WorldWideScience

Sample records for station control operators

  1. Elements of an advanced integrated operator control station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, M.M.; Kreifeldt, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    One of the critical determinants of performance for any remotely operated maintenance system is the compatibility achieved between elements of the man/machine interface (e.g., master manipulator controller, controls, displays) and the human operator. In the remote control engineering task of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program, considerable attention has been devoted to optimizing the man/machine interface of the operator control station. This system must be considered an integral element of the overall maintenance work system which includes transporters, manipulators, remote viewing, and other parts. The control station must reflect the integration of the operator team, control/display panels, manipulator master controllers, and remote viewing monitors. Human factors principles and experimentation have been used in the development of an advanced integrated operator control station designed for the advance servomanipulator. Key features of this next-generation design are summarized in this presentation. 7 references, 4 figures

  2. Elements of an advanced integrated operator control station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, M.M.; Kreifeldt, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    One of the critical determinants of peformance for any remotely operated maintenance system is the compatibility achieved between elements of the man/machine interface (e.g., master manipulator controller, controls, displays, etc.) and the human operator. In the Remote Control Engineering task of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program, considerable attention has been devoted to optimizing the man/machine interface of the operator control station. This system must be considered an integral element of the overall maintenance work system which includes transporters, manipulators, remote viewing, and other parts. The control station must reflect the integration of the operator team, control/display panels, manipulator master controllers, and remote viewing monitors. Human factors principles and experimentation have been used in the development of an advanced integrated operator control station designed for the advance servomanipulator. Key features of this next-generation design are summarized in this presentation. 7 references, 4 figures

  3. Space station operations management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Kathleen V.

    1989-01-01

    Space Station Freedom operations management concepts must be responsive to the unique challenges presented by the permanently manned international laboratory. Space Station Freedom will be assembled over a three year period where the operational environment will change as significant capability plateaus are reached. First Element Launch, Man-Tended Capability, and Permanent Manned Capability, represent milestones in operational capability that is increasing toward mature operations capability. Operations management concepts are being developed to accomodate the varying operational capabilities during assembly, as well as the mature operational environment. This paper describes operations management concepts designed to accomodate the uniqueness of Space Station Freedoom, utilizing tools and processes that seek to control operations costs.

  4. Automatic sequencing and control of Space Station airlock operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himel, Victor; Abeles, Fred J.; Auman, James; Tqi, Terry O.

    1989-01-01

    Procedures that have been developed as part of the NASA JSC-sponsored pre-prototype Checkout, Servicing and Maintenance (COSM) program for pre- and post-EVA airlock operations are described. This paper addresses the accompanying pressure changes in the airlock and in the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Additionally, the paper focuses on the components that are checked out, and includes the step-by-step sequences to be followed by the crew, the required screen displays and prompts that accompany each step, and a description of the automated processes that occur.

  5. Airline Operational Control (AOC)/UAS Ground Control Station (GCS) Collaboration, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to form a network and a set of tools that will create a shared situation awareness with Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Ground Control Stations (GCSs) and...

  6. 47 CFR 97.109 - Station control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Station control. 97.109 Section 97.109... SERVICE Station Operation Standards § 97.109 Station control. (a) Each amateur station must have at least one control point. (b) When a station is being locally controlled, the control operator must be at the...

  7. Control Centre operations as the focus for building station teamwork - issues and resource impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, G.; Lane, L.; Davey, E.

    2006-01-01

    Effective teamwork among station work groups is essential for plant production and safety in all phases of plant operation. To achieve effective teamwork, all contributing work groups must have ongoing access to and share a common perspective on station work priorities, and recognize how their individual contributions fit with and support the contributions of other groups in support of the larger station goals. Achieving and maintaining this alignment in perspective across all workgroups can be a challenge in large organizations. This paper discusses the experience at Darlington in building and maintaining station teamwork among the station workgroups in support of day-to-day plant operations. The issues encountered and the resource impacts of specific teamwork supporting practices adopted are outlined. (author)

  8. Potential human factors deficiencies in the design of local control stations and operator interfaces in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, C.S.; Levy, I.S.; Fecht, B.A.

    1984-04-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory has completed a project to identify human factors deficiencies in safety-significant control stations outside the control room of a nuclear power plant and to determine whether NUREG-0700, Guidelines for Control Room Design Reviews, would be sufficient for reviewing those local control stations (LCSs). The project accomplished this task by first, reviewing existing data pertaining to human factors deficiencies in LCSs involved in significant safety actions; second, surveying LCSs environments and design features at several operating nuclear power plants; and third, assessing the results of that survey relative to the contents of NUREG-0700

  9. Space Station Freedom operations costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accola, Anne L.; Williams, Gregory J.

    1988-01-01

    Measures to reduce the operation costs of the Space Station which can be implemented in the design and development stages are discussed. Operational functions are described in the context of an overall operations concept. The provisions for operations cost responsibilities among the partners in the Space Station program are presented. Cost estimating methodologies and the way in which operations costs affect the design and development process are examined.

  10. Local control stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, W.S.; Higgins, J.C.; Wachtel, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes research concerning the effects of human engineering design at local control stations (i.e., operator interfaces located outside the control room) on human performance and plant safety. The research considered both multifunction panels (e.g. remote shutdown panels) as well as single-function interfaces (e.g., valves, breakers, gauges, etc.). Changes in performance shaping factors associated with variations in human engineering at LCSs were estimated based on expert opinion. By means of a scaling procedure, these estimates were used to modify the human error probabilities in a PRA model, which was then employed to generate estimates of plant risk and scoping-level value/impact ratios for various human engineering upgrades. Recent documentation of human engineering deficiencies at single-function LCSs was also reviewed, and an assessment of the current status of LCSs with respect to human engineering was conducted

  11. An advanced automation system for operation of Sao Paulo pumping stations from TRANSPETRO Master Control Center - CNCO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corcioli, Mario Sergio; Barreto, Camila Maria Benevenuto [TRANSPETRO, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Since 2000 the operations of the TRANSPETRO pumping stations in the state of Sao Paulo region began to be transferred from local control centers located at the transfer and storage terminals to the National Operational Control Center (CNCO) of TRANSPETRO, located at the headquarters of the company, in Rio de Janeiro. The proposed paper aims to presenting an overview of the automation system that was developed to enable such pumping stations to be operated from CNCO in a reliable and secure manner, focusing on tools that offer an embedded system alarms completely free of false alarms with automatic determining of the root cause, and also automatic and advanced diagnoses of problems caused by failures of hardware, human error and abnormal conditions of the process, providing the CNCO SCADA system of accurate and quality information that help operators to make decisions. The referred automation system was integrated for the first time to CNCO SCADA system in 2000, for pipeline pumps of Osvat (Sao Sebastiao - Vale do Paraiba pipeline) station at the Sao Sebastiao Terminal - northern coast of Sao Paulo region. (author)

  12. RISK DECREASE PROBLEM WITH MAKING ERRORS IN ACTIVITY OF OPERATORS DEALING WITH AUTOMATIC CONTROL SYSTEMS OF GAS-DISTRIBUTION STATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Egorov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains an analysis of specific features pertaining to the activity of operators dealing with automatic control systems of gas-distribution stations. The professional operator’s activity is presented in the form of the developed data model. Possible conceptual approaches to the research are analyzed in the paper. The paper describes an author’s approach to studying a risk decrease problem in the activity of operators on the basis of the analytical research results. Technology for obtaining  research results is cited in the paper. 

  13. The quality control program for an Ontario Hydro operated thermoluminescence dosimetry service at nuclear generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orr, B.H.; Walsh, M.L.

    1975-11-01

    An essential aspect of the Ontario Hydro TLD service is the operation of an acceptable quality control (QC) program. The QC program which has been generally accepted by the A.E.C.B. is presented in this document. The aims of the program are as follows: (1) to ensure that Ontario Hydro maintains an acceptable standard of dosimetry; (2) to be able to demonstrate to any interested party that the dose measurements for individual workers have a high degree of credibility. (author)

  14. Automating Space Station operations planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemer, Kathleen A.

    1989-01-01

    The development and implementation of the operations planning processes for the Space Station are discussed. A three level planning process, consisting of strategic, tactical, and execution level planning, is being developed. The integration of the planning procedures into a tactical planning system is examined and the planning phases are illustrated.

  15. Space station operating system study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Albert E.; Harwell, Morris C.

    1988-01-01

    The current phase of the Space Station Operating System study is based on the analysis, evaluation, and comparison of the operating systems implemented on the computer systems and workstations in the software development laboratory. Primary emphasis has been placed on the DEC MicroVMS operating system as implemented on the MicroVax II computer, with comparative analysis of the SUN UNIX system on the SUN 3/260 workstation computer, and to a limited extent, the IBM PC/AT microcomputer running PC-DOS. Some benchmark development and testing was also done for the Motorola MC68010 (VM03 system) before the system was taken from the laboratory. These systems were studied with the objective of determining their capability to support Space Station software development requirements, specifically for multi-tasking and real-time applications. The methodology utilized consisted of development, execution, and analysis of benchmark programs and test software, and the experimentation and analysis of specific features of the system or compilers in the study.

  16. Robot-operated quality control station based on the UTT method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghardt, Andrzej; Kurc, Krzysztof; Szybicki, Dariusz; Muszyńska, Magdalena; Nawrocki, Jacek

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a robotic test stand for the ultrasonic transmission tomography (UTT) inspection of stator vane thickness. The article presents the method of the test stand design in Autodesk Robot Structural Analysis Professional 2013 software suite. The performance of the designed test stand solution was simulated in the RobotStudio software suite. The operating principle of the test stand measurement system is presented with a specific focus on the measurement strategy. The results of actual wall thickness measurements performed on stator vanes are presented.

  17. Operations of the thermal control system for Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer electronics following the beta angle of the International Space Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Kun; Li, Jinbo; Cui, Zheng; Wang, Naihua; Sun, Qie; Cheng, Lin, E-mail: cheng@sdu.edu.cn

    2014-12-11

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) has been running and measuring cosmic rays on the International Space Station (ISS) since May 19, 2011. The thermal control system (TCS) plays an important role in keeping all components and equipment working in an operational temperature range. Since the AMS started working on the ISS, AMS thermal engineers have been monitoring the on-orbit status of the TCS. During normal operation, the local temperature of AMS components regularly varies along with the β angle of the ISS. Based on the collected temperature data, the general characteristics of local temperature variations of TCS for AMS Electronics following the β of the ISS are discussed with the statistics of the orbit-averaged temperature and the orbit standard deviation of temperature. Furthermore some temperature anomalies at specific β are also studied. - Highlights: • The variation of the main radiators temperature is statistically analyzed. • The hot case and cold case for the main radiators are found in normal operations. • The solar illumination falling on the inner sheet of RAM radiator leads to temperature jump. • The temperature anomalies on the WAKE radiator show a uniform trend except WR3 sensor. • The regularity of the temperature variation is described with fitted equations.

  18. Space Station Freedom operations planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accola, Anne L.; Keith, Bryant

    1989-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom program is developing an operations planning structure which assigns responsibility for planning activities to three tiers of management. The strategic level develops the policy, goals and requirements for the program over a five-year horizon. Planning at the tactical level emphasizes program integration and planning for a two-year horizon. The tactical planning process, architecture, and products have been documented and discussed with the international partners. Tactical planning includes the assignment of user and system hardware as well as significant operational events to a time increment (the period of time from the arrival of one Shuttle to the manned base to the arrival of the next). Execution-level planning emphasizes implementation, and each organization produces detailed plans, by increment, that are specific to its function.

  19. Sizewell B Power Station control dosimetry system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renn, G.

    1995-01-01

    Sizewell B Power Station is the first Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) built in the UK for commercial electricity production. An effective control dosimetry system is a crucial tool, in allowing the station to assess its radiological performance against targets. This paper gives an overview of the control dosimetry system at Sizewell B and describes early operating experience with the system. (UK)

  20. Work/control stations in Space Station weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willits, Charles

    1990-01-01

    An ergonomic integration of controls, displays, and associated interfaces with an operator, whose body geometry and dynamics may be altered by the state of weightlessness, is noted to rank in importance with the optimal positioning of controls relative to the layout and architecture of 'body-ported' work/control stations applicable to the NASA Space Station Freedom. A long-term solution to this complex design problem is envisioned to encompass the following features: multiple imaging, virtual optics, screen displays controlled by a keyboard ergonomically designed for weightlessness, cursor control, a CCTV camera, and a hand-controller featuring 'no-grip' vernier/tactile positioning. This controller frees all fingers for multiple-switch actuations, while retaining index/register determination with the hand controller. A single architectural point attachment/restraint may be used which requires no residual muscle tension in either brief or prolonged operation.

  1. Principles of nuclear power station control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowles, J.B.

    1975-12-01

    This memorandum represents lecture notes first distributed as part of a UKAEA introductory course on Reactor Technology held during November 1975. A nuclear power station is only one element of a dispersed interconnected arrangement of other nuclear and fossil-fired units which together constitute the national 'grid'. Thus the control of any one station must relate to the objectives of the grid network as a whole. A precise control of the supply frequency of the grid is achieved by regulating the output power of individual stations, and it is necessary for each station to be stable when operating in isolation with a variable load. As regards individual stations, several special control problems concerned with individual plant items are discussed, such as: controlled reactivity insertions, temperature reactivity time constants and flow instability. A simplified analysis establishes a fundamental relationship between the stored thermal energy of a boiler unit (a function of mechanical construction) and the flexibility of the heat source (nuclear or fossil-fired) if the station is to cope satisfactorily with demands arising from unscheduled losses of other generating sets or transmission capacity. Two basic control schemes for power station operation are described known as 'coupled' and 'decoupled control'. Each of the control modes has its own merits, which depend on the proposed station operating strategy (base load or load following) and the nature of the heat source. (U.K.)

  2. Space Station overall management approach for operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paules, G.

    1986-01-01

    An Operations Management Concept developed by NASA for its Space Station Program is discussed. The operational goals, themes, and design principles established during program development are summarized. The major operations functions are described, including: space systems operations, user support operations, prelaunch/postlanding operations, logistics support operations, market research, and cost/financial management. Strategic, tactical, and execution levels of operational decision-making are defined.

  3. Operations Data Files, driving force behind International Space Station operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppenbrouwers, Tom; Ferra, Lionel; Markus, Michael; Wolff, Mikael

    2017-09-01

    Almost all tasks performed by the astronauts on-board the International Space Station (ISS) and by ground controllers in Mission Control Centre, from operation and maintenance of station systems to the execution of scientific experiments or high risk visiting vehicles docking manoeuvres, would not be possible without Operations Data Files (ODF). ODFs are the User Manuals of the Space Station and have multiple faces, going from traditional step-by-step procedures, scripts, cue cards, over displays, to software which guides the crew through the execution of certain tasks. Those key operational documents are standardized as they are used on-board the Space Station by an international crew constantly changing every 3 months. Furthermore this harmonization effort is paramount for consistency as the crew moves from one element to another in a matter of seconds, and from one activity to another. On ground, a significant large group of experts from all International Partners drafts, prepares reviews and approves on a daily basis all Operations Data Files, ensuring their timely availability on-board the ISS for all activities. Unavailability of these operational documents will halt the conduct of experiments or cancel milestone events. This paper will give an insight in the ground preparation work for the ODFs (with a focus on ESA ODF processes) and will present an overview on ODF formats and their usage within the ISS environment today and show how vital they are. Furthermore the focus will be on the recently implemented ODF features, which significantly ease the use of this documentation and improve the efficiency of the astronauts performing the tasks. Examples are short video demonstrations, interactive 3D animations, Execute Tailored Procedures (XTP-versions), tablet products, etc.

  4. RF-Station control crate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuzekom, M.G. van; Es, J.T. van.

    1992-01-01

    This report gives a description of the electronic control-system for the RF-station of AmPS. The electronics form the connection between the computer-system and the hardware of the RF-station. Only the elements of the systems which are not described in the other NIKHEF-reports are here discussed in detail. (author). 7 figs

  5. An Operations Management System for the Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, H. G.

    1986-09-01

    This paper presents an overview of the conceptual design of an integrated onboard Operations Management System (OMS). Both hardware and software concepts are presented and the integrated space station network is discussed. It is shown that using currently available software technology, an integrated software solution for Space Station management and control, implemented with OMS software, is feasible.

  6. 30 CFR 77.309-1 - Control stations; location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control stations; location. 77.309-1 Section 77... MINES Thermal Dryers § 77.309-1 Control stations; location. Thermal dryer system control stations constructed after June 30, 1971, shall be installed at a location which will give to the operator of the...

  7. Design and development of improved ballscrew and control circuit for reactivity mechanisms of 220 MWe PHWR operating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, A.K.; Rama Mohan, N.; Mathew, Jimmy; Mathur, M.K.; Roy, S.; Ingle, V.J.; Ghoshal, B.; Ashok Kumar, B.; Patil, D.C.; Dwivedi, K.P.; Bhambra, H.S.

    2006-01-01

    There has been persistent failure of Ballscrews used for Reactivity Mechanism in standardised 220 MWe PHWR units. The detailed review of failures indicated that on one hand the number of demands for operation of Absorber Rod and Regulating Rod had increased due to use of digital circuit in the drive control system as compared analog circuits used earlier. On the other hand, the existing design of ballscrew had some inherent weaknesses to withstand the loads generated during starting and stopping of the regulating rods. To solve these problems two-pronged approach was adopted. The control problem was traced to overshooting of the servomotor of Absorber Rod and Regulating Rod to the full speed at the time of starting and thereafter, settling to the required speed. This sudden overshooting produces a jerk in the drive mechanism. A modified circuit has been evolved to solve this problem. Also, Changing the dead band and gain of control circuits have reduced the number of rod movements. A 'new design' of Ballscrew assembly was finalised by NPCIL with a view to withstand the severe loads generated during starting and stopping of the regulating rods and to achieve enhanced service life under water-lubrication condition. Based on this design, prototype assemblies were successfully manufactured by two Indian manufacturers. The design was cleared for manufacturing of the bulk production of Ballscrew assemblies after evaluation of its performance during rigorous 'Acceptance Testing'. Two ballscrews of new design were installed in the KGS-1 reactor and are operating since July 2005. This paper covers operational feedback including ballscrew failures in various units, Design/Development of Modified Reactivity Mechanism Ballscrews and Control Circuit based on analysis of underlying causes of failures and feedback on performance of new design. (author)

  8. Operation feedback of hydrogen filling station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pregassame, S.; Barral, K.; Allidieres, L.; Charbonneau, T.; Lacombe, Y.

    2004-01-01

    One of the technical challenges of hydrogen technology is the development of hydrogen infrastructures which satisfy either safety requirements and reliability of filling processes. AIR LIQUIDE realized an hydrogen filling station in Sassenage (France) operational since September 2003. This station is able to fill 3 buses a day up to 350bar by equilibrium with high pressure buffers. In parallel with commercial stations, the group wanted to create a testing ground in real conditions running with several objectives: validate on a full scale bench a simulation tool able to predict the temperature of both gas and cylinder's materials during filling processes; define the best filling procedures in order to reach mass, temperature and filling time targets; analyse the temperature distribution and evolution inside the cylinder; get a general knowledge about hydrogen stations from safety and reliability point of view; operate the first full scale refuelling station in France. The station is also up-graded for 700bar filling from either a liquid hydrogen source or a gas booster, with cold filling possibility. This paper presents the results concerning 350bar filling : thermal effects, optimal filling procedures and influence of parameters such as climatic conditions are discussed. (author)

  9. Development of a Space Station Operations Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandli, A. E.; McCandless, W. T.

    To enhance the productivity of operations aboard the Space Station, a means must be provided to augment, and frequently to supplant, human effort in support of mission operations and management, both on the ground and onboard. The Operations Management System (OMS), under development at the Johnson Space Center, is one such means. OMS comprises the tools and procedures to facilitate automation of station monitoring, control, and mission planning tasks. OMS mechanizes, and hence rationalizes, execution of tasks traditionally performed by mission planners, the mission control center team, onboard System Management software, and the flight crew.

  10. Development of a Space Station Operations Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandli, A. E.; Mccandless, W. T.

    1988-01-01

    To enhance the productivity of operations aboard the Space Station, a means must be provided to augment, and frequently to supplant, human effort in support of mission operations and management, both on the ground and onboard. The Operations Management System (OMS), under development at the Johnson Space Center, is one such means. OMS comprises the tools and procedures to facilitate automation of station monitoring, control, and mission planning tasks. OMS mechanizes, and hence rationalizes, execution of tasks traditionally performed by mission planners, the mission control center team, onboard System Management software, and the flight crew.

  11. Operating experience at Scottish Nuclear's power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackburn, P.

    1991-01-01

    A brief history is presented of the design and operation of the four Scottish nuclear power stations currently run by Scottish Nuclear, namely Hunterston 'A' and 'B' and the Torness reactors. A design flaw in the Magnox reactor at Hunterston 'A' led to it being operated at lower than optimal temperature and hence producing less power. For Hunterston 'B' reactor the Advanced Gas Cooled design prototype was used. Operating setbacks and successes are noted. The design chosen for Torness embraced all the good points of Hunterston 'B' but sought to eliminate its faults. After 26 years of successful operation Hunterston 'A' is now being decommissioned, while the other three stations continue to generate electricity successfully. (UK)

  12. Instructor/Operator Station (IOS) Design Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-01

    INSTRUTOR /OPERATOR STATION (IOS) AI O...The three functional categories also define three different users in terms of jobs and qualifications (if the functions have been allocated to manual ...function manually (e.g., collect the data S required from schedules, printed course outlines and telephone calls to training and facility managers).

  13. Improved grid operation through power smoothing control strategies utilizing dedicated energy storage at an electric vehicle charging station

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsen, Thomas; Holjevac, Ninoslav; Bremdal, Bernt A.

    2016-01-01

    project (Flex-ChEV) supported by the ERA-Net Smart Grid FP7 program. The principal asset of the proposed charging station (CS) is a dedicated Energy Storage System (ESS) to compensate for adverse effects on the grid caused by peak charging demand and which could impose severe trials for the local DSO....... Furthermore, CS of this kind could serve multiple business purposes in a smart grid. It can serve as a hub for seamless integration of local renewable and distributed energy resources, it can provide added flexibility for the local grid through different ancillary services and it can act as an efficient......This paper addresses the principal service aspects for electric vehicles (EV), as well as issues related to energy storage design, charging station integration into power system and load management issues. It builds on the research conducted in the Flexible Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure...

  14. KSC ground operations planning for Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, J. R.; Revesz, W., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    At the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida, processing facilities are being built and activated to support the processing, checkout, and launch of Space Station elements. The generic capability of these facilities will be utilized to support resupply missions for payloads, life support services, and propellants for the 30-year life of the program. Special Ground Support Equipment (GSE) is being designed for Space Station hardware special handling requirements, and a Test, Checkout, and Monitoring System (TCMS) is under development to verify that the flight elements are ready for launch. The facilities and equipment used at KSC, along with the testing required to accomplish the mission, are described in detail to provide an understanding of the complexity of operations at the launch site. Assessments of hardware processing flows through KSC are being conducted to minimize the processing flow times for each hardware element. Baseline operations plans and the changes made to improve operations and reduce costs are described, recognizing that efficient ground operations are a major key to success of the Space Station.

  15. Distributed operating system for NASA ground stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, John F.

    1987-01-01

    NASA ground stations are characterized by ever changing support requirements, so application software is developed and modified on a continuing basis. A distributed operating system was designed to optimize the generation and maintenance of those applications. Unusual features include automatic program generation from detailed design graphs, on-line software modification in the testing phase, and the incorporation of a relational database within a real-time, distributed system.

  16. Analytical modeling of nuclear power station operator reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabri, Z.A.; Husseiny, A.A.

    1979-01-01

    The operator-plant interface is a critical component of power stations which requires the formulation of mathematical models to be applied in plant reliability analysis. The human model introduced here is based on cybernetic interactions and allows for use of available data from psychological experiments, hot and cold training and normal operation. The operator model is identified and integrated in the control and protection systems. The availability and reliability are given for different segments of the operator task and for specific periods of the operator life: namely, training, operation and vigilance or near retirement periods. The results can be easily and directly incorporated in system reliability analysis. (author)

  17. Dynamics and control in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterfield, M.H.

    1992-01-01

    This volume presents a wide view of aspects of control of nuclear power stations by taking into consideration the plant as a whole and the protection systems employed therein. Authors with worldwide experience consider all aspects of dynamics and control in the context of both fast and thermal power stations. The topics discussed include the methods of development and applications within the analysis of plant behaviour, the validation of mathematical models, plant testing, and the design and implementation of controls. There are 27 papers all of which are indexed separately; steady states and model evolution (5 papers), control and protection systems (5 papers), transients (7 papers), testing and data (3 papers), model validation (6 papers) and commissioning and operation (1 paper). (author)

  18. Nuclear safeguards control in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boedege, R.; Braatz, U.; Heger, H.

    1976-01-01

    The execution of the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) has initiated a third phase in the efforts taken to ensure peace by limiting the number of atomic powers. In this phase it is important, above all, to turn into workable systems the conditions imposed upon technology by the different provisions of the Verification Agreement of the NPT. This is achieved mainly by elaborating annexes to the Agreement specifically geared to certain model plants, typical representatives selected for LWR power stations being the plants at Garigliano, Italy (BWR), and Stade, Federal Republic of Germany (PWR). The surveillance measures taken to prevent any diversion of special nuclear material for purposes of nuclear weapons manufacture must be effective in achieving their specific objective and must not impede the circumspect management of operations of the plants concerned. A VDEW working party has studied the technical details of the planned surveillance measures in nuclear power stations in the Federal Republic of Germany and now presents a concept of material balancing by units which meets the conditions imposed by the inspection authority and could also be accepted by the operators of nuclear power stations. The concept provides for uninterrupted control of the material balance areas of the nuclear power stations concerned, allows continuous control of the whole nuclear fuel cycle, is based exclusively on existing methods and facilities, and can be implemented at low cost. (orig.) [de

  19. Nuclear power station main control room habitability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschal, W.B.; Knous, W.S.

    1989-01-01

    The main control room at a nuclear power station must remain habitable during a variety of plant conditions and postulated events. The control room habitability requirement and the function of the heating, ventilating, air-conditioning, and air treatment system are to control environmental factors, such as temperature, pressure, humidity, radiation, and toxic gas. Habitability requirements provide for the safety of personnel and enable operation of equipment required to function in the main control room. Habitability as an issue has been gaining prominence with the Advisor Committee of Reactor Safeguards and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission since the incident at Three Mile Island. Their concern is the ability of the presently installed habitability systems to control the main control room environment after an accident. This paper discusses main control room HVAC systems; the concern, requirements, and results of NRC surveys and notices; and an approach to control room habitability reviews

  20. Hybrid radiation background monitoring in operational control and forecasting of environmental contamination by nuclear power station discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermeev, I.S.; Eremenko, V.A.; Makarov, Y.A.; Matueev, V.V.; Zhernov, V.S.

    1986-01-01

    Rapid developments in nuclear power have stimulated research on monitoring and forecasting environmental radiation pollution (ERP), and in particular the amounts, compositions, and distributions of radionuclides in the environment. A conceptual model is presented for hybrid environmental radiation pollution monitoring. When there is an emergency, the model operates in a fashion most closely corresponding to the actual meteorological conditions, and the ERP data given by the model enable one to distinguish changes due to the man-made component from random fluctuations in the natural background. The measurement system in general includes mobile and stationary data-acquisition facilities linked by wire or radio to the central point. The system also accumulates and stores data on the radiation environment, which are edited on the basis of radioactive, chemical, and other transformations. The purpose of hybrid monitoring is ultimately to analyze trends in order to detect elevated discharges and thus to output data to the regional monitoring system

  1. Research on station management in subway operation safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiman

    2017-10-01

    The management of subway station is an important part of the safe operation of urban subway. In order to ensure the safety of subway operation, it is necessary to study the relevant factors that affect station management. In the protection of subway safety operations on the basis of improving the quality of service, to promote the sustained and healthy development of subway stations. This paper discusses the influencing factors of subway operation accident and station management, and analyzes the specific contents of station management security for subway operation, and develops effective suppression measures. It is desirable to improve the operational quality and safety factor for subway operations.

  2. Operating experience of Fugen Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohteru, Shigeru; Kaneko, Jun; Kawahara, Toshio; Matsumoto, Mitsuo

    1987-01-01

    The prototype ATR 'Fugen' developed as one of the national project has verified the performance and reliability of the advanced thermal reactor system through the operation for about eight years since 1979, and the elucidation of the characteristics in plutonium utilization and the development and verification of the tuilizing techniques have been advanced. Besides, the operational results and the achievement of the technical development are successively reflected to the design of a demonstration reactor. In this paper, the outline of Fugan and the operational results are reported. The ATR Fugen Power Station is that of the prototype reactor of heavy water moderated, boiling light water cooled, pressure tube type, having the electric output of 165 MW. It started the full scale operation on March 20, 1979, and as of January, 1987, the total generated electric power reached about 7 billion kWh, the time of power generation was about 43,000 h, and the average capacity factor was 60.6 %. Plutonium utilization techniques, the flow characteristics and the dynamic plant characteristics of a pressure tube type reactor, the operational characteristics of a heavy water system and the techniques of handling heavy water containing tritium, and the operational reliability and maintainability of the machinery and equipment installed have been studied. (Kako, I.)

  3. 47 CFR 25.271 - Control of transmitting stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Control of transmitting stations. 25.271 Section 25.271 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Operations § 25.271 Control of transmitting stations. (a) The licensee of...

  4. 49 CFR 236.814 - Station, control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Station, control. 236.814 Section 236.814..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.814 Station, control. The place where the control machine of a traffic control system is located. ...

  5. Space Station Initial Operational Concept (IOC) operations and safety view - Automation and robotics for Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, William V., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The automation and robotics requirements for the Space Station Initial Operational Concept (IOC) are discussed. The amount of tasks to be performed by an eight-person crew, the need for an automated or directed fault analysis capability, and ground support requirements are considered. Issues important in determining the role of automation for the IOC are listed.

  6. How the Station will operate. [operation, management, and maintenance in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, John T.

    1988-01-01

    Aspects of the upcoming operational phase of the Space Station (SS) are examined. What the crew members will do with their time in their specialized roles is addressed. SS maintenance and servicing and the interaction of the SS Control Center with Johnson Space Center is discussed. The planning of payload operations and strategic planning for the SS are examined.

  7. Human-factor operating concept for Borssele Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieman, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    The safety level in the operation of a reactor is determined basically by human beings. The Borssele Nuclear Power Station has carried out measures for improving the man-machine interface through training and operating instructions for the shift personnel. The retrofitting of control technology relevant to safety engineering should avoid operating instructions which can cause potential failures. A safety study has shown that the remaining risk following all retrofitting measures remains dependent to the extent of 80% on human factors and that human factors as a whole have a positive effect on reactor safety. (orig.) [de

  8. Organization of the operating quality in EDF nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolz, J.

    1976-01-01

    The organization of operating quality in EDF nuclear stations cover a number of planned and systematic actions of technical and management order carried on at station level and Nuclear Safety Department level. Priority is given to safety quality which has to remain the same during the whole life of the stations; the safety of a station depending from its designing, realization and starting up quality on one hand and from its operating methods on the other [fr

  9. Ground control station software design for micro aerial vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walendziuk, Wojciech; Oldziej, Daniel; Binczyk, Dawid Przemyslaw; Slowik, Maciej

    2017-08-01

    This article describes the process of designing the equipment part and the software of a ground control station used for configuring and operating micro unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV). All the works were conducted on a quadrocopter model being a commonly accessible commercial construction. This article contains a characteristics of the research object, the basics of operating the micro aerial vehicles (MAV) and presents components of the ground control station model. It also describes the communication standards for the purpose of building a model of the station. Further part of the work concerns the software of the product - the GIMSO application (Generally Interactive Station for Mobile Objects), which enables the user to manage the actions and communication and control processes from the UAV. The process of creating the software and the field tests of a station model are also presented in the article.

  10. Space station automation and robotics study. Operator-systems interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    This is the final report of a Space Station Automation and Robotics Planning Study, which was a joint project of the Boeing Aerospace Company, Boeing Commercial Airplane Company, and Boeing Computer Services Company. The study is in support of the Advanced Technology Advisory Committee established by NASA in accordance with a mandate by the U.S. Congress. Boeing support complements that provided to the NASA Contractor study team by four aerospace contractors, the Stanford Research Institute (SRI), and the California Space Institute. This study identifies automation and robotics (A&R) technologies that can be advanced by requirements levied by the Space Station Program. The methodology used in the study is to establish functional requirements for the operator system interface (OSI), establish the technologies needed to meet these requirements, and to forecast the availability of these technologies. The OSI would perform path planning, tracking and control, object recognition, fault detection and correction, and plan modifications in connection with extravehicular (EV) robot operations.

  11. 47 CFR 25.277 - Temporary fixed earth station operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Temporary fixed earth station operations. 25.277 Section 25.277 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Operations § 25.277 Temporary fixed earth station operations...

  12. Modular space station, phase B extension. Program operations plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-01-01

    An organized approach is defined for establishing the most significant requirements pertaining to mission operations, information management, and computer program design and development for the modular space station program. The operations plan pertains to the space station and experiment module program elements and to the ground elements required for mission management and mission support operations.

  13. AN AUTOMATED RAILWAY STATION TRAFFIC CONTROL SYSTEM

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AN AUTOMATED RAILWAY STATION TRAFFIC CONTROL SYSTEM. ... involve collision with automobiles or other vehicles and collision with other trains. ... the processed signals to control electromagnetic devices through motor drivers.

  14. A distributed planning concept for Space Station payload operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagopian, Jeff; Maxwell, Theresa; Reed, Tracey

    1994-01-01

    The complex and diverse nature of the payload operations to be performed on the Space Station requires a robust and flexible planning approach. The planning approach for Space Station payload operations must support the phased development of the Space Station, as well as the geographically distributed users of the Space Station. To date, the planning approach for manned operations in space has been one of centralized planning to the n-th degree of detail. This approach, while valid for short duration flights, incurs high operations costs and is not conducive to long duration Space Station operations. The Space Station payload operations planning concept must reduce operations costs, accommodate phased station development, support distributed users, and provide flexibility. One way to meet these objectives is to distribute the planning functions across a hierarchy of payload planning organizations based on their particular needs and expertise. This paper presents a planning concept which satisfies all phases of the development of the Space Station (manned Shuttle flights, unmanned Station operations, and permanent manned operations), and the migration from centralized to distributed planning functions. Identified in this paper are the payload planning functions which can be distributed and the process by which these functions are performed.

  15. Commissioning and operation of the CEBAF end station refrigeration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenius, D.; Bevins, B.; Chronis, W.C.; Ganni, V.

    1996-01-01

    The CEBAF End Station Helium Refrigerator (ESR) System provides refrigeration at 80 K, 20 K and 4.5 K to three End Station experimental halls. The facility consists of a two stage helium screw compressor system, 4.5 K refrigerator, cryogen distribution valve box, and transfer lines to the individual experimental halls. The 4.5 K cold box and compressors were originally part of the ESCAR 1500 W, 4 K refrigeration system at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory which was first commissioned in 1977. The compressors, 4.5 K cold box, and control system design were modified to adapt the plant for the requirements of the CEBAF experimental halls. Additional subsystems of cryogen distribution, transfer lines, warm gas management, and computer control interface were added. This paper describes the major plant subsystems, modifications, operational experiences and performance

  16. Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station operation and management indicators system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Chunfa

    2000-01-01

    Ever since the commercial operation of Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station (GNPS), dynamic objective management concept that features modern enterprises has been adopted by the station to manage all operational activities with the guidance of business plan. And some quantitative indicators have been employed in order to measure effectively the progress status of these operational activities. After several years' evolvement, a hierarchical and standard performance indicators system has been developed and is playing an active part in the plant's efforts towards top quartile of world nuclear power industry. Structured hierarchically with higher levels resolving into lower levels and lower levels committing to higher levels, the indicator system represents the corporate vision, WANO (World Association of Nuclear Operators) performance indicators, plant integrated indicators and departmental key indicators, covering such areas as safety, production, environment, human resource and cost control. The indicator system not only reflects performance-centered management concept, but also shows the controllability of the whole operational process of the station. Indicators of a certain level serve as both early warnings to superior indicators (lagging indicators in this case) and effects to inferior indicators (leading indicators in this case). The dynamic status of these indicators, numbered more than 230, will eventually be fed back to the business plan and realized through daily work of every branch, and even every member of the workforce. With the indicator system as a quantitative management tool, and an effective tracking system, GNPS has achieved great success in self-assessment, objective definition, improvement follow up, resource re-allocation, and management-staff communication. Periodic plant performance assessment is performed through spider chart and other pictorial diagrams. Indicators are displayed at the plant entrance, offices, Main Control Room and SIS network

  17. Web Design for Space Operations: An Overview of the Challenges and New Technologies Used in Developing and Operating Web-Based Applications in Real-Time Operational Support Onboard the International Space Station, in Astronaut Mission Planning and Mission Control Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Operations Planning Team, Mission Control Centre and Mission Automation Support Network (MAS) have all evolved over the years to use commercial web-based technologies to create a configurable electronic infrastructure to manage the complex network of real-time planning, crew scheduling, resource and activity management as well as onboard document and procedure management required to co-ordinate ISS assembly, daily operations and mission support. While these Web technologies are classified as non-critical in nature, their use is part of an essential backbone of daily operations on the ISS and allows the crew to operate the ISS as a functioning science laboratory. The rapid evolution of the internet from 1998 (when ISS assembly began) to today, along with the nature of continuous manned operations in space, have presented a unique challenge in terms of software engineering and system development. In addition, the use of a wide array of competing internet technologies (including commercial technologies such as .NET and JAVA ) and the special requirements of having to support this network, both nationally among various control centres for International Partners (IPs), as well as onboard the station itself, have created special challenges for the MCC Web Tools Development Team, software engineers and flight controllers, who implement and maintain this system. This paper presents an overview of some of these operational challenges, and the evolving nature of the solutions and the future use of COTS based rich internet technologies in manned space flight operations. In particular this paper will focus on the use of Microsoft.s .NET API to develop Web-Based Operational tools, the use of XML based service oriented architectures (SOA) that needed to be customized to support Mission operations, the maintenance of a Microsoft IIS web server onboard the ISS, The OpsLan, functional-oriented Web Design with AJAX

  18. French experience in operating pressurized water reactor power stations. Ten years' operation of the Ardennes power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teste du Bailler, A.; Vedrinne, J.F.

    1978-01-01

    In the paper the experience gained over ten years' operation of the Ardennes (Chooz) nuclear power station is summarized from the point of view of monitoring and control equipment. The reactor was the first pressurized water reactor to be installed in France; it is operated jointly by France and Belgium. The equipment, which in many cases consists of prototypes, was developed for industrial use and with the experience that has now been gained it is possible to evaluate its qualities and defects, the constraints which it imposes and the action that has to be taken in the future. (author)

  19. Space Station - An integrated approach to operational logistics support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosmer, G. J.

    1986-01-01

    Development of an efficient and cost effective operational logistics system for the Space Station will require logistics planning early in the program's design and development phase. This paper will focus on Integrated Logistics Support (ILS) Program techniques and their application to the Space Station program design, production and deployment phases to assure the development of an effective and cost efficient operational logistics system. The paper will provide the methodology and time-phased programmatic steps required to establish a Space Station ILS Program that will provide an operational logistics system based on planned Space Station program logistics support.

  20. 47 CFR 95.139 - Adding a small base station or a small control station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adding a small base station or a small control... base station or a small control station. (a) Except for a GMRS system licensed to a non-individual, one or more small base stations or a small control station may be added to a GMRS system at any point...

  1. Enhanced methods for operating refueling station tube-trailers to reduce refueling cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgowainy, Amgad; Reddi, Krishna

    2017-08-22

    A method and apparatus are provided for operating a refueling station including source tube-trailers and at least one compressor to reduce refueling cost. The refueling station includes a gaseous fuel supply source including a plurality of tanks on a tube trailer coupled to a first control unit, and high pressure buffer storage having predefined capacity coupled to a second control unit and the first tanks by a pressure control valve and the first control unit, and at least one compressor. The refueling station is operated at different modes depending on a state of the refueling station at the beginning of each operational mode. The refueling system is assessed at the end of each operational mode to identify the state of the system and select a next mode of operation. The operational modes include consolidating hydrogen, or any gaseous fuel, within the tubes mounted on the trailer.

  2. Buried waste integrated demonstration human engineered control station. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This document describes the Human Engineered Control Station (HECS) project activities including the conceptual designs. The purpose of the HECS is to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of remote retrieval by providing an integrated remote control station. The HECS integrates human capabilities, limitations, and expectations into the design to reduce the potential for human error, provides an easy system to learn and operate, provides an increased productivity, and reduces the ultimate investment in training. The overall HECS consists of the technology interface stations, supporting engineering aids, platform (trailer), communications network (broadband system), and collision avoidance system.

  3. Buried waste integrated demonstration human engineered control station. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This document describes the Human Engineered Control Station (HECS) project activities including the conceptual designs. The purpose of the HECS is to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of remote retrieval by providing an integrated remote control station. The HECS integrates human capabilities, limitations, and expectations into the design to reduce the potential for human error, provides an easy system to learn and operate, provides an increased productivity, and reduces the ultimate investment in training. The overall HECS consists of the technology interface stations, supporting engineering aids, platform (trailer), communications network (broadband system), and collision avoidance system

  4. Improvements in operational safety performance of the Magnox power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchese, C.J. [BNFL Magnox Generation, Berkeley (United Kingdom)

    2000-10-01

    In the 43 years since commencement of operation of Calder Hall, the first Magnox power station, there remain eight Magnox stations and 20 reactors still in operation, owned by BNFL Magnox Generation. This paper describes how the operational safety performance of these stations has significantly improved over the last ten years. This has been achieved against a background of commercial competition introduced by privatization and despite the fact that the Magnox base design belongs to the past. Finally, the company's future plans for continued improvements in operational safety performance are discussed. (author)

  5. CO2 on the International Space Station: An Operations Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Jennifer; Alexander, David

    2016-01-01

    PROBLEM STATEMENT: We describe CO2 symptoms that have been reported recently by crewmembers on the International Space Station and our continuing efforts to control CO2 to lower levels than historically accepted. BACKGROUND: Throughout the International Space Station (ISS) program, anecdotal reports have suggested that crewmembers develop CO2-related symptoms at lower CO2 levels than would be expected terrestrially. Since 2010, operational limits have controlled the 24-hour average CO2 to 4.0 mm Hg, or below as driven by crew symptomatology. In recent years, largely due to increasing awareness by crew and ground team, there have been increased reports of crew symptoms. The aim of this presentation is to discuss recent observations and operational impacts to lower CO2 levels on the ISS. CASE PRESENTATION: Crewmembers are routinely asked about CO2 symptoms in their weekly private medical conferences with their crew surgeons. In recent ISS expeditions, crewmembers have noted symptoms attributable to CO2 starting at 2.3 mmHg. Between 2.3 - 2.7 mm Hg, fatigue and full-headedness have been reported. Between 2.7 - 3.0 mm Hg, there have been self-reports of procedure missed steps or procedures going long. Above 3.0 - 3.4 mm Hg, headaches have been reported. A wide range of inter- and intra-individual variability in sensitivity to CO2 have been noted. OPERATIONAL / CLINICAL RELEVANCE: These preliminary data provide semi-quantitative ranges that have been used to inform a new operational limit of 3.0 mmHg as a compromise between systems capabilities and the recognition that there are human health and performance impacts at recent ISS CO2 levels. Current evidence would suggest that an operational limit between 0.5 and 2.0 mm Hg may maintain health and performance. Future work is needed to establish long-term ISS and future vehicle operational limits.

  6. Dealing with operational power station wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepper, R B [Central Electricity Generating Board, London (UK). Nuclear Health and Safety Dept.

    1981-08-01

    The disposal of wastes from nuclear power stations is discussed. Liquid and gaseous wastes, from magnox stations, which are of low level activity, are dispersed to the sea or estuaries on coastal sites or for the case of Trawfynyeld, to the nearby lake. Low activity solid wastes are either disposed of on local authority tips or in shallow land burial sites. Intermediate level wastes, consisting mainly of wet materials such as filter sludges and resins from cooling ponds, are at present stored in shielded storage tanks either dry or under water. Only one disposal route for intermediate waste is used by Britain, namely, sea-dumping. Materials for sea dumping have to be encapsulated in a durable material for example, concrete.

  7. Space station operations task force. Panel 4 report: Management integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    The Management Integration Panel of the Space Station Operations Task Force was chartered to provide a structure and ground rules for integrating the efforts of the other three panels and to address a number of cross cutting issues that affect all areas of space station operations. Issues addressed include operations concept implementation, alternatives development and integration process, strategic policy issues and options, and program management emphasis areas.

  8. Smoke control of fires in subway stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Falin; Guo, Shin-Chang [Institute of Applied Mechanics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan 106 (Taiwan); Chuay, He-Yuan [SinoTech Engineering Consulting Co., 171 Nanking E. Road, 5 Sec., Taipei, Taiwan 105 (Taiwan); Chien, Shen-Wen [Department of Fire Science and Administration, National Central Police University, Taoyuan, Taiwan 333 (Taiwan)

    2003-05-01

    We investigate the effectiveness of the smoke control scheme of the Gong-Guan subway station (GGSS), a typical subway station of the Taipei Rapid Transit System and whose mechanical control systems are also standard in modern subway station design. Three-dimensional smoke flow fields under various kinds of fires are computed by computational fluid dynamics techniques and the results are illustrated on various cross-sectional planes. Results indicate that the stack effect plays a deterministic role in smoke control when a fire occurs near the stairwell; under such circumstances, no mechanical smoke control is necessary. When a fire occurs in other places, such as at the end or the center of the platform, the current mechanical control schemes of GGSS are effective; namely, the smoke can be well controlled, either it is confined to a small region or is evacuated from the station, leaving the four exits free of smoke so that the passengers can escape through them. The effect of the platform edge door (PED) on smoke control is also investigated. With the PED, the effectiveness of the present smoke control system for fires occurring on the chassis of a train, a serious fire in the subway station, increases. We also propose an innovative smoke control scheme with a PED, which turns out to be much more efficient in evacuating smoke than that currently used. This study provides both valuable information for the design of passenger evacuation routes in fires as well as criteria for the design of a smoke control system for subway stations. (orig.)

  9. Control and operation of power sources in a medium-voltage direct-current microgrid for an electric vehicle fast charging station with a photovoltaic and a battery energy storage system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García-Triviño, Pablo; Torreglosa, Juan P.; Fernández-Ramírez, Luis M.; Jurado, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Although electric vehicles (EVs) are experiencing a considerable upsurge, the technology associated with them is still under development. This study focused on the control and operation of a medium-voltage direct-current (MVDC) microgrid with an innovative decentralized control system, which was used as a fast charging station (FCS) for EVs. The FCS was composed of a photovoltaic (PV) system, a Li-ion battery energy storage system (BESS), two 48 kW fast charging units for EVs, and a connection to the local grid. With this configuration and thanks to its decentralized control, the FCS was able to work as a stand-alone system most of the time though with occasional grid support. This paper presents a new decentralized energy management system (EMS) with two options to control the power sources of the FCS. The choice of the power source depends on the MVDC bus voltage, the state-of-charge (SOC) of the BESS, and the control option of the EMS. This control was tested by simulating the FCS, when connected to several EVs and under different sun irradiance conditions. Simulation results showed that the FCS operated smoothly and effectively, which confirms the feasibility of using this technology in EVs. - Highlights: • This paper studies a MVDC microgrid for fast charging station of EV. • It is composed of a PV system, a BESS, two EV charging stations and a grid connection. • A decentralized control scheme is applied to control the power sources. • The MVDC bus voltage is the key parameter for controlling the system. • The results demonstrate the feasibility of the system and control under study.

  10. Easy-to-Use UAV Ground Station Software for Low-Altitude Civil Operations, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to design and develop easy-to-use Ground Control Station (GCS) software for low-altitude civil Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) operations. The GCS software...

  11. Towards station-keeping using GPI controllers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jouffroy, Jerome

    In this paper, we propose to use a Generalized Proportional-Integral controller for station-keeping of a ship. For output feedback, this has the advantage of not requiring the use of an asymptotic Luenberger or Kalman observer. After describing the methodology for the simple case of controlling...

  12. Training of engineers for nuclear power station operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myerscough, P.B.

    1980-01-01

    The requirements for staffing and training of a nuclear electric utility are described. Current training facilities at the Central Electricity Generating Board are applicable to gas-cooled technology with the possibility of the introduction of a thermal water system and fast reactors in the future. The CEGB training centres provide for the initial training of operational staff, revision training of experienced operational staff, and training of non-operational staff from the stations and supporting departments. Details are given of the content of the training courses which also provide simulation facilities of the basic dynamics of the CEGB stations. Further developments in simulation will include dynamics of the boiler and turbine plants in Magnox stations. The flexibility of the AGR simulations will enable the training exercises to be adjusted to meet changing operating patterns for each AGR station. (U.K.)

  13. National Geospatial Data Asset (NGDA) Continuously Operating Reference Stations (CORS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Geodetic Survey (NGS), an office of NOAA's National Ocean Service, manages a network of Continuously Operating Reference Stations (CORS) that provide...

  14. Final environmental assessment for vegetation control at VHF stations, microwave stations, electrical substations, and pole yards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-13

    Southwestern Power Adm. operates very high frequency (VHF) and microwave radio stations, electrical substations, and pole yards for electric power transmission throughout AR, MO, and OK. Vegetation growth at the stations must be suppressed for safety of operation and personnel. Southwestern has been using a combination of mechanical/manual and herbicide control for this purpose; Federally- mandated reductions in staff and budgetary resources require Southwestern to evaluate all potentially efficient methods for vegetation control. Three alternatives were examined: no action, mechanical/manual control, and (proposed) a combination of mechanical/manual and herbicide control. Environmental impacts on air and water quality, wetlands, wildlife, endangered species, archaeological and other resources, farmland, human health, transportation, etc. were evaluated.

  15. An adaptive predictive controller and its applications in power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Zhiyuan; Lu Huiming; Zhang Xinggao [North China Electric Power University, Beijing (China); Song Chunping [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China). Dept. of Thermal Energy Engineering

    1999-07-01

    Based on the objective function in the form of integration of generalized model error, a globally convergent model reference adaptive predictive control algorithm (MRAPC) containing inertia-time compensators is presented in this paper. MRAPC has been successfully applied to control important thermal process of more than 20 units in many Chinese power stations. In this paper three representative examples are described. Continual operation results for years demonstrate that MRAPC is a successful attempt for the practical applications of adaptive control techniques. (author)

  16. Lithium control during normal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suryanarayan, S.; Jain, D.

    2010-01-01

    Periodic increases in lithium (Li) concentrations in the primary heat transport (PHT) system during normal operation are a generic problem at CANDU® stations. Lithiated mixed bed ion exchange resins are used at stations for pH control in the PHT system. Typically tight chemistry controls including Li concentrations are maintained in the PHT water. The reason for the Li increases during normal operation at CANDU stations such as Pickering was not fully understood. In order to address this issue a two pronged approach was employed. Firstly, PNGS-A data and information from other available sources was reviewed in an effort to identify possible factors that may contribute to the observed Li variations. Secondly, experimental studies were carried out to assess the importance of these factors in order to establish reasons for Li increases during normal operation. Based on the results of these studies, plausible mechanisms/reasons for Li increases have been identified and recommendations made for proactive control of Li concentrations in the PHT system. (author)

  17. (Shippingport Atomic Power Station). Quarterly operating report, third quarter 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagorski, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    At the beginning of the third quarter of 1980, the Shippingport Atomic Power Station was operating with the 1A, 1B, 1C, and 1D reactor coolant loops and the 1AC and 1BD purification loops in service. During the quarter, the Station was operated for Duquesne Light Company System grid including base load and swing load operation. Twelve (12) planned swing load operations were performed on the LWBR Core this quarter to complete the LWBR operating plan of fifty (50) during this operating phase. The Station was shutdown on September 12 for the Fall 1980 Shutdown and remained in this mode through the end of the quarter. The LWBR Core has generated 18,297.98 EFPH from start-up through the end of the quarter. There were no radioactive liquid discharges from the Radioactive Waste Processing System to the river this quarter. The radioactive liquid waste effluent line to the river remained blanked off to prevent inadvertent radioactive liquid waste discharges. During the quarter, approximately 0.001 curies of Xe 133 activity were released from the station. The radioactivity released from Shippingport Station is far too small to have any measurable effect on the general background environmental radioactivity outside the plant.

  18. Operation of nuclear power stations during 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-08-01

    In 1975, the production of nuclear energy in the Community of the Nine was 77 thousand million net kWh, an increase of 26.5% over 1974. A short commentry explains this large increase and the situation in each country is briefly reviewed. Then data on the evolution of net production (partitioned according to reactor family), on the availability of reactor types according to their age, and on the structure of nuclear plants (situation at the end of 1975) are presented. The statistical data of annual operation are given for each reactor

  19. Evolution of the CANDU control centre retrofit and new stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmstead, R.A.; Mitchell, W.

    1991-01-01

    Significant event data from operating nuclear plants in many countries consistently indicates human errors are the root cause for 40-60% of operating station significant events. Because so much information is already in digital form, opportunities exist to improve the CANDU control centre with retrofits that exploit this information. These opportunities are enhanced because of rapid technological development in computers and electronics, coupled with significant progress in the behavioural sciences that greatly increases our knowledge of the cognitive strengths and weaknesses of human beings. CANDU control rooms are undergoing retrofits and for future CANDU stations, a new concept of the control centre is emerging. The objective is to significantly reduce the incidence of human error, reduce operations and maintenance costs and improve both reliability and safety

  20. Evolution of the CANDU control centre retrofit and new stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olmstead, R A [AECL-CANDU, ON (Canada); Mitchell, W [Ontario Hydro, Darlington Nuclear Generating Station, Bowmanville, ON (Canada)

    1991-04-01

    Significant event data from operating nuclear plants in many countries consistently indicates human errors are the root cause for 40-60% of operating station significant events. Because so much information is already in digital form, opportunities exist to improve the CANDU control centre with retrofits that exploit this information. These opportunities are enhanced because of rapid technological development in computers and electronics, coupled with significant progress in the behavioural sciences that greatly increases our knowledge of the cognitive strengths and weaknesses of human beings. CANDU control rooms are undergoing retrofits and for future CANDU stations, a new concept of the control centre is emerging. The objective is to significantly reduce the incidence of human error, reduce operations and maintenance costs and improve both reliability and safety.

  1. Indicators for monitoring of safety operation and condition of nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manova, D.

    2001-01-01

    A common goal of all employees in the nuclear power field is safety operation of nuclear power stations. The evaluation and control of NPP safety operation are a part of the elements of safety management. The present report is related only to a part of the total assessment and control of the plant safety operation, namely - the indicator system for monitoring of Kozloduy NPP operation and condition. (author)

  2. Multivariable control in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parent, M.; McMorran, P.D.

    1982-11-01

    Multivariable methods have the potential to improve the control of large systems such as nuclear power stations. Linear-quadratic optimal control is a multivariable method based on the minimization of a cost function. A related technique leads to the Kalman filter for estimation of plant state from noisy measurements. A design program for optimal control and Kalman filtering has been developed as part of a computer-aided design package for multivariable control systems. The method is demonstrated on a model of a nuclear steam generator, and simulated results are presented

  3. Load control on nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Takuya; Tsukuda, Yoshiaki.

    1988-01-01

    Power generation control is required for the nuclear power plants to meet electric power demand. In BWRs, power generation control can be achieved by arranging the coolant flow rate and control rod operation. In PWRs, power generation can be regulated by the control rods automatically controled with the steam valves. As a result of the experiments, it is confirmed that the operational function is normal, and safety of reactor components, pressure vessel and fuel elments are assured. (Katagiri, S)

  4. Method for evaluating operator inputs to digital controllers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venhuizen, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Most industrial processes employ operator-interactive control systems. The performance of these control systems is influenced by the choice of control station (device through which operator enters control commands). While the importance of proper control-station selection is widely accepted, standard and simple selection methods are not available for the control station using color-graphics terminals. This paper describes a unique facility for evaluating the effectiveness of various control stations. In the facility, a process is simulated on a hybrid computer, color-graphics display terminals provide information to the operator, and different control stations accept input commands to control the simulation. Tests are being conducted to evaluate a keyboard, a graphics tablet, and a CRT touch panel for use as control stations on a nuclear power plant. Preliminary results indicate that our facility can be used to determine those situations where each type of station is advantageous

  5. Operation of the UK Magnox Stations in a competitive market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrigan, A.

    2000-01-01

    In 1955 the UK Government announced the first major civil nuclear power plant construction programme based on the Magnox design of reactor. This was followed in 1956 with the commencement of operation of Calder Hall, the world's first nuclear power station. The initial programme was for the construction of 1 500-2 000 MW of plant but, with the success of the early stations, this was increased to 5 000 MW by 1960. In total 11 Magnox nuclear power stations were commissioned in the UK over the period 1956 to 1971, comprising a total of 26 reactors (see Table 1). At present 20 of the reactors remain in operation, with an average life of 37 years. Output from the stations has been steady for many years and they have been regarded as the workhorses of the electricity generation industry in the UK. In 1990 the electricity supply and distribution system was deregulated and a market system introduced which has led to a reduction in the sale price of electricity. In addition to this it has been necessary to invest in the plants to maintain safety levels and operational reliability. The plant's can only continue in operation provided they remain safe and economic. This paper will review recent experience with the life management of the Magnox stations. (author)

  6. Shielded chamber control stations: an answer to radiological protection requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaboudiniere, Catherine.

    1979-06-01

    This study, carried out at the radiometallurgy laboratory of the Fontenay-aux-Roses Nuclear Research Centre, is based on an ergonomic approach. It shows that the shielded chamber control station, designed for human protection against ionizing radiations, demands an effort of adaptation on the part of the operator. This station does in fact meet radiological protection obligations but would benefit from certain improvements aimed at reducing the secondary fatigue of manipulators already under the strain of adapting to the machine. Fields in which improvements and/or changes are desirable have been investigated with special reference to telemanipulators. New and better designed instruments will soon appear on the telemanipulator market [fr

  7. 47 CFR 25.137 - Application requirements for earth stations operating with non-U.S. licensed space stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... space stations. (a) Earth station applicants or entities filing a “letter of intent” or “Petition for... Union. (d) Earth station applicants requesting authority to operate with a non-U.S.-licensed space... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application requirements for earth stations...

  8. Integrated architecture of monitoring, supervisory and automatic control for optimization of the operations in the natural gas turbo compressor station at Guamare - state of Rio Grande do Norte - Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento Filho, Epitacio

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the conception and the benefits of the integrated supervisory control architecture for performance, aero thermodynamic and mechanical monitoring of the Ubarana Phase V Turbo compressor Station in Guamare-Rn. The compression station has four gas turbines, each one developing 6.640 kW ( 9.600 rpm - ISO power), driving four centrifugal compressors, each one with unitary capacity of 850.000 m 3 /d, arranged in parallel. The integrated architecture allows the continuous tele monitoring of a large range of mechanical and process parameters. Other resources are real time identification of deterioration signs or performance decaying of each machine in service, serving as a precious tool for the operation and maintenance decisions like wash application intervals and partial or general equipment revision. Just for the sake of operational cost impacts: a small increase of 1% in overall thermal efficiency represents a reduction of US$ 60,000 in annual operational cost, since the annual fuel consume nears US$ 6 million (considering 20 MW with 8,000 h). (author)

  9. Role of check operators in achieving operational excellence at Virginia Power's nuclear stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shriver, B.L.; Williams, T.M.; Stewart, W.L.

    1987-01-01

    Virginia Power has implemented a Check Operator Program as a part of its commitment to excellence in the operation of the North Anna and Surry nuclear power stations. The Check Operator Program utilizes highly qualified licensed personnel to independently evaluate the performance of licensed operators and senior operators during normal, abnormal and simulated emergency conditions. Emphasis is placed upon individual and team performance as well as the procedures and training which support the operators. The check operators report to line management to ensure that their recommendations are implemented into the overall operations philosophy of the power station

  10. Leadership and Cultural Challenges in Operating the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, J. L.; Ritsher, J. B.; Saylor, S. A.; Kanas, N.

    2006-01-01

    Operating the International Space Station (ISS) involves an indefinite, continuous series of long-duration international missions, and this requires an unprecedented degree of cooperation across multiple sites, organizations, and nations. ISS flight controllers have had to find ways to maintain effective team performance in this challenging new context. The goal of this study was to systematically identify and evaluate the major leadership and cultural challenges faces by ISS flight controllers, and to highlight the approaches that they have found most effective to surmount these challenges. We conducted a qualitative survey using a semi-structured interview. Subjects included 14 senior NASA flight controllers who were chosen on the basis of having had substantial experience working with international partners. Data were content analyzed using an iterative process with multiple coders and consensus meetings to resolve discrepancies. To further explore the meaning of the interview findings, we also conducted some new analyses of data from a previous questionnaire study of Russian and American ISS mission control personnel. The interview data showed that respondents had substantial consensus on several leadership and cultural challenges and on key strategies for dealing with them, and they offered a wide range of specific tactics for implementing these strategies. Surprisingly few respondents offered strategies for addressing the challenge of working with team members whose native language is not American English. The questionnaire data showed that Americans think it is more important than Russians that mission control personnel speak the same dialect of one shared common language. Although specific to the ISS program, our results are consistent with recent management, cultural, and aerospace research. We aim to use our results to improve training for current and future ISS flight controllers.

  11. Experiences of operation for Ikata Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashimoto, Shigeyuki

    1979-01-01

    No. 1 plant in the Ikata Nuclear Power Station, Shikoku Electric Power Co., Inc., is a two-loop PWR unit with electric output of 566 MW, and it began the commercial operation on September 30, 1977, as the first nuclear power station in Shikoku. It is the 13th LWR and 7th PWR in Japan. The period of construction was 52 months since it had been started in June, 1973. During the period, it became the object of the first administrative litigation to seek the cancellation of permission to install the reactor, and it was subjected to the influence of the violent economical variation due to the oil shock, but it was completed as scheduled. After the start of operation, it continued the satisfactory operation, and generated about 2.35 billion KWh for 4300 operation hours. It achieved the rate of utilization of 96.7%. Since March 28, 1978, the first periodical inspection was carried out, and abnormality was not found in the reactor, the steam generator and the fuel at all. The period of inspection was 79 days and shorter than expected. The commercial operation was started again on June 14. The outline of the Ikata Nuclear Power Station, its state of operation, and the periodical inspection are reported. Very good results were able to be reported on the operation for one year, thanks to the valuable experiences offered by other electric power companies. (Kako, I.)

  12. Computer software design description for the Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF), Project L-045H, Operator Training Station (OTS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, R.L. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) Operator Training Station (OTS) is a computer-based training tool designed to aid plant operations and engineering staff in familiarizing themselves with the TEDF Central Control System (CCS)

  13. Operational characteristics of pediatric radiology: Image display stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taira, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    The display of diagnostic images is accomplished in the UCLA Pediatric Radiology Clinical Radiology Imaging System (CRIS) using 3 different types of digital viewing stations. These include a low resolution station with six 512 x 512 monitors, a high resolution station with three 1024 x 1024 monitors, and a very high resolution workstation with two 2048 x 2048 monitors. The display stations provide very basic image processing manipulations including zoom and scroll, contrast enhancement, and contrast reversal. The display stations are driven by a computer system which is dedicated for clinical use. During times when the clinical computer is unavailable (maintenance or system malfunction), the 512 x 512 workstation can be switched to operate from a research PACS system in the UCLA Image Processing Laboratory via a broadband communication network. Our initial clinical implementation involves digital viewing for pediatric radiology conferences. Presentation of inpatient cases use the six monitor 512 x 512 multiple viewing station. Later stages of the clinical implementation involve the use of higher resolution displays for the purpose of primary diagnosis from video displays

  14. Hydraulic oil control system for transformer stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truong, P.

    2002-01-01

    'Full text:' Electrical oil control systems are commonly used to contain large volumes of spilled oil in transformer stations. Specially calibrated floats, some of which are designed to float only in oil and others only in water, are used in combination with a pump to contain oil at the catch basin below a transformer station.This electrical control system requires frequent maintenance and inspections to ensure the electrical system is not affected by any electrical surges. Also the floats need to be inspected and cleaned frequently to prevent oil or grit build up that may affect the systems' ability to contain oil.Recognizing the limitations of electrical oil control systems, Hydro One is investigating alternative control systems. A hydraulic oil control system is being investigated as an alternative which can backup oil in a containment area while allowing any water entering the containment area to pass through. Figure 1 shows a schematic of a bench-top model tested at Ryerson University. Oil and water separation occurs within the double-piped column. Oil and water are allowed to enter the external pipe column but only water is allowed to exit the internal pipe column. The internal pipe column is designed to generate enough hydrostatic pressure to ensure the oil is contained in the external pipe column.The hydraulic oil control system provides a reliable control mechanism and requires less maintenance compared to that of the electrical control system. Since the hydraulic oil control system has no moving parts, nor would any parts that require electricity, it is not affected by electrical surges such as lightening.The maintenance requirements of the hydraulic oil control system are: the removal of any oil and grit from the catch basin, and the occasional visual inspection for any crack or clogs in the system. (author)

  15. Training of technical staff for nuclear power station operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haire, T.P.; Myerscough, P.B.

    1981-01-01

    The statutory training requirements covering the technical staff in the CEGB (Central Electricity Generating Board) are discussed. Details of the training programmes emphasize the importance of the staff having a thorough understanding of the nuclear processes involved in the station operation and not relying solely upon a mechanistic approach to operating procedures. The impact of this philosophy on the design of training simulators is examined and a brief comparison is made with the training philosophies in other countries. (U.K.)

  16. Operator Station Design System - A computer aided design approach to work station layout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    The Operator Station Design System is resident in NASA's Johnson Space Center Spacecraft Design Division Performance Laboratory. It includes stand-alone minicomputer hardware and Panel Layout Automated Interactive Design and Crew Station Assessment of Reach software. The data base consists of the Shuttle Transportation System Orbiter Crew Compartment (in part), the Orbiter payload bay and remote manipulator (in part), and various anthropometric populations. The system is utilized to provide panel layouts, assess reach and vision, determine interference and fit problems early in the design phase, study design applications as a function of anthropometric and mission requirements, and to accomplish conceptual design to support advanced study efforts.

  17. Hydrocarbon control strategies for gasoline marketing operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, R.L.; Sakaida, R.R.; Yamada, M.M.

    1978-05-01

    This informational document provides basic and current descriptions of gasoline marketing operations and methods that are available to control hydrocarbon emissions from these operations. The three types of facilities that are described are terminals, bulk plants, and service stations. Operational and business trends are also discussed. The potential emissions from typical facilities, including transport trucks, are given. The operations which lead to emissions from these facilities include (1) gasoline storage, (2) gasoline loading at terminals and bulk plants, (3) gasoline delivery to bulk plants and service stations, and (4) the refueling of vehicles at service stations. Available and possible methods for controlling emissions are described with their estimated control efficiencies and costs. This report also includes a bibliography of references cited in the text, and supplementary sources of information.

  18. INTELLECTUAL MODEL FORMATION OF RAILWAY STATION WORK DURING THE TRAIN OPERATION EXECUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Lavrukhin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this research work is to develop an intelligent technology for determination of the optimal route of freight trains administration on the basis of the technical and technological parameters. This will allow receiving the operational informed decisions by the station duty officer regarding to the train operation execution within the railway station. Metodology. The main elements of the research are the technical and technological parameters of the train station during the train operation. The methods of neural networks in order to form the self-teaching automated system were put in the basis of the generated model of train operation execution. Findings. The presented model of train operation execution at the railway station is realized on the basis of artificial neural networks using learning algorithm with a «teacher» in Matlab environment. The Matlab is also used for the immediate implementation of the intelligent automated control system of the train operation designed for the integration into the automated workplace of the duty station officer. The developed system is also useful to integrate on workplace of the traffic controller. This proposal is viable in case of the availability of centralized traffic control on the separate section of railway track. Originality. The model of train station operation during the train operation execution with elements of artificial intelligence was formed. It allows providing informed decisions to the station duty officer concerning a choice of rational and a safe option of reception and non-stop run of the trains with the ability of self-learning and adaptation to changing conditions. This condition is achieved by the principles of the neural network functioning. Practical value. The model of the intelligent system management of the process control for determining the optimal route receptionfor different categories of trains was formed.In the operational mode it offers the possibility

  19. U.S. Central Station Nuclear Power Plants: operating history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The information assembled in this booklet highlights the operating history of U. S. Central Station nuclear power plants through December 31, 1976. The information presented is based on data furnished by the operating electric utilities. The information is presented in the form of statistical tables and computer printouts of major shutdown periods for each nuclear unit. The capacity factor data for each unit is presented both on the basis of its net design electrical rating and its net maximum dependable capacity, as reported by the operating utility to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission

  20. BR3/Vulcain Nuclear Power Station. Construction and Operational Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storrer, J. [Belgonucleaire, S.A., Brussels (Belgium)

    1968-04-15

    A full-scale reactor experiment was set out as the main objective of the Vulcain research and development programme agreed in May 1962 between the UKAEA and BelgoNucleaire, manager of ''Syndicat Vulcain''. Vulcain uses variable moderation as the long-term method to control reactivity: the reactor is cooled and moderated by a mixture of heavy and light water, the D{sub 2}O content being stepwise reduced to permit power operation with all control rods completely out of the core. To carry out the Vulcain power experiment it was decided to modify the BR3 nuclear power plant located at Mol, Belgium, which had operated from 1962 to 1964 as a conventional PWR with outputs of 40.9 MW(th) and 11.45 MW(e). The BR3/Vulcain plant was started in December 1966 and since then is running with a load factor around 90%. It is the first time that such a reactor type has been built and operated and the experience gained by its design, construction, commissioning and operation has proven to be most valuable. D{sub 2}O is being used at a pressure (2000 lb/in{sup 2} abs.) never before achieved in a heavy-water reactor and the leak rate from the HP primary systems to the atmosphere has been kept to a negligible value, around 1 to 2 grams/h. Commissioning of the primary plant had been carried out with light water first without fuel, and thereafter with fuel, at which time the water was poisoned with boric acid. The reactor vessel contains experimental devices such as 65 in-pile instrumentation detectors and four hydraulically operated Zircaloy control rods. They required the interposition of a collar between the vessel and its lid. Refuelling is performed under boronated light water, the interchange between the primary water and the H{sub 2}O being carried out by means of a draining and spraying system. The reactor had been operated for two years before its modifications for Vulcain: many lessons have therefore been learned about working on irradiated systems. The BR3/Vulcain core has a

  1. Operations planning for Space Station Freedom - And beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Stephen S.; Martin, Thomas E.; Durham, H. J.

    1992-01-01

    The potential of automated planning and electronic execution systems for enhancing operations on board Space Station Freedom (SSF) are discussed. To exploit this potential the Operations Planning and Scheduling Subsystem is being developed at the NASA Johnson Space Center. Such systems may also make valuable contributions to the operation of resource-constrained, long-duration space habitats of the future. Points that should be considered during the design of future long-duration manned space missions are discussed. Early development of a detailed operations concept as an end-to-end mission description offers a basis for iterative design evaluation, refinement, and option comparison, particularly when used with an advanced operations planning system capable of modeling the operations and resource constraints of the proposed designs.

  2. Shippingport Atomic Power Station Operating Experience, Developments and Future Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinroth, H.; Oldham, G.M.; Stiefel, J.T.

    1963-01-01

    This paper describes and evaluates five years of operation and test of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station and discusses the current technical developments and future plans of the Shippingport programme. This programme is directed towards development of the basic technology of light-water reactors to provide the basis for potential reduction in the costs of nuclear power. The Shippingport reactor plant has operated for over five years and has been found to integrate readily into a utility system either as a base load or peak load unit. Plant component performance has been reliable. There have been no problems in contamination or waste disposal. Access to primary coolant components for maintenance has been good, demonstrating the integrity of fuel elements. Each of the three refuelling operations performed since start-up of Shippingport has required successively less time to accomplish. Recently, the third seed was refuelled in 32 working days, about one quarter the time required for the first refuelling. The formal requirements of personnel training, written administrative procedures, power plant manuals, etc., which have been a vital factor in the successful implementation of the Shippingport programme, are described. The results obtained from the comprehensive test programme carried out at Shippingport are compared with calculations, and good agreement has been obtained. Reactor core performance, plant stability, and response to load changes, fuel element and control rod performance, long-term effects such as corrosion and radiation level build-up, component performance, etc., are discussed in this paper. The principal objective of the current and future programmes of the Shippingport Project in advancing the basic technology of water-cooled reactors is discussed. This programme includes the continued operation of the Shippingport plant, and the development, design, manufacture and test operation of a long-life, highpower density second core - Core 2. At its

  3. Operational radio interferometry observation network (ORION) mobile VLBI station. [for NASA Crustal Dynamics Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzetti, N. A.; Vegos, C. J.; Parks, G. S.; Sniffin, R. W.; Gannon, D. L.; Nishimura, H. G.; Clements, P. A.; Mckinney, R. P.; Menninger, F. J.; Vandenberg, N. R.

    1983-01-01

    The design and current status of the ORION mobile VLBI station is described. The station consists of a five-meter antenna, a receiving and recording system installed in a mobile antenna transporter, and an electronics transporter. The station is designed for field operation by a two-person crew at the rate of two sites per week. The various subsystems are described in detail, including the antenna, housing facilities for electronics and crew, microwave equipment, receiver, data acquisition subsystem, frequency and timing subsystem, phase calibration, monitoring and control, water vapor radiometer, and communications.

  4. Operating experience and performance at Narora Atomic Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittal, Subhash; Gupta, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    Narora Atomic Power Station consists of two units of 220 MWe capacity each. These are Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors, fuelled by natural uranium, moderated and cooled by heavy water. The Station is owned by Nuclear Power Corporation of India Ltd., which is responsible for design, construction, commissioning, and operation of all nuclear power stations in the country. NAPS was the first opportunity to apply operating experiences in design, keeping in view the evolving safety and seismicity requirements, ease of maintenance, inservice inspection needs, improved construction ability and standardization. Both the units of NAPS are having improved safety standards of current international levels. All the equipment are indigenous with improved quality and reliability. The first unit of the station went critical in March 1989 and synchronized to the grid in July 1989. The second units followed with its criticality in October 1991 and synchronization in January 1992. Considering the initial stabilizing period, the performance of both units of NAPS has progressively improved over the years. The annual capacity factor for NAPS - 1 was 90.01% and for NAPS - 2 was 89.01% for the financial year 1997-1998. This paper presents an analysis of the performance during the last three years and measures taken to improve it. The stated enhanced performance could be achieved by improvement in human performance by training/re-training, scrupulous monitoring and review of equipment/systems, institution of adequate procedure and ensuring their adherence. (authors)

  5. Man/machine interface for a nuclear cask remote handling control station: system design requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, M.M.; Kreifeldt, J.G.; Draper, J.V.

    1984-01-01

    Design requirements are presented for a control station of a proposed semi-automated facility for remote handling of nuclear waste casks. Functional and operational man/machine interface: controls, displays, software format, station architecture, and work environment. In addition, some input is given to the design of remote sensing systems in the cask handling areas. 18 references, 9 figures, 12 tables

  6. The Chooz power station: ten years of operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teste du Bailler, Andre

    1977-01-01

    The switching into actual service of the Chooz plant, the first pressurized water reactor ever built in France, occurred on 3rd april 1967. Ten years later, one can establish a highly positive balance schedule of plant's operation whose availability is satisfactory, except the mechanical failure which occurred during the startup. The behavior of the equipment, in particular of the components of the primary loop, was satisfactory in its whole since it allowed the gradual increase in capacity by 15% with respect to the initial design. It allowed also the achievment of noticeable progress in the design of equipment intended for the new power stations. Interesting results have also been obtained in radioprotection, working conditions of the staff and environment protection fields. Finally, the training of the operating teams has been closely followed, whether it concerned the operators directly affected by plant operation or the trainees gathered in a school specially organized for this purpose and transferred since to a training Center [fr

  7. Operational results in the Onagawa Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Kanichi; Kato, Katsuya; Terada, Hideo; Kamata, Takakage; Kaimura, Yoshiharu

    1986-01-01

    In the Onagawa Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1 (BWR type, with electric output 524 MW) started operation in June 1, 1984. The power plant has then continued non-stop operation up to April 2, 1985, thus exhibiting its base load plant. In fiscal 1984, the continuous operation is for 342 days; the capacity factor is about 96.1 %, which is the world's top. During the period, the radioactivity releases to the environment in both liquid and gaseous wastes are below the detection limits. The collective exposure dose for plant personnel is merely 6 man-rem. Subsequently, its 1st periodical inspection was started on April 3, 1985, and finished in July the same year. So, the power plant is now again in operation. (Mori, K.)

  8. (Shippingport Atomic Power Station). Quarterly operating report, fourth quarter 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    At the beginning of the fourth quarter of 1980, the Shippingport Atomic Power Station remained shutdown for the normally planned semiannual maintenance and testing program, initiated September 12, 1980. Operational testing began on November 7. Maximum power was achieved November 28 and was maintained throughout the remainder of the quarter except as noted. The LWBR Core has generated 19,046.07 EFPH from start-up through the end of the quarter. During this quarter, approximately 0.000025 curies of Xe 133 activity were released from the station. During the fourth quarter of 1980, 1081 cubic feet of radioactive solid waste was shipped out of state for burial. These shipments contained 0.037 curies of radioactivity.

  9. International Cooperation of Payload Operations on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, Tina; Onken, Jay

    2003-01-01

    One of the primary goals of the International Space Station (ISS) is to provide an orbiting laboratory to be used to conduct scientific research and commercial products utilizing the unique environment of space. The ISS Program has united multiple nations into a coalition with the objective of developing and outfitting this orbiting laboratory and sharing in the utilization of the resources available. The primary objectives of the real- time integration of ISS payload operations are to ensure safe operations of payloads, to avoid mutual interference between payloads and onboard systems, to monitor the use of integrated station resources and to increase the total effectiveness of ISS. The ISS organizational architecture has provided for the distribution of operations planning and execution functions to the organizations with expertise to perform each function. Each IPP is responsible for the integration and operations of their payloads within their resource allocations and the safety requirements defined by the joint program. Another area of international cooperation is the sharing in the development and on- orbit utilization of unique payload facilities. An example of this cooperation is the Microgravity Science Glovebox. The hardware was developed by ESA and provided to NASA as part of a barter arrangement.

  10. FUZZY LOGIC CONTROLLER IMPLEMENTATION FOR PHOTOVOLTAIC STATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imad Zein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar panels have a nonlinear voltage-current characteristic, with a distinct maximum power point (MPP, which depends on the environmental factors, such as temperature and irradiation. In order to continuously harvest maximum power from the solar panels, they have to operate at their MPP despite the inevitable changes in the environment. This is why the controllers of all solar power electronic converters employ some method for maximum power point tracking (MPPT . Over the past years many MPPT techniques have been published and based on that the main paper’s objective is to analyze one of the most promising MPPT control algorithms: fuzzy logic controller

  11. Accounting and cost control of a nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dangelmaier, P.

    1977-01-01

    1) chart or classification of accounts, 2) all plant expenses, 3) cost control, 4) storage of spare parts and supplies, 5) control of applicable dose rate, 6) charges for insurance. The accuracy of accounting and cost control is a primary thing for the efficiency in a nuclear power station. The much more important factor is the availability. It is necessary to save costs by a more effective storage or a more detailed and automatic process of single jobs in the workshop. But a very definite experience made in Obrigheim is the fact that not only commercial people know which financial loss will occur if the plant is out of operation one hour. This knowledge is also important for the technical people and for the workers in the workshops. The technical responsibility and the security in operation of the plant and the commercial understanding for the risk of non-availability do not exclude each other. (HP) [de

  12. Operational considerations for the Space Station Life Science Glovebox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Daryl N.; Bosley, John J.; Vogelsong, Kristofer; Schnepp, Tery A.; Phillips, Robert W.

    1988-01-01

    The U.S. Laboratory (USL) module on Space Station will house a biological research facility for multidisciplinary research using living plant and animal specimens. Environmentally closed chambers isolate the specimen habitats, but specimens must be removed from these chambers during research procedures as well as while the chambers are being cleaned. An enclosed, sealed Life Science Glovebox (LSG) is the only locale in the USL where specimens can be accessed by crew members. This paper discusses the key science, engineering and operational considerations and constraints involving the LSG, such as bioisolation, accessibility, and functional versatility.

  13. Microprocessor control unit of thyristor regulator of microhydroelectric power station ballast load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomokonova, Yu; Bogdanov, E

    2014-01-01

    The operational principle of microhydroelectric power station ballast load is presented. The comparative overview of the mathematical modeling methods is performed. The ranges of thyristors optimal work are shown as a result of the regulator regimes analysis. Shows the necessity of regulation the ballast load in microhydroelectric power station with help of developed algorithm of the program for microprocessor control

  14. Reliable, fault tolerant control systems for nuclear generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeil, T.O.; Olmstead, R.A.; Schafer, S.

    1990-01-01

    Two operational features of CANDU Nuclear Power Stations provide for high plant availability. First, the plant re-fuels on-line, thereby eliminating the need for periodic and lengthy refuelling 'outages'. Second, the all plants are controlled by real-time computer systems. Later plants are also protected using real-time computer systems. In the past twenty years, the control systems now operating in 21 plants have achieved an availability of 99.8%, making significant contributions to high CANDU plant capacity factors. This paper describes some of the features that ensure the high degree of system fault tolerance and hence high plant availability. The emphasis will be placed on the fault tolerant features of the computer systems included in the latest reactor design - the CANDU 3 (450MWe). (author)

  15. Operational test procedure for pumping and instrumentation control skid SALW-6001B monitor and control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, M.F.

    1995-11-01

    This OTP shall verify and document that the monitor and control system comprised of PICS SALW-6001B PLC, 242S PLC, Operator Control Station, and communication network is functioning per operational requirements

  16. Operation of the Hoenoe wind power test station. Final report; Drift av Hoenoe provstation. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellsen, Magnus; Carlson, Ola [Chalmers Univ. of Tech., Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Electric Power Engineering

    2002-04-01

    This project has made it possible to have autonomous operation of the Chalmers experimental wind turbine. By development of the optimal speed and stall control the energy production is good. The test station has been put in good order and is well prepared to been shown to visitors. The proposed research will focus on series capacitors for increasing the power output and better control of the damping valves to reduce vibrations.

  17. On Chinese National Continuous Operating Reference Station System of GNSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Junyong

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Global navigation satellite system (GNSS Continuous Operating Reference Station (CORS System can maintain a accurate, 3D, geocentric and dynamic reference coordinate frame in the corresponding area, can provide positioning and navigation service. It can also serve for the meteorology, geodynamics, earthquake monitoring and Location Based services (LBS etc in the same area. Until now, our country can’t provide a facing National CORS System serving for every profession and trade, and the national sharing platform of CORS System resources has not been established. So this paper discusses some valuable insight how to construct the National CORS System in China. Method: Constructing goal、Service object、CORS distribution、CORS geographic、geology and communication environment and other factors, are major considerations for the Constructing the National CORS System. Moreover, constructing GNSS CORS is more specific, mainly from four aspects, namely site-selection、civil construction、security measures and equipment-selection for consideration. Outcome: The project of the Constructing Global navigation satellite system (GNSS Continuous Operating Reference Station (CORS System in china is put forward, and is discussed from goal、principle、project and other for construction. Some meaning thought how to construct the National CORS System is submitted Conclusion: The Global navigation satellite system (GNSS Continuous Operating Reference Station (CORS System in china is the lack of a unified planning and design in the national level. So far, the national CORS system serving all walks of life has not been provided, and the national sharing platform of CORS System resources has not been established The primary mission of the Global navigation satellite system (GNSS Continuous Operating Reference Station (CORS System in china is as follows: using data set of GNSS and receiving, transport, process, integration, transmit information and

  18. Space Station Environmental Control/Life Support System engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C. W.; Heppner, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    The present paper is concerned with a systems engineering study which has provided an understanding of the overall Space Station ECLSS (Environmental Control and Life Support System). ECLSS/functional partitioning is considered along with function criticality, technology alternatives, a technology description, single thread systems, Space Station architectures, ECLSS distribution, mechanical schematics per space station, and Space Station ECLSS characteristics. Attention is given to trade studies and system synergism. The Space Station functional description had been defined by NASA. The ECLSS will utilize technologies which embody regenerative concepts to minimize the use of expendables.

  19. Operating Experience at the Aagesta Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandstroem, S.

    1966-09-01

    Sweden's first nuclear power reactor Agesta, achieved criticality on July 17, 1963. Full power (65 MW t ) was attained on March 20, 1964. Aagesta is a heavy water cooled and moderated pressure vessel reactor used for production of electricity as well as for district heating. The design, assembly and construction etc, of the reactor was described in detail in a staff report by AB Atomenergi, 'The Aagesta Nuclear Power Station' edited by B McHugh, which was published in September, 1964. In the book experiences from the commissioning and the first operation of the reactor were reported as well as findings from the extensive reactor physics studies made during this period. The report now presented is written by members of the operating team at Aagesta since its start. It reflects in general the experiences up to the end of 1965. The Aagesta Log, however, covers the period up to the normal summer stop 1966. The reactor has hitherto produced 506,000 MWh power of which 48,700 MWh have been electric power. In July 1965 the responsibility for the reactor operation was taken over by the Swedish State Power Board from AB Atomenergi, which company had started the reactor and operated it until the summer break 1965

  20. Operating Experience at the Aagesta Nuclear Power Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstroem, S [ed.

    1966-09-15

    Sweden's first nuclear power reactor Agesta, achieved criticality on July 17, 1963. Full power (65 MW{sub t}) was attained on March 20, 1964. Aagesta is a heavy water cooled and moderated pressure vessel reactor used for production of electricity as well as for district heating. The design, assembly and construction etc, of the reactor was described in detail in a staff report by AB Atomenergi, 'The Aagesta Nuclear Power Station' edited by B McHugh, which was published in September, 1964. In the book experiences from the commissioning and the first operation of the reactor were reported as well as findings from the extensive reactor physics studies made during this period. The report now presented is written by members of the operating team at Aagesta since its start. It reflects in general the experiences up to the end of 1965. The Aagesta Log, however, covers the period up to the normal summer stop 1966. The reactor has hitherto produced 506,000 MWh power of which 48,700 MWh have been electric power. In July 1965 the responsibility for the reactor operation was taken over by the Swedish State Power Board from AB Atomenergi, which company had started the reactor and operated it until the summer break 1965.

  1. Operating Experience at the Aagesta Nuclear Power Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstroem, S. (ed.)

    1966-09-15

    Sweden's first nuclear power reactor Agesta, achieved criticality on July 17, 1963. Full power (65 MW{sub t}) was attained on March 20, 1964. Aagesta is a heavy water cooled and moderated pressure vessel reactor used for production of electricity as well as for district heating. The design, assembly and construction etc, of the reactor was described in detail in a staff report by AB Atomenergi, 'The Aagesta Nuclear Power Station' edited by B McHugh, which was published in September, 1964. In the book experiences from the commissioning and the first operation of the reactor were reported as well as findings from the extensive reactor physics studies made during this period. The report now presented is written by members of the operating team at Aagesta since its start. It reflects in general the experiences up to the end of 1965. The Aagesta Log, however, covers the period up to the normal summer stop 1966. The reactor has hitherto produced 506,000 MWh power of which 48,700 MWh have been electric power. In July 1965 the responsibility for the reactor operation was taken over by the Swedish State Power Board from AB Atomenergi, which company had started the reactor and operated it until the summer break 1965.

  2. Access control system operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, L.D.

    1981-06-01

    An automated method for the control and monitoring of personnel movement throughout the site was developed under contract to the Department of Energy by Allied-General Nuclear Services (AGNS) at the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant (BNFP). These automated features provide strict enforcement of personnel access policy without routine patrol officer involvement. Identification methods include identification by employee ID number, identification by voice verification and identification by physical security officer verification. The ability to grant each level of access authority is distributed over the organization to prevent any single individual at any level in the organization from being capable of issuing an authorization for entry into sensitive areas. Each access event is recorded. As access events occur, the inventory of both the entered and the exited control area is updated so that a current inventory is always available for display. The system has been operated since 1979 in a development mode and many revisions have been implemented in hardware and software as areas were added to the system. Recent changes have involved the installation of backup systems and other features required to achieve a high reliability. The access control system and recent operating experience are described

  3. 47 CFR 90.1331 - Restrictions on the operation of base and fixed stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-3700 MHz Band § 90.1331 Restrictions on the operation of base and fixed stations. (a)(1) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, base and fixed stations may not be located within 150 km of... these stations are available at http://www.fcc.gov/ib/sd/3650/. (2) Base and fixed stations may be...

  4. Space station operations task force. Panel 3 report: User development and integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    The User Development and Integration Panel of the Space Station Operations Task Force was chartered to develop concepts relating to the operations of the Space Station manned base and the platforms, user accommodation and integration activities. The needs of the user community are addressed in the context with the mature operations phase of the Space Station. Issues addressed include space station pricing options, marketing strategies, payload selection and resource allocation options, and manifesting techniques.

  5. Scheduled Operation of PV Power Station Considering Solar Radiation Forecast Error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Satoshi; Hara, Ryoichi; Kita, Hiroyuki; Ito, Takamitsu; Ueda, Yoshinobu; Saito, Yutaka; Takitani, Katsuyuki; Yamaguchi, Koji

    Massive penetration of photovoltaic generation (PV) power stations may cause some serious impacts on a power system operation due to their volatile and unpredictable output. Growth of uncertainty may require larger operating reserve capacity and regulating capacity. Therefore, in order to utilize a PV power station as an alternative for an existing power plant, improvement in controllability and adjustability of station output become very important factor. Purpose of this paper is to develop the scheduled operation technique using a battery system (NAS battery) and the meteorological forecast. The performance of scheduled operation strongly depends on the accuracy of solar radiation forecast. However, the solar radiation forecast contains error. This paper proposes scheduling method and rescheduling method considering the trend of forecast error. More specifically, the forecast error scenario is modeled by means of the clustering analysis of the past actual forecast error. Validity and effectiveness of the proposed method is ascertained through computational simulations using the actual PV generation data monitored at the Wakkanai PV power station and solar radiation forecast data provided by the Japan Weather Association.

  6. Simulator training and licensing examination for nuclear power station operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Pingsheng

    2007-01-01

    For the recruitment, training and position qualification of the simulator instructors and feedback of training effect, the management approaches are formulated in 'The System for Simulator Training and Licensing Examination of Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station Operators'. The concrete requirements on the professional knowledge, work experience and foreign language ability of a simulator instructor are put forward. The process of instructor training is designed. The training items include the trainer training, pedagogy training, time management training, operation activities training during outage of unit, 'shadow' training and on-the-jot training on simulator courses. Job rotation is realized between simulator instructor and licensing personnel on site. New simulator instructor must pass the qualification identification. After a duration of 2 years, re-qualification has to be carried out. On the basis of the operator training method introduced from EDF (electricite De France), some new courses are developed and the improvement on the initial training, retaining courses, the technical support and the experience feedback by using the simulator is done also. (authors)

  7. Criteria for the design of the control room complex for a nuclear power generating station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    This Standard addresses the central control room of a nuclear power generating station and the overall complex in which this room is housed. It is not intended to cover special or normally unattended control rooms, such as those provided for radioactive waste handling or for emergency shutdown operations. The nuclear power generating station control room complex provides a protective envelope for plant operating personnel and for instrument and control equipment vital to the operation of the plant during normal and abnormal conditions. In this capacity, the control room complex must be designed and constructed to meet the following criteria contained in Appendix A of 10CFR50, General Design criteria for Nuclear Power Plants: (1) Criterion 2: design bases for protection against natural phenomena; (2) Criterion 3: fire protection; (3) Criterion 4: environmental and missile design bases; (4) Criterion 5: sharing of structures, systems and components (multiunit stations only); and (5) Criterion 19: control room

  8. Space Station CMIF extended duration metabolic control test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunk, Richard G.; Bagdigian, Robert M.; Carrasquillo, Robyn L.; Ogle, Kathryn Y.; Wieland, Paul O.

    1989-01-01

    The Space Station Extended Duration Metabolic Control Test (EMCT) was conducted at the MSFC Core Module Integration Facility. The primary objective of the EMCT was to gather performance data from a partially-closed regenerative Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system functioning under steady-state conditions. Included is a description of the EMCT configuration, a summary of events, a discussion of anomalies that occurred during the test, and detailed results and analysis from individual measurements of water and gas samples taken during the test. A comparison of the physical, chemical, and microbiological methods used in the post test laboratory analyses of the water samples is included. The preprototype ECLS hardware used in the test, providing an overall process description and theory of operation for each hardware item. Analytical results pertaining to a system level mass balance and selected system power estimates are also included.

  9. Open control/display system for a telerobotics work station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keslowitz, Saul

    1987-01-01

    A working Advanced Space Cockpit was developed that integrated advanced control and display devices into a state-of-the-art multimicroprocessor hardware configuration, using window graphics and running under an object-oriented, multitasking real-time operating system environment. This Open Control/Display System supports the idea that the operator should be able to interactively monitor, select, control, and display information about many payloads aboard the Space Station using sets of I/O devices with a single, software-reconfigurable workstation. This is done while maintaining system consistency, yet the system is completely open to accept new additions and advances in hardware and software. The Advanced Space Cockpit, linked to Grumman's Hybrid Computing Facility and Large Amplitude Space Simulator (LASS), was used to test the Open Control/Display System via full-scale simulation of the following tasks: telerobotic truss assembly, RCS and thermal bus servicing, CMG changeout, RMS constrained motion and space constructible radiator assembly, HPA coordinated control, and OMV docking and tumbling satellite retrieval. The proposed man-machine interface standard discussed has evolved through many iterations of the tasks, and is based on feedback from NASA and Air Force personnel who performed those tasks in the LASS.

  10. Solar Power Station Output Inverter Control Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bauer

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The photovoltaic applications spreads in these days fast, therefore they also undergo great development. Because the amount of the energy obtained from the panel depends on the surrounding conditions, as intensity of the sun exposure or the temperature of the solar array, the converter must be connected to the panel output. The Solar system equipped with inverter can supply small loads like notebooks, mobile chargers etc. in the places where the supplying network is not present. Or the system can be used as a generator and it shall deliver energy to the supply network. Each type of the application has different requirements on the converter and its control algorithm. But for all of them the one thing is common – the maximal efficiency. The paper focuses on design and simulation of the low power inverter that acts as output part of the whole converter. In the paper the design of the control algorithm of the inverter for both types of inverter application – for islanding mode and for operation on the supply grid – is discussed. Attention is also paid to the design of the output filter that should reduce negative side effects of the converter on the supply network.

  11. Control of TFTR during DT operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, G.G.; Alling, P.D.; Blanchard, W.; Camp, R.A.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Hosea, J.C.; Nagy, A.

    1995-01-01

    Since beginning routine D-T operations in December, 1993, there have been more than 500 DT plasmas and approximately 600,000 Ci of tritium processed through TFTR culminating in greater than 10 MW of fusion power produced in a single discharge in November, 1994. These performance levels were achieved while maintaining the highest levels of personnel and equipment safety. Prior to D-T operations, a Chain of Command structure and a TFTR Shift Supervisor (TFTRSS) position were developed for centralized control of the facility with all subsystems reporting to this position. A comprehensive surveillance system was incorporated such that the TFTR SS could easily review the operational readiness of subsystems for D-T operations. A TFTR SS Station was constructed to facilitate monitoring and control of TFTR. This station includes a camera system, FAX, a networked personal computer, a computerized tritium monitor and control system and a hardware interlock system. In the transition from D-D to D-T operations, TFTR's procedures were reviewed/revised and a number of additional procedures developed for control of activities at the facility. This paper details the equipment, administrative and organizational configurations used for controlling TFTR during D-T operations

  12. Investigation the Effects of Operation Methods on Energy Consumption in Agricultural Water Pumping Stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. DelfanAzari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The energy crisis has led the world toward the reduction of energy consumption. More than 70 percent of the energy in agriculture sector is used by pumps. In our country, there is no clear standard and guideline and also no adequate supervision for the design, selection, installation and operation of pumping systems appropriate to the circumstances and needs. Consequently, these systems operate with low efficiency and high losses of energy. While more than 20 percent of the world's electricity is consumed by pumps, average pumping efficiency is less than 40%. So evaluation of pumping stations and providing some solutions to increase efficiency and pumping system’s life time and to reduce energy consumption can be an effective in optimization of energy consumption in the country. The main reasons for the low efficiency of pumping systems comparing to potential efficiency are using unsuitable techniques for flow control, hydraulic and physical changes of pumping system during the time, using pumps or motors with low efficiency and poor maintenance. Normally the amount of flow is not constant over the time in a pumping system and needed flow rate is changed at different times. Designing of pumping system should be responsible for peak requirements as well as it must suggest the suitable flow control method to achieve least energy losses for minimum flow requirements. Also one of the main capabilities to reduce energy consumption in pumping stations is improving the flow control method. Using the flow control valves and bypass line with high energy losses is very common. While the use of variable speed pumps (VSPs that supply water requirement with sufficient pressure and minimum amount of energy, is limited due to lack of awareness of designers and (or high initial costs. Materials and Methods: In this study, the operation of the pumping stations under four scenarios (for discharge control in a drip irrigation system was analyzed

  13. Integrated real time control of influent pumping station and primary settling tanks at WWTP Eindhoven

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Daal-Rombouts, P.M.M.; de Jonge, J; Langeveld, J.G.; Clemens, F.H.L.R.

    2016-01-01

    This research deals with the design and implementation of an integrated control for the WWTP of Eindhoven. The control influences the operation of the primary settling tanks and influent pumping station to reduce reduce ammonia peaks in the WWTP effluent. The control takes into account the treatment

  14. National Geodetic Survey (NGS) Geodetic Control Stations, (Horizontal and/or Vertical Control), March 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This data contains a set of geodetic control stations maintained by the National Geodetic Survey. Each geodetic control station in this dataset has either a precise...

  15. Establishment and evaluation of operation function model for cascade hydropower station

    OpenAIRE

    Chang-ming Ji; Ting Zhou; Hai-tao Huang

    2010-01-01

    Toward solving the actual operation problems of cascade hydropower stations under hydrologic uncertainty, this paper presents the process of extraction of statistical characteristics from long-term optimal cascade operation, and proposes a monthly operation function algorithm for the actual operation of cascade hydropower stations through the identification, processing, and screening of available information during long-term optimal operation. Applying the operation function to the cascade hy...

  16. Operation and maintenance of thermal power stations best practices and health monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Chanda, Pradip

    2016-01-01

    This book illustrates operation and maintenance practices/guidelines for economic generation and managing health of a thermal power generator beyond its regulatory life. The book provides knowledge for professionals managing power station operations, through its unique approach to chemical analysis of water, steam, oil etc. to identify malfunctioning/defects in equipment/systems much before the physical manifestation of the problem. The book also contains a detailed procedure for conducting performance evaluation tests on different equipment, and for analyzing test results for predicting maintenance requirements, which has lent a new dimension to power systems operation and maintenance practices. A number of real life case studies also enrich the book. This book will prove particularly useful to power systems operations professionals in the developing economies, and also to researchers and students involved in studying power systems operations and control. .

  17. Shippingport Atomic Power Station. Quarterly operating report, third quarter 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, T. D.

    1978-01-01

    A loss of ac power to the station occurred on July 28, 1978 caused by an interaction between Beaver Valley Power Station and Shippingport Atomic Power Station when the main transformer of Unit No. 1 of the Beaver Valley Power Station developed an internal failure and tripped the BVPS. Two environmental studies were continued this quarter. The first involves reduction of main unit condenser chlorination and the second, river intake screen fish impingement sampling. There were no radioactive liquid discharges from the Radioactive Waste Processing System to the river this quarter. During the third quarter of 1978, 874 cubic feet of radioactive solid waste was shipped out of state for burial. At the end of the quarter, the Fall shutdown continued with the plant heated up, the main turbine on turning gear and plant testing in progress prior to Station startup.

  18. Automated subsystems control development. [for life support systems of space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, R. F.; Heppner, D. B.; Samonski, F. H., Jr.; Lance, N., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    NASA has the objective to launch a Space Station in the 1990s. It has been found that the success of the Space Station engineering development, the achievement of initial operational capability (IOC), and the operation of a productive Space Station will depend heavily on the implementation of an effective automation and control approach. For the development of technology needed to implement the required automation and control function, a contract entitled 'Automated Subsystems Control for Life Support Systems' (ASCLSS) was awarded to two American companies. The present paper provides a description of the ASCLSS program. Attention is given to an automation and control architecture study, a generic automation and control approach for hardware demonstration, a standard software approach, application of Air Revitalization Group (ARG) process simulators, and a generic man-machine interface.

  19. Online control loop tuning in Pickering Nuclear Generating Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, K.X.; Harrington, S.

    2008-01-01

    Most analog controllers in the Pickering B Nuclear Generating Stations adopted PID control scheme. In replacing the analog controllers with digital controllers, the PID control strategies, including the original tuning parameters were retained. The replacement strategy resulted in minimum effort on control loop tuning. In a few cases, however, it was found during commissioning that control loop tuning was required as a result of poor control loop performance, typically due to slow response and controlled process oscillation. Several factors are accounted for the necessities of control loop re-tuning. Our experience in commissioning the digital controllers showed that online control tuning posted some challenges in nuclear power plant. (author)

  20. Local control stations: Human engineering issues and insights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, W.S.; Higgins, J.C.; O'Hara, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    The objective of this research project was to evaluate current human engineering at local control stations (LCSs) in nuclear power plants, and to identify good human engineering practices relevant to the design of these operator interfaces. General literature and reports of operating experience were reviewed to determine the extent and type of human engineering deficiencies at LCSs in nuclear power plants. In-plant assessments were made of human engineering at single-function as well as multifunction LCSs. Besides confirming the existence of human engineering deficiencies at LCSs, the in-plant assessments provided information about the human engineering upgrades that have been made at nuclear power plants. Upgrades were typically the result of any of three influences regulatory activity, broad industry initiatives such as INPO, and specific in-plant programs (e.g. activities related to training). It is concluded that the quality of LCSs is quite variable and might be improved if there were greater awareness of good practices and existing human engineering guidance relevant to these operator interfaces, which is available from a variety of sources. To make such human engineering guidance more readily accessible, guidelines were compiled from such sources and included in the report as an appendix

  1. New software of the control and data acquisition system for the Nuclotron internal target station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isupov, A.Yu.

    2012-01-01

    The control and data acquisition system for the Internal Target Station (ITS) of the Nuclotron (LHEP, JINR) is implemented. The new software is based on the ngdp framework under the Unix-like operating system FreeBSD to allow easy network distribution of the on-line data collected from ITS, as well as the internal target remote control

  2. Application of wire electrodes in electric discharge machining of metal samples of reactor blocks of the operative atomic power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gozhenko, S.V.

    2007-01-01

    Features of application of electroerosive methods are considered during the process of direct definition of properties of metal of the equipment of power units of the atomic power station. Results of development of a complex of the equipment for wire electric discharge machining of metal templet and its use are presented at the control of the basic metal of the main circulating pipelines over blocks of the atomic power station of Ukraine over long terms of operation

  3. Addressing Obsolescence in Operating Power Stations by Implementation of Safety Related Digital Upgrades Paper for Spanish Nuclear Society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legrand, R.

    2014-07-01

    Obsolescence of Instrumentation and Controls is a major problem facing operating Nuclear Power Stations globally. AREVA is the only supplier that has supported the successful licensing, engineering, procurement, installation and commissioning of a full-scope digital Instrumentation and Control (I and C) Protection System in the United States. (Author)

  4. Annual report on nuclear power station operational management, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-09-01

    As of the end of fiscal year 1984, 28 nuclear power plants were in operation in Japan, the total power output of which was 20.56 million kW, equivalent to 22.9 % of the total generated electric power in Japan. Now nuclear power generation bears a very important role in the stable supply and cost stabilization of electric power. The result of the capacity factor in fiscal year 1984 was 73.9 %, which showed that the nuclear power generation and safety management technologies in Japan are at the top level in the world. However, in order that nuclear power generation accomplishes the role as main power source sufficiently hereafter by increasing the number of plants, the reliability and economical efficiency must be further improved, and especially the safety management and operational management become important. For the purpose, the operational experience accumulated so far must be effectively utilized. In this book, the outline of the administration on the safety regulation of nuclear power generation, the state of operation of nuclear power plants, the state of accidents and failures, the state of regular inspections and so on are summarized. Also the state of radioactive waste management and the radiation control for workers are reported. (Kako, I.)

  5. Axial power deviation control strategy and computer simulation for Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Yehong; Zhou Xiaoling, Xiao Min

    2004-01-01

    Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station has very tight operation diagram especially at its right side. Therefore the successful control of axial power deviation for PWR is crucial to nuclear safety. After analyzing various core characters' effect on axial power distribution, several axial power deviation control strategies has been proposed to comply with different power varying operation scenario. Application and computer simulation of the strategies has shown that our prediction of axial power deviation evolution are comparable to the measurement values, and that our control strategies are effective. Engineering experience shows that the application of our methodology can predict accurately the transient of axial power deviation, and therefore has become a useful tool for reactor operation and safety control. This paper presents the axial power control characteristics, reactor operation strategy research, computer simulation, and comparison to measurement results in Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station. (author)

  6. A 31-day battery-operated recording weather station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard J. Barney

    1972-01-01

    The battery-powered recording weather station measures and records wet bulb temperature, dry bulb temperature, wind travel, and rainfall for 31 days. Assembly procedures and cost of supplies and components are discussed.

  7. Space station contamination control study: Internal combustion, phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, Robert T.

    1987-01-01

    Contamination inside Space Station modules was studied to determine the best methods of controlling contamination. The work was conducted in five tasks that identified existing contamination control requirements, analyzed contamination levels, developed outgassing specification for materials, wrote a contamination control plan, and evaluated current materials of offgassing tests used by NASA. It is concluded that current contamination control methods can be made to function on the Space Station for up to 1000 days, but that current methods are deficient for periods longer than about 1000 days.

  8. Preliminary Design of Monitoring and Control Subsystem for GNSS Ground Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seongkyun Jeong

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System Ground Station monitors navigation satellite signal, analyzes navigation result, and uploads correction information to satellite. GNSS Ground Station is considered as a main object for constructing GNSS infra-structure and applied in various fields. ETRI (Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute is developing Monitoring and Control subsystem, which is subsystem of GNSS Ground Station. Monitoring and Control subsystem acquires GPS and Galileo satellite signal and provides signal monitoring data to GNSS control center. In this paper, the configurations of GNSS Ground Station and Monitoring and Control subsystem are introduced and the preliminary design of Monitoring and Control subsystem is performed. Monitoring and Control subsystem consists of data acquisition module, data formatting and archiving module, data error correction module, navigation solution determination module, independent quality monitoring module, and system operation and maintenance module. The design process uses UML (Unified Modeling Language method which is a standard for developing software and consists of use-case modeling, domain design, software structure design, and user interface structure design. The preliminary design of Monitoring and Control subsystem enhances operation capability of GNSS Ground Station and is used as basic material for detail design of Monitoring and Control subsystem.

  9. The training and assessment of operations engineers at Hinkley Point 'B' nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsey, B.A.; Howard, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    The Nuclear Power Training Centre at Oldbury-on-Severn was established to provide a common training of staff at all nuclear power stations operated by the Central Electricity Generating Board, following the ''Standard Specification for the Nuclear Training of Staff at CEGB Nuclear Power Stations''. The paper deals with the following aspects of AGR Stations: The Legislation applicable to these stations. The current training requirements for Operations Staff. The development of training for operations staff at Hinkley Point 'B' including training for career progression within the Operations Department. A detailed explanation of the training package developed for Reactor Desk Drivers at Hinkley 'B'. Revision training of Operations staff to ensure that they continue to run the plant in a safe and commercially viable manner. The training of Shift Operations Engineers for their duties under the Station Emergency Plan. (author)

  10. AN AUTOMATED RAILWAY STATION TRAFFIC CONTROL SYSTEM

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2017-01-01

    Jan 1, 2017 ... Software simulation was carried out using the Proteus virtual system modeling ... system which helps in track switching and level crossing gate traffic control is capable of improving reliability, speed, .... Lane Switching Network.

  11. Control valve friction operational experience at Darlington NGD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speer, B.

    1995-01-01

    Proper installation of valve packing is an important part of ensuring that control valves operate as intended. Darlington NGD has developed a Valve Packing Program. This program combined with valve diagnostics has enabled the station to ensure that the operability of control valves is maintained after repacking. This paper outlines the process that is used for this. (author)

  12. 29 CFR 4.122 - Contracts for operation of postal contract stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Application of the McNamara-O'Hara Service Contract Act Specific Exclusions § 4.122 Contracts for operation of postal contract stations. The Act, in paragraph (7) of section 7, exempts from its provisions “any... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Contracts for operation of postal contract stations. 4.122...

  13. 78 FR 40519 - Cooper Nuclear Station; Application and Amendment to Facility Operating License Involving...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-05

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 50-298; NRC-2013-0139] Cooper Nuclear Station; Application and Amendment to Facility Operating License Involving Proposed No Significant Hazards..., issued to Nebraska Public Power District (the licensee), for operation of the Cooper Nuclear Station (CNS...

  14. Saltwell Leak Detector Station Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) Software Configuration Management Plan (SCMP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WHITE, K.A.

    2000-01-01

    This document provides the procedures and guidelines necessary for computer software configuration management activities during the operation and maintenance phases of the Saltwell Leak Detector Stations as required by HNF-PRO-309/Rev.1, Computer Software Quality Assurance, Section 2.4, Software Configuration Management. The software configuration management plan (SCMP) integrates technical and administrative controls to establish and maintain technical consistency among requirements, physical configuration, and documentation for the Saltwell Leak Detector Station Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) software during the Hanford application, operations and maintenance. This SCMP establishes the Saltwell Leak Detector Station PLC Software Baseline, status changes to that baseline, and ensures that software meets design and operational requirements and is tested in accordance with their design basis

  15. Multivariable control in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parent, M.; McMorran, P.D.

    1982-12-01

    Linear, state-space models of power plant systems tend to be of high order, leading to difficulties in the design of control systems by state-space methods. However, the control system has access only to the plant inputs and outputs, and the fast-responding internal variables may be masked by slower, dominant variables. Model order reduction applies modal analysis to eliminate the fast modes while retaining the character of the input-output response. Two alternative techniques are presented and demonstrated on a model of a nuclear steam generator. The preferred method is implemented in MVPACK, the computer-aided design package

  16. Computer functions in overall plant control of candu generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Q.B.; Stokes, H.W.

    1976-01-01

    System Planning Specifications form the basic requirements for the performance of the plant including its response to abnormal situations. The rules for the computer control programs are devised from these, taking into account limitations imposed by the reactor, heat transport and turbine-generator systems. The paper outlines these specifications and the limitations imposed by the major items of plant equipment. It describes the functions of each of the main programs, their interactions and the control modes used in the existing Ontario Hydro's nuclear station or proposed for future stations. Some simulation results showing the performance of the overall unit control system and plans for future studies are discussed. (orig.) [de

  17. Flow-Control Systems Proof of Concept for Snowmelt Runoff at McMurdo Station, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    ER D C/ CR RE L TR -1 7- 1 Engineering for Polar Operations , Logistics, and Research (EPOLAR) Flow-Control Systems Proof of Concept for...January 2017 Flow-Control Systems Proof of Concept for Snowmelt Runoff at McMurdo Station, Antarctica Rosa Affleck U.S. Army Engineer Research and...runoff can be extreme where the flow can overwhelm both the drainage system and the operations and maintenance (O&M) crew. CRREL has been involved

  18. Mentoring SFRM: A New Approach to International Space Station Flight Control Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huning, Therese; Barshi, Immanuel; Schmidt, Lacey

    2009-01-01

    The Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) of the Johnson Space Center is responsible for providing continuous operations support for the International Space Station (ISS). Operations support requires flight controllers who are skilled in team performance as well as the technical operations of the ISS. Space Flight Resource Management (SFRM), a NASA adapted variant of Crew Resource Management (CRM), is the competency model used in the MOD. ISS flight controller certification has evolved to include a balanced focus on development of SFRM and technical expertise. The latest challenge the MOD faces is how to certify an ISS flight controller (Operator) to a basic level of effectiveness in 1 year. SFRM training uses a twopronged approach to expediting operator certification: 1) imbed SFRM skills training into all Operator technical training and 2) use senior flight controllers as mentors. This paper focuses on how the MOD uses senior flight controllers as mentors to train SFRM skills.

  19. Design and development of a Space Station proximity operations research and development mockup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Richard F.

    1986-01-01

    Proximity operations (Prox-Ops) on-orbit refers to all activities taking place within one km of the Space Station. Designing a Prox-Ops control station calls for a comprehensive systems approach which takes into account structural constraints, orbital dynamics including approach/departure flight paths, myriad human factors and other topics. This paper describes a reconfigurable full-scale mock-up of a Prox-Ops station constructed at Ames incorporating an array of windows (with dynamic star field, target vehicle(s), and head-up symbology), head-down perspective display of manned and unmanned vehicles, voice- actuated 'electronic checklist', computer-generated voice system, expert system (to help diagnose subsystem malfunctions), and other displays and controls. The facility is used for demonstrations of selected Prox-Ops approach scenarios, human factors research (work-load assessment, determining external vision envelope requirements, head-down and head-up symbology design, voice synthesis and recognition research, etc.) and development of engineering design guidelines for future module interiors.

  20. Monitoring of the operation of a nuclear power station with design problems in an importing country: The Almaraz power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reig, J.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the regulatory activities carried out in Spain as a result of the design problem occurring in the steam generators during operation of Unit I of the Almaraz nuclear power station. First, a brief introduction is given to the operating history and characteristics of Unit I of Almaraz. Particular attention is paid to the specific licences issued subsequent to commercial operation which place limitations on the operation of the station and to the operational incidents of which the Nuclear Safety Council (CSN) has been notified. Next, a description is provided of the safety evaluation carried out by the CSN. Three aspects merit particular attention: methodology, evaluation and conclusions. The methodology applied by an importing country is normally based on that of the country of origin of the design, so that the overall evaluation by the NRC has been considered sufficiently representative of aspects specific to the Almaraz power station. In this regard the importance of international collaboration is clearly seen as a principal instrument for performing the evaluation. In the evaluation a distinction is made between general and specific aspects and between inspection programmes and quality assurance requirements. In addition, the conclusions leading to the requirement of the imposition of additional limitations on the operating licence are stated. Apart from the safety evaluation carried out by the CSN, other regulatory activities have been performed over this two-year period. These activities, which include site inspections, audits of the principal supplier company, other independent calculations and so on, are described. Lastly, the paper refers to the lessons learned from the operation of the above-mentioned unit, which are immediately applicable to other Spanish nuclear power stations. (author)

  1. Experience gained in the operation of the Beznau nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kueffer, K. von.

    1976-01-01

    The 24th December 1969, when the Beznau 1 nuclear power station was placed in commercial operation, marked the beginning of electricity production from nuclear energy in Switzerland. Beznau 2 followed on the 15th March 1972. Together with the Muehleberg nuclear power station, nuclear energy accounts for approximately 20 percent of the total electricity production in Switzerland. Until the end of 1975, Switzerland's three nuclear power stations had a mean energy utilisation factor of 71.3 percent which, as compared with a mean energy utilization factor of 60.5 percent for all the nuclear power stations in the West, suggests fairly good operational results. Problems that arose during operation are discussed in detail. By way of summary it is stated that the operation of the Beznau nuclear power station has so far proved a success. The production of electrical energy has always remained within the limits imposed by the law and by the safety aspects. (Auth.)

  2. Using Distributed Operations to Enable Science Research on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathew, Ann S.; Dudley, Stephanie R. B.; Lochmaier, Geoff D.; Rodriquez, Rick C.; Simpson, Donna

    2011-01-01

    In the early days of the International Space Station (ISS) program, and as the organization structure was being internationally agreed upon and documented, one of the principal tenets of the science program was to allow customer-friendly operations. One important aspect of this was to allow payload developers and principle investigators the flexibility to operate their experiments from either their home sites or distributed telescience centers. This telescience concept was developed such that investigators had several options for ISS utilization support. They could operate from their home site, the closest telescience center, or use the payload operations facilities at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) processes and structures were put into place to allow these different options to its customers, while at the same time maintain its centralized authority over NASA payload operations and integration. For a long duration space program with many scientists, researchers, and universities expected to participate, it was imperative that the program structure be in place to successfully facilitate this concept of telescience support. From a payload control center perspective, payload science operations require two major elements in order to make telescience successful within the scope of the ISS program. The first element is decentralized control which allows the remote participants the freedom and flexibility to operate their payloads within their scope of authority. The second element is a strong ground infrastructure, which includes voice communications, video, telemetry, and commanding between the POIC and the payload remote site. Both of these elements are important to telescience success, and both must be balanced by the ISS program s documented requirements for POIC to maintain its authority as an integration and control center. This paper describes both elements of distributed payload

  3. Study of Naval Air Station Operations to Reduce Fuel Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    reasons and loyalty of frequent business customers , schedules rarely change significantly from week to week. Following the schedule generation, aircraft...Air Station ppm pounds per minute xiv rft ready for tasking SHARP Sierra Hotel Aviation Readiness Program Simio Simulation Modeling Framework...America, the U.S. airline industry experienced a total of $7.18 billion in delay costs in 2013 at an average cost per minute of $78.17 (Airlines

  4. International Space Station Temperature and Humidity Control Subsystem Verification for Node 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David E.

    2007-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Node 1 Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System is comprised of five subsystems: Atmosphere Control and Supply (ACS), Atmosphere Revitalization (AR), Fire Detection and Suppression (FDS), Temperature and Humidity Control (THC), and Water Recovery and Management (WRM). This paper provides a summary of the nominal operation of the Node 1 THC subsystem design. The paper will also provide a discussion of the detailed Element Verification methodologies for nominal operation of the Node 1 THC subsystem operations utilized during the Qualification phase.

  5. Retrofit of new digital control systems in existing power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.E.; Baird, C.F.

    1986-01-01

    With the notable exception of the Canadian CANDU nuclear power stations, little use has been made of digital control in North American nuclear stations. Recently, however, there has been renewed interest in such systems within the nuclear industry in response to demands for better ergonomics in control room design and the obsolescence of control equipment whose fundamental design has changed little in 20 yr. Early in 1985, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited was asked by New Brunswick Power to advise on the redesign of the control systems for two fossil-fired generating stations, Coleson Cove and Courtenay Bay Unit 4. Coleson Cove is to be converted from oil to coal firing with consequent extensive control system changes and Courtenay Bay Unit 4 required a low-cost solution to the problem of relocating its control room from the existing isolated location to the combined control center used by units 1, 2, and 3. In both cases, the recommended solution involves the retrofit of state-of-the-art digital control systems. Although the units involved are nonnuclear the experience is applicable

  6. System control fuzzy neural sewage pumping stations using genetic algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Владлен Николаевич Кузнецов

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is considered the system of management of sewage pumping station with regulators based on a neuron network with fuzzy logic. Linguistic rules for the controller based on fuzzy logic, maintaining the level of effluent in the receiving tank within the prescribed limits are developed. The use of genetic algorithms for neuron network training is shown.

  7. Cause trending analysis for licensing operational events in Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dewei

    2005-01-01

    The human causal factors for all human error licensing operational events on Daya Bay nuclear power station since 1993 to 2003 are categorized, the trend of these causal factors is analyzed. The emphasis is placed on analyzing the deficiencies on complying with and executing regulations and procedures. The results provide directional reference for nuclear power station to improve human performance. (author)

  8. Quality control for the construction of Ikata Nuclear Power Station No. 2 Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Akiyoshi

    1983-01-01

    In the construction of No. 2 unit in Ikata Nuclear Power Station, Shikoku Electric Power Co., the quality control was practiced making effective use of the experience in preceding stations including the Three Mile Island station, U.S., and improving those. The construction works were also performed in consideration of ensuring the safe running of No. 1 unit in commercial operation. In this report, first the outline of No. 2 unit facility and the quality control in the construction processes are described sequentially. For the comprehensive quality control activity over a series of plant design, manufacturing, installation and commissioning processes, the quality control policy was fixed, the system was established, the plan was prepared, and the quality control was promoted as planned and systematically. The outline of the quality control in each stage is described as follows. Design stage: It was implemented for the confirmation of applicable standards and references, the management of drawings submitted for approval, the selection of materials used, the coordination among sub-contractors, design change and the reflection of experience in preceding stations. Manufacturing stage. It was performed for material control, manufacturing management, factory test and control. Installation stage. It was practiced for the management of installation works, the inspection during the installation, and the check-up and control after the installation. Several quality control items were implemented also in the method of construction works and construction management. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  9. (Shippingport Atomic Power Station). Quarterly operating report, third quarter 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, T. D.

    1979-01-01

    At the beginning of the third quarter of 1979, the Shippingport Atomic Power Station remained shutdown to complete repairs of the turbine generator hydrogen circulation fan following discovery of a rubbing noise on May 24, 1979. The Station was in a cooldown condition at approximately 180/sup 0/F and 300 psig with a steam bubble in the pressurizer and the reactor coolant pumps in slow speed. The reactor plant cooldown heat exchanger was in service to maintain coolant temperature. The 1A, 1B, 1C, and 1D reactor coolant loops and the 1AC and 1BD purification loops remained in service. All expended PWR Core 2 fuel elements have previously been shipped off-site. The remaining irradiated PWR Core 2 core barrel and miscellaneous refueling tools were in storage under shielding water in the deep pit of the Fuel Handling Building. The LWBR Core has generated 12,111.00 EFPH from startup through the end of the quarter.

  10. Return on experience on control gates in nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valendru, N.

    2009-01-01

    In application of an EDF internal directive, control gates are used at the exit of the Controlled Areas of each nuclear power station site for the radiological control of materials or wastes on pedestrians and vehicles. The author first presents the radiological control chain for people and its principles. This chain comprises the different controls performed within the controlled area, either at the exit of a works area or at the exit of the reactor building, the different controls performed at the exit of the controlled area (depending on the site classification), the control of pedestrians at the site exit, and the 'whole body' anthropo-gamma-metric control. For each of these controls, the authors indicate the detection objectives, the different contamination threshold values, and the type of gate used. In a second part, the authors more precisely present the new C2 gates which include gamma and beta sensors, indicate how control thresholds are adjusted on different power station sites, and discuss the lessons learned after the first years of use of these new gates (difficulties and problems faced as far as detection and detection thresholds are concerned, changes in organization)

  11. Draft Title V Operating Permit: Andeavor Field Services, LLC - Walker Hollow Compressor Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draft Operating Permit (Permit Number: V-UO-000979-2017.00), statement of basis, public notice bulletin, and the administrative permit docket (application and other supporting documents) for the Andeavor Walker Hollow Compressor Station.

  12. Title V Operating Permit: QEP Field Services Company - Wonsits Valley Compressor Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Response to public comments and the Title V Operating Permit for the QEP Field Services Company, Wonsits Valley Compressor Station, located on the Uintah and Ouray Indian Reservation in Uintah County, Utah.

  13. Title V Operating Permit: QEP Field Services Company - Coyote Wash Compressor Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Response to public comments and the Title V Operating Permit for the QEP Field Services Company, Coyote Wash Compressor Station, located on the Uintah and Ouray Indian Reservation in Uintah County, Utah.

  14. SUMMARY AND EVALUATION OF STARTUP AND OPERATING EXPERIENCE AT INDIAN POINT STATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freyberg, R. H.; Prestele, J. A.

    1963-09-15

    A description of the Indian Point Power Station is given aiong with a summary and evaluation of startup and operating experience. Equipment failures and problems and various corrective measures are also outlined. (C.E.S.)

  15. Automating Stowage Operations for the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Russell; Rabideau, Gregg; Mishkin, Andrew; Lee, Young

    2013-01-01

    A challenge for any proposed mission is to demonstrate convincingly that the proposed systems will in fact deliver the science promised. Funding agencies and mission design personnel are becoming ever more skeptical of the abstractions that form the basis of the current state of the practice with respect to approximating science return. To address this, we have been using automated planning and scheduling technology to provide actual coverage campaigns that provide better predictive performance with respect to science return for a given mission design and set of mission objectives given implementation uncertainties. Specifically, we have applied an adaptation of ASPEN and SPICE to the Eagle-Eye domain that demonstrates the performance of the mission design with respect to coverage of science imaging targets that address climate change and disaster response. Eagle-Eye is an Earth-imaging telescope that has been proposed to fly aboard the International Space Station (ISS).

  16. The appliction of project management in operations preparation of nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Zhengrong; Zhang Zhixiong

    2001-01-01

    Concept, history, characteristics of the project management is introduced. Analysis is performed on the suitability of application of project management approach in nuclear power station operations preparation. Then the application of project management is detailed in order to present the readers our study and practice. Theory and practice indicate that the project management is a useful management tool for operations preparation of nuclear power station to achieve a good performance

  17. The application of project management in operations preparation of nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhixiong; Tang Zhengrong

    2000-01-01

    The author first presents a brief introduction of the concept, history, characteristics of project management. Analysis is performed on the suitability of application of project management approach in nuclear power station operations preparation. Then the application of project management is detailed in order to present the readers authors' study and practice. Theory and practice indicate that the project management is a useful management tool for operations preparation of nuclear power station to achieve a good performance

  18. Operational Control of Internal Transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.R. van der Meer (Robert)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractOperational Control of Internal Transport considers the control of guided vehicles in vehicle-based internal transport systems found in facilities such as warehouses, production plants, distribution centers and transshipment terminals. The author's interest of research having direct use

  19. IT Strategic and Operational Controls

    CERN Document Server

    Kyriazoglou, J

    2010-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive guide to implementing an integrated and flexible set of IT controls in a systematic way. It can help organisations to formulate a complete culture for all areas which must be supervised and controlled; allowing them to simultaneously ensure a secure, high standard whilst striving to obtain the strategic and operational goals of the company.

  20. Experience of remote under water handling operations at Tarapur Atomic Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, S.K.

    1990-01-01

    Each Refuelling outage of Tarapur Atomic Power Station Reactors involves a great deal of remote underwater handling operations using special remote handling tools, working deep down in the reactor vessel under about sixty feet of water and in the narrow confines of highly radioactive core. The remote underwater handling operations include incore and out of core sipping operations, fuel reloading or shuffling, uncoupling of control rod drives, replacement and shuffling of control blades, replacement of local power range monitors, spent fuel shipment in casks, retrieval of fallen or displaced fuel top guide spacers, orifices and their installation, underwater CCTV inspection of reactor internals, core verification, channelling and dechannelling of fuel bundles, inspection of fuel bundles and channels, unbolting and removal of old racks, installation of high density racks, removal and reinstallation of fuel support plugs and guide tubes, underwater cutting of irradiated hardware material and their disposal, fuel reconstitution, removal and reinstallation of system dryer separator etc.. The paper describes in brief the salient experience of remote underwater handling operations at TAPS especially the unusual problems faced and solved, by using special tools, employing specific techniques and by repeated efforts, patience, ingenuity and skills. (author). 10 figs

  1. Cooper Nuclear Station. Annual operating report: January--December 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Plant operations including a chronological summary and a summary of plant outages and power reductions are described. Information is also presented concerning fuel performance, vessel transient condition events, facility changes, maintenance, and personnel radiation exposure

  2. Operating Nuclear Power Stations in a Regulated Cyber Security Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorman, E.

    2014-07-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued 10CFR73.54 to implement a regulated Cyber Security Program at each operating nuclear reactor facility. Milestones were implemented December 31, 2012 to mitigate the attack vectors for the most critical digital assets acknowledged by the industry and the NR C. The NRC inspections have begun. The nuclear Cyber Security Plan, implemented by the site Cyber Security Program (Program), is an element of the operating license at each facility. (Author)

  3. Operating Nuclear Power Stations in a Regulated Cyber Security Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorman, E.

    2014-01-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued 10CFR73.54 to implement a regulated Cyber Security Program at each operating nuclear reactor facility. Milestones were implemented December 31, 2012 to mitigate the attack vectors for the most critical digital assets acknowledged by the industry and the NR C. The NRC inspections have begun. The nuclear Cyber Security Plan, implemented by the site Cyber Security Program (Program), is an element of the operating license at each facility. (Author)

  4. Annual report on operational management of nuclear power stations, 1979-1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    This report was compiled by the Agency of Natural Resoures and Energy. The commercial nuclear power stations in Japan started the operation in 1966 for the first time, and as of the end of March, 1981, 22 plants with more than 15.5 million kW capacity were in operation. Nuclear power generation is regarded as the top-rated substitute energy for petroleum, and the target of its development in 1990 is about 52 million kW. The government and the people are exerting utmost efforts to attain the target. The result of the rate of operation of nuclear power stations reached 60.8% in 1980, but it is important to maintain the good, stable state of operation by perfecting the operational management hereafter in order to establish the position of LWRs. At present, the operational management officers of the government stay in nationwide power stations, and supervise the state of operations, thus the system of operational management was strengthened after the Three Mile Island accident in the U.S., and the improvement in the rate of operation is expected. A table shows the nuclear power stations in operation and under construction. The state of operations of individual nuclear power plants in 1979 and 1980, the accidents and failures occurred in nuclear power plants from 1966 to 1980, the minor troubles, the conditions in the regular inspections of individual nuclear power plants, radioactive waste management and the radiation exposure of workers are reported. (Kako, I.)

  5. Plant Operation Station for HTR-PM Low Power and Shutdown operation Probabilistic safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tao; Tong Jiejuan

    2014-01-01

    Full range Probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) is one of key conditions for nuclear power plant (NPP) licensing according to the requirement of nuclear safety regulatory authority. High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Pebble-bed Module (HTR-PM) has developed construction design and prepared for the charging license application. So after the normal power operation PSA submitted for review, the Low power and Shutdown operation Probabilistic safety analysis (LSPSA) also begin. The results of LSPSA will together with prior normal power PSA results to demonstrate the safety level of HTR-PM NPP Plant Operation Station (POS) is one of important terms in LSPSA. The definition of POS lays the foundation for LSPSA modeling. POS provides initial and boundary conditions for the following event tree and fault tree model development. The aim of this paper is to describe the state-of-the-art of POS definition for HTR-PM LSPSA. As for the first attempt to the high temperature gas cooled reactor module plant, the methodology and procedure of POS definition refers to the LWR LSPSA guidance, and adds to plant initial status analysis due to the HTR-PM characteristics. A specific set of POS grouping vectors is investigate and suggested for HTR-PM NPP, which reflects the characteristics of plant modularization and on-line refueling. As a result, seven POSs are given according to the grouping vectors at the end of the paper. They will be used to the LSPSA modelling and adjusted if necessary. The papers ’work may provide reference to the analogous NPP LSPSA. (author)

  6. Safety procedures in operation of inspection and maintenance of pressure reduction and metering stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villas Boas, Ademar Jose; Biesemeyer, Marco Aurelio R.

    2000-01-01

    Each local Natural Gas Distribution Company in Brazil has its own working procedures for operations of inspection and maintenance on equipment and accessories connected to the gas network. Some of these Companies developed a better elaborated and documented way of working routines, while others only work based on their operators experience. The objective of this work is to create a standard procedure for operations of inspection and maintenance of Pressure Reducing Stations and Metering Stations, mainly the ones concerned to safety aspects. This work has no intention of exhausting all aspects related to this subject but to become the first step to standardize these types of operations among Natural Gas Distribution Companies. (author)

  7. Addressing Challenges to the Design & Test of Operational Lighting Environments for the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Toni A.

    2014-01-01

    In our day to day lives, the availability of light, with which to see our environment, is often taken for granted. The designers of land based lighting systems use sunlight and artificial light as their toolset. The availability of power, quantity of light sources, and variety of design options are often unlimited. The accessibility of most land based lighting systems makes it easy for the architect and engineer to verify and validate their design ideas. Failures with an implementation, while sometimes costly, can easily be addressed by renovation. Consider now, an architectural facility orbiting in space, 260 miles above the surface of the earth. This human rated architectural facility, the International Space Station (ISS) must maintain operations every day, including life support and appropriate human comforts without fail. The facility must also handle logistics of regular shipments of cargo, including new passengers. The ISS requires accommodations necessary for human control of machine systems. Additionally, the ISS is a research facility and supports investigations performed inside and outside its livable volume. Finally, the facility must support remote operations and observations by ground controllers. All of these architectural needs require a functional, safe, and even an aesthetic lighting environment. At Johnson Space Center, our Habitability and Human Factors team assists our diverse customers with their lighting environment challenges, via physical test and computer based analysis. Because of the complexity of ISS operational environment, our team has learned and developed processes that help ISS operate safely. Because of the dynamic exterior lighting environment, uses computational modeling to predict the lighting environment. The ISS' orbit exposes it to a sunrise every 90 minutes, causing work surfaces to quickly change from direct sunlight to earthshine to total darkness. Proper planning of vehicle approaches, robotics operations, and crewed

  8. Brokdorf nuclear power station: Construction scheduling and deadline control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lembcke, U.D.F.

    1986-01-01

    Scheduling, especially deadline control, for all installations of the Brokdorf nuclear power station was carried out centrally by the Project Management of Kraftwerk Union AG. 130 timetables encompassing some 13,000 activities were handled, which were interconnected and linked to 189 timetables (approx. 18,000 activities) from various specialized sections by means of data processing systems. Much space in time scheduling was taken by controls of software processing, especially of the preliminary inspection documents in the piping sector and of working documents for construction management in the control systems area. (orig.) [de

  9. Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1. Annual operating report, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Net electric power generated in 1975 was 1,074,401 MW(e) with the generator on line 4,680.7 hrs. Information is presented concerning operations, maintenance, radioactive effluents and waste shipments, health physics, shutdowns, and personnel exposures

  10. Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station. Annual operating report, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Net electrical power generated was 3,560,206 MWh(e) with the reactor on line 7,689 hrs. Information is presented concerning operations power generation, shutdowns, corrective maintenance, primary coolant chemistry, occupational radiation exposure, reportable occurrences, core spray welds inspection, loss of start-up transformer, and union strike

  11. Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1. Annual operating report, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Net electrical power generated was 2,587,248 MWH(e) with the reactor on line 6,242.4 hr. Information is presented concerning operations, power generation, shutdowns, corrective maintenance, chemistry and radiochemistry, occupational radiation exposure, release of radioactive materials, and reportable occurrences

  12. Human Error and the International Space Station: Challenges and Triumphs in Science Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Samantha S.; Simpson, Beau C.

    2016-01-01

    Any system with a human component is inherently risky. Studies in human factors and psychology have repeatedly shown that human operators will inevitably make errors, regardless of how well they are trained. Onboard the International Space Station (ISS) where crew time is arguably the most valuable resource, errors by the crew or ground operators can be costly to critical science objectives. Operations experts at the ISS Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC), located at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, have learned that from payload concept development through execution, there are countless opportunities to introduce errors that can potentially result in costly losses of crew time and science. To effectively address this challenge, we must approach the design, testing, and operation processes with two specific goals in mind. First, a systematic approach to error and human centered design methodology should be implemented to minimize opportunities for user error. Second, we must assume that human errors will be made and enable rapid identification and recoverability when they occur. While a systematic approach and human centered development process can go a long way toward eliminating error, the complete exclusion of operator error is not a reasonable expectation. The ISS environment in particular poses challenging conditions, especially for flight controllers and astronauts. Operating a scientific laboratory 250 miles above the Earth is a complicated and dangerous task with high stakes and a steep learning curve. While human error is a reality that may never be fully eliminated, smart implementation of carefully chosen tools and techniques can go a long way toward minimizing risk and increasing the efficiency of NASA's space science operations.

  13. Legionella control in power station cooling towers using oxidising biocides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sailer, Christian; Rawlinson, Julia; Killeen, Paul [Ecolab PTY LTD, Ascot, WA (Australia)

    2009-02-15

    Power stations have used oxidising biocides such as chlorine or bromine for many years to control microbial growth in their cooling towers. In this paper Ecolab trademark looks at the direct effect halogen concentration has on Legionella populations in order to determine the most effective halogenation rate required to ensure that the site key performance indicator (KPI) of < 100 colony-forming units (cfu) per mL can be maintained. (orig.)

  14. Control Optimization of a LHC 18 KW Cryoplant Warm Compression Station Using Dynamic Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Bradu, B; Niculescu, S I

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses the control optimization of a 4.5 K refrigerator used in the cryogenic system of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. First, the compressor station with the cold-box have been modeled and simulated under PROCOS (Process and Control Simulator), a simulation environment developed at CERN. Next, an appropriate parameter identification has been performed on the simulator to obtain a simplified model of the system in order to design an Internal Model Control (IMC) enhancing the regulation of the high pressure. Finally, a floating high pressure control is proposed using a cascade control to reduce operational costs.

  15. The Spanish Nuclear Safety Council and nuclear power stations in operation in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perello, M.

    1984-01-01

    On 20 April 1980 the Spanish Congress of Deputies passed an Act setting up the Nuclear Safety Council (CSN) as the sole organization responsible for nuclear safety and radiation protection. In this paper it is stated that that date marked the beginning of a new nuclear safety policy in Spain. As one of its objectives, this policy is aimed at the monitoring and testing of operating nuclear installations. A detailed description is given of the Operating Nuclear Installation Service (SINE), including its basic structure, its functions and the technical and manpower resources available to it. The maintenance of close relations with other organs of the CSN is considered of paramount importance in order for the tasks allotted to SINE to be fulfilled. International co-operation and outside contracting greatly assist importing countries which have limited manpower resources. A description is then given of the present state of the nuclear power stations in operation in Spain together with an account of the most important initiatives which have been taken so far. The year 1968 saw the beginning of commercial operation of the Jose Cabrera nuclear power station, which has the only single-loop PWR reactor in the world. At present, it is being subjected to the Systematic Evaluation Programme (SEP). The Santa Maria de Garona nuclear power station has been operating for over twelve years and is also being subjected to the SEP although design modifications derived from operating experience have already been introduced. The Vandellos I station was the last of the first generation and has also benefited from the operating experience of similar French plants. Unit 1 of the Almaraz power station opens the door to the second generation and the generic problem which has occurred with the steam generators is in process of being solved. Lastly, some general conclusions are presented about the organization of and experience acquired with operating nuclear power stations. (author)

  16. Operating Experience of MACSTOR Modules at CANDU 6 Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaudoin, Robert R.

    2005-01-01

    Over the last three decades, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has contributed to the technology development and implementation of dry spent fuel management facilities in Canada, Korea and Romania During that period, AECL has developed a number of concrete canister models and the MACSTOR200 module, a medium size air-cooled vault with a 228 MgU (Mega grams of Uranium) capacity. AECL's dry storage technologies were used for the construction of eight large-scale above ground dry storage facilities for CANDU spent fuel. As of 2005, those facilities have an installed capacity in excess of 5,000 MgU. Since 1995, the two newest dry storage installations built for CANDU 6 reactors at Gentilly 2 (Canada) and Cernavoda (Romania) used the MACSTOR 200 module. Seven such modules have been built at Gentilly 2 during the 1995 to 2004 period and one at Cernavoda in 2003. The construction and operating experience of those modules is reviewed in this paper. The MACSTOR 200 modules were initially designed for a 50-year service life, with recent units at Gentilly 2 licensed for a 100-year service life in a rural (non-maritime) climate. During the 1995-2005 period, six of the eight modules were loaded with fuel. Their operation has brought a significant amount of experience on loading operations, performance of fuel handling equipment, radiation shielding, heat transfer, monitoring of the two confinement boundaries and radiation dose to personnel. Heat dissipation performance of the MACSTOR 200 was initially licensed using values derived from full scale tests made at AECL's Whiteshell Research Laboratories, that were backed-up by temperature measurements made on the first two modules. Results and computer models developed for the MACSTOR 200 module are described. Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power (KHNP) and its subsidiary Nuclear Environment Technology Institute (NETEC), in collaboration with Hyundai Engineering Company Ltd. (HEC) and AECL, are developing a new dry storage module to

  17. Quality surveillance at Duke Power operating nuclear stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    The Duke Power quality assurance (QA) program originally had three levels of QA audits that reported results to different levels of management and in different time frames. It soon became obvious that although problems were being identified, considerable confusion was being created by reporting them to different levels. Additionally, it was recognized that all audits were dealing in history: events that had already occurred and therefore could not be averted. What was needed was a problem identification system focused on current activities. The Duke quality surveillance program was created by dropping the first level of audits and replacing it with an on-the-scene review system to identify current problems. The quality surveillance program is a success and will be even more so after surveillance personnel acquire additional technical expertise. To that end, a training program has been initiated that will stop just short of operator licensing in the operations area and will also include other areas such as health physics and chemistry

  18. Education and training of operators and maintenance staff at commercial nuclear power stations in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Kataoka, H.

    1998-01-01

    Safe and stable operation of a nuclear power station requires personnel fostering. In Japan, with the objectives of systematically securing qualified people for a long period of time, and maintaining and improving their skills and knowledge, the utilities have created strict personnel training plans, for continuous education and training. Concrete examples of education and training for operators and maintenance personnel at commercial nuclear power stations in Japan, such as education systems training, facility and contents of curriculum, are detailed including some related matters. Recent activities to catch up with environment changes surrounding education and training of operators and maintenance staff are also mentioned. (author)

  19. Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) monitoring station operating regime influence on radionuclide detection sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    International Monitoring System (IMS) stations are being deployed worldwide in support of the Comprehensive [Nuclear] Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). The highly sensitive radionuclide monitoring stations regularly sample airborne radionuclide particulates to determine whether fission products are present in the atmosphere that may be indicative of a nuclear weapons test. Standards have been set for these stations regarding their operation regime and the minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs) for specific radionuclides likely to be present after a nuclear weapons test. This study uses actual CTBT monitoring data to relate a subset of the specified operational standards with the listed MDC limits. It is determined that a relationship exists between the specified operational regime and the MDC values. Since the background radioactivity is largely a function of the radon and thoron progeny, longer decay operational regimes allow for a reduction in the background. For longer lived radionuclides, this corresponds to a reduction in MDC. (author)

  20. Oconee Nuclear Station, Units 1, 2, and 3. Semiannual operating report, January--June 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Information is presented concerning operations, performance characteristics, changes, tests, inspections, containment leak tests, maintenance, primary coolant chemistry, station staff changes, reservoir investigations, plume mapping, and operational environmental radioactivity monitoring data for oconee Units 1, 2, and 3. The non-radiological environmental surveillance program is also described. (FS)

  1. PI Microgravity Services Role for International Space Station Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLombard, Richard

    1998-01-01

    During the ISS era, the NASA Lewis Research Center's Principal Investigator Microgravity Services (PIMS) project will provide to principal investigators (PIs) microgravity environment information and characterization of the accelerations to which their experiments were exposed during on orbit operations. PIMS supports PIs by providing them with microgravity environment information for experiment vehicles, carriers, and locations within the vehicle. This is done to assist the PI with their effort to evaluate the effect of acceleration on their experiments. Furthermore, PIMS responsibilities are to support the investigators in the area of acceleration data analysis and interpretation, and provide the Microgravity science community with a microgravity environment characterization of selected experiment carriers and vehicles. Also, PIMS provides expertise in the areas of microgravity experiment requirements, vibration isolation, and the implementation of requirements for different spacecraft to the microgravity community and other NASA programs.

  2. A joint program for seismographic station operations in the Republic of Kazakstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, W.Y.; Belyashova, N.N.; Richards, P.G.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper there are examples of seismic signals recorded at the stations operated jointly by the Kazakhstan National Nuclear Centre and Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University. Also the way the stations can be used to interpret the natural (earthquake) and and anthropogenic (explosion) sources from which the signals originated is shown. Examples include nuclear explosions carried out by China, India and Pakistan in recent years and months

  3. Enhancements to inventory control procedures used at Koeberg nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, M.P.; Adams, A.R.

    1991-01-01

    In industry today, industrial engineers are forced to seek new and innovative ideas to reduce costs. This can often be accomplished by simplified or modernized operational procedures. With the advancement in computer technology, operational procedures can be enhanced. Despite the fact that Eskom's Koeberg nuclear power station is one of a kind in Africa, it, like most other industries requires a large stock holding capacity. There are currently 25 000 stock items in the Koeberg Stores Information System. Controlling all of these items is no minor task and management is continually trying to optimise the inventory control procedures. One of these procedures is described. 3 refs., 1 fig

  4. Annual report of operation management in nuclear power stations, fiscal year 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    Twenty years have elapsed since the first practical nuclear reactor in Japan started the operation. In the generated power in fiscal year 1985, that of nuclear power stations for the first time overtook that of thermal power stations, and now the age of nuclear power as the main and oil power as the subordinate has begun. As of the end of fiscal year 1985, there were 32 nuclear power plants in operation, having total output capacity of 24.521 million kW. In fiscal year 1985, nuclear power plants generated about 159 billion kWh, which is about 26 % of electric power supply. As to the capacity factor, 76 % was attained in fiscal year 1985, and this is ranked in the top group of LWR-operating countries in the world. It showed that the Japanese technology of nuclear power generation is at the top level in the world. However, in order to increase nuclear power generation and to accomplish the role of main electric power source hereafter, it is necessary to further increase the reliability and economical efficiency. The list of nuclear power stations in Japan, the state of operation of nuclear power stations, the state of accidents and troubles, the state of regular inspection, the management of radioactive wastes and the radiation exposure of workers in nuclear power stations, the operational management and others are reported. (Kako, I.)

  5. Control of Flywheel Energy Storage Systems in Electrical Vehicle Charging Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Bo

    energy storage system (FESS). The proposed PhD project supports a corresponding smart control strategy that could be termed “charging station to grid (CS2G)”. It explores the possibility of using a dedicated energy storage system (FESS) within the charging station to alleviate grid and market conditions...... converters is built and analyzed. |Based on modeling analysis, centralized and distributed control methods are both explored to realize the coordination control of each components in the system. Specially, this project proposes a “dc voltage vs speed” droop strategy for FESS control based on distributed bus...... function method when the system switches its operation behavior between two modes. Finally, a downscaled FCS prototype with FESS is built in the intelligent MG lab, and experiments and hardware-in-loop simulation results are conducted to verify the effectiveness and feasibility with the proposed FCS...

  6. An examination of automation and robotics in the context of Space Station operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criswell, David R.; Lee, Douglas S.; Ragusa, James; Starks, Scott A.; Woodruff, John; Paules, Granville

    1988-01-01

    A NASA-sponsored review of Space Station automation and robotics (A&R) applications from an operations and utilization perspective is presented. The goals of the A&R panel and this report are to identify major suggestions for advanced A&R operations application in Space Station as well as key technologies that have emerged or gained prominence since the completion of previous reports; to review and incorporate the range of possible Space Station A&R applications into a framework for evaluation of A&R opportunities; and to propose incentives for the government, work packages, and subcontractors to more aggressively identify, evaluate, and incorporate advanced A&R in Space Station Operations. The suggestions for A&R focused on narrow objectives using a conservative approach tuned to Space Station at IOC and limiting the Station's growth capabilities. A more aggressive stance is to identify functional needs over the Program's life, exploit and leverage available technology, and develop the key advanced technologies permitting effective use of A&R. The challenge is to systematically identify candidate functions to be automated, provide ways to create solutions resulting in savings or increased capabilities, and offer incentives that will promote the automation.

  7. Environmental Control and Life Support Systems technology options for Space Station application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J. B., Jr.; Ferebee, M. J., Jr.; Sage, K. H.

    1985-01-01

    Continuous assessments regarding the suitability of candidate technologies for manned Space Stations will be needed over the next several years to obtain a basis for recommending the optimum system for an Initial Operating Capability (IOC) Space Station which is to be launched in the early 1990's. This paper has the objective to present analysis programs, the candidate recommendations, and the recommended approach for integration these candidates into the NASA Space Station reference configuration. Attention is given to ECLSS (Environmental Control and Life Support System) technology assessment program, an analysis approach for candidate technology recommendations, mission model variables, a candidate integration program, metabolic oxygen recovery, urine/flush water and all waste water recovery, wash water and condensate water recovery, and an integration analysis.

  8. Education and training of operators and maintenance staff at Hamaoka Nuclear Power Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makido, Hideki; Hayashi, Haruhisa

    1999-01-01

    At Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station, in order to ensure higher safety and reliability of plant operation, education and training is provided consistently, on a comprehensive basis, for all operating, maintenance and other technical staff, aimed at developing more capable human resources in the nuclear power division. To this end, Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station has the 'Nuclear Training Center' on its site. The training center provides the technical personnel including operators and maintenance personnel with practical training, utilizing simulators for operation training and the identical facilities with those at the real plant. Thus, it plays a central role in promoting comprehensive education and training concerning nuclear power generation. Our education system covers knowledge and skills necessary for the safe and stable operation of nuclear power plant, targeting new employees to managerial personnel. It is also organized systematically in accordance with experience and job level. We will report the present education and training of operators and maintenance personnel at Hamaoka Nuclear Training Center. (author)

  9. A10 – UAS Control Station Ergo-nomics Considerations : Tasks CS-6 through CS-8

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The overall objective of the control station tasks within Project A-10 is to provide the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) with information on an ergonomic design of unmanned aircraft system (UAS) control stations which will allow safe piloting o...

  10. National Geodetic Control Stations, Geographic NAD83, NGS (2004) [geodetic_ctrl_point_la_NGS_2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This data contains a set of geodetic control stations maintained by the National Geodetic Survey. Each geodetic control station in this dataset has either a precise...

  11. Nuclear power stations. Information paper no. 1. Controls on the building and running of nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-09-01

    Controls and constraints which govern the development and running of nuclear power stations are briefly examined. Government policy, permission to build, authority to start building, site acquisition building, running and public opinion are briefly discussed.

  12. Organization, Management and Function of International Space Station (ISS) Multilateral Medical Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, James M.; Bogomolov, V. V.; Castrucci, F.; Koike, Y.; Comtois, J. M.; Sargsyan, A. E.

    2007-01-01

    Long duration crews have inhabited the ISS since November of 2000. The favorable medical outcomes of its missions can be largely attributed to sustained collective efforts of all ISS Partners medical organizations. In-flight medical monitoring and support, although crucial, is just a component of the ISS system of Joint Medical Operations. The goal of this work is to review the principles, design, and function of the multilateral medical support of the ISS Program. The governing documents, which describe the relationships among all ISS partner medical organizations, were evaluated, followed by analysis of the roles, responsibilities, and decision-making processes of the ISS medical boards, panels, and working groups. The degree of integration of the medical support system was evaluated by reviewing the multiple levels of the status reviews and mission assurance activities carried out throughout the last six years. The Integrated Medical Group, consisting of physicians and other essential personnel in the mission control centers represents the front-line medical support of the ISS. Data from their day-to-day activities are presented weekly at the Space Medicine Operations Team (SMOT), where known or potential concerns are addressed by an international group of physicians. A broader status review is conducted monthly to project the state of crew health and medical support for the following month, and to determine measures to return to nominal state. Finally, a comprehensive readiness review is conducted during preparations for each ISS mission. The Multilateral Medical Policy Board (MMPB) issues medical policy decisions and oversees all health and medical matters. The Multilateral Space Medicine Board (MSMB) certifies crewmembers and visitors for training and space flight to the Station, and physicians to practice space medicine for the ISS. The Multilateral Medical Operations Panel (MMOP) develops medical requirements, defines and supervises implementation of

  13. Control of Warm Compression Stations Using Model Predictive Control: Simulation and Experimental Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonne, F.; Alamir, M.; Bonnay, P.

    2017-02-01

    This paper deals with multivariable constrained model predictive control for Warm Compression Stations (WCS). WCSs are subject to numerous constraints (limits on pressures, actuators) that need to be satisfied using appropriate algorithms. The strategy is to replace all the PID loops controlling the WCS with an optimally designed model-based multivariable loop. This new strategy leads to high stability and fast disturbance rejection such as those induced by a turbine or a compressor stop, a key-aspect in the case of large scale cryogenic refrigeration. The proposed control scheme can be used to achieve precise control of pressures in normal operation or to avoid reaching stopping criteria (such as excessive pressures) under high disturbances (such as a pulsed heat load expected to take place in future fusion reactors, expected in the cryogenic cooling systems of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor ITER or the Japan Torus-60 Super Advanced fusion experiment JT-60SA). The paper details the simulator used to validate this new control scheme and the associated simulation results on the SBTs WCS. This work is partially supported through the French National Research Agency (ANR), task agreement ANR-13-SEED-0005.

  14. Statement on safety requirements concerning the long-term operation of the Muehleberg nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-12-01

    This report published by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate ENSI investigates the safety requirements with respect to the long-term operation of the Muehleberg nuclear power station in Switzerland. Relevant international requirements and Swiss legal stipulations concerning the long-term operation of the power station are stated. The management of aging processes is looked at. The regular verification of the integrity of various plant components such as containments, piping, steam generation system, etc. is looked at in detail. The state-of-the-art concerning deterministic accident analyses and refitting technology are discussed, as are automated safety systems. The applicable laws, decrees and guidelines are listed in appendices

  15. Neumayer III and Kohnen Station in Antarctica operated by the Alfred Wegener Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Wesche

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Alfred Wegener Institute operates two stations in Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica. The German overwintering station Neumayer III is located on the Ekström Ice Shelf at 70°40’S and 08°16’W and is the logistics base for three long-term observatories (meteorology, air chemistry and geophysics and nearby research activities. Due to the vicinity to the coast (ca. 20 km from the ice shelf edge, the Neumayer III Station is the junction for many German Antarctic expeditions, especially as the starting point for the supply traverse for the second German station Kohnen. The summer station Kohnen is located about 600 km from the coast and 750 km from Neumayer III Station on the Antarctic plateau at 75°S and 00°04’E. It was erected as the base for the deep-drilling ice core project, which took place between 2001 and 2006. Since then Kohnen Station is used as a logistics base for different research projects.

  16. Control optimization of the cryoplant warm compressor station for EAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang, M.; Hu, L. B.; Zhou, Z. W.; Xia, G. H.

    2014-01-01

    The cryogenic control system for EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) was designed based on DeltaV DCS of Emerson Corporation. The automatic control of the cryoplant warm compressors has been implemented. However, with ever-degrading performance of critical equipment, the cryoplant operation in the partial design conditions makes the control system fluctuate and unstable. In this paper, the warm compressor control system was optimized to eliminate the pressure oscillation based on the expert PID theory

  17. A Categorization of Converter Station Controllers Within Multi-terminal DC Transmission Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irnawan, Roni; Silva, Filipe Miguel Faria da; Bak, Claus Leth

    2016-01-01

    of controller might exist in the same system. It is therefore important to identify the parameters required by the converter station controllers to ensure a smooth coordination. In this paper, different converter station controllers available in the literatures are categorized. Challenges of converter station...

  18. Multivariable control in nuclear power stations -survey of design methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mcmorran, P.D.

    1979-12-01

    The development of larger nuclear generating stations increases the importance of dynamic interaction between controllers, because each control action may affect several plant outputs. Multivariable control provides the techniques to design controllers which perform well under these conditions. This report is a foundation for further work on the application of multivariable control in AECL. It covers the requirements of control and the fundamental mathematics used, then reviews the most important linear methods, based on both state-space and frequency-response concepts. State-space methods are derived from analysis of the system differential equations, while frequency-response methods use the input-output transfer function. State-space methods covered include linear-quadratic optimal control, pole shifting, and the theory of state observers and estimators. Frequency-response methods include the inverse Nyquist array method, and classical non-interactive techniques. Transfer-function methods are particularly emphasized since they can incorporate ill-defined design criteria. The underlying concepts, and the application strengths and weaknesses of each design method are presented. A review of significant applications is also given. It is concluded that the inverse Nyquist array method, a frequency-response technique based on inverse transfer-function matrices, is preferred for the design of multivariable controllers for nuclear power plants. This method may be supplemented by information obtained from a modal analysis of the plant model. (auth)

  19. Experience from the construction and operation of Tarapur and Rajasthan Nuclear Power Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, J.C.; Pardiwala, T.F.; Kothare, V.V.; Rao, M.H.P.; Nanjundeswaran, K.

    1977-01-01

    India's experience in construction and operation of nuclear power stations so far covers two BWR and four PHWR Units in three power stations. Two more PHWR units are at an early stage of construction. The twin unit Tarapur Station (2x210 MWe BWR) was built as a turnkey project which restricted participation of Indian engineers in design and construction considerably. The contrasting approach adopted for Rajasthan Station (2x220 MWe PHWR) involved Indian personnel and contractors fully in construction and commissioning, with Canadians providing supervisory assistance in Rajasthan I and essentially consultative help for Rajasthan II. Subsequent stations are wholly Indian efforts. Tarapur went into commercial operation in 1969, 60 months after breaking of ground. Construction was essentially uneventful, major problems faced being stress corrosion induced cracks in the reactor lining and complete change of steam generator tubes. In its seven years of operations, Tarapur has faced several problems mainly arising from rather early designs, indifferent fuel performance, constraints of twin-unit approach and operations in an inadequately developed grid system apart from those generally stemming from assimilation of an advanced technology in a developing country. The Station has undergone six refuellings during this period. Most of the problems have been overcome by design changes, system augmentations and experience and the Station operation since mid 1974 have generally been steady at around 90% of the rated capacity. Construction of Rajasthan I at a remote and isolated site proceeded relatively slowly. Local availability of skilled and semi-skilled manpower was poor, affecting construction. Inadequate roads impeded movements of overdimensioned components. Observing strict Quality Assurance standards required several major rectifications at site. Rajasthan I went on line in 1973 after overcoming major turbine bearing problems during commissioning. Since then, while

  20. A shared-world conceptual model for integrating space station life sciences telescience operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Vicki; Bosley, John

    1988-01-01

    Mental models of the Space Station and its ancillary facilities will be employed by users of the Space Station as they draw upon past experiences, perform tasks, and collectively plan for future activities. The operational environment of the Space Station will incorporate telescience, a new set of operational modes. To investigate properties of the operational environment, distributed users, and the mental models they employ to manipulate resources while conducting telescience, an integrating shared-world conceptual model of Space Station telescience is proposed. The model comprises distributed users and resources (active elements); agents who mediate interactions among these elements on the basis of intelligent processing of shared information; and telescience protocols which structure the interactions of agents as they engage in cooperative, responsive interactions on behalf of users and resources distributed in space and time. Examples from the life sciences are used to instantiate and refine the model's principles. Implications for transaction management and autonomy are discussed. Experiments employing the model are described which the authors intend to conduct using the Space Station Life Sciences Telescience Testbed currently under development at Ames Research Center.

  1. Ergonomic evaluation of CRT display in new control panels for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabazawa, Yoshihiko

    1983-01-01

    New control panels are to support powerfully the synthetic judgement function of operators by processing enormous plant data in the normal operation and at the time of accidents in nuclear power stations, and displaying the results in collective and ordered form on CRTs. This time, by carrying out the evaluation of new control panels using human engineering method, it was able to be confirmed that the new control panels have achieved the initial objectives, and to determine the criteria for the ergonomic evaluation of central control panels mainly with CRT display. Besides, it is considered that the application to wide range can be expected for this evaluation, not only to the CRT display system of the new control panels for nuclear power stations but also to other CRT images, therefore, the outline is reported. Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc. plans to adopt the new control panels with CRT display effectively utilizing process computers hereafter. It is necessary to give sufficient consideration to the method of using CRT images, the kinds of displayed images, colors and the form and arrangement of letters and symbols. 12 CRTs are used for the new control panel. The results are reflected to the control panel for Hamaoka No.3 plant. (Kako, I.)

  2. 47 CFR 25.220 - Non-conforming transmit/receive earth station operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Non-conforming transmit/receive earth station operations. 25.220 Section 25.220 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.220 Non-conforming transmit/receive...

  3. 47 CFR 25.218 - Off-axis EIRP envelopes for FSS earth station operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Off-axis EIRP envelopes for FSS earth station operations. 25.218 Section 25.218 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.218 Off-axis EIRP envelopes for FSS...

  4. Preparations for the 1994 OSART [operational safety review] at Hunterston Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, I.A.

    1993-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency have accepted an invitation from the Scottish Office to carry out an Operational Safety Review at Hunterston Power Station in April 1994. This paper outlines the preparations being undertaken by Scottish Nuclear Limited to ensure the standards set by the International Atomic Energy Agency are met. (author)

  5. Test, Control and Monitor System (TCMS) operations plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, C. K.; Conroy, M. P.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose is to provide a clear understanding of the Test, Control and Monitor System (TCMS) operating environment and to describe the method of operations for TCMS. TCMS is a complex and sophisticated checkout system focused on support of the Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP) and related activities. An understanding of the TCMS operating environment is provided and operational responsibilities are defined. NASA and the Payload Ground Operations Contractor (PGOC) will use it as a guide to manage the operation of the TCMS computer systems and associated networks and workstations. All TCMS operational functions are examined. Other plans and detailed operating procedures relating to an individual operational function are referenced within this plan. This plan augments existing Technical Support Management Directives (TSMD's), Standard Practices, and other management documentation which will be followed where applicable.

  6. Economic benefits of the Space Station to commercial communication satellite operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Kent M.; Dixson, John E.; Weyandt, Charles J.

    1987-01-01

    The economic and financial aspects of newly defined space-based activities, procedures, and operations (APOs) and associated satellite system designs are presented that have the potential to improve economic performance of future geostationary communications satellites. Launch insurance, launch costs, and the economics of APOs are examined. Retrieval missions and various Space Station scenarios are addressed. The potential benefits of the new APOs to the commercial communications satellite system operator are quantified.

  7. Definition of technology development missions for early space stations orbit transfer vehicle serving. Phase 2, task 1: Space station support of operational OTV servicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Representative space based orbital transfer vehicles (OTV), ground based vehicle turnaround assessment, functional operational requirements and facilities, mission turnaround operations, a comparison of ground based versus space based tasks, activation of servicing facilities prior to IOC, fleet operations requirements, maintenance facilities, OTV servicing facilities, space station support requirements, and packaging for delivery are discussed.

  8. 49 CFR 236.777 - Operator, control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operator, control. 236.777 Section 236.777..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.777 Operator, control. An employee assigned to operate the control machine of a traffic control system. ...

  9. Boiler recirculation pumps for nuclear power stations - present state of development. Directions for planning, operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattias, H.B.

    1976-01-01

    Boiler recirculation pumps are important components of modern power stations. The development of large recirculation pumps up to a driving power of 1,500 kW was faced with some problems in meeting the plant requirements. In this paper, the present state of development is dealt with. The development problems in the fields of hydrodynamics, cavitation, corrosion and erosion are dealt with as well as the problems of the design of the casing with regard to thermodynamics and strength. Finally, operational experience with the boiler recirculation pump for 600 MW power stations will be reported on. (orig./AK) [de

  10. Retrofitting and operation solid radwaste system Dresden Station, Units 2 and 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testa, J.; Homer, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    Units 2 and 3 at Dresden Station are twin 794 MW (net) BWR units that became operational in 1970 and 1971. The waste streams are typical of BWR stations, namely, bead resin and filter sludge (powdered resins and diatomaceous earth), evaporator concentrate containing approximately 25% dissolved solids and dry active waste. The original solid radwaste system utilized cement for solidification in open top 55 gallon drums. Remote handling was provided by means of a monorail with moving platforms supporting the drums. A relatively light-weight compactor was used to compact DAW into 55 gallon drums. Difficulties were experienced with this system

  11. Lessons learned in digital upgrade projects digital control system implementation at US nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelley, S.; Bolian, T. W.

    2006-01-01

    AREVA NP has gained significant experience during the past five years in digital upgrades at operating nuclear power stations in the US. Plants are seeking modernization with digital technology to address obsolescence, spare parts availability, vendor support, increasing age-related failures and diminished reliability. New systems offer improved reliability and functionality, and decreased maintenance requirements. Significant lessons learned have been identified relating to the areas of licensing, equipment qualification, software quality assurance and other topics specific to digital controls. Digital control systems have been installed in non safety-related control applications at many utilities within the last 15 years. There have also been a few replacements of small safety-related systems with digital technology. Digital control systems are proving to be reliable, accurate, and easy to maintain. Digital technology is gaining acceptance and momentum with both utilities and regulatory agencies based upon the successes of these installations. Also, new plants are being designed with integrated digital control systems. To support plant life extension and address obsolescence of critical components, utilities are beginning to install digital technology for primary safety-system replacement. AREVA NP analyzed operating experience and lessons learned from its own digital upgrade projects as well as industry-wide experience to identify key issues that should be considered when implementing digital controls in nuclear power stations

  12. Ten year report on the operation of the Latina nuclear power station 1964-1973

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-07-01

    The final report on the operation of the Latina nuclear power station, required under the terms of the contract of participation between ENEL and EURATOM is presented. It covers the first ten years of commercial operation (1 January 1964-31 December 1973) of this power station. Latina uses a British Magnox-type gas-graphite natural uranium reactor with a design thermal capacity of 724 MW. The rated electrical output of the three main turbogenerators was originally 210 MW (3x70), but was reduced to 160 MW in 1971. Construction began in November 1958 and was completed when the reactor first reached criticality in December 1962, the station being connected to the Italian electricity network for the first time in May 1963. The gross rated output of 210 MWe was reached in December 1963 and commercial operation began on 1 January 1964, by which date, however, the power station had already fed 295.5 million kWh into the network

  13. Large eddy simulation of cooling flows in underground subway station according to different PSD operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Yong Jun; Kim, Jin Ho; Park, Sung Huk; Koo, Dong Hoe [Korea Railroad Research Institute, Uiwang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Large eddy simulation (LES) method is applied to systematically investigate the cooling fluid flow and the temperature distribution under the operating of air conditioning in the deeply underground subway station. The Shin-Gum-Ho subway station in Seoul which is the 8{sup th} floor and 43.6 m deep is selected for this analysis. The entire station is covered for simulation. The ventilation mode for air conditioning is kept as ordinary state. Different operating conditions for Platform screen door (PSD) are applied. First one is PSD is completely close and second one is PSD is regularly open and close which imitate the actual circumstances in the platform. The ventilation diffusers are modeled as 95 square shapes in the lobby and 222 squares in the platform. The temperature variations and flow behaviors are numerically simulated after operating of air conditioning for the whole station and the calculated results are compared with experimental data. LES method solves the momentum and thermal equations. Werner-Wengle wall law is applied to viscous sub layers for near wall resolution. The total grid numbers are 7.5 million and the whole domain is divided to 22 blocks. Multi blocks are computed in parallel using MPI. The results show the temperature difference in the platform between PSD-close and PSD-regularly open and close cases is 3-4 .deg. C.

  14. Large eddy simulation of cooling flows in underground subway station according to different PSD operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Yong Jun; Kim, Jin Ho; Park, Sung Huk; Koo, Dong Hoe

    2015-01-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) method is applied to systematically investigate the cooling fluid flow and the temperature distribution under the operating of air conditioning in the deeply underground subway station. The Shin-Gum-Ho subway station in Seoul which is the 8"t"h floor and 43.6 m deep is selected for this analysis. The entire station is covered for simulation. The ventilation mode for air conditioning is kept as ordinary state. Different operating conditions for Platform screen door (PSD) are applied. First one is PSD is completely close and second one is PSD is regularly open and close which imitate the actual circumstances in the platform. The ventilation diffusers are modeled as 95 square shapes in the lobby and 222 squares in the platform. The temperature variations and flow behaviors are numerically simulated after operating of air conditioning for the whole station and the calculated results are compared with experimental data. LES method solves the momentum and thermal equations. Werner-Wengle wall law is applied to viscous sub layers for near wall resolution. The total grid numbers are 7.5 million and the whole domain is divided to 22 blocks. Multi blocks are computed in parallel using MPI. The results show the temperature difference in the platform between PSD-close and PSD-regularly open and close cases is 3-4 .deg. C

  15. Manufacture and quality control of concrete for Ikata Nuclear Power Station, Shikoku Electric Power Co., Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Akiomi; Kitada, Takao

    1989-01-01

    Ikata Nuclear Power Station, only one nuclear power station in Shikoku, is located at the root of Sada Peninsula on Seto Inland sea side. At present, No.1 and No.2 plants of 566 MW each are in commercial operation, and on the east side, No.3 plant is under construction. No.3 plant is a PWR type plant of 890 MWe output, and the start of commercial operation is scheduled in March, 1995. In the construction of No.3 plant, the concrete used for civil engineering and building works is about 430,000 m 3 , and for the improvement of the quality control of concrete, the pursuit of economic efficiency, the fostering of concrete technology of employee and the coprosperity with local industries, the facilities for manufacturing concrete were constructed within the premise of the power station. The amount of use of concrete and respective materials classified by respective fiscal years, and the amount of manufacture of concrete that determines the scale of the concrete plant are shown. As to the construction of the concrete plant, the foundation work was started in March, 1987, and the machine foundation and building works were started in May, 1987. The acceptance was completed on August 17, 1987. The facilities of manufacturing concrete, the manufacture of concrete, and the quality control of materials and concrete are reported. (author)

  16. Managing Recurrent Congestion of Subway Network in Peak Hours with Station Inflow Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingru Zou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Station inflow control (SIC is an important and effective method for reducing recurrent congestion during peak hours in the Beijing, Shanghai, and Guangzhou subway systems. This work proposes a practical and efficient method for establishing a static SIC scheme in normal weekdays for large-scale subway networks. First, a traffic assignment model without capacity constraint is utilized to determine passenger flow distributions on the network. An internal relationship between station inflows and section flows is then constructed. Second, capacity bottlenecks are identified by considering the transport capacity of each section. Then, a feedback-based bottleneck elimination strategy is established to search target control stations and determine their control time and control strength. To validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach, a decision support system coded in the C# programming language was developed, and the Beijing subway was used as a case study. The results indicate that the proposed method and tool are capable of practical applications, and the generated SIC plan has better performance over the existing SIC plan. This study provides a practical and useful method for operation agencies to construct SIC schemes in the subway system.

  17. Overview of different control strategies for a typical cryogenic warm compressor station at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzetti, M.; Garcia, C. V. M.; Bradu, B.; Rogez, E.

    2017-12-01

    Helium cryogenic systems are extensively used at CERN under several configurations for accelerators and detectors. The Warm Compressor Station (WCS) is the primary component of the helium cryogenic systems. The basic controls structure mainly depends on the bypass, charge and discharge valves configuration ensuring the nominal flow and compression ratio. This paper presents three studied methods for the WCS process control systems covering all transient and operational requirements: the proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control approach, the Fuzzy Logic Control approach (FLC) and the Internal Model Control approach (IMC). The paper emphasizes on simulation results of the different control strategies using Ecosimpro software associated to the CERN CryoLib library. Advantages and limitations of each method are presented.

  18. Rate of generation of tritium during the operation of Tsuruga Power Station Unit No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funamoto, Hisao; Yoshinari, Masaharu; Fukuda, Masayuki; Makino, Shinichi; Watari, Tuneo

    1994-01-01

    Total amount of 3 H activity in primary coolant due to the operation of Tsuruga Power Station Unit No. 2 was estimated. The 3 H inventory was measured for samples from the spent fuel pool, primary coolant and miscellaneous tanks. From the result of the measurement and the data of environmental release of 3 H, the rate of generation of 3 H in the reactor was found to be 25 TBq/GWa. Since Tsuruga Power Station Unit No. 2 is a PWR type reactor, we presume that most of the 3 H in primary coolant is formed by 10 B(n, 2α) 3 H reaction. It is necessary to release about 23 TBq/GWa of 3 H to maintain the station inventory at the present level. (author)

  19. Environmental emissions control programs at Lambton TGS [Thermal Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalvins, A.K.

    1992-01-01

    Ontario Hydro's air emissions control programs at Lambton thermal generating station, both committed and planned, are reviewed, and their potential impacts on emissions, effluents and wastes are discussed. Control technologies examined include flue gas conditioning, wet limestone scrubbing, combustion process modifications, urea injection, and selective catalytic reduction. The implementation of these technologies has the potential to create new solid and liquid waste disposal problems, the full extent of which is often not realized at the process selection stage. For example, selective noncatalytic reduction using urea injection can lead to increased CO emissions, escape of unreacted ammonia from the stack at levels of 5-50 ppM, increase in N 2 O emissions, contamination of fly ash, gypsum and waste water with ammonia, and an increase in CO 2 emissions of less than 0.4% due to increased power consumption. Optimum performance of the air emissions control systems, with minimum negative impact on the environment, requires consideration of the impact of these systems on all waste streams. 11 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  20. Final environmental statement related to the operation of Clinton Power Station, Unit No. 1. Docket No. 50-461

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-05-01

    This final environmental statement contains the second assessment of the environmental impact associated with operation of Clinton Power Station Unit 1 pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and 10 CFR Part 51, as amended, of the NRC's regulations. This statement examines: the affected environment, environmental consequences and mitigating actions, and environmental and economic benefits and costs. Land-use and terrestrial- and aquatic-ecological impacts will be small. Air-quality impacts will also be small. However, steam fog from the station's cooling lake has the potential for reducing visibility over nearby roads and bridges. A fog-monitoring program for roads and ridges near the lake has been recommended. Impacts to historic and prehistoric sites will be negligible. Chemical discharges to Lake Clinton and Salt Creek are expected to have no appreciable impacts on water quality under normal conditions and will be required to meet conditions of the station's NPDES permit. The hydrothermal analyses indicate that under certain meteorological conditions (1-in-50-year drought), the plant would have to be operated at reduced power levels in order to meet the thermal standards established by the Illinois Pollution Control Board Order PCB 81-82. The effects of routine operations, energy transmission, and periodic maintenance of rights-of-way and transmission line facilties should not jeopardize any populations of endangered or threatened species. No significant impacts are anticipated from normal operational releases of radioactivity. Contentions associated with environmental issues accepted during the operating-license hearing are related to assessment of effects of low-level radiation. The net socioeconomic effects of the project will be beneficial. The action called for is the issuance of an operating license for Unit 1 of Clinton

  1. Development of Abnormal Operating Strategies for Station Blackout in Shutdown Operating Mode in Pressurized Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Duk-Joo; Lee, Seung-Chan; Sung, Je-Joong; Ha, Sang-Jun [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Su-Hyun [FNC Tech. Co., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Loss of all AC power is classified as one of multiple failure accident by regulatory guide of Korean accident management program. Therefore we need develop strategies for the abnormal operating procedure both of power operating and shutdown mode. This paper developed abnormal operating guideline for loss of all AC power by analysis of accident scenario in pressurized water reactor. This paper analyzed the loss of ultimate heat sink (LOUHS) in shutdown operating mode and developed the operating strategy of the abnormal procedure. Also we performed the analysis of limiting scenarios that operator actions are not taken in shutdown LOUHS. Therefore, we verified the plant behavior and decided operator action to taken in time in order to protect the fuel of core with safety. From the analysis results of LOUHS, the fuel of core maintained without core uncovery for 73 minutes respectively for opened RCS states after the SBO occurred. Therefore, operator action for the emergency are required to take in 73 minutes for opened RCS state. Strategy is to cooldown by using spent fuel pool cooling system. This method required to change the plant design in some plant. In RCS boundary closed state, first abnormal operating strategy in shutdown LOUHS is first abnormal operating strategy in shutdown LOUHS is to remove the residual heat of core by steam dump flow and auxiliary feedwater of SG.

  2. Optimizing the use of operating experience at Ontario Hydro's Bruce Nuclear Generating Station 'A'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, E.L.

    1991-01-01

    One of the most significant lessons learned from the Three Mile Island event (March 1979), and again with the Chernobyl disaster - (April 1986) was the ongoing requirement to learn from our mistakes and near misses, and those of our fellow utilities around the world: so that as an industry we do not repeat the same mistakes. The very future of our industry will depend on how well each one of us accomplishes this important ask. This paper describes in detail the challenges encountered by one station when incorporating a comprehensive 'Operating Program'. It begins with the Corporate Office's directives to its stations for such a program; and follows up with the details of the actual station implementation of the program, and day to day operating experiences. The paper describes in detail the following Operating Experience programs: - Root Cause Determination process. The Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, Human Performance Enhancement System (HPES) as an integral component of the Root Cause process. Finding solutions for our station for problems identified elsewhere is covered herein; - Significant Event Recommendation Tracking System: - Commitment Tracking System; - Operating Experience (Sharing Lessons Learned) System. The paper will show all the above processes tie closely together and complement each other. The paper discusses the staff required for such processes and their training requirements. It recommends process time lines, reporting mechanisms, and sign off requirements. It will describe the equipment utilized to carry out this work effectively, and with a minimum of staff. One unique feature of the Bruce 'A' system is an 'Effectiveness Follow-Up', usually three to six months after the event recommendations have been completed. By rechecking the finished actions and reviewing them with the personnel involved with the originating event we ensure that the real root causes have been identified and resolved. (author)

  3. Optimizing the use of operating experience at Ontario Hydro's Bruce Nuclear Generating Station 'A'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, E L [Operating Experience Reactor Safety, Bruce Nuclear Generating Station ' A' , Ontario Hydro, Tiverton, Ontario (Canada)

    1991-04-01

    One of the most significant lessons learned from the Three Mile Island event (March 1979), and again with the Chernobyl disaster - (April 1986) was the ongoing requirement to learn from our mistakes and near misses, and those of our fellow utilities around the world: so that as an industry we do not repeat the same mistakes. The very future of our industry will depend on how well each one of us accomplishes this important ask. This paper describes in detail the challenges encountered by one station when incorporating a comprehensive 'Operating Program'. It begins with the Corporate Office's directives to its stations for such a program; and follows up with the details of the actual station implementation of the program, and day to day operating experiences. The paper describes in detail the following Operating Experience programs: - Root Cause Determination process. The Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, Human Performance Enhancement System (HPES) as an integral component of the Root Cause process. Finding solutions for our station for problems identified elsewhere is covered herein; - Significant Event Recommendation Tracking System: - Commitment Tracking System; - Operating Experience (Sharing Lessons Learned) System. The paper will show all the above processes tie closely together and complement each other. The paper discusses the staff required for such processes and their training requirements. It recommends process time lines, reporting mechanisms, and sign off requirements. It will describe the equipment utilized to carry out this work effectively, and with a minimum of staff. One unique feature of the Bruce 'A' system is an 'Effectiveness Follow-Up', usually three to six months after the event recommendations have been completed. By rechecking the finished actions and reviewing them with the personnel involved with the originating event we ensure that the real root causes have been identified and resolved. (author)

  4. 76 FR 45301 - PSEG Nuclear LLC, Hope Creek Generating Station; Notice of Issuance of Renewed Facility Operating...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-28

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Docket No. 50-354 [NRC-2009-0391] PSEG Nuclear LLC, Hope Creek... operator of the Hope Creek Generating Station (HCGS). Renewed Facility Operating License No. NPF- 57... Renewal of Nuclear Power Plants, Supplement 45, Regarding Hope Creek Generating Station and Salem Nuclear...

  5. Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Test Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Darlene

    1989-01-01

    Different aspects of Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) testing are currently taking place at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Unique to this testing is the variety of test areas and the fact that all are located in one building. The north high bay of building 4755, the Core Module Integration Facility (CMIF), contains the following test areas: the Subsystem Test Area, the Comparative Test Area, the Process Material Management System (PMMS), the Core Module Simulator (CMS), the End-use Equipment Facility (EEF), and the Pre-development Operational System Test (POST) Area. This paper addresses the facility that supports these test areas and briefly describes the testing in each area. Future plans for the building and Space Station module configurations will also be discussed.

  6. Mentoring SFRM: A New Approach to International Space Station Flight Controller Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huning, Therese; Barshi, Immanuel; Schmidt, Lacey

    2008-01-01

    The Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) of the Johnson Space Center is responsible for providing continuous operations support for the International Space Station (ISS). Operations support requires flight controllers who are skilled in team performance as well as the technical operations of the ISS. Space Flight Resource Management (SFRM), a NASA adapted variant of Crew Resource Management (CRM), is the competency model used in the MOD. ISS flight controller certification has evolved to include a balanced focus on development of SFRM and technical expertise. The latest challenge the MOD faces is how to certify an ISS flight controller (operator) to a basic level of effectiveness in 1 year. SFRM training uses a two-pronged approach to expediting operator certification: 1) imbed SFRM skills training into all operator technical training and 2) use senior flight controllers as mentors. This paper focuses on how the MOD uses senior flight controllers as mentors to train SFRM skills. Methods: A mentor works with an operator throughout the training flow. Inserted into the training flow are guided-discussion sessions and on-the-job observation opportunities focusing on specific SFRM skills, including: situational leadership, conflict management, stress management, cross-cultural awareness, self care and team care while on-console, communication, workload management, and situation awareness. The mentor and operator discuss the science and art behind the skills, cultural effects on skills applications, recognition of good and bad skills applications, recognition of how skills application changes subtly in different situations, and individual goals and techniques for improving skills. Discussion: This mentoring program provides an additional means of transferring SFRM knowledge compared to traditional CRM training programs. Our future endeavors in training SFRM skills (as well as other organization s) may benefit from adding team performance skills mentoring. This paper

  7. Space station environmental control and life support systems test bed program - an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrend, Albert F.

    As the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) begins to intensify activities for development of the Space Station, decisions must be made concerning the technical state of the art that will be baselined for the initial Space Station system. These decisions are important because significant potential exists for enhancing system performance and for reducing life-cycle costs. However, intelligent decisions cannot be made without an adequate assessment of new and ready technologies, i.e., technologies which are sufficiently mature to allow predevelopment demonstrations to prove their application feasibility and to quantify the risk associated with their development. Therefore, the NASA has implemented a technology development program which includes the establishment of generic test bed capabilities in which these new technologies and approaches can be tested at the prototype level. One major Space Station subsystem discipline in which this program has been implemented is the environmental control and life support system (ECLSS). Previous manned space programs such as Gemini, Apollo, and Space Shuttle have relied heavily on consumables to provide environmental control and life support services. However, with the advent of a long-duration Space Station, consumables must be reduced within technological limits to minimize Space Station resupply penalties and operational costs. The use of advanced environmental control and life support approaches involving regenerative processes offers the best solution for significant consumables reduction while also providing system evolutionary growth capability. Consequently, the demonstration of these "new technologies" as viable options for inclusion in the baseline that will be available to support a Space Station initial operational capability in the early 1990's becomes of paramount importance. The mechanism by which the maturity of these new regenerative life support technologies will be demonstrated is the Space

  8. NOISE CONTROL IN GAS STATIONS – CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Eduardo Amaral Herzer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The high noise level in urban has changed, in the last decades, in some way of pollution that has worried the health agents. The value registered accused levels of so high discomfort that the urban sound pollution passed to be considered as a kind of pollution that hit the outnumbered people. There are efficient measures in its control, but still there are few companies that adopt measure control and auditive conservation program. This way, the objective of the work was to evaluate the noise level in which the employees and users of the gas station are daily exposed. The survey of quantitative datum was done measuring the noise level right in the emission source and making arithmetic means with the gotten sample. The average obtained revealed that the working environment isn’t appropriate, that means the noise can affect straight to communication and working production. With the prevention objective or stabilizing the auditive lost in witch the workers and the frequenters are submitted to the referred place were proposed measures to the implantation of a Auditive Conservation Program (ACP.

  9. Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station five-year business plan and operating results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shanming

    2000-01-01

    Guangdong Nuclear Power Joint Venture Company, Ltd. first 5-Year Business Plan (hereinafter referred to as 5-Year Business Plan) serves as guidance of both the operations and management of the company. Continuous performance improvement of the nuclear power station has been achieved through the fulfillment of goals and improvement plan defined by the 5-Year Business Plan, and through standard and systematic management. Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station (GNPS) has made great contributions to sustainable economic developments of both Guangdong and Hong Kong since its commercial operation in 1994. As of the end of 1999, the cumulative off-take electricity generated by GNPS had reached 69.9 billion kWh. Of the WANO indicators universally applied by nuclear power industry throughout the world, 6 indicators of Daya Bay performance entered the world top quartile while 9 the medium level

  10. Operational and biological effects zones from base stations of cellular telephony

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geronikolou, St. A., E-mail: sgeronik@bioacademy.gr [Biomedical Research Foundation Academy of Athens, Athens (Greece); Zimeras, S., E-mail: zimste@aegean.gr [University of the Aegean, Karlovassi, Samos (Greece); Tsitomeneas, S. Th., E-mail: stsit@teipir.gr [Piraeus University of Applied Sciences, Aigaleo (Greece)

    2016-03-25

    The possible environmental impacts of cellular base stations are operational and biological. The operational effects comprise Εlectro-Μagnetic Interference (EMI), lightning alterations and aesthetic degradation. Both thermal and non-thermal biological effects depend on the absorption of UHF radiofrequencies used. We measured, calculated and estimated the impact zones. The results are: (a) The lightning lethal zone equal to the antenna height, (b) the EMI impact in a zone up to 40m and (c) the ICNIRP’s limits exceed to a zone of 8∼20m into the antenna’s radiation pattern (for 2G GSM and 3G UMTS station). Finally we conclude the adverse effects must not expected in a zone of more than 150m from the radiated antenna, whereas, there is possibility of stochastic effects in intermediate distances (20/40-150m).

  11. Nuclear electric power safety, operation, and control aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Knowles, J Brian

    2013-01-01

    Assesses the engineering of renewable sources for commercial power generation and discusses the safety, operation, and control aspects of nuclear electric power From an expert who advised the European Commission and UK government in the aftermath of Three Mile Island and Chernobyl comes a book that contains experienced engineering assessments of the options for replacing the existing, aged, fossil-fired power stations with renewable, gas-fired, or nuclear plants. From geothermal, solar, and wind to tidal and hydro generation, Nuclear Electric Power: Safety, Operation, and Control Aspects ass

  12. Expert operator preferences in remote manipulator control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundstrom, E.; Draper, J.V.; Fausz, A.; Woods, H.

    1995-06-01

    This report describes a survey of expert remote manipulator operators designed to identify features of control systems related to operator efficiency and comfort. It provides information for designing the control center for the Single-Shell Tank Waste Retrieval Manipulator System (TWRMS) Test Bed, described in a separate report. Research questions concerned preferred modes of control, optimum work sessions, sources of operator fatigue, importance of control system design features, and desired changes in control rooms. Participants comprised four expert remote manipulator operators at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, who individually have from 9 to 20 years of experience using teleoperators. The operators had all used rate and position control, and all preferred bilateral (force-reflecting) position control. They reported spending an average of 2.75 h in control of a teleoperator system during a typical shift. All were accustomed to working in a crew of two and alternating control and support roles in 2-h rotations in an 8-h shift. Operators reported that fatigue in using remote manipulator systems came mainly from watching TV monitors and making repetitive motions. Three of four experienced symptoms, including headaches and sore eyes, wrists, and back. Of 17 features of control rooms rated on importance, highest ratings went to comfort and support provided by the operator chair, location of controls, location of video monitors, video image clarity, types of controls, and control modes. When asked what they wanted to change, operators said work stations designed for comfort; simpler, lighter hand-controls; separate controls for each camera; better placement of remote camera; color monitors; and control room layouts that support crew interaction. Results of this small survey reinforced the importance of ergonomic factors in remote manipulation

  13. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of River Bend Station (Docket No. 50-458)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-10-01

    Supplement No. 1 to the Safety Evaluation Report on the application filed by Gulf States Utilities Company as applicant and for itself and Cajun Electric Power Cooperative, as owners, for a license to operate River Bend Station has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This supplement reports the status of certain items that had not been resolved at the time of publication of the Safety Evaluation Report

  14. Black Fox Station, Units 1 and 2. Application for construction permits and operating licenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    An application to construct and operate Black Fox Station, Units 1 and 2, is presented. The two BWR type reactors will have a rated core thermal power of 3579 MW(t) and a net electrical power of approximately 1150 MW(e). The facility will be located in Inola Township, 23 miles east of Tulsa on the east side of the Verdigris River in Rogers County, Oklahoma

  15. Final environmental statement related to the operation of River Bend Station (Docket No. 50-458)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This Final Environmental Statement contains the second assessment of the environmental impact associated with the operation of River Bend Station, pursuant to the National Environment Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 51, as amended, of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations. This statement examines the environment, environmental consequences and mitigating actions, and environmental and economic benefits and costs

  16. Draft environmental statement related to the operation of River Bend Station (Docket No. 50-458)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    This draft environmental statement contains the second assessment of the environmental impact associated with the operation of River Bend Station, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 51, as amended, of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations. This statement examines the environment, environmental consequences and mitigating actions, and environmental and economic benefits and costs

  17. Planning in the Continuous Operations Environment of the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Theresa; Hagopian, Jeff

    1996-01-01

    The continuous operation planning approach developed for the operations planning of the International Space Station (ISS) is reported on. The approach was designed to be a robust and cost-effective method. It separates ISS planning into two planning functions: long-range planning for a fixed length planning horizon which continually moves forward as ISS operations progress, and short-range planning which takes a small segment of the long-range plan and develops a detailed operations schedule. The continuous approach is compared with the incremental approach, the short and long-range planning functions are described, and the benefits and challenges of implementing a continuous operations planning approach for the ISS are summarized.

  18. International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Status: 2008 - 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David E.; Gentry, Gregory J.; Gentry, Gregory J.

    2009-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system includes regenerative and non-regenerative technologies that provide the basic life support functions to support the crew, while maintaining a safe and habitable shirtsleeve environment. This paper provides a summary of the U.S. ECLS system activities over the past year, covering the period of time between March 2008 and February 2009. The ISS continued permanent crew operations, with the continuation of Phase 3 of the ISS Assembly Sequence. Work continues on the last of the Phase 3 pressurized elements and the continued manufacturing and testing of the regenerative ECLS equipment.

  19. International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Status for the Prior Year: 2011 - 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David E.; Dake, Jason R.; Gentry, Gregory J

    2013-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system includes regenerative and non-regenerative technologies that provide the basic life support functions to support the crew, while maintaining a safe and habitable shirtsleeve environment. This paper provides a summary of the U.S. ECLS system activities over the prior year, covering the period of time between March 2011 and February 2012. The ISS continued permanent crew operations including the continuation of six crew members being on ISS. Work continues on the last of the Phase 3 pressurized elements, the commercial cargo resupply vehicles, and work to try and extend ISS service life from 2015 to at least 2028.

  20. International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Status: 2009 - 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David E.; Dake, Jason R.; Gentry, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system includes regenerative and non -regenerative technologies that provide the basic life support functions to support the crew, while maintaining a safe and habitable shirtsleeve environment. This paper provides a summary of the U.S. ECLS system activities over the past year, covering the period of time between March 2009 and February 2010. The ISS continued permanent crew operations, with the start of Phase 3 of the ISS Assembly Sequence and an increase of the ISS crew size from three to six. Work continues on the last of the Phase 3 pressurized elements.

  1. International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Previous Year Status for 2013 - 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David E.; Gentry, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system includes regenerative and non-regenerative technologies that provide the basic life support functions to support the crew, while maintaining a safe and habitable shirtsleeve environment. This paper provides a summary of the U.S. ECLS system activities over the past year and the impacts of the international partners' activities on them, covering the period of time between March 2013 and February 2014. The ISS continued permanent crew operations including the continuation of six crew members being on ISS. Work continues on the commercial crew vehicles, and work to try and extend ISS service life.

  2. International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Status: 2014-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David E.; Gentry, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system includes regenerative and non-regenerative technologies that provide the basic life support functions to support the crew, while maintaining a safe and habitable shirtsleeve environment. This paper provides a summary of the U.S. ECLS system activities over the past year and the impacts of the international partners' activities on them, covering the period of time between March 2014 and February 2015. The ISS continued permanent crew operations including the continuation of six crew members being on ISS. Work continues on the commercial crew vehicles, and work to try and extend ISS service life.

  3. EDS operator and control software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, L.L.

    1985-04-01

    The Enrichment Diagnostic System (EDS) was developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to acquire, display and analyze large quantities of transient data for a real-time Advanced Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) experiment. Major topics discussed in this paper are the EDS operator interface (SHELL) program, the data acquisition and analysis scheduling software, and the graphics software. The workstation concept used in EDS, the software used to configure a user's workstation, and the ownership and management of a diagnostic are described. An EDS diagnostic is a combination of hardware and software designed to study specific aspects of the process. Overall system performance is discussed from the standpoint of scheduling techniques, evaluation tools, optimization techniques, and program-to-program communication methods. EDS is based on a data driven design which keeps the need to modify software to a minimum. This design requires a fast and reliable data base management system. A third party data base management product, Berkeley Software System Database, written explicitly for HP1000's, is used for all EDS data bases. All graphics is done with an in-house graphics product, Device Independent Graphics Library (DIGLIB). Examples of devices supported by DIGLIB are: Versatec printer/plotters, Raster Technologies Graphic Display Controllers, and HP terminals (HP264x and HP262x). The benefits derived by using HP hardware and software as well as obstacles imposed by the HP environment are presented in relation to EDS development and implementation

  4. Minimal average consumption downlink base station power control strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Holtkamp H.; Auer G.; Haas H.

    2011-01-01

    We consider single cell multi-user OFDMA downlink resource allocation on a flat-fading channel such that average supply power is minimized while fulfilling a set of target rates. Available degrees of freedom are transmission power and duration. This paper extends our previous work on power optimal resource allocation in the mobile downlink by detailing the optimal power control strategy investigation and extracting fundamental characteristics of power optimal operation in cellular downlink. W...

  5. Control and digital supervision of sub-stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, O; Messie, M; Labrouche, G. de la

    1996-01-01

    The article is about the electromagnetic compatibility, security of the operation, requirements evolution and techniques among other aspects. It concludes that the dynamics of the progress associated with digital technologies should therefore, to control by means of a rational development that requires of tools and methods that are at the same time with the technological and economic jump, the jump should also be cultural concerning the coming of a new field of knowledge, the prosecution of data

  6. International Space Station Atmosphere Control and Supply, Atmosphere Revitalization, and Water Recovery and Management Subsystem - Verification for Node 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David E.

    2007-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Node 1 Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System is comprised of five subsystems: Atmosphere Control and Supply (ACS), Atmosphere Revitalization (AR), Fire Detection and Suppression (FDS), Temperature and Humidity Control (THC), and Water Recovery and Management (WRM). This paper provides a summary of the nominal operation of the Node 1 ACS, AR, and WRM design and detailed Element Verification methodologies utilized during the Qualification phase for Node 1.

  7. Obtaining college credit for licensed operator courses at the Wolf Creek Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, C.W.; Coulthard, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    The presentation examined alternatives to formal college courses as a means to obtain college credit toward a baccalaureate degree for station operations personnel. The focus is on the American Council on Education (ACE-PONSI) program which evaluates and makes credit recommendations for courses sponsored by organizations, like utilities, whose primary function is not education. Significant elements of the licensed operator program were prepared for an ACE-PONSI review and determined to be equivalent to college level nuclear engineering technology course work. The ACE-PONSI evaluation provides a good foundation and a significant amount of the training program evaluation required prior to the INPO accreditation effort

  8. Design and field operation of 1175 MW steam turbine for Ohi Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirota, Yoshio; Nakagami, Yasuo; Fujii, Hisashi; Shibanai, Hirooki.

    1980-01-01

    Two 1175 MW steam turbine and generator units have been successfully in commercial operation since March 1979 and December 1979 respectively at Ohi Nuclear Power Station of the Kansai Electric Power Company. Those units, the largest in their respective outputs in Japan, have also such remarkable design features as two-stage reheat, nozzle governing turbine, water cooled generator stator and turbine-driven feedwater pumps. This paper covers design features and some topics of various pre-operational tests of the above-mentioned units. (author)

  9. Design and field operation of 1175 MW steam turbine for Ohi Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirota, Y.; Nakagami, Y.; Fujii, H.; Shibanai, H.

    1980-01-01

    Two 1,175 MW steam turbine and generator units have been successfully in commercial operation since March 1979 and December 1979 respectively at Ohi Nuclear Power Station of the Kansai Electric Power Company. Those units, the largest in their respective outputs in Japan, have also such remarkable design features as two-stage reheat, nozzle governing turbine, water cooled generator stator and turbine-driven feedwater pumps. This paper covers design features and some topics of various pre-operational tests of the above-mentioned units. (author)

  10. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of River Bend Station (Docket No. 50-458)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-05-01

    The Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Gulf States Utilities Company, as applicant and owner, for a license to operate the River Bend Station (Docket No. 50-458) has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located near St. Francisville, Louisiana. Subject to favorable resolution of the items discussed in this report, the NRC staff concludes that the facility can be operated by the applicant without endangering the health and safety of the public

  11. Positive identity entry control system with geographically distributed portals and enrollment stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntire, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    A positive identity entry control system using distributed processing to allow reliable geographically separated portals and enrollment stations has been installed and is fully operational at a large area DOE site. Identity verification requires a credential, a memorized number and measurement of a physical characteristic of the user. Additionally, all portal activity is monitored by guards. The portal system is dual redundant such that no single point failure will shut down operations. Each portal site maintains its own subset of the master data base so off-site failure of the central data base manager or its communication links will not significantly affect local portal activity. The system is suitable for installations with large populations requiring access control at several remote sites scattered over a large area

  12. Integrating Space Flight Resource Management Skills into Technical Lessons for International Space Station Flight Controller Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Evelyn

    2008-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center s (JSC) International Space Station (ISS) Space Flight Resource Management (SFRM) training program is designed to teach the team skills required to be an effective flight controller. It was adapted from the SFRM training given to Shuttle flight controllers to fit the needs of a "24 hours a day/365 days a year" flight controller. More recently, the length reduction of technical training flows for ISS flight controllers impacted the number of opportunities for fully integrated team scenario based training, where most SFRM training occurred. Thus, the ISS SFRM training program is evolving yet again, using a new approach of teaching and evaluating SFRM alongside of technical materials. Because there are very few models in other industries that have successfully tied team and technical skills together, challenges are arising. Despite this, the Mission Operations Directorate of NASA s JSC is committed to implementing this integrated training approach because of the anticipated benefits.

  13. Model Predictive Control of Offshore Power Stations With Waste Heat Recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierobon, Leonardo; Chan, Richard; Li, Xiangan

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of waste heat recovery units on oil and gas offshore platforms demands advances in both design methods and control systems. Model-based control algorithms can play an important role in the operation of offshore power stations. A novel regulator based on a linear model predictive...... control (MPC) coupled with a steady-state performance optimizer has been developed in the SIMULINK language and is documented in the paper. The test case is the regulation of a power system serving an oil and gas platform in the Norwegian Sea. One of the three gas turbines is combined with an organic...... Rankine cycle (ORC) turbogenerator to increase the energy conversion efficiency. Results show a potential reduction of frequency drop up to 40%for a step in the load set-point of 4 MW, compared to proportional–integral control systems. Fuel savings in the range of 2–3% are also expected by optimizing on...

  14. Quality control of Ling'ao nuclear power station civil construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Buliang; Ye Changyuan

    2001-01-01

    Based on the quality control model adopted during Ling'ao Nuclear Power Station construction, the author briefly introduces quality control process of some main civil construction activities (reinforced concrete, steel liner, steel works and prestressing force) of nuclear power station, and makes some descriptions on non-conformance control of civil works. These quality control processes described come from the concrete practice during civil construction of Ling'ao Nuclear Power Station, and are based on Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station construction experience

  15. Human-factors-based implementation of the remote characterization system high-level control station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noakes, M.W.; Richardson, B.S.; Rowe, J.C.; Draper, J.V.; Sandness, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    The detection and characterization of buried objects and materials is an important first step in the restoration of the numerous US Department of Energy (DOE) and US Department of Defense waste disposal sites. DOE, through its Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Robotics and Technology Development Program, has developed the Remote Characterization System (RCS) to address the needs of remote subsurfacecharacterization. The RCS consists of a low-metal-content (low-metallic-signature) remotely piloted vehicle, a high-level control station (HLCS) where operators can remotely control the vehicle and analyze real-time data from sensors, and an array of sensors that can be chosen to meet the survey task at hand. Communication between the vehicle and the base station is handled by a radio link. Site mapping is made possible through the use of geopositioning satellite data. The primary mode of vehicle operation is teleoperation, but provision has been made for semiautonomous or supervisory control that allows for automated sitesurvey on simple sites. Data analysis and display is supported for both real-time observation and postprocessing of data. The particular emphasis of this paper documents the human-factors-based design influences on the HLCS and describes the design in detail

  16. Chemistry control experiences at Kaiga Generating Station (KGS), NPCIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harikrishna, K.; Somasundaram, K.M.; Sanathkumar, V.V.; Nageswara Rao, G.

    2006-01-01

    The Chemistry control section at Kaiga Generating Station (KGS), NPCIL had keenly pursued many developmental works and projects which had not only improved the system performance and reliability but also largely benefited the Station by many ways. The highlights of some of the major developmental works that have contributed significantly are: 1. Studies on frequent and sharp rise in dew point values of AGMS: In the Annulus Gas Monitoring Systems (AGMS) of KGS units, it was observed that the system dew points were rising very sharply and abruptly. The systematic studies revealed the presence of Hydrogen impurity in CO 2 gas cylinders, hence emphasized the need to ensure the gaseous contents before injecting the media from the cylinders to the system. 2. a. Studies on frequent tube failures of TG auxiliary coolers: The detailed studies and investigation revealed that under deposit corrosion contributed by microbiological attack was the main cause for frequent failures of 90/10 Cupro Nickel cooler tubes which could be minimized either by resorting to periodical mechanical/chemical cleaning of cooler tubes or by regular chemical treatment with a suitable chemical formulation. b. Development of suitable chemical formulation for chemical cleaning of TG auxiliary coolers: A series of in-house experiments at site resulted in developing a suitable chemical formulation for effective cleaning of 90/10 Cupro Nickel cooler tubes. The formulation with 1 % w/w Citric acid with pH adjusted to 8.0 by Ammonia in first step followed by 1 % w/w EDTA with pH adjusted to 9.0 by Hydrazine in the second step could yield more than 90 % cleanliness. 3. Chemical cleaning of cooling circuits of AHUs: An in-house formulation was developed and used for chemical cleaning of cooling circuits (with copper tubes) of AHUs. Post chemical cleaning, the room temperatures decreased by 3-4 degC, hence resulted in better cooling. 4. Enhancement in service period of BBD IX columns: The service period of

  17. Local control station for development, testing and maintenance of mirror fusion facility subsystem controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ables, E.; Kelly, M.F.

    1985-01-01

    A Local Control Station (LCS) was designed and built to provide a simplified ad easily configurable means of controlling any Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) subsystem for the purpose of development, testing and maintenance of the subsystem. All MFTF-B Subsystems incorporate at least one Local Control Computer (LCC) that is connected to and accepts high level commands from one of the Supervisory Control and Diagnostic System (SCDS) computers. The LCS connects directly to the LCC in place of SCDS. The LCS communicates with the subsystem hardware using the same SCDS commands that the local control computer recognizes and as such requires no special configuration of the LCC

  18. Operating experience with nuclear power stations in Member States in 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-10-01

    This report is the thirty-seventh in the Agency's series of annual reports on operating experience with nuclear power stations in Member States. For the first time it is issued purely in an electronic version. The report is a direct output from the Agency's Power Reactor Information System (PRIS), whose databank contains all operating experience data published in the Agency's operating experience annual reports since 1970 and basic information on power reactors, including design data. It presents operating experience data for all worldwide nuclear power plants after starting commercial operation. The PRIS databank is available free of charge to IAEA Member States through its two services: PRIS-PC, and PRIS CD-ROM. The PRIS-PC allows direct access to the database through the Internet. The PRIS-PC on CD-ROM only includes data for reactors in operation, under construction and shutdown. It keeps the same feature as in the current front-end-tool PRIS-PC interface. This front-end-tool interface allows to search and query through pre-designed statistics. The PRIS-PC on CD-ROM contains mapping interface including a view of the world map with zooming features to country, region and site map and links to PRIS database to retrieve related (nuclear power plant) information. PRIS data and related indicators are also available on the PRIS Website: www.iaea.org/programmes/a2. It contains publicly available information about reactor units and nuclear industry results. Load, operation and availability factors are used as the basic performance indicators. Energy unavailability factors, separate for planned and unplanned unavailability, due either to causes under plant management control or external causes out of plant management control, are used as a measure of energy lost through a unit not being available. However, some ambiguity remains in the operators' reports of the unavailability data, resulting in inconsistencies in these factors. It is recognized that there is an inherent

  19. Operating experience with nuclear power stations in Member States in 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-08-01

    This report is the thirty-eighth in the Agency's series of annual reports on operating experience with nuclear power stations in Member States. For the second time it is issued purely in an electronic version. The report is a direct output from the Agency's Power Reactor Information System (PRIS), whose databank contains all operating experience data published in the Agency's operating experience annual reports since 1970 and basic information on power reactors, including design data. It presents operating experience data for all worldwide nuclear power plants after starting commercial operation. The PRIS databank is available free of charge to IAEA Member States through its services: web-based PRIS-Statistics (http://prisweb.iaea.org/statistics/), PRIS-PC, PRIS CD-ROM and PRIS Website. The PRIS-Statistics and PRIS-PC allow direct access to the database through the Internet. The PRIS-PC on CD-ROM only includes data for reactors in operation, under construction and shutdown. It keeps the same feature as in the current front-end-tool PRIS-PC interface. This front-endtool interface allows to search and query through pre-designed statistics. PRIS data and related indicators are also available on the PRIS Website: www.iaea.org/programmes/a2. It contains publicly available information about reactor units and nuclear industry results. Load, operation and availability factors are used as the basic performance indicators. Energy unavailability factors, separate for planned and unplanned unavailability, due either to causes under plant management control or external causes out of plant management control, are used as a measure of energy lost through a unit not being available. However, some ambiguity remains in the operators' reports of the unavailability data, resulting in inconsistencies in these factors. It is recognized that there is an inherent difficulty in reporting unavailability in energy due to external causes with relation to energy losses due to load following

  20. Advanced control room caters for the operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, C.R.; Rygg, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    In existing control rooms the operators' efficiency is often limited by widely scattered and sometimes illogically arranged controls which tend to increase the potential for outages or equipment damage. The advanced control room described allows instant and ready access to preselected information and control by one or two operators from a seated or standing position. (author)

  1. Application of a water quality model for determining instream aeration station location and operational rules: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles S. Melching

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Instream aeration has been used as a supplement to secondary treatment or a substitute for tertiary treatment for meeting dissolved oxygen (DO standards in rivers. Many studies have used water quality models to determine the number, location, and capacity of instream aeration stations (IASs needed to meet DO standards in combination with other pollution control measures. DO concentrations have been improved in the North Shore Channel and North Branch Chicago River by the Devon Avenue IAS for more than 35 years. A study was initiated to determine whether it was better to rehabilitate or relocate this station and to determine appropriate operational guidance for the IAS at the selected location. A water quality model capable of simulating DO concentrations during unsteady flow was used to evaluate the proper location for an IAS and operational guidance for this IAS. Three test years, a dry year, a wet year, and an extreme year, were considered in the evaluation. The study found that the Devon Avenue IAS should be rehabilitated as this location performed as well as or better than any of 10 alternative locations. According to the new operational guidance for this IAS, the amount of time with blowers operating could be substantially reduced compared to traditional operations while at the same time the attainment of the DO standards could be increased. This study shows that a carefully designed modeling study is key to effective selection, location, and operation of IASs such that attainment of DO standards can be maximized while operation hours of blowers can be minimized. Keywords: Instream aeration, Dissolved oxygen, Water quality modeling, Water quality management, Computer simulation

  2. An independent spent-fuel storage installation at Surry Station: Design and operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKay, H.S.; Wakeman, B.H.; Pickworth, J.M.; Routh, S.D.; Hopkins, W.C.

    1989-07-01

    Design and licensing of the Surry Power Station Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) was initiated in 1982 by Virginia Power as part of a comprehensive strategy to increase spent fuel storage capacity at the Station. Designed to use large, metal dry storage casks, the Surry ISFSI will accommodate 84 such casks with a total storage capacity of 811 MTU of spent PWR fuel assemblies. The ISFSI is located at the Surry Station in a wooded area approximately 1000 meters (3300 feet) east of the reactor facilities. Construction of the first of three reinforced concrete storage pads and its associated support systems was completed in March 1986. The operating license and Technical Specifications were issued by the US NRC on July 2, 1986. Initial loading operations of a General Nuclear Systems, Inc., CASTOR V/21 storage cask began in September 1986. The first two CASTOR V/21 casks were placed in storage at the ISFSI in December 1986. 16 refs., 33 figs., 16 tabs

  3. Ten-yearly report on operations at the Garigliano nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This document is the final report on operation of the Garigliano Nuclear Power Station as required under the participation contract between Enel and Euratom and refers to the first ten years of commercial operation (1 May 1964-31 December 1973) of the power station. In the decade in question the Garigliano Power Station has assumed an important position in the world spectrum of nuclear energy since it was the first thermal-power reactor in the world to have irradiated considerable quantities of plutonium as a fuel in its own core for the production of energy. An experimental programme on this was started in 1966 with theoretical study of plutonium recycling and was followed by the charging of the Garigliano reactor with some mixed oxide elements (PuO 2 -UO 2 ) in 1968 and 1970. The excellent performance of these prototype elements, which among other things were examined in detail at the end of each radiation cycle, prompted Enel to decide in favour of the use of entire batches of recycled fuel elements of the PuO 2 -UO 2 type in the reactor from 1975 onwards

  4. Space station communications and tracking equipment management/control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapell, M. H.; Seyl, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    Design details of a communications and tracking (C and T) local area network and the distribution system requirements for the prospective space station are described. The hardware will be constructed of LRUs, including those for baseband, RF, and antenna subsystems. It is noted that the C and T equipment must be routed throughout the station to accommodate growth of the station. Configurations of the C and T modules will therefore be dependent on the function of the space station module where they are located. A block diagram is provided of a sample C and T hardware distribution configuration. A topology and protocol will be needed to accommodate new terminals, wide bandwidths, bidirectional message transmission, and distributed functioning. Consideration will be given to collisions occurring in the data transmission channels.

  5. Operation control device under radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Kiichi; Murakami, Toichi.

    1994-01-01

    The device of the present invention performs smooth progress of operation by remote control for a plurality of operations in periodical inspections in controlled areas of a nuclear power plant, thereby reducing the operator's exposure dose. Namely, the device monitors the progressing state of the operation by displaying the progress of operation on a CRT of a centralized control device present in a low dose area remote from an operation field through an ITV camera disposed in the vicinity of the operation field. Further, operation sequence and operation instruction procedures previously inputted in the device are indicated to the operation field through an operation instruction outputting device (field CRT) in accordance with the progress of the operation steps. On the other hand, the operation progress can be aided by inputting information from the operation field such as start or completion of the operation steps. Further, the device of the present invention can monitor the change of operation circumstances and exposure dose of operators based on the information from a radiation dose measuring device disposed in the operation circumstance and to individual operators. (I.S.)

  6. Accidents in the operation of nuclear power stations. Action for damages against foreign operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willner, K.

    1986-01-01

    On the occasion of a lecture evening of the Leo Goodman Library in Munich questions of civil liability of foreign reactor operators in cases of nuclear accidents were discussed by participants of various universities. Special subjects were i.a. problems of civil procedural and insurance law, absolute liability according to sec. 25 Atomic Energy Act as well as questions of applicable law. (WG) [de

  7. Space Station Freedom assembly and operation at a 51.6 degree inclination orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troutman, Patrick A.; Brewer, Laura M.; Heck, Michael L.; Kumar, Renjith R.

    1993-01-01

    This study examines the implications of assembling and operating Space Station Freedom at a 51.6 degree inclination orbit utilizing an enhanced lift Space Shuttle. Freedom assembly is currently baselined at a 220 nautical mile high, 28.5 degree inclination orbit. Some of the reasons for increasing the orbital inclination are (1) increased ground coverage for Earth observations, (2) greater accessibility from Russian and other international launch sites, and (3) increased number of Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV) landing sites. Previous studies have looked at assembling Freedom at a higher inclination using both medium and heavy lift expendable launch vehicles (such as Shuttle-C and Energia). The study assumes that the shuttle is used exclusively for delivering the station to orbit and that it can gain additional payload capability from design changes such as a lighter external tank that somewhat offsets the performance decrease that occurs when the shuttle is launched to a 51.6 degree inclination orbit.

  8. Amateur Radio on the International Space Station - the First Operational Payload on the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, F. H.; McFadin, L.; Steiner, M.; Conley, C. L.

    2002-01-01

    As astronauts and cosmonauts have adapted to life on the International Space Station (ISS), they have found Amateur Radio and its connection to life on Earth to be a constant companion and a substantial psychological boost. Since its first use in November 2000, the first five expedition crews have utilized the amateur radio station in the FGB to talk to thousands of students in schools, to their families on Earth, and to amateur radio operators around the world. Early in the development of ISS, an international organization called ARISS (Amateur Radio on the International Space Station) was formed to coordinate the construction and operation of amateur radio (ham radio) equipment on ISS. ARISS represents a melding of the volunteer teams that have pioneered the development and use of amateur radio equipment on human spaceflight vehicles. The Shuttle/Space Amateur Radio Experiment (SAREX) team enabled Owen Garriott to become the first astronaut ham to use amateur radio from space in 1983. Since then, amateur radio teams in the U.S. (SAREX), Germany, (SAFEX), and Russia (Mirex) have led the development and operation of amateur radio equipment on board NASA's Space Shuttle, Russia's Mir space station, and the International Space Station. The primary goals of the ARISS program are fourfold: 1) educational outreach through crew contacts with schools, 2) random contacts with the Amateur Radio public, 3) scheduled contacts with the astronauts' friends and families and 4) ISS-based communications experimentation. To date, over 65 schools have been selected from around the world for scheduled contacts with the orbiting ISS crew. Ten or more students at each school ask the astronauts questions, and the nature of these contacts embodies the primary goal of the ARISS program, -- to excite student's interest in science, technology and amateur radio. The ARISS team has developed various hardware elements for the ISS amateur radio station. These hardware elements have flown to ISS

  9. REACTOR CONTROL ROD OPERATING SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, G.

    1961-12-12

    A nuclear reactor control rod mechanism is designed which mechanically moves the control rods into and out of the core under normal conditions but rapidly forces the control rods into the core by catapultic action in the event of an emergency. (AEC)

  10. Decentralized energy management strategy based on predictive controllers for a medium voltage direct current photovoltaic electric vehicle charging station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torreglosa, Juan P.; García-Triviño, Pablo; Fernández-Ramirez, Luis M.; Jurado, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Electric vehicle charging station supplied by photovoltaic, batteries and grid connection is analyzed. • The bus voltage is the key parameter for controlling the system by decentralized approach. • Decentralized control approach facilities the enlargement of the system. • Photovoltaic and battery systems are controlled by model predictive controllers. • Response by model predictive controllers improves that by PI controllers. - Abstract: The use of distributed charging stations based on renewable energy sources for electric vehicles has increased in recent years. Combining photovoltaic solar energy and batteries as energy storage system, directly tied into a medium voltage direct current bus, and with the grid support, results to be an interesting option for improving the operation and efficiency of electric vehicle charging stations. In this paper, an electric vehicle charging station supplied by photovoltaic solar panels, batteries and with grid connection is analysed and evaluated. A decentralized energy management system is developed for regulating the energy flow among the photovoltaic system, the battery and the grid in order to achieve the efficient charging of electric vehicles. The medium voltage direct current bus voltage is the key parameter for controlling the system. The battery is controlled by a model predictive controller in order to keep the bus voltage at its reference value. Depending on the state-of-charge of the battery and the bus voltage, the photovoltaic system can work at maximum power point tracking mode or at bus voltage sustaining mode, or even the grid support can be needed. The results demonstrate the proper operation and energy management of the electric vehicle charging station under study.

  11. Improvement on control of waste disposal system at Genkai Nuclear Power Station No.1 and No.2 unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morooka, Masatoshi; Tsutsumi, Akria

    1989-01-01

    At Genkai Nuclear Power Station, the operational and control systems of the boric acid evaporator, waste liquid evaporator and gaseous waste disposal system were converted from general purpose analong systems to computer instrumentation and control systems in order to improve their operability and controllability. The equipments were operated by batch processing system, so plant operators were required to operate them manually. By introducing the computer instrumentation and control systems, the automatic operation of the equipments has become possible. Furthermore, it has become possible to monitor the relevant parameters intensively with a CRT in the operating room, and it contributes to the improvement of reliability and labor saving. The operation of No.1 plant was begun in October, 1975, and No.2 plant in March, 1981. Both are the PWR plants of 625 MVA capacity. The outline of the power station facilities, the background of the reconstruction, the problems and the plan of reconstruction for the boric acid recovery facility, waste liquid evaporator and gas compressor, the peculiarity of the reconstruction works, and the effect of introducing the new systems are reported. (Kako, I.)

  12. 75 FR 3622 - Revisions to Rules Authorizing the Operation of Low Power Auxiliary Stations in the 698-806 MHz...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-22

    ... translators, and Class A stations are continuing to operate in the 700 MHz Band after the transition. The..., marketing, and packaging materials, including online materials, related to such devices. The labeling must... display (including online display) any low power auxiliary stations, including wireless microphones, that...

  13. 75 FR 3639 - Revisions to Rules Authorizing the Operation of Low Power Auxiliary Stations in the 698-806 MHz...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-22

    .... 10-24; DA 10-92] Revisions to Rules Authorizing the Operation of Low Power Auxiliary Stations in the... Auxiliary Stations, Including Wireless Microphones, and the Digital Television Transition AGENCY: Federal... language that must be used in the consumer disclosure that is required by Section 15.216 of Appendix B in...

  14. Controlling occupational radiation exposure at operating nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, H.W.; Oakes, T.W.; Shank, K.E.

    1977-01-01

    The historical development of the philosophy of keeping the radiation exposure of workers at light-water reactors as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) is presented. A review is made of some of the ALARA activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Energy Research and Development Administration, and various nuclear installations. Data compiled by the NRC show that routine and special maintenance at light-water reactors accounts for 72 percent of all occupational exposure at these sites. The role that Oak Ridge National Laboratory has taken in ALARA research is presented, with emphasis placed on a study of valve malfunctions at light-water reactors. The valve study indicates a trend toward decreasing valve reliability over the past few years. Finally a cost--benefit analysis of radiation dose reduction is discussed. The rationale for assigning a cost per man-rem based on the radiation exposure level that is encountered is presented

  15. Improved operability of the CANDU 9 control centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macbeth, M. J.; Webster, A.

    1996-01-01

    The next generation CANDU nuclear power plant being designed by AECL is the 900 MWe class CANDU 9 station. It is based upon the Darlington CANDU station design which is among the world leaders in capacity factor with low Operation, Maintenance and Administration (OM and A) costs. This Control Centre design includes the proven functionality of existing CANDU control centres (including the Wolsong 2,3, and 4 control centre improvements, such as the Emergency Core Cooling panels), the characteristics identified by systematic design with human factors analysis of operations requirements and the advanced features needed to improve station operability which is made possible by the application of new technology. The CANDU 9 Control Centre provides plant staff with an improved operability capability due to the combination of proveness, systematic design with human factors engineering and enhanced operating features. Significant features which contribute to this improved operability include: · Standard NSP, BOP and F/H panels with controls and indicators integrated by a standard display/presentation philosophy. · Common plant parameter signal database for extensive monitoring, checking, display and annunciation. · Powerful annunciation system allowing alarm filtering, prioritizing and interrogation to enhance staff recognition of events, plant state and required corrective procedural actions. · The use of an overview display to present immediate and uncomplicated plant status information to facilitate operator awareness of unit status in a highly readable and recognizable format. · Extensive cross checking of similar process parameters amongst themselves, with the counterpart safety system parameters and as well as with 'signature' values obtained from known steady state conditions. · Powerful calculation capabilities, using the plant wide database, providing immediate recognizable and readable and readable output data on plant state information and plant state change

  16. Emergency operating instruction improvements at San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station Units 2 and 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trillo, M.W.; Smith, B.H.

    1989-01-01

    In late 1987, San Onofre nuclear generating station (SONGS) began an extensive upgrade of the units 2 and 3 emergency operating instructions (EOIs). The original intent of this program was to incorporate revised generic guidance and to correct problems that were identified by operators. While this program was in progress, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) conducted a series of audits of emergency operating procedure (EOP) development and maintenance programs as 16 commercial nuclear facilities in the United States. These audits included four stations with Combustion Engineering-designed nuclear steam supply systems. (One of these audits included a review of preupgrade SONGS units 2 and 3 EOIs.) Significant industrywide comments resulted from these audits. The NRC has stated its intent to continue the review and audit of EOIs and the associated maintenance programs at all US commercial nuclear facilities. The units 2 and 3 EOI upgrade program developed procedural improvements and procedural program maintenance improvements that address many of the existing audit comments that have been received by the industry. Other resulting improvements may be useful in minimizing NRC comments in future such audits. Specific improvements are discussed. The upgrade program resulted in benefits that were not originally anticipated. The results of this program can be of significant use by other utilities in addressing the industrywide concerns that have been raised in recent NRC audits of EOP development and maintenance programs

  17. Surry Power Station, Units 1 and 2. Semiannual operating report, July--December 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    Net electric power generated by Surry Unit 1 was 6,930,353 MWH with the generator on line for 10,417.7 hours. Net electric power generated by Unit 2 was 5,699,299 MWH with the generator on line for 8,384.2 hours. Information is presented concerning operation, radioactive effluent releases, solid radioactive wastes, fuel shipments, occurrences in which temperature limitations on the condenser cooling water discharge were exceeded, changes in station organization, occupational personnel radiation exposure, nonradiological monitoring including thermal, physical, and biological programs, and the radiological environmental monitoring program. (U.S.)

  18. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of River Bend Station (Docket No. 50-458)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-08-01

    Supplement No. 3 to the Safety Evaluation Report on the application filed by Gulf States Utilities Company as applicant and for itself and Cajun Electric Power cooperative, as owners, for a license to operate River Bend Station has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located in West Feliciana Parish, near St. Francisville, Louisiana. This supplement reports the status of certain items that had not been resolved at the time of publication of the Safety Evaluation Report, Supplement No. 1, and Supplement No. 2

  19. Commissioning and operation of distillation column at Madras Atomic Power Station (Paper No. 1.10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neelakrishnan, G.; Subramanian, N.

    1992-01-01

    In Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS), an upgrading plant based on vacuum distillation was constructed to upgrade the downgraded heavy water collected in vapor recovery dryers. There are two distillation columns and each having a capacity of 77.5 tonne per annum of reactor grade heavy water with average feed concentration of 30% IP. The performance of the distillation columns has been very good. The column I and column II have achieved an operating factor of 92% and 90% respectively. The commissioning activities, and subsequent improvements carried out in the distillation columns are described. (author)

  20. The role of the control room operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.C.

    A control room operator at an Ontario Hydro nuclear power plant operates a reactor-turbine unit according to approved procedures within imposed constraints to meet the objectives of the organization. A number of operating and administrative tasks make up this role. Control room operators spend approximately six percent of their time physically operating equipment exclusive of upset conditions, and another one percent operating in upset conditions. Testing occupies five percent of an operator's time. Operators must be trained to recognize the entire spectrum of inputs available to them and use them all effectively. Any change in system or unit state is always made according to an approved procedure. Extensive training is required; operators must be taught and pracised in what to do, and must know the reasons behind their actions. They are expected to memorize emergency procedures, to know when to consult operating procedures, and to have sufficient understanding and practice to perform these procedures reliably

  1. Performance of International Space Station Alpha Trace Contaminant Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J. L.

    2016-01-01

    The analysis presented herein was conducted during the early transitional period between the Space Station Freedom and the International Space Station programs as part of an effort to evaluate key design specifications and standards used by the United States and Russia. The analysis was originally documented under NASA cover letter ED62(36-94) dated August 16, 1994. The analysis was revised and rereleased under NASA cover letter ED62(51-94) dated November 14, 1994. These cover letters are provided here to guide programmatic context for the reader.

  2. Trainer module for security control center operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    An operator trainer module has been developed to be used with the security control center equipment to be installed as part of a safeguards physical protection system. The module is designed to provide improved training and testing capabilities for control center operators through the use of simulations for perimeter equipment operations. Operators, through the trainer module, can be challenged with a variety of realistic situations which require responsive action identical to that needed in an actual system. This permits a consistent evaluation and confirmation of operator capabilities prior to assignment as an operator and allows for periodic retesting to verify that adequate performance levels are maintained

  3. Managing operations of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) exchange stations for use with a smart grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurre, Sarah G.; Bent, Russell; Pan, Feng; Sharkey, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    We consider a deterministic integer programming model for determining the optimal operations of multiple plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) battery exchange stations over time. The operations include the number of batteries to charge, discharge, and exchange at each point in time over a set time horizon. We allow discharging of batteries back to the power grid, through vehicle-to-grid technology. We incorporate the exchange station's dependence on the power network, transportation network, and other exchange stations. The charging and discharging at these exchange stations lead to a greater amount of variability which creates a less predictable and flat power generation curve. We introduce and test three policies to smooth the power generation curve by balancing its load. Further, tests are conducted evaluating these policies while factoring wind energy into the power generation curve. These computational tests use realistic data and analysis of the results suggest general operating procedures for exchange stations and evaluate the effectiveness of these power flattening policies. - Highlights: • Model the operations of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery exchange stations. • Determine the optimal and general charging, discharging, and exchange operations. • Conclude that forced customer service levels are unnecessary with proper pricing. • Examine policies to reduce variability in power generation from PHEVs and wind. • Observe that strict constraints on exchange stations best reduce variability

  4. Operating Experience with Nuclear Power Stations in Member States in 2012. 2013 Edition (CD-ROM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-07-01

    This report is the forty-fourth in the IAEA’s series of annual reports on operating experience with nuclear power stations in Member States. This report provides annual performance data and outage information for individual nuclear power plants from around the world. Summaries of historical performance and outages during the lifetimes of those plants are also included. Additionally, in order to provide a broad picture of nuclear power usage, this report contains six figures that illustrate global operational statistics through 2012. The report is a direct output from the IAEA’s Power Reactor Information System (PRIS), whose databank contains all operating experience data published in the IAEA’s operating experience annual reports since 1970 and basic information on power reactors, including design data. It presents operating experience data for all worldwide nuclear power plants after starting commercial operation. The PRIS databank is available free of charge to IAEA Member States through its public website and on-line application PRIS-Statistics. The web-site www.iaea.org/pris contains publicly available information about reactor units and nuclear industry results. The PRIS-Statistics (http://pris.iaea.org) allows direct access to the database through the Internet. This application allows registered users report generation through pre-designed reports and filters

  5. Long-term security of electrical and control engineering equipment in nuclear power stations to withstand a loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, H.

    1996-01-01

    Electrical and control engineering equipment, which has to function even after many years of operation in the event of a fault in a saturated steam atmosphere of 160 C maximum, is essential in nuclear power stations in order to control a loss of coolant accident. The nuclear power station operators have, for this purpose, developed verification strategies for groups of components, by means of which it is ensured that the electrical and control engineering components are capable of dealing with a loss of coolant accident even at the end of their planned operating life. (orig.) [de

  6. Control of operational transients in power reactors - Methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukovic, D.

    1983-01-01

    By introducing the nuclear power stations in the electric power system, questions of their possibilities to satisfy system's demand arise. Control of operational transients (temperature and Xe 135 ) in power reactors by determining the optimal control rod strategy is given. Ti optimize the Xe 135 transients, the Pantryagin theorem of optimal processes is applied. For solving three dimensional, two-group diffusion equations the heterogeneous Feinberg-Galanin method with axial flux harmonics is adopted. An application of this formalism to three-dimensional, finite cylindrical pressurised water reactor radially reflected is presented. (author)

  7. Putting ROSE to Work: A Proposed Application of a Request-Oriented Scheduling Engine for Space Station Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaap, John; Muery, Kim

    2000-01-01

    Scheduling engines are found at the core of software systems that plan and schedule activities and resources. A Request-Oriented Scheduling Engine (ROSE) is one that processes a single request (adding a task to a timeline) and then waits for another request. For the International Space Station, a robust ROSE-based system would support multiple, simultaneous users, each formulating requests (defining scheduling requirements), submitting these requests via the internet to a single scheduling engine operating on a single timeline, and immediately viewing the resulting timeline. ROSE is significantly different from the engine currently used to schedule Space Station operations. The current engine supports essentially one person at a time, with a pre-defined set of requirements from many payloads, working in either a "batch" scheduling mode or an interactive/manual scheduling mode. A planning and scheduling process that takes advantage of the features of ROSE could produce greater customer satisfaction at reduced cost and reduced flow time. This paper describes a possible ROSE-based scheduling process and identifies the additional software component required to support it. Resulting changes to the management and control of the process are also discussed.

  8. Co-operatives and Normative Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregn, Kirsten; Jagd, Søren

    1992-01-01

    This paper explores the conditions for applying normative control in co-operatives. For normative control to be effective two conditions are found particularly important: Individuals must be morally involved and the organization must have a system of making it possible to link common norms...... and individual action. If these conditions are not fulfilled, as may be the case in many co-operatives, normative control cannot be expected to work. The problems of normative control in co-operatives may then not be caused by the use of normative control as such, but may instead be a problem of securing...

  9. Measurement uncertainty recapture (MUR) power uprates operation at Kuosheng Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Chinjang; Wang Tunglu; Lin Chihpao

    2009-01-01

    Measurement Uncertainty Recapture PowerUprates (MUR PU) are achieved through the use of state-of-the-art feedwater flow measurement devices, i.e., ultrasonic flow meters (UFMs), that reduce the degree of uncertainty associated with feedwater flow measurement and in turn provide for a more accurate calculation of thermal power. The Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER) teamed with Sargent and Lundy, LLC (S and L), Pacific Engineers and Constructors, Ltd (PECL), and AREVA to develop a program and plan for the Kuosheng Nuclear Power Station (KNPS) MUR PU Engineering Service Project and for the assistance to Kuosheng MUR PU operation. After regulator's approval of the licensing requests, KSNPS conducted the power ascension test and switchover to the new rated thermal power for Unit 2 and Unit 1 on 7/7/2007 and 11/30/2007, respectively. From then on, KNPS became the first nuclear power plant implementing MUR PU operation in Taiwan and in Asia. (author)

  10. Access control system in Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneda, Hisashi; Shimura, Shigetaka; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Kitazawa, Toshiichi

    1983-01-01

    The new computerized system has introduced to improve function of radiation protection for those who enter the radiation control area, by dealing with measurement of radiation dose, check of personal qualification, resistration of working condition and statistical treatment of these data. This system uses combined TLD, ''TL BADGE'', as a radiation detection sensor, instead of conventional pocket dosimeter and film badge. TL BADGE reading instrument are installed at the entrance to the control area and at working areas. The data of radiation dose, personal qualification etc. read by the reading instrument are transmitted directly to the computer system, which compiles and transacts these data. This system is consisted of three minicomputers, double memory files, CRTs for effective data search and display and floppy disks as a medium for registration, etc. Thus the computer system improves its reliability and the maintenanceability of data, being capable of automatical transaction of a great amount of data quickly. This report describes: Concept of using computer system, System outline, Measurement of radiation dose and Operational functions. (author)

  11. Controlling operational risk: Concepts and practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Tillaart, A.H.A.J.

    2003-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is controlling 'operational risk' in banks. Operational risk is defined as the risk of losses resulting from inadequate or failed internal processes, people, systems, or from external events. Within this very broad subject, we focus on the place of operational risk

  12. The International Space Station: Operations and Assembly - Learning From Experiences - Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Sean; Dillon, William F.

    2006-01-01

    As the Space Shuttle continues flight, construction and assembly of the International Space Station (ISS) carries on as the United States and our International Partners resume the building, and continue to carry on the daily operations, of this impressive and historical Earth-orbiting research facility. In his January 14, 2004, speech announcing a new vision for America s space program, President Bush ratified the United States commitment to completing construction of the ISS by 2010. Since the launch and joining of the first two elements in 1998, the ISS and the partnership have experienced and overcome many challenges to assembly and operations, along with accomplishing many impressive achievements and historical firsts. These experiences and achievements over time have shaped our strategy, planning, and expectations. The continual operation and assembly of ISS leads to new knowledge about the design, development and operation of systems and hardware that will be utilized in the development of new deep-space vehicles needed to fulfill the Vision for Exploration and to generate the data and information that will enable our programs to return to the Moon and continue on to Mars. This paper will provide an overview of the complexity of the ISS Program, including a historical review of the major assembly events and operational milestones of the program, along with the upcoming assembly plans and scheduled missions of the space shuttle flights and ISS Assembly sequence.

  13. Power generation, operation and control

    CERN Document Server

    Wood, Allen J; Sheblé, Gerald B

    2013-01-01

    Since publication of the second edition, there have been extensive changes in the algorithms, methods, and assumptions in energy management systems that analyze and control power generation. This edition is updated to acquaint electrical engineering students and professionals with current power generation systems. Algorithms and methods for solving integrated economic, network, and generating system analysis are provided. Also included are the state-of-the-art topics undergoing evolutionary change, including market simulation, multiple market analysis, multiple interchange contract analysis, c

  14. Materials Science Research Rack Onboard the International Space Station Hardware and Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, John R.; Frazier, Natalie C.; Johnson, Jimmie

    2012-01-01

    The Materials Science Research Rack (MSRR) is a research facility developed under a cooperative research agreement between NASA and ESA for materials science investigations on the International Space Station (ISS). MSRR was launched on STS-128 in August 2009, and is currently installed in the U.S. Destiny Laboratory Module. Since that time, MSRR has performed virtually flawlessly, logging more than 620 hours of operating time. The MSRR accommodates advanced investigations in the microgravity environment on the ISS for basic materials science research in areas such as solidification of metals and alloys. The purpose is to advance the scientific understanding of materials processing as affected by microgravity and to gain insight into the physical behavior of materials processing. MSRR allows for the study of a variety of materials including metals, ceramics, semiconductor crystals, and glasses. Materials science research benefits from the microgravity environment of space, where the researcher can better isolate chemical and thermal properties of materials from the effects of gravity. With this knowledge, reliable predictions can be made about the conditions required on Earth to achieve improved materials. MSRR is a highly automated facility with a modular design capable of supporting multiple types of investigations. Currently the NASA-provided Rack Support Subsystem provides services (power, thermal control, vacuum access, and command and data handling) to the ESA developed Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) which accommodates interchangeable Furnace Inserts (FI). Two ESA-developed FIs are presently available on the ISS: the Low Gradient Furnace (LGF) and the Solidification and Quenching Furnace (SQF). Sample-Cartridge Assemblies (SCAs), each containing one or more material samples, are installed in the FI by the crew and can be processed at temperatures up to 1400 C. Once an SCA is installed, the experiment can be run by automatic command or science conducted via

  15. Computer control for remote wind turbine operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manwell, J.F.; Rogers, A.L.; Abdulwahid, U.; Driscoll, J. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Light weight wind turbines located in harsh, remote sites require particularly capable controllers. Based on extensive operation of the original ESI-807 moved to such a location, a much more sophisticated controller than the original one has been developed. This paper describes the design, development and testing of that new controller. The complete control and monitoring system consists of sensor and control inputs, the control computer, control outputs, and additional equipment. The control code was written in Microsoft Visual Basic on a PC type computer. The control code monitors potential faults and allows the turbine to operate in one of eight states: off, start, run, freewheel, low wind shut down, normal wind shutdown, emergency shutdown, and blade parking. The controller also incorporates two {open_quotes}virtual wind turbines,{close_quotes} including a dynamic model of the machine, for code testing. The controller can handle numerous situations for which the original controller was unequipped.

  16. The Impact of Climatological Conditions on Low Enriched Uranium Loading Station Operations for the HEU Blend Down Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, R.C.

    2002-01-01

    A computer model was developed using COREsim to perform a time motion study for the Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Loading Station operations. The project is to blend Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) with Natural Uranium (NU) to produce LEU to be shipped to Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for further processing. To cope with a project cost reduction, the LEU Loading Station concept has changed from an enclosed building with air-conditioning to a partially enclosed building without air conditioning. The LEU Loading Station is within a radiological contaminated area; two pairs of coveralls and negative pressure respirator are required. As a result, inclement weather conditions, especially heat stress, will affect and impact the LEU loading operations. The purposes of the study are to determine the climatological impacts on LEU Loading operations, resources required for committed throughputs, and to find out the optimum process pathways for multi crews working simultaneously in the space-lim ited LEU Loading Station

  17. Organization of Control Units with Operational Addressing

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander A. Barkalov; Roman M. Babakov; Larysa A. Titarenko

    2012-01-01

    The using of operational addressing unit as the block of control unit is proposed. The new structure model of Moore finite-state machine with reduced hardware amount is developed. The generalized structure of operational addressing unit is suggested. An example of synthesis process for Moore finite-state machine with operational addressing unit is given. The analytical researches of proposed structure of control unit are executed.

  18. Engineering Process Monitoring for Control Room Operation

    OpenAIRE

    Bätz, M

    2001-01-01

    A major challenge in process operation is to reduce costs and increase system efficiency whereas the complexity of automated process engineering, control and monitoring systems increases continuously. To cope with this challenge the design, implementation and operation of process monitoring systems for control room operation have to be treated as an ensemble. This is only possible if the engineering of the monitoring information is focused on the production objective and is lead in close coll...

  19. Wet steam turbines for nuclear generating stations -design and operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usher, J.

    1977-01-01

    Lecture to the Institution of Nuclear Engineers, 11 Jan. 1977. The object of this lecture was to give an account of some design features of large wet steam turbines and to show by describing some recent operational experience how their design concepts were fulfilled. Headings are as follows: effects of wet steam cycle on turbine layout and operation (H.P. turbine, L.P. turbine); turbine control and operation; water separators; and steam reheaters. (U.K.)

  20. Empirical Requirements Analysis for Mars Surface Operations Using the Flashline Mars Arctic Research Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancey, William J.; Lee, Pascal; Sierhuis, Maarten; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Living and working on Mars will require model-based computer systems for maintaining and controlling complex life support, communication, transportation, and power systems. This technology must work properly on the first three-year mission, augmenting human autonomy, without adding-yet more complexity to be diagnosed and repaired. One design method is to work with scientists in analog (mars-like) setting to understand how they prefer to work, what constrains will be imposed by the Mars environment, and how to ameliorate difficulties. We describe how we are using empirical requirements analysis to prototype model-based tools at a research station in the High Canadian Arctic.

  1. Mobile environmental radiation monitoring station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assido, H.; Shemesh, Y.; Mazor, T.; Tal, N.; Barak, D.

    1997-01-01

    A mobile environmental radiation monitoring station has been developed and established for the Israeli Ministry of Environment. The radiation monitoring station is ready for immediate placing in any required location, or can be operated from a vehicle. The station collects data Tom the detector and transfers it via cellular communication network to a Computerized Control Center for data storage, processing, and display . The mobile station is fully controlled from the. Routinely, the mobile station responses to the data request accumulated since the last communication session. In case of fault or alarm condition in the mobile station, a local claim is activated and immediately initiates communication with the via cellular communication network. (authors)

  2. Tianwan Nuclear Power Station. An Example for Chinese - Russian - German Co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidowitzsch, B.

    2004-01-01

    The Tianwan NPS is the first NPP worldwide, equipped completely with digital control systems. The DCS platforms TELEPERM XS and TELEPERM XP fulfill all automation tasks from reactor protection to water treatment system. The screen-based OM690 system offers a modern HMI for NPP operation. The Tianwan NPS Main IC project is an example of successful multi-cultural co-operation

  3. General predictive control using the delta operator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten Rostgaard; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad; Ravn, Ole

    1993-01-01

    This paper deals with two-discrete-time operators, the conventional forward shift-operator and the δ-operator. Both operators are treated in view of construction of suitable solutions to the Diophantine equation for the purpose of prediction. A general step-recursive scheme is presented. Finally...... a general predictive control (GPC) is formulated and applied adaptively to a continuous-time plant...

  4. Automatic operation device for control rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimizu, Koichi

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To enable automatic operation of control rods based on the reactor operation planning, and particularly, to decrease the operator's load upon start up and shutdown of the reactor. Constitution: Operation plannings, demand for the automatic operation, break point setting value, power and reactor core flow rate change, demand for operation interrupt, demand for restart, demand for forecasting and the like are inputted to an input device, and an overall judging device performs a long-term forecast as far as the break point by a long-term forecasting device based on the operation plannings. The automatic reactor operation or the like is carried out based on the long-term forecasting and the short time forecasting is performed by the change in the reactor core status due to the control rod operation sequence based on the control rod pattern and the operation planning. Then, it is judged if the operation for the intended control rod is possible or not based on the result of the short time forecasting. (Aizawa, K.)

  5. The approach associated with the continued operation of the Calder Hall and Chapelcross nuclear power stations to 50 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayres, G.

    1996-01-01

    Calder Hall was the world's first commercial nuclear power station, commencing operation in 1956, and with its sister station at Chapelcross has operated successfully, with consistently high load factors, for approximately 40 years. The first part of this paper reviews the operating history of the stations. Secondly, the paper will briefly describe both the work carried out under the Long Term Safety Review which has supported operation to 40 years and the work being carried out as part of a Periodic Safety Review to support continued operation of both stations to 50 years. The commercial improvements, some of which, of course, do have some nuclear safety significance, will be briefly described in the context of operating within what is increasingly becoming a demanding privatized electricity market in the United Kingdom. Finally, potential life limiting features will be identified and the monitoring programmes described leading to the conclusion that there is no reason why the stations should not continue to operate to at least 50 years. (author). 4 refs

  6. Method of controlling the reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguro, Akira; Nakakura, Hiroyuki.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To moderate vibratory response due to delayed operation thereby obtain stable controlled response in the operation control for a PWR type reactor. Method: the reactor operation is controlled by the axial power distribution control by regulating the boron concentration in primary coolants with a boron density control system and controlling the average temperature for the primary coolants with the control rod control system. In this case, the control operation and the control response become instable due to transmission delay, etc. of aqueous boric acid injection to the primary coolant circuits to result in vibratory response. In the present invention, signals are prepared by adding the amount in proportion to the variation coefficient with time of xenone concentration obtained from the measured value for the reactor power added to the conventional axial power distribution parameter deviation and used as the input signals for the boron concentration control system. As a result, the instability due to the transmission delay of the aqueous boric acid injection is improved by the preceding control by the amount in proportion with the variation coefficient with time of the xenone concentration. An advantageous effect can be expected for the load following operation during day time according to the present invention. (Kamimura, M.)

  7. Operating experience with nuclear power stations in Member States in 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    This report is twenty-ninth in the IAEA series of annual reports on operating experience with nuclear power stations in Member States. The report is a direct output from the Agency's Power Reactor Information System (PRIS), whose database contains all operating experience data published in Agency's operating experience annual reports published since 1971 and basic information on power reactors, including design data. According to the information available to the Agency at the end of 1997, there were 437 nuclear power reactors having a total capacity of 351795 MW(e). During 1997 three new reactors having total capacity of 3555 MW(e) were connected to the grid in France and the Republic of Korea. There were 36 nuclear power plants under construction in the world. Load, operation and availability factors are used as the basic performance factors. In addition to annual performance data and outage information, the report contains a historical summary of performance and outages during the lifetime of individual plants and five figures illustrating worldwide performance and statistical data

  8. Operating control techniques for maglev transport systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraft, K H; Schnieder, E

    1984-06-01

    The technical and operational possibilities of magnetic levitation transport systems can only be fully exploited by introducing 'intelligent' control systems which ensure automatic and trouble-free train running. The solution of exacting requirements in the fields of traction dynamics, security and control as well as information gathering transmission and processing is an important prior condition in that respect. The authors report here on the present state of research and development in operating control techniques applicable to maglev transport systems.

  9. Computer control of shielded cell operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffords, W.R. III.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes in detail a computer system to remotely control shielded cell operations. System hardware, software, and design criteria are discussed. We have designed a computer-controlled buret that provides a tenfold improvement over the buret currently in service. A computer also automatically controls cell analyses, calibrations, and maintenance. This system improves conditions for the operators by providing a safer, more efficient working environment and is expandable for future growth and development

  10. Control room habitability survey of licensed commercial nuclear power generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driscoll, J.W.

    1988-10-01

    This document presents the results of a survey of control room habitability systems at twelve commercial nuclear generating stations. The survey, conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), is part of an NRC program initiated in response to concerns and recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS). The major conclusion of the report is that the numerous types of potentially significant discrepancies found among the surveyed plants may be indicative of similar discrepancies throughout the industry. The report provides plant-specific and generalized findings regarding safety functions with respect to the consistency of the design, construction, operation and testing of control room habitability systems and corresponding Technical Specifications compared with descriptions provided in the license basis documentation including assumptions in the operator toxic gas concentration and radiation dose calculations. Calculations of operator toxic gas concentrations and radiation doses were provided in the license basis documentation and were not performed by the ANL survey team. Recommendation for improvements are provided in the report

  11. Preparedness of fire safety in underground train station: Comparison between train operators in Malaysia with other operators from the developed countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajedi, Noor Aqilah A.; Sukor, Nur Sabahiah A.; Ismail, Mohd Ashraf M.; Shamsudin, Shahrul A.

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare the fire evacuation plan and preparation at the underground train stations in the different countries. The methodology for this study was using the extended questionnaire survey to investigate the Rapid Rail Sdn Bhd, Malaysia's fire safety plan and preparation at the underground train stations. There were four sections in the questionnaire which included (i) background of the respondents, (ii) the details on the train stations, safety instruction and fire evacuation exercises (iii) technical systems, installation and equipment at the underground stations and (iv) procedures and technical changes related to fire safety that had been applied by the operators. Previously, the respondents from the different train operator services in the developed countries had completed the questionnaires. This paper extends the response from the Rapid Rail Sdn Bhd to compare the emergency procedures and preparation for fire event with the developed countries. As a result, this study found that the equipment and facilities that provided at the underground train stations that operated by Rapid Rail are relevant for fire safety procedures and needs. The main advantage for Rapid Rail is the underground stations were designed with two or more entrances/exits that may perform better evacuation compare to one main entrance/exit train stations in the other developed countries.

  12. Metrological and operational performance of measuring systems used in vehicle compressed natural gas filling stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velosa, Jhonn F.; Abril, Henry; Garcia, Luis E. [CDT de GAS (Venezuela). Gas Technological Development Center Corporation

    2008-07-01

    Corporation CDT GAS financially supported by the Colombian government through COLCIENCIAS, carried out a study aimed at designing, developing and implementing in Colombia a calibration and metrological verification 'specialized service' for gas meters installed at dispensers of filling stations using compressed natural gas. The results permitted the identification of improving opportunities (in measuring systems, equipment and devices used to deliver natural gas) which are focused on achieving the highest security and reliability of trading processes of CNG for vehicles. In the development of the first stage of the project, metrological type variables were initially considered, but given the importance of the measuring system and its interaction with the various elements involving gas supply to the filling station, the scope of the work done included aspects related to the operational performance, that is, those influencing the security of the users and the metrological performance of the measuring system. The development of the second stage counted on the collaboration of national companies from the sector of CNG for vehicles, which permitted the carrying out of multiple calibrations to the measuring systems installed in the CNG dispensers, thus achieving, in a concrete way, valid and reliable technological information of the implemented procedures. (author)

  13. Influence of Trash-Barriering on Operation of Pumping Station with Wet-Pits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoyun Qiu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Trash racks are set before inlet sumps of a pumping station with wet-pits in order to block trash. The flow fields before and behind the trash rack were numerically simulated and flow fields in the inlet sump were calculated using the simulated velocity distribution of the section behind the trash rack as the inlet boundary condition. Local head loss of trash-barriering increases with the increase of blockage ratio of the trash rack. When waterweeds block upper part of the trash rack, flow pattern behind the trash rack will be extremely turbulent, flow velocity of lower part of inlet section of inlet sump will increase, flow velocity of the upper part will decrease, and even backflow appears, which will deteriorate the flow pattern and increase head loss in the inlet sump. Trash-barriering has little effect on velocity distribution of impeller inlet section. Trash-barriering will not only increase head and power of the pump but also decrease the flow. For the example of the pumping station: when blockage ratios of the trash racks are 0.3, 0.5, and 0.7, operating cost will increase by 13%~43% than that of without trash racks. Therefore, the trash rack should be cleaned up timely.

  14. Short-term optimal operation of Three-gorge and Gezhouba cascade hydropower stations in non-flood season with operation rules from data mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Chao; Lian Jijian; Wang Junna

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Short-term optimal operation of Three-gorge and Gezhouba hydropower stations was studied. ► Key state variable and exact constraints were proposed to improve numerical model. ► Operation rules proposed were applied in population initiation step for faster optimization. ► Culture algorithm with difference evolution was selected as optimization method. ► Model and method proposed were verified by case study with feasible operation solutions. - Abstract: Information hidden in the characteristics and relationship data of a cascade hydropower stations can be extracted by data-mining approaches to be operation rules and optimization support information. In this paper, with Three-gorge and Gezhouba cascade hydropower stations as an example, two operation rules are proposed due to different operation efficiency of water turbines and tight water volume and hydraulic relationship between two hydropower stations. The rules are applied to improve optimization model with more exact decision and state variables and constraints. They are also used in the population initiation step to develop better individuals with culture algorithm with differential evolution as an optimization method. In the case study, total feasible population and the best solution based on an initial population with an operation rule can be obtained with a shorter computation time than that of a pure random initiated population. Amount of electricity generation in a dispatch period with an operation rule also increases with an average increase rate of 0.025%. For a fixed water discharge process of Three-gorge hydropower station, there is a better rule to decide an operation plan of Gezhouba hydropower station in which total hydraulic head for electricity generation is optimized and distributed with inner-plant economic operation considered.

  15. Nuclear thermal rocket engine operation and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunn, S.V.; Savoie, M.T.; Hundal, R.

    1993-06-01

    The operation of a typical Rover/Nerva-derived nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) engine is characterized and the control requirements of the NTR are defined. A rationale for the selection of a candidate diverse redundant NTR engine control system is presented and the projected component operating requirements are related to the state of the art of candidate components and subsystems. The projected operational capabilities of the candidate system are delineated for the startup, full-thrust, shutdown, and decay heat removal phases of the engine operation. 9 refs

  16. International Space Station Passive Thermal Control System Analysis, Top Ten Lessons-Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovine, John

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) has been on-orbit for over 10 years, and there have been numerous technical challenges along the way from design to assembly to on-orbit anomalies and repairs. The Passive Thermal Control System (PTCS) management team has been a key player in successfully dealing with these challenges. The PTCS team performs thermal analysis in support of design and verification, launch and assembly constraints, integration, sustaining engineering, failure response, and model validation. This analysis is a significant body of work and provides a unique opportunity to compile a wealth of real world engineering and analysis knowledge and the corresponding lessons-learned. The analysis lessons encompass the full life cycle of flight hardware from design to on-orbit performance and sustaining engineering. These lessons can provide significant insight for new projects and programs. Key areas to be presented include thermal model fidelity, verification methods, analysis uncertainty, and operations support.

  17. Generating a representative signal of coal moisture content to anticipate combustion control in thermal power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prieto-Fernandez, Ismael; Luengo-Garcia, J. Carlos; Alonso-Hidalgo, Manuela; Ponte-Gutierrez, Daniel [Area de Maquinas y Motores Termicos, Universidad de Oviedo, Campus Universitario s/n 33203, Asturias Gijon (Spain)

    2002-06-01

    This article describes the possibilities of continuously measuring coal moisture in the boiler feeding circuit of a thermal power station so that the measurement can be used as a signal for the boiler combustion control system. To do so, in the first place, the point through which coal would be fed into the boiler was chosen. After studying the different parts of the circuit, the feeder was selected. Then, an installation was designed, at semi-industrial scale, faithfully reproducing the operation of a belt conveyor. In order to measure the moisture content, a microwave system was installed, and a large number of coal samples with different ranks and grain sizes was tested showing eventually the likelihood of the objective.

  18. International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Status: 2011-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David E.; Dake, Jason R.; Gentry, Gregory J.

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system includes regenerative and non-regenerative technologies that provide the basic life support functions to support the crew, while maintaining a safe and habitable shirtsleeve environment. This paper provides a summary of the U.S. ECLS system activities over the past year and the impacts of the international partners activities on them, covering the period of time between March 2011 and February 2012. The ISS continued permanent crew operations including the continuation of six crew members being on ISS. Work continues on the commercial cargo resupply vehicles, and work to try and extend ISS service life from 2015 to no later than 2028. 1

  19. Experience in the chemistry field from the operating cycle of Grohnde and Philippsburg II nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobi, G.; Ruehle, W.

    1987-01-01

    Experience from the primary section of the plants in relation to the activity pattern of corrosion products, indicates primarily that cobalt-free materials have been used throughout in Philippsburg II nuclear power station, which was no longer economically possible at Grohnde because of the advanced stages of manufacture and installation. Consequently, the activity concentration for Co-60 in Philippsburg was lower from the outset than at a comparable time at Grohnde. The second part of the paper discusses experience from the secondary section of the plants, based on the AVT (all volatile treatment) method of operation and its effect on the deposits in the steam generators. The chemical control is described and a comparison is made between the sampling points at Grohnde and Philippsburg II. (orig.) [de

  20. Intelligent tutors for control center operator training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vale, Z.A. [Porto Univ. (Portugal). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Fernandes, M.F.; Marques, A. [Electricity of Portugal, Sacavem (Portugal)

    1995-12-31

    Power systems are presently remotely operated and controlled from control centers that receive on-line information about the power system state. Control center operators have very high-demanding tasks what makes their training a key issue for the performance of the whole power system. Simulators are usually used by electrical utilities for this purpose but they are very expensive applications and their use requires the preparation of the training sessions by qualified training staff which is a very time consuming task. Due to this, these simulators are only used a few times a year. Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS) provide some new possibilities for control center operator training making easier its use without much assistance of the teaching staff. On the other hand, an expert system in use in a control center can be adapted to an ITS to train operators without much effort. 18 refs

  1. Reusable Rack Interface Controller Common Software for Various Science Research Racks on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, George C.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the EXPRESS (Expedite the PRocessing of Experiments to Space Station) rack project is to provide a set of predefined interfaces for scientific payloads which allow rapid integration into a payload rack on International Space Station (ISS). VxWorks' was selected as the operating system for the rack and payload resource controller, primarily based on the proliferation of VME (Versa Module Eurocard) products. These products provide needed flexibility for future hardware upgrades to meet everchanging science research rack configuration requirements. On the International Space Station, there are multiple science research rack configurations, including: 1) Human Research Facility (HRF); 2) EXPRESS ARIS (Active Rack Isolation System); 3) WORF (Window Observational Research Facility); and 4) HHR (Habitat Holding Rack). The RIC (Rack Interface Controller) connects payloads to the ISS bus architecture for data transfer between the payload and ground control. The RIC is a general purpose embedded computer which supports multiple communication protocols, including fiber optic communication buses, Ethernet buses, EIA-422, Mil-Std-1553 buses, SMPTE (Society Motion Picture Television Engineers)-170M video, and audio interfaces to payloads and the ISS. As a cost saving and software reliability strategy, the Boeing Payload Software Organization developed reusable common software where appropriate. These reusable modules included a set of low-level driver software interfaces to 1553B. RS232, RS422, Ethernet buses, HRDL (High Rate Data Link), video switch functionality, telemetry processing, and executive software hosted on the FUC computer. These drivers formed the basis for software development of the HRF, EXPRESS, EXPRESS ARIS, WORF, and HHR RIC executable modules. The reusable RIC common software has provided extensive benefits, including: 1) Significant reduction in development flow time; 2) Minimal rework and maintenance; 3) Improved reliability; and 4) Overall

  2. Design of the system of maintenance operations occupational safety and health database application of nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xuehong; Li Xiangyang; Ye Yongjun

    2011-01-01

    Based on the KKS code of building equipment in nuclear power station, this paper introduces the method of establishing the system of maintenance operation occupational safety and health database application. Through the application system of maintenance occupational safety and health database, it can summarize systematically all kinds of maintenance operation dangerous factor of nuclear power station, and make a convenience for staff to learn the maintenance operation dangerous factors and the prevention measures, so that it can achieve the management concept of 'precaution crucial, continuous improvement' that advocated by OSHMS. (authors)

  3. 78 FR 32278 - Vogtle Electric Generating Station, Units 3 and 4; Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Change to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... Generating Station, Units 3 and 4; Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Change to Information in Tier 1, Table... Nuclear Operating Company, Inc., and Georgia Power Company, Oglethorpe Power Corporation, Municipal... Table 3.3-1, ``Definition of Wall Thicknesses for Nuclear Island Buildings, Turbine Buildings, and Annex...

  4. Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support Systems: An Update on Waste Water Reclamation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferner, Kathleen M.

    1994-01-01

    Since the mid-1980's, work has been ongoing In the development of the various environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS) for the space station. Part of this effort has been focused on the development of a new subsystem to reclaim waste water that had not been previously required for shuttle missions. Because of the extended manned missions proposed, reclamation of waste water becomes imperative to avoid the weight penalties associated with resupplying a crew's entire water needs for consumption and daily hygiene. Hamilton Standard, under contract to Boeing Aerospace and Electronics, has been designing the water reclamation system for space station use. Since June of 1991, Hamilton Standard has developed a combined water processor capable of reclaiming potable quality water from waste hygiene water, used laundry water, processed urine, Shuttle fuel cell water, humidity condensate and other minor waste water sources. The system was assembled and then tested with over 27,700 pounds of 'real' waste water. During the 1700 hours of system operation required to process this waste water, potable quality water meeting NASA and Boeing specifications was produced. This paper gives a schematic overview of the system, describes the test conditions and test results and outlines the next steps for system development.

  5. Intelligent Control and Operation of Distribution System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhattarai, Bishnu Prasad

    methodology to ensure efficient control and operation of the future distribution networks. The major scientific challenge is thus to develop control models and strategies to coordinate responses from widely distributed controllable loads and local generations. Detailed models of key Smart Grid (SG) elements...... in this direction but also benefit distribution system operators in the planning and development of the distribution network. The major contributions of this work are described in the following four stages: In the first stage, an intelligent Demand Response (DR) control architecture is developed for coordinating...... the key SG actors, namely consumers, network operators, aggregators, and electricity market entities. A key intent of the architecture is to facilitate market participation of residential consumers and prosumers. A Hierarchical Control Architecture (HCA) having primary, secondary, and tertiary control...

  6. Modeling Control Situations in Power System Operations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saleem, Arshad; Lind, Morten; Singh, Sri Niwas

    2010-01-01

    for intelligent operation and control must represent system features, so that information from measurements can be related to possible system states and to control actions. These general modeling requirements are well understood, but it is, in general, difficult to translate them into a model because of the lack...... of explicit principles for model construction. This paper presents a work on using explicit means-ends model based reasoning about complex control situations which results in maintaining consistent perspectives and selecting appropriate control action for goal driven agents. An example of power system......Increased interconnection and loading of the power system along with deregulation has brought new challenges for electric power system operation, control and automation. Traditional power system models used in intelligent operation and control are highly dependent on the task purpose. Thus, a model...

  7. Life support and internal thermal control system design for the Space Station Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, R.; Mitchell, K.; Reuter, J.; Carrasquillo, R.; Beverly, B.

    1991-01-01

    A Review of the Space Station Freedom Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) as well as the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) design, including recent changes resulting from an activity to restructure the program, is provided. The development state of the original Space Station Freedom ECLSS through the restructured configuration is considered and the selection of regenerative subsystems for oxygen and water reclamation is addressed. A survey of the present ground development and verification program is given.

  8. The development of a model of control room operator cognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, C. Felicity

    1998-01-01

    The nuclear generation station CRO is one of the main contributors to plant performance and safety. In the past, studies of operator behaviour have been made under emergency or abnormal situations, with little consideration being given to the more routine aspects of plant operation. One of the tasks of the operator is to detect the early signs of a problem, and to take steps to prevent a transition to an abnormal plant state. In order to do this CRO must determine that plant indications are no longer in the normal range, and take action to prevent a further move away from normal. This task is made more difficult by the extreme complexity of the control room, and by the may hindrances that the operator must face. It would therefore be of great benefit to understand CRO cognitive performance, especially under normal operating conditions. Through research carried out at several Canadian nuclear facilities we were able to develop a deeper understanding of CRO monitoring of highly automated systems during normal operations, and specifically to investigate the contributions of cognitive skills to monitoring performance. The consultants were asked to develop a deeper understanding of CRO monitoring during normal operations, and specifically to investigate the contributions of cognitive skills to monitoring performance. The overall objective of this research was to develop and validate a model of CRO monitoring. The findings of this research have practical implications for systems integration, training, and interface design. The result of this work was a model of operator monitoring activities. (author)

  9. Annual report of operation management in nuclear power stations, fiscal year 1985. Showa 60 nendo genshiryoku hatsudensho unten kanri nenpo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    Twenty years have elapsed since the first practical nuclear reactor in Japan started the operation. In the generated power in fiscal year 1985, that of nuclear power stations for the first time overtook that of thermal power stations, and now the age of nuclear power as the main and oil power as the subordinate has begun. As of the end of fiscal year 1985, there were 32 nuclear power plants in operation, having total output capacity of 24.521 million kW. In fiscal year 1985, nuclear power plants generated about 159 billion kWh, which is about 2 % of electric power supply. As to the capacity factor, 76% was attained in fiscal year 1985, and this is ranked in the top group of LWR-operating countries in the world. It showed that the Japanese technology of nuclear power generation is at the top level in the world. However, in order to increase nuclear power generation and to accomplish the role of main electric power source hereafter, it is necessary to further increase the reliability and economical efficiency. The list of nuclear power stations in Japan, the state of operation of nuclear power stations, the state of accidents and troubles, the state of regular inspection, the management of radioactive wastes and the radiation exposure of workers in nuclear power stations, the operational management and others are reported.

  10. Enhancing Safety at Airline Operations Control Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukáš Řasa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years a new term of Safety Management System (SMS has been introduced into aviation legislation. This system is being adopted by airline operators. One of the groundbased actors of everyday operations is Operations Control Centre (OCC. The goal of this article has been to identify and assess risks and dangers which occur at OCC and create a template for OCC implementation into SMS.

  11. Operational Assessment of Controller Complexity, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In today's operations, acceptable levels of controller workload are maintained by assigning sector capacities based on simple aircraft count and a capacity threshold...

  12. Engineering Process Monitoring for Control Room Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Bätz, M

    2001-01-01

    A major challenge in process operation is to reduce costs and increase system efficiency whereas the complexity of automated process engineering, control and monitoring systems increases continuously. To cope with this challenge the design, implementation and operation of process monitoring systems for control room operation have to be treated as an ensemble. This is only possible if the engineering of the monitoring information is focused on the production objective and is lead in close collaboration of control room teams, exploitation personnel and process specialists. In this paper some principles for the engineering of monitoring information for control room operation are developed at the example of the exploitation of a particle accelerator at the European Laboratory for Nuclear Research (CERN).

  13. Operating experience with nuclear power stations in Member States in 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-11-01

    This report is the thirty-fourth in the Agency's series of annual reports on operating experience with nuclear power stations in Member States. The report is a direct output from the Agency's Power Reactor Information System (PRIS), whose database contains all operating experience data published in the Agency's operating experience annual reports since 1971 and basic information on power reactors, including design data. It presents operating experience data for all worldwide nuclear power plants after starting commercial operation. The PRIS databank is available free of charge to IAEA Member States through its two services: PRIS-PC and MicroPRIS. The PRIS-PC allows direct access to the database via telephone lines or through the Internet. The MicroPRIS contains a subset of the PRIS database and is a personal computer version of PRIS data available on diskette in a form readily accessible by standard, commercially available personal computer packages. PRIS is also available in the Internet at http://www.iaea.org/programmes/a2. Load, operation and availability factors are used as the basic performance factors. Energy unavailability factors, separate for planned and unplanned unavailability, due either to causes in the plant or causes external to the plant, are used as a measure of energy lost through a unit not being available. However, some ambiguity remains in the operator reports of the unavailability data, resulting in inconsistencies in these factors. It is recognized that there is an inherent difficulty in reporting unavailability in energy with relation to a maximum capacity which may change several times during the year. In addition, there are different practices in reporting planned and unplanned unavailability among Member States. The unavailability factors in this report should therefore be used with caution. It should be noted that, for load, operation and unavailability factors, there might be differences between the data of this report and those

  14. Developing control room operator selection procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosshardt, M.J.; Bownas, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    PDRI is performing a two-year study to identify the tasks performed and attributes required in electric power generating plant operating jobs, and focusing on the control room operator position. Approximately 65 investor-owned utilities are participating in the study

  15. Automatic Control of Freeboard and Turbine Operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Frigaard, Peter Bak; Friis-Madsen, Erik

    The report deals with the modules for automatic control of freeboard and turbine operation on board the Wave dragon, Nissum Bredning (WD-NB) prototype, and covers what has been going on up to ultimo 2003.......The report deals with the modules for automatic control of freeboard and turbine operation on board the Wave dragon, Nissum Bredning (WD-NB) prototype, and covers what has been going on up to ultimo 2003....

  16. Operational trade-offs in reservoir control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgakakos, Aris P.

    1993-11-01

    Reservoir operation decisions require constant reevaluation in the face of conflicting objectives, varying hydrologic conditions, and frequent operational policy changes. Optimality is a relative concept very much dependent on the circumstances under which a decision is made. More than anything else, reservoir management authorities need the means to assess the impacts of various operational options. It is their responsibility to define what is desirable after a thorough evaluation of the existing circumstances. This article presents a model designed to generate operational trade-offs common among reservoir systems. The model avoids an all-encompassing problem formulation and distinguishes three operational modes (levels) corresponding to normal, drought, and flood operations. Each level addresses only relevant system elements and uses a static and a dynamic control module to optimize turbine performance within each planning period and temporally. The model is used for planning the operation of the Savannah River System.

  17. Development and prospects of guidance system for operators in nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aeba, Youichi

    1988-01-01

    In nuclear power plants, the information on plant process and the status of machinery and equipment is collected in a central control room, and operators watch the information and carry out the necessary operation according to circumstances, in this way, the stable safe operation is carried out. Recently, process parameters and the status of machinery and equipment are displayed, being classified by the objectives of monitoring, and when operators evaluate the condition of a plant, the burden of collecting required information is reduced, and the identification of the cause of abnormality and the forecast of the range of spread and the development of abnormality are eased. However, the burden of operators in the case of coping with the abnormal event in a plant is still heavy. In this report, the prospect of the operation-supporting system to which knowledge engineering is applied and the status of its development are described. The concept, system constitution, knowledge expression and inference control mechanism of the operation-supporting system, the test of the system and the results, and the perspective of the system hereafter are reported. (Kako, I.)

  18. Development of the Next Generation Gas Trap for the Space Station Internal Thermal Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Spelbring, Chris; Reeves, Daniel R.; Holt, James M.

    2003-01-01

    The current dual-membrane gas trap is designed to remove non-condensed gases (NCG) from the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) coolant on board the International Space Station (ISS). To date it has successfully served its purpose of preventing depriming, overspeed, and shutdown of the ITCS pump. However, contamination in the ITCS coolant has adversely affected the gas venting rate and lifetime of the gas trap, warranting a development effort for a next-generation gas trap. Design goals are to meet or exceed the current requirements to (1) include greater operating ranges and conditions, (2) eliminate reliance on the current hydrophilic tube fabrication process, and (3) increase operational life and tolerance to particulate and microbial growth fouling. In addition, the next generation gas trap will essentially be a 'dropin" design such that no modifications to the ITCS pump package assembly (PPA) will be required, and the implementation of the new design will not affect changes to the ITCS operational conditions, interfaces, or software. This paper will present the initial membrane module design and development work which has included (1) a trade study among several conceptual designs, (2) performance modeling of a hydrophobic-only design, and (3) small-scale development test data for the hydrophobic-only design. Testing has shown that the hydrophobic-only design is capable of performing even better than the current dual-membrane design for both steady-state gas removal and gas slug removal.

  19. International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System Overview of Events: 2010-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Gregory J.; Cover, John

    2015-01-01

    Nov 2, 2014 marked the completion of the 14th year of continuous human presence in space on board the International Space Station (ISS). After 42 expedition crews, over 115 assembly & utilization flights, over 180 combined Shuttle/Station, US & Russian Extravehicular Activities (EVAs), the post-Assembly-Complete ISS continues to fly and the engineering teams continue to learn from operating its systems, particularly the life support equipment. Problems with initial launch, assembly and activation of ISS elements have given way to more long term system operating trends. New issues have emerged, some with gestation periods measured in years. Major events and challenges for each U.S. Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) subsystem occurring during calendar years 2010 through 2014 are summarily discussed in this paper, along with look-aheads for what might be coming in the future for each U.S. ECLS subsystem.

  20. Adding control to arbitrary unknown quantum operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiao-Qi; Ralph, Timothy C.; Kalasuwan, Pruet; Zhang, Mian; Peruzzo, Alberto; Lanyon, Benjamin P.; O'Brien, Jeremy L.

    2011-01-01

    Although quantum computers promise significant advantages, the complexity of quantum algorithms remains a major technological obstacle. We have developed and demonstrated an architecture-independent technique that simplifies adding control qubits to arbitrary quantum operations—a requirement in many quantum algorithms, simulations and metrology. The technique, which is independent of how the operation is done, does not require knowledge of what the operation is, and largely separates the problems of how to implement a quantum operation in the laboratory and how to add a control. Here, we demonstrate an entanglement-based version in a photonic system, realizing a range of different two-qubit gates with high fidelity. PMID:21811242

  1. A study of operation of station fire brigade with comparison for Japan and the U.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiki, Kuniyasu

    2011-01-01

    With the occurrence of a fire at Kashiwazaki Kariwa No. 3 unit on a site transformer when Niigata Chuetsu Offshore Earthquake occurred in 2007, the movement of establishing station fire brigade broke out all over Japan. Fire brigade of U.S. power stations is an organization structured with the standards of clear requirements. Some of station fire event reports include examples of activation of station fire brigade. Preparing station fire brigade with good expertise is quite meaningful on the viewpoint of ruling out significant threats of fire against nuclear safety, such as Browns Ferry station fire occurred in 1975. The purpose of this study is to extract useful knowledge through making research on examples of operations of station fire brigade of both Japan and the U.S. As for fire occurrence, relatively frequent fires are seen at Japanese stations with miscellaneous components or some material for works. In the U.S., on the other hand, we can identify relatively frequent fires occurred with important equipment. This might make fire brigades of the U.S. well-prepared for fire fighting by establishing fire-coping strategies for every location in the station. Also, in some stations, fire brigade is continuously trained to enhance its firefighting and rescuing abilities. With the aspect of training of brigades, they are often assembled with devoted staff, which enable them acquiring frequent training and educations to improve their skills further. Fire fighting and rescuing are inevitably dangerous task. This is why frequent training is essential in order to prevent injuries and to keep up their motivation. Unfortunately, the circumstance for brigades in Japan is not helpful enough in experiencing special training needed for them. We have to figure out some way to get over such disadvantages. (author)

  2. Applying interactive control to waste processing operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasz, E.L.; Merrill, R.D.; Couture, S.A.

    1992-08-01

    At present waste and residue processing includes steps that require human interaction. The risk of exposure to unknown hazardous materials and the potential for radiation contamination motivates the desire to remove operators from these processes. Technologies that facilitate this include glove box robotics, modular systems for remote and automated servicing, and interactive controls that minimize human intervention. LLNL is developing an automated system which is designed to supplant the operator for glove box tasks, thus protecting the operator from the risk of radiation exposure and minimizing operator-associated waste. Although most of the processing can be automated with minimal human interaction, there are some tasks where intelligent intervention is both desirable and necessary to adapt to Enexpected circumstances and events. These activities require that the operator interact with the process using a remote manipulator which provides or reflects a natural feel to the operator. The remote manipulation system which was developed incorporates sensor fusion and interactive control, and provides the operator with an effective means of controlling the robot in a potentially unknown environment. This paper describes recent accomplishments in technology development and integration, and outlines the future goals of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for achieving this integrated interactive control capability

  3. Plant status control - with an operational focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, L.A.

    2000-01-01

    In the Nuclear industry, we have done a very good job of designing, developing, constructing, and improving our nuclear facilities. We have, however, often been inconsistent in documenting the details of our facilities, clearly addressing the rules around facility operation, and controlling and tracking the temporary, or permanent changes to our facilities. The reality is, that once we build a facility, we then must operate the facility, for it to be viable. Further we must operate it safely and efficiently for the facility to produce its product, and be acceptable to the public. Unfortunately, when we design and build these large, complicated facilities, we cannot project all the nuances of facility operation, although we can recognize this potential gap, and prepare for it. In order to allow for the complexities of the real world, we must provide the individuals who are tasked with operating our nuclear facilities, with the tools and processes to deal with 'all the nuances' of facility operation. This discussion will focus on the concepts behind a key process for ensuring that we meet our design and operating needs for our facilities, as well as recognizing and dealing with the potential gaps. The key process is 'Plant Status Control', and the discussion will have a primary focus on the needs of the end users, that being the individuals that have the immediate and current accountability for control and safety of the facility, the equipment, the staff, and ultimately the public, that being our Operations staff, and the Shift Manager. (author)

  4. Operation control device for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suto, Osamu.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To render the controlling functions of a central control console more centralized by constituting the operation controls for a nuclear power plant with computer systems having substantially independent functions such as those of plant monitor controls, reactor monitor management and CRT display and decreasing interactions between each of the systems. Constitution: An input/output device for the input of process data for a nuclear power plant and indication data for a plant control console is connected to a plant supervisory and control computer system and a display computer system, the plant supervisory control computer system and a reactor and management computer system are connected with a CRT display control device, a printer and a CRT display input/output device, and the display computer system is connected with the CRT display control device and the CRT display unit on the central control console, whereby process input can be processed and displayed at high speed. (Yoshino, Y.)

  5. CV controls from design to operation

    CERN Document Server

    Blanc, D

    2002-01-01

    The cooling and Ventilation (CV) group has emphasised the need to redefine its organisational structure at the end of 98. The main objective of this operation was to ensure the CV group to be more competitive and efficient through the growing tasks of the LHC projects. The main evolution given to this reorganisation is that the new structure is more project oriented and then operates on three distinct axes: Design, Work and Operation. Process control project management requires a complete and early interaction and participation of all the actors involved. This procedure to be efficient and constructive must be considered and performed not only during the design stage but along the project planning phases and must go beyond the completion work including the process control operation activity. The paper explains the present project management for process control. It describes the present constraints and gives suggestions to a different approach to these projects to improve performances and efficiency of a contr...

  6. Hydrate Control for Gas Storage Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey Savidge

    2008-10-31

    The overall objective of this project was to identify low cost hydrate control options to help mitigate and solve hydrate problems that occur in moderate and high pressure natural gas storage field operations. The study includes data on a number of flow configurations, fluids and control options that are common in natural gas storage field flow lines. The final phase of this work brings together data and experience from the hydrate flow test facility and multiple field and operator sources. It includes a compilation of basic information on operating conditions as well as candidate field separation options. Lastly the work is integrated with the work with the initial work to provide a comprehensive view of gas storage field hydrate control for field operations and storage field personnel.

  7. International Space Station Common Cabin Air Assembly Condensing Heat Exchanger Hydrophilic Coating Operation, Recovery, and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balistreri, Steven F.; Steele, John W.; Caron, Mark E.; Laliberte, Yvon J.; Shaw, Laura A.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to control the temperature and humidity of an environment or habitat is critical for human survival. These factors are important to maintaining human health and comfort, as well as maintaining mechanical and electrical equipment in good working order to support the human and to accomplish mission objectives. The temperature and humidity of the International Space Station (ISS) United States On-orbit Segment (USOS) cabin air is controlled by the Common Cabin Air Assembly (CCAA). The CCAA consists of a fan, a condensing heat exchanger (CHX), an air/water separator, temperature and liquid sensors, and electrical controlling hardware and software. The CHX is the primary component responsible for control of temperature and humidity. The CCAA CHX contains a chemical coating that was developed to be hydrophilic and thus attract water from the humid influent air. This attraction forms the basis for water removal and therefore cabin humidity control. However, there have been several instances of CHX coatings becoming hydrophobic and repelling water. When this behavior is observed in an operational CHX in the ISS segments, the unit s ability to remove moisture from the air is compromised and the result is liquid water carryover into downstream ducting and systems. This water carryover can have detrimental effects on the ISS cabin atmosphere quality and on the health of downstream hardware. If the water carryover is severe and widespread, this behavior can result in an inability to maintain humidity levels in the USOS. This paper will describe the operation of the five CCAAs within the USOS, the potential causes of the hydrophobic condition, and the impacts of the resulting water carryover to downstream systems. It will describe the history of this behavior and the actual observed impacts to the ISS USOS. Information on mitigation steps to protect the health of future CHX hydrophilic coatings as well as remediation and recovery of the full heat exchanger will be

  8. Operational advanced materials control and accountability system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malanify, J.J.; Bearse, R.C.; Christensen, E.L.

    1980-01-01

    An accountancy system based on the Dynamic Materials Accountability (DYMAC) System has been in operation at the Plutonium Processing Facility at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) since January 1978. This system, now designated the Plutonium Facility/Los Alamos Safeguards System (PF/LASS), has enhanced nuclear material accountability and process control at the LASL facility. The nondestructive assay instruments and the central computer system are operating accurately and reliably. As anticipated, several uses of the system have developed in addition to safeguards, notably scrap control and quality control. The successes of this experiment strongly suggest that implementation of DYMAC-based systems should be attempted at other facilities. 20 refs

  9. AMO EXPRESS: A Command and Control Experiment for Crew Autonomy Onboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetson, Howard K.; Haddock, Angie T.; Frank, Jeremy; Cornelius, Randy; Wang, Lui; Garner, Larry

    2015-01-01

    NASA is investigating a range of future human spaceflight missions, including both Mars-distance and Near Earth Object (NEO) targets. Of significant importance for these missions is the balance between crew autonomy and vehicle automation. As distance from Earth results in increasing communication delays, future crews need both the capability and authority to independently make decisions. However, small crews cannot take on all functions performed by ground today, and so vehicles must be more automated to reduce the crew workload for such missions. NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems Program funded Autonomous Mission Operations (AMO) project conducted an autonomous command and control experiment on-board the International Space Station that demonstrated single action intelligent procedures for crew command and control. The target problem was to enable crew initialization of a facility class rack with power and thermal interfaces, and involving core and payload command and telemetry processing, without support from ground controllers. This autonomous operations capability is enabling in scenarios such as initialization of a medical facility to respond to a crew medical emergency, and representative of other spacecraft autonomy challenges. The experiment was conducted using the Expedite the Processing of Experiments for Space Station (EXPRESS) rack 7, which was located in the Port 2 location within the U.S Laboratory onboard the International Space Station (ISS). Activation and deactivation of this facility is time consuming and operationally intensive, requiring coordination of three flight control positions, 47 nominal steps, 57 commands, 276 telemetry checks, and coordination of multiple ISS systems (both core and payload). Utilization of Draper Laboratory's Timeliner software, deployed on-board the ISS within the Command and Control (C&C) computers and the Payload computers, allowed development of the automated procedures specific to ISS without having to certify

  10. SEP operating history of the Dresden Nuclear Power Station Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mays, G.T.; Harrington, K.H.

    1983-01-01

    206 forced shutdowns and power reductions were reviewed, along with 631 reportable events and other miscellaneous documentation concerning the operation of Dresden-2, in order to indicate those areas of plant operation that compromised plant safety. The most serious plant challenge to plant safety occurred on June 5, 1970; while undergoing power testing at 75% power, a spurious signal in the reactor pressure control system caused a turbine trip followed by a reactor scram. Subsequent erratic water level and pressure control in the reactor vessel, compounded by a stuck indicator pen on a water level monitor-recorder and inability of the isolation condenser to function, led to discharge of steam and water through safety valves into the reactor drywell. No significant contamination was discharged. There was no pressure damage or the reactor vessel of the drywell containment walls. Six areas of operation that should be of continued concern are diesel generator failures, control rod and rod drive malfunctions, radioactive waste management/health physics program problems, operator errors, turbine control valve and EHC problems, and HPCI failures. All six event types have continued to recur

  11. Flow Control and Design Assessment for Drainage System at McMurdo Station, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-24

    Drainage System at McMurdo Station, Antarctica Co ld R eg io ns R es ea rc h an d En gi ne er in g La bo ra to ry Rosa Affleck, Meredith...Flow Control and Design Assessment for Drainage System at McMurdo Station, Antarctica Rosa Affleck, Meredith Carr, and Brendan West Cold Regions...Characterization and Variations at McMurdo Station, Antarctica . ERDC/CRREL TR-14-6. Hanover, NH: U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center

  12. Proceedings of the workshop on future control station designs and human performance issues in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The nuclear community is currently at a stage where new reactors are being built, advanced reactors are being planned, and existing reactors are undergoing various forms of modernization of their control stations. Nuclear power plants are characterised by a high degree of complexity, where efficient and safe performance is dependent on both a sound technical design and effective teamwork and work practices. Team interactions have long traditions in current nuclear power plants. The way people operate and maintain the plants may need to accommodate technical advances associated with control station modernization and advanced plant control stations. The nuclear community likely to see the introduction of new designs, new tools to support the staff, changes to staffing types and levels, concepts of operation for new reactors that are different from current reactors, e.g., multi-unit control, possible remote operation, distributed decision making, and cooperation across distances. Based on recent experience, there is limited knowledge about human performance issues with regard to upgraded control rooms. However, even less knowledge exists regarding operation and maintenance of control stations for future and more advanced reactor designs. In order to explore these issues, the CSNI Special Experts' Group on Human and Organisational Factors (SEGHOF), now the Working Group on Human and Organizational Factors (WGHOF), and the Halden Reactor Project (HRP) hosted a joint workshop which provided an international forum for utilities, vendors, research bodies and regulators to discuss human performance issues related to control stations for future nuclear power plant designs and for modified control rooms for existing plants. The Norwegian petroleum industry also shared their experiences, especially with integrated and distributed operations among off-shore and on-shore control centres. There were 74 participants from 20 countries at the workshop. Twenty-two papers were

  13. The effects of local control station design variation on plant risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, J.

    1989-01-01

    The existence of human engineering deficiencies at local control stations (LCSs) was addressed in a study (NUREG/CR-3696) conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). PNL concluded that the existence of these human factors deficiencies at safety significant LCSs increases the potential for operator errors that could be detrimental to plant and public safety. However, PNL did not specific analysis to evaluate the effects of LCS design variations on human performance, on plant risk, or on the cost benefit feasibility of upgrading LCSs. The purpose of the present investigation was to conduct such an analysis. The specific objectives of the research were (1) to further define important local control stations, human factors related LCS design variations, and typical human engineering deficiencies (HEDs) at LCSs; (2) to determine the effect of LCS design variations on human performance, i.e., on risk-significant human errors (HEs); (3) to determine the effect of LCS-induced human performance variation on plant risk as measured by core melt frequency (CMF); and (4) to determine whether LCS improvements (upgrades in LCS design to mitigate HEDs) are feasible in a scoping-type value-impact analysis. The results can be summarized as follows. There was an overall effect of LCS variations on human performance. The transition from the worst LCS configuration to the best resulted in an absolute reduction or improvement of 0.82 in mean HEP (reduction by a factor of 20). The transition from low to high levels of FC was associated with a 0.46 (86%) reduction in mean HEP. The majority of the effect was accounted for in the transition from the low to medium levels. The Panel Design dimension also had an effect on human performance although not as large as functional centralization. Upgrading from a low to high panel design resulted in a 0.29 (69%) reduction in mean HEP

  14. Provision of Flexible Load Control by Multi-Flywheel-Energy-Storage System in Electrical Vehicle Charging Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Bo; Dragicevic, Tomislav; Andrade, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    in order to support basic electrical operation. This paper proposes a local implementation of a hysteresis-based aggregation algorithm for coordinated control of multiple stations that can provide functions such as peak shaving, spinning reserves, frequency control, regulation and load following. Local......Electrical vehicle (EV) chargers are going to occupy a considerable portion of total energy consumption in the future smart grid. Fast charging stations (FCS), as the most demanding representatives of charging infrastructure, will be requested to provide some ancillary services to the power system...... stability. Finally, corresponding hardware in the loop results based on dSPACE1006 platform have been reported in order to verify the validity of proposed approach....

  15. External Contamination Control of Attached Payloads on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Carlos E.; Mikatarian, Ronald R.; Olsen, Randy L.; Huang, Alvin Y.; Steagall, Courtney A.; Schmidl, William D.; Wright, Bruce D.; Koontz, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is an on-orbit platform for science utilization in low Earth orbit with multiple sites for external payloads with exposure to the natural and induced environments. Contamination is one of the induced environments that can impact performance, mission success and science utilization on the vehicle. This paper describes the external contamination control requirements and integration process for externally mounted payloads on the ISS. The external contamination control requirements are summarized and a description of the integration and verification process is detailed to guide payload developers in the certification process of attached payloads on the vehicle. A description of the required data certification deliverables covers the characterization of contamination sources. Such characterization includes identification, usage and operational data for each class of contamination source. Classes of external contamination sources covered are vacuum exposed materials, sources of leakage, vacuum venting and thrusters. ISS system level analyses are conducted by the ISS Space Environments Team to certify compliance with external contamination control requirements. This paper also addresses the ISS induced contamination environment at attached payload sites, both at the requirements level as well as measurements made on ISS.

  16. Managing Recurrent Congestion of Subway Network in Peak Hours with Station Inflow Control

    OpenAIRE

    Qingru Zou; Xiangming Yao; Peng Zhao; Fei Dou; Taoyuan Yang

    2018-01-01

    Station inflow control (SIC) is an important and effective method for reducing recurrent congestion during peak hours in the Beijing, Shanghai, and Guangzhou subway systems. This work proposes a practical and efficient method for establishing a static SIC scheme in normal weekdays for large-scale subway networks. First, a traffic assignment model without capacity constraint is utilized to determine passenger flow distributions on the network. An internal relationship between station inflows a...

  17. Post-IOC space station: Models of operation and their implications for organizational behavior, performance and effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, S.; Meindl, J.; Hunt, R.

    1985-01-01

    Issues of crew productivity during design work on space station are discussed. The crew productivity is defined almost exclusively in terms of human factors engineering and habitability design concerns. While such spatial environmental conditions are necessary to support crew performance and productivity, they are not sufficient to ensure high levels of crew performance and productivity on the post-Initial Operational Configurations (IOC) space station. The role of the organizational environment as a complement to the spatial environment for influencing crew performance in such isolated and confined work settings is examined. Three possible models of operation for post-IOC space station's organizational environment are identified and it is explained how they and space station's spatial environment will combine and interact to occasion patterns of crew behavior is suggested. A three phase program of research design: (1) identify patterns of crew behavior likely to be occasioned on post-IOC space station for each of the three models of operation; and (2) to determine proactive/preventative management strategies which could be adopted to maximize the emergence of preferred outcomes in crew behavior under each of the several spatial and organizational environment combinations.

  18. Operational experience with the CEBAF control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovater, C.; Chowdhary, M.; Karn, J.; Tiefenback, M.; Zeijts, J. van; Watson, W.

    1996-01-01

    The CEBAF accelerator at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) successfully began its experimental nuclear physics program in November of 1995 and has since surpassed predicted machine availability. Part of this success can be attributed to using the EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) control system toolkit. The CEBAF control system is one of the largest accelerator control system now operating. It controls approximately 338 SRF cavities, 2,300 magnets, 500 beam position monitors and other accelerator devices, such as gun hardware and other beam monitoring devices. All told, the system must be able to access over 125,000 database records. The system has been well received by both operators and the hardware designers. The EPICS utilities have made the task of troubleshooting systems easier. The graphical and test-based creation tools have allowed operators to custom build control screens. In addition, the ability to integrate EPICS with other software packages, such as Tcl/Tk, has allowed physicists to quickly prototype high-level application programs, and to provide GUI front ends for command line driven tools. Specific examples of the control system applications are presented in the areas of energy and orbit control, cavity tuning and accelerator tune up diagnostics

  19. Operation and management of United Central Piping LPG supply stations in Shenzhen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai Yankai

    1997-11-01

    Shenzhen has based its city gas development project on the eventual conversion to natural gas supply by way of central piping LPG supply stations. To fully exploit the potential gas supply capability of every central piping station and cut down the total running cost, we have been connecting the existing supply stations and their piping system into a network, which not only provided a more reliable gas supply performance, but can greatly simplify the evacuation of gas stations from the ever-expanding downtown areas to suburbs. Through this way, the periodic gas stock held by individual stations can be transferred to storage terminal or stations of enough holding capability; the supplying distance has been much lengthened and the gas volume held in the piping system increased; gas supply covered by small stations has been shifted to new and large stations. By linking these stations, we are able to provide pipeline LP gas supply for a large area, and in the same time lay down the pipeline infrastructure for the upcoming LNG supply so that an easy conversion to LNG supply can be secured as soon as the projected LNG terminal is put to service. (au)

  20. Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project (SSDP): configuration control system and project activity controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullee, G.R.

    1986-01-01

    The SSDP has been using a Configuration Control system as a significant element in the management plan for the safe and effective performance of the project. The objective of the Configuration Control system is to control the physical plant configuration, system status, work schedules, status tracking, and day-to-day problem resolution. Prior to the Decommissioning Operations Contractor (DOC) assuming operational responsibility for the Shippingport Plant, an assessment was made of the status of the configuration of the systems and related documentation. Action was taken as required to match the operating procedures and system documentation with the actual physical condition of the plant. During the first stage of the project, planning was put in place for subsequent decommissioning activities. This planning included defining organizational responsibilities, completing the necessary project instructions and procedures, and doing the planning and scheduling for the subsequent decommissioning phase activities. Detailed instructions for the performance of the various decommissioning tasks were prepared. Prior to the start of any work on a given Activity Package, a Work Authorization is required. The Work Authorization form provides a complete checklist to ensure that all necessary prerequisites are completed. A computerized Communications Configuration Control Information system monitors status including information on system status, tag-outs, radiological work permits, etc. An ongoing effort is being directed toward maintaining operating instructions and system schematics, etc. current as the Plant configuration changes. The experience with the Configuration Control System to date has been favorable

  1. Ecological effects of nuclear steam electric station operations on estuarine systems. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihursky, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    This report summarizes the findings of studies of the impact of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant on the aquatic biota of Chesapeake Bay. Physical findings show that the typical radial extent of influence of the discharge on the physical and chemical environment of the Bay is rather limited (< 2 km). This suggestion is bolstered by findings of phytoplankton and zooplankton studies: when effects were noted at all, they only appeared at sampling stations nearest (within 2 km of) the discharge. Also, direct entrainment effects on these groups were either small (in the case of phytoplankton) or species-specific (in the case of zooplankton). Benthos showed mixed responses to plant operations - the populations of some species were enhanced, one species was adversely affected, and others were unaffected. The major plant effect on the benthos was due to habitat resource enrichment, and the consequence was higher standing stocks (e.g., more food for fish) in the affected area. Direct plant effects on finfish are dominated by impingement. Mortality as a result of impingement, for many species, tends to be moderate to slight. Effects as a result of entrainment of eggs and larvae are limited because the Calvert Cliffs area is not a major spawning location for any species. In sum, the Calvert Cliffs plant appears to have a limited effect on the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. 180 references, 6 figures, 18 tables

  2. Operation of a soil vapor extraction and air sparging system at a former gasoline service station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gromicko, G.J.; Klingensmith, R.C.; Simpson, D.K.

    1995-01-01

    Closure activities for three underground storage tanks (USTs) were conducted at Quaker State Corporation's (QSC) former service station in Conneaut, Pennsylvania as part of a property transfer during July, 1991. The facility, formerly owned by QSC, was operated from construction (early 1960's) through the sale of the property (early 1980's). Subsequent to sale of the facility, the property has been resold and the building reconfigured several times. The facility is located on a comer lot located along state highway Route 322 in the business district of Conneaut Lake as shown in Figure 1. Across the highway to the north, is Conneaut lake. The site is bordered by a residential property to the south and commercial properties on the east and west. A Pennsylvania State Game Commission Game Lands, is located approximately 150 feet southeast of the property Quaker State again became involved with the property in 1991 when the cur-rent owner attempted to sell the property and the lender for the prospective purchaser identified the presence of USTs. Subsequent to the confirmation of the USTS, UST closure activities were initiated. Subsurface investigations were conducted to delineate the extent of potential petroleum impacts and corrective actions were initiated which are on-going today

  3. Current situation and control measures of groundwater pollution in gas station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiong; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Qianjin

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, pollution accidents caused by gas station leakage has occurred worldwide which can be persistent in groundwater. Numerous studies have demonstrated that the contaminated groundwater is threatening the ecological environment and human health. In this article, current status and sources of groundwater pollution by gas station are analyzed, and experience of how to prevent groundwater pollution from gas stations are summarized. It is demonstrated that installation of secondary containment measures for the oil storage of the oil tank system, such as installation of double-layer oil tanks or construction of impermeable ponds, is a preferable method to prevent gas stations from groundwater pollution. Regarding to the problems of groundwater pollution caused by gas station, it is proposed that it is urgent to investigate the leakage status of gas station. Relevant precise implementation regulations shall be issued and carried out, and supervision management of gas stations would need to be strengthened. Then single-layer steel oil tanks shall be replaced by double-layer tanks, and the impermeable ponds should be constructed according to the risk ranking. From the control methodology, the groundwater environment monitoring systems, supervision level, laws and regulations as well as pollution remediation should also be carried out and strengthened.

  4. Modeling and Optimization of Collaborative Passenger Control in Urban Rail Stations under Mass Passenger Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of urban rail transit, the phenomenon of outburst passenger flows flocking to stations is occurring much more frequently. Passenger flow control is one of the main methods used to ensure passengers’ safety. While most previous studies have only focused on control measures inside the target station, ignoring the collaboration between stops, this paper puts emphasis on joint passenger control methods during the occurrence of large passenger flows. To provide a theoretic description for the problem under consideration, an integer programming model is built, based on the analysis of passenger delay and the processes by which passengers alight and board. Taking average passenger delay as the objective, the proposed model aims to disperse the pressure of oversaturated stations into others, achieving the optimal state for the entire line. The model is verified using a case study and the results show that restricted access measures taken collaboratively by stations produce less delay and faster evacuation. Finally, a sensitivity analysis is conducted, from which we find that the departure interval and maximum conveying capacity of the train affect passenger delay markedly in the process of passenger control and infer that control measures should be taken at stations near to the one experiencing an emergency.

  5. The operation of the GANIL control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prome, M.; David, L.; Lecorche, E.

    1984-06-01

    When the first GANIL beams were obtained the control system was operating in an elementary way; the system behaved almost like a huge multiplexer. Now a large number of programs have been written; they allow to take benefit of the full power of the computers; they help the operators for starting, tuning and monitoring the accelerator. The paper gives a general description of these programs which are executed on the central computer: it shows how the accelerator is controlled either directly or via dedicated microprocessors. Informations are also given on the alarm system

  6. Monitoring equipment environment during nuclear plant operation at Salem and Hope Creek generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, A.; Smith, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    Monitoring of environmental parameters has become a significant issue for operating nuclear power plants. While the long-term benefits of plant life extension programs are being pursued with comprehensive environmental monitoring programs, the potential effect of local hot spots at various plant locations needs to be evaluated for its effect on equipment degradation and shortening of equipment qualified life. A significant benefit can be experienced from temperature monitoring when a margin exists between the design versus actual operating temperature. This margin can be translated into longer equipment qualified life and significant reduction in maintenance activities. At PSE and G, the immediate need for monitoring environmental parameters is being accomplished via the use of a Logic Beach Bitlogger. The Bitlogger is a portable data loggings system consisting of a system base, input modules and a communication software package. Thermocouples are installed on selected electrical equipment and cables are run from the thermocouples to the input module of the Bitlogger. Temperature readings are taken at selected intervals, stored in memory, and downloaded periodically to a PC software program, i.e., Lotus. The data is formatted into tabular or graphical documents. Because of their versatility, Bitloggers are being used differently at the authors Nuclear facility. At the Salem Station (2 Units-4 loop Westinghouse PWR), a battery powered, fully portable, calibrated Bitlogger is located in an accessible area inside Containment where it monitors the temperature of various electrical equipment within the Pressurizer Enclosure. It is planned that close monitoring of the local hot spot temperatures in this area will allow them to adjust and reconcile the environmental qualification of the equipment

  7. Operation and control of ITER plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Features incorporated in the design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak and its ancillary and plasma diagnostic systems that will facilitate operation and control of ignited and/or high-Q DT plasmas are presented. Control methods based upon straight-forward extrapolation of techniques employed in the present generation of tokamaks are found to be adequate and effective for DT plasma control with burn durations of ≥1000 s. Examples of simulations of key plasma control functions including magnetic configuration control and fusion burn (power) control are given. The prospects for the creation and control of steady-state plasmas sustained by non-inductive current drive are also discussed. (author)

  8. Operation and control of ITER plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Features incorporated in the design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak and its ancillary and plasma diagnostic systems that will facilitate operation and control of ignited and/or high-Q DT plasmas are presented. Control methods based upon straight-forward extrapolation of techniques employed in the present generation of tokamaks are found to be adequate and effective for DT plasma control with burn durations of ≥1000 s. Examples of simulations of key plasma control functions including magnetic configuration control and fusion burn (power) control are given. The prospects for the creation and control of steady-state plasmas sustained by non-inductive current drive are also discussed. (author)

  9. Trace Contaminant Control During the International Space Station's On-Orbit Assembly and Outfitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J. L.

    2017-01-01

    analysis. During the International Space Station's (ISS's) on-orbit assembly and outfitting, a series of engineering analyses were conducted to evaluate how effective the passive TCC methods were relative to providing adequate operational margin for the active TCC equipment's capabilities aboard the ISS. These analyses were based on habitable module and cargo vehicle offgassing test results. The offgassing test for a fully assembled module or cargo vehicle is an important preflight spacecraft evaluation method that has been used successfully during all crewed spacecraft programs to provide insight into how effectively the passive contamination control methods limit the equipment offgassing component of the overall trace contaminant generation load. The progression of TCC assessments beginning in 1998 with the ISS's first habitable element launch and continuing through the final pressurized element's arrival in 2010 are presented. Early cargo vehicle flight assessments between 2008 and 2011 are also presented as well as a discussion on predictive methods for assessing cargo via a purely analytical technique. The technical approach for TCC employed during this 13-year period successfully maintained the cabin atmospheric quality within specified parameters during the technically challenging ISS assembly and outfitting stages. The following narrative provides details on the important role of spacecraft offgassing testing, trace contaminant performance requirements, and flight rules for achieving the ultimate result-a cabin environment that enables people to live and work safely in space.

  10. Heavy water radiolysis and chemistry control of the Fugen Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibuki, Y.; Kitabata, T.; Kato, T.

    1989-01-01

    A computer analysis for heavy water radiolysis clarified the mechanism of the heavy water radiolysis rate change with impurities in the heavy water and cover gas, helium. The mechanism is supported by over ten years' operational data of the heavy water radiolysis in the Fugen nuclear power station. (author)

  11. Operation of Beaver Valley Power Station, Unit 2, Docket No. 50-412, Beaver County, Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-09-01

    The final environmental impact statement (EPA No. 850438F) assesses the effects of operating a pressurized water reactor in Pennsylvania on the south bank of the Ohio River, which would serve as the final heat sink for the cooling system. Operation of Unit 2 would add 836 MW of capacity and increase system reliability. The plant would employ 465 at an $18 million payroll. Facilities for the plant would take up 56 acres of agricultural land. The operation result in both water and noise pollution. There is only a small probability of impacts due to potential radiation exposure. The Federal Water Pollution Control Act of 1972 and Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulations require the impact statement

  12. 75 FR 10833 - In the Matter of Entergy Nuclear Operations; Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station; Demand for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-09

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 05000271; License No. DPR-28; EA-10-034; NRC-2010-0089] In the Matter of Entergy Nuclear Operations; Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station; Demand for... this Demand for Information, the following information, in writing, and under oath or affirmation: 1...

  13. Autonomous rendezvous and docking operations of unmanned expendable cargo transfer vehicles (e.g. Centaur) with Space Station Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmet, Brian R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the results of the feasibility study using Centaur or other CTV's to deliver payloads to the Space Station Freedom (SSF). During this study was examined the requirements upon unmanned cargo transfer stages (including Centaur) for phasing, rendezvous, proximity operations and docking/berthing (capture).

  14. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Shoreham Nuclear Power Station, Unit No. 1. Docket No. 50-322

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-02-01

    Supplement No. 3 to the Safety Evaluation Report of Long Island Lighting Company's application for a license to operate the Shoreham Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1, located in Suffolk County, New York, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This supplement addresses several items that have come to light since the previous supplement was issued

  15. PC-based control of the internal target station at the Nuclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilman, J [and others

    1996-12-31

    A PC-based control system of the internal target at the Nuclotron is described. The system is based on CAMAC-control of the step motor of the station and screen representation of information about needed beam parameters and space-time position of targets relative to a beam. 6 refs.; 4 figs.

  16. Ergonomic configuration of control rooms in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, G.

    1984-01-01

    Human possibilities and limits of performance can be taken into account by work configuration measures, in order to make the optimum contribution to the total output of the human being/machine system. The results of and considerations for the level ergonomic configuration of the control room, for the elements of the information carrier, for the structuring of the work field and for communication centres are introduced. (DG) [de

  17. Development of virtual bait stations to control Argentine ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in environmentally sensitive habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Dong-Hwan; Vetter, Richard S; Rust, Michael K

    2010-10-01

    A novel bait station referred to as a virtual bait station was developed and tested against field populations of the invasive Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Mayr) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), at White Beach, Camp Pendleton, in Oceanside, CA. White Beach is a nesting habitat for an endangered seabird, the California least tern (Sterna antillarum browni Mearns). The beach is heavily infested with Argentine ants, one of the threats for the California least tern chicks. Conventional pest control strategies are prohibited because of the existence of the protected bird species and the site's proximity to the ocean. The bait station consisted of a polyvinyl chloride pipe that was treated on the inside with fipronil insecticide at low concentrations to obtain delayed toxicity against ants. The pipe was provisioned with an inverted bottle of 25% sucrose solution, then capped, and buried in the sand. Foraging ants crossed the treated surface to consume the sucrose solution. The delayed toxicity of fipronil deposits allowed the ants to continue foraging on the sucrose solution and to interact with their nestmates, killing them within 3-5 d after exposure. Further modification of the bait station design minimized the accumulation of dead ants in the sucrose solution, significantly improving the longevity and efficacy of the bait station. The virtual bait station exploits the foraging behavior of the ants and provides a low impact approach to control ants in environmentally sensitive habitats. It excluded all insects except ants, required only milligram quantities of toxicant, and eliminated the problem of formulating toxicants into aqueous sugar baits.

  18. Data Reduction and Control Software for Meteor Observing Stations Based on CCD Video Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madiedo, J. M.; Trigo-Rodriguez, J. M.; Lyytinen, E.

    2011-01-01

    The SPanish Meteor Network (SPMN) is performing a continuous monitoring of meteor activity over Spain and neighbouring countries. The huge amount of data obtained by the 25 video observing stations that this network is currently operating made it necessary to develop new software packages to accomplish some tasks, such as data reduction and remote operation of autonomous systems based on high-sensitivity CCD video devices. The main characteristics of this software are described here.

  19. Operating nuclear power stations in a regulated cyber security environment: a roadmap for success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorman, E., E-mail: Erik.Dorman@areva.com [AREVA Inc., Cyber Security Solutions, Charlotte, NC (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued 10CFR73.54 to implement a regulated Cyber Security Program at each operating nuclear reactor facility. Milestones were implemented December 31, 2012 to mitigate the attack vectors for the most critical digital assets acknowledged by the industry and the NRC. The NRC inspections have begun. The nuclear Cyber Security Plan, implemented by the site Cyber Security Program (Program), is an element of the operating license at each facility. The Program is designed to protect critical digital assets (CDAs) by applying and maintaining defense-in depth protective strategies to ensure the capability to detect, respond to, and recover from cyber-attacks. The Program references NEI 08-09 R. 6, the Nuclear Energy Institute Template that provides guidance for applying Cyber Security controls derived from NIST 800-53/82 and slightly modified to fit the nuclear environment. Many mature processes are in place at nuclear facilities in response to numerous regulations implemented over the past 30 years. Many of these processes such as the Physical Security Program offer protections that are leveraged to protect the functions of critical digital assets from unauthorized physical access. Other processes and technology such as engineering design control, work management and pre-job briefs, control of portable media and mobile devices, and deterministically segregated networks protect critical digital assets. By leveraging the regulated nuclear environment, integrating NIST type Cyber Security controls, and prudently deploying technology the Cyber Security posture of operating nuclear facilities supports on-demand base load electricity 24/7 with capacity factors exceeding 85%. This paper is designed to provide a glimpse into Cyber Security Programs that support safe operation and reliability in the regulated nuclear environment while supporting the on-demand base load electricity production 24/7. (author)

  20. Operating nuclear power stations in a regulated cyber security environment: a roadmap for success

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorman, E.

    2015-01-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued 10CFR73.54 to implement a regulated Cyber Security Program at each operating nuclear reactor facility. Milestones were implemented December 31, 2012 to mitigate the attack vectors for the most critical digital assets acknowledged by the industry and the NRC. The NRC inspections have begun. The nuclear Cyber Security Plan, implemented by the site Cyber Security Program (Program), is an element of the operating license at each facility. The Program is designed to protect critical digital assets (CDAs) by applying and maintaining defense-in depth protective strategies to ensure the capability to detect, respond to, and recover from cyber-attacks. The Program references NEI 08-09 R. 6, the Nuclear Energy Institute Template that provides guidance for applying Cyber Security controls derived from NIST 800-53/82 and slightly modified to fit the nuclear environment. Many mature processes are in place at nuclear facilities in response to numerous regulations implemented over the past 30 years. Many of these processes such as the Physical Security Program offer protections that are leveraged to protect the functions of critical digital assets from unauthorized physical access. Other processes and technology such as engineering design control, work management and pre-job briefs, control of portable media and mobile devices, and deterministically segregated networks protect critical digital assets. By leveraging the regulated nuclear environment, integrating NIST type Cyber Security controls, and prudently deploying technology the Cyber Security posture of operating nuclear facilities supports on-demand base load electricity 24/7 with capacity factors exceeding 85%. This paper is designed to provide a glimpse into Cyber Security Programs that support safe operation and reliability in the regulated nuclear environment while supporting the on-demand base load electricity production 24/7. (author)

  1. Stress, performance, and control room operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontaine, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    The notion of control room operator performance being detrimentally affected by stress has long been the focus of considerable conjecture. It is important to gain a better understanding of the validity of this concern for the development of effective severe-accident management approaches. This paper illustrates the undeniable negative impact of stress on a wide variety of tasks. A computer-controlled simulated work environment was designed in which both male and female operators were closely monitored during the course of the study for both stress level (using the excretion of the urine catecholamines epinephrine and norepinephrine as an index) and job performance. The experimental parameters employed by the study when coupled with the subsequent statistical analyses of the results allow one to make some rather striking comments with respect to how a given operator might respond to a situation that he or she perceives to be psychologically stressful (whether the stress be externally or internally generated). The findings of this study clearly indicated that stress does impact operator performance on tasks similar in nature to those conducted by control room operators and hence should be seriously considered in the development of severe-accident management strategies

  2. Nuclear power plant control room operator control and monitoring tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovell, C.R.; Beck, M.G.; Carter, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory is conducting a research project the purpose of which is to develop the technical bases for regulatory review criteria for use in evaluating the safety implications of human factors associated with the use of artificial intelligence and expert systems, and with advanced instrumentation and control (I and C) systems in nuclear power plants (NPP). This report documents the results from Task 8 of that project. The primary objectives of the task was to identify the scope and type of control and monitoring tasks now performed by control-room operators. Another purpose was to address the types of controls and safety systems needed to operate the nuclear plant. The final objective of Task 8 was to identify and categorize the type of information and displays/indicators required to monitor the performance of the control and safety systems. This report also discusses state-of-the-art controls and advanced display devices which will be available for use in control-room retrofits and in control room of future plants. The fundamental types of control and monitoring tasks currently conducted by operators can be divided into four classifications: function monitoring tasks, control manipulation tasks, fault diagnostic tasks, and administrative tasks. There are three general types of controls used in today's NPPs, switches, pushbuttons, and analog controllers. Plant I and C systems include components to achieve a number of safety-related functions: measuring critical plant parameters, controlling critical plant parameters within safety limits, and automatically actuating protective devices if safe limits are exceeded. The types of information monitored by the control-room operators consist of the following parameters: pressure, fluid flow and level, neutron flux, temperature, component status, water chemistry, electrical, and process and area radiation. The basic types of monitoring devices common to nearly all NPP control rooms include: analog meters

  3. Initial operation of NSTX with plasma control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gates, D.; Bell, M.; Ferron, J.; Kaye, S.; Menard, J.; Mueller, D.; Neumeyer, C.; Sabbagh, S.

    2000-01-01

    First plasma, with a maximum current of 300kA, was achieved on NSTX in February 1999. These results were obtained using preprogrammed coil currents. The first controlled plasmas on NSTX were made starting in August 1999 with the full 1MA plasma current achieved in December 1999. The controlled quantities were plasma position (R, Z) and current (Ip). Variations in the plasma shape are achieved by adding preprogrammed currents to those determined by the control parameters. The control system is fully digital, with plasma position and current control, data acquisition, and power supply control all occurring in the same four-processor real time computer. The system uses the PCS (Plasma Control Software) system designed at General Atomics. Modular control algorithms, specific to NSTX, were written and incorporated into the PCS. The application algorithms do the actual control calculations, with the PCS handling data passing. The control system, including planned upgrades, will be described, along with results of the initial controlled plasma operations. Analysis of the performance of the control system will also be presented

  4. Draft environmental statement related to the operation of Hope Creek Generating Station (Docket No. 50-354)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, D.H.

    1984-06-01

    This report contains an assessment of the environmental impact associated with the operation of the Hope Creek Generating Station pursuant to the National Environment Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 51, as amended, of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations. This statement examines the environmental impacts, environmental consequences and mitigating actions, and environmental and economic benefits and costs associated with station operation. Land use and terrestrial and aquatic ecological impacts will be small. No operational impacts to historic and archeological sites are anticipated. The effects of routine operations, energy transmission, and periodic maintenance of rights-of-way and transmission facilities should not jeopardize any populations of endangered or threatened species. No significant impacts are anticipated from normal operational releases of radioactivity. The risk of radiation exposure associated with accidental release of radioactivity is very low. Socioeconomic impacts of the project are anticipated to be minimal. The action called for is the issuance of an operating license for Hope Creek Generating Station, Unit 1

  5. Operator approach to linear control systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cheremensky, A

    1996-01-01

    Within the framework of the optimization problem for linear control systems with quadratic performance index (LQP), the operator approach allows the construction of a systems theory including a number of particular infinite-dimensional optimization problems with hardly visible concreteness. This approach yields interesting interpretations of these problems and more effective feedback design methods. This book is unique in its emphasis on developing methods for solving a sufficiently general LQP. Although this is complex material, the theory developed here is built on transparent and relatively simple principles, and readers with less experience in the field of operator theory will find enough material to give them a good overview of the current state of LQP theory and its applications. Audience: Graduate students and researchers in the fields of mathematical systems theory, operator theory, cybernetics, and control systems.

  6. Control procedure for well drilling operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourdon, J C

    1988-09-09

    A control procedure of rotary drilling operations is proposed. It uses the Drill off test. The drill-off test permits to determine the rock drill speed variation as a function of the wright applied on the top of the pipe. We can deduce from that a rock drill wear parameter. The method permits to prevent a rupture and its grave economic consequences.

  7. Quantum circuits cannot control unknown operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araújo, Mateus; Feix, Adrien; Costa, Fabio; Brukner, Časlav

    2014-01-01

    One of the essential building blocks of classical computer programs is the ‘if’ clause, which executes a subroutine depending on the value of a control variable. Similarly, several quantum algorithms rely on applying a unitary operation conditioned on the state of a control system. Here we show that this control cannot be performed by a quantum circuit if the unitary is completely unknown. The task remains impossible even if we allow the control to be done modulo a global phase. However, this no-go theorem does not prevent implementing quantum control of unknown unitaries in practice, as any physical implementation of an unknown unitary provides additional information that makes the control possible. We then argue that one should extend the quantum circuit formalism to capture this possibility in a straightforward way. This is done by allowing unknown unitaries to be applied to subspaces and not only to subsystems. (paper)

  8. IAEA Leads Operational Safety Mission to Rajasthan Atomic Power Station 3 and 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Full text: An international team of nuclear safety experts led by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) today completed a review of safety practices at Units 3 and 4 of the Rajasthan Atomic Power Station in Rawatbhata. The team noted a series of good practices and made recommendations and suggestions to reinforce safety practices. The IAEA assembled the Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) at the request of the Government of India. Led by the IAEA's Division of Nuclear Installation Safety, the team performed an in-depth operational safety review from 29 October to 14 November 2012. The team was comprised of experts from Canada, Belgium, Finland, Germany, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden and the IAEA. The team conducted an in-depth review of the aspects essential to the safe operation of the Power Plant. The conclusions of the review are based on the IAEA's Safety Standards and good international practices. The review covered the areas of Management, Organization and Administration; Training; Operations; Maintenance; Technical Support; Operating Experience; Radiation Protection; Chemistry; Emergency Planning and Preparedness; and Severe Accident Management. The OSART team identified a number of good practices of the plant. These will be shared in due course by the IAEA with the global nuclear industry for consideration. Examples include the following: - The Power Plant's safety culture cultivates a constructive work environment and a sense of accountability among the Power Plant personnel, and gives its staff the opportunity to expand skills and training; - The Power Plant's Public Awareness Programme provides educational opportunities to the local community about nuclear and radiation safety; - The Power Plant has a Management of Training and Authorization system for effective management of training activities; and - The Power Plant uses testing facilities and mockups to improve the quality of maintenance work and to reduce radiation doses. The OSART

  9. Demonstration of containment purge and vent valve operability for the Hope Creek Generating Station, Unit 1 (Docket No. 50-354)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kido, C.

    1985-05-01

    The containment purge and vent valve qualification program for the Hope Creek Generating Station has been reviewed by the NRC Licensing Support Section. The review indicates that the licensee has demonstrated the dependability of containment isolation against the buildup of containment pressure due to a LOCA/DBA with the restrictions that during operating conditions 1, 2, and 3 all purge and vent valves will be sealed closed and under administrative control, and during power ascension and descension conditions the 26 in. inboard valve (1-GS-HV-4952) will be used in series with the 2 in. bypass valve (1-GS-HV-4951) to control the release of containment pressure

  10. Advanced Control Test Operation (ACTO) facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    The Advanced Control Test Operation (ACTO) project, sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), is being developed to enable the latest modern technology, automation, and advanced control methods to be incorporated into nuclear power plants. The facility is proposed as a national multi-user center for advanced control development and testing to be completed in 1991. The facility will support a wide variety of reactor concepts, and will be used by researchers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), plus scientists and engineers from industry, other national laboratories, universities, and utilities. ACTO will also include telecommunication facilities for remote users

  11. Private financing and operation of a space station: Investment requirements, risk, government support and other primary business management considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, M.

    1982-01-01

    Private investment in a manned space station is considered as an alternative to complete government sponsorship of such a program. The implications of manned space operations are discussed from a business perspective. The most significant problems and risks which would be faced by a private company involved in a space station enterprise are outlined and possible government roles in helping to overcome these difficulties suggested. Economic factors such as inflation and the rate of interest are of primary concern, but less obvious conditions such as antitrust and appropriate regulatory laws, government appropriations for space activities, and national security are also considered.

  12. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN OF MONITORING AND CONTROL SUBSYSTEM FOR GNSS GROUND STATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seongkyun Jeong

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS becomes more important and is applied to various systems. Recently, the Galileo navigation system is being developed in Europe. Also, other countries like China, Japan and India are developing the global/regional navigation satellite system. As various global/regional navigation satellite systems are used, the navigation ground system gets more important for using the navigation system reasonably and efficiently. According to this trend, the technology of GNSS Ground Station (GGS is developing in many fields. The one of purposes for this study is to develop the high precision receiver for GNSS sensor station and to provide ground infrastructure for better performance services on navigation system. In this study, we consider the configuration of GNSS Ground Station and analyze function of Monitoring and Control subsystem which is a part of GNSS Ground Station. We propose Monitoring and Control subsystem which contains the navigation software for GNSS Ground System to monitor and control equipments in GNSS Ground Station, to spread the applied field of navigation system, and to provide improved navigation information to user.

  13. Smart Inverter Control and Operation for Distributed Energy Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazay, Ahmad F.

    the microgrid as well as solve specific issues of connecting the microgrid to the system. A detailed procedure for controlling VSC and designing an optimal operation of the controller is also covered in the first part of the dissertation. This section provides an optimal operation for controlling motor drive and demonstrates issues when motor load exists at an autonomous microgrid. It also provides a solution for specific issues at operating a microgrid at autonomous mode as well as improving the structural design for the grid-tied microgrid. The solution for autonomous microgrid includes changing the operational state of the switching pattern of the smart inverter to solve the issue of a common mode voltage (CMV) that appears across the motor load. It also solves the issue of power supplying to large loads, such as induction motors. The last section of the low-level section involves an improvement of the performance and operation of the PV charging station for a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) at grid-tied mode. This section provides a novel structure and smart controller for PV charging station using three-phase hybrid boost converter topology. It also provides a form of applications of a multifunction smart inverter using PV charging station. The second part of the research is focusing on improving the performance of the microgrid by integrating several smart inverters to form a microgrid. It investigates the issue of connecting DER units with the microgrid at real applications. One of the common issues of the microgrid is the circulating current which is caused by poor reactive power sharing accuracy. When more than two DER units are connected in parallel, a microgrid is forming be generating required power for the load. When the microgrid is operated at autonomous mode, all DER units participate in generating voltage and frequency as well as share the load's power. This section provides a smart and novel controlling technique to solve the issue of unequal

  14. Use of environmental TLD data at a nuclear power station to estimate detection limits for radiation exposure due to station operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, E.; Hardeman, J.; Kahn, B.

    1987-01-01

    The environmental radiation monitoring network maintained by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources at the Hatch Nuclear Plant, Baxley, GA, was used to determine the variability in measured background exposures in order to estimate the detection limits for radiation due to station operation. Data were obtained from LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) exposed in sets of four at 46 locations for 16 consecutive quarters from 1982 to 1985. The average exposure for 695 values was 11.8 microC kg-1 y-1 (mR/quarter). At individual locations, the averages of quarterly exposures ranged from 9.3 to 14.3 microC kg-1 y-1 and had standard deviations from 0.8 to 2.2 microC kg-1 y-1 with a typical standard deviation of 1.5 microC kg-1 y-1. The standard deviation due to reading the TLDs and subtracting the transit plus storage exposure, estimated as 0.4 microC kg-1 y-1, contributed only a small fraction of the uncertainty of the mean background; the greater contribution is from temporal fluctuations. There is a spatial pattern of higher background along the Altamaha River but no distinct seasonal pattern. The observation that exposure values at most locations rose and fell in unison suggested a calculational model that adjusts the average exposure level at a location by an increment determined each quarter at control locations. This model reduced the standard deviation for a predicted quarterly background exposure to 0.9 microC kg-1 y-1, with a range of 0.5 to 1.3 microC kg-1 y-1. If the standard deviation of the net value is multiplied by an error probability constant of 3.3 (type I and II errors not greater than 5%), the detection limits range from 2 to 5 microC kg-1 y-1 at the individual locations, with an average of 3 microC kg-1 y-1. This approach or two similar ones described earlier are recommended for improving the detection limit where needed

  15. Assessment and Control of Spacecraft Charging Risks on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Steve; Valentine, Mark; Keeping, Thomas; Edeen, Marybeth; Spetch, William; Dalton, Penni

    2004-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) operates in the F2 region of Earth's ionosphere, orbiting at altitudes ranging from 350 to 450 km at an inclination of 51.6 degrees. The relatively dense, cool F2 ionospheric plasma suppresses surface charging processes much of the time, and the flux of relativistic electrons is low enough to preclude deep dielectric charging processes. The most important spacecraft charging processes in the ISS orbital environment are: 1) ISS electrical power system interactions with the F2 plasma, 2) magnetic induction processes resulting from flight through the geomagnetic field and, 3) charging processes that result from interaction with auroral electrons at high latitude. Recently, the continuing review and evaluation of putative ISS charging hazards required by the ISS Program Office revealed that ISS charging could produce an electrical shock hazard to the ISS crew during extravehicular activity (EVA). ISS charging risks are being evaluated in an ongoing measurement and analysis campaign. The results of ISS charging measurements are combined with a recently developed model of ISS charging (the Plasma Interaction Model) and an exhaustive analysis of historical ionospheric variability data (ISS Ionospheric Specification) to evaluate ISS charging risks using Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) methods. The PRA combines estimates of the frequency of occurrence and severity of the charging hazards with estimates of the reliability of various hazard controls systems, as required by NASA s safety and risk management programs, to enable design and selection of a hazard control approach that minimizes overall programmatic and personnel risk. The PRA provides a quantitative methodology for incorporating the results of the ISS charging measurement and analysis campaigns into the necessary hazard reports, EVA procedures, and ISS flight rules required for operating ISS in a safe and productive manner.

  16. Production and quality control of concrete for the Rajasthan Atomic Power Station - [Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singha Roy, P.K.; Sukhtankar, K.D.; Prasad, K.

    1975-01-01

    The production and quality control of concrete and concrete materials for the construction of the twin-reactor Rajasthan Atomic Power Station with its 400 MW net capacity posed many challenges since many of the requirements for the properties of concrete were new and were being laid down for the first time in India. Some of the conditions for the concrete included leak-tightness against gas pressure, total absence of shrinkage in the containment even when the ambient temperature during concreting was as high as 45degC, placing concrete at a temperature as low as 8degC, the use of non-shrink and high strength grout, absolute impermeability against water, high density for radiation shielding, controlled modulus of elasticity for large machine foundations, high strength with high slump for the prestressed concrete dome, etc. Though the total quantity of concrete was not very much compared with a large river valley or steel plant project, (e.g., about 1.2 X 10 6 m 3 for a 2-million tonne steel plant) it was quite significant, being about 70,000 m 3 of normal density and 2,100 m 3 of high density concrete. The production of these quantities entailed intensive material study and investigation, development of new mixes with additives not tried out before in the country, and design and quality control techniques which were unique in many respects. The paper deals with the production and quality control of concrete, including grouts used in the projects, but the actual concreting and construction operations are not discussed. (author)

  17. Description of the operation and radiological impact of a spanish coastal coal-fired power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbacho, Jose A.; Baeza, Antonio; Robles, Beatriz; Mora, Juan C.; Cancio, David

    2008-01-01

    The 'Litoral' Coal-Fired Power Plant (LCFPP) is situated in the town of Carboneras (Almeria) in southern Spain. Its nominal output power is 1589 M We. The fuel used is imported sub-bituminous coal supplied by collier vessels, and unloaded in a port annexed to the plant. The climate of the area is semi-arid mediterranean, with particularly low rainfall. The plant's radiological impact was studied considering various exposure pathways for the workers and the general public. In particular, inhalation and external exposure contributions to the effective dose due to the different materials involved in the operation (coals, fly ash, and bottom ash) were evaluated. Alpha spectrometry was used to characterize radiologically the airborne particulates collected in aerosol filters at points within the installation, and to determine 210 Po levels in aerosols collected in filters placed around the power station. High resolution gamma spectrometry was used to characterize coal and ash samples from the plant, and soil samples collected outside the installation within a radius of 5 km. A dose rate monitor was used to measure the ambient dose equivalent at different points inside and outside the plant. Samples of the seawater used in the plant and of products for human consumption produced nearby were also collected and characterized radiologically. The effective dose was evaluated following a realistic approach based principally on experimental measurements and in situ observations, complemented with mathematical models when necessary. The resulting estimated effective doses for selected representative groups of workers and general public were all below the reference levels used in this work. (author)

  18. Leibstadt nuclear power station (KKL): The Future after twenty years of operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenenberger, M.

    2005-01-01

    Switzerland's largest power plant, KKL (1 165 MW BWR), is situated on the Swiss side of the Rhine River, not far from the entry of the Aare River. In 2003, the plant generated some 17% of the electricity consumed in the country. In line with the importance of the plant, it shareholders are all major Swiss power utilities. KKL was connected to the power grid in December 1984. Its construction cost amounted to approx. euro 3 200 million. After some backfitting measures at an expense of approx. euro 200 million, the plant is now in excellent technical shape. Generating costs, which were very high in the beginning, have been greatly reduced in the meantime. This was helped by a decrease of borrowed capital, the favorable development of interest rates and, above all, the rise in annual production. This, in turn, was achieved in various programs increasing plant power, and by shortening the annual revision outages. From the coming year onward, costs could be below Eurocent 3.3/kWh. Also the organization and the staff of te plant are prepared for the future. They have demonstrated their fitness in various national and international reviews. Also the political environment is favorable, by and large. In 2003, the Swiss voting population so clearly rejected the two opt-out initiatives that there has been a lasting positive change in the policy of continuing the operation of existing plants. Also for KKL, the waste management problem is still unsolved. This is due primarily to political reasons. The envisaged repository for low-level waste was rejected in a referendum in 2003. Technically and in its organization, the Leibstadt Nuclear Power Station is ready for the future. The electricity generated at Leibstadt is desired and accepted politically. (orig.)

  19. Operator interface to the ORIC control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludemann, C.A.; Casstevens, B.J.

    1983-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC) was built in the early 1960s with a hard-wired manual control system. Presently, it serves as a variable-energy heavy-ion cyclotron with an internal ion source, or as an energy booster for the new 25 MV tandem electrostatic accelerator of the Holifield Heavy Ion Facility. One factor which has kept the cyclotron the productive research tool it is today is the gradual transfer of its control functions to a computer-based system beginning in the 1970s. This particular placement of a computer between an accelerator and its operators afforded some unique challenges and opportunities that would not be encountered today. Historically, the transformation began at a time when computers were just beginning to gain acceptance as reliable operational tools. Veteran operators with tens of years of accelerator experience justifiably expressed skepticism that this improvement would aid them, particularly if they had to re-learn how to operate the machine. The confidence of the operators was gained when they realized that one of the primary principles of ergonomics was being upheld. The computer software and hardware was being designed to serve them and not the computer

  20. Control of water chemistry in operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riess, R.

    1997-01-01

    Water chemistry plays a major role in fuel cladding corrosion and hydriding. Although a full understanding of all mechanisms involved in cladding corrosion does not exist, controlling the water chemistry has achieved quite some progress in recent years. As an example, in PWRs the activity transport is controlled by operating the coolant under higher pH-values (i.e. the ''modified'' B/Li-Chemistry). On the other hand, the lithium concentration is limited to a maximum value of 2 ppm in order to avoid an acceleration of the fuel cladding corrosion. In BWR plants, for example, the industry has learned on how to limit the copper concentration in the feedwater in order to limit CILC (Copper Induced Localized Corrosion) on the fuel cladding. However, economic pressures are leading to more rigorous operating conditions in power reactors. Fuel burnups are to be increased, higher efficiencies are to be achieved, by running at higher temperatures, plant lifetimes are to be extended. In summary, this paper will describe the state of the art in controlling water chemistry in operating reactors and it will give an outlook on potential problems that will arise when going to more severe operating conditions. (author). 3 figs, 6 tabs

  1. Control of water chemistry in operating reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riess, R [Siemens AG Unternehmensbereich KWU, Erlangen (Germany)

    1997-02-01

    Water chemistry plays a major role in fuel cladding corrosion and hydriding. Although a full understanding of all mechanisms involved in cladding corrosion does not exist, controlling the water chemistry has achieved quite some progress in recent years. As an example, in PWRs the activity transport is controlled by operating the coolant under higher pH-values (i.e. the ``modified`` B/Li-Chemistry). On the other hand, the lithium concentration is limited to a maximum value of 2 ppm in order to avoid an acceleration of the fuel cladding corrosion. In BWR plants, for example, the industry has learned on how to limit the copper concentration in the feedwater in order to limit CILC (Copper Induced Localized Corrosion) on the fuel cladding. However, economic pressures are leading to more rigorous operating conditions in power reactors. Fuel burnups are to be increased, higher efficiencies are to be achieved, by running at higher temperatures, plant lifetimes are to be extended. In summary, this paper will describe the state of the art in controlling water chemistry in operating reactors and it will give an outlook on potential problems that will arise when going to more severe operating conditions. (author). 3 figs, 6 tabs.

  2. The controlled ecological life support system Antarctic analog project: Analysis of wastewater from the South Pole Station, Antarctica, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Michael T.; Bubenheim, David L.; Straight, Christian L.; Belisle, Warren

    1994-01-01

    The Controlled Ecological Life Support system (CELSS) Antarctic Analog Project (CAAP) is a joint National Science Foundation (NSF) and NASA project for the development, deployment and operation of CELSS technologies at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. NASA goals are operational testing of CELSS technologies and the conduct of scientific studies to facilitate technology selection and system design. The NSF goals are that the food production, water purification, and waste treatment capabilities which will be provided by CAAP will improve the quality of life for the South Pole inhabitants, reduce logistics dependence, and minimize environmental impacts associated with human presence on the polar plateau. This report presents an analysis of wastewater samples taken from the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, Antarctica. The purpose of the work is to develop a quantitative understanding of the characteristics of domestic sewage streams at the South Pole Station. This information will contribute to the design of a proposed plant growth/waste treatment system which is part of the CELSS Antarctic Analog Project (CAAP).

  3. 47 CFR 74.765 - Posting of station and operator licenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Low... the licensee, if the licensee does not reside in the community served by the station, and the name and...

  4. A digital, decentralized power station control system with bus-transmission facilitates the problem of backfitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, G.E.; Schemmel, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    Current NPP control equipment technology is essentially characterized by the transmission of information in parallel using individual cables, and utilizes hardwired techniques for the processing of information. Progress in the area of semiconductor development characterized by micro-processors and LSI-circuits, has opened up new possibilities for the solution of the control tasks. The new power station control system PROCONTROL P utilizes these possibilities

  5. Management and Operational Control of Criticality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, J. T. [Authority Health and Safety Branch, United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, Risley, Lancs. (United Kingdom)

    1966-05-15

    The evidence of the six process criticality accidents that have been reported to date shows that, without exception, they have been due to the failure of operational controls. In no instance has a criticality accident in processing been due to the use of wrong data 01 inaccurate calculation. Criticality accidents are least likely to occur in the production stream and are more likely to be associated with ancillary equipment and operations. Important as correct criticality calculations are, there are many other considerations which require the exercise of judgement in establishing the operational environment. No operation involving fissile material should be permitted without a formal review resulting in a documented statement of (a) the environmental assessment, (b) the nuclear safety arguments which demonstrate safety under that environment, and (c) the operational requirements which will ensure the validity of (b) under the conditions of (a). To ensure the continued viability of the environmental assessment and the continued reliability of clearance conditions there should be close supervision by operating management, and periodic checks made by site nuclear safety staff. Additionally, there should be periodic and systematic examinations by competent persons who are not responsible to the overall management of the site. (author)

  6. Mathematical model for estimating of technical and technological indicators of railway stations operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.M. Kozachenko

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article aims to create a mathematical model of the railway station functioning for the solving of problems of station technology development on the plan-schedule basis. Methodology. The methods of graph theory and object-oriented analysis are used as research methods. The model of the station activity plan-schedule includes a model of technical equipment of the station (plan-schedule net and a model of the station functioning , which are formalized on the basis of parametric graphs. Findings. The presented model is implemented as an application to the graphics package AutoCAD. The software is developed in Visual LISP and Visual Basic. Taking into account that the construction of the plan-schedule is mostly a traditional process of adding, deleting, and modifying of icons, the developed interface is intuitively understandable for a technologist and practically does not require additional training. Originality. A mathematical model was created on the basis of the theory of graphs and object-oriented analysis in order to evaluate the technical and process of railway stations indicators; it is focused on solving problems of technology development of their work. Practical value. The proposed mathematical model is implemented as an application to the graphics package of AutoCAD. The presence of a mathematical model allows carrying out an automatic analysis of the plan-schedule and, thereby, reducing the period of its creation more than twice.

  7. Generating a representative signal of coal ash content to anticipate combustion control in a thermal power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prieto-Fernandez, Ismael; Santurio-Diaz, J.M.; Folgueras-Diaz, B.; Lopez-Bobo, M. Rosario; Fernandez-Viar, P.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the possibilities of continuously measuring coal ash in the boiler feeding circuit of a thermal power station so that the measurement can be used as a signal for the boiler combustion control system. An installation was designed, at semi-industrial scale, that could faithfully reproduce the operation of a belt feeder. In order to measure the ash content, a natural radioactivity meter was installed and a large number of coal samples with different ranks and grain sizes were tested, eventually showing the possibility of achieving the objective

  8. Study of sources, dose contribution and control measures of Argon-41 at Kaiga Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkata Ramana, K.; Shrikrishna, U.V.; Manojkumar, M.; Ramesh, R.; Madhan, V.; Varadhan, R.S.

    2001-01-01

    Air is used as a medium for cooling calandria vault and thermal shield systems in the earlier Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (Rajasthan Atomic Power Station and Madras Atomic Power Station) in India. This leads to production of significant quantity of 41 Ar in calandria vault and thermal shield cooling systems due to neutron activation of 40 Ar present in air (∼1% v/v). The presence of 41 Ar in reactor building contributes significant external doses to plant personnel during reactor operation and the release of this radionuclide to the environment result in dose to the public in the vicinity of the plants. An attempt is made to eliminate Argon-41 production in Indian standard Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (Narora Atomic Power Station, Kakrapar Atomic Power Station, Kaiga Generating Station -1 and 2 and Rajasthan Atomic Power Station-3 and 4), by filling the calandria vault with demineralized water and providing a separate Annulus Gas Monitoring System (AGMS) for detecting leaks from calandria tube or pressure tube using Carbon dioxide as a medium. However, 41 Ar is produced in the Annulus Gas Monitoring System, Primary Heat Transport cover gas system and moderator cover gas system due to ingress of air into the systems during operational transients or due to trace quantity of air present as an impurity in the gases used for the above systems. A study was conducted to identify and quantify the sources of 41 Ar in the work areas. This report brings out the sources of 41 Ar, reasons for 41 Ar production and the results of the measures incorporated to reduce the presence of 41 Ar in the above systems. (author)

  9. [The social hygiene problems in the operator work of hydroelectric power station workers and the means for enhancing work capacity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakashian, A N; Lepeshkina, T R; Ratushnaia, A N; Glushchenko, S S; Zakharenko, M I; Lastovchenko, V B; Diordichuk, T I

    1993-01-01

    Weight, tension and harmfulness of professional activity, peculiarities of labour conditions and characteristics of work, shift dynamics of operative personnel's working capacity were studied in the course of 8-hour working day currently accepted at hydroelectric power stations (HEPS) and experimental 12-hour schedule. Working conditions classified as "admissible", positive dynamics of operators' state, their social and material contentment were a basis for 12-hour two-shift schedule to be recommended as more appropriate. At the same time, problem of optimal shift schedules for operative personnel of HEPS remains unsolved and needs to be further explored.

  10. Intelligent systems supporting the control room operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, E.

    1997-01-01

    The operational experience obtained with the various applications of the systems discussed in this paper shows that more consequent use of the systems will make detection and management of disturbances still more efficient and faster. This holds true both for a low level of process automation and for power plants with a high level of automation. As for conventional power plants, the trend clearly is towards higher degrees of automation and consequent application of supporting systems. Thus, higher availability and rapid failure management are achieved, at low effects on normal operation. These systems are monitoring and process control systems, expert systems, and systems for optimal use of the equipment, or systems for post-incident analyses and computer-assisted on-shift protocols, or operating manuals. (orig./CB) [de

  11. [Controlling systems for operating room managers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüpfer, G; Bauer, M; Scherzinger, B; Schleppers, A

    2005-08-01

    Management means developing, shaping and controlling of complex, productive and social systems. Therefore, operating room managers also need to develop basic skills in financial and managerial accounting as a basis for operative and strategic controlling which is an essential part of their work. A good measurement system should include financial and strategic concepts for market position, innovation performance, productivity, attractiveness, liquidity/cash flow and profitability. Since hospitals need to implement a strategy to reach their business objectives, the performance measurement system has to be individually adapted to the strategy of the hospital. In this respect the navigation system developed by Gälweiler is compared to the "balanced score card" system of Kaplan and Norton.

  12. Replacement of five main block valves without interruption of normal operation in a remote NGL station placed at 13400 FT AMSL, challenge and strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinto, Yamil; Morales, Raul; Elorreaga, Gerson [Compania Operadora del Gas del Amazonas, Lima (Peru)

    2012-07-01

    The present paper is aimed to share experience of the replacement of five block valves carried on in a pressure reduction station remotely operated and located in a remote area in The Andes of Peru at 13400 ft AMSL. To accomplish the job, it was necessary the construction of a temporary bypass made of carbon steel pipeline with its own regulating, instrumentation and automation facilities, hence capable of reduce the NGL pressure, controlled and remotely operated by a SCADA system. The temporary bypass connection and disconnection to put on service was carried out using Hot Tap and Line Stop equipment. The replacement of the five block valves was met without interruption of the hydrocarbons flow, and resetting the pressure reduction station to steady operating conditions. Besides the operating works these activities involve safety considerations for personal working in high altitudes. The outputs were the successful replacements of the block valves, and most important was that the NGL continuous flow was met, so both the production and processing plants were supplied with the daily transportation rates in standard conditions, and in accordance with the requirements of the plant operation. (author)

  13. Skill retention and control room operator competency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stammers, R.B.

    1981-12-01

    The problem of skill retention in relation to the competency of control room operators is addressed. Although there are a number of related reviews of the literature, this particular topic has not been examined in detail before. The findings of these reviews are summarised and their implications for the area discussed. The limited research on skill retention in connection with process control is also reviewed. Some topics from cognitive and instructional psychology are also raised. In particular overlearning is tackled and the potential value of learning strategies is assessed. In conclusion the important topic of measurement of performance is introduced and a number of potentially valuable training approaches are outlined. (author)

  14. Space Telescope Control System science user operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, H. J.; Rossini, R.; Simcox, D.; Bennett, N.

    1984-01-01

    The Space Telescope science users will have a flexible and efficient means of accessing the capabilities provided by the ST Pointing Control System, particularly with respect to managing the overal acquisition and pointing functions. To permit user control of these system functions - such as vehicle scanning, tracking, offset pointing, high gain antenna pointing, solar array pointing and momentum management - a set of special instructions called 'constructs' is used in conjuction with command data packets. This paper discusses the user-vehicle interface and introduces typical operational scenarios.

  15. Bisimulations for Delimited-Control Operators

    OpenAIRE

    Biernacki , Dariusz; Lenglet , Sergueï; Polesiuk , Piotr

    2017-01-01

    We propose a survey of the behavioral theory of an untyped lambda-calculus extended with the delimited-control operators shift and reset. We define a contextual equivalence for this calculus, that we then aim to characterize with coinductively defined relations, called bisimilarities. We study different styles of bisimilarities (namely applicative, normal form, and environmental), and we give several examples to illustrate their respective strengths and weaknesses. We also discuss how to exte...

  16. Control Transfer in Operating System Kernels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-13

    microkernel system that runs less code in the kernel address space. To realize the performance benefit of allocating stacks in unmapped kseg0 memory, the...review how I modified the Mach 3.0 kernel to use continuations. Because of Mach’s message-passing microkernel structure, interprocess communication was...critical control transfer paths, deeply- nested call chains are undesirable in any case because of the function call overhead. 4.1.3 Microkernel Operating

  17. Control of individual daily growth in group-housed pigs using feeding stations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramaekers, P.J.L.

    1996-01-01

    In this thesis, it was examined whether it is possible to control individual daily growth and carcass composition in group-housed pigs using feeding stations. A forelegs weighing system to estimate the daily individual body weight (BW) of group-housed pigs was developed and validated. In two

  18. A Control Algorithm for Electric Vehicle Fast Charging Stations Equipped with Flywheel Energy Storage Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Bo; Dragicevic, Tomislav; Freijedo Fernandez, Francisco Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a control strategy for plugin electric vehicle (PEV) fast charging station (FCS) equipped with a flywheel energy storage system (FESS). The main role of the FESS is not to compromise the predefined charging profile of PEV battery during the provision of a hysteresis-type active...

  19. Two-Level Control for Fast Electrical Vehicle Charging Stations with Multi Flywheel Energy Storage System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SUN, BO; Dragicevic, Tomislav; Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    This paper applies a hierarchical control for a fast charging station (FCS) composed of paralleled PWM rectifier and dedicated paralleled multiple flywheel energy storage systems (FESSs), in order to mitigate peak power shock on grid caused by sudden connection of electrical vehicle (EV) chargers...

  20. Strengthening the control on radioactive sources - Cernavoda NPP operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daian, I.; Simionov, V.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the national legal frame governing the radioactive source management, legislative requirements introduced during last years and current status of controlled radioactive sources program at Cernavoda NPP. Romania has only one nuclear power plant, Cernavoda NPP, equipped with five PHWR - CANDU-6 Canadian type reactors - with a 700 MW(e) gross capacity each, in different implementation stages. The legal representative of the nuclear power production sector in Romania is 'Nuclearelectrica' S.A. National Company (SNN). SNN is a governmental company controlled by the Ministry of Industry and Trade. The company has headquarters in Bucharest and three subsidiaries: - CNE-PROD Cernavoda (CNE-PROD), operating the Cernavoda NPP - Unit 1; - CNE-INVEST Cernavoda, in charge with the completion of Unit 2 and with the preservation of Units 3,4,5; - Nuclear Fuel Plant in Pitesti (FCN). Unit 1 is in commercial operation since December 2, 1996, Unit 2 is under construction (80% completed) and Units 3, 4, 5 are under preservation. The operation of Cernavoda NPP implies use of radioactive sources that may present a significant risk to health, property and the environment when control is lost. Within the last years CNCAN issued new regulations stating clear responsibilities for the different institutions involved in radioactive materials control programs. To manage radioactive sources in a safe way CNE-PROD established and revised the Controlled Radioactive Sources Program, as part of Station Radiation Protection Regulation, ensuring strict recording of the radioactive sources and their usage, ensuring physical and radiological security, protecting the personnel, members of the public and the environment from the hazards of ionizing radiation during the life cycle of the plant, including decommissioning. (authors)

  1. Strengthening the control on radioactive sources - Cernavoda NPP operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daian, I.; Simionov, V.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: This paper presents the national legal frame governing the radioactive source management, legislative requirements introduced during last years and current status of controlled radioactive sources program at Cernavoda NPP. Romania has only one nuclear power plant, Cernavoda NPP, equipped with five PHWR - CANDU-6 Canadian type reactors - with a 700 MW(e) gross capacity each, in different implementation stages. The legal representative of the nuclear power production sector in Romania is 'Nuclearelectrica' S.A. National Company (SNN). SNN is a governmental company controlled by the Ministry of Industry and Trade. The company has headquarters in Bucharest and three subsidiaries: - CNE-PROD Cernavoda (CNE-PROD), operating the Cernavoda NPP - Unit 1; - CNE-INVEST Cernavoda, in charge with the completion of Unit 2 and with the preservation of Units 3,4,5; - Nuclear Fuel Plant in Pitesti (FCN). Unit 1 is in commercial operation since December 2, 1996, Unit 2 is under construction (80% completed) and Units 3, 4, 5 are under preservation. The operation of Cernavoda NPP implies use of radioactive sources that may present a significant risk to health, property and the environment when control is lost. Within the last years CNCAN issued new regulations stating clear responsibilities for the different institutions involved in radioactive materials control programs. To manage radioactive sources in a safe way CNE-PROD established and revised the Controlled Radioactive Sources Program, as part of Station Radiation Protection Regulation, ensuring strict recording of the radioactive sources and their usage, ensuring physical and radiological security, protecting the personnel, members of the public and the environment from the hazards of ionizing radiation during the life cycle of the plant. (authors)

  2. 21 CFR 111.127 - What quality control operations are required for packaging and labeling operations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What quality control operations are required for... and Process Control System: Requirements for Quality Control § 111.127 What quality control operations are required for packaging and labeling operations? Quality control operations for packaging and...

  3. International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Acceptance Testing for Node 1 Temperature and Humidity Control Subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David E.

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Node 1 Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System is comprised of five subsystems: Atmosphere Control and Storage (ACS), Atmosphere Revitalization (AR), Fire Detection and Suppression (FDS), Temperature and Humidity Control (THC), and Water Recovery and Management (WRM). This paper will provide a summary of the Node 1 ECLS THC subsystem design and a detailed discussion of the ISS ECLS Acceptance Testing methodology utilized for this subsystem.The International Space Station (ISS) Node 1 Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System is comprised of five subsystems: Atmosphere Control and Storage (ACS), Atmosphere Revitalization (AR), Fire Detection and Suppression (FDS), Temperature and Humidity Control (THC), and Water Recovery and Management (WRM). This paper will provide a summary of the Node 1 ECLS THC subsystem design and a detailed discussion of the ISS ECLS Acceptance Testing methodology utilized for this subsystem.

  4. Control structures design for fossil power station units; Diseno de estructuras de control para unidades termoelectricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomares Gonzalez, Daniel; Ricano Castillo, Juan Manuel [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1990-12-31

    In this paper are designed an analyzed the control ties of a 300MW fossil unit at different operation levels. The design and analysis were developed on an operation range of 50% to 100% load. The main control ties were studied among which are the feedwater flow, the superheating zone temperatures and the generated output. The technique used for the design is the decomposition in singular values (DSV) of the plant transference matrix. This is a recent technique that permits finding the most important interactions among output-input variables, over a significative frequencies range for the transference matrix of the plant. For this purpose utilizes the control properties of the transference matrix, such as: control effort, output-input interaction and ruggedness with respect to uncertainties. The control structures obtained were tested in a digital model of a fossil plant unit. A comparison study of both structures (original and modified) showed enhancement in the performance of the power plant with modified structure. [Espanol] En este trabajo se disenan y analizan los lazos de control de una unidad termoelectrica de 300 MW, a diferentes niveles de operacion. El diseno y analisis se desarrollo sobre un rango de operacion de 50 a 100 por ciento de carga. Se estudiaron los principales lazos de control entre los que se encuentran el flujo de agua de alimentacion, las temperaturas de la zona de sobrecalentamiento y la potencia generada. La tecnica utilizada para el diseno es la descomposicion en valores singulares (DVS) de la matriz de transferencia de la planta. Esta es una tecnica reciente que permite encontrar las interacciones mas importantes entre variables entrada-salida, sobre un rango de frecuencias significativas para la matriz de transferencia de la planta. Utiliza para ello las propiedades de control de la matriz de transferencia, como son: esfuerzo de control, interaccion entrada-salida y robustez con respecto a incertidumbres. Las estructuras de control

  5. Control structures design for fossil power station units; Diseno de estructuras de control para unidades termoelectricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomares Gonzalez, Daniel; Ricano Castillo, Juan Manuel [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1989-12-31

    In this paper are designed an analyzed the control ties of a 300MW fossil unit at different operation levels. The design and analysis were developed on an operation range of 50% to 100% load. The main control ties were studied among which are the feedwater flow, the superheating zone temperatures and the generated output. The technique used for the design is the decomposition in singular values (DSV) of the plant transference matrix. This is a recent technique that permits finding the most important interactions among output-input variables, over a significative frequencies range for the transference matrix of the plant. For this purpose utilizes the control properties of the transference matrix, such as: control effort, output-input interaction and ruggedness with respect to uncertainties. The control structures obtained were tested in a digital model of a fossil plant unit. A comparison study of both structures (original and modified) showed enhancement in the performance of the power plant with modified structure. [Espanol] En este trabajo se disenan y analizan los lazos de control de una unidad termoelectrica de 300 MW, a diferentes niveles de operacion. El diseno y analisis se desarrollo sobre un rango de operacion de 50 a 100 por ciento de carga. Se estudiaron los principales lazos de control entre los que se encuentran el flujo de agua de alimentacion, las temperaturas de la zona de sobrecalentamiento y la potencia generada. La tecnica utilizada para el diseno es la descomposicion en valores singulares (DVS) de la matriz de transferencia de la planta. Esta es una tecnica reciente que permite encontrar las interacciones mas importantes entre variables entrada-salida, sobre un rango de frecuencias significativas para la matriz de transferencia de la planta. Utiliza para ello las propiedades de control de la matriz de transferencia, como son: esfuerzo de control, interaccion entrada-salida y robustez con respecto a incertidumbres. Las estructuras de control

  6. CARMENES instrument control system and operational scheduler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Piquer, Alvaro; Guàrdia, Josep; Colomé, Josep; Ribas, Ignasi; Gesa, Lluis; Morales, Juan Carlos; Pérez-Calpena, Ana; Seifert, Walter; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Amado, Pedro J.; Caballero, José A.; Reiners, Ansgar

    2014-07-01

    The main goal of the CARMENES instrument is to perform high-accuracy measurements of stellar radial velocities (1m/s) with long-term stability. CARMENES will be installed in 2015 at the 3.5 m telescope in the Calar Alto Observatory (Spain) and it will be equipped with two spectrographs covering from the visible to the near-infrared. It will make use of its near-IR capabilities to observe late-type stars, whose peak of the spectral energy distribution falls in the relevant wavelength interval. The technology needed to develop this instrument represents a challenge at all levels. We present two software packages that play a key role in the control layer for an efficient operation of the instrument: the Instrument Control System (ICS) and the Operational Scheduler. The coordination and management of CARMENES is handled by the ICS, which is responsible for carrying out the operations of the different subsystems providing a tool to operate the instrument in an integrated manner from low to high user interaction level. The ICS interacts with the following subsystems: the near-IR and visible channels, composed by the detectors and exposure meters; the calibration units; the environment sensors; the front-end electronics; the acquisition and guiding module; the interfaces with telescope and dome; and, finally, the software subsystems for operational scheduling of tasks, data processing, and data archiving. We describe the ICS software design, which implements the CARMENES operational design and is planned to be integrated in the instrument by the end of 2014. The CARMENES operational scheduler is the second key element in the control layer described in this contribution. It is the main actor in the translation of the survey strategy into a detailed schedule for the achievement of the optimization goals. The scheduler is based on Artificial Intelligence techniques and computes the survey planning by combining the static constraints that are known a priori (i.e., target

  7. Contextual control of discriminated operant behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouton, Mark E; Todd, Travis P; León, Samuel P

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that changing the context after instrumental (operant) conditioning can weaken the strength of the operant response. That result contrasts with the results of studies of Pavlovian conditioning, in which a context switch often does not affect the response elicited by a conditioned stimulus. To begin to make the methods more similar, Experiments 1-3 tested the effects of a context switch in rats on a discriminated operant response (R; lever pressing or chain pulling) that had been reinforced only in the presence of a 30-s discriminative stimulus (S; tone or light). As in Pavlovian conditioning, responses and reinforcers became confined to presentations of the S during training. However, in Experiment 1, after training in Context A, a switch to Context B caused a decrement in responding during S. In Experiment 2, a switch to Context B likewise decreased responding in S when Context B was equally familiar, equally associated with reinforcement, or equally associated with the training of a discriminated operant (a different R reinforced in a different S). However, there was no decrement if Context B had been associated with the same response that was trained in Context A (Experiments 2 and 3). The effectiveness of S transferred across contexts, whereas the strength of the response did not. Experiment 4 found that a continuously reinforced response was also disrupted by context change when the same response manipulandum was used in both training and testing. Overall, the results suggest that the context can have a robust general role in the control of operant behavior. Mechanisms of contextual control are discussed.

  8. Self operation type reactor control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Makoto; Gunji, Minoru.

    1990-01-01

    A boiling-requefication chamber containing transporting materials having somewhat higher boiling point that the usual reactor operation temperature and liquid neutron absorbers having a boiling point sufficiently higher than that of the transporting materials is disposed near the coolant exit of a fuel assembly and connected with a tubular chamber in the reactor core with a moving pipe at the bottom. Since the transporting materials in the boiling-requefication chamber is boiled and expanded by heating, the liquid neutron absorbers are introduced passing through the moving pipe into the cylindrical chamber to control the nuclear reactions. When the temperature is lowered by the control, the transporting materials are liquefied to contract the volume and the liquid neutron absorbers in the cylindrical chamber are returned passing through the moving tube into the boiling-liquefication chamber to make the nuclear reaction vigorous. Thus, self-operation type power conditioning and power stopping are enabled not by way of control rods and not requiring external control, to prevent scram failure or misoperation. (N.H.)

  9. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Hope Creek Generation Station (Docket No. 50-354). Supplement No. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-07-01

    Supplement No. 6 to the Safety Evaluation Report on the application filed by Public Service Electric and Gas Company on its own behalf as co-owner and as agent for the other co-owner, the Atlantic City Electric Company, for a license to operate Hope Creek Generating Station has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located in Lower Alloways Creek Township in Salem County, New Jersey. This supplement reports the status of certain items that has not been resolved at the time of the publication of the Safety Evaluation Report. This supplement supports the issuance of a full-power license to operate Hope Creek Generating Station

  10. International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Acceptance Testing for Node 1 Atmosphere Control and Supply Subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David E.

    2009-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Node 1 Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System is comprised of five subsystems: Atmosphere Control and Supply (ACS), Atmosphere Revitalization (AR), Fire Detection and Suppression (FDS), Temperature and Humidity Control (THC), and Water Recovery and Management (WRM). This paper provides a summary of the Node 1 ECLS ACS subsystem design and a detailed discussion of the ISS ECLS Acceptance Testing methodology utilized for that subsystem.

  11. Particulate matter over a seven year period in urban and rural areas within, proximal and far from mining and power station operations in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafyllou, A G; Zoras, S; Evagelopoulos, V

    2006-11-01

    Lignite mining operations and lignite-fired power stations result in major particulate pollution (fly ash and fugitive dust) problems in the areas surrounding these activities. The problem is more complicated, especially, for urban areas located not far from these activities, due to additional contribution from the urban pollution sources. Knowledge of the distribution of airborne particulate matter into size fraction has become an increasing area of focus when examining the effects of particulate pollution. On the other hand, airborne particle concentration measurements are useful in order to assess the air pollution levels based on national and international air quality standards. These measurements are also necessary for developing air pollutants control strategies or for evaluating the effectiveness of these strategies, especially, for long periods. In this study an attempt is made in order to investigate the particle size distribution of fly ash and fugitive dust in a heavy industrialized (mining and power stations operations) area with complex terrain in the northwestern part of Greece. Parallel total suspended particulates (TSP) and particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 microm (PM10) concentrations are analyzed. These measurements gathered from thirteen monitoring stations located in the greater area of interest. Spatial, temporal variation and trend are analyzed over the last seven years. Furthermore, the geographical variation of PM10 - TSP correlation and PM10/TSP ratio are investigated and compared to those in the literature. The analysis has indicated that a complex system of sources and meteorological conditions modulate the particulate pollution of the examined area.

  12. Final Environmental Statement related to the operation of Beaver Valley Power Station, Unit 2 (Docket No. 50-412)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-09-01

    This Final Environmental Statement contains the second assessment of the environmental impact associated with Beaver Valley Power Station Unit 2 pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 51, as amended, of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations. This statement examines the environment, environmental consequences and mitigating actions, and environmental benefits and costs, and concludes that the action called for is the issuance of an operating license for Beaver Valley Unit 2

  13. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Beaver Valley Power Station, Unit 2 (Docket No. 50-412)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    This report, Supplement No. 4 to the Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Duquesne Light Company et al. (the applicant) for a license to operate the Beaver Valley Power Station, Unit 2 (Docket No. 50-412), has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This supplement reports the status of certain items that had not been resolved when the Safety Evaluation Report and its Supplements 1, 2, and 3 were published

  14. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Beaver Valley Power Station, Unit 2 (Docket No. 50-412)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    This report, Supplement No. 1 to the Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Duquesne Light Company et al. (the applicant) for a license to operate the Beaver valley Power Station, Unit 2 (Docket No. 50-412), has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This supplement reports the status of certain items that had not been resolved at the time the Safety Evaluation Report was published

  15. Draft environmental statement related to the operation of Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit No. 3 (Docket No. 50-423)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    This Draft Environmental Statement contains the second assessment of the environmental impact associated with the operation of Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit 3, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 51, as amended, of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations. This statement examines the environment, environmental consequences and mitigating actions, and environmental and economic benefits and costs

  16. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Shoreham Nuclear Power Station, Unit No. 1 (Docket No. 50-322)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-04-01

    Supplement 10 (SSER 10) to the Safety Evaluation Report on Long Island Lighting Company's application for a license to operate the Shoreham Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1, located in Suffolk County, New York, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This supplement addresses several items that have been reviewed by the staff since the previous supplement was issued

  17. Station-keeping control of an unmanned surface vehicle exposed to current and wind disturbances

    OpenAIRE

    Sarda, Edoardo I.; Qu, Huajin; Bertaska, Ivan R.; von Ellenrieder, Karl D.

    2017-01-01

    Field trials of a 4 meter long, 180 kilogram, unmanned surface vehicle (USV) have been conducted to evaluate the performance of station-keeping heading and position controllers in an outdoor marine environment disturbed by wind and current. The USV has a twin hull configuration and a custom-designed propulsion system, which consists of two azimuthing thrusters, one for each hull. Nonlinear proportional derivative, backstepping and sliding mode feedback controllers were tested in winds of abou...

  18. Chapter 8: Plasma operation and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ITER Physics Expert Group on Disruptions, Control, Plasma, and MHD; ITER Physics Expert Group on Energetic Particles, Heating, Current and Drive; ITER Physics Expert Group on Diagnostics; ITER Physics Basis Editors

    1999-12-01

    Wall conditioning of fusion devices involves removal of desorbable hydrogen isotopes and impurities from interior device surfaces to permit reliable plasma operation. Techniques used in present devices include baking, metal film gettering, deposition of thin films of low-Z material, pulse discharge cleaning, glow discharge cleaning, radio frequency discharge cleaning, and in situ limiter and divertor pumping. Although wall conditioning techniques have become increasingly sophisticated, a reactor scale facility will involve significant new challenges, including the development of techniques applicable in the presence of a magnetic field and of methods for efficient removal of tritium incorporated into co-deposited layers on plasma facing components and their support structures. The current status of various approaches is reviewed, and the implications for reactor scale devices are summarized. Creation and magnetic control of shaped and vertically unstable elongated plasmas have been mastered in many present tokamaks. The physics of equilibrium control for reactor scale plasmas will rely on the same principles, but will face additional challenges, exemplified by the ITER/FDR design. The absolute positioning of outermost flux surface and divertor strike points will have to be precise and reliable in view of the high heat fluxes at the separatrix. Long pulses will require minimal control actions, to reduce accumulation of AC losses in superconducting PF and TF coils. To this end, more complex feedback controllers are envisaged, and the experimental validation of the plasma equilibrium response models on which such controllers are designed is encouraging. Present simulation codes provide an adequate platform on which equilibrium response techniques can be validated. Burning plasmas require kinetic control in addition to traditional magnetic shape and position control. Kinetic control refers to measures controlling density, rotation and temperature in the plasma core as

  19. Operating large controlled thermonuclear fusion research facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaudreau, M.P.J.; Tarrh, J.M.; Post, R.S.; Thomas, P.

    1987-01-01

    The MIT Tara Tandem Mirror is a large, state of the art controlled thermonuclear fusion research facility. Over the six years of its design, implementation, and operation, every effort was made to minimize cost and maximize performance by using the best and latest hardware, software, and scientific and operational techniques. After reviewing all major DOE fusion facilities, an independent DOE review committee concluded that the Tara operation was the most automated and efficient of all DOE facilities. This paper includes a review of the key elements of the Tara design, construction, operation, management, physics milestones, and funding that led to this success. The authors emphasize a chronological description of how the system evolved from the proposal stage to a mature device with an emphasis on the basic philosophies behind the implementation process. This description can serve both as a qualitative and quantitative database for future large experiment planning. It includes actual final costs and manpower spent as well as actual run and maintenance schedules, number of data shots, major system failures, etc. The paper concludes with recommendations for the next generation of facilities

  20. Human reliability analysis of control room operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Isaac J.A.L.; Carvalho, Paulo Victor R.; Grecco, Claudio H.S. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    Human reliability is the probability that a person correctly performs some system required action in a required time period and performs no extraneous action that can degrade the system Human reliability analysis (HRA) is the analysis, prediction and evaluation of work-oriented human performance using some indices as human error likelihood and probability of task accomplishment. Significant progress has been made in the HRA field during the last years, mainly in nuclear area. Some first-generation HRA methods were developed, as THERP (Technique for human error rate prediction). Now, an array of called second-generation methods are emerging as alternatives, for instance ATHEANA (A Technique for human event analysis). The ergonomics approach has as tool the ergonomic work analysis. It focus on the study of operator's activities in physical and mental form, considering at the same time the observed characteristics of operator and the elements of the work environment as they are presented to and perceived by the operators. The aim of this paper is to propose a methodology to analyze the human reliability of the operators of industrial plant control room, using a framework that includes the approach used by ATHEANA, THERP and the work ergonomics analysis. (author)

  1. Operating large controlled thermonuclear fusion research facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaudreau, M.P.J.; Tarrh, J.M.; Post, R.S.; Thomas, P.

    1987-10-01

    The MIT Tara Tandem Mirror is a large, state of the art controlled thermonuclear fusion research facility. Over the six years of its design, implementation, and operation, every effort was made to minimize cost and maximize performance by using the best and latest hardware, software, and scientific and operational techniques. After reviewing all major DOE fusion facilities, an independent DOE review committee concluded that the Tara operation was the most automated and efficient of all DOE facilities. This paper includes a review of the key elements of the Tara design, construction, operation, management, physics milestones, and funding that led to this success. We emphasize a chronological description of how the system evolved from the proposal stage to a mature device with an emphasis on the basic philosophies behind the implementation process. This description can serve both as a qualitative and quantitative database for future large experiment planning. It includes actual final costs and manpower spent as well as actual run and maintenance schedules, number of data shots, major system failures, etc. The paper concludes with recommendations for the next generation of facilities. 13 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs

  2. The use of operator surveys by the CEGB to evaluate nuclear control room design and initiatives in the design of alarm systems and control room operating procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, A.R.G.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on the use of operator surveys and trip report analysis methods which the Central Electricity Generating Board has developed to assess the extent and adequacy of operator support systems currently installed on its four twin-reactor, first generation Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor nuclear power plants. The survey consisted of a programme of structured interviews with control room engineers. The scope of the questions addressed; working environment, communications, man-machine interface, procedural information, and the diagnostic and predictive support system. The analysis of trip reports was targetted at identifying aspects of the performance of the operator support systems which might have been contributory to the cause of reactor trip. The results of this work are being used to assist in determining guidelines for the development of operator support systems, computerised controls and the structure of station operating procedures

  3. Startup and first operation evaluation of the nuclear station at Fessenheim

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leblond, Andre; Ferriole, Guy.

    1978-01-01

    Having first recalled the main characteristics of the Fessenheim power station and its different construction and startup stages, the starting tests and the difficulties encountered are described. The main results recorded and the conclusions which can be drawn are analyzed [fr

  4. 47 CFR 80.1073 - Radio operator requirements for ship stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... 80.1073 Section 80.1073 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS... selecting HF DSC guard channels and receiving scheduled maritime safety information broadcasts; (4...

  5. Tethered balloon operation for wintering aerosol measurements in the lower troposphere at Syowa Station, Antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    Keiichiro Hara; Kazuo Osada; Takashi Yamanouchi

    2007-01-01

    The 46th Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE-46) carried out twenty seven tethered-balloon-borne aerosol measurements at Syowa Station for better understanding of aerosol chemical and physical properties in the lower troposphere from 6th January 2005 until 11 December 2005. This report summarizes the plan, preparation, field activities and some troubles/problems in the tethered-balloon observations.

  6. Nuclear power station: validation of a method for designing operation mimic diagrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colard, M.I.; De Vlaminck, M.; Javaux, D.

    1995-01-01

    This is the first time in a Belgium nuclear power station that the design of mimic diagrams has involved biotechnologists. The methodology is based upon task analysis, the formalism of which has been evaluated. It is now integrated in the Dimos assisted supervision system to produce the final design of mimic diagram images. (authors). 3 figs., 3 refs

  7. Action Stations! 100 years of trauma care on maritime and amphibious operations in the Royal Navy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, M; Smith, J E

    2015-01-01

    Over the past century trauma care within the Royal Navy (RN) has evolved; wartime experiences and military medical research have combined to allow significant improvement in the care of casualties. This article describes the key maritime and amphibious operations that have seen the Royal Navy Medical Service (RNMS) deliver high levels of support to wherever the Naval Service has deployed in the last 100 years. Key advancements in which progress has led to improved outcomes for injured personnel are highlighted--the control and treatment of blood loss, wound care, and the prevention and management of organ failure with optimal resuscitation. Historians often point out how slowly military medicine progressed for the first few thousand years of its recorded history, and how quickly it has progressed in the last century. This reflective article will show how the RNMS has been an integral part of that story, and how the lessons learnt by our predecessors have shaped our modern day doctrine surrounding trauma care.

  8. 14 CFR 91.1013 - Operational control briefing and acknowledgment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Ownership Operations Operational Control § 91.1013 Operational control briefing and acknowledgment. (a) Upon...) Liability risk in the event of a flight-related occurrence that causes personal injury or property damage...

  9. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit No. 3 (Docket No. 50-423)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    The Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by Northeast Nuclear Energy Company, as applicant and agent for the owners, for a license to operate the Millstone Nuclear Power Station Unit 3 (Docket No. 50-423), has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located in the town of Waterford, New London County, Connecticut, on the north shore of Long Island Sound. Subject to favorable resolution of the items discussed in this report, the NRC staff concludes that the facility can be operated by the applicant without endangering the health and safety of the public

  10. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Hope Creek Generating Station (Docket No. 50-354)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-10-01

    The Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by Public Service Electric and Gas Company, as applicant, for a license to operate the Hope Creek Generating Station (Docket No. 50-354), has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located in Salem County, New Jersey. Subject to favorable resolution of the items discussed in this report, the NRC staff concludes that the facility can be operated by the applicant without endangering the health and safety of the public

  11. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Beaver Valley Power Station, Unit 2 (Docket No. 50-412)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report on the application filed by Duquesne Light Company, as applicant and agent for the owners, for a license to operate the Beaver Valley Power Station Unit 2 (Docket No. 50-412) has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located in Shippingport Borough, Beaver County, Pennsylvania, on the south bank of the Ohio River. Subject to the favorable resolution of the items discussed in this report, the staff concludes that the facility can be operated by the applicant without endangering the health and safety of the public

  12. HVAC modifications and computerized energy analysis for the Operations Support Building at the Mars Deep Space Station at Goldstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, A.; Stelzmuller, P.

    1986-01-01

    The key heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) modifications implemented at the Mars Deep Space Station's Operation Support Building at Jet Propulsion Laboratories (JPL) in order to reduce energy consumption and decrease operating costs are described. An energy analysis comparison between the computer simulated model for the building and the actual meter data was presented. The measurement performance data showed that the cumulative energy savings was about 21% for the period 1979 to 1981. The deviation from simulated data to measurement performance data was only about 3%.

  13. Application of modern tools and techniques to maximize engineering productivity in the development of orbital operations plans for the space station progrm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manford, J. S.; Bennett, G. R.

    1985-01-01

    The Space Station Program will incorporate analysis of operations constraints and considerations in the early design phases to avoid the need for later modifications to the Space Station for operations. The application of modern tools and administrative techniques to minimize the cost of performing effective orbital operations planning and design analysis in the preliminary design phase of the Space Station Program is discussed. Tools and techniques discussed include: approach for rigorous analysis of operations functions, use of the resources of a large computer network, and providing for efficient research and access to information.

  14. Operating System For Numerically Controlled Milling Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, R. B.

    1992-01-01

    OPMILL program is operating system for Kearney and Trecker milling machine providing fast easy way to program manufacture of machine parts with IBM-compatible personal computer. Gives machinist "equation plotter" feature, which plots equations that define movements and converts equations to milling-machine-controlling program moving cutter along defined path. System includes tool-manager software handling up to 25 tools and automatically adjusts to account for each tool. Developed on IBM PS/2 computer running DOS 3.3 with 1 MB of random-access memory.

  15. Ageing management of control and instrumentation systems for Indian Nuclear Power Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Premchandran, T.; Ghoshal, B.; Shirolkar, K.M.; Ahmad, S.N.

    2006-01-01

    During the time of enmasse coolant channel replacement program, undertaken at Rajasthan Atomic Power Station and Madras Atomic Power Station, upgradation and ageing management activities of these units were also taken up with a view to improve the performance of the station. This paper presents the approach followed for handling the issues, pertaining to the ageing management and obsolesce of various components of Control and Instrumentation systems of these stations. Ageing related issues for field instruments, control room instruments and hardware like cables, terminal blocks and relays will be covered in this paper. It will also cover various aspects of ageing management like assessment of degradation due to ageing, policy followed for identifying the instruments that are to be replaced, selection procedure for items for assessment of residual life, testing method followed for life assessment and problems faced during replacement. From the experience gained, the issues to be addressed during design and construction stages of future plants to minimize the ageing related problems are also discussed in this paper. (author)

  16. The Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO): Four Years Operating on the International Space Station (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, C. O.; Nahorniak, J.; Tufillaro, N.; Kappus, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO) is the first spaceborne imaging spectrometer designed to sample the coastal ocean. HICO images selected coastal regions at 92 m spatial resolution with full spectral coverage (88 channels covering 400 to 900 nm) and a high signal-to-noise ratio to resolve the complexity of the coastal ocean. Under sponsorship of the Office of Naval Research, HICO was built by the Naval Research Laboratory, which continues to operate the sensor. HICO has been operating on the International Space Station since October 2009 and has collected over 8000 scenes for more than 50 users. As Project Scientist I have been the link to the international ocean optics community primarily through our OSU HICO website (http://hico.oregonstate.edu). HICO operations are now under NASA support and HICO data is now also be available through the NASA Ocean Color Website (http://oceancolor.gsfc.nasa.gov ). Here we give a brief overview of HICO data and operations and discuss the unique challenges and opportunities that come from operating on the International Space Station.

  17. Final environmental statement related to the operation of Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit No. 3 (Docket No. 50-423)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    This Final Environmental Statement contains the second assessment of the environmental impact associated with the operation of Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit 3, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 51, as amended, of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations. This statement examines the environment, environmental consequences and mitigating actions, and environmental and economic benefits and costs. Land use and terrestrial and aquatic ecological impacts will be small. Operational impacts to historic and archeologic sites will be small. The effects of routine operations, energy transmission, and periodic maintenance of rights-of-way and transmission facilities should not jeopardize any populations of endangered or threatened species. No significant impacts are anticipated from normal operational releases of radioactivity. The risk of radiation exposure associated with accidental release of radioactivity is very low. The net socioeconomic effects of the project will be beneficial. On the basis of the analysis and evaluation set forth in this environmental statement, it is concluded that the action called for under NEPA and 10 CFR 51 is the issuance of an operating license for Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit 3. 101 references, 33 figures, 30 tables

  18. Experience in industrial operation of the plant for immobilizing radioactive wastes in thermosetting resins at the Ardennes Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, P.; Romestain, P.; Bruant, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    The French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) has developed, at the Grenoble Centre for Nuclear Studies, a procedure for immobilizing low- and intermediate-level wastes in thermosetting resins of the polyester or epoxy types. To demonstrate feasibility on an industrial scale, a pilot plant has been set up at the effluent treatment station of the Ardennes Franco-Belgium Nuclear Power Station (SENA), which is a 305 MW(e) PWR type. Assembly work began in January 1979. After a period devoted to final adjustments and operation with inactive products, conditioning of active products began in January 1981. In the paper, the methods of conditioning the three types of waste (evaporation concentrates, ion exchange resins and filter cartridges) are described, experience of the start-up and operation of the plant is reported and the principal results of coating characterization tests are given. The results of tests on active and inactive products show that the characteristics of the materials obtained on an industrial scale match those of laboratory products and confirm their high quality with regard to mechanical behaviour, fire resistance, homogeneity and low-leachability. Industrial experience and economic comparisons show that the process of immobilizing waste from nuclear power stations in thermosetting resins offers an extremely interesting alternative to classical methods of conditioning. (author)

  19. Human factors issues and approaches in the spatial layout of a space station control room, including the use of virtual reality as a design analysis tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Joseph P., II

    1994-01-01

    Human Factors Engineering support was provided for the 30% design review of the late Space Station Freedom Payload Control Area (PCA). The PCA was to be the payload operations control room, analogous to the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (POCC). This effort began with a systematic collection and refinement of the relevant requirements driving the spatial layout of the consoles and PCA. This information was used as input for specialized human factors analytical tools and techniques in the design and design analysis activities. Design concepts and configuration options were developed and reviewed using sketches, 2-D Computer-Aided Design (CAD) drawings, and immersive Virtual Reality (VR) mockups.

  20. Tethered balloon operation for wintering aerosol measurements in the lower troposphere at Syowa Station, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiichiro Hara

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The 46th Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE-46 carried out twenty seven tethered-balloon-borne aerosol measurements at Syowa Station for better understanding of aerosol chemical and physical properties in the lower troposphere from 6th January 2005 until 11 December 2005. This report summarizes the plan, preparation, field activities and some troubles/problems in the tethered-balloon observations.

  1. Modern operator's consoles for accelerator control at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, P.; Cahill, K.; Peters, R.; Smedinghoff, J.

    1991-01-01

    Since the construction of the Tevatron the Fermilab accelerator complex has been controlled from operator's consoles based on PDP-11 computers and interaction with display hardware via Camac. In addition the Linac has been controllable from microprocessor-based local consoles. The new generation of console devices is based on VAXstation computers, networked by Ethernet and Token Ring, and utilizing the X-windows protocol. Under X the physical display (server) can be driven by any network node, and need not be part of the console computer (client). This allows great flexibility in configuring display devices - with X-terminals, Unix workstations, and Macintoshes all having been utilized. Over half of the 800 application programs on the system have been demonstrated to work properly in the new environment. The modern version of a Linac local console runs in a Macintosh. These are networked via Token Ring to Linac local control stations. They provide color graphics and a hard copy capability which was previously lacking

  2. Production and quality control of concrete for the Rajasthan Atomic Power Station - [Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh Roy, P.K.; Sukhtankar, K.D.; Prasad, K.

    1975-01-01

    The following aspects of the production and quality control of concrete and concrete materials used in the construction of twin-reactor Rajasthan Atomic Power Station are discussed : (1) relationship between strength of cubes and cylinders made of concrete used for the prestressed dome (2) temperature control during pouring of concrete (3) thermal conductivity of heavy concrete (4) various types of grouting procedures used for different structures forming part of reactors (5) quality control of normal and heavy concrete and (6) leakage through form ties. Typical concrete mixes used for grouts are also given. (M.G.B.)

  3. A portable meteorological station plus nuclear radiation monitoring system using a basic-8052 micro-controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Mohamad, A.; Aghabi, S.; Weiss, C.

    2002-01-01

    a portable meteorology station capable of measuring various atmospheric parameters (mainly ambient temperature, relative humidity, atmospheric pressure, wind speed and direction) was designed and built. The physical quantities were converted to electrical signals using suitable sensors. These signals were then processed and transferred to digital values to be stored in suitable memories. A nuclear radiation alarm system was also built, on the main board, to monitor the nuclear radiation releases levels. The system consists of three main parts: control board, data acquisition board and signals conditioning board. the overall system is controlled by a BASIC-8052 micro-controller. (authors)

  4. Calculation of optimum control rod operation programme for boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehr, L.

    1978-01-01

    Control rod operation programmes are calculated based on a three dimensional Boiling Water Reactor situation model. The position of the control rods at variosu burn-ups is chosen by an optimisation so that the sum of the square deviations of the load density distribution from an optimum distribution ('Haling' distribution) are minimised. Other conditions are remaining critical and observing the thermal limits for central fuel element melting and critical heat surface loading. As an example, an optimum control rod operation programme for the first cycle in Lengen nuclear power station is calculated and is compared with the programme actually used. (orig.) 891 HP [de

  5. Application of a hazard and operability study method to hazard evaluation of a chemical unit of the power station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, E; Zare, M; Barkhordari, A; Mirmohammadi, Sj; Halvani, Ghh

    2008-12-28

    The aim of this study was to identify the hazards, evaluate their risk factors and determine the measure for promotion of the process and reduction of accidents in the chemical unit of the power station. In this case and qualitative study, HAZOP technique was used to recognize the hazards and problems of operations on the chemical section at power station. Totally, 126 deviations were documented with various causes and consequences. Ranking and evaluation of identified risks indicate that the majority of deviations were categorized as "acceptable" and less than half of that were "unacceptable". The highest calculated risk level (1B) related to both the interruption of acid entry to the discharge pumps and an increased density of the acid. About 27% of the deviations had the lowest risk level (4B). The identification of hazards by HAZOP indicates that it could, systemically, assess and criticize the process of consumption or production of acid and alkali in the chemical unit of power plant.

  6. Wisconsin Public Service, Weston Generating Station; Petition to Object to Issuance of Title V Operating Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the Title V air operating permit regulations. This document is part of the Title V Petition Database available at www2.epa.gov/title-v-operating-permits/title-v-petition-database.

  7. Dresden Nuclear Power Station, Units 1, 2, and 3. Annual operating report: January--December 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    After a summary of reactor operating experiences, data are presented concerning amendments to the operating licenses and technical specifications, changes, modifications, tests, experiments, and maintenance of safety-related equipment

  8. Process control upgrades yield huge operational improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzgerald, W.V.

    2001-01-01

    Most nuclear plants in North America were designed and built in the late 60 and 70. The regulatory nature of this industry over the years has made design changes at the plant level difficult, if not impossible, to implement. As a result, many plants in this world region have been getting by on technology that is over 40 years behind the times. What this translates into is that the plants have not been able to take advantage of the huge technology gains that have been made in process control during this period. As a result, most of these plants are much less efficient and productive than they could be. One particular area of the plant that is receiving a lot of attention is the feedwater heaters. These systems were put in place to improve efficiency, but most are not operating correctly. This paper will present a case study where one progressive mid-western utility decided that enough was enough and implemented a process control audit of their heater systems. The audit clearly pointed out the existing problems with the current process control system. It resulted in a proposal for the implementation of a state of the art, digital distributed process control system for the heaters along with a complete upgrade of the level controls and field devices that will stabilize heater levels, resulting in significant efficiency gains and lower maintenance bills. Overall the payback period for this investment should be less than 6 months and the plant is now looking for more opportunities that can provide even bigger gains. (author)

  9. Selective analysis of power plant operation on the Hudson River with emphasis on the Bowline Point Generating Station. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnthouse, L.W.; Cannon, J.B.; Christensen, S.G.

    1977-07-01

    A comprehensive study of the effects of power plant operation on the Hudson River was conducted. The study included thermal, biological, and air quality effects of existing and planned electrical generating stations. This section on thermal impacts presents a comprehensive mathematical modeling and computer simulation study of the effects of heat rejection from the plants. The overall study consisted of three major parts: near-field analysis; far-field analysis; and zone-matched near-field/far-field analysis. Near-field analyses were completed for Roseton, Danskammer, and Bowline Point Generating Stations, and near-field dilution ratios range from a low of about 2 for Bowline Point and 3 for Roseton to a maximum of 6 for both plants. The far-field analysis included a critical review of existing studies and a parametric review of operating plants. The maximum thermal load case, based on hypothetical 1974 river conditions, gives the daily maximum cross-section-averaged and 2-mile-segment-averaged water temperatures as 83.80 0 F in the vicinity of the Indian Point Station and 83.25 0 F in the vicinity of the Bowline Station. This maximum case will be significantly modified if cooling towers are used at certain units. A full analysis and discussion of these cases is presented. A study of the Hudson River striped bass population is divided into the following eight subsections: distribution of striped bass eggs, larvae, and juveniles in the Hudson River; entrainment mortality factor; intake factor; impingement; effects of discharges; compensation; model estimates of percent reduction; and Hudson River striped bass stock

  10. 78 FR 61400 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc., Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station, Issuance of Director's Decision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... 40 years since their initial construction. The wires, and possibly the connections and splices inside conduits, are designed to operate properly only in a dry environment and are not designed to operate in a... construction. There are no existing methods to ensure operability, short of visual inspection or replacing...

  11. COMBINED CYCLE GAS TURBINE FOR THERMAL POWER STATIONS: EXPERIENCE IN DESIGNING AND OPERATION, PROSPECTS IN APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Karnitsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper has reviewed main world tendencies in power consumption and power system structure. Main schemes of combined cycle gas turbines have been considered in the paper. The paper contains an operational analysis of CCGT blocks that are operating within the Belarusian energy system. The analysis results have been given in tables showing main operational indices of power blocks

  12. Analysis of gross error rates in operation of commercial nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joos, D.W.; Sabri, Z.A.; Husseiny, A.A.

    1979-01-01

    Experience in operation of US commercial nuclear power plants is reviewed over a 25-month period. The reports accumulated in that period on events of human error and component failure are examined to evaluate gross operator error rates. The impact of such errors on plant operation and safety is examined through the use of proper taxonomies of error, tasks and failures. Four categories of human errors are considered; namely, operator, maintenance, installation and administrative. The computed error rates are used to examine appropriate operator models for evaluation of operator reliability. Human error rates are found to be significant to a varying degree in both BWR and PWR. This emphasizes the import of considering human factors in safety and reliability analysis of nuclear systems. The results also indicate that human errors, and especially operator errors, do indeed follow the exponential reliability model. (Auth.)

  13. Possible efficiency improvement by application of various operating regimes for the cooling water pump station at thermal power plant - Bitola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijakovski Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal power plant (TPP - Bitola is the largest electricity producer in the Republic of Macedonia with installed capacity of 691 MW. It is a lignite fired power plant, in operation since 1982. Most of the installed equipment is of Russian origin. Power plant's cold end comprised of a condenser, pump station and cooling tower is depicted in the article. Possible way to raise the efficiency of the cold end by changing the operating characteristics of the pumps is presented in the article. Diagramic and tabular presentation of the working characteristics of the pumps (two pumps working in paralel for one block with the pipeline, as well as engaged power for their operation are also presented in this article.

  14. Sandia National Laboratories land use permit for operations at Oliktok Alaska Long Range Radar Station.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catechis, Christopher Spyros

    2013-02-01

    The property subject to this Environmental Baseline Survey (EBS) is located at the Oliktok Long Range Radar Station (LRRS). The Oliktok LRRS is located at 70À 30 W latitude, 149À 53 W longitude. It is situated at Oliktok Point on the shore of the Beaufort Sea, east of the Colville River. The purpose of this EBS is to document the nature, magnitude, and extent of any environmental contamination of the property; identify potential environmental contamination liabilities associated with the property; develop sufficient information to assess the health and safety risks; and ensure adequate protection for human health and the environment related to a specific property.

  15. Power consumption analysis of pump station control systems based on fuzzy controllers with discrete terms in iThink software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muravyova, E. A.; Bondarev, A. V.; Sharipov, M. I.; Galiaskarova, G. R.; Kubryak, A. I.

    2018-03-01

    In this article, power consumption of pumping station control systems is discussed. To study the issue, two simulation models of oil level control in the iThink software have been developed, using a frequency converter only and using a frequency converter and a fuzzy controller. A simulation of the oil-level control was carried out in a graphic form, and plots of pumps power consumption were obtained. Based on the initial and obtained data, the efficiency of the considered control systems has been compared, and also the power consumption of the systems was shown graphically using a frequency converter only and using a frequency converter and a fuzzy controller. The models analysis has shown that it is more economical and safe to use a control circuit with a frequency converter and a fuzzy controller.

  16. 46 CFR 196.85-1 - Magazine operation and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Magazine operation and control. 196.85-1 Section 196.85... OPERATIONS Magazine Control § 196.85-1 Magazine operation and control. (a) Keys to magazine spaces and magazine chests shall be kept in the sole control or custody of the Master or one delegated qualified...

  17. High-Rate Communications Outage Recorder Operations for Optimal Payload and Science Telemetry Management Onboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shell, Michael T.; McElyea, Richard M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    All International Space Station (ISS) Ku-band telemetry transmits through the High-Rate Communications Outage Recorder (HCOR). The HCOR provides the recording and playback capability for all payload, science, and International Partner data streams transmitting through NASA's Ku-band antenna system. The HCOR is a solid-state memory recorder that provides recording capability to record all eight ISS high-rate data during ISS Loss-of-Signal periods. NASA payloads in the Destiny module are prime users of the HCOR; however, NASDA and ESA will also utilize the HCOR for data capture and playback of their high data rate links from the Kibo and Columbus modules. Marshall Space Flight Center's Payload Operations Integration Center manages the HCOR for nominal functions, including system configurations and playback operations. The purpose of this paper is to present the nominal operations plan for the HCOR and the plans for handling contingency operations affecting payload operations. In addition, the paper will address HCOR operation limitations and the expected effects on payload operations. The HCOR is manifested for ISS delivery on flight 9A with the HCOR backup manifested on flight 11A. The HCOR replaces the Medium-Rate Communications Outage Recorder (MCOR), which has supported payloads since flight 5A.1.

  18. Packaging's Contribution for the Effectiveness of the Space Station's Food Service Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausch, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    Storage limitations will have a major effect on space station food service. For example: foods with low bulk density such as ice cream, bread, cake, standard type potato chips and other low density snacks, flaked cereals, etc., will exacerbate the problem of space limitations; package containers are inherently volume consuming and refuse creating; and the useful observation that the optimum package is no package at all leads to the tentative conclusion that the least amount of packaging per unit of food, consistent with storage, aesthetics, preservation, cleanliness, cost and disposal criteria, is the most practical food package for the space station. A series of trade offs may have to be made to arrive at the most appropriate package design for a particular type of food taking all the criteria into account. Some of these trade offs are: single serve vs. bulk; conventional oven vs. microwave oven; nonmetallic aseptically vs. non-aseptically packaged foods; and comparison of aseptic vs. nonaseptic food packages. The advantages and disadvantages are discussed.

  19. Graphics and control for in-reactor operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.L.

    1996-01-01

    Remotely operated inspection, repair and maintenance tasks for Magnox Electric's eight twin MAGNOX-type reactor stations must conform to the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate's regulations. The performance of manipulator systems used to undertake such operations has improved significantly with the recent introduction of computer graphics. These are used for simulation and demonstration purposes as well as a real-time aid to the manipulator operator. Outage times can be reduced by the appropriate use of such computer technology to reduce manipulator operation times. (UK)

  20. Fire protection equipment in the area of control of the Neckar Community Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhardt, S.; Grauf, E.

    1976-01-01

    In the Neckar Community Nuclear Power Station - an 805 MW pressurised water reactor shortly to reach the stage of nuclear operation - fire protection measures have been realised to an extent hitherto uncommon in German nuclear power plants. The reason is to be sought from the authorities who have become more sensitive because of a fire in a reactor vessel during the construction stage and the fire at Browns Ferry and have consequently become extremely expert. Apart from the fire regulations hitherto normal further subregulations have been created in order to be able to make better provision of extinguishing devices against fire hazards. (orig.) [de