite-volume, dual-time-stepping artificial compressibility approach for a Reynolds number of 1.1 million on a mesh with 1.8 million nodes. The geometrical complexities of the draft tube are handled using domain decomposition with overset (chimera) grids. Numerical simulations show that unsteady statistical turbulence models can capture very complex 3D flow phenomena dominated by geometry-induced, large-scale instabilities and unsteady coherent structures such as the onset of vortex breakdown and the formation of the unsteady rope vortex downstream of the turbine runner. Both URANS and DES appear to yield the general shape and magnitude of mean velocity profiles in reasonable agreement with measurements. Significant discrepancies among the DES and URANS predictions of the turbulence statistics are also observed in the straight downstream diffuser.

  16. Statistics of the Navier–Stokes-alpha-beta regularization model for fluid turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinz, Denis F; Kim, Tae-Yeon; Fried, Eliot

    2014-01-01

    We explore one-point and two-point statistics of the Navier–Stokes-αβ regularization model at moderate Reynolds number (Re ≈ 200) in homogeneous isotropic turbulence. The results are compared to the limit cases of the Navier–Stokes-α model and the Navier–Stokes-αβ model without subgrid-scale stress, as well as with high-resolution direct numerical simulation. After reviewing spectra of different energy norms of the Navier–Stokes-αβ model, the Navier–Stokes-α model, and Navier–Stokes-αβ model without subgrid-scale stress, we present probability density functions and normalized probability density functions of the filtered and unfiltered velocity increments along with longitudinal velocity structure functions of the regularization models and direct numerical simulation results. We highlight differences in the statistical properties of the unfiltered and filtered velocity fields entering the governing equations of the Navier–Stokes-α and Navier–Stokes-αβ models and discuss the usability of both velocity fields for realistic flow predictions. The influence of the modified viscous term in the Navier–Stokes-αβ model is studied through comparison to the case where the underlying subgrid-scale stress tensor is neglected. Whereas, the filtered velocity field is found to have physically more viable probability density functions and structure functions for the approximation of direct numerical simulation results, the unfiltered velocity field is found to have flatness factors close to direct numerical simulation results. (paper)

  17. Turbulence Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens Peter; Shui, Wan; Johansson, Jens

    2011-01-01

    term with stresses depending linearly on the strain rates. This term takes into account the transfer of linear momentum from one part of the fluid to another. Besides there is another term, which takes into account the transfer of angular momentum. Thus the model implies a new definition of turbulence...

  18. An efficient approach to transient turbulent dispersion modeling by CFD-statistical analysis of a many-puff system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ching, W-H; K H Leung, Michael; Leung, Dennis Y C

    2009-01-01

    Transient turbulent dispersion phenomena can be found in various practical problems, such as the accidental release of toxic chemical vapor and the airborne transmission of infectious droplets. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is an effective tool for analyzing such transient dispersion behaviors. However, the transient CFD analysis is often computationally expensive and time consuming. In the present study, a computationally efficient CFD-statistical hybrid modeling method has been developed for studying transient turbulent dispersion. In this method, the source emission is represented by emissions of many infinitesimal puffs. Statistical analysis is performed to obtain first the statistical properties of the puff trajectories and subsequently the most probable distribution of the puff trajectories that represent the macroscopic dispersion behaviors. In two case studies of ambient dispersion, the numerical modeling results obtained agree reasonably well with both experimental measurements and conventional k-ε modeling results published in the literature. More importantly, the proposed many-puff CFD-statistical hybrid modeling method effectively reduces the computational time by two orders of magnitude.

  19. Statistical properties of the coarse-grained velocity gradient tensor in turbulence: Monte-Carlo simulations of the tetrad model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pumir, Alain; Naso, Aurore

    2010-01-01

    A proper description of the velocity gradient tensor is crucial for understanding the dynamics of turbulent flows, in particular the energy transfer from large to small scales. Insight into the statistical properties of the velocity gradient tensor and into its coarse-grained generalization can be obtained with the help of a stochastic 'tetrad model' that describes the coarse-grained velocity gradient tensor based on the evolution of four points. Although the solution of the stochastic model can be formally expressed in terms of path integrals, its numerical determination in terms of the Monte-Carlo method is very challenging, as very few configurations contribute effectively to the statistical weight. Here, we discuss a strategy that allows us to solve the tetrad model numerically. The algorithm is based on the importance sampling method, which consists here of identifying and sampling preferentially the configurations that are likely to correspond to a large statistical weight, and selectively rejecting configurations with a small statistical weight. The algorithm leads to an efficient numerical determination of the solutions of the model and allows us to determine their qualitative behavior as a function of scale. We find that the moments of order n≤4 of the solutions of the model scale with the coarse-graining scale and that the scaling exponents are very close to the predictions of the Kolmogorov theory. The model qualitatively reproduces quite well the statistics concerning the local structure of the flow. However, we find that the model generally tends to predict an excess of strain compared to vorticity. Thus, our results show that while some physical aspects are not fully captured by the model, our approach leads to a very good description of several important qualitative properties of real turbulent flows.

  20. Prediction of velocity distributions in rod bundle axial flow, with a statistical model (K-epsilon) of turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Junior, H.C. da.

    1978-12-01

    Reactor fuel elements generally consist of rod bundles with the coolant flowing axially through the region between the rods. The confiability of the thermohydraulic design of such elements is related to a detailed description of the velocity field. A two-equation statistical model (K-epsilon) of turbulence is applied to compute main and secondary flow fields, wall shear stress distributions and friction factors of steady, fully developed turbulent flows, with incompressible, temperature independent fluid flowing axially through triangular or square arrays of rod bundles. The numerical procedure uses the vorticity and the stream function to describe the velocity field. Comparison with experimental and analytical data of several investigators is presented. Results are in good agreement. (Author) [pt

  1. The structure and statistics of interstellar turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kritsuk, A G; Norman, M L; Ustyugov, S D

    2017-01-01

    We explore the structure and statistics of multiphase, magnetized ISM turbulence in the local Milky Way by means of driven periodic box numerical MHD simulations. Using the higher order-accurate piecewise-parabolic method on a local stencil (PPML), we carry out a small parameter survey varying the mean magnetic field strength and density while fixing the rms velocity to observed values. We quantify numerous characteristics of the transient and steady-state turbulence, including its thermodynamics and phase structure, kinetic and magnetic energy power spectra, structure functions, and distribution functions of density, column density, pressure, and magnetic field strength. The simulations reproduce many observables of the local ISM, including molecular clouds, such as the ratio of turbulent to mean magnetic field at 100 pc scale, the mass and volume fractions of thermally stable Hi, the lognormal distribution of column densities, the mass-weighted distribution of thermal pressure, and the linewidth-size relationship for molecular clouds. Our models predict the shape of magnetic field probability density functions (PDFs), which are strongly non-Gaussian, and the relative alignment of magnetic field and density structures. Finally, our models show how the observed low rates of star formation per free-fall time are controlled by the multiphase thermodynamics and large-scale turbulence. (paper)

  2. Statistical symmetry restoration in fully developed turbulence: Renormalization group analysis of two models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, N. V.; Gulitskiy, N. M.; Kostenko, M. M.; Malyshev, A. V.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper we consider the model of incompressible fluid described by the stochastic Navier-Stokes equation with finite correlation time of a random force. Inertial-range asymptotic behavior of fully developed turbulence is studied by means of the field theoretic renormalization group within the one-loop approximation. It is corroborated that regardless of the values of model parameters and initial data the inertial-range behavior of the model is described by the limiting case of vanishing correlation time. This indicates that the Galilean symmetry of the model violated by the "colored" random force is restored in the inertial range. This regime corresponds to the only nontrivial fixed point of the renormalization group equation. The stability of this point depends on the relation between the exponents in the energy spectrum E ∝k1 -y and the dispersion law ω ∝k2 -η . The second analyzed problem is the passive advection of a scalar field by this velocity ensemble. Correlation functions of the scalar field exhibit anomalous scaling behavior in the inertial-convective range. We demonstrate that in accordance with Kolmogorov's hypothesis of the local symmetry restoration the main contribution to the operator product expansion is given by the isotropic operator, while anisotropic terms should be considered only as corrections.

  3. Statistical theory of turbulent incompressible multimaterial flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashiwa, B.

    1987-10-01

    Interpenetrating motion of incompressible materials is considered. ''Turbulence'' is defined as any deviation from the mean motion. Accordingly a nominally stationary fluid will exhibit turbulent fluctuations due to a single, slowly moving sphere. Mean conservation equations for interpenetrating materials in arbitrary proportions are derived using an ensemble averaging procedure, beginning with the exact equations of motion. The result is a set of conservation equations for the mean mass, momentum and fluctuational kinetic energy of each material. The equation system is at first unclosed due to integral terms involving unknown one-point and two-point probability distribution functions. In the mean momentum equation, the unclosed terms are clearly identified as representing two physical processes. One is transport of momentum by multimaterial Reynolds stresses, and the other is momentum exchange due to pressure fluctuations and viscous stress at material interfaces. Closure is approached by combining careful examination of multipoint statistical correlations with the traditional physical technique of κ-ε modeling for single-material turbulence. This involves representing the multimaterial Reynolds stress for each material as a turbulent viscosity times the rate of strain based on the mean velocity of that material. The multimaterial turbulent viscosity is related to the fluctuational kinetic energy κ, and the rate of fluctuational energy dissipation ε, for each material. Hence a set of κ and ε equations must be solved, together with mean mass and momentum conservation equations, for each material. Both κ and the turbulent viscosities enter into the momentum exchange force. The theory is applied to (a) calculation of the drag force on a sphere fixed in a uniform flow, (b) calculation of the settling rate in a suspension and (c) calculation of velocity profiles in the pneumatic transport of solid particles in a pipe

  4. Statistical steady states in turbulent droplet condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bec, Jeremie; Krstulovic, Giorgio; Siewert, Christoph

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the general problem of turbulent condensation. Using direct numerical simulations we show that the fluctuations of the supersaturation field offer different conditions for the growth of droplets which evolve in time due to turbulent transport and mixing. This leads to propose a Lagrangian stochastic model consisting of a set of integro-differential equations for the joint evolution of the squared radius and the supersaturation along droplet trajectories. The model has two parameters fixed by the total amount of water and the thermodynamic properties, as well as the Lagrangian integral timescale of the turbulent supersaturation. The model reproduces very well the droplet size distributions obtained from direct numerical simulations and their time evolution. A noticeable result is that, after a stage where the squared radius simply diffuses, the system converges exponentially fast to a statistical steady state independent of the initial conditions. The main mechanism involved in this convergence is a loss of memory induced by a significant number of droplets undergoing a complete evaporation before growing again. The statistical steady state is characterised by an exponential tail in the droplet mass distribution.

  5. BOOK REVIEW: Statistical Mechanics of Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambon, C.

    2004-10-01

    This is a handbook for a computational approach to reacting flows, including background material on statistical mechanics. In this sense, the title is somewhat misleading with respect to other books dedicated to the statistical theory of turbulence (e.g. Monin and Yaglom). In the present book, emphasis is placed on modelling (engineering closures) for computational fluid dynamics. The probabilistic (pdf) approach is applied to the local scalar field, motivated first by the nonlinearity of chemical source terms which appear in the transport equations of reacting species. The probabilistic and stochastic approaches are also used for the velocity field and particle position; nevertheless they are essentially limited to Lagrangian models for a local vector, with only single-point statistics, as for the scalar. Accordingly, conventional techniques, such as single-point closures for RANS (Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes) and subgrid-scale models for LES (large-eddy simulations), are described and in some cases reformulated using underlying Langevin models and filtered pdfs. Even if the theoretical approach to turbulence is not discussed in general, the essentials of probabilistic and stochastic-processes methods are described, with a useful reminder concerning statistics at the molecular level. The book comprises 7 chapters. Chapter 1 briefly states the goals and contents, with a very clear synoptic scheme on page 2. Chapter 2 presents definitions and examples of pdfs and related statistical moments. Chapter 3 deals with stochastic processes, pdf transport equations, from Kramer-Moyal to Fokker-Planck (for Markov processes), and moments equations. Stochastic differential equations are introduced and their relationship to pdfs described. This chapter ends with a discussion of stochastic modelling. The equations of fluid mechanics and thermodynamics are addressed in chapter 4. Classical conservation equations (mass, velocity, internal energy) are derived from their

  6. Thermalized solutions, statistical mechanics and turbulence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-02-20

    Feb 20, 2015 ... In this study, we examine the intriguing connection between turbulence and equilibrium statistical mechanics. There are several recent works which emphasize this connection. Thus in the last ... Current Issue : Vol. 90, Issue 6.

  7. Statistical analysis of anomalous transport in resistive interchange turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugama, Hideo; Wakatani, Masahiro.

    1992-01-01

    A new anomalous transport model for resistive interchange turbulence is derived from statistical analysis applying two-scale direct-interaction approximation to resistive magnetohydrodynamic equations with a gravity term. Our model is similar to the K-ε model for eddy viscosity of turbulent shear flows in that anomalous transport coefficients are expressed in terms of by the turbulent kinetic energy K and its dissipation rate ε while K and ε are determined by transport equations. This anomalous transport model can describe some nonlocal effects such as those from boundary conditions which cannot be treated by conventional models based on the transport coefficients represented by locally determined plasma parameters. (author)

  8. The Statistical Mechanics of Ideal MHD Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2003-01-01

    Turbulence is a universal, nonlinear phenomenon found in all energetic fluid and plasma motion. In particular. understanding magneto hydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and incorporating its effects in the computation and prediction of the flow of ionized gases in space, for example, are great challenges that must be met if such computations and predictions are to be meaningful. Although a general solution to the "problem of turbulence" does not exist in closed form, numerical integrations allow us to explore the phase space of solutions for both ideal and dissipative flows. For homogeneous, incompressible turbulence, Fourier methods are appropriate, and phase space is defined by the Fourier coefficients of the physical fields. In the case of ideal MHD flows, a fairly robust statistical mechanics has been developed, in which the symmetry and ergodic properties of phase space is understood. A discussion of these properties will illuminate our principal discovery: Coherent structure and randomness co-exist in ideal MHD turbulence. For dissipative flows, as opposed to ideal flows, progress beyond the dimensional analysis of Kolmogorov has been difficult. Here, some possible future directions that draw on the ideal results will also be discussed. Our conclusion will be that while ideal turbulence is now well understood, real turbulence still presents great challenges.

  9. A turbulence model in mixtures. First part: Statistical description of mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besnard, D.

    1987-03-01

    Classical theory of mixtures gives a model for molecular mixtures. This kind of model is based on a small gradient approximation for concentration, temperature, and pression. We present here a mixture model, allowing for large gradients in the flow. We also show that, with a local balance assumption between material diffusion and flow gradients evolution, we obtain a model similar to those mentioned above [fr

  10. Radiation statistics in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Silva, C B; Coelho, P J; Malico, I

    2009-01-01

    An analysis of turbulence-radiation interaction (TRI) in statistically stationary (forced) homogeneous and isotropic turbulence is presented. A direct numerical simulation code was used to generate instantaneous turbulent scalar fields, and the radiative transfer equation (RTE) was solved to provide statistical data relevant in TRI. The radiation intensity is non-Gaussian and is not spatially correlated with any of the other turbulence or radiation quantities. Its power spectrum exhibits a power-law region with a slope steeper than the classical -5/3 law. The moments of the radiation intensity, Planck-mean and incident-mean absorption coefficients, and emission and absorption TRI correlations are calculated. The influence of the optical thickness of the medium, mean and variance of the temperature and variance of the molar fraction of the absorbing species is studied. Predictions obtained from the time-averaged RTE are also included. It was found that while turbulence yields an increase of the mean blackbody radiation intensity, it causes a decrease of the time-averaged Planck-mean absorption coefficient. The absorption coefficient self-correlation is small in comparison with the temperature self-correlation, and the role of TRI in radiative emission is more important than in radiative absorption. The absorption coefficient-radiation intensity correlation is small, which supports the optically thin fluctuation approximation, and justifies the good predictions often achieved using the time-averaged RTE.

  11. Radiation statistics in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Silva, C B; Coelho, P J [Mechanical Engineering Department, IDMEC/LAETA, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Malico, I [Physics Department, University of Evora, Rua Romao Ramalho, 59, 7000-671 Evora (Portugal)], E-mail: carlos.silva@ist.utl.pt, E-mail: imbm@uevora.pt, E-mail: pedro.coelho@ist.utl.pt

    2009-09-15

    An analysis of turbulence-radiation interaction (TRI) in statistically stationary (forced) homogeneous and isotropic turbulence is presented. A direct numerical simulation code was used to generate instantaneous turbulent scalar fields, and the radiative transfer equation (RTE) was solved to provide statistical data relevant in TRI. The radiation intensity is non-Gaussian and is not spatially correlated with any of the other turbulence or radiation quantities. Its power spectrum exhibits a power-law region with a slope steeper than the classical -5/3 law. The moments of the radiation intensity, Planck-mean and incident-mean absorption coefficients, and emission and absorption TRI correlations are calculated. The influence of the optical thickness of the medium, mean and variance of the temperature and variance of the molar fraction of the absorbing species is studied. Predictions obtained from the time-averaged RTE are also included. It was found that while turbulence yields an increase of the mean blackbody radiation intensity, it causes a decrease of the time-averaged Planck-mean absorption coefficient. The absorption coefficient self-correlation is small in comparison with the temperature self-correlation, and the role of TRI in radiative emission is more important than in radiative absorption. The absorption coefficient-radiation intensity correlation is small, which supports the optically thin fluctuation approximation, and justifies the good predictions often achieved using the time-averaged RTE.

  12. Toy models of developed turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Hnatich

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the advection of a passive scalar quantity by incompressible helical turbulent flow within the framework of extended Kraichnan model. Turbulent fluctuations of velocity field are assumed to have the Gaussian statistics with zero mean and defined noise with finite time-correlation. Actual calculations have been done up to two-loop approximation within the framework of field-theoretic renormalization group approach. It turned out that space parity violation (helicity of turbulent environment does not affect anomalous scaling which is a peculiar attribute of the corresponding model without helicity. However, stability of asymptotic regimes, where anomalous scaling takes place, strongly depends on the amount of helicity. Moreover, helicity gives rise to the turbulent diffusivity, which has been calculated in one-loop approximation.

  13. Gyrokinetic Statistical Absolute Equilibrium and Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Jian-Zhou; Hammett, Gregory W.

    2011-01-01

    A paradigm based on the absolute equilibrium of Galerkin-truncated inviscid systems to aid in understanding turbulence (T.-D. Lee, 'On some statistical properties of hydrodynamical and magnetohydrodynamical fields,' Q. Appl. Math. 10, 69 (1952)) is taken to study gyrokinetic plasma turbulence: A finite set of Fourier modes of the collisionless gyrokinetic equations are kept and the statistical equilibria are calculated; possible implications for plasma turbulence in various situations are discussed. For the case of two spatial and one velocity dimension, in the calculation with discretization also of velocity v with N grid points (where N + 1 quantities are conserved, corresponding to an energy invariant and N entropy-related invariants), the negative temperature states, corresponding to the condensation of the generalized energy into the lowest modes, are found. This indicates a generic feature of inverse energy cascade. Comparisons are made with some classical results, such as those of Charney-Hasegawa-Mima in the cold-ion limit. There is a universal shape for statistical equilibrium of gyrokinetics in three spatial and two velocity dimensions with just one conserved quantity. Possible physical relevance to turbulence, such as ITG zonal flows, and to a critical balance hypothesis are also discussed.

  14. Effective control of complex turbulent dynamical systems through statistical functionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majda, Andrew J; Qi, Di

    2017-05-30

    Turbulent dynamical systems characterized by both a high-dimensional phase space and a large number of instabilities are ubiquitous among complex systems in science and engineering, including climate, material, and neural science. Control of these complex systems is a grand challenge, for example, in mitigating the effects of climate change or safe design of technology with fully developed shear turbulence. Control of flows in the transition to turbulence, where there is a small dimension of instabilities about a basic mean state, is an important and successful discipline. In complex turbulent dynamical systems, it is impossible to track and control the large dimension of instabilities, which strongly interact and exchange energy, and new control strategies are needed. The goal of this paper is to propose an effective statistical control strategy for complex turbulent dynamical systems based on a recent statistical energy principle and statistical linear response theory. We illustrate the potential practical efficiency and verify this effective statistical control strategy on the 40D Lorenz 1996 model in forcing regimes with various types of fully turbulent dynamics with nearly one-half of the phase space unstable.

  15. Gyrokinetic statistical absolute equilibrium and turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Jianzhou; Hammett, Gregory W.

    2010-01-01

    A paradigm based on the absolute equilibrium of Galerkin-truncated inviscid systems to aid in understanding turbulence [T.-D. Lee, Q. Appl. Math. 10, 69 (1952)] is taken to study gyrokinetic plasma turbulence: a finite set of Fourier modes of the collisionless gyrokinetic equations are kept and the statistical equilibria are calculated; possible implications for plasma turbulence in various situations are discussed. For the case of two spatial and one velocity dimension, in the calculation with discretization also of velocity v with N grid points (where N+1 quantities are conserved, corresponding to an energy invariant and N entropy-related invariants), the negative temperature states, corresponding to the condensation of the generalized energy into the lowest modes, are found. This indicates a generic feature of inverse energy cascade. Comparisons are made with some classical results, such as those of Charney-Hasegawa-Mima in the cold-ion limit. There is a universal shape for statistical equilibrium of gyrokinetics in three spatial and two velocity dimensions with just one conserved quantity. Possible physical relevance to turbulence, such as ITG zonal flows, and to a critical balance hypothesis are also discussed.

  16. Turbulence Statistics in a Two-Dimensional Vortex Condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frishman, Anna; Herbert, Corentin

    2018-05-01

    Disentangling the evolution of a coherent mean-flow and turbulent fluctuations, interacting through the nonlinearity of the Navier-Stokes equations, is a central issue in fluid mechanics. It affects a wide range of flows, such as planetary atmospheres, plasmas, or wall-bounded flows, and hampers turbulence models. We consider the special case of a two-dimensional flow in a periodic box, for which the mean flow, a pair of box-size vortices called "condensate," emerges from turbulence. As was recently shown, a perturbative closure describes correctly the condensate when turbulence is excited at small scales. In this context, we obtain explicit results for the statistics of turbulence, encoded in the Reynolds stress tensor. We demonstrate that the two components of the Reynolds stress, the momentum flux and the turbulent energy, are determined by different mechanisms. It was suggested previously that the momentum flux is fixed by a balance between forcing and mean-flow advection: using unprecedently long numerical simulations, we provide the first direct evidence supporting this prediction. By contrast, combining analytical computations with numerical simulations, we show that the turbulent energy is determined only by mean-flow advection and obtain for the first time a formula describing its profile in the vortex.

  17. Statistical descriptions of polydisperse turbulent two-phase flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minier, Jean-Pierre, E-mail: jean-pierre.minier@edf.fr

    2016-12-15

    Disperse two-phase flows are flows containing two non-miscible phases where one phase is present as a set of discrete elements dispersed in the second one. These discrete elements, or ‘particles’, can be droplets, bubbles or solid particles having different sizes. This situation encompasses a wide range of phenomena, from nano-particles and colloids sensitive to the molecular fluctuations of the carrier fluid to inertia particles transported by the large-scale motions of turbulent flows and, depending on the phenomenon studied, a broad spectrum of approaches have been developed. The aim of the present article is to analyze statistical models of particles in turbulent flows by addressing this issue as the extension of the classical formulations operating at a molecular or meso-molecular level of description. It has a three-fold purpose: (1) to bring out the thread of continuity between models for discrete particles in turbulent flows (above the hydrodynamical level of description) and classical mesoscopic formulations of statistical physics (below the hydrodynamical level); (2) to reveal the specific challenges met by statistical models in turbulence; (3) to establish a methodology for modeling particle dynamics in random media with non-zero space and time correlations. The presentation is therefore centered on organizing the different approaches, establishing links and clarifying physical foundations. The analysis of disperse two-phase flow models is developed by discussing: first, approaches of classical statistical physics; then, by considering models for single-phase turbulent flows; and, finally, by addressing current formulations for discrete particles in turbulent flows. This brings out that particle-based models do not cease to exist above the hydrodynamical level and offer great interest when combined with proper stochastic formulations to account for the lack of equilibrium distributions and scale separation. In the course of this study, general

  18. Fade statistics of M-turbulent optical links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurado-Navas, Antonio; Maria Garrido-Balsells, Jose; Castillo-Vazquez, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    A new and generalized statistical model, called Malaga or simply M distribution, has been derived recently to characterize the irradiance fluctuations of an unbounded optical wavefront propagating through a turbulent medium under all irradiance fluctuation conditions. The aforementioned model...... extends and unifies in a simple analytical closed-form expression most of the proposed statistical models for free-space optical (FSO) communications widely employed until now in the scientific literature. Based on that M model, we have studied some important features associated to its fade statistics...

  19. Modeling of turbulent chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.-Y.

    1995-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on modeling turbulent reacting flows, regimes of turbulent combustion, regimes of premixed and regimes of non-premixed turbulent combustion, chemical closure models, flamelet model, conditional moment closure (CMC), NO(x) emissions from turbulent H2 jet flames, probability density function (PDF), departures from chemical equilibrium, mixing models for PDF methods, comparison of predicted and measured H2O mass fractions in turbulent nonpremixed jet flames, experimental evidence of preferential diffusion in turbulent jet flames, and computation of turbulent reacting flows.

  20. The Kolmogorov-Obukhov Statistical Theory of Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnir, Björn

    2013-08-01

    In 1941 Kolmogorov and Obukhov postulated the existence of a statistical theory of turbulence, which allows the computation of statistical quantities that can be simulated and measured in a turbulent system. These are quantities such as the moments, the structure functions and the probability density functions (PDFs) of the turbulent velocity field. In this paper we will outline how to construct this statistical theory from the stochastic Navier-Stokes equation. The additive noise in the stochastic Navier-Stokes equation is generic noise given by the central limit theorem and the large deviation principle. The multiplicative noise consists of jumps multiplying the velocity, modeling jumps in the velocity gradient. We first estimate the structure functions of turbulence and establish the Kolmogorov-Obukhov 1962 scaling hypothesis with the She-Leveque intermittency corrections. Then we compute the invariant measure of turbulence, writing the stochastic Navier-Stokes equation as an infinite-dimensional Ito process, and solving the linear Kolmogorov-Hopf functional differential equation for the invariant measure. Finally we project the invariant measure onto the PDF. The PDFs turn out to be the normalized inverse Gaussian (NIG) distributions of Barndorff-Nilsen, and compare well with PDFs from simulations and experiments.

  1. Stochastic modelling of turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Emil Hedevang Lohse

    previously been shown to be closely connected to the energy dissipation. The incorporation of the small scale dynamics into the spatial model opens the door to a fully fledged stochastic model of turbulence. Concerning the interaction of wind and wind turbine, a new method is proposed to extract wind turbine...

  2. Turbulence modelling; Modelisation de la turbulence isotherme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurence, D. [Electricite de France (EDF), Direction des Etudes et Recherches, 92 - Clamart (France)

    1997-12-31

    This paper is an introduction course in modelling turbulent thermohydraulics, aimed at computational fluid dynamics users. No specific knowledge other than the Navier Stokes equations is required beforehand. Chapter I (which those who are not beginners can skip) provides basic ideas on turbulence physics and is taken up in a textbook prepared by the teaching team of the ENPC (Benque, Viollet). Chapter II describes turbulent viscosity type modelling and the 2k-{epsilon} two equations model. It provides details of the channel flow case and the boundary conditions. Chapter III describes the `standard` (R{sub ij}-{epsilon}) Reynolds tensions transport model and introduces more recent models called `feasible`. A second paper deals with heat transfer and the effects of gravity, and returns to the Reynolds stress transport model. (author). 37 refs.

  3. Lagrangian statistics in compressible isotropic homogeneous turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yantao; Wang, Jianchun; Shi, Yipeng; Chen, Shiyi

    2011-11-01

    In this work we conducted the Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of a forced compressible isotropic homogeneous turbulence and investigated the flow statistics from the Lagrangian point of view, namely the statistics is computed following the passive tracers trajectories. The numerical method combined the Eulerian field solver which was developed by Wang et al. (2010, J. Comp. Phys., 229, 5257-5279), and a Lagrangian module for tracking the tracers and recording the data. The Lagrangian probability density functions (p.d.f.'s) have then been calculated for both kinetic and thermodynamic quantities. In order to isolate the shearing part from the compressing part of the flow, we employed the Helmholtz decomposition to decompose the flow field (mainly the velocity field) into the solenoidal and compressive parts. The solenoidal part was compared with the incompressible case, while the compressibility effect showed up in the compressive part. The Lagrangian structure functions and cross-correlation between various quantities will also be discussed. This work was supported in part by the China's Turbulence Program under Grant No.2009CB724101.

  4. Statistical properties of turbulence: An overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the turbulent advection of passive scalars, turbulence in the one-dimensional Burgers equation, and fluid turbulence in the presence of polymer ... However, it is not easy to state what would consti- tute a solution of the turbulence ...... flow with Lagrangian tracers and use a cubic spline interpolation method to calculate their ...

  5. Statistical theory of resistive drift-wave turbulence and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, G.; Krommes, J.A.; Bowman, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    Resistive drift-wave turbulence in a slab geometry is studied by statistical closure methods and direct numerical simulations. The two-field Hasegawa endash Wakatani (HW) fluid model, which evolves the electrostatic potential and plasma density self-consistently, is a paradigm for understanding the generic nonlinear behavior of multiple-field plasma turbulence. A gyrokinetic derivation of the HW model is sketched. The recently developed Realizable Markovian Closure (RMC) is applied to the HW model; spectral properties, nonlinear energy transfers, and turbulent transport calculations are discussed. The closure results are also compared to direct numerical simulation results; excellent agreement is found. The transport scaling with the adiabaticity parameter, which measures the strength of the parallel electron resistivity, is analytically derived and understood through weak- and strong-turbulence analyses. No evidence is found to support previous suggestions that coherent structures cause a large depression of saturated transport from its quasilinear value in the hydrodynamic regime of the HW model. Instead, the depression of transport is well explained by the spectral balance equation of the (second-order) statistical closure when account is taken of incoherent noise. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  6. A statistical state dynamics approach to wall turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, B F; Gayme, D F; Ioannou, P J

    2017-03-13

    This paper reviews results obtained using statistical state dynamics (SSD) that demonstrate the benefits of adopting this perspective for understanding turbulence in wall-bounded shear flows. The SSD approach used in this work employs a second-order closure that retains only the interaction between the streamwise mean flow and the streamwise mean perturbation covariance. This closure restricts nonlinearity in the SSD to that explicitly retained in the streamwise constant mean flow together with nonlinear interactions between the mean flow and the perturbation covariance. This dynamical restriction, in which explicit perturbation-perturbation nonlinearity is removed from the perturbation equation, results in a simplified dynamics referred to as the restricted nonlinear (RNL) dynamics. RNL systems, in which a finite ensemble of realizations of the perturbation equation share the same mean flow, provide tractable approximations to the SSD, which is equivalent to an infinite ensemble RNL system. This infinite ensemble system, referred to as the stochastic structural stability theory system, introduces new analysis tools for studying turbulence. RNL systems provide computationally efficient means to approximate the SSD and produce self-sustaining turbulence exhibiting qualitative features similar to those observed in direct numerical simulations despite greatly simplified dynamics. The results presented show that RNL turbulence can be supported by as few as a single streamwise varying component interacting with the streamwise constant mean flow and that judicious selection of this truncated support or 'band-limiting' can be used to improve quantitative accuracy of RNL turbulence. These results suggest that the SSD approach provides new analytical and computational tools that allow new insights into wall turbulence.This article is part of the themed issue 'Toward the development of high-fidelity models of wall turbulence at large Reynolds number'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  7. Model for Simulation Atmospheric Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik

    1976-01-01

    A method that produces realistic simulations of atmospheric turbulence is developed and analyzed. The procedure makes use of a generalized spectral analysis, often called a proper orthogonal decomposition or the Karhunen-Loève expansion. A set of criteria, emphasizing a realistic appearance...... eigenfunctions and estimates of the distributions of the corresponding expansion coefficients. The simulation method utilizes the eigenfunction expansion procedure to produce preliminary time histories of the three velocity components simultaneously. As a final step, a spectral shaping procedure is then applied....... The method is unique in modeling the three velocity components simultaneously, and it is found that important cross-statistical features are reasonably well-behaved. It is concluded that the model provides a practical, operational simulator of atmospheric turbulence....

  8. Collaborative testing of turbulence models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, P.

    1992-12-01

    This project, funded by AFOSR, ARO, NASA, and ONR, was run by the writer with Profs. Brian E. Launder, University of Manchester, England, and John L. Lumley, Cornell University. Statistical data on turbulent flows, from lab. experiments and simulations, were circulated to modelers throughout the world. This is the first large-scale project of its kind to use simulation data. The modelers returned their predictions to Stanford, for distribution to all modelers and to additional participants ('experimenters')--over 100 in all. The object was to obtain a consensus on the capabilities of present-day turbulence models and identify which types most deserve future support. This was not completely achieved, mainly because not enough modelers could produce results for enough test cases within the duration of the project. However, a clear picture of the capabilities of various modeling groups has appeared, and the interaction has been helpful to the modelers. The results support the view that Reynolds-stress transport models are the most accurate.

  9. Vortex statistics for turbulence in a container with rigid boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clercx, H.J.H.; Nielsen, A.H.

    2000-01-01

    The evolution of vortex statistics for decaying two-dimensional turbulence in a square container with rigid no-slip walls is compared with a few available experimental results and with the scaling theory of two-dimensional turbulent decay as proposed by Carnevale et al. Power-law exponents......, computed from an ensemble average of several numerical runs, coincide with some experimentally obtained values, but not with data obtained from numerical simulations of decaying two-dimensional turbulence with periodic boundary conditions....

  10. Statistical Model of Extreme Shear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose

    2004-01-01

    In order to continue cost-optimisation of modern large wind turbines, it is important to continously increase the knowledge on wind field parameters relevant to design loads. This paper presents a general statistical model that offers site-specific prediction of the probability density function...... by a model that, on a statistically consistent basis, describe the most likely spatial shape of an extreme wind shear event. Predictions from the model have been compared with results from an extreme value data analysis, based on a large number of high-sampled full-scale time series measurements...... are consistent, given the inevitabel uncertainties associated with model as well as with the extreme value data analysis. Keywords: Statistical model, extreme wind conditions, statistical analysis, turbulence, wind loading, statistical analysis, turbulence, wind loading, wind shear, wind turbines....

  11. Behaviour of turbulence models near a turbulent/non-turbulent interface revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrey, P.; Aupoix, B.

    2006-01-01

    The behaviour of turbulence models near a turbulent/non-turbulent interface is investigated. The analysis holds as well for two-equation as for Reynolds stress turbulence models using Daly and Harlow diffusion model. The behaviour near the interface is shown not to be a power law, as usually considered, but a more complex parametric solution. Why previous works seemed to numerically confirm the power law solution is explained. Constraints for turbulence modelling, i.e., for ensuring that models have a good behaviour near a turbulent/non-turbulent interface so that the solution is not sensitive to small turbulence levels imposed in the irrotational flow, are drawn

  12. Vortex statistics in turbulent rotating convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunnen, R.P.J.; Clercx, H.J.H.; Geurts, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    The vortices emerging in rotating turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in water at Rayleigh number Ra=6.0×108 are investigated using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry and by direct numerical simulation. The so-called Q criterion is used to detect the vortices from velocity fields. This

  13. Statistical properties of turbulence: An overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAMANA. cO Indian Academy of Sciences. Vol. 73, No. 1. — journal of .... also be obtained from atmospheric boundary layers [61–64], oceanic flows [65], and ... tion [72], structures behind a splitter plate [73], and large vortical structures in ... its PDF shows that, in turbulent flows, λ2 has a small, positive mean value [80];.

  14. Fundamental Statistical Descriptions of Plasma Turbulence in Magnetic Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krommes, John A.

    2001-01-01

    A pedagogical review of the historical development and current status (as of early 2000) of systematic statistical theories of plasma turbulence is undertaken. Emphasis is on conceptual foundations and methodology, not practical applications. Particular attention is paid to equations and formalism appropriate to strongly magnetized, fully ionized plasmas. Extensive reference to the literature on neutral-fluid turbulence is made, but the unique properties and problems of plasmas are emphasized throughout. Discussions are given of quasilinear theory, weak-turbulence theory, resonance-broadening theory, and the clump algorithm. Those are developed independently, then shown to be special cases of the direct-interaction approximation (DIA), which provides a central focus for the article. Various methods of renormalized perturbation theory are described, then unified with the aid of the generating-functional formalism of Martin, Siggia, and Rose. A general expression for the renormalized dielectric function is deduced and discussed in detail. Modern approaches such as decimation and PDF methods are described. Derivations of DIA-based Markovian closures are discussed. The eddy-damped quasinormal Markovian closure is shown to be nonrealizable in the presence of waves, and a new realizable Markovian closure is presented. The test-field model and a realizable modification thereof are also summarized. Numerical solutions of various closures for some plasma-physics paradigms are reviewed. The variational approach to bounds on transport is developed. Miscellaneous topics include Onsager symmetries for turbulence, the interpretation of entropy balances for both kinetic and fluid descriptions, self-organized criticality, statistical interactions between disparate scales, and the roles of both mean and random shear. Appendices are provided on Fourier transform conventions, dimensional and scaling analysis, the derivations of nonlinear gyrokinetic and gyrofluid equations

  15. Fundamental Statistical Descriptions of Plasma Turbulence in Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John A. Krommes

    2001-02-16

    A pedagogical review of the historical development and current status (as of early 2000) of systematic statistical theories of plasma turbulence is undertaken. Emphasis is on conceptual foundations and methodology, not practical applications. Particular attention is paid to equations and formalism appropriate to strongly magnetized, fully ionized plasmas. Extensive reference to the literature on neutral-fluid turbulence is made, but the unique properties and problems of plasmas are emphasized throughout. Discussions are given of quasilinear theory, weak-turbulence theory, resonance-broadening theory, and the clump algorithm. Those are developed independently, then shown to be special cases of the direct-interaction approximation (DIA), which provides a central focus for the article. Various methods of renormalized perturbation theory are described, then unified with the aid of the generating-functional formalism of Martin, Siggia, and Rose. A general expression for the renormalized dielectric function is deduced and discussed in detail. Modern approaches such as decimation and PDF methods are described. Derivations of DIA-based Markovian closures are discussed. The eddy-damped quasinormal Markovian closure is shown to be nonrealizable in the presence of waves, and a new realizable Markovian closure is presented. The test-field model and a realizable modification thereof are also summarized. Numerical solutions of various closures for some plasma-physics paradigms are reviewed. The variational approach to bounds on transport is developed. Miscellaneous topics include Onsager symmetries for turbulence, the interpretation of entropy balances for both kinetic and fluid descriptions, self-organized criticality, statistical interactions between disparate scales, and the roles of both mean and random shear. Appendices are provided on Fourier transform conventions, dimensional and scaling analysis, the derivations of nonlinear gyrokinetic and gyrofluid equations

  16. Direct numerical simulation and statistical analysis of turbulent convection in lead-bismuth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otic, I.; Grotzbach, G. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Institut fuer Kern-und Energietechnik (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Improved turbulent heat flux models are required to develop and analyze the reactor concept of an lead-bismuth cooled Accelerator-Driven-System. Because of specific properties of many liquid metals we have still no sensors for accurate measurements of the high frequency velocity fluctuations. So, the development of the turbulent heat transfer models which are required in our CFD (computational fluid dynamics) tools needs also data from direct numerical simulations of turbulent flows. We use new simulation results for the model problem of Rayleigh-Benard convection to show some peculiarities of the turbulent natural convection in lead-bismuth (Pr = 0.025). Simulations for this flow at sufficiently large turbulence levels became only recently feasible because this flow requires the resolution of very small velocity scales with the need for recording long-wave structures for the slow changes in the convective temperature field. The results are analyzed regarding the principle convection and heat transfer features. They are also used to perform statistical analysis to show that the currently available modeling is indeed not adequate for these fluids. Basing on the knowledge of the details of the statistical features of turbulence in this convection type and using the two-point correlation technique, a proposal for an improved statistical turbulence model is developed which is expected to account better for the peculiarities of the heat transfer in the turbulent convection in low Prandtl number fluids. (authors)

  17. Workshop on Engineering Turbulence Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinelli, Louis A. (Editor); Liou, W. W. (Editor); Shabbir, A. (Editor); Shih, T.-H. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Discussed here is the future direction of various levels of engineering turbulence modeling related to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computations for propulsion. For each level of computation, there are a few turbulence models which represent the state-of-the-art for that level. However, it is important to know their capabilities as well as their deficiencies in order to help engineers select and implement the appropriate models in their real world engineering calculations. This will also help turbulence modelers perceive the future directions for improving turbulence models. The focus is on one-point closure models (i.e., from algebraic models to higher order moment closure schemes and partial differential equation methods) which can be applied to CFD computations. However, other schemes helpful in developing one-point closure models, are also discussed.

  18. Lagrangian statistics across the turbulent-nonturbulent interface in a turbulent plane jet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taveira, Rodrigo R; Diogo, José S; Lopes, Diogo C; da Silva, Carlos B

    2013-10-01

    Lagrangian statistics from millions of particles are used to study the turbulent entrainment mechanism in a direct numerical simulation of a turbulent plane jet at Re(λ) ≈ 110. The particles (tracers) are initially seeded at the irrotational region of the jet near the turbulent shear layer and are followed as they are drawn into the turbulent region across the turbulent-nonturbulent interface (TNTI), allowing the study of the enstrophy buildup and thereby characterizing the turbulent entrainment mechanism in the jet. The use of Lagrangian statistics following fluid particles gives a more correct description of the entrainment mechanism than in previous works since the statistics in relation to the TNTI position involve data from the trajectories of the entraining fluid particles. The Lagrangian statistics for the particles show the existence of a velocity jump and a characteristic vorticity jump (with a thickness which is one order of magnitude greater than the Kolmogorov microscale), in agreement with previous results using Eulerian statistics. The particles initially acquire enstrophy by viscous diffusion and later by enstrophy production, which becomes "active" only deep inside the turbulent region. Both enstrophy diffusion and production near the TNTI differ substantially from inside the turbulent region. Only about 1% of all particles find their way into pockets of irrotational flow engulfed into the turbulent shear layer region, indicating that "engulfment" is not significant for the present flow, indirectly suggesting that the entrainment is largely due to "nibbling" small-scale mechanisms acting along the entire TNTI surface. Probability density functions of particle positions suggests that the particles spend more time crossing the region near the TNTI than traveling inside the turbulent region, consistent with the particles moving tangent to the interface around the time they cross it.

  19. Modeling Compressed Turbulence with BHR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Daniel

    2011-11-01

    Turbulence undergoing compression or expansion occurs in systems ranging from internal combustion engines to supernovae. One common feature in many of these systems is the presence of multiple reacting species. Direct numerical simulation data is available for the single-fluid, low turbulent Mach number case. Wu, et al. (1985) compared their DNS results to several Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes models. They also proposed a three-equation k - ɛ - τ model, in conjunction with a Reynolds-stress model. Subsequent researchers have proposed alternative corrections to the standard k - ɛ formulation. Here we investigate three variants of the BHR model (Besnard, 1992). BHR is a model for multi-species variable-density turbulence. The three variants are the linear eddy-viscosity, algebraic-stress, and full Reynolds-stress formulations. We then examine the predictions of the model for the fluctuating density field for the case of variable-density turbulence.

  20. Stochastic Subspace Modelling of Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sichani, Mahdi Teimouri; Pedersen, B. J.; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2009-01-01

    positive definite cross-spectral density matrix a frequency response matrix is constructed which determines the turbulence vector as a linear filtration of Gaussian white noise. Finally, an accurate state space modelling method is proposed which allows selection of an appropriate model order......, and estimation of a state space model for the vector turbulence process incorporating its phase spectrum in one stage, and its results are compared with a conventional ARMA modelling method.......Turbulence of the incoming wind field is of paramount importance to the dynamic response of civil engineering structures. Hence reliable stochastic models of the turbulence should be available from which time series can be generated for dynamic response and structural safety analysis. In the paper...

  1. On the turbulent flow in piston engines: Coupling of statistical theory quantities and instantaneous turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zentgraf, Florian; Baum, Elias; Dreizler, Andreas [Fachgebiet Reaktive Strömungen und Messtechnik (RSM), Center of Smart Interfaces (CSI), Technische Universität Darmstadt, Jovanka-Bontschits-Straße 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Böhm, Benjamin [Fachgebiet Energie und Kraftwerkstechnik (EKT), Technische Universität Darmstadt, Jovanka-Bontschits-Straße 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Peterson, Brian, E-mail: brian.peterson@ed.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, School of Engineering, Institute for Energy Systems, University of Edinburgh, The King’s Buildings, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JL, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-15

    Planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) and tomographic PIV (TPIV) measurements are utilized to analyze turbulent statistical theory quantities and the instantaneous turbulence within a single-cylinder optical engine. Measurements are performed during the intake and mid-compression stroke at 800 and 1500 RPM. TPIV facilitates the evaluation of spatially resolved Reynolds stress tensor (RST) distributions, anisotropic Reynolds stress invariants, and instantaneous turbulent vortical structures. The RST analysis describes distributions of individual velocity fluctuation components that arise from unsteady turbulent flow behavior as well as cycle-to-cycle variability (CCV). A conditional analysis, for which instantaneous PIV images are sampled by their tumble center location, reveals that CCV and turbulence have similar contributions to RST distributions at the mean tumble center, but turbulence is dominant in regions peripheral to the tumble center. Analysis of the anisotropic Reynolds stress invariants reveals the spatial distribution of axisymmetric expansion, axisymmetric contraction, and 3D isotropy within the cylinder. Findings indicate that the mid-compression flow exhibits a higher tendency toward 3D isotropy than the intake flow. A novel post-processing algorithm is utilized to classify the geometry of instantaneous turbulent vortical structures and evaluate their frequency of occurrence within the cylinder. Findings are coupled with statistical theory quantities to provide a comprehensive understanding of the distribution of turbulent velocity components, the distribution of anisotropic states of turbulence, and compare the turbulent vortical flow distribution that is theoretically expected to what is experimentally observed. The analyses reveal requisites of important turbulent flow quantities and discern their sensitivity to the local flow topography and engine operation.

  2. Advancements in engineering turbulence modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, T.-H.

    1991-01-01

    Some new developments in two-equation models and second order closure models are presented. Two-equation models (k-epsilon models) have been widely used in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for engineering problems. Most of low-Reynolds number two-equation models contain some wall-distance damping functions to account for the effect of wall on turbulence. However, this often causes the confusion and difficulties in computing flows with complex geometry and also needs an ad hoc treatment near the separation and reattachment points. A set of modified two-equation models is proposed to remove the aforementioned shortcomings. The calculations using various two-equation models are compared with direct numerical simulations of channel flow and flat boundary layers. Development of a second order closure model is also discussed with emphasis on the modeling of pressure related correlation terms and dissipation rates in the second moment equations. All the existing models poorly predict the normal stresses near the wall and fail to predict the 3-D effect of mean flow on the turbulence (e.g. decrease in the shear stress caused by the cross flow in the boundary layer). The newly developed second order near-wall turbulence model is described and is capable of capturing the near-wall behavior of turbulence as well as the effect of 3-D mean flow on the turbulence.

  3. Structure and modeling of turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, E.A.

    1995-01-01

    The open-quotes vortex stringsclose quotes scale l s ∼ LRe -3/10 (L-external scale, Re - Reynolds number) is suggested as a grid scale for the large-eddy simulation. Various aspects of the structure of turbulence and subgrid modeling are described in terms of conditional averaging, Markov processes with dependent increments and infinitely divisible distributions. The major request from the energy, naval, aerospace and environmental engineering communities to the theory of turbulence is to reduce the enormous number of degrees of freedom in turbulent flows to a level manageable by computer simulations. The vast majority of these degrees of freedom is in the small-scale motion. The study of the structure of turbulence provides a basis for subgrid-scale (SGS) models, which are necessary for the large-eddy simulations (LES)

  4. Modeling of Turbulent Swirling Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Zhu, Jiang; Liou, William; Chen, Kuo-Huey; Liu, Nan-Suey; Lumley, John L.

    1997-01-01

    Aircraft engine combustors generally involve turbulent swirling flows in order to enhance fuel-air mixing and flame stabilization. It has long been recognized that eddy viscosity turbulence models are unable to appropriately model swirling flows. Therefore, it has been suggested that, for the modeling of these flows, a second order closure scheme should be considered because of its ability in the modeling of rotational and curvature effects. However, this scheme will require solution of many complicated second moment transport equations (six Reynolds stresses plus other scalar fluxes and variances), which is a difficult task for any CFD implementations. Also, this scheme will require a large amount of computer resources for a general combustor swirling flow. This report is devoted to the development of a cubic Reynolds stress-strain model for turbulent swirling flows, and was inspired by the work of Launder's group at UMIST. Using this type of model, one only needs to solve two turbulence equations, one for the turbulent kinetic energy k and the other for the dissipation rate epsilon. The cubic model developed in this report is based on a general Reynolds stress-strain relationship. Two flows have been chosen for model evaluation. One is a fully developed rotating pipe flow, and the other is a more complex flow with swirl and recirculation.

  5. Turbulence models in supersonic flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirani, E.; Ahmadikia, H.; Talebi, S.

    2001-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate five different turbulence models when used in rather complicated two-dimensional and axisymmetric supersonic flows. They are Baldwin-Lomax, k-l, k-ε, k-ω and k-ζ turbulence models. The compressibility effects, axisymmetric correction terms and some modifications for transition region are used and tested in the models. Two computer codes based on the control volume approach and two flux-splitting methods. Roe and Van Leer, are developed. The codes are used to simulate supersonic mixing layers, flow behind axisymmetric body, under expanded jet, and flow over hollow cylinder flare. The results are compared with experimental data and behavior of the turbulence models is examined. It is shown that both k-l and k-ζ models produce very good results. It is also shown that the compressibility correction in the model is required to obtain more accurate results. (author)

  6. Flapping model of scalar mixing in turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerstein, A.R.

    1991-01-01

    Motivated by the fluctuating plume model of turbulent mixing downstream of a point source, a flapping model is formulated for application to other configurations. For the scalar mixing layer, simple expressions for single-point scalar fluctuation statistics are obtained that agree with measurements. For a spatially homogeneous scalar mixing field, the family of probability density functions previously derived using mapping closure is reproduced. It is inferred that single-point scalar statistics may depend primarily on large-scale flapping motions in many cases of interest, and thus that multipoint statistics may be the principal indicators of finer-scale mixing effects

  7. PDF turbulence modeling and DNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, A. T.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of time discontinuity (or jump condition) in the coalescence/dispersion (C/D) mixing model is addressed in probability density function (pdf). A C/D mixing model continuous in time is introduced. With the continuous mixing model, the process of chemical reaction can be fully coupled with mixing. In the case of homogeneous turbulence decay, the new model predicts a pdf very close to a Gaussian distribution, with finite higher moments also close to that of a Gaussian distribution. Results from the continuous mixing model are compared with both experimental data and numerical results from conventional C/D models. The effect of Coriolis forces on compressible homogeneous turbulence is studied using direct numerical simulation (DNS). The numerical method used in this study is an eight order compact difference scheme. Contrary to the conclusions reached by previous DNS studies on incompressible isotropic turbulence, the present results show that the Coriolis force increases the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy, and that anisotropy develops as the Coriolis force increases. The Taylor-Proudman theory does apply since the derivatives in the direction of the rotation axis vanishes rapidly. A closer analysis reveals that the dissipation rate of the incompressible component of the turbulent kinetic energy indeed decreases with a higher rotation rate, consistent with incompressible flow simulations (Bardina), while the dissipation rate of the compressible part increases; the net gain is positive. Inertial waves are observed in the simulation results.

  8. Statistical Prediction of Laminar-turbulent Transition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rubinstein, Robert

    2000-01-01

    ... on representative stability theories including the resonant triad model and the parabolized stability equations. The first type of model can describe the effect of initial phase differences among disturbance modes on transition location...

  9. Statistical characterization of turbulence in the boundary plasma of EAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Ning; Nielsen, Anders Henry; Xu, G.S.

    2013-01-01

    In Ohmic heated low confinement mode (L-mode) discharges, the intermittent statistical characteristics of turbulent fluctuations have been investigated in the edge and the scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma on EAST (the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak) by fast reciprocating Langmuir probe...

  10. Scalar statistics in variable property turbulent channel flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patel, A.; Boersma, B.J.; Pecnik, R.

    2017-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation of fully developed, internally heated channel flows with isothermal walls is performed using the low-Mach-number approximation of Navier-Stokes equation to investigate the influence of temperature-dependent properties on turbulent scalar statistics. Different constitutive

  11. Statistics of the turbulent/non-turbulent interface in a spatially developing mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio

    2014-06-02

    The thin interface separating the inner turbulent region from the outer irrotational fluid is analysed in a direct numerical simulation of a spatially developing turbulent mixing layer. A vorticity threshold is defined to detect the interface separating the turbulent from the non-turbulent regions of the flow, and to calculate statistics conditioned on the distance from this interface. The conditional statistics for velocity are in remarkable agreement with the results for other free shear flows available in the literature, such as turbulent jets and wakes. In addition, an analysis of the passive scalar field in the vicinity of the interface is presented. It is shown that the scalar has a jump at the interface, even stronger than that observed for velocity. The strong jump for the scalar has been observed before in the case of high Schmidt number (Sc). In the present study, such a strong jump is observed for a scalar with Sc ≈ 1. Conditional statistics of kinetic energy and scalar dissipation are presented. While the kinetic energy dissipation has its maximum far from the interface, the scalar dissipation is characterised by a strong peak very close to the interface. Finally, it is shown that the geometric features of the interfaces correlate with relatively large scale structures as visualised by low-pressure isosurfaces. © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

  12. Statistics of the turbulent/non-turbulent interface in a spatially evolving mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Cristancho, Juan

    2012-12-01

    The thin interface separating the inner turbulent region from the outer irrotational fluid is analyzed in a direct numerical simulation of a spatially developing turbulent mixing layer. A vorticity threshold is defined to detect the interface separating the turbulent from the non-turbulent regions of the flow, and to calculate statistics conditioned on the distance from this interface. Velocity and passive scalar statistics are computed and compared to the results of studies addressing other shear flows, such as turbulent jets and wakes. The conditional statistics for velocity are in remarkable agreement with the results for other types of free shear flow available in the literature. In addition, a detailed analysis of the passive scalar field (with Sc 1) in the vicinity of the interface is presented. The scalar has a jump at the interface, even stronger than that observed for velocity. The strong jump for the scalar has been observed before in the case of high Schmidt number, but it is a new result for Schmidt number of order one. Finally, the dissipation for the kinetic energy and the scalar are presented. While the kinetic energy dissipation has its maximum far from the interface, the scalar dissipation is characterized by a strong peak very close to the interface.

  13. Statistical properties of turbulence: An overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Centre for Condensed Matter Theory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science,. Bangalore .... as they can be in a laboratory, but a far greater range of ..... velocity field introduced in the Kraichnan model .... spin system in d dimensions close to its critical point ...... [30] Ts Adzhemyan L, Antonov N V and Vasiliev A N.

  14. Scalar Statistics along Inertial Particle Trajectory in Isotropic Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ya-Ming, Liu; Zhao-Hui, Liu; Hai-Feng, Han; Jing, Li; Han-Feng, Wang; Chu-Guang, Zheng

    2009-01-01

    The statistics of a passive scalar along inertial particle trajectory in homogeneous isotropic turbulence with a mean scalar gradient is investigated by using direct numerical simulation. We are interested in the influence of particle inertia on such statistics, which is crucial for further understanding and development of models in non-isothermal gas-particle flows. The results show that the scalar variance along particle trajectory decreases with the increasing particle inertia firstly; when the particle's Stokes number S t is less than 1.0, it reaches the minimal value when S t is around 1.0, then it increases if S t increases further. However, the scalar dissipation rate along the particle trajectory shows completely contrasting behavior in comparison with the scalar variance. The mechanical-to-thermal time scale ratios averaged along particle, p , are approximately two times smaller than that computed in the Eulerian frame r, and stay at nearly 1.77 with a weak dependence on particle inertia. In addition, the correlations between scalar dissipation and now structure characteristics along particle trajectories, such as strain and vorticity, are also computed, and they reach their maximum and minimum, 0.31 and 0.25, respectively, when S t is around 1.0. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  15. Asymptotic expansion and statistical description of turbulent systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagan, W.K. III.

    1986-01-01

    A new approach to studying turbulent systems is presented in which an asymptotic expansion of the general dynamical equations is performed prior to the application of statistical methods for describing the evolution of the system. This approach has been applied to two specific systems: anomalous drift wave turbulence in plasmas and homogeneous, isotropic turbulence in fluids. For the plasma case, the time and length scales of the turbulent state result in the asymptotic expansion of the Vlasov/Poisson equations taking the form of nonlinear gyrokinetic theory. Questions regarding this theory and modern Hamiltonian perturbation methods are discussed and resolved. A new alternative Hamiltonian method is described. The Eulerian Direct Interaction Approximation (EDIA) is slightly reformulated and applied to the equations of nonlinear gyrokinetic theory. Using a similarity transformation technique, expressions for the thermal diffusivity are derived from the EDIA equations for various geometries, including a tokamak. In particular, the unique result for generalized geometry may be of use in evaluating fusion reactor designs and theories of anomalous thermal transport in tokamaks. Finally, a new and useful property of the EDIA is pointed out. For the fluid case, an asymptotic expansion is applied to the Navier-Stokes equation and the results lead to the speculation that such an approach may resolve the problem of predicting the Kolmogorov inertial range energy spectrum for homogeneous, isotropic turbulence. 45 refs., 3 figs

  16. Numerical investigation of kinetic turbulence in relativistic pair plasmas - I. Turbulence statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdankin, Vladimir; Uzdensky, Dmitri A.; Werner, Gregory R.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2018-02-01

    We describe results from particle-in-cell simulations of driven turbulence in collisionless, magnetized, relativistic pair plasma. This physical regime provides a simple setting for investigating the basic properties of kinetic turbulence and is relevant for high-energy astrophysical systems such as pulsar wind nebulae and astrophysical jets. In this paper, we investigate the statistics of turbulent fluctuations in simulations on lattices of up to 10243 cells and containing up to 2 × 1011 particles. Due to the absence of a cooling mechanism in our simulations, turbulent energy dissipation reduces the magnetization parameter to order unity within a few dynamical times, causing turbulent motions to become sub-relativistic. In the developed stage, our results agree with predictions from magnetohydrodynamic turbulence phenomenology at inertial-range scales, including a power-law magnetic energy spectrum with index near -5/3, scale-dependent anisotropy of fluctuations described by critical balance, lognormal distributions for particle density and internal energy density (related by a 4/3 adiabatic index, as predicted for an ultra-relativistic ideal gas), and the presence of intermittency. We also present possible signatures of a kinetic cascade by measuring power-law spectra for the magnetic, electric and density fluctuations at sub-Larmor scales.

  17. Macro-scale turbulence modelling for flows in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinson, F.

    2006-03-01

    - This work deals with the macroscopic modeling of turbulence in porous media. It concerns heat exchangers, nuclear reactors as well as urban flows, etc. The objective of this study is to describe in an homogenized way, by the mean of a spatial average operator, turbulent flows in a solid matrix. In addition to this first operator, the use of a statistical average operator permits to handle the pseudo-aleatory character of turbulence. The successive application of both operators allows us to derive the balance equations of the kind of flows under study. Two major issues are then highlighted, the modeling of dispersion induced by the solid matrix and the turbulence modeling at a macroscopic scale (Reynolds tensor and turbulent dispersion). To this aim, we lean on the local modeling of turbulence and more precisely on the k - ε RANS models. The methodology of dispersion study, derived thanks to the volume averaging theory, is extended to turbulent flows. Its application includes the simulation, at a microscopic scale, of turbulent flows within a representative elementary volume of the porous media. Applied to channel flows, this analysis shows that even within the turbulent regime, dispersion remains one of the dominating phenomena within the macro-scale modeling framework. A two-scale analysis of the flow allows us to understand the dominating role of the drag force in the kinetic energy transfers between scales. Transfers between the mean part and the turbulent part of the flow are formally derived. This description significantly improves our understanding of the issue of macroscopic modeling of turbulence and leads us to define the sub-filter production and the wake dissipation. A f - f - w >f model is derived. It is based on three balance equations for the turbulent kinetic energy, the viscous dissipation and the wake dissipation. Furthermore, a dynamical predictor for the friction coefficient is proposed. This model is then successfully applied to the study of

  18. Application of some turbulence models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushijima, Sho; Kato, Masanobu; Fujimoto, Ken; Moriya, Shoichi

    1985-01-01

    In order to predict numerically the thermal stratification and the thermal striping phenomena in pool-type FBRs, it is necessary to simulate adequately various turbulence properties of flows with good turbulence models. This report presents numerical simulations of two dimensional isothermal steady flows in a rectangular plenum using three types of turbulence models. Three models are general k-ε model and two Reynolds stress models. The agreements of these results are examined and the properties of these models are compared. The main results are summarized as follows. (1) Concerning the mean velocity distributions, although a little differences exist, all results of three models agree with experimental values. (2) It can be found that non-isotropy of normal Reynolds stresses (u' 2 , v' 2 ) distributions is qwite well simulated by two Reynolds stress models, but not adequately by k-ε model, shear Reynolds stress (-u', v') distribations of three models have little differences and agree good with experiments. (3) Balances of the various terms of Reynolds stress equations are examined. Comparing the results obtained by analyses and those of previous experiments, both distributions show qualitative agreements. (author)

  19. Turbulence modelling for incompressible flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodi, W.

    1985-12-01

    EUROMECH colloquium 180 was held at Karlsruhe from 4-6 July, 1984, with the aim of bringing together specialists working in the area of turbulence modelling and of reviewing the state-of-the-art in this field. 44 scientists from 12 countries participated and 28 papers were presented. The meeting started with a review of the performance of two-equation turbulence models employing transport equations for both the velocity and the length scale of turbulence. These models are now generally well established, but it was found that their application to certain flow situations remains problematic. The modelling assumptions involved in Reynolds stress-equation models were reviewed next, and new assumptions were proposed. It was generally agreed that, as computing power increases, these more complex models will become more popular also for practical applications. The increase in computing power also allows more and more to resolve the viscous sublayer with low Reynolds numbers models, and the capabilities and problems of these models were discussed. In this connection, special aspects of boundary layer calculations were also discussed, namely those associated with 3D boundary layers, converging and diverging flow and slightly detached boundary layers. The complex physical phenomena prevalent in situations under the influence of buoyancy and rotation were reviewed, and several papers were presented on models for simulating these effects. (orig./HP) [de

  20. Turbulence Statistics of a Buoyant Jet in a Stratified Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleney, Amy Brooke

    Using non-intrusive optical diagnostics, turbulence statistics for a round, incompressible, buoyant, and vertical jet discharging freely into a stably linear stratified environment is studied and compared to a reference case of a neutrally buoyant jet in a uniform environment. This is part of a validation campaign for computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Buoyancy forces are known to significantly affect the jet evolution in a stratified environment. Despite their ubiquity in numerous natural and man-made flows, available data in these jets are limited, which constrain our understanding of the underlying physical processes. In particular, there is a dearth of velocity field data, which makes it challenging to validate numerical codes, currently used for modeling these important flows. Herein, jet near- and far-field behaviors are obtained with a combination of planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) and multi-scale time-resolved particle image velocimetry (TR-PIV) for Reynolds number up to 20,000. Deploying non-intrusive optical diagnostics in a variable density environment is challenging in liquids. The refractive index is strongly affected by the density, which introduces optical aberrations and occlusions that prevent the resolution of the flow. One solution consists of using index matched fluids with different densities. Here a pair of water solutions - isopropanol and NaCl - are identified that satisfy these requirements. In fact, they provide a density difference up to 5%, which is the largest reported for such fluid pairs. Additionally, by design, the kinematic viscosities of the solutions are identical. This greatly simplifies the analysis and subsequent simulations of the data. The spectral and temperature dependence of the solutions are fully characterized. In the near-field, shear layer roll-up is analyzed and characterized as a function of initial velocity profile. In the far-field, turbulence statistics are reported for two different scales, one

  1. Statistical description of turbulent transport for flux driven toroidal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J.; Imadera, K.; Kishimoto, Y.; Li, J. Q.; Nordman, H.

    2017-06-01

    A novel methodology to analyze non-Gaussian probability distribution functions (PDFs) of intermittent turbulent transport in global full-f gyrokinetic simulations is presented. In this work, the auto-regressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model is applied to time series data of intermittent turbulent heat transport to separate noise and oscillatory trends, allowing for the extraction of non-Gaussian features of the PDFs. It was shown that non-Gaussian tails of the PDFs from first principles based gyrokinetic simulations agree with an analytical estimation based on a two fluid model.

  2. Chaotic Lagrangian models for turbulent relative dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacorata, Guglielmo; Vulpiani, Angelo

    2017-04-01

    A deterministic multiscale dynamical system is introduced and discussed as a prototype model for relative dispersion in stationary, homogeneous, and isotropic turbulence. Unlike stochastic diffusion models, here trajectory transport and mixing properties are entirely controlled by Lagrangian chaos. The anomalous "sweeping effect," a known drawback common to kinematic simulations, is removed through the use of quasi-Lagrangian coordinates. Lagrangian dispersion statistics of the model are accurately analyzed by computing the finite-scale Lyapunov exponent (FSLE), which is the optimal measure of the scaling properties of dispersion. FSLE scaling exponents provide a severe test to decide whether model simulations are in agreement with theoretical expectations and/or observation. The results of our numerical experiments cover a wide range of "Reynolds numbers" and show that chaotic deterministic flows can be very efficient, and numerically low-cost, models of turbulent trajectories in stationary, homogeneous, and isotropic conditions. The mathematics of the model is relatively simple, and, in a geophysical context, potential applications may regard small-scale parametrization issues in general circulation models, mixed layer, and/or boundary layer turbulence models as well as Lagrangian predictability studies.

  3. Structure and statistics of turbulent flow over riblets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, R. D.; Crawford, C. H.; Karniadakis, G. E.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we present comparisons of turbulence statistics obtained from direct numerical simulation of flow over streamwise aligned triangular riblets with experimental results. We also present visualizations of the instantaneous velocity field inside and around the riblet valleys. In light of the behavior of the statistics and flowfields inside the riblet valleys, we investigate previously reported physical mechanisms for the drag reducing effect of riblets; our results here support the hypothesis of flow anchoring by the riblet valleys and the corresponding inhibition of spanwise flow motions.

  4. Stochastic model of Rayleigh-Taylor turbulent mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abarzhi, S.I.; Cadjan, M.; Fedotov, S.

    2007-01-01

    We propose a stochastic model to describe the random character of the dissipation process in Rayleigh-Taylor turbulent mixing. The parameter alpha, used conventionally to characterize the mixing growth-rate, is not a universal constant and is very sensitive to the statistical properties of the dissipation. The ratio between the rates of momentum loss and momentum gain is the statistic invariant and a robust parameter to diagnose with or without turbulent diffusion accounted for

  5. PDF Modeling of Turbulent Combustion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pope, Stephen B

    2006-01-01

    .... The PDF approach to turbulent combustion has the advantages of fully representing the turbulent fluctuations of species and temperature, and of allowing realistic combustion chemistry to be implemented...

  6. Application of statistical dynamical turbulence closures to data assimilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Kane, Terence J; Frederiksen, Jorgen S

    2010-01-01

    We describe the development of an accurate yet computationally tractable statistical dynamical closure theory for general inhomogeneous turbulent flows, coined the quasi-diagonal direct interaction approximation closure (QDIA), and its application to problems in data assimilation. The QDIA provides prognostic equations for evolving mean fields, covariances and higher-order non-Gaussian terms, all of which are also required in the formulation of data assimilation schemes for nonlinear geophysical flows. The QDIA is a generalization of the class of direct interaction approximation theories, initially developed by Kraichnan (1959 J. Fluid Mech. 5 497) for isotropic turbulence, to fully inhomogeneous flows and has been further generalized to allow for both inhomogeneous and non-Gaussian initial conditions and long integrations. A regularization procedure or empirical vertex renormalization that ensures correct inertial range spectra is also described. The aim of this paper is to provide a coherent mathematical description of the QDIA turbulence closure and closure-based data assimilation scheme we have labeled the statistical dynamical Kalman filter. The mathematical formalism presented has been synthesized from recent works of the authors with some additional material and is presented in sufficient detail that the paper is of a pedagogical nature.

  7. Shell Models of Superfluid Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wacks, Daniel H; Barenghi, Carlo F

    2011-01-01

    Superfluid helium consists of two inter-penetrating fluids, a viscous normal fluid and an inviscid superfluid, coupled by a mutual friction. We develop a two-fluid shell model to study superfluid turbulence and investigate the energy spectra and the balance of fluxes between the two fluids in a steady state. At sufficiently low temperatures a 'bottle-neck' develops at high wavenumbers suggesting the need for a further dissipative effect, such as the Kelvin wave cascade.

  8. Scalings, spectra, and statistics of strong wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, P.A.

    1996-01-01

    A two-component model of strongly nonlinear wave turbulence is developed for a broad class of systems in which high-frequency electrostatic waves interact with low-frequency sound-like waves. In this model coherent nonlinear wave packets form and collapse amid a sea of incoherent background waves. It is shown that three classes of turbulence exist, typified by Langmuir, lower-hybrid, and upper-hybrid turbulence. Balance between power input to incoherent waves, and dissipation at the end of collapse determines power-law scalings of turbulent electrostatic energy density, density fluctuations, length and time scales. Knowledge of the evolution of collapsing packets enables probability distributions of the magnitudes of electric fields and density fluctuations to be calculated, yielding power-law dependences. Wavenumber spectra of collapsing waves and associated density fluctuations are also calculated and shown to have power-law forms. Applications to Langmuir, lower-hybrid, and upper-hybrid waves are discussed. In the Langmuir case the results agree with earlier theory and simulations, with one exception, which is consistent only with earlier simulations. In the lower-hybrid and upper-hybrid cases, the results are consistent with the few simulations to date. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  9. Statistical state dynamics-based analysis of the physical mechanisms sustaining and regulating turbulence in Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Brian F.; Ioannou, Petros J.

    2017-08-01

    This paper describes a study of the self-sustaining process in wall turbulence. The study is based on a second order statistical state dynamics model of Couette flow in which the state variables are the streamwise mean flow (first cumulant) and perturbation covariance (second cumulant). This statistical state dynamics model is closed by either setting the third cumulant to zero or by replacing it with a stochastic parametrization. Statistical state dynamics models with this form are referred to as S3T models. S3T models have been shown to self-sustain turbulence with a mean flow and second order perturbation structure similar to that obtained by direct numerical simulation of the equations of motion. The use of a statistical state dynamics model to study the physical mechanisms underlying turbulence has important advantages over the traditional approach of studying the dynamics of individual realizations of turbulence. One advantage is that the analytical structure of S3T statistical state dynamics models isolates the interaction between the mean flow and the perturbation components of the turbulence. Isolation of the interaction between these components reveals how this interaction underlies both the maintenance of the turbulence variance by transfer of energy from the externally driven flow to the perturbation components as well as the enforcement of the observed statistical mean turbulent state by feedback regulation between the mean and perturbation fields. Another advantage of studying turbulence using statistical state dynamics models of S3T form is that the analytical structure of S3T turbulence can be completely characterized. For example, the perturbation component of turbulence in the S3T system is demonstrably maintained by a parametric perturbation growth mechanism in which fluctuation of the mean flow maintains the perturbation field which in turn maintains the mean flow fluctuations in a synergistic interaction. Furthermore, the equilibrium

  10. Multifractal Modeling of Turbulent Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiee, Mehdi; Zayernouri, Mohsen; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2017-11-01

    Stochastic processes in random media are emerging as interesting tools for modeling anomalous transport phenomena. Applications include intermittent passive scalar transport with background noise in turbulent flows, which are observed in atmospheric boundary layers, turbulent mixing in reactive flows, and long-range dependent flow fields in disordered/fractal environments. In this work, we propose a nonlocal scalar transport equation involving the fractional Laplacian, where the corresponding fractional index is linked to the multifractal structure of the nonlinear passive scalar power spectrum. This work was supported by the AFOSR Young Investigator Program (YIP) award (FA9550-17-1-0150) and partially by MURI/ARO (W911NF-15-1-0562).

  11. Modeling molecular mixing in a spatially inhomogeneous turbulent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Daniel W.; Deb, Rajdeep

    2012-02-01

    Simulations of spatially inhomogeneous turbulent mixing in decaying grid turbulence with a joint velocity-concentration probability density function (PDF) method were conducted. The inert mixing scenario involves three streams with different compositions. The mixing model of Meyer ["A new particle interaction mixing model for turbulent dispersion and turbulent reactive flows," Phys. Fluids 22(3), 035103 (2010)], the interaction by exchange with the mean (IEM) model and its velocity-conditional variant, i.e., the IECM model, were applied. For reference, the direct numerical simulation data provided by Sawford and de Bruyn Kops ["Direct numerical simulation and lagrangian modeling of joint scalar statistics in ternary mixing," Phys. Fluids 20(9), 095106 (2008)] was used. It was found that velocity conditioning is essential to obtain accurate concentration PDF predictions. Moreover, the model of Meyer provides significantly better results compared to the IECM model at comparable computational expense.

  12. Soap film flows: Statistics of two-dimensional turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorobieff, P.; Rivera, M.; Ecke, R.E.

    1999-01-01

    Soap film flows provide a very convenient laboratory model for studies of two-dimensional (2-D) hydrodynamics including turbulence. For a gravity-driven soap film channel with a grid of equally spaced cylinders inserted in the flow, we have measured the simultaneous velocity and thickness fields in the irregular flow downstream from the cylinders. The velocity field is determined by a modified digital particle image velocimetry method and the thickness from the light scattered by the particles in the film. From these measurements, we compute the decay of mean energy, enstrophy, and thickness fluctuations with downstream distance, and the structure functions of velocity, vorticity, thickness fluctuation, and vorticity flux. From these quantities we determine the microscale Reynolds number of the flow R λ ∼100 and the integral and dissipation scales of 2D turbulence. We also obtain quantitative measures of the degree to which our flow can be considered incompressible and isotropic as a function of downstream distance. We find coarsening of characteristic spatial scales, qualitative correspondence of the decay of energy and enstrophy with the Batchelor model, scaling of energy in k space consistent with the k -3 spectrum of the Kraichnan endash Batchelor enstrophy-scaling picture, and power-law scalings of the structure functions of velocity, vorticity, vorticity flux, and thickness. These results are compared with models of 2-D turbulence and with numerical simulations. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  13. Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bailly, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the major problems of turbulence and turbulent processes, including  physical phenomena, their modeling and their simulation. After a general introduction in Chapter 1 illustrating many aspects dealing with turbulent flows, averaged equations and kinetic energy budgets are provided in Chapter 2. The concept of turbulent viscosity as a closure of the Reynolds stress is also introduced. Wall-bounded flows are presented in Chapter 3, and aspects specific to boundary layers and channel or pipe flows are also pointed out. Free shear flows, namely free jets and wakes, are considered in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 deals with vortex dynamics. Homogeneous turbulence, isotropy, and dynamics of isotropic turbulence are presented in Chapters 6 and 7. Turbulence is then described both in the physical space and in the wave number space. Time dependent numerical simulations are presented in Chapter 8, where an introduction to large eddy simulation is offered. The last three chapters of the book summarize remarka...

  14. Extreme value statistics and finite-size scaling at the ecological extinction/laminar-turbulence transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Hong-Yan; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    Experiments on transitional turbulence in pipe flow seem to show that turbulence is a transient metastable state since the measured mean lifetime of turbulence puffs does not diverge asymptotically at a critical Reynolds number. Yet measurements reveal that the lifetime scales with Reynolds number in a super-exponential way reminiscent of extreme value statistics, and simulations and experiments in Couette and channel flow exhibit directed percolation type scaling phenomena near a well-defined transition. This universality class arises from the interplay between small-scale turbulence and a large-scale collective zonal flow, which exhibit predator-prey behavior. Why is asymptotically divergent behavior not observed? Using directed percolation and a stochastic individual level model of predator-prey dynamics related to transitional turbulence, we investigate the relation between extreme value statistics and power law critical behavior, and show that the paradox is resolved by carefully defining what is measured in the experiments. We theoretically derive the super-exponential scaling law, and using finite-size scaling, show how the same data can give both super-exponential behavior and power-law critical scaling.

  15. Large-eddy simulation in a mixing tee junction: High-order turbulent statistics analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, Richard J.A.; Serre, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Mixing and thermal fluctuations in a junction are studied using large eddy simulation. • Adiabatic and conducting steel wall boundaries are tested. • Wall thermal fluctuations are not the same between the flow and the solid. • Solid thermal fluctuations cannot be predicted from the fluid thermal fluctuations. • High-order turbulent statistics show that the turbulent transport term is important. - Abstract: This study analyses the mixing and thermal fluctuations induced in a mixing tee junction with circular cross-sections when cold water flowing in a pipe is joined by hot water from a branch pipe. This configuration is representative of industrial piping systems in which temperature fluctuations in the fluid may cause thermal fatigue damage on the walls. Implicit large-eddy simulations (LES) are performed for equal inflow rates corresponding to a bulk Reynolds number Re = 39,080. Two different thermal boundary conditions are studied for the pipe walls; an insulating adiabatic boundary and a conducting steel wall boundary. The predicted flow structures show a satisfactory agreement with the literature. The velocity and thermal fields (including high-order statistics) are not affected by the heat transfer with the steel walls. However, predicted thermal fluctuations at the boundary are not the same between the flow and the solid, showing that solid thermal fluctuations cannot be predicted by the knowledge of the fluid thermal fluctuations alone. The analysis of high-order turbulent statistics provides a better understanding of the turbulence features. In particular, the budgets of the turbulent kinetic energy and temperature variance allows a comparative analysis of dissipation, production and transport terms. It is found that the turbulent transport term is an important term that acts to balance the production. We therefore use a priori tests to evaluate three different models for the triple correlation

  16. Exploiting similarity in turbulent shear flows for turbulence modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, David F.; Harris, Julius E.; Hassan, H. A.

    1992-01-01

    It is well known that current k-epsilon models cannot predict the flow over a flat plate and its wake. In an effort to address this issue and other issues associated with turbulence closure, a new approach for turbulence modeling is proposed which exploits similarities in the flow field. Thus, if we consider the flow over a flat plate and its wake, then in addition to taking advantage of the log-law region, we can exploit the fact that the flow becomes self-similar in the far wake. This latter behavior makes it possible to cast the governing equations as a set of total differential equations. Solutions of this set and comparison with measured shear stress and velocity profiles yields the desired set of model constants. Such a set is, in general, different from other sets of model constants. The rational for such an approach is that if we can correctly model the flow over a flat plate and its far wake, then we can have a better chance of predicting the behavior in between. It is to be noted that the approach does not appeal, in any way, to the decay of homogeneous turbulence. This is because the asymptotic behavior of the flow under consideration is not representative of the decay of homogeneous turbulence.

  17. Exploiting similarity in turbulent shear flows for turbulence modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, David F.; Harris, Julius E.; Hassan, H. A.

    1992-12-01

    It is well known that current k-epsilon models cannot predict the flow over a flat plate and its wake. In an effort to address this issue and other issues associated with turbulence closure, a new approach for turbulence modeling is proposed which exploits similarities in the flow field. Thus, if we consider the flow over a flat plate and its wake, then in addition to taking advantage of the log-law region, we can exploit the fact that the flow becomes self-similar in the far wake. This latter behavior makes it possible to cast the governing equations as a set of total differential equations. Solutions of this set and comparison with measured shear stress and velocity profiles yields the desired set of model constants. Such a set is, in general, different from other sets of model constants. The rational for such an approach is that if we can correctly model the flow over a flat plate and its far wake, then we can have a better chance of predicting the behavior in between. It is to be noted that the approach does not appeal, in any way, to the decay of homogeneous turbulence. This is because the asymptotic behavior of the flow under consideration is not representative of the decay of homogeneous turbulence.

  18. Statistical properties of turbulence in a toroidal magnetized ECR plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Yi; Lu Ronghua; Wang Zhijiang; Wen Yizhi; Yu Changxuan; Wan Shude; Liu, Wandong

    2008-01-01

    The statistical analyses of fluctuation data measured by electrostatic-probe arrays clearly show that the self-organized criticality (SOC) avalanches are not the dominant behaviors in a toroidal ECR plasma in the SMT (Simple Magnetic Torus) mode of KT-5D device. The f -1 index region in the auto-correlation spectra of the floating potential V f and the ion saturation current I s , which is a fingerprint of a SOC system, ranges only in a narrow frequency band. By investigating the Hurst exponents at increasingly coarse grained time series, we find that at a time scale of τ>100 μs, there exists no or a very weak long-range correlation over two decades in τ. The difference between the PDFs of I s and V f clearly shows a more global nature of the latter. The transport flux induced by the turbulence suggests that the natural intermittency of turbulent transport maybe independent of the avalanche induced by near criticality. The drift instability is dominant in a SMT plasma generated by means of ECR discharges

  19. On passive scalar derivative statistics in grid turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, C.; Warhaft, Z.

    1994-01-01

    The probability density function, and related statistics, of scalar (temperature) derivative fluctuations in decaying grid turbulence with an imposed cross-stream, passive linear temperature profile, is studied for a turbulence Reynolds number range, Re l , varying from 50 to 1200, (corresponding to a Taylor Reynolds number range 30 λ θy has a value of 1.8±0.2 (twice the value observed in shear flows), and has no significant variation with Reynolds number. The ratio of the temperature derivative standard deviation along the gradient to that normal to it is approximately 1.2±0.1 also, with no variation with Re. The kurtosis of the derivatives increases approximately as Re 0.2 l . The results show that the rare, intense temperature deviations that produce the skewed scalar derivative, increase in frequency, but their area fraction (of the total field) becomes smaller as the Reynolds number increases. Thus, since S θy remains constant, they become sharper and more intense, occurring deeper in the tails of the probability density function. Measurements in a thermal mixing layer, which has a nonlinear mean temperature profile, are also presented, and these show a similar value of S θy to the linear profile case. The experiments broadly confirm the two-dimensional numerical simulations of Holzer and Siggia [Phys. Fluids (in press)], as well as other recent simulations, although there are some differences

  20. Turbulent Flow Over Large Roughness Elements: Effect of Frontal and Plan Solidity on Turbulence Statistics and Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placidi, M.; Ganapathisubramani, B.

    2018-04-01

    Wind-tunnel experiments were carried out on fully-rough boundary layers with large roughness (δ /h ≈ 10, where h is the height of the roughness elements and δ is the boundary-layer thickness). Twelve different surface conditions were created by using LEGO™ bricks of uniform height. Six cases are tested for a fixed plan solidity (λ _P) with variations in frontal density (λ _F), while the other six cases have varying λ _P for fixed λ _F. Particle image velocimetry and floating-element drag-balance measurements were performed. The current results complement those contained in Placidi and Ganapathisubramani (J Fluid Mech 782:541-566, 2015), extending the previous analysis to the turbulence statistics and spatial structure. Results indicate that mean velocity profiles in defect form agree with Townsend's similarity hypothesis with varying λ _F, however, the agreement is worse for cases with varying λ _P. The streamwise and wall-normal turbulent stresses, as well as the Reynolds shear stresses, show a lack of similarity across most examined cases. This suggests that the critical height of the roughness for which outer-layer similarity holds depends not only on the height of the roughness, but also on the local wall morphology. A new criterion based on shelter solidity, defined as the sheltered plan area per unit wall-parallel area, which is similar to the `effective shelter area' in Raupach and Shaw (Boundary-Layer Meteorol 22:79-90, 1982), is found to capture the departure of the turbulence statistics from outer-layer similarity. Despite this lack of similarity reported in the turbulence statistics, proper orthogonal decomposition analysis, as well as two-point spatial correlations, show that some form of universal flow structure is present, as all cases exhibit virtually identical proper orthogonal decomposition mode shapes and correlation fields. Finally, reduced models based on proper orthogonal decomposition reveal that the small scales of the turbulence

  1. Stochastic models for turbulent reacting flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerstein, A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop and apply stochastic models of various processes occurring within turbulent reacting flows in order to identify the fundamental mechanisms governing these flows, to support experimental studies of these flows, and to further the development of comprehensive turbulent reacting flow models.

  2. Lagrangian statistics in weakly forced two-dimensional turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Michael K; Ecke, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of Lagrangian single-point and multiple-point statistics in a quasi-two-dimensional stratified layer system are reported. The system consists of a layer of salt water over an immiscible layer of Fluorinert and is forced electromagnetically so that mean-squared vorticity is injected at a well-defined spatial scale ri. Simultaneous cascades develop in which enstrophy flows predominately to small scales whereas energy cascades, on average, to larger scales. Lagrangian correlations and one- and two-point displacements are measured for random initial conditions and for initial positions within topological centers and saddles. Some of the behavior of these quantities can be understood in terms of the trapping characteristics of long-lived centers, the slow motion near strong saddles, and the rapid fluctuations outside of either centers or saddles. We also present statistics of Lagrangian velocity fluctuations using energy spectra in frequency space and structure functions in real space. We compare with complementary Eulerian velocity statistics. We find that simultaneous inverse energy and enstrophy ranges present in spectra are not directly echoed in real-space moments of velocity difference. Nevertheless, the spectral ranges line up well with features of moment ratios, indicating that although the moments are not exhibiting unambiguous scaling, the behavior of the probability distribution functions is changing over short ranges of length scales. Implications for understanding weakly forced 2D turbulence with simultaneous inverse and direct cascades are discussed.

  3. Statistical characteristics of turbulence in giant molecular clouds. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogul'chansky, Ya.Yu.

    1989-01-01

    Using the invariant group of transformations of equations for characteristic functional of turbulence in compressible medium the spectral characteristics in inertial range are obtained. The influence of magnetic field on the turbulent spectra is evaluated. The application of the results obtained to supersonical turbulence in giant molecular clouds is discussed. 42 refs

  4. Multiplicative Process in Turbulent Velocity Statistics: A Simplified Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chillà, F.; Peinke, J.; Castaing, B.

    1996-04-01

    A lot of models in turbulence links the energy cascade process and intermittency, the characteristic of which being the shape evolution of the probability density functions (pdf) for longitudinal velocity increments. Using recent models and experimental results, we show that the flatness factor of these pdf gives a simple and direct estimate for what is called the deepness of the cascade. We analyse in this way the published data of a Direct Numerical Simulation and show that the deepness of the cascade presents the same Reynolds number dependence as in laboratory experiments. Plusieurs modèles de turbulence relient la cascade d'énergie et l'intermittence, caractérisée par l'évolution des densités de probabilité (pdf) des incréments longitudinaux de vitesse. Nous appuyant aussi bien sur des modèles récents que sur des résultats expérimentaux, nous montrons que la Curtosis de ces pdf permet une estimation simple et directe de la profondeur de la cascade. Cela nous permet de réanalyser les résultats publiés d'une simulation numérique et de montrer que la profondeur de la cascade y évolue de la même façon que pour les expériences de laboratoire en fonction du nombre de Reynolds.

  5. Sampling, Probability Models and Statistical Reasoning Statistical

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 5. Sampling, Probability Models and Statistical Reasoning Statistical Inference. Mohan Delampady V R Padmawar. General Article Volume 1 Issue 5 May 1996 pp 49-58 ...

  6. Comparison of turbulent particle dispersion models in turbulent shear flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Laín

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This work compares the performance of two Lagrangian turbulent particle dispersion models: the standard model (e.g., that presented in Sommerfeld et al. (1993, in which the fluctuating fluid velocity experienced by the particle is composed of two components, one correlated with the previous time step and a second one randomly sampled from a Wiener process, and the model proposed by Minier and Peirano (2001, which is based on the PDF approach and performs closure at the level of acceleration of the fluid experienced by the particle. Formulation of a Langevin equation model for the increments of fluid velocity seen by the particle allows capturing some underlying physics of particle dispersion in general turbulent flows while keeping the mathematical manipulation of the stochastic model simple, thereby avoiding some pitfalls and simplifying the derivation of macroscopic relations. The performance of both dispersion models is tested in the configurations of grid-generated turbulence (Wells and Stock (1983 experiments, simple shear flow (Hyland et al., 1999 and confined axisymmetric jet flow laden with solids (Hishida and Maeda (1987 experiments.

  7. Modeling of turbulent bubbly flows; Modelisation des ecoulements turbulents a bulles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellakhal, Ghazi

    2005-03-15

    The two-phase flows involve interfacial interactions which modify significantly the structure of the mean and fluctuating flow fields. The design of the two-fluid models adapted to industrial flows requires the taking into account of the effect of these interactions in the closure relations adopted. The work developed in this thesis concerns the development of first order two-fluid models deduced by reduction of second order closures. The adopted reasoning, based on the principle of decomposition of the Reynolds stress tensor into two statistically independent contributions turbulent and pseudo-turbulent parts, allows to preserve the physical contents of the second order relations closure. Analysis of the turbulence structure in two basic flows: homogeneous bubbly flows uniform and with a constant shear allows to deduce a formulation of the two-phase turbulent viscosity involving the characteristic scales of bubbly turbulence, as well as an analytical description of modification of the homogeneous turbulence structure induced by the bubbles presence. The Eulerian two-fluid model was then generalized with the case of the inhomogeneous flows with low void fractions. The numerical results obtained by the application of this model integrated in the computer code MELODIF in the case of free sheared turbulent bubbly flow of wake showed a satisfactory agreement with the experimental data and made it possible to analyze the modification of the characteristic scales of such flow by the interfacial interactions. The two-fluid first order model is generalized finally with the case of high void fractions bubbly flows where the hydrodynamic interactions between the bubbles are not negligible any more. (author)

  8. Lattice Boltzmann model for three-dimensional decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Hui; Tao Wenquan; Zhang Yan

    2009-01-01

    We implement a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence based on an analogous Galerkin filter and focus on the fundamental statistical isotropic property. This regularized method is constructed based on orthogonal Hermite polynomial space. For decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence, this regularized method can simulate the isotropic property very well. Numerical studies demonstrate that the novel regularized LBM is a promising approximation of turbulent fluid flows, which paves the way for coupling various turbulent models with LBM

  9. Three-dimensional electromagnetic strong turbulence. I. Scalings, spectra, and field statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, D. B.; Robinson, P. A.; Cairns, Iver H.; Skjaeraasen, O.

    2011-01-01

    The first fully three-dimensional (3D) simulations of large-scale electromagnetic strong turbulence (EMST) are performed by numerically solving the electromagnetic Zakharov equations for electron thermal speeds ν e with ν e /c≥0.025. The results of these simulations are presented, focusing on scaling behavior, energy density spectra, and field statistics of the Langmuir (longitudinal) and transverse components of the electric fields during steady-state strong turbulence, where multiple wave packets collapse simultaneously and the system is approximately statistically steady in time. It is shown that for ν e /c > or approx. 0.17 strong turbulence is approximately electrostatic and can be explained using the electrostatic two-component model. For v e /c > or approx. 0.17 the power-law behaviors of the scalings, spectra, and field statistics differ from the electrostatic predictions and results because ν e /c is sufficiently high to allow transverse modes to become trapped in density wells. The results are compared with those of past 3D electrostatic strong turbulence (ESST) simulations and 2D EMST simulations. For number density perturbations, the scaling behavior, spectra, and field statistics are shown to be only weakly dependent on ν e /c, whereas the Langmuir and transverse scalings, spectra, and field statistics are shown to be strongly dependent on ν e /c. Three-dimensional EMST is shown to have features in common with 2D EMST, such as a two-component structure and trapping of transverse modes which are dependent on ν e /c.

  10. Turbulence models development and engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groetzbach, G.; Ammann, T.; Dorr, B.; Hiltner, I.; Hofmann, S.; Kampczyk, M.; Kimhi, Y.; Seiter, C.; Woerner, M.; Alef, M.; Hennemuth, A.

    1995-01-01

    The FLUTAN code is used for analyzing the decay heat removal in new reactor concepts. The turbulence models applied in FLUTAN are improved by the development of the TURBIT code. TURBIT serves for a numerical simulation of turbulent channel flow. (orig.)

  11. Statistical Equilibria of Turbulence on Surfaces of Different Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wanming; Marston, Brad

    2012-02-01

    We test the validity of statistical descriptions of freely decaying 2D turbulence by performing direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the Euler equation with hyperviscosity on a square torus and on a sphere. DNS shows, at long times, a dipolar coherent structure in the vorticity field on the torus but a quadrapole on the sphereootnotetextJ. Y-K. Cho and L. Polvani, Phys. Fluids 8, 1531 (1996).. A truncated Miller-Robert-Sommeria theoryootnotetextA. J. Majda and X. Wang, Nonlinear Dynamics and Statistical Theories for Basic Geophysical Flows (Cambridge University Press, 2006). can explain the difference. The theory conserves up to the second-order Casimir, while also respecting conservation laws that reflect the symmetry of the domain. We further show that it is equivalent to the phenomenological minimum-enstrophy principle by generalizing the work by Naso et al.ootnotetextA. Naso, P. H. Chavanis, and B. Dubrulle, Eur. Phys. J. B 77, 284 (2010). to the sphere. To explain finer structures of the coherent states seen in DNS, especially the phenomenon of confinement, we investigate the perturbative inclusion of the higher Casimir constraints.

  12. Gaussian free turbulence: structures and relaxation in plasma models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruzinov, A.V.

    1993-01-01

    Free-turbulent relaxation in two-dimensional MHD, the degenerate Hasegawa-Mima equation and a two-dimensional microtearing model are studied. The Gibbs distributions of these three systems can be completely analyzed, due to the special structure of their invariants and due to the existence of ultraviolet catastrophe. The free-turbulent field is seen to be a sum of a certain coherent structure (statistical attractor) and Gaussian random noise. Two-dimensional current layers are shown to be statistical attractors in 2D MHD. (author)

  13. Statistics and Dynamics of Aircraft Encounters of Turbulence over Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    America and Europe , and turbulence above Greenland is the fo- cus of this study. Turbulence derived from interactions with terrain and mountain waves can...Seasonal variations in the large- scale circulation (viz., storm tracks) will modify the frequency of occurrence of cyclones. Such variations coupled with...Greenland’s southern tip is from the southeast quadrant. The passage of extratropical cyclones to the south of the turbulent regions is one source of low

  14. The statistical mechanics of vortex-acoustic ion wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giles, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    The equilibrium statistical mechanics of electrostatic ion wave turbulence is studied within the framework of a continuum ion flow with adiabatic electrons. The wave field consists in general of two components, namely ion-acoustic and ion vortex modes. It is shown that the latter can significantly affect the equilibria on account of their ability both to emit and to scatter ion sound. Exact equilibria for the vortex-acoustic wave field are given in terms of a canonical distribution and the correlation functions are expressed in terms of a generating functional. Detailed calculations are carried out for the case in which the dominant coupling is an indirect interaction of the vortex modes mediated by the sound field. An equation for the spectrum of the vortex modes is obtained for this case, which is shown to possess a simple exact solution. This solution shows that the spectrum of fluctuations changes considerably as the total energy increases. Condensed vortex states could occur in the plasma sheet of the earth's magnetosphere and it is shown that the predicted ratio of the mean ion energy to the mean electron energy is consistent with the trend of observed values. (author)

  15. Progress in modeling hypersonic turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, Otto

    1993-01-01

    A good knowledge of the turbulence structure, wall heat transfer, and friction in turbulent boundary layers (TBL) at high speeds is required for the design of hypersonic air breathing airplanes and reentry space vehicles. This work reports on recent progress in the modeling of high speed TBL flows. The specific research goal described here is the development of a second order closure model for zero pressure gradient TBL's for the range of Mach numbers up to hypersonic speeds with arbitrary wall cooling requirements.

  16. Modeling turbulence structure. Chemical kinetics interaction in turbulent reactive flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnussen, B F [The Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

    1998-12-31

    The challenge of the mathematical modelling is to transfer basic physical knowledge into a mathematical formulation such that this knowledge can be utilized in computational simulation of practical problems. The combustion phenomena can be subdivided into a large set of interconnected phenomena like flow, turbulence, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, radiation, extinction, ignition etc. Combustion in one application differs from combustion in another area by the relative importance of the various phenomena. The difference in fuel, geometry and operational conditions often causes the differences. The computer offers the opportunity to treat the individual phenomena and their interactions by models with wide operational domains. The relative magnitude of the various phenomena therefore becomes the consequence of operational conditions and geometry and need not to be specified on the basis of experience for the given problem. In mathematical modelling of turbulent combustion, one of the big challenges is how to treat the interaction between the chemical reactions and the fluid flow i.e. the turbulence. Different scientists adhere to different concepts like the laminar flamelet approach, the pdf approach of the Eddy Dissipation Concept. Each of these approaches offers different opportunities and problems. All these models are based on a sound physical basis, however none of these have general validity in taking into consideration all detail of the physical chemical interaction. The merits of the models can only be judged by their ability to reproduce physical reality and consequences of operational and geometric conditions in a combustion system. The presentation demonstrates and discusses the development of a coherent combustion technology for energy conversion and safety based on the Eddy Dissipation Concept by Magnussen. (author) 30 refs.

  17. Modeling turbulence structure. Chemical kinetics interaction in turbulent reactive flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnussen, B.F. [The Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

    1997-12-31

    The challenge of the mathematical modelling is to transfer basic physical knowledge into a mathematical formulation such that this knowledge can be utilized in computational simulation of practical problems. The combustion phenomena can be subdivided into a large set of interconnected phenomena like flow, turbulence, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, radiation, extinction, ignition etc. Combustion in one application differs from combustion in another area by the relative importance of the various phenomena. The difference in fuel, geometry and operational conditions often causes the differences. The computer offers the opportunity to treat the individual phenomena and their interactions by models with wide operational domains. The relative magnitude of the various phenomena therefore becomes the consequence of operational conditions and geometry and need not to be specified on the basis of experience for the given problem. In mathematical modelling of turbulent combustion, one of the big challenges is how to treat the interaction between the chemical reactions and the fluid flow i.e. the turbulence. Different scientists adhere to different concepts like the laminar flamelet approach, the pdf approach of the Eddy Dissipation Concept. Each of these approaches offers different opportunities and problems. All these models are based on a sound physical basis, however none of these have general validity in taking into consideration all detail of the physical chemical interaction. The merits of the models can only be judged by their ability to reproduce physical reality and consequences of operational and geometric conditions in a combustion system. The presentation demonstrates and discusses the development of a coherent combustion technology for energy conversion and safety based on the Eddy Dissipation Concept by Magnussen. (author) 30 refs.

  18. Statistical Study of Turbulence: Spectral Functions and Correlation Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkiel, Francois N.

    1958-01-01

    In reading the publications on turbulence of different authors, one often runs the risk of confusing the various correlation coefficients and turbulence spectra. We have made a point of defining, by appropriate concepts, the differences which exist between these functions. Besides, we introduce in the symbols a few new characteristics of turbulence. In the first chapter, we study some relations between the correlation coefficients and the different turbulence spectra. Certain relations are given by means of demonstrations which could be called intuitive rather than mathematical. In this way we demonstrate that the correlation coefficients between the simultaneous turbulent velocities at two points are identical, whether studied in Lagrange's or in Euler's systems. We then consider new spectra of turbulence, obtained by study of the simultaneous velocities along a straight line of given direction. We determine some relations between these spectra and the correlation coefficients. Examining the relation between the spectrum of the turbulence measured at a fixed point and the longitudinal-correlation curve given by G. I. Taylor, we find that this equation is exact only when the coefficient is very small.

  19. Diffeomorphic Statistical Deformation Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Sass; Hansen, Mads/Fogtman; Larsen, Rasmus

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present a new method for constructing diffeomorphic statistical deformation models in arbitrary dimensional images with a nonlinear generative model and a linear parameter space. Our deformation model is a modified version of the diffeomorphic model introduced by Cootes et al....... The modifications ensure that no boundary restriction has to be enforced on the parameter space to prevent folds or tears in the deformation field. For straightforward statistical analysis, principal component analysis and sparse methods, we assume that the parameters for a class of deformations lie on a linear...... with ground truth in form of manual expert annotations, and compared to Cootes's model. We anticipate applications in unconstrained diffeomorphic synthesis of images, e.g. for tracking, segmentation, registration or classification purposes....

  20. Statistical properties of wall shear stress fluctuations in turbulent channel flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keirsbulck, L.; Labraga, L.; Gad-el-Hak, M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Accurate measurements of instantaneous wall shear stress are conducted. ► LDA is used to measure near-wall streamwise velocity. ► Electrochemical probe is used to measure wall shear stress. ► Frequency response and non-uniform correction methods were used to provide an accurate, well-resolved wall-statistics database. ► Reynolds number dependency of the statistical wall quantities is investigated. - Abstract: Instantaneous velocity and wall shear stress measurements are conducted in a turbulent channel flow in the Kármán number range of Re τ = 74–400. A one-dimensional LDA system is used to measure the streamwise velocity fluctuations, and an electrochemical technique is utilized to measure the instantaneous wall shear stress. For the latter, frequency response and nonuniform correction methods are used to provide an accurate, well-resolved wall statistics database. The Reynolds number dependency of the statistical wall quantities is carefully investigated. The corrected relative wall shear stress fluctuations fit well with the best DNS data available and meet the need for clarification of the small discrepancy observed in the literature between the experimental and numerical results of such quantities. Higher-order statistics of the wall shear stress, spectra, and the turbulence kinetic energy budget at the wall are also investigated. The present paper shows that the electrochemical technique is a powerful experimental method for hydrodynamic studies involving highly unsteady flows. The study brings with it important consequences, especially in the context of the current debate regarding the appropriate scaling as well as the validation of new predictive models of near-wall turbulence.

  1. Efficient Turbulence Modeling for CFD Wake Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Laan, Paul

    Wind turbine wakes can cause 10-20% annual energy losses in wind farms, and wake turbulence can decrease the lifetime of wind turbine blades. One way of estimating these effects is the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to simulate wind turbines wakes in the atmospheric boundary layer. Since...... this flow is in the high Reynolds number regime, it is mainly dictated by turbulence. As a result, the turbulence modeling in CFD dominates the wake characteristics, especially in Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS). The present work is dedicated to study and develop RANS-based turbulence models...... verified with a grid dependency study. With respect to the standard k-ε EVM, the k-ε- fp EVM compares better with measurements of the velocity deficit, especially in the near wake, which translates to improved power deficits of the first wind turbines in a row. When the CFD metholody is applied to a large...

  2. Direct Numerical Simulations of Statistically Stationary Turbulent Premixed Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Im, Hong G.; Arias, Paul G.; Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Uranakara, Harshavardhana A.

    2016-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent combustion have evolved tremendously in the past decades, thanks to the rapid advances in high performance computing technology. Today’s DNS is capable of incorporating detailed reaction mechanisms

  3. Statistical theory and transition in multiple-scale-lengths turbulence in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Sanae-I. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan); Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    The statistical theory of strong turbulence in inhomogeneous plasmas is developed for the cases where fluctuations with different scale-lengths coexist. Nonlinear interactions in the same kind of fluctuations as well as nonlinear interplay between different classes of fluctuations are kept in the analysis. Nonlinear interactions are modelled as turbulent drag, nonlinear noise and nonlinear drive, and a set of Langevin equations is formulated. With the help of an Ansatz of a large number of degrees of freedom with positive Lyapunov number, Langevin equations are solved and the fluctuation dissipation theorem in the presence of strong plasma turbulence has been derived. A case where two driving mechanisms (one for micro mode and the other for semi-micro mode) coexist is investigated. It is found that there are several states of fluctuations: in one state, the micro mode is excited and the semi-micro mode is quenched; in the other state, the semi-micro mode is excited, and the micro mode remains at finite but suppressed level. New type of turbulence transition is obtained, and a cusp type catastrophe is revealed. A phase diagram is drawn for turbulence which is composed of multiple classes of fluctuations. Influence of the inhomogeneous global radial electric field is discussed. A new insight is given for the physics of internal transport barrier. Finally, the nonlocal heat transport due to the long-wave-length fluctuations, which are noise-pumped by shorter-wave-length ones, is analyzed and the impact on transient transport problems is discussed. (author)

  4. Statistics of optical vortex wander on propagation through atmospheric turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yalong

    2013-04-01

    The transverse position of an optical vortex on propagation through atmospheric turbulence is studied. The probability density of the optical vortex position on a transverse plane in the atmosphere is formulated in weak turbulence by using the Born approximation. With these formulas, the effect of aperture averaging on topological charge detection is investigated. These results provide quantitative guidelines for the design of an optimal detector of topological charge, which has potential application in optical vortex communication systems.

  5. A statistical theory on the turbulent diffusion of Gaussian puffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikkelsen, T.; Larsen, S.E.; Pecseli, H.L.

    1982-12-01

    The relative diffusion of a one-dimensional Gaussian cloud of particles is related to a two-particle covariance function in a homogeneous and stationary field of turbulence. A simple working approximation is suggested for the determination of this covariance function in terms of entirely Eulerian fields. Simple expressions are derived for the growth of the puff's standard deviation for diffusion times that are small compared to the integral time scale of the turbulence. (Auth.)

  6. Gyrofluid Modeling of Turbulent, Kinetic Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despain, Kate Marie

    2011-12-01

    Gyrofluid models to describe plasma turbulence combine the advantages of fluid models, such as lower dimensionality and well-developed intuition, with those of gyrokinetics models, such as finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects. This allows gyrofluid models to be more tractable computationally while still capturing much of the physics related to the FLR of the particles. We present a gyrofluid model derived to capture the behavior of slow solar wind turbulence and describe the computer code developed to implement the model. In addition, we describe the modifications we made to a gyrofluid model and code that simulate plasma turbulence in tokamak geometries. Specifically, we describe a nonlinear phase mixing phenomenon, part of the E x B term, that was previously missing from the model. An inherently FLR effect, it plays an important role in predicting turbulent heat flux and diffusivity levels for the plasma. We demonstrate this importance by comparing results from the updated code to studies done previously by gyrofluid and gyrokinetic codes. We further explain what would be necessary to couple the updated gyrofluid code, gryffin, to a turbulent transport code, thus allowing gryffin to play a role in predicting profiles for fusion devices such as ITER and to explore novel fusion configurations. Such a coupling would require the use of Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) to make the modeling process fast enough to be viable. Consequently, we also describe our experience with GPU computing and demonstrate that we are poised to complete a gryffin port to this innovative architecture.

  7. Direct Numerical Simulations of Statistically Stationary Turbulent Premixed Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Im, Hong G.

    2016-07-15

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent combustion have evolved tremendously in the past decades, thanks to the rapid advances in high performance computing technology. Today’s DNS is capable of incorporating detailed reaction mechanisms and transport properties of hydrocarbon fuels, with physical parameter ranges approaching laboratory scale flames, thereby allowing direct comparison and cross-validation against laser diagnostic measurements. While these developments have led to significantly improved understanding of fundamental turbulent flame characteristics, there are increasing demands to explore combustion regimes at higher levels of turbulent Reynolds (Re) and Karlovitz (Ka) numbers, with a practical interest in new combustion engines driving towards higher efficiencies and lower emissions. The article attempts to provide a brief overview of the state-of-the-art DNS of turbulent premixed flames at high Re/Ka conditions, with an emphasis on homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flow configurations. Some important qualitative findings from numerical studies are summarized, new analytical approaches to investigate intensely turbulent premixed flame dynamics are discussed, and topics for future research are suggested. © 2016 Taylor & Francis.

  8. Advances in fluid modeling and turbulence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Akira; Ninokata, Hisashi; Tanaka, Nobukazu

    2002-01-01

    The context of this book consists of four fields: Environmental Fluid Mechanics; Industrial Fluid Mechanics; Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics; and Turbulence Measurements. Environmental Fluid Mechanics includes free surface flows in channels, rivers, seas, and estuaries. It also discusses wind engineering issues, ocean circulation model and dispersion problems in atmospheric, water and ground water environments. In Industrial Fluid Mechanics, fluid phenomena in energy exchanges, modeling of turbulent two- or multi-phase flows, swirling flows, flows in combustors, variable density flows and reacting flows, flows in turbo-machines, pumps and piping systems, and fluid-structure interaction are discussed. In Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics, progress in modeling turbulent flows and heat/mass transfers, computational fluid dynamics/numerical techniques, parallel computing algorithms, applications of chaos/fractal theory in turbulence are reported. In Turbulence Measurements, experimental studies of turbulent flows, experimental and post-processing techniques, quantitative and qualitative flow visualization techniques are discussed. Separate abstracts were presented for 15 of the papers in this issue. The remaining 89 were considered outside the subject scope of INIS. (J.P.N.)

  9. A mathematical model of turbulence for turbulent boundary layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira Filho, H.D.V.

    1977-01-01

    Equations to the so called Reynolds stress-tensor (kinetic turbulent energy) and dissipation rate are developed and a turbulence flux approximation used. Our ideia here is to use those equations in order to develop an economical and fast numeircal procedure for computation of turbulent boundary layer. (author) [pt

  10. A minimal model of self-sustaining turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Vaughan L.; Gayme, Dennice F.; Farrell, Brian F.; Ioannou, Petros J.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we examine the turbulence maintained in a Restricted Nonlinear (RNL) model of plane Couette flow. This model is a computationally efficient approximation of the second order statistical state dynamics obtained by partitioning the flow into a streamwise averaged mean flow and perturbations about that mean, a closure referred to herein as the RNL ∞ model. The RNL model investigated here employs a single member of the infinite ensemble that comprises the covariance of the RNL ∞ dynamics. The RNL system has previously been shown to support self-sustaining turbulence with a mean flow and structural features that are consistent with direct numerical simulations (DNS). Regardless of the number of streamwise Fourier components used in the simulation, the RNL system’s self-sustaining turbulent state is supported by a small number of streamwise varying modes. Remarkably, further truncation of the RNL system’s support to as few as one streamwise varying mode can suffice to sustain the turbulent state. The close correspondence between RNL simulations and DNS that has been previously demonstrated along with the results presented here suggest that the fundamental mechanisms underlying wall-turbulence can be analyzed using these highly simplified RNL systems

  11. Exact statistical results for binary mixing and reaction in variable density turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristorcelli, J. R.

    2017-02-01

    We report a number of rigorous statistical results on binary active scalar mixing in variable density turbulence. The study is motivated by mixing between pure fluids with very different densities and whose density intensity is of order unity. Our primary focus is the derivation of exact mathematical results for mixing in variable density turbulence and we do point out the potential fields of application of the results. A binary one step reaction is invoked to derive a metric to asses the state of mixing. The mean reaction rate in variable density turbulent mixing can be expressed, in closed form, using the first order Favre mean variables and the Reynolds averaged density variance, ⟨ρ2⟩ . We show that the normalized density variance, ⟨ρ2⟩ , reflects the reduction of the reaction due to mixing and is a mix metric. The result is mathematically rigorous. The result is the variable density analog, the normalized mass fraction variance ⟨c2⟩ used in constant density turbulent mixing. As a consequence, we demonstrate that use of the analogous normalized Favre variance of the mass fraction, c″ ⁣2˜ , as a mix metric is not theoretically justified in variable density turbulence. We additionally derive expressions relating various second order moments of the mass fraction, specific volume, and density fields. The central role of the density specific volume covariance ⟨ρ v ⟩ is highlighted; it is a key quantity with considerable dynamical significance linking various second order statistics. For laboratory experiments, we have developed exact relations between the Reynolds scalar variance ⟨c2⟩ its Favre analog c″ ⁣2˜ , and various second moments including ⟨ρ v ⟩ . For moment closure models that evolve ⟨ρ v ⟩ and not ⟨ρ2⟩ , we provide a novel expression for ⟨ρ2⟩ in terms of a rational function of ⟨ρ v ⟩ that avoids recourse to Taylor series methods (which do not converge for large density differences). We have derived

  12. Philosophies and fallacies in turbulence modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalart, Philippe R.

    2015-04-01

    We present a set of positions, likely to be controversial, on turbulence modeling for the Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) equations. The paper has three themes. First is what we call the "fundamental paradox" of turbulence modeling, between the local character of the Partial Differential Equations strongly favored by CFD methods and the nonlocal physical nature of turbulence. Second, we oppose two philosophies. The "Systematic" philosophy attempts to model the exact transport equations for the Reynolds stresses or possibly higher moments term by term, gradually relegating the Closure Problem to higher moments and invoking the "Principle of Receding Influence" (although rarely formulating it). In contrast, the "Openly Empirical" philosophy produces models which satisfy strict constraints such as Galilean invariance, but lack an explicit connection with terms in the exact turbulence equations. The prime example is the eddy-viscosity assumption. Third, we explain a series of what we perceive as fallacies, many of them widely held and by senior observers, in turbulence knowledge, leading to turbulence models. We divide them into "hard" fallacies for which a short mathematical argument demonstrates that a particular statement is wrong or meaningless, and "soft" fallacies for which approximate physical arguments can be opposed, but we contend that a clear debate is overdue and wishful thinking has been involved. Some fallacies appear to be "intermediate." An example in the hard class is the supposed isotropy of the diagonal Reynolds stresses. Examples in the soft class are the need to match the decay rate of isotropic turbulence, and the value of realizability in a model. Our hope is to help the direct effort in this field away from simplistic and hopeless lines of work, and to foster debates.

  13. Effects of forcing time scale on the simulated turbulent flows and turbulent collision statistics of inertial particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, B.; Parishani, H.; Ayala, O.; Wang, L.-P.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study systematically the effects of forcing time scale in the large-scale stochastic forcing scheme of Eswaran and Pope [“An examination of forcing in direct numerical simulations of turbulence,” Comput. Fluids 16, 257 (1988)] on the simulated flow structures and statistics of forced turbulence. Using direct numerical simulations, we find that the forcing time scale affects the flow dissipation rate and flow Reynolds number. Other flow statistics can be predicted using the altered flow dissipation rate and flow Reynolds number, except when the forcing time scale is made unrealistically large to yield a Taylor microscale flow Reynolds number of 30 and less. We then study the effects of forcing time scale on the kinematic collision statistics of inertial particles. We show that the radial distribution function and the radial relative velocity may depend on the forcing time scale when it becomes comparable to the eddy turnover time. This dependence, however, can be largely explained in terms of altered flow Reynolds number and the changing range of flow length scales present in the turbulent flow. We argue that removing this dependence is important when studying the Reynolds number dependence of the turbulent collision statistics. The results are also compared to those based on a deterministic forcing scheme to better understand the role of large-scale forcing, relative to that of the small-scale turbulence, on turbulent collision of inertial particles. To further elucidate the correlation between the altered flow structures and dynamics of inertial particles, a conditional analysis has been performed, showing that the regions of higher collision rate of inertial particles are well correlated with the regions of lower vorticity. Regions of higher concentration of pairs at contact are found to be highly correlated with the region of high energy dissipation rate

  14. Tendency to occupy a statistically dominant spatial state of the flow as a driving force for turbulent transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekmarev, Sergei F

    2013-03-01

    The transition from laminar to turbulent fluid motion occurring at large Reynolds numbers is generally associated with the instability of the laminar flow. On the other hand, since the turbulent flow characteristically appears in the form of spatially localized structures (e.g., eddies) filling the flow field, a tendency to occupy such a structured state of the flow cannot be ruled out as a driving force for turbulent transition. To examine this possibility, we propose a simple analytical model that treats the flow as a collection of localized spatial structures, each of which consists of elementary cells in which the behavior of the particles (atoms or molecules) is uncorrelated. This allows us to introduce the Reynolds number, associating it with the ratio between the total phase volume for the system and that for the elementary cell. Using the principle of maximum entropy to calculate the most probable size distribution of the localized structures, we show that as the Reynolds number increases, the elementary cells group into the localized structures, which successfully explains turbulent transition and some other general properties of turbulent flows. An important feature of the present model is that a bridge between the spatial-statistical description of the flow and hydrodynamic equations is established. We show that the basic assumptions underlying the model, i.e., that the particles are indistinguishable and elementary volumes of phase space exist in which the state of the particles is uncertain, are involved in the derivation of the Navier-Stokes equation. Taking into account that the model captures essential features of turbulent flows, this suggests that the driving force for the turbulent transition is basically the same as in the present model, i.e., the tendency of the system to occupy a statistically dominant state plays a key role. The instability of the flow at high Reynolds numbers can then be a mechanism to initiate structural rearrangement of

  15. Turbulence in collisionless plasmas: statistical analysis from numerical simulations with pressure anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowal, G [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao 1226, 05508-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Falceta-Goncalves, D A; Lazarian, A, E-mail: kowal@astro.iag.usp.br [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    In recent years, we have experienced increasing interest in the understanding of the physical properties of collisionless plasmas, mostly because of the large number of astrophysical environments (e.g. the intracluster medium (ICM)) containing magnetic fields that are strong enough to be coupled with the ionized gas and characterized by densities sufficiently low to prevent the pressure isotropization with respect to the magnetic line direction. Under these conditions, a new class of kinetic instabilities arises, such as firehose and mirror instabilities, which have been studied extensively in the literature. Their role in the turbulence evolution and cascade process in the presence of pressure anisotropy, however, is still unclear. In this work, we present the first statistical analysis of turbulence in collisionless plasmas using three-dimensional numerical simulations and solving double-isothermal magnetohydrodynamic equations with the Chew-Goldberger-Low laws closure (CGL-MHD). We study models with different initial conditions to account for the firehose and mirror instabilities and to obtain different turbulent regimes. We found that the CGL-MHD subsonic and supersonic turbulences show small differences compared to the MHD models in most cases. However, in the regimes of strong kinetic instabilities, the statistics, i.e. the probability distribution functions (PDFs) of density and velocity, are very different. In subsonic models, the instabilities cause an increase in the dispersion of density, while the dispersion of velocity is increased by a large factor in some cases. Moreover, the spectra of density and velocity show increased power at small scales explained by the high growth rate of the instabilities. Finally, we calculated the structure functions of velocity and density fluctuations in the local reference frame defined by the direction of magnetic lines. The results indicate that in some cases the instabilities significantly increase the anisotropy of

  16. Turbulence in collisionless plasmas: statistical analysis from numerical simulations with pressure anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowal, G; Falceta-Goncalves, D A; Lazarian, A

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, we have experienced increasing interest in the understanding of the physical properties of collisionless plasmas, mostly because of the large number of astrophysical environments (e.g. the intracluster medium (ICM)) containing magnetic fields that are strong enough to be coupled with the ionized gas and characterized by densities sufficiently low to prevent the pressure isotropization with respect to the magnetic line direction. Under these conditions, a new class of kinetic instabilities arises, such as firehose and mirror instabilities, which have been studied extensively in the literature. Their role in the turbulence evolution and cascade process in the presence of pressure anisotropy, however, is still unclear. In this work, we present the first statistical analysis of turbulence in collisionless plasmas using three-dimensional numerical simulations and solving double-isothermal magnetohydrodynamic equations with the Chew-Goldberger-Low laws closure (CGL-MHD). We study models with different initial conditions to account for the firehose and mirror instabilities and to obtain different turbulent regimes. We found that the CGL-MHD subsonic and supersonic turbulences show small differences compared to the MHD models in most cases. However, in the regimes of strong kinetic instabilities, the statistics, i.e. the probability distribution functions (PDFs) of density and velocity, are very different. In subsonic models, the instabilities cause an increase in the dispersion of density, while the dispersion of velocity is increased by a large factor in some cases. Moreover, the spectra of density and velocity show increased power at small scales explained by the high growth rate of the instabilities. Finally, we calculated the structure functions of velocity and density fluctuations in the local reference frame defined by the direction of magnetic lines. The results indicate that in some cases the instabilities significantly increase the anisotropy of

  17. Statistical properties of visible and infrared beams retroreflected through a turbulent atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slatkine, M.; Bensimon, D.; Englander, A.; Shtrikman, S.; Treves, D.

    1980-01-01

    Statistical properties of HeNe and CO 2 laser beams retroreflected through a turbulent atmosphere are investigated experimentally for round paths of 1 km and 12 km. Both heterodyne and direct detection are used

  18. Physics Based Modeling of Compressible Turbulance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-07

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0345 PHYSICS -BASED MODELING OF COMPRESSIBLE TURBULENCE PARVIZ MOIN LELAND STANFORD JUNIOR UNIV CA Final Report 09/13/2016...on the AFOSR project (FA9550-11-1-0111) entitled: Physics based modeling of compressible turbulence. The period of performance was, June 15, 2011...by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Page 1 of 2FORM SF 298 11/10/2016https://livelink.ebs.afrl.af.mil/livelink/llisapi.dll PHYSICS -BASED MODELING OF COMPRESSIBLE

  19. Lagrangian statistics of particle pairs in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biferale, L.; Boffeta, G.; Celani, A.; Devenish, B.J.; Lanotte, A.; Toschi, F.

    2005-01-01

    We present a detailed investigation of the particle pair separation process in homogeneous isotropic turbulence. We use data from direct numerical simulations up to R????280 following the evolution of about two million passive tracers advected by the flow over a time span of about three decades. We

  20. Dynamics and statistics of heavy particles in turbulent flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cencini, M.; Bec, J.; Biferale, L.; Boffetta, G.; Celani, A.; Lanotte, A.; Musacchio, S.; Toschi, F.

    2006-01-01

    We present the results of direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent flows seeded with millions of passive inertial particles. The maximum Reynolds number is Re¿~ 200. We consider particles much heavier than the carrier flow in the limit when the Stokes drag force dominates their dynamical

  1. Experimental evidence of the statistical intermittency in a cryogenic turbulent jet of normal and superfluid Helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duri, D.

    2012-01-01

    This experimental work is focused on the statistical study of the high Reynolds number turbulent velocity field in an inertially driven liquid helium axis-symmetric round jet at temperatures above and below the lambda transition (between 2.3 K and 1.78 K) in a cryogenic wind tunnel. The possibility to finely tune the fluid temperature allows us to perform a comparative study of the quantum He II turbulence within the classical framework of the Kolmogorov turbulent cascade in order to have a better understanding of the energy cascade process in a superfluid. In particular we focused our attention on the intermittency phenomena, in both He I and He II phases, by measuring the high order statistics of the longitudinal velocity increments by means of the flatness and the skewness statistical estimators. A first phase consisted in developing the cryogenic facility, a closed loop pressurized and temperature regulated wind tunnel, and adapting the classic hot-wire anemometry technique in order to be able to work in such a challenging low temperature environment. A detailed calibration procedure of the fully developed turbulent flow was the carried out at 2.3 K at Reynolds numbers based on the Taylor length scale up to 2600 in order to qualify our testing set-up and to identify possible facility-related spurious phenomena. This procedure showed that the statistical properties of the longitudinal velocity increments are in good agreement with respect to previous results. By further reducing the temperature of the working fluid (at a constant pressure) below the lambda point down to 1.78 K local velocity measurements were performed at different superfluid density fractions. The results show a classic behaviour of the He II energy cascade at large scales while, at smaller scales, a deviation has been observed. The occurrence of this phenomenon, which requires further investigation and modelling, is highlighted by the observed changing sign of the third order structure

  2. Statistics of turbulent structures in a thermal plasma jet

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlína, Jan; Šonský, Jiří; Něnička, Václav; Zachar, Andrej

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 38, - (2005), s. 1760-1768 ISSN 0022-3727 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA1057202; GA ČR(CZ) GA202/05/0728 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20570509 Keywords : turbulent structures * thermal plasma jet Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.957, year: 2005

  3. THE MATRYOSHKA RUN. II. TIME-DEPENDENT TURBULENCE STATISTICS, STOCHASTIC PARTICLE ACCELERATION, AND MICROPHYSICS IMPACT IN A MASSIVE GALAXY CLUSTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miniati, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We use the Matryoshka run to study the time-dependent statistics of structure-formation-driven turbulence in the intracluster medium of a 10 15 M ☉ galaxy cluster. We investigate the turbulent cascade in the inner megaparsec for both compressional and incompressible velocity components. The flow maintains approximate conditions of fully developed turbulence, with departures thereof settling in about an eddy-turnover time. Turbulent velocity dispersion remains above 700 km s –1 even at low mass accretion rate, with the fraction of compressional energy between 10% and 40%. The normalization and the slope of the compressional turbulence are susceptible to large variations on short timescales, unlike the incompressible counterpart. A major merger occurs around redshift z ≅ 0 and is accompanied by a long period of enhanced turbulence, ascribed to temporal clustering of mass accretion related to spatial clustering of matter. We test models of stochastic acceleration by compressional modes for the origin of diffuse radio emission in galaxy clusters. The turbulence simulation model constrains an important unknown of this complex problem and brings forth its dependence on the elusive microphysics of the intracluster plasma. In particular, the specifics of the plasma collisionality and the dissipation physics of weak shocks affect the cascade of compressional modes with strong impact on the acceleration rates. In this context radio halos emerge as complex phenomena in which a hierarchy of processes acting on progressively smaller scales are at work. Stochastic acceleration by compressional modes implies statistical correlation of radio power and spectral index with merging cores distance, both testable in principle with radio surveys

  4. Some Recent Developments in Turbulence Closure Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, Paul A.

    2018-01-01

    Turbulence closure models are central to a good deal of applied computational fluid dynamical analysis. Closure modeling endures as a productive area of research. This review covers recent developments in elliptic relaxation and elliptic blending models, unified rotation and curvature corrections, transition prediction, hybrid simulation, and data-driven methods. The focus is on closure models in which transport equations are solved for scalar variables, such as the turbulent kinetic energy, a timescale, or a measure of anisotropy. Algebraic constitutive representations are reviewed for their role in relating scalar closures to the Reynolds stress tensor. Seamless and nonzonal methods, which invoke a single closure model, are reviewed, especially detached eddy simulation (DES) and adaptive DES. Other topics surveyed include data-driven modeling and intermittency and laminar fluctuation models for transition prediction. The review concludes with an outlook.

  5. Statistics and scaling of turbulence in a spatially developing mixing layer at Reλ = 250

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio

    2012-03-21

    The turbulent flow originating from the interaction between two parallel streams with different velocities is studied by means of direct numerical simulation. Rather than the more common temporal evolving layer, a spatially evolving configuration, with perturbed laminar inlet conditions is considered. The streamwise evolution and the self-similar state of turbulence statistics are reported and compared to results available in the literature. The characteristics of the transitional region agree with those observed in other simulations and experiments of mixing layers originating from laminar inlets. The present results indicate that the transitional region depends strongly on the inlet flow. Conversely, the self-similar state of turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation agrees quantitatively with those in a temporal mixing layer developing from turbulent initial conditions [M. M. Rogers and R. D. Moser, “Direct simulation of a self-similar turbulent mixing layer,” Phys. Fluids6, 903 (1994)]. The statistical features of turbulence in the self-similar region have been analysed in terms of longitudinal velocity structure functions, and scaling exponents are estimated by applying the extended self-similarity concept. In the small scale range (60 < r/η < 250), the scaling exponents display the universal anomalous scaling observed in homogeneous isotropic turbulence. The hypothesis of isotropy recovery holds in the turbulent mixing layer despite the presence of strong shear and large-scale structures, independently of the means of turbulence generation. At larger scales (r/η > 400), the mean shear and large coherent structures result in a significant deviation from predictions based on homogeneous isotropic turbulence theory. In this second scaling range, the numerical values of the exponents agree quantitatively with those reported for a variety of other flows characterized by strong shear, such as boundary layers, as well as channel and wake flows.

  6. Statistics and scaling of turbulence in a spatially developing mixing layer at Reλ = 250

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio; Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    The turbulent flow originating from the interaction between two parallel streams with different velocities is studied by means of direct numerical simulation. Rather than the more common temporal evolving layer, a spatially evolving configuration, with perturbed laminar inlet conditions is considered. The streamwise evolution and the self-similar state of turbulence statistics are reported and compared to results available in the literature. The characteristics of the transitional region agree with those observed in other simulations and experiments of mixing layers originating from laminar inlets. The present results indicate that the transitional region depends strongly on the inlet flow. Conversely, the self-similar state of turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation agrees quantitatively with those in a temporal mixing layer developing from turbulent initial conditions [M. M. Rogers and R. D. Moser, “Direct simulation of a self-similar turbulent mixing layer,” Phys. Fluids6, 903 (1994)]. The statistical features of turbulence in the self-similar region have been analysed in terms of longitudinal velocity structure functions, and scaling exponents are estimated by applying the extended self-similarity concept. In the small scale range (60 < r/η < 250), the scaling exponents display the universal anomalous scaling observed in homogeneous isotropic turbulence. The hypothesis of isotropy recovery holds in the turbulent mixing layer despite the presence of strong shear and large-scale structures, independently of the means of turbulence generation. At larger scales (r/η > 400), the mean shear and large coherent structures result in a significant deviation from predictions based on homogeneous isotropic turbulence theory. In this second scaling range, the numerical values of the exponents agree quantitatively with those reported for a variety of other flows characterized by strong shear, such as boundary layers, as well as channel and wake flows.

  7. Statistics of the turbulent/non-turbulent interface in a spatially developing mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio; Cristancho, Juan; Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    available in the literature, such as turbulent jets and wakes. In addition, an analysis of the passive scalar field in the vicinity of the interface is presented. It is shown that the scalar has a jump at the interface, even stronger than that observed

  8. Stochastic models of edge turbulent transport in the thermonuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volchenkov, Dima

    2005-01-01

    Two-dimensional stochastic model of turbulent transport in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of thermonuclear reactors is considered. Convective instability arisen in the system with respect to perturbations reveals itself in the strong outward bursts of particle density propagating ballistically across the SOL. The criterion of stability for the fluctuations of particle density is formulated. A possibility to stabilize the system depends upon the certain type of plasma waves interactions and the certain scenario of turbulence. A bias of limiter surface would provide a fairly good insulation of chamber walls excepting for the resonant cases. Pdf of the particle flux for the large magnitudes of flux events is modeled with a simple discrete time toy model of I-dimensional random walks concluding at the boundary. The spectra of wandering times feature the pdf of particle flux in the model and qualitatively reproduce the experimental statistics of transport events

  9. Statistical properties of turbulent transport and fluctuations in tokamak and stellarator devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidalgo, C; Pedrosa, M A; Milligen, B Van; Sanchez, E; Balbin, R; Garcia-Cortes, I [Euratom-CIEMAT Association, Madrid (Spain); Bleuel, J; Giannone, L.; Niedermeyer, H [Euratom-IPP Association, Garching (Germany)

    1997-05-01

    The statistical properties of fluctuations and turbulent transport have been studied in the plasma boundary region of stellarator (TJ-IU, W7-AS) and tokamak (TJ-I) devices. The local flux probability distribution function shows the bursty character of the flux and presents a systematic change as a function of the radial location. There exist large amplitude transport bursts that account for a significant part of the total flux. There is a strong similarity between the statistical properties of the turbulent fluxes in different devices. The value of the radial coherence associated with fluctuations and turbulent transport is strongly intermittent. This result emphasizes the importance of measurements with time resolution in understanding the interplay between the edge and the core regions in the plasma. For measurements in the plasma edge region of the TJ-IU torsatron, the turbulent flux does not, in general, show a larger radial coherence than the one associated with the fluctuations. (author). 14 refs, 6 figs.

  10. On the Eulerian-Lagrangian Transform in the Statistical Theory of Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandel, C. F:; Kofoed-Hansen, O.

    1962-01-01

    "Fundamental Problems in Turbulence" Conference Paper (see Abstr. 1962A024007). Two important types of probing of a turbulent velocity field droarr/dtoarr = voarr (voarr constant) and the Lagrangian probing defined by droarr/dtoarr = roarr (roarr t). Explicit expressions are derived for the trans......"Fundamental Problems in Turbulence" Conference Paper (see Abstr. 1962A024007). Two important types of probing of a turbulent velocity field droarr/dtoarr = voarr (voarr constant) and the Lagrangian probing defined by droarr/dtoarr = roarr (roarr t). Explicit expressions are derived...... for the transformation of autocorrelations and power spectra obtained by Eulerian and Lagrangian probing in the case of fully developed isotropic and homogeneous turbulence. The derivations are based on a statistical representation of the turbulent velocity field using the results of the equilibrium theory of turbulence....... The Taylor (1921) hypothesis is verified in the limit of high probing velocities. The Hay-Pasquill (1960) conjecture relating the Lagrangian and Eulerian power spectra results as an approximation to the transformation equations. Application of the results to the theory of turbulent diffusion is indicated....

  11. Fluid model of the magnetic presheath in a turbulent plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanojevic, M; Duhovnik, J; Jelic, N; Kendl, A; Kuhn, S

    2005-01-01

    A fluid model of the magnetic presheath in a turbulent boundary plasma is presented. Turbulent transport corrections of the classical three-dimensional fluid transport equations, which can be used to study magnetic presheaths in various geometries, are derived by means of the ensemble averaging procedure from the statistical theory of plasma turbulence. Then, the magnetic presheath in front of an infinite plane surface is analysed in detail. The linearized planar magnetic presheath equations are applied to the plasma-presheath-magnetic-presheath boundary (i.e. the magnetic presheath edge), whereas the original non-linear planar magnetic presheath equations are used for the entire magnetic presheath, allowing for various sets of experimentally relevant free model parameters to be applied. Important new results of this study are, among others, new expressions for the fluid Bohm criterion at the Debye sheath edge and for the ion flux density perpendicular to the wall. These new results, which exhibit corrections due to the turbulent charged particle transport, can qualitatively explain the fact that whenever the angle between the magnetic field and the wall is very small (i.e. several degrees) or zero, electric currents, measured by Langmuir probes in the boundary regions of nuclear fusion devices and in various low-temperature plasmas, are anomalously enhanced in comparison with those expected or predicted by other theoretical models

  12. Lagrangian statistics of mesoscale turbulence in a natural environment: The Agulhas return current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Francesco; Gencarelli, Christian N; Hedgecock, Ian M

    2016-12-01

    The properties of mesoscale geophysical turbulence in an oceanic environment have been investigated through the Lagrangian statistics of sea surface temperature measured by a drifting buoy within the Agulhas return current, where strong temperature mixing produces locally sharp temperature gradients. By disentangling the large-scale forcing which affects the small-scale statistics, we found that the statistical properties of intermittency are identical to those obtained from the multifractal prediction in the Lagrangian frame for the velocity trajectory. The results suggest a possible universality of turbulence scaling.

  13. Eulerian and Lagrangian statistics from high resolution numerical simulations of weakly compressible turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benzi, R.; Biferale, L.; Fisher, R.T.; Lamb, D.Q.; Toschi, F.

    2009-01-01

    We report a detailed study of Eulerian and Lagrangian statistics from high resolution Direct Numerical Simulations of isotropic weakly compressible turbulence. Reynolds number at the Taylor microscale is estimated to be around 600. Eulerian and Lagrangian statistics is evaluated over a huge data

  14. Statistics of the relative velocity of particles in bidisperse turbulent suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Akshay; Gustavsson, Kristian; Mehlig, Bernhard; Mitra, Dhrubaditya

    2017-11-01

    We calculate the joint probability distribution function (JPDF) of relative distances (R) and velocities (V with longitudinal component VR) of a pair of bidisperse heavy inertial particles in homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flows using direct numerical simulations (DNS). A recent paper (J. Meibohm, et. al. 2017), using statistical-model simulations and mathematical analysis of an one-dimensional white-noise model, has shown that the JPDF, P (R ,VR) , for two particles with Stokes numbers, St1 and St2 , can be interpreted in terms of StM , the harmonic mean of St1 and St2 and θ ≡ | St1 - St2 | / (St1 + St2) . For small θ there emerges a small-scale cutoff Rc and a small-velocity cutoff Vc such that for VR Foundation, Dnr. KAW 2014.0048.

  15. Statistical treatment of turbulent polydisperse particle systems a non-sectional PDF approach

    CERN Document Server

    Shrimpton, JS; Scott, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces the modeling process of turbulent particulate flows which are encountered in many engineering and environmental applications. Views the modeling process from a mesoscopic level, and offers many numerical simulations of basic processes.

  16. Analysis of a turbulent buoyant confined jet modeled using realizable k-ε model

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed; Sun, Shuyu; Heidemann, Wolfgang; Mü ller-Steinhagen, Hans M.

    2010-01-01

    Through this paper, analyses of components of the unheated/heated turbulent confined jet are introduced and some models to describe them are developed. Turbulence realizable k-ε model is used to model the turbulence of this problem. Numerical

  17. Effects of Turbulent Reynolds Number on the Displacement Speed Statistics in the Thin Reaction Zones Regime of Turbulent Premixed Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilanjan Chakraborty

    2011-01-01

    nature of the correlations remains unaffected. The dependence of displacement speed on strain rate and curvature is found to weaken with increasing turbulent Reynolds number when either Damköhler or Karlovitz number is held constant, but the qualitative nature of the correlation remains unaltered. The implications of turbulent Reynolds number effects in the context of Flame Surface Density (FSD modelling have also been addressed, with emphasis on the influence of displacement speed on the curvature and propagation terms in the FSD balance equation.

  18. Prediction of interior noise due to random acoustic or turbulent boundary layer excitation using statistical energy analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of predicting interior noise due to random acoustic or turbulent boundary layer excitation was investigated in experiments in which a statistical energy analysis model (VAPEPS) was used to analyze measurements of the acceleration response and sound transmission of flat aluminum, lucite, and graphite/epoxy plates exposed to random acoustic or turbulent boundary layer excitation. The noise reduction of the plate, when backed by a shallow cavity and excited by a turbulent boundary layer, was predicted using a simplified theory based on the assumption of adiabatic compression of the fluid in the cavity. The predicted plate acceleration response was used as input in the noise reduction prediction. Reasonable agreement was found between the predictions and the measured noise reduction in the frequency range 315-1000 Hz.

  19. PDF modeling of turbulent flows on unstructured grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakosi, Jozsef

    In probability density function (PDF) methods of turbulent flows, the joint PDF of several flow variables is computed by numerically integrating a system of stochastic differential equations for Lagrangian particles. Because the technique solves a transport equation for the PDF of the velocity and scalars, a mathematically exact treatment of advection, viscous effects and arbitrarily complex chemical reactions is possible; these processes are treated without closure assumptions. A set of algorithms is proposed to provide an efficient solution of the PDF transport equation modeling the joint PDF of turbulent velocity, frequency and concentration of a passive scalar in geometrically complex configurations. An unstructured Eulerian grid is employed to extract Eulerian statistics, to solve for quantities represented at fixed locations of the domain and to track particles. All three aspects regarding the grid make use of the finite element method. Compared to hybrid methods, the current methodology is stand-alone, therefore it is consistent both numerically and at the level of turbulence closure without the use of consistency conditions. Since both the turbulent velocity and scalar concentration fields are represented in a stochastic way, the method allows for a direct and close interaction between these fields, which is beneficial in computing accurate scalar statistics. Boundary conditions implemented along solid bodies are of the free-slip and no-slip type without the need for ghost elements. Boundary layers at no-slip boundaries are either fully resolved down to the viscous sublayer, explicitly modeling the high anisotropy and inhomogeneity of the low-Reynolds-number wall region without damping or wall-functions or specified via logarithmic wall-functions. As in moment closures and large eddy simulation, these wall-treatments provide the usual trade-off between resolution and computational cost as required by the given application. Particular attention is focused on

  20. New method for eliminating the statistical bias in highly turbulent flow measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, S.I.; Terao, Y.; Hirata, K.I.; Kitakyushu Industrial Research Institute, Fukuoka, Japan)

    1987-01-01

    A simple method was developed for eliminating statistical bias which can be applied to highly turbulent flows with the sparse and nonuniform seeding conditions. Unlike the method proposed so far, a weighting function was determined based on the idea that the statistical bias could be eliminated if the asymmetric form of the probability density function of the velocity data were corrected. Moreover, the data more than three standard deviations away from the mean were discarded to remove the apparent turbulent intensity resulting from noise. The present method was applied to data obtained in the wake of a block, which provided local turbulent intensities up to about 120 percent, it was found to eliminate the statistical bias with high accuracy. 9 references

  1. Studies of turbulent round jets through experimentation, simulation, and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keedy, Ryan

    This thesis studies the physics of the turbulent round jet. In particular, it focuses on three different problems that have the turbulent round jet as their base flow. The first part of this thesis examines a compressible turbulent round jet at its sonic condition. We investigate the shearing effect such a jet has when impinging on a solid surface that is perpendicular to the flow direction. We report on experiments to evaluate the jet's ability to remove different types of explosive particles from a glass surface. Theoretical analysis revealed trends and enabled modeling to improve the predictability of particle removal for various jet conditions. The second part of thesis aims at developing a non-intrusive measurement technique for free-shear turbulent flows in nature. Most turbulent jet investigations in the literature, both in the laboratory and in the field, required specialized intrusive instrumentation and/or complex optical setups. There are many situations in naturally-occurring flows where the environment may prove too hostile or remote for existing instrumentation. We have developed a methodology for analyzing video of the exterior of a naturally-occurring flow and calculating the flow velocity. We found that the presence of viscosity gradients affects the velocity analysis. While these effects produce consistent, predictable changes, we became interested in the mechanism by which the viscosity gradients affect the mixing and development of the turbulent round jet. We conducted a stability analysis of the axisymmetric jet when a viscosity gradient is present. Finally, the third problem addressed in this thesis is the growth of liquid droplets by condensation in a turbulent round jet. A vapor-saturated turbulent jet issues into a cold, dry environment. The resulting mixing produces highly inhomogeneous regions of supersaturation, where droplets grow and evaporate. Non-linear interactions between the droplet growth rate and the supersaturation field make

  2. BOOK REVIEW: Plasma and Fluid Turbulence: Theory and Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, A.; Itoh, S. I.; Itoh, K.

    2003-03-01

    The area of turbulence has been covered by many books over the years. This has, of course, mainly been fluid turbulence, while the area of plasma turbulence has been treated much less. This book by Yoshizawa et al covers both plasma and fluid turbulence, in a way that does justice to both areas at the same time as cross-disciplinary aspects are illuminated. The book should be useful to physicists working in both areas partly because it examines fundamental aspects in a pedagogical way, partly because it is up to date and partly because of the cross-disciplinary aspects which enrich both areas. It is written as an advanced textbook. The reader should have previous knowledge of at least one of the areas and also some background in statistical physics. The book starts with the very important and highly up to date area of structure formation which is relevant both to fluids and plasmas. Here, pipe flow of fluids is treated as an introduction to the area, then follows discussion of the generation of magnetic fields by turbulent motion in stellar objects and stucture formation in plasmas confined by a magnetic field. Also the concept of bifurcation is introduced. This part builds up knowledge from the simple fluid case to the problems of magnetic confinement of plasmas in a very pedagogical way. It continues by introducing the fundamentals of fluid turbulence. This is done very systematically and concepts useful for industrial applications like the K-e method and several ways of heuristic modelling are introduced. Also the two dimensional vortex equation, which is also relevant to magnetized plasmas is introduced. In chapter 5 the statistical theory of turbulence is treated. It starts with a very nice and easy to understand example of renormalization of a simple nonlinear equation where the exact solution is known. It introduces the method of partial renormalization, Greens functions and the direct interaction approximation (DIA). The book then continues with an

  3. Mixing and Turbulence Statistics in an Inclined Interface Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Akshay; Lele, Sanjiva

    2016-11-01

    The interaction of a Mach 1.55 shockwave with a nominally inclined interface is considered. Unlike the classical Richtmyer-Meshkov problem, the interface evolution is non-linear from early time and large highly correlated vortical structures are observed even after reshock. The simulations target the experiment of McFarland et al. (2014). Simulations are performed using the Miranda code (Cook et al., 2005) that uses high-order spectral-like numerics (Lele, 1992). Results from multiple grid resolutions up to 4 billion grid points establish grid convergence. Comparisons to the experiments show that the simulations adequately capture the physics of the problem. Analysis of the data from the simulations based on variable density turbulence equations in the Favre averaged form will be presented. Statistics of unclosed terms in the variable density RANS equations will also be presented and compared to standard closure models. It is observed that the Reynolds Stresses have a non-monotonic return to isotropy after reshock and that compressibility effects are important long after reshock. The effect of numerics are also quantified and presented. Computer time for this work was provided by NSF PRAC award "Multi-material turbulent mixing" on the Blue Waters system.

  4. Simulation analysis of air flow and turbulence statistics in a rib grit roughened duct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogiatzis, I I; Denizopoulou, A C; Ntinas, G K; Fragos, V P

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of variable artificial roughness patterns on a surface is an effective technique to enhance the rate of heat transfer to fluid flow in the ducts of solar air heaters. Different geometries of roughness elements investigated have demonstrated the pivotal role that vortices and associated turbulence have on the heat transfer characteristics of solar air heater ducts by increasing the convective heat transfer coefficient. In this paper we investigate the two-dimensional, turbulent, unsteady flow around rectangular ribs of variable aspect ratios by directly solving the transient Navier-Stokes and continuity equations using the finite elements method. Flow characteristics and several aspects of turbulent flow are presented and discussed including velocity components and statistics of turbulence. The results reveal the impact that different rib lengths have on the computed mean quantities and turbulence statistics of the flow. The computed turbulence parameters show a clear tendency to diminish downstream with increasing rib length. Furthermore, the applied numerical method is capable of capturing small-scale flow structures resulting from the direct solution of Navier-Stokes and continuity equations.

  5. The Research of Optical Turbulence Model in Underwater Imaging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liying Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to research the effect of turbulence on underwater imaging system and image restoration, the underwater turbulence model is simulated by computer fluid dynamics. This model is obtained in different underwater turbulence intensity, which contains the pressure data that influences refractive index distribution. When the pressure value is conversed to refractive index, the refractive index distribution can be received with the refraction formula. In the condition of same turbulent intensity, the distribution of refractive index presents gradient in the whole region, with disorder and mutations in the local region. With the turbulence intensity increase, the holistic variation of the refractive index in the image is larger, and the refractive index change more tempestuously in the local region. All the above are illustrated by the simulation results with he ray tracing method and turbulent refractive index model. According to different turbulence intensity analysis, it is proved that turbulence causes image distortion and increases noise.

  6. John Lumley's Contributions to Turbulence Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    We recall the contributions that John Lumley made to turbulence modeling in the 1970s and 1980s. In these early days, computer power was feeble by today's standards, and eddy-viscosity models were prevalent in CFD. Lumley recognized, however, that second-moment closures represent the simplest level at which the physics of turbulent flows can reasonably be represented. This is especially true when the velocity field is coupled to scalar fields through buoyancy, as in the atmosphere and oceans. While Lumley was not the first to propose second-moment closures, he can be credited with establishing the rational approach to constructing such closures. This includes the application of various invariance principles and tensor representation theorems, imposing the constraints imposed by realizability, and of course appealing to experimental data in simple, canonical flows. These techniques are now well-accepted and have found application far beyond second-moment closures.

  7. Intermittency in MHD turbulence and coronal nanoflares modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Veltri

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available High resolution numerical simulations, solar wind data analysis, and measurements at the edges of laboratory plasma devices have allowed for a huge progress in our understanding of MHD turbulence. The high resolution of solar wind measurements has allowed to characterize the intermittency observed at small scales. We are now able to set up a consistent and convincing view of the main properties of MHD turbulence, which in turn constitutes an extremely efficient tool in understanding the behaviour of turbulent plasmas, like those in solar corona, where in situ observations are not available. Using this knowledge a model to describe injection, due to foot-point motions, storage and dissipation of MHD turbulence in coronal loops, is built where we assume strong longitudinal magnetic field, low beta and high aspect ratio, which allows us to use the set of reduced MHD equations (RMHD. The model is based on a shell technique in the wave vector space orthogonal to the strong magnetic field, while the dependence on the longitudinal coordinate is preserved. Numerical simulations show that injected energy is efficiently stored in the loop where a significant level of magnetic and velocity fluctuations is obtained. Nonlinear interactions give rise to an energy cascade towards smaller scales where energy is dissipated in an intermittent fashion. Due to the strong longitudinal magnetic field, dissipative structures propagate along the loop, with the typical speed of the Alfvén waves. The statistical analysis on the intermittent dissipative events compares well with all observed properties of nanoflare emission statistics. Moreover the recent observations of non thermal velocity measurements during flare occurrence are well described by the numerical results of the simulation model. All these results naturally emerge from the model dynamical evolution without any need of an ad-hoc hypothesis.

  8. Structure-Based Turbulence Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reynolds, W

    2000-01-01

    .... Maire carried out this work as part of his Phi) research. During the award period we began to explore ways to simplify the structure-based modeling so that it could be used in repetitive engineering calculations...

  9. Exclusion statistics and integrable models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashkevich, S.

    1998-01-01

    The definition of exclusion statistics, as given by Haldane, allows for a statistical interaction between distinguishable particles (multi-species statistics). The thermodynamic quantities for such statistics ca be evaluated exactly. The explicit expressions for the cluster coefficients are presented. Furthermore, single-species exclusion statistics is realized in one-dimensional integrable models. The interesting questions of generalizing this correspondence onto the higher-dimensional and the multi-species cases remain essentially open

  10. Towards CFD modeling of turbulent pipeline material transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahirpour, Amir; Herzog, Nicoleta; Egbers, Cristoph

    2013-04-01

    to generate an optimized LES solver to model turbulent pipe flow for larger Reynolds numbers. The validations are carried out using experiments conducted in Cottbus Large Pipe Test Facility at BTU as a reference [3]. In the mentioned experimental research, evolution of statistical pipe flow quantities, such as turbulence intensity, skewness and flatness are investigated to clarify the development length needed to achieve fully developed turbulence. These observations take place in a relatively large pipe test facility with an inner pipe diameter of Di = 0.19 m and a total length of L = 27 m where a bulk Reynolds number of 8.5×105 can be reached. 1. CO2 pipeline Infrastructure: An analysis of global challenges and opportunities, Final Report For International Energy Agency of Greenhouse Gas Program (2010) 2. J. Kim, P. Moin, R. Moser, Turbulence statistics in fully developed channel flow at low Reynolds number, J.Fluid Mech. 177, 133-166, (1987) 3. F. Zimmer, E.-S. Zanoun and C. Egbers, A study on the influence of triggering pipe flow regarding mean and higher order statistics, Journal of Physics: Conference Series 318 (2011) 032039

  11. Strongly coupled fluid-particle flows in vertical channels. I. Reynolds-averaged two-phase turbulence statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capecelatro, Jesse; Desjardins, Olivier; Fox, Rodney O.

    2016-01-01

    Simulations of strongly coupled (i.e., high-mass-loading) fluid-particle flows in vertical channels are performed with the purpose of understanding the fundamental physics of wall-bounded multiphase turbulence. The exact Reynolds-averaged (RA) equations for high-mass-loading suspensions are presented, and the unclosed terms that are retained in the context of fully developed channel flow are evaluated in an Eulerian–Lagrangian (EL) framework for the first time. A key distinction between the RA formulation presented in the current work and previous derivations of multiphase turbulence models is the partitioning of the particle velocity fluctuations into spatially correlated and uncorrelated components, used to define the components of the particle-phase turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and granular temperature, respectively. The adaptive spatial filtering technique developed in our previous work for homogeneous flows [J. Capecelatro, O. Desjardins, and R. O. Fox, “Numerical study of collisional particle dynamics in cluster-induced turbulence,” J. Fluid Mech. 747, R2 (2014)] is shown to accurately partition the particle velocity fluctuations at all distances from the wall. Strong segregation in the components of granular energy is observed, with the largest values of particle-phase TKE associated with clusters falling near the channel wall, while maximum granular temperature is observed at the center of the channel. The anisotropy of the Reynolds stresses both near the wall and far away is found to be a crucial component for understanding the distribution of the particle-phase volume fraction. In Part II of this paper, results from the EL simulations are used to validate a multiphase Reynolds-stress turbulence model that correctly predicts the wall-normal distribution of the two-phase turbulence statistics.

  12. Strongly coupled fluid-particle flows in vertical channels. I. Reynolds-averaged two-phase turbulence statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capecelatro, Jesse; Desjardins, Olivier; Fox, Rodney O.

    2016-03-01

    Simulations of strongly coupled (i.e., high-mass-loading) fluid-particle flows in vertical channels are performed with the purpose of understanding the fundamental physics of wall-bounded multiphase turbulence. The exact Reynolds-averaged (RA) equations for high-mass-loading suspensions are presented, and the unclosed terms that are retained in the context of fully developed channel flow are evaluated in an Eulerian-Lagrangian (EL) framework for the first time. A key distinction between the RA formulation presented in the current work and previous derivations of multiphase turbulence models is the partitioning of the particle velocity fluctuations into spatially correlated and uncorrelated components, used to define the components of the particle-phase turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and granular temperature, respectively. The adaptive spatial filtering technique developed in our previous work for homogeneous flows [J. Capecelatro, O. Desjardins, and R. O. Fox, "Numerical study of collisional particle dynamics in cluster-induced turbulence," J. Fluid Mech. 747, R2 (2014)] is shown to accurately partition the particle velocity fluctuations at all distances from the wall. Strong segregation in the components of granular energy is observed, with the largest values of particle-phase TKE associated with clusters falling near the channel wall, while maximum granular temperature is observed at the center of the channel. The anisotropy of the Reynolds stresses both near the wall and far away is found to be a crucial component for understanding the distribution of the particle-phase volume fraction. In Part II of this paper, results from the EL simulations are used to validate a multiphase Reynolds-stress turbulence model that correctly predicts the wall-normal distribution of the two-phase turbulence statistics.

  13. Achieving fast reconnection in resistive MHD models via turbulent means

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lapenta

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Astrophysical fluids are generally turbulent and this preexisting turbulence must be taken into account for models of magnetic reconnection in astrophysical, solar or heliospheric environments. In addition, reconnection itself induces turbulence which provides an important feedback on the reconnection process. In this paper we discuss both the theoretical model and numerical evidence that magnetic reconnection becomes fast in the approximation of resistive MHD. We consider the relation between the Lazarian and Vishniac turbulent reconnection theory and Lapenta's numerical experiments testifying of the spontaneous onset of turbulent reconnection in systems which are initially laminar.

  14. Turbulence statistics and energy budget in rotating Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunnen, R.P.J.; Geurts, Bernardus J.; Clercx, H.J.H.

    The strongly-modified turbulence statistics of Rayleigh–Bénard convection subject to various rotation rates is addressed by numerical investigations. The flow is simulated in a domain with periodic boundary conditions in the horizontal directions, and confined vertically by parallel no-slip

  15. Exclusion statistics and integrable models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashkevich, S.

    1998-01-01

    The definition of exclusion statistics that was given by Haldane admits a 'statistical interaction' between distinguishable particles (multispecies statistics). For such statistics, thermodynamic quantities can be evaluated exactly; explicit expressions are presented here for cluster coefficients. Furthermore, single-species exclusion statistics is realized in one-dimensional integrable models of the Calogero-Sutherland type. The interesting questions of generalizing this correspondence to the higher-dimensional and the multispecies cases remain essentially open; however, our results provide some hints as to searches for the models in question

  16. Continuum methods of physical modeling continuum mechanics, dimensional analysis, turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Hutter, Kolumban

    2004-01-01

    The book unifies classical continuum mechanics and turbulence modeling, i.e. the same fundamental concepts are used to derive model equations for material behaviour and turbulence closure and complements these with methods of dimensional analysis. The intention is to equip the reader with the ability to understand the complex nonlinear modeling in material behaviour and turbulence closure as well as to derive or invent his own models. Examples are mostly taken from environmental physics and geophysics.

  17. Multigrid solution of incompressible turbulent flows by using two-equation turbulence models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, X.; Liu, C. [Front Range Scientific Computations, Inc., Denver, CO (United States); Sung, C.H. [David Taylor Model Basin, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Most of practical flows are turbulent. From the interest of engineering applications, simulation of realistic flows is usually done through solution of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and turbulence model equations. It has been widely accepted that turbulence modeling plays a very important role in numerical simulation of practical flow problem, particularly when the accuracy is of great concern. Among the most used turbulence models today, two-equation models appear to be favored for the reason that they are more general than algebraic models and affordable with current available computer resources. However, investigators using two-equation models seem to have been more concerned with the solution of N-S equations. Less attention is paid to the solution method for the turbulence model equations. In most cases, the turbulence model equations are loosely coupled with N-S equations, multigrid acceleration is only applied to the solution of N-S equations due to perhaps the fact the turbulence model equations are source-term dominant and very stiff in sublayer region.

  18. Turbulence modeling with fractional derivatives: Derivation from first principles and initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epps, Brenden; Cushman-Roisin, Benoit

    2017-11-01

    Fluid turbulence is an outstanding unsolved problem in classical physics, despite 120+ years of sustained effort. Given this history, we assert that a new mathematical framework is needed to make a transformative breakthrough. This talk offers one such framework, based upon kinetic theory tied to the statistics of turbulent transport. Starting from the Boltzmann equation and ``Lévy α-stable distributions'', we derive a turbulence model that expresses the turbulent stresses in the form of a fractional derivative, where the fractional order is tied to the transport behavior of the flow. Initial results are presented herein, for the cases of Couette-Poiseuille flow and 2D boundary layers. Among other results, our model is able to reproduce the logarithmic Law of the Wall in shear turbulence.

  19. Multi-time, multi-scale correlation functions in turbulence and in turbulent models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biferale, L.; Boffetta, G.; Celani, A.; Toschi, F.

    1999-01-01

    A multifractal-like representation for multi-time, multi-scale velocity correlation in turbulence and dynamical turbulent models is proposed. The importance of subleading contributions to time correlations is highlighted. The fulfillment of the dynamical constraints due to the equations of motion is

  20. Statistical examination of particle in a turbulent, non-dilute particle suspension flow experimental measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, R.C.; Jones, B.G.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study of particles suspended in fully developed turbulent water flow in a vertical pipe was done. Three series of experiments were conducted to investigate the statistical behaviour of particles in nondilute turbulent suspension flow, for two particle densities and particle sizes, and for several particle volume loadings ranging from 0 to 1 percent. The mean free fall velocity of the particles was determined at these various particle volume loadings, and the phenomenon of cluster formation was observed. The precise volume loading which gives the maximum relative settling velocity was observed to depend on particle density and size. (E.G.) [pt

  1. Low dimensional modeling of wall turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubry, Nadine

    2015-11-01

    In this talk we will review the original low dimensional dynamical model of the wall region of a turbulent boundary layer [Aubry, Holmes, Lumley and Stone, Journal of Fluid Dynamics 192, 1988] and discuss its impact on the field of fluid dynamics. We will also invite a few researchers who would like to make brief comments on the influence Lumley had on their research paths. In collaboration with Philip Holmes, Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics and Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ.

  2. Constructive modelling of structural turbulence: computational experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belotserkovskii, O M; Oparin, A M; Troshkin, O V [Institute for Computer Aided Design, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vtoraya Brestskaya st., 19/18, Moscow, 123056 (Russian Federation); Chechetkin, V M [Keldysh Institute for Applied Mathematics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miusskaya sq., 4, Moscow, 125047 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: o.bel@icad.org.ru, E-mail: a.oparin@icad.org.ru, E-mail: troshkin@icad.org.ru, E-mail: chech@gin@keldysh.ru

    2008-12-15

    Constructively, the analysis of the phenomenon of turbulence must and can be performed through direct numerical simulations of mechanics supposed to be inherent to secondary flows. This one reveals itself through such instances as large vortices, structural instabilities, vortex cascades and principal modes discussed in this paper. Like fragments of a puzzle, they speak of a motion ordered with its own nuts and bolts, however chaotic it appears at first sight. This opens an opportunity for a multi-oriented approach of which a prime ideology seems to be a rational combination of grid, spectral and statistical methods. An attempt is made to bring together the above instances and produce an alternative point of view on the phenomenon in question when based on the main laws of conservation.

  3. A computer model for dispersed fluid-solid turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.H.; Tulig, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    A computer model is being developed to simulate two-phase turbulent flow phenomena in fluids containing finely dispersed solids. The model is based on a dual-continuum picture of the individual phases and an extension of a two-equation turbulence closure theory. The resulting set of nonlinear partial differential equations are solved using a finite difference procedure with special treatment to promote convergence. The model has been checked against a number of idealized flow problems with known solutions. The authors are currently comparing model predictions with measurements to determine a proper set of turbulence parameters needed for simulating two-phase turbulent flows

  4. Kolmogorov Behavior of Near-Wall Turbulence and Its Application in Turbulence Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Lumley, John L.

    1992-01-01

    The near-wall behavior of turbulence is re-examined in a way different from that proposed by Hanjalic and Launder and followers. It is shown that at a certain distance from the wall, all energetic large eddies will reduce to Kolmogorov eddies (the smallest eddies in turbulence). All the important wall parameters, such as friction velocity, viscous length scale, and mean strain rate at the wall, are characterized by Kolmogorov microscales. According to this Kolmogorov behavior of near-wall turbulence, the turbulence quantities, such as turbulent kinetic energy, dissipation rate, etc. at the location where the large eddies become Kolmogorov eddies, can be estimated by using both direct numerical simulation (DNS) data and asymptotic analysis of near-wall turbulence. This information will provide useful boundary conditions for the turbulent transport equations. As an example, the concept is incorporated in the standard k-epsilon model which is then applied to channel and boundary flows. Using appropriate boundary conditions (based on Kolmogorov behavior of near-wall turbulence), there is no need for any wall-modification to the k-epsilon equations (including model constants). Results compare very well with the DNS and experimental data.

  5. Statistical modeling for degradation data

    CERN Document Server

    Lio, Yuhlong; Ng, Hon; Tsai, Tzong-Ru

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the statistical aspects of the analysis of degradation data. In recent years, degradation data analysis has come to play an increasingly important role in different disciplines such as reliability, public health sciences, and finance. For example, information on products’ reliability can be obtained by analyzing degradation data. In addition, statistical modeling and inference techniques have been developed on the basis of different degradation measures. The book brings together experts engaged in statistical modeling and inference, presenting and discussing important recent advances in degradation data analysis and related applications. The topics covered are timely and have considerable potential to impact both statistics and reliability engineering.

  6. Statistical modelling with quantile functions

    CERN Document Server

    Gilchrist, Warren

    2000-01-01

    Galton used quantiles more than a hundred years ago in describing data. Tukey and Parzen used them in the 60s and 70s in describing populations. Since then, the authors of many papers, both theoretical and practical, have used various aspects of quantiles in their work. Until now, however, no one put all the ideas together to form what turns out to be a general approach to statistics.Statistical Modelling with Quantile Functions does just that. It systematically examines the entire process of statistical modelling, starting with using the quantile function to define continuous distributions. The author shows that by using this approach, it becomes possible to develop complex distributional models from simple components. A modelling kit can be developed that applies to the whole model - deterministic and stochastic components - and this kit operates by adding, multiplying, and transforming distributions rather than data.Statistical Modelling with Quantile Functions adds a new dimension to the practice of stati...

  7. Stochastic transport models for mixing in variable-density turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakosi, J.; Ristorcelli, J. R.

    2011-11-01

    In variable-density (VD) turbulent mixing, where very-different- density materials coexist, the density fluctuations can be an order of magnitude larger than their mean. Density fluctuations are non-negligible in the inertia terms of the Navier-Stokes equation which has both quadratic and cubic nonlinearities. Very different mixing rates of different materials give rise to large differential accelerations and some fundamentally new physics that is not seen in constant-density turbulence. In VD flows material mixing is active in a sense far stronger than that applied in the Boussinesq approximation of buoyantly-driven flows: the mass fraction fluctuations are coupled to each other and to the fluid momentum. Statistical modeling of VD mixing requires accounting for basic constraints that are not important in the small-density-fluctuation passive-scalar-mixing approximation: the unit-sum of mass fractions, bounded sample space, and the highly skewed nature of the probability densities become essential. We derive a transport equation for the joint probability of mass fractions, equivalent to a system of stochastic differential equations, that is consistent with VD mixing in multi-component turbulence and consistently reduces to passive scalar mixing in constant-density flows.

  8. Lagrangian statistics and flow topology in forced two-dimensional turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoch, B; Del-Castillo-Negrete, D; Bos, W J T; Schneider, K

    2011-03-01

    A study of the relationship between Lagrangian statistics and flow topology in fluid turbulence is presented. The topology is characterized using the Weiss criterion, which provides a conceptually simple tool to partition the flow into topologically different regions: elliptic (vortex dominated), hyperbolic (deformation dominated), and intermediate (turbulent background). The flow corresponds to forced two-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence in doubly periodic and circular bounded domains, the latter with no-slip boundary conditions. In the double periodic domain, the probability density function (pdf) of the Weiss field exhibits a negative skewness consistent with the fact that in periodic domains the flow is dominated by coherent vortex structures. On the other hand, in the circular domain, the elliptic and hyperbolic regions seem to be statistically similar. We follow a Lagrangian approach and obtain the statistics by tracking large ensembles of passively advected tracers. The pdfs of residence time in the topologically different regions are computed introducing the Lagrangian Weiss field, i.e., the Weiss field computed along the particles' trajectories. In elliptic and hyperbolic regions, the pdfs of the residence time have self-similar algebraic decaying tails. In contrast, in the intermediate regions the pdf has exponential decaying tails. The conditional pdfs (with respect to the flow topology) of the Lagrangian velocity exhibit Gaussian-like behavior in the periodic and in the bounded domains. In contrast to the freely decaying turbulence case, the conditional pdfs of the Lagrangian acceleration in forced turbulence show a comparable level of intermittency in both the periodic and the bounded domains. The conditional pdfs of the Lagrangian curvature are characterized, in all cases, by self-similar power-law behavior with a decay exponent of order -2.

  9. Space-time statistics of the turbulence in the PRETEXT and TEXT tokamak edge plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levinson, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    A study of the statistical space-time properties of the turbulence observed in the edge regions of the PRETEXT and the TEXT tokamaks are reported. Computer estimates of the particle-transport spectrum T(omega), and of the local wavenumber-frequency spectra S(K,omega) for poloidal (k/sub y/) and toroidal (k/sub z/) wavenumbers was determined. A conventional fast-Fourier-transform technique is used initially for the analyses of the potential and density fluctuations obtained from spatially fixed Langmuir-probe pairs. Measurements of the fluctuation-induced particle transport revealed that the particle flux is outward for both PRETEXT and TEXT, and it results primarily from the low-frequency, long-wavelength components of the turbulence. The S(K/sub y/, omega) spectra are dominated by low frequencies ( -1 ) and appear broadened about an approximately linear statistical dispersion relation, anti k(omega). The broadening is characterized by a spectral width sigma/sub k/(omega) (rms deviation about anti k(omega)). In PRETEXT, sigma/sub k/(omega) is of the order of anti k(omega), and the turbulence appears to propagate poloidally with an apparent mean phase velocity of 1-2 x 10 5 cm/s in the ion diamagnetic drift direction. In TEXT, a reversal in the phase velocity of the turbulence in the edge plasma was observed

  10. The Selection of Turbulence Models for Prediction of Room Airflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    This paper discusses the use of different turbulence models and their advantages in given situations. As an example, it is shown that a simple zero-equation model can be used for the prediction of special situations as flow with a low level of turbulence. A zero-equation model with compensation...

  11. A Statistical Programme Assignment Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosholm, Michael; Staghøj, Jonas; Svarer, Michael

    When treatment effects of active labour market programmes are heterogeneous in an observable way  across the population, the allocation of the unemployed into different programmes becomes a particularly  important issue. In this paper, we present a statistical model designed to improve the present...... duration of unemployment spells may result if a statistical programme assignment model is introduced. We discuss several issues regarding the  plementation of such a system, especially the interplay between the statistical model and  case workers....

  12. New Approaches in Modeling Multiphase Flows and Dispersion in Turbulence, Fractal Methods and Synthetic Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolleau, FCGA; Redondo, J-M

    2012-01-01

    This book contains a collection of the main contributions from the first five workshops held by Ercoftac Special Interest Group on Synthetic Turbulence Models (SIG42. It is intended as an illustration of the sig's activities and of the latest developments in the field. This volume investigates the use of Kinematic Simulation (KS) and other synthetic turbulence models for the particular application to environmental flows. This volume offers the best syntheses on the research status in KS, which is widely used in various domains, including Lagrangian aspects in turbulence mixing/stirring, partic

  13. Turbulence modeling of natural convection in enclosures: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seok Ki; Kim, Seong O

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a review of recent developments of turbulence models for natural convection in enclosures is presented. The emphasis is placed on the effect of the treatments of Reynolds stress and turbulent heat flux on the stability and accuracy of the solution for natural convection in enclosures. The turbulence models considered in the preset study are the two-layer k -ε model, the shear stress transport (SST) model, the elliptic-relaxation (V2-f) model and the elliptic-blending second-moment closure (EBM). Three different treatments of the turbulent heat flux are the generalized gradient diffusion hypothesis (GGDH), the algebraic flux model (AFM) and the differential flux model (DFM). The mathematical formulation of the above turbulence models and their solution method are presented. Evaluation of turbulence models are performed for turbulent natural convection in a 1:5 rectangular cavity ( Ra = 4.3x10 10 ) and in a square cavity with conducting top and bottom walls ( Ra =1.58x10 9 ) and the Rayleigh-Benard convection ( Ra = 2x10 6 ∼ Ra =10 9 ). The relative performances of turbulence models are examined and their successes and shortcomings are addressed

  14. Coarse Grained Transport Model for Neutrals in Turbulent SOL Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marandet, Y.; Mekkaoui, A.; Genesio, P.; Rosato, J.; Capes, H.; Godbert-Mouret, L.; Koubiti, M.; Stamm, R., E-mail: yannick.marandet@univ-amu.fr [PIIM, CNRS/Aix-Marseille University, Marseille (France); Reiter, D.; Boerner, P. [IEK4, FZJ, Juelich (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: Edge plasmas of magnetic fusion devices exhibit strong intermittent turbulence, which governs perpendicular transport of particles and heat. Turbulent fluxes result from the coarse graining procedure used to derive the transport equation, which entails time averaging of the underlying equations governing the turbulent evolution of the electron and ion fluids. In previous works, we have pointed out that this averaging is not carried out on the Boltzmann equation that describes the transport of neutral particles (atoms, molecules) in current edge code suites (such as SOLPS). Since fluctuations in the far SOL are of order unity, calculating the transport of neutral particles, hence the source terms in plasma fluid equations, in the average plasma background might lead to misleading results. In particular, retaining the effects of fluctuations could affect the estimation of the importance of main chamber recycling, hence first wall sputtering by charge exchange atoms, as well as main chamber impurity contamination and transport. In this contribution, we obtain an exact coarse-grained equation for the average neutral density, assuming that density fluctuations are described by multivariate Gamma statistics. This equation is a scattering free Boltzmann equation, where the ionization rate has been renormalized to account for fluctuations. The coarse grained transport model for neutrals has been implemented in the EIRENE code, and applications in 2D geometry with ITER relevant plasma parameters are presented. Our results open the way for the implementation of the effects of turbulent fluctuations on the transport of neutral particles in coupled plasma/neutral edge codes like B2-EIRENE. (author)

  15. Turbulent Statistics From Time-Resolved PIV Measurements of a Jet Using Empirical Mode Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Milo D.

    2013-01-01

    Empirical mode decomposition is an adaptive signal processing method that when applied to a broadband signal, such as that generated by turbulence, acts as a set of band-pass filters. This process was applied to data from time-resolved, particle image velocimetry measurements of subsonic jets prior to computing the second-order, two-point, space-time correlations from which turbulent phase velocities and length and time scales could be determined. The application of this method to large sets of simultaneous time histories is new. In this initial study, the results are relevant to acoustic analogy source models for jet noise prediction. The high frequency portion of the results could provide the turbulent values for subgrid scale models for noise that is missed in large-eddy simulations. The results are also used to infer that the cross-correlations between different components of the decomposed signals at two points in space, neglected in this initial study, are important.

  16. Acceleration statistics of finite-sized particles in turbulent flow: the role of Faxen forces

    OpenAIRE

    Calzavarini, Enrico; Volk, Romain; Bourgoin, Mickael; Leveque, Emmanuel; Pinton, Jean-Francois; Toschi, Federico

    2008-01-01

    International audience; The dynamics of particles in turbulence when the particle size is larger than the dissipative scale of the carrier flow are studied. Recent experiments have highlighted signatures of particles' finiteness on their statistical properties, namely a decrease of their acceleration variance, an increase of correlation times (at increasing the particles size) and an independence of the probability density function of the acceleration once normalized to their variance. These ...

  17. A weakened cascade model for turbulence in astrophysical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howes, G. G.; TenBarge, J. M.; Dorland, W.

    2011-01-01

    A refined cascade model for kinetic turbulence in weakly collisional astrophysical plasmas is presented that includes both the transition between weak and strong turbulence and the effect of nonlocal interactions on the nonlinear transfer of energy. The model describes the transition between weak and strong MHD turbulence and the complementary transition from strong kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) turbulence to weak dissipating KAW turbulence, a new regime of weak turbulence in which the effects of shearing by large scale motions and kinetic dissipation play an important role. The inclusion of the effect of nonlocal motions on the nonlinear energy cascade rate in the dissipation range, specifically the shearing by large-scale motions, is proposed to explain the nearly power-law energy spectra observed in the dissipation range of both kinetic numerical simulations and solar wind observations.

  18. On specification of initial conditions in turbulence models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rollin, Bertrand [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Andrews, Malcolm J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-01

    Recent research has shown that initial conditions have a significant influence on the evolution of a flow towards turbulence. This important finding offers a unique opportunity for turbulence control, but also raises the question of how to properly specify initial conditions in turbulence models. We study this problem in the context of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability is an interfacial fluid instability that leads to turbulence and turbulent mixing. It occurs when a light fluid is accelerated in to a heavy fluid because of misalignment between density and pressure gradients. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability plays a key role in a wide variety of natural and man-made flows ranging from supernovae to the implosion phase of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). Our approach consists of providing the turbulence models with a predicted profile of its key variables at the appropriate time in accordance to the initial conditions of the problem.

  19. Modelling and prediction of non-stationary optical turbulence behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doelman, N.J.; Osborn, J.

    2016-01-01

    There is a strong need to model the temporal fluctuations in turbulence parameters, for instance for scheduling, simulation and prediction purposes. This paper aims at modelling the dynamic behaviour of the turbulence coherence length r0, utilising measurement data from the Stereo-SCIDAR instrument

  20. Turbulence theories and modelling of fluids and plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshizawa, Akira; Yokoi, Nobumitsu [Institute of Industrial Science, Univ. of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Itoh, Sanae-I. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan); Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2001-04-01

    Theoretical and heuristic modelling methods are reviewed for studying turbulence phenomena of fluids and plasmas. Emphasis is put on understanding of effects on turbulent characteristics due to inhomogeneities of field and plasma parameters. The similarity and dissimilarity between the methods for fluids and plasmas are sought in order to shed light on the properties that are shared or not by fluid and plasma turbulence. (author)

  1. Power laws and inverse motion modelling: application to turbulence measurements from satellite images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo D. Mininni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of tackling the ill-posed inverse problem of motion estimation from image sequences, we propose to introduce prior knowledge on flow regularity given by turbulence statistical models. Prior regularity is formalised using turbulence power laws describing statistically self-similar structure of motion increments across scales. The motion estimation method minimises the error of an image observation model while constraining second-order structure function to behave as a power law within a prescribed range. Thanks to a Bayesian modelling framework, the motion estimation method is able to jointly infer the most likely power law directly from image data. The method is assessed on velocity fields of 2-D or quasi-2-D flows. Estimation accuracy is first evaluated on a synthetic image sequence of homogeneous and isotropic 2-D turbulence. Results obtained with the approach based on physics of fluids outperform state-of-the-art. Then, the method analyses atmospheric turbulence using a real meteorological image sequence. Selecting the most likely power law model enables the recovery of physical quantities, which are of major interest for turbulence atmospheric characterisation. In particular, from meteorological images we are able to estimate energy and enstrophy fluxes of turbulent cascades, which are in agreement with previous in situ measurements.

  2. A study of key features of the RAE atmospheric turbulence model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, W. F.; Heffley, R. K.

    1978-01-01

    A complex atmospheric turbulence model for use in aircraft simulation is analyzed in terms of its temporal, spectral, and statistical characteristics. First, a direct comparison was made between cases of the RAE model and the more conventional Dryden turbulence model. Next the control parameters of the RAE model were systematically varied and the effects noted. The RAE model was found to possess a high degree of flexibility in its characteristics, but the individual control parameters are cross-coupled in terms of their effect on various measures of intensity, bandwidth, and probability distribution.

  3. Tropical geometry of statistical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachter, Lior; Sturmfels, Bernd

    2004-11-16

    This article presents a unified mathematical framework for inference in graphical models, building on the observation that graphical models are algebraic varieties. From this geometric viewpoint, observations generated from a model are coordinates of a point in the variety, and the sum-product algorithm is an efficient tool for evaluating specific coordinates. Here, we address the question of how the solutions to various inference problems depend on the model parameters. The proposed answer is expressed in terms of tropical algebraic geometry. The Newton polytope of a statistical model plays a key role. Our results are applied to the hidden Markov model and the general Markov model on a binary tree.

  4. Mathematical and numerical foundations of turbulence models and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chacón Rebollo, Tomás

    2014-01-01

    With applications to climate, technology, and industry, the modeling and numerical simulation of turbulent flows are rich with history and modern relevance. The complexity of the problems that arise in the study of turbulence requires tools from various scientific disciplines, including mathematics, physics, engineering, and computer science. Authored by two experts in the area with a long history of collaboration, this monograph provides a current, detailed look at several turbulence models from both the theoretical and numerical perspectives. The k-epsilon, large-eddy simulation, and other models are rigorously derived and their performance is analyzed using benchmark simulations for real-world turbulent flows. Mathematical and Numerical Foundations of Turbulence Models and Applications is an ideal reference for students in applied mathematics and engineering, as well as researchers in mathematical and numerical fluid dynamics. It is also a valuable resource for advanced graduate students in fluid dynamics,...

  5. Statistical Model of Extreme Shear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose; Larsen, Gunner Chr.

    2005-01-01

    In order to continue cost-optimisation of modern large wind turbines, it is important to continuously increase the knowledge of wind field parameters relevant to design loads. This paper presents a general statistical model that offers site-specific prediction of the probability density function...... by a model that, on a statistically consistent basis, describes the most likely spatial shape of an extreme wind shear event. Predictions from the model have been compared with results from an extreme value data analysis, based on a large number of full-scale measurements recorded with a high sampling rate...

  6. Statistical Models for Social Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, Tom A. B.; Cook, KS; Massey, DS

    2011-01-01

    Statistical models for social networks as dependent variables must represent the typical network dependencies between tie variables such as reciprocity, homophily, transitivity, etc. This review first treats models for single (cross-sectionally observed) networks and then for network dynamics. For

  7. Entropic multirelaxation lattice Boltzmann models for turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bösch, Fabian; Chikatamarla, Shyam S.; Karlin, Ilya V.

    2015-10-01

    We present three-dimensional realizations of a class of lattice Boltzmann models introduced recently by the authors [I. V. Karlin, F. Bösch, and S. S. Chikatamarla, Phys. Rev. E 90, 031302(R) (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.90.031302] and review the role of the entropic stabilizer. Both coarse- and fine-grid simulations are addressed for the Kida vortex flow benchmark. We show that the outstanding numerical stability and performance is independent of a particular choice of the moment representation for high-Reynolds-number flows. We report accurate results for low-order moments for homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence and second-order grid convergence for most assessed statistical quantities. It is demonstrated that all the three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann realizations considered herein converge to the familiar lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook model when the resolution is increased. Moreover, thanks to the dynamic nature of the entropic stabilizer, the present model features less compressibility effects and maintains correct energy and enstrophy dissipation. The explicit and efficient nature of the present lattice Boltzmann method renders it a promising candidate for both engineering and scientific purposes for highly turbulent flows.

  8. Radiation turbulence interactions in pulverized coal flames: Chaotic map models of soot fluctuations in turbulent diffusion flames. Quarterly report, October 1995--December 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonough, J.M.; Menguc, M.P.; Mukerji, S.; Swabb, S.; Manickavasagam, S.; Ghosal, S.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, we introduce a methodology to characterize soot volume fraction fluctuations in turbulent diffusion flames via chaotic maps. The approach is based on the hypothesis that the fluctuations of properties in turbulent flames is deterministic in nature, rather than statistical. Out objective is to develop models to mimic these fluctuations. The models will be used eventually in comprehensive algorithms to study the true physics of turbulent flames and the interaction of turbulence with radiation. To this extent, we measured the time series of soot scattering coefficient in an ethylene diffusion flame from light scattering experiments. Following this, corresponding power spectra and delay maps were calculated. It was shown that if the data were averaged, the characteristics of the fluctuations were almost completely washed out. The psds from experiments were successfully modeled using a series of logistic maps.

  9. Numerical Investigation of Turbulence Models for a Superlaminar Journal Bearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoshuang Ding

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available With rotating machineries working at high speeds, oil flow in bearings becomes superlaminar. Under superlaminar conditions, flow exhibits between laminar and fully developed turbulence. In this study, superlaminar oil flow in an oil-lubricated tilting-pad journal bearing is analyzed through computational fluid dynamics (CFD. A three-dimensional bearing model is established. CFD results from the laminar model and 14 turbulence models are compared with experimental findings. The laminar simulation results of pad-side pressure are inconsistent with the experimental data. Thus, the turbulence effects on superlaminar flow should be considered. The simulated temperature and pressure distributions from the classical fully developed turbulence models cannot correctly fit the experimental data. As such, turbulence models should be corrected for superlaminar flow. However, several corrections, such as transition correction, are unsuitable. Among all the flow models, the SST model with low-Re correction exhibits the best pressure distribution and turbulence viscosity ratio. Velocity profile analysis confirms that a buffer layer plays an important role in the superlaminar boundary layer. Classical fully developed turbulence models cannot accurately predict the buffer layer, but this problem can be resolved by initiating an appropriate low-Re correction. Therefore, the SST model with low-Re correction yields suitable results for superlaminar flows in bearings.

  10. Interaction between combustion and turbulence in modelling of emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oksanen, A.; Maeki-Mantila, E.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the work was to study the combustion models taking into account the coupling between gas phase reactions and turbulence the modelling of emissions, especially of nitric oxide, when temperature and species concentrations are fluctuating by turbulence. The principal tools to model turbulent gas phase combustion were methods based on the probability density function (pdf) with β and γ-distributions the practice of which can take into consideration the stochastic nature of turbulence and, on the other hand, the models which also include the effect turbulence on the reaction rates in the flames e.g. the Eddy Dissipation Model (EDM), the Eddy Dissipation Concept (EDC), the kinetic mod and the combinations of those ones, respectively. Besides these models effect of the different turbulence models (standard, RNG and CHENKIM k-ε models) on the combustion phenomena, especially on the formation emissions was also studied. Same kind of modelling has been done by the teams in the Special Interest Group of ERCOFTAC (European Research Community On Flow Turbulence And Combustion) under the title of Aerodynamics and Steady State Combustion Chambers and Furnaces (A.S.C.F.) with which we have co-operated during some years with success. (author)

  11. Sensometrics: Thurstonian and Statistical Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Rune Haubo Bojesen

    . sensR is a package for sensory discrimination testing with Thurstonian models and ordinal supports analysis of ordinal data with cumulative link (mixed) models. While sensR is closely connected to the sensometrics field, the ordinal package has developed into a generic statistical package applicable......This thesis is concerned with the development and bridging of Thurstonian and statistical models for sensory discrimination testing as applied in the scientific discipline of sensometrics. In sensory discrimination testing sensory differences between products are detected and quantified by the use...... and sensory discrimination testing in particular in a series of papers by advancing Thurstonian models for a range of sensory discrimination protocols in addition to facilitating their application by providing software for fitting these models. The main focus is on identifying Thurstonian models...

  12. Turbulence models development and engineering applications; Turbulenzmodellentwicklung und ingenieurtechnische Anwendung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groetzbach, G.; Ammann, T.; Dorr, B.; Hiltner, I.; Hofmann, S.; Kampczyk, M.; Kimhi, Y.; Seiter, C.; Woerner, M.; Alef, M.; Hennemuth, A.

    1995-08-01

    The FLUTAN code is used for analyzing the decay heat removal in new reactor concepts. The turbulence models applied in FLUTAN are improved by the development of the TURBIT code. TURBIT serves for a numerical simulation of turbulent channel flow. (orig.)

  13. Status of Turbulence Modeling for Hypersonic Propulsion Flowpaths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Yoder, Dennis A.; Vyas, Manan A.; Engblom, William A.

    2012-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of current turbulent flow calculation methods for hypersonic propulsion flowpaths, particularly the scramjet engine. Emphasis is placed on Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) methods, but some discussion of newer meth- ods such as Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is also provided. The report is organized by considering technical issues throughout the scramjet-powered vehicle flowpath including laminar-to-turbulent boundary layer transition, shock wave / turbulent boundary layer interactions, scalar transport modeling (specifically the significance of turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers) and compressible mixing. Unit problems are primarily used to conduct the assessment. In the combustor, results from calculations of a direct connect supersonic combustion experiment are also used to address the effects of turbulence model selection and in particular settings for the turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers. It is concluded that RANS turbulence modeling shortfalls are still a major limitation to the accuracy of hypersonic propulsion simulations, whether considering individual components or an overall system. Newer methods such as LES-based techniques may be promising, but are not yet at a maturity to be used routinely by the hypersonic propulsion community. The need for fundamental experiments to provide data for turbulence model development and validation is discussed.

  14. Natural Convection Analysis with Various Turbulent Models Using FLUENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yu Sun

    2007-01-01

    The buoyancy driven convective flow fields are steady circulatory flows which were made between surfaces maintained at two fixed temperatures. They are ubiquitous in nature and play an important role in many engineering applications. Especially, in last decades, natural convection in a close loop or cavity becomes the main issue in the molecular biology for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Application of a natural convection can reduce the costs and efforts remarkably. This paper focuses on the sensitivity study of turbulence analysis using CFD for a natural convection in a closed rectangular cavity. Using commercial CFD code, FLUENT, various turbulent models were applied to the turbulent flow. Results from each CFD model will be compared each other in the viewpoints of flow characteristics. This work will suggest the best turbulent model of CFD for analyzing turbulent flows of the natural convection in an enclosure system

  15. Turbulent Combustion Modeling Advances, New Trends and Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Echekki, Tarek

    2011-01-01

    Turbulent combustion sits at the interface of two important nonlinear, multiscale phenomena: chemistry and turbulence. Its study is extremely timely in view of the need to develop new combustion technologies in order to address challenges associated with climate change, energy source uncertainty, and air pollution. Despite the fact that modeling of turbulent combustion is a subject that has been researched for a number of years, its complexity implies that key issues are still eluding, and a theoretical description that is accurate enough to make turbulent combustion models rigorous and quantitative for industrial use is still lacking. In this book, prominent experts review most of the available approaches in modeling turbulent combustion, with particular focus on the exploding increase in computational resources that has allowed the simulation of increasingly detailed phenomena. The relevant algorithms are presented, the theoretical methods are explained, and various application examples are given. The book ...

  16. Advances in engineering turbulence modeling. [computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, T.-H.

    1992-01-01

    Some new developments in two equation models and second order closure models are presented. In this paper, modified two equation models are proposed to remove shortcomings such as computing flows over complex geometries and the ad hoc treatment near the separation and reattachment points. The calculations using various two equation models are compared with direct numerical solutions of channel flows and flat plate boundary layers. Development of second order closure models will also be discussed with emphasis on the modeling of pressure related correlation terms and dissipation rates in the second moment equations. All existing models poorly predict the normal stresses near the wall and fail to predict the three dimensional effect of mean flow on the turbulence. The newly developed second order near-wall turbulence model to be described in this paper is capable of capturing the near-wall behavior of turbulence as well as the effect of three dimension mean flow on the turbulence.

  17. On the Statistical Properties of Turbulent Energy Transfer Rate in the Inner Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorriso-Valvo, Luca; Carbone, Francesco; Perri, Silvia; Greco, Antonella; Marino, Raffaele; Bruno, Roberto

    2018-01-01

    The transfer of energy from large to small scales in solar wind turbulence is an important ingredient of the long-standing question of the mechanism of the interplanetary plasma heating. Previous studies have shown that magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is statistically compatible with the observed solar wind heating as it expands in the heliosphere. However, in order to understand which processes contribute to the plasma heating, it is necessary to have a local description of the energy flux across scales. To this aim, it is customary to use indicators such as the magnetic field partial variance of increments (PVI), which is associated with the local, relative, scale-dependent magnetic energy. A more complete evaluation of the energy transfer should also include other terms, related to velocity and cross-helicity. This is achieved here by introducing a proxy for the local, scale-dependent turbulent energy transfer rate ɛ_{Δ t}(t), based on the third-order moment scaling law for MHD turbulence. Data from Helios 2 are used to determine the statistical properties of such a proxy in comparison with the magnetic and velocity fields PVI, and the correlation with local solar wind heating is computed. PVI and ɛ_{Δ t}(t) are generally well correlated; however, ɛ_{Δ t}(t) is a very sensitive proxy that can exhibit large amplitude values, both positive and negative, even for low amplitude peaks in the PVI. Furthermore, ɛ_{Δ t}(t) is very well correlated with local increases of the temperature when large amplitude bursts of energy transfer are localized, thus suggesting an important role played by this proxy in the study of plasma energy dissipation.

  18. Modelling of structural effects on chemical reactions in turbulent flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gammelsaeter, H.R.

    1997-12-31

    Turbulence-chemistry interactions are analysed using algebraic moment closure for the chemical reaction term. The coupling between turbulence and chemical length and time scales generate a complex interaction process. This interaction process is called structural effects in this work. The structural effects are shown to take place on all scales between the largest scale of turbulence and the scales of the molecular motions. The set of equations describing turbulent correlations involved in turbulent reacting flows are derived. Interactions are shown schematically using interaction charts. Algebraic equations for the turbulent correlations in the reaction rate are given using the interaction charts to include the most significant couplings. In the frame of fundamental combustion physics, the structural effects appearing on the small scales of turbulence are proposed modelled using a discrete spectrum of turbulent scales. The well-known problem of averaging the Arrhenius law, the specific reaction rate, is proposed solved using a presumed single variable probability density function and a sub scale model for the reaction volume. Although some uncertainties are expected, the principles are addressed. Fast chemistry modelling is shown to be consistent in the frame of algebraic moment closure when the turbulence-chemistry interaction is accounted for in the turbulent diffusion. The modelling proposed in this thesis is compared with experimental data for an laboratory methane flame and advanced probability density function modelling. The results show promising features. Finally it is shown a comparison with full scale measurements for an industrial burner. All features of the burner are captured with the model. 41 refs., 33 figs.

  19. Models for turbulent flows with variable density and combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, W.P.

    1980-01-01

    Models for transport processes and combustion in turbulent flows are outlined with emphasis on the situation where the fuel and air are injected separately. Attention is restricted to relatively simple flames. The flows investigated are high Reynolds number, single-phase, turbulent high-temperature flames in which radiative heat transfer can be considered negligible. Attention is given to the lower order closure models, algebraic stress and flux models, the k-epsilon turbulence model, the diffusion flame approximation, and finite rate reaction mechanisms

  20. Progress in wall turbulence 2 understanding and modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez, Javier; Marusic, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    This is the proceedings of the ERCOFTAC Workshop on Progress in Wall Turbulence: Understanding and Modelling, that was held in Lille, France from June 18 to 20, 2014. The workshop brought together world specialists of near wall turbulence and stimulated exchanges between them around up-to-date theories, experiments, simulations and numerical models. This book contains a coherent collection of recent results on near wall turbulence including theory, new experiments, DNS, and modeling with RANS, LES.The fact that both physical understanding and modeling by different approaches are addressed by the best specialists in a single workshop is original.

  1. Stochastic Models for Laser Propagation in Atmospheric Turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leland, Robert Patton

    In this dissertation, stochastic models for laser propagation in atmospheric turbulence are considered. A review of the existing literature on laser propagation in the atmosphere and white noise theory is presented, with a view toward relating the white noise integral and Ito integral approaches. The laser beam intensity is considered as the solution to a random Schroedinger equation, or forward scattering equation. This model is formulated in a Hilbert space context as an abstract bilinear system with a multiplicative white noise input, as in the literature. The model is also modeled in the Banach space of Fresnel class functions to allow the plane wave case and the application of path integrals. Approximate solutions to the Schroedinger equation of the Trotter-Kato product form are shown to converge for each white noise sample path. The product forms are shown to be physical random variables, allowing an Ito integral representation. The corresponding Ito integrals are shown to converge in mean square, providing a white noise basis for the Stratonovich correction term associated with this equation. Product form solutions for Ornstein -Uhlenbeck process inputs were shown to converge in mean square as the input bandwidth was expanded. A digital simulation of laser propagation in strong turbulence was used to study properties of the beam. Empirical distributions for the irradiance function were estimated from simulated data, and the log-normal and Rice-Nakagami distributions predicted by the classical perturbation methods were seen to be inadequate. A gamma distribution fit the simulated irradiance distribution well in the vicinity of the boresight. Statistics of the beam were seen to converge rapidly as the bandwidth of an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process was expanded to its white noise limit. Individual trajectories of the beam were presented to illustrate the distortion and bending of the beam due to turbulence. Feynman path integrals were used to calculate an

  2. Hamiltonian and Thermodynamic Modeling of Quantum Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grmela, Miroslav

    2010-10-01

    The state variables in the novel model introduced in this paper are the fields playing this role in the classical Landau-Tisza model and additional fields of mass, entropy (or temperature), superfluid velocity, and gradient of the superfluid velocity, all depending on the position vector and another tree dimensional vector labeling the scale, describing the small-scale structure developed in 4He superfluid experiencing turbulent motion. The fluxes of mass, momentum, energy, and entropy in the position space as well as the fluxes of energy and entropy in scales, appear in the time evolution equations as explicit functions of the state variables and of their conjugates. The fundamental thermodynamic relation relating the fields to their conjugates is left in this paper undetermined. The GENERIC structure of the equations serves two purposes: (i) it guarantees that solutions to the governing equations, independently of the choice of the fundamental thermodynamic relation, agree with the observed compatibility with thermodynamics, and (ii) it is used as a guide in the construction of the novel model.

  3. Interaction between combustion and turbulence in modelling of emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oksanen, A.; Maeki-Mantila, E.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the work is to study the combustion models which are taking into account the coupling between gas phase chemistry and turbulence in the modelling of emissions, especially of nitric oxide, when temperature and species concentrating are fluctuating by turbulence. The principal tools to model turbulent gas phase combustion are the probability density function (pdf) and the other models which are taking into consideration the effect of turbulence on the chemical reactions in flames. Such other models to use in the modelling are many e.g. Eddy Dissipation Model (EDM), Eddy Dissipation Concept (EDC), Eddy Dissipation Kinetic model (EDK), Eddy Break Up model (EBU), kinetic models and the combinations of those ones, respectively. Besides these models the effect of the different turbulence models on the formation of emissions will be also studied. Same kind of modelling has been done also by the teams in the Special Interest Group of ERCOFTAC (European Research Community On Flow Turbulence And Combustion) under the name of Aerodynamics and Steady State Combustion Chambers and Furnaces (A.S.C.F.). Combustion measurements are also tried to do if only the practical conditions take it possible. (author)

  4. Classical model of intermediate statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaniadakis, G.

    1994-01-01

    In this work we present a classical kinetic model of intermediate statistics. In the case of Brownian particles we show that the Fermi-Dirac (FD) and Bose-Einstein (BE) distributions can be obtained, just as the Maxwell-Boltzmann (MD) distribution, as steady states of a classical kinetic equation that intrinsically takes into account an exclusion-inclusion principle. In our model the intermediate statistics are obtained as steady states of a system of coupled nonlinear kinetic equations, where the coupling constants are the transmutational potentials η κκ' . We show that, besides the FD-BE intermediate statistics extensively studied from the quantum point of view, we can also study the MB-FD and MB-BE ones. Moreover, our model allows us to treat the three-state mixing FD-MB-BE intermediate statistics. For boson and fermion mixing in a D-dimensional space, we obtain a family of FD-BE intermediate statistics by varying the transmutational potential η BF . This family contains, as a particular case when η BF =0, the quantum statistics recently proposed by L. Wu, Z. Wu, and J. Sun [Phys. Lett. A 170, 280 (1992)]. When we consider the two-dimensional FD-BE statistics, we derive an analytic expression of the fraction of fermions. When the temperature T→∞, the system is composed by an equal number of bosons and fermions, regardless of the value of η BF . On the contrary, when T=0, η BF becomes important and, according to its value, the system can be completely bosonic or fermionic, or composed both by bosons and fermions

  5. Modeling Scramjet Flows with Variable Turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, X.; Hassan, H. A.; Baurle, R. A.

    2006-01-01

    A complete turbulence model, where the turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers are calculated as part of the solution and where averages involving chemical source terms are modeled, is presented. The ability of avoiding the use of assumed or evolution Probability Distribution Functions (PDF's) results in a highly efficient algorithm for reacting flows. The predictions of the model are compared with two sets of experiments involving supersonic mixing and one involving supersonic combustion. The results demonstrate the need for consideration of turbulence/chemistry interactions in supersonic combustion. In general, good agreement with experiment is indicated.

  6. Turbulent Spot Pressure Fluctuation Wave Packet Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dechant, Lawrence J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Wave packet analysis provides a connection between linear small disturbance theory and subsequent nonlinear turbulent spot flow behavior. The traditional association between linear stability analysis and nonlinear wave form is developed via the method of stationary phase whereby asymptotic (simplified) mean flow solutions are used to estimate dispersion behavior and stationary phase approximation are used to invert the associated Fourier transform. The resulting process typically requires nonlinear algebraic equations inversions that can be best performed numerically, which partially mitigates the value of the approximation as compared to a more complete, e.g. DNS or linear/nonlinear adjoint methods. To obtain a simpler, closed-form analytical result, the complete packet solution is modeled via approximate amplitude (linear convected kinematic wave initial value problem) and local sinusoidal (wave equation) expressions. Significantly, the initial value for the kinematic wave transport expression follows from a separable variable coefficient approximation to the linearized pressure fluctuation Poisson expression. The resulting amplitude solution, while approximate in nature, nonetheless, appears to mimic many of the global features, e.g. transitional flow intermittency and pressure fluctuation magnitude behavior. A low wave number wave packet models also recover meaningful auto-correlation and low frequency spectral behaviors.

  7. Textual information access statistical models

    CERN Document Server

    Gaussier, Eric

    2013-01-01

    This book presents statistical models that have recently been developed within several research communities to access information contained in text collections. The problems considered are linked to applications aiming at facilitating information access:- information extraction and retrieval;- text classification and clustering;- opinion mining;- comprehension aids (automatic summarization, machine translation, visualization).In order to give the reader as complete a description as possible, the focus is placed on the probability models used in the applications

  8. Single-Phase Bundle Flows Including Macroscopic Turbulence Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Jun; Yoon, Han Young [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Seok Jong; Cho, Hyoung Kyu [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    To deal with various thermal hydraulic phenomena due to rapid change of fluid properties when an accident happens, securing mechanistic approaches as much as possible may reduce the uncertainty arising from improper applications of the experimental models. In this study, the turbulence mixing model, which is well defined in the subchannel analysis code such as VIPRE, COBRA, and MATRA by experiments, is replaced by a macroscopic k-e turbulence model, which represents the aspect of mathematical derivation. The performance of CUPID with macroscopic turbulence model is validated against several bundle experiments: CNEN 4x4 and PNL 7x7 rod bundle tests. In this study, the macroscopic k-e model has been validated for the application to subchannel analysis. It has been implemented in the CUPID code and validated against CNEN 4x4 and PNL 7x7 rod bundle tests. The results showed that the macroscopic k-e turbulence model can estimate the experiments properly.

  9. New Models for Velocity/Pressure-Gradient Correlations in Turbulent Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poroseva, Svetlana; Murman, Scott

    2014-11-01

    To improve the performance of Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence models, one has to improve the accuracy of models for three physical processes: turbulent diffusion, interaction of turbulent pressure and velocity fluctuation fields, and dissipative processes. The accuracy of modeling the turbulent diffusion depends on the order of a statistical closure chosen as a basis for a RANS model. When the Gram-Charlier series expansions for the velocity correlations are used to close the set of RANS equations, no assumption on Gaussian turbulence is invoked and no unknown model coefficients are introduced into the modeled equations. In such a way, this closure procedure reduces the modeling uncertainty of fourth-order RANS (FORANS) closures. Experimental and direct numerical simulation data confirmed the validity of using the Gram-Charlier series expansions in various flows including boundary layers. We will address modeling the velocity/pressure-gradient correlations. New linear models will be introduced for the second- and higher-order correlations applicable to two-dimensional incompressible wall-bounded flows. Results of models' validation with DNS data in a channel flow and in a zero-pressure gradient boundary layer over a flat plate will be demonstrated. A part of the material is based upon work supported by NASA under award NNX12AJ61A.

  10. Estimating Turbulence Statistics and Parameters from Lidar Measurements. Remote Sensing Summer School

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sathe, Ameya

    This report is prepared as a written contribution to the Remote Sensing Summer School, that is organized by the Department of Wind Energy, Technical University of Denmark. It provides an overview of the state-of-the-art with regards to estimating turbulence statistics from lidar measurements...... configuration. The so-called velocity Azimuth Display (VAD) and the Doppler Beam Swinging (DBS) methods of post processing the lidar data are investigated in greater details, partly due to their wide use in commercial lidars. It is demonstrated that the VAD or DBS techniques result in introducing significant...

  11. A model for reaction rates in turbulent reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinitz, W.; Evans, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    To account for the turbulent temperature and species-concentration fluctuations, a model is presented on the effects of chemical reaction rates in computer analyses of turbulent reacting flows. The model results in two parameters which multiply the terms in the reaction-rate equations. For these two parameters, graphs are presented as functions of the mean values and intensity of the turbulent fluctuations of the temperature and species concentrations. These graphs will facilitate incorporation of the model into existing computer programs which describe turbulent reacting flows. When the model was used in a two-dimensional parabolic-flow computer code to predict the behavior of an experimental, supersonic hydrogen jet burning in air, some improvement in agreement with the experimental data was obtained in the far field in the region near the jet centerline. Recommendations are included for further improvement of the model and for additional comparisons with experimental data.

  12. Málaga statistical distribution: the new universal analytical propagation model for atmospheric optical communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurado-Navas, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    in homogeneous, isotropic turbulence. Málaga distribution was demonstrated to have the advantage of unifying most of the proposed statistical models derived until now in the scientific literature in a closed-form and mathematically-tractable expression. Furthermore, it unifies most of the proposed statistical...... models for the irradiance fluctuations derived in the bibliography providing, in addition, an excellent agreement with published plane wave and spherical wave simulation data over a wide range of turbulence conditions (weak to strong). In this communication, reviews of its different features...... scintillation in atmospheric optical communication links under any turbulence conditions...

  13. Improved model for statistical alignment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miklos, I.; Toroczkai, Z. (Zoltan)

    2001-01-01

    The statistical approach to molecular sequence evolution involves the stochastic modeling of the substitution, insertion and deletion processes. Substitution has been modeled in a reliable way for more than three decades by using finite Markov-processes. Insertion and deletion, however, seem to be more difficult to model, and thc recent approaches cannot acceptably deal with multiple insertions and deletions. A new method based on a generating function approach is introduced to describe the multiple insertion process. The presented algorithm computes the approximate joint probability of two sequences in 0(13) running time where 1 is the geometric mean of the sequence lengths.

  14. A new energy transfer model for turbulent free shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, William W.-W.

    1992-01-01

    A new model for the energy transfer mechanism in the large-scale turbulent kinetic energy equation is proposed. An estimate of the characteristic length scale of the energy containing large structures is obtained from the wavelength associated with the structures predicted by a weakly nonlinear analysis for turbulent free shear flows. With the inclusion of the proposed energy transfer model, the weakly nonlinear wave models for the turbulent large-scale structures are self-contained and are likely to be independent flow geometries. The model is tested against a plane mixing layer. Reasonably good agreement is achieved. Finally, it is shown by using the Liapunov function method, the balance between the production and the drainage of the kinetic energy of the turbulent large-scale structures is asymptotically stable as their amplitude saturates. The saturation of the wave amplitude provides an alternative indicator for flow self-similarity.

  15. A Lagrangian dynamic subgrid-scale model turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneveau, C.; Lund, T. S.; Cabot, W.

    1994-01-01

    A new formulation of the dynamic subgrid-scale model is tested in which the error associated with the Germano identity is minimized over flow pathlines rather than over directions of statistical homogeneity. This procedure allows the application of the dynamic model with averaging to flows in complex geometries that do not possess homogeneous directions. The characteristic Lagrangian time scale over which the averaging is performed is chosen such that the model is purely dissipative, guaranteeing numerical stability when coupled with the Smagorinsky model. The formulation is tested successfully in forced and decaying isotropic turbulence and in fully developed and transitional channel flow. In homogeneous flows, the results are similar to those of the volume-averaged dynamic model, while in channel flow, the predictions are superior to those of the plane-averaged dynamic model. The relationship between the averaged terms in the model and vortical structures (worms) that appear in the LES is investigated. Computational overhead is kept small (about 10 percent above the CPU requirements of the volume or plane-averaged dynamic model) by using an approximate scheme to advance the Lagrangian tracking through first-order Euler time integration and linear interpolation in space.

  16. Strategies for Reduced-Order Models in Uncertainty Quantification of Complex Turbulent Dynamical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Di

    Turbulent dynamical systems are ubiquitous in science and engineering. Uncertainty quantification (UQ) in turbulent dynamical systems is a grand challenge where the goal is to obtain statistical estimates for key physical quantities. In the development of a proper UQ scheme for systems characterized by both a high-dimensional phase space and a large number of instabilities, significant model errors compared with the true natural signal are always unavoidable due to both the imperfect understanding of the underlying physical processes and the limited computational resources available. One central issue in contemporary research is the development of a systematic methodology for reduced order models that can recover the crucial features both with model fidelity in statistical equilibrium and with model sensitivity in response to perturbations. In the first part, we discuss a general mathematical framework to construct statistically accurate reduced-order models that have skill in capturing the statistical variability in the principal directions of a general class of complex systems with quadratic nonlinearity. A systematic hierarchy of simple statistical closure schemes, which are built through new global statistical energy conservation principles combined with statistical equilibrium fidelity, are designed and tested for UQ of these problems. Second, the capacity of imperfect low-order stochastic approximations to model extreme events in a passive scalar field advected by turbulent flows is investigated. The effects in complicated flow systems are considered including strong nonlinear and non-Gaussian interactions, and much simpler and cheaper imperfect models with model error are constructed to capture the crucial statistical features in the stationary tracer field. Several mathematical ideas are introduced to improve the prediction skill of the imperfect reduced-order models. Most importantly, empirical information theory and statistical linear response theory are

  17. Active Learning with Statistical Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Active Learning with Statistical Models ASC-9217041, NSF CDA-9309300 6. AUTHOR(S) David A. Cohn, Zoubin Ghahramani, and Michael I. Jordan 7. PERFORMING...TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Al, MIT, Artificial Intelligence, active learning , queries, locally weighted 6 regression, LOESS, mixtures of gaussians...COMPUTATIONAL LEARNING DEPARTMENT OF BRAIN AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES A.I. Memo No. 1522 January 9. 1995 C.B.C.L. Paper No. 110 Active Learning with

  18. Lagrangian single-particle turbulent statistics through the Hilbert-Huang transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yongxiang; Biferale, Luca; Calzavarini, Enrico; Sun, Chao; Toschi, Federico

    2013-04-01

    The Hilbert-Huang transform is applied to analyze single-particle Lagrangian velocity data from numerical simulations of hydrodynamic turbulence. The velocity trajectory is described in terms of a set of intrinsic mode functions C(i)(t) and of their instantaneous frequency ω(i)(t). On the basis of this decomposition we define the ω-conditioned statistical moments of the C(i) modes, named q-order Hilbert spectra (HS). We show that such quantities have enhanced scaling properties as compared to traditional Fourier transform- or correlation-based (structure functions) statistical indicators, thus providing better insights into the turbulent energy transfer process. We present clear empirical evidence that the energylike quantity, i.e., the second-order HS, displays a linear scaling in time in the inertial range, as expected from a dimensional analysis. We also measure high-order moment scaling exponents in a direct way, without resorting to the extended self-similarity procedure. This leads to an estimate of the Lagrangian structure function exponents which are consistent with the multifractal prediction in the Lagrangian frame as proposed by Biferale et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 064502 (2004)].

  19. Macro-scale turbulence modelling for flows in porous media; Modelisation a l'echelle macroscopique d'un ecoulement turbulent au sein d'un milieu poreux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinson, F

    2006-03-15

    - This work deals with the macroscopic modeling of turbulence in porous media. It concerns heat exchangers, nuclear reactors as well as urban flows, etc. The objective of this study is to describe in an homogenized way, by the mean of a spatial average operator, turbulent flows in a solid matrix. In addition to this first operator, the use of a statistical average operator permits to handle the pseudo-aleatory character of turbulence. The successive application of both operators allows us to derive the balance equations of the kind of flows under study. Two major issues are then highlighted, the modeling of dispersion induced by the solid matrix and the turbulence modeling at a macroscopic scale (Reynolds tensor and turbulent dispersion). To this aim, we lean on the local modeling of turbulence and more precisely on the k - {epsilon} RANS models. The methodology of dispersion study, derived thanks to the volume averaging theory, is extended to turbulent flows. Its application includes the simulation, at a microscopic scale, of turbulent flows within a representative elementary volume of the porous media. Applied to channel flows, this analysis shows that even within the turbulent regime, dispersion remains one of the dominating phenomena within the macro-scale modeling framework. A two-scale analysis of the flow allows us to understand the dominating role of the drag force in the kinetic energy transfers between scales. Transfers between the mean part and the turbulent part of the flow are formally derived. This description significantly improves our understanding of the issue of macroscopic modeling of turbulence and leads us to define the sub-filter production and the wake dissipation. A f - <{epsilon}>f - <{epsilon}{sub w}>f model is derived. It is based on three balance equations for the turbulent kinetic energy, the viscous dissipation and the wake dissipation. Furthermore, a dynamical predictor for the friction coefficient is proposed. This model is then

  20. Flame surface statistics of constant-pressure turbulent expanding premixed flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Abhishek; Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Law, Chung K.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we investigate the local flame surface statistics of constant-pressure turbulent expanding flames. First the statistics of local length ratio is experimentally determined from high-speed planar Mie scattering images of spherically expanding flames, with the length ratio on the measurement plane, at predefined equiangular sectors, defined as the ratio of the actual flame length to the length of a circular-arc of radius equal to the average radius of the flame. Assuming isotropic distribution of such flame segments we then convolute suitable forms of the length-ratio probability distribution functions (pdfs) to arrive at the corresponding area-ratio pdfs. It is found that both the length ratio and area ratio pdfs are near log-normally distributed and shows self-similar behavior with increasing radius. Near log-normality and rather intermittent behavior of the flame-length ratio suggests similarity with dissipation rate quantities which stimulates multifractal analysis.

  1. A non-local shell model of hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plunian, F [Laboratoire de Geophysique Interne et Tectonophysique, CNRS, Universite Joseph Fourier, Maison des Geosciences, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Stepanov, R [Institute of Continuous Media Mechanics, Korolyov 1, 614013 Perm (Russian Federation)

    2007-08-15

    We derive a new shell model of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in which the energy transfers are not necessarily local. Like the original MHD equations, the model conserves the total energy, magnetic helicity, cross-helicity and volume in phase space (Liouville's theorem) apart from the effects of external forcing, viscous dissipation and magnetic diffusion. The model of hydrodynamic (HD) turbulence is derived from the MHD model setting the magnetic field to zero. In that case the conserved quantities are the kinetic energy and the kinetic helicity. In addition to a statistically stationary state with a Kolmogorov spectrum, the HD model exhibits multiscaling. The anomalous scaling exponents are found to depend on a free parameter {alpha} that measures the non-locality degree of the model. In freely decaying turbulence, the infra-red spectrum also depends on {alpha}. Comparison with theory suggests using {alpha} = -5/2. In MHD turbulence, we investigate the fully developed turbulent dynamo for a wide range of magnetic Prandtl numbers in both kinematic and dynamic cases. Both local and non-local energy transfers are clearly identified.

  2. A turbulent two-phase flow model for nebula flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champney, J.M.; Cuzzi, J.N.

    1990-01-01

    A new and very efficient turbulent two-phase flow numericaly model is described to analyze the environment of a protoplanetary nebula at a stage prior to the formation of planets. Focus is on settling processes of dust particles in flattened gaseous nebulae. The model employs a perturbation technique to improve the accuracy of the numerical simulations of such flows where small variations of physical quantities occur over large distance ranges. The particles are allowed to be diffused by gas turbulence in addition to settling under gravity. Their diffusion coefficients is related to the gas turbulent viscosity by the non-dimensional Schmidt number. The gas turbulent viscosity is determined by the means of the eddy viscosity hypothesis that assumes the Reynolds stress tensor proportional to the mean strain rate tensor. Zero- and two-equation turbulence models are employed. Modeling assumptions are detailed and discussed. The numerical model is shown to reproduce an existing analytical solution for the settling process of particles in an inviscid nebula. Results of nebula flows are presented taking into account turbulence effects of nebula flows. Diffusion processes are found to control the settling of particles. 24 refs

  3. A stochastic model of particle dispersion in turbulent reacting gaseous environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guangyuan; Lignell, David; Hewson, John

    2012-11-01

    We are performing fundamental studies of dispersive transport and time-temperature histories of Lagrangian particles in turbulent reacting flows. The particle-flow statistics including the full particle temperature PDF are of interest. A challenge in modeling particle motions is the accurate prediction of fine-scale aerosol-fluid interactions. A computationally affordable stochastic modeling approach, one-dimensional turbulence (ODT), is a proven method that captures the full range of length and time scales, and provides detailed statistics of fine-scale turbulent-particle mixing and transport. Limited results of particle transport in ODT have been reported in non-reacting flow. Here, we extend ODT to particle transport in reacting flow. The results of particle transport in three flow configurations are presented: channel flow, homogeneous isotropic turbulence, and jet flames. We investigate the functional dependence of the statistics of particle-flow interactions including (1) parametric study with varying temperatures, Reynolds numbers, and particle Stokes numbers; (2) particle temperature histories and PDFs; (3) time scale and the sensitivity of initial and boundary conditions. Flow statistics are compared to both experimental measurements and DNS data.

  4. The Modelling of Particle Resuspension in a Turbulent Boundary Layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Fan

    2011-01-01

    The work presented concerns the way small particles attached to a surface are resuspended when exposed to a turbulent flow. Of particular concern to this work is the remobilization of radioactive particles as a consequence of potential nuclear accidents. In this particular case the focus is on small particles, < 5 microns in diameter, where the principal force holding such particles onto a surface arises from van der Waals inter-molecular forces. Given its suitable treatment of the microphysics of small particles, it was decided here to aim to develop improved versions of the Rock'n'Roll (R'n'R) model; the R'n'R model is based on a statistical approach to resuspension involving the rocking and rolling of a particle about surface asperities induced by the moments of the fluctuating drag forces acting on the particle close to the surface. Firstly, a force (moment) balance model has been modified by including the distribution of the aerodynamic force instead of considering only its mean value. The R'n'R model is significantly improved by using realistic statistical fluctuations of both the stream-wise fluid velocity and acceleration close to the wall obtained from Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of turbulent channel flow; in the standard model a major assumption is that these obey a Gaussian distribution. The flow conditions are translated into the moments of the drag force acting on the particle attached to the surface. In so doing the influence of highly non-Gaussian forces on the resuspension rate has been examined along with the sensitivity of the fluctuation statistics to LES and DNS. As a result of the analysis of our DNS/LES data 3 distinct features of the modified R'n'R model have emerged as playing an important part in the resuspension. The first is the typical forcing frequency due to the turbulent aerodynamic drag forces acting on the particle attached to a surface. The second is the value of the ratio of the root

  5. Modelling and simulation of turbulence and heat transfer in wall-bounded flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popovac, M.

    2006-01-01

    At present it is widely accepted that there is no universal turbulence model, i.e. no turbulence model can give acceptably good predictions for all turbulent flows that are found in nature or engineering. Every turbulence model is based on certain assumptions, and hence it is aimed at certain type

  6. Validation of turbulence models for LMFBR outlet plenum flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.B.; Golay, M.W.

    1977-01-01

    Small scale experiments involving water flows are used to provide mean flow and turbulence field data for LMFBR outlet plenum flows. Measurements are performed at Reynolds number (Re) values of 33000 and 70000 in a 1/15 - scale FFTF geometry and at Re = 35000 in a 3/80-scale CRBR geometry. The experimental behavior is predicted using two different two-equation turbulence model computer programs, TEACH-T and VARR-II. It is found that the qualitative nature of the flow field within the plenum depends strongly upon the distribution of the mean inlet flow field, importantly also upon the degree of inlet turbulence, and also upon the turbulent momentum exchange model used in the calculations. In the FFTF geometry, the TEACH-T predictions agree well with the experiments. 7 refs

  7. The Modelling of Particle Resuspension in a Turbulent Boundary Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Fan

    2011-10-20

    The work presented concerns the way small particles attached to a surface are resuspended when exposed to a turbulent flow. Of particular concern to this work is the remobilization of radioactive particles as a consequence of potential nuclear accidents. In this particular case the focus is on small particles, < 5 microns in diameter, where the principal force holding such particles onto a surface arises from van der Waals inter-molecular forces. Given its suitable treatment of the microphysics of small particles, it was decided here to aim to develop improved versions of the Rock'n'Roll (R'n'R) model; the R'n'R model is based on a statistical approach to resuspension involving the rocking and rolling of a particle about surface asperities induced by the moments of the fluctuating drag forces acting on the particle close to the surface. Firstly, a force (moment) balance model has been modified by including the distribution of the aerodynamic force instead of considering only its mean value. The R'n'R model is significantly improved by using realistic statistical fluctuations of both the stream-wise fluid velocity and acceleration close to the wall obtained from Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of turbulent channel flow; in the standard model a major assumption is that these obey a Gaussian distribution. The flow conditions are translated into the moments of the drag force acting on the particle attached to the surface. In so doing the influence of highly non-Gaussian forces on the resuspension rate has been examined along with the sensitivity of the fluctuation statistics to LES and DNS. As a result of the analysis of our DNS/LES data 3 distinct features of the modified R'n'R model have emerged as playing an important part in the resuspension. The first is the typical forcing frequency due to the turbulent aerodynamic drag forces acting on the particle attached to a surface. The

  8. Intermittency and geometrical statistics of three-dimensional homogeneous magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: A wavelet viewpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimatsu, Katsunori; Kawahara, Yasuhiro; Schneider, Kai; Okamoto, Naoya; Farge, Marie

    2011-01-01

    Scale-dependent and geometrical statistics of three-dimensional incompressible homogeneous magnetohydrodynamic turbulence without mean magnetic field are examined by means of the orthogonal wavelet decomposition. The flow is computed by direct numerical simulation with a Fourier spectral method at resolution 512 3 and a unit magnetic Prandtl number. Scale-dependent second and higher order statistics of the velocity and magnetic fields allow to quantify their intermittency in terms of spatial fluctuations of the energy spectra, the flatness, and the probability distribution functions at different scales. Different scale-dependent relative helicities, e.g., kinetic, cross, and magnetic relative helicities, yield geometrical information on alignment between the different scale-dependent fields. At each scale, the alignment between the velocity and magnetic field is found to be more pronounced than the other alignments considered here, i.e., the scale-dependent alignment between the velocity and vorticity, the scale-dependent alignment between the magnetic field and its vector potential, and the scale-dependent alignment between the magnetic field and the current density. Finally, statistical scale-dependent analyses of both Eulerian and Lagrangian accelerations and the corresponding time-derivatives of the magnetic field are performed. It is found that the Lagrangian acceleration does not exhibit substantially stronger intermittency compared to the Eulerian acceleration, in contrast to hydrodynamic turbulence where the Lagrangian acceleration shows much stronger intermittency than the Eulerian acceleration. The Eulerian time-derivative of the magnetic field is more intermittent than the Lagrangian time-derivative of the magnetic field.

  9. Attempt to model the edge turbulence of a tokamak as a random superposition of eddies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endler, M; Theimer, G; Weinlich, M; Carlson, A; Giannone, L.; Niedermeyer, H; Rudyj, A [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

    1993-12-31

    Turbulence is considered to be the most likely origin of the anomalous transport in tokamaks. Although the main interest is focussed on the bulk plasma, transport in the scrape-off layer is very important for reactor design. For this reason extensive experimental investigations of the edge turbulence were performed on the ASDEX divertor tokamak. Langmuir probe arrays were used in the floating potential mode and in the ion saturation mode to measure the poloidal distribution of density and plasma potential fluctuations neglecting temperature fluctuations. Density fluctuations integrated radially over the boundary layer were derived from H{sub {alpha}}-measurements. Data from up to 16 channels were sampled with a frequency of 1 MHz during time windows of 1 s. Often one parameter like the plasma density or the radial probe position were scanned during this interval. It is impossible to derive physical mechanisms directly from these statistical observations. We draw general conclusions about the physics involved from the entity of observations and propose a set of basic effects to include in a theoretical model. Being still unable to solve the complex nonlinear problem of the fully developed turbulence exactly we attempt to describe the turbulence with a simple non-self-consistent statistical model. This allows to derive plausible physical interpretations of several features of the statistical functions and may be used as a guide-line for the development of a manageable theoretical model. (author) 6 refs., 3 figs.

  10. On the Conditioning of Machine-Learning-Assisted Turbulence Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinlong; Sun, Rui; Wang, Qiqi; Xiao, Heng

    2017-11-01

    Recently, several researchers have demonstrated that machine learning techniques can be used to improve the RANS modeled Reynolds stress by training on available database of high fidelity simulations. However, obtaining improved mean velocity field remains an unsolved challenge, restricting the predictive capability of current machine-learning-assisted turbulence modeling approaches. In this work we define a condition number to evaluate the model conditioning of data-driven turbulence modeling approaches, and propose a stability-oriented machine learning framework to model Reynolds stress. Two canonical flows, the flow in a square duct and the flow over periodic hills, are investigated to demonstrate the predictive capability of the proposed framework. The satisfactory prediction performance of mean velocity field for both flows demonstrates the predictive capability of the proposed framework for machine-learning-assisted turbulence modeling. With showing the capability of improving the prediction of mean flow field, the proposed stability-oriented machine learning framework bridges the gap between the existing machine-learning-assisted turbulence modeling approaches and the demand of predictive capability of turbulence models in real applications.

  11. Tempered fractional time series model for turbulence in geophysical flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerschaert, Mark M.; Sabzikar, Farzad; Phanikumar, Mantha S.; Zeleke, Aklilu

    2014-09-01

    We propose a new time series model for velocity data in turbulent flows. The new model employs tempered fractional calculus to extend the classical 5/3 spectral model of Kolmogorov. Application to wind speed and water velocity in a large lake are presented, to demonstrate the practical utility of the model.

  12. Tempered fractional time series model for turbulence in geophysical flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meerschaert, Mark M; Sabzikar, Farzad; Phanikumar, Mantha S; Zeleke, Aklilu

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new time series model for velocity data in turbulent flows. The new model employs tempered fractional calculus to extend the classical 5/3 spectral model of Kolmogorov. Application to wind speed and water velocity in a large lake are presented, to demonstrate the practical utility of the model. (paper)

  13. Alpha-modeling strategy for LES of turbulent mixing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, Bernard J.; Holm, Darryl D.; Drikakis, D.; Geurts, B.J.

    2002-01-01

    The α-modeling strategy is followed to derive a new subgrid parameterization of the turbulent stress tensor in large-eddy simulation (LES). The LES-α modeling yields an explicitly filtered subgrid parameterization which contains the filtered nonlinear gradient model as well as a model which

  14. Analysis of the K-epsilon turbulence model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadi, B.; Pironneau, O.

    1993-12-01

    This book is aimed at applied mathematicians interested in numerical simulation of turbulent flows. The book is centered around the k - ε model but it also deals with other models such as subgrid scale models, one equation models and Reynolds Stress models. The reader is expected to have some knowledge of numerical methods for fluids and, if possible, some understanding of fluid mechanics, the partial differential equations used and their variational formulations. This book presents the k - ε method for turbulence in a language familiar to applied mathematicians, stripped bare of all the technicalities of turbulence theory. The model is justified from a mathematical standpoint rather than from a physical one. The numerical algorithms are investigated and some theoretical and numerical results presented. This book should prove an invaluable tool for those studying a subject that is still controversial but very useful for industrial applications. (authors). 71 figs., 200 refs

  15. Stochastic scalar mixing models accounting for turbulent frequency multiscale fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soulard, Olivier; Sabel'nikov, Vladimir; Gorokhovski, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Two new scalar micromixing models accounting for a turbulent frequency scale distribution are investigated. These models were derived by Sabel'nikov and Gorokhovski [Second International Symposium on Turbulence and Shear FLow Phenomena, Royal Institute of technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden, June 27-29, 2001] using a multiscale extension of the classical interaction by exchange with the mean (IEM) and Langevin models. They are, respectively, called Extended IEM (EIEM) and Extended Langevin (ELM) models. The EIEM and ELM models are tested against DNS results in the case of the decay of a homogeneous scalar field in homogeneous turbulence. This comparison leads to a reformulation of the law governing the mixing frequency distribution. Finally, the asymptotic behaviour of the modeled PDF is discussed

  16. Asymptotic stability of spectral-based PDF modeling for homogeneous turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Alejandro; Duraisamy, Karthik; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2015-11-01

    Engineering models of turbulence, based on one-point statistics, neglect spectral information inherent in a turbulence field. It is well known, however, that the evolution of turbulence is dictated by a complex interplay between the spectral modes of velocity. For example, for homogeneous turbulence, the pressure-rate-of-strain depends on the integrated energy spectrum weighted by components of the wave vectors. The Interacting Particle Representation Model (IPRM) (Kassinos & Reynolds, 1996) and the Velocity/Wave-Vector PDF model (Van Slooten & Pope, 1997) emulate spectral information in an attempt to improve the modeling of turbulence. We investigate the evolution and asymptotic stability of the IPRM using three different approaches. The first approach considers the Lagrangian evolution of individual realizations (idealized as particles) of the stochastic process defined by the IPRM. The second solves Lagrangian evolution equations for clusters of realizations conditional on a given wave vector. The third evolves the solution of the Eulerian conditional PDF corresponding to the aforementioned clusters. This last method avoids issues related to discrete particle noise and slow convergence associated with Lagrangian particle-based simulations.

  17. Measurement and statistical analysis of the wavefront distortions induced by atmospheric turbulence using two-channel moiré deflectometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dashti, Mohsen; Rasouli, Saifollah

    2012-01-01

    Recently, an adjustable, high-sensitivity, wide dynamic range, two-channel wavefront sensor based on moiré deflectometry was proposed by Rasouli et al (2010 Opt. Express 18 23906). In this work we have used this sensor on a telescope for measuring turbulence-induced wavefront distortions. A slightly divergent laser beam passes through turbulent ground level atmosphere and enters the telescope’s aperture. The laser beam is collimated behind the telescope’s focal point by means of a collimator and the beam enters the wavefront sensor. First, from deviations in the moiré fringes we calculate the two orthogonal components of the angle of arrival at each location across the wavefront. The deviations have been deduced in successive frames which allows evolution of the wavefront shape and Fried’s seeing parameter r 0 to be determined. Mainly, statistical analysis of the reconstructed wavefront distortions are presented. The achieved accuracy in the measurements and comparison between the measurements and the theoretical models are presented. Owing to the use of the sensor on a telescope, and using sub-pixel accuracy for the measurement of the moiré fringe displacements, the sensitivity of the measurements is improved by more than one order of magnitude. In this work we have achieved a minimum measurable angle of arrival fluctuations equal to 3.7 × 10 −7 rad or 0.07 arc s. Besides, because of the large area of the telescope’s aperture, a high spatial resolution is achieved in detecting the spatial perturbations of the atmospheric turbulence. (paper)

  18. Log-Normal Turbulence Dissipation in Global Ocean Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Brodie; Fox-Kemper, Baylor

    2018-03-01

    Data from turbulent numerical simulations of the global ocean demonstrate that the dissipation of kinetic energy obeys a nearly log-normal distribution even at large horizontal scales O (10 km ) . As the horizontal scales of resolved turbulence are larger than the ocean is deep, the Kolmogorov-Yaglom theory for intermittency in 3D homogeneous, isotropic turbulence cannot apply; instead, the down-scale potential enstrophy cascade of quasigeostrophic turbulence should. Yet, energy dissipation obeys approximate log-normality—robustly across depths, seasons, regions, and subgrid schemes. The distribution parameters, skewness and kurtosis, show small systematic departures from log-normality with depth and subgrid friction schemes. Log-normality suggests that a few high-dissipation locations dominate the integrated energy and enstrophy budgets, which should be taken into account when making inferences from simplified models and inferring global energy budgets from sparse observations.

  19. Turbulence Modeling and Computation of Turbine Aerodynamics and Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Luo, J.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the present research is to develop improved turbulence models for the computation of complex flows through turbomachinery passages, including the effects of streamline curvature, heat transfer and secondary flows. Advanced turbulence models are crucial for accurate prediction of rocket engine flows, due to existance of very large extra strain rates, such as strong streamline curvature. Numerical simulation of the turbulent flows in strongly curved ducts, including two 180-deg ducts, one 90-deg duct and a strongly concave curved turbulent boundary layer have been carried out with Reynolds stress models (RSM) and algebraic Reynolds stress models (ARSM). An improved near-wall pressure-strain correlation has been developed for capturing the anisotropy of turbulence in the concave region. A comparative study of two modes of transition in gas turbine, the by-pass transition and the separation-induced transition, has been carried out with several representative low-Reynolds number (LRN) k-epsilon models. Effects of blade surface pressure gradient, freestream turbulence and Reynolds number on the blade boundary layer development, and particularly the inception of transition are examined in detail. The present study indicates that the turbine blade transition, in the presence of high freestream turbulence, is predicted well with LRN k-epsilon models employed. The three-dimensional Navier-Stokes procedure developed by the present authors has been used to compute the three-dimensional viscous flow through the turbine nozzle passage of a single stage turbine. A low Reynolds number k-epsilon model and a zonal k-epsilon/ARSM (algebraic Reynolds stress model) are utilized for turbulence closure. An assessment of the performance of the turbulence models has been carried out. The two models are found to provide similar predictions for the mean flow parameters, although slight improvement in the prediction of some secondary flow quantities has been obtained by the

  20. Modeling of the reactant conversion rate in a turbulent shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, S. H.; Madnia, C. K.; Givi, P.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of direct numerical simulations (DNS) of spatially developing shear flows under the influence of infinitely fast chemical reactions of the type A + B yields Products. The simulation results are used to construct the compositional structure of the scalar field in a statistical manner. The results of this statistical analysis indicate that the use of a Beta density for the probability density function (PDF) of an appropriate Shvab-Zeldovich mixture fraction provides a very good estimate of the limiting bounds of the reactant conversion rate within the shear layer. This provides a strong justification for the implementation of this density in practical modeling of non-homogeneous turbulent reacting flows. However, the validity of the model cannot be generalized for predictions of higher order statistical quantities. A closed form analytical expression is presented for predicting the maximum rate of reactant conversion in non-homogeneous reacting turbulence.

  1. Subgrid models for mass and thermal diffusion in turbulent mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, H; Yu, Y; Glimm, J; Li, X-L; Sharp, D H

    2010-01-01

    We propose a new method for the large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent mixing flows. The method yields convergent probability distribution functions (PDFs) for temperature and concentration and a chemical reaction rate when applied to reshocked Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) unstable flows. Because such a mesh convergence is an unusual and perhaps original capability for LES of RM flows, we review previous validation studies of the principal components of the algorithm. The components are (i) a front tracking code, FronTier, to control numerical mass diffusion and (ii) dynamic subgrid scale (SGS) models to compensate for unresolved scales in the LES. We also review the relevant code comparison studies. We compare our results to a simple model based on 1D diffusion, taking place in the geometry defined statistically by the interface (the 50% isoconcentration surface between the two fluids). Several conclusions important to physics could be drawn from our study. We model chemical reactions with no closure approximations beyond those in the LES of the fluid variables itself, and as with dynamic SGS models, these closures contain no adjustable parameters. The chemical reaction rate is specified by the joint PDF for temperature and concentration. We observe a bimodal distribution for the PDF and we observe significant dependence on fluid transport parameters.

  2. Hydrodynamics of Bubble Columns: Turbulence and Population Balance Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Braga Vieira

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an in-depth numerical analysis on the hydrodynamics of a bubble column. As in previous works on the subject, the focus here is on three important parameters characterizing the flow: interfacial forces, turbulence and inlet superficial Gas Velocity (UG. The bubble size distribution is taken into account by the use of the Quadrature Method of Moments (QMOM model in a two-phase Euler-Euler approach using the open-source Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD code OpenFOAM (Open Field Operation and Manipulation. The interfacial forces accounted for in all the simulations presented here are drag, lift and virtual mass. For the turbulence analysis in the water phase, three versions of the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS k-ε turbulence model are examined: namely, the standard, modified and mixture variants. The lift force proves to be of major importance for a trustworthy prediction of the gas volume fraction profiles for all the (superficial gas velocities tested. Concerning the turbulence, the mixture k-ε model is seen to provide higher values of the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate in comparison to the other models, and this clearly affects the prediction of the gas volume fraction in the bulk region, and the bubble-size distribution. In general, the modified k-ε model proves to be a good compromise between modeling simplicity and accuracy in the study of bubble columns of the kind undertaken here.

  3. Center for modeling of turbulence and transition: Research briefs, 1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This research brief contains the progress reports of the research staff of the Center for Modeling of Turbulence and Transition (CMOTT) from July 1993 to July 1995. It also constitutes a progress report to the Institute of Computational Mechanics in Propulsion located at the Ohio Aerospace Institute and the Lewis Research Center. CMOTT has been in existence for about four years. In the first three years, its main activities were to develop and validate turbulence and combustion models for propulsion systems, in an effort to remove the deficiencies of existing models. Three workshops on computational turbulence modeling were held at LeRC (1991, 1993, 1994). At present, CMOTT is integrating the CMOTT developed/improved models into CFD tools which can be used by the propulsion systems community. This activity has resulted in an increased collaboration with the Lewis CFD researchers.

  4. Statistical balance of vorticity and a new scale for vortical structures in turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, E.A.

    1993-01-01

    The balance of one-point and two-point statistical characterics of vorticity, is considered on the basis of the Navier-Stokes equations. It is shown that within the inertial range of scales (L Re -3/4 much-lt r much-lt L, L external scale, Re Reynolds number) there is a physically distinguished scale l s ∼L Re -3/10 . The balance of vortical correlations with scales r≥l s is directly affected by the large-scale motion. l s is a natural length scale for the ''vortex strings,'' observed experimentally and numerically in three-dimensional turbulent flows. The twist of vortex lines in the internal structure of vortex strings is also briefly discussed

  5. Statistical moments of the angular spectrum of normal waves in a turbulent collisional magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aistov, A.V.; Gavrilenko, V.G.

    1996-01-01

    The normal incidence of a small-amplitude electromagnetic wave upon a semi-infinite turbulent collisional plasm with an oblique external magnetic field is considered. Within a small-angle-scattering approximation of the radiative transport theory, a system of differential equations is derived for statistical moments of the angular power spectrum of radiation. The dependences of the spectrum centroid, dispersion, and asymmetry on the depth of penetration are studied numerically. The nonmonotonic behavior of the dispersion is revealed, and an increase in the spectrum width with absorption anisotropy is found within some depth interval. It is shown that, at large depths, the direction of the displacement of the spectrum centroid, does not always coincide with the direction of minimum absorption

  6. Strained spiral vortex model for turbulent fine structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, T. S.

    1982-01-01

    A model for the intermittent fine structure of high Reynolds number turbulence is proposed. The model consists of slender axially strained spiral vortex solutions of the Navier-Stokes equation. The tightening of the spiral turns by the differential rotation of the induced swirling velocity produces a cascade of velocity fluctuations to smaller scale. The Kolmogorov energy spectrum is a result of this model.

  7. Numerical modeling of buoyancy-driven turbulent flows in enclosures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, K.J.; Lien, F.S.

    2004-01-01

    Modeling turbulent natural convection in enclosures with differentially heated vertical walls is numerically challenging, in particular, when low-Reynolds-number (low-Re) models are adopted. When the turbulence level in the core region of cavity is low, most low-Re models, particular those showing good performance for bypass transitional flows, tend to relaminarize the flow and, as a consequence, significantly underpredict the near-wall turbulence intensities and boundary-layer thickness. Another challenge associated with low-turbulence buoyancy-driven flows in enclosures is its inherent unsteadiness, which can pose convergence problems when a steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equation is solved. In the present study, an unsteady RANS approach in conjunction with the low-Re k-ε model of Lien and Leschziner [Int. J. Comput. Fluid Dyn. 12 (1999) 1] is initially adopted and the predicted flow field is found effectively relaminarized. To overcome this difficulty, likely caused by the low-Re functions in the ε-equation, the two-layer approach is attempted, in which ε is prescribed algebraically using the one-equation k-l model of Wolfshtein [Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 12 (1969) 301]. The two-layer approach combined with a quadratic stress-strain relation gives overall the best performance in terms of mean velocities, temperature and turbulence quantities

  8. GIGMF - A statistical model program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladuca, G.; Deberth, C.

    1978-01-01

    The program GIGMF computes the differential and integrated statistical model cross sections for the reactions proceeding through a compound nuclear stage. The computational method is based on the Hauser-Feshbach-Wolfenstein theory, modified to include the modern version of Tepel et al. Although the program was written for a PDP-15 computer, with 16K high speed memory, many reaction channels can be taken into account with the following restrictions: the pro ectile spin must be less than 2, the maximum spin momenta of the compound nucleus can not be greater than 10. These restrictions are due solely to the storage allotments and may be easily relaxed. The energy of the impinging particle, the target and projectile masses, the spin and paritjes of the projectile, target, emergent and residual nuclei the maximum orbital momentum and transmission coefficients for each reaction channel are the input parameters of the program. (author)

  9. Approximate deconvolution models of turbulence analysis, phenomenology and numerical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Layton, William J

    2012-01-01

    This volume presents a mathematical development of a recent approach to the modeling and simulation of turbulent flows based on methods for the approximate solution of inverse problems. The resulting Approximate Deconvolution Models or ADMs have some advantages over more commonly used turbulence models – as well as some disadvantages. Our goal in this book is to provide a clear and complete mathematical development of ADMs, while pointing out the difficulties that remain. In order to do so, we present the analytical theory of ADMs, along with its connections, motivations and complements in the phenomenology of and algorithms for ADMs.

  10. The lagRST Model: A Turbulence Model for Non-Equilibrium Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillard, Randolph P.; Oliver, A. Brandon; Olsen, Michael E.; Blaisdell, Gregory A.; Lyrintzis, Anastasios S.

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a new class of turbulence model designed for wall bounded, high Reynolds number flows with separation. The model addresses deficiencies seen in the modeling of nonequilibrium turbulent flows. These flows generally have variable adverse pressure gradients which cause the turbulent quantities to react at a finite rate to changes in the mean flow quantities. This "lag" in the response of the turbulent quantities can t be modeled by most standard turbulence models, which are designed to model equilibrium turbulent boundary layers. The model presented uses a standard 2-equation model as the baseline for turbulent equilibrium calculations, but adds transport equations to account directly for non-equilibrium effects in the Reynolds Stress Tensor (RST) that are seen in large pressure gradients involving shock waves and separation. Comparisons are made to several standard turbulence modeling validation cases, including an incompressible boundary layer (both neutral and adverse pressure gradients), an incompressible mixing layer and a transonic bump flow. In addition, a hypersonic Shock Wave Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction with separation is assessed along with a transonic capsule flow. Results show a substantial improvement over the baseline models for transonic separated flows. The results are mixed for the SWTBLI flows assessed. Separation predictions are not as good as the baseline models, but the over prediction of the peak heat flux downstream of the reattachment shock that plagues many models is reduced.

  11. On the problem of turbulent arcs modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yas'ko, O.I.

    1998-01-01

    A new hypothesis is proposed which considers mass as a charge which produces a special field during its movement likewise the electric charge creates magnetic one. This approach throws new light on vortexes formation since interaction of moving mass with the considered field exerts swirling effect. Some aspects of turbulence in flows near walls and in blown electric arc discharge were considered to validate the hypothesis in the cases of cold and high-temperature flows. The theoretical results are found to comply with experiment well. (author)

  12. Numerical schemes for one-point closure turbulence models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larcher, Aurelien

    2010-01-01

    First-order Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence models are studied in this thesis. These latter consist of the Navier-Stokes equations, supplemented with a system of balance equations describing the evolution of characteristic scalar quantities called 'turbulent scales'. In so doing, the contribution of the turbulent agitation to the momentum can be determined by adding a diffusive coefficient (called 'turbulent viscosity') in the Navier-Stokes equations, such that it is defined as a function of the turbulent scales. The numerical analysis problems, which are studied in this dissertation, are treated in the frame of a fractional step algorithm, consisting of an approximation on regular meshes of the Navier-Stokes equations by the nonconforming Crouzeix-Raviart finite elements, and a set of scalar convection-diffusion balance equations discretized by the standard finite volume method. A monotone numerical scheme based on the standard finite volume method is proposed so as to ensure that the turbulent scales, like the turbulent kinetic energy (k) and its dissipation rate (ε), remain positive in the case of the standard k - ε model, as well as the k - ε RNG and the extended k - ε - ν 2 models. The convergence of the proposed numerical scheme is then studied on a system composed of the incompressible Stokes equations and a steady convection-diffusion equation, which are both coupled by the viscosities and the turbulent production term. This reduced model allows to deal with the main difficulty encountered in the analysis of such problems: the definition of the turbulent production term leads to consider a class of convection-diffusion problems with an irregular right-hand side belonging to L 1 . Finally, to step towards the unsteady problem, the convergence of the finite volume scheme for a model convection-diffusion equation with L 1 data is proved. The a priori estimates on the solution and on its time derivative are obtained in discrete norms, for

  13. Turbulence Modeling of Flows with Extensive Crossflow Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argyris G. Panaras

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The reasons for the difficulty in simulating accurately strong 3-D shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions (SBLIs and high-alpha flows with classical turbulence models are investigated. These flows are characterized by the appearance of strong crossflow separation. In view of recent additional evidence, a previously published flow analysis, which attributes the poor performance of classical turbulence models to the observed laminarization of the separation domain, is reexamined. According to this analysis, the longitudinal vortices into which the separated boundary layer rolls up in this type of separated flow, transfer external inviscid air into the part of the separation adjacent to the wall, decreasing its turbulence. It is demonstrated that linear models based on the Boussinesq equation provide solutions of moderate accuracy, while non-linear ones and others that consider the particular structure of the flow are more efficient. Published and new Reynolds Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS simulations are reviewed, as well as results from a recent Large Eddy Simulation (LES study, which indicate that in calculations characterized by sufficient accuracy the turbulent kinetic energy of the reverse flow inside the separation vortices is very low, i.e., the flow is almost laminar there.

  14. An improved mixing model providing joint statistics of scalar and scalar dissipation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Daniel W. [Department of Energy Resources Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Jenny, Patrick [Institute of Fluid Dynamics, ETH Zurich (Switzerland)

    2008-11-15

    For the calculation of nonpremixed turbulent flames with thin reaction zones the joint probability density function (PDF) of the mixture fraction and its dissipation rate plays an important role. The corresponding PDF transport equation involves a mixing model for the closure of the molecular mixing term. Here, the parameterized scalar profile (PSP) mixing model is extended to provide the required joint statistics. Model predictions are validated using direct numerical simulation (DNS) data of a passive scalar mixing in a statistically homogeneous turbulent flow. Comparisons between the DNS and the model predictions are provided, which involve different initial scalar-field lengthscales. (author)

  15. Numerical modeling of turbulent combustion and flame spread

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Zhenghua

    1999-01-01

    Theoretical models have been developed to address several important aspects of numerical modeling of turbulent combustion and flame spread. The developed models include a pyrolysis model for charring and non-charring solid materials, a fast narrow band radiation property evaluation model (FASTNB) and a turbulence model for buoyant flow and flame. In the pyrolysis model, a completely new algorithm has been proposed, where a moving dual mesh concept was developed and implemented. With this new concept, it provides proper spatial resolution for both temperature and density and automatically considers the regression of the surface of the non-charring solid material during its pyrolysis. It is simple, very efficient and applicable to both charring and non-charring materials. FASTNB speeds up significantly the evaluation of narrow band spectral radiation properties and thus provides a potential of applying narrow band model in numerical simulations of practical turbulent combustion. The turbulence model was developed to improve the consideration of buoyancy effect on turbulence and turbulent transport. It was found to be simple, promising and numerically stable. It has been tested against both plane and axisymmetric thermal plumes and an axisymmetric buoyant diffusion flame. When compared with the widely used standard buoyancy-modified {kappa} - {epsilon} model, it gives significant improvement on numerical results. These developed models have been fully incorporated into CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) code and coupled with other CFD sub-models, including the DT (Discrete Transfer) radiation model, EDC (Eddy Dissipation Concept) combustion model, flamelet combustion model, various soot models and transpired wall function. Comprehensive numerical simulations have been carried out to study soot formation and oxidation in turbulent buoyant diffusion flames, flame heat transfer and flame spread in fires. The gas temperature and velocity, soot volume fraction, wall

  16. A new turbulence-based model for sand transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayaud, Jerome; Wiggs, Giles; Bailey, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of the changing rate of sediment flux in space and time is essential for quantifying surface erosion and deposition in desert landscapes. While many aeolian studies have relied on time-averaged parameters such as wind velocity (U) and wind shear velocity (u*) to determine sediment flux, there is increasing evidence that high-frequency turbulence is an important driving force behind the entrainment and transport of sand. However, turbulence has yet to be incorporated into a functional sand transport model that can be used for predictive purposes. In this study we present a new transport model (the 'turbulence model') that accounts for high-frequency variations in the horizontal (u) and vertical (w) components of wind flow. The turbulence model is fitted to wind velocity and sediment transport data from a field experiment undertaken in Namibia's Skeleton Coast National Park, and its performance at three temporal resolutions (10 Hz, 1 Hz, 1 min) is compared to two existing models that rely on time-averaged wind velocity data (Radok, 1977; Dong et al., 2003). The validity of the three models is analysed under a variety of saltation conditions, using a 2-hour (1 Hz measurement resolution) dataset from the Skeleton Coast and a 5-hour (1 min measurement resolution) dataset from the southwestern Kalahari Desert. The turbulence model is shown to outperform the Radok and Dong models when predicting total saltation count over the three experimental periods. For all temporal resolutions presented in this study (10 Hz-10 min), the turbulence model predicted total saltation count to within at least 0.34%, whereas the Radok and Dong models over- or underestimated total count by up to 5.50% and 20.53% respectively. The strong performance of the turbulence model can be attributed to a lag in mass flux response built into its formulation, which can be adapted depending on the temporal resolution of investigation. This accounts for the inherent lag within the physical

  17. Decaying and kicked turbulence in a shell model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hooghoudt, Jan Otto; Lohse, Detlef; Toschi, Federico

    2001-01-01

    Decaying and periodically kicked turbulence are analyzed within the Gledzer–Ohkitani–Yamada shell model, to allow for sufficiently large scaling regimes. Energy is transferred towards the small scales in intermittent bursts. Nevertheless, mean field arguments are sufficient to account for the ens......Decaying and periodically kicked turbulence are analyzed within the Gledzer–Ohkitani–Yamada shell model, to allow for sufficiently large scaling regimes. Energy is transferred towards the small scales in intermittent bursts. Nevertheless, mean field arguments are sufficient to account...

  18. Inner-outer predictive wall model for wall-bounded turbulence in hypersonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, M. Pino; Helm, Clara M.

    2017-11-01

    The inner-outer predictive wall model of Mathis et al. is modified for hypersonic turbulent boundary layers. The model is based on a modulation of the energized motions in the inner layer by large scale momentum fluctuations in the logarithmic layer. Using direct numerical simulation (DNS) data of turbulent boundary layers with free stream Mach number 3 to 10, it is shown that the variation of the fluid properties in the compressible flows leads to large Reynolds number (Re) effects in the outer layer and facilitate the modulation observed in high Re incompressible flows. The modulation effect by the large scale increases with increasing free-stream Mach number. The model is extended to include spanwise and wall-normal velocity fluctuations and is generalized through Morkovin scaling. Temperature fluctuations are modeled using an appropriate Reynolds Analogy. Density fluctuations are calculated using an equation of state and a scaling with Mach number. DNS data are used to obtain the universal signal and parameters. The model is tested by using the universal signal to reproduce the flow conditions of Mach 3 and Mach 7 turbulent boundary layer DNS data and comparing turbulence statistics between the modeled flow and the DNS data. This work is supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Grant FA9550-17-1-0104.

  19. On turbulence models for rod bundle flow computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazi, Gabor

    2005-01-01

    In commercial computational fluid dynamics codes there is more than one turbulence model built in. It is the user responsibility to choose one of those models, suitable for the problem studied. In the last decade, several computations were presented using computational fluid dynamics for the simulation of various problems of the nuclear industry. A common feature in a number of those simulations is that they were performed using the standard k-ε turbulence model without justifying the choice of the model. The simulation results were rarely satisfactory. In this paper, we shall consider the flow in a fuel rod bundle as a case study and discuss why the application of the standard k-ε model fails to give reasonable results in this situation. We also show that a turbulence model based on the Reynolds stress transport equations can provide qualitatively correct results. Generally, our aim is pedagogical, we would like to call the readers attention to the fact that turbulence models have to be selected based on theoretical considerations and/or adequate information obtained from measurements

  20. A unified wall function for compressible turbulence modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, K. C.; Chan, A.

    2018-05-01

    Turbulence modelling near the wall often requires a high mesh density clustered around the wall and the first cells adjacent to the wall to be placed in the viscous sublayer. As a result, the numerical stability is constrained by the smallest cell size and hence requires high computational overhead. In the present study, a unified wall function is developed which is valid for viscous sublayer, buffer sublayer and inertial sublayer, as well as including effects of compressibility, heat transfer and pressure gradient. The resulting wall function applies to compressible turbulence modelling for both isothermal and adiabatic wall boundary conditions with the non-zero pressure gradient. Two simple wall function algorithms are implemented for practical computation of isothermal and adiabatic wall boundary conditions. The numerical results show that the wall function evaluates the wall shear stress and turbulent quantities of wall adjacent cells at wide range of non-dimensional wall distance and alleviate the number and size of cells required.

  1. Sensitivity study of CFD turbulent models for natural convection analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu sun, Park

    2007-01-01

    The buoyancy driven convective flow fields are steady circulatory flows which were made between surfaces maintained at two fixed temperatures. They are ubiquitous in nature and play an important role in many engineering applications. Application of a natural convection can reduce the costs and efforts remarkably. This paper focuses on the sensitivity study of turbulence analysis using CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) for a natural convection in a closed rectangular cavity. Using commercial CFD code, FLUENT and various turbulent models were applied to the turbulent flow. Results from each CFD model will be compared each other in the viewpoints of grid resolution and flow characteristics. It has been showed that: -) obtaining general flow characteristics is possible with relatively coarse grid; -) there is no significant difference between results from finer grid resolutions than grid with y + + is defined as y + = ρ*u*y/μ, u being the wall friction velocity, y being the normal distance from the center of the cell to the wall, ρ and μ being respectively the fluid density and the fluid viscosity; -) the K-ε models show a different flow characteristic from K-ω models or from the Reynolds Stress Model (RSM); and -) the y + parameter is crucial for the selection of the appropriate turbulence model to apply within the simulation

  2. Detonability of turbulent white dwarf plasma: Hydrodynamical models at low densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenn, Daniel

    The origins of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) remain an unsolved problem of contemporary astrophysics. Decades of research indicate that these supernovae arise from thermonuclear runaway in the degenerate material of white dwarf stars; however, the mechanism of these explosions is unknown. Also, it is unclear what are the progenitors of these objects. These missing elements are vital components of the initial conditions of supernova explosions, and are essential to understanding these events. A requirement of any successful SN Ia model is that a sufficient portion of the white dwarf plasma must be brought under conditions conducive to explosive burning. Our aim is to identify the conditions required to trigger detonations in turbulent, carbon-rich degenerate plasma at low densities. We study this problem by modeling the hydrodynamic evolution of a turbulent region filled with a carbon/oxygen mixture at a density, temperature, and Mach number characteristic of conditions found in the 0.8+1.2 solar mass (CO0812) model discussed by Fenn et al. (2016). We probe the ignition conditions for different degrees of compressibility in turbulent driving. We assess the probability of successful detonations based on characteristics of the identified ignition kernels, using Eulerian and Lagrangian statistics of turbulent flow. We found that material with very short ignition times is abundant in the case that turbulence is driven compressively. This material forms contiguous structures that persist over many ignition time scales, and that we identify as prospective detonation kernels. Detailed analysis of the kernels revealed that their central regions are densely filled with material characterized by short ignition times and contain the minimum mass required for self-sustained detonations to form. It is conceivable that ignition kernels will be formed for lower compressibility in the turbulent driving. However, we found no detonation kernels in models driven 87.5 percent

  3. A simple dynamic subgrid-scale model for LES of particle-laden turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, George Ilhwan; Bassenne, Maxime; Urzay, Javier; Moin, Parviz

    2017-04-01

    In this study, a dynamic model for large-eddy simulations is proposed in order to describe the motion of small inertial particles in turbulent flows. The model is simple, involves no significant computational overhead, contains no adjustable parameters, and is flexible enough to be deployed in any type of flow solvers and grids, including unstructured setups. The approach is based on the use of elliptic differential filters to model the subgrid-scale velocity. The only model parameter, which is related to the nominal filter width, is determined dynamically by imposing consistency constraints on the estimated subgrid energetics. The performance of the model is tested in large-eddy simulations of homogeneous-isotropic turbulence laden with particles, where improved agreement with direct numerical simulation results is observed in the dispersed-phase statistics, including particle acceleration, local carrier-phase velocity, and preferential-concentration metrics.

  4. Near-Wall Turbulence Modelling of Rotating and Curved Shear Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, Bjoern Anders

    1997-12-31

    This thesis deals with verification and refinement of turbulence models within the framework of the Reynolds-averaged approach. It pays special attention to modelling the near-wall region, where the turbulence is strongly non-homogeneous and anisotropic. It also studies in detail the effects associated with an imposed rotation of the reference frame or streamline curvature. The objective with near-wall turbulence closure modelling is to formulate a set of equations governing single point turbulence statistics, which can be solved in the region of the flow which extends to the wall. This is in contrast to the commonly adopted wall-function approach in which the wall-boundary conditions are replaced by matching conditions in the logarithmic region. The near-wall models allow more flexibility by not requiring any such universal behaviour. Assessment of the novel elliptic relaxation approach to model the proximity of a solid boundary reveals an encouraging potential used in conjunction with second-moment and eddy-viscosity closures. The most natural level of closure modelling to predict flows affected by streamline curvatures or an imposed rotation of the reference frame is at the second-moment closure (SMC) level. Although SMCs naturally accounts for the effects of system rotation, the usual application of a scalar dissipation rate equation is shown to require ad hoc corrections in some cases in order to give good results. The elliptic relaxation approach is also used in conjunction with non-linear pressure-strain models and very encouraging results are obtained for rotating flows. Rotational induced secondary motions are vital to predicting the effects of system rotation. Some severe weaknesses of non-linear pressure-strain models are also indicated. Finally, a modelling methodology for anisotropic dissipation in nearly homogeneous turbulence are proposed. 84 refs., 56 figs., 16 tabs.

  5. Statistical modeling of Earth's plasmasphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veibell, Victoir

    The behavior of plasma near Earth's geosynchronous orbit is of vital importance to both satellite operators and magnetosphere modelers because it also has a significant influence on energy transport, ion composition, and induced currents. The system is highly complex in both time and space, making the forecasting of extreme space weather events difficult. This dissertation examines the behavior and statistical properties of plasma mass density near geosynchronous orbit by using both linear and nonlinear models, as well as epoch analyses, in an attempt to better understand the physical processes that precipitates and drives its variations. It is shown that while equatorial mass density does vary significantly on an hourly timescale when a drop in the disturbance time scale index ( Dst) was observed, it does not vary significantly between the day of a Dst event onset and the day immediately following. It is also shown that increases in equatorial mass density were not, on average, preceded or followed by any significant change in the examined solar wind or geomagnetic variables, including Dst, despite prior results that considered a few selected events and found a notable influence. It is verified that equatorial mass density and and solar activity via the F10.7 index have a strong correlation, which is stronger over longer timescales such as 27 days than it is over an hourly timescale. It is then shown that this connection seems to affect the behavior of equatorial mass density most during periods of strong solar activity leading to large mass density reactions to Dst drops for high values of F10.7. It is also shown that equatorial mass density behaves differently before and after events based on the value of F10.7 at the onset of an equatorial mass density event or a Dst event, and that a southward interplanetary magnetic field at onset leads to slowed mass density growth after event onset. These behavioral differences provide insight into how solar and geomagnetic

  6. Description of group-theoretical model of developed turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saveliev, V L; Gorokhovski, M A

    2008-01-01

    We propose to associate the phenomenon of stationary turbulence with the special self-similar solutions of the Euler equations. These solutions represent the linear superposition of eigenfields of spatial symmetry subgroup generators and imply their dependence on time through the parameter of the symmetry transformation only. From this model, it follows that for developed turbulent process, changing the scale of averaging (filtering) of the velocity field is equivalent to composition of scaling, translation and rotation transformations. We call this property a renormalization-group invariance of filtered turbulent fields. The renormalization group invariance provides an opportunity to transform the averaged Navier-Stokes equation over a small scale (inner threshold of the turbulence) to larger scales by simple scaling. From the methodological point of view, it is significant to note that the turbulent viscosity term appeared not as a result of averaging of the nonlinear term in the Navier-Stokes equation, but from the molecular viscosity term with the help of renormalization group transformation.

  7. Large Eddy Simulation of Spatially Developing Turbulent Reacting Shear Layers with the One-Dimensional Turbulence Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffie, Andreas Frank

    model. The chemical reaction is simulated with a global single-step, second-order equilibrium reaction with an Arrhenius reaction rate. The two benchmark cases of constant density reacting and variable density non-reacting shear layers used to determine ODT parameters yield perfect agreement with regards to first and second-order flow statistics as well as shear layer growth rate. The variable density non-reacting shear layer also serves as a testing case for the LES-ODT model to simulate passive scalar mixing. The variable density, reacting shear layer cases only agree reasonably well and indicate that more work is necessary to improve variable density coupling of ODT and LES. The disagreement is attributed to the fact that the ODT filtered density is kept constant across the Runge-Kutta steps. Furthermore, a more in-depth knowledge of large scale and subgrid turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) spectra at several downstream locations as well as TKE budgets need to be studied to obtain a better understanding about the model as well as about the flow under investigation. The local Reynolds number based on the one-percent thickness at the exit is Redelta ≈ 5300, for the constant density reacting and for the variable density non-reacting case. For the variable density reacting shear layer, the Reynolds number based on the 1% thickness is Redelta ≈ 2370. The variable density reacting shear layers show suppressed growth rates due to density variations caused by heat release. This has also been reported in literature. A Lewis number parameter study is performed to extract non-unity Lewis number effects. An increase in the Lewis number leads to a further suppression of the growth rate, however to an increase spread of second-order flow statistics. Major focus and challenge of this work is to improve and advance the three-dimensional coupling of the one-dimensional ODT domains while keeping the solution correct. This entails major restructuring of the model. The turbulent

  8. Simple Analytical Forms of the Perpendicular Diffusion Coefficient for Two-component Turbulence. III. Damping Model of Dynamical Turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gammon, M.; Shalchi, A., E-mail: andreasm4@yahoo.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada)

    2017-10-01

    In several astrophysical applications one needs analytical forms of cosmic-ray diffusion parameters. Some examples are studies of diffusive shock acceleration and solar modulation. In the current article we explore perpendicular diffusion based on the unified nonlinear transport theory. While we focused on magnetostatic turbulence in Paper I, we included the effect of dynamical turbulence in Paper II of the series. In the latter paper we assumed that the temporal correlation time does not depend on the wavenumber. More realistic models have been proposed in the past, such as the so-called damping model of dynamical turbulence. In the present paper we derive analytical forms for the perpendicular diffusion coefficient of energetic particles in two-component turbulence for this type of time-dependent turbulence. We present new formulas for the perpendicular diffusion coefficient and we derive a condition for which the magnetostatic result is recovered.

  9. Phase relations in a forced turbulent boundary layer: implications for modelling of high Reynolds number wall turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvvuri, Subrahmanyam; McKeon, Beverley

    2017-03-13

    Phase relations between specific scales in a turbulent boundary layer are studied here by highlighting the associated nonlinear scale interactions in the flow. This is achieved through an experimental technique that allows for targeted forcing of the flow through the use of a dynamic wall perturbation. Two distinct large-scale modes with well-defined spatial and temporal wavenumbers were simultaneously forced in the boundary layer, and the resulting nonlinear response from their direct interactions was isolated from the turbulence signal for the study. This approach advances the traditional studies of large- and small-scale interactions in wall turbulence by focusing on the direct interactions between scales with triadic wavenumber consistency. The results are discussed in the context of modelling high Reynolds number wall turbulence.This article is part of the themed issue 'Toward the development of high-fidelity models of wall turbulence at large Reynolds number'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  10. Probability density function modeling of scalar mixing from concentrated sources in turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakosi, J.; Franzese, P.; Boybeyi, Z.

    2007-11-01

    Dispersion of a passive scalar from concentrated sources in fully developed turbulent channel flow is studied with the probability density function (PDF) method. The joint PDF of velocity, turbulent frequency and scalar concentration is represented by a large number of Lagrangian particles. A stochastic near-wall PDF model combines the generalized Langevin model of Haworth and Pope [Phys. Fluids 29, 387 (1986)] with Durbin's [J. Fluid Mech. 249, 465 (1993)] method of elliptic relaxation to provide a mathematically exact treatment of convective and viscous transport with a nonlocal representation of the near-wall Reynolds stress anisotropy. The presence of walls is incorporated through the imposition of no-slip and impermeability conditions on particles without the use of damping or wall-functions. Information on the turbulent time scale is supplied by the gamma-distribution model of van Slooten et al. [Phys. Fluids 10, 246 (1998)]. Two different micromixing models are compared that incorporate the effect of small scale mixing on the transported scalar: the widely used interaction by exchange with the mean and the interaction by exchange with the conditional mean model. Single-point velocity and concentration statistics are compared to direct numerical simulation and experimental data at Reτ=1080 based on the friction velocity and the channel half width. The joint model accurately reproduces a wide variety of conditional and unconditional statistics in both physical and composition space.

  11. Stirring turbulence with turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cekli, H.E.; Joosten, R.; van de Water, W.

    2015-01-01

    We stir wind-tunnel turbulence with an active grid that consists of rods with attached vanes. The time-varying angle of these rods is controlled by random numbers. We study the response of turbulence on the statistical properties of these random numbers. The random numbers are generated by the

  12. Group-kinetic theory and modeling of atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchen, C. M.

    1989-01-01

    A group kinetic method is developed for analyzing eddy transport properties and relaxation to equilibrium. The purpose is to derive the spectral structure of turbulence in incompressible and compressible media. Of particular interest are: direct and inverse cascade, boundary layer turbulence, Rossby wave turbulence, two phase turbulence; compressible turbulence, and soliton turbulence. Soliton turbulence can be found in large scale turbulence, turbulence connected with surface gravity waves and nonlinear propagation of acoustical and optical waves. By letting the pressure gradient represent the elementary interaction among fluid elements and by raising the Navier-Stokes equation to higher dimensionality, the master equation was obtained for the description of the microdynamical state of turbulence.

  13. Predicting Statistical Response and Extreme Events in Uncertainty Quantification through Reduced-Order Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, D.; Majda, A.

    2017-12-01

    A low-dimensional reduced-order statistical closure model is developed for quantifying the uncertainty in statistical sensitivity and intermittency in principal model directions with largest variability in high-dimensional turbulent system and turbulent transport models. Imperfect model sensitivity is improved through a recent mathematical strategy for calibrating model errors in a training phase, where information theory and linear statistical response theory are combined in a systematic fashion to achieve the optimal model performance. The idea in the reduced-order method is from a self-consistent mathematical framework for general systems with quadratic nonlinearity, where crucial high-order statistics are approximated by a systematic model calibration procedure. Model efficiency is improved through additional damping and noise corrections to replace the expensive energy-conserving nonlinear interactions. Model errors due to the imperfect nonlinear approximation are corrected by tuning the model parameters using linear response theory with an information metric in a training phase before prediction. A statistical energy principle is adopted to introduce a global scaling factor in characterizing the higher-order moments in a consistent way to improve model sensitivity. Stringent models of barotropic and baroclinic turbulence are used to display the feasibility of the reduced-order methods. Principal statistical responses in mean and variance can be captured by the reduced-order models with accuracy and efficiency. Besides, the reduced-order models are also used to capture crucial passive tracer field that is advected by the baroclinic turbulent flow. It is demonstrated that crucial principal statistical quantities like the tracer spectrum and fat-tails in the tracer probability density functions in the most important large scales can be captured efficiently with accuracy using the reduced-order tracer model in various dynamical regimes of the flow field with

  14. Probing NWP model deficiencies by statistical postprocessing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosgaard, Martin Haubjerg; Nielsen, Henrik Aalborg; Nielsen, Torben S.

    2016-01-01

    The objective in this article is twofold. On one hand, a Model Output Statistics (MOS) framework for improved wind speed forecast accuracy is described and evaluated. On the other hand, the approach explored identifies unintuitive explanatory value from a diagnostic variable in an operational....... Based on the statistical model candidates inferred from the data, the lifted index NWP model diagnostic is consistently found among the NWP model predictors of the best performing statistical models across sites....

  15. An investigation of implicit turbulence modeling for laminar-turbulent transition in natural convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunggang; Tsubokura, Makoto; Wang, Weihsiang

    2017-11-01

    The automatic dissipation adjustment (ADA) model based on truncated Navier-Stokes equations is utilized to investigate the feasibility of using implicit large eddy simulation (ILES) with ADA model on the transition in natural convection. Due to the high Rayleigh number coming from the larger temperature difference (300K), Roe scheme modified for low Mach numbers coordinating ADA model is used to resolve the complicated flow field. Based on the qualitative agreement of the comparisons with DNS and experimental results and the capability of numerically predicating a -3 decay law for the temporal power spectrum of the temperature fluctuation, this study thus validates the feasibility of ILES with ADA model on turbulent natural convection. With the advantages of ease of implementation because no explicit modeling terms are needed and nearly free of tuning parameters, ADA model offers to become a promising tool for turbulent thermal convection. Part of the results is obtained using the K computer at the RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science (Proposal number hp160232).

  16. The Statistical Distribution of Turbulence Driven Velocity Extremes in the Atmosperic Boundary Layer cartwright/Longuet-Higgins Revised

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose

    2007-01-01

    The statistical distribution of extreme wind excursions above a mean level, for a specified recurrence period, is of crucial importance in relation to design of wind sensitive structures. This is particularly true for wind turbine structures. Based on an assumption of a Gaussian "mother......" distribution, Cartwright and Longuet-Higgens [1] derived an asymptotic expression for the distribution of the largest excursion from the mean level during an arbitrary recurrence period. From its inception, this celebrated expression has been widely used in wind engineering (as well as in off-shore engineering...... associated with large excursions from the mean [2]. Thus, the more extreme turbulence excursions (i.e. the upper tail of the turbulence PDF) seem to follow an Exponential-like distribution rather than a Gaussian distribution, and a Gaussian estimate may under-predict the probability of large turbulence...

  17. A marketing mix model for a complex and turbulent environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Mason

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper is based on the proposition that the choice of marketing tactics is determined, or at least significantly influenced, by the nature of the company’s external environment. It aims to illustrate the type of marketing mix tactics that are suggested for a complex and turbulent environment when marketing and the environment are viewed through a chaos and complexity theory lens. Design/Methodology/Approach: Since chaos and complexity theories are proposed as a good means of understanding the dynamics of complex and turbulent markets, a comprehensive review and analysis of literature on the marketing mix and marketing tactics from a chaos and complexity viewpoint was conducted. From this literature review, a marketing mix model was conceptualised. Findings: A marketing mix model considered appropriate for success in complex and turbulent environments was developed. In such environments, the literature suggests destabilising marketing activities are more effective, whereas stabilising type activities are more effective in simple, stable environments. Therefore the model proposes predominantly destabilising type tactics as appropriate for a complex and turbulent environment such as is currently being experienced in South Africa. Implications: This paper is of benefit to marketers by emphasising a new way to consider the future marketing activities of their companies. How this model can assist marketers and suggestions for research to develop and apply this model are provided. It is hoped that the model suggested will form the basis of empirical research to test its applicability in the turbulent South African environment. Originality/Value: Since businesses and markets are complex adaptive systems, using complexity theory to understand how to cope in complex, turbulent environments is necessary, but has not been widely researched. In fact, most chaos and complexity theory work in marketing has concentrated on marketing strategy, with

  18. Evaluation of partially premixed turbulent flame stability from mixture fraction statistics in a slot burner

    KAUST Repository

    Kruse, Stephan

    2018-04-11

    Partially premixed combustion is characterized by mixture fraction inhomogeneity upstream of the reaction zone and occurs in many applied combustion systems. The temporal and spatial fluctuations of the mixture fraction have tremendous impact on the combustion characteristics, emission formation, and flame stability. In this study, turbulent partially premixed flames are experimentally studied in a slot burner configuration. The local temperature and gas composition is determined by means of one-dimensional, simultaneous detection of Rayleigh and Raman scattering. The statistics of the mixture fraction are utilized to characterize the impact of the Reynolds number, the global equivalence ratio, the progress of mixing within the flame, as well as the mixing length on the mixing field. Furthermore, these effects are evaluated by means of a regime diagram for partially premixed flames. In this study, it is shown that the increase of the mixing length results in a significantly more stable flame. The impact of the Reynolds number on flame stability is found to be minor.

  19. Evaluation of partially premixed turbulent flame stability from mixture fraction statistics in a slot burner

    KAUST Repository

    Kruse, Stephan; Mansour, Mohy S.; Elbaz, Ayman M.; Varea, Emilien; Grü nefeld, Gerd; Beeckmann, Joachim; Pitsch, Heinz

    2018-01-01

    Partially premixed combustion is characterized by mixture fraction inhomogeneity upstream of the reaction zone and occurs in many applied combustion systems. The temporal and spatial fluctuations of the mixture fraction have tremendous impact on the combustion characteristics, emission formation, and flame stability. In this study, turbulent partially premixed flames are experimentally studied in a slot burner configuration. The local temperature and gas composition is determined by means of one-dimensional, simultaneous detection of Rayleigh and Raman scattering. The statistics of the mixture fraction are utilized to characterize the impact of the Reynolds number, the global equivalence ratio, the progress of mixing within the flame, as well as the mixing length on the mixing field. Furthermore, these effects are evaluated by means of a regime diagram for partially premixed flames. In this study, it is shown that the increase of the mixing length results in a significantly more stable flame. The impact of the Reynolds number on flame stability is found to be minor.

  20. Comparison of PIV and Hot-Wire statistics of turbulent boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dróżdż, A; Uruba, V

    2014-01-01

    The paper shows a cross checking of turbulent boundary layer measurements using large field of view PIV and hot-wire anemometry techniques. The time-resolved PIV method was used for the experiments. The measuring plane was oriented perpendicularly to the wall and parallel to the mean flow. Hot wire measurement has been performed using the special probe with perpendicular hot wire. The HW point measurements were performed in the same place as PIV experiments. The hot-wire probe has the wire length of l + < 20 in considered range of Reynolds numbers. Various evaluation methods were applied on PIV data. The profiles of statistical characteristics of streamwise velocity components were evaluated from the data. Mean values, standard deviations as well as skewness and kurtosis coefficients were compared for a few values of Re θ . Reynolds number ranges from 1000 to 5500. The result shows that with the increasing Reynolds number the attenuation of fluctuations maximum in PIV measurements occurs with respect to Hot-Wire measurements, however representation of velocity fluctuations using the PIV method is satisfactory. The influence of wall-normal fluctuation component on Hot-Wire near wall peak was also investigated.

  1. Statistical Investigation on Coherent Vortex Structure in Turbulent Drag Reducing Channel Flow with Blown Polymer Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishitsuka, Shota; Motozawa, Masaaki; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Iwamoto, Kaoru; Ando, Hirotomo; Senda, Tetsuya

    2011-01-01

    Coherent vortex structure in turbulent drag-reducing channel flow with blown polymer solution from the wall was investigated. As a statistical analysis, we carried out Galilean decomposition, swirling strength and linear stochastic estimation of the PIV data obtained by the PIV measurement in x – y plane. Reynolds number based on bulk velocity and channel height was set to 40000. As a result, the angle of shear layer that cleared up by using Galilean decomposition becomes small in the drag-reducing flow. Q3 events were observed near the shear layer. In addition, as a result of linear stochastic estimation (LSE) based on swirling strength, we confirmed that the velocity under the vortex core is strong in the water flow. This result shows Q2 (ejection) are dominant in the water flow. However, in the drag-reducing flow with blown polymer solution, the velocity above the vortex core become strong, that is, Q4 (sweep) events are relatively strong around the vortex core. This is the result of Q4 events to come from the channel center region because the polymer solution does not exist in this region. The typical structure like this was observed in the drag -reducing flow with blown polymer solution from the wall.

  2. Tsallis Extended Thermodynamics Applied to 2-d Turbulence: Lévy Statistics and q-Fractional Generalized Kraichnanian Energy and Enstrophy Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter W. Egolf

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The extended thermodynamics of Tsallis is reviewed in detail and applied to turbulence. It is based on a generalization of the exponential and logarithmic functions with a parameter q. By applying this nonequilibrium thermodynamics, the Boltzmann-Gibbs thermodynamic approach of Kraichnan to 2-d turbulence is generalized. This physical modeling implies fractional calculus methods, obeying anomalous diffusion, described by Lévy statistics with q < 5/3 (sub diffusion, q = 5/3 (normal or Brownian diffusion and q > 5/3 (super diffusion. The generalized energy spectrum of Kraichnan, occurring at small wave numbers k, now reveals the more general and precise result k−q. This corresponds well for q = 5/3 with the Kolmogorov-Oboukov energy spectrum and for q > 5/3 to turbulence with intermittency. The enstrophy spectrum, occurring at large wave numbers k, leads to a k−3q power law, suggesting that large wave-number eddies are in thermodynamic equilibrium, which is characterized by q = 1, finally resulting in Kraichnan’s correct k−3 enstrophy spectrum. The theory reveals in a natural manner a generalized temperature of turbulence, which in the non-equilibrium energy transfer domain decreases with wave number and shows an energy equipartition law with a constant generalized temperature in the equilibrium enstrophy transfer domain. The article contains numerous new results; some are stated in form of eight new (proven propositions.

  3. SIMO optical wireless links with nonzero boresight pointing errors over M modeled turbulence channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varotsos, G. K.; Nistazakis, H. E.; Petkovic, M. I.; Djordjevic, G. T.; Tombras, G. S.

    2017-11-01

    Over the last years terrestrial free-space optical (FSO) communication systems have demonstrated an increasing scientific and commercial interest in response to the growing demands for ultra high bandwidth, cost-effective and secure wireless data transmissions. However, due the signal propagation through the atmosphere, the performance of such links depends strongly on the atmospheric conditions such as weather phenomena and turbulence effect. Additionally, their operation is affected significantly by the pointing errors effect which is caused by the misalignment of the optical beam between the transmitter and the receiver. In order to address this significant performance degradation, several statistical models have been proposed, while particular attention has been also given to diversity methods. Here, the turbulence-induced fading of the received optical signal irradiance is studied through the M (alaga) distribution, which is an accurate model suitable for weak to strong turbulence conditions and unifies most of the well-known, previously emerged models. Thus, taking into account the atmospheric turbulence conditions along with the pointing errors effect with nonzero boresight and the modulation technique that is used, we derive mathematical expressions for the estimation of the average bit error rate performance for SIMO FSO links. Finally, proper numerical results are given to verify our derived expressions and Monte Carlo simulations are also provided to further validate the accuracy of the analysis proposed and the obtained mathematical expressions.

  4. Air-chemistry "turbulence": power-law scaling and statistical regularity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-m. Hsu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available With the intent to gain further knowledge on the spectral structures and statistical regularities of surface atmospheric chemistry, the chemical gases (NO, NO2, NOx, CO, SO2, and O3 and aerosol (PM10 measured at 74 air quality monitoring stations over the island of Taiwan are analyzed for the year of 2004 at hourly resolution. They represent a range of surface air quality with a mixed combination of geographic settings, and include urban/rural, coastal/inland, plain/hill, and industrial/agricultural locations. In addition to the well-known semi-diurnal and diurnal oscillations, weekly, and intermediate (20 ~ 30 days peaks are also identified with the continuous wavelet transform (CWT. The spectra indicate power-law scaling regions for the frequencies higher than the diurnal and those lower than the diurnal with the average exponents of −5/3 and −1, respectively. These dual-exponents are corroborated with those with the detrended fluctuation analysis in the corresponding time-lag regions. These exponents are mostly independent of the averages and standard deviations of time series measured at various geographic settings, i.e., the spatial inhomogeneities. In other words, they possess dominant universal structures. After spectral coefficients from the CWT decomposition are grouped according to the spectral bands, and inverted separately, the PDFs of the reconstructed time series for the high-frequency band demonstrate the interesting statistical regularity, −3 power-law scaling for the heavy tails, consistently. Such spectral peaks, dual-exponent structures, and power-law scaling in heavy tails are important structural information, but their relations to turbulence and mesoscale variability require further investigations. This could lead to a better understanding of the processes controlling air quality.

  5. Modelling high Reynolds number wall-turbulence interactions in laboratory experiments using large-scale free-stream turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Eda; Hearst, R Jason; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram

    2017-03-13

    A turbulent boundary layer subjected to free-stream turbulence is investigated in order to ascertain the scale interactions that dominate the near-wall region. The results are discussed in relation to a canonical high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer because previous studies have reported considerable similarities between these two flows. Measurements were acquired simultaneously from four hot wires mounted to a rake which was traversed through the boundary layer. Particular focus is given to two main features of both canonical high Reynolds number boundary layers and boundary layers subjected to free-stream turbulence: (i) the footprint of the large scales in the logarithmic region on the near-wall small scales, specifically the modulating interaction between these scales, and (ii) the phase difference in amplitude modulation. The potential for a turbulent boundary layer subjected to free-stream turbulence to 'simulate' high Reynolds number wall-turbulence interactions is discussed. The results of this study have encouraging implications for future investigations of the fundamental scale interactions that take place in high Reynolds number flows as it demonstrates that these can be achieved at typical laboratory scales.This article is part of the themed issue 'Toward the development of high-fidelity models of wall turbulence at large Reynolds number'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  6. Numerical prediction of an axisymmetric turbulent mixing layer using two turbulence models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear power, once considered and then rejected (in the U. S.) for application to space vehicle propulsion, is being reconsidered for powering space rockets, especially for interplanetary travel. The gas core reactor, a high risk, high payoff nuclear engine concept, is one that was considered in the 1960s and 70s. As envisioned then, the gas core reactor would consist of a heavy, slow moving core of fissioning uranium vapor surrounded by a fast moving outer stream of hydrogen propellant. Satisfactory operation of such a configuration would require stable nuclear reaction kinetics to occur simultaneously with a stable, coflowing, probably turbulent fluid system having a dense inner stream and a light outer stream. The present study examines the behavior of two turbulence models in numerically simulating an idealized version of the above coflowing fluid system. The two models are the standard k˜ɛ model and a thin shear algebraic stress model (ASM). The idealized flow system can be described as an axisymmetric mixing layer of constant density. Predictions for the radial distribution of the mean streamwise velocity and shear stress for several axial stations are compared with experiment. Results for the k˜ɛe predictions are broadly satisfactory while those for the ASM are distinctly poorer.

  7. Computational Enhancements for Direct Numerical Simulations of Statistically Stationary Turbulent Premixed Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Mukhadiyev, Nurzhan

    2017-05-01

    Combustion at extreme conditions, such as a turbulent flame at high Karlovitz and Reynolds numbers, is still a vast and an uncertain field for researchers. Direct numerical simulation of a turbulent flame is a superior tool to unravel detailed information that is not accessible to most sophisticated state-of-the-art experiments. However, the computational cost of such simulations remains a challenge even for modern supercomputers, as the physical size, the level of turbulence intensity, and chemical complexities of the problems continue to increase. As a result, there is a strong demand for computational cost reduction methods as well as in acceleration of existing methods. The main scope of this work was the development of computational and numerical tools for high-fidelity direct numerical simulations of premixed planar flames interacting with turbulence. The first part of this work was KAUST Adaptive Reacting Flow Solver (KARFS) development. KARFS is a high order compressible reacting flow solver using detailed chemical kinetics mechanism; it is capable to run on various types of heterogeneous computational architectures. In this work, it was shown that KARFS is capable of running efficiently on both CPU and GPU. The second part of this work was numerical tools for direct numerical simulations of planar premixed flames: such as linear turbulence forcing and dynamic inlet control. DNS of premixed turbulent flames conducted previously injected velocity fluctuations at an inlet. Turbulence injected at the inlet decayed significantly while reaching the flame, which created a necessity to inject higher than needed fluctuations. A solution for this issue was to maintain turbulence strength on the way to the flame using turbulence forcing. Therefore, a linear turbulence forcing was implemented into KARFS to enhance turbulence intensity. Linear turbulence forcing developed previously by other groups was corrected with net added momentum removal mechanism to prevent mean

  8. Statistical State Dynamics Based Study of the Role of Nonlinearity in the Maintenance of Turbulence in Couette Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Brian; Ioannou, Petros; Nikolaidis, Marios-Andreas

    2017-11-01

    While linear non-normality underlies the mechanism of energy transfer from the externally driven flow to the perturbation field, nonlinearity is also known to play an essential role in sustaining turbulence. We report a study based on the statistical state dynamics of Couette flow turbulence with the goal of better understanding the role of nonlinearity in sustaining turbulence. The statistical state dynamics implementations used are ensemble closures at second order in a cumulant expansion of the Navier-Stokes equations in which the averaging operator is the streamwise mean. Two fundamentally non-normal mechanisms potentially contributing to maintaining the second cumulant are identified. These are essentially parametric perturbation growth arising from interaction of the perturbations with the fluctuating mean flow and transient growth of perturbations arising from nonlinear interaction between components of the perturbation field. By the method of selectively including these mechanisms parametric growth is found to maintain the perturbation field in the turbulent state while the more commonly invoked mechanism associated with transient growth of perturbations arising from scattering by nonlinear interaction is found to suppress perturbation variance. Funded by ERC Coturb Madrid Summer Program and NSF AGS-1246929.

  9. Validating modeled turbulent heat fluxes across large freshwater surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofgren, B. M.; Fujisaki-Manome, A.; Gronewold, A.; Anderson, E. J.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Blanken, P.; Spence, C.; Lenters, J. D.; Xiao, C.; Charusambot, U.

    2017-12-01

    Turbulent fluxes of latent and sensible heat are important physical processes that influence the energy and water budgets of the Great Lakes. Validation and improvement of bulk flux algorithms to simulate these turbulent heat fluxes are critical for accurate prediction of hydrodynamics, water levels, weather, and climate over the region. Here we consider five heat flux algorithms from several model systems; the Finite-Volume Community Ocean Model, the Weather Research and Forecasting model, and the Large Lake Thermodynamics Model, which are used in research and operational environments and concentrate on different aspects of the Great Lakes' physical system, but interface at the lake surface. The heat flux algorithms were isolated from each model and driven by meteorological data from over-lake stations in the Great Lakes Evaporation Network. The simulation results were compared with eddy covariance flux measurements at the same stations. All models show the capacity to the seasonal cycle of the turbulent heat fluxes. Overall, the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment algorithm in FVCOM has the best agreement with eddy covariance measurements. Simulations with the other four algorithms are overall improved by updating the parameterization of roughness length scales of temperature and humidity. Agreement between modelled and observed fluxes notably varied with geographical locations of the stations. For example, at the Long Point station in Lake Erie, observed fluxes are likely influenced by the upwind land surface while the simulations do not take account of the land surface influence, and therefore the agreement is worse in general.

  10. Turbulence modeling for Francis turbine water passages simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruzewski, P; Munch, C; Mombelli, H P; Avellan, F; Hayashi, H; Yamaishi, K; Hashii, T; Sugow, Y

    2010-01-01

    The applications of Computational Fluid Dynamics, CFD, to hydraulic machines life require the ability to handle turbulent flows and to take into account the effects of turbulence on the mean flow. Nowadays, Direct Numerical Simulation, DNS, is still not a good candidate for hydraulic machines simulations due to an expensive computational time consuming. Large Eddy Simulation, LES, even, is of the same category of DNS, could be an alternative whereby only the small scale turbulent fluctuations are modeled and the larger scale fluctuations are computed directly. Nevertheless, the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes, RANS, model have become the widespread standard base for numerous hydraulic machine design procedures. However, for many applications involving wall-bounded flows and attached boundary layers, various hybrid combinations of LES and RANS are being considered, such as Detached Eddy Simulation, DES, whereby the RANS approximation is kept in the regions where the boundary layers are attached to the solid walls. Furthermore, the accuracy of CFD simulations is highly dependent on the grid quality, in terms of grid uniformity in complex configurations. Moreover any successful structured and unstructured CFD codes have to offer a wide range to the variety of classic RANS model to hybrid complex model. The aim of this study is to compare the behavior of turbulent simulations for both structured and unstructured grids topology with two different CFD codes which used the same Francis turbine. Hence, the study is intended to outline the encountered discrepancy for predicting the wake of turbine blades by using either the standard k-ε model, or the standard k-ε model or the SST shear stress model in a steady CFD simulation. Finally, comparisons are made with experimental data from the EPFL Laboratory for Hydraulic Machines reduced scale model measurements.

  11. The Turbulent Interstellar Medium: Insights and Questions from Numerical Models

    OpenAIRE

    Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; de Avillez, Miguel A.; Korpi, Maarit J.

    2003-01-01

    "The purpose of numerical models is not numbers but insight." (Hamming) In the spirit of this adage, and of Don Cox's approach to scientific speaking, we discuss the questions that the latest generation of numerical models of the interstellar medium raise, at least for us. The energy source for the interstellar turbulence is still under discussion. We review the argument for supernovae dominating in star forming regions. Magnetorotational instability has been suggested as a way of coupling di...

  12. Turbulence modeling for Francis turbine water passages simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruzewski, P; Munch, C; Mombelli, H P; Avellan, F [Ecole polytechnique federale de Lausanne, Laboratory of Hydraulic Machines Avenue de Cour 33 bis, CH-1007 Lausanne (Switzerland); Hayashi, H; Yamaishi, K; Hashii, T; Sugow, Y, E-mail: pierre.maruzewski@epfl.c [Nippon KOEI Power Systems, 1-22 Doukyu, Aza, Morijyuku, Sukagawa, Fukushima Pref. 962-8508 (Japan)

    2010-08-15

    The applications of Computational Fluid Dynamics, CFD, to hydraulic machines life require the ability to handle turbulent flows and to take into account the effects of turbulence on the mean flow. Nowadays, Direct Numerical Simulation, DNS, is still not a good candidate for hydraulic machines simulations due to an expensive computational time consuming. Large Eddy Simulation, LES, even, is of the same category of DNS, could be an alternative whereby only the small scale turbulent fluctuations are modeled and the larger scale fluctuations are computed directly. Nevertheless, the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes, RANS, model have become the widespread standard base for numerous hydraulic machine design procedures. However, for many applications involving wall-bounded flows and attached boundary layers, various hybrid combinations of LES and RANS are being considered, such as Detached Eddy Simulation, DES, whereby the RANS approximation is kept in the regions where the boundary layers are attached to the solid walls. Furthermore, the accuracy of CFD simulations is highly dependent on the grid quality, in terms of grid uniformity in complex configurations. Moreover any successful structured and unstructured CFD codes have to offer a wide range to the variety of classic RANS model to hybrid complex model. The aim of this study is to compare the behavior of turbulent simulations for both structured and unstructured grids topology with two different CFD codes which used the same Francis turbine. Hence, the study is intended to outline the encountered discrepancy for predicting the wake of turbine blades by using either the standard k-{epsilon} model, or the standard k-{epsilon} model or the SST shear stress model in a steady CFD simulation. Finally, comparisons are made with experimental data from the EPFL Laboratory for Hydraulic Machines reduced scale model measurements.

  13. MODELING OF AN AIRPLANE WING MOMENTS INDUCED BY ATMOSPHERIC TURBULENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Antonova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We have used Diederich’s theory of wingspan average correlation functions to obtain analytical expressions for the local spectral density of aircraft wing moments induced by horizontal and vertical wind gusts. We have assumed that the correlation functions of atmospheric turbulence belong to the Bullen family which includes both partial cases of known Dryden’s model as well as von Karman’s  model.

  14. Turbulence modeling for Francis turbine water passages simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruzewski, P.; Hayashi, H.; Munch, C.; Yamaishi, K.; Hashii, T.; Mombelli, H. P.; Sugow, Y.; Avellan, F.

    2010-08-01

    The applications of Computational Fluid Dynamics, CFD, to hydraulic machines life require the ability to handle turbulent flows and to take into account the effects of turbulence on the mean flow. Nowadays, Direct Numerical Simulation, DNS, is still not a good candidate for hydraulic machines simulations due to an expensive computational time consuming. Large Eddy Simulation, LES, even, is of the same category of DNS, could be an alternative whereby only the small scale turbulent fluctuations are modeled and the larger scale fluctuations are computed directly. Nevertheless, the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes, RANS, model have become the widespread standard base for numerous hydraulic machine design procedures. However, for many applications involving wall-bounded flows and attached boundary layers, various hybrid combinations of LES and RANS are being considered, such as Detached Eddy Simulation, DES, whereby the RANS approximation is kept in the regions where the boundary layers are attached to the solid walls. Furthermore, the accuracy of CFD simulations is highly dependent on the grid quality, in terms of grid uniformity in complex configurations. Moreover any successful structured and unstructured CFD codes have to offer a wide range to the variety of classic RANS model to hybrid complex model. The aim of this study is to compare the behavior of turbulent simulations for both structured and unstructured grids topology with two different CFD codes which used the same Francis turbine. Hence, the study is intended to outline the encountered discrepancy for predicting the wake of turbine blades by using either the standard k-epsilon model, or the standard k-epsilon model or the SST shear stress model in a steady CFD simulation. Finally, comparisons are made with experimental data from the EPFL Laboratory for Hydraulic Machines reduced scale model measurements.

  15. Relevant criteria for testing the quality of turbulence models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Sten Tronæs; Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans; Sørensen, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    Seeking relevant criteria for testing the quality of turbulence models, the scale of turbulence and the gust factor have been estimated from data and compared with predictions from first-order models of these two quantities. It is found that the mean of the measured length scales is approx. 10......% smaller than the IEC model, for wind turbine hub height levels. The mean is only marginally dependent on trends in time series. It is also found that the coefficient of variation of the measured length scales is about 50%. 3sec and 10sec pre-averaging of wind speed data are relevant for MW-size wind...... turbines when seeking wind characteristics that correspond to one blade and the entire rotor, respectively. For heights exceeding 50-60m the gust factor increases with wind speed. For heights larger the 60-80m, present assumptions on the value of the gust factor are significantly conservative, both for 3...

  16. Characterizing the Severe Turbulence Environments Associated With Commercial Aviation Accidents: A Real-Time Turbulence Model (RTTM) Designed for the Operational Prediction of Hazardous Aviation Turbulence Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Michael L.; Lux, Kevin M.; Cetola, Jeffrey D.; Huffman, Allan W.; Riordan, Allen J.; Slusser, Sarah W.; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Charney, Joseph J.; Waight, Kenneth T.

    2004-01-01

    Real-time prediction of environments predisposed to producing moderate-severe aviation turbulence is studied. We describe the numerical model and its postprocessing system designed for said prediction of environments predisposed to severe aviation turbulence as well as presenting numerous examples of its utility. The numerical model is MASS version 5.13, which is integrated over three different grid matrices in real time on a university work station in support of NASA Langley Research Center s B-757 turbulence research flight missions. The postprocessing system includes several turbulence-related products, including four turbulence forecasting indices, winds, streamlines, turbulence kinetic energy, and Richardson numbers. Additionally, there are convective products including precipitation, cloud height, cloud mass fluxes, lifted index, and K-index. Furthermore, soundings, sounding parameters, and Froude number plots are also provided. The horizontal cross-section plot products are provided from 16 000 to 46 000 ft in 2000-ft intervals. Products are available every 3 hours at the 60- and 30-km grid interval and every 1.5 hours at the 15-km grid interval. The model is initialized from the NWS ETA analyses and integrated two times a day.

  17. Effects of solid inertial particles on the velocity and temperature statistics of wall bounded turbulent flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakhaei, Mohammadhadi; Lessani, B.

    2016-01-01

    and particles, and the scatter plotsof fluid-particle temperature differences are presented. In addition, the variations of different budgetterms for the turbulent kinetic energy equation and fluctuating temperature variance equation in thepresence of particles are reported. The fluid turbulent heat flux...... is reduced by the presence of particles,and in spite of the additional heat exchange between the carrier fluid and the particles, the total heattransfer rate stays always lower for particle-laden flows. To further clarify this issue, the total Nusseltnumber is split into a turbulence contribution...... and a particle contribution, and the effects of particles inertiaon fluid turbulent heat flux and fluid-particle heat transfer are examined in detail...

  18. Modeling water droplet condensation and evaporation in DNS of turbulent channel flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, E; Kuerten, J G M; Geld, C W M van der [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Geurts, B J, E-mail: e.russo@tue.nl [Faculty EEMCS, University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2011-12-22

    In this paper a point particle model for two-way coupling in water droplet-laden incompressible turbulent flow of air is proposed. The model is based on conservation laws and semi-empirical correlations. It has been implemented and tested in a DNS code based for turbulent channel flow with an Eulerian-Lagrangian approach. The two-way coupling is investigated in terms of the effects of mass and heat transfer on the droplets distributions along the channel wall-normal direction and by comparison of the droplet temperature statistics with respect to the case without evaporation and condensation. A remarkable conclusion is that the presence of evaporating and condensing droplets results in an increase in the non-dimensional heat transfer coefficient of the channel flow represented by the Nusselt number.

  19. Stochastic modelling of conjugate heat transfer in near-wall turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozorski, Jacek; Minier, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    The paper addresses the conjugate heat transfer in turbulent flows with temperature assumed to be a passive scalar. The Lagrangian approach is applied and the heat transfer is modelled with the use of stochastic particles. The intensity of thermal fluctuations in near-wall turbulence is determined from the scalar probability density function (PDF) with externally provided dynamical statistics. A stochastic model for the temperature field in the wall material is proposed and boundary conditions for stochastic particles at the solid-fluid interface are formulated. The heated channel flow with finite-thickness walls is considered as a validation case. Computation results for the mean temperature profiles and the variance of thermal fluctuations are presented and compared with available DNS data

  20. Stochastic modelling of conjugate heat transfer in near-wall turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozorski, Jacek [Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery, Polish Academy of Sciences, Fiszera 14, 80952 Gdansk (Poland)]. E-mail: jp@imp.gda.pl; Minier, Jean-Pierre [Research and Development Division, Electricite de France, 6 quai Watier, 78400 Chatou (France)

    2006-10-15

    The paper addresses the conjugate heat transfer in turbulent flows with temperature assumed to be a passive scalar. The Lagrangian approach is applied and the heat transfer is modelled with the use of stochastic particles. The intensity of thermal fluctuations in near-wall turbulence is determined from the scalar probability density function (PDF) with externally provided dynamical statistics. A stochastic model for the temperature field in the wall material is proposed and boundary conditions for stochastic particles at the solid-fluid interface are formulated. The heated channel flow with finite-thickness walls is considered as a validation case. Computation results for the mean temperature profiles and the variance of thermal fluctuations are presented and compared with available DNS data.

  1. Higher-order turbulence statistics of wave–current flow over a submerged hemisphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barman, Krishnendu; Debnath, Koustuv; Mazumder, Bijoy S, E-mail: debnath_koustuv@yahoo.com [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah 711103, West Bengal (India)

    2017-04-15

    Higher-order turbulence characteristics such as turbulence production, turbulence kinetic energy flux, third order moments and velocity spectra associated with turbulent bursting events due to the influence of a submerged hemisphere under wave–current interactions are presented. The velocity components were measured using three dimensional (3D) 16 MHz micro-acoustic Doppler velocimetry (Micro-ADV). In the wave–current interactions, the contributions of turbulent bursting events such as ejections and sweeps significantly reduce in comparison to the current-only case. The distributions of the mean time intervals of ejection and sweeping events are found to alter due to the superposition of surface waves. Results also depict that the turbulence production in the wake region of the hemisphere reduces remarkably, due to the superposition of surface waves on the current. Further, spectral and co-spectral analysis demonstrates that there is a significant reduction of power spectral peak for both longitudinal and bottom-normal velocities upon superposition of surface waves, which signifies a remarkable change in energy distribution between different frequencies of waves. (paper)

  2. Scalar energy fluctuations in Large-Eddy Simulation of turbulent flames: Statistical budgets and mesh quality criterion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vervisch, Luc; Domingo, Pascale; Lodato, Guido [CORIA - CNRS and INSA de Rouen, Technopole du Madrillet, BP 8, 76801 Saint-Etienne-du-Rouvray (France); Veynante, Denis [EM2C - CNRS and Ecole Centrale Paris, Grande Voie des Vignes, 92295 Chatenay-Malabry (France)

    2010-04-15

    Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) provides space-filtered quantities to compare with measurements, which usually have been obtained using a different filtering operation; hence, numerical and experimental results can be examined side-by-side in a statistical sense only. Instantaneous, space-filtered and statistically time-averaged signals feature different characteristic length-scales, which can be combined in dimensionless ratios. From two canonical manufactured turbulent solutions, a turbulent flame and a passive scalar turbulent mixing layer, the critical values of these ratios under which measured and computed variances (resolved plus sub-grid scale) can be compared without resorting to additional residual terms are first determined. It is shown that actual Direct Numerical Simulation can hardly accommodate a sufficiently large range of length-scales to perform statistical studies of LES filtered reactive scalar-fields energy budget based on sub-grid scale variances; an estimation of the minimum Reynolds number allowing for such DNS studies is given. From these developments, a reliability mesh criterion emerges for scalar LES and scaling for scalar sub-grid scale energy is discussed. (author)

  3. Application of turbulence modeling to predict surface heat transfer in stagnation flow region of circular cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chi R.; Yeh, Frederick C.

    1987-01-01

    A theoretical analysis and numerical calculations for the turbulent flow field and for the effect of free-stream turbulence on the surface heat transfer rate of a stagnation flow are presented. The emphasis is on the modeling of turbulence and its augmentation of surface heat transfer rate. The flow field considered is the region near the forward stagnation point of a circular cylinder in a uniform turbulent mean flow. The free stream is steady and incompressible with a Reynolds number of the order of 10 to the 5th power and turbulence intensity of less than 5 percent. For this analysis, the flow field is divided into three regions: (1) a uniform free-stream region where the turbulence is homogeneous and isotropic; (2) an external viscid flow region where the turbulence is distorted by the variation of the mean flow velocity; and, (3) an anisotropic turbulent boundary layer region over the cylinder surface. The turbulence modeling techniques used are the kappa-epsilon two-equation model in the external flow region and the time-averaged turbulence transport equation in the boundary layer region. The turbulence double correlations, the mean velocity, and the mean temperature within the boundary layer are solved numerically from the transport equations. The surface heat transfer rate is calculated as functions of the free-stream turbulence longitudinal microlength scale, the turbulence intensity, and the Reynolds number.

  4. Modelling the optical turbulence boiling and its effect on finite-exposure differential image motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdja, A.; Borgnino, J.

    2007-07-01

    It is usually accepted that whenever dealing with astronomical observation through the atmosphere, the optical turbulence temporal evolution can be sufficiently described with the so-called frozen turbulence hypothesis. In this model, turbulence is supposed to be equivalent to a series of solid phase screens that slide horizontally in front of the observation field of view. Experimental evidence shows, however, that an additional physical process must be taken into account when describing the temporal behaviour of the optical turbulence. In fact, while translating above the observer, turbulence undergoes a proper temporal evolution and affects differently the astronomical and, more specifically, the astrometric observations. The proper temporal evolution of the turbulence-induced optical turbulence observable quantities is here called the optical turbulence boiling. We are proposing through this paper a theoretical approach to the modelling of the optical turbulence temporal evolution when the turbulent layer horizontal translation and the optical turbulence boiling are both involved. The model we propose, as a working hypothesis though, has a direct relevance to differential astrometry because of its explicit dependence upon the optical turbulence temporal evolution. It can also be generalized to other techniques of high angular resolution astronomical observation through the atmospheric turbulence.

  5. Neural network modeling for near wall turbulent flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milano, Michele; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2002-01-01

    A neural network methodology is developed in order to reconstruct the near wall field in a turbulent flow by exploiting flow fields provided by direct numerical simulations. The results obtained from the neural network methodology are compared with the results obtained from prediction and reconstruction using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). Using the property that the POD is equivalent to a specific linear neural network, a nonlinear neural network extension is presented. It is shown that for a relatively small additional computational cost nonlinear neural networks provide us with improved reconstruction and prediction capabilities for the near wall velocity fields. Based on these results advantages and drawbacks of both approaches are discussed with an outlook toward the development of near wall models for turbulence modeling and control

  6. Computational Modeling of Turbulent Spray Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, L.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the research presented in this thesis is development and validation of predictive models or modeling approaches of liquid fuel combustion (spray combustion) in hot-diluted environments, known as flameless combustion or MILD combustion. The goal is to combine good physical insight,

  7. Comment paper: Workshop on Engineering Turbulence Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalart, P. R.

    1992-01-01

    The speaker for this paper describes and evaluates a k-epsilon model for calculating Samuel-Joubert flow. He proceeds to present both Boeing's and his positions on the state-of-the-art in this area and future goals. Finally, presented is a one equation mathematical model for calculating Samuel-Joubert flow. All results are presented in viewgraph format.

  8. Statistical modelling of fish stocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, Trine

    1999-01-01

    for modelling the dynamics of a fish population is suggested. A new approach is introduced to analyse the sources of variation in age composition data, which is one of the most important sources of information in the cohort based models for estimation of stock abundancies and mortalities. The approach combines...... and it is argued that an approach utilising stochastic differential equations might be advantagous in fish stoch assessments....

  9. MHD turbulence models for the reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimblett, C.G.; Watkins, M.L.

    1976-01-01

    A kinematic model which describes the effect of isotropic, non-mirror symmetric turbulence on a mean magnetic field is used to examine the temporal behaviour of magnetic field in high beta pinch experiments. Solutions to the model can indicate the formation of a steady-state, force-free configuration that corresponds to the state of lowest magnetic energy and the reversal of the toroidal magnetic field at the plasma boundary in accordance with experimental observations on toroidal pinches such as ZETA and HBTX. This model neglects both the dynamic interaction between fluid and field and the associated anisotropy. These effects are examined in a further model. (author)

  10. Application of two-equation turbulence models to turbulent gas flow heated by a high heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Hiroshi

    1978-01-01

    Heat transfer in heated turbulent gas flow is analyzed using two-equation turbulence models. Four kinds of two-equation models are examined; that is, k-epsilon model by Jones-Launder, k-w model by Wilcox-Traci, k-kL model by Rotta, k-ω model by Saffman-Wilcox. The results are compared with more than ten experiments by seven authors. The k-kL model proposed originally by Rotta and modified by the present author is found to give relatively the best results. It well predicts the decrease in the heat transfer coefficient found in the heated turbulent gas flow; however, it fails to predict the laminarization due to a strong heating. (author)

  11. Statistical lung model for microdosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.R.; Hadley, R.T.

    1984-03-01

    To calculate the microdosimetry of plutonium in the lung, a mathematical description is needed of lung tissue microstructure that defines source-site parameters. Beagle lungs were expanded using a glutaraldehyde fixative at 30 cm water pressure. Tissue specimens, five microns thick, were stained with hematoxylin and eosin then studied using an image analyzer. Measurements were made along horizontal lines through the magnified tissue image. The distribution of air space and tissue chord lengths and locations of epithelial cell nuclei were recorded from about 10,000 line scans. The distribution parameters constituted a model of lung microstructure for predicting the paths of random alpha particle tracks in the lung and the probability of traversing biologically sensitive sites. This lung model may be used in conjunction with established deposition and retention models for determining the microdosimetry in the pulmonary lung for a wide variety of inhaled radioactive materials

  12. Statistical modelling for ship propulsion efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jóan Petur; Jacobsen, Daniel J.; Winther, Ole

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a state-of-the-art systems approach to statistical modelling of fuel efficiency in ship propulsion, and also a novel and publicly available data set of high quality sensory data. Two statistical model approaches are investigated and compared: artificial neural networks...

  13. Actuarial statistics with generalized linear mixed models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonio, K.; Beirlant, J.

    2007-01-01

    Over the last decade the use of generalized linear models (GLMs) in actuarial statistics has received a lot of attention, starting from the actuarial illustrations in the standard text by McCullagh and Nelder [McCullagh, P., Nelder, J.A., 1989. Generalized linear models. In: Monographs on Statistics

  14. Spherical Process Models for Global Spatial Statistics

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, Jaehong; Jun, Mikyoung; Genton, Marc G.

    2017-01-01

    Statistical models used in geophysical, environmental, and climate science applications must reflect the curvature of the spatial domain in global data. Over the past few decades, statisticians have developed covariance models that capture

  15. Physical modelling of interactions between interfaces and turbulence; Modelisation physique des interactions entre interfaces et turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toutant, A

    2006-12-15

    The complex interactions between interfaces and turbulence strongly impact the flow properties. Unfortunately, Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) have to entail a number of degrees of freedom proportional to the third power of the Reynolds number to correctly describe the flow behaviour. This extremely hard constraint makes it impossible to use DNS for industrial applications. Our strategy consists in using and improving DNS method in order to develop the Interfaces and Sub-grid Scales concept. ISS is a two-phase equivalent to the single-phase Large Eddy Simulation (LES) concept. The challenge of ISS is to integrate the two-way coupling phenomenon into sub-grid models. Applying a space filter, we have exhibited correlations or sub-grid terms that require closures. We have shown that, in two-phase flows, the presence of a discontinuity leads to specific sub-grid terms. Comparing the maximum of the norm of the sub-grid terms with the maximum of the norm of the advection tensor, we have found that sub-grid terms related to interfacial forces and viscous effect are negligible. Consequently, in the momentum balance, only the sub-grid terms related to inertia have to be closed. Thanks to a priori tests performed on several DNS data, we demonstrate that the scale similarity hypothesis, reinterpreted near discontinuity, provides sub-grid models that take into account the two-way coupling phenomenon. These models correspond to the first step of our work. Indeed, in this step, interfaces are smooth and, interactions between interfaces and turbulence occur in a transition zone where each physical variable varies sharply but continuously. The next challenge has been to determine the jump conditions across the sharp equivalent interface corresponding to the sub-grid models of the transition zone. We have used the matched asymptotic expansion method to obtain the jump conditions. The first tests on the velocity of the sharp equivalent interface are very promising (author)

  16. Turbulence modeling and surface heat transfer in a stagnation flow region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. R.; Yeh, F. C.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis for the turbulent flow field and the effect of freestream turbulence on the surface heat transfer rate of a stagnation flow is presented. The emphasis is on modeling and its augmentation of surface heat transfer rate. The flow field considered is the region near the forward stagnation point of a circular cylinder in a uniform turbulent mean flow.

  17. Statistical Models and Methods for Lifetime Data

    CERN Document Server

    Lawless, Jerald F

    2011-01-01

    Praise for the First Edition"An indispensable addition to any serious collection on lifetime data analysis and . . . a valuable contribution to the statistical literature. Highly recommended . . ."-Choice"This is an important book, which will appeal to statisticians working on survival analysis problems."-Biometrics"A thorough, unified treatment of statistical models and methods used in the analysis of lifetime data . . . this is a highly competent and agreeable statistical textbook."-Statistics in MedicineThe statistical analysis of lifetime or response time data is a key tool in engineering,

  18. Three-fluid, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic solar wind model with eddy viscosity and turbulent resistivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usmanov, Arcadi V.; Matthaeus, William H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Goldstein, Melvyn L., E-mail: arcadi.usmanov@nasa.gov [Code 672, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-06-10

    We have developed a three-fluid, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic solar wind model that incorporates turbulence transport, eddy viscosity, turbulent resistivity, and turbulent heating. The solar wind plasma is described as a system of co-moving solar wind protons, electrons, and interstellar pickup protons, with separate energy equations for each species. Numerical steady-state solutions of Reynolds-averaged solar wind equations coupled with turbulence transport equations for turbulence energy, cross helicity, and correlation length are obtained by the time relaxation method in the corotating with the Sun frame of reference in the region from 0.3 to 100 AU (but still inside the termination shock). The model equations include the effects of electron heat conduction, Coulomb collisions, photoionization of interstellar hydrogen atoms and their charge exchange with the solar wind protons, turbulence energy generation by pickup protons, and turbulent heating of solar wind protons and electrons. The turbulence transport model is based on the Reynolds decomposition and turbulence phenomenologies that describe the conversion of fluctuation energy into heat due to a turbulent cascade. In addition to using separate energy equations for the solar wind protons and electrons, a significant improvement over our previous work is that the turbulence model now uses an eddy viscosity approximation for the Reynolds stress tensor and the mean turbulent electric field. The approximation allows the turbulence model to account for driving of turbulence by large-scale velocity gradients. Using either a dipole approximation for the solar magnetic field or synoptic solar magnetograms from the Wilcox Solar Observatory for assigning boundary conditions at the coronal base, we apply the model to study the global structure of the solar wind and its three-dimensional properties, including embedded turbulence, heating, and acceleration throughout the heliosphere. The model results are

  19. Statistics and the shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidenmueller, H.A.

    1985-01-01

    Starting with N. Bohr's paper on compound-nucleus reactions, we confront regular dynamical features and chaotic motion in nuclei. The shell-model and, more generally, mean-field theories describe average nuclear properties which are thus identified as regular features. The fluctuations about the average show chaotic behaviour of the same type as found in classical chaotic systems upon quantisation. These features are therefore generic and quite independent of the specific dynamics of the nucleus. A novel method to calculate fluctuations is discussed, and the results of this method are described. (orig.)

  20. Subgrid Modeling of AGN-driven Turbulence in Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scannapieco, Evan; Brüggen, Marcus

    2008-10-01

    Hot, underdense bubbles powered by active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are likely to play a key role in halting catastrophic cooling in the centers of cool-core galaxy clusters. We present three-dimensional simulations that capture the evolution of such bubbles, using an adaptive mesh hydrodynamic code, FLASH3, to which we have added a subgrid model of turbulence and mixing. While pure hydro simulations indicate that AGN bubbles are disrupted into resolution-dependent pockets of underdense gas, proper modeling of subgrid turbulence indicates that this is a poor approximation to a turbulent cascade that continues far beyond the resolution limit. Instead, Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities act to effectively mix the heated region with its surroundings, while at the same time preserving it as a coherent structure, consistent with observations. Thus, bubbles are transformed into hot clouds of mixed material as they move outward in the hydrostatic intracluster medium (ICM), much as large airbursts lead to a distinctive "mushroom cloud" structure as they rise in the hydrostatic atmosphere of Earth. Properly capturing the evolution of such clouds has important implications for many ICM properties. In particular, it significantly changes the impact of AGNs on the distribution of entropy and metals in cool-core clusters such as Perseus.

  1. Eigenspace perturbations for structural uncertainty estimation of turbulence closure models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jofre, Lluis; Mishra, Aashwin; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2017-11-01

    With the present state of computational resources, a purely numerical resolution of turbulent flows encountered in engineering applications is not viable. Consequently, investigations into turbulence rely on various degrees of modeling. Archetypal amongst these variable resolution approaches would be RANS models in two-equation closures, and subgrid-scale models in LES. However, owing to the simplifications introduced during model formulation, the fidelity of all such models is limited, and therefore the explicit quantification of the predictive uncertainty is essential. In such scenario, the ideal uncertainty estimation procedure must be agnostic to modeling resolution, methodology, and the nature or level of the model filter. The procedure should be able to give reliable prediction intervals for different Quantities of Interest, over varied flows and flow conditions, and at diametric levels of modeling resolution. In this talk, we present and substantiate the Eigenspace perturbation framework as an uncertainty estimation paradigm that meets these criteria. Commencing from a broad overview, we outline the details of this framework at different modeling resolution. Thence, using benchmark flows, along with engineering problems, the efficacy of this procedure is established. This research was partially supported by NNSA under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program (PSAAP) II, and by DARPA under the Enabling Quantification of Uncertainty in Physical Systems (EQUiPS) project (technical monitor: Dr Fariba Fahroo).

  2. Gyrofluid turbulence models with kinetic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorland, W.; Hammett, G.W.

    1992-12-01

    Nonlinear gyrofluid equations are derived by taking moments of the nonlinear, electrostatic gyrokinetic equation. The principal model presented includes evolution equations for the guiding center n, u parallel, T parallel, and T perpendicular along with an equation expressing the quasineutrality constraint. Additional evolution equations for higher moments are derived which may be used if greater accuracy is desired. The moment hierarchy is closed with a Landau-damping model which is equivalent to a multi-pole approximation to the plasma dispersion function, extended to include finite Larmor radius effects. In particular, new dissipative, nonlinear terms are found which model the perpendicular phase-mixing of the distribution function along contours of constant electrostatic potential. These ''FLR phase-mixing'' terms introduce a hyperviscosity-like damping ∝ k perpendicular 2 |Φ rvec k rvec k x rvec k'| which should provide a physics-based damping mechanism at high k perpendicular ρ which is potentially as important as the usual polarization drift nonlinearity. The moments are taken in guiding center space to pick up the correct nonlinear FLR terms and the gyroaveraging of the shear. The equations are solved with a nonlinear, three dimensional initial value code. Linear results are presented, showing excellent agreement with linear gyrokinetic theory

  3. Modeling the subfilter scalar variance for large eddy simulation in forced isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheminet, Adam; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2011-11-01

    Static and dynamic model for the subfilter scalar variance in homogeneous isotropic turbulence are investigated using direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a lineary forced passive scalar field. First, we introduce a new scalar forcing technique conditioned only on the scalar field which allows the fluctuating scalar field to reach a statistically stationary state. Statistical properties, including 2nd and 3rd statistical moments, spectra, and probability density functions of the scalar field have been analyzed. Using this technique, we performed constant density and variable density DNS of scalar mixing in isotropic turbulence. The results are used in an a-priori study of scalar variance models. Emphasis is placed on further studying the dynamic model introduced by G. Balarac, H. Pitsch and V. Raman [Phys. Fluids 20, (2008)]. Scalar variance models based on Bedford and Yeo's expansion are accurate for small filter width but errors arise in the inertial subrange. Results suggest that a constant coefficient computed from an assumed Kolmogorov spectrum is often sufficient to predict the subfilter scalar variance.

  4. CONDITIONAL FLOW STATISTICS AND ALIGNMENT OF PRINCIPAL STRAIN RATES, VORTICITY, AND SCALAR GRADIENTS IN A TURBULENT NONPREMIXED JET FLAME

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio

    2015-06-30

    The alignment of vorticity and gradients of conserved and reactive scalars with the eigenvectors of the strain rate tensor (i.e., the principal strains) is investigated in a direct numerical simulation of a turbulent nonpremixed flame achieving a Taylor’s scale Reynolds number in the range 100≤Reλ≤150 (Attili et al. Comb. Flame, 161, 2014). The vorticity vector displays a pronounced tendency to align with the direction of the intermediate strain. These alignment statistics are in almost perfect agreement with those in homogeneous isotropic turbulence (Ashurst et al. Physics of Fluids 30, 1987) and differ significantly from the results obtained in other nonpremixed flames in which vorticity alignment with the most extensive strain was observed (Boratavet al. Physics of Fluids 8, 1996). The gradients of conserved and reactive scalars align with the most compressive strain. It is worth noting that conditioning on the local values of the mixture fraction, or equivalently conditioning on the distance from the flame sheet, does not affect the statistics. Our results suggest that turbulence overshadows the effects of heat release and chemical reactions. This may be due to the larger Reynolds number achieved in the present study compared to that in previous works.

  5. CONDITIONAL FLOW STATISTICS AND ALIGNMENT OF PRINCIPAL STRAIN RATES, VORTICITY, AND SCALAR GRADIENTS IN A TURBULENT NONPREMIXED JET FLAME

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio; Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    The alignment of vorticity and gradients of conserved and reactive scalars with the eigenvectors of the strain rate tensor (i.e., the principal strains) is investigated in a direct numerical simulation of a turbulent nonpremixed flame achieving a Taylor’s scale Reynolds number in the range 100≤Reλ≤150 (Attili et al. Comb. Flame, 161, 2014). The vorticity vector displays a pronounced tendency to align with the direction of the intermediate strain. These alignment statistics are in almost perfect agreement with those in homogeneous isotropic turbulence (Ashurst et al. Physics of Fluids 30, 1987) and differ significantly from the results obtained in other nonpremixed flames in which vorticity alignment with the most extensive strain was observed (Boratavet al. Physics of Fluids 8, 1996). The gradients of conserved and reactive scalars align with the most compressive strain. It is worth noting that conditioning on the local values of the mixture fraction, or equivalently conditioning on the distance from the flame sheet, does not affect the statistics. Our results suggest that turbulence overshadows the effects of heat release and chemical reactions. This may be due to the larger Reynolds number achieved in the present study compared to that in previous works.

  6. Implementation of Dryden Continuous Turbulence Model into Simulink for LSA-02 Flight Test Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichwanul Hakim, Teuku Mohd; Arifianto, Ony

    2018-04-01

    Turbulence is a movement of air on small scale in the atmosphere that caused by instabilities of pressure and temperature distribution. Turbulence model is integrated into flight mechanical model as an atmospheric disturbance. Common turbulence model used in flight mechanical model are Dryden and Von Karman model. In this minor research, only Dryden continuous turbulence model were made. Dryden continuous turbulence model has been implemented, it refers to the military specification MIL-HDBK-1797. The model was implemented into Matlab Simulink. The model will be integrated with flight mechanical model to observe response of the aircraft when it is flight through turbulence field. The turbulence model is characterized by multiplying the filter which are generated from power spectral density with band-limited Gaussian white noise input. In order to ensure that the model provide a good result, model verification has been done by comparing the implemented model with the similar model that is provided in aerospace blockset. The result shows that there are some difference for 2 linear velocities (vg and wg), and 3 angular rate (pg, qg and rg). The difference is instantly caused by different determination of turbulence scale length which is used in aerospace blockset. With the adjustment of turbulence length in the implemented model, both model result the similar output.

  7. Stochastic Modeling of Direct Radiation Transmission in Particle-Laden Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banko, Andrew; Villafane, Laura; Kim, Ji Hoon; Esmaily Moghadam, Mahdi; Eaton, John K.

    2017-11-01

    Direct radiation transmission in turbulent flows laden with heavy particles plays a fundamental role in systems such as clouds, spray combustors, and particle-solar-receivers. Owing to their inertia, the particles preferentially concentrate and the resulting voids and clusters lead to deviations in mean transmission from the classical Beer-Lambert law for exponential extinction. Additionally, the transmission fluctuations can exceed those of Poissonian media by an order of magnitude, which implies a gross misprediction in transmission statistics if the correlations in particle positions are neglected. On the other hand, tracking millions of particles in a turbulence simulation can be prohibitively expensive. This work presents stochastic processes as computationally cheap reduced order models for the instantaneous particle number density field and radiation transmission therein. Results from the stochastic processes are compared to Monte Carlo Ray Tracing (MCRT) simulations using the particle positions obtained from the point-particle DNS of isotropic turbulence at a Taylor Reynolds number of 150. Accurate transmission statistics are predicted with respect to MCRT by matching the mean, variance, and correlation length of DNS number density fields. Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-NA0002373-1 and the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DGE-114747.

  8. Modelling thermal radiation in buoyant turbulent diffusion flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consalvi, J. L.; Demarco, R.; Fuentes, A.

    2012-10-01

    This work focuses on the numerical modelling of radiative heat transfer in laboratory-scale buoyant turbulent diffusion flames. Spectral gas and soot radiation is modelled by using the Full-Spectrum Correlated-k (FSCK) method. Turbulence-Radiation Interactions (TRI) are taken into account by considering the Optically-Thin Fluctuation Approximation (OTFA), the resulting time-averaged Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE) being solved by the Finite Volume Method (FVM). Emission TRIs and the mean absorption coefficient are then closed by using a presumed probability density function (pdf) of the mixture fraction. The mean gas flow field is modelled by the Favre-averaged Navier-Stokes (FANS) equation set closed by a buoyancy-modified k-ɛ model with algebraic stress/flux models (ASM/AFM), the Steady Laminar Flamelet (SLF) model coupled with a presumed pdf approach to account for Turbulence-Chemistry Interactions, and an acetylene-based semi-empirical two-equation soot model. Two sets of experimental pool fire data are used for validation: propane pool fires 0.3 m in diameter with Heat Release Rates (HRR) of 15, 22 and 37 kW and methane pool fires 0.38 m in diameter with HRRs of 34 and 176 kW. Predicted flame structures, radiant fractions, and radiative heat fluxes on surrounding surfaces are found in satisfactory agreement with available experimental data across all the flames. In addition further computations indicate that, for the present flames, the gray approximation can be applied for soot with a minor influence on the results, resulting in a substantial gain in Computer Processing Unit (CPU) time when the FSCK is used to treat gas radiation.

  9. Low-dimensional representations of exact coherent states of the Navier-Stokes equations from the resolvent model of wall turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ati S; Moarref, Rashad; McKeon, Beverley J; Park, Jae Sung; Graham, Michael D; Willis, Ashley P

    2016-02-01

    We report that many exact invariant solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for both pipe and channel flows are well represented by just a few modes of the model of McKeon and Sharma [J. Fluid Mech. 658, 336 (2010)]. This model provides modes that act as a basis to decompose the velocity field, ordered by their amplitude of response to forcing arising from the interaction between scales. The model was originally derived from the Navier-Stokes equations to represent turbulent flows and has been used to explain coherent structure and to predict turbulent statistics. This establishes a surprising new link between the two distinct approaches to understanding turbulence.

  10. Bayesian models: A statistical primer for ecologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, N. Thompson; Hooten, Mevin B.

    2015-01-01

    Bayesian modeling has become an indispensable tool for ecological research because it is uniquely suited to deal with complexity in a statistically coherent way. This textbook provides a comprehensive and accessible introduction to the latest Bayesian methods—in language ecologists can understand. Unlike other books on the subject, this one emphasizes the principles behind the computations, giving ecologists a big-picture understanding of how to implement this powerful statistical approach.Bayesian Models is an essential primer for non-statisticians. It begins with a definition of probability and develops a step-by-step sequence of connected ideas, including basic distribution theory, network diagrams, hierarchical models, Markov chain Monte Carlo, and inference from single and multiple models. This unique book places less emphasis on computer coding, favoring instead a concise presentation of the mathematical statistics needed to understand how and why Bayesian analysis works. It also explains how to write out properly formulated hierarchical Bayesian models and use them in computing, research papers, and proposals.This primer enables ecologists to understand the statistical principles behind Bayesian modeling and apply them to research, teaching, policy, and management.Presents the mathematical and statistical foundations of Bayesian modeling in language accessible to non-statisticiansCovers basic distribution theory, network diagrams, hierarchical models, Markov chain Monte Carlo, and moreDeemphasizes computer coding in favor of basic principlesExplains how to write out properly factored statistical expressions representing Bayesian models

  11. Validation of an LES Model for Soot Evolution against DNS Data in Turbulent Jet Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Michael

    2012-11-01

    An integrated modeling approach for soot evolution in turbulent reacting flows is validated against three-dimensional Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) data in a set of n-heptane nonpremixed temporal jet flames. As in the DNS study, the evolution of the soot population is described statistically with the Hybrid Method of Moments (HMOM). The oxidation of the fuel and formation of soot precursors are described with the Radiation Flamelet/Progress Variable (RFPV) model that includes an additional transport equation for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) to account for the slow chemistry governing these species. In addition, the small-scale interactions between soot, chemistry, and turbulence are described with a presumed subfilter PDF approach that accounts for the very large spatial intermittency characterizing soot in turbulent reacting flows. The DNS dataset includes flames at three different Damköhler numbers to study the influence of global mixing rates on the evolution of PAH and soot. In this work, the ability of the model to capture these trends quantitatively as Damköhler number varies is investigated. In order to reliably assess the LES approach, the LES is initialized from the filtered DNS data after an initial transitional period in an effort to minimize the hydrodynamic differences between the DNS and the LES.

  12. Resolvent-based modeling of passive scalar dynamics in wall-bounded turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Scott; Saxton-Fox, Theresa; McKeon, Beverley

    2017-11-01

    The resolvent formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations expresses the system state as the output of a linear (resolvent) operator acting upon a nonlinear forcing. Previous studies have demonstrated that a low-rank approximation of this linear operator predicts many known features of incompressible wall-bounded turbulence. In this work, this resolvent model for wall-bounded turbulence is extended to include a passive scalar field. This formulation allows for a number of additional simplifications that reduce model complexity. Firstly, it is shown that the effect of changing scalar diffusivity can be approximated through a transformation of spatial wavenumbers and temporal frequencies. Secondly, passive scalar dynamics may be studied through the low-rank approximation of a passive scalar resolvent operator, which is decoupled from velocity response modes. Thirdly, this passive scalar resolvent operator is amenable to approximation by semi-analytic methods. We investigate the extent to which this resulting hierarchy of models can describe and predict passive scalar dynamics and statistics in wall-bounded turbulence. The support of AFOSR under Grant Numbers FA9550-16-1-0232 and FA9550-16-1-0361 is gratefully acknowledged.

  13. Statistical Model-Based Face Pose Estimation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Xinliang; YANG Jie; LI Feng; WANG Huahua

    2007-01-01

    A robust face pose estimation approach is proposed by using face shape statistical model approach and pose parameters are represented by trigonometric functions. The face shape statistical model is firstly built by analyzing the face shapes from different people under varying poses. The shape alignment is vital in the process of building the statistical model. Then, six trigonometric functions are employed to represent the face pose parameters. Lastly, the mapping function is constructed between face image and face pose by linearly relating different parameters. The proposed approach is able to estimate different face poses using a few face training samples. Experimental results are provided to demonstrate its efficiency and accuracy.

  14. Modeling Turbulent Combustion for Variable Prandtl and Schmidt Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, H. A.

    2004-01-01

    This report consists of two abstracts submitted for possible presentation at the AIAA Aerospace Science Meeting to be held in January 2005. Since the submittal of these abstracts we are continuing refinement of the model coefficients derived for the case of a variable Turbulent Prandtl number. The test cases being investigated are a Mach 9.2 flow over a degree ramp and a Mach 8.2 3-D calculation of crossing shocks. We have developed an axisymmetric code for treating axisymmetric flows. In addition the variable Schmidt number formulation was incorporated in the code and we are in the process of determining the model constants.

  15. Turbulence and Self-Organization Modeling Astrophysical Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Marov, Mikhail Ya

    2013-01-01

    This book focuses on the development of continuum models of natural turbulent media. It provides a theoretical approach to the solutions of different problems related to the formation, structure and evolution of astrophysical and geophysical objects. A stochastic modeling approach is used in the mathematical treatment of these problems, which reflects self-organization processes in open dissipative systems. The authors also consider examples of ordering for various objects in space throughout their evolutionary processes. This volume is aimed at graduate students and researchers in the fields of mechanics, astrophysics, geophysics, planetary and space science.

  16. Uncertainty the soul of modeling, probability & statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Briggs, William

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a philosophical approach to probability and probabilistic thinking, considering the underpinnings of probabilistic reasoning and modeling, which effectively underlie everything in data science. The ultimate goal is to call into question many standard tenets and lay the philosophical and probabilistic groundwork and infrastructure for statistical modeling. It is the first book devoted to the philosophy of data aimed at working scientists and calls for a new consideration in the practice of probability and statistics to eliminate what has been referred to as the "Cult of Statistical Significance". The book explains the philosophy of these ideas and not the mathematics, though there are a handful of mathematical examples. The topics are logically laid out, starting with basic philosophy as related to probability, statistics, and science, and stepping through the key probabilistic ideas and concepts, and ending with statistical models. Its jargon-free approach asserts that standard methods, suc...

  17. Eulerian short-time statistics of turbulent flow at large Reynolds number

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, J.J.H.

    2004-01-01

    An asymptotic analysis is presented of the short-time behavior of second-order temporal velocity structure functions and Eulerian acceleration correlations in a frame that moves with the local mean velocity of the turbulent flow field. Expressions in closed-form are derived which cover the viscous

  18. Statistical analysis of dispersion relations in turbulent solar wind fluctuations using Cluster data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perschke, C.; Narita, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Multi-spacecraft measurements enable us to resolve three-dimensional spatial structures without assuming Taylor's frozen-in-flow hypothesis. This is very useful to study frequency-wave vector diagram in solar wind turbulence through direct determination of three-dimensional wave vectors. The existence and evolution of dispersion relation and its role in fully-developed plasma turbulence have been drawing attention of physicists, in particular, if solar wind turbulence represents kinetic Alfvén or whistler mode as the carrier of spectral energy among different scales through wave-wave interactions. We investigate solar wind intervals of Cluster data for various flow velocities with a high-resolution wave vector analysis method, Multi-point Signal Resonator technique, at the tetrahedral separation about 100 km. Magnetic field data and ion data are used to determine the frequency- wave vector diagrams in the co-moving frame of the solar wind. We find primarily perpendicular wave vectors in solar wind turbulence which justify the earlier discussions about kinetic Alfvén or whistler wave. The frequency- wave vector diagrams confirm (a) wave vector anisotropy and (b) scattering in frequencies.

  19. Automated statistical modeling of analytical measurement systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    The statistical modeling of analytical measurement systems at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) has been completely automated through computer software. The statistical modeling of analytical measurement systems is one part of a complete quality control program used by the Remote Analytical Laboratory (RAL) at the ICPP. The quality control program is an integration of automated data input, measurement system calibration, database management, and statistical process control. The quality control program and statistical modeling program meet the guidelines set forth by the American Society for Testing Materials and American National Standards Institute. A statistical model is a set of mathematical equations describing any systematic bias inherent in a measurement system and the precision of a measurement system. A statistical model is developed from data generated from the analysis of control standards. Control standards are samples which are made up at precise known levels by an independent laboratory and submitted to the RAL. The RAL analysts who process control standards do not know the values of those control standards. The object behind statistical modeling is to describe real process samples in terms of their bias and precision and, to verify that a measurement system is operating satisfactorily. The processing of control standards gives us this ability

  20. Necessity for non-standard models of interstellar turbulence. The 'Champagne bottle' model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonazzola, S; Celnikier, L M; Chevreton, M [Observatoire de Paris, Section de Meudon, 92 (France)

    1978-01-01

    A complete treatment of interstellar pulsar scintillation by the Physically Thin Screen phase changing model allows one to obtain better agreement with observation and thereby extract new information about the turbulence structure of the interstellar plasma.

  1. On the necessity for non-standard models of interstellar turbulence. The 'Champagne bottle' model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonazzola, S.; Celnikier, L.M.; Chevreton, M.

    1978-01-01

    A complete treatment of interstellar pulsar scintillation by the Physically Thin Screen phase changing model allows one to obtain better agreement with observation and thereby extract new information about the turbulence structure of the interstellar plasma

  2. Assessment of realizability constraints in v2-f turbulence models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sveningsson, A.; Davidson, L.

    2004-01-01

    The use of the realizability constraint in v 2 -f turbulence models is assessed by computing a stator vane passage flow. In this flow the stagnation region is large and it is shown that the time scale bound suggested by [Int. J. Heat Fluid Flow 17 (1995) 89] is well suited to prevent unphysical growth of turbulence kinetic energy. However, this constraint causes numerical instabilities when used in the equation for the relaxation parameter, f. It is also shown that the standard use of the realizability constraint in the v 2 -f model is inconsistent and some modifications are suggested. These changes of the v 2 -f model are examined and shown to have negligible effect on the overall performance of the v 2 -f model. In this work two different versions of the v 2 -f model are investigated and the results obtained are compared with experimental data. The model on a form similar to that originally suggested by Durbin (e.g. [AIAA J. 33 (1995) 659]) produced the overall best agreement with stator vane heat transfer data

  3. Turbulent mass flux closure modeling for variable density turbulence in the wake of an air-entraining transom stern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Kelli; Yue, Dick

    2016-11-01

    This work presents the development and a priori testing of closure models for the incompressible highly-variable density turbulent (IHVDT) flow in the near wake region of a transom stern. This complex, three-dimensional flow includes three regions with distinctly different flow behavior: (i) the convergent corner waves that originate from the body and collide on the ship center plane; (ii) the "rooster tail" that forms from the collision; and (iii) the diverging wave train. The characteristics of these regions involve violent free-surface flows and breaking waves with significant turbulent mass flux (TMF) at Atwood number At = (ρ2 -ρ1) / (ρ2 +ρ1) 1 for which there is little guidance in turbulence closure modeling for the momentum and scalar transport along the wake. Utilizing datasets from high-resolution simulations of the near wake of a canonical three-dimensional transom stern using conservative Volume-of-Fluid (cVOF), implicit Large Eddy Simulation (iLES), and Boundary Data Immersion Method (BDIM), we develop explicit algebraic turbulent mass flux closure models that incorporate the most relevant physical processes. Performance of these models in predicting the turbulent mass flux in all three regions of the wake will be presented. Office of Naval Research.

  4. An algebraic stress/flux model for two-phase turbulent flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, R.

    1995-12-01

    An algebraic stress model (ASM) for turbulent Reynolds stress and a flux model for turbulent heat flux are proposed for two-phase bubbly and slug flows. These mathematical models are derived from the two-phase transport equations for Reynolds stress and turbulent heat flux, and provide C μ , a turbulent constant which defines the level of eddy viscosity, as a function of the interfacial terms. These models also include the effect of heat transfer. When the interfacial drag terms and the interfacial momentum transfer terms are absent, the model reduces to a single-phase model used in the literature

  5. PDF modelling and particle-turbulence interaction of turbulent spray flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beishuizen, N.A.

    2008-01-01

    Turbulent spray flames can be found in many applications, such as Diesel engines, rocket engines and power plants. The many practical applications are a motivation to investigate the physical phenomena occurring in turbulent spray flames in detail in order to be able to understand, predict and

  6. Topology for statistical modeling of petascale data.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascucci, Valerio (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT); Mascarenhas, Ajith Arthur; Rusek, Korben (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Bennett, Janine Camille; Levine, Joshua (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT); Pebay, Philippe Pierre; Gyulassy, Attila (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT); Thompson, David C.; Rojas, Joseph Maurice (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX)

    2011-07-01

    This document presents current technical progress and dissemination of results for the Mathematics for Analysis of Petascale Data (MAPD) project titled 'Topology for Statistical Modeling of Petascale Data', funded by the Office of Science Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) Applied Math program. Many commonly used algorithms for mathematical analysis do not scale well enough to accommodate the size or complexity of petascale data produced by computational simulations. The primary goal of this project is thus to develop new mathematical tools that address both the petascale size and uncertain nature of current data. At a high level, our approach is based on the complementary techniques of combinatorial topology and statistical modeling. In particular, we use combinatorial topology to filter out spurious data that would otherwise skew statistical modeling techniques, and we employ advanced algorithms from algebraic statistics to efficiently find globally optimal fits to statistical models. This document summarizes the technical advances we have made to date that were made possible in whole or in part by MAPD funding. These technical contributions can be divided loosely into three categories: (1) advances in the field of combinatorial topology, (2) advances in statistical modeling, and (3) new integrated topological and statistical methods.

  7. Gasdynamic Model of Turbulent Combustion in TNT Explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B; Beckner, V E

    2010-01-08

    A model is proposed to simulate turbulent combustion in confined TNT explosions. It is based on: (i) the multi-component gasdynamic conservation laws, (ii) a fast-chemistry model for TNT-air combustion, (iii) a thermodynamic model for frozen reactants and equilibrium products, (iv) a high-order Godunov scheme providing a non-diffusive solution of the governing equations, and (v) an ILES approach whereby adaptive mesh refinement is used to capture the energy bearing scales of the turbulence on the grid. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of explosion fields from 1.5-g PETN/TNT charges were performed. Explosions in six different chambers were studied: three calorimeters (volumes of 6.6-l, 21.2-l and 40.5-l with L/D = 1), and three tunnels (L/D = 3.8, 4.65 and 12.5 with volumes of 6.3-l) - to investigate the influence of chamber volume and geometry on the combustion process. Predicted pressures histories were quite similar to measured pressure histories for all cases studied. Experimentally, mass fraction of products, Y{sub p}{sup exp}, reached a peak value of 88% at an excess air ratio of twice stoichiometric, and then decayed with increasing air dilution; mass fractions Y{sub p}{sup calc} computed from the numerical simulations followed similar trends. Based on this agreement, we conclude that the dominant effect that controls the rate of TNT combustion with air is the turbulent mixing rate; the ILES approach along with the fast-chemistry model used here adequately captures this effect.

  8. Statistical modelling of citation exchange between statistics journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varin, Cristiano; Cattelan, Manuela; Firth, David

    2016-01-01

    Rankings of scholarly journals based on citation data are often met with scepticism by the scientific community. Part of the scepticism is due to disparity between the common perception of journals' prestige and their ranking based on citation counts. A more serious concern is the inappropriate use of journal rankings to evaluate the scientific influence of researchers. The paper focuses on analysis of the table of cross-citations among a selection of statistics journals. Data are collected from the Web of Science database published by Thomson Reuters. Our results suggest that modelling the exchange of citations between journals is useful to highlight the most prestigious journals, but also that journal citation data are characterized by considerable heterogeneity, which needs to be properly summarized. Inferential conclusions require care to avoid potential overinterpretation of insignificant differences between journal ratings. Comparison with published ratings of institutions from the UK's research assessment exercise shows strong correlation at aggregate level between assessed research quality and journal citation 'export scores' within the discipline of statistics.

  9. Turbulent diffusion modelling for windflow and dispersion analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartzis, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    The need for simple but reliable models for turbulent diffusion for windflow and atmospheric dispersion analysis is a necessity today if one takes into consideration the relatively high demand in computer time and costs for such an analysis, arising mainly from the often large solution domains needed, the terrain complexity and the transient nature of the phenomena. In the accident consequence assessment often there is a need for a relatively large number of cases to be analysed increasing further the computer time and costs. Within the framework of searching for relatively simple and universal eddy viscosity/diffusivity models, a new three dimensional non isotropic model is proposed applicable to any domain complexity and any atmospheric stability conditions. The model utilizes the transport equation for turbulent kinetic energy but introduces a new approach in effective length scale estimation based on the flow global characteristics and local atmospheric stability. The model is discussed in detail and predictions are given for flow field and boundary layer thickness. The results are compared with experimental data with satisfactory results

  10. A Galilean and tensorial invariant k-epsilon model for near wall turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z.; Shih, T. H.

    1993-01-01

    A k-epsilon model is proposed for wall bounded turbulent flows. In this model, the eddy viscosity is characterized by a turbulent velocity scale and a turbulent time scale. The time scale is bounded from below by the Kolmogorov time scale. The dissipation rate equation is reformulated using this time scale and no singularity exists at the wall. A new parameter R = k/S(nu) is introduced to characterize the damping function in the eddy viscosity. This parameter is determined by local properties of both the mean and the turbulent flow fields and is free from any geometry parameter. The proposed model is then Galilean and tensorial invariant. The model constants used are the same as in the high Reynolds number Standard k-epsilon Model. Thus, the proposed model will also be suitable for flows far from the wall. Turbulent channel flows and turbulent boundary layer flows with and without pressure gradients are calculated. Comparisons with the data from direct numerical simulations and experiments show that the model predictions are excellent for turbulent channel flows and turbulent boundary layers with favorable pressure gradients, good for turbulent boundary layers with zero pressure gradients, and fair for turbulent boundary layer with adverse pressure gradients.

  11. Statistics of peak overpressure and shock steepness for linear and nonlinear N-wave propagation in a kinematic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuldashev, Petr V; Ollivier, Sébastien; Karzova, Maria M; Khokhlova, Vera A; Blanc-Benon, Philippe

    2017-12-01

    Linear and nonlinear propagation of high amplitude acoustic pulses through a turbulent layer in air is investigated using a two-dimensional KZK-type (Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov) equation. Initial waves are symmetrical N-waves with shock fronts of finite width. A modified von Kármán spectrum model is used to generate random wind velocity fluctuations associated with the turbulence. Physical parameters in simulations correspond to previous laboratory scale experiments where N-waves with 1.4 cm wavelength propagated through a turbulence layer with the outer scale of about 16 cm. Mean value and standard deviation of peak overpressure and shock steepness, as well as cumulative probabilities to observe amplified peak overpressure and shock steepness, are analyzed. Nonlinear propagation effects are shown to enhance pressure level in random foci for moderate initial amplitudes of N-waves thus increasing the probability to observe highly peaked waveforms. Saturation of the pressure level is observed for stronger nonlinear effects. It is shown that in the linear propagation regime, the turbulence mainly leads to the smearing of shock fronts, thus decreasing the probability to observe high values of steepness, whereas nonlinear effects dramatically increase the probability to observe steep shocks.

  12. Investigating Coherent Structures in the Standard Turbulence Models using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliassen, Lene; Andersen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    The wind turbine design standards recommend two different methods to generate turbulent wind for design load analysis, the Kaimal spectra combined with an exponential coherence function and the Mann turbulence model. The two turbulence models can give very different estimates of fatigue life, especially for offshore floating wind turbines. In this study the spatial distributions of the two turbulence models are investigated using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition, which is used to characterize large coherent structures. The main focus has been on the structures that contain the most energy, which are the lowest POD modes. The Mann turbulence model generates coherent structures that stretches in the horizontal direction for the longitudinal component, while the structures found in the Kaimal model are more random in their shape. These differences in the coherent structures at lower frequencies for the two turbulence models can be the reason for differences in fatigue life estimates for wind turbines. (paper)

  13. Daily precipitation statistics in regional climate models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frei, Christoph; Christensen, Jens Hesselbjerg; Déqué, Michel

    2003-01-01

    An evaluation is undertaken of the statistics of daily precipitation as simulated by five regional climate models using comprehensive observations in the region of the European Alps. Four limited area models and one variable-resolution global model are considered, all with a grid spacing of 50 km...

  14. Infinite Random Graphs as Statistical Mechanical Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durhuus, Bergfinnur Jøgvan; Napolitano, George Maria

    2011-01-01

    We discuss two examples of infinite random graphs obtained as limits of finite statistical mechanical systems: a model of two-dimensional dis-cretized quantum gravity defined in terms of causal triangulated surfaces, and the Ising model on generic random trees. For the former model we describe a ...

  15. Statistical analysis of the turbulent Reynolds stress and its link to the shear flow generation in a cylindrical laboratory plasma device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Z.; Yu, J. H.; Holland, C.; Xu, M.; Mueller, S. H.; Tynan, G. R.

    2008-01-01

    The statistical properties of the turbulent Reynolds stress arising from collisional drift turbulence in a magnetized plasma column are studied and a physical picture of turbulent driven shear flow generation is discussed. The Reynolds stress peaks near the maximal density gradient region, and is governed by the turbulence amplitude and cross-phase between the turbulent radial and azimuthal velocity fields. The amplitude probability distribution function (PDF) of the turbulent Reynolds stress is non-Gaussian and positively skewed at the density gradient maximum. The turbulent ion-saturation (Isat) current PDF shows that the region where the bursty Isat events are born coincides with the positively skewed non-Gaussian Reynolds stress PDF, which suggests that the bursts of particle transport appear to be associated with bursts of momentum transport as well. At the shear layer the density fluctuation radial correlation length has a strong minimum (∼4-6 mm∼0.5C s /Ω ci , where C s is the ion acoustic speed and Ω ci is the ion gyrofrequency), while the azimuthal turbulence correlation length is nearly constant across the shear layer. The results link the behavior of the Reynolds stress, its statistical properties, generation of bursty radially going azimuthal momentum transport events, and the formation of the large-scale shear layer.

  16. Matrix Tricks for Linear Statistical Models

    CERN Document Server

    Puntanen, Simo; Styan, George PH

    2011-01-01

    In teaching linear statistical models to first-year graduate students or to final-year undergraduate students there is no way to proceed smoothly without matrices and related concepts of linear algebra; their use is really essential. Our experience is that making some particular matrix tricks very familiar to students can substantially increase their insight into linear statistical models (and also multivariate statistical analysis). In matrix algebra, there are handy, sometimes even very simple "tricks" which simplify and clarify the treatment of a problem - both for the student and

  17. Non-Equilibrium Turbulence and Two-Equation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Two-equation turbulence models are analyzed from the perspective of spectral closure theories. Kolmogorov theory provides useful information for models, but it is limited to equilibrium conditions in which the energy spectrum has relaxed to a steady state consistent with the forcing at large scales; it does not describe transient evolution between such states. Transient evolution is necessarily through nonequilibrium states, which can only be found from a theory of turbulence evolution, such as one provided by a spectral closure. When the departure from equilibrium is small, perturbation theory can be used to approximate the evolution by a two-equation model. The perturbation theory also gives explicit conditions under which this model can be valid, and when it will fail. Implications of the non-equilibrium corrections for the classic Tennekes-Lumley balance in the dissipation rate equation are drawn: it is possible to establish both the cancellation of the leading order Re1/2 divergent contributions to vortex stretching and enstrophy destruction, and the existence of a nonzero difference which is finite in the limit of infinite Reynolds number.

  18. Transition and Turbulence Modeling for Blunt-Body Wake Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nance, Robert P.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Hassan, H. A.

    1997-01-01

    This study attempts t o improve the modeling and computational prediction of high- speed transitional wake flows. The recently developed kappa - zeta (Enstrophy) turbulence model is coupled with a newly developed transition prediction method and implemented in an implicit flow solver well-suited to hypersonic flows. In this model, transition onset is determined as part of the solution. Results obtained using the new model for a 70- deg blunted cone/sting geometry demonstrate better agreement with experimental heat- transfer measurements when compared to laminar calculations as well as solutions using the kappa - omega model. Results are also presented for the situation where transition onset is preselected. It is shown that, in this case, results are quite sensitive to location of the transition point.

  19. Analytical model spectrum for electrostatic turbulence in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiedler-Ferrari, N.; Misguich, J.H.

    1990-04-01

    In this work we present an analytical model spectrum, for three-dimensional electrostatic turbulence (homogeneous, stationary and locally isotropic in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field), constructed by using experimental results from TFR and TEXT Tokamaks, and satisfying basic symmetry and parity conditions. The proposed spectrum seems to be tractable for explicit analytical calculations of transport processes, and consistent with experimental data. Additional experimental measurements in the bulk plasma remain however necessary in order to determine some unknown spectral properties of parallel propagation

  20. Edge turbulence and transport: Text and ATF modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritz, C.P.; Rhodes, T.L.; Lin, H.; Rowan, W.L.; Bengtson, R.; Wootton, A.J.; Diamond, P.H.; Ware, A.S.; Thayer, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    We present experimental results on edge turbulence and transport from the tokamak TEXT and the torsatron ATF. The measured electrostatic fluctuations can explain the edge transport of particles and energy. Certain drive (radiation) and stabilizing (velocity shear) terms are suggested by the results. The experimental fluctuation levels and spectral widths can be reproduced by considering the nonlinear evolution of the reduced MHD equations, incorporating a thermal drive from line radiation. In the tokamak limit (with toroidal electric field) the model corresponds to the resistivity gradient mode, while in the currentless torsatron or stellarator limit it corresponds to a thermally driven drift wave

  1. Modeling of Atmospheric Turbulence Effect on Terrestrial FSO Link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Prokes

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric turbulence results in many effects causing fluctuation in the received optical power. Terrestrial laser beam communication is affected above all by scintillations. The paper deals with modeling the influence of scintillation on link performance, using the modified Rytov theory. The probability of correct signal detection in direct detection system in dependence on many parameters such as link distance, power link margin, refractive-index structure parameter, etc. is discussed and different approaches to the evaluation of scintillation effect are compared. The simulations are performed for a horizontal-path propagation of the Gaussian-beam wave.

  2. Statistics of a mixed Eulerian-Lagrangian velocity increment in fully developed turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, R; Kamps, O; Grauer, R; Homann, H

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between Eulerian and Lagrangian probability density functions obtained from numerical simulations of two-dimensional as well as three-dimensional turbulence. We show that in contrast to the structure functions of the Lagrangian velocity increment δ τ v(y)=u(x(y, τ), τ)- u(y, 0), where u(x, t) denotes the Eulerian velocity and x(y, t) the particle path initially starting at x(y, 0)=y, the structure functions of the velocity increment δ τ w(y)=u(x(y, τ), τ)- u(y, τ) exhibit a wide range of scaling behavior. Similar scaling indices are detected for the structure functions for particles diffusing in frozen turbulent fields. Furthermore, we discuss a connection to the scaling of Eulerian transversal structure functions.

  3. Statistical physics of pairwise probability models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roudi, Yasser; Aurell, Erik; Hertz, John

    2009-01-01

    (dansk abstrakt findes ikke) Statistical models for describing the probability distribution over the states of biological systems are commonly used for dimensional reduction. Among these models, pairwise models are very attractive in part because they can be fit using a reasonable amount of  data......: knowledge of the means and correlations between pairs of elements in the system is sufficient. Not surprisingly, then, using pairwise models for studying neural data has been the focus of many studies in recent years. In this paper, we describe how tools from statistical physics can be employed for studying...

  4. Shed vortex structure and phase-averaged velocity statistics in symmetric/asymmetric turbulent flat plate wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Man Mohan

    2018-05-01

    The near wake of a flat plate is investigated via direct numerical simulations. Many earlier experimental investigations have used thin plates with sharp trailing edges and turbulent boundary layers to create the wake. This results in large θ/DTE values (θ is the boundary layer momentum thickness toward the end of the plate and DTE is the trailing edge thickness). In the present study, the emphasis is on relatively thick plates with circular trailing edges (CTEs) resulting in θ/D values less than one (D is the plate thickness and the diameter of the CTE) and vigorous vortex shedding. The Reynolds numbers based on the plate length and D are 1.255 × 106 and 10 000, respectively. Two cases are computed: one with turbulent boundary layers on both the upper and lower surfaces of the plate (statistically the same, symmetric wake, Case TT) and the other with turbulent and laminar boundary layers on the upper and lower surfaces, respectively (asymmetric case, Case TL). The data and understanding obtained are of considerable engineering interest, particularly in turbomachinery where the pressure side of an airfoil can remain laminar or transitional because of a favorable pressure gradient and the suction side is turbulent. Shed-vortex structure and phase-averaged velocity statistics obtained in the two cases are compared here. The upper negative shed vortices in Case TL (turbulent separating boundary layer) are weaker than the lower positive ones (laminar separating boundary layer) at inception (a factor of 1.27 weaker in terms of peak phase-averaged spanwise vorticity at the first appearance of a peak). The upper vortices weaken rapidly as they travel downstream. A second feature of interest in Case TL is a considerable increase in the peak phase-averaged, streamwise normal intensity (random component) with increasing streamwise distance (x/D) that occurs near the positive vortex cores. This behavior is observed for a few diameters in the near wake. This is counter to

  5. Intermittency, avalanche statistics, and long-term correlations in a turbulent plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellanos, Omar; Sentíes, José M; Anabitarte, Ernesto; López, Juan M

    2013-01-01

    We study the turbulent dynamics of a helium plasma in a non-confining cylindrical configuration. Our experimental setup allows us to analyze particle transport in different plasma regions. We find that, whereas the transport is diffusive in the innermost regions of the plasma, distinctive non-diffusive features appear in regions away from the center. Indeed, at the plasma edge we find that particle flux exhibits a power-law distribution of avalanche durations, intermittency, and long-term correlations. (paper)

  6. Structure of Temperature Field on a Wall in Turbulent Flow (Statistics of Thermal Streaks, Heat Transfer)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hetsroni, G.; Mosyak, A.; Rozenblit, R.; Yarin, L.P.

    1998-01-01

    The present work deals with an experimental study of a temperature field on the wall in turbulent flow. The measurements of the local, instantaneous and average temperature of the wall were carried out by the hot-foil infrared technique. The detailed data on the average and fluctuation temperature distributions are presented. It is shown that temperature fluctuations, as normalized by the difference between the temperatures of the undisturbed fluid and the wall, do not change

  7. Bed slope effects on turbulent wave boundary layers: 1. Model validation and quantification of rough-turbulent results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Fredsøe, Jørgen; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2009-01-01

    measurements for steady streaming induced by a skewed free stream velocity signal is also provided. We then simulate a series of experiments involving oscillatory flow in a convergent-divergent smooth tunnel, and a good match with respect to bed shear stresses and streaming velocities is achieved......A numerical model solving incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations, combined with a two-equation k-omega turbulence closure, is used to study converging-diverging effects from a sloping bed on turbulent (oscillatory) wave boundary layers. Bed shear stresses from the numerical model....... The streaming is conceptually explained using analogies from steady converging and diffuser flows. A parametric study is undertaken to assess both the peak and time-averaged bed shear stresses in converging and diverging half periods under rough-turbulent conditions. The results are presented as friction factor...

  8. Energy dissipation statistics along the Lagrangian trajectories in three-dimensional turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jian-ping; Wang, Yong-bo; Qiu, Xiang; Xia, Yu-xian; Liu, Yu-lu

    2018-02-01

    Energy dissipation rate is relevant in the turbulent phenomenology theory, such as the classical Kolmogorov 1941 and 1962 refined similarity hypothesis. However, it is extremely difficult to retrieve experimentally or numerically. In this paper, the full energy dissipation, its proxy and the pseudo-energy dissipation rate along the Lagrangian trajectories in the three-dimensional turbulent flows are examined by using a state-of-art high resolution direct numerical simulation database with a Reynolds number Re λ = 400. It is found that the energy dissipation proxy ɛ P is more correlated with the full energy dissipation rate ɛ. The corresponding correlation coefficient ρ between the velocity gradient and e shows a Gaussian distribution. Furthermore, the coarse-grained dissipation rate is considered. The cross correlation ρ is found to be increased with the increasing of the scale τ. Finally, the hierarchical structure is extracted for the full energy dissipation rate, its proxy and the pseudo one. The results show a power-law behavior in the inertial range 10 ≤ τ/ τ η ≤ 100. The experimental scaling exponent of the full energy dissipation rate is found to be h L =0.69, agrees very well with the one found for the Eulerian velocity. The experimental values for ɛ P and ɛ S are around h L = 0.78, implying a more intermittent Lagrangian turbulence. Therefore, the intermittency parameter provided by ɛ P and ɛ S will be biased.

  9. Distributions with given marginals and statistical modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Fortiana, Josep; Rodriguez-Lallena, José

    2002-01-01

    This book contains a selection of the papers presented at the meeting `Distributions with given marginals and statistical modelling', held in Barcelona (Spain), July 17-20, 2000. In 24 chapters, this book covers topics such as the theory of copulas and quasi-copulas, the theory and compatibility of distributions, models for survival distributions and other well-known distributions, time series, categorical models, definition and estimation of measures of dependence, monotonicity and stochastic ordering, shape and separability of distributions, hidden truncation models, diagonal families, orthogonal expansions, tests of independence, and goodness of fit assessment. These topics share the use and properties of distributions with given marginals, this being the fourth specialised text on this theme. The innovative aspect of the book is the inclusion of statistical aspects such as modelling, Bayesian statistics, estimation, and tests.

  10. Aspects of statistical model for multifragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, P.; Das Gupta, S.; Mekjian, A. Z.

    1999-01-01

    We deal with two different aspects of an exactly soluble statistical model of fragmentation. First we show, using zero range force and finite temperature Thomas-Fermi theory, that a common link can be found between finite temperature mean field theory and the statistical fragmentation model. We show the latter naturally arises in the spinodal region. Next we show that although the exact statistical model is a canonical model and uses temperature, microcanonical results which use constant energy rather than constant temperature can also be obtained from the canonical model using saddle-point approximation. The methodology is extremely simple to implement and at least in all the examples studied in this work is very accurate. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society

  11. On the impacts of coarse-scale models of realistic roughness on a forward-facing step turbulent flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yanhua; Ren, Huiying

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Discrete wavelet transform was used to produce coarse-scale models of roughness. ► PIV were performed in a forward-facing step flow with roughness of different scales. ► Impacts of roughness scales on various turbulence statistics were studied. -- Abstract: The present work explores the impacts of the coarse-scale models of realistic roughness on the turbulent boundary layers over forward-facing steps. The surface topographies of different scale resolutions were obtained from a novel multi-resolution analysis using discrete wavelet transform. PIV measurements are performed in the streamwise–wall-normal (x–y) planes at two different spanwise positions in turbulent boundary layers at Re h = 3450 and δ/h = 8, where h is the mean step height and δ is the incoming boundary layer thickness. It was observed that large-scale but low-amplitude roughness scales had small effects on the forward-facing step turbulent flow. For the higher-resolution model of the roughness, the turbulence characteristics within 2h downstream of the steps are observed to be distinct from those over the original realistic rough step at a measurement position where the roughness profile possesses a positive slope immediately after the step’s front. On the other hand, much smaller differences exist in the flow characteristics at the other measurement position whose roughness profile possesses a negative slope following the step’s front

  12. Bayesian uncertainty analysis with applications to turbulence modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Sai Hung; Oliver, Todd A.; Prudencio, Ernesto E.; Prudhomme, Serge; Moser, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we apply Bayesian uncertainty quantification techniques to the processes of calibrating complex mathematical models and predicting quantities of interest (QoI's) with such models. These techniques also enable the systematic comparison of competing model classes. The processes of calibration and comparison constitute the building blocks of a larger validation process, the goal of which is to accept or reject a given mathematical model for the prediction of a particular QoI for a particular scenario. In this work, we take the first step in this process by applying the methodology to the analysis of the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model in the context of incompressible, boundary layer flows. Three competing model classes based on the Spalart-Allmaras model are formulated, calibrated against experimental data, and used to issue a prediction with quantified uncertainty. The model classes are compared in terms of their posterior probabilities and their prediction of QoI's. The model posterior probability represents the relative plausibility of a model class given the data. Thus, it incorporates the model's ability to fit experimental observations. Alternatively, comparing models using the predicted QoI connects the process to the needs of decision makers that use the results of the model. We show that by using both the model plausibility and predicted QoI, one has the opportunity to reject some model classes after calibration, before subjecting the remaining classes to additional validation challenges.

  13. Flowfield and Radiation Analysis of Missile Exhaust Plumes Using a Turbulent-Chemistry Interaction Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Calhoon, W. H; Kenzakowski, D. C

    2000-01-01

    ... components and missile defense systems. Current engineering level models neglect turbulent-chemistry interactions and typically underpredict the intensity of plume afterburning and afterburning burnout...

  14. Mathematical model for the calculation of internal turbulent flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolau, V. de P.; Valle Pereira Filho, H. do

    1981-01-01

    The Navier-Stokes and the turbulent kinetic energy equations for the incompressible, turbulent and fully developed pipe flow, were solved by a finite difference procedure. The distributions of the mean velocity, turbulent shear stress and turbulent kinetic energy were obtained at different Reynolds numbers. Those numerical results were compared with experimental data and the agreement was good in whole cross section of the flow. (Author) [pt

  15. Stochastic tools in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Lumey, John L

    2012-01-01

    Stochastic Tools in Turbulence discusses the available mathematical tools to describe stochastic vector fields to solve problems related to these fields. The book deals with the needs of turbulence in relation to stochastic vector fields, particularly, on three-dimensional aspects, linear problems, and stochastic model building. The text describes probability distributions and densities, including Lebesgue integration, conditional probabilities, conditional expectations, statistical independence, lack of correlation. The book also explains the significance of the moments, the properties of the

  16. PROSPECTS OF DESIGNING FLEXIBLE BUSINESS MODEL IN TURBULENT TIMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amalia DUTU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to analyze the current global context to capture the characteristics of the new type of volatile and turbulent business environment in which companies must operate nowdays and to bring some propositions in order to guide managers in designing or redesigning business models to achieve flexibility. The central message of this paper, that is a point of view one, is that, nowdays but also in the future, business models that are based on strategic, organizational and operational flexibility and on reaction speed will be those who will provide the greatest capacity to respond to change. Even if the international theory provides a multiple perspective analysis of business model concept, still how it can be achieved such flexibility remains an open issue in the academic debate, but also in the practice of companies. Thus, the paper contains some propositions in order to guide managers in the process of designing or redesigning the business model.

  17. Statistical Compression for Climate Model Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerling, D.; Guinness, J.; Soh, Y. J.

    2017-12-01

    Numerical climate model simulations run at high spatial and temporal resolutions generate massive quantities of data. As our computing capabilities continue to increase, storing all of the data is not sustainable, and thus is it important to develop methods for representing the full datasets by smaller compressed versions. We propose a statistical compression and decompression algorithm based on storing a set of summary statistics as well as a statistical model describing the conditional distribution of the full dataset given the summary statistics. We decompress the data by computing conditional expectations and conditional simulations from the model given the summary statistics. Conditional expectations represent our best estimate of the original data but are subject to oversmoothing in space and time. Conditional simulations introduce realistic small-scale noise so that the decompressed fields are neither too smooth nor too rough compared with the original data. Considerable attention is paid to accurately modeling the original dataset-one year of daily mean temperature data-particularly with regard to the inherent spatial nonstationarity in global fields, and to determining the statistics to be stored, so that the variation in the original data can be closely captured, while allowing for fast decompression and conditional emulation on modest computers.

  18. Performance assessment of turbulence models for the prediction of moderator thermal flow inside CANDU calandria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gong Hee; Bang, Young Seok; Woo, Sweng Woong

    2012-01-01

    The moderator thermal flow in the CANDU calandria is generally complex and highly turbulent because of the interaction of the buoyancy force with the inlet jet inertia. In this study, the prediction performance of turbulence models for the accurate analysis of the moderator thermal flow are assessed by comparing the results calculated with various types of turbulence models in the commercial flow solver FLUENT with experimental data for the test vessel at Sheridan Park Engineering Laboratory (SPEL). Through this comparative study of turbulence models, it is concluded that turbulence models that include the source term to consider the effects of buoyancy on the turbulent flow should be used for the reliable prediction of the moderator thermal flow inside the CANDU calandria

  19. Statistics of strain rates and surface density function in a flame-resolved high-fidelity simulation of a turbulent premixed bluff body burner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandeep, Anurag; Proch, Fabian; Kempf, Andreas M.; Chakraborty, Nilanjan

    2018-06-01

    The statistical behavior of the surface density function (SDF, the magnitude of the reaction progress variable gradient) and the strain rates, which govern the evolution of the SDF, have been analyzed using a three-dimensional flame-resolved simulation database of a turbulent lean premixed methane-air flame in a bluff-body configuration. It has been found that the turbulence intensity increases with the distance from the burner, changing the flame curvature distribution and increasing the probability of the negative curvature in the downstream direction. The curvature dependences of dilatation rate ∇ṡu → and displacement speed Sd give rise to variations of these quantities in the axial direction. These variations affect the nature of the alignment between the progress variable gradient and the local principal strain rates, which in turn affects the mean flame normal strain rate, which assumes positive values close to the burner but increasingly becomes negative as the effect of turbulence increases with the axial distance from the burner exit. The axial distance dependences of the curvature and displacement speed also induce a considerable variation in the mean value of the curvature stretch. The axial distance dependences of the dilatation rate and flame normal strain rate govern the behavior of the flame tangential strain rate, and its mean value increases in the downstream direction. The current analysis indicates that the statistical behaviors of different strain rates and displacement speed and their curvature dependences need to be included in the modeling of flame surface density and scalar dissipation rate in order to accurately capture their local behaviors.

  20. Model output statistics applied to wind power prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joensen, A; Giebel, G; Landberg, L [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Madsen, H; Nielsen, H A [The Technical Univ. of Denmark, Dept. of Mathematical Modelling, Lyngby (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    Being able to predict the output of a wind farm online for a day or two in advance has significant advantages for utilities, such as better possibility to schedule fossil fuelled power plants and a better position on electricity spot markets. In this paper prediction methods based on Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models are considered. The spatial resolution used in NWP models implies that these predictions are not valid locally at a specific wind farm. Furthermore, due to the non-stationary nature and complexity of the processes in the atmosphere, and occasional changes of NWP models, the deviation between the predicted and the measured wind will be time dependent. If observational data is available, and if the deviation between the predictions and the observations exhibits systematic behavior, this should be corrected for; if statistical methods are used, this approaches is usually referred to as MOS (Model Output Statistics). The influence of atmospheric turbulence intensity, topography, prediction horizon length and auto-correlation of wind speed and power is considered, and to take the time-variations into account, adaptive estimation methods are applied. Three estimation techniques are considered and compared, Extended Kalman Filtering, recursive least squares and a new modified recursive least squares algorithm. (au) EU-JOULE-3. 11 refs.

  1. Improved model of quasi-particle turbulence (with applications to Alfven and drift wave turbulence)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendonca, J. T.; Hizanidis, K.

    2011-01-01

    We consider the classical problem of wave stability and dispersion in a turbulent plasma background. We adopt a kinetic description for the quasi-particle turbulence. We describe an improved theoretical approach, which goes beyond the geometric optics approximation and retains the recoil effects associated with the emission and absorption of low frequency waves by nearly resonant quasi-particles. We illustrate the present approach by considering two particular examples. One is the excitation of zonal flows by drift wave turbulence or driftons. The other is the coupling between ion acoustic waves and Alfven wave turbulence, eventually leading to saturation of Alfven wave growth. Both examples are relevant to anomalous transport in magnetic fusion devices. Connection with previous results is established. We show that these results are recovered in the geometric optics approximation.

  2. Scalar and joint velocity-scalar PDF modelling of near-wall turbulent heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozorski, Jacek; Waclawczyk, Marta; Minier, Jean-Pierre

    2004-01-01

    The temperature field in a heated turbulent flow is considered as a dynamically passive scalar. The probability density function (PDF) method with down to the wall integration is explored and new modelling proposals are put forward, including the explicit account for the molecular transport terms. Two variants of the approach are considered: first, the scalar PDF method with the use of externally-provided turbulence statistics; and second, the joint (stand-alone) velocity-scalar PDF method where a near-wall model for dynamical variables is coupled with a model for temperature. The closure proposals are formulated in the Lagrangian setting and resulting stochastic evolution equations are solved with a Monte Carlo method. The near-wall region of a heated channel flow is taken as a validation case; the second-order thermal statistics are of a particular interest. The PDF computation results agree reasonably with available DNS data. The sensitivity of results to the molecular Prandtl number and to the thermal wall boundary condition is accounted for

  3. Performance modeling, loss networks, and statistical multiplexing

    CERN Document Server

    Mazumdar, Ravi

    2009-01-01

    This monograph presents a concise mathematical approach for modeling and analyzing the performance of communication networks with the aim of understanding the phenomenon of statistical multiplexing. The novelty of the monograph is the fresh approach and insights provided by a sample-path methodology for queueing models that highlights the important ideas of Palm distributions associated with traffic models and their role in performance measures. Also presented are recent ideas of large buffer, and many sources asymptotics that play an important role in understanding statistical multiplexing. I

  4. Simple statistical model for branched aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemarchand, Claire; Hansen, Jesper Schmidt

    2015-01-01

    , given that it already has bonds with others. The model is applied here to asphaltene nanoaggregates observed in molecular dynamics simulations of Cooee bitumen. The variation with temperature of the probabilities deduced from this model is discussed in terms of statistical mechanics arguments....... The relevance of the statistical model in the case of asphaltene nanoaggregates is checked by comparing the predicted value of the probability for one molecule to have exactly i bonds with the same probability directly measured in the molecular dynamics simulations. The agreement is satisfactory......We propose a statistical model that can reproduce the size distribution of any branched aggregate, including amylopectin, dendrimers, molecular clusters of monoalcohols, and asphaltene nanoaggregates. It is based on the conditional probability for one molecule to form a new bond with a molecule...

  5. Statistical correlation of spectral broadening in VLF transmitter signal and low-frequency ionospheric turbulence from observation on DEMETER satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rozhnoi

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In our earlier papers we have found the effect of VLF transmitter signal depression over epicenters of the large earthquakes from observation on the French DEMETER satellite that can be considered as new method of global diagnostics of seismic influence on the ionosphere. At present paper we investigate a possibility VLF signal-ionospheric turbulence interaction using additional characteristic of VLF signal-spectrum broadening. This characteristic is important for estimation of the interaction type: linear or nonlinear scattering. Our main results are the following:
    – There are two zones of increased spectrum broadening, which are centered near magnetic latitudes Φ=±10° and Φ=±40°. Basing on the previous case study research and ground ionosonde registrations, probably it is evidence of nonlinear (active scattering of VLF signal on the ionospheric turbulence. However occurrence rate of spectrum broadening in the middle-latitude area is higher than in the near-equatorial zone (~15–20% in comparison with ~100% in former area that is probably coincides with the rate of ionospheric turbulence.
    – From two years statistics of observation in the selected 3 low-latitude regions and 1 middle-latitude region inside reception area of VLF signal from NWC transmitter we find a correlation of spectrum broadening neither with ion-cyclotron noise (f=150–500 Hz, which possibly means poor representation of the turbulence by the noise due to its mixture with natural ELF emission (which correlates with whistler, nor with magnetic storm activity.
    – We find rather evident correlation of ion-cyclotron frequency noise, VLF signal depression and weak correlation of spectrum broadening with seismicity in the middle-latitude region over Japan. But in the low-latitude regions we do not find such a correlation. Statistical decrease of VLF signal supports our previous case study results. However rather weak spectrum broadening

  6. Advances in statistical models for data analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Minerva, Tommaso; Vichi, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    This edited volume focuses on recent research results in classification, multivariate statistics and machine learning and highlights advances in statistical models for data analysis. The volume provides both methodological developments and contributions to a wide range of application areas such as economics, marketing, education, social sciences and environment. The papers in this volume were first presented at the 9th biannual meeting of the Classification and Data Analysis Group (CLADAG) of the Italian Statistical Society, held in September 2013 at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy.

  7. Structured statistical models of inductive reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Charles; Tenenbaum, Joshua B

    2009-01-01

    Everyday inductive inferences are often guided by rich background knowledge. Formal models of induction should aim to incorporate this knowledge and should explain how different kinds of knowledge lead to the distinctive patterns of reasoning found in different inductive contexts. This article presents a Bayesian framework that attempts to meet both goals and describes [corrected] 4 applications of the framework: a taxonomic model, a spatial model, a threshold model, and a causal model. Each model makes probabilistic inferences about the extensions of novel properties, but the priors for the 4 models are defined over different kinds of structures that capture different relationships between the categories in a domain. The framework therefore shows how statistical inference can operate over structured background knowledge, and the authors argue that this interaction between structure and statistics is critical for explaining the power and flexibility of human reasoning.

  8. Model for neural signaling leap statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevrollier, Martine; Oria, Marcos

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple model for neural signaling leaps in the brain considering only the thermodynamic (Nernst) potential in neuron cells and brain temperature. We numerically simulated connections between arbitrarily localized neurons and analyzed the frequency distribution of the distances reached. We observed qualitative change between Normal statistics (with T 37.5 0 C, awaken regime) and Levy statistics (T = 35.5 0 C, sleeping period), characterized by rare events of long range connections.

  9. Statistical models based on conditional probability distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayanan, R.S.

    1991-10-01

    We present a formulation of statistical mechanics models based on conditional probability distribution rather than a Hamiltonian. We show that it is possible to realize critical phenomena through this procedure. Closely linked with this formulation is a Monte Carlo algorithm, in which a configuration generated is guaranteed to be statistically independent from any other configuration for all values of the parameters, in particular near the critical point. (orig.)

  10. Model for neural signaling leap statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevrollier, Martine; Oriá, Marcos

    2011-03-01

    We present a simple model for neural signaling leaps in the brain considering only the thermodynamic (Nernst) potential in neuron cells and brain temperature. We numerically simulated connections between arbitrarily localized neurons and analyzed the frequency distribution of the distances reached. We observed qualitative change between Normal statistics (with T = 37.5°C, awaken regime) and Lévy statistics (T = 35.5°C, sleeping period), characterized by rare events of long range connections.

  11. Model for neural signaling leap statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevrollier, Martine; Oria, Marcos, E-mail: oria@otica.ufpb.br [Laboratorio de Fisica Atomica e Lasers Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal da ParaIba Caixa Postal 5086 58051-900 Joao Pessoa, Paraiba (Brazil)

    2011-03-01

    We present a simple model for neural signaling leaps in the brain considering only the thermodynamic (Nernst) potential in neuron cells and brain temperature. We numerically simulated connections between arbitrarily localized neurons and analyzed the frequency distribution of the distances reached. We observed qualitative change between Normal statistics (with T 37.5{sup 0}C, awaken regime) and Levy statistics (T = 35.5{sup 0}C, sleeping period), characterized by rare events of long range connections.

  12. Theoretical models for MHD turbulence in the solar wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veltri, P.; Malara, F.

    1997-01-01

    The in situ measurements of velocity, magnetic field, density and temperature fluctuations performed in the solar wind have greatly improved our knowledge of MDH turbulence not only from the point of view of space physics but also from the more general point of view of plasma physics. These fluctuations which extend over a wide range of frequencies (about 5 decades), a fact which seems to be the signature of turbulent nonlinear energy cascade, display, mainly in the trailing edge of high-speed streams, a number of features characteristic of a self-organized situation: i) a high degree of correlation between magnetic and velocity field fluctuations, ii) a very low level of fluctuations in mass density and magnetic-field intensity, iii) a considerable anisotropy revealed by minimum variance analysis of the magnetic-field correlation tensor. Many fundamental processes in plasma physics, which were largely unknown or not understood before their observations in the solar wind, have been explained, by building up analytical models or performing numerical simulations. We discuss the most recent analytical theories and numerical simulations and outline the limits implicit in any analysis which consider the low-frequency solar-wind fluctuations as a superposition of linear modes. The characterization of low-frequency fluctuations during Alfvenic periods, which results from the models discussed, is finally presented

  13. Gauge turbulence, topological defect dynamics, and condensation in Higgs models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasenzer, Thomas; McLerran, Larry; Pawlowski, Jan M.; Sexty, Dénes

    2014-01-01

    The real-time dynamics of topological defects and turbulent configurations of gauge fields for electric and magnetic confinement are studied numerically within a 2+1D Abelian Higgs model. It is shown that confinement is appearing in such systems equilibrating after a strong initial quench such as the overpopulation of the infrared modes. While the final equilibrium state does not support confinement, metastable vortex defect configurations appearing in the gauge field are found to be closely related to the appearance of physically observable confined electric and magnetic charges. These phenomena are seen to be intimately related to the approach of a non-thermal fixed point of the far-from-equilibrium dynamical evolution, signaled by universal scaling in the gauge-invariant correlation function of the Higgs field. Even when the parameters of the Higgs action do not support condensate formation in the vacuum, during this approach, transient Higgs condensation is observed. We discuss implications of these results for the far-from-equilibrium dynamics of Yang–Mills fields and potential mechanisms of how confinement and condensation in non-Abelian gauge fields can be understood in terms of the dynamics of Higgs models. These suggest that there is an interesting new class of dynamics of strong coherent turbulent gauge fields with condensates

  14. Gauge turbulence, topological defect dynamics, and condensation in Higgs models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasenzer, Thomas [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI, Planckstraße 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); McLerran, Larry [Physics Department, Bldg. 510A, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); RIKEN BNL Research Center, Bldg. 510A, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Physics Department, China Central Normal University, Wuhan (China); Pawlowski, Jan M.; Sexty, Dénes [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI, Planckstraße 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    The real-time dynamics of topological defects and turbulent configurations of gauge fields for electric and magnetic confinement are studied numerically within a 2+1D Abelian Higgs model. It is shown that confinement is appearing in such systems equilibrating after a strong initial quench such as the overpopulation of the infrared modes. While the final equilibrium state does not support confinement, metastable vortex defect configurations appearing in the gauge field are found to be closely related to the appearance of physically observable confined electric and magnetic charges. These phenomena are seen to be intimately related to the approach of a non-thermal fixed point of the far-from-equilibrium dynamical evolution, signaled by universal scaling in the gauge-invariant correlation function of the Higgs field. Even when the parameters of the Higgs action do not support condensate formation in the vacuum, during this approach, transient Higgs condensation is observed. We discuss implications of these results for the far-from-equilibrium dynamics of Yang–Mills fields and potential mechanisms of how confinement and condensation in non-Abelian gauge fields can be understood in terms of the dynamics of Higgs models. These suggest that there is an interesting new class of dynamics of strong coherent turbulent gauge fields with condensates.

  15. Scalar flux modeling in turbulent flames using iterative deconvolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaou, Z. M.; Cant, R. S.; Vervisch, L.

    2018-04-01

    In the context of large eddy simulations, deconvolution is an attractive alternative for modeling the unclosed terms appearing in the filtered governing equations. Such methods have been used in a number of studies for non-reacting and incompressible flows; however, their application in reacting flows is limited in comparison. Deconvolution methods originate from clearly defined operations, and in theory they can be used in order to model any unclosed term in the filtered equations including the scalar flux. In this study, an iterative deconvolution algorithm is used in order to provide a closure for the scalar flux term in a turbulent premixed flame by explicitly filtering the deconvoluted fields. The assessment of the method is conducted a priori using a three-dimensional direct numerical simulation database of a turbulent freely propagating premixed flame in a canonical configuration. In contrast to most classical a priori studies, the assessment is more stringent as it is performed on a much coarser mesh which is constructed using the filtered fields as obtained from the direct simulations. For the conditions tested in this study, deconvolution is found to provide good estimates both of the scalar flux and of its divergence.

  16. Phenomenological modeling of turbulence in Z-pinch implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornhill, J.W.; Whitney, K.G.; Deeney, C.; LePell, P.D.

    1994-01-01

    A phenomenological investigation into the effects of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence on the initial stagnation dynamics of aluminum wire array and argon gas puff Z-pinch implosions is performed. The increases that turbulence produces in the plasma viscosity, heat conductivity, and electrical resistivity are modeled by using multipliers for these quantities in one-dimensional (1-D) MHD calculations. The major effect of these increases is to soften the 1-D implosions by decreasing the densities that are achieved on axis at stagnation. As a consequence, a set of multipliers can be found that reasonably duplicates the average electron temperatures, ion densities, and mass of the K-shell emission region that were measured at stagnation for a variety of Physics International aluminum wire array and argon gas puff experiments. It is determined that the dependence of these measured quantities on the multipliers is weak once a level of enhancement is reached, where agreement between calculations and experiments is attained. The scaling of K-shell yield with load mass for a fixed implosion velocity is then reexamined, and the minimum load mass needed to efficiently produce K-shell emission by thermalization of kinetic energy is calculated for aluminum and argon using this phenomenological soft implosion modeling. The results show an upward shift in the minimum mass by a factor of 6 when compared to the original nonturbulent hard implosion calculations

  17. Precipitation in a boiling soup: is microphysics driving the statistical properties of intense turbulent convection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodi, A.; von Hardenberg, J.; Provenzale, A.

    2012-04-01

    Intense precipitation events are often associated with strong convective phenomena in the atmosphere. A deeper understanding of how microphysics affects the spatial and temporal variability of convective processes is relevant for many hydro-meteorological applications, such as the estimation of rainfall using remote sensing techniques and the ability to predict severe precipitation processes. In this paper, high-resolution simulations (0.1-1 km) of an atmosphere in radiative-convective equilibrium are performed using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model by prescribing different microphysical parameterizations. The dependence of fine-scale spatio-temporal properties of convective structures on microphysical details are investigated and the simulation results are compared with the known properties of radar maps of precipitation fields. We analyze and discuss similarities and differences and, based also on previous results on the dependence of precipitation statistics on the raindrop terminal velocity, try to draw some general inferences.

  18. Comparative study of turbulence model performance for axisymmetric sudden expansion flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Youngmin; Kim, Young In; Kim, Keung Koo; Yoon, Juhyeon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this study, the performance of turbulence models in predicting the turbulent flow in an axisymmetric sudden expansion with an expansion ratio of 4 is assessed for a Reynolds number of 5.6 Χ 10{sup 4}. The comparisons show that the standard k-ε and RSM models provide the best agreement with the experimental data, whereas the standard k-ω model gives poor predictions. Owing to its computational efficiency, the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach has been widely used for the prediction of turbulent flows and associated pressure losses in a variety of internal flow systems such as a diffuser, orifice, converging nozzle, and pipes with sudden expansion. However, the lack of a general turbulence model often leads to limited applications of a RANS approach, i. e., the accuracy and validity of solutions obtained from RANS equations vary with the turbulence model, flow regime, near-wall treatment, and configuration of the problem. In light of the foregoing, a large amount of turbulence research has been conducted to assess the performance of existing turbulence models for different flow fields. In this paper, the turbulent flow in an axisymmetric sudden expansion is numerically investigated for a Reynolds number of 5.6 Χ 10{sup 4}, with the aim of examining the performance of several turbulence models.

  19. Comparative study of turbulence model performance for axisymmetric sudden expansion flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Youngmin; Kim, Young In; Kim, Keung Koo; Yoon, Juhyeon

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the performance of turbulence models in predicting the turbulent flow in an axisymmetric sudden expansion with an expansion ratio of 4 is assessed for a Reynolds number of 5.6 Χ 10 4 . The comparisons show that the standard k-ε and RSM models provide the best agreement with the experimental data, whereas the standard k-ω model gives poor predictions. Owing to its computational efficiency, the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach has been widely used for the prediction of turbulent flows and associated pressure losses in a variety of internal flow systems such as a diffuser, orifice, converging nozzle, and pipes with sudden expansion. However, the lack of a general turbulence model often leads to limited applications of a RANS approach, i. e., the accuracy and validity of solutions obtained from RANS equations vary with the turbulence model, flow regime, near-wall treatment, and configuration of the problem. In light of the foregoing, a large amount of turbulence research has been conducted to assess the performance of existing turbulence models for different flow fields. In this paper, the turbulent flow in an axisymmetric sudden expansion is numerically investigated for a Reynolds number of 5.6 Χ 10 4 , with the aim of examining the performance of several turbulence models

  20. Statistical models of global Langmuir mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Fox-Kemper, Baylor; Breivik, Øyvind; Webb, Adrean

    2017-05-01

    The effects of Langmuir mixing on the surface ocean mixing may be parameterized by applying an enhancement factor which depends on wave, wind, and ocean state to the turbulent velocity scale in the K-Profile Parameterization. Diagnosing the appropriate enhancement factor online in global climate simulations is readily achieved by coupling with a prognostic wave model, but with significant computational and code development expenses. In this paper, two alternatives that do not require a prognostic wave model, (i) a monthly mean enhancement factor climatology, and (ii) an approximation to the enhancement factor based on the empirical wave spectra, are explored and tested in a global climate model. Both appear to reproduce the Langmuir mixing effects as estimated using a prognostic wave model, with nearly identical and substantial improvements in the simulated mixed layer depth and intermediate water ventilation over control simulations, but significantly less computational cost. Simpler approaches, such as ignoring Langmuir mixing altogether or setting a globally constant Langmuir number, are found to be deficient. Thus, the consequences of Stokes depth and misaligned wind and waves are important.

  1. Special course on modern theoretical and experimental approaches to turbulent flow structure and its modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-08-01

    The large eddy concept in turbulent modeling and techniques for direct simulation are discussed. A review of turbulence modeling is presented along with physical and numerical aspects and applications. A closure model for turbulent flows is presented and routes to chaos by quasi-periodicity are discussed. Theoretical aspects of transition to turbulence by space/time intermittency are covered. The application to interpretation of experimental results of fractal dimensions and connection of spatial temporal chaos are reviewed. Simulation of hydrodynamic flow by using cellular automata is discussed.

  2. A mathematical model for turbulent incompressible flows through mixing grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allaire, G.

    1989-01-01

    A mathematical model is proposed for the computation of turbulent incompressible flows through mixing grids. This model is obtained as follows: in a three-dimentional-domain we represent a mixing grid by small identical wings of size ε 2 periodically distributed at the nodes of a plane regular mesh of size ε, and we consider incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with a no-slip condition on the wings. Using an appropriate homogenization process we pass to the limit when ε tends to zero and we obtain a Brinkman equation, i.e. a Navier-Stokes equation plus a zero-order term for the velocity, in a homogeneous domain without anymore wings. The interest of this model is that the spatial discretization is simpler in a homogeneous domain, and, moreover, the new term, which expresses the grid's mixing effect, can be evaluated with a local computation around a single wing

  3. Stability of model flocks in turbulent-like flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khurana, Nidhi; Ouellette, Nicholas T

    2013-01-01

    We report numerical simulations of a simple model of flocking particles in the presence of an uncertain background environment. We consider two types of environmental perturbations: random noise applied separately to each particle, and spatiotemporally correlated ‘noise’ provided by a turbulent-like flow field. The effects of these two types of noise are very different; surprisingly, the applied flow field tends to destroy the global order of the flocking model even for vanishingly small flow amplitudes. Local order, however, is preserved in smaller sub-flocks, although their composition changes dynamically. Our results suggest that realistic perturbations must be considered in assessing the stability of models of collective animal behavior, and that random noise is not a sufficient proxy. (paper)

  4. A turbulent time scale based k–ε model for probability density function modeling of turbulence/chemistry interactions: Application to HCCI combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maroteaux, Fadila; Pommier, Pierre-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Turbulent time evolution is introduced in stochastic modeling approach. ► The particles number is optimized trough a restricted initial distribution. ► The initial distribution amplitude is modeled by magnitude of turbulence field. -- Abstract: Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine technology is known as an alternative to reduce NO x and particulate matter (PM) emissions. As shown by several experimental studies published in the literature, the ideally homogeneous mixture charge becomes stratified in composition and temperature, and turbulent mixing is found to play an important role in controlling the combustion progress. In a previous study, an IEM model (Interaction by Exchange with the Mean) has been used to describe the micromixing in a stochastic reactor model that simulates the HCCI process. The IEM model is a deterministic model, based on the principle that the scalar value approaches the mean value over the entire volume with a characteristic mixing time. In this previous model, the turbulent time scale was treated as a fixed parameter. The present study focuses on the development of a micro-mixing time model, in order to take into account the physical phenomena it stands for. For that purpose, a (k–ε) model is used to express this micro-mixing time model. The turbulence model used here is based on zero dimensional energy cascade applied during the compression and the expansion cycle; mean kinetic energy is converted to turbulent kinetic energy. Turbulent kinetic energy is converted to heat through viscous dissipation. Besides, in this study a relation to calculate the initial heterogeneities amplitude is proposed. The comparison of simulation results against experimental data shows overall satisfactory agreement at variable turbulent time scale

  5. Simplification and Validation of a Spectral-Tensor Model for Turbulence Including Atmospheric Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chougule, Abhijit; Mann, Jakob; Kelly, Mark; Larsen, Gunner C.

    2018-02-01

    A spectral-tensor model of non-neutral, atmospheric-boundary-layer turbulence is evaluated using Eulerian statistics from single-point measurements of the wind speed and temperature at heights up to 100 m, assuming constant vertical gradients of mean wind speed and temperature. The model has been previously described in terms of the dissipation rate ɛ , the length scale of energy-containing eddies L , a turbulence anisotropy parameter Γ, the Richardson number Ri, and the normalized rate of destruction of temperature variance η _θ ≡ ɛ _θ /ɛ . Here, the latter two parameters are collapsed into a single atmospheric stability parameter z / L using Monin-Obukhov similarity theory, where z is the height above the Earth's surface, and L is the Obukhov length corresponding to Ri,η _θ. Model outputs of the one-dimensional velocity spectra, as well as cospectra of the streamwise and/or vertical velocity components, and/or temperature, and cross-spectra for the spatial separation of all three velocity components and temperature, are compared with measurements. As a function of the four model parameters, spectra and cospectra are reproduced quite well, but horizontal temperature fluxes are slightly underestimated in stable conditions. In moderately unstable stratification, our model reproduces spectra only up to a scale ˜ 1 km. The model also overestimates coherences for vertical separations, but is less severe in unstable than in stable cases.

  6. Interchange turbulence model for the edge plasma in SOLEDGE2D-EIRENE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bufferand, H.; Marandet, Y. [Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS, PIIM, Marseille (France); Ciraolo, G.; Ghendrih, P.; Bucalossi, J.; Fedorczak, N.; Gunn, J.; Tamain, P. [CEA, IRFM, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Colin, C.; Galassi, D.; Leybros, R.; Serre, E. [Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS, M2P2, Marseille (France)

    2016-08-15

    Cross-field transport in edge tokamak plasmas is known to be dominated by turbulent transport. A dedicated effort has been made to simulate this turbulent transport from first principle models but the numerical cost to run these simulations on the ITER scale remains prohibitive. Edge plasma transport study relies mostly nowadays on so-called transport codes where the turbulent transport is taken into account using effective ad-hoc diffusion coefficients. In this contribution, we propose to introduce a transport equation for the turbulence intensity in SOLEDGE2D-EIRENE to describe the interchange turbulence properties. Going beyond the empirical diffusive model, this system automatically generates profiles for the turbulent transport and hence reduces the number of degrees of freedom for edge plasma transport codes. We draw inspiration from the k-epsilon model widely used in the neutral fluid community. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Rigorous Statistical Bounds in Uncertainty Quantification for One-Layer Turbulent Geophysical Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Di; Majda, Andrew J.

    2018-04-01

    Statistical bounds controlling the total fluctuations in mean and variance about a basic steady-state solution are developed for the truncated barotropic flow over topography. Statistical ensemble prediction is an important topic in weather and climate research. Here, the evolution of an ensemble of trajectories is considered using statistical instability analysis and is compared and contrasted with the classical deterministic instability for the growth of perturbations in one pointwise trajectory. The maximum growth of the total statistics in fluctuations is derived relying on the statistical conservation principle of the pseudo-energy. The saturation bound of the statistical mean fluctuation and variance in the unstable regimes with non-positive-definite pseudo-energy is achieved by linking with a class of stable reference states and minimizing the stable statistical energy. Two cases with dependence on initial statistical uncertainty and on external forcing and dissipation are compared and unified under a consistent statistical stability framework. The flow structures and statistical stability bounds are illustrated and verified by numerical simulations among a wide range of dynamical regimes, where subtle transient statistical instability exists in general with positive short-time exponential growth in the covariance even when the pseudo-energy is positive-definite. Among the various scenarios in this paper, there exist strong forward and backward energy exchanges between different scales which are estimated by the rigorous statistical bounds.

  8. Modelling of turbulence and combustion for simulation of gas explosions in complex geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arntzen, Bjoern Johan

    1998-12-31

    This thesis analyses and presents new models for turbulent reactive flows for CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulation of gas explosions in complex geometries like offshore modules. The course of a gas explosion in a complex geometry is largely determined by the development of turbulence and the accompanying increased combustion rate. To be able to model the process it is necessary to use a CFD code as a starting point, provided with a suitable turbulence and combustion model. The modelling and calculations are done in a three-dimensional finite volume CFD code, where complex geometries are represented by a porosity concept, which gives porosity on the grid cell faces, depending on what is inside the cell. The turbulent flow field is modelled with a k-{epsilon} turbulence model. Subgrid models are used for production of turbulence from geometry not fully resolved on the grid. Results from laser doppler anemometry measurements around obstructions in steady and transient flows have been analysed and the turbulence models have been improved to handle transient, subgrid and reactive flows. The combustion is modelled with a burning velocity model and a flame model which incorporates the burning velocity into the code. Two different flame models have been developed: SIF (Simple Interface Flame model), which treats the flame as an interface between reactants and products, and the {beta}-model where the reaction zone is resolved with about three grid cells. The flame normally starts with a quasi laminar burning velocity, due to flame instabilities, modelled as a function of flame radius and laminar burning velocity. As the flow field becomes turbulent, the flame uses a turbulent burning velocity model based on experimental data and dependent on turbulence parameters and laminar burning velocity. The laminar burning velocity is modelled as a function of gas mixture, equivalence ratio, pressure and temperature in reactant. Simulations agree well with experiments. 139

  9. Growth curve models and statistical diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Jian-Xin

    2002-01-01

    Growth-curve models are generalized multivariate analysis-of-variance models. These models are especially useful for investigating growth problems on short times in economics, biology, medical research, and epidemiology. This book systematically introduces the theory of the GCM with particular emphasis on their multivariate statistical diagnostics, which are based mainly on recent developments made by the authors and their collaborators. The authors provide complete proofs of theorems as well as practical data sets and MATLAB code.

  10. Topology for Statistical Modeling of Petascale Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascucci, Valerio [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Levine, Joshua [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Gyulassy, Attila [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Bremer, P. -T. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2013-10-31

    Many commonly used algorithms for mathematical analysis do not scale well enough to accommodate the size or complexity of petascale data produced by computational simulations. The primary goal of this project is to develop new mathematical tools that address both the petascale size and uncertain nature of current data. At a high level, the approach of the entire team involving all three institutions is based on the complementary techniques of combinatorial topology and statistical modelling. In particular, we use combinatorial topology to filter out spurious data that would otherwise skew statistical modelling techniques, and we employ advanced algorithms from algebraic statistics to efficiently find globally optimal fits to statistical models. The overall technical contributions can be divided loosely into three categories: (1) advances in the field of combinatorial topology, (2) advances in statistical modelling, and (3) new integrated topological and statistical methods. Roughly speaking, the division of labor between our 3 groups (Sandia Labs in Livermore, Texas A&M in College Station, and U Utah in Salt Lake City) is as follows: the Sandia group focuses on statistical methods and their formulation in algebraic terms, and finds the application problems (and data sets) most relevant to this project, the Texas A&M Group develops new algebraic geometry algorithms, in particular with fewnomial theory, and the Utah group develops new algorithms in computational topology via Discrete Morse Theory. However, we hasten to point out that our three groups stay in tight contact via videconference every 2 weeks, so there is much synergy of ideas between the groups. The following of this document is focused on the contributions that had grater direct involvement from the team at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City.

  11. Spatial, spectral and statistical properties of the electrostatic fluctuations and measurements of the scattering of the beam in a strongly turbulent plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Michael Duane

    The purpose of this investigation is to measure the spatial, spectral and statistical properties of the high (/omega/ ~/ ω pe) and low (/omega/ ~/ ωpi) frequency electrostatic fluctuations in an unmagnetized, statistically stable, beam-driven, strongly turbulent plasma and compare the results to theoretical predictions. In addition the scattering of the electron beam in both angle and energy is measured and compared to theory. This study is motivated by the recent advances in statistical theories of strong Langmuir turbulence and the glaring lack of confirmatory experimental data. With the advent of modern computers and electronics, enormous data sets are now routinely digitize and subjected to sophisticated statistical and spectral analysis. These methods, along with traditional procedures and an innovative technique known as a 'conditional trigger', are used to extract ensemble averages from the turbulent system for comparison with the theoretical models. It is found that the high-frequency fluctuations consist of low-level wave activity /langle W/rangle/ ~/ 10-2 - 103 punctuated by semi-periodic, intense, spiky field events /langle W/rangle/ ~/ 1, where /langle W/rangle is the normalized intensity. The low- level wave activity has a spectral spread Δ k/k/ ~/ /Delta/omega//omega/ ~ 30%, dispersion relation v beam/ ~/ /omega/k, and correlation length lc/ /approx/ 3λES, where λES is the electrostatic wavelength, and shows evidence of low-intensity parametric decay products. The intense field events, on the other hand, show little correlation for l/ >/ λES, have a full-width-at-half-maximum of 1 f/ /n2/ /propto/ β where β ~/ 1.3 for the experiment and is predicted to be β ~/ 1.98 by the model. The scattering of the electron beam in angle for a typical wave intensity level /langle W/rangle/ ~/ 0.04 is Θ ~/ 3o, and in energy is Δ U/ ~/ 25 eV for a 400 eV beam. The scattering of the beam in both angle and energy is found to agree well with theory.

  12. Bayesian models a statistical primer for ecologists

    CERN Document Server

    Hobbs, N Thompson

    2015-01-01

    Bayesian modeling has become an indispensable tool for ecological research because it is uniquely suited to deal with complexity in a statistically coherent way. This textbook provides a comprehensive and accessible introduction to the latest Bayesian methods-in language ecologists can understand. Unlike other books on the subject, this one emphasizes the principles behind the computations, giving ecologists a big-picture understanding of how to implement this powerful statistical approach. Bayesian Models is an essential primer for non-statisticians. It begins with a definition of probabili

  13. Statistical Mechanics of the Geometric Control of Flow Topology in Two-Dimensional Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadiga, Balasubramanya; Loxley, Peter

    2013-04-01

    We apply the principle of maximum entropy to two dimensional turbulence in a new fashion to predict the effect of geometry on flow topology. We consider two prototypical regimes of turbulence that lead to frequently observed self-organized coherent structures. Our theory predicts bistable behavior that exhibits hysteresis and large abrupt changes in flow topology in one regime; the other regime is predicted to exhibit monstable behavior with a continuous change of flow topology. The predictions are confirmed in fully nonlinear numerical simulations of the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equation. These results suggest an explanation of the low frequency regime transitions that have been observed in the non-equilibrium setting of this problem. Following further development in the non-equilibrium context, we expect that insights developed in this problem should be useful in developing a better understanding of the phenomenon of low frequency regime transitions that is a pervasive feature of the weather and climate systems. Familiar occurrences of this phenomenon---wherein extreme and abrupt qualitative changes occur, seemingly randomly, after very long periods of apparent stability---include blocking in the extra-tropical winter atmosphere, the bimodality of the Kuroshio extension system, the Dansgaard-Oeschger events, and the glacial-interglacial transitions.

  14. Statistical analysis of the velocity and scalar fields in reacting turbulent wall-jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouransari, Z.; Biferale, L.; Johansson, A. V.

    2015-02-01

    The concept of local isotropy in a chemically reacting turbulent wall-jet flow is addressed using direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. Different DNS databases with isothermal and exothermic reactions are examined. The chemical reaction and heat release effects on the turbulent velocity, passive scalar, and reactive species fields are studied using their probability density functions (PDFs) and higher order moments for velocities and scalar fields, as well as their gradients. With the aid of the anisotropy invariant maps for the Reynolds stress tensor, the heat release effects on the anisotropy level at different wall-normal locations are evaluated and found to be most accentuated in the near-wall region. It is observed that the small-scale anisotropies are persistent both in the near-wall region and inside the jet flame. Two exothermic cases with different Damköhler numbers are examined and the comparison revealed that the Damköhler number effects are most dominant in the near-wall region, where the wall cooling effects are influential. In addition, with the aid of PDFs conditioned on the mixture fraction, the significance of the reactive scalar characteristics in the reaction zone is illustrated. We argue that the combined effects of strong intermittency and strong persistency of anisotropy at the small scales in the entire domain can affect mixing and ultimately the combustion characteristics of the reacting flow.

  15. Craig's XY distribution and the statistics of Lagrangian power in two-dimensional turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandi, Mahesh M.; Connaughton, Colm

    2008-03-01

    We examine the probability distribution function (PDF) of the energy injection rate (power) in numerical simulations of stationary two-dimensional (2D) turbulence in the Lagrangian frame. The simulation is designed to mimic an electromagnetically driven fluid layer, a well-documented system for generating 2D turbulence in the laboratory. In our simulations, the forcing and velocity fields are close to Gaussian. On the other hand, the measured PDF of injected power is very sharply peaked at zero, suggestive of a singularity there, with tails which are exponential but asymmetric. Large positive fluctuations are more probable than large negative fluctuations. It is this asymmetry of the tails which leads to a net positive mean value for the energy input despite the most probable value being zero. The main features of the power distribution are well described by Craig’s XY distribution for the PDF of the product of two correlated normal variables. We show that the power distribution should exhibit a logarithmic singularity at zero and decay exponentially for large absolute values of the power. We calculate the asymptotic behavior and express the asymmetry of the tails in terms of the correlation coefficient of the force and velocity. We compare the measured PDFs with the theoretical calculations and briefly discuss how the power PDF might change with other forcing mechanisms.

  16. Spectrally-consistent regularization modeling of turbulent natural convection flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trias, F Xavier; Gorobets, Andrey; Oliva, Assensi; Verstappen, Roel

    2012-01-01

    The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations constitute an excellent mathematical modelization of turbulence. Unfortunately, attempts at performing direct simulations are limited to relatively low-Reynolds numbers because of the almost numberless small scales produced by the non-linear convective term. Alternatively, a dynamically less complex formulation is proposed here. Namely, regularizations of the Navier-Stokes equations that preserve the symmetry and conservation properties exactly. To do so, both convective and diffusive terms are altered in the same vein. In this way, the convective production of small scales is effectively restrained whereas the modified diffusive term introduces a hyperviscosity effect and consequently enhances the destruction of small scales. In practice, the only additional ingredient is a self-adjoint linear filter whose local filter length is determined from the requirement that vortex-stretching must stop at the smallest grid scale. In the present work, the performance of the above-mentioned recent improvements is assessed through application to turbulent natural convection flows by means of comparison with DNS reference data.

  17. Review of turbulence modelling for numerical simulation of nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, J.P.; Haapalehto, T.

    1996-01-01

    The report deals with the modelling of turbulent flows in nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulic applications. The goal is to give tools and knowledge about turbulent flows and their modelling in practical applications for engineers, and especially nuclear engineers. The emphasize is on the theory of turbulence, the existing different turbulence models, the state-of-art of turbulence in research centres, the available models in the commercial code CFD-FLOW3D, and the latest applications of turbulence modelling in nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics. It turns out that it is difficult to elaborate an universal turbulence model and each model has its advantages and drawbacks in each application. However, the increasing power of computers can permit the emergence of new methods of turbulence modelling such as Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) which open new horizons in this field. These latter methods are beginning to be available in commercial codes and are used in different nuclear applications such as 3-D modelling of the nuclear reactor cores and the steam generators. (orig.) (22 refs.)

  18. Numerical simulation of stratified flows with different k-ε turbulence models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagestad, S.

    1991-01-01

    The thesis comprises the numerical simulation of stratified flows with different k-ε models. When using the k-ε model, two equations are solved to describe the turbulence. The k-equation represents the turbulent kinetic energy of the turbulence and the ε-equation is the turbulent dissipation. Different k-ε models predict stratified flows differently. The standard k-ε model leads to higher turbulent mixing than the low-Reynolds model does. For lower Froude numbers, F 0 , this effect becomes enhanced. Buoyancy extension of the k-ε model also leads to less vertical mixing in cases with strong stratification. When the stratification increases, buoyancy-extension becomes larger influence. The turbulent Prandtl number effects have large impact on the transport of heat and the development of the flow. Two different formulae which express the turbulent Prandtl effects have been tested. For unstably stratified flows, the rapid mixing and three-dimensionality of the flow can in fact be computed using a k-ε model when buoyancy-extended is employed. The turbulent heat transfer and thus turbulent production in unstable stratified flows depends strongly upon the turbulent Prandtl number effect. The main conclusions are: Stable stratified flows should be computed with a buoyancy-extended low-Reynolds k-ε model; Unstable stratified flows should be computed with a buoyancy-extended standard k-ε model; The turbulent Prandtl number effects should be included in the computations; Buoyancy-extension has lead to more correct description of the physics for all of the investigated flows. 78 refs., 128 figs., 17 tabs

  19. Interstellar turbulence model : A self-consistent coupling of plasma and neutral fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, Dastgeer; Zank, Gary P.; Pogorelov, Nikolai

    2006-01-01

    We present results of a preliminary investigation of interstellar turbulence based on a self-consistent two-dimensional fluid simulation model. Our model describes a partially ionized magnetofluid interstellar medium (ISM) that couples a neutral hydrogen fluid to a plasma through charge exchange interactions and assumes that the ISM turbulent correlation scales are much bigger than the shock characteristic length-scales, but smaller than the charge exchange mean free path length-scales. The shocks have no influence on the ISM turbulent fluctuations. We find that nonlinear interactions in coupled plasma-neutral ISM turbulence are influenced substantially by charge exchange processes

  20. Subgrid models for mass and thermal diffusion in turbulent mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, David H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lim, Hyunkyung [STONY BROOK UNIV; Li, Xiao - Lin [STONY BROOK UNIV; Gilmm, James G [STONY BROOK UNIV

    2008-01-01

    We are concerned with the chaotic flow fields of turbulent mixing. Chaotic flow is found in an extreme form in multiply shocked Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable flows. The goal of a converged simulation for this problem is twofold: to obtain converged solutions for macro solution features, such as the trajectories of the principal shock waves, mixing zone edges, and mean densities and velocities within each phase, and also for such micro solution features as the joint probability distributions of the temperature and species concentration. We introduce parameterized subgrid models of mass and thermal diffusion, to define large eddy simulations (LES) that replicate the micro features observed in the direct numerical simulation (DNS). The Schmidt numbers and Prandtl numbers are chosen to represent typical liquid, gas and plasma parameter values. Our main result is to explore the variation of the Schmidt, Prandtl and Reynolds numbers by three orders of magnitude, and the mesh by a factor of 8 per linear dimension (up to 3200 cells per dimension), to allow exploration of both DNS and LES regimes and verification of the simulations for both macro and micro observables. We find mesh convergence for key properties describing the molecular level of mixing, including chemical reaction rates between the distinct fluid species. We find results nearly independent of Reynolds number for Re 300, 6000, 600K . Methodologically, the results are also new. In common with the shock capturing community, we allow and maintain sharp solution gradients, and we enhance these gradients through use of front tracking. In common with the turbulence modeling community, we include subgrid scale models with no adjustable parameters for LES. To the authors' knowledge, these two methodologies have not been previously combined. In contrast to both of these methodologies, our use of Front Tracking, with DNS or LES resolution of the momentum equation at or near the Kolmogorov scale, but without

  1. Statistical transmutation in doped quantum dimer models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamas, C A; Ralko, A; Cabra, D C; Poilblanc, D; Pujol, P

    2012-07-06

    We prove a "statistical transmutation" symmetry of doped quantum dimer models on the square, triangular, and kagome lattices: the energy spectrum is invariant under a simultaneous change of statistics (i.e., bosonic into fermionic or vice versa) of the holes and of the signs of all the dimer resonance loops. This exact transformation enables us to define the duality equivalence between doped quantum dimer Hamiltonians and provides the analytic framework to analyze dynamical statistical transmutations. We investigate numerically the doping of the triangular quantum dimer model with special focus on the topological Z(2) dimer liquid. Doping leads to four (instead of two for the square lattice) inequivalent families of Hamiltonians. Competition between phase separation, superfluidity, supersolidity, and fermionic phases is investigated in the four families.

  2. STATISTICAL MODELS OF REPRESENTING INTELLECTUAL CAPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Feraru

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article entitled Statistical Models of Representing Intellectual Capital approaches and analyses the concept of intellectual capital, as well as the main models which can support enterprisers/managers in evaluating and quantifying the advantages of intellectual capital. Most authors examine intellectual capital from a static perspective and focus on the development of its various evaluation models. In this chapter we surveyed the classical static models: Sveiby, Edvisson, Balanced Scorecard, as well as the canonical model of intellectual capital. Among the group of static models for evaluating organisational intellectual capital the canonical model stands out. This model enables the structuring of organisational intellectual capital in: human capital, structural capital and relational capital. Although the model is widely spread, it is a static one and can thus create a series of errors in the process of evaluation, because all the three entities mentioned above are not independent from the viewpoint of their contents, as any logic of structuring complex entities requires.

  3. Superfluid turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    Most flows of fluids, in nature and in technology, are turbulent. Since much of the energy expended by machines and devices that involve fluid flows is spent in overcoming drag caused by turbulence, there is a strong motivation to understand the phenomena. Surprisingly, the peculiar, quantum-mechanical form of turbulence that can form in superfluid helium may turn out to be much simpler to understand that the classical turbulence that forms in normal fluids. It now seems that the study of superfluid turbulence may provide simplified model systems for studying some forms of classical turbulence. There are also practical motivations for studying superfluid turbulence. For example, superfuid helium is often used as a coolant in superconducting machinery. Superfluid turbulence is the primary impediment to the transfer of heat by superfluid helium; an understanding of the phenomena may make it possible to design more efficient methods of refrigeration for superconducting devices. 8 figs

  4. Modeling water droplet condensation and evaporation in DNS of turbulent channel flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russo, E.; Kuerten, J.G.M.; Geld, van der C.W.M.; Geurts, B.J.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper a point particle model for two-way coupling in water droplet-laden incompressible turbulent flow of air is proposed. The model is based on conservation laws and semi-empirical correlations. It has been implemented and tested in a DNS code based for turbulent channel flow with an

  5. Modeling water droplet condensation and evaporation in DNS of turbulent channel flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russo, E; Kuerten, Johannes G.M.; van der Geld, C.W.M.; Geurts, Bernardus J.

    In this paper a point particle model for two-way coupling in water droplet-laden incompressible turbulent flow of air is proposed. The model is based on conservation laws and semi-empirical correlations. It has been implemented and tested in a DNS code based for turbulent channel flow with an

  6. Turbulence modeling needs of commercial CFD codes: Complex flows in the aerospace and automotive industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Befrui, Bizhan A.

    1995-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation discusses the following: STAR-CD computational features; STAR-CD turbulence models; common features of industrial complex flows; industry-specific CFD development requirements; applications and experiences of industrial complex flows, including flow in rotating disc cavities, diffusion hole film cooling, internal blade cooling, and external car aerodynamics; and conclusions on turbulence modeling needs.

  7. (ajst) statistical mechanics model for orientational

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Science and Engineering Series Vol. 6, No. 2, pp. 94 - 101. STATISTICAL MECHANICS MODEL FOR ORIENTATIONAL. MOTION OF TWO-DIMENSIONAL RIGID ROTATOR. Malo, J.O. ... there is no translational motion and that they are well separated so .... constant and I is the moment of inertia of a linear rotator. Thus, the ...

  8. Statistical Model Checking for Biological Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    David, Alexandre; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand; Legay, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Statistical Model Checking (SMC) is a highly scalable simulation-based verification approach for testing and estimating the probability that a stochastic system satisfies a given linear temporal property. The technique has been applied to (discrete and continuous time) Markov chains, stochastic...

  9. Topology for Statistical Modeling of Petascale Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, Janine Camille [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Pebay, Philippe Pierre [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Pascucci, Valerio [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Levine, Joshua [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Gyulassy, Attila [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Rojas, Maurice [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2014-07-01

    This document presents current technical progress and dissemination of results for the Mathematics for Analysis of Petascale Data (MAPD) project titled "Topology for Statistical Modeling of Petascale Data", funded by the Office of Science Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) Applied Math program.

  10. Establishing statistical models of manufacturing parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senevat, J.; Pape, J.L.; Deshayes, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the effect of pilgering and cold-work parameters on contractile strain ratio and mechanical properties that were investigated using a large population of Zircaloy tubes. Statistical models were established between: contractile strain ratio and tooling parameters, mechanical properties (tensile test, creep test) and cold-work parameters, and mechanical properties and stress-relieving temperature

  11. Statistical models for optimizing mineral exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wignall, T.K.; DeGeoffroy, J.

    1987-01-01

    The primary purpose of mineral exploration is to discover ore deposits. The emphasis of this volume is on the mathematical and computational aspects of optimizing mineral exploration. The seven chapters that make up the main body of the book are devoted to the description and application of various types of computerized geomathematical models. These chapters include: (1) the optimal selection of ore deposit types and regions of search, as well as prospecting selected areas, (2) designing airborne and ground field programs for the optimal coverage of prospecting areas, and (3) delineating and evaluating exploration targets within prospecting areas by means of statistical modeling. Many of these statistical programs are innovative and are designed to be useful for mineral exploration modeling. Examples of geomathematical models are applied to exploring for six main types of base and precious metal deposits, as well as other mineral resources (such as bauxite and uranium)

  12. A statistical model for mapping morphological shape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jiahan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Living things come in all shapes and sizes, from bacteria, plants, and animals to humans. Knowledge about the genetic mechanisms for biological shape has far-reaching implications for a range spectrum of scientific disciplines including anthropology, agriculture, developmental biology, evolution and biomedicine. Results We derived a statistical model for mapping specific genes or quantitative trait loci (QTLs that control morphological shape. The model was formulated within the mixture framework, in which different types of shape are thought to result from genotypic discrepancies at a QTL. The EM algorithm was implemented to estimate QTL genotype-specific shapes based on a shape correspondence analysis. Computer simulation was used to investigate the statistical property of the model. Conclusion By identifying specific QTLs for morphological shape, the model developed will help to ask, disseminate and address many major integrative biological and genetic questions and challenges in the genetic control of biological shape and function.

  13. MODELLING OF TURBULENT WAKE FOR TWO WIND TURBINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arina S. Kryuchkova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The construction of several large wind farms (The Ulyanovsk region, the Republic of Adygea, the Kaliningrad region, the North of the Russian Federation is planned on the territory of the Russian Federation in 2018–2020. The tasks, connected with the design of new wind farms, are currently important. One of the possible direction in the design is connected with mathematical modeling. Large eddy method (eddy-resolving simulation, developed within the Computational Fluid Dynamics, allows to reproduce unsteady structure of the flow in details and define various integrated characteristics for wind turbines. The mathematical model included the main equations of continuity and momentum equations for incompressible viscous flow. The large-scale vortex structures were calculated by means of integration the filtered equations. The calculation was carried out using lagrangian dynamic Smagorinsky’s model to define turbulent subgrid viscosity. The parallelepiped-shaped numerical domain and 3 different unstructured meshes (with 2,4,8 million cells were used for numerical simulation.The geometrical parameters of wind turbine were set proceeding to open sources for BlindTest 2–4 project from Internet. All physical values were defined at the center of computational cell. The approximation of items in the equations was performed with the second order of accuracy for time and space. The equations for coupling of velocity, pressure were solved by means of iterative algorithm PIMPLE. The total quantity of the calculated physical values at each time step was equal 18. So, the resources of a high performance computer were required. As a result of flow simulation in the wake for two three-bladed wind turbines the average and instantaneous values of velocity, pressure, subgrid kinetic energy, turbulent viscosity, components of stress tensor were calculated. The received results qualitatively matching the known results of experiment and numerical simulation testify

  14. Performance modeling, stochastic networks, and statistical multiplexing

    CERN Document Server

    Mazumdar, Ravi R

    2013-01-01

    This monograph presents a concise mathematical approach for modeling and analyzing the performance of communication networks with the aim of introducing an appropriate mathematical framework for modeling and analysis as well as understanding the phenomenon of statistical multiplexing. The models, techniques, and results presented form the core of traffic engineering methods used to design, control and allocate resources in communication networks.The novelty of the monograph is the fresh approach and insights provided by a sample-path methodology for queueing models that highlights the importan

  15. Statistical models for competing risk analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sather, H.N.

    1976-08-01

    Research results on three new models for potential applications in competing risks problems. One section covers the basic statistical relationships underlying the subsequent competing risks model development. Another discusses the problem of comparing cause-specific risk structure by competing risks theory in two homogeneous populations, P1 and P2. Weibull models which allow more generality than the Berkson and Elveback models are studied for the effect of time on the hazard function. The use of concomitant information for modeling single-risk survival is extended to the multiple failure mode domain of competing risks. The model used to illustrate the use of this methodology is a life table model which has constant hazards within pre-designated intervals of the time scale. Two parametric models for bivariate dependent competing risks, which provide interesting alternatives, are proposed and examined

  16. Statistical physics of pairwise probability models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser Roudi

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Statistical models for describing the probability distribution over the states of biological systems are commonly used for dimensional reduction. Among these models, pairwise models are very attractive in part because they can be fit using a reasonable amount of data: knowledge of the means and correlations between pairs of elements in the system is sufficient. Not surprisingly, then, using pairwise models for studying neural data has been the focus of many studies in recent years. In this paper, we describe how tools from statistical physics can be employed for studying and using pairwise models. We build on our previous work on the subject and study the relation between different methods for fitting these models and evaluating their quality. In particular, using data from simulated cortical networks we study how the quality of various approximate methods for inferring the parameters in a pairwise model depends on the time bin chosen for binning the data. We also study the effect of the size of the time bin on the model quality itself, again using simulated data. We show that using finer time bins increases the quality of the pairwise model. We offer new ways of deriving the expressions reported in our previous work for assessing the quality of pairwise models.

  17. Unconfined deflagrative explosions without turbulence: experiments and model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lannoy, A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews laboratory, balloon and open field experiments which have been performed to study the deflagration regime in free air. In a first part, are considered different models available to estimate deflagrative unconfined explosions effects, without turbulence. Then, a description is given of the known performed tests, which indicate the effective scale of various experiments, their operating conditions and the type of measurements carried out. Results are presented and discussed. The influence on the explosion force of different parameters (fuel concentration gradients, flammable mixture shape and size, ignition energy) is estimated. The overall conclusion of this survey is that flammable mixtures drifting over open field and ignited, will burn with low flame speed and consequently will generate very weak pressure effects [fr

  18. Turbulence model for melt pool natural convection heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelkar, K.M.; Patankar, S.V.

    1994-01-01

    Under severe reactor accident scenarios, pools of molten core material may form in the reactor core or in the hemispherically shaped lower plenum of the reactor vessel. Such molten pools are internally heated due to the radioactive decay heat that gives rise to buoyant flows in the molten pool. The flow in such pools is strongly influenced by the turbulent mixing because the expected Rayleigh numbers under accidents scenarios are very high. The variation of the local heat flux over the boundaries of the molten pools are important in determining the subsequent melt progression behavior. This study reports results of an ongoing effort towards providing a well validated mathematical model for the prediction of buoyant flow and heat transfer in internally heated pool under conditions expected in severe accident scenarios

  19. Aspects of the statistical theory of stochastic magnetic fields: test particle transport and turbulent collisionless tearing mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleva, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    The first part of this work is concerned with test particle transport in a stochastic magnetic field. In the absence of collisions, the test particle self-diffusion coefficient is given by D = D/sub m/ V (in the zero gyroradius limit), where D/sub m/ is the magnetic diffusion coefficient due to a given spectrum of magnetic fluctuations and V is the particle velocity along a field line. The effect of collisions, either classical or turbulent, on this result is considered. The second part of this work is concerned with the evolution of the collisionless tearing mode in the presence of a stochastic magnetic field. A statistical closure approximation, obtained from the DIA by neglecting a mode-coupling term, is used to derive a nonlinear dispersion relation. For L 0 < L/sub K/ the dominant nonlinear effect is shown to be a turbulent broadening of the perturbed current layer. Saturation occurs when the perturbed current layer broadens to the point where Δ' = 0, where Δ' is the jump in the logarithmic derivative of the vector potential across the perturbed current layer

  20. Level crossing statistics for optical beam wander in a turbulent atmosphere with applications to ground-to-space laser communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yura, Harold T; Fields, Renny A

    2011-06-20

    Level crossing statistics is applied to the complex problem of atmospheric turbulence-induced beam wander for laser propagation from ground to space. A comprehensive estimate of the single-axis wander angle temporal autocorrelation function and the corresponding power spectrum is used to develop, for the first time to our knowledge, analytic expressions for the mean angular level crossing rate and the mean duration of such crossings. These results are based on an extension and generalization of a previous seminal analysis of the beam wander variance by Klyatskin and Kon. In the geometrical optics limit, we obtain an expression for the beam wander variance that is valid for both an arbitrarily shaped initial beam profile and transmitting aperture. It is shown that beam wander can disrupt bidirectional ground-to-space laser communication systems whose small apertures do not require adaptive optics to deliver uniform beams at their intended target receivers in space. The magnitude and rate of beam wander is estimated for turbulence profiles enveloping some practical laser communication deployment options and suggesting what level of beam wander effects must be mitigated to demonstrate effective bidirectional laser communication systems.

  1. Statistical models of petrol engines vehicles dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, C. O.; Marinescu, M.; Alexa, O.; Vilău, R.; Grosu, D.

    2017-10-01

    This paper focuses on studying statistical models of vehicles dynamics. It was design and perform a one year testing program. There were used many same type cars with gasoline engines and different mileage. Experimental data were collected of onboard sensors and those on the engine test stand. A database containing data of 64th tests was created. Several mathematical modelling were developed using database and the system identification method. Each modelling is a SISO or a MISO linear predictive ARMAX (AutoRegressive-Moving-Average with eXogenous inputs) model. It represents a differential equation with constant coefficients. It were made 64th equations for each dependency like engine torque as output and engine’s load and intake manifold pressure, as inputs. There were obtained strings with 64 values for each type of model. The final models were obtained using average values of the coefficients. The accuracy of models was assessed.

  2. Equilibrium statistical mechanics of lattice models

    CERN Document Server

    Lavis, David A

    2015-01-01

    Most interesting and difficult problems in equilibrium statistical mechanics concern models which exhibit phase transitions. For graduate students and more experienced researchers this book provides an invaluable reference source of approximate and exact solutions for a comprehensive range of such models. Part I contains background material on classical thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, together with a classification and survey of lattice models. The geometry of phase transitions is described and scaling theory is used to introduce critical exponents and scaling laws. An introduction is given to finite-size scaling, conformal invariance and Schramm—Loewner evolution. Part II contains accounts of classical mean-field methods. The parallels between Landau expansions and catastrophe theory are discussed and Ginzburg—Landau theory is introduced. The extension of mean-field theory to higher-orders is explored using the Kikuchi—Hijmans—De Boer hierarchy of approximations. In Part III the use of alge...

  3. Statistical shape and appearance models of bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkalkan, Nazli; Weinans, Harrie; Zadpoor, Amir A

    2014-03-01

    When applied to bones, statistical shape models (SSM) and statistical appearance models (SAM) respectively describe the mean shape and mean density distribution of bones within a certain population as well as the main modes of variations of shape and density distribution from their mean values. The availability of this quantitative information regarding the detailed anatomy of bones provides new opportunities for diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of skeletal diseases. The potential of SSM and SAM has been recently recognized within the bone research community. For example, these models have been applied for studying the effects of bone shape on the etiology of osteoarthritis, improving the accuracy of clinical osteoporotic fracture prediction techniques, design of orthopedic implants, and surgery planning. This paper reviews the main concepts, methods, and applications of SSM and SAM as applied to bone. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Statistical Models of Adaptive Immune populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethna, Zachary; Callan, Curtis; Walczak, Aleksandra; Mora, Thierry

    The availability of large (104-106 sequences) datasets of B or T cell populations from a single individual allows reliable fitting of complex statistical models for naïve generation, somatic selection, and hypermutation. It is crucial to utilize a probabilistic/informational approach when modeling these populations. The inferred probability distributions allow for population characterization, calculation of probability distributions of various hidden variables (e.g. number of insertions), as well as statistical properties of the distribution itself (e.g. entropy). In particular, the differences between the T cell populations of embryonic and mature mice will be examined as a case study. Comparing these populations, as well as proposed mixed populations, provides a concrete exercise in model creation, comparison, choice, and validation.

  5. Cellular automata and statistical mechanical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rujan, P.

    1987-01-01

    The authors elaborate on the analogy between the transfer matrix of usual lattice models and the master equation describing the time development of cellular automata. Transient and stationary properties of probabilistic automata are linked to surface and bulk properties, respectively, of restricted statistical mechanical systems. It is demonstrated that methods of statistical physics can be successfully used to describe the dynamic and the stationary behavior of such automata. Some exact results are derived, including duality transformations, exact mappings, disorder, and linear solutions. Many examples are worked out in detail to demonstrate how to use statistical physics in order to construct cellular automata with desired properties. This approach is considered to be a first step toward the design of fully parallel, probabilistic systems whose computational abilities rely on the cooperative behavior of their components

  6. 4th European Turbulence Conference

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    The European Turbulence Conferences have been organized under the auspices of the European Mechanics Committee (Euromech) to provide a forum for discussion and exchange of recent and new results in the field of turbulence. The first conference was organized in Lyon in 1986 with 152 participants. The second and third conferences were held in Berlin (1988) and Stockholm (1990) with 165 and 172 participants respectively. The fourth was organized in Delft from 30 June to 3 July 1992 by the J.M. Burgers Centre. There were 214 participants from 22 countries. This steadily growing number of participants demonstrates both the success and need for this type of conference. The main topics of the Fourth European Turbulence Conference were: Dynamical Systems and Transition; Statistical Physics and Turbulence; Experiments and Novel Experimental Techniques; Particles and Bubbles in Turbulence; Simulation Methods; Coherent Structures; Turbulence Modelling and Compressibility Effects. In addition a special session was held o...

  7. RANS modeling for particle transport and deposition in turbulent duct flows: Near wall model uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayaraju, S.T.; Sathiah, P.; Roelofs, F.; Dehbi, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Near-wall modeling uncertainties in the RANS particle transport and deposition are addressed in a turbulent duct flow. • Discrete Random Walk (DRW) model and Continuous Random Walk (CRW) model performances are tested. • Several near-wall anisotropic model accuracy is assessed. • Numerous sensitivity studies are performed to recommend a robust, well-validated near-wall model for accurate particle deposition predictions. - Abstract: Dust accumulation in the primary system of a (V)HTR is identified as one of the foremost concerns during a potential accident. Several numerical efforts have focused on the use of RANS methodology to better understand the complex phenomena of fluid–particle interaction at various flow conditions. In the present work, several uncertainties relating to the near-wall modeling of particle transport and deposition are addressed for the RANS approach. The validation analyses are performed in a fully developed turbulent duct flow setup. A standard k − ε turbulence model with enhanced wall treatment is used for modeling the turbulence. For the Lagrangian phase, the performance of a continuous random walk (CRW) model and a discrete random walk (DRW) model for the particle transport and deposition are assessed. For wall bounded flows, it is generally seen that accounting for near wall anisotropy is important to accurately predict particle deposition. The various near-wall correlations available in the literature are either derived from the DNS data or from the experimental data. A thorough investigation into various near-wall correlations and their applicability for accurate particle deposition predictions are assessed. The main outcome of the present work is a well validated turbulence model with optimal near-wall modeling which provides realistic particle deposition predictions

  8. A reduced model for ion temperature gradient turbulent transport in helical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunami, M.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Sugama, H.

    2013-07-01

    A novel reduced model for ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulent transport in helical plasmas is presented. The model enables one to predict nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation results from linear gyrokinetic analyses. It is shown from nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of the ITG turbulence in helical plasmas that the transport coefficient can be expressed as a function of the turbulent fluctuation level and the averaged zonal flow amplitude. Then, the reduced model for the turbulent ion heat diffusivity is derived by representing the nonlinear turbulent fluctuations and zonal flow amplitude in terms of the linear growth rate of the ITG instability and the linear response of the zonal flow potentials. It is confirmed that the reduced transport model results are in good agreement with those from nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations for high ion temperature plasmas in the Large Helical Device. (author)

  9. Improving filtering and prediction of spatially extended turbulent systems with model errors through stochastic parameter estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershgorin, B.; Harlim, J.; Majda, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    The filtering and predictive skill for turbulent signals is often limited by the lack of information about the true dynamics of the system and by our inability to resolve the assumed dynamics with sufficiently high resolution using the current computing power. The standard approach is to use a simple yet rich family of constant parameters to account for model errors through parameterization. This approach can have significant skill by fitting the parameters to some statistical feature of the true signal; however in the context of real-time prediction, such a strategy performs poorly when intermittent transitions to instability occur. Alternatively, we need a set of dynamic parameters. One strategy for estimating parameters on the fly is a stochastic parameter estimation through partial observations of the true signal. In this paper, we extend our newly developed stochastic parameter estimation strategy, the Stochastic Parameterization Extended Kalman Filter (SPEKF), to filtering sparsely observed spatially extended turbulent systems which exhibit abrupt stability transition from time to time despite a stable average behavior. For our primary numerical example, we consider a turbulent system of externally forced barotropic Rossby waves with instability introduced through intermittent negative damping. We find high filtering skill of SPEKF applied to this toy model even in the case of very sparse observations (with only 15 out of the 105 grid points observed) and with unspecified external forcing and damping. Additive and multiplicative bias corrections are used to learn the unknown features of the true dynamics from observations. We also present a comprehensive study of predictive skill in the one-mode context including the robustness toward variation of stochastic parameters, imperfect initial conditions and finite ensemble effect. Furthermore, the proposed stochastic parameter estimation scheme applied to the same spatially extended Rossby wave system demonstrates

  10. Numerical study of corner separation in a linear compressor cascade using various turbulence models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yangwei

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional corner separation is a common phenomenon that significantly affects compressor performance. Turbulence model is still a weakness for RANS method on predicting corner separation flow accurately. In the present study, numerical study of corner separation in a linear highly loaded prescribed velocity distribution (PVD compressor cascade has been investigated using seven frequently used turbulence models. The seven turbulence models include Spalart–Allmaras model, standard k–ɛ model, realizable k–ɛ model, standard k–ω model, shear stress transport k–ω model, v2–f model and Reynolds stress model. The results of these turbulence models have been compared and analyzed in detail with available experimental data. It is found the standard k–ɛ model, realizable k–ɛ model, v2–f model and Reynolds stress model can provide reasonable results for predicting three dimensional corner separation in the compressor cascade. The Spalart–Allmaras model, standard k–ω model and shear stress transport k–ω model overestimate corner separation region at incidence of 0°. The turbulence characteristics are discussed and turbulence anisotropy is observed to be stronger in the corner separating region.

  11. Comparison of different turbulence models in open channels with smooth-rough bedforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghani, U.

    2013-01-01

    The turbulence models play an important role in all types of computational fluid dynamics based numerical modelling. There is no universal turbulence model which can be applied in all the scenarios. Therefore, if a suitable closure model is used in a simulation work, only then the successful numerical modelling will be achieved. This paper presents the evaluation of three turbulence models in numerical modelling of open channel flows having beds comprising of two parallel strips, one being smooth and the other one being rough. The roughness on the rough side of the channel was created with the help of gravels. The turbulence models tested for their suitability in this case were Reynolds stress model, k-model and RNG based k-model. A structured mesh was used in this simulation work. Grid independence test was also conducted in the simulation. The evaluation of the turbulence models was made through the primary velocity contours and secondary velocity vectors over the cross section of the channel. It was revealed that Reynolds stress model simulated the flow behaviour successfully and results obtained through this model matched very closely to that of the experimental data whereas k-model and RNG based k-model failed to reproduce the flow field successfully. These results will be helpful for CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) modellers in correct selection of the turbulence model in these types of channels. (author)

  12. Modelling and analysis of turbulent datasets using Auto Regressive Moving Average processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faranda, Davide; Dubrulle, Bérengère; Daviaud, François; Pons, Flavio Maria Emanuele; Saint-Michel, Brice; Herbert, Éric; Cortet, Pierre-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a novel way to extract information from turbulent datasets by applying an Auto Regressive Moving Average (ARMA) statistical analysis. Such analysis goes well beyond the analysis of the mean flow and of the fluctuations and links the behavior of the recorded time series to a discrete version of a stochastic differential equation which is able to describe the correlation structure in the dataset. We introduce a new index Υ that measures the difference between the resulting analysis and the Obukhov model of turbulence, the simplest stochastic model reproducing both Richardson law and the Kolmogorov spectrum. We test the method on datasets measured in a von Kármán swirling flow experiment. We found that the ARMA analysis is well correlated with spatial structures of the flow, and can discriminate between two different flows with comparable mean velocities, obtained by changing the forcing. Moreover, we show that the Υ is highest in regions where shear layer vortices are present, thereby establishing a link between deviations from the Kolmogorov model and coherent structures. These deviations are consistent with the ones observed by computing the Hurst exponents for the same time series. We show that some salient features of the analysis are preserved when considering global instead of local observables. Finally, we analyze flow configurations with multistability features where the ARMA technique is efficient in discriminating different stability branches of the system

  13. Turbulence modeling of the Von Karman flow: Viscous and inertial stirrings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poncet, Sebastien; Schiestel, Roland; Monchaux, Romain

    2008-01-01

    The present work considers the turbulent Von Karman flow generated by two counter-rotating smooth flat (viscous stirring) or bladed (inertial stirring) disks. Numerical predictions based on one-point statistical modeling using a low-Reynolds number second-order full stress transport closure (RSM model) are compared to velocity measurements performed at CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, France). The main and significant novelty of this paper is the use of a drag force in the momentum equations to reproduce the effects of inertial stirring instead of modeling the blades themselves. The influences of the rotational Reynolds number, the aspect ratio of the cavity, the rotating disk speed ratio and of the presence or not of impellers are investigated to get a precise knowledge of both the dynamics and the turbulence properties in the Von Karman configuration. In particular, we highlighted the transition between the merged and separated boundary layer regimes and the one between the Batchelor [Batchelor, G.K., 1951. Note on a class of solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations representing steady rotationally-symmetric flow. Quat. J. Mech. Appl. Math. 4 (1), 29-41] and the Stewartson [Stewartson, K., 1953. On the flow between two rotating coaxial disks. Proc. Camb. Philos. Soc. 49, 333-341] flow structures in the smooth disk case. We determined also the transition between the one cell and the two cell regimes for both viscous and inertial stirrings

  14. Modelling of turbulent hydrocarbon combustion. Test of different reactor concepts for describing the interactions between turbulence and chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, C; Kremer, H [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Lehrstuhl fuer Energieanlagentechnik, Bochum (Germany); Kilpinen, P; Hupa, M [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland). Combustion Chemistry Research Group

    1998-12-31

    The detailed modelling of turbulent reactive flows with CFD-codes is a major challenge in combustion science. One method of combining highly developed turbulence models and detailed chemistry in CFD-codes is the application of reactor based turbulence chemistry interaction models. In this work the influence of different reactor concepts on methane and NO{sub x} chemistry in turbulent reactive flows was investigated. Besides the classical reactor approaches, a plug flow reactor (PFR) and a perfectly stirred reactor (PSR), the Eddy-Dissipation Combustion Model (EDX) and the Eddy Dissipation Concept (EDC) were included. Based on a detailed reaction scheme and a simplified 2-step mechanism studies were performed in a simplified computational grid consisting of 5 cells. The investigations cover a temperature range from 1273 K to 1673 K and consider fuel-rich and fuel-lean gas mixtures as well as turbulent and highly turbulent flow conditions. All test cases investigated in this study showed a strong influence of the reactor residence time on the species conversion processes. Due to this characteristic strong deviations were found for the species trends resulting from the different reactor approaches. However, this influence was only concentrated on the `near burner region` and after 4-5 cells hardly any deviation and residence time dependence could be found. The importance of the residence time dependence increased when the species conversion was accelerated as it is the case for overstoichiometric combustion conditions and increased temperatures. The study focused furthermore on the fine structure in the EDC. Unlike the classical approach this part of the cell was modelled as a PFR instead of a PSR. For high temperature conditions there was hardly any difference between both reactor types. However, decreasing the temperature led to obvious deviations. Finally, the effect of the selective species transport between the cells on the conversion process was investigated

  15. Modelling of turbulent hydrocarbon combustion. Test of different reactor concepts for describing the interactions between turbulence and chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, C.; Kremer, H. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Lehrstuhl fuer Energieanlagentechnik, Bochum (Germany); Kilpinen, P.; Hupa, M. [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland). Combustion Chemistry Research Group

    1997-12-31

    The detailed modelling of turbulent reactive flows with CFD-codes is a major challenge in combustion science. One method of combining highly developed turbulence models and detailed chemistry in CFD-codes is the application of reactor based turbulence chemistry interaction models. In this work the influence of different reactor concepts on methane and NO{sub x} chemistry in turbulent reactive flows was investigated. Besides the classical reactor approaches, a plug flow reactor (PFR) and a perfectly stirred reactor (PSR), the Eddy-Dissipation Combustion Model (EDX) and the Eddy Dissipation Concept (EDC) were included. Based on a detailed reaction scheme and a simplified 2-step mechanism studies were performed in a simplified computational grid consisting of 5 cells. The investigations cover a temperature range from 1273 K to 1673 K and consider fuel-rich and fuel-lean gas mixtures as well as turbulent and highly turbulent flow conditions. All test cases investigated in this study showed a strong influence of the reactor residence time on the species conversion processes. Due to this characteristic strong deviations were found for the species trends resulting from the different reactor approaches. However, this influence was only concentrated on the `near burner region` and after 4-5 cells hardly any deviation and residence time dependence could be found. The importance of the residence time dependence increased when the species conversion was accelerated as it is the case for overstoichiometric combustion conditions and increased temperatures. The study focused furthermore on the fine structure in the EDC. Unlike the classical approach this part of the cell was modelled as a PFR instead of a PSR. For high temperature conditions there was hardly any difference between both reactor types. However, decreasing the temperature led to obvious deviations. Finally, the effect of the selective species transport between the cells on the conversion process was investigated

  16. A comparative study of various inflow boundary conditions and turbulence models for wind turbine wake predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lin-Lin; Zhao, Ning; Song, Yi-Lei; Zhu, Chun-Ling

    2018-05-01

    This work is devoted to perform systematic sensitivity analysis of different turbulence models and various inflow boundary conditions in predicting the wake flow behind a horizontal axis wind turbine represented by an actuator disc (AD). The tested turbulence models are the standard k-𝜀 model and the Reynolds Stress Model (RSM). A single wind turbine immersed in both uniform flows and in modeled atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flows is studied. Simulation results are validated against the field experimental data in terms of wake velocity and turbulence intensity.

  17. Development of a three-dimensional local scale atmospheric model with turbulence closure model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazawa, Hiromi

    1989-05-01

    Through the study to improve SPEEDI's capability, a three-dimensional numerical atmospheric model PHYSIC (Prognostic HYdroStatic model Including turbulence Closure model) was developed to apply it to the transport and diffusion evaluation over complex terrains. The detailed description of the atmospheric model was given. This model consists of five prognostic equations; the momentum equations of horizontal components with the so-called Boussinesq and hydrostatic assumptions, the conservation equations of heat, turbulence kinetic energy and turbulence length scale. The coordinate system used is the terrain following z * coordinate system which allows the existence of complex terrain. The minute formula of the turbulence closure calculation, the surface layer process, the ground surface heat budget, and the atmospheric and solar radiation were also presented. The time integration method used in this model is the Alternating Direction Implicit (A.D.I.) method with a vertically and horizontally staggered grid system. The memory storage needed to execute this model with 31 x 31 x 16 grid points, five layers in soil and double precision variables is about 5.3 MBytes. The CPU time is about 2.2 x 10 -5 s per one step per one grid point with a vector processor FACOM VP-100. (author)

  18. Dynamic heterogeneity and conditional statistics of non-Gaussian temperature fluctuations in turbulent thermal convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaozhou; Wang, Yin; Tong, Penger

    2018-05-01

    Non-Gaussian fluctuations with an exponential tail in their probability density function (PDF) are often observed in nonequilibrium steady states (NESSs) and one does not understand why they appear so often. Turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC) is an example of such a NESS, in which the measured PDF P (δ T ) of temperature fluctuations δ T in the central region of the flow has a long exponential tail. Here we show that because of the dynamic heterogeneity in RBC, the exponential PDF is generated by a convolution of a set of dynamics modes conditioned on a constant local thermal dissipation rate ɛ . The conditional PDF G (δ T |ɛ ) of δ T under a constant ɛ is found to be of Gaussian form and its variance σT2 for different values of ɛ follows an exponential distribution. The convolution of the two distribution functions gives rise to the exponential PDF P (δ T ) . This work thus provides a physical mechanism of the observed exponential distribution of δ T in RBC and also sheds light on the origin of non-Gaussian fluctuations in other NESSs.

  19. Statistical Modelling of Wind Proles - Data Analysis and Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónsson, Tryggvi; Pinson, Pierre

    The aim of the analysis presented in this document is to investigate whether statistical models can be used to make very short-term predictions of wind profiles.......The aim of the analysis presented in this document is to investigate whether statistical models can be used to make very short-term predictions of wind profiles....

  20. Interaction between combustion and turbulence in modelling of emissions; Palamisen ja turbulenssin vuorovaikutus paeaestoejen mallinnuksessa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oksanen, A.; Maeki-Mantila, E. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Thermal Engineering

    1996-12-01

    The aim of the work was to study the combustion models taking into account the coupling between gas phase reactions and turbulence the modelling of emissions, especially of nitric oxide, when temperature and species concentrations are fluctuating by turbulence. The principal tools to model turbulent gas phase combustion were methods based on the probability density function (pdf) with {beta} and {gamma}-distributions the practice of which can take into consideration the stochastic nature of turbulence and, on the other hand, the models which also include the effect turbulence on the reaction rates in the flames e.g. the Eddy Dissipation Model (EDM), the Eddy Dissipation Concept (EDC), the kinetic mod and the combinations of those ones, respectively. Besides these models effect of the different turbulence models (standard, RNG and CHENKIM k-{epsilon} models) on the combustion phenomena, especially on the formation emissions was also studied. Same kind of modelling has been done by the teams in the Special Interest Group of ERCOFTAC (European Research Community On Flow Turbulence And Combustion) under the title of Aerodynamics and Steady State Combustion Chambers and Furnaces (A.S.C.F.) with which we have co-operated during some years with success. (author)

  1. Statistical modeling of geopressured geothermal reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Esmail; Hughes, Richard; White, Christopher D.

    2017-06-01

    Identifying attractive candidate reservoirs for producing geothermal energy requires predictive models. In this work, inspectional analysis and statistical modeling are used to create simple predictive models for a line drive design. Inspectional analysis on the partial differential equations governing this design yields a minimum number of fifteen dimensionless groups required to describe the physics of the system. These dimensionless groups are explained and confirmed using models with similar dimensionless groups but different dimensional parameters. This study models dimensionless production temperature and thermal recovery factor as the responses of a numerical model. These responses are obtained by a Box-Behnken experimental design. An uncertainty plot is used to segment the dimensionless time and develop a model for each segment. The important dimensionless numbers for each segment of the dimensionless time are identified using the Boosting method. These selected numbers are used in the regression models. The developed models are reduced to have a minimum number of predictors and interactions. The reduced final models are then presented and assessed using testing runs. Finally, applications of these models are offered. The presented workflow is generic and can be used to translate the output of a numerical simulator into simple predictive models in other research areas involving numerical simulation.

  2. A statistical model for instable thermodynamical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, Jens-Uwe

    2003-01-01

    A generic model is presented for statistical systems which display thermodynamic features in contrast to our everyday experience, such as infinite and negative heat capacities. Such system are instable in terms of classical equilibrium thermodynamics. Using our statistical model, we are able to investigate states of instable systems which are undefined in the framework of equilibrium thermodynamics. We show that a region of negative heat capacity in the adiabatic environment, leads to a first order like phase transition when the system is coupled to a heat reservoir. This phase transition takes place without a phase coexistence. Nevertheless, all intermediate states are stable due to fluctuations. When two instable system are brought in thermal contact, the temperature of the composed system is lower than the minimum temperature of the individual systems. Generally, the equilibrium states of instable system cannot be simply decomposed into equilibrium states of the individual systems. The properties of instable system depend on the environment, ensemble equivalence is broken

  3. High Resolution 3D Experimental Investigation of Flow Structures and Turbulence Statistics in the Viscous and Buffer Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jian; Malkiel, Edwin; Katz, Joseph

    2006-11-01

    Digital Holographic Microscopy is implemented to perform 3D velocity measurement in the near-wall region of a turbulent boundary layer in a square channel over a smooth wall at Reτ=1,400. The measurements are performed at a resolution of ˜1μm over a sample volume of 1.5x2x1.5mm (x^+=50, y^+=60, z^+=50), sufficient for resolving buffer layer structures and for measuring the instantaneous wall shear stress distributions from velocity gradients in the sublayer. The data provides detailed statistics on the spatial distribution of both wall shear stress components along with the characteristic flow structures, including streamwise counter-rotating vortex pairs, multiple streamwise vortices, and rare hairpins. Conditional sampling identifies characteristic length scales of 70 wall units in spanwise and 10 wall units in wall-normal direction. In the region of high stress, the conditionally averaged flow consists of a stagnation-like sweeping motion induced by a counter rotating pair of streamwise vortices. Regions with low stress are associated with ejection motion, also generated by pairs of counter-rotating vortices. Statistics on the local strain and geometric alignment between strain and vorticity shows that the high shear generating vortices are inclined at 45 to streamwise direction, indicating that vortices are being stretched. Results of on-going analysis examines statistics of helicity, strain and impacts of near-wall structures.

  4. A turbulent mixing Reynolds stress model fitted to match linear interaction analysis predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffond, J; Soulard, O; Souffland, D

    2010-01-01

    To predict the evolution of turbulent mixing zones developing in shock tube experiments with different gases, a turbulence model must be able to reliably evaluate the production due to the shock-turbulence interaction. In the limit of homogeneous weak turbulence, 'linear interaction analysis' (LIA) can be applied. This theory relies on Kovasznay's decomposition and allows the computation of waves transmitted or produced at the shock front. With assumptions about the composition of the upstream turbulent mixture, one can connect the second-order moments downstream from the shock front to those upstream through a transfer matrix, depending on shock strength. The purpose of this work is to provide a turbulence model that matches LIA results for the shock-turbulent mixture interaction. Reynolds stress models (RSMs) with additional equations for the density-velocity correlation and the density variance are considered here. The turbulent states upstream and downstream from the shock front calculated with these models can also be related through a transfer matrix, provided that the numerical implementation is based on a pseudo-pressure formulation. Then, the RSM should be modified in such a way that its transfer matrix matches the LIA one. Using the pseudo-pressure to introduce ad hoc production terms, we are able to obtain a close agreement between LIA and RSM matrices for any shock strength and thus improve the capabilities of the RSM.

  5. On two-dimensionalization of three-dimensional turbulence in shell models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakraborty, Sagar; Jensen, Mogens Høgh; Sarkar, A.

    2010-01-01

    Applying a modified version of the Gledzer-Ohkitani-Yamada (GOY) shell model, the signatures of so-called two-dimensionalization effect of three-dimensional incompressible, homogeneous, isotropic fully developed unforced turbulence have been studied and reproduced. Within the framework of shell m......-similar PDFs for longitudinal velocity differences are also presented for the rotating 3D turbulence case....

  6. Group-theoretical model of developed turbulence and renormalization of the Navier-Stokes equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saveliev, V L; Gorokhovski, M A

    2005-07-01

    On the basis of the Euler equation and its symmetry properties, this paper proposes a model of stationary homogeneous developed turbulence. A regularized averaging formula for the product of two fields is obtained. An equation for the averaged turbulent velocity field is derived from the Navier-Stokes equation by renormalization-group transformation.

  7. Stratified turbulent Bunsen flames : flame surface analysis and flame surface density modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramaekers, W.J.S.; Oijen, van J.A.; Goey, de L.P.H.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper it is investigated whether the Flame Surface Density (FSD) model, developed for turbulent premixed combustion, is also applicable to stratified flames. Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of turbulent stratified Bunsen flames have been carried out, using the Flamelet Generated Manifold

  8. Direct numerical simulation and modeling of turbulent natural convection in a vertical differentially heated slot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudjemadi, R.

    1996-03-01

    The main objectives of this thesis are the direct numerical simulation of natural convection in a vertical differentially heated slot and the improvements of second-order turbulence modelling. A three-dimensional direct numerical simulation code has been developed in order to gain a better understanding of turbulence properties in natural convection flows. This code has been validated in several physical configurations: non-stratified natural convection flows (conduction solution), stratified natural convection flows (double boundary layer solution), transitional and turbulent Poiseuille flows. For the conduction solution, the turbulent regime was reached at a Rayleigh number of 1*10 5 and 5.4*10 5 . A detailed analysis of these results has revealed the principal qualities of the available models but has also pointed our their shortcomings. This data base has been used in order to improve the triple correlations transport models and to select the turbulent time scales suitable for such flows. (author). 122 refs., figs., tabs., 4 appends

  9. Logarithmic transformed statistical models in calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeis, C.D.

    1975-01-01

    A general type of statistical model used for calibration of instruments having the property that the standard deviations of the observed values increase as a function of the mean value is described. The application to the Helix Counter at the Rocky Flats Plant is primarily from a theoretical point of view. The Helix Counter measures the amount of plutonium in certain types of chemicals. The method described can be used also for other calibrations. (U.S.)

  10. ARSENIC CONTAMINATION IN GROUNDWATER: A STATISTICAL MODELING

    OpenAIRE

    Palas Roy; Naba Kumar Mondal; Biswajit Das; Kousik Das

    2013-01-01

    High arsenic in natural groundwater in most of the tubewells of the Purbasthali- Block II area of Burdwan district (W.B, India) has recently been focused as a serious environmental concern. This paper is intending to illustrate the statistical modeling of the arsenic contaminated groundwater to identify the interrelation of that arsenic contain with other participating groundwater parameters so that the arsenic contamination level can easily be predicted by analyzing only such parameters. Mul...

  11. A dynamic globalization model for large eddy simulation of complex turbulent flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hae Cheon; Park, No Ma; Kim, Jin Seok [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    A dynamic subgrid-scale model is proposed for large eddy simulation of turbulent flows in complex geometry. The eddy viscosity model by Vreman [Phys. Fluids, 16, 3670 (2004)] is considered as a base model. A priori tests with the original Vreman model show that it predicts the correct profile of subgrid-scale dissipation in turbulent channel flow but the optimal model coefficient is far from universal. Dynamic procedures of determining the model coefficient are proposed based on the 'global equilibrium' between the subgrid-scale dissipation and viscous dissipation. An important feature of the proposed procedures is that the model coefficient determined is globally constant in space but varies only in time. Large eddy simulations with the present dynamic model are conducted for forced isotropic turbulence, turbulent channel flow and flow over a sphere, showing excellent agreements with previous results.

  12. Advancing predictive models for particulate formation in turbulent flames via massively parallel direct numerical simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Bisetti, Fabrizio; Attili, Antonio; Pitsch, Heinz G.

    2014-01-01

    , internal combustion engines, and combustors for stationary power generation and aircraft propulsion. Today, turbulent combustion modelling is hindered severely by the lack of data that are accurate and sufficiently complete to assess and remedy model

  13. A comparative study of turbulence models for dissolved air flotation flow analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Min A; Lee, Kyun Ho; Chung, Jae Dong; Seo, Seung Ho

    2015-01-01

    The dissolved air flotation (DAF) system is a water treatment process that removes contaminants by attaching micro bubbles to them, causing them to float to the water surface. In the present study, two-phase flow of air-water mixture is simulated to investigate changes in the internal flow analysis of DAF systems caused by using different turbulence models. Internal micro bubble distribution, velocity, and computation time are compared between several turbulence models for a given DAF geometry and condition. As a result, it is observed that the standard κ-ε model, which has been frequently used in previous research, predicts somewhat different behavior than other turbulence models

  14. Development of bubble-induced turbulence model for advanced two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoi, Hideaki; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    A two-fluid model can simulate two-phase flow by computational cost less than detailed two-phase flow simulation method such as interface tracking method. The two-fluid model is therefore useful for thermal hydraulic analysis in the large-scale domain such as rod bundles. However, since the two-fluid model includes a lot of constitutive equations verified by use of experimental results, it has problems that the result of analyses depends on accuracy of the constitutive equations. To solve these problems, an advanced two-fluid model has been developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency. In this model, interface tracking method is combined with two-fluid model to accurately predict large interface structure behavior. Liquid clusters and bubbles larger than a computational cell are calculated using the interface tracking method, and those smaller than the cell are simulated by the two-fluid model. The constitutive equations to evaluate the effects of small bubbles or droplets on two-phase flow are also required in the advanced two-fluid model, just as with the conventional two-fluid model. However, the dependency of small bubbles and droplets on two-phase flow characteristics is relatively small, and fewer experimental results are required to verify the characteristics of large interface structures. Turbulent dispersion force model is one of the most important constitutive equations for the advanced two-fluid model. The turbulent dispersion force model has been developed by many researchers for the conventional two-fluid model. However, existing models implicitly include the effects of large bubbles and the deformation of bubbles, and are unfortunately not applicable to the advanced two-fluid model. In the previous study, the authors suggested the turbulent dispersion force model based on the analogy of Brownian motion. And the authors improved the turbulent dispersion force model in consideration of bubble-induced turbulence to improve the analysis results for small

  15. A simple statistical model for geomagnetic reversals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constable, Catherine

    1990-01-01

    The diversity of paleomagnetic records of geomagnetic reversals now available indicate that the field configuration during transitions cannot be adequately described by simple zonal or standing field models. A new model described here is based on statistical properties inferred from the present field and is capable of simulating field transitions like those observed. Some insight is obtained into what one can hope to learn from paleomagnetic records. In particular, it is crucial that the effects of smoothing in the remanence acquisition process be separated from true geomagnetic field behavior. This might enable us to determine the time constants associated with the dominant field configuration during a reversal.

  16. Modelling of turbulent combustion in the blast furnace raceway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karvinen, R; Maekiranta, R [Tampere Univ. (Finland). Energy and Process Engineering

    1997-12-31

    The phenomena concerning coke-gas -suspension and simultaneous combustion of solid coke particles and residual fuel oil in a blast furnace raceway are modelled. The flow field of suspension is predicted by using the two fluid model, which is based on the Eulerian method, in the Phoenics code. The standard k-e -model of turbulence is used. Pyrolysis of oil droplets is calculated with the own coded subroutine, which is based on the Lagrangian approach. Gas phase reaction rate is assumed to be controlled by chemical kinetics. Radiative heat transfer is calculated by using the six-flux method. Heterogenous surface reactions are used for the coke particles. Calculations without coke combustion show that due to a poor mixing in the hot blast, pyrolysis gases of residual fuel oil have not time enough to react with oxygen. It is obvious that if combustion of coke particles is taken into account, the oxygen content in the blast decreases to such a level, that unburnt pyrolysis gases can flow out of the raceway causing problems. The distribution of coke void fraction has been succeeded to predict in the raceway domain. Coke particles fall from the upper part of the raceway to the hot blast forming locally high concentrations, which affect very strongly the oxygen distribution of the hot blast. (orig.) SULA 2 Research Programme; 10 refs.

  17. Modelling of turbulent combustion in the blast furnace raceway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karvinen, R.; Maekiranta, R. [Tampere Univ. (Finland). Energy and Process Engineering

    1996-12-31

    The phenomena concerning coke-gas -suspension and simultaneous combustion of solid coke particles and residual fuel oil in a blast furnace raceway are modelled. The flow field of suspension is predicted by using the two fluid model, which is based on the Eulerian method, in the Phoenics code. The standard k-e -model of turbulence is used. Pyrolysis of oil droplets is calculated with the own coded subroutine, which is based on the Lagrangian approach. Gas phase reaction rate is assumed to be controlled by chemical kinetics. Radiative heat transfer is calculated by using the six-flux method. Heterogenous surface reactions are used for the coke particles. Calculations without coke combustion show that due to a poor mixing in the hot blast, pyrolysis gases of residual fuel oil have not time enough to react with oxygen. It is obvious that if combustion of coke particles is taken into account, the oxygen content in the blast decreases to such a level, that unburnt pyrolysis gases can flow out of the raceway causing problems. The distribution of coke void fraction has been succeeded to predict in the raceway domain. Coke particles fall from the upper part of the raceway to the hot blast forming locally high concentrations, which affect very strongly the oxygen distribution of the hot blast. (orig.) SULA 2 Research Programme; 10 refs.

  18. Anisotropy and buoyancy in nuclear turbulent heat transfer - critical assessment and needs for modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groetzbach, G.

    2007-12-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) programs have a wide application field in reactor technique, like to diverse flow types which have to be considered in Accelerator Driven nuclear reactor Systems (ADS). This requires turbulence models for the momentum and heat transfer with very different capabilities. The physical demands on the models are elaborated for selected transport mechanisms, the status quo of the modelling is discussed, and it is investigated which capabilities are offered by the market dominating commercial CFD codes. One topic of the discussion is on the already earlier achieved knowledge on the distinct anisotropy of the turbulent momentum and heat transport near walls. It is shown that this is relevant in channel flows with inhomogeneous wall conditions. The related consequences for the turbulence modelling are discussed. The second topic is the turbulent heat transport in buoyancy influenced flows. The only turbulence model for heat transfer which is available in the large commercial CFD-codes is based on the Reynolds analogy. This means, it is required to prescribe suitable turbulent Prandtl number distributions. There exist many correlations for channel flows, but they are seldom used in practical applications. Here, a correlation is deduced for the local turbulent Prandtl number which accounts for many parameters, like wall distance, molecular Prandtl number of the fluid, wall roughness and local shear stress, thermal wall condition, etc. so that it can be applied to most ADS typical heat transporting channel flows. The spatial dependence is discussed. It is shown that it is essential for reliable temperature calculations to get accurate turbulent Prandtl numbers especially near walls. If thermal wall functions are applied, then the correlation for the turbulent Prandtl number has to be consistent with the wall functions to avoid unphysical discretisation dependences. In using Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) data for horizontal fluid layers it

  19. Assessment of a turbulence model for numerical predictions of sheet-cavitating flows in centrifugal pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Houlin; Wang, Yong; Liu, Dongxi; Yuan, Shouqi; Wang, Jian [Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang (China)

    2013-09-15

    Various approaches have been developed for numerical predictions of unsteady cavitating turbulent flows. To verify the influence of a turbulence model on the simulation of unsteady attached sheet-cavitating flows in centrifugal pumps, two modified RNG k-ε models (DCM and FBM) are implemented in ANSYS-CFX 13.0 by second development technology, so as to compare three widespread turbulence models in the same platform. The simulation has been executed and compared to experimental results for three different flow coefficients. For four operating conditions, qualitative comparisons are carried out between experimental and numerical cavitation patterns, which are visualized by a high-speed camera and depicted as isosurfaces of vapor volume fraction α{sub v} = 0.1, respectively. The comparison results indicate that, for the development of the sheet attached cavities on the suction side of the impeller blades, the numerical results with different turbulence models are very close to each other and overestimate the experiment ones slightly. However, compared to the cavitation performance experimental curves, the numerical results have obvious difference: the prediction precision with the FBM is higher than the other two turbulence models. In addition, the loading distributions around the blade section at midspan are analyzed in detail. The research results suggest that, for numerical prediction of cavitating flows in centrifugal pumps, the turbulence model has little influence on the development of cavitation bubbles, but the advanced turbulence model can significantly improve the prediction precision of head coefficients and critical cavitation numbers.

  20. Numerical investigation on effects of induced jet on boundary layer and turbulent models around airfoils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shojaeefard, M.H.; Pirnia, A.; Fallahian, M.A. [Iran University of Science and Technology, School of Mechanical Engineering, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tahani, M. [Iran University of Science and Technology, School of Mechanical Engineering, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); University of Tehran, Faculty of New Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    In this study the effects of induced jet at trailing edge of a two dimensional airfoil on its boundary layer shape, separation over surface and turbulent parameters behind trailing edge are numerically investigated and compared against a previous experimental data. After proving independency of results from mesh size and obtaining the required mesh size, different turbulent models are examined and RNG k-epsilon model is chosen because of good agreement with experimental data in velocity and turbulent intensity variations. A comparison between ordinary and jet induced cases, regarding numerical data, is made. The results showed that because of low number of measurement points in experimental study, turbulent intensity extremes are not captured. While in numerical study, these values and their positions are well calculated and exact variation of turbulent intensity is acquired. Also a study in effect of jet at high angles of attack is done and the results showed the ability of jet in controlling separation and reducing wake region. (orig.)