WorldWideScience

Sample records for stationary combustion plants

  1. Danish emission inventories for stationary combustion plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Malene; Nielsen, Ole-Kenneth; Plejdrup, Marlene Schmidt

    Emission inventories for stationary combustion plants are presented and the methodologies and assumptions used for the inventories are described. The pollutants considered are SO2, NOx, NMVOC, CH4, CO, CO2, N2O, NH3, particulate matter, heavy metals, dioxins, HCB and PAH. The CO2 emission in 2008...... incineration plants. The combustion of wood in residential plants has increased considerably in recent years resulting in increased emission of PAH, particulate matter and CO. The emission of NMVOC has increased since 1990 as a result of both the increased combustion of wood in residential plants...... and the increased emission from lean-burn gas engines. The dioxin emission decreased since 1990 due to flue gas cleaning on waste incineration plants. However in recent years the emission has increased as a result of the increased combustion of wood in residential plants....

  2. Danish emission inventories for stationary combustion plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Malene; Nielsen, Ole-Kenneth; Plejdrup, Marlene Schmidt

    Emission inventories for stationary combustion plants are presented and the methodologies and assumptions used for the inventories are described. The pollutants considered are SO2, NOx, NMVOC, CH4, CO, CO2, N2O, particulate matter, heavy metals, dioxins, HCB and PAH. The CO2 emission in 2007 was 10...... incineration plants. The combustion of wood in residential plants has increased considerably in recent years resulting in increased emission of PAH, particulate matter and CO. The emission of NMVOC has increased since 1990 as a result of both the increased combustion of wood in residential plants...... and the increased emission from lean-burn gas engines. The dioxin emission decreased since 1990 due to flue gas cleaning on waste incineration plants. However in recent years the emission has increased as a result of the increased combustion of wood in residential plants....

  3. Danish emission inventories for stationary combustion plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M.; Illerup, J. B.

    Emission inventories for stationary combustion plants are presented and the methodologies and assumptions used for the inventories are described. The pollutants considered are: SO2, NOx, NMVOC, CH4, CO, CO2, N2O, particulate matter, heavy metals, dioxins and PAH. Since 1990 the fuel consumption...... in stationary combustion has increased by 12% - the fossil fuel consumption however only by 6%. Despite the increased fuel consumption the emission of several pollutants have decreased due to the improved flue gas cleaning technology, improved burner technology and the change of fuel type used. A considerable...... plants. The emission of PAH increased as a result of the increased combustion of wood in residential boilers and stoves. Uncertainties for the emissions and trends have been estimated....

  4. Danish emission inventories for stationary combustion plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M.; Illerup, J. B.

    Emission inventories for stationary combustion plants are presented and the methodologies and assumptions used for the inventories are described. The pollutants considered are SO2, NOX, NMVOC, CH4, CO, CO2, N2O, particulate matter, heavy metals, dioxins and PAH. Since 1990 the fuel consumption...... in stationary combustion has increased by 14% - the fossil fuel consumption however only by 8%. Despite the increased fuel consumption the emission of several pollutants has decreased due to the improved flue gas cleaning technology, improved burner technology and the change of fuel type used. A considerable...... plants. The emission of PAH increased as a result of the increased combustion of wood in residential boilers and stoves. Uncertainties for the emissions and trends have been estimated...

  5. Danish emission inventories for stationary combustion plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Malene; Nielsen, Ole-Kenneth; Plejdrup, Marlene Schmidt

    Emission inventories for stationary combustion plants are presented and the methodologies and assumptions used for the inventories are described. The pollutants considered are SO2, NOx, NMVOC, CH4, CO, CO2, N2O, NH3, particulate matter, heavy metals, PCDD/F, HCB and PAH. The CO2 emission in 2011...... of decreased emissions from large power plants and waste incineration plants. The combustion of wood in residential plants has increased considerably until 2007 resulting in increased emission of PAH and particulate matter. The emission of NMVOC has increased since 1990 as a result of both the increased...... combustion of wood in residential plants and the increased emission from lean-burn gas engines. The PCDD/F emission decreased since 1990 due to flue gas cleaning on waste incineration plants....

  6. Improved inventory for heavy metal emissions from stationary combustion plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Malene; Nielsen, Ole-Kenneth; Hoffmann, Leif

    On behalf of the Ministry of the Environment DCE at Aarhus University annually reports heavy metals (HM) emissions to the UNECE CLRTAP (United Nations Economic Commission for Europe Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution). This report presents updated heavy metal emission factors......-2009. The report also include methodology, references and an uncertainty estimate. In Denmark, stationary combustion plants are among the most important emission sources for heavy metals. Emissions of all heavy metals have decreased considerably (73 % - 92 %) since 1990. The main HM emission sources are coal...

  7. Danish emission inventories for stationary combustion plants. Inventories until 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Malene; Nielsen, Ole-Kenneth; Plejdrup, M.; Hjelgaard, K.

    2010-10-15

    Emission inventories for stationary combustion plants are presented and the methodologies and assumptions used for the inventories are described. The pollutants considered are SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, NMVOC, CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}, particulate matter, heavy metals, dioxins, HCB and PAH. The CO{sub 2} emission in 2008 was 16 % lower than in 1990. However, fluctuations in the emission level are large as a result of electricity import/export. The emission of CH{sub 4} has increased due to increased use of lean-burn gas engines in combined heating and power (CHP) plants. However, the emission has decreased in recent years due to structural changes in the Danish electricity market. The N{sub 2}O emission was higher in 2008 than in 1990 but the fluctuations in the time-series are significant. A considerable decrease of the SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and heavy metal emissions is mainly a result of decreased emissions from large power plants and waste incineration plants. The combustion of wood in residential plants has increased considerably in recent years resulting in increased emission of PAH, particulate matter and CO. The emission of NMVOC has increased since 1990 as a result of both the increased combustion of wood in residential plants and the increased emission from lean-burn gas engines. The dioxin emission decreased since 1990 due to flue gas cleaning on waste incineration plants. However in recent years the emission has increased as a result of the increased combustion of wood in residential plants. (Author)

  8. Danish emission inventories for stationary combustion plants. Inventories until year 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Ole-Kenneth; Nielsen, Malene; Boll Illerup, J.

    2007-04-15

    Emission inventories for stationary combustion plants are presented and the methodologies and assumptions used for the inventories are described. The pollutants considered are SO2, NOX, NMVOC, CH4, CO, CO2, N2O, particulate matter, heavy metals, dioxins and PAH. A considerable decrease of the SO2, NOX and heavy metal emissions is mainly a result of decreased emissions from large power plants and waste incineration plants. The emission of CH4 has increased due to increased use of lean-burn gas engines in CHP plants. The emission of PAH increased as a result of the increased combustion of wood in residential boilers and stoves. The dioxin emission decreased due to flue gas cleaning on waste incineration plants. Uncertainties for the emissions and trends have been estimated. (au)

  9. Danish emission inventories for stationary combustion plants. Inventories until year 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, M.; Boll Illerup, J.

    2004-12-01

    Emission inventories for stationary combustion plants are presented and the methodologies and assumptions used for the inventories are described. The pollutants considered are SO{sub 2}, NO{sub X}, NMVOC, CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, particulate matter, heavy metals, dioxins and PAH. Since 1990 the fuel consumption in stationary combustion has increased by 14% - the fossil fuel consumption however only by 8%. Despite the increased fuel consumption the emission of several pollutants has decreased due to the improved flue gas cleaning technology, improved burner technology and the change of fuel type used. A considerable decrease of the SO{sub 2}, NO{sub X} and heavy metal emissions is mainly a result of decreased emissions from large power plants and waste incineration plants. The greenhouse gas emission has decreased 1,3% since 1990. The emission of CH{sub 4}, however, has increased due to increased use of lean-burn gas engines in CHP plants. The emission of PAH increased as a result of the increased combustion of wood in residential boilers and stoves. Uncertainties for the emissions and trends have been estimated. (au)

  10. Danish emission inventories for stationary combustion plants. Inventories until year 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Malene; Illerup, Jytte B

    2006-01-15

    Emission inventories for stationary combustion plants are presented and the methodologies and assumptions used for the inventories are described. The pollutants considered are SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, NMVOC, CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, particulate matter, heavy metals, dioxins and PAH. Since 1990 the fuel consumption in stationary combustion has increased by 25% - the fossil fuel consumption, however, only by 18%. Despite the increased fuel consumption the emission of several pollutants has decreased due to the improved flue gas cleaning technology, improved burner technology and the change of fuel type used. A considerable decrease of the SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and heavy metal emissions is mainly a result of decreased emissions from large power plants and waste incineration plants. The greenhouse gas emission has increased by 11% since 1990 mainly due to increasing export of electricity. The emission of CH{sub 4} has increased due to increased use of lean-burn gas engines in CHP plants. The emission of PAH increased as a result of the increased combustion of wood in residential boilers and stoves. Uncertainties for the emissions and trends have been estimated. (au)

  11. Danish emission inventories for stationary combustion plants. Inventories until year 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, M.; Boll Illerup, J.

    2004-01-01

    Emission inventories for stationary combustion plants are presented and the methodologies and assumptions used for the inventories are described. The pollutants considered are SO 2 , NO X , NMVOC, CH 4 , CO, CO 2 , N 2 O, particulate matter, heavy metals, dioxins and PAH. Since 1990 the fuel consumption in stationary combustion has increased by 14% - the fossil fuel consumption however only by 8%. Despite the increased fuel consumption the emission of several pollutants has decreased due to the improved flue gas cleaning technology, improved burner technology and the change of fuel type used. A considerable decrease of the SO 2 , NO X and heavy metal emissions is mainly a result of decreased emissions from large power plants and waste incineration plants. The greenhouse gas emission has decreased 1,3% since 1990. The emission of CH 4 , however, has increased due to increased use of lean-burn gas engines in CHP plants. The emission of PAH increased as a result of the increased combustion of wood in residential boilers and stoves. Uncertainties for the emissions and trends have been estimated. (au)

  12. Danish emission inventories for stationary combustion plants. Inventories until year 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, Malene; Illerup, Jytte B.

    2006-01-01

    Emission inventories for stationary combustion plants are presented and the methodologies and assumptions used for the inventories are described. The pollutants considered are SO 2 , NO x , NMVOC, CH 4 , CO, CO 2 , N 2 O, particulate matter, heavy metals, dioxins and PAH. Since 1990 the fuel consumption in stationary combustion has increased by 25% - the fossil fuel consumption, however, only by 18%. Despite the increased fuel consumption the emission of several pollutants has decreased due to the improved flue gas cleaning technology, improved burner technology and the change of fuel type used. A considerable decrease of the SO 2 , NO x and heavy metal emissions is mainly a result of decreased emissions from large power plants and waste incineration plants. The greenhouse gas emission has increased by 11% since 1990 mainly due to increasing export of electricity. The emission of CH 4 has increased due to increased use of lean-burn gas engines in CHP plants. The emission of PAH increased as a result of the increased combustion of wood in residential boilers and stoves. Uncertainties for the emissions and trends have been estimated. (au)

  13. Danish emission inventories for stationary combustion plants. Inventories until year 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Malene; Nielsen, Ole-Kenneth; Plejdrup, M.; Hjelgaard, K.

    2009-10-15

    Emission inventories for stationary combustion plants are presented and the methodologies and assumptions used for the inventories are described. The pollutants considered are SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, NMVOC, CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, particulate matter, heavy metals, dioxins, HCB and PAH. The CO{sub 2} emission in 2007 was 10% lower than in 1990. However fluctuations in the emission level are large as a result of electricity import/export. The emission of CH{sub 4} has increased due to increased use of lean-burn gas engines in combined heating and power (CHP) plants. However the emission has decreased in recent years due to structural changes in the Danish electricity market. The N{sub 2}O emission was higher in 2007 than in 1990 but the fluctuations in the timeseries are significant. A considerable decrease of the SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and heavy metal emissions is mainly a result of decreased emissions from large power plants and waste incineration plants. The combustion of wood in residential plants has increased considerably in recent years resulting in increased emission of PAH, particulate matter and CO. The emission of NMVOC has increased since 1990 as a result of both the increased combustion of wood in residential plants and the increased emission from lean-burn gas engines. The dioxin emission decreased since 1990 due to flue gas cleaning on waste incineration plants. However in recent years the emission has increased as a result of the increased combustion of wood in residential plants. (author)

  14. Reduction of NOx emission from stationary combustion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, P.F.

    1992-01-01

    The environmental impacts of NO x emission from stationary combustion sources are briefly described. These include the formation of both acid rain and photochemical smog, major environmental problems. The three mechanisms which have been identified for the formation of NO x in combustion (thermal, prompt and fuel) are also briefly outlined. Recently stringent standards have been introduced to control emissions of NO x and the review describes the major primary and secondary measures. 10 refs. 2 tabs., 5 figs

  15. Internal combustion engines in stationary installations for the efficient use of energy. VDI-meeting at Stuttart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titl, A

    1976-11-01

    The efficient use of stationary internal combustion engines for energy supply is discussed: the state of technology and the scientific significance of internal combustion engines; thermal power coupling with unit-type thermal power plants which supply current as well as heat; and operational experience with unit-type thermal power plants for living districts, sport centers, industries etc.

  16. 40 CFR 60.4239 - What are my compliance requirements if I am a manufacturer of stationary SI internal combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... I am a manufacturer of stationary SI internal combustion engines >19 KW (25 HP) that use gasoline or... NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for Stationary Spark Ignition Internal Combustion... manufacturer of stationary SI internal combustion engines >19 KW (25 HP) that use gasoline or a manufacturer of...

  17. Stationary Engineers Apprenticeship. Related Training Modules. 16.1-16.5 Combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane Community Coll., Eugene, OR.

    This learning module, one in a series of 20 related training modules for apprentice stationary engineers, deals with combustion. Addressed in the individual instructional packages included in the module are the following topics: the combustion process, types of fuel, air and flue gases, heat transfer during combustion, and wood combustion. Each…

  18. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Kkkk of... - Nitrogen Oxide Emission Limits for New Stationary Combustion Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Stationary Combustion Turbines 1 Table 1 to Subpart KKKK of Part 60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Standards of Performance for Stationary Combustion Turbines Pt. 60, Subpt. KKKK, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart KKKK of Part 60—Nitrogen Oxide Emission Limits for New Stationary Combustion Turbines Combustion...

  19. 40 CFR 60.4210 - What are my compliance requirements if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? 60.4210 Section 60.4210 Protection of... CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? (a) Stationary CI internal combustion engine... certified to the standards in 40 CFR part 1039. (b) Stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturers...

  20. 40 CFR 60.4240 - What are my compliance requirements if I am a manufacturer of stationary SI internal combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... I am a manufacturer of stationary SI internal combustion engines >19 KW (25 HP) that are rich burn... I am a manufacturer of stationary SI internal combustion engines >19 KW (25 HP) that are rich burn..., and must test their engines as specified in that part. Stationary SI internal combustion engine...

  1. Stationary Combustion Turbines: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about the NESHAP for stationary combustion turbines by reading the rule history, the rule summary, additional resources, docket folder documents, the economic impact analysis, fact sheet and more

  2. Final Rule to Reduce Hazardous Air Emissions from Newly Built Stationary Combustion Turbines: Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains an August 2003 fact sheet with information regarding the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for Stationary Combustion Turbines. This document provides a summary of the information for this NESHAP.

  3. RECOVERY AND SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 FROM STATIONARY COMBUSTION SYSTEMS BY PHOTOSYNTHESIS OF MICROALGAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. T. Nakamura; Dr. Miguel Olaizola; Dr. Stephen M. Masutani

    2002-12-01

    Most of the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy production. Photosynthesis has long been recognized as a means, at least in theory, to sequester anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Aquatic microalgae have been identified as fast growing species whose carbon fixing rates are higher than those of land-based plants by one order of magnitude. Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI), Aquasearch, and the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute at the University of Hawaii are jointly developing technologies for recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from stationary combustion systems by photosynthesis of microalgae. The research is aimed primarily at demonstrating the ability of selected species of microalgae to effectively fix carbon from typical power plant exhaust gases. This report covers the reporting period 1 July to 30 September 2002 in which PSI, Aquasearch and University of Hawaii conducted their tasks. Based on the work conducted during the previous reporting period, PSI initiated work on feasibility demonstration of direct feeding of coal combustion gas to microalgae. Aquasearch continued their effort on selection and characterization of microalgae suitable for CO{sub 2} sequestration. University of Hawaii continued effort on system optimization of the CO{sub 2} sequestration system.

  4. RECOVERY AND SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 FROM STATIONARY COMBUSTION SYSTEMS BY PHOTOSYNTHESIS OF MICROALGAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Takashi Nakamura

    2003-04-01

    Most of the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy production. Photosynthesis has long been recognized as a means, at least in theory, to sequester anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Aquatic microalgae have been identified as fast growing species whose carbon fixing rates are higher than those of land-based plants by one order of magnitude. Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI), Aquasearch, and the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute at the University of Hawaii are jointly developing technologies for recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from stationary combustion systems by photosynthesis of microalgae. The research is aimed primarily at demonstrating the ability of selected species of microalgae to effectively fix carbon from typical power plant exhaust gases. This report covers the reporting period 1 October to 31 December 2002 in which PSI, Aquasearch and University of Hawaii conducted their tasks. Based on the work conducted during the previous reporting period, PSI initiated work on feasibility demonstration of direct feeding of coal combustion gas to microalgae. Aquasearch continued their effort on selection and characterization of microalgae suitable for CO{sub 2} sequestration. University of Hawaii continued effort on system optimization of the CO{sub 2} sequestration system.

  5. RECOVERY AND SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 FROM STATIONARY COMBUSTION SYSTEMS BY PHOTOSYNTHESIS OF MICROALGAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takashi Nakamura

    2004-11-01

    Most of the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy production. Photosynthesis has long been recognized as a means, at least in theory, to sequester anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Aquatic microalgae have been identified as fast growing species whose carbon fixing rates are higher than those of land-based plants by one order of magnitude. Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI), Aquasearch, and the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute at the University of Hawaii are jointly developing technologies for recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from stationary combustion systems by photosynthesis of microalgae. The research is aimed primarily at demonstrating the ability of selected species of microalgae to effectively fix carbon from typical power plant exhaust gases. This report covers the reporting period 1 April to 30 June 2004 in which PSI, Aquasearch and University of Hawaii conducted their tasks. Based on the work during the previous reporting period, Aquasearch run further, pilot and full scale, carbon sequestration tests with actual propane combustion gases utilizing two different strains of microalgae. Aquasearch continued testing modifications to the coal combustor to allow for longer-term burns. Aquasearch also tested an alternative cell separation technology. University of Hawaii performed experiments at the Mera Pharmaceuticals facility in Kona in mid June to obtain data on the carbon venting rate out of the photobioreactor; gas venting rates were measured with an orifice flow meter and gas samples were collected for GC analysis to determine the carbon content of the vented gases.

  6. Recovery and Sequestration of CO2 from Stationary Combustion Systems by Photosynthesis of Microalgae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Nakamura; C.L. Senior

    2005-04-01

    Most of the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy production. Photosynthesis has long been recognized as a means, at least in theory, to sequester anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Aquatic microalgae have been identified as fast growing species whose carbon fixing rates are higher than those of land-based plants by one order of magnitude. Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI), Aquasearch, and the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute at the University of Hawaii are jointly developing technologies for recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from stationary combustion systems by photosynthesis of microalgae. The research is aimed primarily at demonstrating the ability of selected species of microalgae to effectively fix carbon from typical power plant exhaust gases. This report covers the reporting period 1 October 2000 to 31 March 2005 in which PSI, Aquasearch and University of Hawaii conducted their tasks. This report discusses results of the work pertaining to five tasks: Task 1--Supply of CO2 from Power Plant Flue Gas to Photobioreactor; Task 2--Selection of Microalgae; Task 3--Optimization and Demonstration of Industrial Scale Photobioreactor; Task 4--Carbon Sequestration System Design; and Task 5--Economic Analysis. Based on the work conducted in each task summary conclusion is presented.

  7. 40 CFR 60.4238 - What are my compliance requirements if I am a manufacturer of stationary SI internal combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... I am a manufacturer of stationary SI internal combustion engines â¤19 KW (25 HP) or a manufacturer... Standards of Performance for Stationary Spark Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Compliance Requirements... SI internal combustion engines ≤19 KW (25 HP) or a manufacturer of equipment containing such engines...

  8. 40 CFR 60.4241 - What are my compliance requirements if I am a manufacturer of stationary SI internal combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... I am a manufacturer of stationary SI internal combustion engines participating in the voluntary... I am a manufacturer of stationary SI internal combustion engines participating in the voluntary... internal combustion engines with a maximum engine power greater than 19 KW (25 HP) that do not use gasoline...

  9. RECOVERY AND SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 FROM STATIONARY COMBUSTION SYSTEMS BY PHOTOSYNTHESIS OF MICROALGAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. T. Nakamura; Dr. Miguel Olaizola; Dr. Stephen M. Masutani

    2002-03-01

    Most of the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy production. Photosynthesis has long been recognized as a means, at least in theory, to sequester anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Aquatic microalgae have been identified as fast growing species whose carbon fixing rates are higher than those of land-based plants by one order of magnitude. Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI), Aquasearch, and the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute at the University of Hawaii are jointly developing technologies for recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from stationary combustion systems by photosynthesis of microalgae. The research is aimed primarily at demonstrating the ability of selected species of microalgae to effectively fix carbon from typical power plant exhaust gases. This report covers the reporting period 1 October to 31 December 2001 in which PSI, Aquasearch and University of Hawaii conducted their tasks. Based on the work conducted during the previous reporting period, PSI initiated work on the component optimization work. Aquasearch continued their effort on selection of microalgae suitable for CO{sub 2} sequestration. University of Hawaii initiated effort on system optimization of the CO{sub 2} sequestration system.

  10. RECOVERY AND SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 FROM STATIONARY COMBUSTION SYSTEMS BY PHOTOSYNTHESIS OF MICROALGAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. T. Nakamura; Dr. Miguel Olaizola; Dr. Steven M. Masutani

    2001-08-01

    Most of the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy production. Photosynthesis has long been recognized as a means, at least in theory, to sequester anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Aquatic microalgae have been identified as fast growing species whose carbon fixing rates are higher than those of land-based plants by one order of magnitude. Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI), Aquasearch, and the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute at the University of Hawaii are jointly developing technologies for recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from stationary combustion systems by photosynthesis of microalgae. The research is aimed primarily at demonstrating the ability of selected species of microalgae to effectively fix carbon from typical power plant exhaust gases. This report covers the reporting period 1 April to 30 June 2001 in which PSI, Aquasearch and University of Hawaii conducted their tasks. Based on the work conducted during the previous reporting period, PSI initiated work on the component optimization work. Aquasearch continued their effort on selection of microalgae suitable for CO{sub 2} sequestration. University of Hawaii initiated effort on system optimization of the CO{sub 2} sequestration system.

  11. RECOVERY AND SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 FROM STATIONARY COMBUSTION SYSTEMS BY PHOTOSYNTHESIS OF MICROALGAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. T. Nakamura; Dr. C.L. Senior

    2001-03-01

    Most of the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy production. Photosynthesis has long been recognized as a means, at least in theory, to sequester anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Aquatic microalgae have been identified as fast growing species whose carbon fixing rates are higher than those of land-based plants by one order of magnitude. Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI), Aquasearch, and the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute at the University of Hawaii are jointly developing technologies for recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from stationary combustion systems by photosynthesis of microalgae. The research is aimed primarily at demonstrating the ability of selected species of microalgae to effectively fix carbon from typical power plant exhaust gases. This report covers the reporting period from 1 October to 31 December 2000. During this period planning of chemostat experiments at Aquasearch was initiated. These experiments will be used to select microalgae for the photobioreactor demonstrations. An initial survey of techniques for removing CO{sub 2} from coal-fired flue gas was begun. Chemical adsorption using MEA is the most mature technology and looks to be the most economically viable in the near future.

  12. RECOVERY AND SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 FROM STATIONARY COMBUSTION SYSTEMS BY PHOTOSYNTHESIS OF MICROALGAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. T. Nakamura; Dr. Miguel Olaizola; Dr. Stephen M. Masutani

    2002-01-01

    Most of the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy production. Photosynthesis has long been recognized as a means, at least in theory, to sequester anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Aquatic microalgae have been identified as fast growing species whose carbon fixing rates are higher than those of land-based plants by one order of magnitude. Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI), Aquasearch, and the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute at the University of Hawaii are jointly developing technologies for recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from stationary combustion systems by photosynthesis of microalgae. The research is aimed primarily at demonstrating the ability of selected species of microalgae to effectively fix carbon from typical power plant exhaust gases. This report is the summary first year report covering the reporting period 1 October 2000 to 30 September 2001 in which PSI, Aquasearch and University of Hawaii conducted their tasks. Based on the work conducted during the previous reporting period, PSI initiated work on the component optimization work. Aquasearch continued their effort on selection of microalgae suitable for CO{sub 2} sequestration. University of Hawaii initiated effort on system optimization of the CO{sub 2} sequestration system.

  13. RECOVERY AND SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 FROM STATIONARY COMBUSTION SYSTEMS BY PHOTOSYNTHESIS OF MICROALGAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dr. T. Nakamura; Dr. Miguel Olaizola; Dr. Stephen M. Masutani

    2002-01-01

    Most of the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy production. Photosynthesis has long been recognized as a means, at least in theory, to sequester anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Aquatic microalgae have been identified as fast growing species whose carbon fixing rates are higher than those of land-based plants by one order of magnitude. Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI), Aquasearch, and the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute at the University of Hawaii are jointly developing technologies for recovery and sequestration of CO(sub 2) from stationary combustion systems by photosynthesis of microalgae. The research is aimed primarily at demonstrating the ability of selected species of microalgae to effectively fix carbon from typical power plant exhaust gases. This report covers the reporting period 1 October to 31 December 2001 in which PSI, Aquasearch and University of Hawaii conducted their tasks. Based on the work conducted during the previous reporting period, PSI initiated work on the component optimization work. Aquasearch continued their effort on selection of microalgae suitable for CO(sub 2) sequestration. University of Hawaii initiated effort on system optimization of the CO(sub 2) sequestration system

  14. Control of emissions from stationary combustion sources: Pollutant detection and behavior in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Licht, W.; Engel, A.J.; Slater, S.M.

    1979-01-01

    Stationary combustion resources continue to be significant sources of NOx and SOx pollutants in the ambient atmosphere. This volume considers four problem areas: (1) control of emissions from stationary combustion sources, particularly SOx and NOx (2) pollutant behavior in the atmosphere (3) advances in air pollution analysis and (4) air quality management. Topics of interest include carbon slurries for sulfur dioxide abatement, mass transfer in the Kellogg-Weir air quality control system, oxidation/inhibition of sulfite ion in aqueous solution, some micrometeorological methods of measuring dry deposition rates, Spanish moss as an indicator of airborne metal contamination, and air quality impacts from future electric power generation in Texas

  15. 40 CFR 60.4231 - What emission standards must I meet if I am a manufacturer of stationary SI internal combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... I am a manufacturer of stationary SI internal combustion engines or equipment containing such... Stationary Spark Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Emission Standards for Manufacturers § 60.4231 What emission standards must I meet if I am a manufacturer of stationary SI internal combustion engines or...

  16. Integrity assessment of stationary blade ring for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jung Yong; Chung, Yong Keun; Park, Jong Jin; Kang, Yong Ho

    2004-01-01

    The inner side between HP stationary blades in no.1 turbine of nuclear power plant A is damaged by the FAC(Flow Assisted Corrosion) which is exposed to moisture. For many years the inner side is repaired by welding the damaged part, however, the FAC continues to deteriorate the original material of the welded blade ring. In this study, we have two stages to verify the integrity of stationary blade ring in nuclear power plant A. In the stage I, replication of blade ring is performed to survey the microstructure of blade ring. In the stage II, the stress analysis of blade ring is performed to verify the structural safety of blade ring. Throughout the two stages analysis of blade ring, the stationary blade ring had remained undamaged

  17. 40 CFR 60.4242 - What other requirements must I meet if I am a manufacturer of stationary SI internal combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... I am a manufacturer of stationary SI internal combustion engines or equipment containing stationary SI internal combustion engines or a manufacturer of equipment containing such engines? 60.4242... Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Compliance Requirements for Manufacturers § 60.4242 What other...

  18. 40 CFR 60.4203 - How long must my engines meet the emission standards if I am a stationary CI internal combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... emission standards if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? 60.4203 Section 60.4203... Combustion Engines Emission Standards for Manufacturers § 60.4203 How long must my engines meet the emission standards if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? Engines manufactured by...

  19. Experimental Investigations of Extracted Rapeseed Combustion Emissions in a Small Scale Stationary Fluidized Bed Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Steinbrecht

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to observe the combustion process of extracted rapeseed (ER grist in a stationary fluidized bed combustor (SFBC and evaluate the chemical compositions of the flue gas emissions. The experimental tests of ER combustion in the 90 to 200 kW (Kilowatt SFB combustion test facility show that the optimal ER combustion temperature is within the range from 850 to 880° C. Temperature and the concentration of exhausted emissions (e.g. O2, CO, CO2, NO, NO2, SO2, Corg were measured with dedicated sensors distributed within the combustor, along its height and in the flue gas duct. The experimental results showed that with respect to German emission limits the concentration of SO2 and NOx in the flue gas were high whereas that of CO was low. This study furthermore is applicable for the abundant biomass residue resources in Vietnam (rice husk, rice straw, bagasse, cassava residues, coconut shell etc., which have similar chemical compositions to ER.

  20. Experimental investigations of extracted rapeseed combustion emissions in a small scale stationary fluidized bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh Tung, N.; Steinbrecht, D. [Rostock University, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Marine Technology, Chair of Environmental Technology, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 6, D - 18059 Rostock (Germany); Tung, N. D. [Hanoi University of Agriculture- Hanoi/Vietnam, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Trau Quy - Gia Lam - Hanoi (Viet Nam); Vincent, T. [Rostock University, Chair of Energy Systems, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 6, D - 18059 Rostock (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The objective of this study was to observe the combustion process of extracted rapeseed (ER) grist in a stationary fluidized bed combustor (SFBC) and evaluate the chemical compositions of the flue gas emissions. The experimental tests of ER combustion in the 90 to 200 kW SFB combustion test facility show that the optimal ER combustion temperature is within the range from 850 to 880 {sup o}C. Temperature and the concentration of exhausted emissions (e.g. O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO, NO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, C{sub org}) were measured with dedicated sensors distributed within the combustor, along its height and in the flue gas duct. The experimental results showed that with respect to German emission limits the concentration of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} in the flue gas were high whereas that of CO was low. This study furthermore is applicable for the abundant biomass residue resources in Vietnam (rice husk, rice straw, bagasse, cassava residues, coconut shell etc.), which have similar chemical compositions to ER. (author)

  1. Experimental study of a staged combustion system for stationary gas turbine applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, Warren G.

    Two optically accessible experimental test rigs were designed and constructed to investigate a staged or distributed combustion system for stationary gas turbine applications. The test rigs were fuelled with natural gas and featured two combustion zones: the main combustion zone (MCZ) and the secondary combustion zone (SCZ). The MCZ is a swirl stabilized dump combustor and the SCZ, which is axially downstream from the MCZ, is formed by a transverse jet injecting a premixed fuel/air mixture into the vitiated stream. After installing and commissioning the test rig, an emission survey was conducted to investigate the SCZ conditions, equivalence ratio and momentum ratio, that produce low NOx emissions and give a higher temperature rise before a simulated high pressure turbine than firing only the MCZ. The emission survey found several operating conditions that show the benefit of combustion staging. These beneficial conditions had an SCZ equivalence ratio between 0.41 and 1.12. The data from the emission survey was then used to create an artificial neural network (ANN). The ANN used a multi-layer feed-forward network architecture and was trained with experimental data using the backpropagation training algorithm. The ANN was then used to create performance maps and optimum operational regions were sought. Lastly, optical diagnostics were used to obtain information on the nature of the SCZ reactive jet. The diagnostics included high speed CH* chemiluminescence, OH planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) and dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS). The chemiluminescence and PLIF were used to qualitatively determine the size and shape of the transverse jet reaction zone. Dual-pump CARS was used to quantitatively determine the temperature and H2/N2 concentration ratio profile at the mid-plane of the transverse jet. Dual-pump CARS data was collected for four operating conditions but only one is presented in this dissertation. For the condition presented, the

  2. Standard technical specifications combustion engineering plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    This report documents the results of the combined effort of the NRC and the industry to produce improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS) for Combustion Engineering Plants. The improved STS wee developed based on the criteria in the interim Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specification Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated February 6, 1987. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. This document, Volume 1, contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.9 of the improved STS

  3. Standard Technical Specifications, Combustion Engineering plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    This NUREG contains improved Standard Technical Specifications (M) for Combustion Engineering (CE) Plants and documents the positions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission based on the CE Owners Group's proposed STS. This document is the result of extensive technical meetings and discussions among the NRC staff, the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, the NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the interim Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specification Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated February 6, 1987. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. Volume 1 contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. This document Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. Volume 3 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.9 of the improved STS

  4. Standard Technical Specifications, Combustion Engineering plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    This NUREG contains improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS) for Combustion Engineering (CE) Plants and documents the positions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission based on the CE Owners Group's proposed STS. This document is the result of extensive technical meetings and discussions among the NRC staff, the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, the NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the interim Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specification Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated February 6, 1987. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. Volume 1 contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved SM. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. This document Volume 3 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.9 of the improved M

  5. Improved Economic Performance of Municipal Solid Waste Combustion Plants by Model Based Combustion Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leskens, M.

    2013-01-01

    The combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW) is used for its inertisation, reduction of its volume and the conversion of its energy content into heat and/or electricity. Operation and control of modern large scale MSW combustion (MSWC) plants is determined by economic and environmental objectives

  6. Effect of Non-Stationary Combustion Phases on Emission Factors of Selected Pollutants and PCDD/F from Domestic Combustion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šyc, Michal; Horák, J.; Krpec, K.; Hopan, F.; Ocelka, T.; Stáňa, M.

    LVI, č. 2 (2010), s. 183-187 ISSN 1210-0471 R&D Projects: GA MŽP(CZ) SP/1A2/116/07; GA MŠk 2B08048 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : combustion * emission factors * pollutants Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering http://transactions.fs.vsb.cz/2010-2/1798.pdf

  7. Construction of a power plant with prototype DLN combustion turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkinson, M.L. [CSW Energy, Dallas, TX (United States); Drummond, L.J. [Zurn NEPCO, Redmond, WA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Design and construction of a power plant is always a difficult process and this is especially true when the main keystone, the combustion turbine engine, is being modified by the manufacturer resulting in numerous changes in the design interfaces. The development of the design and construction of the Orange Cogeneration Facility has been in parallel with major modification of the LM6000 to DLE technology (a Dry Low NO{sub x} combustion system). The Dry Low NO{sub x} Combustion System for a combustion turbine offered a means to reduce water usage, lower Zero Liquid Discharge System operating costs and reduce emissions to meet Florida Department of Environmental Protection requirements. This development was successfully accomplished by Owner, EPC contractor and Combustion Turbine Manufacturer by maintaining flexibility in the design and construction while the design interfaces and performance of the combustion turbines were being finalized.

  8. Emulsified fuels. Its use in stationary sources; Combustibles emulsionados. Su utilizacion en fuentes estacionarias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos Morales, Gilberto; Magdaleno Molina, Moises; Vargas Y, Victor M; Gavira D, A [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    1993-12-31

    Basic aspects are set forth of the heavy hydrocarbon fuels, the principles, preparation and particularities of the combustion with emulsions, that currently represent one option, either by themselves or in combination with other technologies to utilize heavy hydrocarbons, obtaining advantages in the reduction of polluting emissions, particulate matter and NOx, which allow continuing operating the operation within the limits established by the technical ecological standards. [Espanol] Se exponen aspectos basicos de los combustibles de hidrocarburos pesados (HC), los principios, preparacion y particularidades de la combustion con emulsiones, que actualmente representan una alternativa por si solos o en combinacion con otras tecnologias para utilizar hidrocarburos pesados, obteniendose ventajas en la reduccion de emisiones de contaminantes de particulas y NOx, lo cual permite continuar operando dentro de los limites que establecen las normas tecnicas ecologicas.

  9. Emulsified fuels. Its use in stationary sources; Combustibles emulsionados. Su utilizacion en fuentes estacionarias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos Morales, Gilberto; Magdaleno Molina, Moises; Vargas Y, Victor M.; Gavira D, A. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    1992-12-31

    Basic aspects are set forth of the heavy hydrocarbon fuels, the principles, preparation and particularities of the combustion with emulsions, that currently represent one option, either by themselves or in combination with other technologies to utilize heavy hydrocarbons, obtaining advantages in the reduction of polluting emissions, particulate matter and NOx, which allow continuing operating the operation within the limits established by the technical ecological standards. [Espanol] Se exponen aspectos basicos de los combustibles de hidrocarburos pesados (HC), los principios, preparacion y particularidades de la combustion con emulsiones, que actualmente representan una alternativa por si solos o en combinacion con otras tecnologias para utilizar hidrocarburos pesados, obteniendose ventajas en la reduccion de emisiones de contaminantes de particulas y NOx, lo cual permite continuar operando dentro de los limites que establecen las normas tecnicas ecologicas.

  10. Demonstration of IGCC features - plant integration and syngas combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannemann, F.; Huth, M.; Karg, J.; Schiffers, U. [Siemens AG Power Generation (KWU), Erlanger/Muelheim (Germany)

    2000-07-01

    Siemens is involved in three IGCC plants in Europe that are currently in operation. Against the background of the Puertollano and Buggenum plants, some of the specific new features of fully integrated IGCC power plants are discussed, including: requirements and design features of the gas turbine syngas supply system; gas turbine operating experience with air extraction for the air separation unit from the gas turbine air compressor; and design requirements and operational features of the combustion system. 7 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Numerical simulations of stationary and transient spray combustion for aircraft gas turbine applications

    OpenAIRE

    Fossi, Athanase Alain

    2017-01-01

    Le développement des turbines à gaz d’aviation actuelles et futures est principalement axé sur la sécurité, la performance, la minimisation de la consommation de l’énergie, et de plus en plus sur la réduction des émissions d’espèces polluantes. Ainsi, les phases de design de moteurs sont soumises auxaméliorations continues par des études expérimentales et numériques. La présente thèse se consacre à l’étude numérique des phases transitoires et stationnaires de la combustion au sein d’une turbi...

  12. Sensor response time calculation with no stationary signals from a Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vela, O.; Vallejo, I.

    1998-01-01

    Protection systems in a Nuclear Power Plant have to response in a specific time fixed by design requirements. This time includes the event detection (sensor delay) and the actuation time system. This time is obtained in refuel simulating the physics event, which trigger the protection system, with an electric signal and measuring the protection system actuation time. Nowadays sensor delay is calculated with noise analysis techniques. The signals are measured in Control Room during the normal operation of the Plant, decreasing both the cost in time and personal radioactive exposure. The noise analysis techniques require stationary signals but normally the data collected are mixed with process signals that are no stationary. This work shows the signals processing to avoid no-stationary components using conventional filters and new wavelets analysis. (Author) 2 refs

  13. Study on the design of inlet and exhaust system of a stationary internal combustion engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesgin, Ugur

    2005-01-01

    The design and operational variables of inlet and exhaust systems are decisive to determine overall engine performance. The best engine overall performance can be obtained by proper design of the engine inlet and exhaust systems and by matching the correct turbocharger to the engine. This paper presents the results of investigations to design the inlet and exhaust systems of a stationary natural gas engine family. To do this, a computational model is verified in which zero dimensional phenomena within the cylinder and one dimensional phenomena in the engine inlet and exhaust systems are used. Using this engine model, the effects of the parameters of the inlet and exhaust systems on the engine performance are obtained. In particular, the following parameters are chosen: valve timing, valve diameter, valve lift profiles, diameter of the exhaust manifold, inlet and exhaust pipe lengths, and geometry of pipe junctions. Proper sizing of the inlet and exhaust pipe systems is achieved very precisely by these investigations. Also, valve timing is tuned by using the results obtained in this study. In general, a very high improvement potential for the engines studied here is presented

  14. Dust separation on bio mass combustion plants

    OpenAIRE

    Srebrenkoska, Vineta

    2011-01-01

    Biomass is material from vegetation, it can be used as a fuel in various boilers and combustor. The main components: carbon, oxygen and hydrogen but it also contains nitrogen, sulphur, small amounts of chlorides and ash. The main part of the ash comprises: Ca, K, Si, Mg, Mn, Al, Fe, P, Na and Zn. During combustion, various kinds of impurities are generated and some of them we find in the flue gas. Most of these are related to the composition of the biomass: particles from ash, NOx f...

  15. Prevention of spontaneous combustion of backfilled plant waste material.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adamski, SA

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Since Grootegeluk Coal Mine commenced operation in 1980 all plant discards and inter-burden material have been stacked on discards dumps, a practice that has led to the spontaneous combustion of the waste material on these dumps. From 1980 to 1988...

  16. Development of second-generation PFB combustion plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, A.; Domeracki, W.; Horazak, D. [and others

    1995-12-31

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (USDOE) Contract DE-AC21-86MC21023 to develop a new type of coal-fueled plant for electric power generation. This new type of plant--called an Advanced or Second-generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (APFBC) plant--offers the promise of efficiencies greater than 45 percent (HHV), with both emissions and a cost of electricity that are significantly lower than conventional pulverized-coal-fired plants with scrubbers. This paper summarizes the pilot-plant R&D work being conducted to develop this new type of plant and discusses a proposed design that should reduce demonstration-plant risks and costs.

  17. Fossil fuel power plant combustion control: Research in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasini, S.; Trebbi, G.

    1991-01-01

    Electric power demand forecasts for Italy to the year 2000 indicate an increase of about 50% which, due to the current moratorium on nuclear energy, should be met entirely by fossil fuel power plants. Now, there is growing public concern about possible negative health impacts due to the air pollution produced through the combustion of fossil fuels. In response to these concerns, ENEL (Italian National Electricity Board) is investing heavily in air pollution abatement technology R ampersand D. The first phase involves the investigation of pollution mechanisms in order to develop suitable mathematical models and diagnostic techniques. The validity of the models is being tested through through measurements made by sophisticated instrumentation placed directly inside the combustion chambers of steam generator systems. These are allowing engineers to develop improved combustion control methods designed to reduce air pollution at source

  18. Politics for emissions reduction at large combustion plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragos, L.; Persu, I.; Predescu, I.

    2005-01-01

    This article presents the harmonization process of Romanian national legislation with EU directives for the establishment of measures for the emission reduction of air pollutants from large combustion plants. The quantity of SO 2 , NO x and dust emissions from big combustion installation during the period 1980 - 2003 is given. The characteristics of the native fuels are also presented. Recently a reorganization and restructuring of the electricity production from lignite are accomplished. It is emphasised in the paper that the use of lignite for energy production is necessary even if the additional costs implied by the compliance with Directive 2001/80/EC are high. Clean combustion technologies and equipment promoted by the OVM-ICCPET, Bucharest will be applied for the improvement of the burning process and reduction of the emissions

  19. Catalytic production of hydrogen from methanol for mobile, stationary and portable fuel-cell power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukyanov, Boris N

    2008-01-01

    Main catalytic processes for hydrogen production from methanol are considered. Various schemes of fuel processors for hydrogen production in stationary, mobile and portable power plants based on fuel cells are analysed. The attention is focussed on the design of catalytic reactors of fuel processors and on the state-of-the-art in the design of catalysts for methanol conversion, carbon monoxide steam conversion and carbon monoxide selective oxidation. Prospects for the use of methanol in on-board fuel processors are discussed.

  20. Pre-Combustion Capture of CO2 in IGCC Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-12-15

    Pre-combustion capture involves reacting a fuel with oxygen or air and/or steam to give mainly a 'synthesis gas (syngas)' or 'fuel gas' composed of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The carbon monoxide is reacted with steam in a catalytic reactor, called a shift converter, to produce CO2 and more hydrogen. CO2 is then separated, usually by a physical or chemical absorption process, resulting in a hydrogen-rich fuel which can be used in many applications, such as boilers, furnaces, gas turbines, engines and fuel cells. Pre-combustion capture is suitable for use in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants especially since the CO2 partial pressures in the fuel gas are higher than in the flue gas. After the introduction there follows a short discussion of the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction. This is followed by chapters on the means of CO2 capture by physical and chemical solvents, solid sorbents, and membranes. The results and conclusions of techno-economic studies are introduced followed by a look at some of the pilot and demonstration plants relevant to pre-combustion capture in IGCC plants.

  1. State of the art of large combustion plants and reference plants in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehmer, S.; Schindler, I.; Szednyj, I.; Winter, B.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the state of the art of large combustion plants with respect to the European directive on integrated pollution prevention and control (IPPC-Directive 96/61/EG). For this purpose 10 sites where one or more thermal power or district heating plants with a rated thermal input of > 50 MW are operated were selected and described in detail. Only coal and oil fired power plants were chosen because of the larger environmental impacts compared to gas fired combustion units. Large industrial combustion plants, where in addition to regular fuels also special fuels and wastes are combusted (e.g. power plants from refineries and from the pulp and paper industry), and waste incineration plants are not treated in this study. The depiction of power plants comprises the whole chain of operation, starting from the description of the type and composition of fuels, the pretreatment and introduction into the boiler, the firing technology, measures for emission reduction (both into air and water) and treatment of solid waste and residues from combustion. Furthermore possibilities to increase energy efficiency and economic aspects are examined in this study. Also legal aspects are shortly described at the beginning of the respective chapters. An actual topic is co-combustion of biomass and waste in thermal power plants. Results of trial operation in Austrian power plants are summarized and conclusions were drawn with respect to environmental impacts of co-incineration, such as emissions into air and water, quality of solid wastes and residues from co-incineration. Important aspects such as shifting of pollutants and dilution effects are discussed. The study concludes with the chapter 'State of the art for power plants', which gives a survey of the relevant measures with particular attention to above mentioned crucial points. (author)

  2. Hydrogen Generation, Combustibility and Mitigation in Nuclear Power Plant Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talha, K.A.; El-Sheikh, B.M.; Gad El-Mawla, A.S.

    2003-01-01

    The nuclear power plant is provided with features to insure safety. The engineered safety features (ESFs) are devoted to set operating conditions under accident conditions. If ESFs fail to apply in some accidents, this would lead to what called severe accidents, and core damage. In this case hydrogen will be generated from different sources particularly from metal-water reactions. Since the containment is the final barrier to protect the environment from the release of radioactive materials; its integrity should not be threatened. In recent years, hydrogen concentration represents a real problem if it exceeds the combustibility limits. This work is devoted to calculate the amount of hydrogen to be generated, indelicate its combustibility and how to inertize the containment using different gases to maintain its integrity and protect the environment from the release of radioactive materials

  3. Fuel combustion in thermal power plants in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotler, V.R.

    1983-11-01

    The position of black coal in the energy balance of Japan is discussed. About 75% of electric energy is produced by thermal power plants. Eighty-five per cent of electricity is produced by power plants fired with liquid fuels and 3% by coal fired plants. Coal production in Japan, the forecast coal import to the country by 1990 (132 Mt/year), proportion of coal imported from various countries, chemical and physical properties of coal from Australia, China and Japan are discussed. Coal classification used in Japan is evaluated. The following topics associated with coal combustion in fossil-fuel power plants in Japan are discussed: coal grindability, types of pulverizing systems, slagging properties of boiler fuel in Japan, systems for slag removal, main types of steam boilers and coal fired furnaces, burner arrangement and design, air pollution control from fly ash, sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides, utilization of fly ash for cement production, methods for removal of nitrogen oxides from flue gas using ammonia and catalysts or ammonia without catalysts, efficiency of nitrogen oxide control, abatement of nitrogen oxide emission from boilers by flue gas recirculation and reducing combustion temperatures. The results of research into air pollution control carried out by the Nagasaki Technical Institute are reviewed.

  4. Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants-stationary batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, R.; Shao, J.; Krencicki, G.; Giachetti, R.

    1994-03-01

    The Aging Management Guideline (AMG) describes recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in BWR and PWR commercial nuclear power plant stationary batteries important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR Part 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein

  5. Modern fluidized bed combustion in Ostrava-Karvina cogeneration plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazac, V. [Energoprojekt Praha, Ostrava (Czechoslovakia); Novacek, A. [Moravskoslezske teplamy, Ostrava (Czechoslovakia); Volny, J. [Templamy Karvina (Czechoslovakia)

    1995-12-01

    The contemporary situation of our environment claims the sensitive approach to solving effective conversion of energy. Limited supplies of noble fuels and their prices evoke the need to use new combustion technologies of accessible fuels in given region without negative ecological influences. Energoproject participates in the preparation of the two projects in Ostrava-Karvin{acute a} black coal field in Czech Republic. The most effective usage of fuel energy is the combined of electricity and heat. If this physical principle is supported by a pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) one obtains a high electricity/heat ratio integrated steam-gas cycle on the basis of solid fuel. Cogeneration plant Toebovice is the dominant source (600 MW{sub th}) of Ostrava district heating system (1100 MW{sub th}). The high utilization of the installed output and utilization of the clean, compact and efficient of the PFBC technology is the principal but not the single reason for the selection of the Toebovice power plant as the first cogeneration plant for installation of the PFBC in Czech Republic. The boiler will burn black coal from the neighboring coal basin.

  6. Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Glassman, Irvin

    1987-01-01

    Combustion, Second Edition focuses on the underlying principles of combustion and covers topics ranging from chemical thermodynamics and flame temperatures to chemical kinetics, detonation, ignition, and oxidation characteristics of fuels. Diffusion flames, flame phenomena in premixed combustible gases, and combustion of nonvolatile fuels are also discussed. This book consists of nine chapters and begins by introducing the reader to heats of reaction and formation, free energy and the equilibrium constants, and flame temperature calculations. The next chapter explores the rates of reactio

  7. Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Glassman, Irvin

    2008-01-01

    Combustion Engineering, a topic generally taught at the upper undergraduate and graduate level in most mechanical engineering programs, and many chemical engineering programs, is the study of rapid energy and mass transfer usually through the common physical phenomena of flame oxidation. It covers the physics and chemistry of this process and the engineering applications-from the generation of power such as the internal combustion automobile engine to the gas turbine engine. Renewed concerns about energy efficiency and fuel costs, along with continued concerns over toxic and particulate emissions have kept the interest in this vital area of engineering high and brought about new developments in both fundamental knowledge of flame and combustion physics as well as new technologies for flame and fuel control. *New chapter on new combustion concepts and technologies, including discussion on nanotechnology as related to combustion, as well as microgravity combustion, microcombustion, and catalytic combustion-all ...

  8. Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Glassman, Irvin

    1997-01-01

    This Third Edition of Glassman's classic text clearly defines the role of chemistry, physics, and fluid mechanics as applied to the complex topic of combustion. Glassman's insightful introductory text emphasizes underlying physical and chemical principles, and encompasses engine technology, fire safety, materials synthesis, detonation phenomena, hydrocarbon fuel oxidation mechanisms, and environmental considerations. Combustion has been rewritten to integrate the text, figures, and appendixes, detailing available combustion codes, making it not only an excellent introductory text but also an important reference source for professionals in the field. Key Features * Explains complex combustion phenomena with physical insight rather than extensive mathematics * Clarifies postulates in the text using extensive computational results in figures * Lists modern combustion programs indicating usage and availability * Relates combustion concepts to practical applications.

  9. Pressurized fluidized bed combustion combined cycle power plant with coal gasification: Second generation pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farina, G.L.; Bressan, L.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the technical and economical background of a research and development program of a novel power generation scheme, which is based on coal gasification, pressurized fluid bed combustion and combined cycles. The participants in this program are: Foster Wheeler (project leader), Westinghouse, IGT and the USA Dept. of Energy. The paper describes the characteristics of the plant, the research program in course of implementation, the components of the pilot plant and the first results obtained

  10. Incineration as a treatment option for shredder light fractions (SLF) by a stationary fluidised bed combustion; Untersuchungen zur Verbrennung von Shredderleichtfraktionen in einer stationaeren Wirbelschicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, Gaston

    2011-07-15

    In this paper the suitability of the stationary fluidised bed combustion as a treatment option for shredder light fractions (SLF) is discussed. This SLF, SLF coarse grain and SLF generated in a further mechanical treatment were burned. The results show a strong change in grain size distribution of the bed material during the combustion the SLF and SLF-coarse fractions. The formation of agglomerates significantly impaired the fluidization. The main reason for this effect is the high content of alkali and alkaline earth metals in the SLF. During the incineration of SLF generated by further mechanical treatment the change in grain size distribution declines much more slowly. This results from the separation of hard plastics with higher calcium contents during further mechanical processing. The tests also showed a complete burnout and a significant enrichment of metals in the solid combustion residues (fabric filter ash bed ash, cyclone ash). These residues represent a recycling concentrate, which needs to be open in the future. (orig.)

  11. Cold flow model study of an oxyfuel combustion pilot plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guio-Perez, D.C.; Tondl, G.; Hoeltl, W.; Proell, T.; Hofbauer, H. [Vienna University of Technology, Institute of Chemical Engineering, Vienna (Austria)

    2011-12-15

    The fluid-dynamic behavior of a circulating fluidized bed pilot plant for oxyfuel combustion was studied in a cold flow model, down-scaled using Glicksman's criteria. Pressures along the unit and the global circulation rate were used for characterization. The analysis of five operating parameters and their influence on the system was carried out; namely, total solids inventory and the air velocity of primary, secondary, loop seal and support fluidizations. The cold flow model study shows that the reactor design allows stable operation at a wide range of fluidization rates, with results that agree well with previous observations described in the literature. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Model predictive control as a tool for improving the process operation of MSW combustion plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskens, M.; Kessel, L.B.M. van; Bosgra, O.H.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a feasibility study is presented on the application of the advanced control strategy called model predictive control (MPC) as a tool for obtaining improved process operation performance for municipal solid waste (MSW) combustion plants. The paper starts with a discussion of the operational objectives and control of such plants, from which a motivation follows for applying MPC to them. This is followed by a discussion on the basic idea behind this advanced control strategy. After that, an MPC-based combustion control system is proposed aimed at tackling a typical MSW combustion control problem and, using this proposed control system, an assessment is made of the improvement in performance that an MPC-based MSW combustion control system can provide in comparison to conventional MSW combustion control systems. This assessment is based on simulations using an experimentally obtained process and disturbance model of a real-life large-scale MSW combustion plant

  13. Demonstration project: Oxy-fuel combustion at Callide-A plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makino, Keiji; Misawa, Nobuhiro; Kiga, Takashi; Spero, Chris

    2007-07-01

    Oxy-fuel combustion is expected to be one of the promising systems on CO2 recovery from pulverized-coal power plant, and enable the CO2 to be captured in a more cost-effective manner compared to other CO2 recover process. An Australia-Japan consortium was established in 2004 specifically for the purpose of conducting a feasibility study on the application of oxy-fuel combustion to an existing pulverized-coal power plant that is Callide-A power plant No.4 unit at 30MWe owned by CS Energy in Australia. One of the important components in this study has been the recent comparative testing of three Australian coals under both oxy-fuel and air combustion conditions using the IHI combustion test facilities. The tests have yielded a number of important outcomes including a good comparison of normal air with oxy-fuel combustion, significant reduction in NOx mass emission rates under oxy-fuel combustion. On the basis of the feasibility study, the project under Australia-Japan consortium is now under way for applying oxy-fuel combustion to an existing plant by way of demonstration. In this project, a demonstration plant of oxy-fuel combustion will be completed by the end of 2008. This project aims at recovering CO2 from an actual power plant for storage. (auth)

  14. Real-time, adaptive machine learning for non-stationary, near chaotic gasoline engine combustion time series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Adam; Bohac, Stanislav V

    2015-10-01

    Fuel efficient Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine combustion timing predictions must contend with non-linear chemistry, non-linear physics, period doubling bifurcation(s), turbulent mixing, model parameters that can drift day-to-day, and air-fuel mixture state information that cannot typically be resolved on a cycle-to-cycle basis, especially during transients. In previous work, an abstract cycle-to-cycle mapping function coupled with ϵ-Support Vector Regression was shown to predict experimentally observed cycle-to-cycle combustion timing over a wide range of engine conditions, despite some of the aforementioned difficulties. The main limitation of the previous approach was that a partially acasual randomly sampled training dataset was used to train proof of concept offline predictions. The objective of this paper is to address this limitation by proposing a new online adaptive Extreme Learning Machine (ELM) extension named Weighted Ring-ELM. This extension enables fully causal combustion timing predictions at randomly chosen engine set points, and is shown to achieve results that are as good as or better than the previous offline method. The broader objective of this approach is to enable a new class of real-time model predictive control strategies for high variability HCCI and, ultimately, to bring HCCI's low engine-out NOx and reduced CO2 emissions to production engines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. DEFINITION OF DENSITY OF THE THERMAL STATIONARY STREAMS ON A SURFACES OF A SLEEVE OF CYLINDER COMBUSTION ENGINE BY A METHOD OF OPTIMUM FILTRATION KALMANA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZARENBIN V. G.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement. At research warmly intensity and thermal weariness of internal combustion engines (ICE the knowledge and the analysis of local temperatures and thermal streams in the basic details forming the chamber of combustion is defining. Theoretically the problem consists in the decision of the equation of heat conductivity at the set features of course of thermal processes on border of bodies. Thus there is a problem of accuracy of the decision since it depends on accuracy of the task of real boundary conditions which can be received only by means of physical experiment and corresponding metrological maintenance. Unlike temperature the thermal stream cannot be measured directly, therefore it define on a difference of temperatures (thermal gradient a method or a calorimetric method. Definition of density of streams with the help as named gauges of a thermal stream when the measured temperatures are used at the decision of a return problem of heat conductivity for chosen thermometric an element is most extended. In this case, except the requirement of one-dimensionality of distribution of temperatures, linearity and the minimum distortion of temperature fields of thermal system, there are considerable difficulties of calculation derivative of the measured temperature. To perspective it is possible to carry methods of researches which it is accepted to name cybernetic diagnostics or identification of systems. Their essence consists that the deformed information on object is compared to its mathematical model and then are defined its condition, parameters or entrance influences by minimization of square-law function are nonviscous. In work definition of density of thermal stationary streams on surfaces of a sleeve of cylinder ICE by a method of optimum filtration Kalmana and also an estimation of their reliability and accuracy is made. Possibility of application of filtration Kalmana is shown at experimental researches in ICE. The purpose

  16. 78 FR 54606 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-05

    ... Combustion Engines; New Source Performance Standards for Stationary Internal Combustion Engines AGENCY... hazardous air pollutants for stationary reciprocating internal combustion engines and the standards of performance for stationary internal combustion engines. Subsequently, the EPA received three petitions for...

  17. Comprehensive investigation of process characteristics for oxy-steam combustion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Bo; Zhao, Haibo; Zou, Chun; Zheng, Chuguang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Oxy-steam combustion exhibits better performance than oxy-CO 2 combustion. • Cost of electricity in oxy-steam combustion is 6.62% less than oxy-CO 2 combustion. • The increase of oxygen concentration in oxidant can improve its system performance. • The decrease of excess oxygen coefficient can be helpful for its system performance. • Integration with solar technology can enhance its thermodynamic performance. - Abstract: Oxy-steam combustion, as an alternative option of oxy-fuel combustion technology, is considered as a promising CO 2 capture technology for restraining CO 2 emissions from power plants. To attain its comprehensive process characteristics, process simulation, thermodynamic assessment, and sensitivity analysis for oxy-steam combustion pulverized-coal-fired power plants are investigated whilst its corresponding CO 2 /O 2 recycled combustion (oxy-CO 2 combustion) power plant is served as the base case for comparison. Techno-economic evaluation and integration with solar parabolic trough collectors are also discussed to justify its economic feasibility and improve its thermodynamic performance further, respectively. It is found that oxy-steam combustion exhibits better performance than oxy-CO 2 combustion on both thermodynamic and economic aspects, in which the cost of electricity decreases about 6.62% whilst the net efficiency and exergy efficiency increase about 0.90 and 1.01 percentage points, respectively. The increment of oxygen concentration in oxidant (20–45 mol.%) and decrease of excess oxygen coefficient (1.01–1.09) in a certain range are favorable for improving oxy-steam combustion system performance. Moreover, its thermodynamic performance can be improved when considering solar parabolic trough collectors for heating recycled water, even though its cost of electricity increases about 2 $/(MW h)

  18. Predictions of the impurities in the CO2 stream of an oxy-coal combustion plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hao; Shao, Yingjuan

    2010-01-01

    Whilst all three main carbon capture technologies (post-combustion, pre-combustion and oxy-fuel combustion) can produce a CO 2 dominant stream, other impurities are expected to be present in the CO 2 stream. The impurities in the CO 2 stream can adversely affect other processes of the carbon capture and storage (CCS) chain including the purification, compression, transportation and storage of the CO 2 stream. Both the nature and the concentrations of potential impurities expected to be present in the CO 2 stream of a CCS-integrated power plant depend on not only the type of the power plant but also the carbon capture method used. The present paper focuses on the predictions of impurities expected to be present in the CO 2 stream of an oxy-coal combustion plant. The main gaseous impurities of the CO 2 stream of oxy-coal combustion are N 2 /Ar, O 2 and H 2 O. Even the air ingress to the boiler and its auxiliaries is small enough to be neglected, the N 2 /Ar concentration of the CO 2 stream can vary between ca. 1% and 6%, mainly depending on the O 2 purity of the air separation unit, and the O 2 concentration can vary between ca. 3% and 5%, mainly depending on the combustion stoichiometry of the boiler. The H 2 O concentration of the CO 2 stream can vary from ca. 10% to over 40%, mainly depending on the fuel moisture and the partitioning of recycling flue gas (RFG) between wet-RFG and dry-RFG. NO x and SO 2 are the two main polluting impurities of the CO 2 stream of an oxy-coal combustion plant and their concentrations are expected to be well above those found in the flue gas of an air-coal combustion plant. The concentration of NO x in the flue gas of an oxy-coal combustion plant can be up to ca. two times to that of an equivalent air-coal combustion plant. The amount of NO x emitted by the oxy-coal combustion plant, however, is expected to be much smaller than that of the air-coal combustion plant. The reductions of the recirculated NO x within the combustion

  19. Boron availability to plants from coal combustion by-products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukier, U.; Sumner, M.E.

    1996-01-01

    Agronomic use of coal combustion by-products is often associated with boron (B) excess in amended soils and subsequently in plants. A greenhouse study with corn (Zea mays L.) as test plant was conducted to determine safe application rates of five fly ashes and one flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FDG). All by-products increased soil and corn tissue B concentration, in some cases above toxicity levels which are 5 mg hot water soluble B (hwsB)kg -1 soil and 100 mg B kg -1 in corn tissue. Acceptable application rates varied from 4 to 100 Mg ha -1 for different by-products. Leaching and weathering of a high B fly ash under ponding conditions decreased its B content and that of corn grown in fly ash amended soil, while leaching of the same fly ash under laboratory conditions increased fly ash B availability to corn in comparison to the fresh fly ash. Hot water soluble B in fly ash or FDG amended soil correlated very well with corn tissue B. Hot water soluble B in fly ash amended soil could be predicted based on soil pH and B solubility in ash at different pH values but not so in the case of FDG. Another greenhouse study was conducted to compare the influence of FDG and Ca(OH 2 ) on B concentration in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaves grown in soil amended with the high B fly ash. The Ca(OH) 2 significantly decreased tissue B content, while FDG did not affect B uptake from fly ash amended soil. 41 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs

  20. Novel roaming and stationary tethered aerial robots for continuous mobile missions in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Beom W.; Choi, Su Y.; Rim, Chun T. [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young Soo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cai, Guowei; Seneviratne, Lakmal [Dept. of Aerospace Engineering, Khalifa University, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2016-08-15

    In this paper, new tethered aerial robots including roaming tethered aerial robots (RTARs) for radioactive material sampling and stationary tethered aerial robots (STARs) for environment monitoring are proposed to meet extremely-long-endurance missions of nuclear power plants. The flight of the proposed tethered aerial robots may last for a few days or even a few months as long as the tethered cable provides continuous power. A high voltage AC or DC power system was newly adopted to reduce the mass of the tethered cable. The RTAR uses a tethered cable spooled from the aerial robot and an aerial tension control system. The aerial tension control system provides the appropriate tension to the tethered cable, which is accordingly laid down on the ground as the RTAR roams. The STAR includes a tethered cable spooled from the ground and a ground tension control system, which enables the STAR to reach high altitudes. Prototypes of the RTAR and STAR were designed and successfully demonstrated in outdoor environments, where the load power, power type, operating frequency, and flight attitude of the RTAR and STAR were: 180 W, AC 100 kHz, and 20 m; and 300 W, AC or DC 100 kHz, and 80 m, respectively.

  1. Novel Roaming and Stationary Tethered Aerial Robots for Continuous Mobile Missions in Nuclear Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beom W. Gu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, new tethered aerial robots including roaming tethered aerial robots (RTARs for radioactive material sampling and stationary tethered aerial robots (STARs for environment monitoring are proposed to meet extremely-long-endurance missions of nuclear power plants. The flight of the proposed tethered aerial robots may last for a few days or even a few months as long as the tethered cable provides continuous power. A high voltage AC or DC power system was newly adopted to reduce the mass of the tethered cable. The RTAR uses a tethered cable spooled from the aerial robot and an aerial tension control system. The aerial tension control system provides the appropriate tension to the tethered cable, which is accordingly laid down on the ground as the RTAR roams. The STAR includes a tethered cable spooled from the ground and a ground tension control system, which enables the STAR to reach high altitudes. Prototypes of the RTAR and STAR were designed and successfully demonstrated in outdoor environments, where the load power, power type, operating frequency, and flight attitude of the RTAR and STAR were: 180 W, AC 100 kHz, and 20 m; and 300 W, AC or DC 100 kHz, and 80 m, respectively.

  2. Sizing of lithium-ion stationary batteries for nuclear power plant use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exavier, Zakaria Barie; Chang, Choong-koo

    2017-01-01

    Class 1E power system is very essential in preventing significant release of radioactive materials to the environment. Batteries are designed to provide control power for emergency operation of safety-related equipment or equipment important to safety, including power for automatic operation of the Reactor Protection System (RPS) and Engineered Safety Features (ESF) protection systems during abnormal and accident conditions through associated inverters. Technical challenges that are involved in the life cycle of batteries used in the nuclear power plants (NPP) are significant. The extension of dc battery backup time used in the dc power supply system of the Nuclear Power Plants also remains a challenge. The lead acid battery is the most popular utilized at the present. And it is generally the most popular energy storage device, because of its low cost and wide availability. The lead acid battery is still having some challenges since many phenomenon are occurred inside the battery during its lifecycle. The image of Lithium-ion battery in 1991 is considered as alternative for lead acid battery due to better performance which Lithium-ion has over Lead acid. It has high energy density and advanced gravimetric and volumetric properties. It is known that industrial standards for the stationary Lithium-Ion battery are still under development. The aim of this paper is to investigate the possibility of replacing of lead acid battery with lithium-ion battery. To study the ongoing research activities and ongoing developed industrial standards for Lithium-ion battery and suggest the method for sizing including, capacity, dimensions, operational conditions, aging factor and safety margin for NPP use. (author)

  3. Effect of excess air on second-generation PFB combustion plant performance and economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, A.; Garland, R.; Newby, R.; Rehmat, A.; Rubow, L.; Bonk, D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a conceptual design of a 1.4-MPa (14-atm) coal-fired second-generation pressurized fluidized bed (PFB) combustion plant and identifies the performance and economic changes that result as the excess air and thus gas turbine-to-steam turbine power ratio, is changed. The performance of these plants, another second- generation PFB combustion plant, and a conventional pulverized-coal (PC)-fired plant with wet limestone flue gas desulfurization is compared. Depending upon the conditions selected, the PFB combustion plant can achieve a 45 percent efficiency (based on the higher heating value of the coal used as fuel) and a cost of electricity at least 20 percent lower than that of the conventional PC-fired plant

  4. The use of Stationary Phase Optimized Selectivity Liquid Chromatography for the development of herbal fingerprints to detect targeted plants in plant food supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deconinck, E; Djiogo, C A Sokeng; Kamugisha, A; Courselle, P

    2017-08-01

    The consumption of plant food supplements is increasing steadily and more and more, these products are bought through internet. Often the products sold through internet are not registered or declared with a national authority, meaning that no or minimal quality control is performed and that they could contain herbs or plants that are regulated. Stationary Phase Optimized Selectivity Liquid Chromatography (SOS-LC) was evaluated for the development of specific fingerprints, to be used for the detection of targeted plants in plant food supplements. Three commonly used plants in plant food supplements and two regulated plants were used to develop fingerprints with SOS-LC. It was shown that for all plants specific fingerprints could be obtained, allowing the detection of these targeted plants in triturations with different herbal matrices as well as in real samples of suspicious supplements seized by the authorities. For three of the five plants a more specific fingerprint was obtained, compared to the ones developed on traditional columns described in literature. It could therefore be concluded that the combination of segments of different types of stationary phases, as used in SOS-LC, has the potential of becoming a valuable tool in the quality control and the identification of crude herbal or plant material and in the detection of regulated plants in plant food supplements or other herbal preparations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of injection pressure on performance, emission, and combustion characteristics of diesel-acetylene-fuelled single cylinder stationary CI engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Anmesh Kumar; Soni, Shyam Lal; Sharma, Dilip; Jain, Narayan Lal

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, the effect of injection pressure on the performance, emission, and combustion characteristics of a diesel-acetylene fuelled single cylinder, four-stroke, direct injection (DI) diesel engine with a rated power of 3.5 kW at a rated speed of 1500 rpm was studied. Experiments were performed in dual-fuel mode at four different injection pressures of 180, 190, 200, and 210 bar with a flow rate of 120 LPH of acetylene and results were compared with that of baseline diesel operation. Experimental results showed that highest brake thermal efficiency of 27.57% was achieved at injection pressure of 200 bar for diesel-acetylene dual-fuel mode which was much higher than 23.32% obtained for baseline diesel. Carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon, and smoke emissions were also measured and found to be lower, while the NO x emissions were higher at 200 bar in dual fuel mode as compared to those in other injection pressures in dual fuel mode and also for baseline diesel mode. Peak cylinder pressure, net heat release rate, and rate of pressure rise were also calculated and were higher at 200 bar injection pressure in dual fuel mode.

  6. Stationary flywheel energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilhaus, A; Hau, E; Gassner, G; Huss, G; Schauberger, H

    1981-01-01

    The aim of this system study is to find out industrial applications of stationary flywheel energy accumulators. The economic value for the consumer and the effects on the power supply grid are investigated. Up to now, stationary flywheel energy accumulators have only been used in a small range. The main reason for thinking of the application in a wider range was the hope that those could be used economically for lowering the maximum output demand of the power supply grid. The possible savings in energy costs, however, proved to be too small for paying back the investment costs. Further benefits are necessary for advantageous application. As to overall economy, compensation of short time maximum power output seems to be more favorable at the power stations. An additional possibility for energy storage by flywheels is given where otherwise lost energy can be used effectively, according to the successful brake energy storage in vehicles. Under this aspect the future use of flywheels in wind-power-plants seems to be promising. Attractive savings of energy can be obtained by introducing modern flywheel technology for emergency power supply units which are employed for instance in telecommunication systems. Especially the application for emergency power supply, in power stations and in combustion with wind energy converters need further investigation.

  7. Combustion systems and power plants incorporating parallel carbon dioxide capture and sweep-based membrane separation units to remove carbon dioxide from combustion gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijmans, Johannes G [Menlo Park, CA; Merkel, Timothy C [Menlo Park, CA; Baker, Richard W [Palo Alto, CA

    2011-10-11

    Disclosed herein are combustion systems and power plants that incorporate sweep-based membrane separation units to remove carbon dioxide from combustion gases. In its most basic embodiment, the invention is a combustion system that includes three discrete units: a combustion unit, a carbon dioxide capture unit, and a sweep-based membrane separation unit. In a preferred embodiment, the invention is a power plant including a combustion unit, a power generation system, a carbon dioxide capture unit, and a sweep-based membrane separation unit. In both of these embodiments, the carbon dioxide capture unit and the sweep-based membrane separation unit are configured to be operated in parallel, by which we mean that each unit is adapted to receive exhaust gases from the combustion unit without such gases first passing through the other unit.

  8. Pilot incineration plant for solid, combustible, and low-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francioni, W.M.

    Radioactively contaminated wastes are formed in the handling of radioactive materials at the Federal Institute for Reactor Research (FIRR) and in other facilities, hospitals, sanitoria, industry, and nuclear power plants. A large part of the wastes are combustible and only very slightly radioactive. Incineration of these wastes is obvious. A pilot incineration plant, henceforth called the PIP, for radioactive combustible wastes of the FIRR is surveyed. The plant and its individual components are described. The production costs of the plant and experience gained in operation available at present are reviewed. Solid combustible radioactive waste can be incinerated in the PIP. The maximum possible reduction in volume of these wastes is achieved by incineration. Subsequently the chemically sterile ashes can be consolidated in a stable block suitable for long-term storage mixing with cement

  9. Feasibility Assessment of CO2 Capture Retrofitted to an Existing Cement Plant : Post-combustion vs. Oxy-fuel Combustion Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerbelová, Hana; Van Der Spek, Mijndert; Schakel, Wouter

    2017-01-01

    This research presents a preliminary techno-economic evaluation of CO2 capture integrated with a cement plant. Two capture technologies are evaluated, monoethanolamine (MEA) post-combustion CO2 capture and oxy-fuel combustion. Both are considered potential technologies that could contribute to

  10. Application and demonstration of oxyfuel combustion technologies to the existing power plant in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Terutoshi; Yamada, Toshihiko; Watanabe, Shuzo; Kiga, Takashi; Gotou, Takahiro [IHI Corporation, Tokyo (Japan). Power Plant Div.; Misawa, Nobuhiro [Electric Power Development Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Spero, Chris [CS Energy Ltd, Brisbane (Australia)

    2013-07-01

    Oxyfuel combustion is able to directly make the highly concentrated CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of pulverized coal fired power plant and, therefore, is expected as one of the promising technologies for CO{sub 2} capture. We are advancing the Oxyfuel combustion demonstration project, which is called Callide Oxyfuel Project, with the support of both Australian and Japanese governments. Currently the boiler retrofit work is completed and the commissioning in air combustion is going on. In this paper, we introduce the general outline of the Callide Oxyfuel Project and its progress.

  11. Sewage Treatment Plants: Standards of Performance for New Stationary Sources 1977 Final Rule (42 FR 58520)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document includes a copy of the Federal Register publication of the November 10, 1977 Final Rule for the Standards of Performance of New Stationary Sources for 40 CFR 60 Subparts O. This document is provided curtesy of HeinOnline.

  12. Determination of Plant-Available Nutrients in Two Wood Ashes: the Influence of Combustion Conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Perná, Ivana; Ochecová, P.; Száková, J.; Hanzlíček, Tomáš; Tlustoš, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 47, 13/14 (2016), 1664-1674 ISSN 0010-3624 R&D Projects: GA MZe QI102A207 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : combustion condition * crystal phases * fertilizer * plant-available nutrients * wood ash Subject RIV: DM - Solid Waste and Recycling Impact factor: 0.589, year: 2016

  13. Emissions from waste combustion. An application of statistical experimental design in a laboratory-scale boiler and an investigation from large-scale incineration plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaojing, Zhang

    1997-05-01

    The aim of this thesis is a study of the emissions from the combustion of household refuse. The experiments were both on a laboratory-scale boiler and on full-scale incineration plants. In the laboratory, an artificial household refuse with known composition was fed into a pilot boiler with a stationary grate. Combustion was under non-optimum conditions. Direct sampling with a Tenax adsorbent was used to measure a range of VOCs. Measurements were also made of incompletely burnt hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, oxygen and flue gas temperature. Combustion and emission parameters were recorded continuously by a multi-point data logger. VOCs were analysed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The full-scale tests were on seven Swedish incineration plants. The data were used to evaluate the emissions from large-scale incineration plants with various type of fuels and incinerators, and were also compared with the laboratory results. The response surface model developed from the laboratory experiments was also validated. This thesis also includes studies on the gasification of household refuse pellets, estimations of particulate and soot emissions, and a thermodynamic analysis of PAHs from combustion flue gas. For pellet gasification, experiments were performed on single, well characterised refuse pellets under carefully controlled conditions. The aim was to see if the effects of pellets were different from those of untreated household refuse. The results from both laboratory and full-scale tests showed that the main contributions to emissions from household refuse are plastics and moisture. 142 refs, 82 figs, 51 tabs

  14. Evaluation of Emissions Declarations according to 11. BimSchV of the year 2004 for the use of emissions reporting at UNFCCC and UNECE. Stationary internal combustion engines; Aufbereitung von Daten der Emissionserklaerungen gemaess 11. BImSchV aus dem Jahre 2004 fuer die Verwendung bei der UNFCCC- und UNECE-Berichterstattung. Teilbericht Stationaere Verbrennungsmotoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degel, Melanie; Joerss, Wolfram [IZT Institut fuer Zukunftsstudien und Technologiebewertung, Berlin (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    The Emissions Declarations according to 11{sup th} BImSchV from 2004 for stationary internal combustion engines were analysed with the aim to derive fuel specific emission factors for a set of air pollutants and greenhouse gases. For that purpose, curtly 1.000 plants have been identified which on one hand are operated with exactly one fuel (no fuel mixing) and on the other hand technologically solely consist of internal combustion engines (no peak boilers). During extensive checks of plausibility, 80 - 95% of the data sets were rejected, depending on pollutant and fuel. Nonetheless, very high fluctuation ranges for specific emissions were found in the remaining data material. As the result, emission factors have been derived for the pollutants NO{sub x}, CO, SO{sub 2}, formaldehyde, total dust, methane, B(a)P, benzene and total-C without Methane and for the fuels natural gas, landfill gas, digester gas, biogas, mine gas, light fuel oil/diesel oil and plant oil. The uncertainties of the derived emission factors are between {+-} 15% and two orders of magnitude. No or no resilient data have been found for the pollutants NH{sub 3}, N{sub 2}O, NMVOC, particulate matter PM{sub 2.5}/PM{sub 10} and soot as well as for the fuels Plant oil ester and wood gas. (orig.)

  15. Enrichment of thallium in fly ashes in a Spanish circulating fluidized-bed combustion plant

    OpenAIRE

    López Antón, María Antonia; Spears, D. Alan; Díaz Somoano, Mercedes; Díaz, Luis; Martínez Tarazona, María Rosa

    2015-01-01

    This work evaluates the behavior of thallium in a 50 MW industrial circulating fluidized-bed combustion plant (CFBC), focusing on the distribution of this element among the bottom and fly ashes separated by the solid retention devices in the plant. The results show that thallium species are mainly retained in the solid by-products and are not emitted to air with flue gases in significant amounts, proving that this technology is a more effective means of preventing thallium emissions than pulv...

  16. Exergetic analysis of cogeneration plants through integration of internal combustion engine and process simulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Leonardo de Oliveira [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: leonardo.carvalho@petrobras.com.br; Leiroz, Albino Kalab; Cruz, Manuel Ernani [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Mecanica], Emails: leiroz@mecanica.ufrj.br, manuel@mecanica.ufrj.br

    2010-07-01

    Internal combustion engines (ICEs) have been used in industry and power generation much before they were massively employed for transportation. Their high reliability, excellent power-to-weight ratio, and thermal efficiency have made them a competitive choice as main energy converters in small to medium sized power plants. Process simulators can model ICE powered energy plants with limited depth, due to the highly simplified ICE models used. Usually a better understanding of the global effects of different engine parameters is desirable, since the combustion process within the ICE is typically the main cause of exergy destruction in systems which utilize them. Dedicated commercial ICE simulators have reached such a degree of maturity, that they can adequately model a wide spectrum of phenomena that occur in ICEs. However, ICE simulators are unable to incorporate the remaining of power plant equipment and processes in their models. This paper presents and exploits the integration of an internal combustion engine simulator with a process simulator, so as to evaluate the construction of a fully coupled simulation platform to analyze the performance of ICE-based power plants. A simulation model of an actual cogeneration plant is used as a vehicle for application of the proposed computational methodology. The results show that by manipulating the engine mapping parameters, the overall efficiency of the plant can be improved. (author)

  17. Advanced combustion technologies for gas turbine power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandsburger, U.; Desu, S.B. [Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Roe, L.A.

    1995-10-01

    During the second half of fiscal year 1995 progress was made in all three funded subject areas of the project as well as in a new area. Work in the area of mixing and combustion management through flow actuation was transferred into an enclosed facility. Jet mixing in a ducted co-flow was examined. The same jets were also subjected to a strong acoustic field established in the duct. Excitation of the jet with static spatial modes was shown to be effective even in the presence of co-flow and the acoustic field. Only when a wall is placed at the jet exit plane did the acoustic field dominate the jet dispersion (as expected due to reflective boundary conditions and the jet shear layer receptivity). This case is, however, not the most relevant to gas turbine combustors since it precludes co-flow. In the area of combustor testing, the design, fabrication, and assembly of a modular combustor test rig for project has been completed at the University of Arkansas. In the area of high temperature piezoceramic actuator materials development, Sr{sub 2}(Nb{sub x}Ta{sub 1-x}){sub 2}O{sub 7} powders have been synthesized, and bulk samples and thick films sintered. These materials have a curie temperature of about 1400{degrees}C compared with 300{degrees}C for the commercially available PZT. While at room temperature the new materials show a piezoelectric constant (d{sub 33}) which is a factor of 100 lower than PZT, at high temperatures they can exhibit significant action. A new area of non-linear, neural-net based, controllers for mixing and combustion control has been added during the second contract year. This work is not funded by the contract. Significant progress was made in this area. Neural nets with up to 15 neurons in the hidden layer were trained with experimental data and also with data generated using linear stability theory. System ID was performed successfully. The network was then used to predict the behavior of jets excited at other modes not used for the training.

  18. Guidelines for the Layout and Contents of Safety Reports for Stationary Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    The purpose of the present document is to suggest guidelines for the organization and contents of the Safety Reports which support the request for authorization to construct and operate a nuclear power plant incorporating one or more reactors. Safety Reports represent the principal communication between the applicant and the Regulatory Body, as outlined in the Code of Practice for the Safe Operation of Nuclear Power Plants. It should be understood that these Safety Reports will be a valuable document for the applicant. They should contain, therefore, precise information on the plant and its operating conditions. The writing of Safety Reports should be considered an opportunity to enhance the safety of the plant and its operating conditions. Their main purpose is to provide information to permit the assessment of the nuclear safety implications which may arise from the establishment of the plant at the chosen site with due consideration to the health and safety of the general public and the operating personnel. Safety Reports should include information such as design bases, site and plant characteristics, limits and conditions, conduct of operation and safety analyses, in such way that the Regulatory Body may be able to evaluate the safety of the plant. The applicant should consider the present guidelines as a series of recommendations to be interpreted according to each specific case.

  19. Study of boron behaviour in two Spanish coal combustion power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-González, Raquel; Cuesta, Aida Fuente; Córdoba, Patricia; Díaz-Somoano, Mercedes; Font, Oriol; López-Antón, M Antonia; Querol, Xavier; Martínez-Tarazona, M Rosa; Giménez, Antonio

    2011-10-01

    A full-scale field study was carried out at two Spanish coal-fired power plants equipped with electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and wet flue gas desulfurisation (FGD) systems to investigate the distribution of boron in coals, solid by-products, wastewater streams and flue gases. The results were obtained from the simultaneous sampling of solid, liquid and gaseous streams and their subsequent analysis in two different laboratories for purposes of comparison. Although the final aim of this study was to evaluate the partitioning of boron in a (co-)combustion power plant, special attention was paid to the analytical procedure for boron determination. A sample preparation procedure was optimised for coal and combustion by-products to overcome some specific shortcomings of the currently used acid digestion methods. In addition boron mass balances and removal efficiencies in ESP and FGD devices were calculated. Mass balance closures between 83 and 149% were obtained. During coal combustion, 95% of the incoming boron was collected in the fly ashes. The use of petroleum coke as co-combustible produced a decrease in the removal efficiency of the ESP (87%). Nevertheless, more than 90% of the remaining gaseous boron was eliminated via the FGD in the wastewater discharged from the scrubber, thereby causing environmental problems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Improved electrical efficiency and bottom ash quality on waste combustion plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Peter A.; Nesterov, I.; Boejer, M.; Hyks, J.; Astrup, T.; Kloeft, H.; Dam-Johansen, K.; Lundtorp, K.; Hedegaard Madsen, O.; Frandsen, F. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)); Mogensen, Erhardt (Babcock and Wilcox Voelund A/S, Glostrup (Denmark))

    2010-07-01

    Investigations making it possible to evaluate and further develop concepts to improve electrical efficiency in a waste combustion plant were performed. Furthermore, one objective of the study was to investigate the possibilities of improving waste bottom ash leaching properties by use of a rotary kiln treatment. The project work included construction of a bench-scale rotary kiln, performing ash rotary kiln treatment experiments, conducting gas suction probe measurements on a waste incineration plant and making some concept evaluations. The influence of the rotary kiln thermal treatment on the leaching of Ca, Al, Si, Mg, Ba, Sr, Cl, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, Mo, sulfate, DOC and carbonate was determined. As a result of these tests, the rotary kiln thermal treatment of bottom ashes can be recommended for reducing the leaching of Cu, Pb, Cl, Zn and DOC; however, an increased leaching of Cr and Mo should be expected. The combustion conditions above the grate of a waste incineration plant were investigated and the release and concentration of volatile ash species in the flue gas such as Cl, Na, K, Ca, Pb, Zn and S were measured. The conducted measurements show that flue gas from grate sections 3 and 4 can produce a sufficiently hot flue gas that contains only low concentrations of corrosive species, and therefore can be used to increase superheater temperatures. Implementation of the so-called flue gas split concept together with other steam circle modifications on a waste combustion plant, and using a reasonable increase in final steam temperature from 400 to 500 deg. C, have the potential to increase electrical efficiency from 24 to 30% (with respect to lower fuel heating value) in a waste combustion plant. (Author)

  1. Risk analysis of highly combustible gas storage, supply, and distribution systems in PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simion, G.P.; VanHorn, R.L.; Smith, C.L.; Bickel, J.H.; Sattison, M.B.; Bulmahn, K.D.

    1993-06-01

    This report presents the evaluation of the potential safety concerns for pressurized water reactors (PWRs) identified in Generic Safety Issue 106, Piping and the Use of Highly Combustible Gases in Vital Areas. A Westinghouse four-loop PWR plant was analyzed for the risk due to the use of combustible gases (predominantly hydrogen) within the plant. The analysis evaluated an actual hydrogen distribution configuration and conducted several sensitivity studies to determine the potential variability among PWRs. The sensitivity studies were based on hydrogen and safety-related equipment configurations observed at other PWRs within the United States. Several options for improving the hydrogen distribution system design were identified and evaluated for their effect on risk and core damage frequency. A cost/benefit analysis was performed to determine whether alternatives considered were justifiable based on the safety improvement and economics of each possible improvement

  2. Formation of the gaseous phase of impurity elements from coal combustion at a thermal power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizil'shtein, L.Ya.; Levchenko, S.V.; Peretyakt'ko, A.G.

    1991-01-01

    Data are reported on the distribution of impurity elements in their principal carriers: organic matter, iron sulfides, and clays. Tests with high-temperature combustion of coals and argillites indicate that elements associated with clay minerals largely remain in ash and slag. They do not pass to the gas phase - a factor to be considered in assessment of environmental impact from thermal power plants and specification of toxic concentration levels of impurity elements in coal

  3. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND ECONOMICS OF A NOMINAL 500 MWe SECOND-GENERATION PFB COMBUSTION PLANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Robertson; H. Goldstein; D. Horazak; R. Newby

    2003-09-01

    Research has been conducted under United States Department of Energy Contract DE-AC21-86MC21023 to develop a new type of coal-fired plant for electric power generation. This new type of plant, called a Second Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion Plant (2nd Gen PFB), offers the promise of efficiencies greater than 48 percent, with both emissions and a cost of electricity that are significantly lower than those of conventional pulverized coal-fired (PC) plants with wet flue gas desulfurization. The 2nd Gen PFB plant incorporates the partial gasification of coal in a carbonizer, the combustion of carbonizer char in a pressurized circulating fluidized bed boiler, and the combustion of carbonizer syngas in a gas turbine combustor to achieve gas turbine inlet temperatures of 2300 F and higher. A conceptual design and an economic analysis was previously prepared for this plant. When operating with a Siemens Westinghouse W501F gas turbine, a 2400psig/1000 F/1000 F/2-1/2 in. Hg. steam turbine, and projected carbonizer, PCFB, and topping combustor performance data, the plant generated 496 MWe of power with an efficiency of 44.9 percent (coal higher heating value basis) and a cost of electricity 22 percent less than a comparable PC plant. The key components of this new type of plant have been successfully tested at the pilot plant stage and their performance has been found to be better than previously assumed. As a result, the referenced conceptual design has been updated herein to reflect more accurate performance predictions together with the use of the more advanced Siemens Westinghouse W501G gas turbine. The use of this advanced gas turbine, together with a conventional 2400 psig/1050 F/1050 F/2-1/2 in. Hg. steam turbine increases the plant efficiency to 48.2 percent and yields a total plant cost of $1,079/KW (January 2002 dollars). The cost of electricity is 40.7 mills/kWh, a value 12 percent less than a comparable PC plant.

  4. AKUT-II: an experimental plant for purifying the HTR loop of combustion waste gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaujean, H.; Vygen, H.

    1976-02-15

    A plant for the separation of aerosols, krypton and tritium (AKUT) used for purifying the head end of the reprocessing of thorium-containing fuel elements from combustion waste gases is described. Data are to be collected to enable a process engineer to plan and construct a large-scale plant, and the correctness and practicability of the concept adopted is to be proved in conjunction with the JUPITER plant. It is true that the tests on the AKUT I plant confirmed that the flow scheme was basically correct, but the actual experimental operation was considerably limited by a fixed and rigid coupling to the combustion furnace. Some operational conditions were encountered which did not meet the design values. Part of the plant (krypton separation) is being tested in the USA. The German concept was taken over in the early stages of tests and adapted to existing apparatuses, the result inevitably being different experimental conditions. The AKUT II plant can now be used for consideration of the economic and safety conditions, and comparisons can be made.

  5. Present status and perspectives of Co-combustion in German power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richers, U.; Seifert, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische Chemie]|[Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Programm Nachhaltigkeit, Energie- und Umwelttechnik; Scheurer, W.; Hein, K.R.G. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Verfahrenstechnik und Dampfkesselwesen

    2002-05-01

    Various approaches to the future waste management policy in Germany are currently under discussion. One problem arising in this connection is the suitability of existing furnaces for the co-combustion of waste. The use of sewage treatment sludge in power plants is already being practiced on a technical scale. Co-combustion in power plants is of interest also because of the CO{sub 2} problem, as renewable resources can also be used for this purpose. This article documents the technical status of co-combustion in Germany and the available quantities of selected supplementary fuels. Moreover, experience accumulated in German coal fired power plants in using supplementary fuels is compiled. Future possibilities are assessed. (orig.) [German] Fuer die zukuenftige Ausrichtung der Abfallentsorgung gibt es verschiedene Moeglichkeiten, die in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland diskutiert werden. Eine Fragestellung in diesem Zusammenhang ist die Eignung bestehender Feuerungsanlagen fuer die Mitverbrennung von Abfallstoffen. Der Einsatz von Klaerschlamm in Kraftwerken wird bereits grosstechnisch praktiziert. Die Mitverbrennung in Kraftwerken ist zusaetzlich aufgrund der CO{sub 2}-Problematik von Interesse, denn nachwachsende Rohstoffe eignen sich ebenfalls zur Mitverbrennung. In dieser Arbeit werden der technische Stand der Mitverbrennung in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland und die dort zur Verfuegung stehenden Mengen ausgewaehlter Zusatzbrennstoffe dokumentiert. Ausserdem werden die Erfahrungen aus deutschen Kraftwerken beim Einsatz von Zusatzbrennstoffen zusammengestellt. Die zukuenftigen Moeglichkeiten werden abgeschaetzt. (orig.)

  6. On the need for new continues measurement techniques at combustion plants; Anlaeggningars behov av ny kontinuerlig maetteknik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eskilsson, David; Samuelsson, Jessica [Swedish National Testing and Research Inst., Boraas (Sweden)

    2006-11-15

    The purpose of this study is to make an inventory regarding the need for new continuous measurement techniques at combustion plants in Sweden. In total 15 interviews at 15 different combustion plants were made. The interviewed plants are of different sizes and use different combustion techniques, fuels, and cleaning equipments. They thereby well reflect the combustion plants present in Sweden today. Among many interesting interview results, we chose to highlight: Continuous measurement of the moisture content of the fuel, which can be used to decide the value of a fuel delivery, or for monitoring or to controlling the combustion (e.g. the speed of the grate); Continuous measurement of the heating value of the fuel, which can be used to decide the value of a fuel delivery, or for monitoring or to controlling the combustion. There is a need for temperature sensors which better withstand the environment in the furnace. Moreover, there is also a need for 3-dimensional measurements of the temperature in the furnace, especially for fluidized beds. This information can be used to control the combustion in different ways, e.g. preventing the bed from sintering. At some plants there was a need to measure the rate of corrosion and the growth of deposits. The measurements can be used to control the fuel mix at an early stage and to thereby avoid problems caused by corrosion and deposits. The measurement results can also be used to control the soot cleaning equipment, fuel mixture and adding of additive. At some of the interviewed plants there was a need to continuously measure the amount of unburned fuel in the ash. The continuous measurement results can be used for automatic control or monitoring of the combustion process. Several plants had problems with their dust instruments. Suitable topics for future work include investigating how the measurement techniques mentioned above may be developed/improved and implemented at the plants.

  7. Air pollution emission reduction techniques in combustion plants; Technique de reduction des emissions de polluants atmospheriques dans les installations de combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouscaren, R. [CITEPA, Centre Interprofessionnel Technique d`Etudes de la Pollution Atmospherique, 75 - Paris (France)

    1996-12-31

    Separating techniques offer a large choice between various procedures for air pollution reduction in combustion plants: mechanical, electrical, filtering, hydraulic, chemical, physical, catalytic, thermal and biological processes. Many environment-friendly equipment use such separating techniques, particularly for dust cleaning and fume desulfurizing and more recently for the abatement of volatile organic pollutants or dioxins and furans. These processes are briefly described

  8. Effect of combustion characteristics on wall radiative heat flux in a 100 MWe oxy-coal combustion plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S.; Ryu, C. [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of). School of Mechanical Engineering; Chae, T.Y. [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of). School of Mechanical Engineering; Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of). Energy System R and D Group; Yang, W. [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of). Energy System R and D Group; Kim, Y.; Lee, S.; Seo, S. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute (KEPRI), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of). Power Generation Lab.

    2013-07-01

    Oxy-coal combustion exhibits different reaction, flow and heat transfer characteristics from air-coal combustion due to different properties of oxidizer and flue gas composition. This study investigated the wall radiative heat flux (WRHF) of air- and oxy-coal combustion in a simple hexahedral furnace and in a 100 MWe single-wall-fired boiler using computational modeling. The hexahedral furnace had similar operation conditions with the boiler, but the coal combustion was ignored by prescribing the gas properties after complete combustion at the inlet. The concentrations of O{sub 2} in the oxidizers ranging between 26 and 30% and different flue gas recirculation (FGR) methods were considered in the furnace. In the hexahedral furnace, the oxy-coal case with 28% of O{sub 2} and wet FGR had a similar value of T{sub af} with the air-coal combustion case, but its WRHF was 12% higher. The mixed FGR case with about 27% O{sub 2} in the oxidizer exhibited the WRHF similar to the air-coal case. During the actual combustion in the 100 MWe boiler using mixed FGR, the reduced volumetric flow rates in the oxy-coal cases lowered the swirl strength of the burners. This stretched the flames and moved the high temperature region farther to the downstream. Due to this reason, the case with 30% O{sub 2} in the oxidizers achieved a WRHF close to that of air-coal combustion, although its adiabatic flame temperature (T{sub af}) and WHRF predicted in the simplified hexahedral furnace was 103 K and 10% higher, respectively. Therefore, the combustion characteristics and temperature distribution significantly influences the WRHF, which should be assessed to determine the ideal operating conditions of oxy- coal combustion. The choice of the weighted sum of gray gases model (WSGGM) was not critical in the large coal-fired boiler.

  9. Simultaneous equivalence ratio and velocity measurements for non-stationary combustion study in a stratified flow; Mesures couplees de richesse et de vitesse pour la combustion instationnaire en ecoulement stratifie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquier-Guilbert, N

    2004-12-15

    Simultaneous knowledge of local velocity and equivalence ratio is very important in numerous combustion applications and especially for direct injection engines where the flame propagates through a heterogeneous concentration distribution of fuel-air mixture. This study reproduce heterogeneities of equivalence ratio with propane and air in a constant volume combustion vessel. The local influence of velocity and equivalence ratio on the propagation of a spark-ignited flame is studied. To create a stratification, a rich axisymmetric pulsed jet is injected in a leaner chamber and the mixing is ignited. Two optical diagnostics are used simultaneously, PIV for velocity and FARLIF for equivalence ratio, with or without combustion. All properties and range of applications of PIV and FARLIF have been verified. These methods were then used to study the characteristics of stratified combustion. (author)

  10. The rise of hot gases resulting from hydrogen combustion at a tritium recovery plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selander, W.N.

    1981-10-01

    An accidental release of hydrogen isotopes at a proposed tritium recovery plant may result in a fire or explosion. In this report estimates are given for the initial transient rise and final height of the cloud of hot gasses which results from various modes of combustion. The radiation dose equivalent caused by the downwind passage of the tritium-bearing cloud is estimated to be less than 100 mrem in any mode of combustion or weather condition. The model used for calculating the final height of the cloud depends on an entrainment assumption, and the low-density cloud loses energy by entrainment at a slower rate than in conventional atmospheric processes. Consequently, the estimated final cloud height is conservative, and, therefore, the actual radiation dose equivalent would be lower than predicted

  11. LES SOFTWARE FOR THE DESIGN OF LOW EMISSION COMBUSTION SYSTEMS FOR VISION 21 PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifford E. Smith; Steven M. Cannon; Virgil Adumitroaie; David L. Black; Karl V. Meredith

    2005-01-01

    In this project, an advanced computational software tool was developed for the design of low emission combustion systems required for Vision 21 clean energy plants. Vision 21 combustion systems, such as combustors for gas turbines, combustors for indirect fired cycles, furnaces and sequestrian-ready combustion systems, will require innovative low emission designs and low development costs if Vision 21 goals are to be realized. The simulation tool will greatly reduce the number of experimental tests; this is especially desirable for gas turbine combustor design since the cost of the high pressure testing is extremely costly. In addition, the software will stimulate new ideas, will provide the capability of assessing and adapting low-emission combustors to alternate fuels, and will greatly reduce the development time cycle of combustion systems. The revolutionary combustion simulation software is able to accurately simulate the highly transient nature of gaseous-fueled (e.g. natural gas, low BTU syngas, hydrogen, biogas etc.) turbulent combustion and assess innovative concepts needed for Vision 21 plants. In addition, the software is capable of analyzing liquid-fueled combustion systems since that capability was developed under a concurrent Air Force Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) program. The complex physics of the reacting flow field are captured using 3D Large Eddy Simulation (LES) methods, in which large scale transient motion is resolved by time-accurate numerics, while the small scale motion is modeled using advanced subgrid turbulence and chemistry closures. In this way, LES combustion simulations can model many physical aspects that, until now, were impossible to predict with 3D steady-state Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) analysis, i.e. very low NOx emissions, combustion instability (coupling of unsteady heat and acoustics), lean blowout, flashback, autoignition, etc. LES methods are becoming more and more practical by linking together tens

  12. Qualitative analysis of coal combusted in boilers of the thermal power plants in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurić Slavko N.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we have looked into the qualitative analysis of coals in Bosnia and Herzegovina (B-H. The analysis includes the following characteristics: moisture (W, ash (A, combustible matter (Vg and lower heating value (Hd. From the statistic parameters we have determined: absolute range (R, arithmetic mean (X, standard deviation (S and variations coefficient (Cv. It has been shown that the coal characteristics (W, A, Vg, Hd have normal distribution. The analysis show that there are considerable deviations of ash characteristics: moisture (36.23%, ash (34.21%, combustible matter (16.15% and lower heating value (25.16% from the mean value which is shown by the variations coefficient (Cv. Large oscilations of mass portions: W, A, Vg and Hd around the mean value can adversely influence the function of a boiler plant and an electric filter plant in thermal power plants in B-H in which the mentioned types of coal burn. Large ash oscilations (34.21% around the mean value point out to the inability of application of dry procedures of desulphurisation of smoke gasses (FGD due to the additional quantity of ash. It has been shown that the characteristics of Bosnian types of coal do not deviate a lot from the characteristics of coal in the surrounding countries (coals of Serbia and Monte Negro. The results can be used in analysis of coal combustion in thermal power plants, optimisation of electrical-filtre, reduction of SO2 in smoke gas and other practical problems.

  13. Increase in efficiency and reduction of generation cost at hard coal-fired power plants. Post-combustion of combustion residues from co-firing of RDF and biomass during dry ash removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baur, Guenter [Magaldi Power GmbH, Esslingen (Germany); Spindeldreher, Olaf [RWE Generation SE, Werne (Germany); RWE Generation SE, Essen (Germany)

    2013-09-01

    Secondary as well as substitute fuels are being used in hard coal-fired power plants to improve efficiency and to enlarge fuel flexibility. However, grinding and firing systems of the existing coal-fired plants are not designed for those co-fuels. Any deterioration of the combustion performance would reduce the power output and increase ash disposal costs by increased content of combustion residues. The application of air-cooled ash removal, with simultaneous and controlled post-combustion of unburned residues on the conveyor belt, enlarges the furnace and maintains combustion efficiency even with different fuel qualities. Plant efficiency can also be increased through heat recovery. (orig.)

  14. Experimental investigation of performance, exhaust emission and combustion parameters of stationary compression ignition engine using ethanol fumigation in dual fuel mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamuwa, D.K.; Sharma, D.; Soni, S.L.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Potential of renewable fuels as diesel replacement is being emphasized. • Effect of ethanol fumigation on the performance of diesel engine is investigated. • NOx, CO_2 and smoke decreases with simultaneous increase in HC and CO. • Increase in ignition delay with decrease in combustion duration for ethanol substitution observed. - Abstract: Dwindling reserves and steeply increasing prices of the fossil-fuels, concern over climatic change due to release of anthropogenic greenhouse gases and the strict environmental regulations have motivated the researchers for the search for renewable alternative fuel that has clean burning characteristics and may be produced indigenously. Alcohols, being oxygenated fuel improve the combustion and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, thus enhancing agrarian economies and encouraging national economy as a whole. The objective of this paper is to investigate the thermal performance, exhaust emissions and combustion behaviour of small capacity compression ignition engine using fumigated ethanol. Fumigated ethanol at different flow rates is supplied to the cylinder during suction with the help of a simplified low cost ethanol fuelling system. With ethanol fumigation, brake thermal efficiency decreased upto 11.2% at low loads due to deteriorated combustion, whereas improved combustion increased efficiency up to 6% at higher loads, as compared to pure diesel. Maximum reduction of 22%, 41% and 27% respectively in nitrogen oxide, smoke and carbon-di-oxide emissions with simultaneous increase in hydrocarbon and carbon-mono-oxide emissions upto maximum of 144% and 139% respectively for different rates of ethanol fumigation have been observed, when compared to pure diesel operation. This is due to the changes in physico-chemical properties of air fuel mixture, viz combustion temperature, oxygen concentration, latent heat of vaporisation, fuel distribution, cetane number and ignition delay, that occurred with addition of

  15. Operational experiences of (in)direct co-combustion in coal and gas fired power plants in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Ree, R.; Korbee, R.; Meijer, R.; Konings, T.; Van Aart, F.

    2001-02-01

    The operational experiences of direct and indirect co-combustion of biomass/waste in European coal and natural gas fired power plants are addressed. The operational experiences of mainly Dutch direct co-combustion activities in coal fired power plants are discussed; whereas an overview of European indirect co-combustion activities is presented. The technical, environmental, and economic feasibility of different indirect co-combustion concepts (i.e. upstream gasification, pyrolysis, combustion with steam-side integration) is investigated, and the results are compared with the economic preferable concept of direct co-combustion. Main technical constraints that limit the co-combustion capacity of biomass/waste in conventional coal fired power plants are: the grindability of the biomass/coal blend, the capacity of available unit components, and the danger of severe slagging, fouling, corrosion and erosion. The main environmental constraints that have to be taken into account are the quality of produced solid waste streams (fly ash, bottom ash, gypsum) and the applicable air emission regulations. 6 refs

  16. Signal validation of SPDS variables for Westinghouse and Combustion Engineering plants - an EPRI project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    Signal validation in the context of this project is the process of combining information from multiple plant sensors to produce highly reliable information about plant conditions. High information reliability is achieved by the use of redundant sources of information and by the inherent detection, identification, and isolation of faulty signals. The signal validation methodology that has been developed in previous EPRI-sponsored projects has been enhanced and applied toward validation of critical safety-related SPDS signals in the Northeast Utilities Millstone 3 Westinghouse PWR plant and the Millstone 2 Combustion Engineering PWR plant. The designs were implemented in FORTRAN software and tested off-line using recorded plant sensor data, RETRAN-generated simulation data, and data to exercise software logic branches and the integration of software modules. Designs and software modules have been developed for 15 variables to support six PWR SPDS critical safety functions as required by a utility advisory group attached to the project. The signal validation process automates a task currently performed by plant operators and does so with consistent, verified logic regardless of operator stress and training level. The methodology uses a simple structure of generic software blocks, a modular implementation, and it performs effectively within the processor and memory constraints of modern plant process computers. The ability to detect and isolate sensor failures with greater sensitivity, robustness, and coverage of common-cause failures should ultimately lead to improved plant availability, efficiency, and productivity

  17. 77 FR 60341 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines; New Source Performance Standards for Stationary Internal Combustion Engines AGENCY: Environmental Protection... Pollutants for Stationary Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines to solicit comment on specific issues...

  18. Review: Circulation of Inorganic Elements in Combustion of Alternative Fuels in Cement Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortada Mut, Maria del Mar; Nørskov, Linda Kaare; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Cement production is an energy-intensive process, which traditionally has been dependent on fossil fuels. However, the use of alternative fuels, i.e., selected waste, biomass, and byproducts with recoverable calorific value, is constantly increasing. Combustion of these fuels is more challenging...... the internal circulation of S, Cl, Na, and K. Compounds containing these elements, such as alkali salts, evaporate when exposed to high temperatures and subsequently condense in colder parts of the plant. The transformation of the volatile inorganic species at different locations in the cement plant...... cycles of inorganic elements that are established within the cement plant and their dependence on process parameters. Special focus is given to the sulfur cycle. This cycle is intensified by CaSO4 decomposition, making it sensitive to local reducing conditions....

  19. Water-gas shift (WGS) Operation of Pre-combustion CO2 Capture Pilot Plant at the Buggenum IGCC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, H.A.J.; Damen, K.; Makkee, M.; Trapp, C.

    2014-01-01

    In the Nuon/Vattenfall CO2 Catch-up project, a pre-combustion CO2 capture pilot plant was built and operated at the Buggenum IGCC power plant, the Netherlands. The pilot consist of sweet water-gas shift, physical CO2 absorption and CO2 compression. The technology performance was verified and

  20. Design of the combustion system for the SGT5-8000H and first experiences in the Irsching power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huth, Michael; Gruschka, Uwe; Janus, Bertram; Meisl, Juergen [Siemens AG, Energy Sector, Muelheim an der Ruhr (Germany); Wasif, Sam [Siemens Power Generation Inc., Energy Sector, Orlando, FL (United States)

    2009-07-01

    The lean premixed combustion system for the new SGT5-8000H 50Hz H-class engine was scaled from the smaller Siemens 60Hz F-class engine. The paper describes the combustion system in more details and the testing methodology including six sigma approaches. First experiences with SGT5-8000H Prototype-Engine in the Irsching power plant are summarised. (orig.)

  1. Analysis of combustion turbine inlet air cooling systems applied to an operating cogeneration power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacartegui, R.; Jimenez-Espadafor, F.; Sanchez, D.; Sanchez, T.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, combustion turbine inlet air cooling (CTIAC) systems are analyzed from an economic outlook, their effects on the global performance parameters and the economic results of the power plant. The study has been carried out on a combined cogeneration system, composed of a General Electric PG 6541 gas turbine and a heat recovery steam generator. The work has been divided into three parts. First, a revision of the present CTIAC technologies is shown, their effects on power plant performance and evaluation of the associated investment and maintenance costs. In a second phase of the work, the cogeneration plant was modelled with the objective of evaluating the power increase and the effects on the generated steam and the thermal oil. The cogeneration power plant model was developed, departing from the recorded operational data of the plant in 2005 and the gas turbine model offered by General Electric, to take into consideration that, in 2000, the gas turbine had been remodelled and the original performance curves should be corrected. The final objective of this model was to express the power plant main variables as a function of the gas turbine intake temperature, pressure and relative humidity. Finally, this model was applied to analyze the economic interest of different intake cooling systems, in different operative ranges and with different cooling capacities

  2. Instrumental neutron activation analysis of coal and its combustion residues from a power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, J.M.; Jeong, J.H.; Lee, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    A growing demand of electrical energy derived from coal combustion led to a significant increase of coal ash as residues. Approximately 70 % of the fly ashes are recycled, while most of the bottom ashes have been land-filled in the ash pond in Korea. In this work, to evaluate the potential impacts of the residues from a coal power plant on the environment, its inorganic elemental components were determined by INAA and PGAA. Coal ash samples were collected from the biggest power plant complex in Korea. These samples were analyzed by using the NAA facilities in the HANARO research reactor of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. A total of 31 elements were analyzed in the samples, and certified reference materials were used for the analytical quality control. The enrichment status of a given metal in fuel coal and ashes was investigated by its concentration ratio. In order to assess the impact of the coal combustion residues on ecosystem, their concentrations determined for each respective type of the samples were compared to both reference data and nearby beach sand samples. (author)

  3. Recycling of impregnated wood and impregnating agents - combustion plant technology; Kyllaestetyn puutavaran ja kyllaestysaineiden kierraetys - polttolaitostekniikka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syrjaenen, T.; Kangas, E. [Kestopuu Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    2000-07-01

    It has been estimated that in the 20th century it is possible to recycle about 70 000 m{sup 3} of impregnated wood, corresponding to about 48 % of the total amount of annually demolished impregnated wood. The amount is estimated to grow up to 130 000 m{sup 3} in 2015 (about 65% of demolished impregnated wood). In the beginning half of the recyclable impregnated wood is poles, but the share of sawn timber will increase as the time goes by. The poles and pieces of them are demolished and transported to an intermediate storage e.g. on the yard of an electricity supply company, from which they can be fetched in larger quantities. Even wood impregnation plant can act as intermediate storage sites. Collection points for impregnated construction timber can be established on timer sales companies, but most of it will be collected at waste processing sites. The economy of impregnated wood recycling chain depends on the sales income of generated energy. Calculations show that collection, transportation and processing costs can be covered with the sales of impregnated wood for energy generation and with recycling fees. The recycling fee for sawn timber would be 20 FIM/m{sup 3} and that for poles 64 FIM/m{sup 3}. In 2001 recycling fees were set for impregnated wood, the fees being 11 FIM/m{sup 3} for sawn timber and 42 FIM/m{sup 3} for poles. Collected impregnated wood can be crushed with either fixed or movable crushers used for crushing of waste wood. The impurities of wood (bolts, nails, stones, etc.), large dimensions of wood, in- homogenous material and dust require special features for the crushing equipment. Crushing device can be equipped with feeding crane and saw for processing of large-dimension wood, and metal detectors and magnetic separators if needed, but the large metal scrap has to be removed before crushing. At present in Finland there is not a combustion plant capable for combustion of impregnated wood without any modification. Improvements of flue gas

  4. Advanced exergoenvironmental analysis of a near-zero emission power plant with chemical looping combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrakopoulou, Fontina; Tsatsaronis, George; Morosuk, Tatiana

    2012-03-06

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) from power plants can be used to mitigate CO(2) emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels. However, CCS technologies are energy intensive, decreasing the operating efficiency of a plant and increasing its costs. Recently developed advanced exergy-based analyses can uncover the potential for improvement of complex energy conversion systems, as well as qualify and quantify plant component interactions. In this paper, an advanced exergoenvironmental analysis is used for the first time as means to evaluate an oxy-fuel power plant with CO(2) capture. The environmental impacts of each component are split into avoidable/unavoidable and endogenous/exogenous parts. In an effort to minimize the environmental impact of the plant operation, we focus on the avoidable part of the impact (which is also split into endogenous and exogenous parts) and we seek ways to decrease it. The results of the advanced exergoenvironmental analysis show that the majority of the environmental impact related to the exergy destruction of individual components is unavoidable and endogenous. Thus, the improvement potential is rather limited, and the interactions of the components are of lower importance. The environmental impact of construction of the components is found to be significantly lower than that associated with their operation; therefore, our suggestions for improvement focus on measures concerning the reduction of exergy destruction and pollutant formation.

  5. The recovery of waste and off-gas in Large Combustion Plants subject to IPPC National Permit in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Marco, Giuseppe; Manuzzi, Raffaella

    2018-03-01

    The recovery of off-gas, waste, and biomass in Large Combustion Plants for energy production gives the opportunity to recycle waste and by-products and to recover materials produced in agricultural and industrial activities. The paper illustrates the Italian situation regarding the production of energy from off-gas, biomass, and waste in Large Combustion Plants subject to Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control (IPPC) National Permit. Moreover, it focuses on the 4 Italian Large Combustion Plants producing energy from biomass and waste. For these ones it illustrates the specific issues related to and provides a description of the solutions adopted in the 4 Italian plants. Given that air emission performance is the most relevant aspect of this kind of plants, the paper specifically focuses and reports results about this subject. In particular, in Italy among 113 LCPs subject to IPPC National Permit we have found that 4 plants use as fuel waste (i.e. solid or liquid biomasses and Solid Recovered Fuels), or a mixture of waste and traditional fuels (co-combustion of Solid Recovered Fuels and coal), and that 11 plants use as fuel off-gases listed in Annex X (i.e. Refinery Fuel Gas, Syngas, and gases produced in iron and steel industries). Moreover, there are 2 IPPC chemical plants that recovery energy from different off-gases not listed in Annex X. Regarding the 4 LCPs that produce energy from waste combustion or co-combustion, we find that they take into account all the specific issues related to this kind of plants (i.e. detailed waste characterization, waste acceptance procedures, waste handling and storage, waste pretreatment and emissions to air), and adopt solutions that are best available techniques to prevent pollution. Moreover for one of these plants, the only one for which we have a significant set of monitoring data because it obtained the IPPC National Permit in 2008, we find that energy efficiency and air emissions of the principal pollutants are in

  6. Numerical analysis of the thermo-fluid-dynamic field in the combustion chamber of an incinerator plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, M.; Dell'Isola, M.; Massarotti, N.

    2009-01-01

    As the interest for energy recovery from waste incineration has increased over the years, concern for the impact such processes have on the environment has also grown. To reduce such an impact, the legislation enforced in Italy and Europe imposes important restrictions on the temperature of the exhausts in the combustion chamber, which must be kept above certain values depending on the type of waste that is being incinerated, for a given period of time. Such conditions can be rather difficult and certainly very expensive to monitor with acceptable accuracy. In this work, a numerical approach is presented for modelling waste combustion in a full scale incineration plant. Both solid and gas phase reactions are considered. Various modes of heat and mass transfer between the waste bed, the air and the combustion products are taken into account, as well as radiation from the combustion chamber walls and the combustion products. The temperature distribution in the combustion chamber is obtained considering either forced or mixed convection. It is therefore shown that neglecting buoyancy effects may lead to appreciable errors. Verification of the code performance is based on comparison with the results of an experimental campaign at a full scale plant in Italy.

  7. Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Co-production Plant Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel Haynes; Justin Brumberg; Venkatraman Iyer; Jonathan Janssen; Ben Lacy; Matt Mosbacher; Craig Russell; Ertan Yilmaz; Williams York; Willy Ziminsky; Tim Lieuwen; Suresh Menon; Jerry Seitzman; Ashok Anand; Patrick May

    2008-12-31

    Future high-efficiency, low-emission generation plants that produce electric power, transportation fuels, and/or chemicals from fossil fuel feed stocks require a new class of fuel-flexible combustors. In this program, a validated combustor approach was developed which enables single-digit NO{sub x} operation for a future generation plants with low-Btu off gas and allows the flexibility of process-independent backup with natural gas. This combustion technology overcomes the limitations of current syngas gas turbine combustion systems, which are designed on a site-by-site basis, and enable improved future co-generation plant designs. In this capacity, the fuel-flexible combustor enhances the efficiency and productivity of future co-production plants. In task 2, a summary of market requested fuel gas compositions was created and the syngas fuel space was characterized. Additionally, a technology matrix and chemical kinetic models were used to evaluate various combustion technologies and to select two combustor concepts. In task 4 systems analysis of a co-production plant in conjunction with chemical kinetic analysis was performed to determine the desired combustor operating conditions for the burner concepts. Task 5 discusses the experimental evaluation of three syngas capable combustor designs. The hybrid combustor, Prototype-1 utilized a diffusion flame approach for syngas fuels with a lean premixed swirl concept for natural gas fuels for both syngas and natural gas fuels at FA+e gas turbine conditions. The hybrid nozzle was sized to accommodate syngas fuels ranging from {approx}100 to 280 btu/scf and with a diffusion tip geometry optimized for Early Entry Co-generation Plant (EECP) fuel compositions. The swozzle concept utilized existing GE DLN design methodologies to eliminate flow separation and enhance fuel-air mixing. With changing business priorities, a fully premixed natural gas & syngas nozzle, Protoytpe-1N, was also developed later in the program. It did

  8. Standard technical specifications: Combustion engineering plants. Volume 1, Revision 1: Specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    This report documents the results of the combined effort of the NRC and the industry to produce improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS), Revision 1 for Combustion Engineering Plants. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved STS or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. Volume 1 contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. Volume 3 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.9 of the improved STS

  9. PWR radiation fields at combustion engineering plants through mid-1985: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barshay, S.S.; Beineke, T.A.; Bradshaw, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    This report presents the results of the initial phase of the EPRI-PWR Standard Radiation Monitoring Program (SRMP) for PWR nuclear power plants with Nuclear Steam Supply Systems supplied by Combustion Engineering, Inc. The purposes of the SRMP are to provide reliable, consistent and systematic measurements of the rate of radiation-field buildup at operating PWR's; and to use that information to identify opportunities for radiation control and the consequent reduction of occupational radiation exposure. The report includes radiation surveys from seven participating power plants. These surveys were conducted at well-defined locations on the reactor coolant loop piping and steam generators, and/or inside the steam generator channel heads. In most cases only one survey is available from each power plant, so that conclusions about the rate of radiation-field buildup are not possible. Some observations are made about the distribution pattern of radiation levels within the steam generator channel heads and around the reactor coolant loops. The report discusses the relationship between out-of-core radiation fields (as measured by the SRMP) and: the pH of the reactor coolant, the concentration of lithium hydroxide in the reactor coolant, and the frequency of changes in reactor power level. In order to provide data for possible future correlations of these parameters with the SRMP radiation-field data, the report summarizes information available from participating plants on primary coolant pH, and on the frequency of changes in reactor power level. 12 refs., 22 figs., 7 tabs

  10. Throughput of oil and demand for oil of non-stationary loaded sliding bearings in internal combustion engines. Oeldurchsatz und Oelbedarf instationaer belasteter Gleitlager am Verbrennungsmotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esch, H.J.

    1981-12-17

    The throughput of oil and the demand for oil of the non-stationary loaded sliding bearings was determined in a high speed petrol engine. The crankshaft bearing and connecting rod bearing were examined. The bearing temperature of the connecting rod bearing was measured by thermocouples built into this bearing; transmission of the signal from the rotating to the fixed part of the system was by means of a rotating transmitter. The temperature measurement in the crankshaft bearing was done by thermocouples in the bearing shell. Using a separate oil supply for the test bearing, the demand for oil was determined by reducing the oil pressure. Comparative oil throughput calculations were carried out to clear up the relationships discovered in the equipment. The results of the investigation are collected in 15 points, which are explained in detail. These include: negligible effect on the oil throughput of the ignition timing, air ratio and coolant temperature at constant speed and constant mean pressure, the considerable rise of the oil throughput through the connecting rod and crankshaft bearing with increasing speed, and the dominating effect of play in the bearing on the maximum bearing temperature.

  11. Obtaining zeolites from slags and ashes from a waste combustion plant in an autoclave process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grela Agnieszka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Waste combustion is associated with the generation of post-processing solid products – waste such as slag and ash. One of the promising technologies in waste management and processing is the synthesis of zeolites and other materials exhibiting sorption properties. The aim of this study was to characterise and assess the physicochemical properties of the waste and the products synthesised from it. This paper presents the possibility of synthesis zeolites from the slag and ash from two waste combustion plants. The investigated waste is classified as hazardous waste and denoted by the EWC code 190111*. The paper presents the results of physicochemical studies of these materials. As a result of synthesis in an autoclave at 140°C with the use of 2 M NaOH, and other compounds, such zeolite forms as chabazite and sodalite were obtained. Textural studies and ion-exchange capacity investigations carried out allowed characterisation of the sorption properties of the materials. It was found that the materials obtained are characterised by the BET specific surface areas of 25.45 m2/g and 16.79 m2/g.

  12. Real-time measurements of particulate matter and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions from stationary combustion sources used in oil and gas production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, D. W.; Hencken, K. R.; Johnsen, H. A.; Ross, J. R.; Walsh, P. M.

    1998-01-01

    Particulate matter emissions and some components of the particles were measured in the exhaust from combustion equipment used in oil and gas production operations near Bakersfield, California. The combustion sources included a 22.5 MW (electric) turbine generator, a 342-Bhp rich-burn spark ignition engine, and a 50 million Btu/h steam generator, all fired using natural gas. The particle components and measurement techniques were as follows: (1) Calcium, magnesium, sodium, silicon, and iron were measured using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), (2) particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were detected using the charge produced by photoionization, (3) particles having sizes between 0.1 and 7.5 (micro)m were counted using an instrument based on light scattering, and (4) total particulate matter was measured according to US EPA Method 5. Not all of the methods were applied to all of the sources. Measurements were also made in the ambient air near the combustion air inlets to the units, for comparison with the concentrations in the exhaust, but the inlet and outlet measurements were not done simultaneously. Calcium, sodium, and silicon were found in the exhaust from the steam generator at concentrations similar to those in the ambient air near the inlet to the burner. Sodium and silicon were observed in the engine exhaust at levels a factor of four higher than their concentrations in the air. The principal metal observed in the engine exhaust was calcium, a component of the lubricating oil, at a concentration of 11.6 (micro)g/m 3 . The air entering the gas turbine is filtered, so the average concentrations of metals in the turbine exhaust under steady operating conditions were even lower than in the air. During start-up following a shut-down to wash the turbine, silicon and iron were the major species in the stack, at concentrations of 6.4 and 16.2 (micro)g/m 3 , respectively. A possible source of silicon is the water injected into the turbine

  13. Plant growth response in experimental soilless mixes prepared from coal combustion products and organic waste materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardhan, S.; Watson, M.; Dick, W.A. [Ohio State University, Wooster, OH (United States)

    2008-07-15

    Large quantities of organic materials such as animal manures, yard trimmings, and biosolids are produced each year. Beneficial use options for them are often limited, and composting has been proposed as a way to better manage these organic materials. Similarly, burning of coal created 125 million tons of coal combustion products (CCP) in the United States in 2006. An estimated 53 million tons of CCP were reused, whereas the remainder was deposited in landfills. By combining CCP and composted organic materials (COM), we were able to create soilless plant growth mixes with physicochemical conditions that can support excellent plant growth. An additional benefit is the conservation of natural raw materials, such as peat, which is generally used for making soilless mixes. Experimental mixes were formulated by combining CCP and COM at ratios ranging from 2:8 to 8:2 (vol/vol), respectively. Water content at saturation for the created mixes was 63% to 72%, whereas for the commercial control, it was 77%. pH values for the best performing mixes ranged between 5.9 and 6.8. Electrical conductivity and concentrations of required plant nutrient were also within plant growth recommendations for container media. Significantly (P < 0.0001) higher plant biomass growth (7%-130%) was observed in the experimental mixes compared with a commercial mix. No additional fertilizers were provided during the experiment, and reduced fertilization costs can thus accrue as an added benefit to the grower. In summary, combining CCP and COM, derived from source materials often viewed as wastes, can create highly productive plant growth mixes.

  14. Mechanochemical modification of the composition and structure of plant raw materials to control the combustion of alternative fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bychkov Aleksey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibilities of mechanochemistry in processing of renewable lignocellulose raw material into solid kinds of biofuel are demonstrated in this work. A review of lignocellulose raw materials promising for our country is presented. These raw materials include wastes from agriculture and forestry, and the biomass of rapidly growing plants. The physicochemical properties of lignocellulose materials with different delignification degrees were modeled with the help of the artificial mixtures of plant raw material with purified cellulose and lignin. The data illustrating the effect of disperse state and lignin content on the reactivity of the material in subsequent combustion are presented. The tests at the combustion bench with the thermal power up to 5 MW allowed determining the optimal combustion parameters for the obtained biofuel in the autothermal mode.

  15. Numerical investigation of the flow inside the combustion chamber of a plant oil stove

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritz, B.; Werler, M.; Wirbser, H.; Gabi, M.

    2013-10-01

    Recently a low cost cooking device for developing and emerging countries was developed at KIT in cooperation with the company Bosch und Siemens Hausgeräte GmbH. After constructing an innovative basic design further development was required. Numerical investigations were conducted in order to investigate the flow inside the combustion chamber of the stove under variation of different geometrical parameters. Beyond the performance improvement a further reason of the investigations was to rate the effects of manufacturing tolerance problems. In this paper the numerical investigation of a plant oil stove by means of RANS simulation will be presented. In order to reduce the computational costs different model reduction steps were necessary. The simulation results of the basic configuration compare very well with experimental measurements and problematic behaviors of the actual stove design could be explained by the investigation.

  16. ABB.-Combustion Engineering's Experience in Nuclear Power Plant Engineering and Construction in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veris, James W.

    1992-01-01

    The Yonggwang Nuclear Project is a milestone project for the Korean Nuclear Industry. The Project has the two objectives of obtaining self-reliance in all aspects of nuclear technology and of constructing two modern nuclear power plants under the leadership of Korean companies acting as prime contractors. ABB.-Combustion Engineering 1000 MW System 80+ TM was chosen in 1987 as the NSLS design to meet these two objectives. This paper summarizers the significant experiences and lessons learned through the first four years of the Project as well as identifying implications for such future projects. The unique challenges of the project are identified and an evaluation of the experiences in the technology, self-reliance program and in the design and manufacturing processes will be made

  17. Combustion synthesis of MgO nanoparticles using plant extract: Structural characterization and photoluminescence studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Danith; Yadav, L. S. Reddy; Lingaraju, K.; Manjunath, K.; Suresh, D.; Prasad, Daruka; Nagabhushana, H.; Sharma, S. C.; Naika, H. Raja; Chikkahanumantharayappa, Nagaraju, G.

    2015-06-01

    Magnesium oxide nanoparticles (MgO Nps) have been successfully synthesized via solution combustion method using Parthenium plant extract as fuel for the first time. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) pattern reveal that product belongs to the cubic phase (Periclase). FTIR spectrum shows the band at 822 cm-1 indicates the formation of cubic periclase MgO. The optical band gap of MgO Nps estimated from UV -Vis spectrum was found to be in the range 5.40-5.45 eV. SEM images showed that, the product is agglomerated and particle in nature. Photoluminescence (PL) studies shows violet emission at 390 nm, blue emission at 470 nm and green emission at 550 nm. MgO Nps shows good photocatalytic activity for the degradation of methylene blue (MB) dye under UV/Sun light irradiation.

  18. Combustion synthesis of MgO nanoparticles using plant extract: Structural characterization and photoluminescence studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Danith; Chikkahanumantharayappa [Dept. of Physics, Vivekananda First grade College, Bangalore - 560055 (India); Yadav, L. S. Reddy; Nagaraju, G., E-mail: nagarajugn@rediffmail.com [Dept of Chemistry, Siddaganga Institute of Technology, Tumkur, Karnataka-572103 (India); Lingaraju, K.; Naika, H. Raja [Dept. of Environmental Science, Tumkur University, Tumkur, Karnataka-572103 (India); Manjunath, K. [Centre for Nano and Material Sciences, Jain University, Jakkasandra, Karnataka-562112 (India); Suresh, D. [Dept. of Chemistry, Tumkur University, Tumkur, Karnataka-572103 (India); Prasad, Daruka [Dept. of Physics, BMS Institute of Technology, Bangalore-560064 (India); Nagabhushana, H. [CNR Rao Center for Advanced Materials, Tumkur University, Tumkur, Karnataka-572103 (India); Sharma, S. C. [Chattisgarh Swami Vivekananda Technological University, Bhilai, Chattisgarh-490009 (India)

    2015-06-24

    Magnesium oxide nanoparticles (MgO Nps) have been successfully synthesized via solution combustion method using Parthenium plant extract as fuel for the first time. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) pattern reveal that product belongs to the cubic phase (Periclase). FTIR spectrum shows the band at 822 cm{sup −1} indicates the formation of cubic periclase MgO. The optical band gap of MgO Nps estimated from UV –Vis spectrum was found to be in the range 5.40–5.45 eV. SEM images showed that, the product is agglomerated and particle in nature. Photoluminescence (PL) studies shows violet emission at 390 nm, blue emission at 470 nm and green emission at 550 nm. MgO Nps shows good photocatalytic activity for the degradation of methylene blue (MB) dye under UV/Sun light irradiation.

  19. Combustion synthesis of MgO nanoparticles using plant extract: Structural characterization and photoluminescence studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Danith; Chikkahanumantharayappa; Yadav, L. S. Reddy; Nagaraju, G.; Lingaraju, K.; Naika, H. Raja; Manjunath, K.; Suresh, D.; Prasad, Daruka; Nagabhushana, H.; Sharma, S. C.

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium oxide nanoparticles (MgO Nps) have been successfully synthesized via solution combustion method using Parthenium plant extract as fuel for the first time. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) pattern reveal that product belongs to the cubic phase (Periclase). FTIR spectrum shows the band at 822 cm −1 indicates the formation of cubic periclase MgO. The optical band gap of MgO Nps estimated from UV –Vis spectrum was found to be in the range 5.40–5.45 eV. SEM images showed that, the product is agglomerated and particle in nature. Photoluminescence (PL) studies shows violet emission at 390 nm, blue emission at 470 nm and green emission at 550 nm. MgO Nps shows good photocatalytic activity for the degradation of methylene blue (MB) dye under UV/Sun light irradiation

  20. Systems Analysis of Technologies for Energy Recovery from Waste. Part I. Gasification followed by Catalytic Combustion, PEM Fuel Cells and Solid Oxide Fuel Cells for Stationary Applications in Comparison with Incineration. Part - II. Catalytic combustion - Experimental part

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assefa, Getachew; Frostell, Bjoern [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Industrial Ecology; Jaeraas, Sven; Kusar, Henrik [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Chemical Technology

    2005-02-01

    This project is entitled 'Systems Analysis: Energy Recovery from waste, catalytic combustion in comparison with fuel cells and incineration'. Some of the technologies that are currently developed by researchers at the Royal Institute of Technology include catalytic combustion and fuel cells as downstream units in a gasification system. The aim of this project is to assess the energy turnover as well as the potential environmental impacts of biomass/waste-to-energy technologies. In second part of this project economic analyses of the technologies in general and catalytic combustion and fuel cell technologies in particular will be carried out. Four technology scenarios are studied: (1) Gasification followed by Low temperature fuel cells (Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells) (2) Gasification followed by high temperature fuel cells (Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) (3) Gasification followed by catalytic combustion and (4) Incineration with energy recovery. The waste used as feedstock is an industrial waste containing parts of household waste, paper waste, wood residues and poly ethene. In the study compensatory district heating is produced by combustion of biofuel. The power used for running the processes in the scenarios will be supplied by the waste-to-energy technologies themselves while compensatory power is assumed to be produced from natural gas. The emissions from the system studied are classified and characterised using methodology from Life Cycle Assessment in to the following environmental impact categories: Global Warming Potential, Acidification Potential, Eutrophication Potential and finally Formation of Photochemical Oxidants. Looking at the result of the four technology chains in terms of the four impact categories with impact per GWh electricity produced as a unit of comparison and from the perspective of the rank each scenario has in all the four impact categories, SOFC appears to be the winner technology followed by PEM and CC as second

  1. Systems Analysis of Technologies for Energy Recovery from Waste. Part I. Gasification followed by Catalytic Combustion, PEM Fuel Cells and Solid Oxide Fuel Cells for Stationary Applications in Comparison with Incineration. Part - II. Catalytic combustion - Experimental part

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assefa, Getachew; Frostell, Bjoern; Jaeraas, Sven; Kusar, Henrik

    2005-02-01

    This project is entitled 'Systems Analysis: Energy Recovery from waste, catalytic combustion in comparison with fuel cells and incineration'. Some of the technologies that are currently developed by researchers at the Royal Institute of Technology include catalytic combustion and fuel cells as downstream units in a gasification system. The aim of this project is to assess the energy turnover as well as the potential environmental impacts of biomass/waste-to-energy technologies. In second part of this project economic analyses of the technologies in general and catalytic combustion and fuel cell technologies in particular will be carried out. Four technology scenarios are studied: (1) Gasification followed by Low temperature fuel cells (Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells) (2) Gasification followed by high temperature fuel cells (Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) (3) Gasification followed by catalytic combustion and (4) Incineration with energy recovery. The waste used as feedstock is an industrial waste containing parts of household waste, paper waste, wood residues and poly ethene. In the study compensatory district heating is produced by combustion of biofuel. The power used for running the processes in the scenarios will be supplied by the waste-to-energy technologies themselves while compensatory power is assumed to be produced from natural gas. The emissions from the system studied are classified and characterised using methodology from Life Cycle Assessment in to the following environmental impact categories: Global Warming Potential, Acidification Potential, Eutrophication Potential and finally Formation of Photochemical Oxidants. Looking at the result of the four technology chains in terms of the four impact categories with impact per GWh electricity produced as a unit of comparison and from the perspective of the rank each scenario has in all the four impact categories, SOFC appears to be the winner technology followed by PEM and CC as second and third

  2. EMISSION AND COMBUSTION CHARACTERISTICS OF DIFFERENT FUELS IN A HCCI ENGINE

    OpenAIRE

    S. Sendilvelan; S.Mohanamurugan

    2011-01-01

    Different intake valve timings and fuel injection amounts were tested in order to identify their effects on exhaust emissions and combustion characteristics using variable valve actuation (VVA) in a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine. The HCCI engine is a promising concept for future automobile engines and stationary power plants. The two-stage ignition process in a HCCI engine creates advanced ignition and stratified combustion, which makes the ignition timing and combus...

  3. Evaluation of the need for a rapid depressurization capability for Combustion Engineering plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, L.; Liang, C.

    1984-12-01

    This report documents the NRC staff evaluation of the need for providing a rapid primary system depressurization capability, in particular by using a power-operated relief valve(s) (PORVs), in the current 3410-MWt and 3800-MWt classes of plants designed by Combustion Engineering (CE). The staff reviewed the responses of licensees, applicants, and vendors to staff questions, supplemented by independent analyses by the staff and its contractors. The staff review led to the conclusion that, on the basis of risk reduction and cost/benefit considerations, no overwhelming benefit would result from requiring the installation of PORVs in CE plants that currently do not have them. However, when other unquantifiable considerations regarding the potential benefits of a PORV are factored into the evaluation, it appears that more substantial benefits could be realized. Given the more comprehensive studies currently under way to resolve the generic unresolved safety issue, USI A-45, Decay Heat Removal Reliability, the staff concludes that the decision regarding PORVs for these CE plants should be deferred and incorporated into the technical resolution of USI A-45

  4. OCTAVIUS: evaluation of flexibility and operability of amine based post combustion CO2 capture at the Brindisi Pilot Plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mangiaracina, A.; Zangrilli, L.; Robinson, L.; Kvamsdal, H.M.; Os, P.J. van

    2014-01-01

    Solvent storage is an option for amine based post combustion capture that can be used to de-couple the capture of CO2 and the energy demand of the process. In this process, electricity output of a power station is temporarily increased by diverting steam from the CO2 capture plant back to the steam

  5. Wood pellets in a power plant - mixed combustion of coal and wood pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nupponen, M.

    2001-01-01

    The author reviews in his presentation the development of Turku Energia, the organization of the company, the key figures of the company in 2000, as well as the purchase of energy in 2000. He also presents the purchase of basic heat load, the energy production plants of the company, the sales of heat in 2000, the emissions of the plants, and the fuel consumption of the plants in 2000. The operating experiences of the plants are also presented. The experiences gained in Turku Energia on mixed combustion of coal and wood pellets show that the mixing ratios, used at the plants, have no effect on the burning properties of the boiler, and the use of wood pellets with coal reduce the SO 2 and NO x emissions slightly. Simultaneously the CO 2 share of the wood pellets is removed from the emissions calculations. Several positive effects were observed, including the disappearance of the coal smell of the bunker, positive publicity of the utilization of wood pellets, and the subsidies for utilization of indigenous fuels in power generation. The problems seen include the tendency of wood pellets to arc the silos, especially when the pellets include high quantities of dust, and the loading of the trucks and the pneumatic unloading of the trucks break the pellets. Additionally the wood pellets bounce on the conveyor so they drop easily from the conveyor, the screw conveyors designed for conveying grain are too weak and they get stuck easily, and static electricity is easily generated in the plastic pipe used as the discharge pipe for wood pellet (sparkling tendency). This disadvantage has been overcome by using metal net and grounding

  6. Emissions to the Atmosphere from Amine-Based Post Combustion CO2 Capture Plant - Regulatory Aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azzi, Merched; Angove, Dennys; Dave, Narendra; Day, Stuart; Do, Thong; Feron, Paul; Sharma, Sunil; Attalla, Moetaz; Abu Zahra, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Amine-based Post Combustion Capture (PCC) of CO 2 is a readily available technology that can be deployed to reduce CO 2 emissions from coal fired power plants. However, PCC plants will likely release small quantities of amine and amine degradation products to the atmosphere along with the treated flue gas. The possible environmental effects of these emissions have been examined through different studies carried out around the world. Based on flue gas from a 400 MW ultra-supercritical coal fired power plant Aspen-Plus PCC process simulations were used to predict the potential atmospheric emissions from the plant. Different research initiatives carried out in this area have produced new knowledge that has significantly reduced the risk perception for the release of amine and amine degradation products to the atmosphere. In addition to the reduction of the CO 2 emissions, the PCC technology will also help in reducing SO x and NO 2 emissions. However, some other pollutants such as NH 3 and aerosols will increase if appropriate control technologies are not adopted. To study the atmospheric photo-oxidation of amines, attempts are being made to develop chemical reaction schemes that can be used for air quality assessment. However, more research is still required in this area to estimate the reactivity of amino solvents in the presence of other pollutants such as NO x and other volatile organic compounds in the background air. Current air quality guidelines may need to be updated to include limits for the additional pollutants such as NH 3 , nitrosamines and nitramines once more information related to their emissions is available. This paper focuses on describing the predicted concentrations of major pollutants that are expected to be released from a coal fired power plant obtained by ASPEN-Plus PCC process simulations in terms of current air quality regulations and other regulatory aspects. (authors)

  7. Improved electrical efficiency and bottom ash quality on waste combustion plants. Appendix A11 to A14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedegaard Madsen, O.; Boejer, M.; Jensen, Peter A.; Dam-Johansen, K.; Lundtorp, K. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)); Mogensen, Erhardt (Babcock and Wilcox Voelund A/S, Glostrup (Denmark))

    2010-07-01

    Investigations making it possible to evaluate and further develop concepts to improve electrical efficiency in a waste combustion plant were performed. Furthermore, one objective of the study was to investigate the possibilities of improving waste bottom ash leaching properties by use of a rotary kiln treatment. The project work included construction of a bench-scale rotary kiln, performing ash rotary kiln treatment experiments, conducting gas suction probe measurements on a waste incineration plant and making some concept evaluations. The influence of the rotary kiln thermal treatment on the leaching of Ca, Al, Si, Mg, Ba, Sr, Cl, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, Mo, sulfate, DOC and carbonate was determined. As a result of these tests, the rotary kiln thermal treatment of bottom ashes can be recommended for reducing the leaching of Cu, Pb, Cl, Zn and DOC; however, an increased leaching of Cr and Mo should be expected. The combustion conditions above the grate of a waste incineration plant were investigated and the release and concentration of volatile ash species in the flue gas such as Cl, Na, K, Ca, Pb, Zn and S were measured. The conducted measurements show that flue gas from grate sections 3 and 4 can produce a sufficiently hot flue gas that contains only low concentrations of corrosive species, and therefore can be used to increase superheater temperatures. Implementation of the so-called flue gas split concept together with other steam circle modifications on a waste combustion plant, and using a reasonable increase in final steam temperature from 400 to 500 deg. C, have the potential to increase electrical efficiency from 24 to 30% (with respect to lower fuel heating value) in a waste combustion plant. The appendices deal with electrical efficiency by dividing the combustion products; release of potentially corrosive constituents from the grate; CFD modeling of grate with and without vertical divider. (Author)

  8. Economics of biomass energy utilization in combustion and gasification plants: effects of logistic variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caputo, Antonio C.; Palumbo, Mario; Pelagagge, Pacifico M.; Scacchia, Federica

    2005-01-01

    The substitution of conventional fossil fuels with biomass for energy production results both in a net reduction of greenhouse gases emissions and in the replacement of non-renewable energy sources. However, at present, generating energy from biomass is rather expensive due to both technological limits related to lower conversion efficiencies, and logistic constraints. In particular, the logistics of biomass fuel supply is likely to be complex owing to the intrinsic feedstock characteristics, such as the limited period of availability and the scattered geographical distribution over the territory. In this paper, the economical feasibility of biomass utilization for direct production of electric energy by means of combustion and gasification-conversion processes, has been investigated and evaluated over a capacity range from 5 to 50 MW, taking into account total capital investments, revenues from energy sale and total operating costs, also including a detailed evaluation of logistic costs. Moreover, in order to evaluate the impact of logistics on the bio-energy plants profitability, the effects of main logistic variables such as specific vehicle transport costs, vehicles capacity, specific purchased biomass costs and distribution density, have been examined. Finally, a mapping of logistic constraints on plant profitability in the specified capacity range has been carried out

  9. Total chain dynamical assessment with an integrated model of a Post Combustion Capture Plant at a Pulverized Coal Plant and CO2 downstream infrastructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kler, R.C.F. de; Haar, A.M. van de

    2013-01-01

    The application of Post Combustion Capture has a significant advantage for mitigating the anthropogenic greenhouse gases in our atmosphere, in comparison to other capture technologies, since it is a so called “End of the Pipe” retrofit and therefore potentially applicable to existing power plants.

  10. Measures for a quality combustion (combustion chamber exit and downstream); Mesures pour une combustion de qualite (sortie de chambre de combustion et en aval)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epinat, G. [APAVE Lyonnaise, 69 (France)

    1996-12-31

    After a review of the different pollutants related to the various types of stationary and mobile combustion processes (stoichiometric, reducing and oxidizing combustion), measures and analyses than may be used to ensure the quality and efficiency of combustion processes are reviewed: opacimeters, UV analyzers, etc. The regulation and control equipment for combustion systems are then listed, according to the generator capacity level

  11. FutureGen 2.0 Oxy-Coal Combustion Carbon Capture Plant Pre-FEED Design and Cost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanigan, Tom; Pybus, Craig; Roy, Sonya; Lockwood, Frederick; McDonald, Denny; Maclnnis, Jim

    2011-09-30

    This report summarizes the results of the Pre-Front End Engineering Design (pre-FEED) phase of a proposed advanced oxy-combustion power generation plant to repower the existing 200 MWe Unit 4 at Ameren Energy Resources’ (AER) Meredosia Power Plant. AER has formed an alliance with Air Liquide Process and Construction, Inc. (ALPC) and Babcock & Wilcox Power Generation Group (B&W PGG) for the design, construction, and testing of the facility, and has contracted with URS Corporation (URS) for preliminary design and Owner’s engineering services. The Project employs oxy-combustion technology – combustion of coal with nearly pure oxygen and recycled flue gas (instead of air) – to capture approximately 90% of the flue gas CO2 for transport and sequestration by another Project. Plant capacity and configuration has been developed based on the B&W PGG-ALPC cool recycle process firing high-sulfur bituminous coal fuel, assuming baseload plant operation to maximize existing steam turbine capability, with limited consideration for plant redundancy and performance optimization in order to keep plant costs as low as practical. Activities and preliminary results from the pre-FEED phase addressed in this report include the following: Overall plant thermal performance; Equipment sizing and system configuration; Plant operation and control philosophy; Plant emissions and effluents; CO2 production and recovery characteristics; Project cost estimate and economic evaluation; Integrated project engineering and construction schedule; Project risk and opportunity assessment; Development of Project permitting strategy and requirements During the Phase 2 of the Project, additional design details will be developed and the Phase 1 work products updated to support actual construction and operation of the facility in Phase 3. Additional information will be provided early in Phase 2 to support Ameren-Environmental in finalizing the appropriate permitting strategies and permit

  12. Compilation of air pollutant emission factors. Volume 1. Stationary point and area sources. Supplement E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    In the Supplement to the Fourth Edition of AP-42 Volume I, new or revised emissions data are presented for Anthracite Coal Combustion; Natural Gas Combustion; Liquified Petroleum Gas Combustion; Wood Waste Combustion In Boilers; Bagasse Combustion In Sugar Mills; Residential Fireplaces; Residential Wood Stoves; Waste Oil Combustion; Automobile Body Incineration; Conical Burners; Open Burning; Stationary Gas Turbines for Electricity Generation; Heavy Duty Natural Gas Fired Pipeline Compressor Engines; Gasoline and Diesel Industrial Engines; Large Stationary Diesel and All Stationary Dual Fuel Engines; Soap and Detergents; and Storage of Organic Liquids

  13. Straw quality for its combustion in a straw-fired power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez Allica, J.; Blanco, F.; Garbisu, C. [NEIKER, Instituto Vasco de Investigacion y Desarrollo Agrario, Derio (Spain); Mitre, A.J.; Gonzalez Bustamante, J.A. [IBERDROLA Ingenieria y Consultoria, Bilbao (Spain); Itoiz, C. [Energia Hidroelectrica de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Alkorta, I. [Universidad del Pais Vasco, Bilbao (Spain). Facultad de Ciencias

    2001-07-01

    ENERGIA HIDROELECTRICA DE NAVARRA, S.A. (Navarra, Spain) is erecting a 25 MW power generation plant using straw for electricity generation. Cereal straws have proved to be difficult to burn in most existing combustion systems. During the last two years, a study has been carried out in Navarra to investigate the possibilities of improving the fuel quality of straw by a reduction in its K{sup +} and Cl{sup -} contents. The simple leaching of K{sup +} and Cl{sup -} with water by exposure to natural rainfall in the field resulted in considerable reductions of these two elements. A reduction in the K{sup +} content of the cereal plants caused by exposure to natural rainfall has been observed during plant ripening (before crop harvesting). Some varieties of straw show lower initial K{sup +} contents, making them more suitable for this purpose. There seems to be no clear correlation between the relative decrease in K{sup +} content and the amount of accumulated rainfall. Our results have also shown a very close correlation between K{sup +} content and electrical conductivity. The simplicity of this latter measurement makes this parameter a very interesting option to test the straw quality directly in the field. Structural components of the straw were not decomposed during the time when we left the straw in the field. Finally, the Cl{sup -} content in straw was increased when the Cl{sup -} dose from the fertiliser was increased. On the other hand, the content of K{sup +} was not influenced by the applied amount of K{sup +} fertiliser. (Author)

  14. Determination of melatonin in wine and plant extracts by capillary electrochromatography with immobilized carboxylic multi-walled carbon nanotubes as stationary phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stege, Patricia W; Sombra, Lorena L; Messina, Germán; Martinez, Luis D; Silva, María F

    2010-07-01

    The finding of melatonin, the often called "hormone of darkness" in plants opens an interesting perspective associated to the plethora of health benefits related to the moderate consumption of red wine. In this study, the implementation of a new method for the determination of melatonin in complex food matrices by CEC with immobilized carboxylic multi-walled carbon nanotubes as stationary phase is demonstrated. The results indicated high electrochromatographic resolution, good capillary efficiencies and improved sensitivity respect to those obtained with conventional capillaries. In addition, it was demonstrated highly reproducible results between runs, days and columns. The LOD for melatonin was 0.01 ng/mL. The method was successfully applied to the determination of melatonin in red and white wine, grape skin and plant extracts of Salvia officinalis L.

  15. Integrating multi-objective optimization with computational fluid dynamics to optimize boiler combustion process of a coal fired power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xingrang; Bansal, R.C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A coal fired power plant boiler combustion process model based on real data. • We propose multi-objective optimization with CFD to optimize boiler combustion. • The proposed method uses software CORBA C++ and ANSYS Fluent 14.5 with AI. • It optimizes heat flux transfers and maintains temperature to avoid ash melt. - Abstract: The dominant role of electricity generation and environment consideration have placed strong requirements on coal fired power plants, requiring them to improve boiler combustion efficiency and decrease carbon emission. Although neural network based optimization strategies are often applied to improve the coal fired power plant boiler efficiency, they are limited by some combustion related problems such as slagging. Slagging can seriously influence heat transfer rate and decrease the boiler efficiency. In addition, it is difficult to measure slag build-up. The lack of measurement for slagging can restrict conventional neural network based coal fired boiler optimization, because no data can be used to train the neural network. This paper proposes a novel method of integrating non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA II) based multi-objective optimization with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to decrease or even avoid slagging inside a coal fired boiler furnace and improve boiler combustion efficiency. Compared with conventional neural network based boiler optimization methods, the method developed in the work can control and optimize the fields of flue gas properties such as temperature field inside a boiler by adjusting the temperature and velocity of primary and secondary air in coal fired power plant boiler control systems. The temperature in the vicinity of water wall tubes of a boiler can be maintained within the ash melting temperature limit. The incoming ash particles cannot melt and bond to surface of heat transfer equipment of a boiler. So the trend of slagging inside furnace is controlled. Furthermore, the

  16. Measuring the exhaust gas dew point of continuously operated combustion plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fehler, D.

    1985-07-16

    Low waste-gas temperatures represent one means of minimizing the energy consumption of combustion facilities. However, condensation should be prevented to occur in the waste gas since this could result in a destruction of parts. Measuring the waste-gas dew point allows to control combustion parameters in such a way as to be able to operate at low temperatures without danger of condensation. Dew point sensors will provide an important signal for optimizing combustion facilities.

  17. Analysis of cumulative energy consumption in an oxy-fuel combustion power plant integrated with a CO2 processing unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziębik, Andrzej; Gładysz, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Oxy-fuel combustion is promising CCS technology. • Sum of direct and indirect energy consumption ought to be consider. • This sum is expressed by cumulative energy consumption. • Input–output analysis is adequate method of CCS modeling. - Abstract: A balance of direct energy consumption is not a sufficient tool for an energy analysis of an oxy-fuel combustion power plant because of the indirect consumption of energy in preceding processes in the energy-technological set of interconnections. The sum of direct and indirect consumption expresses cumulative energy consumption. Based on the “input–output” model of direct energy consumption the mathematical model of cumulative energy consumption concerning an integrated oxy-fuel combustion power plant has been developed. Three groups of energy carriers or materials are to be distinguished, viz. main products, by-products and external supplies not supplementing the main production. The mathematical model of the balance of cumulative energy consumption based on the assumption that the indices of cumulative energy consumption of external supplies (mainly fuels and raw materials) are known a’priori. It results from weak connections between domestic economy and an integrated oxy-fuel combustion power plant. The paper presents both examples of the balances of direct and cumulative energy consumption. The results of calculations of indices of cumulative energy consumption concerning main products are presented. A comparison of direct and cumulative energy effects between three variants has been worked out. Calculations of the indices of cumulative energy consumption were also subjected to sensitive analysis. The influence of the indices of cumulative energy consumption of external supplies (input data), as well as the assumption concerning the utilization of solid by-products of the combustion process have been investigated

  18. Mathematical modelling of straw combustion in a 38 MWe power plant furnace and effect of operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao Bin Yang; Robert Newman; Vida Sharifi; Jim Swithenbank; John Ariss [Sheffield University, Sheffield (United Kingdom). Sheffield University Waste Incineration Centre (SUWIC), Department of Chemical and Process Engineering

    2007-01-15

    As one of the most easily accessible renewable energy resources, straw can be burned to provide electricity and heat to local communities. In this paper, mathematical modelling methods have been employed to simulate the operation of a 38 MWe straw-burning power plant to obtain detailed information on the flow and combustion characteristics in the furnace and to predict the effect on plant performance of variation in operating conditions. The predicted data are compared to measurements in terms of burning time, furnace temperature, flue gas emissions (including NOx), carbon content in the ash and overall combustion efficiency. It is concluded that straw burning on the grate is locally sub-stoichiometric and most of the NO is formed in the downstream combustion chamber and radiation shaft; auxiliary gas burners are responsible for the uneven distribution of temperature and gas flow at the furnace exit; and fuel moisture content is limited to below 25% to prevent excessive CO emission without compromising the plant performance. The current work greatly helps to understand the operating characteristics of large-scale straw-burning plants. 33 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Improved electrical efficiency and bottom ash quality on waste combustion plants. Appendix A1 to A3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesterov, I.; Jensen, Peter A.; Dam-Johansen, K.; Kloeft, H.; Boejer, M. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)); Mogensen, Erhardt (Babcock and Wilcox Voelund A/S, Esbjerg (Denmark))

    2010-07-01

    Investigations making it possible to evaluate and further develop concepts to improve electrical efficiency in a waste combustion plant were performed. Furthermore, one objective of the study was to investigate the possibilities of improving waste bottom ash leaching properties by use of a rotary kiln treatment. The project work included construction of a bench-scale rotary kiln, performing ash rotary kiln treatment experiments, conducting gas suction probe measurements on a waste incineration plant and making some concept evaluations. The influence of the rotary kiln thermal treatment on the leaching of Ca, Al, Si, Mg, Ba, Sr, Cl, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, Mo, sulfate, DOC and carbonate was determined. As a result of these tests, the rotary kiln thermal treatment of bottom ashes can be recommended for reducing the leaching of Cu, Pb, Cl, Zn and DOC; however, an increased leaching of Cr and Mo should be expected. The combustion conditions above the grate of a waste incineration plant were investigated and the release and concentration of volatile ash species in the flue gas such as Cl, Na, K, Ca, Pb, Zn and S were measured. The conducted measurements show that flue gas from grate sections 3 and 4 can produce a sufficiently hot flue gas that contains only low concentrations of corrosive species, and therefore can be used to increase superheater temperatures. Implementation of the so-called flue gas split concept together with other steam circle modifications on a waste combustion plant, and using a reasonable increase in final steam temperature from 400 to 500 deg. C, have the potential to increase electrical efficiency from 24 to 30% (with respect to lower fuel heating value) in a waste combustion plant. The appendices deal with incineration bottom ash leaching properties; design and construction of rotary kiln facility; manual to rotary kiln experiments. (Author)

  20. Improved electrical efficiency and bottom ash quality on waste combustion plants. Appendix A7 to A10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyks, J.; Astrup, T.; Jensen, Peter A.; Nesterov, I.; Boejer, M.; Frandsen, F.; Dam-Johansen, K.; Hedegaard Madsen, O.; Lundtorp, K. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)); Mogensen, Erhardt (Babcock and Wilcox Voelund A/S, Glostrup (Denmark))

    2010-07-01

    Investigations making it possible to evaluate and further develop concepts to improve electrical efficiency in a waste combustion plant were performed. Furthermore, one objective of the study was to investigate the possibilities of improving waste bottom ash leaching properties by use of a rotary kiln treatment. The project work included construction of a bench-scale rotary kiln, performing ash rotary kiln treatment experiments, conducting gas suction probe measurements on a waste incineration plant and making some concept evaluations. The influence of the rotary kiln thermal treatment on the leaching of Ca, Al, Si, Mg, Ba, Sr, Cl, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, Mo, sulfate, DOC and carbonate was determined. As a result of these tests, the rotary kiln thermal treatment of bottom ashes can be recommended for reducing the leaching of Cu, Pb, Cl, Zn and DOC; however, an increased leaching of Cr and Mo should be expected. The combustion conditions above the grate of a waste incineration plant were investigated and the release and concentration of volatile ash species in the flue gas such as Cl, Na, K, Ca, Pb, Zn and S were measured. The conducted measurements show that flue gas from grate sections 3 and 4 can produce a sufficiently hot flue gas that contains only low concentrations of corrosive species, and therefore can be used to increase superheater temperatures. Implementation of the so-called flue gas split concept together with other steam circle modifications on a waste combustion plant, and using a reasonable increase in final steam temperature from 400 to 500 deg. C, have the potential to increase electrical efficiency from 24 to 30% (with respect to lower fuel heating value) in a waste combustion plant. The appendices deal with the influence of kiln treatment on incineration bottom ash leaching; the influence of kiln treatment on corrosive species in deposits; operational strategy for rotary kiln; alkali/chloride release during refuse incineration on a grate. (Author)

  1. Improved electrical efficiency and bottom ash quality on waste combustion plants. Appendix A4 to A6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloeft, H.; Jensen, Peter A.; Nesterov, I.; Hyks, J.; Astrup, T. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)); Mogensen, Erhardt (Babcock and Wilcox Voelund A/S, Glostrup (Denmark))

    2010-07-01

    Investigations making it possible to evaluate and further develop concepts to improve electrical efficiency in a waste combustion plant were performed. Furthermore, one objective of the study was to investigate the possibilities of improving waste bottom ash leaching properties by use of a rotary kiln treatment. The project work included construction of a bench-scale rotary kiln, performing ash rotary kiln treatment experiments, conducting gas suction probe measurements on a waste incineration plant and making some concept evaluations. The influence of the rotary kiln thermal treatment on the leaching of Ca, Al, Si, Mg, Ba, Sr, Cl, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, Mo, sulfate, DOC and carbonate was determined. As a result of these tests, the rotary kiln thermal treatment of bottom ashes can be recommended for reducing the leaching of Cu, Pb, Cl, Zn and DOC; however, an increased leaching of Cr and Mo should be expected. The combustion conditions above the grate of a waste incineration plant were investigated and the release and concentration of volatile ash species in the flue gas such as Cl, Na, K, Ca, Pb, Zn and S were measured. The conducted measurements show that flue gas from grate sections 3 and 4 can produce a sufficiently hot flue gas that contains only low concentrations of corrosive species, and therefore can be used to increase superheater temperatures. Implementation of the so-called flue gas split concept together with other steam circle modifications on a waste combustion plant, and using a reasonable increase in final steam temperature from 400 to 500 deg. C, have the potential to increase electrical efficiency from 24 to 30% (with respect to lower fuel heating value) in a waste combustion plant. The appendices deal with collection of slags for the rotary kiln experiments; overview of the thermal treatment experiments - phase 1; a journal paper with the title ''Quantification of leaching from waste incineration bottom ash treated in a rotary kiln

  2. Molecular hydrogen (H2) combustion emissions and their isotope (D/H) signatures from domestic heaters, diesel vehicle engines, waste incinerator plants, and biomass burning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollmer, M.K.; Walter, S.; Mohn, J.; Steinbacher, M.; Bond, S.W.; Röckmann, T.; Reimann, S.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2), its stable isotope signature ( D), and the key combustion parameters carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane (CH4) were measured from various combustion processes. H2 in the exhaust of gas and oil-fired heaters and of waste incinerator plants was generally

  3. Partitioning behaviour of natural radionuclides during combustion of coal in thermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahu, S.K.; Tiwari, M.; Bhangare, R.C.; Ajmal, P.Y.; Pandit, G.G.

    2014-01-01

    All fossil fuels contain low levels of naturally occurring radioactive substances. The environmental impact of radionuclide-containing waste products from coal combustion is an important issue. These radionuclides vaporize in the hot portions of the coal combustor and then return to the solid phase in cooler downstream zones. Indian coal used in power plants generally has high ash yield (35-45%) and is of low quality. In the burning process of coal, minerals undergo thermal decomposition, fusion, disintegration, and agglomeration. A major portion of elements in the boiler enter into slag or bottom ash, and the rest of the inorganic materials find their way into the flue gas, in fly ash or vapor. Fly and bottom ash are significant sources of exposure to these radionuclides. In the present study, coal and ash samples collected from six thermal power stations were analyzed to determine their natural radioactivity content and the partitioning behavior of these radionuclides was carried out by tracing their activities in fly and bottom ashes. The partitioning of radionuclides is strongly dependent on the size of associated ash particle. Polonium-210 was mostly associated with the finest fraction and showed large variation with particle size whereas 232 Th showed least dependence on the particle size. The high activities of all radionuclides in fly ashes than that of bottom ashes thus may be due to strong affinity of the nuclides towards the finer particle fractions. All the radionuclide distribution favored small particle sizes

  4. Emission inventory for large combustion plants in France according to the 2001/80/CE European directive - LCP - February 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Jean-Pierre; Fontelle, Jean-Pierre; Gavel, Antoine; Vincent, Julien; Matthias, Etienne; Druart, Ariane; Jacquier, Guillaume; Nicco, Laetitia

    2010-02-01

    After a recall of the methodological aspects of this inventory (scope of application, concept of existing or new installation, thermal power, fuels, considered pollutants, equipment, data acquisition and processing), this report presents the national results: typology of large combustion plant (LCP) installations, energy consumption, atmospheric emissions (sulphur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, particles), emission distribution per energy type, sector-based distribution of LCPs. It also presents regional results (for 2008 and evolutions in 2009)

  5. Generic evaluation of feedwater transients and small break loss-of-coolant accidents in combustion engineering designed operating plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of a generic evaluation of feedwater transients, small break loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs), and other TMI-2-related events in the Combustion Engineering (CE)-designed operating plants and to establish or confirm the bases for their continued operation. The results of this evaluation are presented in this report in the form of a set of findings and recommendations in each of the principal review areas

  6. Techno-economic analysis of oxy-combustion coal-fired power plant with cryogenic oxygen storage

    OpenAIRE

    Hanak, Dawid Piotr; Manovic, Vasilije

    2017-01-01

    Around 43% of the cumulative CO2 emissions from the power sector between 2012 and 2050 could be mitigated through implementation of carbon capture and storage, and utilisation of renewable energy sources. Energy storage technologies can increase the efficiency of energy utilisation and thus should be widely deployed along with low-emission technologies. This study evaluates the techno-economic performance of cryogenic O2 storage implemented in an oxy-combustion coal-fired power plant as a mea...

  7. Comparison of ichthyoplankton collected with a pump and stationary plankton nets in a power plant discharge canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, L.R.; Smith, B.A.; Kellogg, R.L.; Perry, E.S.

    1981-01-01

    Simultaneous 15-minute ichthyoplankton abundance samples were taken at the Indian Point Generating Station discharge canal using a 6-in. pump/larval table system and stationary 0.5-m diameter conical plankton nets. A total of 79 paired samples were collected on 6 days in June and July 1978. The average density of total ichthyoplankton collected was 3.0/m 3 for pump samples and 3.3/m 3 net samples. No significant differences (P > 0.05) were detected between density estimates for total ichthyoplankton determined from pump and net samples for eggs, yolk-sac larvae, post yolk-sac larvae, and juveniles. Thirteen out of 14 taxa compared showed no significant difference betwen pump and net collections. The pump and net collection systems were equally effective for estimating densities of most ichthyoplankton

  8. Viability of fuel switching of a gas-fired power plant operating in chemical looping combustion mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basavaraja, R.J.; Jayanti, S.

    2015-01-01

    CLC (chemical looping combustion) promises to be a more efficient way of CO 2 capture than conventional oxy-fuel combustion or post-combustion absorption. While much work has been done on CLC in the past two decades, the issue of multi-fuel compatibility has not been addressed sufficiently, especially with regard to plant layout and reactor design. In the present work, it is shown that this is non-trivial in the case of a CLC-based power plant. The underlying factors have been examined in depth and design criteria for fuel compatibility have been formulated. Based on these, a layout has been developed for a power plant which can run with either natural gas or syngas without requiring equipment changes either on the steam side or on the furnace side. The layout accounts for the higher CO 2 compression costs associated with the use of syngas in place of natural gas. The ideal thermodynamic cycle efficiency, after accounting for the energy penalty of CO 2 compression, is 43.11% and 41.08%, when a supercritical steam cycle is used with natural gas and syngas, respectively. It is shown that fuel switching can be enabled by incorporating the compatibility conditions at the design stage itself. - Highlights: • Concept of fuel sensitivity of plant layout with carbon capture and sequestration. • Power plant layout for natural gas and syngas as fuels. • Criteria for compatibility of air and fuel reactors for dual fuel mode operation. • Layout of a plant for carbon-neutral or carbon negative power generation

  9. Renew, reduce or become more efficient? The climate contribution of biomass co-combustion in a coal-fired power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miedema, Jan H.; Benders, René M.J.; Moll, Henri C.; Pierie, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Coal mining is more energy and CO_2 efficient than biomass production. • Co-combustion of 60% biomass with coal doubles mass transport compared to 100% coal. • Low co-combustion levels reduce GHG emissions, but the margins are small. • Total supply chain efficiency is the highest for the coal reference at 41.2%. - Abstract: Within this paper, biomass supply chains, with different shares of biomass co-combustion in coal fired power plants, are analysed on energy efficiency, energy consumption, renewable energy production, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and compared with the performance of a 100% coal supply chain scenario, for a Dutch situation. The 60% biomass co-combustion supply chain scenarios show possibilities to reduce emissions up to 48%. The low co-combustion levels are effective to reduce GHG emissions, but the margins are small. Currently co-combustion of pellets is the norm. Co-combustion of combined torrefaction and pelleting (TOP) shows the best results, but is also the most speculative. The indicators from the renewable energy directive cannot be aligned. When biomass is regarded as scarce, co-combustion of small shares or no co-combustion is the best option from an energy perspective. When biomass is regarded as abundant, co-combustion of large shares is the best option from a GHG reduction perspective.

  10. High plant availability of phosphorus and low availability of cadmium in four biomass combustion ashes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiaoxi; Rubæk, Gitte H.; Sørensen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    For biomass combustion to become a sustainable energy production system, it is crucial to minimise landfill of biomass ashes, to recycle the nutrients and to minimise the undesirable impact of hazardous substances in the ash. In order to test the plant availability of phosphorus (P) and cadmium (Cd) in four biomass ashes, we conducted two pot experiments on a P-depleted soil and one mini-plot field experiment on a soil with adequate P status. Test plants were spring barley and Italian ryegrass. Ash applications were compared to triple superphosphate (TSP) and a control without P application. Both TSP and ash significantly increased crop yields and P uptake on the P-depleted soil. In contrast, on the adequate-P soil, the barley yield showed little response to soil amendment, even at 300–500 kg P ha"−"1 application, although the barley took up more P at higher applications. The apparent P use efficiency of the additive was 20% in ryegrass - much higher than that of barley for which P use efficiencies varied on the two soils. Generally, crop Cd concentrations were little affected by the increasing and high applications of ash, except for relatively high Cd concentrations in barley after applying 25 Mg ha"−"1 straw ash. Contrarily, even modest increases in the TSP application markedly increased Cd uptake in plants. This might be explained by the low Cd solubility in the ash or by the reduced Cd availability due to the liming effect of ash. High concentrations of resin-extractable P (available P) in the ash-amended soil after harvest indicate that the ash may also contribute to P availability for the following crops. In conclusion, the biomass ashes in this study had P availability similar to the TSP fertiliser and did not contaminate the crop with Cd during the first year. - Highlights: • Effects of four biomass ashes vs. a P fertiliser (TSP) on two crops were studied. • Ashes increased crop yields with P availability similar to TSP on P-depleted soil.

  11. High plant availability of phosphorus and low availability of cadmium in four biomass combustion ashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaoxi, E-mail: Xiaoxi.Li@agro.au.dk; Rubæk, Gitte H.; Sørensen, Peter

    2016-07-01

    For biomass combustion to become a sustainable energy production system, it is crucial to minimise landfill of biomass ashes, to recycle the nutrients and to minimise the undesirable impact of hazardous substances in the ash. In order to test the plant availability of phosphorus (P) and cadmium (Cd) in four biomass ashes, we conducted two pot experiments on a P-depleted soil and one mini-plot field experiment on a soil with adequate P status. Test plants were spring barley and Italian ryegrass. Ash applications were compared to triple superphosphate (TSP) and a control without P application. Both TSP and ash significantly increased crop yields and P uptake on the P-depleted soil. In contrast, on the adequate-P soil, the barley yield showed little response to soil amendment, even at 300–500 kg P ha{sup −1} application, although the barley took up more P at higher applications. The apparent P use efficiency of the additive was 20% in ryegrass - much higher than that of barley for which P use efficiencies varied on the two soils. Generally, crop Cd concentrations were little affected by the increasing and high applications of ash, except for relatively high Cd concentrations in barley after applying 25 Mg ha{sup −1} straw ash. Contrarily, even modest increases in the TSP application markedly increased Cd uptake in plants. This might be explained by the low Cd solubility in the ash or by the reduced Cd availability due to the liming effect of ash. High concentrations of resin-extractable P (available P) in the ash-amended soil after harvest indicate that the ash may also contribute to P availability for the following crops. In conclusion, the biomass ashes in this study had P availability similar to the TSP fertiliser and did not contaminate the crop with Cd during the first year. - Highlights: • Effects of four biomass ashes vs. a P fertiliser (TSP) on two crops were studied. • Ashes increased crop yields with P availability similar to TSP on P-depleted soil

  12. Particulate emissions from biomass combustion in small district heating plants; Partikelemissioner fraan biobraensleeldade mindre fjaerrvaermecentraler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Henrik; Johansson, Linda; Tullin, Claes; Oesterberg, Stefan; Johansson, Mathias [Swedish National Testing and Research Inst., Boraas (Sweden); Leckner, Bo [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Energy Conversion

    2001-12-01

    In recent years, negative health effects associated with increased levels of PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5} (particles less then 10 and 2.5 {mu}m, respectively) in the ambient air have been highlighted. The development towards a sustainable society will lead to an increased use of biomass in Sweden. Conversion from oil to biomass can lead to increased local levels of particulate matter. In smaller district heating plants (up to a few MW), the dust reduction often is restricted to the use of cyclones/multicyclones having limited separation efficiency for submicron particles (particles less than 1 {mu}m). The emissions are often in the range 100 Mg/nm{sup 3} or higher but very few data regarding particle size distributions from district heating plants have been reported in the literature. In addition to the particle size, a number of other properties might be important for the health effects but the knowledge in this area is limited. It is therefore important to characterise the particles in detail regarding physical and chemical qualities. The objective with the present investigation is to measure and characterise the particulate emissions from two biomass based smaller district heating centrals for different fuel qualities (pellets, briquettes, forest residues and wood chips) and operating parameters such as load and excess air. In addition to analyses of dust and particulates, extensive measurements of the flue composition have been performed. Measurements were performed downstream the multicyclones. The dust emissions were found to be in the range 20 to 120 mg/MJ supplied fuel depending on operating condition and fuel quality. At normal operation, the dust emissions were about 35 to 40 mg/MJ supplied fuel. The particle size distributions were measured using an ELPI (Electric Low Pressure Impactor). The number size distributions were found to be dominated by submicron particles with maxima at diameters between 0. 1 and 0.3 gm. Additional measurements indicated that

  13. Thermoeconomic cost analysis of CO_2 compression and purification unit in oxy-combustion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Bo; Zhao, Haibo; Zheng, Chuguang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermoeconomic cost analysis for CO_2 compression and purification unit is conducted. • Exergy cost and thermoeconomic cost occur in flash separation and mixing processes. • Unit exergy costs for flash separator and multi-stream heat exchanger are identical. • Multi-stage CO_2 compressor contributes to the minimum unit exergy cost. • Thermoeconomic performance for optimized CPU is enhanced. - Abstract: High CO_2 purity products can be obtained from oxy-combustion power plants through CO_2 compression and purification unit (CPU) based on phase separation method. To identify cost formation process and potential energy savings for CPU, detailed thermoeconomic cost analysis based on structure theory of thermoeconomics is applied to an optimized CPU (with double flash separators). It is found that the largest unit exergy cost occurs in the first separation process while the multi-stage CO_2 compressor contributes to the minimum unit exergy cost. In two flash separation processes, unit exergy costs for the flash separator and multi-stream heat exchanger are identical but their unit thermoeconomic costs are different once monetary cost for each device is considered. For cost inefficiency occurring in CPU, it mainly derives from large exergy costs and thermoeconomic costs in the flash separation and mixing processes. When compared with an unoptimized CPU, thermoeconomic performance for the optimized CPU is enhanced and the maximum reduction of 5.18% for thermoeconomic cost is attained. To achieve cost effective operation, measures should be taken to improve operations of the flash separation and mixing processes.

  14. The trigeneration cycle as a way to create multipurpose stationary power plants based on conversion of aeroderivative turbofan engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varaksin, A. Yu.; Arbekov, A. N.; Inozemtsev, A. A.

    2014-10-01

    A schematic cycle is considered, and thermodynamic analysis is performed to substantiate the possibility of creating multipurpose industrial power plants, operating on a trigeneration cycle, based on production-type turbofan engines.

  15. Study on the combustion behavior of radiolytically generated hydrogen explosion in small scale annular vessels at the reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Tatsuya; Tamauchi, Yoshikazu; Arai, Nobuyuki; Dai, Wenbin; Sakaihara, Motohiro; Kanehira, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen is generated by radiolysis of water, etc. in process vessels in reprocessing plant. Usually, the hydrogen is scavenged by compressed air into vessels to prevent hydrogen explosion. When an earthquake beyond design based occurs, for example, the compressed air may stop and the hydrogen starts accumulating in the vessels, and under this condition, an ignition source might set off hydrogen explosion. Therefore, the explosion derived by the radiolytically generated hydrogen is designated as one of severe accidents on Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant in new regulatory requirements. It is important to understand the combustion behavior of hydrogen explosion inside a vessel for consideration of safety measures against the severe accident, because the influences of detonation are not considered in the design basis of vessels. Especially, the investigations about the combustion behavior which considered influence of interior obstacles inside the vessel are not performed yet. In order to investigate the combustion behavior comprehensively, explosion experiment, combustion analysis and structural analysis are carried out using the representative vessels (small scale annular vessel, small scale plate vessel, large scale annular vessel and large scale cylindrical vessel) selected from Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant. In this paper, the results of experiments and analysis of small scale annular vessel (as one of representative vessel, imitated a pulsed column in the reprocessing plant) are reported. As imitated vessels, three vessels are manufactured with different interior obstacle arrangements as follows, A) cylindrical obstacles are faithfully reproduced and are arranged based on the actual vessel, B) cylindrical obstacles are arranged more densely than the actual vessel, and C) there are no obstacles inside the vessel. Experiments of hydrogen explosion are performed under condition of stoichiometric hydrogen-air ratio (premixed hydrogen-air is used). As a result of

  16. Chemical characterization of bottom ashes generated during combustion of a Colombian mineral coal in a thermal power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinheiro, H.S.; Nogueira, R.E.F.Q.; Lobo, C.J.S.; Nobre, A.I.S.; Sales, J.C.; Silva, C.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Bottom ashes generated during combustion of a mineral coal from Colombia were characterized by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and X-ray diffraction. The interest in this particular coal is due to the fact that it will be used by a thermal power plant in Ceara, Northeastern Brazil, where it could produce over 900 tons of different residues/combustion products every day. Results from Xray fluorescence allowed identification and quantification of elements present in the sample: silicon (59,17%), aluminum (13,17%), iron (10,74%), potassium (6,11%), titanium (2,91%), calcium (4,97%), sulphur (0,84%) and others (2,09%). The X-ray diffraction revealed patterns from silica, mullite, calcium sulphate and hydrated sodium. Results obtained so far indicate that the material is a potential raw-material for use in the formulation of ceramic components (author)

  17. Combustion plants and the Water Framework Directive. Methodology for consequence assessment; Vaermeanlaeggningar och Vattendirektivet. Metodik foer konsekvensbedoemning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossander, Annelie; Andersson, Jonas; Axby, Fredrik; Schultz, Emma; Persson, Maarten; Svaerd, Sara [Carl Bro AB, Kristianstad (Sweden)

    2007-04-15

    The project can be regarded as a natural continuation to the Vaermeforsk project M4-324 by Axby and Hansson: 'Practical consequences of the Water Framework Directive implementation for combustion plants - New water cleaning technologies and methods for improvement of effluent discharges'. The six different combustion plants studied in this project have been chosen mainly on the basis of their varying size, fuel, cleaning equipment and recipient. The significance of water as a finite resource in the global ecosystems has been more pronounced recently. In the light of the growing stresses on the water resources the European Parliament accepted the Water Framework Directive in year 2000. The main purpose with the directive is to achieve and preserve a 'good water status', among other things through a long term protection of available water resources. Enclosure X of the Framework Directive contains a list of chemical substances where 33 'prioritized substances' and 'prioritized, dangerous substances' are specified. The objective of the list is to reduce the discharges of prioritized substances, and to fully eliminate the prioritized, dangerous substances both from industry and other contexts. Twelve of the substances mentioned on the prioritized list can or could be found in the water coming out from combustion plants. A predominant part of these substances are to be totally phased out in the foreseeable future according to the Water Directive. This can result in restrictions in the permissions to let out water from combustion plants to the surroundings. The substances concerned are the heavy metals lead, cadmium, mercury and nickel, both as pure substances and included in compounds, as well as a number of different polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The intent of the project has been to use an accepted computational model to create an analytic method (an ecotoxicological risk assessment), with the aim to meet the new requirements

  18. Co-combustion of cultivable raw materials in existing power supply plants -a study on the potential for such plants in the eastern Laender. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosskopf, W.; Kappelmann, K.H.

    1996-04-01

    The present study is dedicated to an analysis of co-combustion of biomass in existing power supply plants in the eastern Laender. The question to be resolved is whether the existing substantial potential for substituting fossil energy carriers for biomass in the short term and at low cost also offers a viable option from the viewpoint of political economy. In its final assessment the study also takes agropolitical and ecopolitical interests into account. A further basic question posed by this impact analysis is in what way the increased use of biomass as an energy carrier can contribute to farmers; income and thus help improve employment in rural area. Implicated in this is the question whether the conservation of developed land resulting from large-area biomass cultivation is desirable from the sociopolitical viewpoint. Another important aspect concerning the impact analysis is the question as to the environmental efficiency of biomass co-combustion given the Federal Government's aims regarding CO 2 abatement. The study examines how biomas co-combustion compares with other alternatives to this end in terms of CO 2 abatement costs. These deliberations provide the basis for the study's concluding recommendations to political decision makers who are confronted with the question whether and under what conditions public promotion of biomass co-combustion in the new Laender makes sociopolitical sense. (orig./SR) [de

  19. Analysis of Combined Cycle Power Plants with Chemical Looping Reforming of Natural Gas and Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shareq Mohd Nazir

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a gas-fired combined cycle power plant subjected to a pre-combustion CO2 capture method has been analysed under different design conditions and different heat integration options. The power plant configuration includes the chemical looping reforming (CLR of natural gas (NG, water gas shift (WGS process, CO2 capture and compression, and a hydrogen fuelled combined cycle to produce power. The process is denoted as a CLR-CC process. One of the main parameters that affects the performance of the process is the pressure for the CLR. The process is analysed at different design pressures for the CLR, i.e., 5, 10, 15, 18, 25 and 30 bar. It is observed that the net electrical efficiency increases with an increase in the design pressure in the CLR. Secondly, the type of steam generated from the cooling of process streams also effects the net electrical efficiency of the process. Out of the five different cases including the base case presented in this study, it is observed that the net electrical efficiency of CLR-CCs can be improved to 46.5% (lower heating value of NG basis by producing high-pressure steam through heat recovery from the pre-combustion process streams and sending it to the Heat Recovery Steam Generator in the power plant.

  20. EMISSION AND COMBUSTION CHARACTERISTICS OF DIFFERENT FUELS IN A HCCI ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sendilvelan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Different intake valve timings and fuel injection amounts were tested in order to identify their effects on exhaust emissions and combustion characteristics using variable valve actuation (VVA in a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI engine. The HCCI engine is a promising concept for future automobile engines and stationary power plants. The two-stage ignition process in a HCCI engine creates advanced ignition and stratified combustion, which makes the ignition timing and combustion rate controllable. Meanwhile, the periphery of the fuel-rich zone leads to fierce burning, which results in slightly high NOx emissions. The experiments were conducted in a modified single cylinder water-cooled diesel engine. In this experiment we use diesel, bio-diesel (Jatropha and gasoline as the fuel at different mixing ratios. HCCI has advantages in high thermal efficiency and low emissions and could possibly become a promising combustion method in internal combustion engines.

  1. 75 FR 37732 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-30

    ... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines... hazardous air pollutants for existing stationary compression ignition reciprocating internal combustion... combustion engines. 40 CFR 63.6590 was amended by revising paragraphs (b)(1) and (3). Inadvertently...

  2. 75 FR 75937 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines... internal combustion engines. Subsequently, the Administrator received two petitions for reconsideration... Any industry using a stationary 2211 Electric power reciprocating internal generation, combustion...

  3. 76 FR 12923 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-09

    ... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines... pollutants for existing stationary spark ignition reciprocating internal combustion engines. The final rule... reciprocating internal combustion generation, engine. transmission, or distribution. 622110 Medical and surgical...

  4. 75 FR 51569 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-20

    ... Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol... for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines AGENCY: Environmental... hazardous air pollutants for existing stationary spark ignition reciprocating internal combustion engines...

  5. 77 FR 33811 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-07

    ... 63 National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines; New Source Performance Standards for Stationary Internal Combustion Engines; Proposed Rule #0;#0... Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines; New Source...

  6. 77 FR 37361 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-21

    ... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines; New Source Performance Standards for Stationary Internal Combustion Engines AGENCY: Environmental Protection... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines; New Source Performance...

  7. Full-scale Milling Tests of Wood Pellets for Combustion in a Suspension-Fired Power Plant Boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masche, Marvin; Puig Arnavat, Maria; Wadenbäck, Johan

    The size reduction of pelletized wood is crucial in suspension-fired power plants, and hence its milling characteristics are of interest to optimize the milling and combustion process. The objective of the study was to compare the size and shape of pellets disintegrated in hot water with that from......), and analyzing the comminuted particle shape and particle size distribution (PSD). Large-scale pellet comminution produced finer and wider PSDs than pellet disintegration in hot water, but only slightly altered the particle shape. The mill pressure loss, absorbed mill power, and hence SGEC depended on the pellet...

  8. Quantitative data on the fire behavior of combustible materials found in nuclear power plants: A literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowlen, S.P.

    1987-02-01

    This report presents the findings of a task in which currently available fire research literature was reviewed for quantitative data on the burning characteristics of combustible materials that are found in nuclear power plants. The materials considered for which quantitative data were available include cable insulation materials, flammable liquids, furniture, trash and general refuse, and wood and wood products. A total of 90 figures and tables, taken primarily from the referenced works, which summarize the available quantitative fire characterization information for these materials is presented

  9. CFD analysis of the pulverized coal combustion processes in a 160 MWe tangentially-fired-boiler of a thermal power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Cristiano V. da; Beskow, Arthur B. [Universidade Regional Integrada do Alto Uruguai e das Misses (LABSIM/GEAPI/URI), Erechim, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia e Ciencia da Computacao. Grupo de Engenharia Aplicada a Processos Industriais], Emails: cristiano@uricer.edu.br, Arthur@uricer.edu.br; Indrusiak, Maria Luiza S. [Universidade do Vale do Rio dos Sinos (UNISINOS), Sao Leopoldo, RS (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Mecanica], E-mail: sperbindrusiak@via-rs.net

    2010-10-15

    The strategic role of energy and the current concern with greenhouse effects, energetic and exegetic efficiency of fossil fuel combustion greatly enhance the importance of the studies of complex physical and chemical processes occurring inside boilers of thermal power plants. The state of the art in computational fluid dynamics and the availability of commercial codes encourage numeric studies of the combustion processes. In the present work the commercial software CFX Ansys Europe Ltd. was used to study the combustion of coal in a 160 MWe commercial thermal power plant with the objective of simulating the operational conditions and identifying factors of inefficiency. The behavior of the flow of air and pulverized coal through the burners was analyzed, and the three-dimensional flue gas flow through the combustion chamber and heat exchangers was reproduced in the numeric simulation. (author)

  10. Integration between a demo size post-combustion CO2 capture and full size power plant: an integral approach on energy penalty for different process options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miguel Mercader, F. de; Magneschi, G.; Sanchez Fernandez, E.; Stienstra, G.J.; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2012-01-01

    CO2 capture based on post-combustion capture has the potential to significantly reduce the CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants. However, this capture process reduces considerably the energy efficiency of the power plant. To reduce this energy penalty, this paper studies different

  11. Biofuels combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Charles K

    2013-01-01

    This review describes major features of current research in renewable fuels derived from plants and from fatty acids. Recent and ongoing fundamental studies of biofuel molecular structure, oxidation reactions, and biofuel chemical properties are reviewed, in addition to combustion applications of biofuels in the major types of engines in which biofuels are used. Biofuels and their combustion are compared with combustion features of conventional petroleum-based fuels. Two main classes of biofuels are described, those consisting of small, primarily alcohol, fuels (particularly ethanol, n-butanol, and iso-pentanol) that are used primarily to replace or supplement gasoline and those derived from fatty acids and used primarily to replace or supplement conventional diesel fuels. Research efforts on so-called second- and third-generation biofuels are discussed briefly.

  12. LES SOFTWARE FOR THE DESIGN OF LOW EMISSION COMBUSTION SYSTEMS FOR VISION 21 PLANTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steve Cannon; Baifang Zuo; Virgil Adumitroaie; Keith McDaniel; Cliff Smith

    2002-01-01

    Further development of a combustion Large Eddy Simulation (LES) code for the design of advanced gaseous combustion systems is described in this fifth quarterly report. CFD Research Corporation (CFDRC) is developing the LES module within the parallel, unstructured solver included in the commercial CFD-ACE+ software. In this quarter, in-situ adaptive tabulation (ISAT) for efficient chemical rate storage and retrieval was further tested in the LES code. The use of multiple trees and periodic tree dumping was investigated. Implementation of the Linear Eddy Model (LEM) for subgrid chemistry was finished for serial applications. Validation of the model on a backstep reacting case was performed. Initial calculations of the SimVal experiment were performed for various barrel lengths, equivalence ratio, combustor shapes, and turbulence models. The effects of these variables on combustion instability was studied. Georgia Tech continues the effort to parameterize the LEM over composition space so that a neural net can be used efficiently in the combustion LES code. Next quarter, the 2nd consortium meeting will be held at CFDRC. LES software development and testing will continue. Alpha testing of the code will be performed on cases of interest to the industrial consortium. Optimization of subgrid models will be pursued, particularly with the ISAT approach. Also next quarter, the demonstration of the neural net approach, for chemical kinetics speed-up in CFD-ACE+, should be accomplished

  13. Flexible dynamic operation of solar-integrated power plant with solvent based post-combustion carbon capture (PCC) process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qadir, Abdul; Sharma, Manish; Parvareh, Forough; Khalilpour, Rajab; Abbas, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Flexible operation of power and PCC plant may significantly increase operational revenue. • Higher optimal carbon capture rates observed with solar thermal energy input. • Solar thermal repowering of the power plant provides highest net revenue. • Constant optimal capture rate observed for one of the flexible operation cases. • Up to 42% higher revenue generation observed between two cases with solar input. - Abstract: This paper examines flexible operation of solvent-based post-combustion carbon capture (PCC) for the reduction of power plant carbon emissions while minimizing revenue loss due to the reduced power plant electricity output. The study is conducted using a model superstructure enveloping three plants; a power plant, a PCC plant and a solar thermal field where the power plant and PCC plant are operated flexibly under the influence of hourly electricity market and weather conditions. Reduced (surrogate) models for the reboiler duty and auxiliary power requirement for the carbon capture plant are generated and applied to simulate and compare four cases, (A) power plant with PCC, (B) power plant with solar assisted PCC, (C) power plant with PCC and solar repowering – variable net electricity output and (D) power plant with PCC and solar repowering – fixed net electricity output. Such analyses are conducted under dynamic conditions including power plant part-load operation while varying the capture rate to optimize the revenue of the power plant. Each case was simulated with a lower carbon price of $25/tonne-CO 2 and a higher price of $50/tonne-CO 2 . The comparison of cases B–D found that optimal revenue generation for case C can be up to 42% higher than that of solar-assisted PCC (case B). Case C is found to be the most profitable with the lowest carbon emissions intensity and is found to exhibit a constant capture rate for both carbon prices. The optimal revenue for case D is slightly lower than case C for the lower carbon

  14. Assessment of oxy-fuel, pre- and post-combustion-based carbon capture for future IGCC plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunze, Christian; Spliethoff, Hartmut

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Hot gas cleanup is a highly favorable technology for all selected IGCC concepts. ► Proposed high pressure IGCC with membrane reactor enables direct CO 2 condensation. ► IGCC with OTM and carbonate looping enable significant synergy effects. ► Combining IGCC and oxy-fuel is technically challenging but energetically favorable. ► All selected IGCC concepts are able to realize CO 2 capture rates up to 99%. -- Abstract: Environmental damage due to the emission of greenhouse gases from conventional coal-based power plants is a growing concern. Various carbon capture strategies to minimize CO 2 emissions are currently being investigated. Unfortunately, the efficiency drop due to de-carbonization is still significant and the capture rate is limited. Therefore three future hard coal IGCC concepts are assessed here, applying emerging technologies and various carbon capture approaches. The advanced pre-combustion capture concept is based on hot gas clean-up, membrane-enhanced CO conversion and direct CO 2 condensation. The concept reached a net efficiency of 45.1% (LHV), representing an improvement of 6.46% compared to the conventional IGCC base case. The second IGCC concept, based on post-combustion capture via calcination–carbonation loops, hot gas clean-up and oxygen membranes, showed a net efficiency of 45.87% (LHV). The third IGCC concept applies hot gas clean-up and combustion of the unconverted fuel gas using pure oxygen. The oxygen is supplied by an integrated oxygen membrane. The combination of IGCC and oxy-fuel process reached a net efficiency of 45.74% (LHV). In addition to their increased efficiency, all of the concepts showed significantly improved carbon capture rates up to 99%, resulting in virtually carbon-free fossil power plants.

  15. Working fluid selection for the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) exhaust heat recovery of an internal combustion engine power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douvartzides, S.; Karmalis, I.

    2016-11-01

    Organic Rankine cycle technology is capable to efficiently convert low-grade heat into useful mechanical power. In the present investigation such a cycle is used for the recovery of heat from the exhaust gases of a four stroke V18 MAN 51/60DF internal combustion engine power plant operating with natural gas. Design is focused on the selection of the appropriate working fluid of the Rankine cycle in terms of thermodynamic, environmental and safety criteria. 37 candidate fluids have been considered and all Rankine cycles examined were subcritical. The thermodynamic analysis of all fluids has been comparatively undertaken and the effect of key operation conditions such as the evaporation pressure and the superheating temperature was taken into account. By appropriately selecting the working fluid and the Rankine cycle operation conditions the overall plant efficiency was improved by 5.52% and fuel consumption was reduced by 12.69%.

  16. NOx emissions and thermal efficiencies of small scale biomass-fuelled combustion plant with reference to process industries in a developing country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tariq, A.S.; Purvis, M.R.I.

    1996-01-01

    Solid biomass materials are an important industrial fuel in many developing countries and also show good potential for usage in Europe within a future mix of renewable energy resources. The sustainable use of wood fuels for combustion relies on operation of plant with acceptable thermal efficiency. There is a clear link between plant efficiency and environmental impacts due to air pollution and deforestation. To supplement a somewhat sparse literature on thermal efficiencies and nitrogen oxide emissions from biomass-fuelled plants in developing countries, this paper presents results for tests carried out on 14 combustion units obtained during field trials in Sri Lanka. The plants tested comprised steam boilers and process air heaters. Biomass fuels included: rubber-wood, fuelwood from natural forests; coconut shells; rice husks; and sugar can bagasse. Average NO x (NO and NO 2 ) emissions for the plants were found to be 47 gNO 2 GJ -1 with 18% conversion of fuel nitrogen. The former value is the range of NO x emission values quoted for combustion of coal in grate-fired systems; some oil-fired systems and systems operating on natural gas, but is less than the emission levels for the combustion of pulverized fuel and heavy fuel oil. This value is significantly within current European standards for NO x emission from large combustion plants. Average thermal efficiency of the plants was found to be 50%. Observations made on operational practices demonstrated that there is considerable scope for the improvement of this thermal efficiency value by plant supervisor training, drying of fuelwood and the use of simple instruments for monitoring plant performance. (Author)

  17. Hydrogen combustion study in the containment of Atucha-I nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, J.H.; Gonzalez Videla, E.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the combustion of hydrogen was modeled and studied in the containment vessel of the Atucha I nuclear power station using the CONTAIN package. The hydrogen comes from the oxidation of metallic materials during the severe accidents proposed. The CONTAIN package is an integrated tool that analyzes the physical, chemical and radiation conditions that affect the containment structure of the radioactive materials unloaded from the primary system during a severe accident in the reactor. (author) [es

  18. Studying heat integration options for steam-gas power plants retrofitted with CO2 post-combustion capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carapellucci, Roberto; Giordano, Lorena; Vaccarelli, Maura

    2015-01-01

    Electricity generation from fossil fuels has become a focal point of energy and climate change policies due to its central role in modern economics and its leading contribution to greenhouse gas emissions. Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is regarded by the International Energy Agency as an essential part of the technology portfolio for carbon mitigation, as it can significantly reduce CO 2 emissions while ensuring electricity generation from fossil fuel power plants. This paper studies the retrofit of natural gas combined cycles (NGCCs) with an amine-based post-combustion carbon capture system. NGCCs with differently rated capacities were analysed under the assumptions that the heat requirement of the capture system was provided via a steam extraction upstream of the low-pressure steam turbine or by an auxiliary unit that was able to reduce the power plant derating related to the energy needs of the CCS system. Different types of auxiliary units were investigated based on power plant size, including a gas turbine cogeneration plant and a supplementary firing unit or boiler fed by natural gas or biomass. Energy and economic analyses were performed in order to evaluate the impact of type and layout of retrofit option on energy, environmental and economic performance of NGCCs with the CCS system. - Highlights: • Steam-gas power plants with an amine-based CO 2 capture unit are examined. • The study concerns three combined cycles with different capacity and plant layout. • Several options to fulfil the heat requirement of the CCS system are explored. • Steam extraction significantly reduces the capacity of steam-gas power plant. • An auxiliary combined heat and power unit allows to reduce power plant derating

  19. Characteristics of carbonized sludge for co-combustion in pulverized coal power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Woo; Jang, Cheol-Hyeon

    2011-03-01

    Co-combustion of sewage sludge can destabilize its combustion profile due to high volatility, which results in unstable flame. We carried out fuel reforming for sewage sludge by way of carbonization at pyrolysis temperature of 300-500°C. Fuel characteristics of carbonized sludge at each temperature were analyzed. As carbonization temperature increased, fuel ratio increased, volatile content reduced, and atomic ratio relation of H/C and O/C was similar to that of lignite. The analysis result of FT-IR showed the decrease of aliphatic C-H bond and O-C bond in carbonization. In the analysis result of TG-DTG, the thermogravimetry reduction temperature of carbonized sludge (CS400) was proven to be higher than that of dried sludge, but lower than that of sub-bituminous coal. Hardgrove grindability index increased in proportion to fuel ratio increase, where the carbonized sludge value of 43-110 was similar or higher than the coal value of 49-63. As for ash deposits, slagging and fouling index were higher than that of coal. When carbonized sludge (CS400) and coal were co-combusted in 1-10% according to calorific value, slagging tendency was low in all conditions, and fouling tendency was medium or high according to the compositions of coal. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Characteristics of carbonized sludge for co-combustion in pulverized coal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang-Woo; Jang, Cheol-Hyeon

    2011-01-01

    Co-combustion of sewage sludge can destabilize its combustion profile due to high volatility, which results in unstable flame. We carried out fuel reforming for sewage sludge by way of carbonization at pyrolysis temperature of 300-500 deg. C. Fuel characteristics of carbonized sludge at each temperature were analyzed. As carbonization temperature increased, fuel ratio increased, volatile content reduced, and atomic ratio relation of H/C and O/C was similar to that of lignite. The analysis result of FT-IR showed the decrease of aliphatic C-H bond and O-C bond in carbonization. In the analysis result of TG-DTG, the thermogravimetry reduction temperature of carbonized sludge (CS400) was proven to be higher than that of dried sludge, but lower than that of sub-bituminous coal. Hardgrove grindability index increased in proportion to fuel ratio increase, where the carbonized sludge value of 43-110 was similar or higher than the coal value of 49-63. As for ash deposits, slagging and fouling index were higher than that of coal. When carbonized sludge (CS400) and coal were co-combusted in 1-10% according to calorific value, slagging tendency was low in all conditions, and fouling tendency was medium or high according to the compositions of coal.

  1. LES SOFTWARE FOR THE DESIGN OF LOW EMISSION COMBUSTION SYSTEMS FOR VISION 21 PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Cannon; Clifford Smith

    2003-04-01

    Application and testing of the new combustion Large Eddy Simulation (LES) code for the design of advanced gaseous combustion systems is described in this 10th quarterly report. CFD Research Corporation has developed the LES module within the parallel, unstructured solver included in the commercial CFD-ACE+ software. In this quarter, validation and testing of the combustion LES code was performed for the DOE-Simval combustor. Also, Beta testing by consortium members was performed for various burner and combustor configurations. In the two quarters ahead, CFDRC will validate the code on the new DOE SimVal experiments. Experimental data from DOE should be available in June 2003, though LES calculations are currently being performed. This will ensure a truly predictive test of the software. CFDRC will also provide help to the consortium members on running their cases, and incorporate improvements to the software suggested by the beta testers. The beta testers will compare their predictions with experimental measurements and other numerical calculations. At the end of this project (October, 2003), a final released version of the software will be available for licensing to the general public.

  2. Co-combustion of household waste in small-scale energy supply and waste disposal plants; Co-Verbrennung von Siedlungsabfaellen in Kleinanlagen zur dezentralen Energieversorgung und Abfallentsorgung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeer, Ramona

    2012-07-01

    The studies described in this book demonstrate that the co-combustion of household waste in small-scale combustion plants constitutes an alternative disposal concept which facilitates the operation of decentralised waste disposal and heat supply systems. The basic idea of the concept is the co-combustion of different waste fractions in common household logwood heating systems. The experiments performed have shown that this is technically feasible using currently available technology without further modification and that these plants are capable of combusting various waste fractions at low emission levels. Several co-combustion systems were compared with basic oil, pellet and logwood heating systems in both economic and ecological respects. For this purpose cost-effectiveness calculations and a life cycle assessment were performed and brought together in an eco-efficiency analysis. The results show that the most cost-effective and eco-efficient solution is achieved when the co-combustion system is operated for high energy yield and simultaneous reduction of incombustible fractions.

  3. Partitioning of selected trace elements in coal combustion products from two coal-burning power plants in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Sharon M.; Engle, Mark A.; Ruppert, Leslie F.; Affolter, Ronald H.; Jones, Kevin B.

    2013-01-01

    Samples of feed coal (FC), bottom ash (BA), economizer fly ash (EFA), and fly ash (FA) were collected from power plants in the Central Appalachian basin and Colorado Plateau to determine the partitioning of As, Cr, Hg, Pb, and Se in coal combustion products (CCPs). The Appalachian plant burns a high-sulfur (about 3.9 wt.%) bituminous coal from the Upper Pennsylvanian Pittsburgh coal bed and operates with electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), with flue gas temperatures of about 163 °C in the ESPs. At this plant, As, Pb, Hg, and Se have the greatest median concentrations in FA samples, compared to BA and EFA. A mass balance (not including the FGD process) suggests that the following percentages of trace elements are captured in FA: As (48%), Cr (58%), Pb (54%), Se (20%), and Hg (2%). The relatively high temperatures of the flue gas in the ESPs and low amounts of unburned C in FA (0.5% loss-on-ignition for FA) may have led to the low amount of Hg captured in FA. The Colorado Plateau plant burns a blend of three low-S (about 0.74 wt.%) bituminous coals from the Upper Cretaceous Fruitland Formation and operates with fabric filters (FFs). Flue gas temperatures in the baghouses are about 104 °C. The elements As, Cr, Pb, Hg, and Se have the greatest median concentrations in the fine-grained fly ash product (FAP) produced by cyclone separators, compared to the other CCPs at this plant. The median concentration of Hg in FA (0.0983 ppm) at the Colorado Plateau plant is significantly higher than that for the Appalachian plant (0.0315 ppm); this higher concentration is related to the efficiency of FFs in Hg capture, the relatively low temperatures of flue gas in the baghouses (particularly in downstream compartments), and the amount of unburned C in FA (0.29% loss-on-ignition for FA).

  4. New EC Directive on the limitation of emissions from large combustion plants. Implications for German power plants; Neue EG-Richtlinie ueber nationale Emissionshoechstmengen. Folgerung fuer deutsche Kraftwerke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hildebrand, M. [VDEW - e.V., Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Bereich Recht und Umwelt

    2002-03-25

    The Directive 2001/80/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council, on the limitation of emissions of certain pollutants into the air from large combustion plants uses a regulatory instrument for limiting emissions at the national levels of EU member states. This approach is completely new and the author of this article therefore expects problems to arise in the context of transfer of this EC Directive into national law. Another aspect discussed is the assessment of implications for the operating power plants in Germany. (orig./CB) [German] Mit der im Herbst 2001 durch das Europaeische Parlament und durch den Umweltministerrat verabschiedeten Richtlinie ueber nationale Emissionshoechstmengen wurde vom europaeischen Vorschriftengeber ein in Deutschland bislang systemfremdes Regelungsinstrument geschaffen, dessen Umsetzung in nationales Recht und dessen anlagenspezifische Konsequenzen - zumindest hierzulande -bislang noch reichlich unklar sind. (orig.)

  5. Standard technical specifications: Combustion engineering plants. Volume 3, Revision 1: Bases (Sections 3.4--3.9)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    This report documents the results of the combined effort of the NRC and the industry to produce improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS), Revision 1 for Combustion Engineering Plants. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved STS or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. Volume 1 contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS Volume 3 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.9 of the improved STS

  6. A comparison of circulating fluidised bed combustion and gasification power plant technologies for processing mixtures of coal, biomass and plastic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIlveen-Wright, D.R.; Huang, Y.; McMullan, J.T.; Pinto, F.; Franco, C.; Gulyurtlu, I.; Armesto, L.; Cabanillas, A.; Caballero, M.A.; Aznar, M.P.

    2006-01-01

    Environmental regulations concerning emission limitations from the use of fossil fuels in large combustion plants have stimulated interest in biomass for electricity generation. The main objective of the present study was to examine the technical and economic viability of using combustion and gasification of coal mixed with biomass and plastic wastes, with the aim of developing an environmentally acceptable process to decrease their amounts in the waste stream through energy recovery. Mixtures of a high ash coal with biomass and/or plastic using fluidised bed technologies (combustion and gasification) were considered. Experiments were carried out in laboratory and pilot plant fluidised bed systems on the combustion and air/catalyst and air/steam gasification of these feedstocks and the data obtained were used in the techno-economic analyses. The experimental results were used in simulations of medium to large-scale circulating fluidised bed (CFB) power generation plants. Techno-economic analysis of the modelled CFB combustion systems showed efficiencies of around 40.5% (and around 46.5% for the modelled CFB gasification systems) when fuelled solely by coal, which were only minimally affected by co-firing with up to 20% biomass and/or wastes. Specific investments were found to be around $2150/kWe to $2400/kWe ($1350/kWe to $1450/kWe) and break-even electricity selling prices to be around $68/MWh to $78/MWh ($49/MWh to $54/MWh). Their emissions were found to be within the emission limit values of the large combustion plant directive. Fluidised bed technologies were found to be very suitable for co-firing coal and biomass and/or plastic waste and to offer good options for the replacement of obsolete or polluting power plants. (author)

  7. Operation of a plant for waste combustion in the dim frames and the national and Europe legislation in the case of the solid waste combustion plant Rugenberger-Dam in Hamburg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menke, D.; Zwahr, D.

    2000-01-01

    The difficulties in the operation of a waste processing plant are demonstrated on the example of the waste combustion facility Rudenberger-Dam in Hamburg. The installation and processes are described in details. The produced in the process 30% HCL is in compliance with the requirements for a commercial product, but since it is produced as a result from the processing of waste gases, it is treated as a waste product. Similar problems occur in other installations. German and European legislation in the field of waste management are unnecessary complicated. The introduction of technical frame conditions in the laws often presents an obstacle for the application of new technologies. It is pointed out that the time for changes in the environment legislation has come

  8. LES SOFTWARE FOR THE DESIGN OF LOW EMISSION COMBUSTION SYSTEMS FOR VISION 21 PLANTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steven Cannon; Baifang Zuo; Virgil Adumitroaie; Keith McDaniel; Clifford Smith

    2002-01-01

    Further development of a combustion Large Eddy Simulation (LES) code for the design of advanced gaseous combustion systems is described in this sixth quarterly report. CFD Research Corporation (CFDRC) is developing the LES module within the parallel, unstructured solver included in the commercial CFD-ACE+ software. In this quarter, in-situ adaptive tabulation (ISAT) for efficient chemical rate storage and retrieval was implemented and tested within the Linear Eddy Model (LEM). ISAT type 3 is being tested so that extrapolation can be performed and further improve the retrieval rate. Further testing of the LEM for subgrid chemistry was performed for parallel applications and for multi-step chemistry. Validation of the software on backstep and bluff-body reacting cases were performed. Initial calculations of the SimVal experiment at Georgia Tech using their LES code were performed. Georgia Tech continues the effort to parameterize the LEM over composition space so that a neural net can be used efficiently in the combustion LES code. A new and improved Artificial Neural Network (ANN), with log-transformed output, for the 1-step chemistry was implemented in CFDRC's LES code and gave reasonable results. This quarter, the 2nd consortium meeting was held at CFDRC. Next quarter, LES software development and testing will continue. Alpha testing of the code will continue to be performed on cases of interest to the industrial consortium. Optimization of subgrid models will be pursued, particularly with the ISAT approach. Also next quarter, the demonstration of the neural net approach, for multi-step chemical kinetics speed-up in CFD-ACE+, will be accomplished

  9. Problem of formation of nitrogen oxides during coal combustion in power plant steam generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotler, V.R.; Kuvaev, Yu.V.

    1992-07-01

    Analyzes a study of physical and chemical processes of nitrogen oxide formation during coal combustion conducted at Stanford University (USA). Experimental installation, pulverized coal feeding as well as measuring techniques and equipment are described. Experiments were conducted with 55 micron particles of semibituminous coal. An equation for the percentage of coal carbon converted to gaseous products is given. Active formation of NO from nitrogen content in the fuel was observed when oxygen content was under 4%. Conversion of the fuel nitrogen to NO[sub x] in the 1,350-1,850 K temperature range did not depend on gas temperature but rather on oxygen content. 2 refs.

  10. Combustion aerosols from co-firing of coal and solid recovered fuel in a 400 mw pf-fired power plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul; Wu, Hao; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2010-01-01

    In this work, combustion aerosols (i.e. fine particles fired power plant was sampled with a low-pressure impactor, and analysed by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The power plant was operated at both dedicated coal combustion conditions...... and under conditions with cofiring of up to 10% (thermal basis) of solid recovered fuel (SRF). The SRFs were characterized by high contents of Cl, Ca, Na and trace metals, while the coal had relatively higher S, Al, Fe and K content. The mass-based particle size distribution of the aerosols was found...... to be bi-modal, with an ultrafine (vaporization) mode centered around 0.1 μm, and a coarser (finefragmentation) mode above 2 μm. Co-firing of SRF tended to increase the formation of ultrafine particles as compared with dedicated coal combustion, while the coarse mode tended to decrease. The increased...

  11. Installation of stationary battery plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, K

    1977-01-01

    The author discusses the problems encountered in designing battery rooms and charging stations. The VDE 0510 rule is not sufficient. Additional Laender regulations (regulations concerning electrical operating rooms) are not uniform. It is therefore necessary for planners, builders, owners, and building authorities to establish a common standard.

  12. Fuel cells coming of age for both transport and stationary power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, R J.D.; Frost, J C [Johnson Matthey, London (United Kingdom)

    1998-01-01

    The internal combustion engine has dominated transport and local small scale energy production for so long that it often seems inconceivable that it could be replaced. Of the contenders, fuel cells have long been considered the most likely alternative. Their potential advantages in terms of high efficiency and ultra-low emissions are well documented. However, despite first practical application in the US space programme in the 1960s, they have yet to be commercialised for stationary power plants and of all the potential applications, transportation uses set some of the most stringent performance and cost requirements. Yet there is now considerable optimism that fuel cell vehicles and stationary generators will be a commercially important reality within the next five to ten years. A primary cause of this optimism is the progress made with the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). (author)

  13. Comparative study of cogasification and co-combustion of communal sewage sludge in brown coal fuelled plants; Vergleich der Mitvergasung und Mitverbrennung kommunaler Klaerschlaemme in braunkohlegefeuerten Anlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiffer, H.P.; Bierbaum, K.; Adlhoch, W.; Thomas, G. [Rheinbraun AG, Koeln (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    Co-combustion and cogasification of sewage sludge in brown coal fuelled plants are compared, and an economic assessment is made. (ABI) [Deutsch] Die Mitverbrennung und Mitvergasung von Klaerschlamm in braunkohlegefeuerten Anlagen werden verglichen und auf ihre Wirtschaftlichkeit hin untersucht. (ABI)

  14. Comparative study of cogasification and co-combustion of communal sewage sludge in brown coal fuelled plants; Vergleich der Mitvergasung und Mitverbrennung kommunaler Klaerschlaemme in braunkohlegefeuerten Anlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiffer, H P; Bierbaum, K; Adlhoch, W; Thomas, G [Rheinbraun AG, Koeln (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    Co-combustion and cogasification of sewage sludge in brown coal fuelled plants are compared, and an economic assessment is made. (ABI) [Deutsch] Die Mitverbrennung und Mitvergasung von Klaerschlamm in braunkohlegefeuerten Anlagen werden verglichen und auf ihre Wirtschaftlichkeit hin untersucht. (ABI)

  15. Renew, reduce or become more efficient? The climate contribution of biomass co-combustion in a coal-fired power plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, Jan H.; Benders, Rene M. J.; Moll, Henri C.; Pierie, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Within this paper, biomass supply chains, with different shares of biomass co-combustion in coal fired power plants, are analysed on energy efficiency, energy consumption, renewable energy production, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and compared with the performance of a 100% coal supply chain

  16. Multi-dimensional Analysis Method of Hydrogen Combustion in the Containment of a Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jongtae; Hong, Seongwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gun Hong [Kyungwon E and C Co., Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The most severe case is the occurrence of detonation, which induces a few-fold greater pressure load on the containment wall than a deflagration flame. The occurrence of a containment-wise global detonation is prohibited by a national regulation. The compartments located in the flow path such as steam generator compartment, annular compartment, and dome region are likely to have highly-concentrated hydrogen. If it is found that hydrogen concentration in any compartment is far below a detonation criterion during an accident progression, it can be thought that the occurrence of a detonative explosion in a compartment is excluded. However, if it is not, it is necessary to evaluate the characteristics of flame acceleration in the containment. The possibility of a flame transition from a deflagration to a detonation (DDT) can be evaluated from a calculated hydrogen distribution in a compartment by using sigma-lambda criteria. However, this method can provide a very conservative result because the geometric characteristics of a real compartment are not considered well. In order to evaluate the containment integrity from a threat of a hydrogen explosion, it is necessary to establish an integrated evaluation system, which includes a lumped-parameter and detail analysis methods. In this study, a method for the multi-dimensional analysis of hydrogen combustion is proposed to mechanistically evaluate the flame acceleration characteristics with a geometric effect. The geometry of the containment is modeled 3-dimensionally using a CAD tool. To resolve a propagating flame front, an adaptive mesh refinement method is coupled with a combustion analysis solver.

  17. Analysis of thermally coupled chemical looping combustion-based power plants with carbon capture

    KAUST Repository

    Iloeje, Chukwunwike

    2015-04-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. A number of CO2 capture-enabled power generation technologies have been proposed to address the negative environmental impact of CO2 emission. One important barrier to adopting these technologies is the associated energy penalty. Chemical-looping Combustion (CLC) is an oxy-combustion technology that can significantly lower this penalty. It utilizes an oxygen carrier to transfer oxygen from air/oxidizing stream in an oxidation reactor to the fuel in a reduction reactor. Conventional CLC reactor designs employ two separate reactors, with metal/metal oxide particles circulating pneumatically in-between. One of the key limitations of these designs is the entropy generation due to reactor temperature difference, which lowers the cycle efficiency. Zhao et al. (Zhao et al., 2014; Zhao and Ghoniem, 2014) proposed a new CLC rotary reactor design, which overcomes this limitation. This reactor consists of a single rotating wheel with micro-channels designed to maintain thermal equilibrium between the fuel and air sides. This study uses three thermodynamic models of increasing fidelity to demonstrate that the internal thermal coupling in the rotary CLC reactor creates the potential for improved cycle efficiency. A theoretical availability model and an ideal thermodynamic cycle model are used to define the efficiency limits of CLC systems, illustrate the impact of reactor thermal coupling and discuss relevant criteria. An Aspen Plus® model of a regenerative CLC cycle is then used to show that this thermal coupling raises the cycle efficiency by up to 2% points. A parametric study shows that efficiency varies inversely with pressure, with a maximum of 51% at 3bar, 1000C and 60% at 4bar, 1400C. The efficiency increases with CO2 fraction at high pressure ratios but exhibits a slight inverse dependence at low pressure ratios. The parametric study shows that for low purge steam demand, steam generation improves exhaust heat recovery and increases efficiency

  18. The energetic performance of a novel hybrid solar thermal and chemical looping combustion plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafarian, Mehdi; Arjomandi, Maziar; Nathan, Graham J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A hybrid solar chemical looping combustion power cycle is reported. • The cycle is studied for two configurations, with and without an after-burner. • The oxygen carrier particles are used as storage medium for solar thermal energy. • Total solar shares of 41.4% and 60% are achieved with and without the after-burner. • Efficiencies of 50% and 44.0% are achieved with and without the after-burner. - Abstract: The overall energetic performance of a gas turbine combined cycle powered by a hybrid cycle between a solar thermal and a chemical looping combustion (CLC) system firing methane is reported for two configurations. In one case, the outlet from the air reactor is fed directly to a gas turbine, while in the other an after-burner, also firing methane, is added to increase the gas turbine inlet temperature. The cycle is simulated using Aspen Plus software for the average diurnal profile of normal irradiance for Port Augusta, South Australia. The first law efficiency, total solar absorption efficiency, average and peak fractional power boosts, total solar share, net solar to electrical efficiency, fraction of pressurised CO 2 , incremental CO 2 avoidance and the exergy efficiency for both cycles are reported. The calculations predict a first law efficiency of 50.0% for the cycle employing an after-burner, compared with 44.0% for that without the after-burner. However, this is achieved at the cost of decreasing the solar share from 60.0%, without the after-burner, to 41.4% with it. Also reported is the sensitivity analysis of performance to variations in key operating parameters. The sensitivity analysis shows that further improvements to the performance of the cycle are possible

  19. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of the coal combustion in a boiler of a thermal power plant using different kinds of the manufactured coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Cristiano Vitorino da; Lazzari, Luis Carlos; Ziemniczak, Aline; Beskow, Arthur Bortolin [Universidade Regional Integrada do Alto Uruguai e das Missoes (URI), Erechim, RS (Brazil)], E-mails: cristiano@uricer.edu.br, arthur@uricer.edu.br

    2010-07-01

    The state of the art in computational fluid dynamics and the availability of commercial codes encourage numerical studies of combustion processes. In the present work the commercial software CFX Ansys Europe Ltd. has been used to study the combustion of pulverized coal into the boiler of a thermal power plant. The objective of this work is to obtain new information for process optimization. Different kinds of manufactured coals were numerically tested in a thermal power plant installed at the southeast region of Brazil. The simulations were made using the actual burning conditions of the boiler. Results include the residence time of the fuel into the combustion chamber, temperature fields, flow fluid mechanics, heat transfer and pollutant formation, as well as the CO and NOx concentrations, aiming to determinate the best conditions to burn the investigated coals. The numerical investigation of the phenomena involved on the coal combustion processes are used to complete the experimental information obtained in operational tests. Considering the characteristics of different kinds of manufactured coals used, with this study is possible to achieve the most efficient boiler operation parameters, with decreasing costs of electricity production and reduction of environmentally harmful emissions. It was verified that the different kinds of manufactured coals demand different operation conditions, and the kind of manufactured coal used on the combustion process has a significant effect on the pollutant formation, mainly in rel action with ash concentration. (author)

  20. Modeling of Combined Heat and Power Plant Based on a Multi-Stage Gasifier and Internal Combustion Engines of Various Power Outputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khudyakova, G. I.; Kozlov, A. N.; Svishchev, D. A.

    2017-11-01

    The paper is concerned with an integrated system of internal combustion engine and mini combined heat and power plant (ICE-CHP). The system is based on multi-stage wood biomass gasification. The use of producer gas in the system affects negatively the internal combustion engine performance and, therefore, reduces the efficiency of the ICE-CHP plant. A mathematical model of an internal combustion engine running on low-calorie producer gas was developed using an overview of Russian and foreign manufacturers of reciprocating units, that was made in the research. A thermal calculation was done for four-stroke gas engines of different rated power outputs (30, 100 and 250 kW), running on producer gas (CO2 - 10.2, CO - 45.8, N2 - 38.8%). Thermal calculation demonstrates that the engine exhaust gas temperature reaches 500 - 600°C at the rated power level and with the lower engine power, the temperature gets higher. For example, for an internal combustion engine power of 1000 kW the temperature of exhaust gases equals 400°C. A comparison of the efficiency of engine operation on natural gas and producer gas shows that with the use of producer gas the power output declines from 300 to 250 kWe. The reduction in the effective efficiency in this case makes up 2%. The measures are proposed to upgrade the internal combustion engine to enable it to run on low-calorie producer gas.

  1. Technical notes for the conceptual design for an atmospheric fluidized-bed direct combustion power generating plant. [570 MWe plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-04-01

    The design, arrangement, thermodynamics, and economics of a 592 MW(e) (nominal gross) electric power generating plant equipped with a Babcock and Wilcox Company (B and W) atmospheric fluidized bed (AFB) boiler are described. Information is included on capital and operating costs, process systems, electrical systems, control and instrumentation, and environmental systems. This document represents a portion of an overall report describing the conceptual designs of two atmospheric fluidized bed boilers and balance of plants for the generation of electric power and the analysis and comparison of these conceptual designs to a conventional pulverized coal-fired electric power generation plant equipped with a wet limestone flue gas desulfurization system.

  2. Technical notes for the conceptual design for an atmospheric fluidized-bed direct combustion power generating plant. [570 MWe plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-04-01

    The design, arrangement, thermodynamics, and economics of a 578 MW(e) (nominal gross) electric power generating plant equipped with a Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation (FWEC) atmospheric fluidized bed (AFB) boiler are described. Information is included on capital and operating costs, process systems, electrical systems, control and instrumentation, and environmental systems. This document represents a portion of an overall report describing the conceptual designs of two atmospheric fluidized bed boilers and balance of plants for the generation of electric power and the analysis and comparison of these conceptual designs to a conventional pulverized coal-fired electric power generation plant equipped with a wet limestone flue gas desulfurization system.

  3. Impact of coal combustion from thermal power plant: estimates on ambient SO2 levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, P.V.

    1991-01-01

    Using a Gaussian dispersion model, ambient Ground Levels Concentrations (GLC) of SO 2 due to Nashik Thermal Power Plant have been computed. Annual GLC in 16 cardinal sectors and concentration levels in 6 atmospheric stability classes have been estimated as a function of down wind distance. The values are compared with national ambient air quality standard and risk involved due to the release of SO 2 from power plant has been assessed. (author). 8 refs., 2 appendixes

  4. Co-combustion of gasified contaminated waste wood in a coal fired power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This project demonstrates the technical and economical feasibility of the producing and cofiring of product gas from demolition waste wood. For this purpose LCV product gas is generated in an atmospheric circulating fluidized bed (CFB) gasification plant, cooled and cleaned and transported to the boiler of a 600 MWe pulverized coal fired power plant. Gas cooling and cleaning takes place in a waste heat boiler and a multi stage wet gas cleaning train. Steam raised in the waste heat boiler is exported to the power plant. On an annual basis 70,000 tons of steam coal are substituted by 150,000 tons of contaminated demolition waste wood (50,000 tons oil equivalent), resulting in a net CO2 emission reduction of 170,000 tons per year, while concurrently generating 205 GWh of electrical power. The wood gasification plant was built by NV EPZ (now incorporated in Essent Energi BV) for Amergas BV, now a 100% subsidiary of Essent Energie BV. The gasification plant is located at the Amer Power Station of NV EPZ Production (now Essent Generation) at Geertruidenberg, The Netherlands. Demonstrating several important design features in wood gasification, the plant started hot service in the Spring of 2000, with first gasification accomplished in the Summer of 2000 and is currently being optimized. (au)

  5. Research paper 2000-B-3: the implementation of the EU large combustion plant directive (88/609) in France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schucht, S.

    2000-07-01

    This paper constitutes a contribution to the project 'IMPOL - The Implementation of EU Environmental Policies: Efficiency Issues'. The main objective of this paper is twofold: a description of the implementation process in a historic review and an evaluation according to economic criteria of the implementation of the 1988 EEC Large Combustion Plant Directive (LCPD) in France. The analysis focuses on the electricity supply industry (ESI) and the Directive's provisions towards SO{sub 2} emissions from existing large combustion plants (LCPs), as defined by the Directive. These provisions take the form of national emission ceilings defined for the years 1993, 1998 and 2003 which are presented in the form of overall national emission reduction objectives for the LCP sector. The reference year is 1980. The question of how these emission ceilings were to be reached, i.e. which instruments were to be applied, was left to the discretion of the Member States. In France, we find a large over-compliance with the Directive's targets. This result is, largely, explained by the French nuclear power programme, which was set up after the first oil crisis and which took effects between 1980 and 1990. Furthermore, we find that there were no demands towards existing ESI LCPs or measures taken by the ESI that could be linked to the LCPD. Policy directed at SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions from existing ESI LCPs is limited to a voluntary commitment ('EDF-programme') of Electricite de France (EDF), France's largest electricity supplier and - only in a few cases - to requirements related to the French air quality law, i.e. to requirements defined for local protection areas. Owing to a lack of measures related to the LCP Directive, we analyse the implementation of the EDF programme as well. The economic evaluation is based on criteria of environmental effectiveness and of cost efficiency, productive efficiency and administrative costs. Environmental

  6. Advanced ecological and economical power plant technology based on CFB combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samant, G.; Hirschfelder, H.

    1993-01-01

    The scenario of the power plant industry is worldwide affected by one important issue, namely the stringent and steadily increasing environment regulations. Fluidized bed boilers, based on Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) technology with in-situ emission control, and improved economics as well as with proven record of high efficiency and reliability meets the ecological, economical and technical requirements. It should be noted that in addition to their attractive performance, regarding efficiency and pollution control, coal fired CFB boilers have been successfully introduced not only in power plant industry, but also in other industrial units such as chemical plants, automobile industry, paper mills, cement, etc. The experience gained to date confirms the advantages and also the reliability of this technology. (author)

  7. Physico-chemical and optical properties of combustion-generated particles from coal-fired power plant, automobile and ship engine and charcoal kiln.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hwajin

    2015-04-01

    Similarities and differences in physico-chemical and optical properties of combustion generated particles from various sources were investigated. Coal-fired power plant, charcoal kiln, automobile and ship engine were major sources, representing combustions of coal, biomass and two different types of diesel, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) equipped with both SEM and HRTEM were used for physico-chemical analysis. Light absorbing properties were assessed using a spectrometer equipped with an integrating sphere. Particles generated from different combustion sources and conditions demonstrate great variability in their morphology, structure and composition. From coal-fired power plant, both fly ash and flue gas were mostly composed of heterogeneously mixed mineral ash spheres, suggesting that the complete combustion was occurred releasing carbonaceous species out at high temperature (1200-1300 °C). Both automobile and ship exhausts from diesel combustions show typical features of soot: concentric circles comprised of closely-packed graphene layers. However, heavy fuel oil (HFO) combusted particles from ship exhaust demonstrate more complex compositions containing different morphology of particles other than soot, e.g., spherical shape of char particles composed of minerals and carbon. Even for the soot aggregates, particles from HFO burning have different chemical compositions; carbon is dominated but Ca (29.8%), S (28.7%), Na(1%), and Mg(1%) are contained, respectively which were not found from particles of automobile emission. This indicates that chemical compositions and burning conditions are significant to determine the fate of particles. Finally, from biomass burning, amorphous and droplet-like carbonaceous particles with no crystallite structure are observed and they are generally formed by the condensation of low volatile species at low

  8. Developments in the pre-combustion CO2 capture pilot plant at the Buggenum IGCC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damen, K.; Gnutek, R.; Kaptein, J.; Nannan, N.R.; Oyarzun, B.; Trapp, C.; Colonna, P.; Van Dijk, E.; Gross, J.; Bardow, A.

    2011-01-01

    N.V. Nuon (part of the Vattenfall Group) operates an IGCC in Buggenum and is developing a multi-fuel IGCC with CO2 capture and storage (Nuon Magnum) in Eemshaven, the Netherlands. In order to prepare for large-scale application of CO2 capture and storage, a CO2 capture pilot plant is constructed at

  9. KHD combustion chamber. Flexible use of alternative fuels in the cement plant; KHD Brennkammer. Flexibler Einsatz von alternativen Brennstoffen im Zementwerk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuermann, Heiko [Humboldt Wedag GmbH, Koeln (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    In many parts of the world, the use of alternative fuels is a recognized measure for reducing the CO{sub 2} emissions that result from burning primary fuels such as coal, oil and natural gas. Alternative or secondary fuels are the terms used for combustible residues from industrial and commercial manufacturing processes, agricultural production, and sorted municipal refuse. Due to the wide range of possible sources of alternative fuels, there is very great variation in their energy content, ash, moisture content, particle size, form, density etc., so there is no patent solution for their use in a cement plant. For proper operation of the rotary kiln, it is particularly important to use alternative fuel qualities that have good heat value and reactivity in order to achieve a stable, hot sintering zone and to completely burnout the highest possible amount of the fuel while it is suspended in the air stream. Combustion in the calciner places fewer demands on the properties of the alternative fuels than combustion in the rotary kiln burner does. This means that the calciner is the ideal combustion point for the usage of alternative fuels. To enable maximum possible flexibility for the combustion of widely differing alternative fuels in the calciner, KHD Humboldt Wedag offers the option of installing a combustion chamber in the modular PYROCLON calciner system. Due to the operating characteristics of this combustion chamber, which are described in the following sections of this article, even alternative fuels with low heat values and a low degree of preparation can be safely and completely burnt. (orig.)

  10. Process integration of chemical looping combustion with oxygen uncoupling in a coal-fired power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinelli, Maurizio; Peltola, Petteri; Bischi, Aldo; Ritvanen, Jouni; Hyppänen, Timo; Romano, Matteo C.

    2016-01-01

    High-temperature solid looping processes for CCS (carbon capture and storage) represent a class of promising technologies that enables CO2 capture with relatively low net efficiency penalties. The novel concept of the CLOU (Chemical Looping with Oxygen Uncoupling) process is based on a system of two interconnected fluidized bed reactors that operate at atmospheric pressure. In the fuel reactor, the capability of certain metal oxides to spontaneously release molecular oxygen at high temperatures is exploited to promote the direct conversion of coal in an oxygen-rich atmosphere. As a novel CO_2 capture concept, the CLOU process requires the optimization of design and operation parameters, which may substantially influence the total power plant performance. This study approaches this issue by performing joint simulations of CLOU reactors using a 1.5D model and a steam cycle power plant. A sensitivity analysis has been performed to investigate the performance and main technical issues that are related to the integration of a CLOU island in a state-of-the-art USC (ultra-supercritical) power plant. In particular, the effect of the key process parameters has been evaluated. Superior performance has been estimated for the power plant, with electrical efficiencies of approximately 42% and more than 95% CO2 avoided. - Highlights: • Process modeling and simulation of CLOU integrated in USC coal power plant carried out. • Comprehensive sensitivity analysis on Cu-based CLOU process performed. • Electrical efficiencies of 42% and more than 95% CO_2 avoided obtained. • Reactor size and operating conditions suitable for industrial applications.

  11. Economic evaluation of pre-combustion CO2-capture in IGCC power plants by porous ceramic membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franz, Johannes; Maas, Pascal; Scherer, Viktor

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Process simulations of IGCC with pre-combustion capture via membranes were done. • Most promising technology is the water–gas-shift-membrane-reactor (WGSMR). • Energetic evaluations showed minimum efficiency loss of 5.8%-points for WGSMR. • Economic evaluations identified boundary limits of membrane technology. • Cost of electricity for optimum WGSMR-case is 57 €/MW h under made assumptions. - Abstract: Pre-combustion-carbon-capture is one of the three main routes for the mitigation of CO 2 -emissions by fossil fueled power plants. Based on the data of a detailed technical evaluation of CO 2 -capture by porous ceramic membranes (CM) and ceramic membrane reactors (WGSMR) in an Integrated-Gasification-Combined-Cycle (IGCC) power plant this paper focuses on the economic effects of CO 2 -abatement. First the results of the process simulations are presented briefly. The analysis is based on a comparison with a reference IGCC without CO 2 -capture (dry syngas cooling, bituminous coal, efficiency of 47.4%). In addition, as a second reference, an IGCC process with CO 2 removal based on standard Selexol-scrubbing is taken into account. The most promising technology for CO 2 -capture by membranes in IGCC applications is the combination of a water gas shift reactor and a H 2 -selective membrane into one water gas shift membrane reactor. For the WGSRM-case efficiency losses can be limited to about 6%-points (including losses for CO 2 compression) for a CO 2 separation degree of 90%. This is a severe reduction of the efficiency loss compared to Selexol (10.3% points) or IGCC–CM (8.6% points). The economic evaluation is based on a detailed analysis of investment and operational costs. Parameters like membrane costs and lifetime, costs of CO 2 -certificates and annual operating hours are taken into account. The purpose of these evaluations is to identify the minimum cost of electricity for the different capture cases for the variation of the boundary

  12. Thermo-economic analysis of integrated membrane-SMR ITM-oxy-combustion hydrogen and power production plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanusi, Yinka S.; Mokheimer, Esmail M.A.; Habib, Mohamed A.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •A methane reforming reactor integrated to an oxy-combustion plant is proposed. •Co-production of power and hydrogen was investigated and presented. •Optimal thermo-economic operating conditions of the system were identified and presented. •The ion transport membrane oxygen separation unit has the highest capital cost. •The combustor has the highest exergy destruction. -- Abstract: The demand for hydrogen has greatly increased in the last decade due to the stringent regulations enacted to address environmental pollution concerns. Natural gas reforming is currently the most mature technology for large-scale hydrogen production. However, it is usually associated with greenhouse gas emissions. As part of the strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, new designs need to be developed to integrate hydrogen production facilities that are based on natural gas reforming with carbon capture facilities. In this study, we carried out energy, exergy and economic analysis of hydrogen production in a steam methane reforming reactor integrated with an oxy-combustion plant for co-production of power and hydrogen. The results show that the overall system efficiency and hydrogen production efficiency monotonically increase with increasing the combustor exit temperature (CET), increasing the amount of hydrogen extracted and decreasing the auxiliary fuel added to the system. The optimal thermo-economic operating conditions of the system were obtained as reformer pressure of 15 bar, auxiliary fuel factor of 0.8 and hydrogen extraction factor of 0.6. The production cost of hydrogen using the proposed system, under these optimal operating conditions, is within the range suggested by the International Energy Agency (IEA). Further analysis shows that the capital cost of the membrane-air separation unit (ITM) has the major share in the total investment cost of the system and constitutes 37% of the total capital cost of the system at the CET of 1500 K. The exergy

  13. Stationary nonlinear Airy beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotti, A.; Faccio, D.; Couairon, A.; Papazoglou, D. G.; Panagiotopoulos, P.; Tzortzakis, S.; Abdollahpour, D.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the existence of an additional class of stationary accelerating Airy wave forms that exist in the presence of third-order (Kerr) nonlinearity and nonlinear losses. Numerical simulations and experiments, in agreement with the analytical model, highlight how these stationary solutions sustain the nonlinear evolution of Airy beams. The generic nature of the Airy solution allows extension of these results to other settings, and a variety of applications are suggested.

  14. Alstom's Chemical Looping Combustion Prototype for CO2 Capture from Existing Pulverized Coal-Fired Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrus, Jr., Herbert E. [Alstom Power Inc., Windsor, CT (United States); Chiu, John H. [Alstom Power Inc., Windsor, CT (United States); Edberg, Carl D. [Alstom Power Inc., Windsor, CT (United States); Thibeault, Paul R. [Alstom Power Inc., Windsor, CT (United States); Turek, David G. [Alstom Power Inc., Windsor, CT (United States)

    2012-09-30

    Alstom’s Limestone Chemical Looping (LCL™) process has the potential to capture CO2 from new and existing coal-fired power plants while maintaining high plant power generation efficiency. This new power plant concept is based on a hybrid combustion- gasification process utilizing high temperature chemical and thermal looping technology. This process could also be potentially configured as a hybrid combustion-gasification process producing a syngas or hydrogen for various applications while also producing a separate stream of CO2 for use or sequestration. The targets set for this technology is to capture over 90% of the total carbon in the coal at cost of electricity which is less than 20% greater than Conventional PC or CFB units. Previous work with bench scale test and a 65 kWt Process Development Unit Development (PDU) has validated the chemistry required for the chemical looping process and provided for the investigation of the solids transport mechanisms and design requirements. The objective of this project is to continue development of the combustion option of chemical looping (LCL-C™) by designing, building and testing a 3 MWt prototype facility. The prototype includes all of the equipment that is required to operate the chemical looping plant in a fully integrated manner with all major systems in service. Data from the design, construction, and testing will be used to characterize environmental performance, identify and address technical risks, reassess commercial plant economics, and develop design information for a demonstration plant planned to follow the proposed Prototype. A cold flow model of the prototype will be used to predict operating conditions for the prototype and help in operator training. Operation of the prototype will provide operator experience with this new technology and performance data of the LCL-C™ process, which will be applied to the commercial design and economics and plan for a future demonstration

  15. Development and testing of a washing process for exhaust gas of stationary operated internal combustion engines. Final report. Entwicklung und Erprobung eines Verfahrens der Abgaswaesche fuer stationaere Verbrennungsmotoren. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutelle, R; Huss, R; Wimberger, H J

    1986-01-01

    An exhaust gas washer for stationary operated diesel engines has been developed and tested in combination with a heat pump. The exhaust gas is washed with its own condensate in a packed column. The condensate circulation is performed by mammoth pumps. The pollutant emissions have been reduced depending on operating conditions (speed, temperature, pH of the condensate) by the following rates: HC by 30-85%, aldehydes by 35-99%, phenols by 50-80%, PAH by 80-95%, soot by 25-70%, SO/sub 2/ by 65-90%, NOsub(x) by 5-20%. It has been possible to reduce the NOsub(x) emissions by 75% at an inconsiderably increased fuel consumption by recycling exhaust gases. But higher soot emissions have to be accepted in this case. The condensate is completely degradable in a septic tank after being mixed with waste water containing phosphate. With 42 refs., 13 tabs., 32 figs.

  16. High plant availability of phosphorus and low availability of cadmium in four biomass combustion ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiaoxi; Rubæk, Gitte Holton; Sørensen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    and ash significantly increased crop yields and P uptake on the P-depleted soil. In contrast, on the adequate-P soil, the barley yield showed little response to soil amendment, even at 300–500 kg P ha− 1 application, although the barley took up more P at higher applications. The apparent P use efficiency...... of the additive was 20% in ryegrass - much higher than that of barley for which P use efficiencies varied on the two soils. Generally, crop Cd concentrations were little affected by the increasing and high applications of ash, except for relatively high Cd concentrations in barley after applying 25 Mg ha− 1 straw...... ash. Contrarily, even modest increases in the TSP application markedly increased Cd uptake in plants. This might be explained by the low Cd solubility in the ash or by the reduced Cd availability due to the liming effect of ash. High concentrations of resin-extractable P (available P) in the ash...

  17. Intelligent Monitoring System with High Temperature Distributed Fiberoptic Sensor for Power Plant Combustion Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwang Y. Lee; Stuart S. Yin; Andre Boehman

    2006-09-26

    The objective of the proposed work is to develop an intelligent distributed fiber optical sensor system for real-time monitoring of high temperature in a boiler furnace in power plants. Of particular interest is the estimation of spatial and temporal distributions of high temperatures within a boiler furnace, which will be essential in assessing and controlling the mechanisms that form and remove pollutants at the source, such as NOx. The basic approach in developing the proposed sensor system is three fold: (1) development of high temperature distributed fiber optical sensor capable of measuring temperatures greater than 2000 C degree with spatial resolution of less than 1 cm; (2) development of distributed parameter system (DPS) models to map the three-dimensional (3D) temperature distribution for the furnace; and (3) development of an intelligent monitoring system for real-time monitoring of the 3D boiler temperature distribution. Under Task 1, we have set up a dedicated high power, ultrafast laser system for fabricating in-fiber gratings in harsh environment optical fibers, successfully fabricated gratings in single crystal sapphire fibers by the high power laser system, and developed highly sensitive long period gratings (lpg) by electric arc. Under Task 2, relevant mathematical modeling studies of NOx formation in practical combustors have been completed. Studies show that in boiler systems with no swirl, the distributed temperature sensor may provide information sufficient to predict trends of NOx at the boiler exit. Under Task 3, we have investigated a mathematical approach to extrapolation of the temperature distribution within a power plant boiler facility, using a combination of a modified neural network architecture and semigroup theory. Given a set of empirical data with no analytic expression, we first developed an analytic description and then extended that model along a single axis.

  18. Problematic issues of air protection during thermal processes related to the energetic uses of sewage sludge and other waste. Case study: Co-combustion in peaking power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hroncová, Emília; Ladomerský, Juraj; Musil, Juraj

    2018-03-01

    Currently, it is necessary to deal with issues related to the emissions as there is a constantly increasing interest in combusting sludge from sewage treatment plants in the boilers for wood. An analysis of the energetic importance of the combustion of sewage sludge has already been carried out, but the effects of various treatments of the sludge are not always clear, e.g. composting and subsequent combustion to the air pollution. Investments in other thermal processes of energetic utilisation of sewage sludge and organic waste are not always successfully implemented. The objective of this paper is to point out some problematic cases for acceptance of thermal processes related to energetic use of waste in terms of the air protection. The other aim is to mention the experience with solutions of such issues in Slovakia. There are mentioned first results of the operational validation experiments during the energy generation in circulating fluidized bed boiler in peaking power plant (Power 110MW) with the addition of the so-called alternative fuel based on wood and sewage sludge to the main fuel - black coal (anthracite). And there has already been achieved the highest share of 12.4%w. (dry matter) of sewage sludge in form of compost in blend with black coal, which is technologically viable. Moreover analyzed the problems of the authorization and operation of the co-combustion of sewage sludge and of combustion of products of various kinds of pyrolysis waste - pyrolysis gas and pyrolysis oil are analyzed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Viability study for application of combined reheater cycle (CRC) to fluidized bed combustion plants; Estudio de Viabilidad para la Aplicacion del Ciclo de Recalentamiento Combinado (CRC) a Plantas de Combustion de Lecho Fuido Atmosferico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    Basically, the project try to analyze the application viability of a first reheating in steam cycles of little power plants, useful mainly for biomass and wastes, in our case with coal blends; and a second reheating of the steam in conventional and fluidized bed combustion plants. Using in both cases the thermic energy of the exhaust gases from one gas turbine. The advantages of the CRC cycle are: (1) Reduction of the moisture in the turbine, increasing the energy efficiency and blade protection. (2) To take advantage of the waste gas energy from the gas turbine in optimum way. (3) Great operation flexibility under good efficiency results. In general, the system can use the synergy between gas, coal and waste energies with the highest global efficiency. (Author)

  20. Accurate determination of bromine and iodine in medicinal plants by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry after microwave-induced combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Mariele S.; Mendes, Ana Luiza G.; Henn, Alessandra S.; Picoloto, Rochele S.; Mello, Paola A.; Flores, Erico M. M.

    2017-12-01

    In this work, a method for the determination of bromine and iodine in medicinal plants by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after digestion by microwave-induced combustion (MIC) was developed. Medicinal plants were pressed as pellets and combusted at 20 bar of oxygen. The suitability of absorbing solution (water, 50 mmol L- 1 (NH4)2CO3, 10 mmol L- 1, 25 mmol L- 1, 50 mmol L- 1 or 100 mmol L- 1 NH4OH) was evaluated and a reflux step of 5 min was applied after combustion. The accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated by using certified reference materials (CRMs) of apple leaves and peach leaves and also by spiked samples. Using 50 mmol L- 1 NH4OH as absorbing solution, recoveries close to 100% for bromine and iodine were obtained as well as a low relative standard deviation (5%). No statistical difference (t-test, 95% of confidence level) was observed between the values obtained by ICP-MS after MIC digestion and the certified values. One of the important advantages of the proposed method is that it allowed the use of a relatively high sample mass (1000 mg) of medicinal plant resulting in low limits of quantification (0.033 μg g- 1 and 0.003 μg g- 1 for Br and I, respectively). Blanks were always negligible and only diluted solutions were used, in agreement with current recommendations for analytical methods. A high digestion efficiency was achieved (> 99%) assuring quantitative results. The concentration of analytes in medicinal plants was in the range of 0.17 μg g- 1 to 53.1 μg g- 1 for Br and medicinal plants (125 μg g- 1).

  1. Optimal sizes and siting of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants; Tailles et localisations optimales des usines de retraitement des combustibles nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiriet, L; Deledicq, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Siege (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    The expansion of a nuclear economy entails the development of fuel process and reprocessing plant programmes. The model proposed makes it possible to select the size, the site and the start-up schedule of the plants in such a way as to minimize the total freight and reprocessing costs. As an illustration, we have approached the problem of burnt natural uranium processing plants related to natural uranium-graphite as nuclear power stations. The sites and annual output of the reactors, the possible plant sites and cost functions (freight and reprocessing) are supposed to be known. The method consists in first approaching the process plant problem as a Dynamic Programming problem, increasing programme slices (total reactor output) being explored sequentially. When the quantities of burnt natural uranium to be reprocessed are fixed, the minimization of the transport cost is then also carried out as a dynamic programming problem. The neighbourhood of the optimum process cost is explored in order to find the minimum summation of a suboptimal processing cost and corresponding optimal transport cost. As the reprocessing problem can be represented on a sequential graph, in order to compute the sub-optima, we developed and used a 'reflexion algorithm'. The method can be interpreted as a general mechanism for determining the optimum when to a sequential dynamic problem (for example an equipment programme) is added a complementary problem (transport, for instance). It also makes it possible to estimate the economic losses which result from the choice of a non optimal policy for other than economic reasons. (author) [French] L'expansion de l'economie nucleaire se traduit par un developpement des programmes d'usines d'elaboration et de retraitement des combustibles. Le modele propose permet de choisir la taille, la localisation et la cadence de mise en service des usines de maniere a minimiser le total des frais de transport et de retraitement. A titre d'exemple nous avons

  2. The hybrid MPC-MINLP algorithm for optimal operation of coal-fired power plants with solvent based post-combustion CO2 capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norhuda Abdul Manaf

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an algorithm that combines model predictive control (MPC with MINLP optimization and demonstrates its application for coal-fired power plants retrofitted with solvent based post-combustion CO2 capture (PCC plant. The objective function of the optimization algorithm works at a primary level to maximize plant economic revenue while considering an optimal carbon capture profile. At a secondary level, the MPC algorithm is used to control the performance of the PCC plant. Two techno-economic scenarios based on fixed (capture rate is constant and flexible (capture rate is variable operation modes are developed using actual electricity prices (2011 with fixed carbon prices ($AUD 5, 25, 50/tonne-CO2 for 24 h periods. Results show that fixed operation mode can bring about a ratio of net operating revenue deficit at an average of 6% against the superior flexible operation mode.

  3. BWR simulation in a stationary state for the evaluation of fuel cell design; Simulacion de un reactor BWR en estado estacionario para la evaluacion del diseno de celdas de combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes T, J. L.; Ortiz S, J. J.; Perusquia del C, R.; Castillo M, A., E-mail: joseluis.montes@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    In this paper the simulation of a BWR in order to evaluate the performance of a set of fuel assemblies under stationary state in three dimensions (3-D) is presented. 15 cases selected from a database containing a total of 18225 cases are evaluated. The main selection criteria were based on the results of the design phase of the power cells in two dimensions (2-D) and 3-D initial study. In 2-D studies the parameters that were used to qualify and select the designs were basically the local power peaking factor and neutron multiplication factor of each fuel cell. In the initial 3-D study variables that defined the quality of results, and from which the selection was realized, are the margins to thermal limits of reactor operation and the value of the effective multiplication factor at the end of cycle operation. From the 2-D and 3-D results of the studies described a second 3-D study was realized, where the optimizations of the fuel reload pattern was carried out. The results presented in this paper correspond to this second 3-D study. It was found that the designs of the fuel cell they had a similar behavior to those provided by the fuel supplier of reference BWR. Particularly it noted the impact of reload pattern on the cold shut down margin. An estimate of the operation costs of reference cycle analyzed with each one designed reload batch was also performed. As a result a positive difference (gain) up to 10,347 M/US D was found. (Author)

  4. Development of the stationary state and simulation of an accident severe stage type station blackout with the MELCOR code version 1.8.6 for the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mugica R, C. A.; Godinez S, V.

    2011-11-01

    Considering the events happened since the 11 March of 2011, in Japan, where an earthquake of 9.1 grades Ritcher of intensity and a later tsunami impacted in an important way the operation of a nuclear power plant located in the Fukushima, Japan; damaging and disabling their cooling systems and injection of emergency water due to the total loss of electric power (commonly denominated Station Blackout), is eminent the analysis of this stage type that took to the nuclear power plant to conditions of damage to the core and explosions generation by hydrogen concentrations in the reactor building. In this work an analysis of a stage type station blackout is presented, using the model of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde starting of the stationary state. The analysis is carried out using the MELCOR code (Methods for Estimation of Leakages and Consequences of Releases) version 1.8.6 whose purpose is to model the accidents progression for light water reactors. The obtained results are qualitatively similar to the events observed in the Fukushima nuclear power plant even though limitations exist to achieve a precise simulation of the events happened in Japan, such as the information flow of the chronology of the operator actions, as well as of the characteristic design of the power plant, volumes in cavities and rooms, water/cooling inventories, interconnected systems and their own emergency procedures or guides for the administration of severe accidents among others. (Author)

  5. State of the art and the future fuel portfolio of fluidized bed combustion systems; Status und kuenftiges Brennstoffportfolio bei Wirbelschichtfeuerungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szentannai, Pal; Friebert, Arpad; Winter, Franz [Technische Univ. Wien (Austria). Inst. fuer Verfahrens-, Umwelttechnik und technische Biowissenschaften

    2008-07-01

    Coal, biomass and substitute fuels energetically can be used efficiently and with low pollution in fluidized bed plants. In comparison to biomass there are significant differences between the circulating and stationary fluidized bed technology. The stationary fluidised bed is fed predominantly with biomasses and residual substances. Coal usually is the basis fuel in the circulating fluidised bed. Biomass and residual substances frequently are course-fired. The state of the art is the employment of a broad fuel mixture in small and large fluidized-bed combustion systems. Future developments present an increased use of sewage sludge, fluidized bed combustion systems with wood as a basis fuel, utilization of household waste and the gas production.

  6. The combustion of sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, R.N.

    1978-01-01

    The burning rates of sodium in the form of vapour jets, droplets, sprays and unconfined and confined pools have been reviewed. Attention has been paid to assessing the value of models in the various combustion modes. Additional models have been constructed for the descriptions of laminar and turbulent vapour jets, stationary droplets, forced convection over ambient pool fires together with correlations for peak pressures in confined pool environments. Where appropriate experiments with sodium have not been conducted, the likely behaviour is predicted by comparison with the burning of other fuels, particularly in the field of large free ambient fires. Some areas where further knowledge is required are highlighted. (author)

  7. Current situation regarding the co-combustion of waste materials in power plants; Aktuelle Situation der Mitverbrennung von Abfallstoffen in Kraftwerken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schirmer, U.; Krueger, H.; Puch, K.H. [VGB Technische Vereinigung der Grosskraftwerksbetreiber e.V., Essen (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    In view of the wholly insufficient capacity, relative to current arisings, of waste incineration plants, residue processing plants and plants for the utilisation of other combustible materials we are inevitably faced with the question whether power plant furnaces might not be suited for the thermal treatment and utilisation of wastes and residues. This possibility has been studied by many VGB member companies and seriously investigated for its practicability in several cases. The investigations were premised on the following fundamental positions. The VGB members are prepared to contribute to the solution of the above problems as long as this is possible without detriment to their duties as energy suppliers. They can only assume this responsibility if the requirements of the licensing laws are observed. This concerns the quality and arising quantities of wastes to be taken in, emissions, and the disposal of combustion residues. Power plants typically make more or less complete use of their own process residues, a feature which as far as possible should not be impaired by the co-combustion process. The technical problems posed by the co-combustion of suitable residues and wastes are usually solvable. Co-combustion offers an alternative and a supplement to dedicated waste utilisation plants or plants for the utilisation of suitable residues. Beyond this some companies are interested in profiting from the fees that will be due to them for utilising wastes. From 1990 to 1992 a VGB working group studied the option of co-combustion on the basis of the above premises. The material elaborated by the group now in turn serves as a basis for the following deliberations. [Deutsch] Da die Kapazitaet der Abfallverbrennungsanlagen, der Anlagen zur Reststoffverwertung und der Anlagen zur Nutzung sonstiger brennbaren Stoffe fuer das vorhandene Angebot bei weitem nicht ausreicht, ergibt sich die Frage der Eignung von Kraftwerksfeuerungen zur thermischen Behandlung und Verwertung von

  8. Combustion control and model based optimization. Modeling of combustion process and development of supporting control systems for plant operation; Palamisprosessin saeaetoe ja mallipohjainen optimointi; Voimalaitoksen polttoprosessin mallitus ja saeaetoe sekae operoinnin tukiohjelmien kehitys ja testaus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortela, U.; Mononen, J.; Leppaekoski, K.; Hiltunen, J.; Jouppila, M.; Karppinen, R. [Oulu Univ. (Finland). Systems Engineering Lab.

    1997-10-01

    The aims of the project are to develop the combustion control strategies and to minimize the flue gas emissions. The common goal of the studies has been the reduction of flue gas emissions by using advanced control and optimization methods. The behaviour of different kind of boilers and fuels has been modelled using experimental data from fullscale plants, such as a 42 MW bubbling fluidized bed boiler, 23 MW bubbling fluidized bed boiler and a 300 MW circulating fluidized bed boiler. Many of the individual observations and modelled correlations between control variables and flue gas emissions have lead to operation instructions and/or re-organized control schemes which help to control total emissions. The most part of this knowledge can be formed to the standard IF- THEN - type rules which contain some uncertainty or fuzziness. Rule-based instruction system for the reduction of flue gas emissions is under work. (orig.)

  9. Long term analysis of the biomass content in the feed of a waste-to-energy plant with oxygen-enriched combustion air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellner, Johann; Cencic, Oliver; Zellinger, Günter; Rechberger, Helmut

    2011-10-01

    Thermal utilization of municipal solid waste and commercial wastes has become of increasing importance in European waste management. As waste materials are generally composed of fossil and biogenic materials, a part of the energy generated can be considered as renewable and is thus subsidized in some European countries. Analogously, CO(2) emissions of waste incinerators are only partly accounted for in greenhouse gas inventories. A novel approach for determining these fractions is the so-called balance method. In the present study, the implementation of the balance method on a waste-to-energy plant using oxygen-enriched combustion air was investigated. The findings of the 4-year application indicate on the one hand the general applicability and robustness of the method, and on the other hand the importance of reliable monitoring data. In particular, measured volume flows of the flue gas and the oxygen-enriched combustion air as well as corresponding O(2) and CO(2) contents should regularly be validated. The fraction of renewable (biogenic) energy generated throughout the investigated period amounted to between 27 and 66% for weekly averages, thereby denoting the variation in waste composition over time. The average emission factor of the plant was approximately 45 g CO(2) MJ(-1) energy input or 450 g CO(2) kg(-1) waste incinerated. The maximum error of the final result was about 16% (relative error), which was well above the error (<8%) of the balance method for plants with conventional oxygen supply.

  10. Thermodynamic and economic analysis of the different variants of a coal-fired, 460 MW power plant using oxy-combustion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skorek-Osikowska, Anna; Bartela, Lukasz; Kotowicz, Janusz; Job, Marcin

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Mathematical models of an integrated oxy-combustion power plant. • Thermodynamic analysis of the modeled different cases of the plant. • Analysis of the methods of increasing the net efficiency of the plant. • Economic comparative analysis of the air-type and oxy-type plants. - Abstract: In the face of existing international provisions limiting the emissions of greenhouse gases, primarily carbon dioxide, it is necessary to introduce solutions that will allow the production of electricity from coal with high efficiency and low emissions. Oxy-combustion systems integrated with carbon capture and storage (CCS) installations may prove to be such a solution. This paper presents the main results from a thermodynamic analysis of a supercritical unit operating in oxy-combustion technology, fueled with pulverized coal with a power output of 460 MW. The parameters of the live steam in the analyzed system are 600 °C/30 MPa. To perform the numerical analyses, models of the individual components were built, including an oxygen production installation (ASU), a boiler, a steam cycle and a flue gas conditioning system (CPU). The models were built in the commercial programs GateCycle and Aspen and then integrated into the Excel environment. In this paper, different structures for an integrated oxy-type system were analyzed and compared. The auxiliary power rates were determined for individual technological installations of the oxy-combustion power plant. The highest value of this indicator, in the range between 15.65% and 19.10% was calculated for the cryogenic ASU. The total value of this index for the whole installation reaches as high as 35% for the base case. The use of waste heat from the interstage cooling of compressors in the air separation installation and flue gas conditioning system was considered as the methods of counteracting the efficiency decrease resulting from the introduction of ASU and CPU. The proposed configurations and optimization

  11. Combustion gas from biomass - innovative plant concepts on the basis of circulating fluidized bed gasification; Brenngas aus Biomasse - innovative Anlagenkonzepte auf Basis der Zirkulierenden Wirbelschichtvergasung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greil, C; Hirschfelder, H [Lurgi Umwelt GmbH, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    The contribution describes the applications of the Lurgi-ZWS gas generator. There are three main fields of application: Direct feeding of combustion gas, e.g. into a rotary kiln, as a substitute for coal or oil, without either dust filtering or gas purification. - Feeding of the combustion gas into the steam generator of a coal power plant after dust filtering and, if necessar, filtering of NH{sub 3} or H{sub 2}S. - Combustion in a gas turbine or gas engine after gas purification according to specifications. The applications are described for several exemplary projects. (orig./SR) [Deutsch] Im folgenden wird ueber die Anwendung des Lurgi-ZWS-Gaserzeugers berichtet. Nach heutiger Sicht stehen drei Anwendungsgebiete im Vordergrund: - direkte Einspeisung des Brenngases in z.B. einen Zementdrehrohrofen zur Substitution von Kohle oder Oel, ohne Entstaubung und Gasreinigung. - Einspeisung des Brenngases nach Entstaubung und gegebenenfalls Entfernung weiterer Komponenten wie NH{sub 3} oder H{sub 2}S in den Dampferzeuger eines Kohlekraftwerkes - Einsatz des Brenngases in einer Gasturbine oder Gasmotor nach spezifikationsgerechter Gasreinigung. Die aufgefuehrten Einsatzmoeglichkeiten werden am Beispiel von Projekten beschrieben. (orig./SR)

  12. Stationary scattering theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combes, J.M.

    1980-10-01

    A complementary approach to the time dependent scattering theory for one-body Schroedinger operators is presented. The stationary theory is concerned with objects of quantum theory like scattering waves and amplitudes. In the more recent abstract stationary theory some generalized form of the Lippman-Schwinger equation plays the basic role. Solving this equation leads to a linear map between generalized eigenfunctions of the perturbed and unperturbed operators. This map is the section at fixed energy of the wave-operator from the time dependent theory. Although the radiation condition does not appears explicitely in this formulation it can be shown to hold a posteriori in a variety of situations thus restoring the link with physical theories

  13. Stationary theory of scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, T.

    1977-01-01

    A variant of the stationary methods is described, and it is shown that it is useful in a wide range of problems, including scattering, by long-range potentials, two-space scattering, and multichannel scattering. The method is based on the notion of spectral forms. The paper is restricted to the simplest case of continuous spectral forms defined on a Banach space embedded in the basic Hilbert space. (P.D.)

  14. Combustion/absorption process for the separation of {sup 14}C and {sup 3}H in radwastes released from nuclear power plants and their analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Young Gun, E-mail: ygko@kaeri.re.kr; Kim, Chang-Jong; Cho, Young Hyun; Chung, Kun Ho; Kang, Mun Ja

    2017-06-05

    Highlights: • {sup 14}CO{sub 2} and THO were produced by the combustion of radwaste samples. • The radioactivity of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} and THO absorbed sorbents were measured by LSC. • The CO{sub 2} absorption in the {sup 14}C sorbent was analyzed using by FT-IR and a rheometer. • The temperature and viscosity of the CO{sub 2} absorbed {sup 14}C sorbent was investigated. - Abstract: Radioactivities of {sup 3}H and {sup 14}C in spent radioactive ion exchange resins and spent radioactive lubricant oils released from nuclear power plants, has been determined using a combustion and sorption method (combustion method). The liquid scintillation counting (LSC) spectra showed that the interference of other radionuclides has not significantly affected the determination of radioactivities of {sup 3}H and {sup 14}C in the radwaste samples. The chemical structure of {sup 14}CO{sub 2}, which originated from the combustion of radwastes, trapped {sup 14}C sorbent has been investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). FT-IR study showed interesting results that peaks for uncoupled CO{sub 2} and carbonic amide appeared at FT-IR spectra of CO{sub 2} high-absorbed {sup 14}C sorbents, while the peak for carbamate was only observed at the spectra of CO{sub 2} low-absorbed sorbents. During the CO{sub 2} sorption in {sup 14}C sorbent, temperature and viscosity of the sorbent increased owing to decrease of enthalpy and increase of apparent molecular weight of the sorbent caused by the bonding formation between sorbent molecules.

  15. A comparative thermodynamic, economic and risk analysis concerning implementation of oxy-combustion power plants integrated with cryogenic and hybrid air separation units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skorek-Osikowska, Anna; Bartela, Łukasz; Kotowicz, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Mathematical model of an integrated oxy-combustion power plant. • Comparison of a hybrid membrane–cryogenic oxygen generation plant with a cryogenic plant. • Thermodynamic analysis of the modeled cases of the plant. • Comparative economic analysis of the power plant with cryogenic and hybrid ASU. • Comparative risk analysis using a Monte Carlo method and sensitivity analysis. - Abstract: This paper presents a comparison of two types of oxy-combustion power plant that differ from each other in terms of the method of oxygen separation. For the purpose of the analysis, detailed thermodynamic models of oxy-fuel power plants with gross power of approximately 460 MW were built. In the first variant (Case 1), the plant is integrated with a cryogenic air separation unit (ASU). In the second variant (Case 2), the plant is integrated with a hybrid membrane–cryogenic installation. The models were built and optimized using the GateCycle, Aspen Plus and Aspen Custom Modeller software packages and with the use of our own computational codes. The results of the thermodynamic evaluation of the systems, which primarily uses indicators such as the auxiliary power and efficiencies of the whole system and of the individual components that constitute the unit, are presented. Better plant performance is observed for Case 2, which has a net efficiency of electricity generation that is 1.1 percentage points greater than that of Case 1. For the selected structure of the system, an economic analysis of the solutions was made. This analysis accounts for different scenarios of the functioning of the Emission Trading Scheme and includes detailed estimates of the investment costs in both cases. As an indicator of profitability, the break-even price of electricity was used primarily. The results of the analysis for the assumptions made are presented in this paper. A system with a hybrid air separation unit has slightly better economic performance. The break-even price

  16. Field study of a Brownian Demister Unit to reduce aerosol based emission from a Post Combustion CO2 Capture plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khakharia, P.M.; Kvamsdal, H.M.; Da Silva, E.F.; Vlugt, T.J.H.; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2014-01-01

    Emission of solvent and its degradation products from a typical absorption-desorption based Post Combustion CO2 Capture (PCCC) process is inevitable and thus, an area of growing concern. Recently, it has been pointed out that emissions can also occur by means of aerosol droplets. Conventional

  17. 40 CFR 60.1025 - Do subpart E new source performance standards also apply to my municipal waste combustion unit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... standards also apply to my municipal waste combustion unit? 60.1025 Section 60.1025 Protection of... NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units for Which... municipal waste combustion unit? If this subpart AAAA applies to your municipal waste combustion unit, then...

  18. Techno-economic study of CO2 capture from an existing coal-fired power plant: MEA scrubbing vs. O2/CO2 recycle combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, D.; Croiset, E.; Douglas, P.L.; Douglas, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    The existing fleet of modern pulverised coal fired power plants represents an opportunity to achieve significant reductions in greenhouse gas emissions in the coming years providing that efficient and economical CO 2 capture technologies are available for retrofit. One option is to separate CO 2 from the products of combustion using conventional approaches such as amine scrubbing. An emerging alternative, commonly known as O 2 /CO 2 recycle combustion, involves burning the coal with oxygen in an atmosphere of recycled flue gas. Both approaches can be retrofitted to existing units, however they consume significant amounts of energy to capture, purify and compress the CO 2 for subsequent sequestration. This paper presents a techno-economic comparison of the performance of the two approaches. The comparison was developed using the commercial process simulation packages, Hysys and Aspen Plus. The results show that both processes are expensive options to capture CO 2 from coal power plants, however O 2 /CO 2 appears to be a more attractive retrofit than MEA scrubbing. The CO 2 capture cost for the MEA case is USD 53/ton of CO 2 avoided, which translates into 3.3 cents/kW h. For the O 2 /CO 2 case the CO 2 capture cost is lower at USD 35/ton of CO 2 avoided, which translates into 2.4 cents/kW h. These capture costs represent an approximate increase of 20-30% in current electricity prices

  19. Combustion engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Ragland, Kenneth W

    2011-01-01

    Introduction to Combustion Engineering The Nature of Combustion Combustion Emissions Global Climate Change Sustainability World Energy Production Structure of the Book   Section I: Basic Concepts Fuels Gaseous Fuels Liquid Fuels Solid Fuels Problems Thermodynamics of Combustion Review of First Law Concepts Properties of Mixtures Combustion StoichiometryChemical EnergyChemical EquilibriumAdiabatic Flame TemperatureChemical Kinetics of CombustionElementary ReactionsChain ReactionsGlobal ReactionsNitric Oxide KineticsReactions at a Solid SurfaceProblemsReferences  Section II: Combustion of Gaseous and Vaporized FuelsFlamesLaminar Premixed FlamesLaminar Flame TheoryTurbulent Premixed FlamesExplosion LimitsDiffusion FlamesGas-Fired Furnaces and BoilersEnergy Balance and EfficiencyFuel SubstitutionResidential Gas BurnersIndustrial Gas BurnersUtility Gas BurnersLow Swirl Gas BurnersPremixed-Charge Engine CombustionIntroduction to the Spark Ignition EngineEngine EfficiencyOne-Zone Model of Combustion in a Piston-...

  20. Stationary flow near fronts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhold Steinacker

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In 1906, the Austrian scientist Max Margules published a paper on temperature stratification in resting and non-accelerated moving air. The paper derives conditions for stationary slopes of air mass boundaries and was an important forerunner of frontal theories. Its formulation of relations between changes in density and geostrophic wind across the front is basically a discrete version of the thermal wind balance equation. The paper was highly influential and is still being cited to the present day. This paper accompanies an English translation of Margules’ seminal paper. We conclude here our “Classic Papers” series of the Meteorologische Zeitschrift.

  1. Engineering and Economic Analysis of an Advanced Ultra-Supercritical Pulverized Coal Power Plant with and without Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Task 7. Design and Economic Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booras, George [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA (United States); Powers, J. [General Electric, Schenectady, NY (United States); Riley, C. [General Electric, Schenectady, NY (United States); Hendrix, H. [Hendrix Engineering Solutions, Inc., Calera, AL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report evaluates the economics and performance of two A-USC PC power plants; Case 1 is a conventionally configured A-USC PC power plant with superior emission controls, but without CO2 removal; and Case 2 adds a post-combustion carbon capture (PCC) system to the plant from Case 1, using the design and heat integration strategies from EPRI’s 2015 report, “Best Integrated Coal Plant.” The capture design basis for this case is “partial,” to meet EPA’s proposed New Source Performance Standard, which was initially proposed as 500 kg-CO2/MWh (gross) or 1100 lb-CO2/MWh (gross), but modified in August 2015 to 635 kg-CO2/MWh (gross) or 1400 lb-CO2/MWh (gross). This report draws upon the collective experience of consortium members, with EPRI and General Electric leading the study. General Electric provided the steam cycle analysis as well as v the steam turbine design and cost estimating. EPRI performed integrated plant performance analysis using EPRI’s PC Cost model.

  2. The Stationary SQUID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Jorge

    2018-06-01

    In the customary mode of operation of a SQUID, the electromagnetic field in the SQUID is an oscillatory function of time. In this situation, electromagnetic radiation is emitted and couples to the sample. This is a back action that can alter the state that we intend to measure. A circuit that could perform as a stationary SQUID consists of a loop of superconducting material that encloses the magnetic flux, connected to a superconducting and to a normal electrode. This circuit does not contain Josephson junctions, or any other miniature feature. We study the evolution of the order parameter and of the electrochemical potential in this circuit; they converge to a stationary regime, and the voltage between the electrodes depends on the enclosed flux. We obtain expressions for the power dissipation and for the heat transported by the electric current; the validity of these expressions does not rely on a particular evolution model for the order parameter. We evaluate the influence of fluctuations. For a SQUID perimeter of the order of 1μ m and temperature 0.9T_c, we obtain a flux resolution of the order of 10^{-5}Φ _0/Hz^{1/2}; the resolution is expected to improve as the temperature is lowered.

  3. Combustion 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Levasseur; S. Goodstine; J. Ruby; M. Nawaz; C. Senior; F. Robson; S. Lehman; W. Blecher; W. Fugard; A. Rao; A. Sarofim; P. Smith; D. Pershing; E. Eddings; M. Cremer; J. Hurley; G. Weber; M. Jones; M. Collings; D. Hajicek; A. Henderson; P. Klevan; D. Seery; B. Knight; R. Lessard; J. Sangiovanni; A. Dennis; C. Bird; W. Sutton; N. Bornstein; F. Cogswell; C. Randino; S. Gale; Mike Heap

    2001-06-30

    . To achieve these objectives requires a change from complete reliance of coal-fired systems on steam turbines (Rankine cycles) and moving forward to a combined cycle utilizing gas turbines (Brayton cycles) which offer the possibility of significantly greater efficiency. This is because gas turbine cycles operate at temperatures well beyond current steam cycles, allowing the working fluid (air) temperature to more closely approach that of the major energy source, the combustion of coal. In fact, a good figure of merit for a HIPPS design is just how much of the enthalpy from coal combustion is used by the gas turbine. The efficiency of a power cycle varies directly with the temperature of the working fluid and for contemporary gas turbines the optimal turbine inlet temperature is in the range of 2300-2500 F (1260-1371 C). These temperatures are beyond the working range of currently available alloys and are also in the range of the ash fusion temperature of most coals. These two sets of physical properties combine to produce the major engineering challenges for a HIPPS design. The UTRC team developed a design hierarchy to impose more rigor in our approach. Once the size of the plant had been determined by the choice of gas turbine and the matching steam turbine, the design process of the High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF) moved ineluctably to a down-fired, slagging configuration. This design was based on two air heaters: one a high temperature slagging Radiative Air Heater (RAH) and a lower temperature, dry ash Convective Air Heater (CAH). The specific details of the air heaters are arrived at by an iterative sequence in the following order:-Starting from the overall Cycle requirements which set the limits for the combustion and heat transfer analysis-The available enthalpy determined the range of materials, ceramics or alloys, which could tolerate the temperatures-Structural Analysis of the designs proved to be the major limitation-Finally the commercialization

  4. Cost of transporting irradiated fuels and maintenance costs of a chemical treatment plant for irradiated fuels; Cout de transport des combustibles irradies et cout d'entretien d'une usine de traitement chimique des combustibles irradies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousselier, Y [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    other plants, an attempt has been made to express the maintenance costs as a percentage of the investments corresponding to each of the sections considered. The unequal aspect of maintenance in a plant of this type is demonstrated, this being due particularly to the inaccessibility of most of the equipment during operation. Finally some conclusions are drawn on what the maintenance costs could be and the means of reducing them in future plants. (author) [French] Le cout du cycle des combustibles a fait l'objet de nombreuses etudes mais beaucoup d'entre elles sont basees sur des etudes a priori et sont donc plus ou moins sujettes a caution. C'est ainsi que dans la partie ayant trait au traitement des combustibles irradies, des elements importants du cout n'ont que rarement ete precises a la suite d'experiences pratiques: le cout du transport des combustibles eux-memes et le cout d'entretien de l'usine. Les etudes relatives au cout du transport sont generalement basees sur des calculs faits a partir de donnees un peu arbitraires. Les etudes qui ont ete faites en France pour le transport d'uranium irradie entre les reacteurs EdF de Chinon et l'usine de retraitement de La Hague et l'uranium irradie des reacteurs de recherches jusqu'aux usines de retraitement etrangeres sont exposees et montrent qu'il a ete possible d'arriver a des types de chateaux de transport et des modalites d'expedition qui permettent de diminuer les couts dans des proportions tres importantes. Ceci a pu etre obtenu soit en combinant les transports par rail et par route soit par l'augmentation des capacites unitaires des chateaux de transport: on cite le cas d'un chateau de transport pour element des piles piscines qui est capable de transporter un coeur complet d'une pile a la fois entrainant une reduction substantielle du cout. Les etudes concernant les couts d'entretien d'usines de retraitement sont encore plus rares, or, dans les usines a entretien direct, ces couts sont une fraction non negligeable

  5. A technical and economic study on solar-assisted ammonia-based post-combustion CO_2 capture of power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Liangxu; Zhao, Jun; Deng, Shuai; An, Qingsong

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We examine the probability of solar energy in different locations for SPCC technology. • Numerical relationship between STC areas, the SF, and the APCM were analyzed. • Economic strategies were analyzed under different sensitive factor prices. • The critical price of STCs which causing benefits shift in policy priorities was identified. - Abstract: The market of solar-assisted post-combustion CO_2 capture (SPCC) is emerging globally in recent years. It is considered as a promising technology to apply the ammonia as the absorbent to implement the SPCC technology in view of its low regeneration temperature and low regeneration heat duty. However, few literatures indicate which type of solar thermal collectors (STCs) involved in the ammonia-based SPCC power plant is more applicable. Therefore, in this paper, the maximum theoretical potential price of STCs which make the value of the levelized costs of electricity (LCOE) and the cost of CO_2 removed (COR) lower than that of the reference post-combustion CO_2 capture (PCC) power plant is estimated. The potential of ammonia-based SPCC technology in the selected locations is also estimated, based on the detailed solar radiation resource assessment (i.e. DNI, sunshine time) and the STCs performance. It would be more attractive to adopt the vacuum tube (VT) as the STC involved into the ammonia-based PCC power plant to capture CO_2 than parabolic trough collector (PTC). In order to achieve lower LCOE and COR than that of the reference PCC system, the price of the vacuum tube (VT) has to be reduced to 131.02 $/m"2, 91.76 $/m"2 and 57.10 $/m"2 for the location of M1(Lhasa), M2(Tianjin) and M3(Xi’an), respectively. And the price of the parabolic trough collector (PTC) has to be reduced to 139.09 $/m"2, 89.83 $/m"2 and 50.84 $/m"2, respectively.

  6. 76 FR 12863 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-09

    ... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines... combustion engines. The final rule was published on August 20, 2010. This direct final action amends certain... Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant for Stationary Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines...

  7. Analysis of existing structure and emissions of wood combustion plants for the production of heat and electricity in Bavaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joa, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    This work deals with the detailed analysis of the existing structure of all Bavarian wood burning plants for the generation of heat and electricity as well as the determination of the resulting emission emissions in 2013. The number of wood burning plants in the single-chamber fireplaces, wood central heating and wood-fired heating plants which are in operation in the year 2013 were determined, and how many plants are existing in the various areas like pellet stoves, traditional ovens, wood-burning fireplace, pellet central heating systems, wood chips central heating systems, fire-wood central heating systems, wood combined heat and power plant (electricity and heat) and wood power plants (heat). In addition, the regional distribution of the wood burning plants in the Bavarian governmental districts is investigated as well as the type and amount of energy produced by them (heat, electricity). [de

  8. Design and evaluation of an IGCC power plant using iron-based syngas chemical-looping (SCL) combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorgenfrei, Max; Tsatsaronis, George

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A new concept for power generation including carbon capture was found. • The air reactor temperature significantly influences the net efficiency. • The use of a CO 2 turbine decreases the net efficiency. • Compared to a conventional IGCC with 90% CO 2 capture the net efficiency increases. - Abstract: Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a novel and promising combustion technology with inherent separation of the greenhouse gas CO 2 . This paper focuses on the design and thermodynamic evaluation of an integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) process using syngas chemical looping (SCL) combustion for generating electricity. The syngas is provided by coal gasification; the gas from the gasifier is cleaned using high-temperature gas desulfurization (HGD). In this study, the oxygen carrier iron oxide (Fe 2 O 3 ) is selected to oxidize the syngas in a multistage moving-bed reactor. The resulting reduced iron particles then consist of FeO and Fe 3 O 4 . To create a closed-cycle operation, these particles are partially re-oxidized with steam in a fluidized-bed regenerator to pure Fe 3 O 4 and then fully re-oxidized in a fluidized-bed air combustor to Fe 2 O 3 . One advantage of this process is the co-production of hydrogen diluted with water vapor within the steam regenerator. Both the HGD and CLC systems are not under commercial operation so far. This mixture is fed to a gas turbine for the purpose of generating electricity. The gas turbine is expected to exhibit low NO x emissions due to the high ratio of water in the combustion chamber. Cooling the flue gas in the HRSG condenses the water vapor to yield high-purity CO 2 for subsequent compression and disposal. To evaluate the net efficiency, two conventional syngas gasifiers are considered, namely the BGL slagging gasifier and the Shell entrained-flow gasifier. The option of using a CO 2 turbine after the SCL-fuel reactor is also investigated. A sensitivity analysis is performed on the SCL

  9. Bifurcation, pattern formation and chaos in combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayliss, A.; Matkowsky, B.J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper problems in gaseous combustion and in gasless condensed phase combustion are studied both analytically and numerically. In gaseous combustion we consider the problem of a flame stabilized on a line source of fuel. The authors find both stationary and pulsating axisymmetric solutions as well as stationary and pulsating cellular solutions. The pulsating cellular solutions take the form of either traveling waves or standing waves. Transitions between these patterns occur as parameters related to the curvature of the flame front and the Lewis number are varied. In gasless condensed phase combustion both planar and nonplanar problems are studied. For planar condensed phase combustion we consider two models: accounts for melting and does not. Both models are shown to exhibit a transition from uniformly to pulsating propagating combustion when a parameter related to the activation energy is increased. Upon further increasing this parameter both models undergo a transition to chaos: by intermittency and by a period doubling sequence. In nonplanar condensed phase combustion the nonlinear development of a branch of standing wave solutions is studied and is shown to lead to relaxation oscillations and subsequently to a transition to quasi-periodicity

  10. Preparation and co-combustion of whole plants in a coal dust furnace; Aufbereitung und Mitverbrennung von Ganzpflanzen mit Steinkohle in einer Staubfeuerung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegle, V.; Spliethoff, H.; Hein, K.R.G. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Verfahrenstechnik und Dampfkesselwesen (IVD)

    1996-12-31

    Co-combustion is a favourable and simple way of utilizing biomass. Owing to the high energy density of grains, whole plants must be ground very thoroughly for use in a coal dust furnace. This can be done with low energy consumption in a hammer mill. In addition, multifuel swirl burners permit selective supply of fuel and low-NO{sub x} combustion. The fuel with the highest nitrogen content should be blown into the inner recirculation zone. (orig) [Deutsch] Die Mitverbrennung von Biomasse ist eine guenstige und schnell zu realisierende Moeglichkeit, Biomasse in grossem Umfang zu nutzen. Um Ganzpflanzen in einer Staubfeuerung mitverbrennen zu koennen, muessen diese aufgrund der hohen Energiedichte der Koerner sehr fein aufgemahlen werden. Dies ist mit einer Hammermuehle mit geringem Energieeinsatz moeglich. Durch eine geeignete Sichtung muss diese jedoch noch weiter optimiert werden. Mit Multi-Fuel-Drallbrennern ist eine stickoxidarme Verbrennung moeglich. Der Brennstoff, der den groesseren Stickstoffeintrag in die Flamme bewirkt, soltle in die innere Rezirkulationszone eingeblasen werden. (orig)

  11. Preparation and co-combustion of whole plants in a coal dust furnace; Aufbereitung und Mitverbrennung von Ganzpflanzen mit Steinkohle in einer Staubfeuerung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegle, V; Spliethoff, H; Hein, K R.G. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Verfahrenstechnik und Dampfkesselwesen (IVD)

    1997-12-31

    Co-combustion is a favourable and simple way of utilizing biomass. Owing to the high energy density of grains, whole plants must be ground very thoroughly for use in a coal dust furnace. This can be done with low energy consumption in a hammer mill. In addition, multifuel swirl burners permit selective supply of fuel and low-NO{sub x} combustion. The fuel with the highest nitrogen content should be blown into the inner recirculation zone. (orig) [Deutsch] Die Mitverbrennung von Biomasse ist eine guenstige und schnell zu realisierende Moeglichkeit, Biomasse in grossem Umfang zu nutzen. Um Ganzpflanzen in einer Staubfeuerung mitverbrennen zu koennen, muessen diese aufgrund der hohen Energiedichte der Koerner sehr fein aufgemahlen werden. Dies ist mit einer Hammermuehle mit geringem Energieeinsatz moeglich. Durch eine geeignete Sichtung muss diese jedoch noch weiter optimiert werden. Mit Multi-Fuel-Drallbrennern ist eine stickoxidarme Verbrennung moeglich. Der Brennstoff, der den groesseren Stickstoffeintrag in die Flamme bewirkt, soltle in die innere Rezirkulationszone eingeblasen werden. (orig)

  12. Scale-up study on combustibility and emission formation with two biomass fuels (B quality wood and pepper plant residue) under BFB conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Atif Ahmed; de Jong, Wiebren; Jansens, Peter Johannes [Department of Process and Energy, Section Energy Technology, Faculty 3ME, Delft University of Technology, Leeghwaterstraat 44, NL-2628 CA, Delft (Netherlands); Aho, Martti; Vainikka, Pasi [VTT Processes, P.O. Box 1603, 40101 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Spliethoff, Hartmut [TU Munich, Lehrstuhl fuer Thermische Kraftanlagen, Boltzmannstrasse 15, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2008-12-15

    Combustion of two biomass fuels: demolition wood (DW) and pepper plant residue (PPR), was investigated from an emission viewpoint in a 20 kW{sub th} fluidized bubbling bed reactor and a 1 MW{sub th} fluidized bubbling bed test boiler. Fluidization velocity and boiler output were varied in the larger facility whereas they were kept constant in the smaller reactor. Traditional flue gases were analyzed. In addition, impactor measurements were carried out to determine the mass flow of the finest fly ash and toxic elements. These measurements were compared with EU emission directives for biomass co-incineration. It was possible to combust DW without operational problems. However, the DW was contaminated with lead, which tended to get strongly enriched in the fine fly ash. Pb tends to be adsorbed on the measurement line surfaces stronger than many other toxic elements and therefore proved difficult to collect and measure. Enrichment of Pb in the fine fly ash can be weakened by co-firing DW with PPR. Increasing the share of PPR up to 50% markedly reduces the toxic metal concentration in the finest fly ash. This, however, leads to increased mass flow of fine fly ash and increases the potential risks of operational problems such as bed agglomeration and fouling. (author)

  13. Experiments on the VERONA test facility on formation and decomposition of polyhalogenated dioxins and furans and other organic halogen compounds in the combustion process; Untersuchungen an der Technikumsanlage VERONA zur Bildung und zum Abbau von polyhalogenierten Dioxinen und Furanen und anderen Organohalogenverbindungen in Verbrennungsprozessen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schueler, D.

    2002-09-01

    The study examines measures to reduce dioxin formation in thermal waste treatment. The VERONA pilot plant (VErbrennungsanlage mit feststehendem ROst und getrennter NAchbrennkammer - incineration plant with stationary grate and separate post-combustion chamber) was developed to carry out practical experiments. The experiments were conducted using wood and propane as basic combustible materials and with controlled dosage of various bromine-, chlorine- and copper-containing compounds. The behaviour of the following compounds was studied in the combustion chamber, after the post-combustion chamber and after the heat exchanger: PCPh, PBrPh, PCBz, PBrBz, PCDD/F and PBDD/F. Experiments involving the variation of various primary measures (moisture content of combustible material, air supply, temperature in the combustion chamber, quality of post-combustion, quantities and structures of halogen compounds) have shown that the quality of post-combustion plays a much greater role than the other measures. For this reason, a search was launched for indicators which can be measured readily and by means of which the quality of post-combustion in terms of organohalide decomposition can be evaluated, and which correlate closely with the dioxin concentrations after the heat exchanger. It became apparent that the congeners of the chlorophenols and of the chlorobenzenes, measured in various incineration stages, are not suited, nor is the CO content. (orig.)

  14. Geochemical database of feed coal and coal combustion products (CCPs) from five power plants in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affolter, Ronald H.; Groves, Steve; Betterton, William J.; William, Benzel; Conrad, Kelly L.; Swanson, Sharon M.; Ruppert, Leslie F.; Clough, James G.; Belkin, Harvey E.; Kolker, Allan; Hower, James C.

    2011-01-01

    The principal mission of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Energy Resources Program (ERP) is to (1) understand the processes critical to the formation, accumulation, occurrence, and alteration of geologically based energy resources; (2) conduct scientifically robust assessments of those resources; and (3) study the impacts of energy resource occurrence and (or) their production and use on both the environment and human health. The ERP promotes and supports research resulting in original, geology-based, non-biased energy information products for policy and decision makers, land and resource managers, other Federal and State agencies, the domestic energy industry, foreign governments, non-governmental groups, and academia. Investigations include research on the geology of oil, gas, and coal, and the impacts associated with energy resource occurrence, production, quality, and utilization. The ERP's focus on coal is to support investigations into current issues pertaining to coal production, beneficiation and (or) conversion, and the environmental impact of the coal combustion process and coal combustion products (CCPs). To accomplish these studies, the USGS combines its activities with other organizations to address domestic and international issues that relate to the development and use of energy resources.

  15. Air pollutants conversion study of combustion gas generating by oil fueled thermoelectric power plant to fertilizer byproduct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, Omar Fernandes

    2001-01-01

    This study concerns the development and application of a SO 2 and NO x simultaneous gas treatment through a 135 MW electron beam flue gas treatment demonstration plant at Piratininga Power Plant located at Sao Paulo, the biggest city in Brazil, around 16 million inhabitants, with serious problems concerning air pollution. This power plant belongs to a service electric utility necessary for the supply of energy to more than 5,800,000 customers, covering an area of 21,168 km 2 where approximately 20,2 million people live. This plant is a 470 MW, 2x100 MW built in 1954 and 2x135 MW erected in 1960, oil fueled (at full load, 2,800 ton per day). The oil is low sulfur content 3 /h for 135 MW generated by the plant. This process aims to reduce SO 2 and NO x gas pollutant emissions attending the Brazilian environmental laws including the expecting future law for NO x levels. The process consists in high energy electron beam irradiation (above 0,8 MeV) of burning gas from the plant at ammonia presence forming as reaction product ammonium sulfate and nitrate that are collecting as dry dust at an electrostatic precipitator. This is economically useful to the plant and to Brazil, a mainly agricultural country. The Feasibility Study for a 135 MW pilot plant installation at Piratininga Power Plant allows the data collection to optimize and to develop this process, the operation and maintenance costs evaluation for the country . After the process implementation, the human resources training aiming the all plant extension of this process and also the technology know how transfer to another industrial process plants like coal fired thermoelectrical power plants, siderurgical , incinerators and chemical industries. (author)

  16. Stationary and Transient Response Statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Hauge; Krenk, Steen

    1982-01-01

    The covariance functions for the transient response of a linear MDOF-system due to stationary time limited excitation with an arbitrary frequency content are related directly to the covariance functions of the stationary response. For rational spectral density functions closed form expressions fo...

  17. Results from trialling aqueous NH{sub 3} based post combustion capture in a pilot plant at Munmorah power station. Desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hai; Morgan, Scott; Allport, Andrew; Cottrell, Aaron; Do, Thong; McGregor, James; Wardhaugh, Leigh; Feron, Paul [CSIRO Energy Centre, Mayfield West, NSW (Australia)

    2013-07-01

    Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO) and Delta Electricity have tested an aqueous ammonia based post combustion capture (PCC) process in a pilot plant at Munmorah black coal fired power station. This paper presents and discusses the experimental results obtained and primarily focuses on the desorption section. A high purity of CO{sub 2} product was obtained at the stripper gas outlet with the CO{sub 2} volumetric concentration generally between 99-100% and the remainder being water and NH{sub 3}. An increase in stripper pressure/temperature can lead to a decrease in NH{sub 3} concentration in the CO{sub 2} product. The NH{sub 3} concentration can be controlled within 200 ppm without wash at a stripper pressure of 850 kPa (the maximum pressure tested) at a stripper gas outlet temperatures of 20-25 C. The solid precipitation occurred in the stripper condenser and reflux lines. Due to the low ammonia content in the solution, CO{sub 2} content in the solution was low and generally more than 50% of regeneration energy was used to heat up the solvent under the pilot plant conditions. The lowest regeneration energy obtained from the pilot plant trials is 4-4.2 MJ/kg CO{sub 2} captured. The effect of various parameters including solvent flow-rate and stripper temperature/pressure in the solvent on the regeneration energy was investigated.

  18. Combustion physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. R.

    1985-11-01

    Over 90% of our energy comes from combustion. By the year 2000 the figure will still be 80%, even allowing for nuclear and alternative energy sources. There are many familiar examples of combustion use, both domestic and industrial. These range from the Bunsen burner to large flares, from small combustion chambers, such as those in car engines, to industrial furnaces for steel manufacture or the generation of megawatts of electricity. There are also fires and explosions. The bountiful energy release from combustion, however, brings its problems, prominent among which are diminishing fuel resources and pollution. Combustion science is directed towards finding ways of improving efficiency and reducing pollution. One may ask, since combustion is a chemical reaction, why physics is involved: the answer is in three parts. First, chemicals cannot react unless they come together. In most flames the fuel and air are initially separate. The chemical reaction in the gas phase is very fast compared with the rate of mixing. Thus, once the fuel and air are mixed the reaction can be considered to occur instantaneously and fluid mechanics limits the rate of burning. Secondly, thermodynamics and heat transfer determine the thermal properties of the combustion products. Heat transfer also plays a role by preheating the reactants and is essential to extracting useful work. Fluid mechanics is relevant if work is to be performed directly, as in a turbine. Finally, physical methods, including electric probes, acoustics, optics, spectroscopy and pyrometry, are used to examine flames. The article is concerned mainly with how physics is used to improve the efficiency of combustion.

  19. Wood and coal cofiring in Alaska—operational considerations and combustion gas effects for a grate-fired power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Nicholls; Zackery Wright; Daisy. Huang

    2018-01-01

    Coal is the primary fuel source for electrical power generation in interior Alaska, with more than 600,000 tons burned annually at five different power plants. Woody biomass could be used as part of this fuel mix, offering potential environmental and economic benefits. In this research, debarked chips were cofired with locally mined coal at the Aurora Power Plant...

  20. Combustion plans. Nordrhein-Westfalen opts for environment-friendly disposal of sewage sludge; Aktion Ofen. NRW plant umweltvertraegliche Klaerschlammverwertung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fehrenbach, H.; Giegrich, J.; Knappe, F. [ifeu-Institut fuer Energie- und Umweltforschung GmbH, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2001-06-01

    According to the plans of the Nordrhein-Westfalen minister of the environment, sewage sludge will be banned as a fertiliser. Instead, it is to be disposed in accordance with the specifications of the Act on Recycling and Waste Management and the requirements of the recycling industry. This is the result of a study carried out on behalf of the Ministry which is summarised here. Combustion capacities will be required. [German] Auf die Verbrennungskapazitaeten in NRW rollt eine Klaerschlammlawine zu. Nach den Plaenen des Duesseldorfer Umweltministeriums soll die sogenannte landwirtschaftliche Verwertung kuenftig eingeschraenkt werden. Die Verwertung soll den gesetzlichen Vorgaben des Kreislaufwirtschaftsgesetzes und den Anforderungen der Kreislaufwirtschaft entsprechen. Dies ergibt sich aus einer Studie des Ministeriums, die hier zusammengefasst ist. (orig.)

  1. Reducing air pollution from electricity-generating large combustion plants in the European Union. An assessment of potential emission reductions of NO{sub X}, SO{sub 2} and dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lodewijks, P.; Pieper, H.; Van Wortswinkel, L. [ETC partner Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO) (Belgium); Boyce, B.; Adams, M.; Goossens, E. [EEA, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2013-06-15

    An assessment of potential emission reductions of NO{sub X}, SO{sub 2} and dust - This report presents an assessment of the hypothetical emission reduction potential of NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2} and dust from more than 1 500 of Europe's large combustion plants that operated in 2009. Emissions of these air pollutants could be significantly lower if all plants were to meet the emission limit values as set out in European Union legislation. (Author)

  2. Numerical Estimation Method for the NonStationary Thrust of Pulsejet Ejector Nozzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Mikushkin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers a calculation method for the non-stationary thrust of pulsejet ejector nozzle that is based on detonation combustion of gaseous fuel.To determine initial distributions of the thermodynamic parameters inside the detonation tube was carried out a rapid analysis based on x-t-diagrams of motion of glowing combustion products. For this purpose, the section with transparent walls was connected to the outlet of the tube to register the movement of products of combustion.Based on obtained images and gas-dynamic and thermodynamic equations the velocity distribution of the combustion products, its density, pressure and temperature required for numerical analysis were calculated. The world literature presents data on distribution of parameters, however they are given only for direct initiation of detonation at the closed end and for chemically "frozen" gas composition. The article presents the interpolation methods of parameters measured at the temperatures of 2500-2800K.Estimation of the thermodynamic parameters is based on the Chapman-Jouguet theory that the speed of the combustion products directly behind the detonation wave front with respect to the wave front is equal to the speed of sound of these products at a given point. The method of minimizing enthalpy of the final thermodynamic state was used to calculate the equilibrium parameters. Thus, a software package «IVTANTHERMO», which is a database of thermodynamic properties of many individual substances in a wide temperature range, was used.An integral thrust was numerically calculated according to the ejector nozzle surface. We solved the Navier-Stokes equations using the finite-difference Roe scheme of the second order. The combustion products were considered both as an inert mixture with "frozen" composition and as a mixture in chemical equilibrium with the changing temperature. The comparison with experimental results was made.The above method can be used for rapid

  3. Control of a post-combustion CO2 capture plant during process start-up and load variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaspar, Jozsef; Jørgensen, John Bagterp; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic and flexible operation of a carbon capture plant is important as thermal power plants must be operated very flexibly to accommodate large shares of intermittent energy sources such as wind and solar energy. To facilitate such operation, dynamic models for simulation, optimization...... and control system design are crucial. In this paper, we present a dynamic mathematical model for the absorption and desorption columns in a carbon capture plant. Moreover, we implement a decentralized proportional-integral (PI) based control scheme and we evaluate the performance of the control structure...... for various operational procedures, e.g. start-up, load changes, noise on the flue gas flow rate and composition. Note that the carbon capture plant is based on the solvent storage configuration. To the authors knowledge, this is the first paper addressing the issue of start-up operation and control of carbon...

  4. Standard technical specifications combustion engineering plants: Bases (Sections 2.0--3.3). Volume 2, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    This report documents the results of the combined effort of the NRC and the industry to produce improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS), Revision 1 for General Electric BWR/6 Plants. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved STS or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes

  5. Alcohol combustion chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Sarathy, Mani

    2014-10-01

    Alternative transportation fuels, preferably from renewable sources, include alcohols with up to five or even more carbon atoms. They are considered promising because they can be derived from biological matter via established and new processes. In addition, many of their physical-chemical properties are compatible with the requirements of modern engines, which make them attractive either as replacements for fossil fuels or as fuel additives. Indeed, alcohol fuels have been used since the early years of automobile production, particularly in Brazil, where ethanol has a long history of use as an automobile fuel. Recently, increasing attention has been paid to the use of non-petroleum-based fuels made from biological sources, including alcohols (predominantly ethanol), as important liquid biofuels. Today, the ethanol fuel that is offered in the market is mainly made from sugar cane or corn. Its production as a first-generation biofuel, especially in North America, has been associated with publicly discussed drawbacks, such as reduction in the food supply, need for fertilization, extensive water usage, and other ecological concerns. More environmentally friendly processes are being considered to produce alcohols from inedible plants or plant parts on wasteland. While biofuel production and its use (especially ethanol and biodiesel) in internal combustion engines have been the focus of several recent reviews, a dedicated overview and summary of research on alcohol combustion chemistry is still lacking. Besides ethanol, many linear and branched members of the alcohol family, from methanol to hexanols, have been studied, with a particular emphasis on butanols. These fuels and their combustion properties, including their ignition, flame propagation, and extinction characteristics, their pyrolysis and oxidation reactions, and their potential to produce pollutant emissions have been intensively investigated in dedicated experiments on the laboratory and the engine scale

  6. Une installation expérimentale pour l'étude du traitement par combustion des fumées industrielles An Experimental Plant for Processing Industrial Fumes by Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morillon R.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Le rejet à l'atmosphère d'effluents gazeux d'origine industrielle entraîne un accroissement sensible de la pollution atmosphérique ; en outre, il s'accompagne souvent d'une perte d'énergie lorsque l'élément polluant est un hydrocarbure. Dans ce cas, l'utilisation du gaz naturel pour le traitement par combustion des fumées industrielles apporte une solution élégante et souvent peu coûteuse grâce à la récupération d'énergie qu'il est possible de faire. La première partie de l'article rappelle les aspects théoriques de ce traitement ; en particulier, l'influence des divers éléments sur son efficacité y est discutée (composition de l'atmosphère polluée, température, temps de séjour, etc.. II apparaît ainsi que diverses conditions doivent être remplies simultanément pour obtenir une efficacité satisfaisante. Afin de disposer d'éléments d'ingénierie permettant de construire les unités de traitement les plus efficaces et les plus sûres possible, au coût le plus bas possible, la Direction des études et techniques nouvelles du Gaz de France a réalisé une installation expérimentale qui est présentée dans la deuxième partie de l'article. Enfin, quelques examples d'utilisation de cette installation expérimentale, qui constitue un nouvel outil de travail mis à la disposition des utisitateurs et des constructeurs, sont décrits dans la troisième partie de l'article. The discharge into the atmosphere of industrial waste gases causes substantially increased air pollution. Moreover, it is often accompanied by loss of energy when the polluting element is a hydrocarbon. In such cases, the use of natural gas for processing industrial fumes by combustion provides an elegant solution, which moy often prove economical too becouse of the recovery of energy it makes possible. The first part of this article reviews the theoretical aspects of such processing. The way in which its effectiveness is affected by various parameters

  7. Measurement of the 13C/12C ratio of soil-plant individual sugars by gas chromatography/combustion/isotope-ratio mass spectrometry of silylated derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrien, Delphine; Balesdent, Jérôme; Marol, Christine; Santaella, Catherine

    2003-01-01

    Carbohydrate is an important pool in the terrestrial carbon cycle. The potential offered by natural and artificial 13C-labelling techniques should therefore be applied to the investigation of the dynamics of individual sugars in soils. For this reason, we evaluated the method of 13C sugar analysis by gas chromatography/combustion/isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) after hydrolysis and direct trimethylsilylation. Trimethylsilylation involved the addition of several carbon atoms per sugar. These atoms have to be taken into account in the estimation of the carbon isotope ratio. The analysis of standard and natural pentoses and hexoses of known 13C enrichments revealed that the number of analysed added carbon atoms was less than expected from stoichiometry. This was attributed to incomplete derivatization and/or incomplete oxidation of methylsilyl carbon before IRMS. Using a calibration of the number of analysed added carbon atoms, the isotope excess of enriched samples could be determined with a relative error close to 5%. Concerning the determination of natural abundances by GC/C/IRMS, we could measure the delta 13C of standard C3- and C4-derived sugars with an accuracy of +/-1.5 per thousand using the previous calibration. We were able to apply this technique to plant-soil systems labelled by pulse-chase of 13CO2, revealing the nature and dynamics of sugars in the plant rhizosphere. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. A simple aloe vera plant-extracted microwave and conventional combustion synthesis: Morphological, optical, magnetic and catalytic properties of CoFe2O4 nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, A.; Sridhar, R.; Arul Antony, S.; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2014-11-01

    Nanocrystalline magnetic spinel CoFe2O4 was synthesized by a simple microwave combustion method (MCM) using ferric nitrate, cobalt nitrate and Aloe vera plant extracted solution. For the comparative study, it was also prepared by a conventional combustion method (CCM). Powder X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray and selected-area electron diffraction results indicate that the as-synthesized samples have only single-phase spinel structure with high crystallinity and without the presence of other phase impurities. The crystal structure and morphology of the powders were revealed by high resolution scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, show that the MCM products of CoFe2O4 samples contain sphere-like nanoparticles (SNPs), whereas the CCM method of samples consist of flake-like nanoplatelets (FNPs). The band gap of the samples was determined by UV-Visible diffuse reflectance and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The magnetization (Ms) results showed a ferromagnetic behavior of the CoFe2O4 nanostructures. The Ms value of CoFe2O4-SNPs is higher i.e. 77.62 emu/g than CoFe2O4-FNPs (25.46 emu/g). The higher Ms value of the sample suggest that the MCM technique is suitable for preparing high quality nanostructures for magnetic applications. Both the samples were successfully tested as catalysts for the conversion of benzyl alcohol. The resulting spinel ferrites were highly selective for the oxidation of benzyl alcohol and exhibit important difference among their activities. It was found that CoFe2O4-SNPs catalyst show the best performance, whereby 99.5% selectivity of benzaldehyde was achieved at close to 93.2% conversion.

  9. Fluid-bed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, G.; Schoebotham, N.

    1981-02-01

    In Energy Equipment Company's two-stage fluidized bed system, partial combustion in a fluidized bed is followed by burn-off of the generated gases above the bed. The system can be retrofitted to existing boilers, and can burn small, high ash coal efficiently. It has advantages when used as a hot gas generator for process drying. Tests on a boiler at a Cadbury Schweppes plant are reported.

  10. Particle size, morphology and color tunable ZnO:Eu{sup 3+} nanophosphors via plant latex mediated green combustion synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandrasekhar, M. [Prof. C.N.R. Rao Centre for Advanced Materials, Tumkur University, Tumkur 572 103 (India); Department of Physics, Acharya Institute of Technology, Bangalore 560 107 (India); Nagabhushana, H., E-mail: bhushanvlc@gmail.com [Prof. C.N.R. Rao Centre for Advanced Materials, Tumkur University, Tumkur 572 103 (India); Sharma, S.C. [B.S. Narayan Centre of Excellence for Advanced Materials, B.M.S. Institute of Technology, Yelahanka, Bangalore 560 064 (India); Department of Mechanical Engineering, B.M.S. Institute of Technology, Yelahanka, Bangalore 560 064 (India); Sudheer kumar, K.H. [Department of Environmental Science, Kuvempu University, Shankarghatta, Shimoga 577 451 (India); Department of Chemistry, B.M.S. Institute of Technology, Yelahanka, Bangalore 560 064 (India); B.S. Narayan Centre of Excellence for Advanced Materials, B.M.S. Institute of Technology, Yelahanka, Bangalore 560 064 (India); Dhananjaya, N. [Department of Physics, B.M.S. Institute of Technology, Yelahanka, Bangalore 560 064 (India); B.S. Narayan Centre of Excellence for Advanced Materials, B.M.S. Institute of Technology, Yelahanka, Bangalore 560 064 (India); Sunitha, D.V. [Prof. C.N.R. Rao Centre for Advanced Materials, Tumkur University, Tumkur 572 103 (India); Shivakumara, C. [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Nagabhushana, B.M. [Department of Chemistry, M.S. Ramaiah Institute of Technology, Bangalore 560 054 (India)

    2014-01-25

    Highlights: • ZnO:Eu{sup 3+} phosphors were prepared by green synthesis route. • Morphology and particle size was tuned by varying the concentration of plant latex. • The phosphor show excellent chromaticity coordinates in the white region. -- Abstract: Efficient ZnO:Eu{sup 3+} (1–11 mol%) nanophosphors were prepared for the first time by green synthesis route using Euphorbia tirucalli plant latex. The final products were well characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV–visible spectroscopy (UV–Vis), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), etc. The average particle size of ZnO:Eu{sup 3+} (7 mol%) was found to be in the range 27–47 nm. With increase of plant latex, the particle size was reduced and porous structure was converted to spherical shaped particles. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra indicated that the peaks situated at ∼590, 615, 648 and 702 nm were attributed to the {sup 5}D{sub 0} → {sup 7}F{sub j(j=1,2,3,4)} transitions of Eu{sup 3+} ions. The highest PL intensity was recorded for 7 mol% with Eu{sup 3+} ions and 26 ml plant latex concentration. The PL intensity increases with increase of plant latex concentration up to 30 ml and there after it decreases. The phosphor prepared by this method show spherical shaped particles, excellent chromaticity co-ordinates in the white light region which was highly useful for WLED’s. Further, present method was reliable, environmentally friendly and alternative to economical routes.

  11. Noise Diagnostics of Stationary and Non-Stationary Reactor Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunde, Carl

    2007-04-15

    This thesis concerns the application of noise diagnostics on different problems in the area of reactor physics involving both stationary and non-stationary core processes. Five different problems are treated, divided into three different parts. The first problem treated in the first part is the classification of two-phase flow regimes from neutron radiographic and visible light images with a neuro-wavelet algorithm. The algorithm consists of wavelet pre-processing and of an artificial neural network. The result indicates that the wavelet pre-processing is improving the training of the neural network. Next, detector tubes which are suspected of impacting on nearby fuel-assemblies in a boiling water reactor (BWR) are identified by both a classical spectral method and wavelet-based methods. It was found that there is good agreement between the different methods as well as with visual inspections of detector tube and fuel assembly damage made during the outage at the plant. The third problem addresses the determination of the decay ratio of a BWR from the auto-correlation function (ACF). Here wavelets are used, with some success, both for de-trending and de-nosing of the ACF and also for direct estimation of the decay ratio from the ACF. The second part deals with the analysis of beam-mode and shell-mode core-barrel vibrations in pressurised water reactors (PWRs). The beam-mode vibrations are analysed by using parameters of the vibration peaks, in spectra from ex core detectors. A trend analysis of the peak amplitude shows that the peak amplitude is changing during the fuel cycle. When it comes to the analysis of the shell-mode vibration, 1-D analytical and numerical calculations are performed in order to calculate the neutron noise induced in the core. The two calculations are in agreement and show that a large local noise component is present in the core which could be used to classify the shell-mode vibrations. However, a measurement made in the PWR Ringhals-3 shows

  12. Noise Diagnostics of Stationary and Non-Stationary Reactor Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunde, Carl

    2007-01-01

    This thesis concerns the application of noise diagnostics on different problems in the area of reactor physics involving both stationary and non-stationary core processes. Five different problems are treated, divided into three different parts. The first problem treated in the first part is the classification of two-phase flow regimes from neutron radiographic and visible light images with a neuro-wavelet algorithm. The algorithm consists of wavelet pre-processing and of an artificial neural network. The result indicates that the wavelet pre-processing is improving the training of the neural network. Next, detector tubes which are suspected of impacting on nearby fuel-assemblies in a boiling water reactor (BWR) are identified by both a classical spectral method and wavelet-based methods. It was found that there is good agreement between the different methods as well as with visual inspections of detector tube and fuel assembly damage made during the outage at the plant. The third problem addresses the determination of the decay ratio of a BWR from the auto-correlation function (ACF). Here wavelets are used, with some success, both for de-trending and de-nosing of the ACF and also for direct estimation of the decay ratio from the ACF. The second part deals with the analysis of beam-mode and shell-mode core-barrel vibrations in pressurised water reactors (PWRs). The beam-mode vibrations are analysed by using parameters of the vibration peaks, in spectra from ex core detectors. A trend analysis of the peak amplitude shows that the peak amplitude is changing during the fuel cycle. When it comes to the analysis of the shell-mode vibration, 1-D analytical and numerical calculations are performed in order to calculate the neutron noise induced in the core. The two calculations are in agreement and show that a large local noise component is present in the core which could be used to classify the shell-mode vibrations. However, a measurement made in the PWR Ringhals-3 shows

  13. The Impact of the Bituminous Coal Combustion from the Thermoelectric Power Plant from Paroseni on the Environment of Jiu Valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Rebrisoreanu

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The Jiu Valley Basin is one of the most important coal mining areas in Romania. Other industries, including a power plant, are also well developed in this area. Therefore, pollution is very high. One of the most polluted environmental compounds is the air. High mountains surround the Jiu Valley, which makes difficult the air refreshing. For this reason, it is very important to discuss the air pollution and especially that produced by dust. Since the industrial companies are concentrated in a small area, it is very difficult to identify and prosecute the polluting one. The present paper aims to identify the sources of air pollution, especially among the mining companies, because the power plant is considered the most important polluting agent in this area.

  14. The Impact of the Bituminous Coal Combustion from the Thermoelectric Power Plant from Paroseni on the Environment of Jiu Valley

    OpenAIRE

    Mircea Rebrisoreanu; Eugen Traistă; Aronel Matei; Ovidiu Barbu; Vlad A. Codrea

    2002-01-01

    The Jiu Valley Basin is one of the most important coal mining areas in Romania. Other industries, including a power plant, are also well developed in this area. Therefore, pollution is very high. One of the most polluted environmental compounds is the air. High mountains surround the Jiu Valley, which makes difficult the air refreshing. For this reason, it is very important to discuss the air pollution and especially that produced by dust. Since the industrial companies are concentrated in a ...

  15. 40 CFR 60.4360 - How do I determine the total sulfur content of the turbine's combustion fuel?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... content of the turbine's combustion fuel? 60.4360 Section 60.4360 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Standards of Performance for Stationary Combustion Turbines Monitoring § 60.4360 How do I determine the total sulfur content of the turbine's combustion fuel? You must monitor the total sulfur content of the...

  16. CE/Bechtel design containment response to severe accident phenomenology: A comparison among several combustion engineering plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, Y.F.; Schneider, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    The objectives of this paper are to: (1) discuss the types of severe accident phenomena that drive containment failure modes in CE plants and (2) contribute to the current state of knowledge of CE/Bechtel-design containment response to severe accident phenomenology. The second objective is addressed by providing a comparative study of containment response to severe accidents among several CE plants including Millstone Unit 2 (MP2), Palisades (Consumers Power), Calvert Cliffs (Baltimore Gas and Electric Company), Palo Verde (Arizona Public Service), and SONGS Units 2 and 3 (Southern California Edison). The motivation for addressing the second objective is based on the current lack of comprehensive literature on CE/Bechtel design containment failure modes and mechanisms for accidents that progress beyond the design basis limits. The first part of this paper addresses severe accident phenomena-related failure mechanisms in CE/Bechtel-designed containments. The second part of this work provides a comparative study of containment response among several CE plants

  17. Power generation plants with carbon capture and storage: A techno-economic comparison between coal combustion and gasification technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tola, Vittorio; Pettinau, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Techno-economic performance of coal-fired power plants (without and with CCS). • Without CCS system, USC is more efficient and cost-competitive than IGCC. • CCS energy penalties are more relevant for USC than IGCC. • Higher SNOX system costs are partially compensated by better USC performance. • CCS technologies cannot be profitable without adequate policies and incentives. - Abstract: Worldwide energy production requirements could not be fully satisfied by nuclear and renewables sources. Therefore a sustainable use of fossil fuels (coal in particular) will be required for several decades. In this scenario, carbon capture and storage (CCS) represents a key solution to control the global warming reducing carbon dioxide emissions. The integration between CCS technologies and power generation plants currently needs a demonstration at commercial scale to reduce both technological risks and high capital and operating cost. This paper compares, from the technical and economic points of view, the performance of three coal-fired power generation technologies: (i) ultra-supercritical (USC) plant equipped with a conventional flue gas treatment (CGT) process, (ii) USC plant equipped with SNOX technology for a combined removal of sulphur and nitrogen oxides and (iii) integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant based on a slurry-feed entrained-flow gasifier. Each technology was analysed in its configurations without and with CO 2 capture, referring to a commercial-scale of 1000 MW th . Technical assessment was carried out by using simulation models implemented through Aspen Plus and Gate-Cycle tools, whereas economic assessment was performed through a properly developed simulation model. USC equipped with CGT systems shows an overall efficiency (43.7%) comparable to IGCC (43.9%), whereas introduction of SNOX technology increases USC efficiency up to 44.8%. Being the CCS energy penalties significantly higher for USC (about 10.5% points vs. about 8

  18. Investigations on the emission of air pollutants from small-scale firing plants during the combustion of cereals, straw and similar plant materials; Untersuchungen zur Emission von Luftschadstoffen aus Kleinfeuerungsanlagen bei der Verbrennung von Getreide, Stroh und aehnlichen pflanzlichen Stoffen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalkoff, Wolf-Dieter; Maiwald, Birk; Wolf, Stephan

    2013-05-15

    The purpose of the present field study by the State Environmental Protection Office and the State Institution for Agriculture, Forestry and Horticulture of Saxony Anhalt was to measure emissions of relevant pollutants during the combustion of biogenic fuels such as cereals, straw and similar plant materials in exemplary firing installations. In spite of considerable development efforts on the part of manufacturers there are still problems to be solved with some fuels in meeting the tightened limit values of the First Emission Control Ordinance while ensuring user-friendly equipment operability. Based on these insights, as well as the experiences gained in the course of the trial programme, the recommendation for problem fuels such as straw and similar materials is to operate the boiler at full load and provide robust, amply dimensioned ash removal equipment.

  19. Amended EC Directive on the limitation of emissions of certain pollutants into the air from large combustion plants. Implications for German power plants; Neue EG-Richtlinie fuer Grossfeuerungsanlagen. Folgerungen fuer deutsche Kraftwerke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hildebrand, M. [Verband der Elektrizitaetswirtschaft - VDEW - e.V., Frankfurt (Germany). Bereich Recht und Umwelt

    2002-03-11

    The article highlights the major improvements in terms of reducing emissions from large combustion plants, comparing the new limiting values and specifications with those of the former Directive. As Germany is obliged to transform the new EC Directive into national law within twelve months from its entry into force, an amendment of the respective German regulation can be expected soon. (orig./CB) [German] Mit der im Herbst 2001 durch das Europaeische Parlament und den Umweltministerrat verabschiedeten Novelle der Grossfeuerungsanlagen-Richtlinie hat die Europaeische Union einen markanten, laengst ueberfaelligen Schritt zur EU-weiten Angleichung der emissionsseitigen Anforderungen an grosse Feuerungsanlagen unternommen. Mit dem Inkrafttreten der novellierten Grossfeuerungsanlagen-Richtlinie wurde aber auch der formale Anstoss fuer eine Aktualisierung der deutschen Grossfeuerungsanlagen-Verordnung (13.BImSchV) gegeben. (orig./CB)

  20. Clean Air Act Standards and Guidelines for Energy, Engines, and Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains the stationary sources of air pollution for the energy, engines, and combustion industries, and their corresponding air pollution regulations. To learn more about the regulations for each industry, just click on the links below.

  1. 75 FR 63259 - Standards of Performance for New Stationary Sources and Emission Guidelines for Existing Sources...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-14

    ... Standards of Performance for New Stationary Sources and Emission Guidelines for Existing Sources: Sewage... performance standards for new units and emission guidelines for existing units for specific categories of... standards and emission guidelines for large municipal waste combustion units, small municipal waste...

  2. Oxy-fuel combustion of solid fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftegaard, Maja Bøg; Brix, Jacob; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2010-01-01

    Oxy-fuel combustion is suggested as one of the possible, promising technologies for capturing CO2 from power plants. The concept of oxy-fuel combustion is removal of nitrogen from the oxidizer to carry out the combustion process in oxygen and, in most concepts, recycled flue gas to lower the flame...... provide additional options for improvement of process economics are however likewise investigated. Of particular interest is the change of the combustion process induced by the exchange of carbon dioxide and water vapor for nitrogen as diluent. This paper reviews the published knowledge on the oxy......-fuel process and focuses particularly on the combustion fundamentals, i.e. flame temperatures and heat transfer, ignition and burnout, emissions, and fly ash characteristics. Knowledge is currently available regarding both an entire oxy-fuel power plant and the combustion fundamentals. However, several...

  3. Slipstream pilot-scale demonstration of a novel amine-based post-combustion technology for carbon dioxide capture from coal-fired power plant flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnamurthy, Krish R. [Linde LLC, Murray Hill, NJ (United States)

    2017-02-03

    Post-combustion CO2 capture (PCC) technology offers flexibility to treat the flue gas from both existing and new coal-fired power plants and can be applied to treat all or a portion of the flue gas. Solvent-based technologies are today the leading option for PCC from commercial coal-fired power plants as they have been applied in large-scale in other applications. Linde and BASF have been working together to develop and further improve a PCC process incorporating BASF’s novel aqueous amine-based solvent technology. This technology offers significant benefits compared to other solvent-based processes as it aims to reduce the regeneration energy requirements using novel solvents that are very stable under the coal-fired power plant feed gas conditions. BASF has developed the desired solvent based on the evaluation of a large number of candidates. In addition, long-term small pilot-scale testing of the BASF solvent has been performed on a lignite-fired flue gas. In coordination with BASF, Linde has evaluated a number of options for capital cost reduction in large engineered systems for solvent-based PCC technology. This report provides a summary of the work performed and results from a project supported by the US DOE (DE-FE0007453) for the pilot-scale demonstration of a Linde-BASF PCC technology using coal-fired power plant flue gas at a 1-1.5 MWe scale in Wilsonville, AL at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC). Following a project kick-off meeting in November 2011 and the conclusion of pilot plant design and engineering in February 2013, mechanical completion of the pilot plant was achieved in July 2014, and final commissioning activities were completed to enable start-up of operations in January 2015. Parametric tests were performed from January to December 2015 to determine optimal test conditions and evaluate process performance over a variety of operation parameters. A long-duration 1500-hour continuous test campaign was performed from May to

  4. Differential behaviour of combustion and gasification fly ash from Puertollano Power Plants (Spain) for the synthesis of zeolites and silica extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Font, O.; Moreno, N.; Diez, S.; Querol, X.; Lopez-Soler, A.; Coca, P.; Garcia Pena, F.

    2009-01-01

    Coal gasification (IGCC) and pulverised coal combustion (PCC) fly ashes (FAs), obtained from two power plants fed with the carboniferous bituminous coal from Puertollano (Spain), were characterised and used as raw materials for zeolite synthesis by direct conversion (DC) and by alkaline fusion (Fu), and SiO 2 extraction (Si-Ex) at laboratory scale. The Puertollano FAs are characterised by a high SiO 2 content (59%) with respect to EU coal FAs. High zeolite synthesis yields were obtained from both FAs by using conventional alkaline activation. However, the Si extraction yields were very different. The results of the zeolite synthesis from the Si-bearing extracts from both FAs demonstrated that high purity zeolites with high cation exchange capacity (CEC, between 4.3 and 5.3 meq/g) can be produced. The solid residue arising from Si-Ex is also a relatively high NaP1 zeolite product (CEC 2.4-2.7 meq/g) equivalent to the DC products. The zeolitic materials synthesised from both FAs by Fu showed an intermediate (between the high purity zeolites and the DC products) zeolite content with CEC values from 3.4 to 3.7 meq/g. Low leachable metal contents were obtained from high purity A and X zeolites and zeolite material synthesised by Fu for PCC FA.

  5. The Measurement Handbook of the Thermal Engineering Research Institute, 3. edition, 2005[Measurement of emissions from combustion plants]; Vaermeforsks Maethandbok Utgaava 3, 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavsson, Lennart; Nyquist, Gunnar

    2005-09-01

    The objectives of the measurement handbook is to give recommendations for performing measurements on emissions from combustion plants in a way to produce relevant and consistent results. The handbook gives advice on planning, preparation and performance of emission measurements as well as descriptions of methods for measurement for about twenty components of the flue gas and some physical parameters. Descriptions of measuring methods are based on on the European and/or international standards but are supplemented with experiences from applications of the standards and are described in a uniform way, For each method, the following steps are described: objective, area of application, measuring principle, equipment, performance, analysis and evaluation, experiences, limitations and measurement uncertainties. It is hoped the the handbook will be used both as a practical guide and as a reference. Advice on the measurement of flue gas flux and temperature, and furnace temperature are given and on how sampling of fuel and ashes should be done. The book has separate chapters for EU-directives, quality assurance of automatic measuring systems, calculation of measurement accuracy and validation of alternative measurement methods. Ths third edition has been updated on a number of subjects.

  6. Case study of an MBT plant producing SRF for cement kiln co-combustion, coupled with a bioreactor landfill for process residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosso, Mario; Dellavedova, Stefano; Rigamonti, Lucia; Scotti, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes the performances of the energy recovery pathway from the residual waste based on the production of a Solid Recovered Fuel (SRF) to be exploited via co-combustion in a cement kiln. The SRF is produced in a single stream Mechanical-Biological Treatment plant, where bio-drying of the waste is followed by mechanical refining in order to fulfil the quality requirements by the cement kilns. Peculiar of this MBT is the fact that sorting residues are disposed in a nearby landfill, managed according to a bioreactor approach, where landfill gas is collected for electric energy recovery. A detailed mass and energy balance of the system is presented based on one year operational data, followed by its Life Cycle Assessment. Results show that the system is energetically and environmentally effective, with most of the impacts being more than compensated by the savings of materials and energy. Major role in determining such outcome is the displacement of petcoke in the cement kiln, both in terms of its fossil CO2 emissions and of its life cycle impacts, including the trans-oceanic transport. To check the robustness of the results, two sensitivity analyses are performed on the landfill gas collection efficiency and on the avoided electric energy mix. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The PFBC Power Plant of Escatron; Proyecto de Demostracion de la Combustion en Lecho Fuido a Presion Central Termica de Escatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    The Escatron Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion Demonstration Plant was led by ENDESA which set out on the Project with its own specific objectives, and also have involved contributions from designers and suppliers, as ABB and BWE. The project objectives may be defined as follows: To make progress in the development of clean and efficient technology applicable to a wide range of coal types, specially to the peculiar Spanish black lignites. To be able to design and manufacture a new technology in the contest of European Union, specially developing capacity in Spain. All this give rise to a framework which took shape in the Escatron Project Monitoring Committee. Sulphur retention in PFBC technology has proved to be efficient, with levels higher than 90%. The nitric oxides emissions fall within limits set by present regulations. It is likely that more restrictive regulations in the future, will require the consideration of injecting ammonium technic over free-chamber bed. The most significant problem is that the flue gas from the cyclones to the gas turbine, has a high dust content. The cleaning system for this gas should be improved, and the best option appear to be the introduction of ceramic filters. The new plants could be built at higher power, as should be 300-400 MWe, operating with higher pressure (16 bar). This option together with better steam conditions, gives rise to a better energy yields and competitive electric energy production. But we should not dimis more proved designs of 100-200 MWe, as an interesting modular solution. (Author)

  8. Eddy current inspection of stationary blade rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krzywosz, K.J.; Hastings, S.N.

    1994-01-01

    Stationary turbine blade rings in a US power plant have experienced chloride-induced cracking. Failure analysis determined two types of cracking mechanisms: corrosion fatigue cracking confined to the leading edge of the outer shroud; and stress corrosion cracking present all over the blade surface. Fluorescent dye penetrant is typically used to detect and size cracks. However, it requires cleaning the blade rings by sandblasting to obtain reliable inspection results. Sand blasting in turn requires sealing the lower half of the turbine housing to prevent sand from contaminating the rest of the power plant components. Furthermore, both the penetrant examination and the removal of the sand are time consuming and costly. An alternative NDE technique is desirable which requires no pre-cleaning of the blade and a quick go/no-go inspection with the capability of estimating the crack length. This paper presents an innovative eddy current technique which meets the desired objectives by incorporating the use of specially designed contoured scanners equipped with an array of pancake coils. A set of eddy current pancake coils housed in three different scanners is used to manually scan and inspect the convex side of the stationary blade rings. The pancake coils are operated in a transmit/receive mode using two separate eddy current instruments. This paper presents the inspection concept, including scanner and probe designs, and test results from the various stages of multiple blade rings

  9. Tubular combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Ishizuka, Satoru

    2014-01-01

    Tubular combustors are cylindrical tubes where flame ignition and propagation occur in a spatially confined, highly controlled environment, in a nearly flat, elongated geometry. This allows for some unique advantages where extremely even heat dispersion is required over a large surface while still maintaining fuel efficiency. Tubular combustors also allow for easy flexibility in type of fuel source, allowing for quick changeover to meet various needs and changing fuel pricing. This new addition to the MP sustainable energy series will provide the most up-to-date research on tubular combustion--some of it only now coming out of private proprietary protection. Plentiful examples of current applications along with a good explanation of background theory will offer readers an invaluable guide on this promising energy technology. Highlights include: * An introduction to the theory of tubular flames * The "how to" of maintaining stability of tubular flames through continuous combustion * Examples of both small-scal...

  10. Advanced Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, Gordon R. [NETL

    2013-03-11

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  11. The stationary neutron radiography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, A.A.; Newell, D.L.; Heidel, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    To provide the high intensity neutron beam and support systems necessary for radiography, the Stationary Neutron Radiography System was constructed at McClellan Air Force Base. The Stationary Neutron Radiography System utilizes a one megawatt TRIGA reactor contained in an Aluminium tank surrounded by eight foot thick concrete walls. There are four neutron beam tubes at inclined angles from the reactor core to separate radiography bays. In three of the bays, robotic systems manipulate aircraft components in the neutron beam, while real-time imaging systems provide images concurrent with the irradiation. Film radiography of smaller components is performed in the remaining bay

  12. Experimental results of combustion and desulphurization in fluidized bed. Implementation opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragos, L.; Jinescu, G.; Scarlat, N.

    1996-01-01

    Possibilities of both stationary fluidized bed combustion (SFBC) and circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) technologies for desulfurization of Romanian coal-fired power plants have been studied since the 70's. The results of research on a 2 MWh SFBC semi-industrial pilot hot water boiler and an 1 MWh CFBC pilot plant are presented. 4 sorts of lignite (3 Romanian and 1 Albanian) are used in the study. The combustion efficiencies for SFBC are between 82 - 84% and for CFBC - between 84 - 87%. The heat transfer coefficients for lignite and peat coal have been determined for different zones, different levels of ash recirculation rate and various operating loads. Experiments with 2 sorts of sorbents: dolomite and limestone, under different temperature conditions and at Ca/S molar ratio 0.5 - 3.5 have been carried out. The temperature range for the maximum values of desulfurization efficiency is 840-870 o C for limestone and 820-860 o C for dolomite. The following efficiency values are obtained for lignite in the SFBC pilot plant: 1) over 80%, when using dolomite as a sorbent and the Ca/S molar ratio is greater than 2.5; 2) 75 - 90%, when limestone has been used and the Ca/S molar ratio is in the range 2-3. Desulfurization efficiency in CFBC plant for lignite using limestone is 80-93% for Ca/S ratio between 2 and 3. The necessity to commission a demonstrative installation with low pollutant emissions is pointed out. The Comanesti Power Plant has been chosen for this purpose. An old 75 t/h steam boiler will be replaced with 45 MWh CFBC boiler for combined heat and steam production. The overall estimated investment costs for this plant are about 6 million $US. 1 tabs., 5 refs

  13. Ecophysiological and biochemical traits of three herbaceous plants growing on the disposed coal combustion fly ash of different weathering stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajić Gordana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The ecophysiological and biochemical traits of Calamagrostis epigejos (Roth. Festuca rubra L. and Oenothera biennis L. growing on two fly ash lagoons of different weathering stage (L1-3 years and L2-11 years of the “Nikola Tesla- A” thermoelectric plant (Obrenovac, Serbia were studied. Species-dependent variations were observed at the L1 lagoon; the greatest vitality (Fv/Fm and Fm/Fo followed by higher photopigment and total phenolic contents were measured in O. biennis in relation to C. epigejos (p<0.001 and F. rubra (p<0.001. At the L2 site, higher vitality was found in O. biennis (p<0.001 and F. rubra (p<0.01 compared to C. epigejos. O. biennis had the highest photosynthetic capacity. The results obtained in this study indicate that all examined species maintained a level of photosynthesis that allowed them to survive and grow under the stressful conditions in ash lagoons, albeit with lower than optimal success. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173018

  14. Stationary measure in the multiverse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linde, Andrei; Vanchurin, Vitaly; Winitzki, Sergei

    2009-01-01

    We study the recently proposed ''stationary measure'' in the context of the string landscape scenario. We show that it suffers neither from the ''Boltzmann brain'' problem nor from the ''youngness'' paradox that makes some other measures predict a high CMB temperature at present. We also demonstrate a good performance of this measure in predicting the results of local experiments, such as proton decay

  15. Stationary Liquid Fuel Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Won Sik; Grandy, Andrew; Boroski, Andrew; Krajtl, Lubomir; Johnson, Terry

    2015-01-01

    For effective burning of hazardous transuranic (TRU) elements of used nuclear fuel, a transformational advanced reactor concept named SLFFR (Stationary Liquid Fuel Fast Reactor) was proposed based on stationary molten metallic fuel. The fuel enters the reactor vessel in a solid form, and then it is heated to molten temperature in a small melting heater. The fuel is contained within a closed, thick container with penetrating coolant channels, and thus it is not mixed with coolant nor flow through the primary heat transfer circuit. The makeup fuel is semi- continuously added to the system, and thus a very small excess reactivity is required. Gaseous fission products are also removed continuously, and a fraction of the fuel is periodically drawn off from the fuel container to a processing facility where non-gaseous mixed fission products and other impurities are removed and then the cleaned fuel is recycled into the fuel container. A reference core design and a preliminary plant system design of a 1000 MWt TRU- burning SLFFR concept were developed using TRU-Ce-Co fuel, Ta-10W fuel container, and sodium coolant. Conservative design approaches were adopted to stay within the current material performance database. Detailed neutronics and thermal-fluidic analyses were performed to develop a reference core design. Region-dependent 33-group cross sections were generated based on the ENDF/B-VII.0 data using the MC2-3 code. Core and fuel cycle analyses were performed in theta-r-z geometries using the DIF3D and REBUS-3 codes. Reactivity coefficients and kinetics parameters were calculated using the VARI3D perturbation theory code. Thermo-fluidic analyses were performed using the ANSYS FLUENT computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. Figure 0.1 shows a schematic radial layout of the reference 1000 MWt SLFFR core, and Table 0.1 summarizes the main design parameters of SLFFR-1000 loop plant. The fuel container is a 2.5 cm thick cylinder with an inner radius of 87.5 cm. The fuel

  16. Stationary Liquid Fuel Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Won Sik [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Grandy, Andrew [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Boroski, Andrew [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Krajtl, Lubomir [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Johnson, Terry [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-09-30

    For effective burning of hazardous transuranic (TRU) elements of used nuclear fuel, a transformational advanced reactor concept named SLFFR (Stationary Liquid Fuel Fast Reactor) was proposed based on stationary molten metallic fuel. The fuel enters the reactor vessel in a solid form, and then it is heated to molten temperature in a small melting heater. The fuel is contained within a closed, thick container with penetrating coolant channels, and thus it is not mixed with coolant nor flow through the primary heat transfer circuit. The makeup fuel is semi- continuously added to the system, and thus a very small excess reactivity is required. Gaseous fission products are also removed continuously, and a fraction of the fuel is periodically drawn off from the fuel container to a processing facility where non-gaseous mixed fission products and other impurities are removed and then the cleaned fuel is recycled into the fuel container. A reference core design and a preliminary plant system design of a 1000 MWt TRU- burning SLFFR concept were developed using TRU-Ce-Co fuel, Ta-10W fuel container, and sodium coolant. Conservative design approaches were adopted to stay within the current material performance database. Detailed neutronics and thermal-fluidic analyses were performed to develop a reference core design. Region-dependent 33-group cross sections were generated based on the ENDF/B-VII.0 data using the MC2-3 code. Core and fuel cycle analyses were performed in theta-r-z geometries using the DIF3D and REBUS-3 codes. Reactivity coefficients and kinetics parameters were calculated using the VARI3D perturbation theory code. Thermo-fluidic analyses were performed using the ANSYS FLUENT computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. Figure 0.1 shows a schematic radial layout of the reference 1000 MWt SLFFR core, and Table 0.1 summarizes the main design parameters of SLFFR-1000 loop plant. The fuel container is a 2.5 cm thick cylinder with an inner radius of 87.5 cm. The fuel

  17. K-BREF(Korean BAT reference document) development : BAT and BAT-AELs for large combustion plants and waste incinerators in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Heungmin; Lee, Daegyun; Park, Jaehong

    2017-04-01

    Since the initial environmental policy namely "Regulation on assigning license for environmental pollutant emission facilities" was introduced in 1971, the previous environmental policy that assign licenses on emission facilities of each pollutant has been implementing in Korea. From this, economic standard and environmental quality of Korea are recognized as level of developed countries, even though various development activities for industrialization. However, amount of pollutant, emission route and emission source are increasing with development of various industries, and citizens recognition for environment have been changed as well. Thus, ministry of environment of Korea needs systematic policy based on scientific grounds for conversion of paradigm. For this, ministry of environment was introduced new policy namely "integrated pollution prevention and control(IPPC)", and it will be implemented from 2017 in Korea. IPPC is established for considering environment, economic and efficiency: 10 licenses on each pollutant emission will be integrated to one license, and it can be expected simplification for business licensing process. As well, this policy can be upgraded and processed while considering characteristics on location and industry types, in the future. However, to conduct this system harmoniously, policy demanders have to apply integrated control system to their facilities. Especially, the first applied industries by IPPC are two industries, such as large combustion plants for power generation and waste incineration facilities. Therefore, ministry of environment has to publish technical guideline books firstly for those industries, and they were named to "BAT reference document(BREF)". In this study, essential information for BREFs publishment, that is including emission levels, best available technique(BAT) and so on was investigated. In addition, the BAT-associated emission levels (BAT-AELs) of each industry were set using emission data obtained from

  18. Focusing millimeter wave radar for radial gap measurements in power plant combustion turbines; Fokussierendes Radarverfahren im Millimeterwellenbereich zur Radialspaltmessung in Kraftwerksturbinen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schicht, Andreas

    2011-07-11

    In this work a method for spatially resolved radial gap measurements in power plant combustion turbines by means of an autofocusing imaging radar technique in the millimeter wave range was developed and verified experimentally. The radial gap measurement has been subject of engineering studies for many years, as a reliable, simple solution does not seem to be possible due to the given boundary conditions. These include on the one hand the adverse measurement conditions such as high temperature and pressure, corrosive atmosphere and high speed of motion. On the other hand, the geometrical structure of the rotor blades at their tips turns out to be a key problem for the distance measurement. In particular, the blade tip is composed of small extended portions forming thin ribs of only a few millimeters width. Many established distance sensors like e. g. capacitive sensors cannot detect the correct tip clearance of the blade edge independently from other structures on the blade end only due to their large surface area and thus their lack of spatial resolution. The problem of small structure sizes is overcome by choosing a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) in the millimeter wave range capable of resolving the edges of a typical blade tip. The clearance is determined by measuring the reflection at the blade tip while passing by the antenna, subsequently focusing the data by means of a matched filter operation and interpreting the phase of the blade edge reflection according to the CW radar principle. For this, an autofocus approach was developed, which provides an estimate of the clearance as a first result, which is utilized to overcome the phase ambiguity and thus to increase the measurement range. The autofocus algorithm applies a weighted phase gradient of the point-like blade edge reflection as cost function and sensitive indicator for the focal quality.

  19. 78 FR 14457 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-06

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 60 and 63 [EPA-HQ-OAR-2008-0708, FRL-9756-4] RIN 2060-AQ58 National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines; New Source Performance Standards for Stationary Internal Combustion Engines Correction In rule...

  20. The simulation of stationary and non-stationary regime operation of heavy water production facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peculea, M.; Beca, T.; Constantinescu, D.M.; Dumitrescu, M.; Dimulescu, A.; Isbasescu, G.; Stefanescu, I.; Mihai, M.; Dogaru, C.; Marinescu, M.; Olariu, S.; Constantin, T.; Necula, A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper refers to testing procedures of the production capacity of heavy water production pilot, industrial scale plants and of heavy water reconcentration facilities. Simulation codes taking into account the mass and heat transfers inside the exchange columns were developed. These codes provided valuable insight about the isotope build-up of the installation which allowed estimating the time of reaching the stationary regime. Also transient regimes following perturbations in the operating parameters (i.e. temperature, pressure, fluid rates) of the installation were simulated and an optimal rate of routine inspections and adjustments was thus established

  1. Chemical characterization of bottom ashes generated during combustion of a Colombian mineral coal in a thermal power plant; Caracterizacao quimica das cinzas de fundo originadas pela combustao, em usina termoeletrica, de um carvao mineral do nordeste da Colombia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinheiro, H.S.; Nogueira, R.E.F.Q.; Lobo, C.J.S.; Nobre, A.I.S.; Sales, J.C.; Silva, C.J.M., E-mail: hspfisica@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia. Dept. de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais

    2012-07-01

    Bottom ashes generated during combustion of a mineral coal from Colombia were characterized by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and X-ray diffraction. The interest in this particular coal is due to the fact that it will be used by a thermal power plant in Ceara, Northeastern Brazil, where it could produce over 900 tons of different residues/combustion products every day. Results from Xray fluorescence allowed identification and quantification of elements present in the sample: silicon (59,17%), aluminum (13,17%), iron (10,74%), potassium (6,11%), titanium (2,91%), calcium (4,97%), sulphur (0,84%) and others (2,09%). The X-ray diffraction revealed patterns from silica, mullite, calcium sulphate and hydrated sodium. Results obtained so far indicate that the material is a potential raw-material for use in the formulation of ceramic components (author)

  2. Virtual Stationary Automata for Mobile Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dolev, Shlomi; Gilbert, Seth; Lahiani, Limor; Lynch, Nancy; Nolte, Tina

    2005-01-01

    We define a programming abstraction for mobile networks called the Virtual Stationary Automata programming layer, consisting of real mobile clients, virtual timed I/O automata called virtual stationary automata (VSAs...

  3. High Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL's High-Pressure Combustion Research Facility in Morgantown, WV, researchers can investigate new high-pressure, high-temperature hydrogen turbine combustion...

  4. Combustion Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Combustion Research Laboratory facilitates the development of new combustion systems or improves the operation of existing systems to meet the Army's mission for...

  5. Stationary analysis of signals and ratio decay determination in BWR type reactors by neuronal network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchis, R.; Palomo, M. J.; Munoz-Cobo, J. L.

    1998-01-01

    The signals registered in the nuclear plants have non stationary characteristics, in numerous times. This made difficult the application of the methods of analysis. There are determinate temporal intervals in that the signal is stationary with determinate mean, value together of zones with corrupt registers, and other zones with mean value distinct, but stationary during a temporal interval. The methodology consist in a stationary analysis to the signal received of the nuclear plant. With the Gabor Transformation are determined the temporal intervals of the stationary signals, synthesised it, as previous phase to the application of the methods of the analysis of stability parameters with methods ARMA, SVD, Neural Net,... to the reconstructed signal. 4 refs. (Author)

  6. Development of a NO/x/-free combustion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadakata, M.; Furusawa, T.; Kunii, D.; Imagawa, M.; Nawada, M.

    1980-04-01

    The development of a NO(x)-free combustion-heating system realizing both pollution control and energy savings is described. An experiment was carried out by using a small model plant. The system consists of a combustion furnace and a new-type multifunctional heat exchanger. The heat exchanger is a rotary continuous type designed for soot collection and for catalytic combustion of CO and H2 as well as for preheating combustion air.

  7. Stationary measure in the multiverse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linde, Andrei [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Vanchurin, Vitaly; Winitzki, Sergei, E-mail: alinde@stanford.edu, E-mail: vitaly@cosmos2.phy.tufts.edu, E-mail: winitzki@physik.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich (Germany)

    2009-01-15

    We study the recently proposed ''stationary measure'' in the context of the string landscape scenario. We show that it suffers neither from the ''Boltzmann brain'' problem nor from the ''youngness'' paradox that makes some other measures predict a high CMB temperature at present. We also demonstrate a good performance of this measure in predicting the results of local experiments, such as proton decay.

  8. Non-stationary Markov chains

    OpenAIRE

    Mallak, Saed

    1996-01-01

    Ankara : Department of Mathematics and Institute of Engineering and Sciences of Bilkent University, 1996. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 1996. Includes bibliographical references leaves leaf 29 In thi.s work, we studierl the Ergodicilv of Non-Stationary .Markov chains. We gave several e.xainples with different cases. We proved that given a sec[uence of Markov chains such that the limit of this sec|uence is an Ergodic Markov chain, then the limit of the combination ...

  9. Combustion chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, N.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

  10. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Bbbb of... - Model Rule-Class II Emission Limits for Existing Small Municipal Waste Combustion Unit a

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Existing Small Municipal Waste Combustion Unit a 4 Table 4 to Subpart BBBB of Part 60 Protection of... NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Emission Guidelines and Compliance Times for Small Municipal Waste Combustion... Part 60—Model Rule—Class II Emission Limits for Existing Small Municipal Waste Combustion Unit a For...

  11. Criticality Studies in a Pilot Plant for Processing MTR-Type Irradiated Fuels; Estudios de Criticidad de una Planta Piloto para el Tratamiento de Combustibles Irradiados Tipo ' MTR '

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira Sanchez, G.; Uriarte Hueda, A. [Junta de Energia Nuclear, Division de Materiales Madrid (Spain)

    1966-05-15

    A number of theoretical studies on nuclear safety have been carried out in a pilot plant being constructed at the Junta de Energia Nuclear in Madrid for processing irradiated fuels from the MTR-type experimental reactor JEN-1. The study was carried out working with aqueous and organic solutions at two levels of {sup 235}U enrichment - 20% and 93%. The paper is divided into two main parts: the first deals with the individual items of equipment, and the interactions between these are studied in the second part. The calculations in this second part have been made using three different methods to make it more certain that the system as a whole can never be critical. The first method employed is based on the solid angle concept and makes it possible to fix the maximum {sup 235}U concentrations within the system. The second method, based on the albedo, supplies the value of the multiplication factor K of the whole assembly as a function of the concentration of {sup 235}U. In the last part, the distribution of the equipment is compared with other similar systems and experimental tests from other sources. Finally, the paper specifies the conditions for working the installation which ensure that a nuclear accident can never occur. (author) [Spanish] Se ha efectuado una serie de estudios teoricos sobre la seguridad nuclear de una planta piloto, que se encuentra en construccion en la Junta de Energfa Nuclear situada en Madrid, para el tratamiento de combustibles irradiados procedentes del reactor experimental JEN-1 del tipo MTR. El estudio se ha realizado utilizando disoluciones, tanto acuosas como organicas, con dos grados de enriquecimiento, 20% y 93% en {sup 235}U. Este trabajo comprende dos partes principales: en la primera se han considerado las distintas unidades del equipo individualmente y en la segunda se han estudiado las interacciones entre ellas. El calculo de esta segunda parte se ha hecho por tres metodos diferentes para tener una mayor seguridad de que el

  12. Investigating heat and temperature regime of the combustion chamber furnace screen of the TP 100A steam generator in the Varna thermal power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhlevski, A; Buchinski, B; Dashkiev, Yu; Radzievski, V; Petkov, Kh [Kievski Politekhnicheski Institut (USSR)

    1988-01-01

    In the course of 10 year operation of six TP 100A steam generators 72 emergency operation interruptions occurred due to the piercing of screen pipes in the combustion chamber. According to investigations carried out by the NPO, CKT, VTI, KPI and Soyuzenergo institutes, the damage occurred mainly because of the destructive influence of external gas corrosion processes, overheating and fatigue of metallic pipes, as well as unstable heat and temperature regime in the combustion chamber. Large-scale measurements of the main thermodynamic parameters of the combustion chamber of the TP-100A steam generator were carried out in order to increase service life of screen pipes. It was found that the temperature of screen pipes increases 2.5 C/month because of deposition of sediments. Regular cleaning of screen pipes in intervals of 18 months is recommended as a very efficient means of prolonging their service life. 1 ref.

  13. Characterisation of wood combustion ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maresca, Alberto

    The combustion of wood chips and wood pellets for the production of renewable energy in Denmark increased from 5.7 PJ to 16 PJ during the period 2000-2015, and further increases are expected to occur within the coming years. In 2012, about 22,300 tonnes of wood ashes were generated in Denmark....... Currently, these ashes are mainly landfilled, despite Danish legislation allowing their application onto forest and agricultural soils for fertilising and/or liming purposes. During this PhD work, 16 wood ash samples generated at ten different Danish combustion plants were collected and characterised...... for their composition and leaching properties. Despite the relatively large variations in the contents of nutrients and trace metals, the overall levels were comparable to typical ranges reported in the literature for other wood combustion ashes, as well as with regards to leaching. In general, the composition...

  14. Rotary combustion device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2008-01-01

    Rotary combustion device (1) with rotary combustion chamber (4). Specific measures are taken to provide ignition of a combustible mixture. It is proposed that a hollow tube be provided coaxially with the axis of rotation (6), so that a small part of the mixture is guided into the combustion chamber.

  15. Climatic feedbacks between stationary and transient eddies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branscome, L.E.

    1994-01-01

    Stationary eddies make a significant contribution to poleward heat transport during Northern Hemisphere winter, equaling the transport by transient eddies. On the other hand, stationary eddy transport during the summer is negligible. The effect of topography on time-mean stationary waves and low-frequency variability has been widely studied. In contrast, little attention has been given to the climatic feedbacks associated with stationary eddies. Furthermore, the relationship between stationary and transient eddies in the context of global and regional climate is not well understood. The response of the climate system to anthropogenic forcing is likely to have some dependence on stationary wave transport and its interaction with transient eddies. Some early GCM simulations and observational analyses indicate a strong feedback between the meridional heat fluxes of stationary and transient eddies

  16. Energetic retrofitting of industrial heat supply systems. Possibilities of enhancing the efficiency and energy conservation at large combustion engineering plants; Energetische Modernisierung industrieller Waermeversorgungssysteme. Moeglichkeiten der Effizienzsteigerung und der Energieeinsparung an grossen feuerungstechnischen Anlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-12-15

    In the contribution under consideration, the Deutsche Energie-Agentur GmbH (Berlin, Federal Republic of Germany) reports on an energetic modernization of industrial heat supply systems. Possibilities of an enhancement of the energetic efficiency and energy conservation at large combustion engineering plants are described. After an introduction to this theme, the author of this contribution provides an overview of the optimization of heat supply systems, and reports on the following aspects: Optimisation of the heat demand; energy efficient heat generation; heat recovery; energy efficient conversion technology and generation technology; associate partners for more energy efficiency in industry and commerce; best practice examples.

  17. Fuel cells - a new contributor to stationary power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, Angelo U.

    Stationary power generation historically started as distributed generation near the user, with the configuration of a very open market, where a lot of small competing utilities were offering electricity to the customers. At a second time it became a `monopolistic' business because of technical reasons. Big steam turbines and electric generators, allowing better efficiencies, were more conveniently installed in very large power plants, necessarily located in sites far away from where the power was needed, and the transmission losses were bounded by AC high voltage technology. The Governments were, therefore, trying to balance the power of monopolies, that were limiting the economical development of the countries, by strengthening the concept of electrical energy price public control and, alternatively, by establishing rules to allow a free flow of electricity from one region to the other, or taking direct control through ownership of big and small utilities. The most effective way of making the electric energy system competitive has proved to be the opening of a partial competition in the generation field by forcing the utilities to compare the cost of their energy, produced with new centralised plants, to the price of the available energy, coming from combined heat and power dispersed generators. In fact, with reference to this cost, all the peculiar features of large central stations and dispersed generators were taken into account, like the widespread use of natural gas, the investment risk reduction with single smaller increments of capacity, the transmission and distribution siting difficulties and high costs, the improved system reliability, and, finally, the high quality electric power. Fuel Cells are a recently become available technology for distributed electrical energy production, because they share the main typical aspects, relevant for a distributed power system, like compatibility with other modular subsystem packages, fully automation possibility

  18. Quantum cosmology and stationary states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padmanabhan, T.

    1983-01-01

    A model for quantum gravity, in which the conformal part of the metric is quantized using the path integral formalism, is presented. Einstein's equations can be suitably modified to take into account the effects of quantum conformal fluctuations. A closed Friedman model can be described in terms of well-defined stationary states. The ''ground state'' sets a lower bound (at Planck length) to the scale factor preventing the collapse. A possible explanation for matter creation and quantum nature of matter is suggested. (author)

  19. The French example: nuclear energy, fluidized bed combustion, gas treating against SO2 pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leygonie, R.; Bouscaren, R.

    1989-01-01

    Sulphur dioxide emissions in France have declined by 64% from 1980 to 1987. Those of nitrogen oxides from stationary sources have been lowered by 49 %. The main reason is the development of nuclear electricity, from 52 000 TJ in 1977 to 894 000 TJ in 1987. Another factor is a better efficiency in energy use: from 1973 to 1987, the Gross Domestic Product has progressed by 33% while energy consumption only increased by 6.7%. Furthermore, natural gas consumption has grown from 360 000 TJ in 1973 up to 878 000 TJ in 1987. France still must abate emissions in the medium and long range, and efforts will essentially bear on small and medium-size combustion plants by direct injection of limestone and lime in the furnace development of various types of desulfurizing fluid bed combustors and flue gas treatment processes [fr

  20. Modern tools and concepts to optimise flames and combustions, e.g. in power plants and industrial furnaces, by using optical flame information (radiation).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, D. [ORFEUS Combustion Engineering (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    The ORFEUS system uses a combination of emission spectroscopy, state-of-art video technology and knowledge based systems to optimise combustion and reduce emissions. The paper describes the system, (in particular for coal fired systems) and its application at HEW Power Station Tiefstack, Hamburg (Germany). 1 fig., 8 slides

  1. Second law comparison of oxy-fuel combustion and post-combustion carbon dioxide separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, Adam P.; Simon, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    To define 2nd law efficiency targets for novel separation technologies, a simplified model of a power plant with two forms of CO 2 capture was developed. In this investigation, oxy-fuel combustion and post-combustion CO 2 separation were compared on an exergetic basis. Using exergy balances and black-box models of power plant components, multiple scenarios were run to determine the impact of plant configuration and separation unit efficiency on overall plant performance. Second law efficiency values from the literature were used to set the baseline performance of various CO 2 separation configurations. Assumed advances in 2nd law efficiency were used to determine the potential for overall system performance improvement. It was found that the 2nd law efficiency of air separation must reach a critical value before the thermodynamics of oxy-fuel combustion become favorable. Changes in operating equivalence ratio significantly move the tipping-point between post-combustion and oxy-fuel strategies

  2. Interactive wood combustion for botanical tree models

    KAUST Repository

    Pirk, Sören

    2017-11-22

    We present a novel method for the combustion of botanical tree models. Tree models are represented as connected particles for the branching structure and a polygonal surface mesh for the combustion. Each particle stores biological and physical attributes that drive the kinetic behavior of a plant and the exothermic reaction of the combustion. Coupled with realistic physics for rods, the particles enable dynamic branch motions. We model material properties, such as moisture and charring behavior, and associate them with individual particles. The combustion is efficiently processed in the surface domain of the tree model on a polygonal mesh. A user can dynamically interact with the model by initiating fires and by inducing stress on branches. The flames realistically propagate through the tree model by consuming the available resources. Our method runs at interactive rates and supports multiple tree instances in parallel. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach through numerous examples and evaluate its plausibility against the combustion of real wood samples.

  3. Solid waste combustion for alpha waste incineration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orloff, D.I.

    1981-02-01

    Radioactive waste incinerator development at the Savannah River Laboratory has been augmented by fundamental combustion studies at the University of South Carolina. The objective was to measure and model pyrolysis and combustion rates of typical Savannah River Plant waste materials as a function of incinerator operating conditions. The analytical models developed in this work have been incorporated into a waste burning transient code. The code predicts maximum air requirement and heat energy release as a function of waste type, package size, combustion chamber size, and temperature. Historically, relationships have been determined by direct experiments that did not allow an engineering basis for predicting combustion rates in untested incinerators. The computed combustion rates and burning times agree with measured values in the Savannah River Laboratory pilot (1 lb/hr) and full-scale (12 lb/hr) alpha incinerators for a wide variety of typical waste materials

  4. Reduced NOX combustion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delano, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a method for combusting fuel and oxidant to achieve reduced formation of nitrogen oxides. It comprises: It comprises: heating a combustion zone to a temperature at least equal to 1500 degrees F.; injecting into the heated combustion zone a stream of oxidant at a velocity within the range of from 200 to 1070 feet per second; injecting into the combustion zone, spaced from the oxidant stream, a fuel stream at a velocity such that the ratio of oxidant stream velocity to fuel stream velocity does not exceed 20; aspirating combustion gases into the oxidant stream and thereafter intermixing the aspirated oxidant stream and fuel stream to form a combustible mixture; combusting the combustible mixture to produce combustion gases for the aspiration; and maintaining the fuel stream substantially free from contact with oxidant prior to the intermixture with aspirated oxidant

  5. Analysis of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} trapped {sup 14}C Sorbent, and {sup 14}C and {sup 3}H Radioactivity Determination in Resins and Oils from Nuclear Power Plants Using a Combustion Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Young Gun; Kim, Chang Jong; Choi, Geun Sik; Chung, Kun Ho; Kang, Mun Ja [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Tritium ({sup 3}H, T) generated in the heavy water and C fourteen ({sup 14}C) originated from the graphite moderator or structural materials of the nuclear power plant can cause acute and/or chronic harmful effects by inhalation and ingestion of these radionuclides owing to their binding affinity toward biomolecules and gas phase. {sup 3}H and {sup 14}C radioactivity in ion exchange resins and oils from nuclear power plants were determined by an oxidation (combustion) method. The 0.1 M HNO{sub 3} solution and the {sup 14}C sorbent trapped the {sub 3}H and {sup 14}C respectively in the gas from the combustion of samples. All samples were burned without ash in the combustion system. The reaction of CO{sub 2} and {sup 14}C sorbent was investigated by FT-IR analysis. The study demonstrated the different reaction mechanism according to the CO{sub 2} concentration. In the FT-IR study, it is clearly confirmed that CO{sub 2} from the burned 1 g of sample can be trapped in the {sup 14}C sorbent completely. During the reaction of CO{sub 2} and {sup 14}C sorbent, the temperature and the viscosity of {sup 14}C sorbent increased due to the decrease of enthalpy change and the bonding between each molecules of the sorbent. We expect that our FT-IR study could motivate the development of {sup 14}C sorbent and confirm the {sup 14}C trapping performance of the {sup 14}C sorbent.

  6. Practical consequences of the Water Framework Directive implementation for combustion plants. New water cleaning technologies and methods for improvement of effluent discharges; Praktiska konsekvenser foer foerbraenningsanlaeggningar vid infoerandet av Vattendirektivet. Nya reningstekniker och foerbaettringsaatgaerder vid utslaepp till vatten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axby, Fredrik; Hansson, Christina [Carl Bro Energikonsult AB, Malmoe (Sweden)

    2004-11-01

    As a consequence of the growing impact on water resources the Water Framework Directive was legislated in 2000. The directive should ensure that a 'good water status' and entail a coordinated legislation striving for a long-term protection of all water resources. Stakeholders should be able to participate in the preparations of river basin management plans and programs of measures. District based water authorities will administrate the implementation and are mandated to decide upon regional environmental quality standards and promulgate fees for water use and discharges. The Directive contains a list of 33 prioritized substances that should be reduced or phased out. Discharges from combustion plants contain twelve, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and heavy metals. PAH and heavy metals impacts growth and vital functions as respiration and photosynthesis of water living organisms and induces cancer in humans. NOEC-values (NO Effect Concentration) state manageable substance concentrations for an organism. Flue gas condensate contains concentrations of some of the substances which impact exceeds the critical state level. Extended sewage treatment could thus be needed. Sludge, wash and soot water contains elevated levels of heavy metals. This water is normally treated by municipal sewage treatment. Further treatment at plant site could be relevant. Presence of PAH and heavy metals in leach water depends on the precipitation. Additional flowing-independent water treatment could be relevant. It is very uncertain how plant owners will be affected. Licenses could be reviewed and standards could be raised for sensitive recipients; new limits for prioritized substances and standards for other types of discharges and water fees could be added. Respites could be given if costs exceed the benefits. Location, ecotoxicological risk assessments and precautionary measures could become more relevant in an EIA. Pricing of water could take place by using a system of emissions

  7. Strong Stationary Duality for Diffusion Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Fill, James Allen; Lyzinski, Vince

    2014-01-01

    We develop the theory of strong stationary duality for diffusion processes on compact intervals. We analytically derive the generator and boundary behavior of the dual process and recover a central tenet of the classical Markov chain theory in the diffusion setting by linking the separation distance in the primal diffusion to the absorption time in the dual diffusion. We also exhibit our strong stationary dual as the natural limiting process of the strong stationary dual sequence of a well ch...

  8. Development of a ceramic heat exchanger for a combined cycle plant with pressurized coal dust combustion. Final report; Entwicklung eines keramischen Waermeaustauschers fuer eine Kombianlage mit Kohlenstaubdruckfeuerung. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leithner, R.; Ehlers, C.

    2001-12-01

    State of Research: The Pressurized Pulverized Coal Combustion Combined Cycle (PPCCCC) with a directly fired gas turbine can reach electrical efficiencies beyond 50%. The required gas quality upstream the gas turbine has not been reached yet at temperatures above 1000 C. One approach tested is the precipitation of ash and alkalines at temperatures above the ash melting point. This principle contains problems concerning the remaining content of ash and alkalines in the flue gas and damages to the refractory materials due to corrosion. Goal of the Investigation: An alternative process had to be investigated in which the flue gas is cleaned according to the state of the art, i.e. below the ash fusion temperature. This principle requires cooling down the flue gas and heating it up again after cleaning in a high temperature heat exchanger. Method: A ceramic tube-and-shell heat exchanger in a model scale was designed and was operated at realistic conditions in an atmospheric test plant in connection with a high temperture precipitation. Result: The heat exchanger showed a good performance concerning design and material. The expected temperatures were not reached totally because of untight joints. Clogging occurred in the tube entrances at high temperatures because of sintered ash agglomerates. First tests to clean the entrances during operation showed positive results. The ash precipitation by means of a cyclone and ceramic filter candles was performed without difficulties. Conclusion: Avoiding and improving joints will help to achieve higher temperatures. A process of cleaning the tubes in-line has to be introduced to prevent the clogging effects. If this is successfully done for high temperatures, an attractive principle for a PPCCCC-process is available which reaches the gas purity required. (orig.) [German] Derzeitiger Stand der Forschung: Der Kohlenstaubdruckfeuerungs-Kombiprozess mit direkt befeuerter Gasturbine verspricht elektrische Wirkungsgrade ueber 50%. Die

  9. Annual Report: Advanced Combustion (30 September 2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawk, Jeffrey [NETL; Richards, George

    2012-09-30

    The Advanced Combustion Project addresses fundamental issues of fire-side and steam-side corrosion and materials performance in oxy-fuel combustion environments and provides an integrated approach into understanding the environmental and mechanical behavior such that environmental degradation can be ameliorated and long-term microstructural stability, and thus, mechanical performance can lead to longer lasting components and extended power plant life. The technical tasks of this effort are Oxy-combustion Environment Characterization, Alloy Modeling and Life Prediction, and Alloy Manufacturing and Process Development.

  10. Condensational theory of stationary tornadoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarieva, A.M.; Gorshkov, V.G.; Nefiodov, A.V.

    2011-01-01

    Using the Bernoulli integral for air streamline with condensing water vapor a stationary axisymmetric tornado circulation is described. The obtained profiles of vertical, radial and tangential velocities are in agreement with observations for the Mulhall tornado, world's largest on record and longest-lived among the three tornadoes for which 3D velocity data are available. Maximum possible vortex velocities are estimated. -- Highlights: → Water vapor condensation causes a logarithmic drop of air pressure towards tornado center. → The first ever theoretical description of tornado velocities is obtained. → The maximum vortex velocity grows logarithmically with decreasing tornado eye radius. → Air motion with high velocities can only develop in sufficiently large condensation areas.

  11. Evaluation and Selection of a Multi-Dimensional Code for H{sub 2} Combustion and Explosion Analysis in the Containment of a Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyung Seok; Kim, Sangbaik; Hong, Seongwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Passive Auto-Catalytic Recombiners (PARs) were installed in all NPP containments to reduce hydrogen concentration during a severe accident. However, hydrogen combustion is possible during a severe accident if the hydrogen concentration is higher than about 10% at a local position in the containment. Thus, to assure containment integrity, it is necessary to evaluate an overpressure buildup resulting from a propagation of hydrogen flame along the obstacle and wall in the containment during a severe accident. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) decided to import the computational code for the hydrogen combustion and explosion analysis from a foreign country, to establish a numerical analysis system for considering hydrogen generation in the core, to hydrogen combustion in the containment, as soon as possible. KAERI chose the COM3D as the computational code for hydrogen combustion and explosion analysis by evaluating for its numerical methods, physical models, a solver algorithm, validation and application results, and its ability to connect GASFLOW for calculating hydrogen distribution. In addition, the COM3D is currently used to evaluate the integrity of the EPR containment by predicting the overpressure buildup resulting from the hydrogen flame acceleration with the validated analysis methodology. However, we have to find a way to transfer the GASFLOW results, with a cylindrical grid model, as the initial condition of COM3D with a Cartesian grid model, because the COM3D can automatically import the GASFLOW result only when the Cartesian grid model is used, whereas KAERI has performed the GASFLOW analysis with the cylindrical grid model.

  12. CFD simulation of the combustion process of the low-emission vortex boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, A. A.; Maryandyshev, P. A.; Pankratov, E. V.; Lubov, V. K.

    2017-11-01

    Domestic heat and power engineering needs means and methods for optimizing the existing boiler plants in order to increase their technical, economic and environmental work. The development of modern computer technology, methods of numerical modeling and specialized software greatly facilitates the solution of many emerging problems. CFD simulation allows to obtaine precise results of thermochemical and aerodynamic processes taking place in the furnace of boilers in order to optimize their operation modes and develop directions for their modernization. The paper presents the results of simulation of the combustion process of a low-emission vortex coal boiler of the model E-220/100 using the software package Ansys Fluent. A hexahedral grid with a number of 2 million cells was constructed for the chosen boiler model. A stationary problem with a two-phase flow was solved. The gaseous components are air, combustion products and volatile substances. The solid phase is coal particles at different burnup stages. The Euler-Lagrange approach was taken as a basis. Calculation of the coal particles trajectories was carried out using the Discrete Phase Model which distribution of the size particle of coal dust was accounted for using the Rosin-Rammler equation. Partially Premixed combustion model was used as the combustion model which take into account elemental composition of the fuel and heat analysis. To take turbulence into account, a two-parameter k-ε model with a standard wall function was chosen. Heat transfer by radiation was calculated using the P1-approximation of the method of spherical harmonics. The system of spatial equations was numerically solved by the control volume method using the SIMPLE algorithm of Patankar and Spaulding. Comparison of data obtained during the industrial-operational tests of low-emission vortex boilers with the results of mathematical modeling showed acceptable convergence of the tasks of this level, which confirms the adequacy of the

  13. Impact of co-combustion of petroleum coke and coal on fly ash quality: Case study of a Western Kentucky power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hower, James C.; Thomas, Gerald A.; Mardon, Sarah M.; Trimble, Alan S.

    2005-01-01

    Petroleum coke has been used as a supplement or replacement for coal in pulverized-fuel combustion. At a 444-MW western Kentucky power station, the combustion of nearly 60% petroleum coke with moderate- to high-sulfur Illinois Basin coal produces fly ash with nearly 50% uncombusted petroleum coke and large amounts of V and Ni when compared to fly ash from strictly pulverized coal burns. Partitioning of the V and Ni, known from other studies to be concentrated in petroleum coke, was noted. However, the distribution of V and Ni does not directly correspond to the amount of uncombusted petroleum coke in the fly ash. Vanadium and Ni are preferentially associated with the finer, higher surface area fly ash fractions captured at lower flue gas temperatures. The presence of uncombusted petroleum coke in the fly ash doubles the amount of ash to be disposed, makes the fly ash unmarketable because of the high C content, and would lead to higher than typical (compared to other fly ashes in the region) concentrations of V and Ni in the fly ash even if the petroleum coke C could be beneficiated from the fly ash. Further studies of co-combustion ashes are necessary in order to understand their behavior in disposal

  14. Coal combustion waste management study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    Coal-fired generation accounted for almost 55 percent of the production of electricity in the United States in 1990. Coal combustion generates high volumes of ash and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastes, estimated at almost 90 million tons. The amount of ash and flue gas desulfurization wastes generated by coal-fired power plants is expected to increase as a result of future demand growth, and as more plants comply with Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Nationwide, on average, over 30 percent of coal combustion wastes is currently recycled for use in various applications; the remaining percentage is ultimately disposed in waste management units. There are a significant number of on-site and off-site waste management units that are utilized by the electric utility industry to store or dispose of coal combustion waste. Table ES-1 summarizes the number of disposal units and estimates of waste contained at these unites by disposal unit operating status (i.e, operating or retired). Further, ICF Resources estimates that up to 120 new or replacement units may need to be constructed to service existing and new coal capacity by the year 2000. The two primary types of waste management units used by the industry are landfills and surface impoundments. Utility wastes have been exempted by Congress from RCRA Subtitle C hazardous waste regulation since 1980. As a result of this exemption, coal combustion wastes are currently being regulated under Subtitle D of RCRA. As provided under Subtitle D, wastes not classified as hazardous under Subtitle C are subject to State regulation. At the same time Congress developed this exemption, also known as the ''Bevill Exclusion,'' it directed EPA to prepare a report on coal combustion wastes and make recommendations on how they should be managed

  15. Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — For more than 30 years The Combustion Research Facility (CRF) has served as a national and international leader in combustion science and technology. The need for a...

  16. Alcohol combustion chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Sarathy, Mani; Oß wald, Patrick; Hansen, Nils; Kohse-Hö inghaus, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    . While biofuel production and its use (especially ethanol and biodiesel) in internal combustion engines have been the focus of several recent reviews, a dedicated overview and summary of research on alcohol combustion chemistry is still lacking. Besides

  17. Maximal combustion temperature estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golodova, E; Shchepakina, E

    2006-01-01

    This work is concerned with the phenomenon of delayed loss of stability and the estimation of the maximal temperature of safe combustion. Using the qualitative theory of singular perturbations and canard techniques we determine the maximal temperature on the trajectories located in the transition region between the slow combustion regime and the explosive one. This approach is used to estimate the maximal temperature of safe combustion in multi-phase combustion models

  18. Stationary and non-stationary occurrences of miniature end plate potentials are well described as stationary and non-stationary Poisson processes in the mollusc Navanax inermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappell, M S; Spray, D C; Bennett, M V

    1988-06-28

    Protractor muscles in the gastropod mollusc Navanax inermis exhibit typical spontaneous miniature end plate potentials with mean amplitude 1.71 +/- 1.19 (standard deviation) mV. The evoked end plate potential is quantized, with a quantum equal to the miniature end plate potential amplitude. When their rate is stationary, occurrence of miniature end plate potentials is a random, Poisson process. When non-stationary, spontaneous miniature end plate potential occurrence is a non-stationary Poisson process, a Poisson process with the mean frequency changing with time. This extends the random Poisson model for miniature end plate potentials to the frequently observed non-stationary occurrence. Reported deviations from a Poisson process can sometimes be accounted for by the non-stationary Poisson process and more complex models, such as clustered release, are not always needed.

  19. Stationary power fuel cell commercialization status worldwide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, M.C. [Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Fuel cell technologies for stationary power are set to play a role in power generation applications worldwide. The worldwide fuel cell vision is to provide powerplants for the emerging distributed generation and on-site markets. Progress towards commercialization has occurred in all fuel cell development areas. Around 100 ONSI phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) units have been sold, with significant foreign sales in Europe and Japan. Fuji has apparently overcome its PAFC decay problems. Industry-driven molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) programs in Japan and the U.S. are conducting megawatt (MW)-class demonstrations, which are bringing the MCFC to the verge of commercialization. Westinghouse Electric, the acknowledged world leader in tubular solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology, continues to set performance records and has completed construction of a 4-MW/year manufacturing facility in the U.S. Fuel cells have also taken a major step forward with the conceptual development of ultra-high efficiency fuel cell/gas turbine plants. Many SOFC developers in Japan, Europe, and North America continue to make significant advances.

  20. Experimental study of improvement on combustion control of fluidized bed combustion chamber; Ryudosho shokyakuro no nenshosei no kaizen ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izumiya, T.; Baba, K.; Koshida, H.; Uetani, J.; Furuta, M.

    1998-10-29

    Nippon Steel Corporation has carried out an experimental study using the Yawata waste incinerator plant in order to improve combustion control of a fluidized bed combustion chamber. For controlling the forming of dioxin, combustion control is very important in addition to conventional methods. In this paper, we report two studies about improvements on combustion control. In the first study, we verified improvement on combustion control by modifying gas flow at the freeboard. The operational results of the experiments were studied using the numerical model of the combustion chamber. The modification of gas flow at freeboard was confirmed to be effective to obtain a compact design of fluidized bed combustion chamber for municipal waste. In the second, study we improved combustion control for sewage combustion with municipal waste. In burning municipal waste and sewage, it is especially required to take combustion control into careful consideration. In this experiment, we developed a new device for supplying sewage for the appropriate controlling combustion, and verified its effectiveness to combustion control and an effective reduction of dioxin. (author)

  1. Uncertainties in hydrogen combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamps, D.W.; Wong, C.C.; Nelson, L.S.

    1988-01-01

    Three important areas of hydrogen combustion with uncertainties are identified: high-temperature combustion, flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition, and aerosol resuspension during hydrogen combustion. The uncertainties associated with high-temperature combustion may affect at least three different accident scenarios: the in-cavity oxidation of combustible gases produced by core-concrete interactions, the direct containment heating hydrogen problem, and the possibility of local detonations. How these uncertainties may affect the sequence of various accident scenarios is discussed and recommendations are made to reduce these uncertainties. 40 references

  2. Stationary black holes as holographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racz, Istvan [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-01 (Japan); MTA KFKI, Reszecske- es Magfizikai Kutatointezet, H-1121 Budapest, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33 (Hungary)

    2007-11-21

    Smooth spacetimes possessing a (global) one-parameter group of isometries and an associated Killing horizon in Einstein's theory of gravity are investigated. No assumption concerning the asymptotic structure is made; thereby, the selected spacetimes may be considered as generic distorted stationary black holes. First, spacetimes of arbitrary dimension, n {>=} 3, with matter satisfying the dominant energy condition and allowing a non-zero cosmological constant are investigated. In this part, complete characterization of the topology of the event horizon of 'distorted' black holes is given. It is shown that the topology of the event horizon of 'distorted' black holes is allowed to possess a much larger variety than that of the isolated black hole configurations. In the second part, four-dimensional (non-degenerate) electrovac distorted black hole spacetimes are considered. It is shown that the spacetime geometry and the electromagnetic field are uniquely determined in the black hole region once the geometry of the bifurcation surface and one of the electromagnetic potentials are specified there. Conditions guaranteeing the same type of determinacy, in a neighbourhood of the event horizon, on the domain of outer communication side are also investigated. In particular, they are shown to be satisfied in the analytic case.

  3. Radiation treatment of combustion gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machi, S.; Tokunaga, O.; Nishimura, K.; Hasimoto, S.; Kawakami, W.; Washino, M.; Kawamura, K.; Aoki, S.; Adachi, K.

    1977-01-01

    A pilot plant for the radiation treatment of combustion gas in a flow-system was planned and completed in 1974 at the Abara Mfg. Co. Ltd., Central Laboratory in Fujisawa. The plant has been successfully operated for more than one year. The capacity of the pilot plant is 1000 Nm 3 per hour of the gas with the use of an electron accelerator of 60 mA and 0.75 MeV. The objective of this paper is to review a series of the researches including recent unpublished results, and to discuss the characteristics of the process. The outline and typical results of the pilot plant are first reported here. (author)

  4. Neural networks prediction and fault diagnosis applied to stationary and non stationary ARMA (Autoregressive moving average) modeled time series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marseguerra, M.; Minoggio, S.; Rossi, A.; Zio, E.

    1992-01-01

    The correlated noise affecting many industrial plants under stationary or cyclo-stationary conditions - nuclear reactors included -has been successfully modeled by autoregressive moving average (ARMA) due to the versatility of this technique. The relatively recent neural network methods have similar features and much effort is being devoted to exploring their usefulness in forecasting and control. Identifying a signal by means of an ARMA model gives rise to the problem of selecting its correct order. Similar difficulties must be faced when applying neural network methods and, specifically, particular care must be given to the setting up of the appropriate network topology, the data normalization procedure and the learning code. In the present paper the capability of some neural networks of learning ARMA and seasonal ARMA processes is investigated. The results of the tested cases look promising since they indicate that the neural networks learn the underlying process with relative ease so that their forecasting capability may represent a convenient fault diagnosis tool. (Author)

  5. Management of coal combustion wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-02-01

    It has been estimated that 780 Mt of coal combustion products (CCPs) were produced worldwide in 2010. Only about 53.5% were utilised, the rest went to storage or disposal sites. Disposal of coal combustion waste (CCW) on-site at a power plant may involve decades-long accumulation of waste, with hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of tonnes of dry ash or wet ash slurry being stored. In December 2008, a coal combustion waste pond in Kingston, Tennessee, USA burst. Over 4 million cubic metres of ash sludge poured out, burying houses and rivers in tonnes of toxic waste. Clean-up is expected to continue into 2014 and will cost $1.2 billion. The incident drew worldwide attention to the risk of CCW disposal. This caused a number of countries to review CCW management methods and regulations. The report begins by outlining the physical and chemical characteristics of the different type of ashes generated in a coal-fired power plant. The amounts of CCPs produced and regulations on CCW management in selected countries have been compiled. The CCW disposal methods are then discussed. Finally, the potential environmental impacts and human health risks of CCW disposal, together with the methods used to prevent them, are reviewed.

  6. New class of combustion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merzhanov, A.G.; Borovinskaya, I.P.

    1975-01-01

    A short review is given of the results of work carried out since 1967 on studying the combustion processes caused by the interaction of chemical elements in the condensed phase and leading to the formation of refractory compounds. New phenomena and processes are described which are revealed when investigating the combustion of the systems of this class, viz solid-phase combustion, fast combustion in the condensed phase, filtering combustion, combustion in liquid nitrogen, spinning combustion, self-oscillating combustion, and repeated combustion. A new direction in employment of combustion processes is discussed, viz. a self-propagating high-temperature synthesis of refractory nitrides, carbides, borides, silicides and other compounds

  7. SPECIFIC EMISSIONS FROM BIOMASS COMBUSTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Skopec

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with determining the specific emissions from the combustion of two kinds of biomass fuels in a small-scale boiler. The tested fuels were pellets made of wood and pellets made of rape plant straw. In order to evaluate the specific emissions, several combustion experiments were carried out using a commercial 25 kW pellet-fired boiler. The specific emissions of CO, SO2 and NOx were evaluated in relation to a unit of burned fuel, a unit of calorific value and a unit of produced heat. The specific emissions were compared with some data acquired from the reference literature, with relatively different results. The differences depend mainly on the procedure used for determining the values, and references provide no information about this. Although some of our experimental results may fit with one of the reference sources, they do not fit with the other. The reliability of the references is therefore disputable.

  8. Techno-economic study of CO{sub 2} capture from an existing coal-fired power plant: MEA scrubbing vs. O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} recycle combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, D; Croiset, E; Douglas, P L [Waterloo Univ., Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Douglas, M A [Natural Resources Canada, CANMET Energy Technology Centre, Nepean, ON (Canada)

    2003-11-01

    The existing fleet of modern pulverised coal fired power plants represents an opportunity to achieve significant reductions in greenhouse gas emissions in the coming years providing that efficient and economical CO{sub 2} capture technologies are available for retrofit. One option is to separate CO{sub 2} from the products of combustion using conventional approaches such as amine scrubbing. An emerging alternative, commonly known as O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} recycle combustion, involves burning the coal with oxygen in an atmosphere of recycled flue gas. Both approaches can be retrofitted to existing units, however they consume significant amounts of energy to capture, purify and compress the CO{sub 2} for subsequent sequestration. This paper presents a techno-economic comparison of the performance of the two approaches. The comparison was developed using the commercial process simulation packages, Hysys and Aspen Plus. The results show that both processes are expensive options to capture CO{sub 2} from coal power plants, however O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} appears to be a more attractive retrofit than MEA scrubbing. The CO{sub 2} capture cost for the MEA case is USD 53/ton of CO{sub 2} avoided, which translates into 3.3 cent/kW h. For the O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} case the CO{sub 2} capture cost is lower at USD 35/ton of CO{sub 2} avoided, which translates into 2.4 cent/kW h. These capture costs represent an approximate increase of 20-30% in current electricity prices. (Author)

  9. Combustion modeling in internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental assumptions of the Blizard and Keck combustion model for internal combustion engines are examined and a generalization of that model is derived. The most significant feature of the model is that it permits the occurrence of unburned hydrocarbons in the thermodynamic-kinetic modeling of exhaust gases. The general formulas are evaluated in two specific cases that are likely to be significant in the applications of the model.

  10. Internal combustion engine report: Spark ignited ICE GenSet optimization and novel concept development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, J.; Blarigan, P. Van [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    In this manuscript the authors report on two projects each of which the goal is to produce cost effective hydrogen utilization technologies. These projects are: (1) the development of an electrical generation system using a conventional four-stroke spark-ignited internal combustion engine generator combination (SI-GenSet) optimized for maximum efficiency and minimum emissions, and (2) the development of a novel internal combustion engine concept. The SI-GenSet will be optimized to run on either hydrogen or hydrogen-blends. The novel concept seeks to develop an engine that optimizes the Otto cycle in a free piston configuration while minimizing all emissions. To this end the authors are developing a rapid combustion homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine using a linear alternator for both power take-off and engine control. Targeted applications include stationary electrical power generation, stationary shaft power generation, hybrid vehicles, and nearly any other application now being accomplished with internal combustion engines.

  11. Boiler using combustible fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, H.; Meier, J.G.

    1974-07-03

    A fluid fuel boiler is described comprising a combustion chamber, a cover on the combustion chamber having an opening for introducing a combustion-supporting gaseous fluid through said openings, means to impart rotation to the gaseous fluid about an axis of the combustion chamber, a burner for introducing a fluid fuel into the chamber mixed with the gaseous fluid for combustion thereof, the cover having a generally frustro-conical configuration diverging from the opening toward the interior of the chamber at an angle of between 15/sup 0/ and 55/sup 0/; means defining said combustion chamber having means defining a plurality of axial hot gas flow paths from a downstream portion of the combustion chamber to flow hot gases into an upstream portion of the combustion chamber, and means for diverting some of the hot gas flow along paths in a direction circumferentially of the combustion chamber, with the latter paths being immersed in the water flow path thereby to improve heat transfer and terminating in a gas outlet, the combustion chamber comprising at least one modular element, joined axially to the frustro-conical cover and coaxial therewith. The modular element comprises an inner ring and means of defining the circumferential, radial, and spiral flow paths of the hot gases.

  12. Catalytic combustion in small wood burning appliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oravainen, H. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    There is over a million hand fired small heating appliances in Finland where about 5,4 million cubic meters of wood fuel is used. Combustion in such heating appliances is a batch-type process. In early stages of combustion when volatiles are burned, the formation of carbon monoxide (CO) and other combustible gases are difficult to avoid when using fuels that have high volatile matter content. Harmful emissions are formed mostly after each fuel adding but also during char burnout period. When the CO-content in flue gases is, say over 0.5 %, also other harmful emissions will be formed. Methane (CH{sub 4}) and other hydrocarbons are released and the amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)-compounds can be remarkable. Some PAH-compounds are very carcinogenic. It has been estimated that in Finland even more than 90 % of hydrocarbon and PAH emissions are due to small scale wood combustion. Emissions from transportation is excluded from these figures. That is why wood combustion has a net effect on greenhouse gas phenomena. For example carbon monoxide emissions from small scale wood combustion are two fold compared to that of energy production in power plants. Methane emission is of the same order as emission from transportation and seven fold compared with those of energy production. Emissions from small heating appliances can be reduced by developing the combustion techniques, but also by using other means, for example catalytic converters. In certain stages of the batch combustion, temperature is not high enough, gas mixing is not good enough and residence time is too short for complete combustion. When placed to a suitable place inside a heating appliance, a catalytic converter can oxidize unburned gases in the flue gas into compounds that are not harmful to the environment. (3 refs.)

  13. Catalytic combustion in small wood burning appliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oravainen, H [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    There is over a million hand fired small heating appliances in Finland where about 5,4 million cubic meters of wood fuel is used. Combustion in such heating appliances is a batch-type process. In early stages of combustion when volatiles are burned, the formation of carbon monoxide (CO) and other combustible gases are difficult to avoid when using fuels that have high volatile matter content. Harmful emissions are formed mostly after each fuel adding but also during char burnout period. When the CO-content in flue gases is, say over 0.5 %, also other harmful emissions will be formed. Methane (CH{sub 4}) and other hydrocarbons are released and the amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)-compounds can be remarkable. Some PAH-compounds are very carcinogenic. It has been estimated that in Finland even more than 90 % of hydrocarbon and PAH emissions are due to small scale wood combustion. Emissions from transportation is excluded from these figures. That is why wood combustion has a net effect on greenhouse gas phenomena. For example carbon monoxide emissions from small scale wood combustion are two fold compared to that of energy production in power plants. Methane emission is of the same order as emission from transportation and seven fold compared with those of energy production. Emissions from small heating appliances can be reduced by developing the combustion techniques, but also by using other means, for example catalytic converters. In certain stages of the batch combustion, temperature is not high enough, gas mixing is not good enough and residence time is too short for complete combustion. When placed to a suitable place inside a heating appliance, a catalytic converter can oxidize unburned gases in the flue gas into compounds that are not harmful to the environment. (3 refs.)

  14. Analysis and control of harmful emissions from combustion processes

    OpenAIRE

    Jafari, Ahmad

    2000-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. The harmful effects of air pollutants on human beings and environment have been the major reason for efforts in sampling, analysis and control of their sources. The major pollutants emitted to atmosphere from stationary combustion processes are nitrogen oxides, inorganic acids, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon and soot. In the current work two methods are developed for sampl...

  15. Catalytically stabilized combustion of lean methane-air-mixtures: a numerical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dogwiler, U; Benz, P; Mantharas, I [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The catalytically stabilized combustion of lean methane/air mixtures has been studied numerically under conditions closely resembling the ones prevailing in technical devices. A detailed numerical model has been developed for a laminar, stationary, 2-D channel flow with full heterogeneous and homogeneous reaction mechanisms. The computations provide direct information on the coupling between heterogeneous-homogeneous combustion and in particular on the means of homogeneous ignitions and stabilization. (author) 4 figs., 3 refs.

  16. Lump wood combustion process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubesa, Petr; Horák, Jiří; Branc, Michal; Krpec, Kamil; Hopan, František; Koloničný, Jan; Ochodek, Tadeáš; Drastichová, Vendula; Martiník, Lubomír; Malcho, Milan

    2014-08-01

    The article deals with the combustion process for lump wood in low-power fireplaces (units to dozens of kW). Such a combustion process is cyclical in its nature, and what combustion facility users are most interested in is the frequency, at which fuel needs to be stoked to the fireplace. The paper defines the basic terms such as burnout curve and burning rate curve, which are closely related to the stocking frequency. The fuel burning rate is directly dependent on the immediate thermal power of the fireplace. This is also related to the temperature achieved in the fireplace, magnitude of flue gas losses and the ability to generate conditions favouring the full burnout of the fuel's combustible component, which, at once ensures the minimum production of combustible pollutants. Another part of the paper describes experiments conducted in traditional fireplaces with a grate, at which well-dried lump wood was combusted.

  17. Environmental optimisation of waste combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, Robert [AaF Energikonsult, Stockholm (Sweden); Berge, Niclas; Stroemberg, Birgitta [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2000-12-01

    substances as methane produces however a good opportunity to supervise and detect good combustion. One conclusion concerning stand-by burners is that a well-designed burner installation in a waste combustion unit gives excellent possibilities to achieve good combustion. Stand by burners in general will however give no guarantee for this. Another conclusion is that the leakage of cooling air from the inactive burners represents a potential hydrocarbon emission risk. If and to what extent is dependent on the local conditions. A third conclusion is that it is possible to achieve low emission combustion without stand by burners, if the plant is operated correctly. The recommendation is that: - O{sub 2}, residence time and temperature demands of the furnace is removed and replaced by other low emission criteria. - All units should have either a low emission of CO or a continuos measurement of methane or total hydrocarbon (THC). - The measurement of CO and/or THC should be correlated individually and periodically against a heavy hydrocarbon measurement method (i.e., PAH etc.). - The measurement device must have a short response time in order to detect rapid peaks of unburnt species. The most important task to achieve good combustion is to create a well controlled mixing in the whole furnace.

  18. Understanding and Modelling the Effect of Dissolved Metals on Solvent Degradation in Post Combustion CO2 Capture Based on Pilot Plant Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjana Dhingra

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative degradation is a serious concern for upscaling of amine-based carbon capture technology. Different kinetic models have been proposed based on laboratory experiments, however the kinetic parameters included are limited to those relevant for a lab-scale system and not a capture plant. Besides, most of the models fail to recognize the catalytic effect of metals. The objective of this work is to develop a representative kinetic model based on an apparent auto-catalytic reaction mechanism between solvent degradation, corrosion and ammonia emissions. Measurements from four different pilot plants: (i EnBW’s plant at Heilbronn, Germany (ii TNO’s plant at Maasvlakte, The Netherlands; (iii CSIRO’s plants at Loy Yang and Tarong, Australia and (iv DONG Energy’s plant at Esbjerg, Denmark are utilized to propose a degradation kinetic model for 30 wt % ethanolamine (MEA as the capture solvent. The kinetic parameters of the model were regressed based on the pilot plant campaign at EnBW. The kinetic model was validated by comparing it with the measurements at the remaining pilot campaigns. The model predicted the trends of ammonia emissions and metal concentration within the same order of magnitude. This study provides a methodology to establish a quantitative approach for predicting the onset of unacceptable degradation levels which can be further used to devise counter-measure strategies such as reclaiming and metal removal.

  19. Dampers for Stationary Labyrinth Seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Aini, Yehia; Mitchell, William; Roberts, Lawrence; Montgomery, Stuart; Davis, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Vibration dampers have been invented that are incorporated as components within the stationary labyrinth seal assembly. These dampers are intended to supplement other vibration-suppressing features of labyrinth seals in order to reduce the incidence of high-cycle-fatigue failures, which have been known to occur in the severe vibratory environments of jet engines and turbopumps in which labyrinth seals are typically used. A vibration damper of this type includes several leaf springs and/or a number of metallic particles (shot) all held in an annular seal cavity by a retaining ring. The leaf springs are made of a spring steel alloy chosen, in conjunction with design parameters, to maintain sufficient preload to ensure effectiveness of damping at desired operating temperatures. The cavity is vented via a small radial gap between the retaining ring and seal housing. The damping mechanism is complex. In the case of leaf springs, the mechanism is mainly friction in the slippage between the seal housing and individual dampers. In the case of a damper that contains shot, the damping mechanism includes contributions from friction between individual particles, friction between particles and cavity walls, and dissipation of kinetic energy of impact. The basic concept of particle/shot vibration dampers has been published previously; what is new here is the use of such dampers to suppress traveling-wave vibrations in labyrinth seals. Damping effectiveness depends on many parameters, including, but not limited to, coefficient of friction, mode shape, and frequency and amplitude of vibrational modes. In tests, preloads of the order of 6 to 15 lb (2.72 to 6.8 kilograms) per spring damper were demonstrated to provide adequate damping levels. Effectiveness of shot damping of vibrations having amplitudes from 20 to 200 times normal terrestrial gravitational acceleration (196 to 1,960 meters per square second) and frequencies up to 12 kHz was demonstrated for shot sizes from 0.032 to

  20. Stationary axisymmetric Einstein--Maxwell field equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catenacci, R.; Diaz Alonso, J.

    1976-01-01

    We show the existence of a formal identity between Einstein's and Ernst's stationary axisymmetric gravitational field equations and the Einstein--Maxwell and the Ernst equations for the electrostatic and magnetostatic axisymmetric cases. Our equations are invariant under very simple internal symmetry groups, and one of them appears to be new. We also obtain a method for associating two stationary axisymmetric vacuum solutions with every electrostatic known

  1. Stationary infinitely divisible processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole E.

    Several recent strands of work has led to the consideration of various types of continuous time stationary and infinitely divisible processes. A review of these types, with some new results, is presented.......Several recent strands of work has led to the consideration of various types of continuous time stationary and infinitely divisible processes. A review of these types, with some new results, is presented....

  2. Trace emissions from gaseous combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seebold, J.G. [Chevron Research and Technology Co., Richmond, CA (United States)

    2000-07-01

    The U.S. Clean Air Act (CAA) was amended in 1990 to include the development of maximum achievable control technology (MACT) emission standards for hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) for certain stationary sources by November 2000. MACT emissions standards would affect process heaters and industrial boilers since combustion processes are a potential source for many air toxins. The author noted that one of the problems with MACT is the lack of a clear solid scientific footing which is needed to develop environmentally responsible regulations. In order to amend some of these deficiencies, a 4-year, $7 million research project on the origin and fate of trace emissions in the external combustion of gaseous hydrocarbons was undertaken in a collaborative effort between government, universities and industry. This collaborative project entitled the Petroleum Environmental Research Forum (PERF) Project 92-19 produced basic information and phenomenological understanding in two important areas, one basic and one applied. The specific objectives of the project were to measure emissions while operating different full-scale burners under various operating conditions and then to analyze the emission data to identify which operating conditions lead to low air toxic emissions. Another objective was to develop new chemical kinetic mechanisms and predictive models for the formation of air toxic species which would explain the origin and fate of these species in process heaters and industrial boilers. It was determined that a flame is a very effective reactor and that trace emissions from a typical gas-fired industry burner are very small. An unexpected finding was that trace emissions are not affected by hydrocarbon gaseous fuel composition, nor by the use of ultra low nitrous oxide burners. 2 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Flameless Combustion Workshop

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gutmark, Ephraim

    2005-01-01

    .... "Flameless Combustion" is characterized by high stability levels with virtually no thermoacoustic instabilities, very low lean stability limits and therefore extremely low NOx production, efficient...

  4. Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL) develops aerospace propulsion technology by performing tests on propulsion components and materials. Altitudes up to 137,000...

  5. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    Ashlines: To promote and support the commercially viable and environmentally sound recycling of coal combustion byproducts for productive uses through scientific research, development, and field testing.

  6. Combustion Stratification for Naphtha from CI Combustion to PPC

    KAUST Repository

    Vallinayagam, R.; Vedharaj, S.; An, Yanzhao; Dawood, Alaaeldin; Izadi Najafabadi, Mohammad; Somers, Bart; Johansson, Bengt

    2017-01-01

    This study demonstrates the combustion stratification from conventional compression ignition (CI) combustion to partially premixed combustion (PPC). Experiments are performed in an optical CI engine at a speed of 1200 rpm for diesel and naphtha (RON

  7. Oxy combustion with CO{sub 2} capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-01-15

    An update for oxyfuel-combustion carbon capture in the power industry is provided. The report was developed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) on behalf of the Global CCS Institute. In the oxyfuel-combustion processes, the bulk nitrogen is removed from the air before combustion. The resulting combustion products will have CO2 content up to about 90 per cent (dry basis). The flue gas impurities (predominantly O2, N2, and Ar) may be removed by reducing the flue gas (at moderate pressure) to a temperature at which the CO2 condenses and the impurities do not. Oxyfuel-combustion may be employed with solid fuels such as coal, petroleum coke, and biomass, as well as liquid and gaseous fuels. Some key points raised in the oxyfuel-combustion carbon capture report are: The oxyfuel-combustion/CO2 capture power plant designs being developed and deployed for service in the next four or five years are based on individual component technologies and arrangements which have demonstrated sufficient maturity, with the greatest remaining technical challenge being integrating the systems into a complete steam-electric power plant; By its nature, an oxyfuel-coal power plant is likely to be a 'near zero' emitter of all criteria pollutants; Existing air-fired power plants might be retrofitted with an air separation unit, oxyfuel-fired burners, flue gas recycle, and a CO2 processing unit, with the large fleet of air-fired power plants in service calling for more study of this option; and, Future efficiency improvements to the oxyfuel-combustion process for power generation point toward an oxyfuel-combustion plant with near zero emissions of conventional pollutants, up to 98 per cent CO2 capture, and efficiency comparable to the best power plants currently being built.

  8. Study on Combustion Characteristics and Propelling Projectile Motion Process of Bulk-Loaded Liquid Propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xiaochun; Yu, Yonggang; Mang, Shanshan

    2017-07-01

    Data are presented showing that the problem of gas-liquid interaction instability is an important subject in the combustion and the propellant projectile motion process of a bulk-loaded liquid propellant gun (BLPG). The instabilities themselves arise from the sources, including fluid motion, to form a combustion gas cavity called Taylor cavity, fluid turbulence and breakup caused by liquid motion relative to the combustion chamber walls, and liquid surface breakup arising from a velocity mismatch on the gas-liquid interface. Typically, small disturbances that arise early in the BLPG combustion interior ballistic cycle can become amplified in the absence of burn rate limiting characteristics. Herein, significant attention has been given to developing and emphasizing the need for better combustion repeatability in the BLPG. Based on this goal, the concept of using different geometries of the combustion chamber is introduced and the concept of using a stepped-wall structure on the combustion chamber itself as a useful means of exerting boundary control on the combustion evolution to thus restrain the combustion instability has been verified experimentally in this work. Moreover, based on this background, the numerical simulation is devoted to a special combustion issue under transient high-pressure and high-temperature conditions, namely, studying the combustion mechanism in a stepped-wall combustion chamber with full monopropellant on one end that is stationary and the other end can move at high speed. The numerical results also show that the burning surface of the liquid propellant can be defined geometrically and combustion is well behaved as ignition and combustion progressivity are in a suitable range during each stage in this combustion chamber with a stepped-wall structure.

  9. Steam-moderated oxy-fuel combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seepana, Sivaji; Jayanti, Sreenivas

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present paper is to propose a new variant of the oxy-fuel combustion for carbondioxide (CO 2 ) sequestration in which steam is used to moderate the flame temperature. In this process, pure oxygen is mixed with steam and the resulting oxidant mixture is sent to the boiler for combustion with a fossil fuel. The advantage of this method is that flue gas recirculation is avoided and the volumetric flow rates through the boiler and auxiliary components is reduced by about 39% when compared to the conventional air-fired coal combustion power plant leading to a reduction in the size of the boiler. The flue gas, after condensation of steam, consists primarily of CO 2 and can be sent directly for compression and sequestration. Flame structure analysis has been carried out using a 325-step reaction mechanism of methane-oxidant combustion to determine the concentration of oxygen required to ensure a stable flame. Thermodynamic exergy analysis has also been carried out on SMOC-operated CO 2 sequestration power plant and air-fired power plant, which shows that though the gross efficiency increases the absolute power penalty of ∼8% for CO 2 sequestration when compared to air-fired power plant.

  10. Steam-moderated oxy-fuel combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seepana, Sivaji; Jayanti, Sreenivas [Department of Chemical Engineering, IIT Madras, Adyar, Chennai 600 036 (India)

    2010-10-15

    The objective of the present paper is to propose a new variant of the oxy-fuel combustion for carbondioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in which steam is used to moderate the flame temperature. In this process, pure oxygen is mixed with steam and the resulting oxidant mixture is sent to the boiler for combustion with a fossil fuel. The advantage of this method is that flue gas recirculation is avoided and the volumetric flow rates through the boiler and auxiliary components is reduced by about 39% when compared to the conventional air-fired coal combustion power plant leading to a reduction in the size of the boiler. The flue gas, after condensation of steam, consists primarily of CO{sub 2} and can be sent directly for compression and sequestration. Flame structure analysis has been carried out using a 325-step reaction mechanism of methane-oxidant combustion to determine the concentration of oxygen required to ensure a stable flame. Thermodynamic exergy analysis has also been carried out on SMOC-operated CO{sub 2} sequestration power plant and air-fired power plant, which shows that though the gross efficiency increases the absolute power penalty of {proportional_to}8% for CO{sub 2} sequestration when compared to air-fired power plant. (author)

  11. Oxy-fuel combustion of pulverized fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen; Yan, Jinyue

    2016-01-01

    Oxy-fuel combustion of pulverized fuels (PF), as a promising technology for CO2 capture from power plants, has gained a lot of concerns and also advanced considerable research, development and demonstration in the last past years worldwide. The use of CO2 or the mixture of CO2 and H2O vapor as th...

  12. Acid digestion of combustible waste. Status report 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, C.; Cowan, R.; Divine, J.

    1978-10-01

    The Radioactive Acid Digestion Test Unit (RADTU) has been constructed at Hanford to process combustible transuranic waste. Laboratory testing, pilot plant testing, engineering studies, and safety studies have been completed and incorporated in the system design. 44 figures, 7 tables

  13. Elemental analysis of combustion products by neutron activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heft, R.E.; Koszykowski, R.F.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives a brief description of the neutron activation analysis method, which is being used to determine the elemental profile of combustion products from coal-fired power plants, oil shale retorting, and underground coal gasification

  14. Large Pilot Scale Testing of Linde/BASF Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Technology at the Abbott Coal-Fired Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Kevin C. [University of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2017-08-18

    The work summarized in this report is the first step towards a project that will re-train and create jobs for personnel in the coal industry and continue regional economic development to benefit regions impacted by previous downturns. The larger project is aimed at capturing ~300 tons/day (272 metric tonnes/day) CO2 at a 90% capture rate from existing coal- fired boilers at the Abbott Power Plant on the campus of University of Illinois (UI). It will employ the Linde-BASF novel amine-based advanced CO2 capture technology, which has already shown the potential to be cost-effective, energy efficient and compact at the 0.5-1.5 MWe pilot scales. The overall objective of the project is to design and install a scaled-up system of nominal 15 MWe size, integrate it with the Abbott Power Plant flue gas, steam and other utility systems, and demonstrate the viability of continuous operation under realistic conditions with high efficiency and capacity. The project will also begin to build a workforce that understands how to operate and maintain the capture plants by including students from regional community colleges and universities in the operation and evaluation of the capture system. This project will also lay the groundwork for follow-on projects that pilot utilization of the captured CO2 from coal-fired power plants. The net impact will be to demonstrate a replicable means to (1) use a standardized procedure to evaluate power plants for their ability to be retrofitted with a pilot capture unit; (2) design and construct reliable capture systems based on the Linde-BASF technology; (3) operate and maintain these systems; (4) implement training programs with local community colleges and universities to establish a workforce to operate and maintain the systems; and (5) prepare to evaluate at the large pilot scale level various methods to utilize the resulting captured CO2. Towards the larger project goal, the UI-led team, together

  15. Reduction of SO{sub 2} Emissions in Coal Power Plants by means of Spray-Drying RESOX Research Project; Acondicionamiento de Gases de Combustion para la Reduccion de Emisiones de Particulas en Centrales Termicas de Carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    In this experimental study, two important matters concerning the spray-drying technology for the desulphurisation of combustion gases, from pulverized coal boilers, have been analyzed: (1) the behaviour of the spray-dryer absorber under different operating conditions and (2) the behaviour of an electrostatic precipitator that operates downstream form a spray-dryer. The results of this project are of great interest for evaluating the application of this semi-dry desulphurisation technology in existing power plants that already have electrostatic precipitators. Additionally, the conclusions drawn are useful for establishing the optimum design and operating conditions for an integrated SD-ESP flue gas treatment facility. More than 45 experimental tests have been conducted on a 10,000 Nm``3/h spray-drying desulphurisation pilot plant. The effects of SO{sub 2} and fly ash concentration, Ca/S ratio, approach to saturation temperature, density of the slurry and unit load changes on both spray dryer behaviour and treated flue gas properties have been analyzed. In two additional specific tests, the effect of injecting calcium chloride and of preparing the slurry with seawater has also been studied. The impact of spray-dryer desulphurization on the behaviour of the electrostatic precipitators ha been evaluated comparing experimental data (efficiency, emission level, electrical consumption) for the behaviour of the electrostatic precipitator, obtained in two different experimental conditions: with and without desulphurization. Additionally, the possibility of reducing the power consumption of the precipitator by means of intermittent energization has been analyzed. (Author)

  16. Co-combustion of wood biomass in coal power plants, a contribution to energy turnaround and climate protection?; Die Mitverbrennung holzartiger Biomasse in Kohlekraftwerken. Ein Beitrag zur Energiewende und zum Klimaschutz?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, Claudia; Herr, Michael; Edel, Matthias; Seidl, Hannes

    2011-08-15

    Co-combustion of wood biomass in coal power plants is feasible at short notice and can is a low-cost option for climate protection. While other EU states have already provided funding mechanism, Germany has not followed this lead so far. Domestic wood resources are limited and unevenly distributed among the German regions, so that wood materials will have to be imported. During the past few years, the basic requirements for imports of wood were provided with the initiation of a global pellets market. Sustainability criteria for wood consumption were defined, and international certification systems were developed. The sustainability criteria should be extended to cover also wood-like materials and other biomass for power generation. The German EEG (Renewables Act) is a first step in this direction. Further, investments must be made in logistics capacities. The available logistics of coal power plants can be used with some minor modifications. In all, successful and sustainable international biomass markets may soon be available.

  17. Improvement of a combustion model in MELCOR code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogino, Masao; Hashimoto, Takashi

    1999-01-01

    NUPEC has been improving a hydrogen combustion model in MELCOR code for severe accident analysis. In the proposed combustion model, the flame velocity in a node was predicted using five different flame front shapes of fireball, prism, bubble, spherical jet, and plane jet. For validation of the proposed model, the results of the Battelle multi-compartment hydrogen combustion test were used. The selected test cases for the study were Hx-6, 13, 14, 20 and Ix-2 which had two, three or four compartments under homogeneous hydrogen concentration of 5 to 10 vol%. The proposed model could predict well the combustion behavior in multi-compartment containment geometry on the whole. MELCOR code, incorporating the present combustion model, can simulate combustion behavior during severe accident with acceptable computing time and some degree of accuracy. The applicability study of the improved MELCOR code to the actual reactor plants will be further continued. (author)

  18. Analyzing Non Stationary Processes in Radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racette, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The lack of well-developed techniques for modeling changing statistical moments in our observations has stymied the application of stochastic process theory for many scientific and engineering applications. Non linear effects of the observation methodology is one of the most perplexing aspects to modeling non stationary processes. This perplexing problem was encountered when modeling the effect of non stationary receiver fluctuations on the performance of radiometer calibration architectures. Existing modeling approaches were found not applicable; particularly problematic is modeling processes across scales over which they begin to exhibit non stationary behavior within the time interval of the calibration algorithm. Alternatively, the radiometer output is modeled as samples from a sequence random variables; the random variables are treated using a conditional probability distribution function conditioned on the use of the variable in the calibration algorithm. This approach of treating a process as a sequence of random variables with non stationary stochastic moments produce sensible predictions of temporal effects of calibration algorithms. To test these model predictions, an experiment using the Millimeter wave Imaging Radiometer (MIR) was conducted. The MIR with its two black body calibration references was configured in a laboratory setting to observe a third ultra-stable reference (CryoTarget). The MIR was programmed to sequentially sample each of the three references in approximately a 1 second cycle. Data were collected over a six-hour interval. The sequence of reference measurements form an ensemble sample set comprised of a series of three reference measurements. Two references are required to estimate the receiver response. A third reference is used to estimate the uncertainty in the estimate. Typically, calibration algorithms are designed to suppress the non stationary effects of receiver fluctuations. By treating the data sequence as an ensemble

  19. Stationary radiation of objects with scattering media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'eva, Inna A

    2001-01-01

    The radiation observed inside or outside a stationary radiator with a scattering medium is a sum of components, each being determined by, first, the primary radiation from some part of the radiator and, second, the probability of this radiation reaching the region where it is observed. In this review, general and rather simple relations between these components are discussed. These relations, unlike the components themselves, are independent of the specific optical characteristics of the object as well as of its geometry, inhomogeneity, etc. In deriving the relations, the situations in which geometrical optics is either applicable or inapplicable to radiation in a scattering medium are considered. For the case where geometrical optics does apply, stationary relations are derived from the probabilistic stationarity condition for radiation passing through the medium, i.e., from the fact that all radiation emitted in a stationary regime disappears with probability unity. Equilibrium relations are derived from the stationary relations in the particular case of a thermal radiator in an isothermal cavity. To derive the stationary relations in the geometrical optics approximation, we obtain general solutions of the linear equation of transfer using the Green function approach. If geometrical optics cannot be applied to a scattering and radiating medium, only relations for the components of outgoing thermal radiation are obtained, and the generalized Kirchhoff law, obtained by Levin and Rytov using statistical radio-physics methods, is employed. In this case, stationary relations are also derived from a probabilistic stationarity condition; the equilibrium relations follow from the stationary ones as well as from the equilibrium condition for radiation in the isothermal cavity. The quantities involved in all the relations obtained are a subject of experimental and computational spectroscopic studies. Examples of current and potential applications are given. The relations

  20. Hollow Fiber Membrane Contactors for Post-Combustion CO2 Capture: A Scale-Up Study from Laboratory to Pilot Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chabanon E.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Membrane contactors have been proposed for decades as a way to achieve intensified mass transfer processes. Post-combustion CO2 capture by absorption into a chemical solvent is one of the currently most intensively investigated topics in this area. Numerous studies have already been reported, unfortunately almost systematically on small, laboratory scale, modules. Given the level of flue gas flow rates which have to be treated for carbon capture applications, a consistent scale-up methodology is obviously needed for a rigorous engineering design. In this study, the possibilities and limitations of scale-up strategies for membrane contactors have been explored and will be discussed. Experiments (CO2 absorption from a gas mixture in a 30%wt MEA aqueous solution have been performed both on mini-modules and at pilot scale (10 m2 membrane contactor module based on PTFE hollow fibers. The results have been modelled utilizing a resistance in series approach. The only adjustable parameter is in fitting the simulations to experimental data is the membrane mass transfer coefficient (km, which logically plays a key role. The difficulties and uncertainties associated with scaleup computations from lab scale to pilot scale modules, with a particular emphasis on the km value, are presented and critically discussed.

  1. Updates of the fire protection system of the Juzbado Nuclear Fuel Fabrication Plant; Actualizaciones del Sistema de Proteccion Contra Incendios de la Fabrica de Combustible Nuclear de Juzbado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorado, P.; Palomo, J. J.; Romano, A.

    2015-07-01

    The Juzbado Nuclear Fuel Fabrication Plant fire protection system is one of the most important safety system of the plant. Every year, a large part of the annual investment is employed to improve this system, to update its technology, in order to improve detection and extinction capability to minimize fire risk. Over the last few years, several improvement projects have been carried out that focused on fire detection technology update and on optimization of local detectors integration with a centralized control system, as well as on an advanced public address system, which used clear and unambiguous messages improving personnel response to a plant evacuation. Planned projects and those, which are currently under development, focus on improving passive fire protection means as well as fire protection of key emergency response equipment s such as emergency diesel generators and fire extinguishing bombs. (Author)

  2. Strobes: An oscillatory combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corbel, J.M.L.; Lingen, J.N.J. van; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Gijzeman, O.L.J.; Meijerink, A.

    2012-01-01

    Strobe compositions belong to the class of solid combustions. They are mixtures of powdered ingredients. When ignited, the combustion front evolves in an oscillatory fashion, and flashes of light are produced by intermittence. They have fascinated many scientists since their discovery at the

  3. Catalytically enhanced combustion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, C.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a fuel having improved combustion efficiency. It comprises a petroleum based liquid hydrocarbon; and a combustion catalyst comprising from about 18 to about 21 weight percent naphthalene, from about 75 to about 80 weight percent toluene, and from about 2.8 to about 3.2 weight percent benzyl alcohol

  4. Fifteenth combustion research conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The BES research efforts cover chemical reaction theory, experimental dynamics and spectroscopy, thermodynamics of combustion intermediates, chemical kinetics, reaction mechanisms, combustion diagnostics, and fluid dynamics and chemically reacting flows. 98 papers and abstracts are included. Separate abstracts were prepared for the papers

  5. The logistics and the supply chain in the Juzbado Nuclear Fuel Manufacturing Plant; Cadena logistica en la fabrica de elementos combustibles de Juzbado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    The paper describe the logistics and the supply chain in the Juzbado Nuclear Fuel Manufacturing Plant, located in Juzbado in the province of Salamanca. In the the article are described the principal elements in the supply chain and the difficulties of its management derived from the short period for the manufacturing of the nuclear fuel. It's also given a view in relation to the transportation by land sea of the nuclear components, uranium oxide powder and the manufactured fuel. The characteristics of the supply chain are determined by the plant production forecast, by the origin and high technology of the raw materials and by nuclear fuel delivery site locations. (Author)

  6. 40 CFR 60.4244 - What test methods and other procedures must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary SI...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 100 percent peak (or the highest achievable) load and according to the requirements in § 60.8 and... performance tests during periods of startup, shutdown, or malfunction, as specified in § 60.8(c). If your stationary SI internal combustion engine is non-operational, you do not need to startup the engine solely to...

  7. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart IIIi of... - Requirements for Performance Tests for Stationary CI ICE With a Displacement of ≥30 Liters per...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... liters per cylinder a. Reduce NOX emissions by 90 percent or more i. Select the sampling port location... (incorporated by reference, see § 60.17) (d) NOX concentration must be at 15 percent O2, dry basis. Results of... in the stationary CI internal combustion engine exhaust. i. Select the sampling port location and the...

  8. Fuels and Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Johansson, Bengt

    2016-08-17

    This chapter discusses the combustion processes and the link to the fuel properties that are suitable for them. It describes the basic three concepts, including spark ignition (SI) and compression ignition (CI), and homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI). The fuel used in a CI engine is vastly different from that in an SI engine. In an SI engine, the fuel should sustain high pressure and temperature without autoignition. Apart from the dominating SI and CI engines, it is also possible to operate with a type of combustion: autoignition. With HCCI, the fuel and air are fully premixed before combustion as in the SI engine, but combustion is started by the increased pressure and temperature during the compression stroke. Apart from the three combustion processes, there are also a few combined or intermediate concepts, such as Spark-Assisted Compression Ignition (SACI). Those concepts are discussed in terms of the requirements of fuel properties.

  9. Fuels and Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Johansson, Bengt

    2016-01-01

    This chapter discusses the combustion processes and the link to the fuel properties that are suitable for them. It describes the basic three concepts, including spark ignition (SI) and compression ignition (CI), and homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI). The fuel used in a CI engine is vastly different from that in an SI engine. In an SI engine, the fuel should sustain high pressure and temperature without autoignition. Apart from the dominating SI and CI engines, it is also possible to operate with a type of combustion: autoignition. With HCCI, the fuel and air are fully premixed before combustion as in the SI engine, but combustion is started by the increased pressure and temperature during the compression stroke. Apart from the three combustion processes, there are also a few combined or intermediate concepts, such as Spark-Assisted Compression Ignition (SACI). Those concepts are discussed in terms of the requirements of fuel properties.

  10. PDF Modeling of Turbulent Combustion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pope, Stephen B

    2006-01-01

    .... The PDF approach to turbulent combustion has the advantages of fully representing the turbulent fluctuations of species and temperature, and of allowing realistic combustion chemistry to be implemented...

  11. Energy balance of a wood biomass combustion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baggio, P.; Cemin, A.; Grigiante, M.; Ragazzi, M.

    2001-01-01

    This article reports the results of a project developed at the University of Trent dealing with some wood biomass combustion processes. The project has been particularly dedicated to the study of the energetic analysis of the combustion processes that occur on a gasified wood stove of advanced combustion technologies. A considerable number of experimental tests has been carried out making use of different type of wood widely in use in Trentino region. The wood stove is a part of a pilot plant providing an hydraulic circuit equipped with a specific apparatus to measure all the necessary data to determine the energy balance required and specifically the thermal efficiency of the plant [it

  12. CRITERIA POLLUTANT EMISSIONS FROM INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES IN THE NATURAL GAS INDUSTRY VOLUME 1. TECHNICAL REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report summarizes emission factors for criteria pollutants (NOx, CO, CH4, C2H6, THC, NMHC, and NMEHC) from stationary internal combustion engines and gas turbines used in the natural gas industry. The emission factors were calculated from test results from five test campaigns...

  13. Stability and instability of stationary solutions for sublinear parabolic equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajikiya, Ryuji

    2018-01-01

    In the present paper, we study the initial boundary value problem of the sublinear parabolic equation. We prove the existence of solutions and investigate the stability and instability of stationary solutions. We show that a unique positive and a unique negative stationary solutions are exponentially stable and give the exact exponent. We prove that small stationary solutions are unstable. For one space dimensional autonomous equations, we elucidate the structure of stationary solutions and study the stability of all stationary solutions.

  14. Towards Gravitating Discs around Stationary Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semerák, Oldřich

    This article outlines the search for an exact general relativistic description of the exterior(vacuum) gravitational field of a rotating spheroidal black hole surrounded by a realistic axially symmetric disc of matter. The problem of multi-body stationary spacetimes is first exposed from the perspective of the relativity theory (section 1) and astrophysics (section 2), listing the basic methods employed and results obtained. Then (in section 3) basic formulas for stationary axisymmetric solutions are summarized. Sections 4 and 5 review what we have learnt with Miroslav Žáček and Tomáš Zellerin about certain static and stationary situations recently. Concluding remarks are given in section 6. Although the survey part is quite general, the list of references cannot be complete.Our main desideratum was the informative value rather than originality — novelties have been preferred, mainly reviews and those with detailed introductions.

  15. Oil use of the effluent plant ETEO (Effluent Station of Oil Treatment) as combustible for generation of energy in the power plant UG-50Hz; Utulizacao de oleo da ETEO (Estacao de Tratamento de Efluentes Oleosos) para geracao de energia na UG-50Hz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Jose Francisco de; Nascimento, Jose Maria do; Silva, Luiz Antonio da; Salazar, Marcos Vinicios; Baptista, Reinaldo Lopes; Barros, Sueli Aguiar [Companhia Siderurgica Nacional (CSN), Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-11-01

    The areas of finishing products of CSN Steel Plant generate contaminated effluents with oil and grease , that are treated in ETEO (Effluent Station of Oil Treatment). In this plant, the oil is processed to be sold for the consuming market. However, some seasons of the year, the market does not absorb the oil, and CSN is obliged to defray the burning of this oil, to not interrupt the productive process and cause an environmental impact. Because of this situation, we search alternatives for the viable use of this oil inside CSN steel plant, taking care for the security of the processes and the impact to the environment. This paper describes the details of the work and the implantation of the burning of this oil of the ETEO with BPF oil (type of petrochemical oil) as combustible in the boiler 7 of the power plant UG 50 Hz. For the implantation of this project, operational contingencies of security for equipment was prepared . Moreover, the work included chemical analyses of the oil and the conditions of the boiler using this mixing of oils. The reached results demonstrate the total viability of this project and it was proved another alternative of the use of this residue, with reduction of the fuel costs , steam costs and the electric energy generated in the power plant of CSN. (author)

  16. Fundamental Study of Single Biomass Particle Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momenikouchaksaraei, Maryam

    This thesis is a comprehensive study of single biomass particle combustion. The effect of particle shape and size and operating conditions on biomass conversion characteristics were investigated experimentally and theoretically. The experimental samples were divided in two groups: particles...... well-defined conditions, and the complete combustion processes were recorded as video sequences by a CCD camera installed in the set-up. One of the project objectives is to simulate conditions reasonably close to the conditions in a power plant boiler, i.e., reasonably high temperatures (up to 1600°C...

  17. Influence of Coal Quality on Combustion Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lans, Robert Pieter Van Der; Glarborg, Peter; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1998-01-01

    mixing pattern on NO formation under these conditions. Emissions from the opposed fired plant with all combustion air introduced through the burners could only be qualitatively reproduced by the pilot furnace. Under single stage conditions the test rig provided higher NO levels. Carbon in ash levels did...... not show any correlation between the coals and the furnaces. An engineering, mathematical model has been developed describing radiation heat transfer and coal combustion in full scale furnaces. The model has been validated against measured temperatures and the amount of carbon in fly ash. The model...

  18. Fuel Combustion Laboratory | Transportation Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuel Combustion Laboratory Fuel Combustion Laboratory NREL's Fuel Combustion Laboratory focuses on designs, using both today's technology and future advanced combustion concepts. This lab supports the combustion chamber platform for fuel ignition kinetics research, was acquired to expand the lab's

  19. Fuel cycle management by the electric enterprises and spanish nuclear Power plants; Gestion del ciclo de combustible por las empresas electricas y centrales nucleares espanolas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celma, E. M.; Gonzalez, C.; Lopez, J. V.; Melara, J.; Lopez, L.; Martinez, J. C.; Culbras, F.; Blanco, J.; Francia, L.

    2015-07-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Group reports to the Technology Committee of the UNESA Nuclear Energy Committee, and is constituted by representatives of both the Spanish Utilities and the Nuclear Power Plants. The Group addresses the nuclear plant common issues in relation to the operation and management of the nuclear fuel in their different stages of the Fuel Cycle. The article reviews the activities developed by the Group in the Front-End, mainly in the monitoring of international programs that define criteria to improve the Fuel Reliability and in the establishment of common bases for the implementation of changes in the regulation applying the nuclear fuel. Concerning the Back-End the Group focuses on those activities of coordination with third parties related to the management of used fuel. (Author)

  20. Stoichiometric calculations of combustion of Lakhra lignite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, I.; Ali, M.M.

    2002-01-01

    Lakhra coal field is largest productive coal field of Pakistan. About 1.5 millions tonne of this coal is, annually, mined and transported daily to various parts of the country in 500 trucks each of 10 tonnes of coal. The major consumers of this coal are brick kilns located in Sindh and Punjab. It is available at Rs. 500/- per tonne at mine head. A number of attempts were made for the production of power (electricity) by foreign companies. Feasibility studies were undertaken but no one set up power plant. It may be due to inferior quality of coal as it is lignitic in nature with high ash and sulfur contents. This coal is also, very sensitive to spontaneous combustion. Spontaneous combustion is the auto-ignition of coal at ambient conditions. Hence there are storage problems. In spite of these drawbacks, a 3(50) Mega Watt (3 units of each 50 mega watt power generation capacity) power plant, based on atmospheric fluidized bed combustion of coal technology (AFBC), was setup in early nineties. The performance of this plant remained poor. The main reasons might be poor quality of coal and limestone. Limestone is used with high sulfur Lakhra lignite, in fluidized bed combustor, to arrest sulfur of the coal, fixing sulfur as calcium sulfate to minimize hazardous emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/). Spontaneous combustion of Lakhra lignite is responsible for each fire of coal and conveyor belt etc. (author)

  1. Ignition circuit for combustion engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, H W

    1977-05-26

    The invention refers to the ignition circuit for combustion engines, which are battery fed. The circuit contains a transistor and an oscillator to produce an output voltage on the secondary winding of an output transformer to supply an ignition current. The plant is controlled by an interrupter. The purpose of the invention is to form such a circuit that improved sparks for ignition are produced, on the one hand, and that on the other hand, the plant can continue to function after loss of the oscillator. The problem is solved by the battery and the secondary winding of the output transformers of the oscillator are connected via a rectifier circuit to produce a resultant total voltage with the ignition coil from the battery voltage and the rectified pulsating oscillator output.

  2. Sewage sludge disposal at the city of Duesseldorf - Conception of co-combustion in a coal power plant; Klaerschlammentsorgung der Stadt Duesseldorf - Konzeption der Mitverbrennung im Kraftwerk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindert, M. [Umweltamt der Landeshauptstadt Duesseldorf (Germany); Hansmann, G. [Stadtwerke Duesseldorf AG (Germany); Mittmann, H. [Kanal- und Wasserbauamt der Landeshauptstadt Duesseldorf (Germany); Goertz, W. [Umweltamt der Landeshauptstadt Duesseldorf (Germany)

    1995-11-01

    Simultaneously to the enlargement of the biological wastewater treatment plants in Germany the amount of sludges increased. For the reuse or disposal of these sludges different methods - from agricultural use to incineration - are applied. For the city of Duesseldorf it became necessary to outline a new conception for the sludge disposal. A number of methods has been considered, showing that co-incineration in a coal-power-plant appears to be practicable under the circumstances found in Duesseldorf. Hence the effects of such a co-incineration on the emissions and the composition of solid waste materials of the power plant have been investigated in the course of an experimental operation. These experiments show that coincineration of the sludge also has advantages from the ecological point of view. (orig.) [Deutsch] Mit dem Ausbau der biologischen Klaeranlagen in Deutschland stieg in den letzten Jahren auch die Menge des anfallenden Klaerschlamms. Zur Verwertung bzw. Entsorgung dieses Schlammes werden unterschiedliche Verfahren - von der landwirtschaftlichen Verwertung bis zur Verbrennung - herangezogen. Fuer die Stadt Duesseldorf ergab sich die Notwendigkeit, die Klaerschlammentsorgung neu zu konzipieren. Verschiedene Varianten wurden geprueft, wobei die Mitverbrennung in der Schmelzkammerfeuerung eines Steinkohlekraftwerkes unter den in Duesseldorf herrschenden Randbedingungen praktikabel erschien. Daher wurden die Auswirkungen einer solchen Mitverbrennung auf das Emissionsverhalten und die Zusammensetzung der festen Reststoffe des Kraftwerks waehrend eines Probebetriebes untersucht. Die Versuche zeigen, dass die Mitverbrennung auch aus oekologischer Sicht Vorteile aufweist. (orig.)

  3. Stationary Double Layers in a Collisionless Magnetoplasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noriyoshi, Sato; Mieno, Tetsu; Hatakeyama, Rikizo

    1983-01-01

    of the plate on the low-potential side, being accompanied with current limitation. This localized potential drop moves along the plasma column, but finally stops and results in the formation of the stationary double layer in the presence of sufficient plasma supply from the plate on the high-potential side.......Stationary double layers are generated in a magnetoplasma by applying potential differences between two heated plates on which the plasma is produced by surface ionization. By measuring the double-layer formation process, a localized potential drop is found to be formed initially in front...

  4. Stationary Engineers Apprenticeship. Related Training Modules. 20.1-23.1 Miscellaneous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane Community Coll., Eugene, OR.

    This learning module, one in a series of 20 related training modules for apprentice stationary engineers, deals with miscellaneous job skills needed by persons working in power plants. Addressed in the individual instructional packages included in the module are the following topics: transformers, circuit protection, construction of foundations…

  5. Technology for Transient Simulation of Vibration during Combustion Process in Rocket Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubanov, V. M.; Stepanov, D. V.; Shabliy, L. S.

    2018-01-01

    The article describes the technology for simulation of transient combustion processes in the rocket thruster for determination of vibration frequency occurs during combustion. The engine operates on gaseous propellant: oxygen and hydrogen. Combustion simulation was performed using the ANSYS CFX software. Three reaction mechanisms for the stationary mode were considered and described in detail. The way for obtaining quick CFD-results with intermediate combustion components using an EDM model was found. The way to generate the Flamelet library with CFX-RIF was described. A technique for modeling transient combustion processes in the rocket thruster was proposed based on the Flamelet library. A cyclic irregularity of the temperature field like vortex core precession was detected in the chamber. Frequency of flame precession was obtained with the proposed simulation technique.

  6. Working group report: methane emissions from fuel combustion and industrial processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdowski, J.J.M.; Beck, L.; Piccot, S.; Olivier, J.G.J.; Veldt, C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper lists the source categories which are currently recognised as minor sources of methane. These fall into five broad groups: stationary fuel combustion (residential combustion of fuels, solid waste incineration at home sites, on-site agricultural waste burning, industrial and utility combustion of coal, wood, oil and gas, commercial and industrial waste incineration); mobile fuel combustion; non-combustion industrial processes (primary metals production, chemical manufacturing processes, petroleum refining, commercial charcoal manufacturing waste treatments); minor energy production sources (storage and distribution of automotive fuels, geothermal energy production; peat mining operations, oil shale mining operations); and miscellaneous sources. The paper also presents a preliminary estimate of global methane emissions from these minor sources and the results of the working group's discussion on recommendations for the IPCC/OECD methodology and specific research needs. A list of control options for emissions from minor sources is provided. 2 tabs

  7. Advanced coal combustion technologies and their environmental impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozicevic, Maja; Feretic, Danilo; Tomsic, Zeljko

    1997-01-01

    Estimations of world energy reserves show that coal will remain the leading primary energy source for electricity production in the foreseeable future. In order to comply with ever stricter environmental regulations and to achieve efficient use of limited energy resources, advanced combustion technologies are being developed. The most promising are the pressurised fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) and the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC). By injecting sorbent in the furnace, PFBC removes more than 90 percent of SO 2 in flue gases without additional emission control device. In addition, due to lower combustion temperature, NO x emissions are around 90 percent lower than those from pulverised coal (PC) plant. IGCC plant performance is even more environmentally expectable and its high efficiency is a result of a combined cycle usage. Technical, economic and environmental characteristics of mentioned combustion technologies will be presented in this paper. Comparison of PFBC, IGCC and PC power plants economics and air impact will also be given. (Author)

  8. Emissions of hydrocarbons from combustion of biofuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, Mona; Persson, Eva Marie.

    1991-10-01

    Evaluations and measurements of emissions of hydrocarbons from power plants with a capacity exceeding 1 MW using biofuels (wood fuels and peat) have been studied in order to identify and quantify the emissions of incompletely combusted hydrocarbons. The influence of the type of fuel and the combustion technology applied were also studied, using literature references. The report summarizes monitoring results from a number of plants using biofuels. The reported emissions from the different plants can not be compared as they are relatively few and the test results have been obtained under various conditions using different methods of testing and analysis. The methods used are often poorly documented in the studied reports. Few investigations of emissions of hydrocarbons from plants in the range of 1 to 10 MW have been carried out. The plant and the technology used are important factors determining the amount and type of emissions of hydrocarbons. Larger temporary emissions can occur during start up, operational disturbances or when using fuel of inhomogeneous quality. In order to minimize the emissions the combustion process must be efficiently controlled, and a fuel of a hohogeneous quality must be used. The report also summarizes sampling and analysis methods used for monitoring emissions of hydrocarbons. (29 refs., 17 figs.)

  9. Sandia Combustion Research: Technical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This report contains reports from research programs conducted at the Sandia Combustion Research Facility. Research is presented under the following topics: laser based diagnostics; combustion chemistry; reacting flow; combustion in engines and commercial burners; coal combustion; and industrial processing. Individual projects were processed separately for entry onto the DOE databases.

  10. Evaluating the impact of an ammonia-based post-combustion CO2 capture process on a steam power plant with different cooling water temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnenberg, Sebastian; Darde, Victor Camille Alfred; Oexmann, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    The use of aqueous ammonia is a promising option to capture carbon dioxide from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants. Compared to a capture process using monoethanolamine (MEA), the use of ammonia can reduce the heat requirement of the CO2 desorption significantly, although an additional effort...... pressure, solvent circulation rate, solvent recycling rate and chilling temperature) are evaluated and the optimal configuration with respect to the overall net efficiency penalty is determined.The study shows that the configuration of the process with absorption at low temperature (approximately 10°C...

  11. Mechanisms and kinetics of granulated sewage sludge combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijo-Kleczkowska, Agnieszka; Środa, Katarzyna; Kosowska-Golachowska, Monika; Musiał, Tomasz; Wolski, Krzysztof

    2015-12-01

    This paper investigates sewage sludge disposal methods with particular emphasis on combustion as the priority disposal method. Sewage sludge incineration is an attractive option because it minimizes odour, significantly reduces the volume of the starting material and thermally destroys organic and toxic components of the off pads. Additionally, it is possible that ashes could be used. Currently, as many as 11 plants use sewage sludge as fuel in Poland; thus, this technology must be further developed in Poland while considering the benefits of co-combustion with other fuels. This paper presents the results of experimental studies aimed at determining the mechanisms (defining the fuel combustion region by studying the effects of process parameters, including the size of the fuel sample, temperature in the combustion chamber and air velocity, on combustion) and kinetics (measurement of fuel temperature and mass changes) of fuel combustion in an air stream under different thermal conditions and flow rates. The combustion of the sludge samples during air flow between temperatures of 800 and 900°C is a kinetic-diffusion process. This process determines the sample size, temperature of its environment, and air velocity. The adopted process parameters, the time and ignition temperature of the fuel by volatiles, combustion time of the volatiles, time to reach the maximum temperature of the fuel surface, maximum temperature of the fuel surface, char combustion time, and the total process time, had significant impacts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Shale oil combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-dabbas, M.A.

    1992-05-01

    A 'coutant' carbon steel combustion chamber cooled by water jacket was conslructed to burn diesel fuel and mixlure of shale oil and diesel fuels. During experimental work nir fuel ratio was determined, temperaturces were measured using Chromel/ Almel thermocouple, finally the gasous combustion product analysis was carricd out using gas chromatograph technique. The constructed combustion chamber was operating salisfactory for several hours of continous work. According to the measurements it was found that: the flame temperature of a mixture of diesel and shale oil fuels was greater than the flame temperature of diesel fuel. and the sulfer emissious of a mixture of diesel and shale oil fuels was higher than that of diesel fuel. Calculation indicated that the dry gas energy loss was very high and the incomplete combustion energy loss very small. (author). 23 refs., 35 figs

  13. Shale oil combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-dabbas, M A

    1992-05-01

    A `coutant` carbon steel combustion chamber cooled by water jacket was conslructed to burn diesel fuel and mixlure of shale oil and diesel fuels. During experimental work nir fuel ratio was determined, temperaturces were measured using Chromel/ Almel thermocouple, finally the gasous combustion product analysis was carricd out using gas chromatograph technique. The constructed combustion chamber was operating salisfactory for several hours of continous work. According to the measurements it was found that: the flame temperature of a mixture of diesel and shale oil fuels was greater than the flame temperature of diesel fuel. and the sulfer emissious of a mixture of diesel and shale oil fuels was higher than that of diesel fuel. Calculation indicated that the dry gas energy loss was very high and the incomplete combustion energy loss very small. (author). 23 refs., 35 figs.

  14. Indoor combustion and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Kathleen; Triche, Elizabeth W

    2008-08-01

    Indoor combustion produces both gases (eg, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide) and particulate matter that may affect the development or exacerbation of asthma. Sources in the home include both heating devices (eg, fireplaces, woodstoves, kerosene heaters, flued [ie, vented] or nonflued gas heaters) and gas stoves for cooking. This article highlights the recent literature examining associations between exposure to indoor combustion and asthma development and severity. Since asthma is a chronic condition affecting both children and adults, both age groups are included in this article. Overall, there is some evidence of an association between exposure to indoor combustion and asthma, particularly asthma symptoms in children. Some sources of combustion such as coal stoves have been more consistently associated with these outcomes than other sources such as woodstoves.

  15. Main principles of development stationary training facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsiptsyura, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    The designation of stationary training facilities is shown and the main requirements for them are formulated. When considering the above-mentioned requirements, special attention was paid to obligatory correspondence between training experience and practical skill of an operator. It is shown, that the switchboard block is the major unit of the training facility, which should develop skills and habits of an operator

  16. Stationary solutions and asymptotic flatness I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiris, Martin

    2014-01-01

    In general relativity, a stationary isolated system is defined as an asymptotically flat (AF) stationary spacetime with compact material sources. Other definitions that are less restrictive on the type of asymptotic could in principle be possible. Between this article and its sequel, we show that under basic assumptions, asymptotic flatness indeed follows as a consequence of Einstein's theory. In particular, it is proved that any vacuum stationary spacetime-end whose (quotient) manifold is diffeomorphic to R 3 minus a ball and whose Killing field has its norm bounded away from zero, is necessarily AF with Schwarzschildian fall off. The ‘excised’ ball would contain (if any) the actual material body, but this information is unnecessary to reach the conclusion. In this first article, we work with weakly asymptotically flat (WAF) stationary ends, a notion that generalizes as much as possible that of the AF end, and prove that WAF ends are AF with Schwarzschildian fall off. Physical and mathematical implications are also discussed. (paper)

  17. Stone Stability under Stationary Nonuniform Flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenstra, Remco; Hofland, B.; Paarlberg, Andries; Smale, Alfons; Huthoff, Fredrik; Uijttewaal, W.S.J.

    2016-01-01

    A stability parameter for rock in bed protections under nonuniform stationary flow is derived. The influence of the mean flow velocity, turbulence, and mean acceleration of the flow are included explicitly in the parameter. The relatively new notion of explicitly incorporating the mean acceleration

  18. New interval forecast for stationary autoregressive models ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, we proposed a new forecasting interval for stationary Autoregressive, AR(p) models using the Akaike information criterion (AIC) function. Ordinarily, the AIC function is used to determine the order of an AR(p) process. In this study however, AIC forecast interval compared favorably with the theoretical forecast ...

  19. Relativistic elasticity of stationary fluid branes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armas, J.; Obers, N.A.

    2013-01-01

    under certain conditions that a given stationary fluid configuration living on a dynamical surface of vanishing thickness and satisfying locally the first law of thermodynamics will behave like an elastic brane when the surface is subject to small deformations. These results, which are independent...

  20. Characterization of Stationary Distributions of Reflected Diffusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    operations research to finance and mathemat- ical physics , and their stationary distributions often serve to characterize or approximate important...REFERENCES [1] Atar , R., Budhiraja, A. and Dupuis, P. (2001). On positive recurrence of constrained diffusion processes. Ann. Probab., 29 No. 2, 979-1000

  1. The stationary states of interacting fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frazer, W.R.; Hove, Léon van

    1958-01-01

    As an application of a time-independent perturbation formalism developed earlier for systems with many degrees of freedom, we give in terms of diagrams the general perturbation expressions for the exact stationary states of interacting fields. The physical vacuum is obtained by applying to the bare

  2. Calendar Year 2016 Stationary Source Emissions Inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evelo, Stacie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The City of Albuquerque (COA) Environmental Health Department Air Quality Program has issued stationary source permits and registrations the Department of Energy/Sandia Field Office for operations at the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico. This emission inventory report meets the annual reporting compliance requirements for calendar year (CY) 2016 as required by the COA.

  3. FY 1991 report on the results of the development of an entrained bed coal gasification power plant. Part 2. Support study for the development of an entrained bed coal gasification power plant (Summarization of the operation study); 1991 nendo seika hokokusho. Funryusho sekitan gaska hatsuden plant kaihatsu (Funryusho sekitan gaska hatsuden plant kaihatsu no shien kenkyu) - Sono 2. Unten kenkyu sokatsu hen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-04-01

    The paper summarized the results of the following tests on a 40 t/d pilot plant which were conducted as the support study for the development of an entrained bed coal gasification power plant: dry desulfurization test, dry dedusting test, high-temperature NOx gas combustion test (gas turbine element test). In the dry desulfurization test, tested were the operational automation and monitoring technology, performance of desulfurization, characteristics of load response, sulfur recovery, etc. In the dry dedusting test, tested were the filter medium/dust separation, powder level meter, continuous dust densitometer, operational automation, characteristics of partial load/load response, improvement of filtration materials, test on characteristics of air conveyance, etc. In the high-temperature low-NOx gas combustion test (gas turbine element test), the following were conducted: examination of the test method of gas turbine materials, inspection/examination of the corrosion of gas turbine combustion test device, inspection/examination of the internal corrosion of the stationary blade for gas turbine deposit test, inspection/examination of gasification system. The results of these support studies were reflected one after another in the project on the development of an entrained bed coal gasification power plant. (NEDO)

  4. Sandia Combustion Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, S.C.; Palmer, R.E.; Montana, C.A. (eds.)

    1988-01-01

    During the late 1970s, in response to a national energy crisis, Sandia proposed to the US Department of Energy (DOE) a new, ambitious program in combustion research. Shortly thereafter, the Combustion Research Facility (CRF) was established at Sandia's Livermore location. Designated a ''user facility,'' the charter of the CRF was to develop and maintain special-purpose resources to support a nationwide initiative-involving US inventories, industry, and national laboratories--to improve our understanding and control of combustion. This report includes descriptions several research projects which have been simulated by working groups and involve the on-site participation of industry scientists. DOE's Industry Technology Fellowship program, supported through the Office of Energy Research, has been instrumental in the success of some of these joint efforts. The remainder of this report presents results of calendar year 1988, separated thematically into eleven categories. Referred journal articles appearing in print during 1988 and selected other publications are included at the end of Section 11. Our traditional'' research activities--combustion chemistry, reacting flows, diagnostics, engine and coal combustion--have been supplemented by a new effort aimed at understanding combustion-related issues in the management of toxic and hazardous materials.

  5. LIEKKI 2 - Combustion technology is environmental technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupa, M. [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Finland has wide experience in applications of various combustion technologies and fuels and in supplying energy to industry and municipalities. Furthermore, combustion hardware and equipment are amongst our most important export products. Above all, fluidized bed boilers, recovery boilers for pulp mills and heavy diesel engines and diesel power plants have achieved excellent success in the world markets. Exports of these products alone have amounted to several billions of Finnish marks of annual sales in recent years. Within modern combustion technology, the objective is to control flue gas emissions as far as possible in the process itself, thus doing away with the need for the separate scrubbing of flue gases. To accomplish this it has been necessary to conduct a large amount of research on the details of the chemistry of combustion emissions and the flows in furnaces and engine cylinders. A host of completely new products are being developed for the combustion technology field. The LIEKKI programme has been particularly interested in so-called combined-cycle processes based on pressurized fluidized bed technology

  6. Reaction and diffusion in turbulent combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, S.B. [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The motivation for this project is the need to obtain a better quantitative understanding of the technologically-important phenomenon of turbulent combustion. In nearly all applications in which fuel is burned-for example, fossil-fuel power plants, furnaces, gas-turbines and internal-combustion engines-the combustion takes place in a turbulent flow. Designers continually demand more quantitative information about this phenomenon-in the form of turbulent combustion models-so that they can design equipment with increased efficiency and decreased environmental impact. For some time the PI has been developing a class of turbulent combustion models known as PDF methods. These methods have the important virtue that both convection and reaction can be treated without turbulence-modelling assumptions. However, a mixing model is required to account for the effects of molecular diffusion. Currently, the available mixing models are known to have some significant defects. The major motivation of the project is to seek a better understanding of molecular diffusion in turbulent reactive flows, and hence to develop a better mixing model.

  7. Pre-Combustion Carbondioxide Capture in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zeki YILMAZOĞLU

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Thermal power plants have a significant place big proportion in the production of electric energy. Thermal power plants are the systems which converts heat energy to mechanical energy and also mechanical energy to electrical energy. Heat energy is obtained from combustion process and as a result of this, some harmful emissions, like CO2, which are the reason for global warming, are released to atmosphere. The contribution of carbondioxide to global warming has been exposed by the previous researchs. Due to this fact, clean energy technologies are growing rapidly all around the world. Coal is generally used in power plants and when compared to other fossil energy sources unit electricity production cost is less than others. When reserve rate is taken into account, coal may be converted to energy in a more efficient and cleaner way. The aim for using the clean coal technologies are to eradicate the harmful emissions of coal and to store the carbondioxide, orginated from combustion, in different forms. In line with this aim, carbondioxide may be captured by either pre-combustion, by O2/CO2 recycling combustion systems or by post combustion. The integrated gasification combined cycles (IGCC are available in pre-combustion capture systems, whereas in O2/CO2 recycling combustion systems there are ultrasuper critical boiler technologies and finally flue gas washing systems by amines exists in post combustion systems. In this study, a pre-combustion CO2 capture process via oxygen blown gasifiers is compared with a conventional power plant in terms of CO2 emissions. Captured carbondioxide quantity has been presented as a result of the calculations made throughout the study.

  8. Proceedings of the 1998 international joint power generation conference (FACT-Vol.22). Volume 1: Fuels and combustion technologies; Gas turbines; Environmental engineering; Nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, A.; Natole, R.; Sanyal, A.; Veilleux, J.

    1998-01-01

    Papers are arranged under the following topical sections: Fuels and combustion technologies; Low NOx burner applications; Low cost solutions to utility NOx compliance issues; Coal combustion--Retrofit experiences, low NOx, and efficiency; Highly preheated air combustion; Combustion control and optimization; Advanced technology for gas fuel combustion; Spray combustion and mixing; Efficient power generation using gas turbines; Safety issues in power industry; Efficient and environmentally benign conversion of wastes to energy; Artificial intelligence monitoring, control, and optimization of power plants; Combustion modeling and diagnostics; Advanced combustion technologies and combustion synthesis; Aero and industrial gas turbine presentations IGTI gas turbine division; NOx/SO 2 ; Plant cooling water system problems and solutions; Issues affecting plant operations and maintenance; and Costs associated with operating and not operating a nuclear power plant. Papers within scope have been processed separately for inclusion on the database

  9. Chaotic Bohmian trajectories for stationary states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesa, Alexandre; Martin, John; Struyve, Ward

    2016-01-01

    In Bohmian mechanics, the nodes of the wave function play an important role in the generation of chaos. However, so far, most of the attention has been on moving nodes; little is known about the possibility of chaos in the case of stationary nodes. We address this question by considering stationary states, which provide the simplest examples of wave functions with stationary nodes. We provide examples of stationary wave functions for which there is chaos, as demonstrated by numerical computations, for one particle moving in three spatial dimensions and for two and three entangled particles in two dimensions. Our conclusion is that the motion of the nodes is not necessary for the generation of chaos. What is important is the overall complexity of the wave function. That is, if the wave function, or rather its phase, has a complex spatial variation, it will lead to complex Bohmian trajectories and hence to chaos. Another aspect of our work concerns the average Lyapunov exponent, which quantifies the overall amount of chaos. Since it is very hard to evaluate the average Lyapunov exponent analytically, which is often computed numerically, it is useful to have simple quantities that agree well with the average Lyapunov exponent. We investigate possible correlations with quantities such as the participation ratio and different measures of entanglement, for different systems and different families of stationary wave functions. We find that these quantities often tend to correlate to the amount of chaos. However, the correlation is not perfect, because, in particular, these measures do not depend on the form of the basis states used to expand the wave function, while the amount of chaos does. (paper)

  10. Co-combustion: A summary of technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leckner Bo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Co-combustion of biomass or waste together with a base fuel in a boiler is a simple and economically suitable way to replace fossil fuels by biomass and to utilize waste. Co-combustion in a high-efficiency power station means utilization of biomass and waste with a higher thermal efficiency than what otherwise had been possible. Due to transport limitations, the additional fuel will only supply a minor part (less than a few hundreds MW fuel of the energy in a plant. There are several options: co-combustion with coal in pulverized or fluidized bed boilers, combustion on added grates inserted in pulverized coal boilers, combustors for added fuel coupled in parallel to the steam circuit of a power plant, external gas producers delivering its gas to replace an oil, gas or pulverized fuel burner. Furthermore biomass can be used for reburning in order to reduce NO emissions or for afterburning to reduce N2O emissions in fluidized bed boilers. Combination of fuels can give rise to positive or negative synergy effects, of which the best known are the interactions between S, Cl, K, Al, and Si that may give rise to or prevent deposits on tubes or on catalyst surfaces, or that may have an influence on the formation of dioxins. With better knowledge of these effects the positive ones can be utilized and the negative ones can be avoided.

  11. Power generation from municipal and industrial wastes with particular reference to sewage combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, B. (Vereinigte Kesselwerke AG, Duesseldorf, West Germany); Lauer, H. (Badische Anilin- und Soda-Fabrik AG, Ludwigshafen am Rhein, West Germany)

    1980-01-01

    Some characteristic features and modern technological concepts employed in large sewage combustion plants are examined. Particular attention is given to the plants in Krefeld, Wuppertal, and Ludwigshafen, Germany, and in Ajinomoto, Japan.

  12. Assessing the stationary energy storage equivalency of vehicle-to-grid charging battery electric vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarroja, Brian; Zhang, Li; Wifvat, Van; Shaffer, Brendan; Samuelsen, Scott

    2016-01-01

    A study has been performed to understand the quantitative impact of key differences between vehicle-to-grid and stationary energy storage systems on renewable utilization, greenhouse gas emissions, and balancing fleet operation, using California as the example. To simulate the combined electricity and light-duty transportation system, a detailed electric grid dispatch model (including stationary energy storage systems) was combined with an electric vehicle charging dispatch model that incorporates conventional smart and vehicle-to-grid capabilities. By subjecting smaller amounts of renewable energy to round-trip efficiency losses and thereby increasing the efficiency of renewable utilization, it was found that vehicle-to-grid energy storage can achieve higher renewable utilization levels and reduced greenhouse gas emissions compared to stationary energy storage systems. Vehicle-to-grid energy storage, however, is not as capable of balancing the power plant fleet compared to stationary energy storage systems due to the constraints of consumer travel patterns. The potential benefits of vehicle-to-grid are strongly dependent on the availability of charging infrastructure at both home and workplaces, with potential benefits being compromised with residential charging availability only. Overall, vehicle-to-grid energy storage can provide benefits over stationary energy storage depending on the system attribute selected for improvement, a finding amenable to managing through policy. - Highlights: • Using vehicle-to-grid-based storage increases the efficiency of renewable energy utilization. • Vehicle-to-grid-based energy storage has less overall flexibility compared to stationary energy storage. • The discharge ability of vehicle-to-grid-based provides a significant benefit over one-way smart charging. • Both workplace and home charging are critical for providing vehicle-to-grid-related benefits. • Increasing charging intelligence reduces stationary energy

  13. Combining mechanical-biological residual waste treatment plants with the carbonisation-combustion process; Kombination MBA mit dem Schwel-Brenn-Verfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diekmann, J.; Wiehn, G. [Siemens AG Unternehmensbereich KWU, Erlangen (Germany). Bereich Energieerzeugung

    1998-09-01

    The disposal market for household waste is strongly influenced by the legal framework governing it. A further factor that makes it difficult for the authorities responsible for disposal to decide on residual waste disposal by means of thermal or mechanical-biological treatment plants is the downward pressure on disposal prices from inexpensive, underused landfills. This makes it all the more important for a future-oriented waste management to develop a both economically and ecologically optimised waste disposal concept. In this situation there is much in favour of adopting a concept consisting of a combination of mechanical, mechanical-biological, and thermal treatment which takes due account of waste disposal concepts at the regional and supraregional scale. [Deutsch] Der Entsorgungsmarkt fuer Siedlungsabfaelle wird stark durch die Entwicklung der rechtlichen Rahmenbedingungen beeinflusst. Hinzu kommt, dass der Entscheidungsprozess der oeffentlichen Entsorgungstraeger zur Restabfallentsorgung mittels thermischer oder mechanisch-biologischer Anlagen durch den Druck auf die Entsorgungspreise aufgrund der kostenguenstigen, nicht ausgelasteten Deponien erschwert wird. Umso mehr muss das Ziel einer zukunftsorientierten Abfallwirtschaft sein, unter oekonomischen und oekologischen Gesichtspunkten ein optimiertes Abfallkonzept aufzubauen. Hier kann es sehr hilfreich sein, sich eines Konzeptes, bestehend aus der Kombination von mechanischer, mechanisch-biologischer und thermischer Behandlung unter Beruecksichtigung des regionalen und ueberregionalen Abfallkonzeptes zu bedienen. (orig./SR)

  14. Framework for Assessing Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    This revision of the 2011 report, Accounting Framework for Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources, evaluates biogenic CO2 emissions from stationary sources, including a detailed study of the scientific and technical issues associated with assessing biogenic carbon dioxide...

  15. Comparing post-combustion CO2 capture operation at retrofitted coal-fired power plants in the Texas and Great Britain electric grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Stuart M.; Chalmers, Hannah L.; Webber, Michael E.; King, Carey W.

    2011-04-01

    This work analyses the carbon dioxide (CO2) capture system operation within the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) and Great Britain (GB) electric grids using a previously developed first-order hourly electricity dispatch and pricing model. The grids are compared in their 2006 configuration with the addition of coal-based CO2 capture retrofits and emissions penalties from 0 to 100 US dollars per metric ton of CO2 (USD/tCO2). CO2 capture flexibility is investigated by comparing inflexible CO2 capture systems to flexible ones that can choose between full- and zero-load CO2 capture depending on which operating mode has lower costs or higher profits. Comparing these two grids is interesting because they have similar installed capacity and peak demand, and both are isolated electricity systems with competitive wholesale electricity markets. However, differences in capacity mix, demand patterns, and fuel markets produce diverging behaviours of CO2 capture at coal-fired power plants. Coal-fired facilities are primarily base load in ERCOT for a large range of CO2 prices but are comparably later in the dispatch order in GB and consequently often supply intermediate load. As a result, the ability to capture CO2 is more important for ensuring dispatch of coal-fired facilities in GB than in ERCOT when CO2 prices are high. In GB, higher overall coal prices mean that CO2 prices must be slightly higher than in ERCOT before the emissions savings of CO2 capture offset capture energy costs. However, once CO2 capture is economical, operating CO2 capture on half the coal fleet in each grid achieves greater emissions reductions in GB because the total coal-based capacity is 6 GW greater than in ERCOT. The market characteristics studied suggest greater opportunity for flexible CO2 capture to improve operating profits in ERCOT, but profit improvements can be offset by a flexibility cost penalty.

  16. Comparing post-combustion CO2 capture operation at retrofitted coal-fired power plants in the Texas and Great Britain electric grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, Stuart M; Webber, Michael E; Chalmers, Hannah L; King, Carey W

    2011-01-01

    This work analyses the carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture system operation within the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) and Great Britain (GB) electric grids using a previously developed first-order hourly electricity dispatch and pricing model. The grids are compared in their 2006 configuration with the addition of coal-based CO 2 capture retrofits and emissions penalties from 0 to 100 US dollars per metric ton of CO 2 (USD/tCO 2 ). CO 2 capture flexibility is investigated by comparing inflexible CO 2 capture systems to flexible ones that can choose between full- and zero-load CO 2 capture depending on which operating mode has lower costs or higher profits. Comparing these two grids is interesting because they have similar installed capacity and peak demand, and both are isolated electricity systems with competitive wholesale electricity markets. However, differences in capacity mix, demand patterns, and fuel markets produce diverging behaviours of CO 2 capture at coal-fired power plants. Coal-fired facilities are primarily base load in ERCOT for a large range of CO 2 prices but are comparably later in the dispatch order in GB and consequently often supply intermediate load. As a result, the ability to capture CO 2 is more important for ensuring dispatch of coal-fired facilities in GB than in ERCOT when CO 2 prices are high. In GB, higher overall coal prices mean that CO 2 prices must be slightly higher than in ERCOT before the emissions savings of CO 2 capture offset capture energy costs. However, once CO 2 capture is economical, operating CO 2 capture on half the coal fleet in each grid achieves greater emissions reductions in GB because the total coal-based capacity is 6 GW greater than in ERCOT. The market characteristics studied suggest greater opportunity for flexible CO 2 capture to improve operating profits in ERCOT, but profit improvements can be offset by a flexibility cost penalty.

  17. Combustion of Waste Wood. Second phase of the collaboration project on waste wood combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Annika; Andersson, Christer; Eriksson, Jan; Hemstroem, Bengt; Jungstedt, Jenny; Kling, Aasa; Bahr, Bo von; Ekvall, Annika; Eskilsson, David; Tullin, Claes; Harnevie, Henrik; Sieurin, Jan; Keihaes, Juha; Mueller, Christian; Berg, Magnus; Wikman, Karin

    2003-08-01

    Combustion of waste wood has during the last decade increased dramatically and this has resulted in a number of Swedish plants using this fuel, e.g. Handeloe P11 (Norrkoeping) and ldbaecken P3 (Nykoeping), and yet other plants that are under construction (e.g. Nynaeshamn). The experience from these plants are that waste wood combustion results in a number of operational problems. To some extent these problems are different compared with the problems related to combustion of other biofuels but the situation is not directly comparable to waste incinerators. The problems are mainly related to slagging and fouling of heat exchanger surfaces and accelerated corrosion at relatively low temperature compared to the situation for ordinary biofuels. In some cases an increase in the emissions of specific substances can also result in difficulties to fulfil the EC-directive on waste combustion. Within previous projects the main problems related to combustion of waste wood have been identified and to some extent the cause of these problems has been clarified. One result of this reported investigation is a deeper understanding of the actual causes of these problems. However, the most important result is a number of recommendations for different measures on how to achieve disturbance-free combustion of waste wood. These recommendations actually summarises the most important possible solutions on how to achieve a disturbance-free operation and a lower maintenance cost for boilers combusting waste wood and can thereby be regarded as a short summery of the whole project: 1) Improving fuel quality by Improved sorting at the source and Sieving of the fuel -> Reducing the amount of metals and chlorine and Separation of fines and thereby reducing the amount of metals. 2) Combustion modifications by Avoiding reducing conditions at the heat exchanger surfaces -> Minimising slagging, fouling and corrosion. 3) Additives or co-combustion by Addition of sulphur with the fuel; Injection of

  18. Transient flow combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacina, R. R.

    1984-01-01

    Non-steady combustion problems can result from engine sources such as accelerations, decelerations, nozzle adjustments, augmentor ignition, and air perturbations into and out of the compressor. Also non-steady combustion can be generated internally from combustion instability or self-induced oscillations. A premixed-prevaporized combustor would be particularly sensitive to flow transients because of its susceptability to flashback-autoignition and blowout. An experimental program, the Transient Flow Combustion Study is in progress to study the effects of air and fuel flow transients on a premixed-prevaporized combustor. Preliminary tests performed at an inlet air temperature of 600 K, a reference velocity of 30 m/s, and a pressure of 700 kPa. The airflow was reduced to 1/3 of its original value in a 40 ms ramp before flashback occurred. Ramping the airflow up has shown that blowout is more sensitive than flashback to flow transients. Blowout occurred with a 25 percent increase in airflow (at a constant fuel-air ratio) in a 20 ms ramp. Combustion resonance was found at some conditions and may be important in determining the effects of flow transients.

  19. Learning Markov models for stationary system behaviors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yingke; Mao, Hua; Jaeger, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    to a single long observation sequence, and in these situations existing automatic learning methods cannot be applied. In this paper, we adapt algorithms for learning variable order Markov chains from a single observation sequence of a target system, so that stationary system properties can be verified using......Establishing an accurate model for formal verification of an existing hardware or software system is often a manual process that is both time consuming and resource demanding. In order to ease the model construction phase, methods have recently been proposed for automatically learning accurate...... the learned model. Experiments demonstrate that system properties (formulated as stationary probabilities of LTL formulas) can be reliably identified using the learned model....

  20. Stationary nonimaging lenses for solar concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsidas, Panagiotis; Chatzi, Eleni; Modi, Vijay

    2010-09-20

    A novel approach for the design of refractive lenses is presented, where the lens is mounted on a stationary aperture and the Sun is tracked by a moving solar cell. The purpose of this work is to design a quasi-stationary concentrator by replacing the two-axis tracking of the Sun with internal motion of the miniaturized solar cell inside the module. Families of lenses are designed with a variation of the simultaneous multiple surface technique in which the sawtooth genetic algorithm is implemented to optimize the geometric variables of the optic in order to produce high fluxes for a range of incidence angles. Finally, we show examples of the technique for lenses with 60° and 30° acceptance half-angles, with low to medium attainable concentrations.

  1. Relativistic elasticity of stationary fluid branes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Jay; Obers, Niels A.

    2013-02-01

    Fluid mechanics can be formulated on dynamical surfaces of arbitrary codimension embedded in a background space-time. This has been the main object of study of the blackfold approach in which the emphasis has primarily been on stationary fluid configurations. Motivated by this approach we show under certain conditions that a given stationary fluid configuration living on a dynamical surface of vanishing thickness and satisfying locally the first law of thermodynamics will behave like an elastic brane when the surface is subject to small deformations. These results, which are independent of the number of space-time dimensions and of the fluid arising from a gravitational dual, reveal the (electro)elastic character of (charged) black branes when considering extrinsic perturbations.

  2. Combustion and regulation; Combustion et reglementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This conference was organized after the publication of the French by-law no 2010 relative to combustion installations and to the abatement of atmospheric pollution. Five topics were discussed during the conference: the new regulations, their content, innovations and modalities of application; the means of energy suppliers to face the new provisions and their schedule; the manufacturers proposals for existing installations and the new equipments; the administration control; and the impact of the new measures on exploitation and engineering. Twenty papers and 2 journal articles are reported in these proceedings. (J.S.)

  3. Alternative solvents for post combustion carbon capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arachchige, Udara S.P.R. [Telemark University College, Porsgrunn (Norway); Melaaen, Morten C. [Telemark University College, Porsgrunn (Norway); Tel-Tek, Porsgrunn (Norway)

    2013-07-01

    The process model of post combustion chemical absorption is developed in Aspen Plus for both coal and gas fired power plant flue gas treating. The re-boiler energy requirement is considered as the most important factor to be optimized. Two types of solvents, mono-ethylamine (MEA) and di-ethylamine (DEA), are used to implement the model for three different efficiencies. The re-boiler energy requirement for regeneration process is calculated. Temperature and concentration profiles in absorption column are analyzed to understand the model behavior. Re-boiler energy requirement is considerably lower for DEA than MEA as well as impact of corrosion also less in DEA. Therefore, DEA can be recommended as a better solvent for post combustion process for carbon capture plants in fossil fuel fired power industries.

  4. The stationary storage of energy. Available technologies and CEA researches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    After a discussion of the main challenges related to the stationary storage of energy, this publication proposes an overview of the different available technologies: plant for transfer of energy by pumping, compressed air, energy flywheels, hydrogen, lithium-ion battery, redox-flow battery, thermal storage by sensitive heat, thermal-chemical storage coupled to a thermal solar system, thermal storage by phase change, superconductive inductance storage, super-capacitors. It discusses the criteria of choice of storage technology, either for electric energy storage or for heat storage. It proposes an overview of researches performed within the CEA on storage systems: electrochemical, thermal, and hydrogen-based storages. The final chapter addresses current fundamental researches on storage in the field of lithium-ion batteries, hydrogen as a fuel, and thermoelectricity

  5. Grid Converters for Stationary Battery Energy Storage Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trintis, Ionut

    The integration of renewable energy sources in the power system, with high percentage, is a well known challenge nowadays. Power sources like wind and solar are highly volatile, with uctuations on various time scales. One long term solution is to build a continentwide or worldwide supergrid....... Another solution is to use distributed energy storage units, and create virtual power plants. Stationary energy storage is a complementary solution, which can postpone the network expansion and can be optimized for dierent kind of grid services. As an energy storage solution with timing for few seconds...... multilevel converter structure with integrated energy storage is introduced. This converter structure is suitable to interface low and medium voltage energy storage units to medium and high voltage grids. It can also interconnect a DC and AC grid with bidirectional power ow, were both can be backed...

  6. Nitrogen Chemistry in Fluidized Bed Combustion of Coal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anker Degn

    and reduction by homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. The data for the estimation of kinetics of the heterogeneous reactions were measured by one of the partners in the project for char and bed material sampled from a pressurized FBC pilot plant burning Kiveton Park coal. Experimental data from the pilot...... plant were used for model verification. The simulations of the NO emission during staged combustion and NH3 injection for NO reduction were in qualitative agreement with the experimental data. A parametric study of the influence of operating conditions on the conversion of fuel-N to NO showed......, the gas interchange coefficient, the bubble size and the bubble rise velocity. The most important combustion parameters were the rate of CO and CH4 combustion and the fraction of CO produced from char combustion. By using a rate of production analysis, the important reactions in the NO model were...

  7. Solar radiation on Mars: Stationary photovoltaic array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelbaum, J.; Sherman, I.; Landis, G. A.

    1993-01-01

    Solar energy is likely to be an important power source for surface-based operation on Mars. Photovoltaic cells offer many advantages. In this article we have presented analytical expressions and solar radiation data for stationary flat surfaces (horizontal and inclined) as a function of latitude, season and atmospheric dust load (optical depth). The diffuse component of the solar radiation on Mars can be significant, thus greatly affecting the optimal inclination angle of the photovoltaic surface.

  8. Covariance matrix estimation for stationary time series

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Han; Wu, Wei Biao

    2011-01-01

    We obtain a sharp convergence rate for banded covariance matrix estimates of stationary processes. A precise order of magnitude is derived for spectral radius of sample covariance matrices. We also consider a thresholded covariance matrix estimator that can better characterize sparsity if the true covariance matrix is sparse. As our main tool, we implement Toeplitz [Math. Ann. 70 (1911) 351–376] idea and relate eigenvalues of covariance matrices to the spectral densities or Fourier transforms...

  9. Quantum field theory in stationary coordinate systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfautsch, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    Quantum field theory is examined in stationary coordinate systems in Minkowski space. Preliminary to quantization of the scalar field, all of the possible stationary coordinate systems in flat spacetime are classified and explicitly constructed. Six distinct classes of such systems are found. Of these six, three have (identical) event horizons associated with them and five have Killing horizons. Two classes have distinct Killing and event horizons, with an intervening region analogous to the ergosphere in rotating black holes. Particular representatives of each class are selected for subsequent use in the quantum field theory. The scalar field is canonically quantized and a vacuum defined in each of the particular coordinate systems chosen. The vacuum states can be regarded as adapted to the six classes of stationary motions. There are only two vacuum states found, the Minkowski vacuum in those coordinate systems without event horizons and the Fulling vacuum in those with event horizons. The responses of monopole detectors traveling along stationary world lines are calculated in both the Minkowski and Fulling vacuums. The responses for each class of motions are distinct from those for every other class. A vacuum defined by the response of a detector must therefore not be equivalent in general to a vacuum defined by canonical quantization. Quantization of the scalar field within a rotating wedge is examined. It has not been possible to construct mode functions satisfying appropriate boundary conditions on the surface of the wedge. The asymptotic form of the renormalized stress tensor near the surfaces had been calculated and is found to include momentum terms which represent a circulation of energy within the wedge

  10. Stationary black holes: large D analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Ryotaku; Tanabe, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    We consider the effective theory of large D stationary black holes. By solving the Einstein equations with a cosmological constant using the 1/D expansion in near zone of the black hole we obtain the effective equation for the stationary black hole. The effective equation describes the Myers-Perry black hole, bumpy black holes and, possibly, the black ring solution as its solutions. In this effective theory the black hole is represented as an embedded membrane in the background, e.g., Minkowski or Anti-de Sitter spacetime and its mean curvature is given by the surface gravity redshifted by the background gravitational field and the local Lorentz boost. The local Lorentz boost property of the effective equation is observed also in the metric itself. In fact we show that the leading order metric of the Einstein equation in the 1/D expansion is generically regarded as a Lorentz boosted Schwarzschild black hole. We apply this Lorentz boost property of the stationary black hole solution to solve perturbation equations. As a result we obtain an analytic formula for quasinormal modes of the singly rotating Myers-Perry black hole in the 1/D expansion.

  11. Generating stationary entangled states in superconducting qubits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jing; Liu Yuxi; Li Chunwen; Tarn, T.-J.; Nori, Franco

    2009-01-01

    When a two-qubit system is initially maximally entangled, two independent decoherence channels, one per qubit, would greatly reduce the entanglement of the two-qubit system when it reaches its stationary state. We propose a method on how to minimize such a loss of entanglement in open quantum systems. We find that the quantum entanglement of general two-qubit systems with controllable parameters can be controlled by tuning both the single-qubit parameters and the two-qubit coupling strengths. Indeed, the maximum fidelity F max between the stationary entangled state, ρ ∞ , and the maximally entangled state, ρ m , can be about 2/3≅max(tr(ρ ∞ ρ m ))=F max , corresponding to a maximum stationary concurrence, C max , of about 1/3≅C(ρ ∞ )=C max . This is significant because the quantum entanglement of the two-qubit system can be produced and kept, even for a long time. We apply our proposal to several types of two-qubit superconducting circuits and show how the entanglement of these two-qubit circuits can be optimized by varying experimentally controllable parameters.

  12. Stationary stochastic processes theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lindgren, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Some Probability and Process BackgroundSample space, sample function, and observablesRandom variables and stochastic processesStationary processes and fieldsGaussian processesFour historical landmarksSample Function PropertiesQuadratic mean propertiesSample function continuityDerivatives, tangents, and other characteristicsStochastic integrationAn ergodic resultExercisesSpectral RepresentationsComplex-valued stochastic processesBochner's theorem and the spectral distributionSpectral representation of a stationary processGaussian processesStationary counting processesExercisesLinear Filters - General PropertiesLinear time invariant filtersLinear filters and differential equationsWhite noise in linear systemsLong range dependence, non-integrable spectra, and unstable systemsThe ARMA-familyLinear Filters - Special TopicsThe Hilbert transform and the envelopeThe sampling theoremKarhunen-Loève expansionClassical Ergodic Theory and MixingThe basic ergodic theorem in L2Stationarity and transformationsThe ergodic th...

  13. Backset-stationary and during car driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Bertil; Stenlund, Hans; Björnstig, Ulf

    2008-12-01

    The aim of the study was to measure and analyze backset, defined as the horizontal distance between the back of the occupant's head and a point located on the ventral/top aspect of the sewn rim of the head restraint, with the car stationary and during driving, in the driver's position in a modern car. A population of 65 subjects, 35 males and 30 females, was studied in a Volvo V70 car, model year 2007. The subjects were studied in the driver's position, in a self-selected posture. Stationary backset was measured with the technique described by Jonsson et al. (2007) and backset during driving with video analysis. Descriptive data were calculated, and variability and correlation analyses were performed. A t-test was used to test differences of means. Significance level was set to 0.05. In comparison to stationary backset, mean backset during driving was 43 mm greater in males and 41 mm greater in females. Driving backset was 44 mm larger in males than in females. Driving backset was moderately correlated (0.37-0.43) to stature, seated height, and seat back angle in males and moderately correlated (0.44-0.52) to hip width, waist circumference, and weight in females. The overall intraclass correlation coefficient for backset during driving was 0.81 (CI: 0.75-0.86). These results may be of use in designing future updates of test protocols/routines for geometric backset, such as RCAR and RCAR-IIWPG.

  14. 30 CFR 57.14115 - Stationary grinding machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stationary grinding machines. 57.14115 Section... and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14115 Stationary grinding machines. Stationary grinding machines, other than special bit grinders, shall be equipped with— (a) Peripheral hoods...

  15. 30 CFR 77.401 - Stationary grinding machines; protective devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stationary grinding machines; protective... OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Safeguards for Mechanical Equipment § 77.401 Stationary grinding machines; protective devices. (a) Stationary grinding machines other than special bit grinders shall be equipped with...

  16. 30 CFR 75.1723 - Stationary grinding machines; protective devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stationary grinding machines; protective....1723 Stationary grinding machines; protective devices. (a) Stationary grinding machines other than... the wheel. (3) Safety washers. (b) Grinding wheels shall be operated within the specifications of the...

  17. 30 CFR 56.14115 - Stationary grinding machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stationary grinding machines. 56.14115 Section... Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14115 Stationary grinding machines. Stationary grinding machines, other than special bit grinders, shall be equipped with— (a) Peripheral hoods capable of...

  18. Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Michael A.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Steffler, Eric D.; Swank, W. David

    2013-04-02

    Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

  19. Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbert Andrus; Gregory Burns; John Chiu; Gregory Lijedahl; Peter Stromberg; Paul Thibeault

    2009-01-07

    For the past several years Alstom Power Inc. (Alstom), a leading world-wide power system manufacturer and supplier, has been in the initial stages of developing an entirely new, ultra-clean, low cost, high efficiency power plant for the global power market. This new power plant concept is based on a hybrid combustion-gasification process utilizing high temperature chemical and thermal looping technology The process consists of the oxidation, reduction, carbonation, and calcination of calcium-based compounds, which chemically react with coal, biomass, or opportunity fuels in two chemical loops and one thermal loop. The chemical and thermal looping technology can be alternatively configured as (i) a combustion-based steam power plant with CO{sub 2} capture, (ii) a hybrid combustion-gasification process producing a syngas for gas turbines or fuel cells, or (iii) an integrated hybrid combustion-gasification process producing hydrogen for gas turbines, fuel cells or other hydrogen based applications while also producing a separate stream of CO{sub 2} for use or sequestration. In its most advanced configuration, this new concept offers the promise to become the technology link from today's Rankine cycle steam power plants to tomorrow's advanced energy plants. The objective of this work is to develop and verify the high temperature chemical and thermal looping process concept at a small-scale pilot facility in order to enable AL to design, construct and demonstrate a pre-commercial, prototype version of this advanced system. In support of this objective, Alstom and DOE started a multi-year program, under this contract. Before the contract started, in a preliminary phase (Phase 0) Alstom funded and built the required small-scale pilot facility (Process Development Unit, PDU) at its Power Plant Laboratories in Windsor, Connecticut. Construction was completed in calendar year 2003. The objective for Phase I was to develop the indirect combustion loop with CO{sub 2

  20. Optical Tomography in Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evseev, Vadim

    spectral measurements at several line-of-sights with a view to applications for tomographic measurements on full-scale industrial combustion systems. The system was successfully applied on industrial scale for simultaneous fast exhaust gas temperature measurements in the three optical ports of the exhaust......D project, it was also important to investigate the spectral properties of major combustion species such as carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide in the infrared range at high temperatures to provide the theoretical background for the development of the optical tomography methods. The new software....... JQSRT 113 (2012) 2222, 10.1016/j.jqsrt.2012.07.015] included in the PhD thesis as an attachment. The knowledge and experience gained in the PhD project is the first important step towards introducing the advanced optical tomography methods of combustion diagnostics developed in the project to future...

  1. Internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Quentin A.; Mecredy, Henry E.; O'Neal, Glenn B.

    1991-01-01

    An improved engine is provided that more efficiently consumes difficult fuels such as coal slurries or powdered coal. The engine includes a precombustion chamber having a portion thereof formed by an ignition plug. The precombustion chamber is arranged so that when the piston is proximate the head, the precombustion chamber is sealed from the main cylinder or the main combustion chamber and when the piston is remote from the head, the precombustion chamber and main combustion chamber are in communication. The time for burning of fuel in the precombustion chamber can be regulated by the distance required to move the piston from the top dead center position to the position wherein the precombustion chamber and main combustion chamber are in communication.

  2. Dust Combustion Safety Issues for Fusion Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. C. Cadwallader

    2003-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of a safety research task to identify the safety issues and phenomenology of metallic dust fires and explosions that are postulated for fusion experiments. There are a variety of metal dusts that are created by plasma erosion and disruptions within the plasma chamber, as well as normal industrial dusts generated in the more conventional equipment in the balance of plant. For fusion, in-vessel dusts are generally mixtures of several elements; that is, the constituent elements in alloys and the variety of elements used for in-vessel materials. For example, in-vessel dust could be composed of beryllium from a first wall coating, tungsten from a divertor plate, copper from a plasma heating antenna or diagnostic, and perhaps some iron and chromium from the steel vessel wall or titanium and vanadium from the vessel wall. Each of these elements has its own unique combustion characteristics, and mixtures of elements must be evaluated for the mixture’s combustion properties. Issues of particle size, dust temperature, and presence of other combustible materials (i.e., deuterium and tritium) also affect combustion in air. Combustion in other gases has also been investigated to determine if there are safety concerns with “inert” atmospheres, such as nitrogen. Several coolants have also been reviewed to determine if coolant breach into the plasma chamber would enhance the combustion threat; for example, in-vessel steam from a water coolant breach will react with metal dust. The results of this review are presented here.

  3. 40 CFR 60.1370 - What records must I keep for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... waste combustion unit at your plant. Include supporting calculations. (b) Records of low carbon feed... waste combustion units that use activated carbon? 60.1370 Section 60.1370 Protection of Environment... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units for Which Construction is...

  4. Unburned carbon in combustion residues from mainly solid biofuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjurstroem H; Lind B; Lagerkvist A

    2012-02-15

    Unburned carbon in 21 combustion residues from solid biofuels is investigated using several methods of analysis (a.o. LOI and TOC), as well as micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results are used to discuss the distribution of unburned carbon in the residues from the different combustion plants and its nature (organic or elemental). The consequences of the elemental nature of carbon for environmental properties of the residue are noted

  5. Fuel and combustion stratification study of Partially Premixed Combustion

    OpenAIRE

    Izadi Najafabadi, M.; Dam, N.; Somers, B.; Johansson, B.

    2016-01-01

    Relatively high levels of stratification is one of the main advantages of Partially Premixed Combustion (PPC) over the Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) concept. Fuel stratification smoothens heat release and improves controllability of this kind of combustion. However, the lack of a clear definition of “fuel and combustion stratifications” is obvious in literature. Hence, it is difficult to compare stratification levels of different PPC strategies or other combustion concepts. T...

  6. Aerosols from biomass combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nussbaumer, T

    2001-07-01

    This report is the proceedings of a seminar on biomass combustion and aerosol production organised jointly by the International Energy Agency's (IEA) Task 32 on bio energy and the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE). This collection of 16 papers discusses the production of aerosols and fine particles by the burning of biomass and their effects. Expert knowledge on the environmental impact of aerosols, formation mechanisms, measurement technologies, methods of analysis and measures to be taken to reduce such emissions is presented. The seminar, visited by 50 participants from 11 countries, shows, according to the authors, that the reduction of aerosol emissions resulting from biomass combustion will remain a challenge for the future.

  7. High Gravity (g) Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    UNICORN (Unsteady Ignition and Combustion with Reactions) code10. Flame propagation in a tube that is 50-mm wide and 1000-mm long (similar to that...turbine engine manufacturers, estimating the primary zone space heating rate. Both combustion systems, from Company A and Company B, required a much...MBTU/atm-hr-ft3) Te m pe ra tu re R is e (K ) dP/P = 2% dP/P = 2.5% dP/P = 3% dP/P = 3.5% dP/P = 4% Company A Company B Figure 13: Heat Release Rate

  8. Combustibility of tetraphenylborate solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D.D.

    1989-01-01

    Liquid slurries expected under normal in-tank processing (ITP) operations are not ignitible because of their high water content. However, deposits of dry solids from the slurries are combustible and produce dense, black smoke when burned. The dry solids burn similarly to Styrofoam and more easily than sawdust. It is the opinion of fire hazard experts that a benzene vapor deflagration could ignite the dry solids. A tetraphenylborate solids fire will rapidly plug the waste tank HEPA ventilation filters due to the nature of the smoke produced. To prevent ignition and combustion of these solids, the waste tanks have been equipped with a nitrogen inerting system

  9. Studies in combustion dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koszykowski, M.L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop a fundamental understanding and a quantitative predictive capability in combustion modeling. A large part of the understanding of the chemistry of combustion processes comes from {open_quotes}chemical kinetic modeling.{close_quotes} However, successful modeling is not an isolated activity. It necessarily involves the integration of methods and results from several diverse disciplines and activities including theoretical chemistry, elementary reaction kinetics, fluid mechanics and computational science. Recently the authors have developed and utilized new tools for parallel processing to implement the first numerical model of a turbulent diffusion flame including a {open_quotes}full{close_quotes} chemical mechanism.

  10. Combustion stratification for naphtha from CI combustion to PPC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vallinayagam, R.; Vedharaj, S.; An, Y.; Dawood, A.; Izadi Najafabadi, M.; Somers, L.M.T.; Johansson, B.H.

    2017-01-01

    This study demonstrated the change in combustion homogeneity from conventional diesel combustion via partially premixed combustion towards HCCI. Experiments are performed in an optical diesel engine at a speed of 1200 rpm with diesel fuel. Single injection strategy is employed and the fuel is

  11. 40 CFR 60.4305 - Does this subpart apply to my stationary combustion turbine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... turbine. Any additional heat input to associated heat recovery steam generators (HRSG) or duct burners... subpart are exempt from the requirements of subpart GG of this part. Heat recovery steam generators and duct burners regulated under this subpart are exempted from the requirements of subparts Da, Db, and Dc...

  12. Modern biofuel-fired power plants in power and heat production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuominen, J.

    1993-01-01

    This article gives a survey of the gasification techniques, power plant technology and boiler solutions for small power plants using biofuels. Also some experiences from commercial projects and targets of development work are presented. At present, fluidized bed combustion is by far the most important combustion technique for biomass fuels in small power plants. Compared with grate combustion, fluidized bed combustion is a distinctly more economical combustion method, and so the thermic dimensioning of a steam boiler is easier. Besides, a wider range of fuels can be used in fluidized bed combustion. Fluidized bed combustion is an excellent combustion technique for biofuels. Plenty of experience has been gained in the combustion of peat and industrial waste wood, as far as both bubbling fluidized bed combustion (BFBC) and circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) are concerned. Both of the fluidized bed techniques are suitable for the combustion of biomasses

  13. Toxicology of Biodiesel Combustion products

    Science.gov (United States)

    1. Introduction The toxicology of combusted biodiesel is an emerging field. Much of the current knowledge about biological responses and health effects stems from studies of exposures to other fuel sources (typically petroleum diesel, gasoline, and wood) incompletely combusted. ...

  14. Underground treatment of combustible minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarapuu, E

    1954-10-14

    A process is described for treating oil underground, consisting in introducing several electrodes spaced one from the other in a bed of combustibles underground so that they come in electric contact with this bed of combustibles remaining insulated from the ground, and applying to the electrodes a voltage sufficient to produce an electric current across the bed of combustibles, so as to heat it and create an electric connection between the electrodes on traversing the bed of combustibles.

  15. Supersonic Combustion Ramjet Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    was in collaboration with Prof. R. Bowersox (Texas A&M University) and Dr. K. Kobayashi ( Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency, JAXA). 4.2 Ignition... cinema stereoscopic PIV system for the measurement of micro- and meso-scale turbulent premixed flame dynamics,” Paper B13, 5th US Combustion

  16. Infrared monitoring of combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, S.C.; Morrison, P.W. Jr.; Solomon, P.R.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the use of Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy for combustion monitoring is described. A combination of emission, transmission, and reflection FT-IR spectroscopy yields data on the temperature and composition of the gases, surfaces and suspended particles in the combustion environment. Detection sensitivity of such trace exhaust gases as CO, CO 2 , SO 2 , NO x , and unburned hydrocarbons is at the ppm level. Tomographic reconstruction converts line-of-sight measurements into spatially resolved temperature and concentration data. Examples from various combustion processes are used to demonstrate the capabilities of the technique. Industrial measurements are described that have been performed directly in the combustion zone and in the exhaust duct of a large chemical recovery boiler. Other measurements of hot slag show how FT-IR spectroscopy can determine the temperature and optical properties of surfaces. In addition, experiments with water droplets show that transmission FT-IR data yield spectra that characterize particle size and number density

  17. Combustible dust tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    The sugar dust explosion in Georgia on February 7, 2008 killed 14 workers and injured many others (OSHA, 2009). As a consequence of this explosion, OSHA revised its Combustible Dust National Emphasis (NEP) program. The NEP targets 64 industries with more than 1,000 inspections and has found more tha...

  18. deNOx catalysts for biomass combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Steffen Buus

    The present thesis revolves around the challenges involved in removal of nitrogen oxides in biomass fired power plants. Nitrogen oxides are unwanted byproducts formed to some extent during almost any combustion. In coal fired plants these byproducts are removed by selective catalytic reduction......, however the alkali in biomass complicate matters. Alkali in biomass severely deactivates the catalyst used for the selective catalytic reduction in matter of weeks, hence a more alkali resistant catalyst is needed. In the thesis a solution to the problem is presented, the nano particle deNOx catalyst...

  19. Combustion of uraniferous lignites in fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, G.; Gasos, P.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper a description of the continuous fluid bed combustion pilot plant unit, installed in the Junta de Energia Nuclear facilities, is presented. Besides, this paper deals with some of the studies carried out in the pilot plant aimed at the recovery of uranium from lignites, high in sulfur and ashes, coming from Calaf basin (Barcelona). These studies include the recovery of the heating value of these lignites and the reduction of environmental effect of SO 2 . Based on these studies an application exercise is presented. 9 references, 5 figures, 5 tables

  20. Stationary and non-stationary extreme value modeling of extreme temperature in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Husna; Salleh, Nur Hanim Mohd; Kassim, Suraiya

    2014-09-01

    Extreme annual temperature of eighteen stations in Malaysia is fitted to the Generalized Extreme Value distribution. Stationary and non-stationary models with trend are considered for each station and the Likelihood Ratio test is used to determine the best-fitting model. Results show that three out of eighteen stations i.e. Bayan Lepas, Labuan and Subang favor a model which is linear in the location parameter. A hierarchical cluster analysis is employed to investigate the existence of similar behavior among the stations. Three distinct clusters are found in which one of them consists of the stations that favor the non-stationary model. T-year estimated return levels of the extreme temperature are provided based on the chosen models.