WorldWideScience

Sample records for static stabilizers biomechanical

  1. Low-Back Biomechanics and Static Stability During Isometric Pushing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, Kevin P.; Bennett, Bradford C.

    2006-01-01

    Pushing and pulling tasks are increasingly prevalent in industrial workplaces. Few studies have investigated low-back biomechanical risk factors associated with pushing, and we are aware of none that has quantified spinal stability during pushing exertions. Data recorded from 11 healthy participants performing isometric pushing exertions demonstrated that trunk posture, vector force direction of the applied load, and trunk moment were influenced (p pushing task, and foot position. A biomechanical model was used to analyze the posture and hand force data gathered from the pushing exertions. Model results indicate that pushing exertions provide significantly (p pushing exertions. If one maintains stability by means of cocontraction, additional spinal load is thereby created, increasing the risk of overload injury. Thus it is important to consider muscle cocontraction when evaluating the biomechanics of pushing exertions. Potential applications of this research include improved assessment of biomechanical risk factors for the design of industrial pushing tasks. PMID:16435695

  2. Static and dynamic biomechanical properties of the regenerating rabbit Achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Koji; Noguchi, Masahiko; Ikoma, Kazuya; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2008-07-01

    Since tendons show viscoelastic behavior, dynamic viscoelastic properties should be assessed in addition to static biomechanical properties. We evaluated differences between static and dynamic biomechanical properties of the regenerating rabbit Achilles tendon following tenotomy. At 3, 6, or 12 weeks after right Achilles tenotomy, the right (regenerating) and left (control) tendons were collected with the calcaneus from 49 rabbits. A unidirectional failure test and a dynamic viscoelastic test were conducted. Tensile strength and Young's modulus (static biomechanical properties) in the regenerating group at Week 6 were significantly greater than at Week 3, while at Week 12, these were significantly greater than at Week 6. However, even at Week 12, both parameters were less than in the control group. The value of tan delta represents dynamic viscoelasticity, a smaller tan delta indicates greater elasticity. tan delta for the regenerating group was significantly greater than for the control group at Week 3, but regenerating and control groups did not significantly differ at Week 6. No marked change was seen from Weeks 6 to 12 in the regenerating group, and no significant difference in tan delta was evident between the regenerating and control groups at Week 12. Dynamic biomechanical properties of regenerating rabbit Achilles tendons may improve more rapidly than static biomechanical properties. Ability to tolerate dynamic movement in the healing Achilles tendon may improve more rapidly than ability to withstand static stresses.

  3. Stability of plasma in static equilibrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krusiial, M D; Oberman, N R [Project Matterhorn, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1958-07-01

    Our purpose is to derive from the Boltzmann equation in the small m/e limit, criteria useful in the discussion of stability of plasmas in static equilibrium. At first we ignore collisions but later show their effects may be taken into account. Our approach yields a generalization of the usual energy principles for investigating the stability of hydromagnetic systems to situations where the effect of heat flow along magnetic lines is not negligible, and hence to situations where the strictly hydrodynamic approach is inapplicable. In the first two sections we characterize our general method of approach and delineate the properties of the small m/e limit which we use to determine the constants of the motion and the condition for static equilibrium. In the next two sections we calculate the first and second variations of the energy and conclude with a statement of the general stability criterion. In the final three sections we state several theorems which relate our stability criterion to those of ordinary hydromagnetic theory, we show how to take into account the effect of collisions, and briefly discuss the remaining problem of incorporating the charge neutrality condition into the present stability theory. (author)

  4. Matlab Stability and Control Toolbox: Trim and Static Stability Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Kenny, Sean P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the technical background of the Trim and Static module of the Matlab Stability and Control Toolbox. This module performs a low-fidelity stability and control assessment of an aircraft model for a set of flight critical conditions. This is attained by determining if the control authority available for trim is sufficient and if the static stability characteristics are adequate. These conditions can be selected from a prescribed set or can be specified to meet particular requirements. The prescribed set of conditions includes horizontal flight, take-off rotation, landing flare, steady roll, steady turn and pull-up/ push-over flight, for which several operating conditions can be specified. A mathematical model was developed allowing for six-dimensional trim, adjustable inertial properties, asymmetric vehicle layouts, arbitrary number of engines, multi-axial thrust vectoring, engine(s)-out conditions, crosswind and gyroscopic effects.

  5. MATLAB Stability and Control Toolbox Trim and Static Stability Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Sean P.; Crespo, Luis

    2012-01-01

    MATLAB Stability and Control Toolbox (MASCOT) utilizes geometric, aerodynamic, and inertial inputs to calculate air vehicle stability in a variety of critical flight conditions. The code is based on fundamental, non-linear equations of motion and is able to translate results into a qualitative, graphical scale useful to the non-expert. MASCOT was created to provide the conceptual aircraft designer accurate predictions of air vehicle stability and control characteristics. The code takes as input mass property data in the form of an inertia tensor, aerodynamic loading data, and propulsion (i.e. thrust) loading data. Using fundamental nonlinear equations of motion, MASCOT then calculates vehicle trim and static stability data for the desired flight condition(s). Available flight conditions include six horizontal and six landing rotation conditions with varying options for engine out, crosswind, and sideslip, plus three take-off rotation conditions. Results are displayed through a unique graphical interface developed to provide the non-stability and control expert conceptual design engineer a qualitative scale indicating whether the vehicle has acceptable, marginal, or unacceptable static stability characteristics. If desired, the user can also examine the detailed, quantitative results.

  6. Relations between Biomechanical Parameters and Static Power of Arms in Children with Disturbed Posture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slobodan Andrašić

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at determining the parameters and biomechanical analysis of their impact on the static arm strength in children with impaired posture as poor kyphotic posture, lordotic poor posture and children with flat feet. A transversal study included a sample of 67 children on the territory of the municipality of Subotica. The structure of the sample is as follows: 22 subjects with impaired kyphotic posture, 18 patients with impaired lordotic posture, and 27 subjects with flat feet. Measuring the level of static arm strength was done by the standardized "folding endurance" test. Observing the morphological development of children with kyphotic, lordotic poor posture and flat feet determined statistically significant differences in biomechanical variables.

  7. Shoulder biomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugo, Roberto; Kung, Peter; Ma, C. Benjamin [Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, University of California, San Francisco, 500 Parnassus Avenue, MU 320W-0728 San Francisco, CA 914143 (United States)], E-mail: maben@orthosurg.ucsf.edu

    2008-10-15

    The biomechanics of the glenohumeral joint depend on the interaction of both static and dynamic-stabilizing structures. Static stabilizers include the bony anatomy, negative intra-articular pressure, the glenoid labrum, and the glenohumeral ligaments along with the joint capsule. The dynamic-stabilizing structures include the rotator cuff muscles and the other muscular structures surrounding the shoulder joint. The combined effect of these stabilizers is to support the multiple degrees of motion within the glenohumeral joint. The goal of this article is to review how these structures interact to provide optimal stability and how failure of some of these mechanisms can lead to shoulder joint pathology.

  8. 14 CFR 23.173 - Static longitudinal stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Static longitudinal stability. 23.173... Stability § 23.173 Static longitudinal stability. Under the conditions specified in § 23.175 and with the airplane trimmed as indicated, the characteristics of the elevator control forces and the friction within...

  9. New Sufficient LMI Conditions for Static Output Stabilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adegas, Fabiano Daher

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents new linear matrix inequality conditions to the static output feedback stabilization problem. Although the conditions are only sufficient, numerical experiments show excellent success rates in finding a stabilizing controller....

  10. 14 CFR 25.173 - Static longitudinal stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Static longitudinal stability. 25.173... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 25.173 Static... forces (including friction) must be as follows: (a) A pull must be required to obtain and maintain speeds...

  11. Biomechanics of the spine. Part I: Spinal stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izzo, Roberto; Guarnieri, Gianluigi; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Muto, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Biomechanics, the application of mechanical principles to living organisms, helps us to understand how all the bony and soft spinal components contribute individually and together to ensure spinal stability, and how traumas, tumours and degenerative disorders exert destabilizing effects. Spine stability is the basic requirement to protect nervous structures and prevent the early mechanical deterioration of spinal components. The literature reports a number of biomechanical and clinical definitions of spinal stability, but a consensus definition is lacking. Any vertebra in each spinal motion segment, the smallest functional unit of the spine, can perform various combinations of the main and coupled movements during which a number of bony and soft restraints maintain spine stability. Bones, disks and ligaments contribute by playing a structural role and by acting as transducers through their mechanoreceptors. Mechanoreceptors send proprioceptive impulses to the central nervous system which coordinates muscle tone, movement and reflexes. Damage to any spinal structure gives rise to some degree of instability. Instability is classically considered as a global increase in the movements associated with the occurrence of back and/or nerve root pain. The assessment of spinal instability remains a major challenge for diagnostic imaging experts. Knowledge of biomechanics is essential in view of the increasing involvement of radiologists and neuroradiologists in spinal interventional procedures and the ongoing development of new techniques and devices. Bioengineers and surgeons are currently focusing on mobile stabilization systems. These systems represent a new frontier in the treatment of painful degenerative spine and aim to neutralize noxious forces, restore the normal function of spinal segments and protect the adjacent segments. This review discusses the current concepts of spine stability

  12. Biomechanics of the spine. Part I: Spinal stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izzo, Roberto, E-mail: roberto1766@interfree.it [Neuroradiology Department, “A. Cardarelli” Hospital, Napoli (Italy); Guarnieri, Gianluigi, E-mail: gianluigiguarnieri@hotmail.it [Neuroradiology Department, “A. Cardarelli” Hospital, Napoli (Italy); Guglielmi, Giuseppe, E-mail: g.gugliemi@unifg.it [Department of Radiology, University of Foggia, Foggia (Italy); Muto, Mario, E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Neuroradiology Department, “A. Cardarelli” Hospital, Napoli (Italy)

    2013-01-15

    Biomechanics, the application of mechanical principles to living organisms, helps us to understand how all the bony and soft spinal components contribute individually and together to ensure spinal stability, and how traumas, tumours and degenerative disorders exert destabilizing effects. Spine stability is the basic requirement to protect nervous structures and prevent the early mechanical deterioration of spinal components. The literature reports a number of biomechanical and clinical definitions of spinal stability, but a consensus definition is lacking. Any vertebra in each spinal motion segment, the smallest functional unit of the spine, can perform various combinations of the main and coupled movements during which a number of bony and soft restraints maintain spine stability. Bones, disks and ligaments contribute by playing a structural role and by acting as transducers through their mechanoreceptors. Mechanoreceptors send proprioceptive impulses to the central nervous system which coordinates muscle tone, movement and reflexes. Damage to any spinal structure gives rise to some degree of instability. Instability is classically considered as a global increase in the movements associated with the occurrence of back and/or nerve root pain. The assessment of spinal instability remains a major challenge for diagnostic imaging experts. Knowledge of biomechanics is essential in view of the increasing involvement of radiologists and neuroradiologists in spinal interventional procedures and the ongoing development of new techniques and devices. Bioengineers and surgeons are currently focusing on mobile stabilization systems. These systems represent a new frontier in the treatment of painful degenerative spine and aim to neutralize noxious forces, restore the normal function of spinal segments and protect the adjacent segments. This review discusses the current concepts of spine stability.

  13. Biomechanics of unilateral and bilateral sacroiliac joint stabilization: laboratory investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Derek P; Parrish, Robin; Gundanna, Mukund; Leasure, Jeremi; Yerby, Scott A; Kondrashov, Dimitriy

    2018-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Bilateral symptoms have been reported in 8%-35% of patients with sacroiliac (SI) joint dysfunction. Stabilization of a single SI joint may significantly alter the stresses on the contralateral SI joint. If the contralateral SI joint stresses are significantly increased, degeneration may occur; alternatively, if the stresses are significantly reduced, bilateral stabilization may be unnecessary for patients with bilateral symptoms. The biomechanical effects of 1) unilateral stabilization on the contralateral SI joint and 2) bilateral stabilization on both SI joints are currently unknown. The objectives of this study were to characterize bilateral SI joint range of motion (ROM) and evaluate and compare the biomechanical effects of unilateral and bilateral implant placement for SI joint fusion. METHODS A lumbopelvic model (L5-pelvis) was used to test the ROM of both SI joints in 8 cadavers. A single-leg stance setup was used to load the lumbar spine and measure the ROM of each SI joint in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. Both joints were tested 1) while intact, 2) after unilateral stabilization, and 3) after bilateral stabilization. Stabilization consisted of lateral transiliac placement of 3 triangular titanium plasma-sprayed (TPS) implants. RESULTS Intact testing showed that during single-leg stance the contralateral SI joint had less ROM in flexion-extension (27%), lateral bending (32%), and axial rotation (69%) than the loaded joint. Unilateral stabilization resulted in significant reduction of flexion-extension ROM (46%) on the treated side; no significant ROM changes were observed for the nontreated side. Bilateral stabilization resulted in significant reduction of flexion-extension ROM of the primary (45%) and secondary (75%) SI joints. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrated that during single-leg loading the ROMs for the stance (loaded) and swing (unloaded) SI joints are significantly different. Unilateral stabilization for SI

  14. Stability of the Einstein static universe in open cosmological models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canonico, Rosangela; Parisi, Luca

    2010-01-01

    The stability properties of the Einstein static solution of general relativity are altered when corrective terms arising from modification of the underlying gravitational theory appear in the cosmological equations. In this paper the existence and stability of static solutions are considered in the framework of two recently proposed quantum gravity models. The previously known analysis of the Einstein static solutions in the semiclassical regime of loop quantum cosmology with modifications to the gravitational sector is extended to open cosmological models where a static neutrally stable solution is found. A similar analysis is also performed in the framework of Horava-Lifshitz gravity under detailed balance and projectability conditions. In the case of open cosmological models the two solutions found can be either unstable or neutrally stable according to the admitted values of the parameters.

  15. Static or feedback stabilization of the burn in a Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minardi, E.

    1980-02-01

    The control of the burn in an ignited Tokamak using a space and time dependent external vertical magnetic field is discussed. It is shown that a static field, suitably shaped in space, is able to stabilize the burn for a certain range of the plasma parameters of physical interest. An oscillating magnetic field with constant frequency and amplitude fixed by the initial plasma parameters stabilizes the burn in all situations. (orig.)

  16. Stability Analysis of Static Slip-Energy Recovery Drive via ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The stability of the sub synchronous static slip energy recovery scheme for the speed control of slip-ring induction motor is presented. A set of nonlinear differential equations which describe the system dynamics are derived and linearized about an operating point using perturbation technique. The Eigenvalue analysis of the ...

  17. Static Voltage Stability Analysis by Using SVM and Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Hajian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Voltage stability is an important problem in power system networks. In this paper, in terms of static voltage stability, and application of Neural Networks (NN and Supported Vector Machine (SVM for estimating of voltage stability margin (VSM and predicting of voltage collapse has been investigated. This paper considers voltage stability in power system in two parts. The first part calculates static voltage stability margin by Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBFNN. The advantage of the used method is high accuracy in online detecting the VSM. Whereas the second one, voltage collapse analysis of power system is performed by Probabilistic Neural Network (PNN and SVM. The obtained results in this paper indicate, that time and number of training samples of SVM, are less than NN. In this paper, a new model of training samples for detection system, using the normal distribution load curve at each load feeder, has been used. Voltage stability analysis is estimated by well-know L and VSM indexes. To demonstrate the validity of the proposed methods, IEEE 14 bus grid and the actual network of Yazd Province are used.

  18. Atmospheric stability analysis over statically and dynamically rough surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maric, Emina; Metzger, Meredith; Singha, Arindam; Sadr, Reza

    2011-11-01

    The ratio of buoyancy flux to turbulent kinetic energy production in the atmospheric surface layer is investigated experimentally for air flow over two types of surfaces characterized by static and dynamic roughness. In this study, ``static'' refers to the time-invariant nature of naturally-occurring roughness over a mud/salt playa; while, ``dynamic'' refers to the behavior of water waves along an air-water interface. In both cases, time-resolved measurements of the momentum and heat fluxes were acquired from synchronized 3D sonic anemometers mounted on a vertical tower. Field campaigns were conducted at two sites, representing the ``statically'' and ``dynamically'' rough surfaces, respectively: (1) the SLTEST facility in Utah's western desert, and (2) the new Doha airport in Qatar under construction along the coast of the Persian Gulf. Note, at site 2, anemometers were located directly above the water by extension from a tower secured to the end of a 1 km-long pier. Comparisons of the Monin-Obukhov length, flux Richardson number, and gradient Richardson number are presented, and discussed in the context of the observed evolution of the turbulent spectra in response to diurnal variations of atmospheric stability. Supported by the Qatar National Research Fund.

  19. Relative contributions of plantar fascia and ligaments on the arch static stability: a finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Kai; Ji, Wen-Ting; Wang, Dong-Mei; Wang, Cheng-Tao; Wang, Xu

    2010-10-01

    The plantar fascia (PF) and major ligaments play important roles in keeping the static foot arch structure. Their functions and relative contributions to the arch stability have not been well studied. A three-dimensional finite element foot model was created based on the reconstruction of magnetic resonance images. During balanced standing, four cases after individual releases of the PF, spring ligament (SL), and long and short plantar ligaments (LPL and SPL) were simulated, to compare their biomechanical consequences with the normal predictions under the intact structure. Although the predictions showed the arch did not collapse obviously after each structure sectioning, the internal mechanical behaviors changed considerably. The PF release resulted in the maximal increases of approximately 91%, 65% and 47% in the tensions of the LPF, SPL and SL, produced the largest changes in all bone rotations, and brought an obvious shift of high stress from the medial metatarsals to the lateral metatarsals. The SL release mainly enhanced bone rotation angles and weakened the joint stability of the arch structure. The LPL and the SPL performed the roles of mutual compensation as either one was released. The influence of the LPL on the load distribution among metatarsals was greater than for the SPL and the SL.

  20. Surgical options for lumbosacral fusion: biomechanical stability, advantage, disadvantage and affecting factors in selecting options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Hiroyuki

    2014-07-01

    Numerous surgical procedures and instrumentation techniques for lumbosacral fusion (LSF) have been developed. This is probably because of its high mechanical demand and unique anatomy. Surgical options include anterior column support (ACS) and posterior stabilization procedures. Biomechanical studies have been performed to verify the stability of those options. The options have their own advantage but also disadvantage aspects. This review article reports the surgical options for lumbosacral fusion, their biomechanical stability, advantages/disadvantages, and affecting factors in option selection. Review of literature. LSF has lots of options both for ACS and posterior stabilization procedures. Combination of posterior stabilization procedures is an option. Furthermore, combinations of ACS and posterior stabilization procedures are other options. It is difficult to make a recommendation or treatment algorithm of LSF from the current literature. However, it is important to know all aspects of the options and decision-making of surgical options for LSF needs to be tailored for each patient, considering factors such as biomechanical stress and osteoporosis.

  1. Interosseous Ligament and Transverse Forearm Stability: A Biomechanical Cadaver Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutowski, Christina J; Darvish, Kurosh; Ilyas, Asif M; Jones, Christopher M

    2017-02-01

    The interosseous ligament (IOL) is known to be an important longitudinal stabilizer of the forearm. We hypothesize that it may also contribute to transverse stability, with pronosupination tensioning of the radius relative to the ulna. Therefore, when injured, we predict the interosseous space should widen in the transverse plane, enough to be appreciable on plain radiographs. A measurable difference in interosseous space, comparing an injured with an uninjured forearm, can potentially be of diagnostic and clinical value. Ten fresh-frozen cadaver arms (from 5 individuals) were radiographed in 6 different positions of forearm supination, first in an uninjured state and then with the IOL sectioned, both partially (central band only) and completely. The transverse interosseous distance was measured on radiographs using edge detection software and compared using analysis of variance and contrast analysis. The maximum range of pronosupination was also compared before and after injury, using a paired t test. Average maximum supination increased from 84° to 106°, and pronation from 69° to 84°, after the IOL was sectioned completely. Sectioning of the IOL led to a statistically significant increase in the interosseous distance, a minimum of 2 mm, in all but one forearm position. The IOL of the forearm plays an important role in providing transverse stability to the radius and ulna. When the IOL is sectioned, the forearm exhibits increased pronosupination range of motion. Radiographs of bilateral forearms taken in identical rotational position can reliably differentiate between an intact and torn IOL in cadavers. The IOL's stabilizing role during forearm rotation suggests a novel strategy for diagnosing forearm IOL injury using comparative radiographic measurements. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. SIMULATION OF THE TRANSITIONAL REGIME OF THE MOLDOVAN POWER UNDER STATIC STABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Postolaty V.M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the outcome of the Moldovan power system static stability modeling and analysis, considering the operation in parallel with the Ukrainian power system and the established operation regimes. The analysis includes verification of the reserve of static stability and definition of the static stability limits for a given operation mode, and the determination of the power system stability domain of the controlled system nodes. Parameters used for the analysis are the active power flows via controlled sections and the voltage levels at the controlled system nodes. Two options of Moldovan power system scheme are considered: a single-circuit transit Dniester HPP - Balti - Straseni – Chisinau 330kV and a double-circuit transit. Studies have shown that the implementation of the double-circuit transit would lead to better static stability parameters and lower power system losses. The analysis has been carried out based on the power system stability.

  3. Biomechanical aspects of initial intraosseous stability and implant design: a quantitative micro-morphometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akça, Kivanç; Chang, Ting-Ling; Tekdemir, Ibrahim; Fanuscu, Mete I

    2006-08-01

    The objective of this biomechanical study was to explore the effect of bone micro-morphology on initial intraosseous stability of implants with different designs. Straumann and Astra Tech dental implants were placed into anterior and posterior regions of completely edentulous maxilla and mandible of a human cadaver. Experiments were undertaken to quantify initial implant stability and bone micro-morphology. Installation torque values (ITVs) and implant stability quotients (ISQs) were measured to determine initial intraosseous implant stability. For quantification of relative bone volume and micro-architecture, sectioned implant-bone and bone core specimens of each implant placement site were consecutively scanned and trabecular bone was analyzed in a micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) unit. Experimental outcomes were evaluated for correlations among implant designs, initial intraosseous implant stability and bone micro-structural parameters. ITVs correlated higher with bone volume fraction (BV/TV) than ISQs, at 88.1% and 68.9% levels, respectively. Correlations between ITVs and micro-morphometric parameters were significant at the 95% confidence level (Pimplant designs used were not significant at the 95% confidence level (P>0.05). Bone micro-morphology has a prevailing effect over implant design on intraosseus initial implant stability, and ITV is more sensitive in terms of revealing biomechanical properties at the bone-implant interface in comparison with ISQ.

  4. Patch-augmented rotator cuff repair: influence of the patch fixation technique on primary biomechanical stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Christian; Spreiter, Gregor; Audigé, Laurent; Ferguson, Stephen J; Flury, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    There is an ongoing debate about the potential of patch augmentation to improve biomechanical stability and healing associated with rotator cuff repair. The biomechanical properties of three different patch-augmented rotator cuff repair techniques were assessed in vitro and compared with a standard repair. Dermal collagen patch augmentation may increase the primary stability and strength of the repaired tendon in vitro, depending on the technique used for patch application. Forty cadaveric sheep shoulders with dissected infraspinatus tendons were randomized into four groups (n = 10/group) for tendon repair using a knotless double-row suture anchor technique. A xenologous dermal extracellular matrix patch was used for augmentation in the three test groups using an "integrated", "cover", or "hybrid" technique. Tendons were preconditioned, cyclically loaded from 10 to 30 N at 1 Hz, and then loaded monotonically to failure. Biomechanical properties and the mode of failure were evaluated. Patch augmentation significantly increased the maximum load at failure by 61 % in the "cover" technique test group (225.8 N) and 51 % in the "hybrid" technique test group (211.4 N) compared with the non-augmented control group (140.2 N) (P ≤ 0.015). For the test group with "integrated" patch augmentation, the load at failure was 28 % lower (101.6 N) compared with the control group (P = 0.043). There was no significant difference in initial and linear stiffness among the four experimental groups. The most common mode of failure was tendon pullout. No anchor dislocation, patch disruption or knot breakage was observed. Additional patch augmentation with a collagen patch influences the biomechanical properties of a rotator cuff repair in a cadaveric sheep model. Primary repair stability can be significantly improved depending on the augmentation technique.

  5. [Stability versus mobility of the shoulder. Biomechanical aspects in athletes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, M F; Smith, T; Struck, M; Wellmann, M

    2014-03-01

    The demand profile of athletes shoulders is high. On the one hand the shoulder has to provide a maximum active range of motion that allows rapid movements of the arm and on the other hand it has to be sufficiently stabilized to decelerate rapid movements and to neutralize the resulting translational forces. Two general types of instability can be differentiated in athletes shoulders: the macroinstability typically occurring in athletes involved in contact sports and the microinstability occurring in athletes involved in overhead sports.Repetitive abduction and external rotation movements of athletes involved in overhead sports lead to adaptation of the glenohumeral joint capsule and ligaments. The anterior capsule becomes stretched while the posterior capsule develops tightness. These adaptations can result in an anterior microinstability as well as posterosuperior impingement (PSI) which implicates a pathological contact of the posterosuperior rotator cuff with the posterior glenoid and which is also associated with SLAP lesions. In contrast the shoulders of swimmers are prone to anterosuperior impingement because the arm stroke involves a forceful combined anteflexion, adduction and internal rotation of the arm.The macroinstability of contact athletes is caused by sufficient trauma and characterized by a structural lesion of capsulolabral or bony lesion. While the empirical recurrence risk of young contact athletes is already high, it can be further impaired by bony defects of the glenoid. In suspected cases, critical glenoid defects should be quantified by computed tomography (CT) scans and treated by bony augmentation of the glenoid.

  6. Frontal plane stability following UKA in a biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyse, Thomas J; Tucker, Scott M; Rajak, Yogesh; Kia, Mohammad; Lipman, Joseph D; Imhauser, Carl W; Westrich, Geoffrey H

    2015-06-01

    Function and kinematics following unicondylar knee arthroplasty (UKA) have been reported to be close to the native knee. Gait, stair climbing and activities of daily living expose the knee joint to a combination of varus and valgus moments. Replacement of the medial compartment via UKA is likely to change the physiologic knee stability and its ability to respond to varus and valgus moments. It was hypothesized that UKA implantation would stiffen the knee and decrease range of motion in the frontal plane. Six fresh frozen cadaver knees were prepared and mounted in a six-degrees-of-freedom robot. An axial load of 200 N was applied with the knee in 15°, 45° and 90° of flexion. Varus and valgus moments were added, respectively, before and after implantation of medial UKA. Tests were than redone with a thicker polyethylene inlay to simulate overstuffing of the medial compartment. Range of motion in the frontal plane and the tibial response to moments were recorded via the industrial robot. The range of motion in the frontal plane was decreased with both, balanced and overstuffed UKA and shifted towards valgus. When exposed to valgus moments, knees following UKA were stiffer in comparison with the native knee. The effect was even more pronounced with medial overstuffing. In UKA, the compressive anatomy is replaced by much stiffer components. This lack of medial compression and relative overstuffing leads to a tighter medial collateral ligament. This drives the trend towards a stiffer joint as documented by a decrease in frontal plane range of motion. Overstuffing should strictly be avoided when performing UKA.

  7. Stability of the Einstein static universe in modified theories of gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Boehmer, Christian G.; Hollenstein, Lukas; Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Seahra, Sanjeev S.

    2010-01-01

    We present a brief overview of the stability analysis of the Einstein static universe in various modified theories of gravity, like f(R) gravity, Gauss-Bonnet or f(G) gravity, and Horava-Lifshitz gravity.

  8. BIOMECHANICS OF THERAPEUTIC RIDING DURING THE DISEASES OF I-II DEGREE DYSPLASTIC LUMBAR AND STATIC (SHORT LEG) SCOLIOSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheshaberidze, E; Merabishvili, I; Loria, M

    2015-11-01

    The goal of the paper is to substantiate the essence of ridetherapy biomechanics as the pathogenetic therapeutic and prophylactic method at lumbar dysplastic (the I and II degrees) and static (short-legged induced) scoliosis. Uneven lower extremities caused by any reason and asymmetric support induce the change in the arrangement of trochantin to the vertebra and correspondingly the uneven loading of lumbar muscles. The asymmetric strength of lumbar muscles evoked by the change in rotator condition becomes the cause of the formation of scoliosis primary arc which, in its turn, causes a compensatory spinal curvature. In case of dysplastic scoliosis a leading role belongs to the beginning of dystrophic changes in intervertebral discs and its further decentration. At riding position the lower extremities are completely disengaged from the antigravity redistribution, the child is in direct contact with vibrations and jolts coming from the horseback; the antigravity loading is distributed on the muscles of the torso and thus, it creates an opportunity to purposefully affect the correction of the spine. During scoliosis the pathogenic essence of ridetherapy is due to the comprehensiveness of its procedures, expressed in the fact that during one procedure several factors are influenced simultaneously: nucleus pulpous, the torso and iliopsoas muscles, the antigravity system, etc. According to the clinical-functional and radiographic studies carried out in the dynamics on 11-16 years old adolescents it has been established that in those groups where the rehabilitation was conducted in a complex with ridetherapy the authentically higher results were obtained as compared to the groups where the rehabilitation was held using therapeutic exercises and massage.

  9. Investigation of biomechanical behavior of lumbar vertebral segments with dynamic stabilization device using finite element approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deoghare, Ashish B.; Kashyap, Siddharth; Padole, Pramod M.

    2013-03-01

    Degenerative disc disease is a major source of lower back pain and significantly alters the biomechanics of the lumbar spine. Dynamic stabilization device is a remedial technique which uses flexible materials to stabilize the affected lumbar region while preserving the natural anatomy of the spine. The main objective of this research work is to investigate the stiffness variation of dynamic stabilization device under various loading conditions under compression, axial rotation and flexion. Three dimensional model of the two segment lumbar spine is developed using computed tomography (CT) scan images. The lumbar structure developed is analyzed in ANSYS workbench. Two types of dynamic stabilization are considered: one with stabilizing device as pedicle instrumentation and second with stabilization device inserted around the inter-vertebral disc. Analysis suggests that proper positioning of the dynamic stabilization device is of paramount significance prior to the surgery. Inserting the device in the posterior region indicates the adverse effects as it shows increase in the deformation of the inter-vertebral disc. Analysis executed by positioning stabilizing device around the inter-vertebral disc yields better result for various stiffness values under compression and other loadings. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Application of a Modal Approach in Solving the Static Stability Problem for Electric Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharov, J. V.

    2017-12-01

    Application of a modal approach in solving the static stability problem for power systems is examined. It is proposed to use the matrix exponent norm as a generalized transition function of the power system disturbed motion. Based on the concept of a stability radius and the pseudospectrum of Jacobian matrix, the necessary and sufficient conditions for existence of the static margins were determined. The capabilities and advantages of the modal approach in designing centralized or distributed control and the prospects for the analysis of nonlinear oscillations and rendering the dynamic stability are demonstrated.

  11. The biomechanical influence of the deltotrapezoid fascia on horizontal and vertical acromioclavicular joint stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, M F; Averbeck, A K; Welke, B; Smith, T; Claassen, L; Wellmann, M

    2016-04-01

    Many studies have investigated the biomechanical influence of the acromioclavicular (AC) and coracoclavicular (CC) ligaments on the stability of the acromioclavicular joint (ACJ). It has been shown that augmentation of the CC ligaments alone can result in residual horizontal instability. Our hypothesis was that the DTF would have a significant stabilizing effect on horizontal ACJ stability. In a biomechanical in vitro study a sequential injury of the ACJ was created on eight shoulders from full body, which were placed in an upright sitting position. The translation and rotation of the clavicle were measured in relation to the acromion using an optical navigation system in various states during thoracic-humeral elevation, abduction, and horizontal adduction. The three states were: an intact shoulder, complete sectioning of the AC ligaments, and a circular lesion of the DTF. Compared to the intact state we found a significant increase in anterior rotation of the clavicle of 1.11° (p = 0.012) and a tendency in lateral translation of 2.71 mm (p = 0.017) in relation to the acromion, with a combined lesion of AC ligaments and DTF. No significant differences were found between the intact state and the isolated dissected AC ligaments as well in adduction as elevation. A combined lesion of the AC ligaments and the DTF resulted in a quantitatively small but significant increase in anterior rotation and a tendency in lateral translation of the clavicle in relation to the acromion. These differences were quantitatively small, so that the clinical relevance of the stabilization effect of combined AC ligaments and DTF injuries is questionable.

  12. Biomechanics of Posterior Dynamic Fusion Systems in the Lumbar Spine: Implications for Stabilization With Improved Arthrodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Alexander K; Siegfried, Catherine M; Chew, Brandon; Hobbs, Joseph; Sabersky, Abraham; Jho, Diana J; Cook, Daniel J; Bellotte, Jonathan Brad; Whiting, Donald M; Cheng, Boyle C

    2016-08-01

    A comparative biomechanical human cadaveric spine study of a dynamic fusion rod and a traditional titanium rod. The purpose of this study was to measure and compare the biomechanical metrics associated with a dynamic fusion device, Isobar TTL Evolution, and a rigid rod. Dynamic fusion rods may enhance arthrodesis compared with a rigid rod. Wolff's law implies that bone remodeling and growth may be enhanced through anterior column loading (AL). This is important for dynamic fusion rods because their purpose is to increase AL. Six fresh-frozen lumbar cadaveric specimens were used. Each untreated specimen (Intact) underwent biomechanical testing. Next, each specimen had a unilateral transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion performed at L3-L4 using a cage with an integrated load cell. Pedicle screws were also placed at this time. Subsequently, the Isobar was implanted and tested, and finally, a rigid rod replaced the Isobar in the same pedicle screw arrangement. In terms of range of motion, the Isobar performed comparably to the rigid rod and there was no statistical difference found between Isobar and rigid rod. There was a significant difference between the intact and rigid rod and also between intact and Isobar conditions in flexion extension. For interpedicular displacement, there was a significant increase in flexion extension (P=0.017) for the Isobar compared with the rigid rod. Isobar showed increased AL under axial compression compared with the rigid rod (P=0.024). Isobar provided comparable stabilization to a rigid rod when using range of motion as the metric, however, AL was increased because of the greater interpedicular displacement of dynamic rod compared with a rigid rod. By increasing interpedicular displacement and AL, it potentially brings clinical benefit to procedures relying on arthrodesis.

  13. Bone anchors or interference screws? A biomechanical evaluation for autograft ankle stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeys, Lee; Korrosis, Sotiris; Stewart, Todd; Harris, Nicholas J

    2004-01-01

    Autograft stabilization uses free semitendinosus tendon grafts to anatomically reconstruct the anterior talofibular ligament. Study aims were to evaluate the biomechanical properties of Mitek GII anchors compared with the Arthrex Bio-Tenodesis Screw for free tendon reconstruction of the anterior talofibular ligament. There are no differences in load to failure and percentage specimen elongation at failure between the 2 methods. Controlled laboratory study using porcine models. Sixty porcine tendon constructs were failure tested. Re-creating the pull of the anterior talofibular ligament, loads were applied at 70 degrees to the bones. Thirty-six tendons were fixed to porcine tali and tested using a single pull to failure; 10 were secured with anchors and No. 2 Ethibond, 10 with anchors and FiberWire, 10 with screws and Fiberwire, and 6 with partially gripped screws. Cyclic preloading was conducted on 6 tendons fixed by anchors and on 6 tendons fixed by screws before failure testing. Two groups of 6 components fixed to the fibula were also tested. The talus single-pull anchor group produced a mean load of 114 N and elongation of 37% at failure. The talus single-pull screw group produced a mean load of 227 N and elongation of 22% at failure (P anchors. The improved biomechanics of interference screws suggests that these may be more suited to in vivo reconstruction of the anterior talofibular ligament than are bone anchors.

  14. Transient Stability Enhancement in Power System Using Static VAR Compensator (SVC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef MOULOUDI

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an indirect adaptive fuzzy excitation and static VAR (unit of reactive power, volt-ampere reactive compensator (SVC controller is proposed to enhance transient stability for the power system, which based on input-output linearization technique. A three-bus system, which contains a generator and static VAR compensator (SVC, is considered in this paper, the SVC is located at the midpoint of the transmission lines. Simulation results show that the proposed controller compared with a controller based on tradition linearization technique can enhance the transient stability of the power system under a large sudden fault, which may occur nearly at the generator bus terminal.

  15. Optical-coupling nuclear spin maser under highly stabilized low static field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshimi, A., E-mail: yoshimi@ribf.riken.jp [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Inoue, T.; Uchida, M.; Hatakeyama, N.; Asahi, K. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics (Japan)

    2008-01-15

    A nuclear spin maser of a new type, that employs a feedback scheme based on optical nuclear spin detection, has been fabricated. The spin maser is operated at a low static field of 30 mG by using the optical detection method. The frequency stability and precision of the spin maser have been improved by a highly stabilized current source for the static magnetic field. An experimental setup to search for an electric dipole moment (EDM) in {sup 129}Xe atom is being developed.

  16. The Effect of Lower Body Stabilization and Different Writing Tools on Writing Biomechanics in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsin-Yi Kathy; Lien, Yueh-Ju; Yu, Yu-Chun; Ju, Yan-Ying; Pei, Yu-Cheng; Cheng, Chih-Hsiu; Wu, David Bin-Chia

    2013-01-01

    A high percentage of children with cerebral palsy (CP) have difficulty keeping up with the handwriting demands at school. Previous studies have addressed the effects of proper sitting and writing tool on writing performance, but less on body biomechanics. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of lower body stabilization and pencil…

  17. Nonlinear Slewing Spacecraft Control Based on Exergy, Power Flow, and Static and Dynamic Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinett, Rush D.; Wilson, David G.

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents a new nonlinear control methodology for slewing spacecraft, which provides both necessary and sufficient conditions for stability by identifying the stability boundaries, rigid body modes, and limit cycles. Conservative Hamiltonian system concepts, which are equivalent to static stability of airplanes, are used to find and deal with the static stability boundaries: rigid body modes. The application of exergy and entropy thermodynamic concepts to the work-rate principle provides a natural partitioning through the second law of thermodynamics of power flows into exergy generator, dissipator, and storage for Hamiltonian systems that is employed to find the dynamic stability boundaries: limit cycles. This partitioning process enables the control system designer to directly evaluate and enhance the stability and performance of the system by balancing the power flowing into versus the power dissipated within the system subject to the Hamiltonian surface (power storage). Relationships are developed between exergy, power flow, static and dynamic stability, and Lyapunov analysis. The methodology is demonstrated with two illustrative examples: (1) a nonlinear oscillator with sinusoidal damping and (2) a multi-input-multi-output three-axis slewing spacecraft that employs proportional-integral-derivative tracking control with numerical simulation results.

  18. Biomechanical evaluation of immediate stability with rectangular versus cylindrical interbody cages in stabilization of the lumbar spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webb John K

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent cadaver studies show stability against axial rotation with a cylindrical cage is marginally superior to a rectangular cage. The purpose of this biomechanical study in cadaver spine was to evaluate the stability of a new rectangular titanium cage design, which has teeth similar to the threads of cylindrical cages to engage the endplates. Methods Ten motion segments (five L2-3, five L4-5 were tested. From each cadaver spine, one motion segment was fixed with a pair of cylindrical cages (BAK, Sulzer Medica and the other with paired rectangular cages (Rotafix, Corin Spinal. Each specimen was tested in an unconstrained state, after cage introduction and after additional posterior translaminar screw fixation. The range of motion (ROM in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and rotation was tested in a materials testing machine, with +/- 5 Nm cyclical load over 10 sec per cycle; data from the third cycle was captured for analysis. Results ROM in all directions was significantly reduced (p Conclusions There was no significant difference in immediate stability in any direction between the threaded cylindrical cage and the new design of the rectangular cage with endplate teeth.

  19. Stability of Einstein static state universe in the spatially flat branemodels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Kaituo [Department of Physics, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu, Anhui 241000 (China); Wu, Puxun [Center for Nonlinear Science and Department of Physics, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315211 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center for Quantum Effects and Applications, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, Hunan 410081 (China); Center for High Energy Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100080 (China); Yu, Hongwei, E-mail: hwyu@hunnu.edu.cn [Synergetic Innovation Center for Quantum Effects and Applications, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, Hunan 410081 (China); Center for Nonlinear Science and Department of Physics, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315211 (China); Luo, Ling-Wei [Institute of Physics, Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2016-07-10

    With the assumption that a perfect fluid with a constant equation of state is the only energy component on the brane, we study the stability of Einstein static state solution under homogeneous and inhomogeneous scalar perturbations in both spatially flat Randall–Sundrum (RS) and Shtanov–Sahni (SS) braneworlds. We find that if the perfect fluid has a phantom-like property and the “Weyl fluid” originating from the projection of the bulk Weyl tensor onto the brane behaves like a radiation with positive energy density, the Einstein static state solution is stable in the SS braneworld, but unstable in the RS one. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the static state solution is also stable in the bulk with a timelike extra dimension. Thus, in the model where the extra dimension is timelike, our universe can stay at the Einstein static state past-eternally, which means that the big bang singularity might be resolved successfully by an emergent scenario.

  20. Economic evaluation of flying-qualities design criteria for a transport configured with relaxed static stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwa, S. M.

    1980-01-01

    Direct constrained parameter optimization was used to optimally size a medium range transport for minimum direct operating cost. Several stability and control constraints were varied to study the sensitivity of the configuration to specifying the unaugmented flying qualities of transports designed to take maximum advantage of relaxed static stability augmentation systems. Additionally, a number of handling qualities related design constants were studied with respect to their impact on the design.

  1. The effect of radiation processing and filler morphology on the biomechanical stability of a thermoset polyester composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayabalan, M; Shalumon, K T; Mitha, M K [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Polymer Division, BMT Wing, Thiruvananthapuram 695 012, Kerala (India); Ganesan, K; Epple, M, E-mail: muthujayabalan@rediffmail.co [University of Duisburg-Essen, Inorganic Chemistry and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE), Universitaetsstr. 5-7, 45117 Essen (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    The effect of radiation processing and filler morphology on the biodegradation and biomechanical stability of a poly(propylene fumarate)/hydroxyapatite composite was investigated. Radiation processing influenced both cross-linking and biodegradation of the composites. Irradiation with a dose of 3 Mrad resulted in enhanced cross-linking, mechanical properties and a higher storage modulus which are favourable for dimensional stability of the implant. The particle morphology of the added hydroxyapatite in the highly cross-linked state significantly influenced the biomechanical and interfacial stability of the composites. Reorganization of agglomerated hydroxyapatite occurred in the cross-linked polymeric matrix under dynamic mechanical loading under simulated physiological conditions. Such a reorganization may increase the damping characteristics of the composite.

  2. The effect of radiation processing and filler morphology on the biomechanical stability of a thermoset polyester composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayabalan, M; Shalumon, K T; Mitha, M K; Ganesan, K; Epple, M

    2010-04-01

    The effect of radiation processing and filler morphology on the biodegradation and biomechanical stability of a poly(propylene fumarate)/hydroxyapatite composite was investigated. Radiation processing influenced both cross-linking and biodegradation of the composites. Irradiation with a dose of 3 Mrad resulted in enhanced cross-linking, mechanical properties and a higher storage modulus which are favourable for dimensional stability of the implant. The particle morphology of the added hydroxyapatite in the highly cross-linked state significantly influenced the biomechanical and interfacial stability of the composites. Reorganization of agglomerated hydroxyapatite occurred in the cross-linked polymeric matrix under dynamic mechanical loading under simulated physiological conditions. Such a reorganization may increase the damping characteristics of the composite.

  3. The effect of radiation processing and filler morphology on the biomechanical stability of a thermoset polyester composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayabalan, M; Shalumon, K T; Mitha, M K; Ganesan, K; Epple, M

    2010-01-01

    The effect of radiation processing and filler morphology on the biodegradation and biomechanical stability of a poly(propylene fumarate)/hydroxyapatite composite was investigated. Radiation processing influenced both cross-linking and biodegradation of the composites. Irradiation with a dose of 3 Mrad resulted in enhanced cross-linking, mechanical properties and a higher storage modulus which are favourable for dimensional stability of the implant. The particle morphology of the added hydroxyapatite in the highly cross-linked state significantly influenced the biomechanical and interfacial stability of the composites. Reorganization of agglomerated hydroxyapatite occurred in the cross-linked polymeric matrix under dynamic mechanical loading under simulated physiological conditions. Such a reorganization may increase the damping characteristics of the composite.

  4. On the stability of Einstein static universe at background level in massive bigravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mousavi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We study the static cosmological solutions and their stability at background level in the framework of massive bigravity theory with Friedmann–Robertson–Walker (FRW metrics. By the modification proposed in the cosmological equations subject to a perfect fluid we obtain new solutions interpreted as the Einstein static universe. It turns out that the non-vanishing size of initial scale factor of Einstein static universe depends on the non-vanishing three-dimensional spatial curvature of FRW metrics and also the graviton's mass. By dynamical system approach and numerical analysis, we find that the extracted solutions for closed and open universes can be stable for some viable ranges of equation of state parameter, viable values of fraction of two scale factors, and viable values of graviton's mass obeying the hierarchy m<

  5. Linear stability analysis of a levitated nanomagnet in a static magnetic field: Quantum spin stabilized magnetic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusconi, C. C.; Pöchhacker, V.; Cirac, J. I.; Romero-Isart, O.

    2017-10-01

    We theoretically study the levitation of a single magnetic domain nanosphere in an external static magnetic field. We show that, apart from the stability provided by the mechanical rotation of the nanomagnet (as in the classical Levitron), the quantum spin origin of its magnetization provides two additional mechanisms to stably levitate the system. Despite the Earnshaw theorem, such stable phases are present even in the absence of mechanical rotation. For large magnetic fields, the Larmor precession of the quantum magnetic moment stabilizes the system in full analogy with magnetic trapping of a neutral atom. For low magnetic fields, the magnetic anisotropy stabilizes the system via the Einstein-de Haas effect. These results are obtained with a linear stability analysis of a single magnetic domain rigid nanosphere with uniaxial anisotropy in a Ioffe-Pritchard magnetic field.

  6. Relapse and stability of surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion, an anatomical biomechanical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koudstaal, M.J.; Smeets, J.B.J.; Kleinrensink, G.J.; Schulten, A.J.M.; van der Wal, K.G.H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This anatomic biomechanical study was undertaken to gain insight into the underlining mechanism of tipping of the maxillary segments during transverse expansion using tooth-borne and bone-borne distraction devices. Materials and Methods: An anatomic biomechanical study was performed on 10

  7. Planning for Micro-grid with Static Voltage Stability and Maximizing Renewable Energy Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Youfu; Zhang, Yuhong; Lv, Xuehai; Zhang, Wentai; Wei, Jun; Zhang, Changhua; Chen, Xin

    2017-05-01

    The access position and capacity of distribution generation (DG) affect the static voltage stability of micro-grid, thus affecting the renewable energy utilization. In the current reform of the energy supply side, a multi-objective optimization model is established, aiming at the abandoning wind and abandoning light problem. This model has three advantages, which are the largest renewable energy utilization, static voltage stability of micro-grid and the minimum cost of DG investment considering environmental benefits. It can effectively promote the use of wind power, photovoltaic power generation and other renewable energy sources. In this paper, the multi-objective optimization problem is transformed into a single objective programming problem by using the deviation method; the optimal solution of multi-objective function is solved by using particle swarm optimization algorithm, so as to establish the planning scheme of micro-grid. Simulation results prove the correctness and feasibility of the optimization method.

  8. Orbital stability analysis in biomechanics: a systematic review of a nonlinear technique to detect instability of motor tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, F; Bisi, M C; Stagni, R

    2013-01-01

    Falls represent a heavy economic and clinical burden on society. The identification of individual chronic characteristics associated with falling is of fundamental importance for the clinicians; in particular, the stability of daily motor tasks is one of the main factors that the clinicians look for during assessment procedures. Various methods for the assessment of stability in human movement are present in literature, and methods coming from stability analysis of nonlinear dynamic systems applied to biomechanics recently showed promise. One of these techniques is orbital stability analysis via Floquet multipliers. This method allows to measure orbital stability of periodic nonlinear dynamic systems and it seems a promising approach for the definition of a reliable motor stability index, taking into account for the whole task cycle dynamics. Despite the premises, its use in the assessment of fall risk has been deemed controversial. The aim of this systematic review was therefore to provide a critical evaluation of the literature on the topic of applications of orbital stability analysis in biomechanics, with particular focus to methodologic aspects. Four electronic databases have been searched for articles relative to the topic; 23 articles were selected for review. Quality of the studies present in literature has been assessed with a customised quality assessment tool. Overall quality of the literature in the field was found to be high. The most critical aspect was found to be the lack of uniformity in the implementation of the analysis to biomechanical time series, particularly in the choice of state space and number of cycles to include in the analysis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Certain aspects of determining reserves of static stability of electricity systems in a minimum mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jovanovic, S; Popovic, D

    1982-01-01

    Results are described from analyzing static stability of the minimum modes for needs of planning electricity systems of Serbia (Socialist Federated Republic of Yugoslovia) up to 1985 with regard for development of the power transmission line network 400 kV, and introduction of turbogenerators of high output. Studies were made of the institute ''Nikola Tesla'' using computers for a digital computer using a mathematical model of multiple-machine electricity systems.

  10. Dynamic augmentation restores anterior tibial translation in ACL suture repair: a biomechanical comparison of non-, static and dynamic augmentation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogeslag, Roy A G; Brouwer, Reinoud W; Huis In 't Veld, Rianne; Stephen, Joanna M; Amis, Andrew A

    2018-02-03

    There is a lack of objective evidence investigating how previous non-augmented ACL suture repair techniques and contemporary augmentation techniques in ACL suture repair restrain anterior tibial translation (ATT) across the arc of flexion, and after cyclic loading of the knee. The purpose of this work was to test the null hypotheses that there would be no statistically significant difference in ATT after non-, static- and dynamic-augmented ACL suture repair, and they will not restore ATT to normal values across the arc of flexion of the knee after cyclic loading. Eleven human cadaveric knees were mounted in a test rig, and knee kinematics from 0° to 90° of flexion were recorded by use of an optical tracking system. Measurements were recorded without load and with 89-N tibial anterior force. The knees were tested in the following states: ACL-intact, ACL-deficient, non-augmented suture repair, static tape augmentation and dynamic augmentation after 10 and 300 loading cycles. Only static tape augmentation and dynamic augmentation restored ATT to values similar to the ACL-intact state directly postoperation, and maintained this after cyclic loading. However, contrary to dynamic augmentation, the ATT after static tape augmentation failed to remain statistically less than for the ACL-deficient state after cyclic loading. Moreover, after cyclic loading, ATT was significantly less with dynamic augmentation when compared to static tape augmentation. In contrast to non-augmented ACL suture repair and static tape augmentation, only dynamic augmentation resulted in restoration of ATT values similar to the ACL-intact knee and decreased ATT values when compared to the ACL-deficient knee immediately post-operation and also after cyclic loading, across the arc of flexion, thus allowing the null hypotheses to be rejected. This may assist healing of the ruptured ACL. Therefore, this study would support further clinical evaluation of dynamic augmentation of ACL repair.

  11. Static and dynamic stability of the guidance force in a side-suspended HTS maglev system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dajin; Cui, Chenyu; Zhao, Lifeng; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Xiqing; Zhao, Yong

    2017-02-01

    The static and dynamic stability of the guidance force in a side-suspended HTS-PMG (permanent magnetic guideway) system were studied theoretically and experimentally. It is found that there are two types of guidance force that exist in the HTS-PMG system, which are sensitive to the levitation gap and the arrangement of YBCO bulks around the central axis of the PMG. An optimized YBCO array was used to stabilize the system, which enabled a side-suspended HTS-PMG maglev vehicle to run stably at 102 km h-1 on a circular test track with 6.5 m in diameter.

  12. Static and dynamic stability of pneumatic vibration isolators and systems of isolators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryaboy, Vyacheslav M.

    2014-01-01

    Pneumatic vibration isolation is the most widespread effective method for creating vibration-free environments that are vital for precise experiments and manufacturing operations in optoelectronics, life sciences, microelectronics, nanotechnology and other areas. The modeling and design principles of a dual-chamber pneumatic vibration isolator, basically established a few decades ago, continue to attract attention of researchers. On the other hand, behavior of systems of such isolators was never explained in the literature in sufficient detail. This paper covers a range of questions essential for understanding the mechanics of pneumatic isolation systems from both design and application perspectives. The theory and a model of a single standalone isolator are presented in concise form necessary for subsequent analysis. Then the dynamics of a system of isolators supporting a payload is considered with main attention directed to two aspects of their behavior: first, the static stability of payloads with high positions of the center of gravity; second, dynamic stability of the feedback system formed by mechanical leveling valves. The direct method of calculating the maximum stable position of the center of gravity is presented and illustrated by three-dimensional stability domains; analytic formulas are given that delineate these domains. A numerical method for feedback stability analysis of self-leveling valve systems is given, and the results are compared with the analytical estimates for a single isolator. The relation between the static and dynamic phenomena is discussed.

  13. A comparative biomechanical analysis of implants for the stabilization of proximal humerus fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füchtmeier, B; May, R; Fierlbeck, J; Hammer, J; Nerlich, M

    2006-01-01

    A new humerus nail (Sirus) has become available for the treatment of fractures of the proximal humerus. The aim of the study was the biomechanical comparison of this implant with established systems. 12 matched pairs of human humeri were employed for testing. Three randomized groups were formed (n = 4 pairs). A bending moment of 7.5 Nm and a torsional moment of 8.3 Nm were applied in a test of five loading cycles to all intact bones. Loading was consistently initiated at the distal epiphysis. The consequent deformation at the distal epiphysis was continuously recorded. Then an osteotomy with a defect of 5 mm was created to simulate an unstable subcapital humerus fracture. For paired comparison, one of each pair was stabilized with the Sirus proximal humerus nail. The other side was fixed with a reference implant. The following groups were created.: Group I: Sirus versus Proximal humerus nail (PHN) with spiral blade. Group II: Sirus versus PHILOS plate. Group III: Sirus versus 4.5 mm AO T-plate. The proximal humerus nail (Sirus) demonstrated significantly higher stiffness values than the reference implants for both bending and torsional load. The following values were recorded at a bending moment of 7.5 Nm: Sirus 14.2 mm, PHN 20.7 mm, PHILOS plate 28.1 mm, 4.5 AO T-plate 29.3 mm p model presented here. Supplementary, the Sirus Nail showed higher stiffness values than the PHN. However, the latter are gaining in importance due to the possibility of minimal invasive implantation. Whether this will be associated with functional advantages requires further clinical investigation.

  14. New Systematic CFD Methods to Calculate Static and Single Dynamic Stability Derivatives of Aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai-gang Mi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Several new systematic methods for high fidelity and reliability calculation of static and single dynamic derivatives are proposed in this paper. Angle of attack step response is used to obtain static derivative directly; then translation acceleration dynamic derivative and rotary dynamic derivative can be calculated by employing the step response motion of rate of the angle of attack and unsteady motion of pitching angular velocity step response, respectively. Longitudinal stability derivative calculations of SACCON UCAV are taken as test cases for validation. Numerical results of all cases achieve good agreement with reference values or experiments data from wind tunnel, which indicate that the proposed methods can be considered as new tools in the process of design and production of advanced aircrafts for their high efficiency and precision.

  15. Individuals with chronic ankle instability exhibit dynamic postural stability deficits and altered unilateral landing biomechanics: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Jeffrey D; Stewart, Ethan M; Macias, David M; Chander, Harish; Knight, Adam C

    2018-06-13

    To evaluate the literature regarding unilateral landing biomechanics and dynamic postural stability in individuals with and without chronic ankle instability (CAI). Four online databases (PubMed, ScienceDirect, Scopus, and SportDiscus) were searched from the earliest records to 31 January 2018, as well as reference sections of related journal articles, to complete the systematic search. Studies investigating the influence of CAI on unilateral landing biomechanics and dynamic postural stability were systematically reviewed and evaluated. Twenty articles met the criteria and were included in the systematic review. Individuals with CAI were found to have deficits in dynamic postural stability on the affected limb with medium to large effect sizes and altered lower extremity kinematics, most notably in the ankle and knee, with medium to large effect sizes. Additionally, greater loading rates and peak ground reaction forces, in addition to reductions in ankle muscle activity were also found in individuals with CAI during unilateral jump-landing tasks. Individuals with CAI demonstrate dynamic postural stability deficits, lower extremity kinematic alterations, and reduced neuromuscular control during unilateral jump-landings. These are likely factors that contribute recurrent lateral ankle sprain injuries during dynamic activity in individuals with CAI. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Revisiting the anatomy and biomechanics of the anconeus muscle and its role in elbow stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Barry P

    2013-07-01

    Recent studies have designated the anconeus muscle as an option for use as a pedicled flap for covering soft tissue defects about the elbow, with reported minimal risk of morbidity. This has raised the question as to the importance of the anconeus muscle and as to whether this is truly an accessory muscle that can be sacrificed, or whether the anconeus muscle significantly contributes to elbow and forearm stability? This study revisits the anatomy and biomechanics of the anconeus muscle and aims to investigate the neuromuscular compartments of the anconeus muscle and to determine the changes in the muscle length, fibre length and moment arm over a range of elbow flexion angles for each compartment. An anatomical study on 8 human cadavers (51-77 years of age) was done and a 2-dimensional kinematic elbow model developed to determine changes in the muscle length and moment arm of the muscle related to changes in elbow flexion angles. The muscle was modelled with two possible lines of action, one along the posterior and another on the anterior edge of the muscle as they had different muscle fibre lengths (posterior: average of 32 mm, anterior: average of 20 mm). The anterior edge also had an aponeurosis which was 70% of its length. From 0 to 120° elbow flexion, the length of the posterior and anterior edges increased with a maximum change recorded at 90° elbow flexion (31.7±1.0 mm and 65.3±1.4 mm, respectively). The moment arm is 14-mm at 0° flexion, but between the posterior and anterior edges it decreases at different rates with increasing elbow flexion angle. Beyond 80°, the anterior edge behaves as an elbow flexor, while the posterior edge remains an elbow extensor. The study demonstrates that the anconeus muscle has two neuromuscular compartments each with distinct intramuscular innervations and muscle fibre lengths. The posterior and deep aspect of the muscle functions as an elbow extensor decreasing in influence with increasing elbow flexion angle. The

  17. Femoral Component External Rotation Affects Knee Biomechanics: A Computational Model of Posterior-stabilized TKA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Mohammad; Wright, Timothy M; Cross, Michael B; Mayman, David J; Pearle, Andrew D; Sculco, Peter K; Westrich, Geoffrey H; Imhauser, Carl W

    2018-01-01

    The correct amount of external rotation of the femoral component during TKA is controversial because the resulting changes in biomechanical knee function associated with varying degrees of femoral component rotation are not well understood. We addressed this question using a computational model, which allowed us to isolate the biomechanical impact of geometric factors including bony shapes, location of ligament insertions, and implant size across three different knees after posterior-stabilized (PS) TKA. Using a computational model of the tibiofemoral joint, we asked: (1) Does external rotation unload the medial collateral ligament (MCL) and what is the effect on lateral collateral ligament tension? (2) How does external rotation alter tibiofemoral contact loads and kinematics? (3) Does 3° external rotation relative to the posterior condylar axis align the component to the surgical transepicondylar axis (sTEA) and what anatomic factors of the femoral condyle explain variations in maximum MCL tension among knees? We incorporated a PS TKA into a previously developed computational knee model applied to three neutrally aligned, nonarthritic, male cadaveric knees. The computational knee model was previously shown to corroborate coupled motions and ligament loading patterns of the native knee through a range of flexion. Implant geometries were virtually installed using hip-to-ankle CT scans through measured resection and anterior referencing surgical techniques. Collateral ligament properties were standardized across each knee model by defining stiffness and slack lengths based on the healthy population. The femoral component was externally rotated from 0° to 9° relative to the posterior condylar axis in 3° increments. At each increment, the knee was flexed under 500 N compression from 0° to 90° simulating an intraoperative examination. The computational model predicted collateral ligament forces, compartmental contact forces, and tibiofemoral internal/external and

  18. Static stability characteristics of the boilers at Oldbury nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paynter, R.J.; Rea, J.

    1986-01-01

    The cause of an intermittent load loss at Oldbury Nuclear Power Station is shown to be the high sensitivity of boiler performance to the imposed spatial distribution of boiler gas inlet temperature. This high sensitivity is demonstrated to be a function of the inherent static stability characteristics of the boilers. The installation of orifice plates with a high flow resistance into the feed pipework to the half boilers has greatly reduced the boiler sensitivity and eliminated the intermittent load loss so that, on average, higher electrical generation is obtained from the station. (author)

  19. The effect of pre-vertebroplasty tumor ablation using laser-induced thermotherapy on biomechanical stability and cement fill in the metastatic spine

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Henry; Mousavi, Payam; Chin, Lee; Roth, Sandra; Finkelstein, Joel; Vitken, Alex; Whyne, Cari

    2007-01-01

    A biomechanical study comparing simulated lytic vertebral metastases treated with laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) and vertebroplasty versus vertebroplasty alone. To investigate the effect of tumor ablation using LITT prior to vertebroplasty on biomechanical stability and cement fill patterns in a standardized model of spinal metastatic disease. Vertebroplasty in the metastatic spine is aimed at reducing pain, but is associated with risk of cement extravasation in up to 10%. Six pairs of fr...

  20. Existence and stability of circular orbits in general static and spherically symmetric spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Junji; Liu, Jiawei; Liu, Xionghui; Mo, Zhongyou; Pang, Xiankai; Wang, Yaoguang; Yang, Nan

    2018-02-01

    The existence and stability of circular orbits (CO) in static and spherically symmetric (SSS) spacetime are important because of their practical and potential usefulness. In this paper, using the fixed point method, we first prove a necessary and sufficient condition on the metric function for the existence of timelike COs in SSS spacetimes. After analyzing the asymptotic behavior of the metric, we then show that asymptotic flat SSS spacetime that corresponds to a negative Newtonian potential at large r will always allow the existence of CO. The stability of the CO in a general SSS spacetime is then studied using the Lyapunov exponent method. Two sufficient conditions on the (in)stability of the COs are obtained. For null geodesics, a sufficient condition on the metric function for the (in)stability of null CO is also obtained. We then illustrate one powerful application of these results by showing that three SSS spacetimes whose metric function is not completely known will allow the existence of timelike and/or null COs. We also used our results to assert the existence and (in)stabilities of a number of known SSS metrics.

  1. Anisotropic perturbations and stability of a static universe in f(G,T) gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, M.; Ikram, Ayesha

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the stability of the Einstein universe against anisotropic homogeneous perturbations in f(G,T) gravity ( G and T represent the Gauss-Bonnet invariant and trace of the energy-momentum tensor, respectively). The corresponding field equations are constructed for static as well as perturbed configurations in the presence of a perfect fluid. We consider two specific forms of generic function f(G,T) associated with zero as well as non-zero covariant divergence of the energy-momentum tensor and explore the stability regions of the Einstein universe parameterized by the equation of state parameter. It is concluded that a stable Einstein universe exists for an appropriate choice of model parameters.

  2. Evaluation method of longitudinal static stability of tailless airplane. Mubiyokuki no tate no seianteisei no hyokaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, S; Kajita, H [Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1992-01-05

    As for the tailless airplane which has the swept taper wing of linear leading and tailing edges, the longitudinal static stability was evaluated by using the modified strip or airfoil theory and the lifting surface theory (DLM method). The sectional lift coefficient of the whole wing, the pitching moment coefficient around the center of gravity, and the equation relating to the elevon were shown. It is thought as a weak point of any tailless airplane that the spanwise lift distribution may keep away from the optimal one because the wash-out is necessary to keep the longitudinal static stability. In order to evaluate this fact, the inductive drag was calculated by using the calculation soft for the induced drag based on the lift surface method to obtain the airplane efficiency factor. The Northrop XB-35 was used for the model of this calculation. Both theories agreed qualititatively. The allowable range of longitudinal center of gravity was 12.5% of the mean chord length. The structural twist is about 9{degree}, and this value gives hardly any adverse effect to the airplane efficiency factor for crusing configuration. 13 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. On the stability of Einstein static universe in doubly general relativity scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khodadi, M., E-mail: m.khodadi@stu.umz.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Faculty of Basic Sciences, University of Mazandaran, P. O. Box 47416-95447, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Heydarzade, Y., E-mail: heydarzade@azaruniv.edu [Department of Physics, Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, 53714-161, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nozari, K., E-mail: knozari@umz.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Faculty of Basic Sciences, University of Mazandaran, P. O. Box 47416-95447, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Darabi, F., E-mail: f.darabi@azaruniv.edu [Department of Physics, Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, 53714-161, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), 55134-441, Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-12-12

    By presenting a relation between the average energy of the ensemble of probe photons and the energy density of the universe, in the context of gravity’s rainbow or the doubly general relativity scenario, we introduce a rainbow FRW universe model. By analyzing the fixed points in the flat FRW model modified by two well-known rainbow functions, we find that the finite time singularity avoidance (i.e. Big Bang) may still remain as a problem. Then we follow the “emergent universe” scenario in which there is no beginning of time and consequently there is no Big-Bang singularity. Moreover, we study the impact of high energy quantum gravity modifications related to the gravity’s rainbow on the stability conditions of an “Einstein static universe” (ESU). We find that independent of the particular rainbow function, the positive energy condition dictates a positive spatial curvature for the universe. In fact, without raising a nonphysical energy condition in the quantum gravity regimes, we can observe agreement between gravity’s rainbow scenario and the basic assumption of the modern version of the “emergent universe”. We show that in the absence and presence of an energy-dependent cosmological constant Λ(ϵ), a stable Einstein static solution is available versus the homogeneous and linear scalar perturbations under the variety of the obtained conditions. Also, we explore the stability of ESU against the vector and tensor perturbations.

  4. Stability of the elbow joint: relevant anatomy and clinical implications of in vitro biomechanical studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, J.; Schep, N. W. L.; Eygendaal, D.; Kleinrensink, G.-J.; Tuinebreijer, W. E.; den Hartog, D.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this literature review is to describe the clinical anatomy of the elbow joint based on information from in vitro biomechanical studies. The clinical consequences of this literature review are described and recommendations are given for the treatment of elbow joint dislocation.The PubMed

  5. Stability of the Elbow Joint: Relevant Anatomy and Clinical Implications of In Vitro Biomechanical Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. de Haan (Jeroen); D. Eygendaal (Denise); N.W.L. Schep (Niels); G.J. Kleinrensink (Gert Jan); W.E. Tuinebreijer (Wim); D. den Hartog (Dennis)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAbstract: The aim of this literature review is to describe the clinical anatomy of the elbow joint based on information from in vitro biomechanical studies. The clinical consequences of this literature review are described and recommendations are given for the treatment of elbow joint

  6. Effects of a dynamic core stability program on the biomechanics of cutting maneuvers: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, E F; Richter, C; O'Connor, S; Moran, K A

    2018-02-01

    Deficits in trunk control predict ACL injuries which frequently occur during high-risk activities such as cutting. However, no existing trunk control/core stability program has been found to positively affect trunk kinematics during cutting activities. This study investigated the effectiveness of a 6-week dynamic core stability program (DCS) on the biomechanics of anticipated and unanticipated side and crossover cutting maneuvers. Thirty-one male, varsity footballers participated in this randomized controlled trial. Three-dimensional trunk and lower limb biomechanics were captured in a motion analysis laboratory during the weight acceptance phase of anticipated and unanticipated side and crossover cutting maneuvers at baseline and 6-week follow-up. The DCS group performed a DCS program three times weekly for 6 weeks in a university rehabilitation room. Both the DCS and control groups concurrently completed their regular practice and match play. Statistical parametric mapping and repeated measures analysis of variance were used to determine any group (DCS vs control) by time (pre vs post) interactions. The DCS resulted in greater internal hip extensor (P=.017, η 2 =0.079), smaller internal knee valgus (P=.026, η 2 =0.076), and smaller internal knee external rotator moments (P=.041, η 2 =0.066) during anticipated side cutting compared with the control group. It also led to reduced posterior ground reaction forces for all cutting activities (P=.015-.030, η 2 =0.074-0.105). A 6-week DCS program did not affect trunk kinematics, but it did reduce a small number of biomechanical risk factors for ACL injury, predominantly during anticipated side cutting. A DCS program could play a role in multimodal ACL injury prevention programs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Effects of static strain aging on residual stress stability and alternating bending strength of shot peened AISI 4140

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menig, R.; Schulze, V.; Voehringer, O. [Inst. fuer Werkstoffkunde 1, Univ. Karlsruhe (TH), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    Increases of residual stress stability and alternating bending strength of shot peened AISI 4140 are obtained by successive annealing treatments. This is caused by static strain aging effects, which lead to pinning of dislocations by carbon atoms and very small carbides. It will be shown that by well directed annealing of a quenched and tempered AISI 4140 it is possible to maximize the positive effects of static strain aging, without causing extended thermal residual stress relaxation. The amount of yield stress increases caused by static strain aging is quantified using tensile tests. Static strain aging is also found to be responsible for an increase of the quasi static and cyclic surface yield strength present after shot peening. (orig.)

  8. Additional Tension Screws Improve Stability in Elastic Stable Intramedullary Nailing: Biomechanical Analysis of a Femur Spiral Fracture Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachert, Gregor; Rapp, Marion; Eggert, Rebecca; Schulze-Hessing, Maaike; Gros, Nina; Stratmann, Christina; Wendlandt, Robert; Kaiser, Martin M

    2015-08-01

    For pediatric femoral shaft fractures, elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN) is an accepted method of treatment. But problems regarding stability with shortening or axial deviation are well known in complex fracture types and heavier children. Biomechanical in vitro testing was performed to determine whether two modified osteosyntheses with an additional tension screw fixation or screw fixation alone without nails could significantly improve the stability in comparison to classical ESIN. A total of 24 synthetic adolescent-sized femoral bone models (Sawbones, 4th generation; Vashon, Washington, United States) with an identical spiral fracture (length 100 mm) were used. All grafts underwent retrograde fixation with two C-shaped steel nails (2C). Of the 24, 8 osteosyntheses were supported by one additional tension screw (2C1S) and another 8 by two screws (2S) in which the intramedullary nails were removed before testing. Each configuration underwent biomechanical testing in 4-point bending, external rotation (ER) and internal rotation (IR). Furthermore, the modifications were tested in axial physiological 9 degrees position for shifting and dynamic compression as well as dynamic load. Both screw configurations (2C1S and 2S) demonstrated a significantly higher stability in comparison to the 2C configuration in 4-point bending (anterior-posterior, 0.95 Nm/mm [2C] spiral fracture model, the stability of ESIN could be significantly improved by two modifications with additional tension screws. If transferred in clinical practice, these modifications might offer earlier weight bearing and less problems of shortening or axial deviation. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Carrying shopping bags does not alter static postural stability and gait parameters in healthy older females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bampouras, Theodoros M; Dewhurst, Susan

    2016-05-01

    Food shopping is an important aspect of maintaining independence and social interaction in older age. Carriage of shopping bags alters the body's weight distribution which, depending on load distribution, could potentially increase instability during standing and walking. The study examined the effect of carrying UK style shopping bags on static postural stability and gait in healthy older and young females. Nine older (71.0±6.0 years) and 10 young (26.7±5.2 years) females were assessed in five conditions carrying no bags, one 1.5kg bag in each hand, one 3kg bag in each hand, one 1.5kg bag in preferred hand, one 3kg bag in preferred hand. Antero-posterior and medio-lateral displacement, and 95% ellipse area from a 30s quiet standing were used for postural stability assessment. Stride length and its coefficient of variation, total double support time, step asymmetry and gait stability ratio were calculated from 1min treadmill walking at self-selected speed for gait assessment. Carrying shopping bags did not negatively affect postural stability or gait variables, in either group. Further, in older individuals, a decrease in sway velocity was found when holding bags during the postural stability assessment (pbags, irrespective of the load distribution, may have a stabilising effect during quiet standing. These results should help to alleviate concerns regarding safety of carrying shopping bags and help encourage shopping, both as a social and as a physical activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Influencing Power Flow and Transient Stability by Static Synchronous Series Compensator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Imran Azim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present world, modern power system networks, being a complicated combination of generators, transmission lines, transformers, circuit breakers and other devices, are more vulnerable to various types of faults causing stability problems. Among these faults, transient fault is believed to be a major disturbance as it causes large damage to a sound system within a certain period of time. Therefore, the protection against transient faults, better known as transient stability control is one of the major considerations for the power system engineers. This paper presents the control approach in the transmission line during transient faults by means of Static Synchronous Series Compensator (SSSC in order to stabilize Single Machine Infinite Bus (SMIB system.  In this paper, SSSC is represented by variable voltage injection associated with the transformer leakage reactance and the voltage source. The comparative results depict that the swing curve of a system increases monotonically after the occurrence of transient faults However, SSSC is effective enough to make it stable after a while.

  11. Stability of Einstein static universe in gravity theory with a non-minimal derivative coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Qihong [Hunan Normal University, Department of Physics and Synergetic Innovation Center for Quantum Effects and Applications, Changsha, Hunan (China); Zunyi Normal College, School of Physics and Electronic Science, Zunyi (China); Wu, Puxun [Hunan Normal University, Department of Physics and Synergetic Innovation Center for Quantum Effects and Applications, Changsha, Hunan (China); Peking University, Center for High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Yu, Hongwei [Hunan Normal University, Department of Physics and Synergetic Innovation Center for Quantum Effects and Applications, Changsha, Hunan (China)

    2018-01-15

    The emergent mechanism provides a possible way to resolve the big-bang singularity problem by assuming that our universe originates from the Einstein static (ES) state. Thus, the existence of a stable ES solution becomes a very crucial prerequisite for the emergent scenario. In this paper, we study the stability of an ES universe in gravity theory with a non-minimal coupling between the kinetic term of a scalar field and the Einstein tensor. We find that the ES solution is stable under both scalar and tensor perturbations when the model parameters satisfy certain conditions, which indicates that the big-bang singularity can be avoided successfully by the emergent mechanism in the non-minimally kinetic coupled gravity. (orig.)

  12. Stability of Einstein static universe in gravity theory with a non-minimal derivative coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qihong; Wu, Puxun; Yu, Hongwei

    2018-01-01

    The emergent mechanism provides a possible way to resolve the big-bang singularity problem by assuming that our universe originates from the Einstein static (ES) state. Thus, the existence of a stable ES solution becomes a very crucial prerequisite for the emergent scenario. In this paper, we study the stability of an ES universe in gravity theory with a non-minimal coupling between the kinetic term of a scalar field and the Einstein tensor. We find that the ES solution is stable under both scalar and tensor perturbations when the model parameters satisfy certain conditions, which indicates that the big-bang singularity can be avoided successfully by the emergent mechanism in the non-minimally kinetic coupled gravity.

  13. Coordinated setting of stabilizers for synchronous generators and static var compensators in multimachine systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simoes Costa, A J.A.; Silva, A S; Freitas, F D [Santa Catarina Univ., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Eletrica

    1994-12-31

    Two distinct approaches for the coordinated setting of multimachine power system controllers are presented. The first strategy is based on the re-allocation of the poles related to the electromechanical modes of the system through decentralized control. The second method is a coordinated global procedure based on structurally constrained optimal control. Both approaches considered power system stabilizers and supplementary signals for static var compensators as the controllers to be adjusted. Other types of controllers, such as FACTS devices, can also be tuned by using the proposed techniques. A 13-machine, 77-bus power system which is based on the Brazilian South-Southeast interconnected network is employed to assess the performance of the proposed methods. (author) 14 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  14. Stability of the Einstein static universe in f(R, T) gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabani, Hamid; Ziaie, Amir Hadi

    2017-01-01

    The Einstein static (ES) universe has played a major role in various emergent scenarios recently proposed in order to cure the problem of the initial singularity of the standard model of cosmology. In the model we address, we study the existence and stability of an ES universe in the context of f(R, T) modified theories of gravity. Considering specific forms of the f(R, T) function, we seek for the existence of solutions representing ES state. Using dynamical system techniques along with numerical analysis, we find two classes of solutions: the first one is always unstable of the saddle type, while the second is always stable so that its dynamical behavior corresponds to a center equilibrium point. The importance of the second class of solutions is due to the significant role they play in constructing non-singular emergent models in which the universe could have experienced past-eternally a series of infinite oscillations about such an initial static state after which it enters, through a suitable physical mechanism, to an inflationary era. Considering specific forms for the functionality of f(R, T), we show that this theory is capable of providing cosmological solutions which admit emergent universe (EU) scenarios. We also investigate homogeneous scalar perturbations for the mentioned models. The stability regions of the solutions are parametrized by a linear equation of state (EoS) parameter and other free parameters that will be introduced for the models. Our results suggest that modifications in f(R, T) gravity would lead to stable solutions which are unstable in f(R) gravity model. (orig.)

  15. Stability of the Einstein static universe in f(R, T) gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shabani, Hamid [University of Sistan and Baluchestan, Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences, Zahedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ziaie, Amir Hadi [Kahnooj Branch, Islamic Azad University, Department of Physics, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    The Einstein static (ES) universe has played a major role in various emergent scenarios recently proposed in order to cure the problem of the initial singularity of the standard model of cosmology. In the model we address, we study the existence and stability of an ES universe in the context of f(R, T) modified theories of gravity. Considering specific forms of the f(R, T) function, we seek for the existence of solutions representing ES state. Using dynamical system techniques along with numerical analysis, we find two classes of solutions: the first one is always unstable of the saddle type, while the second is always stable so that its dynamical behavior corresponds to a center equilibrium point. The importance of the second class of solutions is due to the significant role they play in constructing non-singular emergent models in which the universe could have experienced past-eternally a series of infinite oscillations about such an initial static state after which it enters, through a suitable physical mechanism, to an inflationary era. Considering specific forms for the functionality of f(R, T), we show that this theory is capable of providing cosmological solutions which admit emergent universe (EU) scenarios. We also investigate homogeneous scalar perturbations for the mentioned models. The stability regions of the solutions are parametrized by a linear equation of state (EoS) parameter and other free parameters that will be introduced for the models. Our results suggest that modifications in f(R, T) gravity would lead to stable solutions which are unstable in f(R) gravity model. (orig.)

  16. Temperature stability of static and dynamic properties of 1.55 µm quantum dot lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahinia, A; Banyoudeh, S; Rippien, A; Schnabel, F; Eyal, O; Cestier, I; Kalifa, I; Mentovich, E; Eisenstein, G; Reithmaier, J P

    2018-03-05

    Static and dynamic properties of InP-based 1.55 µm quantum dot (QD) lasers were investigated. Due to the reduced size inhomogeneity and a high dot density of the newest generation of 1.55 µm QD gain materials, ridge waveguide lasers (RWG) exhibit improved temperature stability and record-high modulation characteristics. Detailed results are shown for the temperature dependence of static properties including threshold current, voltage-current characteristics, external differential efficiency and emission wavelength. Similarly, small and large signal modulations were found to have only minor dependences on temperature. Moreover, we show the impact of the active region design and the cavity length on the temperature stability. Measurements were performed in pulsed and continuous wave operation. High characteristic temperatures for the threshold current were obtained with T 0 values of 144 K (15 - 60 °C), 101 K (60 - 110 °C) and 70 K up to 180 °C for a 900-µm-long RWG laser comprising 8 QD layers. The slope efficiency in these lasers is nearly independent of temperature showing a T 1 value of more than 900 K up to 110 °C. Due to the high modal gain, lasers with a cavity length of 340 µm reached new record modulation bandwidths of 17.5 GHz at 20 °C and 9 GHz at 80 °C, respectively. These lasers were modulated at 26 GBit/s in the non-return to zero format at 80 °C and at 25 GBaud using a four-level pulse amplitude format at 21 °C.

  17. The Comparison of the Role of Vision on Static Postural Stability in Athletes and Nonathletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohre Meshkati

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The goal of the present study was to compare the role of vision on static postural stability between athletes and nonathletes. Methods: Participants included two groups of 25 persons, men Karatekas who were selected in Isfahan (age 20.6±2.8 years, 66.24±10.34 kg of weight, height 1.76±0.07 m and healthy young men in Isfahan (age 21.6±2.33 years, 66.8±11.34 kg of weight, height 1.74±0.08 m. The sampling was conducted on the basis of nonprobability sampling method. All participants performed the static balance test on the force plate. Postural stability was measured and assessed during 35 seconds in a state of constant standing with paired feet in the center of the force plate in the two positions of eyes open and closed (3 trials in each positions with random sequences. The rest between trials was 25 seconds. Parameters of mean velosity, standard deviation of velosity and standard deviation of amplitude in both anterior-posterior and medio-lateral plans from the center of foot pressure were recorded by the device. Two-way ANOVA was used for data analysis. Results: The test results showed that the interaction between vision and group did not exist. Closing the eyes led to a significant increase in postural sway in all parameters. Two parameters of mean velocity and standard deviation of velosity in medio-lateral plan were significantly greater in athletes than nonathletes. Discussion: The findings can be considered for the design of exercises in karate and rehabilitation after sports injuries.

  18. On the stability of Einstein static universe in doubly general relativity scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khodadi, M.; Nozari, K. [University of Mazandaran, Department of Physics, Faculty of Basic Sciences, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Heydarzade, Y. [Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, Department of Physics, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Darabi, F. [Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, Department of Physics, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    By presenting a relation between the average energy of the ensemble of probe photons and the energy density of the universe, in the context of gravity's rainbow or the doubly general relativity scenario, we introduce a rainbow FRW universe model. By analyzing the fixed points in the flat FRW model modified by two well-known rainbow functions, we find that the finite time singularity avoidance (i.e. Big Bang) may still remain as a problem. Then we follow the ''emergent universe'' scenario in which there is no beginning of time and consequently there is no Big-Bang singularity. Moreover, we study the impact of high energy quantum gravity modifications related to the gravity's rainbow on the stability conditions of an ''Einstein static universe'' (ESU). We find that independent of the particular rainbow function, the positive energy condition dictates a positive spatial curvature for the universe. In fact, without raising a nonphysical energy condition in the quantum gravity regimes, we can observe agreement between gravity's rainbow scenario and the basic assumption of the modern version of the ''emergent universe''. We show that in the absence and presence of an energy-dependent cosmological constant Λ(ε), a stable Einstein static solution is available versus the homogeneous and linear scalar perturbations under the variety of the obtained conditions. Also, we explore the stability of ESU against the vector and tensor perturbations. (orig.)

  19. Technical Suitability and Static Stability of Sungkur Fishing Boats for Fish and Shrimp Catching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusmilyansari; Rosadi, E.; Iriansyah

    2017-10-01

    Sungkur fishing gear is operated actively on one the side of fishing boat, which requires technical suitability and fishing gear stability to ensure success in fish catching. This is a case study which aimed to analyze some technical issues related to the boat, boat’s hydrostatic parameters, and the boat’s stability. The data were collected though observation, measuring the boat to obtain the offset table. The data were analyzed numerically and descriptively. The data were processed with technical formula, Microsoft Office’s Excel software, graphic display, minitab, statistical data processing, and maxsurf program. The research results showed that: (1) the sungkur fishing boat dimensional ratio L/B (6.47 - 7.00); L/D (10.90 - 11.20) and B/D (1.60 - 1.668) is within the range value of Indonesian fishing boats suitable to operate the fishing gear by towing or dragging. However, during fish catching operation, there have been problems in a hydrodynamic force due to the fishing gear movement, which affect the fish catching efficiency. (2) The boat’s coefficient of fineness is in the fine type shape; the displacement on each waterline has increased; the loads of the boat are getting larger following the increase of waterline from one to five; this is also shown from the increasing midship area value. Ton per centimeter immersion to change wl 1 by 1 cm needs 0.04 tons of weight. (3) Sungkur fishing boat have a good static stability, which is proven by the positive value of angle of maximum GZ by 79.1 - 83.6. In other words, the boat has the ability to return to its original position after tilting; however, stability dynamics happens because fishing gear operation are located on just one side of boat.

  20. Effect of a static external magnetic perturbation on resistive mode stability in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzpatrick, R.

    1994-03-01

    The influence of a general static external magnetic perturbation on the stability of resistive modes in a tokamak plasma is examined. There are three main parts to this investigation. Firstly, the vacuum perturbation is expanded as a set of well-behaved toroidal ring functions and is, thereafter, specified by the coefficients of this expansion. Secondly, a dispersion relation is derived for resistive plasma instabilities in the presence of a general external perturbation and finally, this dispersion relation is solved for the amplitudes of the tearing and twisting modes driven in the plasma by a specific perturbation. It is found that the amplitudes of driven tearing and twisting modes are negligible until a certain critical perturbation strength is exceeded. Only tearing modes are driven in low-β plasmas with εβ p p ∼>1. For error-field perturbations made up of a large number of different poloidal and toroidal harmonics the critical strength to drive locked modes has a open-quote staircase close-quote variation with edge-q, characterized by strong discontinuities as coupled rational surfaces enter or leave the plasma. For single harmonic perturbations the variation with edge-q is far smoother. Both types of behaviour have been observed experimentally. The critical perturbation strength is found to decrease strongly close to an ideal external kink stability boundary. This is also in agreement with experimental observations

  1. Primary stability and self-tapping blades: biomechanical assessment of dental implants in medium-density bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yung-Soo; Lim, Young-Jun

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this biomechanical study was to assess the influence of self-tapping blades in terms of primary implant stability between implants with self-tapping blades and implants without self-tapping blades using five different analytic methods, especially in medium-density bone. Two different types of dental implants (4 × 10 mm) were tested: self-tapping and non-self-tapping. The fixture design including thread profiles was exactly the same between the two groups; the only difference was the presence of cutting blades on one half of the apical portion of the implant body. Solid rigid polyurethane blocks with corresponding densities were selected to simulate medium-density bone. Five mechanical assessments (insertion torque, resonance frequency analysis [RFA], reverse torque, pull-out and push in test) were performed for primary stability. Implants without self-tapping blades showed significantly higher values (P0.05). The outcomes of the present study indicate that the implant body design without self-tapping blades has a good primary stability compared with that with self-tapping blades in medium-density bone. Considering the RFA, a distinct layer of cortical bone on marginal bone will yield implant stability quotient values similar to those in medium-bone density when implants have the same diameter. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Effects of dorsal versus ventral shear loads on the rotational stability of the thoracic spine: a biomechanical porcine and human cadaveric study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kouwenhoven, J.W.M.; Smit, T.H.; van der Veen, A.J.; Kingma, I.; van Dieen, J.H.; Castelein, R.M.

    2007-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN. A biomechanical in vitro study on porcine and human spinal segments. OBJECTIVE. To investigate axial rotational stability of the thoracic spine under dorsal and ventral shear loads. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. Idiopathic scoliosis is a condition restricted exclusively to humans. An

  3. Biomechanical stability of novel mechanically adapted open-porous titanium scaffolds in metatarsal bone defects of sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieding, Jan; Lindner, Tobias; Bergschmidt, Philipp; Bader, Rainer

    2015-04-01

    Open-porous titanium scaffolds for large segmental bone defects offer advantages like early weight-bearing and limited risk of implant failure. The objective of this experimental study was to determine the biomechanical behavior of novel open-porous titanium scaffolds with mechanical-adapted properties in vivo. Two types of the custom-made, open-porous scaffolds made of Ti6Al4V (Young's modulus: 6-8 GPa and different pore sizes) were implanted into a 20 mm segmental defect in the mid-diaphysis of the metatarsus of sheep, and were stabilized with an osteosynthesis plate. After 12 and 24 weeks postoperatively, torsional testing was performed on the implanted bone and compared to the contralateral non-treated side. Maximum torque, maximum angle, torsional stiffness, fracture energy, shear modulus and shear stress were investigated. Furthermore, bone mineral density (BMD) of the newly formed bone was determined. Mechanical loading capabilities for both scaffolds were similar and about 50% after 12 weeks (e.g., max. torque of approximately 20 Nm). A further increase after 24 weeks was found for most of the investigated parameters. Results for torsional stiffness and shear modulus as well as bone formation depended on the type of scaffold. Increased BMD after 24 weeks was found for one scaffold type but remained constant for the other one. The present data showed the capability of mechanically adapted open-porous titanium scaffolds to function as bone scaffolds for large segmental defects and the influence of the scaffold's stiffness. A further increase in the biomechanical stability can be assumed for longer observation periods of greater than six months. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Fuzzy Load-Shedding Strategy Considering Photovoltaic Output Fluctuation Characteristics and Static Voltage Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the equilibrium point equations of a classic three-node system integrated with a large-scale photovoltaic cell (PV power plant, the impact of PV output fluctuation on the saddle-node bifurcation (SNB was derived and analyzed. When PV runs in a unity power factor and the PV output active power Ppv is not too large (several hundred MW and below, the PV output fluctuation has little effect on the SNB point position and load margin index, so that the load margin index can be calculated online using the SNB point at Ppv = 0 pu. On the other hand, the local reactive power compensation in the load center can effectively raise the load bus voltage and make the voltage stability problem become more concealed; the traditional under-voltage load-shedding (UVLS strategy only carries out load shedding when the bus voltage amplitude is below the specified value and cannot effectively maintain the system static voltage stability in some occasions. In this paper, a fuzzy load-shedding strategy considering the impact of PV output fluctuations for the large-scale PV grid-connected system was designed, taking the load bus voltage amplitude and load margin index as fuzzy input variables, and the load-shedding command as a fuzzy output variable. Nine fuzzy IF-THEN rules were extracted for the fuzzy controller and the corresponding practical calculation method of load-shedding quantity was put forward. The simulation results of the classic three-node system and IEEE 14-bus system, both with a 100 MW PV power plant, verified the effectiveness of the fuzzy load-shedding controller whose input variable load margin index was calculated using the SNB point when the PV active power output was 0. The designed fuzzy load-shedding strategy can compensate for the defect—that the traditional UVLS strategy cannot effectively guarantee the system static voltage stability—and it can be widely used in power grids integrated with PV power plants whose scales are at a

  5. Does surface roughness influence the primary stability of acetabular cups? A numerical and experimental biomechanical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Cann, Sophie; Galland, Alexandre; Rosa, Benoît; Le Corroller, Thomas; Pithioux, Martine; Argenson, Jean-Noël; Chabrand, Patrick; Parratte, Sébastien

    2014-09-01

    Most acetabular cups implanted today are press-fit impacted cementless. Anchorage begins with the primary stability given by insertion of a slightly oversized cup. This primary stability is key to obtaining bone ingrowth and secondary stability. We tested the hypothesis that primary stability of the cup is related to surface roughness of the implant, using both an experimental and a numerical models to analyze how three levels of surface roughness (micro, macro and combined) affect the primary stability of the cup. We also investigated the effect of differences in diameter between the cup and its substrate, and of insertion force, on the cups' primary stability. The results of our study show that primary stability depends on the surface roughness of the cup. The presence of macro-roughness on the peripheral ring is found to decrease primary stability; there was excessive abrasion of the substrate, damaging it and leading to poor primary stability. Numerical modeling indicates that oversizing the cup compared to its substrate has an impact on primary stability, as has insertion force. Copyright © 2014 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Static Magnetic Field Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation in Pulp Cells by Affecting Cell Membrane Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Chih Hsieh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the causes of dental pulpitis is lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced inflammatory response. Following pulp tissue inflammation, odontoblasts, dental pulp cells (DPCs, and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs will activate and repair damaged tissue to maintain homeostasis. However, when LPS infection is too serious, dental repair is impossible and disease may progress to irreversible pulpitis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine whether static magnetic field (SMF can attenuate inflammatory response of dental pulp cells challenged with LPS. In methodology, dental pulp cells were isolated from extracted teeth. The population of DPSCs in the cultured DPCs was identified by phenotypes and multilineage differentiation. The effects of 0.4 T SMF on DPCs were observed through MTT assay and fluorescent anisotropy assay. Our results showed that the SMF exposure had no effect on surface markers or multilineage differentiation capability. However, SMF exposure increases cell viability by 15%. In addition, SMF increased cell membrane rigidity which is directly related to higher fluorescent anisotropy. In the LPS-challenged condition, DPCs treated with SMF demonstrated a higher tolerance to LPS-induced inflammatory response when compared to untreated controls. According to these results, we suggest that 0.4 T SMF attenuates LPS-induced inflammatory response to DPCs by changing cell membrane stability.

  7. An analysis of the effects of aeroelasticity on static longitudinal stability and control of a swept-back-wing airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Richard B

    1951-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the effects of aeroelasticity on the stick-fixed static longitudinal stability and elevator angle required for balance of an airplane is presented together with calculated effects for a swept-wing bomber of relatively high flexibility. Although large changes in stability due to certain parameters are indicated for the example airplane, the over-all stability change after considering all parameters was quite small, compared to the individual effects, due to the counterbalancing of wing and tail contributions. The effect of flexibility on longitudinal control for the example airplane was found to be of little real importance.

  8. When do anterior external or internal fixators provide additional stability in an unstable (Tile C) pelvic fracture? A biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, E; Theologis, A A; Horst, P; Kandemir, U; Pekmezci, M

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the additional stability that is provided by anterior external and internal fixators in an unstable pelvic fracture model (OTA 61-C). An unstable pelvic fracture (OTA 61-C) was created in 27 synthetic pelves by making a 5-mm gap through the sacral foramina (posterior injury) and an ipsilateral pubic rami fracture (anterior injury). The posterior injury was fixed with either a single iliosacral (IS) screw, a single trans-iliac, trans-sacral (TS) screw, or two iliosacral screws (S1S2). Two anterior fixation techniques were utilized: external fixation (Ex-Fix) and supra-acetabular external fixation and internal fixation (In-Fix); supra-acetabular pedicle screws connected with a single subcutaneous spinal rod. The specimens were tested using a nondestructive single-leg stance model. Peak-to-peak (P2P) displacement and rotation and conditioning displacement (CD) were calculated. The Ex-Fix group failed in 83.3 % of specimens with concomitant single-level posterior fixation (Total: 15/18-7 of 9 IS fixation, 8 of 9 TS fixation), and 0 % (0/9) of specimens with concomitant two-level (S1S2) posterior fixation. All specimens with the In-Fix survived testing except for two specimens treated with In-Fix combined with IS fixation. Trans-sacral fixation had higher pubic rotation and greater sacral and pubic displacement than S1S2 (p < 0.05). Rotation of the pubis and sacrum was not different between In-Fix constructs combined with single-level IS and TS fixation. In this model of an unstable pelvic fracture (OTA 61-C), anterior fixation with an In-Fix was biomechanically superior to an anterior Ex-Fix in the setting of single-level posterior fixation. There was no biomechanical difference between the In-Fix and Ex-Fix when each was combined with two levels of posterior sacral fixation.

  9. Effect of hydroxyapatite on the biodegradation and biomechanical stability of polyester nanocomposites for orthopaedic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayabalan, M; Shalumon, K T; Mitha, M K; Ganesan, K; Epple, M

    2010-03-01

    The effect of hydroxyapatite (HAP) on the performance of nanocomposites of an unsaturated polyester, i.e., hydroxy-terminated high molecular weight poly(proplyene fumarate) (HT-PPFhm), was investigated. A thermoset nanocomposite was prepared with nanoparticles of calcined HAP (<100 nm, rod-like shape, filler content 30 wt.%), HT-PPFhm and N-vinyl pyrrolidone, dibenzoyl peroxide and N,N-dimethyl aniline. Two more nanocomposites were prepared with precipitated HAP nanoparticles (<100 nm rod-like shape) and commercially available HAP nanoparticles (<200 nm spherical shape), respectively. Calcined HAP nanoparticles resulted in very good crosslinking in the resin matrix with high crosslinking density and interfacial bonding with the polymer, owing to the rod-like shape of the nanoparticles; this gave improved biomechanical strength and modulus and also controlled degradation of the nanocomposite for scaffold formation. The tissue compatibility and osteocompatibility of the nanocomposite containing calcined HAP nanoparticles was evaluated. The tissue compatibility was studied by intramuscular implantation in a rabbit animal model for 3 months as per ISO standard 10993/6. The in vivo femoral bone repair was also carried out in the rabbit animal model as per ISO standard 10993/6. The nanocomposite containing calcined HAP nanoparticles is both biocompatible and osteocompatible. Copyright 2009 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Biology of biomechanics: Finite element analysis of a statically determinate system to rotate the occlusal plane for correction of a skeletal Class III open-bite malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, W Eugene; Viecilli, Rodrigo F; Chang, Chris; Katona, Thomas R; Paydar, Nasser H

    2015-12-01

    In the absence of adequate animal or in-vitro models, the biomechanics of human malocclusion must be studied indirectly. Finite element analysis (FEA) is emerging as a clinical technology to assist in diagnosis, treatment planning, and retrospective analysis. The hypothesis tested is that instantaneous FEA can retrospectively simulate long-term mandibular arch retraction and occlusal plane rotation for the correction of a skeletal Class III malocclusion. Seventeen published case reports were selected of patients treated with statically determinate mechanics using posterior mandible or infrazygomatic crest bone screw anchorage to retract the mandibular arch. Two-dimensional measurements were made for incisor and molar movements, mandibular arch rotation, and retraction relative to the maxillary arch. A patient with cone-beam computed tomography imaging was selected for a retrospective FEA. The mean age for the sample was 23.3 ± 3.3 years; there were 7 men and 10 women. Mean incisor movements were 3.35 ± 1.55 mm of retraction and 2.18 ± 2.51 mm of extrusion. Corresponding molar movements were retractions of 4.85 ± 1.78 mm and intrusions of 0.85 ± 2.22 mm. Retraction of the mandibular arch relative to the maxillary arch was 4.88 ± 1.41 mm. Mean posterior rotation of the mandibular arch was -5.76° ± 4.77° (counterclockwise). The mean treatment time (n = 16) was 36.2 ± 15.3 months. Bone screws in the posterior mandibular region were more efficient for intruding molars and decreasing the vertical dimension of the occlusion to close an open bite. The full-cusp, skeletal Class III patient selected for FEA was treated to an American Board of Orthodontics Cast-Radiograph Evaluation score of 24 points in about 36 months by en-masse retraction and posterior rotation of the mandibular arch: the bilateral load on the mandibular segment was about 200 cN. The mandibular arch was retracted by about 5 mm, posterior rotation was about 16.5°, and molar intrusion was about 3

  11. Stability of radial head and neck fractures: a biomechanical study of six fixation constructs with consideration of three locking plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, Klaus Josef; Mueller, Lars P; Krezdorn, David; Appelmann, Philipp; Prommersberger, Karl J; Sternstein, Werner; Rommens, Pol M

    2007-12-01

    Open reduction and internal fixation of radial neck fractures can lead to secondary loss of reduction and nonunion due to insufficient stability. Nevertheless, there are only a few biomechanical studies about the stability achieved by different osteosynthesis constructs. Forty-eight formalin-fixed, human proximal radii were divided into 6 groups according to their bone density (measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry). A 2.7-mm gap osteotomy was performed to simulate an unstable radial neck fracture, which was fixed with 3 nonlocking implants: a 2.4-mm T plate, a 2.4-mm blade plate, and 2.0-mm crossed screws, and 3 locking plates: a 2.0-mm LCP T plate, a 2.0-mm 6x2 grid plate, and a 2.0-mm radial head plate. Implants were tested under axial (N/mm) and torsional (Ncm/ degrees ) loads with a servohydraulic materials testing machine. The radial head plate was significantly stiffer than all other implants under axial as well as under torsional loads, with values of 36 N/mm and 13 Ncm/ degrees . The second-stiffest implant was the blade plate, with values of 20 N/mm and 6 Ncm/ degrees . The weakest implants were the 2.0-mm LCP, with values of 6 N/mm and 2 Ncm/ degrees , and the 2.0-mm crossed screws, with values of 18 N/mm and 2 Ncm/ degrees . The 2.4-mm T plate, with values of 14 N/mm and 4 Ncm/ degrees , and the 2.0-mm grid plate, with values of 8 N/mm and 4 Ncm/ degrees came to lie in the midfield. The 2.0-mm angle-stable plates-depending on their design-allow fixation with comparable or even higher stability than the bulky 2.4-mm nonlocking implants and 2.0-mm crossed screws.

  12. The Comprehensive Biomechanics and Load-Sharing of Semirigid PEEK and Semirigid Posterior Dynamic Stabilization Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Sengupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alternatives to conventional rigid fusion have been proposed for several conditions related to degenerative disc disease when nonoperative treatment has failed. Semirigid fixation, in the form of dynamic stabilization or PEEK rods, is expected to provide compression under loading as well as an intermediate level of stabilization. This study systematically examines both the load-sharing characteristics and kinematics of these two devices compared to the standard of internal rigid fixators. Load-sharing was studied by using digital pressure films inserted between an artificially machined disc and two loading fixtures. Rigid rods, PEEK rods, and the dynamic stabilization system were inserted posteriorly for stabilization. The kinematics were quantified on ten, human, cadaver lumbosacral spines (L3-S1 which were tested under a pure bending moment, in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. The magnitude of load transmission through the anterior column was significantly greater with the dynamic device compared to PEEK rods and rigid rods. The contact pressures were distributed more uniformly, throughout the disc with the dynamic stabilization devices, and had smaller maximum point-loading (pressures on any particular point within the disc. Kinematically, the motion was reduced by both semirigid devices similarly in all directions, with slight rigidity imparted by a lateral interbody device.

  13. Static and dynamic stability results for a class of three-dimensional configurations of Kirchhoff elastic rods

    KAUST Repository

    Majumdar, Apala

    2013-06-01

    We analyze the dynamical stability of a naturally straight, inextensible and unshearable elastic rod, under tension and controlled end rotation, within the Kirchhoff model in three dimensions. The cases of clamped boundary conditions and isoperimetric constraints are treated separately. We obtain explicit criteria for the static stability of arbitrary extrema of a general quadratic strain energy. We exploit the equivalence between the total energy and a suitably defined norm to prove that local minimizers of the strain energy, under explicit hypotheses, are stable in the dynamic sense due to Liapounov. We also extend our analysis to damped systems to show that static equilibria are dynamically stable in the Liapounov sense, in the presence of a suitably defined local drag force. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The roles of static stability and tropical-extratropical interactions in the summer interannual variability of the North Atlantic sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbengue, Cheikh Oumar; Woollings, Tim; Dacre, Helen F.; Hodges, Kevin I.

    2018-04-01

    Summer seasonal forecast skill in the North Atlantic sector is lower than winter skill. To identify potential controls on predictability, the sensitivity of North Atlantic baroclinicity to atmospheric drivers is quantified. Using ERA-INTERIM reanalysis data, North Atlantic storm-track baroclinicity is shown to be less sensitive to meridional temperature-gradient variability in summer. Static stability shapes the sector's interannual variability by modulating the sensitivity of baroclinicity to variations in meridional temperature gradients and tropopause height and by modifying the baroclinicity itself. High static stability anomalies at upper levels result in more zonal extratropical cyclone tracks and higher eddy kinetic energy over the British Isles in the summertime. These static stability anomalies are not strongly related to the summer NAO; but they are correlated with the suppression of convection over the tropical Atlantic and with a poleward-shifted subtropical jet. These results suggest a non-local driver of North Atlantic variability. Furthermore, they imply that improved representations of convection over the south-eastern part of North America and the tropical Atlantic might improve summer seasonal forecast skill.

  15. Longitudinal Static Stability and wake visualization of high altitude long endurance aircraft developed in Bandung institute of technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irsyad Lukman, E.; Agoes Moelyadi, M.

    2018-04-01

    A High Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) Unamanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) is currently being researched in Bandung Institute of Technology. The HALE is designed to be a pseudo-sattelite for information and communication purpose in Indonesia. This paper would present the longitudinal static stability of the aircraft that was analysed using DATCOM as well as simulation of the wing using ANSYS CFX. Result shows that the aircraft has acceptable stability and the wake from the wing at climbing condition cannot be ignored, however it does not affect the horizontal tail.

  16. The effect of pre-vertebroplasty tumor ablation using laser-induced thermotherapy on biomechanical stability and cement fill in the metastatic spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Henry; Mousavi, Payam; Chin, Lee; Roth, Sandra; Finkelstein, Joel; Vitken, Alex; Whyne, Cari

    2007-08-01

    A biomechanical study comparing simulated lytic vertebral metastases treated with laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) and vertebroplasty versus vertebroplasty alone. To investigate the effect of tumor ablation using LITT prior to vertebroplasty on biomechanical stability and cement fill patterns in a standardized model of spinal metastatic disease. Vertebroplasty in the metastatic spine is aimed at reducing pain, but is associated with risk of cement extravasation in up to 10%. Six pairs of fresh-frozen cadaveric thoracolumbar spinal motion segments were tested in axial compression intact, with simulated metastases and following percutaneous vertebroplasty with or without LITT. Canal narrowing under load, pattern of cement fill, load to failure, and LITT temperature and pressure generation were collected. In all LITT specimens, cement filled the defect without extravasation. The canal extravasation rate was 33% in specimens treated without LITT. LITT and vertebroplasty yielded a trend toward improved posterior wall stability (P = 0.095) as compared to vertebroplasty alone. Moderate rises in temperature and minimal pressure generation was seen during LITT. In this model, elimination of tumor by LITT, facilitates cement fill, enhances biomechanical stability and reduces the risk of cement extravasation.

  17. Biomechanical Effects of Posterior Condylar Offset and Posterior Tibial Slope on Quadriceps Force and Joint Contact Forces in Posterior-Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung-Tak Kang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the biomechanical effect of the posterior condylar offset (PCO and posterior tibial slope (PTS in posterior-stabilized (PS fixed-bearing total knee arthroplasty (TKA. We developed ±1, ±2, and ±3 mm PCO models in the posterior direction and −3°, 0°, 3°, and 6° PTS models using a previously validated FE model. The influence of changes in the PCO and PTS on the biomechanical effects under deep-knee-bend loading was investigated. The contact stress on the PE insert increased by 14% and decreased by 7% on average as the PCO increased and decreased, respectively, compared to the neutral position. In addition, the contact stress on post in PE insert increased by 18% on average as PTS increased from −3° to 6°. However, the contact stress on the patellar button decreased by 11% on average as PTS increased from −3° to 6° in all different PCO cases. The quadriceps force decreased by 14% as PTS increased from −3° to 6° in all PCO models. The same trend was found in patellar tendon force. Changes in PCO had adverse biomechanical effects whereas PTS increase had positive biomechanical effects. However, excessive PTS should be avoided to prevent knee instability and subsequent failure.

  18. Mechanical stability of the subtalar joint after lateral ligament sectioning and ankle brace application: a biomechanical experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Tomoaki; Kura, Hideji; Suzuki, Daisuke; Uchiyama, Eiichi; Fujimiya, Mineko; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2009-12-01

    The roles of each ligament supporting the subtalar joint have not been clarified despite several biomechanical studies. The effects of ankle braces on subtalar instability have not been shown. The ankle brace has a partial effect on restricting excessive motion of the subtalar joint. Controlled laboratory study. Ten normal fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens were used. The angular motions of the talus were measured via a magnetic tracking system. The specimens were tested while inversion and eversion forces, as well as internal and external rotation torques, were applied. The calcaneofibular ligament, cervical ligament, and interosseous talocalcaneal ligament were sectioned sequentially, and the roles of each ligament, as well as the stabilizing effects of the ankle brace, were examined. Complete sectioning of the ligaments increased the angle between the talus and calcaneus in the frontal plane to 51.7 degrees + or - 11.8 degrees compared with 35.7 degrees + or - 6.0 degrees in the intact state when inversion force was applied. There was a statistically significant difference in the angles between complete sectioning of the ligaments and after application of the brace (34.1 degrees + or - 7.3 degrees ) when inversion force was applied. On the other hand, significant differences in subtalar rotation were not found between complete sectioning of the ligaments and application of the brace when internal and external rotational torques were applied. The ankle brace limited inversion of the subtalar joint, but it did not restrict motion after application of internal or external rotational torques. In cases of severe ankle sprains involving the calcaneofibular ligament, cervical ligament, and interosseous talocalcaneal ligament injuries, application of an ankle brace might be less effective in limiting internal-external rotational instabilities than in cases of inversion instabilities in the subtalar joint. An improvement in the design of the brace is needed to restore

  19. Hybrid dynamic stabilization: a biomechanical assessment of adjacent and supraadjacent levels of the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mageswaran, Prasath; Techy, Fernando; Colbrunn, Robb W; Bonner, Tara F; McLain, Robert F

    2012-09-01

    The object of this study was to evaluate the effect of hybrid dynamic stabilization on adjacent levels of the lumbar spine. Seven human spine specimens from T-12 to the sacrum were used. The following conditions were implemented: 1) intact spine; 2) fusion of L4-5 with bilateral pedicle screws and titanium rods; and 3) supplementation of the L4-5 fusion with pedicle screw dynamic stabilization constructs at L3-4, with the purpose of protecting the L3-4 level from excessive range of motion (ROM) and to create a smoother motion transition to the rest of the lumbar spine. An industrial robot was used to apply continuous pure moment (± 2 Nm) in flexion-extension with and without a follower load, lateral bending, and axial rotation. Intersegmental rotations of the fused, dynamically stabilized, and adjacent levels were measured and compared. In flexion-extension only, the rigid instrumentation at L4-5 caused a 78% decrease in the segment's ROM when compared with the intact specimen. To compensate, it caused an increase in motion at adjacent levels L1-2 (45.6%) and L2-3 (23.2%) only. The placement of the dynamic construct at L3-4 decreased the operated level's ROM by 80.4% (similar stability as the fusion at L4-5), when compared with the intact specimen, and caused a significant increase in motion at all tested adjacent levels. In flexion-extension with a follower load, instrumentation at L4-5 affected only a subadjacent level, L5-sacrum (52.0%), while causing a reduction in motion at the operated level (L4-5, -76.4%). The dynamic construct caused a significant increase in motion at the adjacent levels T12-L1 (44.9%), L1-2 (57.3%), and L5-sacrum (83.9%), while motion at the operated level (L3-4) was reduced by 76.7%. In lateral bending, instrumentation at L4-5 increased motion at only T12-L1 (22.8%). The dynamic construct at L3-4 caused an increase in motion at T12-L1 (69.9%), L1-2 (59.4%), L2-3 (44.7%), and L5-sacrum (43.7%). In axial rotation, only the placement of

  20. Biomechanical stability analysis of the lambda-model controlling one joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, L; Zhu, K Y

    2007-06-01

    Computer modeling and control of the human motor system might be helpful for understanding the mechanism of human motor system and for the diagnosis and treatment of neuromuscular disorders. In this paper, a brief view of the equilibrium point hypothesis for human motor system modeling is given, and the lambda-model derived from this hypothesis is studied. The stability of the lambda-model based on equilibrium and Jacobian matrix is investigated. The results obtained in this paper suggest that the lambda-model is stable and has a unique equilibrium point under certain conditions.

  1. A Biomechanical Comparison of 3 Different Arthroscopic Lateral Ankle Stabilization Techniques in 36 Cadaveric Ankles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottom, James M; Baker, Joseph S; Richardson, Phillip E; Maker, Jared M

    Arthroscopic lateral ankle stabilization has become an increasingly popular option among foot and ankle surgeons to address lateral ankle instability, because it combines a modified Broström-Gould procedure with the ability to address any intra-articular pathologic findings at the same session. The present study evaluated 3 different constructs in a cadaveric model. Thirty-six fresh frozen cadaver limbs were used, and the anterior talofibular ligament was identified and sectioned. The specimens were then placed into 1 of 3 groups. Group 1 received a repair with a single-row, 2-suture anchor construct; group 2 received repair with a novel, double-row, 4-anchor knotless construct; and group 3 received repair with a double-row, 3-anchor construct. Specimens were then tested for stiffness and load to ultimate failure using a customized jig. Stiffness was measured in each of the groups and was 12.10 ± 5.43 (range 5.50 to 22.24) N/mm for group 1, 13.40 ± 7.98 (range 6.71 to 36.28) N/mm for group 2, and 12.55 ± 4.00 (range 6.48 to 22.14) N/mm for group 3. No significant differences were found among the 3 groups in terms of stiffness (p = .939, 1-way analysis of variance, ɑ = 0.05). The groups were tested to failure, with observed force measurements of 156.43 ± 30.39 (range 83.69 to 192.00) N for group 1, 206.62 ± 55.62 (range 141.37 to 300.29) N for group 2, and 246.82 ± 82.37 (range 164.26 to 384.93) N for group 3. Statistically significant differences were noted between groups 1 and 3 (p = .006, 1-way analysis of variance, ɑ = 0.05). The results of the present study have shown that a previously reported arthroscopic lateral ankle stabilization procedure, when modified with an additional proximal suture anchor into the fibula, results in a statistically significant increase in strength in terms of the maximum load to failure. Additionally, we have described a previously unreported, knotless technique for arthroscopic lateral ankle

  2. Less-invasive stabilization of rib fractures by intramedullary fixation: a biomechanical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottlang, Michael; Helzel, Inga; Long, William; Fitzpatrick, Daniel; Madey, Steven

    2010-05-01

    This study evaluated intramedullary fixation of rib fractures with Kirschner wires and novel ribs splints. We hypothesized that rib splints can provide equivalent fixation strength while avoiding complications associated with Kirschner wires, namely wire migration and cutout. The durability, strength, and failure modes of rib fracture fixation with Kirschner wires and rib splints were evaluated in 22 paired human ribs. First, intact ribs were loaded to failure to determine their strength. After fracture fixation with Kirschner wires and rib splints, fixation constructs were dynamically loaded to 360,000 cycles at five times the respiratory load to determine their durability. Finally, constructs were loaded to failure to determine residual strength and failure modes. All constructs sustained dynamic loading without failure. Dynamic loading caused three times more subsidence in Kirschner wire constructs (1.2 mm +/- 1.4 mm) than in rib splint constructs (0.4 mm +/- 0.2 mm, p = 0.09). After dynamic loading, rib splint constructs remained 48% stronger than Kirschner wire constructs (p = 0.001). Five of 11 Kirschner wire constructs failed catastrophically by cutting through the medial cortex, leading to complete loss of stability and wire migration through the lateral cortex. The remaining six constructs failed by wire bending. Rib splint constructs failed by development of fracture lines along the superior and interior cortices. No splint construct failed catastrophically, and all splint constructs retained functional reduction and fixation. Because of their superior strength and absence of catastrophic failure mode, rib splints can serve as an attractive alternative to Kirschner wires for intramedullary stabilization of rib fractures, especially in the case of posterior rib fractures where access for plating is limited.

  3. Changes in the stability and biomechanics of P22 bacteriophage capsid during maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Ravi; Llauró, Aida; Rayaprolu, Vamseedhar; Qazi, Shefah; de Pablo, Pedro J; Douglas, Trevor; Bothner, Brian

    2018-03-15

    The capsid of P22 bacteriophage undergoes a series of structural transitions during maturation that guide it from spherical to icosahedral morphology. The transitions include the release of scaffold proteins and capsid expansion. Although P22 maturation has been investigated for decades, a unified model that incorporates thermodynamic and biophysical analyses is not available. A general and specific model of icosahedral capsid maturation is of significant interest to theoreticians searching for fundamental principles as well as virologists and material scientists seeking to alter maturation to their advantage. To address this challenge, we have combined the results from orthogonal biophysical techniques including differential scanning fluorimetry, atomic force microscopy, circular dichroism, and hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. By integrating these results from single particle and population measurements, an energy landscape of P22 maturation from procapsid through expanded shell to wiffle ball emerged, highlighting the role of metastable structures and the thermodynamics guiding maturation. The propagation of weak quaternary interactions across symmetric elements of the capsid is a key component for stability in P22. A surprising finding is that the progression to wiffle ball, which lacks pentamers, shows that chemical and thermal stability can be uncoupled from mechanical rigidity, elegantly demonstrating the complexity inherent in capsid protein interactions and the emergent properties that can arise from icosahedral symmetry. On a broader scale, this work demonstrates the power of applying orthogonal biophysical techniques to elucidate assembly mechanisms for supramolecular complexes and provides a framework within which other viral systems can be compared. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of static pre-loading on the dynamic stability of a column on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents, from strictly analytical consideration, the dynamic analysis of a finite column stressed by a step load but in the presence of a previously imposed static load. The results show that (a) the dynamic buckling load for this type of loading is relatively higher than that of a similar column stressed by a step load ...

  5. The effect of winglets on the static aerodynamic stability characteristics of a representative second generation jet transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, P. F.; Flechner, S. G.

    1976-01-01

    A baseline wing and a version of the same wing fitted with winglets were tested. The longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics were determined through an angle-of-attack range from -1 deg to 10 deg at an angle of sideslip of 0 deg for Mach numbers of 0.750, 0.800, and 0.825. The lateral aerodynamic characteristics were determined through the same angle-of-attack range at fixed sideslip angles of 2.5 deg and 5 deg. Both configurations were investigated at Reynolds numbers of 13,000,000, per meter (4,000,000 per foot) and approximately 20,000,000 per meter (6,000,000 per foot). The winglet configuration showed slight increases over the baseline wing in static longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic stability throughout the test Mach number range for a model design lift coefficient of 0.53. Reynolds number variation had very little effect on stability.

  6. STUDY OF STATIC AND DYNAMIC STABILITY OF THIN-WALLED BARS EXCITED BY PERIODICAL AXIAL EXTERNAL FORCES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minodora Maria PASĂRE

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In these paper, starting from the relations for the displacements and spinning the transversal section of a bar with thin walls of sections opened expressed by the corresponding influence functions and introducing the components of the exterior forces distributed and the moments of the exterior forces distributed due to the inertia forces, the exciting axial forces together with the following effect of these and of the reaction forces of the elastic environment for leaning it may reach to the system of the equations of parametric vibrations under the form of three integral equation These equations may serve for the study of vibrations of the bars, to study the static stability and to study the dynamic stability

  7. Optimum design of large span concrete filled steel tubular arch bridge based on static, stability and modal analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵长军; 胡隽; 徐兴

    2002-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element model was established for a large span concrete filled steel tubular (CFST) arch bridge which is currently under construction. The arch rib, the spandrel columns, the prestressed concrete box-beam, the cast-in-situ concrete plate of bridge deck, the steel box-beam and the crossbeams connecting the two pieces of arch ribs, were modeled by three-dimensional Timoshenko beam elements (3DTBE). The suspenders were modeled by three-dimensional cable elements (3DCE). Both geometric nonlinearity and prestress effect could be included in each kind of element. At the same time a second finite element model with the same geometric and material properties excepted for the sectional dimension of arch rib was set up. Static dynamic analyses were performed to determine the corresponding characteristics of the structure. The results showed that the arch rib's axial rigidity could be determined by static analysis. The stability and vibration of this system could be separated into in-plane modes, out-of-plane modes and coupled modes. The in-plane stability and dynamic characteristics are determined by the arch rib's vertical stiffness and that of out-of-plane is determined by the crossbeams' stiffness and arch rib's lateral stiffness mainly. The in-plane stiffness is much greater than that of out-of-plane for this kind of bridge . The effect of geometric nonlinearity and prestress effect on bridge behavior is insignificant.

  8. Stability of the static solitons in a pure spinor theory with fractional power nonlinearities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akdeniz, K.G.; Tezgor, G.; Barut, A.O.; Kalayci, J.; Okan, S.E.

    1988-08-01

    Soliton solutions are obtained in a pure fermionic model with fractional power nonlinear self-interactions. The stability properties of the minimum solutions have also been investigated within the framework of the Shatah-Strauss formalism. (author). 10 refs

  9. An Analysis of the Effects of Wing Aspect Ratio and Tail Location on Static Longitudinal Stability Below the Mach Number of Lift Divergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelson, John A.; Crown, J. Conrad

    1948-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the influence of wing aspect ratio and tail location on the effects of compressibility upon static longitudinal stability. The investigation showed that the use of reduced wing aspect ratios or short tail lengths leads to serious reductions in high-speed stability and the possibility of high-speed instability.

  10. Challenging the in-vivo assessment of biomechanical properties of the uterine cervix: A critical analysis of ultrasound based quasi-static procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, M M; Badir, S; Pensalfini, M; Bajka, M; Abitabile, P; Zimmermann, R; Mazza, E

    2015-06-25

    Measuring the stiffness of the uterine cervix might be useful in the prediction of preterm delivery, a still unsolved health issue of global dimensions. Recently, a number of clinical studies have addressed this topic, proposing quantitative methods for the assessment of the mechanical properties of the cervix. Quasi-static elastography, maximum compressibility using ultrasound and aspiration tests have been applied for this purpose. The results obtained with the different methods seem to provide contradictory information about the physiologic development of cervical stiffness during pregnancy. Simulations and experiments were performed in order to rationalize the findings obtained with ultrasound based, quasi-static procedures. The experimental and computational results clearly illustrate that standardization of quasi-static elastography leads to repeatable strain values, but for different loading forces. Since force cannot be controlled, this current approach does not allow the distinction between a globally soft and stiff cervix. It is further shown that introducing a reference elastomer into the elastography measurement might overcome the problem of force standardization, but a careful mechanical analysis is required to obtain reliable stiffness values for cervical tissue. In contrast, the maximum compressibility procedure leads to a repeatable, semi-quantitative assessment of cervical consistency, due to the nonlinear nature of the mechanical behavior of cervical tissue. The evolution of cervical stiffness in pregnancy obtained with this procedure is in line with data from aspiration tests. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Voltage stability index based optimal placement of static VAR compensator and sizing using Cuckoo search algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswara Rao, B.; Kumar, G. V. Nagesh; Chowdary, D. Deepak; Bharathi, M. Aruna; Patra, Stutee

    2017-07-01

    This paper furnish the new Metaheuristic algorithm called Cuckoo Search Algorithm (CSA) for solving optimal power flow (OPF) problem with minimization of real power generation cost. The CSA is found to be the most efficient algorithm for solving single objective optimal power flow problems. The CSA performance is tested on IEEE 57 bus test system with real power generation cost minimization as objective function. Static VAR Compensator (SVC) is one of the best shunt connected device in the Flexible Alternating Current Transmission System (FACTS) family. It has capable of controlling the voltage magnitudes of buses by injecting the reactive power to system. In this paper SVC is integrated in CSA based Optimal Power Flow to optimize the real power generation cost. SVC is used to improve the voltage profile of the system. CSA gives better results as compared to genetic algorithm (GA) in both without and with SVC conditions.

  12. Effect of Semi-Rigid and Soft Ankle Braces on Static and Dynamic Postural Stability in Young Male Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriaki Maeda, Yukio Urabe, Shogo Tsutsumi, Shuhei Numano, Miho Morita, Takuya Takeuchi, Shou Iwata, Toshiki Kobayashi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ankle braces have been suggested to protect ankle joints from a sprain by restricting inversion and improving proprioception. However, the difference in effects between a semi-rigid brace and a soft brace regarding dynamic postural control after landing is not known. The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of soft (SB and semi-rigid (SRB ankle braces on static and dynamic postural stability in healthy young men. Altogether, 21 male adults (mean age 24.0 ± 1.5 years were assessed for one leg while wearing non-brace (NB, SB or SRB. Balance in single-limb stance on a single-force platform with open eyes and closed eyes were assessed for the non-dominant leg under SB, SRB, and NB conditions. Locus length/second (mm/s and the enveloped area (mm·s-2 surrounded by the circumference of the wave pattern during postural sway were calculated. For assessing dynamic postural stability, the participant jumped and landed on one leg on a force platform, and the Dynamic Postural Stability Index (DPSI and the maximum vertical ground reaction force (vGRFmax were measured. The data were compared among the three conditions with repeated-measures analysis of variance. The correlations between locus length/second, enveloped area, DPSI values (DPSI, Anterior-Posterior Stability Index, Medial-Lateral Stability Index, and Vertical Stability Index, and vGRFmax were then calculated. The results indicated that locus length/second and enveloped area with open eyes and closed eyes were not significantly different for each condition. However, a significant lower in the DPSI and Vertical Stability Index were observed with the SRB in comparison to the SB and NB. A significant improvement in vGRFmax was also observed with the SRB in comparison to NB. SRB demonstrated a positive effect on dynamic postural stability after landing on a single leg and may improve balance by increasing dynamic postural stability.

  13. Dynamic Stability Study of Static Gas Bearing for Small Cryogenic Turbo-Expander

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xuemin; Zhuang Ming; Zhang Qiyong; Li Shanshan; Fu Bao

    2011-01-01

    An experimental method is presented to analyze the dynamic stability of the gas bearing for small cryogenic turbo-expanders. The rotation imbalance response and the shape of the rotor orbit were obtained for different speeds up to 110,000 rpm, and the critical speed of the rotor-bearing system was determined by a Bode diagram. An FFT signal analytical method was applied to identify the resonance frequency, and the waterfall plot was presented. During the whole process of speeding up to the designed speed of 110,000 rpm, the rotor-bearing works stably with no whirl instability, which is validated in a waterfall plot. Also, the tested rotor-bearing model was analyzed theoretically. It was proved that the experimental results were highly consistent with those of theoretical calculations. Thus the experimental method proposed here to analyze the dynamic stability of the gas bearing is feasible. (fusion engineering)

  14. Dynamic and Static Combination Analysis Method of Slope Stability Analysis during Earthquake

    OpenAIRE

    Liang Lu; Zongjian Wang; Xiaoyuan Huang; Bin Zheng; Katsuhiko Arai

    2014-01-01

    The results of laboratory model tests for simulating the slope failure due to vibration, including unreinforced slope and the slope reinforced by using geotextile, show that the slope failure occurs when a cumulative plastic displacement exceeds a certain critical value. To overcome the defects of conventional stability analysis, which evaluates the slope characteristics only by its strength parameters, a numerical procedure considering the stiffness and deformation of materials and geosynthe...

  15. Particle-bubble aggregate stability on static bubble generated by single nozzle on flotation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warjito, Harinaldi, Setyantono, Manus; Siregar, Sahala D.

    2016-06-01

    There are three sub-processes on flotation. These processes are intervening liquid film into critical thickness, rupture of liquid film forming three phase contact line, and expansion three phase contact line forming aggregate stability. Aggregate stability factor contribute to determine flotation efficiency. Aggregate stability has some important factors such as reagent and particle geometry. This research focussed on to understand effect of particle geometry to aggregate stability. Experimental setup consists of 9 x 9 x26 cm flotation column made of glass, bubble generator, particle feeding system, and high speed video camera. Bubble generator made from single nozzle with 0.3 mm diameter attached to programmable syringe pump. Particle feeding system made of pipette. Particle used in this research is taken from open pit Grasberg in Timika, Papua. Particle has sub-angular geometry and its size varies from 38 to 300 µm. Bubble-particle interaction are recorded using high speed video camera. Recordings from high speed video camera analyzed using image processing software. Experiment result shows that aggregate particle-bubble and induction time depends on particle size. Small particle (38-106 µm) has long induction time and able to rupture liquid film and also forming three phase contact line. Big particle (150-300 µm) has short induction time, so it unable to attach with bubble easily. This phenomenon is caused by apparent gravity work on particle-bubble interaction. Apparent gravity worked during particle sliding on bubble surface experience increase and reached its maximum magnitude at bubble equator. After particle passed bubble equator, apparent gravity force experience decrease. In conclusion particle size from 38-300 µm can form stable aggregate if particle attached with bubble in certain condition.

  16. On stability of exponential cosmological solutions with non-static volume factor in the Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivashchuk, V.D. [VNIIMS, Center for Gravitation and Fundamental Metrology, Moscow (Russian Federation); Peoples' Friendship University of Russia (RUDN University), Institute of Gravitation and Cosmology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    A (n + 1)-dimensional gravitational model with Gauss-Bonnet term and a cosmological constant term is considered. When ansatz with diagonal cosmological metrics is adopted, the solutions with an exponential dependence of the scale factors, a{sub i} ∝ exp(v{sup i}t), i = 1,.., n, are analyzed for n > 3. We study the stability of the solutions with non-static volume factor, i.e. K(v) = sum {sub k=1}{sup n} v{sup k} ≠ 0. We prove that under a certain restriction R imposed solutions with K(v) > 0 are stable, while solutions with K(v) < 0 are unstable. Certain examples of stable solutions are presented. We show that the solutions with v{sup 1} = v{sup 2} = v{sup 3} = H > 0 and zero variation of the effective gravitational constant are stable if the restriction R is obeyed. (orig.)

  17. Static and Dynamic Stability Analysis of Distributed Energy Resources Components with Storage Devices and Loads for Smart Grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mihet-Popa, Lucian; Groza, V.

    2011-01-01

    of the Smart Grids (SGs). A SG can operate interconnected to the main distribution grid or in islanded mode. This paper presents experimental tests for static and dynamic stability analysis carried out in a dedicated laboratory for research in distributed control and smart grid with a high share of renewable......The distributed energy resources (DER) contains several technologies, such as diesel engines, small wind turbines, photovoltaic inverters, etc. The control of DER components with storage devices and (controllable) loads, such as batteries, capacitors, dump loads, are central to the concept...... energy production. Moreover to point out, on a laboratory scale, the coupling between DR and storage and to effectively compensate wind fluctuations a number of tests have been done. In order to find out the parameters of various types of DER components for dynamic simulation models a number of tests...

  18. Flexible 2D Crystals of Polycyclic Aromatics Stabilized by Static Distortion Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Matthias; Sojka, Falko; Matthes, Lars; Bechstedt, Friedhelm; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Mannsfeld, Stefan C B; Forker, Roman; Fritz, Torsten

    2016-07-26

    The epitaxy of many organic films on inorganic substrates can be classified within the framework of rigid lattices which helps to understand the origin of energy gain driving the epitaxy of the films. Yet, there are adsorbate-substrate combinations with distinct mutual orientations for which this classification fails and epitaxy cannot be explained within a rigid lattice concept. It has been proposed that tiny shifts in atomic positions away from ideal lattice points, so-called static distortion waves (SDWs), are responsible for the observed orientational epitaxy in such cases. Using low-energy electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy, we provide direct experimental evidence for SDWs in organic adsorbate films, namely hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene on graphite. They manifest as wave-like sub-Ångström molecular displacements away from an ideal adsorbate lattice which is incommensurate with graphite. By means of a density-functional-theory based model, we show that, due to the flexibility in the adsorbate layer, molecule-substrate energy is gained by straining the intermolecular bonds and that the resulting total energy is minimal for the observed domain orientation, constituting the orientational epitaxy. While structural relaxation at an interface is a common assumption, the combination of the precise determination of the incommensurate epitaxial relation, the direct observation of SDWs in real space, and their identification as the sole source of epitaxial energy gain constitutes a comprehensive proof of this effect.

  19. Time-interval for integration of stabilizing haptic and visual information in subjects balancing under static and dynamic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Louis eHoneine

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining equilibrium is basically a sensorimotor integration task. The central nervous system continually and selectively weights and rapidly integrates sensory inputs from multiple sources, and coordinates multiple outputs. The weighting process is based on the availability and accuracy of afferent signals at a given instant, on the time-period required to process each input, and possibly on the plasticity of the relevant pathways. The likelihood that sensory inflow changes while balancing under static or dynamic conditions is high, because subjects can pass from a dark to a well-lit environment or from a tactile-guided stabilization to loss of haptic inflow. This review article presents recent data on the temporal events accompanying sensory transition, on which basic information is fragmentary. The processing time from sensory shift to reaching a new steady state includes the time to (a subtract or integrate sensory inputs, (b move from allocentric to egocentric reference or vice versa, and (c adjust the calibration of motor activity in time and amplitude to the new sensory set. We present examples of processes of integration of posture-stabilizing information, and of the respective sensorimotor time-intervals while allowing or occluding vision or adding or subtracting tactile information. These intervals are short, in the order of 1-2 s for different postural conditions, modalities and deliberate or passive shift. They are just longer for haptic than visual shift, just shorter on withdrawal than on addition of stabilizing input, and on deliberate than unexpected mode. The delays are the shortest (for haptic shift in blind subjects. Since automatic balance stabilization may be vulnerable to sensory-integration delays and to interference from concurrent cognitive tasks in patients with sensorimotor problems, insight into the processing time for balance control represents a critical step in the design of new balance- and locomotion training

  20. Time-interval for integration of stabilizing haptic and visual information in subjects balancing under static and dynamic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeine, Jean-Louis; Schieppati, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining equilibrium is basically a sensorimotor integration task. The central nervous system (CNS) continually and selectively weights and rapidly integrates sensory inputs from multiple sources, and coordinates multiple outputs. The weighting process is based on the availability and accuracy of afferent signals at a given instant, on the time-period required to process each input, and possibly on the plasticity of the relevant pathways. The likelihood that sensory inflow changes while balancing under static or dynamic conditions is high, because subjects can pass from a dark to a well-lit environment or from a tactile-guided stabilization to loss of haptic inflow. This review article presents recent data on the temporal events accompanying sensory transition, on which basic information is fragmentary. The processing time from sensory shift to reaching a new steady state includes the time to (a) subtract or integrate sensory inputs; (b) move from allocentric to egocentric reference or vice versa; and (c) adjust the calibration of motor activity in time and amplitude to the new sensory set. We present examples of processes of integration of posture-stabilizing information, and of the respective sensorimotor time-intervals while allowing or occluding vision or adding or subtracting tactile information. These intervals are short, in the order of 1–2 s for different postural conditions, modalities and deliberate or passive shift. They are just longer for haptic than visual shift, just shorter on withdrawal than on addition of stabilizing input, and on deliberate than unexpected mode. The delays are the shortest (for haptic shift) in blind subjects. Since automatic balance stabilization may be vulnerable to sensory-integration delays and to interference from concurrent cognitive tasks in patients with sensorimotor problems, insight into the processing time for balance control represents a critical step in the design of new balance- and locomotion training devices

  1. The stabilizing potential of anterior, posterior and combined techniques for the reconstruction of a 2-level cervical corpectomy model: biomechanical study and first results of ATPS prototyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, Heiko; Schmidt, Rene; Mayer, Michael; Hitzl, Wolfgang; Zenner, Juliane; Midderhoff, Stefan; Middendorf, Stefan; Graf, Nicolaus; Gräf, Nicolaus; Resch, H; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Willke, Hans-Joachim

    2010-12-01

    Clinical studies reported frequent failure with anterior instrumented multilevel cervical corpectomies. Hence, posterior augmentation was recommended but necessitates a second approach. Thus, an author group evaluated the feasibility, pull-out characteristics, and accuracy of anterior transpedicular screw (ATPS) fixation. Although first success with clinical application of ATPS has already been reported, no data exist on biomechanical characteristics of an ATPS-plate system enabling transpedicular end-level fixation in advanced instabilities. Therefore, we evaluated biomechanical qualities of an ATPS prototype C4-C7 for reduction of range of motion (ROM) and primary stability in a non-destructive setup among five constructs: anterior plate, posterior all-lateral mass screw construct, posterior construct with lateral mass screws C5 + C6 and end-level fixation using pedicle screws unilaterally or bilaterally, and a 360° construct. 12 human spines C3-T1 were divided into two groups. Four constructs were tested in group 1 and three in group 2; the ATPS prototypes were tested in both groups. Specimens were subjected to flexibility test in a spine motion tester at intact state and after 2-level corpectomy C5-C6 with subsequent reconstruction using a distractable cage and one of the osteosynthesis mentioned above. ROM in flexion-extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending was reported as normalized values. All instrumentations but the anterior plate showed significant reduction of ROM for all directions compared to the intact state. The 360° construct outperformed all others in terms of reducing ROM. While there were no significant differences between the 360° and posterior constructs in flexion-extension and lateral bending, the 360° constructs were significantly more stable in axial rotation. Concerning primary stability of ATPS prototypes, there were no significant differences compared to posterior-only constructs in flexion-extension and axial rotation. The

  2. Effect of Static Soaking Under Different Temperatures on the Lime Stabilized Gypseous Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman Al-Zubaydi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study concerns with the effect of long-term soaking on the unconfined compressive strength, loss in weight and gypsum dissolution of gypseous soil stabilized with (4% lime, take into account the following variables: initial water content, water temperature, soaking duration. The results reveals that, the unconfined compressive strength was dropped, and the reduction in values was different according to the initial water content and water temperature, so that the reduction of the unconfined compressive strength of samples soaked in water at low temperatures (50 and 250 C was greater than those soaked in water temperatures  at (490 and 600 C. The results obtained shows that the increase in soaking period decreases the percentage amount of gypsum and loss in weight for all water temperatures and soaking durations.

  3. Influence of stability islands in the recurrence of particles in a static oval billiard with holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Matheus, E-mail: mathehansen@gmail.com [Instituto de Física da Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão, Travessa R 187, Cidade Universitária, 05314-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Egydio de Carvalho, R., E-mail: regydio@rc.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista – UNESP, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil); Leonel, Edson D., E-mail: edleonel@rc.unesp.br [Departamento de Física, UNESP – Univ Estadual Paulista, Av. 24A, 1515, Bela Vista, 13506-900, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil); Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics, Strada Costiera 11, 34151 Trieste (Italy)

    2016-10-23

    Statistical properties for the recurrence of particles in an oval billiard with a hole in the boundary are discussed. The hole is allowed to move in the boundary under two different types of motion: (i) counterclockwise periodic circulation with a fixed step length and; (ii) random movement around the boundary. After injecting an ensemble of particles through the hole we show that the surviving probability of the particles without recurring – without escaping – from the billiard is described by an exponential law and that the slope of the decay is proportional to the relative size of the hole. Since the phase space of the system exhibits islands of stability we show there are preferred regions of escaping in the polar angle, hence given a partial answer to an open problem: Where to place a hole in order to maximize or minimize a suitable defined measure of escaping. - Highlights: • Statistical properties in an oval billiard is studied. • Where to place a hole in order to maximize or minimize the escape. • We found a partial answer to an open problem of escape of particles.

  4. QUASI-STATIC MODEL OF MAGNETICALLY COLLIMATED JETS AND RADIO LOBES. II. JET STRUCTURE AND STABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colgate, Stirling A.; Li, Hui [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Fowler, T. Kenneth [University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hooper, E. Bickford [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); McClenaghan, Joseph; Lin, Zhihong [University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

    2015-11-10

    This is the second in a series of companion papers showing that when an efficient dynamo can be maintained by accretion disks around supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei, it can lead to the formation of a powerful, magnetically driven, and mediated helix that could explain both the observed radio jet/lobe structures and ultimately the enormous power inferred from the observed ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays. In the first paper, we showed self-consistently that minimizing viscous dissipation in the disk naturally leads to jets of maximum power with boundary conditions known to yield jets as a low-density, magnetically collimated tower, consistent with observational constraints of wire-like currents at distances far from the black hole. In this paper we show that these magnetic towers remain collimated as they grow in length at nonrelativistic velocities. Differences with relativistic jet models are explained by three-dimensional magnetic structures derived from a detailed examination of stability properties of the tower model, including a broad diffuse pinch with current profiles predicted by a detailed jet solution outside the collimated central column treated as an electric circuit. We justify our model in part by the derived jet dimensions in reasonable agreement with observations. Using these jet properties, we also discuss the implications for relativistic particle acceleration in nonrelativistically moving jets. The appendices justify the low jet densities yielding our results and speculate how to reconcile our nonrelativistic treatment with general relativistic MHD simulations.

  5. Biomechanical Measures During Landing and Postural Stability Predict Second Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Return to Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterno, Mark V.; Schmitt, Laura C.; Ford, Kevin R.; Rauh, Mitchell J.; Myer, Gregory D.; Huang, Bin; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Athletes who return to sport participation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) have a higher risk of a second anterior cruciate ligament injury (either reinjury or contralateral injury) compared with non–anterior cruciate ligament–injured athletes. Hypotheses Prospective measures of neuromuscular control and postural stability after ACLR will predict relative increased risk for a second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Study Design Cohort study (prognosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods Fifty-six athletes underwent a prospective biomechanical screening after ACLR using 3-dimensional motion analysis during a drop vertical jump maneuver and postural stability assessment before return to pivoting and cutting sports. After the initial test session, each subject was followed for 12 months for occurrence of a second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Lower extremity joint kinematics, kinetics, and postural stability were assessed and analyzed. Analysis of variance and logistic regression were used to identify predictors of a second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Results Thirteen athletes suffered a subsequent second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Transverse plane hip kinetics and frontal plane knee kinematics during landing, sagittal plane knee moments at landing, and deficits in postural stability predicted a second injury in this population (C statistic = 0.94) with excellent sensitivity (0.92) and specificity (0.88). Specific predictive parameters included an increase in total frontal plane (valgus) movement, greater asymmetry in internal knee extensor moment at initial contact, and a deficit in single-leg postural stability of the involved limb, as measured by the Biodex stability system. Hip rotation moment independently predicted second anterior cruciate ligament injury (C = 0.81) with high sensitivity (0.77) and specificity (0.81). Conclusion Altered neuromuscular control of the hip and knee during a dynamic landing task

  6. Invertebrate biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patek, S N; Summers, A P

    2017-05-22

    Invertebrate biomechanics focuses on mechanical analyses of non-vertebrate animals, which at root is no different in aim and technique from vertebrate biomechanics, or for that matter the biomechanics of plants and fungi. But invertebrates are special - they are fabulously diverse in form, habitat, and ecology and manage this without the use of hard, internal skeletons. They are also numerous and, in many cases, tractable in an experimental and field setting. In this Primer, we will probe three axes of invertebrate diversity: worms (Phylum Annelida), spiders (Class Arachnida) and insects (Class Insecta); three habitats: subterranean, terrestrial and airborne; and three integrations with other fields: ecology, engineering and evolution. Our goal is to capture the field of invertebrate biomechanics, which has blossomed from having a primary focus on discoveries at the interface of physics and biology to being inextricably linked with integrative challenges that span biology, physics, mathematics and engineering. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Computational biomechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ethier, C.R.

    2004-01-01

    Computational biomechanics is a fast-growing field that integrates modern biological techniques and computer modelling to solve problems of medical and biological interest. Modelling of blood flow in the large arteries is the best-known application of computational biomechanics, but there are many others. Described here is work being carried out in the laboratory on the modelling of blood flow in the coronary arteries and on the transport of viral particles in the eye. (author)

  8. Stability of machining induced residual stresses in Inconel 718 under quasi-static loading at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madariaga, A.; Esnaola, J.A.; Arrazola, P.J.; Ruiz-Hervias, J.; Muñoz, P.; Ostolaza, K.

    2015-01-01

    Tensile residual stresses are very often generated on the surface when machining nickel alloys. In order to determine their influence on the final mechanical behaviour of the component residual stress stability should be considered. In the present work the evolution of surface residual stresses induced by machining in Inconel 718 under static loading at room temperature was studied experimentally and numerically. An Inconel 718 disc was face turned employing industrial working conditions and specimens for tensile tests were extracted from the disc. Surface residual stresses were measured by X-ray diffraction for initial state and after applying different loads over the material's yield stress. Then, a finite element model based on the surface–core approach was fitted to experimental results and the study was extended to analyse the influence of load level, degree of work-hardening and initial surface conditions. For the studied case, initial tensile surface residual stress (776 MPa) became even more tensile when applying loads higher than the material yield stress, but a shift was observed at the highest applied load (1350 MPa) and initial residual stress was relaxed about 170 MPa. This particular behaviour is associated to the modified stress–strain properties of the machined affected surface layer which was strongly work-hardened. Moreover, if the work-hardened properties are not considered in the finite element model results differ substantially from experiments. Surface residual stress stability also depends on the initial surface residual stress, but the degree of work-hardening induced by the machining process must be considered as well. If the difference between the yield stress of the surface and the yield stress of the core is lower than the initial surface residual stress, the surface begins yielding first and consequently the surface residual stress is decreased. In contrast, if the difference between the yield stress of the surface and the

  9. Stability of machining induced residual stresses in Inconel 718 under quasi-static loading at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madariaga, A., E-mail: amadariaga@mondragon.edu [Mechanical and Industrial Production Department, Faculty of Engineering, Mondragon Unibertsitatea, Loramendi 4, Mondragon 20500 Gipuzkoa (Spain); Esnaola, J.A.; Arrazola, P.J. [Mechanical and Industrial Production Department, Faculty of Engineering, Mondragon Unibertsitatea, Loramendi 4, Mondragon 20500 Gipuzkoa (Spain); Ruiz-Hervias, J.; Muñoz, P. [Departamento Ciencia de Materiales, ETSI Caminos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, c/Profesor Aranguren s/n, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Ostolaza, K. [Materials and Processes Technology Department, ITP S.A., Parque Tecnológico, Edificio 300, 48170 Zamudio (Spain)

    2015-01-03

    Tensile residual stresses are very often generated on the surface when machining nickel alloys. In order to determine their influence on the final mechanical behaviour of the component residual stress stability should be considered. In the present work the evolution of surface residual stresses induced by machining in Inconel 718 under static loading at room temperature was studied experimentally and numerically. An Inconel 718 disc was face turned employing industrial working conditions and specimens for tensile tests were extracted from the disc. Surface residual stresses were measured by X-ray diffraction for initial state and after applying different loads over the material's yield stress. Then, a finite element model based on the surface–core approach was fitted to experimental results and the study was extended to analyse the influence of load level, degree of work-hardening and initial surface conditions. For the studied case, initial tensile surface residual stress (776 MPa) became even more tensile when applying loads higher than the material yield stress, but a shift was observed at the highest applied load (1350 MPa) and initial residual stress was relaxed about 170 MPa. This particular behaviour is associated to the modified stress–strain properties of the machined affected surface layer which was strongly work-hardened. Moreover, if the work-hardened properties are not considered in the finite element model results differ substantially from experiments. Surface residual stress stability also depends on the initial surface residual stress, but the degree of work-hardening induced by the machining process must be considered as well. If the difference between the yield stress of the surface and the yield stress of the core is lower than the initial surface residual stress, the surface begins yielding first and consequently the surface residual stress is decreased. In contrast, if the difference between the yield stress of the surface and the

  10. Relationship between the medial longitudinal arch and the thoracic and lumbar curvatures with the static and dynamic stability in obese females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Rahimi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Reviewing the literature reveals a possible correlation between the obesity and the potential foot, spine and stability problems. Investigating the important parameters affecting the balance of obese people and prevention from falling are of high importance to reduce the resulting expenditures. This study aimed to assess the acts and the counter acts between the medial longitudinal arch (MLA and the thoracic and lumbar curvatures with the static and dynamic stability in obese females. Materials and Methods: Twenty eight obese females (age= 25±8 years old, BMI=37±4 and twenty nine non-obese females (age= 23±4 years old, BMI=23±3 were recruited in this case-control study with the cross-sectional technique. The MLA, spinal curve angles and the static or dynamic balance index of the subjects were measured using the navicular drop, flexible ruler and Biodex balance system tools, respectively. The static balance test was carried out using a modified Clinical Test of Sensory Interaction and Balance (CTSIB test in both the open and closed eyes while the subjects stood on their dominant legs. The order of the dynamic and static tests was selected randomly.Results: The findings of this study showed that in closed eye condition, most changes happened between the global Stability Index (SI and BMI; while in open eye condition, most changes occurred between the lateral-medial stability index and BMI (r=0.5. Also during an open eye condition, a moderate correlation was found between the navicular drop and lateral-medial stability index (r=0.05. In closed eyes condition, no significant changes were found between the SI and lumbar lordosis (r=0.0004; while a weak correlation was found between the thoracic curve angle and lateral-medial stability index (r=0.04.Conclusion: The dynamic stability is not only correlated to their BMI, but is highly dependent on their foot curvature types and slightly on their thoracic curve angle. Abdominal

  11. Evaluation of standardized porcine bone models to test primary stability of dental implants, using biomechanical tests and Micro-CT. An in vitro pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Delmondes Freitas Dantas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim This study evaluated a new porcine bone model to test the primary stability of different implants, analyzing Micro-CT, insertion torque, and pull-out strength. Materials and methods Bone cylinders were prepared from porcine bone and separated into 2 groups: 10 high density bone cylinders (HDB, and 10 low density bone cylinders (LDB. Then, 3D pre-implant analyses were performed, evaluating tridimensional bone density (ratio of trabecular bone volume and total tomographic volume, BV/TV, trabecular separation; percentage of closed pores; percentage of open pores; percentage of total porosity, in 3 bone levels (L1 bone volume corresponding to the internal part of the threads; L2 corresponding to the area between 0 to 0.5 mm from the end of threads; L3 corresponding to the area between 0.5 to 1.5 mm from the end of threads. Twenty implants of two different macrostructures were inserted in the bone cylinders, and divided into 4 groups (5 implants each: Group 1, e-Fix HE implant placed in HDB cylinder; Group 2, e-Fix HE implant in LDB cylinder; Group 3, e-Fix HE Silver implant placed in HDB cylinder; Group 4, e-Fix HE Silver implant in LDB cylinder. The insertion torque was recorded and bone cylinders were re-evaluated by Micro-CT (post-implant analysis. Then a pull-out strength test was performed. Results 3D analysis showed that pre- and post-implants intra-groups evaluation had statistically significant differences in Group 3 and 4, for all tomographic parameters assessed. Group 3 showed the best values for biomechanical tests (Friedman Test, p<0.05. Conclusion This methodology can produce standardized bone cylinders of high and low bone density, in which different implant designs are able to promote different effects, evidenced by biomechanical and image analysis.

  12. The effect of a combined glenoid and Hill-Sachs defect on glenohumeral stability: a biomechanical cadaveric study using 3-dimensional modeling of 142 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciero, Robert A; Parrino, Anthony; Bernhardson, Andrew S; Diaz-Doran, Vilmaris; Obopilwe, Elifho; Cote, Mark P; Golijanin, Petr; Mazzocca, Augustus D; Provencher, Matthew T

    2015-06-01

    Bone loss in anterior glenohumeral instability occurs on both the glenoid and the humerus; however, existing biomechanical studies have evaluated glenoid and humeral head defects in isolation. Thus, little is known about the combined effect of these bony lesions in a clinically relevant model on glenohumeral stability. The purpose of this study was to determine the biomechanical efficacy of a Bankart repair in the setting of bipolar (glenoid and humeral head) bone defects determined via computer-generated 3-dimensional (3D) modeling of 142 patients with recurrent anterior shoulder instability. The null hypothesis was that adding a bipolar bone defect will have no effect on glenohumeral stability after soft tissue Bankart repair. Controlled laboratory study. A total of 142 consecutive patients with recurrent anterior instability were analyzed with 3D computed tomography scans. Two Hill-Sachs lesions were selected on the basis of volumetric size representing the 25th percentile (0.87 cm(3); small) and 50th percentile (1.47 cm(3); medium) and printed in plastic resin with a 3D printer. A total of 21 cadaveric shoulders were evaluated on a custom shoulder-testing device permitting 6 degrees of freedom, and the force required to translate the humeral head anteriorly 10 mm at a rate of 2.0 mm/s with a compressive load of 50 N was determined at 60° of glenohumeral abduction and 60° of external rotation. All Bankart lesions were made sharply from the 2- to 6-o'clock positions for a right shoulder. Subsequent Bankart repair with transosseous tunnels using high-strength suture was performed. Hill-Sachs lesions were made in the cadaver utilizing a plastic mold from the exact replica off the 3D printer. Testing was conducted in the following sequence for each specimen: (1) intact, (2) posterior capsulotomy, (3) Bankart lesion, (4) Bankart repair, (5) Bankart lesion with 2-mm glenoid defect, (6) Bankart repair, (7) Bankart lesion with 2-mm glenoid defect and Hill-Sachs lesion

  13. Enhancement of load frequency stabilization effect of superconducting magnetic energy storage by static synchronous series compensator based on H ∞ control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngamroo, Issarachai; Taeratanachai, Chanin; Dechanupaprittha, Sanchai; Mitani, Yasunori

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that the load frequency stabilization effect of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) in an interconnected power system is restricted to its located area. The SMES almost has no frequency stabilization effect in another interconnected area. To enhance the frequency stabilization effect of SMES, the static synchronous series compensator (SSSC) can be applied as an auxiliary device. The SSSC can be used as an energy transfer device of the SMES to stabilize the frequency in another interconnected area. The proposed technique not only introduces a sophisticated frequency stabilization in deregulated power systems but also offers a smart energy management control of SMES. In addition, to take the robust stability of the controlled power system against system uncertainties into account, the H ∞ control is used to design robust frequency stabilizers of the SMES and SSSC. Simulation results in a two area interconnected power system confirm the high robustness of the frequency stabilizers SMES and SSSC against load disturbances and system uncertainties

  14. Biomechanical Comparison of 3 Inferiorly Directed Versus 3 Superiorly Directed Locking Screws on Stability in a 3-Part Proximal Humerus Fracture Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, David M; Santoni, Brandon G; Stoops, T Kyle; Tanner, Gregory; Diaz, Miguel A; Mighell, Mark

    2018-06-01

    To quantify the stability of 3 points of inferiorly directed versus 3 points of superiorly directed locking screw fixation compared with the full contingent of 6 points of locked screw fixation in the treatment of a 3-part proximal humerus fracture. A standardized 3-part fracture was created in 10 matched pairs (experimental groups) and 10 nonmatched humeri (control group). Osteosynthesis was performed using 3 locking screws in the superior hemisphere of the humeral head (suspension), 3 locking screws in the inferior hemisphere (buttress), or the full complement of 6 locking screws (control). Specimens were tested in varus cantilever bending (7.5 Nm) to 10,000 cycles or failure. Construct survival (%) and the cycles to failure were compared. Seven of 10 controls survived the 10,000-cycle runout (70%: 8193 average cycles to failure). No experimental constructs survived the 10,000-cycle runout. Suspension and buttress screw groups failed an average of 331 and 516 cycles, respectively (P = 1.00). The average number of cycles to failure and the number of humeri surviving the 10,000-cycle runout were greater in the control group than in the experimental groups (P ≤ 0.006). Data support the use of a full contingent of 6 points of locking screw fixation over 3 superior or 3 inferior points of fixation in the treatment of a 3-part proximal humerus fracture with a locking construct. No biomechanical advantage to the 3 buttress or 3 suspension screws used in isolation was observed.

  15. Impact of double-tiered subchondral support procedure with a polyaxial locking plate on the stability of distal radius fractures using fresh cadaveric forearms: Biomechanical and radiographic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Sadaaki; Kawasaki, Keikichi; Yamakoshi, Ken-Ichi; Uchiyama, Eiichi; Aoki, Mitsuhiro; Inagaki, Katsunori

    2016-09-01

    The present study compared the changes in biomechanical and radiographic properties under cyclic axial loadings between the 'double-tiered subchondral support' (DSS) group (wherein two rows of screws were used) and the 'non-DSS' (NDSS) group (wherein only one row of distal screws was used) using cadaveric forearm models of radius fractures fixed with a polyaxial locking plate. Fifteen fresh cadaveric forearms were surgically operated to generate an Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO) type 23-C2 fracture model with the fixation of polyaxial volar locking plates. The model specimens were randomized into two groups: DSS (n = 7) and NDSS (n = 8). Both the groups received 4 locking screws in the most distal row, as is usually applied, whereas the DSS group received 2 additional screws in the second row inserted at an inclination of about 15° to support the dorsal aspect of the dorsal subchondral bone. Cyclic axial compression test was performed (3000 cycles; 0-250 N; 60 mm/min) to measure absolute rigidity and displacement, after 1, 1000, 2000 and 3000 cycles, and values were normalized relative to cycle 1. These absolute and normalized values were compared between those two groups. Radiographic images were taken before and after the cyclic loading to measure changes in volar tilt (ΔVT) and radial inclination (ΔRI). The DSS group maintained significantly higher rigidity and lower displacement values than the NDSS group during the entire loading period. Radiographic analysis indicated that the ΔVT values of the DSS group were lower than those of the NDSS group. In contrast, the fixation design did not influence the impact of loading on the ΔRI values. Biomechanical and radiographic analyses demonstrated that two rows of distal locking screws in the DSS procedure conferred higher stability than one row of distal locking screws. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Biomechanical evaluation of the impact of various facet joint lesions on the primary stability of anterior plate fixation in cervical dislocation injuries: a cadaver study: Laboratory investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberkircher, Ludwig; Born, Sebastian; Struewer, Johannes; Bliemel, Christopher; Buecking, Benjamin; Wack, Christina; Bergmann, Martin; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Krüger, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    Injuries of the subaxial cervical spine including facet joints and posterior ligaments are common. Potential surgical treatments consist of anterior, posterior, or anterior-posterior fixation. Because each approach has its advantages and disadvantages, the best treatment is debated. This biomechanical cadaver study compared the effect of different facet joint injuries on primary stability following anterior plate fixation. Fractures and plate fixation were performed on 15 fresh-frozen intact cervical spines (C3-T1). To simulate a translation-rotation injury in all groups, complete ligament rupture and facet dislocation were simulated by dissecting the entire posterior and anterior ligament complex between C-4 and C-5. In the first group, the facet joints were left intact. In the second group, one facet joint between C-4 and C-5 was removed and the other side was left intact. In the third group, both facet joints between C-4 and C-5 were removed. The authors next performed single-level anterior discectomy and interbody grafting using bone material from the respective thoracic vertebral bodies. An anterior cervical locking plate was used for fixation. Continuous loading was performed using a servohydraulic test bench at 2 N/sec. The mean load failure was measured when the implant failed. In the group in which both facet joints were intact, the mean load failure was 174.6 ± 46.93 N. The mean load failure in the second group where only one facet joint was removed was 127.8 ± 22.83 N. In the group in which both facet joints were removed, the mean load failure was 73.42 ± 32.51 N. There was a significant difference between the first group (both facet joints intact) and the third group (both facet joints removed) (p cadaver study, primary stability of anterior plate fixation for dislocation injuries of the subaxial cervical spine was dependent on the presence of the facet joints. If the bone in one or both facet joints is damaged in the clinical setting, anterior plate

  17. [The primary stability between manual and robot assisted implantation of hip prostheses: A biomechanical study on synthetic femurs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decking, J; Gerber, A; Kränzlein, J; Meurer, A; Böhm, B; Plitz, W

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the initial stability of cementless stems implanted with robotic milling and conventional manual broaching. Proximally porous structured stems (G2, ESKA-Implants, Luebeck, Germany) were implanted into synthetic femora. In one group, the femoral cavity was prepared by a CT-based robot (CASPAR, URS-Ortho, Germany) with a high-speed milling head. In the other group, femora were rasped manually with broaches. The broaches had 1 mm proximal press-fit, the robotic cavities 1.5 mm. The implants were exposed to 15 000 loading cycles with 1 000 +/- 500 N. The direction of forces on the implant head were chosen to simulate stair climbing. Internal rotation and translation (caudal, dorsal and lateral) of the implants were measured by linear transducers. The robotic group showed significantly less reversible motion regarding translation in caudal, dorsal and lateral directions. The standard deviations of implant motions were smaller in the robotic group. Using robotic preparation of the femur, initial stability was higher and more consistent than with manual broaching, but differences in undersizing of the cavities created in the femur in relation to the implant may have contributed to these differences for the most part. In-vitro-loading experiments focusing on femoral cavities with varying press-fits are recommended before the introduction of new implants or operating procedures.

  18. Biomechanical comparative study of the stability of injectable pedicle screws with different lateral holes augmented with different volumes of polymethylmethacrylate in osteoporotic lumbar vertebrae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Da; Sheng, Jun; Luo, Yang; Huang, Chen; Wu, Hong-Hua; Zhou, Jiang-Jun; Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Zheng, Wei

    2018-03-19

    Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) is widely used for pedicle screw augmentation in osteoporosis. Until now, there had been no studies of the relationship between screw stability and the distribution and volume of PMMA. The objective of this study was to analyze the relationship between screw stability and the distribution pattern and injected volume of PMMA. This is a biomechanical comparison of injectable pedicle screws with different lateral holes augmented with different volumes of PMMA in cadaveric osteoporotic lumbar vertebrae. Forty-eight osteoporotic lumbar vertebrae were randomly divided into Groups A, B, and C with different pedicle screws (16 vertebrae in each group), and then each group was randomly divided into Subgroups 0, 1, 2, and 3 with different volumes of PMMA (four vertebra with eight pedicles in each subgroup). A pilot hole was prepared in advance using the same method in all samples. Type A and type B pedicle screws were directly inserted into vertebrae in Groups A and B, respectively, and then different volumes of PMMA (0, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mL) were injected through the screws and into vertebrae in Subgroups 0, 1, 2, and 3. The pilot holes were filled with different volumes of PMMA (0, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mL), and then the screws were inserted in Groups C0, C1, C2, and C3. Screw position and distribution of PMMA were evaluated radiographically, and axial pullout tests were performed to measure maximum axial pullout strength (F max ). Polymethylmethacrylate surrounded the anterior one-third of screws in the vertebral body in Groups A1, A2, and A3; the middle one-third of screws in the junction area of the vertebral body and the pedicle in Groups B1, B2, and B3; and the full length of screws evenly in both the vertebral body and the pedicle in Groups C1, C2, and C3. There was no malpositioning of screws or leakage of PMMA in any sample. Two-way analysis of variance revealed that two factors-distribution and volume of PMMA-significantly influenced

  19. Wind-Tunnel Investigation at Low Speed of the Yawing, Pitching, and Static Stability Characteristics of a 1/10-Scale Model of the Grumman F9F-9 Airplane, TED No. NACA AD 3109

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolhart, Walter D.; Thomas, David F., Jr.

    1955-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been made in the Langley stability tunnel to determine the low-speed yawing, pitching, and static stability characteristics of a 1/10-scale model of the Grumman F9F-9 airplane. Tests were made to determine the effects of duct-entrance-fairing plugs on the static lateral and longitudinal stability characteristics of the complete model in the clean condition. The remaining tests were concerned with determining tail contributions as well as the effect of duct-entrance-fairing plugs, slats, flaps, and landing gear on the yawing and pitching stability derivatives. These data are presented without analysis in order to expedite distribution.

  20. Using the Functional Reach Test for Probing the Static Stability of Bipedal Standing in Humanoid Robots Based on the Passive Motion Paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacopo Zenzeri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to analyze the static stability of a computational architecture, based on the Passive Motion Paradigm, for coordinating the redundant degrees of freedom of a humanoid robot during whole-body reaching movements in bipedal standing. The analysis is based on a simulation study that implements the Functional Reach Test, originally developed for assessing the danger of falling in elderly people. The study is carried out in the YARP environment that allows realistic simulations with the iCub humanoid robot.

  1. Biomechanical stability of a supra-acetabular pedicle screw internal fixation device (INFIX) vs external fixation and plates for vertically unstable pelvic fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigdorchik, Jonathan M; Esquivel, Amanda O; Jin, Xin; Yang, King H; Onwudiwe, Ndidi A; Vaidya, Rahul

    2012-09-27

    We have recently developed a subcutaneous anterior pelvic fixation technique (INFIX). This internal fixator permits patients to sit, roll over in bed and lie on their sides without the cumbersome external appliances or their complications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical stability of this novel supraacetabular pedicle screw internal fixation construct (INFIX) and compare it to standard internal fixation and external fixation techniques in a single stance pelvic fracture model. Nine synthetic pelves with a simulated anterior posterior compression type III injury were placed into three groups (External Fixator, INFIX and Internal Fixation). Displacement, total axial stiffness, and the stiffness at the pubic symphysis and SI joint were calculated. Displacement and stiffness were compared by ANOVA with a Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons The mean displacement at the pubic symphysis was 20, 9 and 0.8 mm for external fixation, INFIX and internal fixation, respectively. Plate fixation was significantly stiffer than the INFIX and external Fixator (P = 0.01) at the symphysis pubis. The INFIX device was significantly stiffer than external fixation (P = 0.017) at the symphysis pubis. There was no significant difference in SI joint displacement between any of the groups. Anterior plate fixation is stiffer than both the INFIX and external fixation in single stance pelvic fracture model. The INFIX was stiffer than external fixation for both overall axial stiffness, and stiffness at the pubic symphysis. Combined with the presumed benefit of minimizing the complications associated with external fixation, the INFIX may be a more preferable option for temporary anterior pelvic fixation in situations where external fixation may have otherwise been used.

  2. Anterior cement augmentation of adjacent levels after vertebral body replacement leads to superior stability of the corpectomy cage under cyclic loading-a biomechanical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberkircher, Ludwig; Krüger, Antonio; Hörth, Dominik; Hack, Juliana; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Fleege, Christoph; Rauschmann, Michael; Arabmotlagh, Mohammad

    2018-03-01

    In the operative treatment of osteoporotic vertebral body fractures, a dorsal stabilization in combination with a corpectomy of the fractured vertebral body might be necessary with respect to the fracture morphology, whereby the osteoporotic bone quality may possibly increase the risk of implant failure. To achieve better stability, it is recommended to use cement-augmented screws for dorsal instrumentation. Besides careful end plate preparation, cement augmentation of the adjacent end plates has also been reported to lead to less reduction loss. The aim of the study was to evaluate biomechanically under cyclic loading whether an additional cement augmentation of the adjacent end plates leads to improved stability of the inserted cage. Methodical cadaver study. Fourteen fresh frozen human thoracic spines with proven osteoporosis were used (T2-T7). After removal of the soft tissues, the spine was embedded in Technovit (Kulzer, Germany). Subsequently, a corpectomy of T5 was performed, leaving the dorsal ligamentary structures intact. After randomization with respect to bone quality, two groups were generated: Dorsal instrumentation (cemented pedicle screws, Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN, USA)+cage implantation (CAPRI Corpectomy Cage, K2M, Leesburg, VA, USA) without additional cementation of the adjacent endplates (Group A) and dorsal instrumentation+cage implantation with additional cement augmentation of the adjacent end plates (Group B). The subsequent axial and cyclic loading was performed at a frequency of 1 Hz, starting at 400 N and increasing the load within 200 N after every 500 cycles up to a maximum of 2,200 N. Load failure was determined when the cages sintered macroscopically into the end plates (implant failure) or when the maximum load was reached. One specimen in Group B could not be clamped appropriately into the test bench for axial loading because of a pronounced scoliotic misalignment and had to be excluded. The mean strength for implant

  3. [RESEARCH PROGRESS OF BIOMECHANICS OF PROXIMAL ROW CARPAL INSTABILITY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinhai; Huang, Fuguo

    2015-01-01

    To review the research progress of the biomechanics of proximal row carpal instability (IPRC). The related literature concerning IPRC was extensively reviewed. The biomechanical mechanism of the surrounding soft tissue in maintaining the stability of the proximal row carpal (PRC) was analyzed, and the methods to repair or reconstruct the stability and function of the PRC were summarized from two aspects including basic biomechanics and clinical biomechanics. The muscles and ligaments of the PRC are critical to its stability. Most scholars have reached a consensus about biomechanical mechanism of the PRC, but there are still controversial conclusions on the biomechanics mechanism of the surrounding soft tissue to stability of distal radioulnar joint when the triangular fibrocartilage complex are damaged and the biomechanics mechanism of the scapholunate ligament. At present, there is no unified standard about the methods to repair or reconstruct the stability and function of the PRC. So, it is difficult for clinical practice. Some strides have been made in the basic biomechanical study on muscle and ligament and clinical biomechanical study on the methods to repair or reconstruct the stability and function of PRC, but it will be needed to further study the morphology of carpal articular surface and the adjacent articular surface, the pressure of distal carpals to proximal carpal and so on.

  4. Effects of Static Stretching and Playing Soccer on Knee Laxity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baumgart, Christian; Gokeler, Alli; Donath, Lars; Hoppe, Matthias W.; Freiwald, Juergen

    Objective: This study investigated exercise-induced effects of static stretching and playing soccer on anterior tibial translation (ATT) of the knee joint. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: University biomechanics laboratory. Participants: Thirty-one athletes were randomly assigned into

  5. Effects of Static Stretching and Playing Soccer on Knee Laxity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baumgart, Christian; Gokeler, Alli; Donath, Lars; Hoppe, Matthias W.; Freiwald, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated exercise-induced effects of static stretching and playing soccer on anterior tibial translation (ATT) of the knee joint. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: University biomechanics laboratory. Participants: Thirty-one athletes were randomly assigned into

  6. Immediate effects of the trunk stabilizing exercise on static balance parameters in double-leg and one-leg stances

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jwa-jun; Park, Se-yeon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate effect of stabilizing exercise using the PNF technique on standing balance in one-leg and double-leg stances. [Subjects and Methods] The present study recruited 34 healthy participants from a local university. The Participants performed four balance tests (double-leg stance with and without vision, one-leg stance with and without vision), before and after exercise. The exercise consisted of exercises performed using PNF techniq...

  7. Dinosaur biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, R. McNeill

    2006-01-01

    Biomechanics has made large contributions to dinosaur biology. It has enabled us to estimate both the speeds at which dinosaurs generally moved and the maximum speeds of which they may have been capable. It has told us about the range of postures they could have adopted, for locomotion and for feeding, and about the problems of blood circulation in sauropods with very long necks. It has made it possible to calculate the bite forces of predators such as Tyrannosaurus, and the stresses they imposed on its skull; and to work out the remarkable chewing mechanism of hadrosaurs. It has shown us how some dinosaurs may have produced sounds. It has enabled us to estimate the effectiveness of weapons such as the tail spines of Stegosaurus. In recent years, techniques such as computational tomography and finite element analysis, and advances in computer modelling, have brought new opportunities. Biomechanists should, however, be especially cautious in their work on animals known only as fossils. The lack of living specimens and even soft tissues oblige us to make many assumptions. It is important to be aware of the often wide ranges of uncertainty that result. PMID:16822743

  8. NUMEL: a computer aided design suite for the assessment of the steady state, static/dynamic stability and transient responses of nuclear steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, D.; Lightfoot, P.

    1988-02-01

    NUMEL is a computer aided design suite for the assessment of the steady state, static/dynamic stability and transient responses of nuclear steam generators. The equations solved are those of a monotube coflow or counterflow heat exchanger. The advantages of NUMEL are its fast execution speed, robustness, extensive validation and flexibility coupled with ease of use. The code can simultaneously model up to four separate sections (e.g. reheater, HP boiler). This document is a user manual and describes in detail the running of the NUMEL suite. In addition, a discussion is presented of the necessary approximations involved in representing a serpentine or helical AGR boiler as a monotube counterflow heat exchanger. To date, NUMEL has been applied to the modelling of AGR, Fast Reactor and once through Magnox and conventional boilers. Other versions of the code are available for specialist applications, e.g. Magnox and conventional recirculation boilers. (author)

  9. Biomechanics in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, J. F. V.

    1980-01-01

    Examines current usage of the term "biomechanics" and emphasizes the importance of differentiating between structure and material. Describes current prolects in biomechanics and lists four points about the educational significance of the field. (GS)

  10. Why National Biomechanics Day?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVita, Paul

    2018-04-11

    National Biomechanics Day (NBD) seeks to expand the influence and impact of Biomechanics on our society by expanding the awareness of Biomechanics among young people. NBD will manifest this goal through worldwide, synchronized and coordinated celebrations and demonstrations of all things Biomechanics with high school students. NBD invites all Biomechanists to participate in NBD 2018, http://nationalbiomechanicsday.asbweb.org/. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Research Techniques in Biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Terry

    Biomechanics involves the biological human beings interacting with his/her mechanical environment. Biomechanics research is being done in connection with sport, physical education, and general motor behavior, and concerns mechanics independent of implements. Biomechanics research falls in the following two general categories: (1) that specific…

  12. Static stability of a three-dimensional space truss. M.S. Thesis - Case Western Reserve Univ., 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaker, John F.

    1995-01-01

    In order to deploy large flexible space structures it is necessary to develop support systems that are strong and lightweight. The most recent example of this aerospace design need is vividly evident in the space station solar array assembly. In order to accommodate both weight limitations and strength performance criteria, ABLE Engineering has developed the Folding Articulating Square Truss (FASTMast) support structure. The FASTMast is a space truss/mechanism hybrid that can provide system support while adhering to stringent packaging demands. However, due to its slender nature and anticipated loading, stability characterization is a critical part of the design process. Furthermore, the dire consequences surely to result from a catastrophic instability quickly provide the motivation for careful examination of this problem. The fundamental components of the space station solar array system are the (1) solar array blanket system, (2) FASTMast support structure, and (3) mast canister assembly. The FASTMast once fully deployed from the canister will provide support to the solar array blankets. A unique feature of this structure is that the system responds linearly within a certain range of operating loads and nonlinearly when that range is exceeded. The source of nonlinear behavior in this case is due to a changing stiffness state resulting from an inability of diagonal members to resist applied loads. The principal objective of this study was to establish the failure modes involving instability of the FASTMast structure. Also of great interest during this effort was to establish a reliable analytical approach capable of effectively predicting critical values at which the mast becomes unstable. Due to the dual nature of structural response inherent to this problem, both linear and nonlinear analyses are required to characterize the mast in terms of stability. The approach employed herein is one that can be considered systematic in nature. The analysis begins with one

  13. FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOMECHANICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duane Knudson

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available DESCRIPTION This book provides a broad and in-depth theoretical and practical description of the fundamental concepts in understanding biomechanics in the qualitative analysis of human movement. PURPOSE The aim is to bring together up-to-date biomechanical knowledge with expert application knowledge. Extensive referencing for students is also provided. FEATURES This textbook is divided into 12 chapters within four parts, including a lab activities section at the end. The division is as follows: Part 1 Introduction: 1.Introduction to biomechanics of human movement; 2.Fundamentals of biomechanics and qualitative analysis; Part 2 Biological/Structural Bases: 3.Anatomical description and its limitations; 4.Mechanics of the musculoskeletal system; Part 3 Mechanical Bases: 5.Linear and angular kinematics; 6.Linear kinetics; 7.Angular kinetics; 8.Fluid mechanics; Part 4 Application of Biomechanics in Qualitative Analysis :9.Applying biomechanics in physical education; 10.Applying biomechanics in coaching; 11.Applying biomechanics in strength and conditioning; 12.Applying biomechanics in sports medicine and rehabilitation. AUDIENCE This is an important reading for both student and educators in the medicine, sport and exercise-related fields. For the researcher and lecturer it would be a helpful guide to plan and prepare more detailed experimental designs or lecture and/or laboratory classes in exercise and sport biomechanics. ASSESSMENT The text provides a constructive fundamental resource for biomechanics, exercise and sport-related students, teachers and researchers as well as anyone interested in understanding motion. It is also very useful since being clearly written and presenting several ways of examples of the application of biomechanics to help teach and apply biomechanical variables and concepts, including sport-related ones

  14. Biomechanics principles and practices

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, Donald R

    2014-01-01

    Presents Current Principles and ApplicationsBiomedical engineering is considered to be the most expansive of all the engineering sciences. Its function involves the direct combination of core engineering sciences as well as knowledge of nonengineering disciplines such as biology and medicine. Drawing on material from the biomechanics section of The Biomedical Engineering Handbook, Fourth Edition and utilizing the expert knowledge of respected published scientists in the application and research of biomechanics, Biomechanics: Principles and Practices discusses the latest principles and applicat

  15. Gingival Recessions and Biomechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Morten Godtfredsen

    Gingival recessions and biomechanics “Tissue is the issue, but bone sets the tone.“ A tooth outside the cortical plate can result in loss of bone and development of a gingival recession. The presentation aims to show biomechanical considerations in relation to movement of teeth with gingival...... by moving the root back in the alveolus. The tooth movement is accompanied by bone gain and thus increase the success rate for soft tissue augmentation. The choice of biomechanical system influences the treatment outcome. If a standard straight wire appliance is used, a biomechanical dilemma can arise...

  16. Rotationally Stable Screw-Anchor With Locked Trochanteric Stabilizing Plate Versus Proximal Femoral Nail Antirotation in the Treatment of AO/OTA 31A2.2 Fracture: A Biomechanical Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobe, Matthias; Nagel, Philipp; Maier, Klaus-Jürgen; Gradl, Gertraud; Buecking, Benjamin; Sönmez, Tolga T; Modabber, Ali; Prescher, Andreas; Pape, Hans-Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Third-generation cephalomedullary nails currently represent the gold standard in the treatment of unstable trochanteric femur fractures. Recently, an extramedullary rotationally stable screw-anchor system (RoSA) has been developed. It was designed to combine the benefits of screw and blade and to improve stability using a locked trochanteric stabilizing plate (TSP). The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanical behavior of RoSA/TSP and the proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA). Standardized AO/OTA 31A2.2 fractures were induced by an oscillating saw in 10 paired human specimens (n = 20; mean age = 85 years; range: 71-96 years). The fractures were stabilized by either the RoSA/TSP (Koenigsee Implants, Allendorf, Germany) or the PFNA (DePuy Synthes, Zuchwil, Switzerland). Femurs were positioned in 25 degrees of adduction and 10 degrees of posterior flexion and were cyclically loaded with axial sinusoidal pattern at 0.5 Hz, starting at 300 N, with stepwise increase by 300 N every 500 cycles until bone-implant failure occurred. After every load step, the samples were measured visually and radiographically. Femoral head migration was assessed. The stiffness at the load up to the clinically relevant load step of 1800 N (639 ± 378 N/mm (RoSA/TSP) vs. 673 ± 227 N/mm (PFNA); P = 0.542) was comparable, as was the failure load (3000 ± 787 N vs. 3780 ± 874 N; P = 0.059). Up to 1800 N, no femoral head rotation, head migration, or femoral neck shortening were observed either for RoSA/TSP or PFNA. Whereas failure of the PFNA subsumed fractures of the greater trochanter and the lateral wall, a posterior femoral neck fracture with a significantly increased femoral neck shortening (1.7 mm vs. 0 mm; P = 0.012) was the cause of failure with RoSA/TSP. This specific kind of failure was induced by a femoral neck weakening caused by the posterior TSP stabilizing screw. There was no significant difference in biomechanical properties between the RoSA/TSP and the PFNA for

  17. Effects of Static Stretching and Playing Soccer on Knee Laxity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgart, Christian; Gokeler, Alli; Donath, Lars; Hoppe, Matthias W; Freiwald, Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated exercise-induced effects of static stretching and playing soccer on anterior tibial translation (ATT) of the knee joint. Randomized controlled trial. University biomechanics laboratory. Thirty-one athletes were randomly assigned into a stretching (26.9 ± 6.2 years, 1.77 ± 0.09 m, 67.9 ± 10.7 kg) and a control group (27.9 ± 7.4 years, 1.75 ± 0.08 m, 72.0 ± 14.9 kg). Thirty-one amateur soccer players in an additional soccer group (25.1 ± 5.6 years, 1.74 ± 0.10 m, 71.8 ± 14.8 kg). All participants had no history of knee injury requiring surgery and any previous knee ligament or cartilage injury. The stretching group performed 4 different static stretching exercises with a duration of 2 × 20 seconds interspersed with breaks of 10 seconds. The soccer group completed a 90-minute soccer-specific training program. The control group did not perform any physical activity for approximately 30 minutes. Anterior tibial translation was measured with the KT-1000 knee arthrometer at forces of 67 N, 89 N, and maximal manual force (Max) before and after the intervention. There was a significant increase in ATT after static stretching and playing soccer at all applied forces. Maximal manual testing revealed a mean increase of ATT after static stretching of 2.1 ± 1.6 mm (P soccer of 1.0 ± 1.5 mm (P = 0.001). The ATT increase after static stretching at 67 and 89 N is significantly higher than in controls. At maximum manual testing, significant differences were evident between all groups. Static stretching and playing soccer increase ATT and may consequently influence mechanical factors of the anterior cruciate ligament. The ATT increase after static stretching was greater than after playing soccer. The observed increase in ATT after static stretching and playing soccer may be associated with changes in kinesthetic perception and sensorimotor control, activation of muscles, joint stability, overall performance, and higher injury risk.

  18. Measurement of the Static Stability and Control and the Damping Derivatives of a 0.13-Scale Model of the Convair XFY-1 Airplane, TED No. NACA DE 368

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joseph L.

    1954-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted to determine the static stability and control and damping in roll and yaw of a 0.13-scale model of the Convair XFY-1 airplane with propellers off from 0 deg to 90 deg angle of attack. The tests showed that a slightly unstable pitch-up tendency occurred simultaneously with a break in the normal-force curve in the angle-of-attack range from about 27 deg to 36 deg. The top vertical tail contributed positive values of static directional stability and effective dihedral up to an angle of attack of about 35 deg. The bottom tail contributed positive values of static directional stability but negative values of effective dihedral throughout the angle-of-attack range. Effectiveness of the control surfaces decreased to very low values at the high angles of attack, The model had positive damping in yaw and damping in roll about the body axes over the angle-of-attack range but the damping in yaw decreased to about zero at 90 deg angle of attack.

  19. Biomechanics of the brain

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Karol

    2011-01-01

    With contributions from scientists at major institutions, this book presents an introduction to brain anatomy for engineers and scientists. It provides, for the first time, a comprehensive resource in the field of brain biomechanics.

  20. Computational modeling in biomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Mofrad, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    This book provides a glimpse of the diverse and important roles that modern computational technology is playing in various areas of biomechanics. It includes unique chapters on ab initio quantum mechanical, molecular dynamic and scale coupling methods..

  1. Biomechanics of Spider Silks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-02

    water and deformation conditions. Such fibres [Nexia ’ biosteel ’ silk ] were spun from recombinant silk ’cloned’ from Spidroin II and indeed show 67...SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Biomechanics of Spider Silks F49620-03-1-0111 6. AUTHOR(S) Fritz Vollrath 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES...Perform Pro, WHSIDIOR, Oct 94 COVER SHEET FINAL (3rd Year) Report to AFOSR on: BIOMECHANICS OF SPIDER SILKS Fritz Vollrath, Oxford University, England

  2. Biomechanics and tennis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, B

    2006-05-01

    Success in tennis requires a mix of player talent, good coaching, appropriate equipment, and an understanding of those aspects of sport science pertinent to the game. This paper outlines the role that biomechanics plays in player development from sport science and sport medicine perspectives. Biomechanics is a key area in player development because all strokes have a fundamental mechanical structure and sports injuries primarily have a mechanical cause.

  3. Biomechanical behavior of bone scaffolds made of additive manufactured tricalciumphosphate and titanium alloy under different loading conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieding, Jan; Fritsche, Andreas; Heinl, Peter; Körner, Carolin; Cornelsen, Matthias; Seitz, Hermann; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer

    2013-12-16

    The repair of large segmental bone defects caused by fracture, tumor or infection remains challenging in orthopedic surgery. The capability of two different bone scaffold materials, sintered tricalciumphosphate and a titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V), were determined by mechanical and biomechanical testing. All scaffolds were fabricated by means of additive manufacturing techniques with identical design and controlled pore geometry. Small-sized sintered TCP scaffolds (10 mm diameter, 21 mm length) were fabricated as dense and open-porous samples and tested in an axial loading procedure. Material properties for titanium alloy were determined by using both tensile (dense) and compressive test samples (open-porous). Furthermore, large-sized open-porous TCP and titanium alloy scaffolds (30 mm in height and diameter, 700 µm pore size) were tested in a biomechanical setup simulating a large segmental bone defect using a composite femur stabilized with an osteosynthesis plate. Static physiologic loads (1.9 kN) were applied within these tests. Ultimate compressive strength of the TCP samples was 11.2 ± 0.7 MPa and 2.2 ± 0.3 MPa, respectively, for the dense and the open-porous samples. Tensile strength and ultimate compressive strength was 909.8 ± 4.9 MPa and 183.3 ± 3.7 MPa, respectively, for the dense and the open-porous titanium alloy samples. Furthermore, the biomechanical results showed good mechanical stability for the titanium alloy scaffolds. TCP scaffolds failed at 30% of the maximum load. Based on recent data, the 3D printed TCP scaffolds tested cannot currently be recommended for high load-bearing situations. Scaffolds made of titanium could be optimized by adapting the biomechanical requirements.

  4. [Cement augmentation on the spine : Biomechanical considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, J P; Weiser, L; Kueny, R A; Huber, G; Rueger, J M; Lehmann, W

    2015-09-01

    Vertebral compression fractures are the most common osteoporotic fractures. Since the introduction of vertebroplasty and screw augmentation, the management of osteoporotic fractures has changed significantly. The biomechanical characteristics of the risk of adjacent fractures and novel treatment modalities for osteoporotic vertebral fractures, including pure cement augmentation by vertebroplasty, and cement augmentation of screws for posterior instrumentation, are explored. Eighteen human osteoporotic lumbar spines (L1-5) adjacent to vertebral bodies after vertebroplasty were tested in a servo-hydraulic machine. As augmentation compounds we used standard cement and a modified low-strength cement. Different anchoring pedicle screws were tested with and without cement augmentation in another cohort of human specimens with a simple pull-out test and a fatigue test that better reflects physiological conditions. Cement augmentation in the osteoporotic spine leads to greater biomechanical stability. However, change in vertebral stiffness resulted in alterations with the risk of adjacent fractures. By using a less firm cement compound, the risk of adjacent fractures is significantly reduced. Both screw augmentation techniques resulted in a significant increase in the withdrawal force compared with the group without cement. Augmentation using perforated screws showed the highest stability in the fatigue test. The augmentation of cement leads to a significant change in the biomechanical properties. Differences in the stability of adjacent vertebral bodies increase the risk of adjacent fractures, which could be mitigated by a modified cement compound with reduced strength. Screws that were specifically designed for cement application displayed greatest stability in the fatigue test.

  5. Toward characterization of craniofacial biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szwedowski, Tomasz D; Whyne, Cari M; Fialkov, Jeffrey A

    2010-01-01

    Surgical reconstruction of craniofacial deformities has advanced significantly in recent years. However, unlike orthopedic surgery of the appendicular skeleton, the biomechanical characterization of the human craniofacial skeleton (CFS) has yet to be elucidated. Attempts to simplify facial skeletal structure into straightforward mechanical device analogies have been insufficient in delineating craniofacial biomechanics. Advanced computational engineering analysis methods offer the potential to accurately and completely define the internal mechanical environment of the CFS. This study developed a finite element (FE) model in the I-deas 10 FEM software package of a preserved cadaveric human CFS and compared the predictions of this model against in vitro strain measurement of simulated occlusal loading forces from a single masseter muscle. The FE model applied shell element modeling to capture the behavior of the thin cortical bone that may play an important role in stabilizing the facial structures against functional loads. In vitro testing included strain measurements at 12 locations for a total of 16 independent channels with less than 150 N of tensile force applied through the masseter muscle into the zygomatic arch origin at 4 different orientations, with 3 trials of 500 recorded data points for each loading orientation. Linear regression analysis yielded a moderate prediction (r = 0.57) between the model and experimentally measured strains. Exclusion of strain comparisons in regions that required greater modeling assumptions greatly improved the correlation (r = 0.70). Future validation studies will benefit from improved placement of strain gauges as guided by FE model predicted strain patterns.

  6. Static Longitudinal and Lateral Stability and Control Data Obtained from Tests of a 1/15-Scale Model of the Goodyear XZP5K Airship, TED No. NACA DE 211

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Michael D.

    1956-01-01

    Static longitudinal and lateral stability and control data are presented of an investigation on a l/15-scale model of the Goodyear XZP5K airship over a pitch and yaw range of +/-20 deg and 0 deg to 30 deg, respectively, for various rudder and elevator deflections. Two tail configurations of different plan forms were tested and wake and boundary-layer surveys were conducted. Testing was conducted in the Langley full-scale tunnel at a Reynolds number of approximately 16.5 x 10(exp 6) based on hull length, and corresponds to a Mach number of about 0.12.

  7. Lowering data retention voltage in static random access memory array by post fabrication self-improvement of cell stability by multiple stress application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Tomoko; Takeuchi, Kiyoshi; Saraya, Takuya; Kobayashi, Masaharu; Hiramoto, Toshiro

    2018-04-01

    We propose a new version of the post fabrication static random access memory (SRAM) self-improvement technique, which utilizes multiple stress application. It is demonstrated that, using a device matrix array (DMA) test element group (TEG) with intrinsic channel fully depleted (FD) silicon-on-thin-buried-oxide (SOTB) six-transistor (6T) SRAM cells fabricated by the 65 nm technology, the lowering of data retention voltage (DRV) is more effectively achieved than using the previously proposed single stress technique.

  8. Biomechanically acquired foot types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissman, S.D.

    1989-01-01

    Over the years, orthopedics of the foot has gone through many stages and phases, each of which has spawned a whole vocabulary of its own. According the author, today we are in the biomechanical age, which represents a step forward in understanding the mechanisms governing the functions of the lower extremity. A great deal of scientific research on the various foot types and pathological entities is now being performed. This paper discusses how, from a radiographic point of view, a knowledge of certain angular relationships must be achieved before one can perform a biomechanical evaluation. In order to validate the gross clinical findings, following an examination of a patient, a biomechanical evaluation can be performed on the radiographs taken. It must be remembered, however, that x-rays are never the sole means of making a diagnosis. They are just one of many findings that must be put together to arrive at a pertinent clinical assessment or diagnosis

  9. Dr Dapertutto's biomechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojmenović Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject matter of the research is the basic models of Meyerhold's biomechanics, which were used to define its theoretical principles. Professor Meyerhold, the theatrical leader of an eccentric stream, with which he changed the modern understanding of the theatre, established the technique of biomechanics by analysing the calculated type of movement. The analysis determines the answers to the questions: What kind of influence does Taylor's 'scientific management of work' have on defining the principles of Meyerhold's techniques of biomechanics? Which aesthetic models of stage movement were some of the basic subjects of Meyerhold's research? Meyerhold's theatrical work has been researched by a number of theatre theorists. However, how much does his work influence the film medium?.

  10. Statics and mechanics of structures

    CERN Document Server

    Krenk, Steen

    2013-01-01

    The statics and mechanics of structures form a core aspect of civil engineering. This book provides an introduction to the subject, starting from classic hand-calculation types of analysis and gradually advancing to a systematic form suitable for computer implementation. It starts with statically determinate structures in the form of trusses, beams and frames. Instability is discussed in the form of the column problem - both the ideal column and the imperfect column used in actual column design. The theory of statically indeterminate structures is then introduced, and the force and deformation methods are explained and illustrated. An important aspect of the book’s approach is the systematic development of the theory in a form suitable for computer implementation using finite elements. This development is supported by two small computer programs, MiniTruss and MiniFrame, which permit static analysis of trusses and frames, as well as linearized stability analysis. The book’s final section presents related ...

  11. Ex vivo biomechanical evaluation of pigeon (Columba livia) cadaver intact humeri and ostectomized humeri stabilized with caudally applied titanium locking plate or stainless steel nonlocking plate constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Brett G; Biskup, Jeffrey J; Weigel, Joseph P; Jones, Michael P; Xie, Xie; Liaw, Peter K; Tharpe, Josh L; Sharma, Aashish; Penumadu, Dayakar

    2017-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate mechanical properties of pigeon (Columba livia) cadaver intact humeri versus ostectomized humeri stabilized with a locking or nonlocking plate. SAMPLE 30 humeri from pigeon cadavers. PROCEDURES Specimens were allocated into 3 groups and tested in bending and torsion. Results for intact pigeon humeri were compared with results for ostectomized humeri repaired with a titanium 1.6-mm screw locking plate or a stainless steel 1.5-mm dynamic compression plate; the ostectomized humeri mimicked a fracture in a thin cortical bone. Locking plates were secured with locking screws (2 bicortical and 4 monocortical), and nonlocking plates were secured with bicortical nonlocking screws. Constructs were cyclically tested nondestructively in 4-point bending and then tested to failure in bending. A second set of constructs were cyclically tested non-destructively and then to failure in torsion. Stiffness, strength, and strain energy of each construct were compared. RESULTS Intact specimens were stiffer and stronger than the repair groups for all testing methods, except for nonlocking constructs, which were significantly stiffer than intact specimens under cyclic bending. Intact bones had significantly higher strain energies than locking plates in both bending and torsion. Locking and nonlocking plates were of equal strength and strain energy, but not stiffness, in bending and were of equal strength, stiffness, and strain energy in torsion. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results for this study suggested that increased torsional strength may be needed before bone plate repair can be considered as the sole fixation method for avian species.

  12. Mathematical foundations of biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederer, Peter F

    2010-01-01

    The aim of biomechanics is the analysis of the structure and function of humans, animals, and plants by means of the methods of mechanics. Its foundations are in particular embedded in mathematics, physics, and informatics. Due to the inherent multidisciplinary character deriving from its aim, biomechanics has numerous connections and overlapping areas with biology, biochemistry, physiology, and pathophysiology, along with clinical medicine, so its range is enormously wide. This treatise is mainly meant to serve as an introduction and overview for readers and students who intend to acquire a basic understanding of the mathematical principles and mechanics that constitute the foundation of biomechanics; accordingly, its contents are limited to basic theoretical principles of general validity and long-range significance. Selected examples are included that are representative for the problems treated in biomechanics. Although ultimate mathematical generality is not in the foreground, an attempt is made to derive the theory from basic principles. A concise and systematic formulation is thereby intended with the aim that the reader is provided with a working knowledge. It is assumed that he or she is familiar with the principles of calculus, vector analysis, and linear algebra.

  13. Biomechanical pulping of kenaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz Ahmed; Masood Akhtar; Gary C. Myers; Gary M. Scott

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of fungal pretreatment of whole kenaf prior to refining on refiner electrical energy consumption, paper strength, and optical properties. We also explored the suitability of whole kenaf biomechanical pulp for making newsprint in terms of ISO brightness and strength properties. Kenaf was sterilized by autoclaving...

  14. Biomechanics of footwear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, C J

    1987-07-01

    This article discusses biomechanical principles that indicate a number of basic design criteria for shoes and the properties of good footwear in terms of normal daily activities at home, at school, and at work. These properties also apply to normal occupational footwear and safety footwear.

  15. Training for Women's Basketball: A Biomechanical Emphasis for Preventing Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettitt, Robert W.; Bryson, Erin R.

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes proposed variables linked with higher incidences of anterior cruciate ligament tears in females and the biomechanical aspects of the lower extremity during the performance of common basketball skills, focusing on gender differences in knee joint stability and neuromuscular control, biomechanical aspects of lower extremity skills in…

  16. Biomechanical study of percutaneous lumbar diskectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yuan; Huang Xianglong; Shen Tianzhen; Hu Zhou; Hong Shuizong; Mei Haiying

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the stiffness of lumbar spine after the injury caused by percutaneous diskectomy and evaluate the efficiency of percutaneous lumbar diskectomy by biomechanical study. Methods: Four fresh lumbar specimens were used to analyse load-displacement curves in the intact lumbar spine and vertical disc-injured lumbar spine. The concepts of average flexibility coefficient (f) and standardized average flexibility coefficient (fs) were also introduced. Results: The load-displacement curves showed a good stabilization effect of the intact lumbar spine and disc-injured lumbar spine in flexion, extension, right and left bending. The decrease of anti-rotation also can be detected (P<0.05). Conclusion: In biomechanical study, percutaneous lumbar diskectomy is one of the efficiency methods to treat lumbar diac hernia

  17. Biomechanical considerations in mandibular incisor extraction cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachala, Madhukar Reddy; Aileni, Kaladhar Reddy; Dasari, Arun Kumar; Sinojiya, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Mandibular incisor extraction can be regarded as a valuable treatment option in certain malocclusions to obtain excellence in orthodontic results in terms of function, aesthetics and stability. This treatment alternative is indicated in clinical situations like mild to moderate class III malocclusion, mild anterior mandibular tooth size excess, periodontally compromised teeth, ectopic eruption of mandibular incisor and minimal openbite tendencies. Unlike in premolar extraction cases, space closure in mandibular incisor extraction cases is unique in which the extraction space will be in the middle of the arch. The end result of space closure in these cases should be well aligned, upright, anterior teeth with parallel roots and the goal can be achieved with the bodily tooth movement through proper application of biomechanics. The purpose of this article is to explain the biomechanics of space closure in mandibular incisor extraction cases.

  18. Low-speed wind tunnel investigation of the static stability and control characteristics of an advanced turboprop configuration with the propellers placed over the tail. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Graham Scott

    1990-01-01

    An exploratory wind tunnel investigation was performed in the 30 x 60 foot wind tunnel to determine the low speed static stability and control characteristics into the deep stall regime of an advanced turboprop aircraft with the propellers located over the horizontal tail. By this arrangement, the horizontal tail could potentially provide acoustic shielding to reduce the high community noise caused by the propeller blades. The current configuration was a generic turboprop model equipped with 1 foot diameter single rotating eight bladed propellers that were designed for efficient cruise operation at a Mach number of 0.8. The data presented is static force data. The effects of power on the configuration characteristics were generally favorable. An arrangement with the propellers rotating with the outboard blades moving down was found to have significantly higher installed thrust than an arrangement with the propellers rotating with the inboard blades moving down. The primary unfavorable effect was a large pitch trim change which occurred with power, but the trim change could be minimized with a proper configuration design.

  19. Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad H. Al-Malack

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fuel oil flyash (FFA produced in power and water desalination plants firing crude oils in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is being disposed in landfills, which increases the burden on the environment, therefore, FFA utilization must be encouraged. In the current research, the effect of adding FFA on the engineering properties of two indigenous soils, namely sand and marl, was investigated. FFA was added at concentrations of 5%, 10% and 15% to both soils with and without the addition of Portland cement. Mixtures of the stabilized soils were thoroughly evaluated using compaction, California Bearing Ratio (CBR, unconfined compressive strength (USC and durability tests. Results of these tests indicated that stabilized sand mixtures could not attain the ACI strength requirements. However, marl was found to satisfy the ACI strength requirement when only 5% of FFA was added together with 5% of cement. When the FFA was increased to 10% and 15%, the mixture’s strength was found to decrease to values below the ACI requirements. Results of the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP, which was performed on samples that passed the ACI requirements, indicated that FFA must be cautiously used in soil stabilization.

  20. Biomechanical comparison of osteosynthesis with poly‑L‑lactic acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Aims: The aim of this study was to compare the biomechanical stability of poly‑L‑lactic acid and titanium screws in the fixation of intracapsular condylar fractures, in 10 polyurethane hemimandibles. Materials and Methods: Artificial intracapsular fractures were created with a steel disk and electronic ...

  1. Lift, Drag, Static Stability, and Buffet Boundaries of a Model of the McDonnell F3H-1N Airplane at Mach Numbers from 0.40 to 1.27, TED No. NACA DE 351

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabill, Norman L.

    1956-01-01

    The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics has conducted a flight test of a model approximating the McDonnell F3H-lN airplane configuration to determine its pitch-up and buffet boundaries, as well as the usual longitudinal stability derivatives obtainable from the pulsed- tail technique. The test was conducted by the freely flying rocket- boosted model technique developed at the Langley Laboratory; results were obtained at Mach numbers from 0.40 to 1.27 at corresponding Reynolds numbers of 2.6 x 10(exp 6) and 9.0 x 10(exp 6). The phenomena of pitch-up, buffet, and maximum lift were encountered at Mach numbers between 0.42 and 0.85. The lift-curve slope and wing-root bending-moment slope increased with increasing angle of attack, whereas the static stability decreased with angle of attack at subsonic speeds and increased at transonic speeds. There was little change in trim at low lift at transonic speeds.

  2. Softver za proračun uzdužne statičke stabilnosti i upravljivosti aviona za osnovnu obuku pilota / Software for calculation of an axial static stability and management of airplanes for basic pilot training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalibor Petrović

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available U ovom radu opisan je softver za proračun uzdužne statičke stabilnosti i upravljivosti aviona za osnovnu obuku pilota. Softver je urađen sa numerom da konstruktorima omogući brzo i lako dobijanje potrebnih rezultata vezanih za stabilnost i upravljivost kod preliminarnih proračuna vezanih za ovu vrstu aviona. Program je urađen na osnovu analize velikog broja aviona iz ove klase, a njegova tačnost je testirana na avionu "Lasta". Rezultati koji su dobijeni ovim softverom bili su više od zadovoljavajućih, s obzirom na to da se radi o programu koji bi se koristio za preliminarni proračun. / This document introduced software for calculation of an axial static stability and management of airplanes for basic pilot training. The purpose of this software is to provide a quicker and an easier way of getting results regarding preliminary calculation of stability and management for these types of airplanes. The program is based upon analysis of data gathered from a large number of tested airplanes of this class. The accuracy of the program has been tested on the airplane type 'Lasta' and results were more than satisfying, especially regarding the fact that the program is meant to be used for preliminary calculation.

  3. Simultaneous Robust Coordinated Damping Control of Power System Stabilizers (PSSs, Static Var Compensator (SVC and Doubly-Fed Induction Generator Power Oscillation Dampers (DFIG PODs in Multimachine Power Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zuo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The potential of utilizing doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG-based wind farms to improve power system damping performance and to enhance small signal stability has been proposed by many researchers. However, the simultaneous coordinated tuning of a DFIG power oscillation damper (POD with other damping controllers is rarely involved. A simultaneous robust coordinated multiple damping controller design strategy for a power system incorporating power system stabilizer (PSS, static var compensator (SVC POD and DFIG POD is presented in this paper. This coordinated damping control design strategy is addressed as an eigenvalue-based optimization problem to increase the damping ratios of oscillation modes. Both local and inter-area electromechanical oscillation modes are intended in the optimization design process. Wide-area phasor measurement unit (PMU signals, selected by the joint modal controllability/ observability index, are utilized as SVC and DFIG POD feedback modulation signals to suppress inter-area oscillation modes. The robustness of the proposed coordinated design strategy is achieved by simultaneously considering multiple power flow situations and operating conditions. The recently proposed Grey Wolf optimizer (GWO algorithm is adopted to efficiently optimize the parameter values of multiple damping controllers. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed coordinated design strategy are demonstrated through frequency-domain eigenvalue analysis and nonlinear time-domain simulation studies in two modified benchmark test systems. Moreover, the dynamic response simulation results also validate the robustness of the recommended coordinated multiple damping controllers under various system operating conditions.

  4. Biomechanics of far cortical locking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottlang, Michael; Feist, Florian

    2011-02-01

    The development of far cortical locking (FCL) was motivated by a conundrum: locked plating constructs provide inherently rigid stabilization, yet they should facilitate biologic fixation and secondary bone healing that relies on flexible fixation to stimulate callus formation. Recent studies have confirmed that the high stiffness of standard locked plating constructs can suppress interfragmentary motion to a level that is insufficient to reliably promote secondary fracture healing by callus formation. Furthermore, rigid locking screws cause an uneven stress distribution that may lead to stress fracture at the end screw and stress shielding under the plate. This review summarizes four key features of FCL constructs that have been shown to enhance fixation and healing of fractures: flexible fixation, load distribution, progressive stiffening, and parallel interfragmentary motion. Specifically, flexible fixation provided by FCL reduces the stiffness of a locked plating construct by 80% to 88% to actively promote callus proliferation similar to an external fixator. Load is evenly distributed between FCL screws to mitigate stress risers at the end screw. Progressive stiffening occurs by near cortex support of FCL screws and provides additional support under elevated loading. Finally, parallel interfragmentary motion by the S-shaped flexion of FCL screws promotes symmetric callus formation. In combination, these features of FCL constructs have been shown to induce more callus and to yield significantly stronger and more consistent healing compared with standard locked plating constructs. As such, FCL constructs function as true internal fixators by replicating the biomechanical behavior and biologic healing response of external fixators.

  5. Statics of deformable solids

    CERN Document Server

    Bisplinghoff, Raymond L; Pian, Theodore HH

    2014-01-01

    Profusely illustrated exposition of fundamentals of solid mechanics and principles of mechanics, statics, and simple statically indeterminate systems. Covers strain and stress in three-dimensional solids, elementary elasticity, energy principles in solid continuum, and more. 1965 edition.

  6. Graphic-based musculoskeletal model for biomechanical analyses and animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Edmund Y S

    2003-04-01

    The ability to combine physiology and engineering analyses with computer sciences has opened the door to the possibility of creating the 'Virtual Human' reality. This paper presents a broad foundation for a full-featured biomechanical simulator for the human musculoskeletal system physiology. This simulation technology unites the expertise in biomechanical analysis and graphic modeling to investigate joint and connective tissue mechanics at the structural level and to visualize the results in both static and animated forms together with the model. Adaptable anatomical models including prosthetic implants and fracture fixation devices and a robust computational infrastructure for static, kinematic, kinetic, and stress analyses under varying boundary and loading conditions are incorporated on a common platform, the VIMS (Virtual Interactive Musculoskeletal System). Within this software system, a manageable database containing long bone dimensions, connective tissue material properties and a library of skeletal joint system functional activities and loading conditions are also available and they can easily be modified, updated and expanded. Application software is also available to allow end-users to perform biomechanical analyses interactively. This paper details the design, capabilities, and features of the VIMS development at Johns Hopkins University, an effort possible only through academic and commercial collaborations. Examples using these models and the computational algorithms in a virtual laboratory environment are used to demonstrate the utility of this unique database and simulation technology. This integrated system will impact on medical education, basic research, device development and application, and clinical patient care related to musculoskeletal diseases, trauma, and rehabilitation.

  7. Morphogenesis and Biomechanics of Engineered Skin Cultured Under Uniaxial Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstone, Britani N; Powell, Heather M

    2012-04-01

    Split-thickness autograft is the standard wound treatment for full-thickness burns. In large burns, sparse availability of uninjured skin prevents rapid closure of the wound, resulting in increased scar tissue formation or mortality. Tissue-engineered skin (ES) offers promise when autografts are not available. ES, constructed from a polymeric scaffold and skin cells, has been shown to reduce donor site area required to permanently close wounds, mortality, and morbidity from scarring but cannot restore all skin functions. Current generations of ES are orders of magnitude weaker than normal human skin, leading to difficulty in surgical application, greater susceptibility to mechanical damage during fabrication and application, and less elasticity and strength once engrafted. Previous studies to improve ES biomechanics focus on altering the scaffolding material, which resulted in modest improvements but often inhibited proper skin development. As the skin is naturally under static strain, adding these mechanical cues to the culture environment is hypothesized to improve ES biomechanics. ES was cultured under applied static strains ranging from 0% to 40% strain for a total of 10 days. Strain magnitudes of 10% and 20% strain resulted in significantly stronger ES than unstrained controls, showed upregulation of many genes encoding structural extracellular matrix proteins, and exhibited increased epidermal cell proliferation and differentiation. Enhanced biomechanical properties of ES can allow for facile surgical application and less damage during dressing changes. These findings suggest that mechanical cues play a significant role in skin development and should be further explored.

  8. Static Longitudinal and Lateral Stability Characteristics of an 0.065-Scale Model of the Chance Vought XRSSM-N-9a (REGULUS II) Missile at Mach Numbers from 1.6 to 2.0 (TED No. NACA AD 3122)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, William R.

    1957-01-01

    The static longitudinal and lateral stability charaetefistics of an 0 .065-scale model of the XRSSM-N-9a (REGULUS II) Missile at Mach number range of 1.6 to 2.0 at a Reynolds number per foot of 2.0(exp 8)

  9. Counterterms for static Lovelock solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehdizadeh, M.R.; Dehghani, M.H.; Zangeneh, M.K.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce the counterterms that remove the non-logarithmic divergences of the action in third order Lovelock gravity for static spacetimes. We do this by defining the cosmological constant in such a way that the asymptotic form of the metric have the same form in Lovelock and Einstein gravities. Thus, we employ the counterterms of Einstein gravity and show that the power law divergences of the action of Lovelock gravity for static spacetimes can be removed by suitable choice of coefficients. We find that the dependence of these coefficients on the dimension in Lovelock gravity is the same as in Einstein gravity. We also introduce the finite energy-momentum tensor and employ these counterterms to calculate the finite action and mass of static black hole solutions of third order Lovelock gravity. Next, we calculate the thermodynamic quantities and show that the entropy calculated through the use of Gibbs-Duhem relation is consistent with the obtained entropy by Wald's formula. Furthermore, we find that in contrast to Einstein gravity in which there exists no uncharged extreme black hole, third order Lovelock gravity can have these kind of black holes. Finally, we investigate the stability of static charged black holes of Lovelock gravity in canonical ensemble and find that small black holes show a phase transition between very small and small black holes, while the large ones are stable. (orig.)

  10. Counterterms for static Lovelock solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehdizadeh, M.R. [Shahid Bahonar University, Department of Physics, PO Box 76175, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dehghani, M.H. [Research Institute for Astrophysics and Astronomy of Maragha (RIAAM), Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shiraz University, Physics Department and Biruni Observatory, College of Sciences, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zangeneh, M.K. [Shiraz University, Physics Department and Biruni Observatory, College of Sciences, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, we introduce the counterterms that remove the non-logarithmic divergences of the action in third order Lovelock gravity for static spacetimes. We do this by defining the cosmological constant in such a way that the asymptotic form of the metric have the same form in Lovelock and Einstein gravities. Thus, we employ the counterterms of Einstein gravity and show that the power law divergences of the action of Lovelock gravity for static spacetimes can be removed by suitable choice of coefficients. We find that the dependence of these coefficients on the dimension in Lovelock gravity is the same as in Einstein gravity. We also introduce the finite energy-momentum tensor and employ these counterterms to calculate the finite action and mass of static black hole solutions of third order Lovelock gravity. Next, we calculate the thermodynamic quantities and show that the entropy calculated through the use of Gibbs-Duhem relation is consistent with the obtained entropy by Wald's formula. Furthermore, we find that in contrast to Einstein gravity in which there exists no uncharged extreme black hole, third order Lovelock gravity can have these kind of black holes. Finally, we investigate the stability of static charged black holes of Lovelock gravity in canonical ensemble and find that small black holes show a phase transition between very small and small black holes, while the large ones are stable. (orig.)

  11. A model-based approach to stabilizing crutch supported paraplegic standing by artificial hip joint stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Spek, Jaap H; Veltink, Peter H; Hermens, Hermie J; Koopman, Bart F J M; Boom, Herman B K

    2003-12-01

    The prerequisites for stable crutch supported standing were analyzed in this paper. For this purpose, a biomechanical model of crutch supported paraplegic stance was developed assuming the patient was standing with extended knees. When using crutches during stance, the crutches will put a position constraint on the shoulder, thus reducing the number of degrees of freedom. Additional hip-joint stiffness was applied to stabilize the hip joint and, therefore, to stabilize stance. The required hip-joint stiffness for changing crutch placement and hip-joint offset angle was studied under static and dynamic conditions. Modeling results indicate that, by using additional hip-joint stiffness, stable crutch supported paraplegic standing can be achieved, both under static as well as dynamic situations. The static equilibrium postures and the stability under perturbations were calculated to be dependent on crutch placement and stiffness applied. However, postures in which the hip joint was in extension (C postures) appeared to the most stable postures. Applying at least 60 N x m/rad hip-joint stiffness gave stable equilibrium postures in all cases. Choosing appropriate hip-joint offset angles, the static equilibrium postures changed to more erect postures, without causing instability or excessive arm forces to occur.

  12. Systems biomechanics of the cell

    CERN Document Server

    Maly, Ivan V

    2013-01-01

    Systems Biomechanics of the Cell attempts to outline systems biomechanics of the cell as an emergent and promising discipline. The new field owes conceptually to cell mechanics, organism-level systems biomechanics, and biology of biochemical systems. Its distinct methodology is to elucidate the structure and behavior of the cell by analyzing the unintuitive collective effects of elementary physical forces that interact within the heritable cellular framework. The problematics amenable to this approach includes the variety of cellular activities that involve the form and movement of the cell body and boundary (nucleus, centrosome, microtubules, cortex, and membrane). Among the elementary system effects in the biomechanics of the cell, instability of symmetry, emergent irreversibility, and multiperiodic dissipative motion can be noted. Research results from recent journal articles are placed in this unifying framework. It is suggested that the emergent discipline has the potential to expand the spectrum of ques...

  13. Scale-Independent Biomechanical Optimization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schutte, J. F; Koh, B; Reinbolt, J. A; Haftka, R. T; George, A; Fregly, B. J

    2003-01-01

    ...: the Particle Swarm Optimizer (PSO). They apply this method to the biomechanical system identification problem of finding positions and orientations of joint axes in body segments through the processing of experimental movement data...

  14. Biomechanics: basic and applied research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmann, G.; Rohlmann, A.; Koelbel, R.

    1987-01-01

    This volume presents the state of the art in biomechanics. The most recent achievements of biomechanical research in the fields of orthopaedics, dynamics of the musculoskeletal system, hard and soft tissues, rehabilitation, sports, cardiovascular problems and research methodology have been selected and edited by a distinguished panel of reviewers. The material is such that the volume will serve as a reference for many years for bioengineers, sports scientists, clinicians and clinical researchers in rehabilitation, orthopaedics and cardiovascular surgery

  15. Biomechanical comparison of supraacetabular external fixation and anterior pelvic bridge plating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çavuşoğlu, Ali Turgay; Erbay, Fatma Kübra; Özsoy, Mehmet Hakan; Demir, Teyfik

    2017-10-01

    Unstable pelvic ring injuries are complex and risky injuries due to high morbidity and mortality. Although anterior pelvic external fixator is a suitable method for rapid stabilization of an injured pelvic ring, due to some disadvantages such as high complication rate, nerve damage, and difficulties of patient's mobility and comfort, there has recently been increased searching for alternative methods for stabilization of the pelvic ring. Pubic symphysis zone freely moves in pelvic models. This study aims to evaluate the biomechanical stability of anterior pelvic bridge plating and compare it with supraacetabular external fixators in an untreated unstable pelvic fracture model. Samples were loaded statically with 2-mm/min loading rate in single leg standing position. Maximum load was 2.3 kN. When loading the samples, photographs were taken continuously. Stiffness values were calculated from the load displacement curves. Some reference parameters were described and were measured from unloaded and 2.3-kN-loaded photographs of the test. The mean stiffness values were 491.14 ± 52.22, 478.55 ± 41.44, and 470.25 ± 44.51 N/mm for anterior pelvic bridge plating group, supraacetabular external fixator group, and Control group, respectively. According to the measured parameters from photographs, the mean displacement at the pubic symphysis was 4.7 ± 0.32, 15.8 ± 2.01, and 18.2 ± 0.47 mm for anterior pelvic bridge plating, supraacetabular external fixator, and Control group, respectively. The highest displacement in the pubic symphysis was found in Control group, and minimum displacement was observed in anterior pelvic bridge plating group. When the perpendicular distance between the right and left lower end of ischium was examined, it was observed that displacement was minimum in anterior pelvic bridge plating group compared to other two groups, regarding to the high stability of pubic symphysis. In conclusion, this study revealed

  16. Static electromagnetic frequency changers

    CERN Document Server

    Rozhanskii, L L

    1963-01-01

    Static Electromagnetic Frequency Changers is about the theory, design, construction, and applications of static electromagnetic frequency changers, devices that used for multiplication or division of alternating current frequency. It is originally published in the Russian language. This book is organized into five chapters. The first three chapters introduce the readers to the principles of operation, the construction, and the potential applications of static electromagnetic frequency changers and to the principles of their design. The two concluding chapters use some hitherto unpublished work

  17. Coordination exercise and postural stability in elderly people: Effect of Tai Chi Chuan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, A M; Lin, Y C; Chou, S W; Tang, F T; Wong, P Y

    2001-05-01

    To evaluate the effects of coordination exercise on postural stability in older individuals by Chinese shadow boxing, Tai Chi Chuan (TCC). Cross-sectional study. Research project in a hospital-based biomechanical laboratory. The TCC group (n = 25) had been practicing TCC regularly for 2 to 35 years. The control group (n = 14) included healthy and active older subjects. Static postural stability test: progressively harder sequential tests with 6 combinations of vision (eyes open, eyes closed, sway-referenced) and support (fixed, sway-referenced); and dynamic balance test: 3 tests of weight shifting (left to right, forward-backward, multidirectional) at 3 speeds. Static and dynamic balance of Sensory Organization Testing (SOT) of the Smart Balance Master System. In static postural control, the results showed no differences between the TCC or control group in the more simple conditions, but in the more complicated SOT (eyes closed with sway surface, sway vision with sway surface), the TCC group had significantly better results than the control group. The TCC group also had significantly better results in the rhythmic forward-backward weight-shifting test. Duration of practice did not seem to affect the stability of elder people. The elderly people who regularly practiced TCC showed better postural stability in the more challenged conditions than those who do not (eg, the condition with simultaneous disturbance of vision and proprioception). TCC as a coordination exercise may reduce the risk of a fall through maintaining the ability of posture control.

  18. Fluid-structure interaction-based biomechanical perception model for tactile sensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Wang

    Full Text Available The reproduced tactile sensation of haptic interfaces usually selectively reproduces a certain object attribute, such as the object's material reflected by vibration and its surface shape by a pneumatic nozzle array. Tactile biomechanics investigates the relation between responses to an external load stimulus and tactile perception and guides the design of haptic interface devices via a tactile mechanism. Focusing on the pneumatic haptic interface, we established a fluid-structure interaction-based biomechanical model of responses to static and dynamic loads and conducted numerical simulation and experiments. This model provides a theoretical basis for designing haptic interfaces and reproducing tactile textures.

  19. Comparing dynamical systems concepts and techniques for biomechanical analysis

    OpenAIRE

    van Emmerik, Richard E.A.; Ducharme, Scott W.; Amado, Avelino C.; Hamill, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Traditional biomechanical analyses of human movement are generally derived from linear mathematics. While these methods can be useful in many situations, they do not describe behaviors in human systems that are predominately nonlinear. For this reason, nonlinear analysis methods based on a dynamical systems approach have become more prevalent in recent literature. These analysis techniques have provided new insights into how systems (1) maintain pattern stability, (2) transition into new stat...

  20. The shoulder in baseball pitching: biomechanics and related injuries-part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Samuel S; Loebenberg, Mark L; Rokito, Andrew S; Zuckerman, Joseph D

    The extreme range of motion at the shoulder, the high angular velocities and torques, and the repetitious nature of the pitching motion combine to make the shoulder vulnerable to injury during the baseball pitch. An understanding of the biomechanics that contribute to shoulder injuries during each phase of the pitching motion can facilitate the athlete's diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation. Common injuries that occur during the late cocking and acceleration phases of the pitch include anterior instability and impingement, bicipital tendinitis, and subacromial impingement. Nonoperative treatment consisting of an initial period of rest and NSAIDS, followed by physical therapy and a gradual return to activity, is usually successful. When this approach fails, surgical intervention, either arthroscopic or open, may be necessary. Physical therapy and rehabilitation are directed toward restoring the integrity and strength of the dynamic and static stabilizers of the shoulder joint, yet preserving the range of motion necessary for performance. Through rehabilitation, the dedicated athlete can often return to the pitching mound at his previous level of performance.

  1. BIOMECHANIC EVALUATION OF CARPENTRY WORKERS IN THE DISTRITO FEDERAL, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilton Cesar Fiedler

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was the biomechanical assessment of carpentry woodworkers, located in Brasília, DF. It was filmed the profile of each worker during the performance of his activities in the carpentry and the forces involved in the work were assessed. The image of each woodworker was congealed to accomplish the measurement of articulation angles. The data were submitted to the software of posture analysis “Winowas” (OWAS Method and to the biomechanic model of posture prognosis and static forces, developed by Michigan University. The OWAS method showed that, for all machines and carpentries assessed, the worst posture occurred when the worker lifted and placed the pieces of wood on the floor and during the feeding in the smoother. The tridimensional biomechanic model registered the worst posture in different phases of the work cycle. In the first one, there were problems in all articulations, except the hips, when placing the pieces on the floor from the smoother. In the second one, there were problems in all articulations, except the elbows and the L5-S1 column disc, by feeding the surface planer. The third one, the ankles were the most injured when feeding the smoother, the surface planer, the circular saw and the band saw. According to the results, the woodworkers should try to eliminate the constant work standing upright, use auxiliary machinery to handle pieces of wood, reduce the load during feeding the machines and improve postures.

  2. Rectifier cabinet static breaker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costantino, R.A. Jr; Gliebe, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    A rectifier cabinet static breaker replaces a blocking diode pair with an SCR and the installation of a power transistor in parallel with the latch contactor to commutate the SCR to the off state. The SCR serves as a static breaker with fast turnoff capability providing an alternative way of achieving reactor scram in addition to performing the function of the replaced blocking diodes. The control circuitry for the rectifier cabinet static breaker includes on-line test capability and an LED indicator light to denote successful test completion. Current limit circuitry provides high-speed protection in the event of overload. 7 figs

  3. Rectifier cabinet static breaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, Jr, Roger A.; Gliebe, Ronald J.

    1992-09-01

    A rectifier cabinet static breaker replaces a blocking diode pair with an SCR and the installation of a power transistor in parallel with the latch contactor to commutate the SCR to the off state. The SCR serves as a static breaker with fast turnoff capability providing an alternative way of achieving reactor scram in addition to performing the function of the replaced blocking diodes. The control circuitry for the rectifier cabinet static breaker includes on-line test capability and an LED indicator light to denote successful test completion. Current limit circuitry provides high-speed protection in the event of overload.

  4. Biomechanical analysis of rollator walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjaer, T; Larsen, Peter K; Pedersen, Gitte

    2006-01-01

    The rollator is a very popular walking aid. However, knowledge about how a rollator affects the walking patterns is limited. Thus, the purpose of the study was to investigate the biomechanical effects of walking with and without a rollator on the walking pattern in healthy subjects.......The rollator is a very popular walking aid. However, knowledge about how a rollator affects the walking patterns is limited. Thus, the purpose of the study was to investigate the biomechanical effects of walking with and without a rollator on the walking pattern in healthy subjects....

  5. Simulations of Biomechanical Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Jose Cruz

    Recent studies have published breakthroughs in the application of finite element (FEA) studies in the design and analysis of advanced orthodontics. However, FEA has not captured bone remodeling responses to advanced orthodontics. The results of these simulations report unrealistic displacement around the nasal bridge, which impeded correlation with clinical data. Bone remodeling has been previously documented in FEA and has shown bone response to mechanical stimulus in femur bone models. However, the relationship between mechanical stimulus and bone remodeling has not been reported in orthodontic studies due to the complexity of the skull. In the current study, strain energy is used as the mechanical stimulus to control remodeling, from which density and modulus evolve. Due to the localization of forces in orthodontics, current remodeling algorithms have limited application. In turn, we developed an algorithm that dynamically collects, sorts, and bins stresses in all elements for regional remodeling based on the proximity of the element to the load. The results demonstrate that bone response to orthodontic appliances is different than that of an FEA without bone remodeling, due to load path changes based upon evolution of the bone properties. It was also found that density and moduli proximal to the load application site exhibit faster remodeling than those located remotely. Modeling another biomechanical phenomena, a 3D simulation was created to simulate recent experimental results that discovered a difference in impact mitigation properties of dense-polymer/foam bilayer structure based on the orientation of the dense-polymer with respect to the impact site. The impact energy transmitted varied in time of arrival and amplitude depending on the orientation of the structure (thin layer up or down). By creating a 3D explicit dynamic FEA simulation, it is expected to reduce costly experiments and time consumed in set up, and offer opportunities for optimization for

  6. 'Static' octupole deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leander, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    Certain nuclei can be described as having intrinsic shapes with parity breaking static moments. The rationale for this description is discussed, spectroscopic models are outlined and their consequences are compared with experiment. (orig.)

  7. Cycling biomechanics: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak Timmer, C A

    1991-01-01

    Submitted in partial fulfillment for a Master of Science degree at the University of Pittsburgh, School of Health Related Professions, Pittsburgh, PA 1.5213 This review of current literature on cycling biomechanics emphasizes lower extremity muscle actions and joint excursions, seat height, pedal position, pedaling rate, force application, and pedaling symmetry. Guidelines are discussed for optimal seat height, pedal position, and pedaling rate. Force application in the power and recovery phases of cycling and the relationship of force application to pedaling symmetry are discussed. The need for a biomechanical approach to cycling exists since a great deal of the literature is primarily physiologic in nature. The purpose of this review is to make cyclists and their advisors aware of the biomechanics of cycling and guidelines to follow. This approach is also important because cycling is a very common form of exercise prescribed by physical therapists for clinic or home programs. Biomechanical aspects of cycling should be considered by cyclists at any level of participation and by physical therapists in order for goal-oriented, efficient cycling to occur. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 1991;14(3):106-113.

  8. Clinical applications of biomechanics cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodle, A S

    1986-10-01

    Biomechanics cinematography is the analysis of movement of living organisms through the use of cameras, image projection systems, electronic digitizers, and computers. This article is a comparison of cinematographic systems and details practical uses of the modality in research and education.

  9. Functional anatomy and biomechanics of the carpus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, R.

    2006-01-01

    The wrist is an exceedingly complex structure composed of several joints and a dedicated ligamentous system. Its functional principles allow a wide range of carpal motion and make the wrist remarkably resistant to external stress forces: The proximal carpal row serves as an intercalated link interposed between the static elements of both the forearm and the distal carpal row. Like a flexible placeholder, the proximal row synchronously adapts to the spatial and temporal requirements of the wrist. There are synergistic movement patterns including simultaneous flexion of the proximal row as the wrist is deviated radially and simultaneous extension during ulnar deviation. Together with pronosupination of the radioulnar joints, the combined radial/ulnar inclination and flexion/extension enable spherical, out-of-plane movements of the hand. Carpal function is best explained by the ''model of a ring under tension.'' This review addresses the anatomy and the biomechanics of the wrist and illustrates systematic image analysis by using carpal lines and angles as well as indices of carpal height. (orig.) [de

  10. The biomechanics of seed germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbrecher, Tina; Leubner-Metzger, Gerhard

    2017-02-01

    From a biomechanical perspective, the completion of seed (and fruit) germination depends on the balance of two opposing forces: the growth potential of the embryonic axis (radicle-hypocotyl growth zone) and the restraint of the seed-covering layers (endosperm, testa, and pericarp). The diverse seed tissues are composite materials which differ in their dynamic properties based on their distinct cell wall composition and water uptake capacities. The biomechanics of embryo cell growth during seed germination depend on irreversible cell wall loosening followed by water uptake due to the decreasing turgor, and this leads to embryo elongation and eventually radicle emergence. Endosperm weakening as a prerequisite for radicle emergence is a widespread phenomenon among angiosperms. Research into the biochemistry and biomechanics of endosperm weakening has demonstrated that the reduction in puncture force of a seed's micropylar endosperm is environmentally and hormonally regulated and involves tissue-specific expression of cell wall remodelling proteins such as expansins, diverse hydrolases, and the production of directly acting apoplastic reactive oxygen. The endosperm-weakening biomechanics and its underlying cell wall biochemistry differ between the micropylar (ME) and chalazal (CE) endosperm domains. In the ME, they involve cell wall loosening, cell separation, and programmed cell death to provide decreased and localized ME tissue resistance, autolysis, and finally the formation of an ME hole required for radicle emergence. Future work will further unravel the molecular mechanisms, environmental regulation, and evolution of the diverse biomechanical cell wall changes underpinning the control of germination by endosperm weakening. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Observing the Forces Involved in Static Friction under Static Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Static friction is an important concept in introductory physics. Later in the year students apply their understanding of static friction under more complex conditions of static equilibrium. Traditional lab demonstrations in this case involve exceeding of the maximum level of static friction, resulting in the "onset of motion." (Contains…

  12. Energy conversion statics

    CERN Document Server

    Messerle, H K; Declaris, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Energy Conversion Statics deals with equilibrium situations and processes linking equilibrium states. A development of the basic theory of energy conversion statics and its applications is presented. In the applications the emphasis is on processes involving electrical energy. The text commences by introducing the general concept of energy with a survey of primary and secondary energy forms, their availability, and use. The second chapter presents the basic laws of energy conversion. Four postulates defining the overall range of applicability of the general theory are set out, demonstrating th

  13. Static Transition Compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Damian, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Starting from an operational specification of a translation from a structured to an unstructured imperative language, we point out how a compositional and context-insensitive translation gives rise to static chains of jumps. Taking an inspiration from the notion of continuation, we state a new...... compositional and context-sensitive specification that provably gives rise to no static chains of jumps, no redundant labels, and no unused labels. It is defined with one inference rule per syntactic construct and operates in linear time and space on the size of the source program (indeed it operates in one...

  14. The Biomechanics of Cervical Spondylosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A. Ferrara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging is the major risk factor that contributes to the onset of cervical spondylosis. Several acute and chronic symptoms can occur that start with neck pain and may progress into cervical radiculopathy. Eventually, the degenerative cascade causes desiccation of the intervertebral disc resulting in height loss along the ventral margin of the cervical spine. This causes ventral angulation and eventual loss of lordosis, with compression of the neural and vascular structures. The altered posture of the cervical spine will progress into kyphosis and continue if the load balance and lordosis is not restored. The content of this paper will address the physiological and biomechanical pathways leading to cervical spondylosis and the biomechanical principles related to the surgical correction and treatment of kyphotic progression.

  15. Robot-Crawler: Statically Balanced Gaits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Parasuraman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new statically balanced walking technique for a robot-crawler. The gait design and the control of the robot crawler aim to achieve stability while walking. This statically balanced gait has to be designed in a different fashion to a wheeled robot, as there are discrete changes in the support of the robot when its legs are lifted or placed on the ground. The stability of the robot depends on how the legs are positioned relative to the body and also on the sequence and timing with which the legs are lifted and placed. In order to reduce the risk of stability loss while walking, a measure for the robot stability (so-called stability margin is typically used in the gait and motion planning. In this paper different biological behaviours of four-legged animals are studied and mapped on a quad-legrobot-crawler. Experiments were carried out on the forward walking gaits of lizards and horses. Based on these results, the stability margins of different gaits are discussed and compared.

  16. Confidence crisis of results in biomechanics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudson, Duane

    2017-11-01

    Many biomechanics studies have small sample sizes and incorrect statistical analyses, so reporting of inaccurate inferences and inflated magnitude of effects are common in the field. This review examines these issues in biomechanics research and summarises potential solutions from research in other fields to increase the confidence in the experimental effects reported in biomechanics. Authors, reviewers and editors of biomechanics research reports are encouraged to improve sample sizes and the resulting statistical power, improve reporting transparency, improve the rigour of statistical analyses used, and increase the acceptance of replication studies to improve the validity of inferences from data in biomechanics research. The application of sports biomechanics research results would also improve if a larger percentage of unbiased effects and their uncertainty were reported in the literature.

  17. Explosions and static electricity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonassen, Niels M

    1995-01-01

    The paper deals with the problem of electrostatic discharges as causes of ignition of vapor/gas and dust/gas mixtures. A series of examples of static-caused explosions will be discussed. The concepts of explosion limits, the incendiveness of various discharge types and safe voltages are explained...

  18. Static Transition Compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Damian, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Starting from an operational specification of a translation from a structured to an unstructured imperative language, we point out how a compositional and context-insensitive translation gives rise to static chains of jumps. Taking an inspiration from the notion of continuation, we state a new co...

  19. Biomechanical forces promote embryonic haematopoiesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, Luigi; Naveiras, Olaia; Wenzel, Pamela L.; McKinney-Freeman, Shannon; Mack, Peter J.; Gracia-Sancho, Jorge; Suchy-Dicey, Astrid; Yoshimoto, Momoko; Lensch, M. William; Yoder, Mervin C.; García-Cardeña, Guillermo; Daley, George Q.

    2009-01-01

    Biomechanical forces are emerging as critical regulators of embryogenesis, particularly in the developing cardiovascular system1,2. After initiation of the heartbeat in vertebrates, cells lining the ventral aspect of the dorsal aorta, the placental vessels, and the umbilical and vitelline arteries initiate expression of the transcription factor Runx1 (refs 3–5), a master regulator of haematopoiesis, and give rise to haematopoietic cells4. It remains unknown whether the biomechanical forces imposed on the vascular wall at this developmental stage act as a determinant of haematopoietic potential6. Here, using mouse embryonic stem cells differentiated in vitro, we show that fluid shear stress increases the expression of Runx1 in CD41+c-Kit+ haematopoietic progenitor cells7,concomitantly augmenting their haematopoietic colony-forming potential. Moreover, we find that shear stress increases haematopoietic colony-forming potential and expression of haematopoietic markers in the paraaortic splanchnopleura/aorta–gonads–mesonephros of mouse embryos and that abrogation of nitric oxide, a mediator of shear-stress-induced signalling8, compromises haematopoietic potential in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, these data reveal a critical role for biomechanical forces in haematopoietic development. PMID:19440194

  20. Design and preliminary biomechanical analysis of artificial cervical joint complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Yu; Lan-Tao, Liu; Zhao, Jian-ning; Jian-ning, Zhao

    2013-06-01

    To design an artificial cervical joint complex (ACJC) prosthesis for non-fusion reconstruction after cervical subtotal corpectomy, and to evaluate the biomechanical stability, preservation of segment movements and influence on adjacent inter-vertebral movements of this prosthesis. The prosthesis was composed of three parts: the upper/lower joint head and the middle artificial vertebrae made of Cobalt-Chromium-Molybdenum (Co-Cr-Mo) alloy and polyethylene with a ball-and-socket joint design resembling the multi-axial movement in normal inter-vertebral spaces. Biomechanical tests of intact spine (control), Orion locking plate system and ACJC prosthesis were performed on formalin-fixed cervical spine specimens from 21 healthy cadavers to compare stability, range of motion (ROM) of the surgical segment and ROM of adjacent inter-vertebral spaces. As for stability of the whole lower cervical spine, there was no significant difference of flexion, extension, lateral bending and torsion between intact spine group and ACJC prosthesis group. As for segment movements, difference in flexion, lateral bending or torsion between ACJC prosthesis group and control group was not statistically significant, while ACJC prosthesis group showed an increase in extension (P inter-vertebral ROM of the ACJC prosthesis group was not statistically significant compared to that of the control group. After cervical subtotal corpectomy, reconstruction with ACJC prosthesis not only obtained instant stability, but also reserved segment motions effectively, without abnormal gain of mobility at adjacent inter-vertebral spaces.

  1. Qualitative biomechanical principles for application in coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudson, Duane

    2007-01-01

    Many aspects of human movements in sport can be readily understood by Newtonian rigid-body mechanics. Many of these laws and biomechanical principles, however, are counterintuitive to a lot of people. There are also several problems in the application of biomechanics to sports, so the application of biomechanics in the qualitative analysis of sport skills by many coaches has been limited. Biomechanics scholars have long been interested in developing principles that facilitate the qualitative application of biomechanics to improve movement performance and reduce the risk of injury. This paper summarizes the major North American efforts to establish a set of general biomechanical principles of movement, and illustrates how principles can be used to improve the application of biomechanics in the qualitative analysis of sport technique. A coach helping a player with a tennis serve is presented as an example. The standardization of terminology for biomechanical principles is proposed as an important first step in improving the application ofbiomechanics in sport. There is also a need for international cooperation and research on the effectiveness of applying biomechanical principles in the coaching of sport techniques.

  2. Adhesive strength of hydroxyl apatite(HA) coating and biomechanics behavior of HA-coated prosthesis:an experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    Tian-yang ZHANG; Yong-hong DUAN; Shu ZHU; Jin-yu ZHU; Qing-sheng ZHU

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the influence of adhesive strength of hydroxyapatite(HA) coating on the post-implantation stability of HA-coated prosthesis.Methods The adhesive strength and biomechanics behavior of HA coating were studied by histopathological observation,material parameters and biomechanical testing,the titanium(Ti)-coated prosthesis was employed as control.Results Scratch test showed that the adhesive strength of HA coating was significantly lower than that of Ti coating(P < 0.01).Hist...

  3. Predicting vertebral bone strength by vertebral static histomorphometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus; Ebbesen, Ebbe Nils; Mosekilde, Lis

    2002-01-01

    of the entire vertebral bodies (L-2) were used for histomorphometry. The other iliac crest biopsies and the L-3 were destructively tested by compression. High correlation was found between BV/TV or Tb.Sp and vertebral bone strength (absolute value of r = 0.86 in both cases). Addition of Tb.Th significantly....... No gender-related differences were found in any of the relationships. Neither static histomorphometry nor biomechanical testing of iliac crest bone biopsies is a good predictor of vertebral bone strength.......The study investigates the relationship between static histomorphometry and bone strength of human lumbar vertebral bone. The ability of vertebral histomorphometry to predict vertebral bone strength was compared with that of vertebral densitometry, and also with histomorphometry and bone strength...

  4. A review of biomechanics of the shoulder and biomechanical concepts of rotator cuff repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Yamamoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we describe the basic knowledge about shoulder biomechanics, which is thought to be useful for surgeons. Some clinical reports have described that the excellent outcome after cuff repair without acromioplasty and a limited acromioplasty might be enough for subacromial decompression. It was biomechanically demonstrated that a 10-mm medial shift of the tendon repair site has a minimum effect on biomechanics. Many biomechanical studies reported that the transosseous equivalent repair was superior to other techniques, although the tendon may lose its inherent elasticity. We herein introduce our recent experiment data and latest information on biomechanics.

  5. The Static Quantum Multiverse

    OpenAIRE

    Nomura, Yasunori

    2012-01-01

    We consider the multiverse in the intrinsically quantum mechanical framework recently proposed in Refs. [1,2]. By requiring that the principles of quantum mechanics are universally valid and that physical predictions do not depend on the reference frame one chooses to describe the multiverse, we find that the multiverse state must be static---in particular, the multiverse does not have a beginning or end. We argue that, despite its naive appearance, this does not contradict observation, inclu...

  6. Should the Ipsilateral Hamstrings Be Used for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in the Case of Medial Collateral Ligament Insufficiency? Biomechanical Investigation Regarding Dynamic Stabilization of the Medial Compartment by the Hamstring Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbort, Mirco; Michel, Philipp; Raschke, Michael J; Vogel, Nils; Schulze, Martin; Zoll, Alexander; Fink, Christian; Petersen, Wolf; Domnick, Christoph

    2017-03-01

    Semitendinosus and gracilis muscles are frequently harvested for autologous tendon grafts for cruciate ligament reconstruction. This study investigated the joint-stabilizing effects of these hamstring muscles in cases of insufficiency of the medial collateral ligament (MCL). First, both the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles can actively stabilize the joint against valgus moments in the MCL-deficient knee. Second, the stabilizing influence of these muscles decreases with an increasing knee flexion angle. Controlled laboratory study. The kinematics was examined in 10 fresh-frozen human cadaveric knees using a robotic/universal force moment sensor system and an optical tracking system. The knee kinematics under 5- and 10-N·m valgus moments were determined in the different flexion angles of the (1) MCL-intact and (2) MCL-deficient knee using the following simulated muscle loads: (1) 0-N (idle) load, (2) 200-N semitendinosus (ST) load, and (3) 280-N (200/80-N) combined semitendinosus/gracilis (STGT) load. Cutting the MCL increased the valgus angle under all tested conditions and angles compared with the MCL-intact knee by 4.3° to 8.1° for the 5-N·m valgus moment and 6.5° to 11.9° for the 10-N·m valgus moment ( P .05). The combined 280-N simulated STGT load significantly reduced the valgus angle in 0°, 10°, and 20° of flexion under 5- and 10-N·m valgus moments ( P .05). In 60° and 90° of flexion, ST and STGT loads did not decrease the resulting valgus angle of the MCL-deficient knee without hamstring loads ( P > .05 vs deficient; P = .0001 vs intact). In this human cadaveric study, semitendinosus and gracilis muscles successfully stabilize valgus moments applied to the MCL-insufficient knee when the knee is near extension. In the valgus-unstable knee, these data suggest that the hamstring muscles should be preserved in (multi-) ligament surgery when possible.

  7. Applied Biomechanics in an Instructional Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Jackie L.

    2006-01-01

    Biomechanics is the science of how people move better, meaning more skillfully and more safely. This article places more emphasis on skill rather than safety, though there are many parallels between them. It shares a few features of the author's paradigm of applied biomechanics and discusses an integrated approach toward a middle school football…

  8. Biomechanical properties of bone allografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelker, R.R.; Friedlaender, G.E.; Markham, T.C.

    1983-01-01

    The biomechanical properties of allograft bone can be altered by the methods chosen for its preservation and storage. These effects are minimal with deep-freezing or low-level radiation. Freeze-drying, however, markedly diminishes the torsional and bending strength of bone allografts but does not deleteriously affect the compressive or tensile strength. Irradiation of bone with more than 3.0 megarad or irradiation combined with freeze-drying appears to cause a significant reduction in breaking strength. These factors should be considered when choosing freeze-dried or irradiated allogeneic bone that will be subjected to significant loads following implantation

  9. Problems of Sport Biomechanics and Robotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wlodzimierz S. Erdmann

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents many common areas of interest of different specialists. There are problems described from sport, biomechanics, sport biomechanics, sport engineering, robotics, biomechanics and robotics, sport biomechanics and robotics. There are many approaches to sport from different sciences and engineering. Robotics is a relatively new area and has had moderate attention from sport specialists. The aim of this paper is to present several areas necessary to develop sport robots based on biomechanics and also to present different types of sport robots: serving balls, helping to provide sports training, substituting humans during training, physically participating in competitions, physically participating in competitions against humans, serving as models of real sport performance, helping organizers of sport events and robot toys. Examples of the application of robots in sports communities are also given.

  10. PEBBLES Simulation of Static Friction and New Static Friction Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cogliati, Joshua J.; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.

    2010-01-01

    Pebble bed reactors contain large numbers of spherical fuel elements arranged randomly. Determining the motion and location of these fuel elements is required for calculating certain parameters of pebble bed reactor operation. This paper documents the PEBBLES static friction model. This model uses a three dimensional differential static friction approximation extended from the two dimensional Cundall and Strack model. The derivation of determining the rotational transformation of pebble to pebble static friction force is provided. A new implementation for a differential rotation method for pebble to container static friction force has been created. Previous published methods are insufficient for pebble bed reactor geometries. A new analytical static friction benchmark is documented that can be used to verify key static friction simulation parameters. This benchmark is based on determining the exact pebble to pebble and pebble to container static friction coefficients required to maintain a stable five sphere pyramid.

  11. Anatomy and Biomechanics of the Finger Proximal Interphalangeal Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Eric Quan; Yao, Jeffrey

    2018-05-01

    A complete understanding of the normal anatomy and biomechanics of the proximal interphalangeal joint is critical when treating pathology of the joint as well as in the design of new reconstructive treatments. The osseous anatomy dictates the principles of motion at the proximal interphalangeal joint. Subsequently, the joint is stabilized throughout its motion by the surrounding proximal collateral ligament, accessory collateral ligament, and volar plate. The goal of this article is to review the normal anatomy and biomechanics of the proximal interphalangeal joint and its associated structures, most importantly the proper collateral ligament, accessory collateral ligament, and volar plate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. ES-2 Dummy Biomechanical Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Katie; Abramczyk, Joseph; Berliner, Jeff; Irwin, Annette; Jensen, Jack; Kowsika, Murthy; Mertz, Harold J; Rouhana, Stephen W; Scherer, Risa; Shi, Yibing; Sutterfield, Aleta; Xu, Lan; Tylko, Suzanne; Dalmotas, Dainius

    2002-11-01

    This technical paper presents the results of biomechanical testing conducted on the ES-2 dummy by the Occupant Safety Research Partnership and Transport Canada. The ES-2 is a production dummy, based on the EuroSID-1 dummy, that was modified to further improve testing capabilities as recommended by users of the EuroSID-1 dummy. Biomechanical response data were obtained by completing a series of drop, pendulum, and sled tests that are outlined in the International Organization of Standardization Technical Report 9790 that describes biofidelity requirements for the midsize adult male side impact dummy. A few of the biofidelity tests were conducted on both sides of the dummy to evaluate the symmetry of its responses. Full vehicle crash tests were conducted to verify if the changes in the EuroSID-1, resulting in the ES-2 design, did improve the dummy's testing capability. In addition to the biofidelity testing, the ES-2 dummy repeatability, reproducibility and durability are discussed. Finally, this technical paper will compare the biofidelity ratings of the current adult side impact dummies with the ES-2 dummy, which received an overall dummy biofidelity rating of 4.6.

  13. The static pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longmire, Conrad L [University of California, Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1958-07-01

    In a pinch, the outward diffusion of plasma due to collisions can be balanced by the inward drift resulting from ExB, where E is the applied electric field and B the magnetic field. From the equation expressing the balance of these two effects, together with the pressure balance equation, one obtains the perpendicular conductivity, which is about one-half of the classical parallel conductivity. This result has been applied to the problem of a static pinch under the assumptions: 1) there is an applied longitudinal (B{sub z}) magnetic field; 2) the plasma is isothermal; 3) the solution depends only on the radial coordinate.

  14. DLS 5.0--the biomechanical effects of dynamic locking screws.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Döbele

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Indirect reduction of dia-/metaphyseal fractures with minimally invasive implant application bridges the fracture zone in order to protect the soft-tissue and blood supply. The goal of this fixation strategy is to allow stable motion at the fracture site to achieve indirect bone healing with callus formation. However, concerns have arisen that the high axial stiffness and eccentric position of locked plating constructs may suppress interfragmentary motion and callus formation, particularly under the plate. The reason for this is an asymmetric fracture movement. The biological need for sufficient callus formation and secondary bone healing is three-dimensional micro movement in the fracture zone. The DLS was designed to allow for increased fracture site motion. The purpose of the current study was to determine the biomechanical effect of the DLS_5.0. METHODS: Twelve surrogate bone models were used for analyzing the characteristics of the DLS_5.0. The axial stiffness and the interfragmentary motion of locked plating constructs with DLS were compared to conventional constructs with Locking Head Screws (LS_5.0. A quasi-static axial load of 0 to 2.5 kN was applied. Relative motion was measured. RESULTS: The dynamic system showed a biphasic axial stiffness distribution and provided a significant reduction of the initial axial stiffness of 74.4%. Additionally, the interfragmentary motion at the near cortex increased significantly from 0.033 mm to 0.210 mm (at 200N. CONCLUSIONS: The DLS may ultimately be an improvement over the angular stable plate osteosynthesis. The advantages of the angular stability are not only preserved but even supplemented by a dynamic element which leads to homogenous fracture movement and to a potentially uniform callus distribution.

  15. The effect of trochlear dysplasia on patellofemoral biomechanics: a cadaveric study with simulated trochlear deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Haver, Annemieke; De Roo, Karel; De Beule, Matthieu; Labey, Luc; De Baets, Patrick; Dejour, David; Claessens, Tom; Verdonk, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Trochlear dysplasia appears in different geometrical variations. The Dejour classification is widely used to grade the severity of trochlear dysplasia and to decide on treatment. To investigate the effect of trochlear dysplasia on patellofemoral biomechanics and to determine if different types of trochlear dysplasia have different effects on patellofemoral biomechanics. Controlled laboratory study. Trochlear dysplasia was simulated in 4 cadaveric knees by replacing the native cadaveric trochlea with different types of custom-made trochlear implants, manufactured with 3-dimensional printing. For each knee, 5 trochlear implants were designed: 1 implant simulated the native trochlea (control condition), and 4 implants simulated 4 types of trochlear dysplasia. The knees were subjected to 3 biomechanical tests: a squat simulation, an open chain extension simulation, and a patellar stability test. The patellofemoral kinematics, contact area, contact pressure, and stability were compared between the control condition (replica implants) and the trochlear dysplastic condition and among the subgroups of trochlear dysplasia. The patellofemoral joint in the trochlear dysplastic group showed increased internal rotation, lateral tilt, and lateral translation; increased contact pressures; decreased contact areas; and decreased stability when compared with the control group. Within the trochlear dysplastic group, the implants graded as Dejour type D showed the largest deviations for the kinematical parameters, and the implants graded as Dejour types B and D showed the largest deviations for the patellofemoral contact areas and pressures. Patellofemoral kinematics, contact area, contact pressure, and stability are significantly affected by trochlear dysplasia. Of all types of trochlear dysplasia, the models characterized with a pronounced trochlear bump showed the largest deviations in patellofemoral biomechanics. Investigating the relationship between the shape of the trochlea and

  16. Biomechanical Remodeling of the Diabetic Gastrointestinal Tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Jingbo; Liao, Donghua; Yang, Jian

    2010-01-01

    several years, several studies demonstrated that experimental diabetes induces GI morphological and biomechanical remodeling. Following the development of diabetes, the GI wall becomes thicker and the stiffness of the GI wall increases in a time-dependent manner. It is well known that mechanosensitive...... the biomechanical environment of the mechanosensitive nerve endings, therefore, the structure as well as the tension, stress and strain distribution in the GI wall is important for the sensory and motor function. Biomechanical remodeling of diabetic GI tract including alterations of residual strain and increase...

  17. Biomechanical aspects of playing surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigg, B M; Yeadon, M R

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss some biomechanical aspects of playing surfaces with special focus on (a) surface induced injuries, (b) methodologies used to assess surfaces and (c) findings from various sports. The paper concentrates primarily on questions related to load on the athlete's body. Data from epidemiological studies suggest strongly that the surface is an important factor in the aetiology of injuries. Injury frequencies are reported to be significantly different for different surfaces in several sports. The methodologies used to assess surfaces with respect to load or performance include material tests and tests using experimental subjects. There is only little correlation between the results of these two approaches. Material tests used in many standardized test procedures are not validated which suggests that one should exercise restraint in the interpretation of these results. Point elastic surfaces are widely studied while area elastic surfaces have received little attention to date. Questions of energy losses on sport surfaces have rarely been studied scientifically.

  18. Photovoltaic static concentrator analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almonacid, G.; Luque, A.; Molledo, A. G.

    1984-12-01

    Ray tracing is the basis of the present analysis of truncated bifacial compound parabolic concentrators filled with a dielectric substance, which are of interest in photovoltaic applications where the bifacial cells allow higher static concentrations to be achieved. Among the figures of merit for this type of concentrator, the directional intercept factor plays a major role and is defined as the ratio of the power of the collector to that at the entry aperture, in a lossless concentrator illuminated by light arriving from a given direction. A procedure for measuring outdoor, full size panels has been developed, and a correction method for avoiding the effect of unwanted diffuse radiation during the measurements is presented.

  19. Static electricity: A literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Rita M.

    1991-11-01

    The major concern with static electricity is its discharging in a flammable atmosphere which can explode and cause a fire. Textile materials can have their electrical resistivity decreased by the addition of antistatic finishes, imbedding conductive particles into the fibres or by adding metal fibers to the yarns. The test methods used in the studies of static electricity include measuring the static properties of materials, of clothed persons, and of the ignition energy of flammable gases. Surveys have shown that there is sparse evidence for fires definitively being caused by static electricity. However, the 'worst-case' philosophy has been adopted and a static electricity safety code is described, including correct grounding procedures and the wearing of anti-static clothing and footwear.

  20. THE CENTER FOR MILITARY BIOMECHANICS RESEARCH

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Military Biomechanics Research is a 7,500 ft2 dedicated laboratory outfitted with state-of-the-art equipment for 3-D analysis of movement, measurement...

  1. Recent software developments for biomechanical assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, John O. B.

    1990-08-01

    While much of the software developed in research laboratories is narrow in focus and suited for a specific experiment, some of it is broad enough and of high enough quality to be useful to others in solving similar problems. Several biomechanical assessment packages are now beginning to emerge, including: * 3D research biomechanics (5- and 6-DOF) with kinematics, kinetics, 32-channel analog data subsystem, and project management. * 3D full-body gait analysis with kinematics, kinetics, EMG charts, and force plate charts. * 2D dynamic rear-foot assessment. * 2D occupational biomechanics lifting task and personnel assessments. * 2D dynamic gait analysis. * Multiple 2D dynamic spine assessments. * 2D sport and biomechanics assessments with kinematics and kinetics. * 2D and 3D equine gait assessments.

  2. Biomechanical aspects of bone microstructure in vertebrates ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    2009-10-29

    Oct 29, 2009 ... Biomechanical or biophysical principles can be applied to study biological structures in their modern or .... Accounting for the flow in a horizontal pipe, z1 = z2, and ..... OH, USA for providing financial assistance and academic.

  3. Lingual biomechanics, case selection and success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Labh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Deeper understanding of lingual biomechanics is prerequisite for success with lingual appliance. The difference between labial and lingual force system must be understood and kept in mind during treatment planning, especially anchorage planning, and extraction decision-making. As point of application of force changes, it completely changes the force system in all planes. This article describes lingual biomechanics, anchorage planning, diagnostic considerations, treatment planning, and case selection criteria in lingual orthodontics.

  4. Brillouin microscopy: assessing ocular tissue biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Seok Hyun; Chernyak, Dimitri

    2018-07-01

    Assessment of corneal biomechanics has been an unmet clinical need in ophthalmology for many years. Many researchers and clinicians have identified corneal biomechanics as source of variability in refractive procedures and one of the main factors in keratoconus. However, it has been difficult to accurately characterize corneal biomechanics in patients. The recent development of Brillouin light scattering microscopy heightens the promise of bringing biomechanics into the clinic. The aim of this review is to overview the progress and discuss prospective applications of this new technology. Brillouin microscopy uses a low-power near-infrared laser beam to determine longitudinal modulus or mechanical compressibility of tissue by analyzing the return signal spectrum. Human clinical studies have demonstrated significant difference in the elastic properties of normal corneas versus corneas diagnosed with mild and severe keratoconus. Clinical data have also shown biomechanical changes after corneal cross-linking treatment of keratoconus patients. Brillouin measurements of the crystalline lens and sclera have also been demonstrated. Brillouin microscopy is a promising technology under commercial development at present. The technique enables physicians to characterize the biomechanical properties of ocular tissues.

  5. Mechanics of quasi-static crack growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, J R

    1978-10-01

    Results on the mechanics of quasi-static crack growth are reviewed. These include recent studies on the geometry and stability of crack paths in elastic-brittle solids, and on the thermodynamics of Griffith cracking, including environmental effects. The relation of crack growth criteria to non-elastic rheological models is considered and paradoxes with energy balance approaches, based on singular crack models, are discussed for visco-elastic, diffuso-elastic, and elastic-plastic materials. Also, recent approaches to prediction of stable crack growth in ductile, elastic-plastic solids are discussed.

  6. Elements of magnetohydrodynamic stability theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spies, G.O.

    1976-11-01

    The nonlinear equations of ideal magnetohydrodynamics are discussed along with the following topics: (1) static equilibrium, (2) strict linear theory, (3) stability of a system with one degree of freedom, (4) spectrum and variational principles in magnetohydrodynamics, (5) elementary proof of the modified energy principle, (6) sufficient stability criteria, (7) local stability, and (8) normal modes

  7. Comparing dynamical systems concepts and techniques for biomechanical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard E.A. van Emmerik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Traditional biomechanical analyses of human movement are generally derived from linear mathematics. While these methods can be useful in many situations, they do not describe behaviors in human systems that are predominately nonlinear. For this reason, nonlinear analysis methods based on a dynamical systems approach have become more prevalent in recent literature. These analysis techniques have provided new insights into how systems (1 maintain pattern stability, (2 transition into new states, and (3 are governed by short- and long-term (fractal correlational processes at different spatio-temporal scales. These different aspects of system dynamics are typically investigated using concepts related to variability, stability, complexity, and adaptability. The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast these different concepts and demonstrate that, although related, these terms represent fundamentally different aspects of system dynamics. In particular, we argue that variability should not uniformly be equated with stability or complexity of movement. In addition, current dynamic stability measures based on nonlinear analysis methods (such as the finite maximal Lyapunov exponent can reveal local instabilities in movement dynamics, but the degree to which these local instabilities relate to global postural and gait stability and the ability to resist external perturbations remains to be explored. Finally, systematic studies are needed to relate observed reductions in complexity with aging and disease to the adaptive capabilities of the movement system and how complexity changes as a function of different task constraints.

  8. Comparing dynamical systems concepts and techniques for biomechanical analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard E.A. van Emmerik; Scott W. Ducharme; Avelino C. Amado; Joseph Hamill

    2016-01-01

    Traditional biomechanical analyses of human movement are generally derived from linear mathematics. While these methods can be useful in many situations, they do not describe behaviors in human systems that are predominately nonlinear. For this reason, nonlinear analysis methods based on a dynamical systems approach have become more prevalent in recent literature. These analysis techniques have provided new insights into how systems (1) maintain pattern stability, (2) transition into new states, and (3) are governed by short-and long-term (fractal) correlational processes at different spatio-temporal scales. These different aspects of system dynamics are typically investigated using concepts related to variability, stability, complexity, and adaptability. The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast these different concepts and demonstrate that, although related, these terms represent fundamentally different aspects of system dynamics. In particular, we argue that variability should not uniformly be equated with stability or complexity of movement. In addition, current dynamic stability measures based on nonlinear analysis methods (such as the finite maximal Lyapunov exponent) can reveal local instabilities in movement dynamics, but the degree to which these local instabilities relate to global postural and gait stability and the ability to resist external perturbations remains to be explored. Finally, systematic studies are needed to relate observed reductions in complexity with aging and disease to the adaptive capabilities of the movement system and how complexity changes as a function of different task constraints.

  9. Statics and Mechanics of Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen; Høgsberg, Jan Becker

    The statics and mechanics of structures form a core aspect of civil engineering. This book provides an introduction to the subject, starting from classic hand-calculation types of analysis and gradually advancing to a systematic form suitable for computer implementation. It starts with statically...

  10. Static analysis of an office desk construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Novotný

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper is a static analysis of a desk construction and the determination of its probable mechanical behaviour using Finite Element Method. The construction was modelled and numerically analysed in Autocad Inventor 2011 and the stability of the entire desk was calculated with the size and placement of the loading force based on the standards and cited literature. Possible locations and directions of the deformation were analysed and a solution for its prevention was proposed and the stability of the desk as well as the extreme position of the stand were calculated. The verification of the obtained results in an accredited furniture testing lab is planned using a prototype of the office desk.

  11. Biomechanical testing of zirconium dioxide osteosynthesis system for Le Fort I advancement osteotomy fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingsammer, Lukas; Grillenberger, Markus; Schagerl, Martin; Malek, Michael; Hunger, Stefan

    2018-01-01

    The following work is the first evaluating the applicability of 3D printed zirconium dioxide ceramic miniplates and screws to stabilize maxillary segments following a Le-Fort I advancement surgery. Conventionally used titanium and individual fabricated zirconium dioxide miniplates were biomechanically tested and compared under an occlusal load of 120N and 500N using 3D finite element analysis. The overall model consisted of 295,477 elements. Under an occlusal load of 500N a safety factor before plastic deformation respectively crack of 2.13 for zirconium dioxide and 4.51 for titanium miniplates has been calculated. From a biomechanical point of view 3D printed ZrO 2 mini-plates and screws are suggested to constitute an appropriate patient specific and metal-free solution for maxillary stabilization after Le Fort I osteotomy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Role of Aquaporin 0 in lens biomechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindhu Kumari, S.; Gupta, Neha; Shiels, Alan; FitzGerald, Paul G.; Menon, Anil G.; Mathias, Richard T.; Varadaraj, Kulandaiappan

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of proper biomechanics of the eye lens is important for its structural integrity and for the process of accommodation to focus near and far objects. Several studies have shown that specialized cytoskeletal systems such as the beaded filament (BF) and spectrin-actin networks contribute to mammalian lens biomechanics; mutations or deletion in these proteins alters lens biomechanics. Aquaporin 0 (AQP0), which constitutes ∼45% of the total membrane proteins of lens fiber cells, has been shown to function as a water channel and a structural cell-to-cell adhesion (CTCA) protein. Our recent ex vivo study on AQP0 knockout (AQP0 KO) mouse lenses showed the CTCA function of AQP0 could be crucial for establishing the refractive index gradient. However, biomechanical studies on the role of AQP0 are lacking. The present investigation used wild type (WT), AQP5 KO (AQP5 −/− ), AQP0 KO (heterozygous KO: AQP0 +/− ; homozygous KO: AQP0 −/− ; all in C57BL/6J) and WT-FVB/N mouse lenses to learn more about the role of fiber cell AQPs in lens biomechanics. Electron microscopic images exhibited decreases in lens fiber cell compaction and increases in extracellular space due to deletion of even one allele of AQP0. Biomechanical assay revealed that loss of one or both alleles of AQP0 caused a significant reduction in the compressive load-bearing capacity of the lenses compared to WT lenses. Conversely, loss of AQP5 did not alter the lens load-bearing ability. Compressive load-bearing at the suture area of AQP0 +/− lenses showed easy separation while WT lens suture remained intact. These data from KO mouse lenses in conjunction with previous studies on lens-specific BF proteins (CP49 and filensin) suggest that AQP0 and BF proteins could act co-operatively in establishing normal lens biomechanics. We hypothesize that AQP0, with its prolific expression at the fiber cell membrane, could provide anchorage for cytoskeletal structures like BFs and together they help to

  13. An in vitro biomechanical comparison of equine proximal interphalangeal joint arthrodesis techniques: an axial positioned dynamic compression plate and two abaxial transarticular cortical screws inserted in lag fashion versus three parallel transarticular cortical screws inserted in lag fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sod, Gary A; Riggs, Laura M; Mitchell, Colin F; Hubert, Jeremy D; Martin, George S

    2010-01-01

    To compare in vitro monotonic biomechanical properties of an axial 3-hole, 4.5 mm narrow dynamic compression plate (DCP) using 5.5 mm cortical screws in conjunction with 2 abaxial transarticular 5.5 mm cortical screws inserted in lag fashion (DCP-TLS) with 3 parallel transarticular 5.5 mm cortical screws inserted in lag fashion (3-TLS) for the equine proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint arthrodesis. Paired in vitro biomechanical testing of 2 methods of stabilizing cadaveric adult equine forelimb PIP joints. Cadaveric adult equine forelimbs (n=15 pairs). For each forelimb pair, 1 PIP joint was stabilized with an axial 3-hole narrow DCP (4.5 mm) using 5.5 mm cortical screws in conjunction with 2 abaxial transarticular 5.5 mm cortical screws inserted in lag fashion and 1 with 3 parallel transarticular 5.5 mm cortical screws inserted in lag fashion. Five matching pairs of constructs were tested in single cycle to failure under axial compression, 5 construct pairs were tested for cyclic fatigue under axial compression, and 5 construct pairs were tested in single cycle to failure under torsional loading. Mean values for each fixation method were compared using a paired t-test within each group with statistical significance set at Pcycle to failure, of the DCP-TLS fixation were significantly greater than those of the 3-TLS fixation. Mean cycles to failure in axial compression of the DCP-TLS fixation was significantly greater than that of the 3-TLS fixation. The DCP-TLS was superior to the 3-TLS in resisting the static overload forces and in resisting cyclic fatigue. The results of this in vitro study may provide information to aid in the selection of a treatment modality for arthrodesis of the equine PIP joint.

  14. Biomechanics and mechanobiology in functional tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilak, Farshid; Butler, David L.; Goldstein, Steven A.; Baaijens, Frank P.T.

    2014-01-01

    The field of tissue engineering continues to expand and mature, and several products are now in clinical use, with numerous other preclinical and clinical studies underway. However, specific challenges still remain in the repair or regeneration of tissues that serve a predominantly biomechanical function. Furthermore, it is now clear that mechanobiological interactions between cells and scaffolds can critically influence cell behavior, even in tissues and organs that do not serve an overt biomechanical role. Over the past decade, the field of “functional tissue engineering” has grown as a subfield of tissue engineering to address the challenges and questions on the role of biomechanics and mechanobiology in tissue engineering. Originally posed as a set of principles and guidelines for engineering of load-bearing tissues, functional tissue engineering has grown to encompass several related areas that have proven to have important implications for tissue repair and regeneration. These topics include measurement and modeling of the in vivo biomechanical environment; quantitative analysis of the mechanical properties of native tissues, scaffolds, and repair tissues; development of rationale criteria for the design and assessment of engineered tissues; investigation of the effects biomechanical factors on native and repair tissues, in vivo and in vitro; and development and application of computational models of tissue growth and remodeling. Here we further expand this paradigm and provide examples of the numerous advances in the field over the past decade. Consideration of these principles in the design process will hopefully improve the safety, efficacy, and overall success of engineered tissue replacements. PMID:24818797

  15. Biomechanical rationale and evaluation of an implant system for rib fracture fixation

    OpenAIRE

    Bottlang, M.; Walleser, S.; Noll, M.; Honold, S.; Madey, S. M.; Fitzpatrick, D.; Long, W. B.

    2010-01-01

    Background Biomechanical research directed at developing customized implant solutions for rib fracture fixation is essential to reduce the complexity and to increase the reliability of rib osteosynthesis. Without a simple and reliable implant solution, surgical stabilization of rib fractures will remain underutilized despite proven benefits for select indications. This article summarizes the research, development, and testing of a specialized and comprehensive implant solution for rib fractur...

  16. Computational biomechanics for medicine from algorithms to models and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Joldes, Grand; Nielsen, Poul; Doyle, Barry; Miller, Karol

    2017-01-01

    This volume comprises the latest developments in both fundamental science and patient-specific applications, discussing topics such as: cellular mechanics; injury biomechanics; biomechanics of heart and vascular system; medical image analysis; and both patient-specific fluid dynamics and solid mechanics simulations. With contributions from researchers world-wide, the Computational Biomechanics for Medicine series of titles provides an opportunity for specialists in computational biomechanics to present their latest methodologies and advancements.

  17. 4th International Plant Biomechanics Conference Proceedings (Abstracts)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank W. Telewski; Lothar H. Koehler; Frank W. Ewers

    2003-07-20

    The 4th International Plant Biomechanics Conference facilitated an interdisciplinary exchange between scientists, engineers, and educators addressing the major questions encountered in the field of Plant Biomechanics. Subjects covered by the conference include: Evolution; Ecology; Mechanoreception; Cell Walls; Genetic Modification; Applied Biomechanics of Whole Plants, Plant Products, Fibers & Composites; Fluid Dynamics; Wood & Trees; Fracture Mechanics; Xylem Pressure & Water Transport; Modeling; and Introducing Plant Biomechanics in Secondary School Education.

  18. Statics of Historic Masonry Constructions

    CERN Document Server

    Como, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Masonry constructions are the great majority of the buildings in Europe’s historic centres and the most important monuments in its architectural heritage. Given the age of much of these constructions, the demand for safety assessments and restoration projects is pressing and constant. This book aims to help fill this demand presenting a comprehensive new statics of masonry constructions. The book, result of thirty years of research and professional experience, gives the fundamentals of statics of the masonry solid, then applied to the study of statics of arches, piers and vaults. Further, combining engineering and architecture and through an interdisciplinary approach, the book investigates the statical behaviour of many historic monuments, as the Pantheon, the Colosseum,  the domes of S. Maria del Fiore in Florence and of St. Peter in Rome, the Tower of Pisa, the Gothic Cathedrals and the Masonry Buildings under seismic actions.

  19. Sixth Computational Biomechanics for Medicine Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Nielsen, Poul MF; Miller, Karol; Computational Biomechanics for Medicine : Deformation and Flow

    2012-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges for mechanical engineers is to extend the success of computational mechanics to fields outside traditional engineering, in particular to biology, biomedical sciences, and medicine. This book is an opportunity for computational biomechanics specialists to present and exchange opinions on the opportunities of applying their techniques to computer-integrated medicine. Computational Biomechanics for Medicine: Deformation and Flow collects the papers from the Sixth Computational Biomechanics for Medicine Workshop held in Toronto in conjunction with the Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention conference. The topics covered include: medical image analysis, image-guided surgery, surgical simulation, surgical intervention planning, disease prognosis and diagnostics, injury mechanism analysis, implant and prostheses design, and medical robotics.

  20. Multiscale modeling in biomechanics and mechanobiology

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Wonmuk; Kuhl, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Presenting a state-of-the-art overview of theoretical and computational models that link characteristic biomechanical phenomena, this book provides guidelines and examples for creating multiscale models in representative systems and organisms. It develops the reader's understanding of and intuition for multiscale phenomena in biomechanics and mechanobiology, and introduces a mathematical framework and computational techniques paramount to creating predictive multiscale models.   Biomechanics involves the study of the interactions of physical forces with biological systems at all scales – including molecular, cellular, tissue and organ scales. The emerging field of mechanobiology focuses on the way that cells produce and respond to mechanical forces – bridging the science of mechanics with the disciplines of genetics and molecular biology. Linking disparate spatial and temporal scales using computational techniques is emerging as a key concept in investigating some of the complex problems underlying these...

  1. Static Analysis of Mobile Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    and not allowed, to do. The second issue was that a fully static analysis was never a realistic possibility, because Java , the programming langauge...scale to large programs it had to handle essentially all of the features of Java and could also be used as a general-purpose analysis engine. The...static analysis of imperative languages. • A framework for adding specifications about the behavior of methods, including methods that were

  2. Static Decoupling in fault detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik

    1998-01-01

    An algebraic approach is given for a design of a static residual weighting factor in connection with fault detection. A complete parameterization is given of the weighting factor which will minimize a given performance index......An algebraic approach is given for a design of a static residual weighting factor in connection with fault detection. A complete parameterization is given of the weighting factor which will minimize a given performance index...

  3. Detecting dynamical boundaries from kinematic data in biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Shane D.; Tanaka, Martin L.; Senatore, Carmine

    2010-03-01

    Ridges in the state space distribution of finite-time Lyapunov exponents can be used to locate dynamical boundaries. We describe a method for obtaining dynamical boundaries using only trajectories reconstructed from time series, expanding on the current approach which requires a vector field in the phase space. We analyze problems in musculoskeletal biomechanics, considered as exemplars of a class of experimental systems that contain separatrix features. Particular focus is given to postural control and balance, considering both models and experimental data. Our success in determining the boundary between recovery and failure in human balance activities suggests this approach will provide new robust stability measures, as well as measures of fall risk, that currently are not available and may have benefits for the analysis and prevention of low back pain and falls leading to injury, both of which affect a significant portion of the population.

  4. Influence of different sizes of composite femora on the biomechanical behavior of cementless hip prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidutz, Florian; Woiczinski, Mathias; Kistler, Manuel; Schröder, Christian; Jansson, Volkmar; Fottner, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    For the biomechanical evaluation of cementless stems different sizes of composite femurs have been used in the literature. However, the impact of different specimen sizes on test results is unknown. To determine the potential effect of femur size the biomechanical properties of a conventional stem (CLS Spotorno) were examined in 3 different sizes (small, medium and large composite Sawbones®). Primary stability was tested under physiologically adapted dynamic loading conditions measuring 3-dimensional micromotions. For the small composite femur the dynamic load needed to be adapted since fractures occurred when reaching 1700N. Additionally, surface strain distribution was recorded before and after implantation to draw conclusions about the tendency for stress shielding. All tested sizes revealed similar micromotions only reaching a significant different level at one measurement point. The highest micromotions were observed at the tip of the stems exceeding the limit for osseous integration of 150μm. Regarding strain distribution the highest strain reduction after implantation was registered in all sizes at the level of the lesser trochanter. Specimen size seems to be a minor influence factor for biomechanical evaluation of cementless stems. However, the small composite femur is less suitable for biomechanical testing since this size failed under physiological adapted loads. For the CLS Spotorno osseous integration is unlikely at the tip of the stem and the tendency for stress shielding is the highest at the level of the lesser trochanter. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Role of Aquaporin 0 in lens biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindhu Kumari, S; Gupta, Neha; Shiels, Alan; FitzGerald, Paul G; Menon, Anil G; Mathias, Richard T; Varadaraj, Kulandaiappan

    2015-07-10

    Maintenance of proper biomechanics of the eye lens is important for its structural integrity and for the process of accommodation to focus near and far objects. Several studies have shown that specialized cytoskeletal systems such as the beaded filament (BF) and spectrin-actin networks contribute to mammalian lens biomechanics; mutations or deletion in these proteins alters lens biomechanics. Aquaporin 0 (AQP0), which constitutes ∼45% of the total membrane proteins of lens fiber cells, has been shown to function as a water channel and a structural cell-to-cell adhesion (CTCA) protein. Our recent ex vivo study on AQP0 knockout (AQP0 KO) mouse lenses showed the CTCA function of AQP0 could be crucial for establishing the refractive index gradient. However, biomechanical studies on the role of AQP0 are lacking. The present investigation used wild type (WT), AQP5 KO (AQP5(-/-)), AQP0 KO (heterozygous KO: AQP0(+/-); homozygous KO: AQP0(-/-); all in C57BL/6J) and WT-FVB/N mouse lenses to learn more about the role of fiber cell AQPs in lens biomechanics. Electron microscopic images exhibited decreases in lens fiber cell compaction and increases in extracellular space due to deletion of even one allele of AQP0. Biomechanical assay revealed that loss of one or both alleles of AQP0 caused a significant reduction in the compressive load-bearing capacity of the lenses compared to WT lenses. Conversely, loss of AQP5 did not alter the lens load-bearing ability. Compressive load-bearing at the suture area of AQP0(+/-) lenses showed easy separation while WT lens suture remained intact. These data from KO mouse lenses in conjunction with previous studies on lens-specific BF proteins (CP49 and filensin) suggest that AQP0 and BF proteins could act co-operatively in establishing normal lens biomechanics. We hypothesize that AQP0, with its prolific expression at the fiber cell membrane, could provide anchorage for cytoskeletal structures like BFs and together they help to confer

  6. Tennis elbow: a biomechanical and therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnatz, P; Steiner, C

    1993-07-01

    Lateral epicondylitis, one of the most common lesions of the arm, affects some 50% of tennis players. This condition poses a problem in clinical management because treatment is dependent not only on proper medical therapy but also on correction of the improper on-court biomechanics. The most common flaw is a late contact on the backhand groundstroke, forcing the player to extend the wrist with the extensor muscles. This action predisposes to trauma of the tendon fibers at the lateral epicondyle. Understanding the biomechanics will better prepare the physician to advise the patient and to communicate with a tennis teaching professional to facilitate long-term relief.

  7. Biomechanical CT Metrics Are Associated With Patient Outcomes in COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodduluri, Sandeep; Bhatt, Surya P; Hoffman, Eric A.; Newell, John D.; Martinez, Carlos H.; Dransfield, Mark T.; Han, Meilan K.; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Traditional metrics of lung disease such as those derived from spirometry and static single-volume CT images are used to explain respiratory morbidity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but are insufficient. We hypothesized that the mean Jacobian determinant, a measure of local lung expansion and contraction with respiration, would contribute independently to clinically relevant functional outcomes. Methods We applied image registration techniques to paired inspiratory-expiratory CT scans and derived the Jacobian determinant of the deformation field between the two lung volumes to map local volume change with respiration. We analyzed 490 participants with COPD with multivariable regression models to assess strengths of association between traditional CT metrics of disease and the Jacobian determinant with respiratory morbidity including dyspnea (mMRC), St Georges Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) score, six-minute walk distance (6MWD), and the BODE index, as well as all-cause mortality. Results The Jacobian determinant was significantly associated with SGRQ (adjusted regression co-efficient β = −11.75,95%CI −21.6 to −1.7;p=0.020), and with 6MWD (β=321.15, 95%CI 134.1 to 508.1;p<0.001), independent of age, sex, race, body-mass-index, FEV1, smoking pack-years, CT emphysema, CT gas trapping, airway wall thickness, and CT scanner protocol. The mean Jacobian determinant was also independently associated with the BODE index (β= −0.41, 95%CI −0.80 to −0.02; p = 0.039), and mortality on follow-up (adjusted hazards ratio = 4.26, 95%CI = 0.93 to 19.23; p = 0.064). Conclusion Biomechanical metrics representing local lung expansion and contraction improve prediction of respiratory morbidity and mortality and offer additional prognostic information beyond traditional measures of lung function and static single-volume CT metrics. PMID:28044005

  8. Biomechanical evaluation of a corporectomy in porcine lumbar specimens using flexible polymer belts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran-Fernandez, J A; Hernandez-Gomez, L H; Ruiz-Munoz, E; Urriolagoitia-Calderon, G; Urriolagoitia-Sosa, G; Gonzalez-Rebattu, A; RodrIguez-Canizo, R G; Hernandez-Moreno, H

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental results of a biomechanical evaluation in lumbar porcine specimens (L2-L4), instrumented with flexible polymer belts, under fatigue and tensile loading. The clinical effect called facetary arthrosis is evaluated. An experimental analysis was carried on 3 lumbar porcine specimens. In two of them, polyamide belts are fixed on the interspinous ligament from L2 to L4. Specimens are taken from pigs which are 6 month old. For the present work, the stiffness reduction of the spine and the biomechanical behaviour of the belts in conjunction with the interspinous ligament are evaluated. The purpose is to determine the failure conditions for the elements of the specimen (vertebral disk, supra and intraspinous ligament and vertebral body). Under static loading, which is the base line case, the elements of the specimen failed as a typical healthy structure. While in the fatigue combined with static loading, the element failed in different order. Additionally, the stiffness changed in accordance with the fatigue loading conditions. Because of the simplicity of this alternative technique, a high level of the structural integrity is preserved, as no holes are made on the spinous process in order to insert the fixation screws. Furthermore, there is a cost reduction.

  9. Biomechanical evaluation of a corporectomy in porcine lumbar specimens using flexible polymer belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán-Fernández, J. A.; Hernández-Gómez, L. H.; Ruiz-Muñoz, E.; González-Rebattú, A.; Rodríguez-Cañizo, R. G.; Urriolagoitia-Calderón, G.; Urriolagoitia-Sosa, G.; Hernández-Moreno, H.

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents the experimental results of a biomechanical evaluation in lumbar porcine specimens (L2-L4), instrumented with flexible polymer belts, under fatigue and tensile loading. The clinical effect called facetary arthrosis is evaluated. An experimental analysis was carried on 3 lumbar porcine specimens. In two of them, polyamide belts are fixed on the interspinous ligament from L2 to L4. Specimens are taken from pigs which are 6 month old. For the present work, the stiffness reduction of the spine and the biomechanical behaviour of the belts in conjunction with the interspinous ligament are evaluated. The purpose is to determine the failure conditions for the elements of the specimen (vertebral disk, supra and intraspinous ligament and vertebral body). Under static loading, which is the base line case, the elements of the specimen failed as a typical healthy structure. While in the fatigue combined with static loading, the element failed in different order. Additionally, the stiffness changed in accordance with the fatigue loading conditions. Because of the simplicity of this alternative technique, a high level of the structural integrity is preserved, as no holes are made on the spinous process in order to insert the fixation screws. Furthermore, there is a cost reduction.

  10. Inter-assessor reliability of practice based biomechanical assessment of the foot and ankle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarvis Hannah L

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is no consensus on which protocols should be used to assess foot and lower limb biomechanics in clinical practice. The reliability of many assessments has been questioned by previous research. The aim of this investigation was to (i identify (through consensus what biomechanical examinations are used in clinical practice and (ii evaluate the inter-assessor reliability of some of these examinations. Methods Part1: Using a modified Delphi technique 12 podiatrists derived consensus on the biomechanical examinations used in clinical practice. Part 2: Eleven podiatrists assessed 6 participants using a subset of the assessment protocol derived in Part 1. Examinations were compared between assessors. Results Clinicians choose to estimate rather than quantitatively measure foot position and motion. Poor inter-assessor reliability was recorded for all examinations. Intra-class correlation coefficient values (ICC for relaxed calcaneal stance position were less than 0.23 and were less than 0.14 for neutral calcaneal stance position. For the examination of ankle joint dorsiflexion, ICC values suggest moderate reliability (less than 0.61. The results of a random effects ANOVA highlight that participant (up to 5.7°, assessor (up to 5.8° and random (up to 5.7° error all contribute to the total error (up to 9.5° for relaxed calcaneal stance position, up to 10.7° for the examination of ankle joint dorsiflexion. Kappa Fleiss values for categorisation of first ray position and mobility were less than 0.05 and for limb length assessment less than 0.02, indicating slight agreement. Conclusion Static biomechanical assessment of the foot, leg and lower limb is an important protocol in clinical practice, but the key examinations used to make inferences about dynamic foot function and to determine orthotic prescription are unreliable.

  11. A biomechanical assessment to evaluate breed differences in normal porcine medial collateral ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germscheid, Niccole M; Thornton, Gail M; Hart, David A; Hildebrand, Kevin A

    2011-02-24

    Little information is available on the role of genetic factors and heredity in normal ligament behaviour and their ability to heal. Assessing these factors is challenging because of the lack of suitable animal models. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to develop a porcine model in order to evaluate and compare the biomechanical differences of normal medial collateral ligaments (MCLs) between Yorkshire (YK) and red Duroc (RD) breeds. It was hypothesized that biomechanical differences would not exist between normal YK and RD MCLs. Comparisons between porcine and human MCL were also made. A biomechanical testing apparatus and protocol specific to pig MCL were developed. Ligaments were subjected to cyclic and static creep tests and then elongated to failure. Pig MCL morphology, geometry, and low- and high-load mechanical behaviour were assessed. The custom-designed apparatus and protocol were sufficiently sensitive to detect mechanical property differences between breeds as well as inter-leg differences. The results reveal that porcine MCL is comparable in both shape and size to human MCL and exhibits similar structural and material failure properties, thus making it a feasible model. Comparisons between RD and YK breeds revealed that age-matched RD pigs weigh more, have larger MCL cross-sectional area, and have lower MCL failure stress than YK pigs. The effect of weight may have influenced MCL geometrical and biomechanical properties, and consequently, the differences observed may be due to breed type and/or animal weight. In conclusion, the pig serves as a suitable large animal model for genetic-related connective tissue studies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Immediate effects of a new microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee joint: a comparative biomechanical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellmann, Malte; Schmalz, Thomas; Ludwigs, Eva; Blumentritt, Siegmar

    2012-03-01

    To investigate the immediate biomechanical effects after transition to a new microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee joint. Intervention cross-over study with repeated measures. Only prosthetic knee joints were changed. Motion analysis laboratory. Men (N=11; mean age ± SD, 36.7±10.2y; Medicare functional classification level, 3-4) with unilateral transfemoral amputation. Two microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee joints: C-Leg and a new prosthetic knee joint, Genium. Static prosthetic alignment, time-distance parameters, kinematic and kinetic parameters, and center of pressure. After a half-day training and an additional half-day accommodation, improved biomechanical outcomes were demonstrated by the Genium: lower ground reaction forces at weight acceptance during level walking at various velocities, increased swing phase flexion angles during walking on a ramp, and level walking with small steps. Maximum knee flexion angle during swing phase at various velocities was nearly equal for Genium. Step-over-step stair ascent with the Genium knee was more physiologic as demonstrated by a more equal load distribution between the prosthetic and contralateral sides and a more natural gait pattern. When descending stairs and ramps, knee flexion moments with the Genium tended to increase. During quiet stance on a decline, subjects using Genium accepted higher loading of the prosthetic side knee joint, thus reducing same side hip joint loading as well as postural sway. In comparision to the C-Leg, the Genium demonstrated immediate biomechanical advantages during various daily ambulatory activities, which may lead to an increase in range and diversity of activity of people with above-knee amputations. Results showed that use of the Genium facilitated more natural gait biomechanics and load distribution throughout the affected and sound musculoskeletal structure. This was observed during quiet stance on a decline, walking on level ground, and walking up and down ramps and

  13. Canine stifle joint biomechanics associated with tibial plateau leveling osteotomy predicted by use of a computer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Nathan P; Bertocci, Gina E; Marcellin-Little, Denis J

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate effects of tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) on canine stifle joint biomechanics in a cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL)-deficient stifle joint by use of a 3-D computer model simulating the stance phase of gait and to compare biomechanics in TPLO-managed, CrCL-intact, and CrCL-deficient stifle joints. Computer simulations of the pelvic limb of a Golden Retriever. A previously developed computer model of the canine pelvic limb was used to simulate TPLO stabilization to achieve a tibial plateau angle (TPA) of 5° (baseline value) in a CrCL-deficient stifle joint. Sensitivity analysis was conducted for tibial fragment rotation of 13° to -3°. Ligament loads, relative tibial translation, and relative tibial rotation were determined and compared with values for CrCL-intact and CrCL-deficient stifle joints. TPLO with a 5° TPA converted cranial tibial translation to caudal tibial translation and increased loads placed on the remaining stifle joint ligaments, compared with results for a CrCL-intact stifle joint. Lateral collateral ligament load was similar, medial collateral ligament load increased, and caudal cruciate ligament load decreased after TPLO, compared with loads for a CrCL-deficient stifle joint. Relative tibial rotation after TPLO was similar to that of a CrCL-deficient stifle joint. Stifle joint biomechanics were affected by TPLO fragment rotation. In the model, stifle joint biomechanics were partially improved after TPLO, compared with CrCL-deficient stifle joint biomechanics, but TPLO did not fully restore CrCL-intact stifle joint biomechanics. Overrotation of the tibial fragment negatively influenced stifle joint biomechanics by increasing caudal tibial translation.

  14. Biomechanics of Pediatric Manual Wheelchair Mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavens, Brooke A; Schnorenberg, Alyssa J; Aurit, Christine M; Tarima, Sergey; Vogel, Lawrence C; Harris, Gerald F

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is limited research of the biomechanics of pediatric manual wheelchair mobility. Specifically, the biomechanics of functional tasks and their relationship to joint pain and health is not well understood. To contribute to this knowledge gap, a quantitative rehabilitation approach was applied for characterizing upper extremity biomechanics of manual wheelchair mobility in children and adolescents during propulsion, starting, and stopping tasks. A Vicon motion analysis system captured movement, while a SmartWheel simultaneously collected three-dimensional forces and moments occurring at the handrim. A custom pediatric inverse dynamics model was used to evaluate three-dimensional upper extremity joint motions, forces, and moments of 14 children with spinal cord injury (SCI) during the functional tasks. Additionally, pain and health-related quality of life outcomes were assessed. This research found that joint demands are significantly different amongst functional tasks, with greatest demands placed on the shoulder during the starting task. Propulsion was significantly different from starting and stopping at all joints. We identified multiple stroke patterns used by the children, some of which are not standard in adults. One subject reported average daily pain, which was minimal. Lower than normal physical health and higher than normal mental health was found in this population. It can be concluded that functional tasks should be considered in addition to propulsion for rehabilitation and SCI treatment planning. This research provides wheelchair users and clinicians with a comprehensive, biomechanical, mobility assessment approach for wheelchair prescription, training, and long-term care of children with SCI.

  15. Expose Mechanical Engineering Students to Biomechanics Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hui

    2011-01-01

    To adapt the focus of engineering education to emerging new industries and technologies nationwide and in the local area, a biomechanics module has been developed and incorporated into a mechanical engineering technical elective course to expose mechanical engineering students at ONU (Ohio Northern University) to the biomedical engineering topics.…

  16. Neck muscle biomechanics and neural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fice, Jason Bradley; Siegmund, Gunter P; Blouin, Jean-Sebastien

    2018-04-18

    The mechanics, morphometry, and geometry of our joints, segments and muscles are fundamental biomechanical properties intrinsic to human neural control. The goal of our study was to investigate if the biomechanical actions of individual neck muscles predicts their neural control. Specifically, we compared the moment direction & variability produced by electrical stimulation of a neck muscle (biomechanics) to their preferred activation direction & variability (neural control). Subjects sat upright with their head fixed to a 6-axis load cell and their torso restrained. Indwelling wire electrodes were placed into the sternocleidomastoid (SCM), splenius capitis (SPL), and semispinalis capitis (SSC) muscles. The electrically stimulated direction was defined as the moment direction produced when a current (2-19mA) was passed through each muscle's electrodes. Preferred activation direction was defined as the vector sum of the spatial tuning curve built from RMS EMG when subjects produced isometric moments at 7.5% and 15% of their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) in 26 3D directions. The spatial tuning curves at 15% MVC were well-defined (unimodal, pbiomechanics but, as activation increases, biomechanical constraints in part dictate the activation of synergistic neck muscles.

  17. Biomechanics of the pelvic floor musculature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janda, S.

    2006-01-01

    The present thesis was motivated by two main goals. The first research goal of the thesis was to understand the complex biomechanical behaviour of the pelvic floor muscles. The second goal was to study the mechanism of the pelvic organ prolapse (genital prolapse). The pelvic floor in humans is a

  18. Biomechanical aspects of bone microstructure in vertebrates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-10-29

    Oct 29, 2009 ... Biomechanical or biophysical principles can be applied to study biological structures in their modern or fossil form. Bone is an important tissue in paleontological studies as it is a commonly preserved element in most fossil vertebrates, and can often allow its microstructures such as lacuna and canaliculi to ...

  19. Biomechanical analysis of drop and countermovement jumps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, M. F.; Mackay, M.T.; Schinkelshoek, D.; Huijing, P. A.; van Ingen Schenau, G. J.

    For 13 subjects the performance of drop jumps from a height of 40 cm (DJ) and of countermovement jumps (CMJ) was analysed and compared. From force plate and cine data biomechanical variables including forces, moments, power output and amount of work done were calculated for hip, knee and ankle

  20. Biomechanics and mechanobiology in functional tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guilak, F.; Butler, D.L.; Goldstein, S.A.; Baaijens, F.P.T.

    2014-01-01

    The field of tissue engineering continues to expand and mature, and several products are now in clinical use, with numerous other preclinical and clinical studies underway. However, specific challenges still remain in the repair or regeneration of tissues that serve a predominantly biomechanical

  1. Biomechanics Scholar Citations across Academic Ranks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knudson Duane

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Study aim: citations to the publications of a scholar have been used as a measure of the quality or influence of their research record. A world-wide descriptive study of the citations to the publications of biomechanics scholars of various academic ranks was conducted.

  2. Interdisciplinary Vertical Integration: The Future of Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregor, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    The field of biomechanics has grown rapidly in the past 30 years in both size and complexity. As a result, the term might mean different things to different people. This article addresses the issues facing the field in the form of challenges biomechanists face in the future. Because the field is so diverse, strength within the different areas of…

  3. Biomechanical comparison of transoral and transbuccal lateral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The purpose of this experimental study was to compare the biomechanical behaviors of two different types of osteosynthesis that are used in the treatment of mandibular angle fractures. Materials and Methods: Twenty synthetic polyurethane human mandible replicas, with medullar and cortical portions, were ...

  4. The Value of Biomechanical Research in Dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranney, D. A.

    Simple observation of dance movement, while very useful, can lead to misconceptions, about the physical realities of dance movement, that make learning difficult. This gap between reality and understanding can be reduced by the application of biomechanical techniques such as cinematography, electromyography, and force-plate analysis. Biomechanical…

  5. The Influence of Articular Cartilage Thickness Reduction on Meniscus Biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łuczkiewicz, Piotr; Daszkiewicz, Karol; Chróścielewski, Jacek; Witkowski, Wojciech; Winklewski, Pawel J

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of the biomechanical interaction between meniscus and cartilage in medial compartment knee osteoarthritis. The finite element method was used to simulate knee joint contact mechanics. Three knee models were created on the basis of knee geometry from the Open Knee project. We reduced the thickness of medial cartilages in the intact knee model by approximately 50% to obtain a medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) model. Two variants of medial knee OA model with congruent and incongruent contact surfaces were analysed to investigate the influence of congruency. A nonlinear static analysis for one compressive load case was performed. The focus of the study was the influence of cartilage degeneration on meniscal extrusion and the values of the contact forces and contact areas. In the model with incongruent contact surfaces, we observed maximal compressive stress on the tibial plateau. In this model, the value of medial meniscus external shift was 95.3% greater, while the contact area between the tibial cartilage and medial meniscus was 50% lower than in the congruent contact surfaces model. After the non-uniform reduction of cartilage thickness, the medial meniscus carried only 48.4% of load in the medial compartment in comparison to 71.2% in the healthy knee model. We have shown that the change in articular cartilage geometry may significantly reduce the role of meniscus in load transmission and the contact area between the meniscus and cartilage. Additionally, medial knee OA may increase the risk of meniscal extrusion in the medial compartment of the knee joint.

  6. Statics of historic masonry constructions

    CERN Document Server

    Como, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Masonry constructions are the great majority of the buildings in Europe’s historic centres and the most important monuments of its architectural heritage. Given the age of these constructions, the demand for safety assessments and restoration projects is pressing and constant; still within the broad studies in the subject it is not yet recognised, in particular within the seismic area, a unitary approach to deal with Masonry structures. This successful book contributes to clarify the issues with a rigorous approach offering a comprehensive new Statics of Masonry Constructions. This third edition has been driven by some recent developments of the research in the field, and it gives the fundamentals of Statics with an original and rigorous mathematical formulation, further in-depth inquired in this new version. With many refinements and improvements, the book investigates the static behaviour of many historic monuments, such as the Gothic Cathedrals, the Mycenaean Tholoi, the Pantheon, the Colosseum, the dome...

  7. Analysis on Biomechanical Characteristics of Post-operational Vertebral C5-C6 Segments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heqiang Tian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Both anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF and artificial cervical disc replacement (ACDR have obvious advantages in the treatment of cervical spondylosis. To analyze the operation results, it is absolutely necessary to study the biomechanics of the movement range of post-operational vertebral C5-C6 segments, especially the biomechanical characteristics in cervical tissues in actual movements. In this study, using the human vertebral 3D graph gained by imaging diagnosis (CT, a vertebral solid model is established by the 3D reconstruction algorithm and reverse engineering technology. After that, with cervical soft tissue structure added to the solid model and set with a joint contact mechanism, a finite element model with a complete, accurate cervical C5-C6 kinematic unit is constructed, based on relevant physiological anatomical knowledge. This model includes vertebral segments, an intervertebral disc, ligament and zygopophysis in the cervical C5-C6 kinematic unit. In the created vertebral finite element model, the model is amended, referring to ACDF and ACDR, and the load and constraint are applied to a normal group, a fusion group and a displacement group, so as to analyze the biomechanical characteristics of the cervical vertebra after ACDF and ACDR. By comparing the finite element simulation results of different surgeries, this paper is intended to evaluate the functions and biomechanical behaviors of the post-operational vertebra, and explore the influence of the operation on the biomechanical stability of the cervical vertebra. This will provide theoretical guidance for implementation and optimization of ACDF and ACDR.

  8. Transosseous-equivalent rotator cuff repair: a systematic review on the biomechanical importance of tying the medial row.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, Nathan A; Lee, Andrew S; Chahal, Jaskarndip; Van Thiel, Geoffrey S; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N; Cole, Brian J

    2013-02-01

    Double-row and transosseous-equivalent repair techniques have shown greater strength and improved healing than single-row techniques. The purpose of this study was to determine whether tying of the medial-row sutures provides added stability during biomechanical testing of a transosseous-equivalent rotator cuff repair. We performed a systematic review of studies directly comparing biomechanical differences. Five studies met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Of the 5 studies, 4 showed improved biomechanical properties with tying the medial-row anchors before bringing the sutures laterally to the lateral-row anchors, whereas the remaining study showed no difference in contact pressure, mean failure load, or gap formation with a standard suture bridge with knots tied at the medial row compared with knotless repairs. The results of this systematic review and quantitative synthesis indicate that the biomechanical factors ultimate load, stiffness, gap formation, and contact area are significantly improved when medial knots are tied as part of a transosseous-equivalent suture bridge construct compared with knotless constructs. Further studies comparing the clinical healing rates and functional outcomes between medial knotted and knotless repair techniques are needed. This review indicates that biomechanical factors are improved when the medial row of a transosseous-equivalent rotator cuff is tied compared with a knotless repair. However, this has not been definitively proven to translate to improved healing rates clinically. Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Static dipole polarizabilities of Scn (n ≤ 15) clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi-Bo, Li; Jiang-Shan, Luo; Wei-Dong, Wu; Yong-Jian, Tang; Hong-Yan, Wang; Yun-Dong, Guo

    2009-01-01

    The static dipole polarizabilities of scandium clusters with up to 15 atoms are determined by using the numerically finite field method in the framework of density functional theory. The electronic effects on the polarizabilities are investigated for the scandium clusters. We examine a large highest occupied molecular orbital — the lowest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO–LUMO) gap of a scandium cluster usually corresponds to a large dipole moment. The static polarizability per atom decreases slowly and exhibits local minimum with increasing cluster size. The polarizability anisotropy and the ratio of mean static polarizability to the HOMO–LUMO gap can also reflect the cluster stability. The polarizability of the scandium cluster is partially related to the HOMO–LUMO gap and is also dependent on geometrical characteristics. A strong correlation between the polarizability and ionization energy is observed. (atomic and molecular physics)

  10. Role of Aquaporin 0 in lens biomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sindhu Kumari, S.; Gupta, Neha [Physiology and Biophysics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Shiels, Alan [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); FitzGerald, Paul G. [Cell Biology and Human Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Menon, Anil G. [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Mathias, Richard T. [Physiology and Biophysics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); SUNY Eye Institute, NY (United States); Varadaraj, Kulandaiappan, E-mail: kulandaiappan.varadaraj@stonybrook.edu [Physiology and Biophysics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); SUNY Eye Institute, NY (United States)

    2015-07-10

    Maintenance of proper biomechanics of the eye lens is important for its structural integrity and for the process of accommodation to focus near and far objects. Several studies have shown that specialized cytoskeletal systems such as the beaded filament (BF) and spectrin-actin networks contribute to mammalian lens biomechanics; mutations or deletion in these proteins alters lens biomechanics. Aquaporin 0 (AQP0), which constitutes ∼45% of the total membrane proteins of lens fiber cells, has been shown to function as a water channel and a structural cell-to-cell adhesion (CTCA) protein. Our recent ex vivo study on AQP0 knockout (AQP0 KO) mouse lenses showed the CTCA function of AQP0 could be crucial for establishing the refractive index gradient. However, biomechanical studies on the role of AQP0 are lacking. The present investigation used wild type (WT), AQP5 KO (AQP5{sup −/−}), AQP0 KO (heterozygous KO: AQP0{sup +/−}; homozygous KO: AQP0{sup −/−}; all in C57BL/6J) and WT-FVB/N mouse lenses to learn more about the role of fiber cell AQPs in lens biomechanics. Electron microscopic images exhibited decreases in lens fiber cell compaction and increases in extracellular space due to deletion of even one allele of AQP0. Biomechanical assay revealed that loss of one or both alleles of AQP0 caused a significant reduction in the compressive load-bearing capacity of the lenses compared to WT lenses. Conversely, loss of AQP5 did not alter the lens load-bearing ability. Compressive load-bearing at the suture area of AQP0{sup +/−} lenses showed easy separation while WT lens suture remained intact. These data from KO mouse lenses in conjunction with previous studies on lens-specific BF proteins (CP49 and filensin) suggest that AQP0 and BF proteins could act co-operatively in establishing normal lens biomechanics. We hypothesize that AQP0, with its prolific expression at the fiber cell membrane, could provide anchorage for cytoskeletal structures like BFs and

  11. Influence of biomechanical characteristics on pain and function outcomes from exercise in medial knee osteoarthritis and varus malalignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennell, Kim L.; Dobson, Fiona; Roos, Ewa M.

    2015-01-01

    and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index). Candidate biomechanical characteristics measured at baseline included: i) visually-observed varus thrust during walking; ii) obesity determined by body mass index; iii) static varus alignment; and iv) isometric quadriceps strength. Data were analysed...... between type of exercise and both varus thrust (p=0.001) and obesity (p=0.023). Neuromuscular exercise was more effective for non-obese participants (mean(95%CI) change=29.5(20.5-38.5)mm) and for those with a varus thrust (mean change=28.7(19.4-38.1)mm), whereas quadriceps strengthening was more effective...... for obese people (mean change=24.7(14.9-34.4)mm) and for those without a varus thrust (mean change=29.4(21.2-37.7)mm). Biomechanical characteristics did not influence the effect of exercise on physical function (p>0.05). Conclusions: These preliminary findings suggest varus thrust and obesity influence...

  12. Biomechanical Analysis of an Expandable Lumbar Interbody Spacer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano-Baron, Hector; Newcomb, Anna G U S; Malhotra, Devika; Palma, Atilio E; Martinez-Del-Campo, Eduardo; Crawford, Neil R; Theodore, Nicholas; Kelly, Brian P; Kaibara, Taro

    2018-06-01

    Recently developed expandable interbody spacers are widely accepted in spinal surgery; however, the resulting biomechanical effects of their use have not yet been fully studied. We analyzed the biomechanical effects of an expandable polyetheretherketone interbody spacer inserted through a bilateral posterior approach with and without different modalities of posterior augmentation. Biomechanical nondestructive flexibility testing was performed in 7 human cadaveric lumbar (L2-L5) specimens followed by axial compressive loading. Each specimen was tested under 6 conditions: 1) intact, 2) bilateral L3-L4 cortical screw/rod (CSR) alone, 3) WaveD alone, 4) WaveD + CSR, 5) WaveD + bilateral L3-L4 pedicle screw/rod (PSR), and 6) WaveD + CSR/PSR, where CSR/PSR was a hybrid construct comprising bilateral cortical-level L3 and pedicle-level L4 screws interconnected by rods. The range of motion (ROM) with the interbody spacer alone decreased significantly compared with the intact condition during flexion-extension (P = 0.02) but not during lateral bending or axial rotation (P ≥ 0.19). The addition of CSR or PSR to the interbody spacer alone condition significantly decreased the ROM compared with the interbody spacer alone (P ≤ 0.002); and WaveD + CSR, WaveD + PSR, and WaveD + CSR/PSR (hybrid) (P ≥ 0.29) did not differ. The axial compressive stiffness (resistance to change in foraminal height during compressive loading) with the interbody spacer alone did not differ from the intact condition (P = 0.96), whereas WaveD + posterior instrumentation significantly increased compressive stiffness compared with the intact condition and the interbody spacer alone (P ≤ 0.001). The WaveD alone significantly reduced ROM during flexion-extension while maintaining the axial compressive stiffness. CSR, PSR, and CSR/PSR hybrid constructs were all effective in augmenting the expandable interbody spacer system and improving its stability. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All

  13. Role of biomechanics in the understanding of normal, injured, and healing ligaments and tendons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Ho-Joong

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ligaments and tendons are soft connective tissues which serve essential roles for biomechanical function of the musculoskeletal system by stabilizing and guiding the motion of diarthrodial joints. Nevertheless, these tissues are frequently injured due to repetition and overuse as well as quick cutting motions that involve acceleration and deceleration. These injuries often upset this balance between mobility and stability of the joint which causes damage to other soft tissues manifested as pain and other morbidity, such as osteoarthritis. The healing of ligament and tendon injuries varies from tissue to tissue. Tendinopathies are ubiquitous and can take up to 12 months for the pain to subside before one could return to normal activity. A ruptured medial collateral ligament (MCL can generally heal spontaneously; however, its remodeling process takes years and its biomechanical properties remain inferior when compared to the normal MCL. It is also known that a midsubstance anterior cruciate ligament (ACL tear has limited healing capability, and reconstruction by soft tissue grafts has been regularly performed to regain knee function. However, long term follow-up studies have revealed that 20–25% of patients experience unsatisfactory results. Thus, a better understanding of the function of ligaments and tendons, together with knowledge on their healing potential, may help investigators to develop novel strategies to accelerate and improve the healing process of ligaments and tendons. With thousands of new papers published in the last ten years that involve biomechanics of ligaments and tendons, there is an increasing appreciation of this subject area. Such attention has positively impacted clinical practice. On the other hand, biomechanical data are complex in nature, and there is a danger of misinterpreting them. Thus, in these review, we will provide the readers with a brief overview of ligaments and tendons and refer them to

  14. Role of biomechanics in the understanding of normal, injured, and healing ligaments and tendons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ho-Joong; Fisher, Matthew B; Woo, Savio L-Y

    2009-01-01

    Ligaments and tendons are soft connective tissues which serve essential roles for biomechanical function of the musculoskeletal system by stabilizing and guiding the motion of diarthrodial joints. Nevertheless, these tissues are frequently injured due to repetition and overuse as well as quick cutting motions that involve acceleration and deceleration. These injuries often upset this balance between mobility and stability of the joint which causes damage to other soft tissues manifested as pain and other morbidity, such as osteoarthritis. The healing of ligament and tendon injuries varies from tissue to tissue. Tendinopathies are ubiquitous and can take up to 12 months for the pain to subside before one could return to normal activity. A ruptured medial collateral ligament (MCL) can generally heal spontaneously; however, its remodeling process takes years and its biomechanical properties remain inferior when compared to the normal MCL. It is also known that a midsubstance anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear has limited healing capability, and reconstruction by soft tissue grafts has been regularly performed to regain knee function. However, long term follow-up studies have revealed that 20–25% of patients experience unsatisfactory results. Thus, a better understanding of the function of ligaments and tendons, together with knowledge on their healing potential, may help investigators to develop novel strategies to accelerate and improve the healing process of ligaments and tendons. With thousands of new papers published in the last ten years that involve biomechanics of ligaments and tendons, there is an increasing appreciation of this subject area. Such attention has positively impacted clinical practice. On the other hand, biomechanical data are complex in nature, and there is a danger of misinterpreting them. Thus, in these review, we will provide the readers with a brief overview of ligaments and tendons and refer them to appropriate methodologies used to

  15. Static Analysis for Systems Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis; Rosa, D. Schuch da

    2004-01-01

    This paper shows how static analysis techniques can help understanding biological systems. Based on a simple example we illustrate the outcome of performing three different analyses extracting information of increasing precision. We conclude by reporting on the potential impact and exploitation o...... of these techniques in systems biology....

  16. Static Verification for Code Contracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fähndrich, Manuel

    The Code Contracts project [3] at Microsoft Research enables programmers on the .NET platform to author specifications in existing languages such as C# and VisualBasic. To take advantage of these specifications, we provide tools for documentation generation, runtime contract checking, and static contract verification.

  17. Static Analysis for Dynamic XML

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Aske Simon; Møller, Anders; Schwartzbach, Michael Ignatieff

    2002-01-01

    We describe the summary graph lattice for dataflow analysis of programs that dynamically construct XML documents. Summary graphs have successfully been used to provide static guarantees in the JWIG language for programming interactive Web services. In particular, the JWIG compiler is able to check...

  18. Static Analysis of Functional Programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Klaas; van den Broek, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, the static analysis of programs in the functional programming language Miranda is described based on two graph models. A new control-flow graph model of Miranda definitions is presented, and a model with four classes of caligraphs. Standard software metrics are applicable to these

  19. [The biomechanics of hyperextension injuries of the subaxial cervical spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, G; Meyer, C; Ingenhoff, L; Bredow, J; Müller, L P; Eysel, P; Schiffer, G

    2017-07-01

    Hyperextension injuries of the subaxial cervical spine are potentially hazardous due to relevant destabilization. Depending on the clinical condition, neurologic or vascular damage may occur. Therefore an exact knowledge of the factors leading to destabilization is essential. In a biomechanical investigation, 10 fresh human cadaver cervical spine specimens were tested in a spine simulator. The tested segments were C4 to 7. In the first step, physiologic motion was investigated. Afterwards, the three steps of injury were dissection of the anterior longitudinal ligament, removal of the intervertebral disc/posterior longitudinal ligament, and dissection of the interspinous ligaments/ligamentum flavum. After each step, the mobility was determined. Regarding flexion and extension, an increase in motion of 8.36 % after the first step, 90.45 % after the second step, and 121.67 % after the last step was observed. Testing of lateral bending showed an increase of mobility of 7.88 %/27.48 %/33.23 %; axial rotation increased by 2.87 %/31.16 %/45.80 %. Isolated dissection of the anterior longitudinal ligament led to minor destabilization, whereas the intervertebral disc has to be seen as a major stabilizer of the cervical spine. Few finite-element studies showed comparable results. If a transfer to clinical use is undertaken, an isolated rupture of the anterior longitudinal ligament can be treated without surgical stabilization.

  20. Biomedical Imaging and Computational Modeling in Biomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Iacoviello, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    This book collects the state-of-art and new trends in image analysis and biomechanics. It covers a wide field of scientific and cultural topics, ranging from remodeling of bone tissue under the mechanical stimulus up to optimizing the performance of sports equipment, through the patient-specific modeling in orthopedics, microtomography and its application in oral and implant research, computational modeling in the field of hip prostheses, image based model development and analysis of the human knee joint, kinematics of the hip joint, micro-scale analysis of compositional and mechanical properties of dentin, automated techniques for cervical cell image analysis, and iomedical imaging and computational modeling in cardiovascular disease.   The book will be of interest to researchers, Ph.D students, and graduate students with multidisciplinary interests related to image analysis and understanding, medical imaging, biomechanics, simulation and modeling, experimental analysis.

  1. Cervical spondylosis anatomy: pathophysiology and biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedid, Daniel; Benzel, Edward C

    2007-01-01

    Cervical spondylosis is the most common progressive disorder in the aging cervical spine. It results from the process of degeneration of the intervertebral discs and facet joints of the cervical spine. Biomechanically, the disc and the facets are the connecting structures between the vertebrae for the transmission of external forces. They also facilitate cervical spine mobility. Symptoms related to myelopathy and radiculopathy are caused by the formation of osteophytes, which compromise the diameter of the spinal canal. This compromise may also be partially developmental. The developmental process, together with the degenerative process, may cause mechanical pressure on the spinal cord at one or multiple levels. This pressure may produce direct neurological damage or ischemic changes and, thus, lead to spinal cord disturbances. A thorough understanding of the biomechanics, the pathology, the clinical presentation, the radiological evaluation, as well as the surgical indications of cervical spondylosis, is essential for the management of patients with cervical spondylosis.

  2. Biomechanical implications of lumbar spinal ligament transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Forell, Gregory A; Bowden, Anton E

    2014-11-01

    Many lumbar spine surgeries either intentionally or inadvertently damage or transect spinal ligaments. The purpose of this work was to quantify the previously unknown biomechanical consequences of isolated spinal ligament transection on the remaining spinal ligaments (stress transfer), vertebrae (bone remodelling stimulus) and intervertebral discs (disc pressure) of the lumbar spine. A finite element model of the full lumbar spine was developed and validated against experimental data and tested in the primary modes of spinal motion in the intact condition. Once a ligament was removed, stress increased in the remaining spinal ligaments and changes occurred in vertebral strain energy, but disc pressure remained similar. All major biomechanical changes occurred at the same spinal level as the transected ligament, with minor changes at adjacent levels. This work demonstrates that iatrogenic damage to spinal ligaments disturbs the load sharing within the spinal ligament network and may induce significant clinically relevant changes in the spinal motion segment.

  3. Biomechanics/risk management (Working Group 2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanz, Mariano; Naert, Ignace; Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The remit of this workgroup was to update the existing knowledge base in biomechanical factors, navigation systems and medications that may affect the outcome of implant therapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The literature was systematically searched and critically reviewed. Five manuscripts...... were produced in five specific topics identified as areas where innovative approaches have been developed in biomechanical factors, navigation systems and medications that may affect the outcome of implant therapy. RESULTS: The results and conclusions of the review process are presented...... survival and complications of implant supported restorations? * A systematic review on the accuracy and the clinical outcome of computer-guided template based implant dentistry. * What is the impact of systemic bisphosphonates on patients undergoing oral implant therapy? * What is the impact...

  4. Biomechanical evaluation of native acromioclavicular joint ligaments and two reconstruction techniques in the presence of the sternoclavicular joint: A cadaver study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masionis, Povilas; Šatkauskas, Igoris; Mikelevičius, Vytautas; Ryliškis, Sigitas; Bučinskas, Vytautas; Griškevičius, Julius; Martin Oliva, Xavier; Monzó Planella, Mariano; Porvaneckas, Narūnas; Uvarovas, Valentinas

    2017-01-01

    Where is over 100 reconstruction techniques described for acromioclavicular (AC) joint reconstruction. Although, it is not clear whether the presence of the sternoclavicular (SC) joint influences the biomechanical properties of native AC ligaments and reconstruction techniques. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the biomechanical properties of native AC joint ligaments and two reconstruction techniques in cadavers with the SC joint still present. We tested eight fresh-frozen cadaver hemithoraces for superior translation (70 N load) and translation increment after 1000 cycles (loading from 20 to 70 N) in a controlled laboratory study. There were three testing groups created: native ligaments, the single coracoclavicular loop (SCL) technique, and the two coracoclavicular loops (TCL) technique. Superior translation was measured after static loading. Translation increment was calculated as the difference between superior translation after cyclic and static loading. Native AC ligaments showed significantly lower translation than the SCL ( p = 0.023) and TCL ( p = 0.046) groups. The SCL had a significantly lower translation increment than native AC ligaments ( p = 0.028). There was no significant difference between reconstruction techniques in terms of translation ( p = 0.865) and translation increment ( p = 0.113). Native AC joint ligaments had better static properties than both reconstruction techniques and worse dynamic biomechanical properties than the SCL technique. The SCL technique appeared to be more secure than the TCL technique. The presence of the SC joint did not have an observable influence on test results.

  5. Numerical Simulation of Some Biomechanical Problems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nedoma, Jiří; Klézl, Z.; Fousek, J.; Kestřánek, Zdeněk; Stehlík, J.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 61, 3-6 (2003), s. 283-295 ISSN 0378-4754. [MODELLING 2001. IMACS Conference on Mathematical Modelling and Computational Methods in Mechanics, Physics , Biomechanics and Geodynamics /2./. Pilsen, 19.06.2001-25.06.2001] Institutional research plan: AV0Z1030915 Keywords : non-linear elasticity * contact problems * variational inequality * finite element method * wrist * spine * fracture Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.558, year: 2003

  6. Analysis of Biomechanical Factors in Bend Running

    OpenAIRE

    Bing Zhang; Xinping You; Feng Li

    2013-01-01

    Sprint running is the demonstration of comprehensive abilities of technology and tactics, under various conditions. However, whether it is just to allocate the tracks for short-distance athletes from different racetracks has been the hot topic. This study analyzes its forces, differences in different tracks and winding influences, in the aspects of sport biomechanics. The results indicate, many disadvantages exist in inner tracks, middle tracks are the best and outer ones are inferior to midd...

  7. Biomechanical Factors in Tibial Stress Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-08-01

    Relationship between Loading Rates and Tibial Accelerometry in Forefoot Strike Runners. Presented at the Annual American Society of Biomechanics Mtg...of the APTA, Seattle, WA, 2/99. McClay, IS, Williams, DS, and Manal, KT. Lower Extremity Mechanics of Runners with a Converted Forefoot Strike ...Management, Inc, 1998-1999 The Effect of Different Orthotic Devices on Lower Extremity Mechanics of Rearfoot and Forefoot Strikers, $3,500. Foot Management

  8. Injury Biomechanics of C2 Dens Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank; Baisden, Jamie; Gennarelli, Thomas; Maiman, Dennis

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the biomechanics of dens fractures of the second cervical vertebra in the adult population due to motor vehicle crashes. Case-by-case records from the Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network (CIREN) and National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) databases were used. Variables such as change in velocity, impact direction and body habitus were extracted. Results indicated that similarities exist in the two databases despite differences in sampling...

  9. Computational Biomechanics Theoretical Background and BiologicalBiomedical Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Masao; Nakamura, Masanori

    2012-01-01

    Rapid developments have taken place in biological/biomedical measurement and imaging technologies as well as in computer analysis and information technologies. The increase in data obtained with such technologies invites the reader into a virtual world that represents realistic biological tissue or organ structures in digital form and allows for simulation and what is called “in silico medicine.” This volume is the third in a textbook series and covers both the basics of continuum mechanics of biosolids and biofluids and the theoretical core of computational methods for continuum mechanics analyses. Several biomechanics problems are provided for better understanding of computational modeling and analysis. Topics include the mechanics of solid and fluid bodies, fundamental characteristics of biosolids and biofluids, computational methods in biomechanics analysis/simulation, practical problems in orthopedic biomechanics, dental biomechanics, ophthalmic biomechanics, cardiovascular biomechanics, hemodynamics...

  10. Advanced Computational Methods in Bio-Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Qahtani, Waleed M S; El-Anwar, Mohamed I

    2018-04-15

    A novel partnership between surgeons and machines, made possible by advances in computing and engineering technology, could overcome many of the limitations of traditional surgery. By extending surgeons' ability to plan and carry out surgical interventions more accurately and with fewer traumas, computer-integrated surgery (CIS) systems could help to improve clinical outcomes and the efficiency of healthcare delivery. CIS systems could have a similar impact on surgery to that long since realised in computer-integrated manufacturing. Mathematical modelling and computer simulation have proved tremendously successful in engineering. Computational mechanics has enabled technological developments in virtually every area of our lives. One of the greatest challenges for mechanists is to extend the success of computational mechanics to fields outside traditional engineering, in particular to biology, the biomedical sciences, and medicine. Biomechanics has significant potential for applications in orthopaedic industry, and the performance arts since skills needed for these activities are visibly related to the human musculoskeletal and nervous systems. Although biomechanics is widely used nowadays in the orthopaedic industry to design orthopaedic implants for human joints, dental parts, external fixations and other medical purposes, numerous researches funded by billions of dollars are still running to build a new future for sports and human healthcare in what is called biomechanics era.

  11. Scleral Biomechanics in the Aging Monkey Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Michaël J. A.; Suh, J-K. Francis; Bottlang, Michael; Burgoyne, Claude F.; Downs, J. Crawford

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the age-related differences in the inhomogeneous, anisotropic, nonlinear biomechanical properties of posterior sclera from old (22.9 ± 5.3 years) and young (1.5 ± 0.7 years) rhesus monkeys. Methods The posterior scleral shell of each eye was mounted on a custom-built pressurization apparatus, then intraocular pressure (IOP) was elevated from 5 to 45 mmHg while the 3D displacements of the scleral surface were measured using speckle interferometry. Each scleral shell geometry was digitally reconstructed from data generated by a 3D digitizer (topography) and 20 MHz ultrasounds (thickness). An inverse finite element (FE) method incorporating a fiber-reinforced constitutive model was used to extract a unique set of biomechanical properties for each eye. Displacements, thickness, stress, strain, tangent modulus, structural stiffness, and preferred collagen fiber orientation were mapped for each posterior sclera. Results The model yielded 3-D deformations of posterior sclera that matched well with those observed experimentally. The posterior sclera exhibited inhomogeneous, anisotropic, nonlinear mechanical behavior. The sclera was significantly thinner (p = 0.038), and tangent modulus and structural stiffness were significantly higher in old monkeys (p biomechanics, and potentially contribute to age-related susceptibility to glaucomatous vision loss. PMID:19494203

  12. Current Biomechanical Concepts for Rotator Cuff Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    For the past few decades, the repair of rotator cuff tears has evolved significantly with advances in arthroscopy techniques, suture anchors and instrumentation. From the biomechanical perspective, the focus in arthroscopic repair has been on increasing fixation strength and restoration of the footprint contact characteristics to provide early rehabilitation and improve healing. To accomplish these objectives, various repair strategies and construct configurations have been developed for rotator cuff repair with the understanding that many factors contribute to the structural integrity of the repaired construct. These include repaired rotator cuff tendon-footprint motion, increased tendon-footprint contact area and pressure, and tissue quality of tendon and bone. In addition, the healing response may be compromised by intrinsic factors such as decreased vascularity, hypoxia, and fibrocartilaginous changes or aforementioned extrinsic compression factors. Furthermore, it is well documented that torn rotator cuff muscles have a tendency to atrophy and become subject to fatty infiltration which may affect the longevity of the repair. Despite all the aforementioned factors, initial fixation strength is an essential consideration in optimizing rotator cuff repair. Therefore, numerous biomechanical studies have focused on elucidating the strongest devices, knots, and repair configurations to improve contact characteristics for rotator cuff repair. In this review, the biomechanical concepts behind current rotator cuff repair techniques will be reviewed and discussed. PMID:23730471

  13. An introduction to biomechanics solids and fluids, analysis and design

    CERN Document Server

    Humphrey, Jay D

    2004-01-01

    Designed to meet the needs of undergraduate students, Introduction to Biomechanics takes the fresh approach of combining the viewpoints of both a well-respected teacher and a successful student. With an eye toward practicality without loss of depth of instruction, this book seeks to explain the fundamental concepts of biomechanics. With the accompanying web site providing models, sample problems, review questions and more, Introduction to Biomechanics provides students with the full range of instructional material for this complex and dynamic field.

  14. Lumbar Spine Musculoskeletal Physiology and Biomechanics During Simulated Military Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-2-0043 TITLE: Lumbar Spine Musculoskeletal Physiology and Biomechanics During Simulated Military Operations PRINCIPAL...31May2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Lumbar Spine Musculoskeletal Physiology and Biomechanics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER During Simulated Military Operations 5b... Biomechanics , Cincinnati, 2015. § Website(s) or other Internet site(s) § Nothing to report § Technologies or techniques § Nothing to report

  15. A comparative study of the effect of soft and hard cervical collars on static postural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoo Khalkhali Zavieh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground and Aim: Using cervical collars is one of the treatment methods for releaving cervical pain. The effect of limb orthotics on proprioception and postural stability has been suggested. There is not sufficient studies about the effect of cervical collars on static and dynamic stability, and the effect of soft and hard collars have not been compared with one another. The objective of this study is investigating and comparing the immediate effect of soft and hard cervical collars on static postural stability in healthy young subjects. Methods & Materials: In standing position on firm surface with closed eyes, both soft and hard collars decreased the stability and there was not any significant difference among collars. In standing positions on soft surface with closed and opened eyes, using none of the soft and hard collars did not change the stability. This quasi experimental study through repeated measure method has been conducted on 65 healthy young male and female college students. Static stability was evaluated by modified Clinical Test for Sensory Interaction and Balance (CTSIB in conditions without collar and by soft and hard cervical collars and were compared between the conditions. Results: Conclusion: Our results suggest that in static conditions, without vision, both collars decrease the stability in healthy young subjects. So considering the evaluation of stability and prevention of balance disturbance during the collar prescription seems to be necessary.

  16. Static Behaviour of Bucket Foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kim André

    One new foundation concept in relation to offshore wind turbines is bucket foundations. The concept is known from the oil and gas industry, though the load conditions here are significantly different. The bucket foundation can be used as monopod or e.g. tripod foundations for offshore wind turbines....... The monopod concept is investigated in this thesis, regarding the static behaviour from loads relevant to offshore wind turbines. The main issue in this concept is the rotational stiffness of the foundation and the combined capacity dominated by moments. The vertical bearing capacity of bucket foundations...... theory is proposed. The proposed expression applies to plane strain as well as axis-symmetric stress conditions for foundations with smooth or rough bases. A thorough experimental investigation of the static behaviour of bucket foundations subjected to combined loading is carried out. Laboratory tests...

  17. Size scaling of static friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, O M; Manini, Nicola; Tosatti, Erio

    2013-02-22

    Sliding friction across a thin soft lubricant film typically occurs by stick slip, the lubricant fully solidifying at stick, yielding and flowing at slip. The static friction force per unit area preceding slip is known from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to decrease with increasing contact area. That makes the large-size fate of stick slip unclear and unknown; its possible vanishing is important as it would herald smooth sliding with a dramatic drop of kinetic friction at large size. Here we formulate a scaling law of the static friction force, which for a soft lubricant is predicted to decrease as f(m)+Δf/A(γ) for increasing contact area A, with γ>0. Our main finding is that the value of f(m), controlling the survival of stick slip at large size, can be evaluated by simulations of comparably small size. MD simulations of soft lubricant sliding are presented, which verify this theory.

  18. Statics of historic masonry constructions

    CERN Document Server

    Como, Mario

    2016-01-01

    This successful book, which is now appearing in its second edition, presents a comprehensive new Statics of Masonry Constructions. Masonry constructions are the great majority of the buildings in Europe’s historic centres and the most important monuments in its architectural heritage. Given the age of these constructions, the demand for safety assessments and restoration projects is pressing and constant. The book you hold in hands contributes to fill this demand. The second edition integrates the original text of the first edition with new developments, widening and revisions, due to recent research studies achievements. The result is a book that gives a complete picture of the behaviour of the Masonry Constructions. First of all, it gives the fundamentals of its Statics, based on the no-tension assumption, and then it develops the Limit Analysis for the Masonry Constructions. In this framework, through an interdisciplinary approach combining Engineering and Architecture, the book also investigates the sta...

  19. Water cooled static pressure probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagen, Nicholas T. (Inventor); Eves, John W. (Inventor); Reece, Garland D. (Inventor); Geissinger, Steve L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved static pressure probe containing a water cooling mechanism is disclosed. This probe has a hollow interior containing a central coolant tube and multiple individual pressure measurement tubes connected to holes placed on the exterior. Coolant from the central tube symmetrically immerses the interior of the probe, allowing it to sustain high temperature (in the region of 2500 F) supersonic jet flow indefinitely, while still recording accurate pressure data. The coolant exits the probe body by way of a reservoir attached to the aft of the probe. The pressure measurement tubes are joined to a single, larger manifold in the reservoir. This manifold is attached to a pressure transducer that records the average static pressure.

  20. Precipitation-Static-Reduction Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1943-03-31

    if» 85 z \\ PRECIPITATION-STATIC-REDUCTION RESEARCH study of the effects of flame length , flame spacing, and burner spacing on B shows that there...unod: Flame length *. The visual length of the flame from the burner tip to the flame tip when examined in a darkened room against a black background...Postlve and Negative Flames The use of the second flame-conduction coefficient, B, facilitates considerably the study of the effect of flame length , spacing

  1. Static and Dynamic Membrane Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergiu Ivanov

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available While originally P systems were defined to contain multiset rewriting rules, it turned out that considering different types of rules may produce important results, such as increasing the computational power of the rules. This paper focuses on factoring out the concept of a membrane structure out of various P system models with the goal of providing useful formalisations. Both static and dynamic membrane structures are considered.

  2. Biomechanics of subcellular structures by non-invasive Brillouin microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonacci, Giuseppe; Braakman, Sietse

    2016-11-01

    Cellular biomechanics play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of several diseases. Unfortunately, current methods to measure biomechanical properties are invasive and mostly limited to the surface of a cell. As a result, the mechanical behaviour of subcellular structures and organelles remains poorly characterised. Here, we show three-dimensional biomechanical images of single cells obtained with non-invasive, non-destructive Brillouin microscopy with an unprecedented spatial resolution. Our results quantify the longitudinal elastic modulus of subcellular structures. In particular, we found the nucleoli to be stiffer than both the nuclear envelope (p biomechanics and its role in pathophysiology.

  3. An Evidence-Based Videotaped Running Biomechanics Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Richard B

    2016-02-01

    Running biomechanics play an important role in the development of injuries. Performing a running biomechanics analysis on injured runners can help to develop treatment strategies. This article provides a framework for a systematic video-based running biomechanics analysis plan based on the current evidence on running injuries, using 2-dimensional (2D) video and readily available tools. Fourteen measurements are proposed in this analysis plan from lateral and posterior video. Identifying simple 2D surrogates for 3D biomechanic variables of interest allows for widespread translation of best practices, and have the best opportunity to impact the highly prevalent problem of the injured runner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Harnessing biomechanics to develop cartilage regeneration strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, Kyriacos A; Responte, Donald J; Brown, Wendy E; Hu, Jerry C

    2015-02-01

    As this review was prepared specifically for the American Society of Mechanical Engineers H.R. Lissner Medal, it primarily discusses work toward cartilage regeneration performed in Dr. Kyriacos A. Athanasiou's laboratory over the past 25 years. The prevalence and severity of degeneration of articular cartilage, a tissue whose main function is largely biomechanical, have motivated the development of cartilage tissue engineering approaches informed by biomechanics. This article provides a review of important steps toward regeneration of articular cartilage with suitable biomechanical properties. As a first step, biomechanical and biochemical characterization studies at the tissue level were used to provide design criteria for engineering neotissues. Extending this work to the single cell and subcellular levels has helped to develop biochemical and mechanical stimuli for tissue engineering studies. This strong mechanobiological foundation guided studies on regenerating hyaline articular cartilage, the knee meniscus, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) fibrocartilage. Initial tissue engineering efforts centered on developing biodegradable scaffolds for cartilage regeneration. After many years of studying scaffold-based cartilage engineering, scaffoldless approaches were developed to address deficiencies of scaffold-based systems, resulting in the self-assembling process. This process was further improved by employing exogenous stimuli, such as hydrostatic pressure, growth factors, and matrix-modifying and catabolic agents, both singly and in synergistic combination to enhance neocartilage functional properties. Due to the high cell needs for tissue engineering and the limited supply of native articular chondrocytes, costochondral cells are emerging as a suitable cell source. Looking forward, additional cell sources are investigated to render these technologies more translatable. For example, dermis isolated adult stem (DIAS) cells show potential as a source of

  5. A pilot study of biomechanical assessment before and after an integrative training program for adolescents with juvenile fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Susan T; Thomas, Staci; DiCesare, Christopher; Pfeiffer, Megan; Sil, Soumitri; Ting, Tracy V; Williams, Sara E; Myer, Gregory D; Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita

    2016-07-22

    Adolescents with juvenile fibromyalgia (JFM) tend to be very sedentary and avoid participation in physical activity. A prior study suggested that JFM patients show altered biomechanics compared to healthy adolescents which may make them more prone to pain/injury during exercise. A new intervention combining well established cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) techniques with specialized neuromuscular exercise -Fibromyalgia Integrative Training for Teens (FIT Teens) was developed and shown to be promising in improving functioning in adolescents with JFM. In contrast to traditional exercise programs such as aerobic or resistance training, neuromuscular training is a tailored approach which targets gait, posture, balance and movement mechanics which form the foundation for safe exercise participation with reduced risk for injury or pain (and hence more tolerable by JFM patients). The aim of this pilot feasibility study was to establish whether objective biomechanical assessment including sophisticated 3-D motion analysis would be useful in measuring improvements in strength, balance, gait, and functional performance after participation in the 8-week FIT Teens program. Eleven female participants with JFM (ages 12-18 years) completed pre- and post-treatment assessments of biomechanics, including walking gait analysis, lower extremity strength assessment, functional performance, and dynamic postural stability. Descriptive data indicated that mechanics of walking gait and functional performance appeared to improve after treatment. Hip abduction strength and dynamic postural control also demonstrated improvements bilaterally. Overall, the results of this pilot study offer initial evidence for the utility of biomechanical assessment to objectively demonstrate observable changes in biomechanical performance after an integrated training intervention for youth with JFM. If replicated in larger controlled studies, findings would suggest that through the FIT Teens intervention

  6. Homotheties of cylindrically symmetric static spacetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qadir, A.; Ziad, M.; Sharif, M.

    1998-08-01

    In this note we consider the homotheties of cylindrically symmetric static spacetimes. We find that we can provide a complete list of all metrics that admit non-trivial homothetic motions and are cylindrically symmetric static. (author)

  7. Biomechanical considerations in slipped capital femoral epiphysis and insights into prophylactic fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, E; Bellemore, J M; Cheng, T; Little, D G; Birke, O

    2017-04-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is a deformity of the proximal femur secondary to widened and unstable physis. In stabilising the slip, gold standard treatments stop growth and involve premature physeal closure, which prevents the remodelling of the acquired deformity and creates a leg length discrepancy that may be significant in younger patients. We measured the impact of placing threaded screws across the proximal femoral physis by measuring the centre-trochanteric distance (CTD) and articulo-trochanteric distance (ATD) in participants with or without prophylactic fixation. We then compared the mechanical performance of static (stainless and titanium cannulated Synthes screws) and potentially growing implants (Synthes SCFE screw and Pega Medical Free Gliding screw) in a validated synthetic bone model. In the review of 30 non-fixed and 60 fixated hips over a mean follow-up of 1.9 years, we have noted a significant difference in pre/post CTD and ATD, as well as the change in CTD and ATD over time. In the biomechanical study, the newer implants allowing growth (Synthes SCFE screw and Pega Medical Free Gliding screw) were both shown to be at least non-inferior. The primary deformity of a SCFE in itself alters hip mechanics. Also, as confirmed in this study, there is a secondary deformity that is created by static fixation and relative trochanteric overgrowth. To help remodel mild deformities and prevent secondary trochanteric overgrowth, growing implants seem to be non-inferior to the more standard means of fixation in static testing.

  8. A Pedagogical Model of Static Friction

    OpenAIRE

    Pickett, Galen T.

    2015-01-01

    While dry Coulombic friction is an elementary topic in any standard introductory course in mechanics, the critical distinction between the kinetic and static friction forces is something that is both hard to teach and to learn. In this paper, I describe a geometric model of static friction that may help introductory students to both understand and apply the Coulomb static friction approximation.

  9. In-Flight Pitot-Static Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, John V. (Inventor); Cunningham, Kevin (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A GPS-based pitot-static calibration system uses global output-error optimization. High data rate measurements of static and total pressure, ambient air conditions, and GPS-based ground speed measurements are used to compute pitot-static pressure errors over a range of airspeed. System identification methods rapidly compute optimal pressure error models with defined confidence intervals.

  10. THERE ARE NO BIOMECHANICAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN RUNNERS CLASSIFIED BY THE FUNCTIONAL MOVEMENT SCREEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Rodrigo Ribeiro; Chaves, Shalimá Figueirêdo; Lima, Yuri Lopes; Bezerra, Márcio Almeida; Leão Almeida, Gabriel Peixoto

    2017-01-01

    Background Running has been one of the main choices of physical activity in people seeking an active lifestyle. The Functional Movement Screen (FMS™) is a screening tool that aims to discern movement competency. Purpose The purposes of this study were to compare biomechanical characteristics between two groups rated using the composite FMS™ score, and to analyze the influence of specific individual tests. The hypothesis was that the group that scored above 14 would demonstrate better performance on biomechanical tests than the group that scored below 14. Study Design Cross-Sectional Study. Methods Runners were screened using the FMS™ and were dichotomized into groups based on final score: Functional, where the subjects scored a 14 or greater (G≥14, n = 16) and dysfunctional, when the subjects scored less than 14 (G in flexibility, muscle strength, knee dynamic valgus, or myoelectric response time of the transversus abdominis and long fibular muscles. Index of asymmetry (IS) of global stability was 3.26 ± 26.79% in G≥14 and 31.72 ± 52.69% in GIn-line lunge and active straight-leg raise tests showed no significant difference between the groups (p > 0.05). Conclusions Overall, there were no biomechanical differences between the groups of runners as classified by the FMS™. In addition, in-line lunge and active strength-leg raise tests did not influence on the FMS™ final score. Level of Evidence 2b PMID:28900569

  11. [Rotator cuff repair: single- vs double-row. Clinical and biomechanical results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baums, M H; Kostuj, T; Klinger, H-M; Papalia, R

    2016-02-01

    The goal of rotator cuff repair is a high initial mechanical stability as a requirement for adequate biological recovery of the tendon-to-bone complex. Notwithstanding the significant increase in publications concerning the topic of rotator cuff repair, there are still controversies regarding surgical technique. The aim of this work is to present an overview of the recently published results of biomechanical and clinical studies on rotator cuff repair using single- and double-row techniques. The review is based on a selective literature research of PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Database on the subject of the clinical and biomechanical results of single- and double-row repair. In general, neither the biomechanical nor the clinical evidence can recommend the use of a double-row concept for the treatment for every rotator cuff tear. Only tears of more than 3 cm seem to benefit from better results on both imaging and in clinical outcome studies compared with the use of single-row techniques. Despite a significant increase in publications on the surgical treatment of rotator cuff tears in recent years, the clinical results were not significantly improved in the literature so far. Unique information and algorithms, from which the optimal treatment of this entity can be derived, are still inadequate. Because of the cost-effectiveness and the currently vague evidence, the double-row techniques cannot be generally recommended for the repair of all rotator cuff tears.

  12. Comparison of Expansive Pedicle Screw and Polymethylmethacrylate-Augmented Pedicle Screw in Osteoporotic Sheep Lumbar Vertebrae: Biomechanical and Interfacial Evaluations

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Da; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Bo; Xie, Qing-yun; Wang, Cai-ru; Liu, Jin-biao; Liao, Dong-fa; Jiang, Kai; Lei, Wei; Pan, Xian-ming

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It was reported that expansive pedicle screw (EPS) and polymethylmethacrylate-augmented pedicle screw (PMMA-PS) could be used to increase screw stability in osteoporosis. However, there are no studies comparing the two kinds of screws in vivo. Thus, we aimed to compare biomechanical and interfacial performances of EPS and PMMA-PS in osteoporotic sheep spine. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: After successful induction of osteoporotic sheep, lumbar vertebrae in each sheep were random...

  13. Static feed water electrolysis module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J. D.; Schubert, F. H.; Jensen, F. C.

    1974-01-01

    An advanced static feed water electrolysis module (SFWEM) and associated instrumentation for generating breathable O2 was developed. The system also generates a H2 byproduct for use in an air revitalization system for O2 recovery from metabolic CO2. Special attention was given to: (1) eliminating water feed compartment degassing, (2) eliminating need for zero gravity condenser/separators, (3) increasing current density capability, and (4) providing a self contained module so that operation is independent of laboratory instrumentation and complicated startup/shutdown procedures.

  14. Static stars : Some mathematical curiosities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, C.B.

    1977-01-01

    The equations of structure of static Newtonian and general relativistic stars are investigated. By using Lie group theory, it is shown that, in each case, the condition that there should exist a simple ''homologous'' family of similar solutions necessitates precisely those equations of state for the stellar matter that are usually invoked by means of extraneous physical arguments. In the relativistic case, a diagram which depicts these families is drawn, using the qualitative theory of differential equations. This vividly exhibits the nature of the general solutions, and the exceptional character of the Misner--Zapolsky solution. This diagram is contrasted with similar ones obtained by Chandrasekhar in the Newtonian case

  15. Static Analysis of Dynamic Languages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Magnus

    Dynamic programming languages are highly popular and widely used. Java- Script is often called the lingua franca of the web and it is the de facto standard for client-side web programming. On the server-side the PHP, Python and Ruby languages are prevalent. What these languages have in common...... with static type systems, such as Java and C# , but the same features are rarely available for dynamic languages such as JavaScript. The aim of this thesis is to investigate techniques for improving the tool- support for dynamic programming languages without imposing any artificial restrictions...... of new dataflow analysis techniques to tackle the nature of dynamic programming languages....

  16. Static Validation of Security Protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodei, Chiara; Buchholtz, Mikael; Degano, P.

    2005-01-01

    We methodically expand protocol narrations into terms of a process algebra in order to specify some of the checks that need to be made in a protocol. We then apply static analysis technology to develop an automatic validation procedure for protocols. Finally, we demonstrate that these techniques ...... suffice to identify several authentication flaws in symmetric and asymmetric key protocols such as Needham-Schroeder symmetric key, Otway-Rees, Yahalom, Andrew secure RPC, Needham-Schroeder asymmetric key, and Beller-Chang-Yacobi MSR...

  17. Clinical application of advances in elbow and forearm anatomy and biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Neal B

    2002-02-01

    The static and dynamic stabilizers of the elbow and forearm axis are closely interrelated in elbow and forearm unit motion and load handling. An [figure: see text] understanding of elbow and forearm anatomy is crucial to the surgeon evaluating and treating complex pathologies resulting from acute or remote trauma.

  18. Modelling biomechanics of bark patterning in grasstrees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Holly; Runions, Adam; Hobill, David; Prusinkiewicz, Przemyslaw

    2014-09-01

    Bark patterns are a visually important characteristic of trees, typically attributed to fractures occurring during secondary growth of the trunk and branches. An understanding of bark pattern formation has been hampered by insufficient information regarding the biomechanical properties of bark and the corresponding difficulties in faithfully modelling bark fractures using continuum mechanics. This study focuses on the genus Xanthorrhoea (grasstrees), which have an unusual bark-like structure composed of distinct leaf bases connected by sticky resin. Due to its discrete character, this structure is well suited for computational studies. A dynamic computational model of grasstree development was created. The model captures both the phyllotactic pattern of leaf bases during primary growth and the changes in the trunk's width during secondary growth. A biomechanical representation based on a system of masses connected by springs is used for the surface of the trunk, permitting the emergence of fractures during secondary growth to be simulated. The resulting fracture patterns were analysed statistically and compared with images of real trees. The model reproduces key features of grasstree bark patterns, including their variability, spanning elongated and reticulate forms. The patterns produced by the model have the same statistical character as those seen in real trees. The model was able to support the general hypothesis that the patterns observed in the grasstree bark-like layer may be explained in terms of mechanical fractures driven by secondary growth. Although the generality of the results is limited by the unusual structure of grasstree bark, it supports the hypothesis that bark pattern formation is primarily a biomechanical phenomenon.

  19. Head Impact Biomechanics in Women's College Soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynall, Robert C; Clark, Michael D; Grand, Erin E; Stucker, Jaclyn C; Littleton, Ashley C; Aguilar, Alain J; Petschauer, Meredith A; Teel, Elizabeth F; Mihalik, Jason P

    2016-09-01

    There are limited nonlaboratory soccer head impact biomechanics data. This is surprising given soccer's global popularity. Epidemiological data suggest that female college soccer players are at a greater concussion injury risk than their male counterparts. Therefore, the purposes of our study were to quantify head impact frequency and magnitude during women's soccer practices and games in the National Collegiate Athletic Association and to characterize these data across event type, playing position, year on the team, and segment of game (first and second halves). Head impact biomechanics were collected from female college soccer players (n = 22; mean ± SD age = 19.1 ± 0.1 yr, height = 168.0 ± 3.5 cm, mass = 63.7 ± 6.0 kg). We employed a helmetless head impact measurement device (X2 Biosystems xPatch) before each competition and practice across a single season. Peak linear and rotational accelerations were categorized based on impact magnitude and subsequently analyzed using appropriate nonparametric analyses. Overall, women's college soccer players experience approximately seven impacts per 90 min of game play. The overwhelming majority (~90%) of all head impacts were categorized into our mildest linear acceleration impact classification (10g-20g). Interestingly, a higher percentage of practice impacts in the 20g-40g range compared with games (11% vs 7%) was observed. Head impact biomechanics studies have provided valuable insights into understanding collision sports and for informing evidence-based rule and policy changes. These have included changing the football kickoff, ice hockey body checking ages, and head-to-head hits in both sports. Given soccer's global popularity, and the growing public concern for the potential long-term neurological implications of collision and contact sports, studying soccer has the potential to impact many athletes and the sports medicine professionals caring for them.

  20. A Minimum Leakage Quasi-Static RAM Bitcell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Teman

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available As SRAMs continue to grow and comprise larger percentages of the area and power consumption in advanced systems, the need to minimize static currents becomes essential. This brief presents a novel 9T Quasi-Static RAM Bitcell that provides aggressive leakage reduction and high write margins. The quasi-static operation method of this cell, based on internal feedback and leakage ratios, minimizes static power while maintaining sufficient, albeit depleted, noise margins. This paper presents the concept of the novel cell, and discusses the stability of the cell under hold, read and write operations. The cell was implemented in a low-power 40 nm TSMC process, showing as much as a 12× reduction in leakage current at typical conditions, as compared to a standard 6T or 8T bitcell at the same supply voltage. The implemented cell showed full functionality under global and local process variations at nominal and low voltages, as low as 300 mV.

  1. Biomechanical studies: science (f)or common sense?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mellema, Jos J.; Doornberg, Job N.; Guitton, Thierry G.; Ring, David; van der Zwan, A. L.; Spoor, A. B.; van Vugt, A. B.; Armstrong, A. D.; Shrivastava, A.; Wahegaonkar, A. L.; Shafritz, A. B.; Adams, J.; Ilyas, A.; Vochteloo, A. J. H.; Castillo, A. P.; Basak, A.; Andreas, P.; Barquet, A.; Kristan, A.; Berner, A.; Ranade, A. B.; Ashish, S.; Terrono, A. L.; Jubel, A.; Frieman, B.; Bamberger, H. B.; van den Bekerom, M. P. J.; Belangero, W. D.; Hearon, B. F.; Boler, J. M.; Walter, F. L.; Boyer, M.; Wills, B. P. D.; Broekhuyse, H.; Buckley, R.; Watkins, B.; Sears, B. W.; Calfee, R. P.; Ekholm, C.; Fernandes, C. H.; Swigart, C.; Cassidy, C.; Wilson, C. J.; Bainbridge, L. C.; Wilson, C.; Eygendaal, D.; Goslings, J. C.; Schep, N.; Kloen, P.; Haverlag, R.

    2014-01-01

    It is our impression that many biomechanical studies invest substantial resources studying the obvious: that more and larger metal is stronger. The purpose of this study is to evaluate if a subset of biomechanical studies comparing fixation constructs just document common sense. Using a web-based

  2. Biomechanical factors associated with the development of tibiofemoral knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Tunen, Joyce A C; Dell'Isola, Andrea; Juhl, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Altered biomechanics, increased joint loading and tissue damage, might be related in a vicious cycle within the development of knee osteoarthritis (KOA). We have defined biomechanical factors as joint-related factors that interact with the forces, moments and kinematics in and aroun...... publications in peer-reviewed journals and presentations at (inter)national conferences. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42015025092....

  3. Biomechanical factors associated with the risk of knee injury when ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To systematically assess the literature investigating biomechanical knee injury risk factors when an individual lands from a jump. Data sources. Four electronic databases were searched for peer-reviewed English journals containing landing biomechanical studies published over 14 years (1990 - 2003).

  4. Factors Related to Students' Learning of Biomechanics Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, ChengTu; Smith, Jeremy D.; Bohne, Michael; Knudson, Duane

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to replicate and expand a previous study to identify the factors that affect students' learning of biomechanical concepts. Students were recruited from three universities (N = 149) located in the central and western regions of the United States. Data from 142 students completing the Biomechanics Concept Inventory…

  5. [The development of an oral biomechanical testing instrument].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X H; Sun, X D; Lin, Z

    2000-03-01

    An oral biomechanical testing instrument, which is portable, powered with batteries and controlled by single chip microcomputer, was described. The instrument was characterized by its multichannel, high accuracy, low power dissipation, wide rage of force measurement and stable performance. It can be used for acquisiting, displaying and storing data. And it may be expected to be an ideal instrument for oral biomechanical measurements.

  6. Dance band on the Titanic: biomechanical signaling in cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Mark A; McCulloch, Andrew; Borg, Thomas K

    2002-11-15

    Biomechanical signaling is a complex interaction of both intracellular and extracellular components. Both passive and active components are involved in the extracellular environment to signal through specific receptors to multiple signaling pathways. This review provides an overview of extracellular matrix, specific receptors, and signaling pathways for biomechanical stimulation in cardiac hypertrophy.

  7. The Undergraduate Biomechanics Experience at Iowa State University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Peter R.

    This paper discusses the objectives of a program in biomechanics--the analysis of sports skills and movement--and the evolution of the biomechanics program at Iowa State University. The primary objective of such a course is to provide the student with the basic tools necessary for adequate analysis of human movement, with special emphasis upon…

  8. Biomechanics, Exercise Physiology, and the 75th Anniversary of RQES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamill, Joseph; Haymes, Emily M.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the biomechanics and exercise physiology studies published in the Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport (RQES) over the past 75 years. Studies in biomechanics, a relatively new subdiscipline that evolved from kinesiology, first appeared in the journal about 40 years ago. Exercise physiology studies have…

  9. High resolution extremity CT for biomechanics modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashby, A.E.; Brand, H.; Hollerbach, K.; Logan, C.M.; Martz, H.E.

    1995-01-01

    With the advent of ever more powerful computing and finite element analysis (FEA) capabilities, the bone and joint geometry detail available from either commercial surface definitions or from medical CT scans is inadequate. For dynamic FEA modeling of joints, precise articular contours are necessary to get appropriate contact definition. In this project, a fresh cadaver extremity was suspended in parafin in a lucite cylinder and then scanned with an industrial CT system to generate a high resolution data set for use in biomechanics modeling

  10. Biomechanical evaluation of the Nice knot

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Shannon W.; Chapman, Christopher R.; Adeeb, Samer; Duke, Kajsa; Beaupre, Lauren; Bouliane, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Nice knot is a bulky double-stranded knot. Biomechanical data supporting its use as well as the number of half hitches required to ensure knot security is lacking. Materials and Methods: Nice knots with, one, two, or three half-hitches were compared with the surgeon′s and Tennessee slider knots with three half hitches. Each knot was tied 10 times around a fixed diameter using four different sutures: FiberWire (Arthrex, Naples, FL), Ultrabraid (Smith and Nephew, Andover, MA...

  11. Anatomy, normal variants, and basic biomechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berquist, T.H.; Johnson, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on the anatomy and basic functions of the foot and ankle important to physicians involved in imaging procedures, clinical medicine, and surgery. New radiographic techniques especially magnetic resonance imaging, provide more diagnostic information owing to improved tissue contrast and the ability to obtain multiple image planes (axial, sagittal, coronal, oblique). Therefore, a thorough knowledge of skeletal and soft tissue anatomy is even more essential. Normal variants must also be understood in order to distinguish normal from pathologic changes in the foot and ankle. A basic understanding of biomechanics is also essential for selecting the proper diagnostic techniques

  12. High resolution extremity CT for biomechanics modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashby, A.E.; Brand, H.; Hollerbach, K.; Logan, C.M.; Martz, H.E.

    1995-09-23

    With the advent of ever more powerful computing and finite element analysis (FEA) capabilities, the bone and joint geometry detail available from either commercial surface definitions or from medical CT scans is inadequate. For dynamic FEA modeling of joints, precise articular contours are necessary to get appropriate contact definition. In this project, a fresh cadaver extremity was suspended in parafin in a lucite cylinder and then scanned with an industrial CT system to generate a high resolution data set for use in biomechanics modeling.

  13. BIOMECHANICS AND PATHOMECHANICS OF THE PATELLOFEMORAL JOINT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The patellofemoral joint is a joint that can be an area of concern for athletes of various sports and ages. The joint is somewhat complex with multiple contact points and numerous tissues that attach to the patella. Joint forces are variable and depend on the degree of knee flexion and whether the foot is in contact with the ground. The sports medicine specialist must have a good working knowledge of the anatomy and biomechanics of the patellofemoral joint in order to treat it effectively. PMID:27904787

  14. Diabetic Foot and Exercise Therapy: Step by Step The Role of Rigid Posture and Biomechanics Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Piergiorgio; Gulisano, Massimo; Anichini, Roberto; Seghieri, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Lower extremity ulcers represent a serious and costly complication of diabetes mellitus. Many factors contribute to the development of diabetic foot. Peripheral neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease are the main causes of foot ulceration and contribute in turn to the growth of additional risk factors such as limited joint mobility, muscular alterations and foot deformities. Moreover, a deficit of balance, posture and biomechanics can be present, in particular in patients at high risk for ulceration. The result of this process may be the development of a vicious cycle which leads to abnormal distribution of the foot's plantar pressures in static and dynamic postural conditions. This review shows that some of these risk factors significantly improve after a few weeks of exercise therapy (ET) intervention. Accordingly it has been suggested that ET can be an important weapon in the prevention of foot ulcer. The aim of ET can relate to one or more alterations typically found in diabetic patients, although greater attention should be paid to the evaluation and possible correction of body balance, rigid posture and biomechanics. Some of the most important limitations of ET are difficult access to therapy, patient compliance and the transitoriness of the results if the training stops. Many proposals have been made to overcome such limitations. In particular, it is important that specialized centers offer the opportunity to participate in ET and during the treatment the team should work to change the patient’s lifestyle by improving the execution of appropriate daily physical activity. PMID:24807636

  15. Biomechanics in dermatology: Recent advances and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinson, Ryan T; Haber, Richard M

    2017-02-01

    Biomechanics is increasingly being recognized as an important research area in dermatology. To highlight only a few examples, biomechanics has contributed to the development of novel topical therapies for aesthetic and medical purposes, enhanced our understanding of the pathogenesis of plantar melanoma, and provided insight into the epidemiology of psoriatic disease. This article summarizes the findings from recent studies to demonstrate the important role that biomechanics may have in dermatologic disease and therapy and places these biomechanical findings in a clinical context for the practicing physician. In addition, areas for future biomechanics research and development in dermatology are discussed. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Masticatory System Biomechanical Photoelastic Simulation fot the Comparision of the Conventional and Uni-Lock Systems in Mandibular Osteosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luis Cebrian Carretero

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The biomechanical consequences of the interaction between titanium trauma plates and screws and the fractured mandible are still a matter of investigation. The mathematical and biomechanical models that have been developed show limitations and the experimental studies are not able to reproduce muscle forces and internal stress distributions in the bone-implant interface and mandibular structure. In the present article we show a static simulator of the masticatory system to demonstrate in epoxy resin mandibular models, by means of 3D (three-dimensional photoelasticity, the stress distribution using different osteosynthesis methods in the mandibular angle fractures. The results showed that the simulator and 3D photoelasticity were a useful method to study interactions between bone and osteosynthesis materials. The “Lock” systems can be considered the most favourable method due to their stress distribution in the epoxy resin mandible. 3D photoelasticity in epoxy resin models is a useful method to evaluate stress distribution for biomechanical studies. Regarding to mandibular osteosynthesis, “lock” plates offer the most favourable stress distribution due to being less aggressive to the bone

  17. VARIATIONS IN NEUROMUSCULAR ACTIVITY OF THIGH MUSCLES DURING WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION IN CONSIDERATION OF DIFFERENT BIOMECHANICAL VARIABLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Perchthaler

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The intention of this study was to systematically analyze the impact of biomechanical variables in terms of different vibration frequencies, amplitudes and knee angles on quadriceps femoris and hamstring activity during exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV. 51 healthy men and women (age 55 ± 8 years voluntary participated in the study and were randomly allocated to five different vibration-frequency groups. Each subject performed 9 static squat positions (3 amplitudes x 3 knee angles on a side alternating vibration platform. Surface electromyography (EMG was used to record the neuromuscular activity of the quadriceps femoris and hamstring muscles. Maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs were performed prior to the measurements to normalize the EMG signals. A three-way mixed ANOVA was performed to analyze the different effects of the biomechanical variables on muscle activity. Depending on the biomechanical variables, EMG muscle activity ranged between 18.2 and 74.1 % MVC in the quadriceps femoris and between 5.2 and 27. 3 % MVC in the hamstrings during WBV. The highest levels of muscle activation were found at high frequencies and large amplitudes. Especially in the quadriceps femoris muscle, a WBV frequency of 30 Hz led to a significant increase in muscle activity compared to the other tested frequencies. However, it seems that knee angle is only relevant for the quadriceps femoris muscle. The results of this study should give more information for developing individual training protocols for WBV treatment in different practical applications

  18. Clinical, biomechanical and morphological assessment of anterior cruciate ligament Kevlar®-based artificial prosthesis in rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Garza-Castro, Santiago; González-Rivera, Carlos E; Vílchez-Cavazos, Félix; Morales-Avalos, Rodolfo; Barrera-Flores, Francisco J; Elizondo-Omaña, Rodrigo E; Soto-Dominguez, Adolfo; Acosta-Olivo, Carlos; Mendoza-Lemus, Oscar F

    2017-07-27

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical, biomechanical and morphological characteristics of a Kevlar®-based prosthetic ligament as a synthetic graft of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in an experimental animal model in rabbits. A total of 27 knees of rabbits randomly divided into 3 groups (control, ACL excision and ACL replacement with a Kevlar® prosthesis) were analyzed using clinical, biomechanical and morphological tests at 6, 12 and 18 weeks postprocedure. The mean displacement in mechanical testing was 0.73 ± 0.06 mm, 1.58 ± 0.19 mm and 0.94 ± 0.20 mm for the control, ACL excision and ACL replacement with synthetic prosthesis groups, respectively. The results showed an improvement in the stability of the knee with the use of the Kevlar® synthetic prosthesis in the biomechanical testing (p0.05), between the replacement group and the control group. The histological study revealed a good morphological adaptation of the synthetic material to the knee. This study proposes a new animal model for the placement and evaluation of Kevlar®-based synthetic ACL implants. The studied prosthesis showed promising behavior in the clinical and biomechanical tests and in the histological analysis. This study lays the foundation for further basic and clinical studies of artificial ACL prostheses using this material.

  19. Hubble expansion in static spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossler, Otto E.; Froehlich, Dieter; Movassagh, Ramis; Moore, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    A recently proposed mechanism for light-path expansion in a static spacetime is based on the moving-lenses paradigm. Since the latter is valid independently of whether space expands or not, a static universe can be used to better see the implications. The moving-lenses paradigm is related to the paradigm of dynamical friction. If this is correct, a Hubble-like law is implicit. It is described quantitatively. A bent in the Hubble-like line is predictably implied. The main underlying assumption is Price's Principle (PI 3 ). If the theory is sound, the greatest remaining problem in cosmology becomes the origin of hydrogen. Since Blandford's jet production mechanism for quasars is too weak, a generalized Hawking radiation hidden in the walls of cosmic voids is invoked. A second prediction is empirical: slow pattern changes in the cosmic microwave background. A third is ultra-high redshifts for Giacconi quasars. Bruno's eternal universe in the spirit of Augustine becomes a bit less outlandish

  20. Static stretching does not alter pre and post-landing muscle activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moss Wesley R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Static stretching may result in various strength and power deficiencies. Prior research has not determined, however, if static stretching causes a change in muscle activation during a functional task requiring dynamic stability. The purpose of this study was to determine if static stretching has an effect on mean pre and postlanding muscle (vastus medialis VM, vastus lateralis VL, medial hamstring MH, and biceps femoris BF activity. Methods 26 healthy, physically active subjects were recruited, from which 13 completed a 14-day static stretching regimen for the quadriceps and hamstrings. Using the data from the force plate and EMG readings, a mean of EMG amplitude was calculated for 150 msec before and after landing. Each trial was normalized to an isometric reference position. Means were calculated for the VM, VL, MH, and BF from 5 trials in each session. Measures were collected pre, immediately following the 1st stretching session, and following 2 weeks of stretching. Results A 14-day static stretching regimen resulted in no significant differences in pre or postlanding mean EMG amplitude during a drop landing either acutely or over a 14-day period. Conclusions Static stretching, done acutely or over a 14-day period does not result in measurable differences of mean EMG amplitude during a drop landing. Static stretching may not impede dynamic stability of joints about which stretched muscles cross.

  1. Biomechanical analysis of psoas major muscle by MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagura, Takeo

    1997-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the biomechanical function of the psoas major muscle. First, we carried out anatomical and function-morphological observation of 2 cadavers (46-year-old man and 86-year-old woman). Second, we reconstituted the three-dimensional geometrical models of the psoas major muscle using MR multi-laminograms of the lumber spine regions from 15 normal adult men. Third, we calculated the moment against the lumber hip joint region and the lumber pelvic region. We also examined, the functional change of the psoas major muscle associated with various positional changes by using the model. The psoas major muscle developed the lateroflection moment and the axial compression force against the lumber vertebra and the anterior shear force against the lower lumber vertebra, and posterior shear force against the pelvic at the iliopubic eminence region. The lateroflection moment is largest at the hip joint. We could find no individual differences of the function in the psoas major muscle and a few change in functional activity by the positional change between the lumber and the hip joint. These results suggest that the psoas major muscle has the function to support and stabilize the lumber by compression force and the pelvic-hip joint by posterior shear force, and also the function as an actuator for the hip joint. These suggest that the psoas major muscle has the sufficient function and structure for human to take orthograde by 2 feet. (K.H.)

  2. ATFL elongation after Brostrom procedure: a biomechanical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Kevin L; Campbell, John T; Guyton, Gregory P; Parks, Brent G; Schon, Lew C

    2008-11-01

    Elongation of ligaments during early mobilization after reconstruction may be associated with decreased stability. We evaluated elongation of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) before and after lateral ligament reconstruction within a physiologic range of motion with protected and unprotected, isolated dorsiflexion/plantarflexion range of motion. Six fresh frozen cadaver legs were used with the ATFL meticulously dissected. A differential variable reluctance transducer (DVRT) was spaced to span the course of the ATFL using consistent placement points based on previous reports. Elongation was measured in a load frame with protected motion of 30 degrees plantarflexion and 10 degrees dorsiflexion for the intact and sectioned ATFL and for the repaired specimen with and without protected motion. The proximal DVRT anchor point was detached for sectioning and repair of the ATFL and replaced at the same position. Testing was 1000 cycles at 1 Hz for the repaired protected specimen and 10 cycles at 1 Hz for all other stages. Initial elongation in the unprotected, repaired group was significantly higher than initial elongation in the intact (p ankle after lateral ankle ligament reconstruction was not associated with elongation of the ATFL. The ATFL elongated significantly by comparison without protected dorsiflexion/plantarflexion. The study provides biomechanical support for the safety of early protected dorsiflexion/plantarflexion range of motion after Broström reconstruction.

  3. Needle puncture in rabbit functional spinal units alters rotational biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Robert A; Bell, Kevin M; Quan, Bichun; Nuzhao, Yao; Sowa, Gwendolyn A; Kang, James D

    2015-04-01

    An in vitro biomechanical study for rabbit lumbar functional spinal units (FSUs) using a robot-based spine testing system. To elucidate the effect of annular puncture with a 16 G needle on mechanical properties in flexion/extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending. Needle puncture of the intervertebral disk has been shown to alter mechanical properties of the disk in compression, torsion, and bending. The effect of needle puncture in FSUs, where intact spinal ligaments and facet joints may mitigate or amplify these changes in the disk, on spinal motion segment stability subject to physiological rotations remains unknown. Rabbit FSUs were tested using a robot testing system whose force/moment and position precision were assessed to demonstrate system capability. Flexibility testing methods were developed by load-to-failure testing in flexion/extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending. Subsequent testing methods were used to examine a 16 G needle disk puncture and No. 11 blade disk stab (positive control for mechanical disruption). Flexibility testing was used to assess segmental range-of-motion (degrees), neutral zone stiffness (N m/degrees) and width (degrees and N m), and elastic zone stiffness before and after annular injury. The robot-based system was capable of performing flexibility testing on FSUs-mean precision of force/moment measurements and robot system movements were elastic zone stiffness in flexion and lateral bending. These findings suggest that disk puncture and stab can destabilize FSUs in primary rotations.

  4. Quasi-Static Condensation of Aeroelastic Suspension Bridge Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Randi N.; Krenk, Steen; N. Svendsen, Martin

    2017-01-01

    For long span bridges the wind-induced dynamic response is a design driving factor and therefore continuously a subject for detailed analysis. Traditionally both buffeting and stability calculations have been considered in the frequency domain. However, this yields alimitation in accounting...... for turbulence when considering the stability limit and further it is not possible to account for non-linear effects. These limitations suggest to do simulations of the aeroelastic response of long span bridges in the time domain. For this it is of interest to have an efficient model while still maintaining...... sufficient accuracy. This contribution is on quasi-static reduction of an aeroelastic finite element model of a 3000m suspension bridge proposed for crossing Sulafjorden in Norway. The model is intended for stability limit calculation where the representation of higher modes is of less importance...

  5. Adaptive sports technology and biomechanics: wheelchairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Rory A; De Luigi, Arthur Jason

    2014-08-01

    Wheelchair sports are an important tool in the rehabilitation of people with severe chronic disabilities and have been a driving force for innovation in technology and practice. In this paper, we will present an overview of the adaptive technology used in Paralympic sports with a special focus on wheeled technology and the impact of design on performance (defined as achieving the greatest level of athletic ability and minimizing the risk of injury). Many advances in manual wheelchairs trace their origins to wheelchair sports. Features of wheelchairs that were used for racing and basketball 25 or more years ago have become integral to the manual wheelchairs that people now use every day; moreover, the current components used on ultralight wheelchairs also have benefitted from technological advances developed for sports wheelchairs. For example, the wheels now used on chairs for daily mobility incorporate many of the components first developed for sports chairs. Also, advances in manufacturing and the availability of aerospace materials have driven current wheelchair design and manufacture. Basic principles of sports wheelchair design are universal across sports and include fit; minimizing weight while maintaining high stiffness; minimizing rolling resistance; and optimizing the sports-specific design of the chair. However, a well-designed and fitted wheelchair is not sufficient for optimal sports performance: the athlete must be well trained, skilled, and use effective biomechanics because wheelchair athletes face some unique biomechanical challenges. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Integrative Structural Biomechanical Concepts of Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonse T. Masi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ankylosing spondylitis (AS is not fully explained by inflammatory processes. Clinical, epidemiological, genetic, and course of disease features indicate additional host-related risk processes and predispositions. Collectively, the pattern of predisposition to onset in adolescent and young adult ages, male preponderance, and widely varied severity of AS is unique among rheumatic diseases. However, this pattern could reflect biomechanical and structural differences between the sexes, naturally occurring musculoskeletal changes over life cycles, and a population polymorphism. During juvenile development, the body is more flexible and weaker than during adolescent maturation and young adulthood, when strengthening and stiffening considerably increase. During middle and later ages, the musculoskeletal system again weakens. The novel concept of an innate axial myofascial hypertonicity reflects basic mechanobiological principles in human function, tissue reactivity, and pathology. However, these processes have been little studied and require critical testing. The proposed physical mechanisms likely interact with recognized immunobiological pathways. The structural biomechanical processes and tissue reactions might possibly precede initiation of other AS-related pathways. Research in the combined structural mechanobiology and immunobiology processes promises to improve understanding of the initiation and perpetuation of AS than prevailing concepts. The combined processes might better explain characteristic enthesopathic and inflammatory processes in AS.

  7. Integrated biomechanical and topographical surface characterization (IBTSC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Löberg, Johanna, E-mail: Johanna.Loberg@dentsply.com [Dentsply Implants, Box 14, SE-431 21 Mölndal (Sweden); Mattisson, Ingela [Dentsply Implants, Box 14, SE-431 21 Mölndal (Sweden); Ahlberg, Elisabet [Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2014-01-30

    In an attempt to reduce the need for animal studies in dental implant applications, a new model has been developed which combines well-known surface characterization methods with theoretical biomechanical calculations. The model has been named integrated biomechanical and topographical surface characterization (IBTSC), and gives a comprehensive description of the surface topography and the ability of the surface to induce retention strength with bone. IBTSC comprises determination of 3D-surface roughness parameters by using 3D-scanning electron microscopy (3D-SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), and calculation of the ability of different surface topographies to induce retention strength in bone by using the local model. Inherent in this integrated approach is the use of a length scale analysis, which makes it possible to separate different size levels of surface features. The IBTSC concept is tested on surfaces with different level of hierarchy, induced by mechanical as well as chemical treatment. Sequential treatment with oxalic and hydrofluoric acid results in precipitated nano-sized features that increase the surface roughness and the surface slope on the sub-micro and nano levels. This surface shows the highest calculated shear strength using the local model. The validity, robustness and applicability of the IBTSC concept are demonstrated and discussed.

  8. A Biomechanical Analysis of Different Clavicular Tunnel Diameters in Anatomic Acromioclavicular Ligament Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Andreas; Beitzel, Knut; Alaee, Farhang; Dukas, Alex; Herbst, Elmar; Obopilwe, Elifho; Apostolakos, John; DiVenere, Jessica; Singh, Hardeep; Cote, Mark P; Mazzocca, Augustus D

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the biomechanical stability of a tendon-to-clavicle bone interface fixation of a graft in revision acromioclavicular reconstruction. Fifteen fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders were used. All specimens underwent bone density evaluation. For the primary reconstruction, a 5-mm semitendinosus allograft was inserted into a 5-mm bone tunnel at 25 and 45 mm from the lateral end of the clavicle using a 5.5 × 8-mm PEEK (polyether ether ketone) tenodesis screw. Each single graft was fixed in a cryo-clamp and cyclically loaded from 5 to 70 N for 3,000 cycles, followed by load-to-failure testing at a rate of 120 mm/min to simulate the revision case. To simulate tunnel widening, the tunnels of the revision series were over-drilled with an 8-mm drill, and a 5-mm semitendinosus graft with an 8 × 12-mm PEEK tenodesis screw was inserted. Biomechanical testing was then repeated. The bone mineral density analysis showed a significantly higher density at the 45-mm hole compared with the 25-mm hole (P = .001). The ultimate load to failure increased from the 5.5-mm screw to the 8-mm screw at the 45-mm hole position (P = .001). There was no statistically significant difference at the 25-mm hole position (P = .934). No statistical significance for graft elongation comparing the 5.5-mm screw and the 8-mm screw at the 25-mm (P = .156) and 45-mm (P = .334) positions could be found. Comparable biomechanical stability for the tendon-to-bone interface fixation in different clavicular tunnel diameters simulating primary and revision reconstruction was achieved. There is a lack of literature regarding revision acromioclavicular joint reconstruction, but our biomechanical results show comparable stability to primary reconstruction. These data provide support for the use of anatomic acromioclavicular ligament reconstruction in revision cases. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Static and dynamic thyroid scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahlstedt, J.

    1986-01-01

    Static images as isolated investigation in thyroid diagnosis mainly provides morphologic information, and therefore sonography is largely applied for this purpose. 99m Tc-pertechnetate scans or 123 I-scans are indicated in cases of malpositions and serve to clarify lesions of unknown dignity. Additionally 201 Tl-chloride is suited for examinations with regard to metabolically active thyroid tissue, whereby differential diagnostic laboratory tests must be carried out to exclude parathyroid adenoma. Dynamic thyroid scans before and after regulation tests (suppression, stimulation) reflect the physiological correlation between the iodine avidity of the thyroid, the peripheral thyroid hormone concentrations and the hypophyseal regulation in the TRH-test. The main application of this procedure is the clarification of thyroid autonomy, i.e. indication, detection, quantification or exclusion of thyroid autonomy. For the treatment of immunogenic thyrotoxicosis, dynamic thyroid scintigraphy provides important information about the onset of remission, thus permitting to end thyreostatic therapy. (orig.) [de

  10. Statics learning from engineering examples

    CERN Document Server

    Emri, Igor

    2016-01-01

    This textbook introduces and explains the basic concepts on which statics is based utilizing real engineering examples. The authors emphasize the learning process by showing a real problem, analyzing it, simplifying it, and developing a way to solve it. This feature teaches students intuitive thinking in solving real engineering problems using the fundamentals of Newton’s laws. This book also: · Stresses representation of physical reality in ways that allow students to solve problems and obtain meaningful results · Emphasizes identification of important features of the structure that should be included in a model and which features may be omitted · Facilitates students' understanding and mastery of the "flow of thinking" practiced by professional engineers.

  11. A static world model. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundman, S.

    1981-01-01

    The static particle model of Part I requires creation of ether proportional to the energy of the particle. It is shown that this ether creation leads to gravitation and a forever expanding universe in agreement with the large-number hypothesis. The age, mass and size of the universe are calculated from atomic constants and G. The model predicts scale-invariance with different scales for gravitational matter, nucleons and electrons. This leads to a fine structure constant decreasing very slowly with time. For each scale there is a different type of dynamic balance governing the expansion of the universe. The model indicates that the universe was initially densely packed with (tau) leptons. It suggests a program for calculating the gravitational constant and the muon-electron mass ratio from other universal constants. Tentative numerological derivation gives these quantities with a higher accuracy than has been achieved experimentally. (Auth.)

  12. Performance characterization of VGCF/epoxy nanocomposite sensors under static load cycles and in static structural health monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Bin; Hu, Ning; Cai, Yindi; Furukawa, Manabu; Matsushita, Makoto; Yuan, Weifeng; Cai, Yong; Yan, Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Compared to conventional metal-foil strain gauges, nanocomposite piezoresistive strain sensors have demonstrated high strain sensitivity and have been attracting increasing attention in recent years. To fulfil their ultimate success, the performance of vapor growth carbon fiber (VGCF)/epoxy nanocomposite strain sensors subjected to static cyclic loads was evaluated in this work. A strain-equivalent quantity (resistance change ratio) in cantilever beams with intentionally induced notches in bending was evaluated using the conventional metal-foil strain gauges and the VGCF/epoxy nanocomposite sensors. Compared to the metal-foil strain gauges, the nanocomposite sensors are much more sensitive to even slight structural damage. Therefore, it was confirmed that the signal stability, reproducibility, and durability of these nanocomposite sensors are very promising, leading to the present endeavor to apply them for static structural health monitoring. (paper)

  13. Teaching undergraduate biomechanics with Just-in-Time Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riskowski, Jody L

    2015-06-01

    Biomechanics education is a vital component of kinesiology, sports medicine, and physical education, as well as for many biomedical engineering and bioengineering undergraduate programmes. Little research exists regarding effective teaching strategies for biomechanics. However, prior work suggests that student learning in undergraduate physics courses has been aided by using the Just-in-Time Teaching (JiTT). As physics understanding plays a role in biomechanics understanding, the purpose of study was to evaluate the use of a JiTT framework in an undergraduate biomechanics course. This two-year action-based research study evaluated three JiTT frameworks: (1) no JiTT; (2) mathematics-based JiTT; and (3) concept-based JiTT. A pre- and post-course assessment of student learning used the biomechanics concept inventory and a biomechanics concept map. A general linear model assessed differences between the course assessments by JiTT framework in order to evaluate learning and teaching effectiveness. The results indicated significantly higher learning gains and better conceptual understanding in a concept-based JiTT course, relative to a mathematics-based JiTT or no JiTT course structure. These results suggest that a course structure involving concept-based questions using a JiTT strategy may be an effective method for engaging undergraduate students and promoting learning in biomechanics courses.

  14. Artificial intelligence in sports biomechanics: new dawn or false hope?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Roger

    2006-12-15

    This article reviews developments in the use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in sports biomechanics over the last decade. It outlines possible uses of Expert Systems as diagnostic tools for evaluating faults in sports movements ('techniques') and presents some example knowledge rules for such an expert system. It then compares the analysis of sports techniques, in which Expert Systems have found little place to date, with gait analysis, in which they are routinely used. Consideration is then given to the use of Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) in sports biomechanics, focusing on Kohonen self-organizing maps, which have been the most widely used in technique analysis, and multi-layer networks, which have been far more widely used in biomechanics in general. Examples of the use of ANNs in sports biomechanics are presented for javelin and discus throwing, shot putting and football kicking. I also present an example of the use of Evolutionary Computation in movement optimization in the soccer throw in, which predicted an optimal technique close to that in the coaching literature. After briefly overviewing the use of AI in both sports science and biomechanics in general, the article concludes with some speculations about future uses of AI in sports biomechanics. Key PointsExpert Systems remain almost unused in sports biomechanics, unlike in the similar discipline of gait analysis.Artificial Neural Networks, particularly Kohonen Maps, have been used, although their full value remains unclear.Other AI applications, including Evolutionary Computation, have received little attention.

  15. Correlations among static quark masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewin, K.; Motz, G.B.

    1987-01-01

    Nonrelativistic heavy quarkonia potentials with Coulomb and linearly rising limiting behaviour are correlated additively by Taylor expansion extracting the limiting structure and a constant term. Relations between fit parameters of different potentials including the quark masses m b and m c , are obtained. The known stability of the difference m b -m c , appears as direct consequence of flavour invariance of the potentials

  16. Static and transient beam loading of a synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S.Y.; Weng, W.T.

    1992-01-01

    In a synchrotron, when the beam induced current is comparable to the driver current, the RF cavity is subjected to beam loading perturbation and corrective steps have to be implemented to regain beam stability. In this paper, the static and transient beam loading will be studied. We first discuss the static beam loading, which includes the cavity detuning condition, the stability condition, and the generator power dissipation. The beam current induced beam phase deviation is used as criterion to study the transient beam loading. The upgraded and the old AGS RF system parameters are used as an example to demonstrate how to choose cavity and generator parameters to satisfy the stability requirements under the beam loading. The dynamic models for the beam loading with beam control, and the beam loading with fast power amplifier feedback are presented and analyzed. It is shown that the beam phase and radial feedbacks alone are insufficient for the transient beam loading compensation, but the fast power amplifier feedback can provide effective correction on the beam loading. The limitation of the fast feedback and the beam loading with tuning and AVC loops are also discussed

  17. Biomechanical and Hemodynamic Measures of Right Ventricular Diastolic Function: Translating Tissue Biomechanics to Clinical Relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sae; Vanderpool, Rebecca R; Avazmohammadi, Reza; Lapshin, Eugene; Bachman, Timothy N; Sacks, Michael; Simon, Marc A

    2017-09-12

    Right ventricular (RV) diastolic function has been associated with outcomes for patients with pulmonary hypertension; however, the relationship between biomechanics and hemodynamics in the right ventricle has not been studied. Rat models of RV pressure overload were obtained via pulmonary artery banding (PAB; control, n=7; PAB, n=5). At 3 weeks after banding, RV hemodynamics were measured using a conductance catheter. Biaxial mechanical properties of the RV free wall myocardium were obtained to extrapolate longitudinal and circumferential elastic modulus in low and high strain regions (E 1 and E 2 , respectively). Hemodynamic analysis revealed significantly increased end-diastolic elastance (E ed ) in PAB (control: 55.1 mm Hg/mL [interquartile range: 44.7-85.4 mm Hg/mL]; PAB: 146.6 mm Hg/mL [interquartile range: 105.8-155.0 mm Hg/mL]; P =0.010). Longitudinal E 1 was increased in PAB (control: 7.2 kPa [interquartile range: 6.7-18.1 kPa]; PAB: 34.2 kPa [interquartile range: 18.1-44.6 kPa]; P =0.018), whereas there were no significant changes in longitudinal E 2 or circumferential E 1 and E 2 . Last, wall stress was calculated from hemodynamic data by modeling the right ventricle as a sphere: stress=Pressure×radius2×thickness. RV pressure overload in PAB rats resulted in an increase in diastolic myocardial stiffness reflected both hemodynamically, by an increase in E ed , and biomechanically, by an increase in longitudinal E 1 . Modest increases in tissue biomechanical stiffness are associated with large increases in E ed . Hemodynamic measurements of RV diastolic function can be used to predict biomechanical changes in the myocardium. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  18. Static Equilibrium Configurations of Charged Metallic Bodies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key words: Static equilibrium, charged metallic body, potential energy, projected gradient method. ... television, radio, internet, microwave ovens, mobile telephones, satellite communication systems, radar systems, electrical motors, electrical.

  19. The role of biomechanics in maximising distance and accuracy of golf shots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, Patria A; Keogh, Justin; Reid, Duncan

    2005-01-01

    Golf biomechanics applies the principles and technique of mechanics to the structure and function of the golfer in an effort to improve golf technique and performance. A common recommendation for technical correction is maintaining a single fixed centre hub of rotation with a two-lever one-hinge moment arm to impart force on the ball. The primary and secondary spinal angles are important for conservation of angular momentum using the kinetic link principle to generate high club-head velocity. When the golfer wants to maximise the distance of their drives, relatively large ground reaction forces (GRF) need to be produced. However, during the backswing, a greater proportion of the GRF will be observed on the back foot, with transfer of the GRF on to the front foot during the downswing/acceleration phase. Rapidly stretching hip, trunk and upper limb muscles during the backswing, maximising the X-factor early in the downswing, and uncocking the wrists when the lead arm is about 30 degrees below the horizontal will take advantage of the summation of force principle. This will help generate large angular velocity of the club head, and ultimately ball displacement. Physical conditioning will help to recruit the muscles in the correct sequence and to optimum effect. To maximise the accuracy of chipping and putting shots, the golfer should produce a lower grip on the club and a slower/shorter backswing. Consistent patterns of shoulder and wrist movements and temporal patterning result in successful chip shots. Qualitative and quantitative methods are used to biomechanically assess golf techniques. Two- and three-dimensional videography, force plate analysis and electromyography techniques have been employed. The common golf biomechanics principles necessary to understand golf technique are stability, Newton's laws of motion (inertia, acceleration, action reaction), lever arms, conservation of angular momentum, projectiles, the kinetic link principle and the stretch

  20. Biomechanical implant treatment complications: a systematic review of clinical studies of implants with at least 1 year of functional loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yung-Ting; Fu, Jia-Hui; Al-Hezaimi, Khalid; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss the current literature available on the etiology and management of biomechanical complications of dental implant treatment. An electronic search of the PubMed database for English-language articles published before May 31, 2011, was performed based on a focus question: "How can biomechanical implant treatment complications be managed and identified?" The key words used were "dental implant," "etiology," "management," "excessive occlusal forces," "occlusal forces," "occlusion," "parafunctional habits," "biomechanical failure," "biomechanical complications," and "occlusal overloading." Clinical trials with a minimum of 10 implants followed for at least 1 year after functional loading were included. The initial electronic search identified 2,087 publications, most of which were eliminated, as they were animal studies, finite element analyses, bench-top studies, case reports, and literature reviews. After the titles, abstracts, and full text of 39 potentially eligible publications were reviewed, 15 studies were found to fulfill the inclusion criteria. Occlusal overloading was thought to be the primary etiologic factor in biomechanical implant treatment complications, which commonly included marginal bone loss, fracture of resin/ceramic veneers and porcelain, retention device or denture base fracture of implant-supported overdentures, loosening or fracture of abutment screws, and even implant failure. Occlusal overloading was positively associated with parafunctional habits such as bruxism. An appreciation of the intricacy of implant occlusion would allow clinicians to take a more preventive approach when performing implant treatment planning, as avoidance of implant overloading helps to ensure the long-term stability of implant-supported prostheses.

  1. Comparison of the corneal biomechanical effects after small-incision lenticule extraction and Q value guided femtosecond laser-assisted laser in situ keratomileusis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM:By comparing the changes of biomechanical properties of the cornea after small-incision lenticule extraction(SMILEand those after Q value guided femtosecond laser-assisted laser in situ keratomileusis(FSLASIK, to study the stability of biomechanical properties of the cornea after these two kinds of surgery and provide objective data for clinical operation.METHODS: Prospective comparative cases. One hundred and two cases(200 eyeswith myopia and myopic astigmatism were divided into 2 groups, 51 cases(100 eyesfor SMILE, and 51 cases(100 eyesfor Q value guided FS-LASIK. Corneal hysteresis(CHand the corneal resistance factor(CRFwere quantitatively assessed with the Ocular Response Analyzer(ORApreoperatively and 1d, 2wk, 1 and 3mo postoperatively.RESULTS: The decrease in CH and the CRF were statistically significant in both groups(PP>0.05. There were no statistically significant differences between the biomechanical changes in the two groups at any time(P>0.05.CONCLUSION: Both SMILE and Q value guided FS-LASIK can cause biomechanical decreases in the cornea. After 1d postoperatively, the decreases are nearly stable. There are no significant differences between the effect of SMILE and Q value guided FS-LASIK on the biomechanical properties of the cornea.

  2. Biomechanical ToolKit: Open-source framework to visualize and process biomechanical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barre, Arnaud; Armand, Stéphane

    2014-04-01

    C3D file format is widely used in the biomechanical field by companies and laboratories to store motion capture systems data. However, few software packages can visualize and modify the integrality of the data in the C3D file. Our objective was to develop an open-source and multi-platform framework to read, write, modify and visualize data from any motion analysis systems using standard (C3D) and proprietary file formats (used by many companies producing motion capture systems). The Biomechanical ToolKit (BTK) was developed to provide cost-effective and efficient tools for the biomechanical community to easily deal with motion analysis data. A large panel of operations is available to read, modify and process data through C++ API, bindings for high-level languages (Matlab, Octave, and Python), and standalone application (Mokka). All these tools are open-source and cross-platform and run on all major operating systems (Windows, Linux, MacOS X). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A Comprehensive Reanalysis of the Distal Iliotibial Band: Quantitative Anatomy, Radiographic Markers, and Biomechanical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Jonathan A; Chahla, Jorge; Moatshe, Gilbert; Kruckeberg, Bradley M; Muckenhirn, Kyle J; Vap, Alexander R; Geeslin, Andrew G; LaPrade, Robert F

    2017-09-01

    The qualitative anatomy of the distal iliotibial band (ITB) has previously been described. However, a comprehensive characterization of the quantitative anatomic, radiographic, and biomechanical properties of the Kaplan fibers of the deep distal ITB has not yet been established. It is paramount to delineate these characteristics to fully understand the distal ITB's contribution to rotational knee stability. Purpose/Hypothesis: There were 2 distinct purposes for this study: (1) to perform a quantitative anatomic and radiographic evaluation of the distal ITB's attachment sites and their relationships to pertinent osseous and soft tissue landmarks, and (2) to quantify the biomechanical properties of the deep (Kaplan) fibers of the distal ITB. It was hypothesized that the distal ITB has definable parameters concerning its anatomic attachments and consistent relationships to surgically pertinent landmarks with correlating plain radiographic findings. In addition, it was hypothesized that the biomechanical properties of the Kaplan fibers would support their role as important restraints against internal rotation. Descriptive laboratory study. Ten nonpaired, fresh-frozen human cadaveric knees (mean age, 61.1 years; range, 54-65 years) were dissected for anatomic and radiographic purposes. A coordinate measuring device quantified the attachment areas of the distal ITB to the distal femur, patella, and proximal tibia and their relationships to pertinent bony landmarks. A radiographic analysis was performed by inserting pins into the attachment sites of relevant anatomic structures to assess their location relative to pertinent bony landmarks with fluoroscopic guidance. A further biomechanical assessment of 10 cadaveric knees quantified the load to failure and stiffness of the Kaplan fibers' insertion on the distal femur after a preconditioning protocol. Two separate deep (Kaplan) fiber bundles were identified with attachments to 2 newly identified femoral bony prominences

  4. Research in biomechanics of occupant protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, A I; Yang, K H

    1995-04-01

    This paper discusses the biomechanical bases for occupant protection against frontal and side impact. Newton's Laws of Motion are used to illustrate the effect of a crash on restrained and unrestrained occupants, and the concept of ride down is discussed. Occupant protection through the use of energy absorbing materials is described, and the mechanism of injury of some of the more common injuries is explained. The role of the three-point belt and the airbag in frontal protection is discussed along with the potential injuries that can result from the use of these restraint systems. Side impact protection is more difficult to attain but some protection can be derived from the use of padding or a side impact airbag. It is concluded that the front seat occupants are adequately protected against frontal impact if belts are worn in an airbag equipped vehicle. Side impact protection may not be uniform in all vehicles.

  5. Patellofemoral anatomy and biomechanics: current concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZAFFAGNINI, STEFANO; DEJOUR, DAVID; GRASSI, ALBERTO; BONANZINGA, TOMMASO; MUCCIOLI, GIULIO MARIA MARCHEGGIANI; COLLE, FRANCESCA; RAGGI, FEDERICO; BENZI, ANDREA; MARCACCI, MAURILIO

    2013-01-01

    The patellofemoral joint, due to its particular bone anatomy and the numerous capsuloligamentous structures and muscles that act dynamically on the patella, is considered one of the most complex joints in the human body from the biomechanical point of view. The medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) has been demonstrated to contribute 60% of the force that opposes lateral displacement of the patella, and MPFL injury results in an approximately 50% reduction in the force needed to dislocate the patella laterally with the knee extended. For this reason, recent years have seen a growing interest in the study of this important anatomical structure, whose aponeurotic nature has thus been demonstrated. The MPFL acts as a restraint during motion, playing an active role under conditions of laterally applied stress, but an only marginal role during natural knee flexion. However, it remains extremely difficult to clearly define the anatomy of the MPFL and its relationships with other anatomical structures. PMID:25606512

  6. Integrative Role Of Cinematography In Biomechanics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zernicke, Ronald F.; Gregor, Robert J.

    1982-02-01

    Cinematography is an integral element in the interdisciplinary biomechanics research conducted in the Department of Kinesiology at the University of California, Los Angeles. For either an isolated recording of a movement phenomenon or as a recording component which is synchronized with additional transducers and recording equipment, high speed motion picture film has been effectively incorporated into resr'arch projects ranging from two and three dimensional analyses of human movements, locomotor mechanics of cursorial mammals and primates, to the structural responses and dynamic geometries of skeletal muscles, tendons, and ligaments. The basic equipment used in these studies includes three, 16 mm high speed, pin-registered cameras which have the capacity for electronic phase-locking. Crystal oscillators provide the generator pulses to synchronize the timing lights of the cameras and the analog-to-digital recording equipment. A rear-projection system with a sonic digitizer permits quantification of film coordinates which are stored on computer disks. The capacity for synchronizing the high speed films with additional recording equipment provides an effective means of obtaining not only position-time data from film, but also electromyographic, force platform, tendon force transducer, and strain gauge recordings from tissues or moving organisms. During the past few years, biomechanics research which comprised human studies has used both planar and three-dimensional cinematographic techniques. The studies included planar analyses which range from the gait characteristics of lower extremity child amputees to the running kinematics and kinetics of highly skilled sprinters and long-distance runners. The dynamics of race cycling and kinetics of gymnastic maneuvers were studied with cinematography and either a multi-dimensional force platform or a bicycle pedal with strain gauges to determine the time histories of the applied forces. The three-dimensional technique

  7. Biomechanics trends in modeling and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Ogden, Ray

    2017-01-01

    The book presents a state-of-the-art overview of biomechanical and mechanobiological modeling and simulation of soft biological tissues. Seven well-known scientists working in that particular field discuss topics such as biomolecules, networks and cells as well as failure, multi-scale, agent-based, bio-chemo-mechanical and finite element models appropriate for computational analysis. Applications include arteries, the heart, vascular stents and valve implants as well as adipose, brain, collagenous and engineered tissues. The mechanics of the whole cell and sub-cellular components as well as the extracellular matrix structure and mechanotransduction are described. In particular, the formation and remodeling of stress fibers, cytoskeletal contractility, cell adhesion and the mechanical regulation of fibroblast migration in healing myocardial infarcts are discussed. The essential ingredients of continuum mechanics are provided. Constitutive models of fiber-reinforced materials with an emphasis on arterial walls ...

  8. A survey of static and dynamic potential games

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONZLEZ-SNCHEZ David; HERNNDEZ-LERMA Onsimo

    2016-01-01

    Potential games are noncooperative games for which there exist auxiliary functions, called potentials,such that the maximizers of the potential are also Nash equilibria of the corresponding game. Some properties of Nash equilibria, such as existence or stability, can be derived from the potential, whenever it exists. We survey different classes of potential games in the static and dynamic cases, with a finite number of players, as well as in population games where a continuum of players is allowed. Likewise, theoretical concepts and applications are discussed by means of illustrative examples.

  9. A biomechanical model of mammographic compressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, J H; Rajagopal, V; Nielsen, P M F; Nash, M P

    2008-02-01

    A number of biomechanical models have been proposed to improve nonrigid registration techniques for multimodal breast image alignment. A deformable breast model may also be useful for overcoming difficulties in interpreting 2D X-ray projections (mammograms) of 3D volumes (breast tissues). If a deformable model could accurately predict the shape changes that breasts undergo during mammography, then the model could serve to localize suspicious masses (visible in mammograms) in the unloaded state, or in any other deformed state required for further investigations (such as biopsy or other medical imaging modalities). In this paper, we present a validation study that was conducted in order to develop a biomechanical model based on the well-established theory of continuum mechanics (finite elasticity theory with contact mechanics) and demonstrate its use for this application. Experimental studies using gel phantoms were conducted to test the accuracy in predicting mammographic-like deformations. The material properties of the gel phantom were estimated using a nonlinear optimization process, which minimized the errors between the experimental and the model-predicted surface data by adjusting the parameter associated with the neo-Hookean constitutive relation. Two compressions (the equivalent of cranio-caudal and medio-lateral mammograms) were performed on the phantom, and the corresponding deformations were recorded using a MRI scanner. Finite element simulations were performed to mimic the experiments using the estimated material properties with appropriate boundary conditions. The simulation results matched the experimental recordings of the deformed phantom, with a sub-millimeter root-mean-square error for each compression state. Having now validated our finite element model of breast compression, the next stage is to apply the model to clinical images.

  10. WorldSID Prototype Dummy Biomechanical Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesari, D; Compigne, S; Scherer, R; Xu, L; Takahashi, N; Page, M; Asakawa, K; Kostyniuk, G; Hautmann, E; Bortenschlager, K; Sakurai, M; Harigae, T

    2001-11-01

    The results of biomechanical testing of the WorldSID prototype dummy are presented in this paper. The WorldSID dummy is a new, advanced Worldwide Side Impact Dummy that has the anthropometry of a mid-sized adult male. The first prototype of this dummy has been evaluated by the WorldSID Task Group against previously established corridors for its critical body regions. The response corridors are defined in the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) Technical Report 9790. The prototype is the first version of the WorldSID dummy to be built and tested. This dummy has been subjected to a rigorous program of testing to evaluate, first and foremost its biofidelity, but also its repeatability. Following this initial evaluation, any required modifications will be incorporated into a pre-production version of the WorldSID dummy so that it rates "good" to "excellent" on the ISO dummy biofidelity scale - a rating exceeding that of all current side impact dummies. Also, the overall WorldSID repeatability must not exceed a coefficient of variation of 7% at injury assessment level and this has to be verified for the different body regions. The dummy's head, neck, thorax, abdomen and pelvis were evaluated against the ISO technical report requirements. Testing included drop tests, pendulum impacts, and sled tests. The biofidelity rating of the WorldSID prototype was calculated using the weighted biomechanical test response procedure developed by ISO. The paper presents the results of the testing, which give a very positive indication of the dummy's potential. Based on this evaluation of the dummy biofidelity, the WorldSID prototype dummy exhibits a biofidelity rating of 6.15 that corresponds to an ISO biofidelity classification of "fair". In addition, the dummy shows good repeatability with a global coefficient of variation of 3.30% for the pendulum and rigid sled tests.

  11. Biomechanical implications of walking with indigenous footwear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Catherine; Stassijns, Gaetane; Cornelis, Wim; D'Août, Kristiaan

    2017-04-01

    This study investigates biomechanical implications of walking with indigenous "Kolhapuri" footwear compared to barefoot walking among a population of South Indians. Ten healthy adults from South India walked barefoot and indigenously shod at voluntary speed on an artificial substrate. The experiment was repeated outside, on a natural substrate. Data were collected from (1) a heel-mounted 3D-accelerometer recording peak impact at heel contact, (2) an ankle-mounted 3D-goniometer (plantar/dorsiflexion and inversion/eversion), and (3) sEMG electrodes at the m. tibialis anterior and the m. gastrocnemius medialis. Data show that the effect of indigenous footwear on the measured variables, compared to barefoot walking, is relatively small and consistent between substrates (even though subjects walked faster on the natural substrate). Walking barefoot, compared to shod walking yields higher impact accelerations, but the differences are small and only significant for the artificial substrate. The main rotations of the ankle joint are mostly similar between conditions. Only the shod condition shows a faster ankle rotation over the rapid eversion motion on the natural substrate. Maximal dorsiflexion in late stance differs between the footwear conditions on an artificial substrate, with the shod condition involving a less dorsiflexed ankle, and the plantar flexion at toe-off is more extreme when shod. Overall the activity pattern of the external foot muscles is similar. The indigenous footwear studied (Kolhapuri) seems to alter foot biomechanics only in a subtle way. While offering some degree of protection, walking in this type of footwear resembles barefoot gait and this type of indigenous footwear might be considered "minimal". © 2017 The Authors American Journal of Physical Anthropology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Static polarizabilities of dielectric nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hye-Young; Sofo, Jorge O.; Cole, Milton W.; Velegol, Darrell; Mukhopadhyay, Gautam

    2005-01-01

    A cluster consisting of many atoms or molecules may be considered, in some circumstances, to be a single large molecule with a well-defined polarizability. Once the polarizability of such a cluster is known, one can evaluate certain properties--e.g. the cluster's van der Waals interactions, using expressions derived for atoms or molecules. In the present work, we evaluate the static polarizability of a cluster using a microscopic method that is exact within the linear and dipolar approximations. Numerical examples are presented for various shapes and sizes of clusters composed of identical atoms, where the term 'atom' actually refers to a generic constituent, which could be any polarizable entity. The results for the clusters' polarizabilities are compared with those obtained by assuming simple additivity of the constituents' atomic polarizabilities; in many cases, the difference is large, demonstrating the inadequacy of the additivity approximation. Comparison is made (for symmetrical geometries) with results obtained from continuum models of the polarizability. Also, the surface effects due to the nonuniform local field near a surface or edge are shown to be significant

  13. Static response of deformable microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christov, Ivan C.; Sidhore, Tanmay C.

    2017-11-01

    Microfluidic channels manufactured from PDMS are a key component of lab-on-a-chip devices. Experimentally, rectangular microchannels are found to deform into a non-rectangular cross-section due to fluid-structure interactions. Deformation affects the flow profile, which results in a nonlinear relationship between the volumetric flow rate and the pressure drop. We develop a framework, within the lubrication approximation (l >> w >> h), to self-consistently derive flow rate-pressure drop relations. Emphasis is placed on handling different types of elastic response: from pure plate-bending, to half-space deformation, to membrane stretching. The ``simplest'' model (Stokes flow in a 3D rectangular channel capped with a linearly elastic Kirchhoff-Love plate) agrees well with recent experiments. We also simulate the static response of such microfluidic channels under laminar flow conditions using ANSYSWorkbench. Simulations are calibrated using experimental flow rate-pressure drop data from the literature. The simulations provide highly resolved deformation profiles, which are difficult to measure experimentally. By comparing simulations, experiments and our theoretical models, we show good agreement in many flow/deformation regimes, without any fitting parameters.

  14. Aortic valve biomechanics during LVAD support: Implementation in a bioreactor design and preliminary testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, Madiha

    Although Left Ventricle Assist Device (LVAD) support has enhanced the quality of life for many heart failure patients, its prolonged in-vivo implantation causes change in hemodynamics and biomechanics of the aortic heart valve eventually leading to development of aortic insufficiency (AI). The LVAD decreases pressure in the left ventricle, leading to high transvalvular pressure and reduced aortic valve opening. Our hypothesis is that the increased pressure leads to increased mechanical stretch in the aortic valve leaflets, inducing a cascade of responses that ultimately result in local tissue fibrosis and AI. The goal of this study is to investigate the mechanism behind this hypothesis using the methods of tissue engineering. A bioreactor has been built that imparts cyclic stretch and flow to small 3-D constructs of living cells cultured in a silicone membrane. The approach is to use this device for in vitro tissue culture of vascular interstitial cells (VICs) embedded in a collagen gel, which will be subjected to normal and altered stretch and shear representative of the in vivo valve biomechanics. The bioreactor was validated to measure the amount of stretch and shear it can impart to closely replicate in-vivo conditions using PIV technique and ImageJ software. Mean longitudinal strain of 0.037cm (SD= +/-0.013cm) was recorded with mean perpendicular strain being 0.0046cm (SD= +/-0.0169cm). Measured average shear stress imparted at 100ml/min was 2.735 dynes/cm2 (SD= +/-2.25 dynes/cm2) with 6.21 dynes/cm2 (SD= +/-3.35 dynes/cm2) at 200ml/min. The cells that underwent cycles of stretch and shear in the bioreactor were screened for formation of myofibroblast using techniques of immunohistochemistry. The marker used was ? smooth muscle actin (SMA) which identifies pathological differentiation of the CPCs to myofibroblast. Yhe expression of the myofibroblast phenotype is a feature of valvupathy. In case of Shear Vs Static control, the mean value for SMA expression for

  15. Soft Tissue Biomechanical Modeling for Computer Assisted Surgery

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

      This volume focuses on the biomechanical modeling of biological tissues in the context of Computer Assisted Surgery (CAS). More specifically, deformable soft tissues are addressed since they are the subject of the most recent developments in this field. The pioneering works on this CAS topic date from the 1980's, with applications in orthopaedics and biomechanical models of bones. More recently, however, biomechanical models of soft tissues have been proposed since most of the human body is made of soft organs that can be deformed by the surgical gesture. Such models are much more complicated to handle since the tissues can be subject to large deformations (non-linear geometrical framework) as well as complex stress/strain relationships (non-linear mechanical framework). Part 1 of the volume presents biomechanical models that have been developed in a CAS context and used during surgery. This is particularly new since most of the soft tissues models already proposed concern Computer Assisted Planning, with ...

  16. The increasing importance of the biomechanics of impact trauma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Like most engineering subjects, impact biomechanics has evolved from early ... show that the primary deceleration forces acting in the majority of car ... the natural history of falls in old age' showed how the routine observations of a practicing.

  17. The Impact of Biomechanics in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, David L.; Goldstein, Steven A.; Guo, X. Edward; Kamm, Roger; Laurencin, Cato T.; McIntire, Larry V.; Mow, Van C.; Nerem, Robert M.; Sah, Robert L.; Soslowsky, Louis J.; Spilker, Robert L.; Tranquillo, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    Biomechanical factors profoundly influence the processes of tissue growth, development, maintenance, degeneration, and repair. Regenerative strategies to restore damaged or diseased tissues in vivo and create living tissue replacements in vitro have recently begun to harness advances in understanding of how cells and tissues sense and adapt to their mechanical environment. It is clear that biomechanical considerations will be fundamental to the successful development of clinical therapies based on principles of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine for a broad range of musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, craniofacial, skin, urinary, and neural tissues. Biomechanical stimuli may in fact hold the key to producing regenerated tissues with high strength and endurance. However, many challenges remain, particularly for tissues that function within complex and demanding mechanical environments in vivo. This paper reviews the present role and potential impact of experimental and computational biomechanics in engineering functional tissues using several illustrative examples of past successes and future grand challenges. PMID:19583462

  18. Emulating facial biomechanics using multivariate partial least squares surrogate models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tim; Martens, Harald; Hunter, Peter; Mithraratne, Kumar

    2014-11-01

    A detailed biomechanical model of the human face driven by a network of muscles is a useful tool in relating the muscle activities to facial deformations. However, lengthy computational times often hinder its applications in practical settings. The objective of this study is to replace precise but computationally demanding biomechanical model by a much faster multivariate meta-model (surrogate model), such that a significant speedup (to real-time interactive speed) can be achieved. Using a multilevel fractional factorial design, the parameter space of the biomechanical system was probed from a set of sample points chosen to satisfy maximal rank optimality and volume filling. The input-output relationship at these sampled points was then statistically emulated using linear and nonlinear, cross-validated, partial least squares regression models. It was demonstrated that these surrogate models can mimic facial biomechanics efficiently and reliably in real-time. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Biomechanical comparison of osteosynthesis with poly‑L‑lactic acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-01-21

    Jan 21, 2015 ... Fractures of the mandibular condylar process are common fractures affecting the ... mandible replicas are having a medullar and a cortical portion (Synbone ... Based on the biomechanical simulations they performed Neff et al ...

  20. Recent microfluidic devices for studying gamete and embryo biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, David; Takayama, Shuichi; Smith, Gary D

    2015-06-25

    The technical challenges of biomechanic research such as single cell analysis at a high monetary cost, labor, and time for just a small number of measurements is a good match to the strengths of microfluidic devices. New scientific discoveries in the fertilization and embryo development process, of which biomechanics is a major subset of interest, is crucial to fuel the continual improvement of clinical practice in assisted reproduction. The following review will highlight some recent microfluidic devices tailored for gamete and embryo biomechanics where biomimicry arises as a major theme of microfluidic device design and function, and the application of fundamental biomechanic principles are used to improve outcomes of cryopreservation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A COMPARATIVE STUDY ON EFFECTIVENESS OF STATIC STRETCH AND HOLD RELAX TECHNIQUES OVER HAMSTRING FLEXIBILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Vamsidhar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Flexibility is important in prevention of injury, muscular and postural imbalance more over the Hamstring flexibility has a lion share in sports performances and preventing DOMS. Stretching procedures increases the ROM by embarking on biomechanics and Neurologic and molecular mechanics. Hamstrings, the two joint muscle plays a crucial role in two joints integrity and also spine as they are in closed kinematic chain. The hamstring muscles represent the primary flexors of Knee. Hamstrings tightness results in Limits Knee extension when hip is flexed, Posterior Pelvic tilt, and flatten the lumbar spine. Methods: The subjects selected randomly and divided into two groups (Experimental group and control group.30 samples in One group applied with Static Stretch once a day for 3 repetitions 5 days a week for six weeks and 30 samples in other group applied with Hold relax technique once a day for 4 repetitions 5 days a week for six weeks. The knee joint range of motion was measured at the end of every week with Universal goniometer. Results: By comparing the means of Group – I, given Static Stretch and Group – II, given Hold relax Technique for six weeks implied that there is improvement of flexibility in Group – II and the ‘P’ value < 0.01 shows the difference is highly significant. Conclusion: This study concludes that the hold relax Technique method has proved to be better technique then the static stretch for improving hamstring flexibility.

  2. Inertial Measures of Motion for Clinical Biomechanics: Comparative Assessment of Accuracy under Controlled Conditions - Effect of Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebel, Karina; Boissy, Patrick; Hamel, Mathieu; Duval, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Background Inertial measurement of motion with Attitude and Heading Reference Systems (AHRS) is emerging as an alternative to 3D motion capture systems in biomechanics. The objectives of this study are: 1) to describe the absolute and relative accuracy of multiple units of commercially available AHRS under various types of motion; and 2) to evaluate the effect of motion velocity on the accuracy of these measurements. Methods The criterion validity of accuracy was established under controlled conditions using an instrumented Gimbal table. AHRS modules were carefully attached to the center plate of the Gimbal table and put through experimental static and dynamic conditions. Static and absolute accuracy was assessed by comparing the AHRS orientation measurement to those obtained using an optical gold standard. Relative accuracy was assessed by measuring the variation in relative orientation between modules during trials. Findings Evaluated AHRS systems demonstrated good absolute static accuracy (mean error < 0.5o) and clinically acceptable absolute accuracy under condition of slow motions (mean error between 0.5o and 3.1o). In slow motions, relative accuracy varied from 2o to 7o depending on the type of AHRS and the type of rotation. Absolute and relative accuracy were significantly affected (p<0.05) by velocity during sustained motions. The extent of that effect varied across AHRS. Interpretation Absolute and relative accuracy of AHRS are affected by environmental magnetic perturbations and conditions of motions. Relative accuracy of AHRS is mostly affected by the ability of all modules to locate the same global reference coordinate system at all time. Conclusions Existing AHRS systems can be considered for use in clinical biomechanics under constrained conditions of use. While their individual capacity to track absolute motion is relatively consistent, the use of multiple AHRS modules to compute relative motion between rigid bodies needs to be optimized according to

  3. Biomechanical interpretation of a free-breathing lung motion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Tianyu; White, Benjamin; Lamb, James; Low, Daniel A; Moore, Kevin L; Yang Deshan; Mutic, Sasa; Lu Wei

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a biomechanical model for free-breathing motion and compare it to a published heuristic five-dimensional (5D) free-breathing lung motion model. An ab initio biomechanical model was developed to describe the motion of lung tissue during free breathing by analyzing the stress–strain relationship inside lung tissue. The first-order approximation of the biomechanical model was equivalent to a heuristic 5D free-breathing lung motion model proposed by Low et al in 2005 (Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 63 921–9), in which the motion was broken down to a linear expansion component and a hysteresis component. To test the biomechanical model, parameters that characterize expansion, hysteresis and angles between the two motion components were reported independently and compared between two models. The biomechanical model agreed well with the heuristic model within 5.5% in the left lungs and 1.5% in the right lungs for patients without lung cancer. The biomechanical model predicted that a histogram of angles between the two motion components should have two peaks at 39.8° and 140.2° in the left lungs and 37.1° and 142.9° in the right lungs. The data from the 5D model verified the existence of those peaks at 41.2° and 148.2° in the left lungs and 40.1° and 140° in the right lungs for patients without lung cancer. Similar results were also observed for the patients with lung cancer, but with greater discrepancies. The maximum-likelihood estimation of hysteresis magnitude was reported to be 2.6 mm for the lung cancer patients. The first-order approximation of the biomechanical model fit the heuristic 5D model very well. The biomechanical model provided new insights into breathing motion with specific focus on motion trajectory hysteresis.

  4. Interpreting locomotor biomechanics from the morphology of human footprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatala, Kevin G; Wunderlich, Roshna E; Dingwall, Heather L; Richmond, Brian G

    2016-01-01

    Fossil hominin footprints offer unique direct windows to the locomotor behaviors of our ancestors. These data could allow a clearer understanding of the evolution of human locomotion by circumventing issues associated with indirect interpretations of habitual locomotor patterns from fossil skeletal material. However, before we can use fossil hominin footprints to understand better the evolution of human locomotion, we must first develop an understanding of how locomotor biomechanics are preserved in, and can be inferred from, footprint morphologies. In this experimental study, 41 habitually barefoot modern humans created footprints under controlled conditions in which variables related to locomotor biomechanics could be quantified. Measurements of regional topography (depth) were taken from 3D models of those footprints, and principal components analysis was used to identify orthogonal axes that described the largest proportions of topographic variance within the human experimental sample. Linear mixed effects models were used to quantify the influences of biomechanical variables on the first five principal axes of footprint topographic variation, thus providing new information on the biomechanical variables most evidently expressed in the morphology of human footprints. The footprint's overall depth was considered as a confounding variable, since biomechanics may be linked to the extent to which a substrate deforms. Three of five axes showed statistically significant relationships with variables related to both locomotor biomechanics and substrate displacement; one axis was influenced only by biomechanics and another only by the overall depth of the footprint. Principal axes of footprint morphological variation were significantly related to gait type (walking or running), kinematics of the hip and ankle joints and the distribution of pressure beneath the foot. These results provide the first quantitative framework for developing hypotheses regarding the

  5. Advances in Proximal Interphalangeal Joint Arthroplasty: Biomechanics and Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Andy F; Rahgozar, Paymon; Chung, Kevin C

    2018-05-01

    Proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint arthritis is a debilitating condition. The complexity of the joint makes management particularly challenging. Treatment of PIP arthritis requires an understanding of the biomechanics of the joint. PIP joint arthroplasty is one treatment option that has evolved over time. Advances in biomaterials have improved and expanded arthroplasty design. This article reviews biomechanics and arthroplasty design of the PIP joint. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Biomechanics of compensatory mechanisms in spinal-pelvic complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, D. V.; Hominets, V. V.; Kirillova, I. V.; Kossovich, L. Yu; Kudyashev, A. L.; Teremshonok, A. V.

    2018-04-01

    3D geometric solid computer model of spinal-pelvic complex was constructed on the basis of computed tomography and full body X-ray in standing position data. The constructed model was used for biomechanical analysis of compensatory mechanisms arising in the spine with anteversion and retroversion of the pelvis. The results of numerical biomechanical 3D modeling are in good agreement with the clinical data.

  7. Emulating facial biomechanics using multivariate partial least squares surrogate models

    OpenAIRE

    Martens, Harald; Wu, Tim; Hunter, Peter; Mithraratne, Kumar

    2014-01-01

    This is the author’s final, accepted and refereed manuscript to the article. Locked until 2015-05-06 A detailed biomechanical model of the human face driven by a network of muscles is a useful tool in relating the muscle activities to facial deformations. However, lengthy computational times often hinder its applications in practical settings. The objective of this study is to replace precise but computationally demanding biomechanical model by a much faster multivariate meta-mode...

  8. Clinical and biomechanical researches of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) rods for semi-rigid lumbar fusion: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chan; Liu, Lei; Shi, Jian-Yong; Yan, Kai-Zhong; Shen, Wei-Zhong; Yang, Zhen-Rong

    2018-04-01

    Lumbar spinal fusion using rigid rods is a common surgical technique. However, adjacent segment disease and other adverse effects can occur. Dynamic stabilization devices preserve physiologic motion and reduce painful stress but have a high rate of construct failure and reoperation. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) rods for semi-rigid fusions have a similar stiffness and adequate stabilization power compared with titanium rods, but with improved load sharing and reduced mechanical failure. The purpose of this paper is to review and evaluate the clinical and biomechanical performance of PEEK rods. A systematic review of clinical and biomechanical studies was conducted. A literature search using the PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases identified studies that met the eligibility criteria. Eight clinical studies and 15 biomechanical studies were included in this systematic review. The visual analog scale and the Oswestry disability index improved significantly in most studies, with satisfactory fusion rates. The occurrence of adjacent segment disease was low. In biomechanical studies, PEEK rods demonstrated a superior load-sharing distribution, a larger adjacent segment range of motion, and reduced stress at the rod-screw/screw-bone interfaces compared with titanium rods. The PEEK rod construct was simple to assemble and had a reliable in vivo performance compared with dynamic devices. The quality of clinical studies was low with confounding results, although results from mechanical studies were encouraging. There is no evidence strong enough to confirm better outcomes with PEEK rods than titanium rods. More studies with better protocols, a larger sample size, and a longer follow-up time are needed.

  9. Gait biomechanics in the era of data science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferber, Reed; Osis, Sean T; Hicks, Jennifer L; Delp, Scott L

    2016-12-08

    Data science has transformed fields such as computer vision and economics. The ability of modern data science methods to extract insights from large, complex, heterogeneous, and noisy datasets is beginning to provide a powerful complement to the traditional approaches of experimental motion capture and biomechanical modeling. The purpose of this article is to provide a perspective on how data science methods can be incorporated into our field to advance our understanding of gait biomechanics and improve treatment planning procedures. We provide examples of how data science approaches have been applied to biomechanical data. We then discuss the challenges that remain for effectively using data science approaches in clinical gait analysis and gait biomechanics research, including the need for new tools, better infrastructure and incentives for sharing data, and education across the disciplines of biomechanics and data science. By addressing these challenges, we can revolutionize treatment planning and biomechanics research by capitalizing on the wealth of knowledge gained by gait researchers over the past decades and the vast, but often siloed, data that are collected in clinical and research laboratories around the world. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Biomechanics of occlusion--implications for oral rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, C C

    2016-03-01

    The dental occlusion is an important aspect of clinical dentistry; there are diverse functional demands ranging from highly precise tooth contacts to large crushing forces. Further, there are dogmatic, passionate and often diverging views on the relationship between the dental occlusion and various diseases and disorders including temporomandibular disorders, non-carious cervical lesions and tooth movement. This study provides an overview of the biomechanics of the masticatory system in the context of the dental occlusion's role in function. It explores the adaptation and precision of dental occlusion, its role in bite force, jaw movement, masticatory performance and its influence on the oro-facial musculoskeletal system. Biomechanics helps us better understand the structure and function of biological systems and consequently an understanding of the forces on, and displacements of, the dental occlusion. Biomechanics provides insight into the relationships between the dentition, jaws, temporomandibular joints, and muscles. Direct measurements of tooth contacts and forces are difficult, and biomechanical models have been developed to better understand the relationship between the occlusion and function. Importantly, biomechanical research will provide knowledge to help correct clinical misperceptions and inform better patient care. The masticatory system demonstrates a remarkable ability to adapt to a changing biomechanical environment and changes to the dental occlusion or other components of the musculoskeletal system tend to be well tolerated. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE IN SPORTS BIOMECHANICS: NEW DAWN OR FALSE HOPE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Bartlett

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews developments in the use of Artificial Intelligence (AI in sports biomechanics over the last decade. It outlines possible uses of Expert Systems as diagnostic tools for evaluating faults in sports movements ('techniques' and presents some example knowledge rules for such an expert system. It then compares the analysis of sports techniques, in which Expert Systems have found little place to date, with gait analysis, in which they are routinely used. Consideration is then given to the use of Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs in sports biomechanics, focusing on Kohonen self-organizing maps, which have been the most widely used in technique analysis, and multi-layer networks, which have been far more widely used in biomechanics in general. Examples of the use of ANNs in sports biomechanics are presented for javelin and discus throwing, shot putting and football kicking. I also present an example of the use of Evolutionary Computation in movement optimization in the soccer throw in, which predicted an optimal technique close to that in the coaching literature. After briefly overviewing the use of AI in both sports science and biomechanics in general, the article concludes with some speculations about future uses of AI in sports biomechanics.

  12. Biomechanically Excited SMD Model of a Walking Pedestrian

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Mengshi; Georgakis, Christos T.; Chen, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Through their biomechanical properties, pedestrians interact with the structures they occupy. Although this interaction has been recognized by researchers, pedestrians' biomechanical properties have not been fully addressed. In this paper, a spring-mass-damper (SMD) system, with a pair of biomech......Through their biomechanical properties, pedestrians interact with the structures they occupy. Although this interaction has been recognized by researchers, pedestrians' biomechanical properties have not been fully addressed. In this paper, a spring-mass-damper (SMD) system, with a pair...... produced the pedestrian's center of mass (COM) trajectories from the captured motion markers. The vertical COM trajectory was approximated to be the pedestrian SMD dynamic responses under the excitation of biomechanical forces. SMD model parameters of a pedestrian for a specific walking frequency were...... estimated from a known walking frequency and the pedestrian's weight, assuming that pedestrians always walk in displacement resonance and retain a constant damping ratio of 0.3. Thus, biomechanical forces were extracted using the measured SMD dynamic responses and the estimated SMD parameters. Extracted...

  13. Do cells contribute to tendon and ligament biomechanics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Hammer

    Full Text Available Acellular scaffolds are increasingly used for the surgical repair of tendon injury and ligament tears. Despite this increased use, very little data exist directly comparing acellular scaffolds and their native counterparts. Such a comparison would help establish the effectiveness of the acellularization procedure of human tissues. Furthermore, such a comparison would help estimate the influence of cells in ligament and tendon stability and give insight into the effects of acellularization on collagen.Eighteen human iliotibial tract samples were obtained from nine body donors. Nine samples were acellularized with sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS, while nine counterparts from the same donors remained in the native condition. The ends of all samples were plastinated to minimize material slippage. Their water content was adjusted to 69%, using the osmotic stress technique to exclude water content-related alterations of the mechanical properties. Uniaxial tensile testing was performed to obtain the elastic modulus, ultimate stress and maximum strain. The effectiveness of the acellularization procedure was histologically verified by means of a DNA assay.The histology samples showed a complete removal of the cells, an extensive, yet incomplete removal of the DNA content and alterations to the extracellular collagen. Tensile properties of the tract samples such as elastic modulus and ultimate stress were unaffected by acellularization with the exception of maximum strain.The data indicate that cells influence the mechanical properties of ligaments and tendons in vitro to a negligible extent. Moreover, acellularization with SDS alters material properties to a minor extent, indicating that this method provides a biomechanical match in ligament and tendon reconstruction. However, the given protocol insufficiently removes DNA. This may increase the potential for transplant rejection when acellular tract scaffolds are used in soft tissue repair. Further research

  14. Dynamic stability under sudden loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simitses, G.J.

    1998-01-01

    The concept of dynamic stability of elastic structures subjected to sudden (step) loads is discussed. The various criteria and related methodologies for estimating critical conditions are presented with the emphasis on their similarities and differences. These are demonstrated by employing a simple mechanical model. Several structural configurations are analyzed, for demonstration purposes, with the intention of comparing critical dynamic loads to critical static loads. These configurations include shallow arches and shallow spherical caps, two bar frames, and imperfect cylindrical shells of metallic as well as laminated composite construction. In the demonstration examples, the effect of static pre loading on the dynamic critical load is presented

  15. Patellofemoral pressure changes after static and dynamic medial patellofemoral ligament reconstructions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rood, A.; Hannink, G.; Lenting, A.; Groenen, K.; Koëter, S.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph; van Kampen, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Reconstructing the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) has become a key procedure for stabilizing the patella. Different techniques to reconstruct the MPFL have been described: static techniques in which the graft is fixed rigidly to the bone or dynamic techniques with soft tissue

  16. Patellofemoral Pressure Changes After Static and Dynamic Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstructions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rood, A.; Hannink, G.; Lenting, A.; Groenen, K.; Koeter, S.; Verdonschot, N.J.; Kampen, A. van

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reconstructing the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) has become a key procedure for stabilizing the patella. Different techniques to reconstruct the MPFL have been described: static techniques in which the graft is fixed rigidly to the bone or dynamic techniques with soft tissue

  17. Adiabatic and non-adiabatic electron oscillations in a static electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlberg, C.

    1977-03-01

    The influence of a static electric field on the oscillations of a one-dimensional stream of electrons is investigated. In the weak field limit the oscillations are adiabatic and mode coupling negligible, but becomes significant if the field is tronger. The latter effect is believed to be of importance for the stability of e.g. potential double layers

  18. Biomechanics of Thoracolumbar Burst and Chance-Type Fractures during Fall from Height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design In vitro biomechanical study. Objective To investigate the biomechanics of thoracolumbar burst and Chance-type fractures during fall from height. Methods Our model consisted of a three-vertebra human thoracolumbar specimen (n = 4) stabilized with muscle force replication and mounted within an impact dummy. Each specimen was subjected to a single fall from an average height of 2.1 m with average velocity at impact of 6.4 m/s. Biomechanical responses were determined using impact load data combined with high-speed movie analyses. Injuries to the middle vertebra of each spinal segment were evaluated using imaging and dissection. Results Average peak compressive forces occurred within 10 milliseconds of impact and reached 40.3 kN at the ground, 7.1 kN at the lower vertebra, and 3.6 kN at the upper vertebra. Subsequently, average peak flexion (55.0 degrees) and tensile forces (0.7 kN upper vertebra, 0.3 kN lower vertebra) occurred between 43.0 and 60.0 milliseconds. The middle vertebra of all specimens sustained pedicle and endplate fractures with comminution, bursting, and reduced height of its vertebral body. Chance-type fractures were observed consisting of a horizontal split fracture through the laminae and pedicles extending anteriorly through the vertebral body. Conclusions We hypothesize that the compression fractures of the pedicles and vertebral body together with burst fracture occurred at the time of peak spinal compression, 10 milliseconds. Subsequently, the onset of Chance-type fracture occurred at 20 milliseconds through the already fractured and weakened pedicles and vertebral body due to flexion-distraction and a forward shifting spinal axis of rotation. PMID:25083357

  19. Effects of plantar fascia stiffness on the biomechanical responses of the ankle-foot complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Jason Tak-Man; Zhang, Ming; An, Kai-Nan

    2004-10-01

    The plantar fascia is one of the major stabilizing structures of the longitudinal arch of human foot, especially during midstance of the gait cycle. Knowledge of its functional biomechanics is important for establishing the biomechanical rationale behind different rehabilitation, orthotic and surgical treatment of plantar fasciitis. This study aims at quantifying the biomechanical responses of the ankle-foot complex with different plantar fascia stiffness. A geometrical detailed three-dimensional finite element model of the human foot and ankle, incorporating geometric and contact nonlinearities was constructed by 3D reconstruction of MR images. A sensitivity study was conducted to evaluate the effects of varying elastic modulus (0-700 MPa) of the plantar fascia on the stress/strain distribution of the bony, ligamentous and encapsulated soft tissue structures. The results showed that decreasing the Young's modulus of plantar fascia would increase the strains of the long and short plantar and spring ligaments significantly. With zero fascia Young's modulus to simulate the plantar fascia release, there was a shift in peak von Mises stresses from the third to the second metatarsal bones and increased stresses at the plantar ligament attachment area of the cuboid bone. Decrease in arch height and midfoot pronation were predicted but did not lead to the total collapse of foot arch. Surgical dissection of the plantar fascia may induce excessive strains or stresses in the ligamentous and bony structures. Surgical release of plantar fascia should be well-planned to minimise the effect on its structural integrity to reduce the risk of developing arch instability and subsequent painful foot syndrome.

  20. DYNAMIC MAGNIFICATION OF BIOMECHANICAL SYSTEM MOTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Pokatilov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Methods for estimation of dynamic magnification pertaining to motion in biomechanics have been developed and approbаted in the paper. It has been ascertained that widely-used characteristics for evaluation of motion influence on mechanisms and machinery such as a dynamic coefficient and acceleration capacity factor become irrelevant while investigating human locomotion under elastic support conditions. The reason is an impossibility to compare human motion in case when there is a contact with elastic and rigid supports because while changing rigidity of the support exercise performing technique is also changing. In this case the technique still depends on a current state of a specific sportsman. Such situation is observed in sports gymnastics. Structure of kinematic and dynamic models for human motion has been investigated in the paper. It has been established that properties of an elastic support are reflected in models within two aspects: in an explicit form, when models have parameters of dynamic deformation for a gymnastic apparatus, and in an implicit form, when we have numerically changed parameters of human motion. The first part can be evaluated quantitatively while making comparison with calculations made in accordance with complete models. For this reason notions of selected and complete models have been introduced in the paper. It has been proposed to specify models for support and models of biomechanical system that represent models pertaining only to human locomotor system. It has been revealed that the selected models of support in kinematics and dynamics have structural difference. Kinematics specifies only parameters of elastic support deformation and dynamics specifies support parameters in an explicit form and additionally in models of human motion in an explicit form as well. Quantitative estimation of a dynamic motion magnification in kinematics and dynamics models has been given while using computing experiment for grand

  1. Martian Atmospheric Pressure Static Charge Elimination Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    A Martian pressure static charge elimination tool is currently in development in the Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory (ESPL) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. In standard Earth atmosphere conditions, static charge can be neutralized from an insulating surface using air ionizers. These air ionizers generate ions through corona breakdown. The Martian atmosphere is 7 Torr of mostly carbon dioxide, which makes it inherently difficult to use similar methods as those used for standard atmosphere static elimination tools. An initial prototype has been developed to show feasibility of static charge elimination at low pressure, using corona discharge. A needle point and thin wire loop are used as the corona generating electrodes. A photo of the test apparatus is shown below. Positive and negative high voltage pulses are sent to the needle point. This creates positive and negative ions that can be used for static charge neutralization. In a preliminary test, a floating metal plate was charged to approximately 600 volts under Martian atmospheric conditions. The static elimination tool was enabled and the voltage on the metal plate dropped rapidly to -100 volts. This test data is displayed below. Optimization is necessary to improve the electrostatic balance of the static elimination tool.

  2. Biomechanical Evaluation of the MACSTL Internal Fixator for Thoracic Spinal Stabilisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Veselý

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Unstable fractures of the thoracic spine in humans represent a serious social and economic issue. They may lead to persistent consequences and chronic disease. The anatomical and biomechanical characteristics of the thoracic spine are different from all the other spinal parts due to its higher mobility. The vertebrae of the chest area are less mobile, conferring a higher degree of rigidity to the spine. To destabilize this relatively rigid system, a considerable force is necessary. The treatment of unstable spinal fractures is solely surgical. The decompression of the spinal canal with reposition and stabilisation of the fracture is indicated urgently. This intervention is performed mostly from the posterior approach in the first phase. However, the anterior spinal column is the structure responsible for the stability of the spine. Therefore, the recent advances in spine surgery focus on this area of expertise. For this reason, we carried out a bio-mechanical study aimed at assessing the effectiveness of two surgical tactics used. The study consisted of comparative experiments performed by computer-aided device on segments of pig cadavers (n = 5. The experiment involved a comparison of segments of the thoracic spine under the following conditions: an anatomically intact segment, a spine segment with an artificially created anterior instability, and a segment with an applied internal fixator. The experiment compared the mechanical characteristics of these segments. The experiment has demonstrated that after application of the internal fixator used for stabilisation of the injured anterior spinal column at defined pre-loading of 200 N, the stability of damaged spinal segment in torsion increased twofold. It was also verified that sufficient stability can be ensured using the Modular Anterior Construct System (MACSTL implant for ventral stabilisation of thoracic spine unstable injuries. Endoscopic application of this implant represents an

  3. Biomechanical comments about Triassic dinosaurs from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Delcourt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Triassic dinosaurs of Brazil are found in Santa Maria and Caturrita formations, Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil. There are three species known from the Santa Maria Formation (Staurikosaurus pricei, Saturnalia tupiniquim and Pampadromaeus barberenai, and two from Caturrita Formation (Guaibasaurus candelariensis and Unaysaurus tolentinoi. These dinosaur materials are, for the most part, well preserved and allow for descriptions of musculature and biomechanical studies. The lateral rotation of the Saturnalia femur is corroborated through calculations of muscle moment arms. The enhanced supracetabular crest of Saturnalia, Guaibasaurus, Staurikosaurus, Herrerasaurus ischigualastensis, Efraasia minor and Chormogisaurus novasi suggests that basal dinosaurs may have maintained an inclination of the trunk at least 20º on the horizontal axis. The pectoral girdle articulation of basal sauropodomorphs (Saturnalia and Unaysaurus was established using a new method, the Clavicular Ring, and the scapular blade remains near 60º on the horizontal axis. This is a plesiomorphic condition among sauropodomorphs and is also seen in the articulated plateosauridae Seitaad ruessi. The Brazilian basal dinosaurs were lightweight with a body mass estimated around 18.5 kg for Staurikosaurus, 6.5 kg for Saturnalia, and 17 kg for Guaibasaurus. Pampadromaeus probably weighed 2.5 kg, but measures of its femur are necessary to confirm this hypothesis. The Triassic dinosaurs from Brazil were diversified but shared some functional aspects that were important in an evolutionary context.

  4. Patient-specific models of cardiac biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Adarsh; Villongco, Christopher T.; Chuang, Joyce; Frank, Lawrence R.; Nigam, Vishal; Belezzuoli, Ernest; Stark, Paul; Krummen, David E.; Narayan, Sanjiv; Omens, Jeffrey H.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Kerckhoffs, Roy C. P.

    2013-07-01

    Patient-specific models of cardiac function have the potential to improve diagnosis and management of heart disease by integrating medical images with heterogeneous clinical measurements subject to constraints imposed by physical first principles and prior experimental knowledge. We describe new methods for creating three-dimensional patient-specific models of ventricular biomechanics in the failing heart. Three-dimensional bi-ventricular geometry is segmented from cardiac CT images at end-diastole from patients with heart failure. Human myofiber and sheet architecture is modeled using eigenvectors computed from diffusion tensor MR images from an isolated, fixed human organ-donor heart and transformed to the patient-specific geometric model using large deformation diffeomorphic mapping. Semi-automated methods were developed for optimizing the passive material properties while simultaneously computing the unloaded reference geometry of the ventricles for stress analysis. Material properties of active cardiac muscle contraction were optimized to match ventricular pressures measured by cardiac catheterization, and parameters of a lumped-parameter closed-loop model of the circulation were estimated with a circulatory adaptation algorithm making use of information derived from echocardiography. These components were then integrated to create a multi-scale model of the patient-specific heart. These methods were tested in five heart failure patients from the San Diego Veteran's Affairs Medical Center who gave informed consent. The simulation results showed good agreement with measured echocardiographic and global functional parameters such as ejection fraction and peak cavity pressures.

  5. Physiological and biomechanical aspects of orienteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creagh, U; Reilly, T

    1997-12-01

    Orienteering is an endurance running event which differs from other running sports both in its cognitive element and in the type of terrain encountered. The demands of overcoming this terrain are not manifest in significant differences between orienteers and road runners in somatotype, though elite female orienteers have consistently been shown to have higher levels of adiposity (> 19%) than elite road runners. High aerobic power in orienteers (up to 63 and 76 ml/kg/min in women and men, respectively) is coupled with lower anaerobic performance. While leg strength is generally not high when compared with other athletic specialties, female orienteers have relatively good leg flexion strength. The energy cost of running is greatly increased in rough terrain. Oxygen cost was 26% higher while running in a forest when compared with road running. Biomechanical differences in stride pattern contribute towards this increased demand. Despite the high energy demands during competition, orienteers pace themselves such that their mean heart rate remains within the range of 167 to 172 beats/min, despite large fluctuations. The rough terrain encountered in orienteering results not only in a high energy cost but also in a higher incidence of sport-specific injuries, particularly to the ankle. Minor injuries such as cuts and bruises are common during competition.

  6. Biomechanical influences on balance recovery by stepping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, E T; Robinovitch, S N

    1999-10-01

    Stepping represents a common means for balance recovery after a perturbation to upright posture. Yet little is known regarding the biomechanical factors which determine whether a step succeeds in preventing a fall. In the present study, we developed a simple pendulum-spring model of balance recovery by stepping, and used this to assess how step length and step contact time influence the effort (leg contact force) and feasibility of balance recovery by stepping. We then compared model predictions of step characteristics which minimize leg contact force to experimentally observed values over a range of perturbation strengths. At all perturbation levels, experimentally observed step execution times were higher than optimal, and step lengths were smaller than optimal. However, the predicted increase in leg contact force associated with these deviations was substantial only for large perturbations. Furthermore, increases in the strength of the perturbation caused subjects to take larger, quicker steps, which reduced their predicted leg contact force. We interpret these data to reflect young subjects' desire to minimize recovery effort, subject to neuromuscular constraints on step execution time and step length. Finally, our model predicts that successful balance recovery by stepping is governed by a coupling between step length, step execution time, and leg strength, so that the feasibility of balance recovery decreases unless declines in one capacity are offset by enhancements in the others. This suggests that one's risk for falls may be affected more by small but diffuse neuromuscular impairments than by larger impairment in a single motor capacity.

  7. Comparative biomechanics: life's physical world (second edition)

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Why do you switch from walking to running at a specific speed? Why do tall trees rarely blow over in high winds? And why does a spore ejected into air at seventy miles per hour travel only a fraction of an inch? Comparative Biomechanics is the first and only textbook that takes a comprehensive look at the mechanical aspects of life--covering animals and plants, structure and movement, and solids and fluids. An ideal entry point into the ways living creatures interact with their immediate physical world, this revised and updated edition examines how the forms and activities of animals and plants reflect the materials available to nature, considers rules for fluid flow and structural design, and explores how organisms contend with environmental forces. Drawing on physics and mechanical engineering, Steven Vogel looks at how animals swim and fly, modes of terrestrial locomotion, organism responses to winds and water currents, circulatory and suspension-feeding systems, and the relationship between size and mech...

  8. Adaptive sports technology and biomechanics: prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luigi, Arthur Jason; Cooper, Rory A

    2014-08-01

    With the technologic advances in medicine and an emphasis on maintaining physical fitness, the population of athletes with impairments is growing. It is incumbent upon health care practitioners to make every effort to inform these individuals of growing and diverse opportunities and to encourage safe exercise and athletic participation through counseling and education. Given the opportunities for participation in sports for persons with a limb deficiency, the demand for new, innovative prosthetic designs is challenging the clinical and technical expertise of the physician and prosthetist. When generating a prosthetic prescription, physicians and prosthetists should consider the needs and preferences of the athlete with limb deficiency, as well as the functional demands of the chosen sporting activity. The intent of this article is to provide information regarding the current advancements in the adaptive sports technology and biomechanics in the field of prosthetics, and to assist clinicians and their patients in facilitating participation in sporting activities. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Injury biomechanics of C2 dens fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank; Baisden, Jamie; Gennarelli, Thomas; Maiman, Dennis

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the biomechanics of dens fractures of the second cervical vertebra in the adult population due to motor vehicle crashes. Case-by-case records from the Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network (CIREN) and National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) databases were used. Variables such as change in velocity, impact direction and body habitus were extracted. Results indicated that similarities exist in the two databases despite differences in sampling methods between the two sources (e.g., CIREN is not population based). Trauma is predominantly associated with the frontal mode of impact. Majority of injuries occur with change in velocities below current federal guideline thresholds. No specific bias exists with respect to variables such as age, height, weight, and gender. Because similar conclusions can be drawn with regard to vehicle model years, design changes during these years may have had little effect on this injury. To ameliorate trauma, emphasis should be placed on the frontal impact mode and entire adult population. Because of clinical implications in the fracture type (II being most critical) and lack of specific coding, CIREN data demonstrates the need to improve injury coding in the AIS and application in the NASS to enhance occupant safety and treatment in the field of automotive medicine.

  10. CURRENT CONCEPTS IN BIOMECHANICAL INTERVENTIONS FOR PATELLOFEMORAL PAIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meira, Erik P.

    2016-01-01

    Patellofemoral pain (PFP) has historically been a complex and enigmatic issue. Many of the factors thought to relate to PFP remain after patients' symptoms have resolved making their clinical importance difficult to determine. The tissue homeostasis model proposed by Dye in 2005 can assist with understanding and implementing biomechanical interventions for PFP. Under this model, the goal of interventions for PFP should be to re-establish patellofemoral joint (PFJ) homeostasis through a temporary alteration of load to the offended tissue, followed by incrementally restoring the envelope of function to the baseline level or higher. High levels of PFJ loads, particularly in the presence of an altered PFJ environment, are thought to be a factor in the development of PFP. Clinical interventions often aim to alter the biomechanical patterns that are thought to result in elevated PFJ loads while concurrently increasing the load tolerance capabilities of the tissue through therapeutic exercise. Biomechanics may play a role in PFJ load modification not only when addressing proximal and distal components, but also when considering the involvement of more local factors such as the quadriceps musculature. Biomechanical considerations should consider the entire kinetic chain including the hip and the foot/ankle complex, however the beneficial effects of these interventions may not be the result of long-term biomechanical changes. Biomechanical alterations may be achieved through movement retraining, but the interventions likely need to be task-specific to alter movement patterns. The purpose of this commentary is to describe biomechanical interventions for the athlete with PFP to encourage a safe and complete return to sport. Level of Evidence 5 PMID:27904791

  11. Static potentials from an extended gauge symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doria, R.M.; Helayel Neto, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Static potentials derived from the inclusion of more than one vector field in a single simple group are calculated. A confinement mechanism including colourful unphysical particle is discussed. (Author) [pt

  12. Biomechanics of an Expandable Lumbar Interbody Fusion Cage Deployed Through Transforaminal Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mica, Michael Conti; Voronov, Leonard I.; Carandang, Gerard; Havey, Robert M.; Wojewnik, Bartosz

    2017-01-01

    Introduction A novel expandable lumbar interbody fusion cage has been developed which allows for a broad endplate footprint similar to an anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF); however, it is deployed from a minimally invasive transforaminal unilateral approach. The perceived benefit is a stable circumferential fusion from a single approach that maintains the anterior tension band of the anterior longitudinal ligament. The purpose of this biomechanics laboratory study was to evaluate the biomechanical stability of an expandable lumbar interbody cage inserted using a transforaminal approach and deployed in situ compared to a traditional lumbar interbody cage inserted using an anterior approach (control device). Methods Twelve cadaveric spine specimens (L1-L5) were tested intact and after implantation of both the control and experimental devices in two (L2-L3 and L3-L4) segments of each specimen; the assignments of the control and experimental devices to these segments were alternated. Effect of supplemental pedicle screw-rod stabilization was also assessed. Moments were applied to the specimens in flexion-extension (FE), lateral bending (LB), and axial rotation (AR). The effect of physiologic preload on construct stability was evaluated in FE. Segmental motions were measured using an optoelectronic motion measurement system. Results The deployable expendable TLIF cage and control devices significantly reduced FE motion with and without compressive preload when compared to the intact condition (p0.05). Adding bilateral pedicle screws resulted in further reduction of ROM for all loading modes compared to intact condition, with no statistical difference between the two constructs (p>0.05). Conclusions The ability of the deployable expendable interbody cage in reducing segmental motions was equivalent to the control cage when used as a stand-alone construct and also when supplemented with bilateral pedicle screw-rod instrumentation. The larger footprint of the fully

  13. Hybridized electromagnetic-triboelectric nanogenerator for scavenging biomechanical energy for sustainably powering wearable electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kewei; Wang, Xue; Yang, Ya; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-01-01

    We report a hybridized electromagnetic-triboelectric nanogenerator for highly efficient scavenging of biomechanical energy to sustainably power wearable electronics by human walking. Based on the effective conjunction of triboelectrification and electromagnetic induction, the hybridized nanogenerator, with dimensions of 5 cm × 5 cm × 2.5 cm and a light weight of 60 g, integrates a triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) that can deliver a peak output power of 4.9 mW under a loading resistance of 6 MΩ and an electromagnetic generator (EMG) that can deliver a peak output power of 3.5 mW under a loading resistance of 2 kΩ. The hybridized nanogenerator exhibits a good stability for the output performance and a much better charging performance than that of an individual energy-harvesting unit (TENG or EMG). Furthermore, the hybridized nanogenerator integrated in a commercial shoe has been utilized to harvest biomechanical energy induced by human walking to directly light up tens of light-emitting diodes in the shoe and sustainably power a smart pedometer for reading the data of a walking step, distance, and energy consumption. A wireless pedometer driven by the hybrid nanogenerator can work well to send the walking data to an iPhone under the distance of 25 m. This work pushes forward a significant step toward energy harvesting from human walking and its potential applications in sustainably powering wearable electronics.

  14. Biomechanical analysis of the fixation systems for anterior column and posterior hemi-transverse acetabular fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jianyin; Dong, Pengfei; Li, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Feng; Wang, Zhihua; Cai, Xianhua

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical properties of common fixation systems for complex acetabular fractures. A finite element (FE) pelvic model with anterior column and posterior hemi-transverse acetabular fractures was created. Three common fixation systems were used to fix the posterior wall acetabular fractures: 1. Anterior column plate combined with posterior column screws (group I), 2. Anterior column plate combined with quadrilateral area screws (group II) and 3. Double-column plates (group III). And 600 N, representing the body weight, was loaded on the upper surface of the sacrum to simulate the double-limb stance. The amounts of total and relative displacements were compared between the groups. The total amount of displacement was 2.76 mm in group II, 2.81 mm in group III, and 2.83 mm in group I. The amount of relative displacement was 0.0078 mm in group II, 0.0093 mm in group III and 0.014 mm in group I. Our results suggested that all fixation systems enhance biomechanical stability significantly. Anterior column plate combined with quadrilateral area screws has quite comparable results to double column plates, they were superior to anterior column plate combined with posterior screws. Copyright © 2017 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Edentulism, beaks, and biomechanical innovations in the evolution of theropod dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautenschlager, Stephan; Witmer, Lawrence M; Altangerel, Perle; Rayfield, Emily J

    2013-12-17

    Maniraptoriformes, the speciose group of derived theropod dinosaurs that ultimately gave rise to modern birds, display a diverse and remarkable suite of skeletal adaptations. Apart from the evolution of flight, a large-scale change in dietary behavior appears to have been one of the main triggers for specializations in the bauplan of these derived theropods. Among the different skeletal specializations, partial or even complete edentulism and the development of keratinous beaks form a recurring and persistent trend in from the evolution of derived nonavian dinosaurs. Therizinosauria is an enigmatic maniraptoriform clade, whose members display these and other osteological characters thought to be correlated with the shift from carnivory to herbivory. This makes therizinosaurians prime candidates to assess the functional significance of these morphological characters. Based on a highly detailed biomechanical model of Erlikosaurus andrewsi, a therizinosaurid from the Upper Cretaceous of Mongolia, different morphological configurations incorporating soft-tissue structures, such as a keratinous rhamphotheca, are evaluated for their biomechanical performance. Our results indicate that the development of beaks and the presence of a keratinous rhamphotheca would have helped to dissipate stress and strain, making the rostral part of the skull less susceptible to bending and displacement, and this benefit may extend to other vertebrate clades that possess rhamphothecae. Keratinous beaks, paralleled by edentulism, thus represent an evolutionary innovation developed early in derived theropods to enhance cranial stability, distinct to postulated mass-saving benefits associated with the origin of flight.

  16. Biomechanical testing of a hybrid locking plate fixation of equine sesamoid osteotomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida da Silveira, E; Levasseur, A; Lacourt, M; Elce, Y; Petit, Y

    2014-01-01

    To compare the biomechanical properties of a hybrid locking compression plate (LCP) construct with the compression screw technique as a treatment for transverse mid-body proximal sesamoid bone fractures. Ten paired forelimbs from abattoir horses were used. The medial proximal sesamoid bone of each limb was osteotomized transversely and randomly assigned, to either repair with a two-hole 3.5 mm LCP or a 4.5 mm cortical screw placed in lag fashion. Each limb was tested biomechanically by axial loading in single cycle until failure. The point of failure was evaluated from the load-displacement curves. Then a gross evaluation and radiographs were performed to identify the mode of failure. The loads to failure of limbs repaired with the hybrid LCP construct (4968 N ± 2167) and the limbs repaired with the screw technique (3009 N ± 1091) were significantly different (p fracture of the apical fragment of the proximal sesamoid bone. The LCP technique has potential to achieve a better fracture stability and healing when applied to mid-body fractures of the proximal sesamoid bone. Further testing, particularly fatigue resistance is required to corroborate its potential as a treatment option for mid-body fractures of the proximal sesamoid bone.

  17. Static Deadlock Detection in MPI Synchronization Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Ming-Xue, Liao; Xiao-Xin, He; Zhi-Hua, Fan

    2007-01-01

    It is very common to use dynamic methods to detect deadlocks in MPI programs for the reason that static methods have some restrictions. To guarantee high reliability of some important MPI-based application software, a model of MPI synchronization communication is abstracted and a type of static method is devised to examine deadlocks in such modes. The model has three forms with different complexity: sequential model, single-loop model and nested-loop model. Sequential model is a base for all ...

  18. Static quarks with improved statistical precision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Della Morte, M.; Duerr, S.; Molke, H.; Heitger, J.

    2003-09-01

    We present a numerical study for different discretisations of the static action, concerning cut-off effects and the growth of statistical errors with Euclidean time. An error reduction by an order of magnitude can be obtained with respect to the Eichten-Hill action, for time separations up to 2 fm, keeping discretization errors small. The best actions lead to a big improvement on the precision of the quark mass M b and F B s in the static approximation. (orig.)

  19. Statics formulas and problems : engineering mechanics 1

    CERN Document Server

    Gross, Dietmar; Wriggers, Peter; Schröder, Jörg; Müller, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    This book contains the most important formulas and more than 160 completely solved problems from Statics. It provides engineering students material to improve their skills and helps to gain experience in solving engineering problems. Particular emphasis is placed on finding the solution path and formulating the basic equations. Topics include: - Equilibrium - Center of Gravity, Center of Mass, Centroids - Support Reactions - Trusses - Beams, Frames, Arches - Cables - Work and Potential Energy - Static and Kinetic Friction - Moments of Inertia.

  20. Posterior Rigid Instrumentation of C7: Surgical Considerations and Biomechanics at the Cervicothoracic Junction. A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayoumi, Ahmed B; Efe, Ibrahim E; Berk, Selim; Kasper, Ekkehard M; Toktas, Zafer Orkun; Konya, Deniz

    2018-03-01

    The cervicothoracic junction is a challenging anatomic transition in spine surgery. It is commonly affected by different types of diseases that may significantly impair stability in this region. The seventh cervical vertebra (C7) is an atypical cervical vertebra with unique anatomic features compared to subaxial cervical spine (C3 to C6). C7 has relatively broader laminae, larger pedicles, smaller lateral masses, and a long nonbifid spinous process. These features allow a variety of surgical methods for performing posterior rigid instrumentation in the form of different types of screws, such as lateral mass screws, pedicle screws, transfacet screws, and intralaminar screws. Many biomechanical studies on cadavers have evaluated and compared different types of implants at C7. We reviewed PubMed/Medline by using specific combinations of keywords to summarize previously published articles that examined C7 posterior rigid instrumentation thoroughly in an experimental fashion on patients or cadavers with additional descriptive radiologic parameters for evaluation of the optimum surgical technique for each type. A total of 44 articles were reported, including 22 articles that discussed anatomic considerations (entry points, sagittal and axial trajectories, and features of screws) and another 22 articles that discussed the relevant biomechanical testing at this transitional region if C7 was directly involved in terms of receiving posterior rigid implants. C7 can accommodate different types of screws, which can provide additional benefits and risks based on availability of bony purchase, awareness of surgical technique, biomechanics, and anatomic considerations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Structural biomechanics of the craniomaxillofacial skeleton under maximal masticatory loading: Inferences and critical analysis based on a validated computational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakdel, Amir R; Whyne, Cari M; Fialkov, Jeffrey A

    2017-06-01

    The trend towards optimizing stabilization of the craniomaxillofacial skeleton (CMFS) with the minimum amount of fixation required to achieve union, and away from maximizing rigidity, requires a quantitative understanding of craniomaxillofacial biomechanics. This study uses computational modeling to quantify the structural biomechanics of the CMFS under maximal physiologic masticatory loading. Using an experimentally validated subject-specific finite element (FE) model of the CMFS, the patterns of stress and strain distribution as a result of physiological masticatory loading were calculated. The trajectories of the stresses were plotted to delineate compressive and tensile regimes over the entire CMFS volume. The lateral maxilla was found to be the primary vertical buttress under maximal bite force loading, with much smaller involvement of the naso-maxillary buttress. There was no evidence that the pterygo-maxillary region is a buttressing structure, counter to classical buttress theory. The stresses at the zygomatic sutures suggest that two-point fixation of zygomatic complex fractures may be sufficient for fixation under bite force loading. The current experimentally validated biomechanical FE model of the CMFS is a practical tool for in silico optimization of current practice techniques and may be used as a foundation for the development of design criteria for future technologies for the treatment of CMFS injury and disease. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Static Members of Classes in C#

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian LUPASC

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The C# language is object-oriented, which is why the declared member data must be part of a class. Thus, there is no possibility to declare certain variables that can be accessed from anywhere within the application, as it happens, for example, with global variables at the C language level. Making this work in C# is possible through static members of the class. Declaring a class implies defining some of its member data that later receive values when creating each object. A static member of the class can be interpreted as belonging only to the class, not to the objects subsequently created, which means that for the non-static data, there are as many children as there were objects created, while for the static ones there is only one copy, regardless of the number of created objects. In this regard, this paper presents the main aspects that characterize these abstract concepts of object oriented programming in general and C# language in particular, detailing how to develop an application that includes both static and non-static members. At the same time, particularities in the mirror for the two types of data, restrictions on use and potential limitations are presented.

  3. Biomechanics of the thorax - research evidence and clinical expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Diane Gail

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the biomechanics of the thorax is critical for understanding its role in multiple conditions since the thorax is part of many integrated systems including the musculoskeletal, respiratory, cardiac, digestive and urogynecological. The thorax is also an integrated system within itself and an element of the whole body/person. Therefore, understanding the biomechanics of the thorax is fundamental to all forms of treatment for multiple conditions. The interpretation of movement examination findings depends on one's view of optimal biomechanics and the influential factors. This article will provide a synopsis of the current state of research evidence as well as observations from clinical experience pertaining to the biomechanics of the thorax in order to help clinicians organise this knowledge and facilitate evidence-based and informed management of the, often complex, patient with or without thoracic pain and impairment. The integrated systems model (ISM) will be introduced as a way to determine when the noted biomechanical findings are relevant to a patient's clinical presentation.

  4. Optic nerve head biomechanics in aging and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, J Crawford

    2015-04-01

    This nontechnical review is focused upon educating the reader on optic nerve head biomechanics in both aging and disease along two main themes: what is known about how mechanical forces and the resulting deformations are distributed in the posterior pole and ONH (biomechanics) and what is known about how the living system responds to those deformations (mechanobiology). We focus on how ONH responds to IOP elevations as a structural system, insofar as the acute mechanical response of the lamina cribrosa is confounded with the responses of the peripapillary sclera, prelaminar neural tissues, and retrolaminar optic nerve. We discuss the biomechanical basis for IOP-driven changes in connective tissues, blood flow, and cellular responses. We use glaucoma as the primary framework to present the important aspects of ONH biomechanics in aging and disease, as ONH biomechanics, aging, and the posterior pole extracellular matrix (ECM) are thought to be centrally involved in glaucoma susceptibility, onset and progression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Biomechanics of the thorax – research evidence and clinical expertise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Diane Gail

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the biomechanics of the thorax is critical for understanding its role in multiple conditions since the thorax is part of many integrated systems including the musculoskeletal, respiratory, cardiac, digestive and urogynecological. The thorax is also an integrated system within itself and an element of the whole body/person. Therefore, understanding the biomechanics of the thorax is fundamental to all forms of treatment for multiple conditions. The interpretation of movement examination findings depends on one's view of optimal biomechanics and the influential factors. This article will provide a synopsis of the current state of research evidence as well as observations from clinical experience pertaining to the biomechanics of the thorax in order to help clinicians organise this knowledge and facilitate evidence-based and informed management of the, often complex, patient with or without thoracic pain and impairment. The integrated systems model (ISM) will be introduced as a way to determine when the noted biomechanical findings are relevant to a patient's clinical presentation. PMID:26309383

  6. Biomechanics Strategies for Space Closure in Deep Overbite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harryanto Wijaya

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Space closure is an interesting aspect of orthodontic treatment related to principles of biomechanics. It should be tailored individually based on patient’s diagnosis and treatment plan. Understanding the space closure biomechanics basis leads to achieve the desired treatment objective. Overbite deepening and losing posterior anchorage are the two most common unwanted side effects in space closure. Conventionally, correction of overbite must be done before space closure resulted in longer treatment. Application of proper space closure biomechanics strategies is necessary to achieve the desired treatment outcome. This cases report aimed to show the space closure biomechanics strategies that effectively control the overbite as well as posterior anchorage in deep overbite patients without increasing treatment time. Two patients who presented with class II division 1 malocclusion were treated with fixed orthodontic appliance. The primary strategies included extraction space closure on segmented arch that employed two-step space closure, namely single canine retraction simultaneously with incisors intrusion followed by enmasse retraction of four incisors by using differential moment concept. These strategies successfully closed the space, corrected deep overbite and controlled posterior anchorage simultaneously so that the treatment time was shortened. Biomechanics strategies that utilized were effective to achieve the desired treatment outcome.

  7. Experimental study of pedicle screw stability on low BMD vertebrae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qi; Yang Huilin; Tang Tiansi; Wu Yiwei; Wang Yijin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To conduct biomechanical study of different pedicle screws stability on spinal specimen, discuss the relationship between design parameter of screw, insertion torgue and BMD, establish the theoretical foundation for application of pedicle screw on osteoporotic patients. Methods: Six fixed lumbar cadavers were collected, the effects of design parameter, insertion torque and etc on fixation stability were determined under various BMD by using biomechanical ways. Results: According to in vitro study: (1) There was a significant difference among pullout strength of all screws (P 2 >U 1 >SF 1 >SF 2 >RF. Conclusions: There is a close correlated between type of screw, BMD and stability. The U-type screw displays the best fixation effect on specimen of low BMD. (authors)

  8. Richardson Number, stability and turbulence- A coherent view

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varkey, M.J.

    As turbulence in water is governed by vertical mobility controlled by static stability and horizontal mobility controlled by currents, the Richardson Number should give a measure of turbulence also. It is argued in this note that inverse...

  9. From Static Output Feedback to Structured Robust Static Output Feedback: A Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Sadabadi , Mahdieh ,; Peaucelle , Dimitri

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the vast literature on static output feedback design for linear time-invariant systems including classical results and recent developments. In particular, we focus on static output feedback synthesis with performance specifications, structured static output feedback, and robustness. The paper provides a comprehensive review on existing design approaches including iterative linear matrix inequalities heuristics, linear matrix inequalities with rank constraints, methods with ...

  10. Biomechanical evaluation of straight antegrade nailing in proximal humeral fractures: the rationale of the "proximal anchoring point".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euler, Simon A; Petri, Maximilian; Venderley, Melanie B; Dornan, Grant J; Schmoelz, Werner; Turnbull, Travis Lee; Plecko, Michael; Kralinger, Franz S; Millett, Peter J

    2017-09-01

    Varus failure is one of the most common failure modes following surgical treatment of proximal humeral fractures. Straight antegrade nails (SAN) theoretically provide increased stability by anchoring to the densest zone of the proximal humerus (subchondral zone) with the end of the nail. The aim of this study was to biomechanically investigate the characteristics of this "proximal anchoring point" (PAP). We hypothesized that the PAP would improve stability compared to the same construct without the PAP. Straight antegrade humeral nailing was performed in 20 matched pairs of human cadaveric humeri for a simulated unstable two-part fracture. Biomechanical testing, with stepwise increasing cyclic axial loading (50-N increments each 100 cycles) at an angle of 20° abduction revealed significantly higher median loads to failure for SAN constructs with the PAP (median, 450 N; range, 200-1.000 N) compared to those without the PAP (median, 325 N; range, 100-500 N; p = 0.009). SAN constructs with press-fit proximal extensions (endcaps) showed similar median loads to failure (median, 400 N; range, 200-650 N), when compared to the undersized, commercially available SAN endcaps (median, 450 N; range, 200-600 N; p = 0.240). The PAP provided significantly increased stability in SAN constructs compared to the same setup without this additional proximal anchoring point. Varus-displacing forces to the humeral head were superiorly reduced in this setting. This study provides biomechanical evidence for the "proximal anchoring point's" rationale. Straight antegrade humeral nailing may be beneficial for patients undergoing surgical treatment for unstable proximal humeral fractures to decrease secondary varus displacement and thus potentially reduce revision rates.

  11. Biomechanical and clinical evaluation of posterior malleolar fractures. A systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; Haverkamp, Daniel; Kloen, Peter

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Ankle fractures often have involvement of the posterior malleolus. Treatment guidelines exist based on limited biomechanical evidence and still is considered controversial. The objective of this article is to review the biomechanical literature concerning changes in tibiotalar contract

  12. Biomechanical analysis using Kinovea for sports application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muaza Nor Adnan, Nor; Patar, Mohd Nor Azmi Ab; Lee, Hokyoo; Yamamoto, Shin-Ichiroh; Jong-Young, Lee; Mahmud, Jamaluddin

    2018-04-01

    This paper assesses the reliability of HD VideoCam–Kinovea as an alternative tool in conducting motion analysis and measuring knee relative angle of drop jump movement. The motion capture and analysis procedure were conducted in the Biomechanics Lab, Shibaura Institute of Technology, Omiya Campus, Japan. A healthy subject without any gait disorder (BMI of 28.60 ± 1.40) was recruited. The volunteered subject was asked to per the drop jump movement on preset platform and the motion was simultaneously recorded using an established infrared motion capture system (Hawk–Cortex) and a HD VideoCam in the sagittal plane only. The capture was repeated for 5 times. The outputs (video recordings) from the HD VideoCam were input into Kinovea (an open-source software) and the drop jump pattern was tracked and analysed. These data are compared with the drop jump pattern tracked and analysed earlier using the Hawk–Cortex system. In general, the results obtained (drop jump pattern) using the HD VideoCam–Kinovea are close to the results obtained using the established motion capture system. Basic statistical analyses show that most average variances are less than 10%, thus proving the repeatability of the protocol and the reliability of the results. It can be concluded that the integration of HD VideoCam–Kinovea has the potential to become a reliable motion capture–analysis system. Moreover, it is low cost, portable and easy to use. As a conclusion, the current study and its findings are found useful and has contributed to enhance significant knowledge pertaining to motion capture-analysis, drop jump movement and HD VideoCam–Kinovea integration.

  13. The influence of sex and obesity on gait biomechanics in people with severe knee osteoarthritis scheduled for arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, K L; Sosdian, L; Hinman, R S; Wrigley, T V; Kasza, J; Dowsey, M; Choong, P; Bennell, K L

    2017-11-01

    Sex and body mass may influence knee biomechanics associated with poor total knee arthroplasty (TKA) outcomes for knee osteoarthritis (OA). This study aimed to determine if gait differed between men and women, and overweight and class I obese patients with severe knee OA awaiting TKA. 34 patients with severe knee OA (average age 70.0 (SD 7.2) years, body mass index 30.3 (4.1kg/m 2 )) were recruited from a TKA waiting list. Three-dimensional gait analysis was performed at self-selected walking speed. Comparisons were made between men and women, and overweight (body mass index (BMI) 25.0-29.9kg/m 2 ) and class I obese (BMI 30.0-34.9kg/m 2 ) participants. Biomechanical outcomes included absolute and body size-adjusted peak knee adduction moment (KAM), KAM impulse, peak knee flexion moment, as well as peak knee flexion and varus-valgus angles, peak varus-valgus thrust, and peak vertical ground reaction force (GRF). Men had a higher absolute peak KAM, KAM impulse and peak GRF compared to women, and this sex-difference in frontal plane moments remained after adjusting for body size. However, when additionally adjusting for static knee alignment, differences disappeared. Knee biomechanics were similar between obesity groups after adjusting for the greater body weight of those with class I obesity. Men had greater KAM and KAM impulse even after adjustment for body size; however adjustment for their more varus knees removed this difference. Obesity group did not influence knee joint kinematics or moments. This suggests sex- and obesity-differences in these variables may not be associated with TKA outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cable Stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottura, L [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-07-01

    Superconductor stability is at the core of the design of any successful cable and magnet application. This chapter reviews the initial understanding of the stability mechanism, and reviews matters of importance for stability such as the nature and magnitude of the perturbation spectrum and the cooling mechanisms. Various stability strategies are studied, providing criteria that depend on the desired design and operating conditions.

  15. Scapula fracture incidence in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty using screws above or below metaglene central cage: clinical and biomechanical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennon, Justin C; Lu, Caroline; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Crosby, Lynn A

    2017-06-01

    Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA) is a viable treatment option for rotator cuff tear arthropathy but carries a complication risk of scapular fracture. We hypothesized that using screws above the central glenoid axis for metaglene fixation creates a stress riser contributing to increased scapula fracture incidence. Clinical type III scapular fracture incidence was determined with screw placement correlation: superior screw vs. screws placed exclusively below the glenoid midpoint. Cadaveric RTSA biomechanical modeling was employed to analyze scapular fractures. We reviewed 318 single-surgeon single-implant RTSAs with screw correlation to identify type III scapular fractures. Seventeen cadaveric scapula specimens were matched for bone mineral density, metaglenes implanted, and fixation with 2 screw configurations: inferior screws alone (group 1 INF ) vs. inferior screws with one additional superior screw (group 2 SUP ). Biomechanical load to failure was analyzed. Of 206 patients, 9 (4.4%) from the superior screw group experienced scapula fractures (type III); 0 fractures (0/112; 0%) were identified in the inferior screw group. Biomechanically, superior screw constructs (group 2 SUP ) demonstrated significantly (P < .05) lower load to failure (1077 N vs. 1970 N) compared with constructs with no superior screws (group 1 INF ). There was no significant age or bone mineral density discrepancy. Clinical scapular fracture incidence significantly decreased (P < .05) for patients with no screws placed above the central cage compared with patients with superior metaglene screws. Biomechanical modeling demonstrates significant construct compromise when screws are used above the central cage, fracturing at nearly half the ultimate load of the inferior screw constructs. We recommend use of inferior screws, all positioned below the central glenoid axis, unless necessary to stabilize the metaglene construct. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery

  16. Laser-Modified Surface Enhances Osseointegration and Biomechanical Anchorage of Commercially Pure Titanium Implants for Bone-Anchored Hearing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Omar; Simonsson, Hanna; Palmquist, Anders; Thomsen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Osseointegrated implants inserted in the temporal bone are a vital component of bone-anchored hearing systems (BAHS). Despite low implant failure levels, early loading protocols and simplified procedures necessitate the application of implants which promote bone formation, bone bonding and biomechanical stability. Here, screw-shaped, commercially pure titanium implants were selectively laser ablated within the thread valley using an Nd:YAG laser to produce a microtopography with a superimposed nanotexture and a thickened surface oxide layer. State-of-the-art machined implants served as controls. After eight weeks’ implantation in rabbit tibiae, resonance frequency analysis (RFA) values increased from insertion to retrieval for both implant types, while removal torque (RTQ) measurements showed 153% higher biomechanical anchorage of the laser-modified implants. Comparably high bone area (BA) and bone-implant contact (BIC) were recorded for both implant types but with distinctly different failure patterns following biomechanical testing. Fracture lines appeared within the bone ~30–50 μm from the laser-modified surface, while separation occurred at the bone-implant interface for the machined surface. Strong correlations were found between RTQ and BIC and between RFA at retrieval and BA. In the endosteal threads, where all the bone had formed de novo, the extracellular matrix composition, the mineralised bone area and osteocyte densities were comparable for the two types of implant. Using resin cast etching, osteocyte canaliculi were observed directly approaching the laser-modified implant surface. Transmission electron microscopy showed canaliculi in close proximity to the laser-modified surface, in addition to a highly ordered arrangement of collagen fibrils aligned parallel to the implant surface contour. It is concluded that the physico-chemical surface properties of laser-modified surfaces (thicker oxide, micro- and nanoscale texture) promote bone bonding

  17. ANALYSIS OF BIOMECHANICAL PARAMETERS IN COLONIC ANASTOMOSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaga, Tiago Cavalcanti; Aguiar, José Lamartine de Andrade; Martins-Filho, Euclides Dias; Kreimer, Flávio; Silva-Filho, Fernando Luiz; Albuquerque, Amanda Vasconcelos de

    2016-01-01

    The use of measures in colonic anastomoses to prevent dehiscences is of great medical interest. Sugarcane molasses, which has adequate tolerability and compatibility in vivo, has not yet been tested for this purpose. To analyze the biomechanical parameters of colonic suture in rats undergoing colectomy, using sugarcane molasses polysaccharide as tape or gel. 45 Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus albinus) were randomized into three groups of 15 animals: irrigation of enteric sutures with 0.9% saline solution; application of sugarcane molasses polysaccharide as tape; and sugarcane molasses polysaccharide as gel. The rats underwent colon ressection, with subsequent reanastomosis using polypropylene suture; they were treated according to their respective groups. Five rats from each group were evaluated at different times after the procedure: 30, 90 and 180 days postoperatively. The following variables were evaluated: maximum rupture force, modulus of elasticity and specific deformation of maximum force. The biomechanical variables among the scheduled times and treatment groups were statistically calculated. The characteristics of maximum rupture force and modulus of elasticity of the specimens remained identical, regardless of treatment with saline, polysaccharide gel or tape, and treatment time. However, it was found that the specific deformation of maximum force of the intestinal wall was higher after 180 days in the group treated with sugarcane polysaccharide gel (p=0.09). Compared to control, it was detected greater elasticity of the intestinal wall in mice treated with sugarcane polysaccharide gel, without changing other biomechanical characteristics, regardless of type or time of treatment. A aplicação de produtos em anastomoses colônicas que possam prevenir o surgimento de deiscências são de grande interesse médico. O emprego do polissacarídeo de melaço de cana-de-açúcar (Saccharum officinarum), que possui adequada tolerabilidade e compatibilidade in vivo

  18. Computational biomechanics for medicine new approaches and new applications

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Karol; Wittek, Adam; Nielsen, Poul

    2015-01-01

    The Computational Biomechanics for Medicine titles provide an opportunity for specialists in computational biomechanics to present their latest methodologiesand advancements. Thisvolumecomprises twelve of the newest approaches and applications of computational biomechanics, from researchers in Australia, New Zealand, USA, France, Spain and Switzerland. Some of the interesting topics discussed are:real-time simulations; growth and remodelling of soft tissues; inverse and meshless solutions; medical image analysis; and patient-specific solid mechanics simulations. One of the greatest challenges facing the computational engineering community is to extend the success of computational mechanics to fields outside traditional engineering, in particular to biology, the biomedical sciences, and medicine. We hope the research presented within this book series will contribute to overcoming this grand challenge.

  19. Intestinal morphometric and biomechanical changes during aging in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Jingbo; Gregersen, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim: Previously we demonstrated pronounced morphometric and biomechanical remodeling in the rat intestine during physiological growth up to 32 weeks of age. The aim of the present study is to study intestinal geometric and biomechanical changes in aging rats. Materials and methods...... in the circumferential direction. In conclusion pronounced morphometric and biomechanical remodeling occurred in the rat intestine during aging. The observed changes likely reflect the changes of the physiological function of the intestine during ageing, similar to other tissues where function, mechanical loading......: Twenty-four male Wistar rats, aged from 6 to 22 months, were used in the study. The body weight and the wet weight per length of duodenal and ileal segments were measured at the termination of experiment. Morphometric data were obtained by measuring the wall thickness and wall cross-sectional area...

  20. Computational biomechanics for medicine imaging, modeling and computing

    CERN Document Server

    Doyle, Barry; Wittek, Adam; Nielsen, Poul; Miller, Karol

    2016-01-01

    The Computational Biomechanics for Medicine titles provide an opportunity for specialists in computational biomechanics to present their latest methodologies and advancements. This volume comprises eighteen of the newest approaches and applications of computational biomechanics, from researchers in Australia, New Zealand, USA, UK, Switzerland, Scotland, France and Russia. Some of the interesting topics discussed are: tailored computational models; traumatic brain injury; soft-tissue mechanics; medical image analysis; and clinically-relevant simulations. One of the greatest challenges facing the computational engineering community is to extend the success of computational mechanics to fields outside traditional engineering, in particular to biology, the biomedical sciences, and medicine. We hope the research presented within this book series will contribute to overcoming this grand challenge.

  1. Biomechanical analysis technique choreographic movements (for example, "grand battman jete"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batieieva N.P.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : biomechanical analysis of the execution of choreographic movement "grand battman jete". Material : the study involved students (n = 7 of the department of classical choreography faculty of choreography. Results : biomechanical analysis of choreographic movement "grand battman jete" (classic exercise, obtained kinematic characteristics (path, velocity, acceleration, force of the center of mass (CM bio parts of the body artist (foot, shin, thigh. Built bio kinematic model (phase. The energy characteristics - mechanical work and kinetic energy units legs when performing choreographic movement "grand battman jete". Conclusions : It was found that the ability of an athlete and coach-choreographer analyze the biomechanics of movement has a positive effect on the improvement of choreographic training of qualified athletes in gymnastics (sport, art, figure skating and dance sports.

  2. Biomechanics of Wheat/Barley Straw and Corn Stover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher T. Wright; Peter A. Pryfogle; Nathan A. Stevens; Eric D. Steffler; J. Richard Hess; Thomas H. Ulrich

    2005-03-01

    The lack of understanding of the mechanical characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks is a limiting factor in economically collecting and processing crop residues, primarily wheat and barley stems and corn stover. Several testing methods, including compression, tension, and bend have been investigated to increase our understanding of the biomechanical behavior of cellulosic feedstocks. Biomechanical data from these tests can provide required input to numerical models and help advance harvesting, handling, and processing techniques. In addition, integrating the models with the complete data set from this study can identify potential tools for manipulating the biomechanical properties of plant varieties in such a manner as to optimize their physical characteristics to produce higher value biomass and more energy efficient harvesting practices.

  3. Is gender influencing the biomechanical results after autologous chondrocyte implantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuz, Peter C; Müller, Sebastian; Erggelet, Christoph; von Keudell, Arvind; Tischer, Thomas; Kaps, Christian; Niemeyer, Philipp; Hirschmüller, Anja

    2014-01-01

    The influence of gender on the biomechanical outcome after autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) including isokinetic muscle strength measurements has not been investigated. The present prospective study was performed to evaluate gender-specific differences in the biomechanical function 48 months after ACI. Fifty-two patients (mean age 35.6 ± 8.5 years) that met our inclusion criteria, underwent ACI with Bioseed C(®) and were evaluated with the KOOS score preoperatively, 6, 12 and 48 months after surgery. At final follow-up, 44 out of the 52 patients underwent biomechanical evaluation with isokinetic strength measurements of both knees. All data were evaluated separately for men and women and compared for each time interval using the Mann-Whitney U test. Clinical scores improved significantly over the whole study period (p genders. Isokinetic muscle strength measures are significantly worse in women (p role for the explanation of gender-specific results after ACI.

  4. Effects of circumferential ankle pressure on ankle proprioception, stiffness, and postural stability: a preliminary investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Sung H; Granata, Kevin P; Bunker, Linda K

    2004-08-01

    Cross-sectional repeated-measures design. Determine the effects of circumferential ankle pressure (CAP) intervention on proprioceptive acuity, ankle stiffness, and postural stability. The application of CAP using braces, taping, and adaptive shoes or military boots is widely used to address chronic ankle instability (CAI). An underlying assumption is that the CAP intervention might improve ankle stability through increased proprioceptive acuity and stiffness in the ankle. METHOD AND MEASURES: A convenience sample of 10 subjects was recruited from the local university community and categorized according to proprioceptive acuity (high, low) and ankle stability (normal, CAI). Proprioceptive acuity was measured when blindfolded subjects were asked to accurately reproduce a self-selected target ankle position before and after the application of CAP. Proprioceptive acuity was determined in 5 different ankle joint position sense tests: neutral, inversion, eversion, plantar flexion, and dorsiflexion. Joint position angles were recorded electromechanically using a potentiometer. Passive ankle stiffness was computed from the ratio of applied static moment versus angular displacement. Active ankle stiffness was determined from biomechanical analyses of ankle motion following a mediolateral perturbation. Postural stability was quantified from the center of pressure displacement in the mediolateral and the anteroposterior directions in unipedal stance. All measurements were recorded with and without CAP applied by a pediatric blood pressure cuff. Data were analyzed using a separate mixed-model analysis of variance (ANOVA) for each dependent variable. Post hoc comparison using Tukey's honestly significant difference (HSD) test was performed if significant interactions were obtained. Significance level was set at P<.05 for all analyses. Significant group (high versus low proprioceptive acuity) x CAP interactions were identified for postural stability. Passive ankle stiffness was

  5. Vesicle biomechanics in a time-varying magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hui; Curcuru, Austen

    2015-01-01

    Cells exhibit distortion when exposed to a strong electric field, suggesting that the field imposes control over cellular biomechanics. Closed pure lipid bilayer membranes (vesicles) have been widely used for the experimental and theoretical studies of cellular biomechanics under this electrodeformation. An alternative method used to generate an electric field is by electromagnetic induction with a time-varying magnetic field. References reporting the magnetic control of cellular mechanics have recently emerged. However, theoretical analysis of the cellular mechanics under a time-varying magnetic field is inadequate. We developed an analytical theory to investigate the biomechanics of a modeled vesicle under a time-varying magnetic field. Following previous publications and to simplify the calculation, this model treated the inner and suspending media as lossy dielectrics, the membrane thickness set at zero, and the electric resistance of the membrane assumed to be negligible. This work provided the first analytical solutions for the surface charges, electric field, radial pressure, overall translational forces, and rotational torques introduced on a vesicle by the time-varying magnetic field. Frequency responses of these measures were analyzed, particularly the frequency used clinically by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). The induced surface charges interacted with the electric field to produce a biomechanical impact upon the vesicle. The distribution of the induced surface charges depended on the orientation of the coil and field frequency. The densities of these charges were trivial at low frequency ranges, but significant at high frequency ranges. The direction of the radial force on the vesicle was dependent on the conductivity ratio between the vesicle and the medium. At relatively low frequencies (biomechanics under a time-varying magnetic field. Biological effects of clinical TMS are not likely to occur via alteration of the biomechanics of brain

  6. The distal semimembranosus complex: normal MR anatomy, variants, biomechanics and pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, Javier; Jbara, Marlena; Maimon, Ron; Matityahu, Amir; Hwang, Ki; Padron, Mario; Mota, Javier; Beltran, Luis; Sundaram, Murali

    2003-01-01

    To describe the normal MR anatomy and variations of the distal semimembranosus tendinous arms and the posterior oblique ligament as seen in the three orthogonal planes, to review the biomechanics of this complex and to illustrate pathologic examples. The distal semimembranosus tendon divides into five tendinous arms named the anterior, direct, capsular, inferior and the oblique popliteal ligament. These arms intertwine with the branches of the posterior oblique ligament in the posterior medial aspect of the knee, providing stability. This tendon-ligamentous complex also acts synergistically with the popliteus muscle and actively pulls the posterior horn of the medial meniscus during knee flexion. Pathologic conditions involving this complex include complete and partial tears, insertional tendinosis, avulsion fractures and bursitis. (orig.)

  7. The distal semimembranosus complex: normal MR anatomy, variants, biomechanics and pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran, Javier; Jbara, Marlena; Maimon, Ron [Department of Radiology, Maimonides Medical Center, 4802 Tenth Avenue, NY 11219, Brooklyn (United States); Matityahu, Amir; Hwang, Ki [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Padron, Mario [Department of Radiology, Clinica CEMTRO, Madrid (Spain); Mota, Javier [Department of Radiology, Instituto Clinica Corachan, Barcelona (Spain); Beltran, Luis [New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States); Sundaram, Murali [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2003-08-01

    To describe the normal MR anatomy and variations of the distal semimembranosus tendinous arms and the posterior oblique ligament as seen in the three orthogonal planes, to review the biomechanics of this complex and to illustrate pathologic examples. The distal semimembranosus tendon divides into five tendinous arms named the anterior, direct, capsular, inferior and the oblique popliteal ligament. These arms intertwine with the branches of the posterior oblique ligament in the posterior medial aspect of the knee, providing stability. This tendon-ligamentous complex also acts synergistically with the popliteus muscle and actively pulls the posterior horn of the medial meniscus during knee flexion. Pathologic conditions involving this complex include complete and partial tears, insertional tendinosis, avulsion fractures and bursitis. (orig.)

  8. Containment vessel stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harstead, G.A.; Morris, N.F.; Unsal, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    The stability analysis for a steel containment shell is presented herein. The containment is a freestanding shell consisting of a vertical cylinder with a hemispherical dome. It is stiffened by large ring stiffeners and relatively small longitudinal stiffeners. The containment vessel is subjected to both static and dynamic loads which can cause buckling. These loads must be combined prior to their use in a stability analysis. The buckling loads were computed with the aid of the ASME Code case N-284 used in conjunction with general purpose computer codes and in-house programs. The equations contained in the Code case were used to compute the knockdown factors due to shell imperfections. After these knockdown factors were applied to the critical stress states determined by freezing the maximum dynamic stresses and combining them with other static stresses, a linear bifurcation analysis was carried out with the aid of the BOSOR4 program. Since the containment shell contained large penetrations, the Code case had to be supplemented by a local buckling analysis of the shell area surrounding the largest penetration. This analysis was carried out with the aid of the NASTRAN program. Although the factor of safety against buckling obtained in this analysis was satisfactory, it is claimed that the use of the Code case knockdown factors are unduly conservative when applied to the analysis of buckling around penetrations. (orig.)

  9. Forward lunge knee biomechanics before and after partial meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Michelle; Nielsen, Jonas Høberg; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    partial meniscectomy (APM) on knee joint mechanics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in knee joint biomechanics during a forward lunge in patients with a suspected degenerative meniscal tear from before to three months after APM. METHODS: Twenty-two patients (35-55years old......) with a suspected degenerative medial meniscal tear participated in this study. Three dimensional knee biomechanics were assessed on the injured and contralateral leg before and three months after APM. The visual analogue scale was used to assess knee pain and the Knee Injury Osteoarthritis Outcome Score was used...

  10. Biomechanical Response and Behavior of Users under Emergency Buffer Crash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Miralbes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to study the biomechanical effects on elevator users and the injuries sustained should an elevator crash happen. The analysis will focus on buffer impact, signaling that the earlier mentioned buffer is usually located at the bottom of the pit. In order to carry out this analysis, a numerical technique based on finite element method will be used, while elevator users will be simulated by means of automotive dummies. Two crash factors will be studied, namely, location of dummy and fall velocity. The analysis criteria will be damages sustained by the dummy, based on biomechanical index such as HIC, CSI, forces, and accelerations.

  11. Some considerations on the seismic stability of large slopes surrounding the nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Hiroyuki

    1982-01-01

    As a series of the research on the seismic stabilities of a large scale slope surrounding the Nuclear Power Plant, the numerical simulation and analytical stability calculation are conducted in order to clarify the applicability of static stability evaluation method (conventional circular arc slip method, static non-linear F.E. analysis) and dynamic one (2-dimensional dynamic F.E. analysis). The discussions on these slope stability methods are done and the followings are clarified, i) The results of numerical simulation by dynamic F.E. analysis concerning the response property and the failure mode are qualitatively corresponded with the behaviour of dynamic failure test. ii) From the results of static and dynamic stability analysis, it is concluded that the conventional circular arc slip method gives the severest evaluation for slope stability. iii) It is proposed that the seismic coefficient for static slope stability analysis should be used the value of the equivalent instant acceleration. (author)

  12. Development of esMOCA Biomechanic, Motion Capture Instrumentation for Biomechanics Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendra, A.; Akhmad, S.

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to build motion capture instruments using inertial measurement unit sensors to assist in the analysis of biomechanics. Sensors used are accelerometer and gyroscope. Estimation of orientation sensors is done by digital motion processing in each sensor nodes. There are nine sensor nodes attached to the upper limbs. This sensor is connected to the pc via a wireless sensor network. The development of kinematics and inverse dynamamic models of the upper limb is done in simulink simmechanic. The kinematic model receives streaming data of sensor nodes mounted on the limbs. The output of the kinematic model is the pose of each limbs and visualized on display. The dynamic inverse model outputs the reaction force and reaction moment of each joint based on the limb motion input. Model validation in simulink with mathematical model of mechanical analysis showed results that did not differ significantly

  13. Mao-Gilles Stabilization Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Jérôme Gilles

    2013-01-01

    Originally, the Mao-Gilles stabilization algorithm was designed to compensate the non-rigid deformations due to atmospheric turbulence. Given a sequence of frames affected by atmospheric turbulence, the algorithm uses a variational model combining optical flow and regularization to characterize the static observed scene. The optimization problem is solved by Bregman Iteration and the operator splitting method. The algorithm is simple, efficient, and can be easily generalized for different sce...

  14. Mao-Gilles Stabilization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Gilles

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Originally, the Mao-Gilles stabilization algorithm was designed to compensate the non-rigid deformations due to atmospheric turbulence. Given a sequence of frames affected by atmospheric turbulence, the algorithm uses a variational model combining optical flow and regularization to characterize the static observed scene. The optimization problem is solved by Bregman Iteration and the operator splitting method. The algorithm is simple, efficient, and can be easily generalized for different scenarios involving non-rigid deformations.

  15. Motion Analysis of Chinese Bajiquan Based on Three-dimensional Images of Biomechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available With the development of sports biomechanics, human motion mechanical characteristics have received more and more attention from plenty of researchers. Therefore, how to analyze the biomechanics of the living body has become the principle problem at the present stage. In this study, the three-dimensional (3D image was adopted for a sport dynamics analysis of the riding style of the Chinese Bajiquan. First of all, the change rules of the temporal characteristic parameters when the research objects in the experiment group and the control group completing the riding style action were analyzed based on the characteristics of the action; in the initial stage of the action, the movement speed was relatively slow, and with the center of gravity of the right feet moving down, stable support was formed. Secondly, parameters such as hip joint angle and knee joint angle, etc., were tested from the perspective of dynamics sensors and a rigid block model was constructed to accurately calculate the joint angle. The hip joint guaranteed the stability of center of gravity during movement; the fluctuation of the ankle joint was relatively small, while the maximum fluctuation range of the trunk angle during movement was small, which could keep the upper limbs up straight as well as reduce fluctuation, and the lowering of the center of gravity was good for the stability of the lower limbs. When the riding style action was completed, the toes of the research objects in the experiment group would buckle subconsciously to control the balance of the body. Therefore, the riding style requires the interaction among different parameters, which conforms with the characteristics of the Chinese Bajiquan.

  16. Acceleration of a Static Observer Near the Event Horizon of a Static Isolated Black Hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Noel A.

    1981-01-01

    Compares the magnitude of the proper acceleration of a static observer in a static, isolated, spherically symmetric space-time region with the Newtonian result including the situation in the interior of a perfect-fluid star. This provides a simple physical interpretation of surface gravity and illustrates the global nature of the event horizon.…

  17. Static and dynamic control of plasma equilibrium in a Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, J.; Dei Cas, R.

    1979-01-01

    We are dealing here with the problem of controlling the plasma boundary and its displacements. Static control consists in determining the currents in the external coils of the Tokamak so that the plasma boundary has certain fixed characteristics: radial position, vertical elongation, desired shape. A self-consistent method is proposed here, considering a free plasma boundary, and using the techniques of optimal control of distributed parameter systems to solve the problem. The dynamic control problem considered in the second part of the paper is the control of the plasma radial displacements. An elaborate system of preprogramming and feedback control has been developed to ensure equilibrium and stability of the horizontal plasma motions. Optimal control techniques have been used to calculate the optimal primary coils configuration, the preprogramming voltages and the feedback gains. A new stability diagrams has been obtained which takes into account the erosion of the plasma by the limiter. All these calculations have been applied successfully to TFR 600 where thin liner and the presence of an iron core make the problem of stabilization of the radial displacements very difficult

  18. Evaluating plantar fascia strain in hyperpronating cadaveric feet following an extra-osseous talotarsal stabilization procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Michael E; Jawrani, Nikhil T; Goel, Vijay K

    2011-01-01

    Abnormal talotarsal joint mechanics leading to hyperpronation is implicated as one of the most common causes of plantar fasciopathy. In patients with hyperpronating feet, the plantar fascia experiences excessive tensile forces during static and dynamic weight-bearing activities because of excessive medial longitudinal arch depression. For the purposes of this study, we hypothesized that plantar fascia strain in hyperpronating cadaveric feet would decrease after intervention with an extra-osseous talotarsal stabilization (EOTTS) device. A miniature differential variable reluctance transducer was used to quantify the plantar fascia strain in 6 fresh-frozen cadaver foot specimens exhibiting flexible instability of the talotarsal joint complex (i.e., hyperpronation). The strain was measured as the foot was moved from its neutral to maximally pronated position, before and after intervention using the HyProCure(®) EOTTS device. The mean plantar fascia elongation was 0.83 ± 0.27 mm (strain 3.62% ± 1.17%) and 0.56 ± 0.2 mm (strain 2.42% ± 0.88%) before and after intervention, respectively (N = 18, variation reported is ± 1 SD). The average plantar fascia strain decreased by 33%, and the difference was statistically significant with p plantar fascia strain suggests that an EOTTS device might be effective in stabilizing the pathologic talotarsal joint complex and the medial longitudinal arch and in eliminating hyperpronation. An EOTTS procedure might offer a possible treatment option for plantar fasciopathy in cases in which the underlying etiology is abnormal talotarsal biomechanics. Copyright © 2011 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Statics and rotational dynamics of composite beams

    CERN Document Server

    Ghorashi, Mehrdaad

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive study of the nonlinear statics and dynamics of composite beams and consists of solutions with and without active elements embedded in the beams. The static solution provides the initial conditions for the dynamic analysis. The dynamic problems considered include the analyses of clamped (hingeless) and articulated (hinged) accelerating rotating beams. Two independent numerical solutions for the steady state and the transient responses are presented. The author illustrates that the transient solution of the nonlinear formulation of accelerating rotating beam converges to the steady state solution obtained by the shooting method. Other key areas considered include calculation of the effect of perturbing the steady state solution, coupled nonlinear flap-lag dynamics of a rotating articulated beam with hinge offset and aerodynamic damping, and static and dynamic responses of nonlinear composite beams with embedded anisotropic piezo-composite actuators. The book is intended as a t...

  20. Extending and Enhancing SAS (Static Analysis Suite)

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, David

    2016-01-01

    The Static Analysis Suite (SAS) is an open-source software package used to perform static analysis on C and C++ code, helping to ensure safety, readability and maintainability. In this Summer Student project, SAS was enhanced to improve ease of use and user customisation. A straightforward method of integrating static analysis into a project at compilation time was provided using the automated build tool CMake. The process of adding checkers to the suite was streamlined and simplied by developing an automatic code generator. To make SAS more suitable for continuous integration, a reporting mechanism summarising results was added. This suitability has been demonstrated by inclusion of SAS in the Future Circular Collider Software nightly build system. Scalability of the improved package was demonstrated by using the tool to analyse the ROOT code base.

  1. Sawja: Static Analysis Workshop for Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Laurent; Barré, Nicolas; Besson, Frédéric; Demange, Delphine; Jensen, Thomas; Monfort, Vincent; Pichardie, David; Turpin, Tiphaine

    Static analysis is a powerful technique for automatic verification of programs but raises major engineering challenges when developing a full-fledged analyzer for a realistic language such as Java. Efficiency and precision of such a tool rely partly on low level components which only depend on the syntactic structure of the language and therefore should not be redesigned for each implementation of a new static analysis. This paper describes the Sawja library: a static analysis workshop fully compliant with Java 6 which provides OCaml modules for efficiently manipulating Java bytecode programs. We present the main features of the library, including i) efficient functional data-structures for representing a program with implicit sharing and lazy parsing, ii) an intermediate stack-less representation, and iii) fast computation and manipulation of complete programs. We provide experimental evaluations of the different features with respect to time, memory and precision.

  2. Static Analysis for JavaScript

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Simon Holm

    . This dissertation describes the design and implementation of a static analysis for JavaScript that can assist programmers in finding bugs in code during development. We describe the design of a static analysis tool for JavaScript, built using the monotone framework. This analysis infers detailed type information......Web applications present unique challenges to designers of static analysis tools. One of these challenges is the language JavaScript used for client side scripting in the browser. JavaScript is a complex language with many pitfalls and poor tool support compared to other languages...... about programs. This information can be used to detect bugs such as null pointer dereferences and unintended type coercions. The analysis is sound, enabling it to prove the absence of certain program errors. JavaScript is usually run within the context of the browser and the DOM API. The major...

  3. On the geometric phenomenology of static friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Shankar; Merin, A P; Nitsure, Nitin

    2017-09-06

    In this note we introduce a hierarchy of phase spaces for static friction, which give a graphical way to systematically quantify the directional dependence in static friction via subregions of the phase spaces. We experimentally plot these subregions to obtain phenomenological descriptions for static friction in various examples where the macroscopic shape of the object affects the frictional response. The phase spaces have the universal property that for any experiment in which a given object is put on a substrate fashioned from a chosen material with a specified nature of contact, the frictional behaviour can be read off from a uniquely determined classifying map on the control space of the experiment which takes values in the appropriate phase space.

  4. Pheromone Static Routing Strategy for Complex Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Mao-Bin; Henry, Y. K. Lau; Ling, Xiang; Jiang, Rui

    2012-12-01

    We adopt the concept of using pheromones to generate a set of static paths that can reach the performance of global dynamic routing strategy [Phys. Rev. E 81 (2010) 016113]. The path generation method consists of two stages. In the first stage, a pheromone is dropped to the nodes by packets forwarded according to the global dynamic routing strategy. In the second stage, pheromone static paths are generated according to the pheromone density. The output paths can greatly improve traffic systems' overall capacity on different network structures, including scale-free networks, small-world networks and random graphs. Because the paths are static, the system needs much less computational resources than the global dynamic routing strategy.

  5. Static Einstein--Maxwell field equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, A.

    1979-01-01

    The static Einstein--Maxwell field equations are investigated in the presence of both electric and magnetic fields. The sources or bodies are assumed to be of finite size and to not affect the connectivity of the associated space. Furthermore, electromagnetic and metric fields are assumed to have reasonable differentiabilities. It is then proved that the electric and magnetic field vectors are constant multiples of one another. Moreover, the static Einstein--Maxwell equations reduce to the static magnetovac case. If, furthermore, the variational derivation of the Einstein--Maxwell equations is assumed, then both the total electric and magnetic charge of each body must vanish. As a physical consequence it is pointed out that if a suspended magnet be electrically charged then it must experience a purely general relativistic torque

  6. Utility of the Static-99 and Static-99R With Latino Sex Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leguízamo, Alejandro; Lee, Seung C; Jeglic, Elizabeth L; Calkins, Cynthia

    2017-12-01

    The predictive validity of the Static-99 measures with ethnic minorities in the United States has only recently been assessed with mixed results. We assessed the predictive validity of the Static-99 and Static-99R with a sample of Latino sex offenders ( N = 483) as well as with two subsamples (U.S.-born, including Puerto Rico, and non-U.S.-born). The overall sexual recidivism rate was very low (1.9%). Both the Static-99 measures were able to predict sexual recidivism for offenders born in the United States and Puerto Rico, but neither was effective in doing so for other Latino immigrants. Calibration analyses ( N = 303) of the Static-99R were consistent with the literature and provided support for the potential use of the measure with Latinos born in the United States and Puerto Rico. These findings and their implications are discussed as they pertain to the assessment of Latino sex offenders.

  7. Gas Measurement Using Static Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Michael H; Schardt, Michael; Rauscher, Markus S; Koch, Alexander W

    2017-11-13

    Online monitoring of gases in industrial processes is an ambitious task due to adverse conditions such as mechanical vibrations and temperature fluctuations. Whereas conventional Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometers use rather complex optical and mechanical designs to ensure stable operation, static FTIR spectrometers do not require moving parts and thus offer inherent stability at comparatively low costs. Therefore, we present a novel, compact gas measurement system using a static single-mirror Fourier transform spectrometer (sSMFTS). The system works in the mid-infrared range from 650 cm - 1 to 1250 cm - 1 and can be operated with a customized White cell, yielding optical path lengths of up to 120 cm for highly sensitive quantification of gas concentrations. To validate the system, we measure different concentrations of 1,1,1,2-Tetrafluoroethane (R134a) and perform a PLS regression analysis of the acquired infrared spectra. Thereby, the measured absorption spectra show good agreement with reference data. Since the system additionally permits measurement rates of up to 200 Hz and high signal-to-noise ratios, an application in process analysis appears promising.

  8. Thermal effects in static friction: thermolubricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchini, A; Bortolani, V; Santoro, G; Brigazzi, M

    2008-10-01

    We present a molecular dynamics analysis of the static friction between two thick slabs. The upper block is formed by N2 molecules and the lower block by Pb atoms. We study the effects of the temperature as well as the effects produced by the structure of the surface of the lower block on the static friction. To put in evidence the temperature effects we will compare the results obtained with the lower block formed by still atoms with those obtained when the atoms are allowed to vibrate (e.g., with phonons). To investigate the importance of the geometry of the surface of the lower block we apply the external force in different directions, with respect to a chosen crystallographic direction of the substrate. We show that the interaction between the lattice dynamics of the two blocks is responsible for the strong dependence of the static friction on the temperature. The lattice dynamics interaction between the two blocks strongly reduces the static friction, with respect to the case of the rigid substrate. This is due to the large momentum transfer between atoms and the N2 molecules which disorders the molecules of the interface layer. A further disorder is introduced by the temperature. We perform calculations at T = 20K which is a temperature below the melting, which for our slab is at 50K . We found that because of the disorder the static friction becomes independent of the direction of the external applied force. The very low value of the static friction seems to indicate that we are in a regime of thermolubricity similar to that observed in dynamical friction.

  9. Power system static state estimation using Kalman filter algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saikia Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available State estimation of power system is an important tool for operation, analysis and forecasting of electric power system. In this paper, a Kalman filter algorithm is presented for static estimation of power system state variables. IEEE 14 bus system is employed to check the accuracy of this method. Newton Raphson load flow study is first carried out on our test system and a set of data from the output of load flow program is taken as measurement input. Measurement inputs are simulated by adding Gaussian noise of zero mean. The results of Kalman estimation are compared with traditional Weight Least Square (WLS method and it is observed that Kalman filter algorithm is numerically more efficient than traditional WLS method. Estimation accuracy is also tested for presence of parametric error in the system. In addition, numerical stability of Kalman filter algorithm is tested by considering inclusion of zero mean errors in the initial estimates.

  10. Spectral analysis of viscous static compressible fluid equilibria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez, Manuel [Departamento de Analisis Matematico, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid (Spain)

    2001-05-25

    It is generally assumed that the study of the spectrum of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations around a static state will provide information about the stability of the equilibrium. This is obvious for inviscid barotropic compressible fluids by the self-adjoint character of the relevant operator, and rather easy for viscous incompressible fluids by the compact character of the resolvent. The viscous compressible linearized system, both for periodic and homogeneous Dirichlet boundary problems, satisfies neither condition, but it does turn out to be the generator of an immediately continuous, almost stable semigroup, which justifies the analysis of the spectrum as predictive of the initial behaviour of the flow. As for the spectrum itself, except for a unique negative finite accumulation point, it is formed by eigenvalues with negative real part, and nonreal eigenvalues are confined to a certain bounded subset of complex numbers. (author)

  11. Static measurements at PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syed Nahar Bin Syed Hussin Shabuddin; Sharifuldin Bin Salleh, Mohd Amin; Harasawa, Susumu

    1985-06-01

    Static measurements at the PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor (RTP) were made to study the variation of its fuel temperature with reactor power. Some constants that relate power to fuel temperature behaviour were also determined. These constants are reflective of the coolling characteristics in the reactor core. Comparison was also made between the negative temperature coefficient of reactivity obtained from these measurements to those published in the Safety Analysis Report, SAR. The differences between these values are attributable to a delayed effect found in static measurements but not included in the SAR calculation which consider the prompt effect only.

  12. Static compensators (STATCOMs) in power systems

    CERN Document Server

    Shahnia, Farhad; Ghosh, Arindam

    2014-01-01

    A static compensator (STATCOM), also known as static synchronous compensator, is a member of the flexible alternating current transmission system (FACTS) devices. It is a power-electronics based regulating device which is composed of a voltage source converter (VSC) and is shunt-connected to alternating current electricity transmission and distribution networks. The voltage source is created from a DC capacitor and the STATCOM can exchange reactive power with the network. It can also supply some active power to the network, if a DC source of power is connected across the capacitor. A STATCOM

  13. MEMS linear and nonlinear statics and dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Younis, Mohammad I

    2011-01-01

    MEMS Linear and Nonlinear Statics and Dynamics presents the necessary analytical and computational tools for MEMS designers to model and simulate most known MEMS devices, structures, and phenomena. This book also provides an in-depth analysis and treatment of the most common static and dynamic phenomena in MEMS that are encountered by engineers. Coverage also includes nonlinear modeling approaches to modeling various MEMS phenomena of a nonlinear nature, such as those due to electrostatic forces, squeeze-film damping, and large deflection of structures. The book also: Includes examples of nume

  14. Static multiplicities in heterogeneous azeotropic distillation sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjerg, Klavs; Andersen, Torben Ravn; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    1998-01-01

    In this paper the results of a bifurcation analysis on heterogeneous azeotropic distillation sequences are given. Two sequences suitable for ethanol dehydration are compared: The 'direct' and the 'indirect' sequence. It is shown, that the two sequences, despite their similarities, exhibit very...... different static behavior. The method of Petlyuk and Avet'yan (1971), Bekiaris et al. (1993), which assumes infinite reflux and infinite number of stages, is extended to and applied on heterogeneous azeotropic distillation sequences. The predictions are substantiated through simulations. The static sequence...

  15. de Sitter relativity in static charts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotaescu, Ion I. [West University of Timisoara, Timisoara (Romania)

    2018-02-15

    The relative geodesic motion in static (and spherically symmetric) local charts on the (1 + 3)-dimensional de Sitter spacetimes is studied in terms of conserved quantities. The Lorentzian isometries are derived, relating the coordinates of the local chart of a fixed observer with the coordinates of a mobile chart considered as the rest frame of a massive particle freely moving on a timelike geodesic. The time dilation and Lorentz contraction are discussed pointing out some notable features of the de Sitter relativity in static charts. (orig.)

  16. The Nature of Stability in Replicating Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Addy Pross

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available We review the concept of dynamic kinetic stability, a type of stability associated specifically with replicating entities, and show how it differs from the well-known and established (static kinetic and thermodynamic stabilities associated with regular chemical systems. In the process we demonstrate how the concept can help bridge the conceptual chasm that continues to separate the physical and biological sciences by relating the nature of stability in the animate and inanimate worlds, and by providing additional insights into the physicochemical nature of abiogenesis.

  17. A biomechanical evaluation of proximal femoral nail antirotation with respect to helical blade position in femoral head: A cadaveric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Ho Hwang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Despite new developments in the management of osteoporotic fractures, complications like screw cutout are still found in the fixation of proximal femur fractures even with biomechanically proven better implants like proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA. The purpose of this cadaveric study was to investigate the biomechanical stability of this device in relation to two common positions (center-center and inferior-center of the helical blade in the femoral head in unstable trochanteric fractures. Materials and Methods: Eight pairs of human cadaveric femurs were used; in one group [center-center (C-C group], the helical blade of PFNA was fixed randomly in central position both in anteroposterior and lateral view, whereas in the other group it was fixed in inferior one-third position in anteroposterior and in central position in lateral view [inferior-center (I-C group]. Unstable intertrochanteric fracture was created and each specimen was loaded cyclically till load to failure Results: Angular and rotational displacements were significantly higher within the C-C group compared to the I-C group in both unloaded and loaded condition. Loading to failure was higher in the I-C group compared to the C-C group. No statistical significance was found for this parameter. Correlations between tip apex distance, cyclic loading which lead to femoral head displacement, and ultimate load to failure showed a significant positive relationship. Conclusion: The I-C group was superior to the C-C group and provided better biomechanical stability for angular and rotational displacement. This study would be a stimulus for further experimental studies with larger number specimens and complex loading protocols at multicentres.

  18. Direct lateral approach to lumbar fusion is a biomechanically equivalent alternative to the anterior approach: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Cory J; Coughlin, Dezba G; Lotz, Jeffrey C; Serhan, Hassan A; Hu, Serena S

    2012-05-01

    A human cadaveric biomechanical study of lumbar mobility before and after fusion and with or without supplemental instrumentation for 5 instrumentation configurations. To determine the biomechanical differences between anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) and direct lateral interbody fusion (DLIF) with and without supplementary instrumentation. Some prior studies have compared various surgical approaches using the same interbody device whereas others have investigated the stabilizing effect of supplemental instrumentation. No published studies have performed a side-by-side comparison of standard and minimally invasive techniques with and without supplemental instrumentation. Eight human lumbosacral specimens (16 motion segments) were tested in each of the 5 following configurations: (1) intact, (2) with ALIF or DLIF cage, (3) with cage plus stabilizing plate, (4) with cage plus unilateral pedicle screw fixation (PSF), and (5) with cage plus bilateral PSF. Pure moments were applied to induce specimen flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. Three-dimensional kinematic responses were measured and used to calculate range of motion, stiffness, and neutral zone. Compared to the intact state, DLIF significantly reduced range of motion in flexion, extension, and lateral bending (P = 0.0117, P = 0.0015, P = 0.0031). Supplemental instrumentation significantly increased fused-specimen stiffness for both DLIF and ALIF groups. For the ALIF group, bilateral PSF increased stiffness relative to stand-alone cage by 455% in flexion and 317% in lateral bending (P = 0.0009 and P < 0.0001). The plate increased ALIF group stiffness by 211% in extension and 256% in axial rotation (P = 0.0467 and P = 0.0303). For the DLIF group, bilateral PSF increased stiffness by 350% in flexion and 222% in extension (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.0008). No differences were observed between ALIF and DLIF groups supplemented with bilateral PSF. Our data support that the direct lateral approach

  19. Biomechanics research in ski jumping, 1991-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwameder, Hermann

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, I review biomechanics research in ski jumping with a specific focus on publications presented between 1991 and 2006 on performance enhancement, limiting factors of the take-off, specific training and conditioning, aerodynamics, and safety. The first section presents a brief description of ski jumping phases (in-run, take-off, early flight, stable flight, and landing) regarding the biomechanical and functional fundamentals. The most important and frequently used biomechanical methods in ski jumping (kinematics, ground reaction force analyses, muscle activation patterns, aerodynamics) are summarized in the second section. The third section focuses on ski jumping articles and research findings published after the establishment of the V-technique in 1991, as the introduction of this technique has had a major influence on performance enhancement, ski jumping regulations, and the construction of hill profiles. The final section proposes topics for future research in the biomechanics of ski jumping, including: take-off and early flight and the relative roles of vertical velocity and forward somersaulting angular momentum; optimal jumping patterns utilizing the capabilities of individual athletes; development of kinematic and kinetic feedback systems for hill jumps; comparisons of simulated and hill jumps; effect of equipment modifications on performance and safety enhancement.

  20. Biomechanical, anthropometric, and psychological determinants of barbell back squat strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigotsky, Andrew D; Bryanton, Megan A; Nuckols, Greg; Beardsley, Chris; Contreras, Bret; Evans, Jessica; Schoenfeld, Brad J

    2018-02-27

    Previous investigations of strength have only focused on biomechanical or psychological determinants, while ignoring the potential interplay and relative contributions of these variables. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relative contributions of biomechanical, anthropometric, and psychological variables to the prediction of maximum parallel barbell back squat strength. Twenty-one college-aged participants (male = 14; female = 7; age = 23 ± 3 years) reported to the laboratory for two visits. The first visit consisted of anthropometric, psychometric, and parallel barbell back squat one-repetition maximum (1RM) testing. On the second visit, participants performed isometric dynamometry testing for the knee, hip, and spinal extensors in a sticking point position-specific manner. Multiple linear regression and correlations were used to investigate the combined and individual relationships between biomechanical, anthropometric, and psychological variables and squat 1RM. Multiple regression revealed only one statistically predictive determinant: fat free mass normalized to height (standardized estimate ± SE = 0.6 ± 0.3; t(16) = 2.28; p = 0.037). Correlation coefficients for individual variables and squat 1RM ranged from r = -0.79-0.83, with biomechanical, anthropometric, experiential, and sex predictors showing the strongest relationships, and psychological variables displaying the weakest relationships. These data suggest that back squat strength in a heterogeneous population is multifactorial and more related to physical rather than psychological variables.